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Sample records for pre-eclampsia

  1. Pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Mol, Ben W J; Roberts, Claire T; Thangaratinam, Shakila; Magee, Laura A; de Groot, Christianne J M; Hofmeyr, G Justus

    2016-03-01

    Pre-eclampsia affects 3-5% of pregnancies and is traditionally diagnosed by the combined presentation of high blood pressure and proteinuria. New definitions also include maternal organ dysfunction, such as renal insufficiency, liver involvement, neurological or haematological complications, uteroplacental dysfunction, or fetal growth restriction. When left untreated, pre-eclampsia can be lethal, and in low-resource settings, this disorder is one of the main causes of maternal and child mortality. In the absence of curative treatment, the management of pre-eclampsia involves stabilisation of the mother and fetus, followed by delivery at an optimal time. Although algorithms to predict pre-eclampsia are promising, they have yet to become validated. Simple preventive measures, such as low-dose aspirin, calcium, and diet and lifestyle interventions, show potential but small benefit. Because pre-eclampsia predisposes mothers to cardiovascular disease later in life, pregnancy is also a window for future health. A collaborative approach to discovery and assessment of the available treatments will hasten our understanding of pre-eclampsia and is an effort much needed by the women and babies affected by its complications. PMID:26342729

  2. [Pre-eclampsia].

    PubMed

    Post Uiterweer, E D; Veerbeek, J H W; Franx, A

    2015-02-01

    Pre-eclampsia or toxaemia of pregnancy is a multi-organ disorder in the second half of pregnancy. Approximately 1-3% of all pregnancies in the Netherlands are complicated by this condition. The disease is characterised by vascular damage resulting in hypertension and proteinuria with high morbidity for both mother and child. The underlying cause is a poorly developed placenta. To date the only real treatment comprises medicinal protection against complications and the disorder can be cured only through termination of pregnancy. Complications range from severe hypertension to maternal mortality due to cerebral haemorrhage. Long-term consequences can be severe for both mother and child. For instance, the risk of cardiovascular disease in mothers in later life is significantly increased. Many risk factors have been identified, including diabetes, BMI and an age of above 40. The association between periodontal disease and pre-eclampsia emphasises the importance of good oral hygiene in the periconceptional period. PMID:26193106

  3. Update in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Chanprapaph, Pharuhas

    2004-10-01

    Pre-eclampsia, formerly called pregnancy-induced hypertension, refers to the new onset of hypertension (SBP > or = 140 mmHg or DBP > or = 90 mmHg) and proteinuria (> or = 0.3 g protein in a 24-hour urine specimen or 1+ on dipstick) after 20 weeks of gestation in a previously normotensive women. It is a life-threatening, multi-organ involvement disease and remains the leading cause of maternal death. Its clinical manifestations are the result of generalized vasospasm, activation of the coagulation system, and changes in several humoral and autoregulatory systems related to volume and blood pressure control. Pre-eclampsia is responsible for high perinatal mortality and morbidity rates, primarily due to early termination of pregnancy. Fetus growth restriction, oligohyrdramnios and non-reassuring fetal status are the consequences of chronic placental hypoperfusion. Pre-eclampsia does not appear to accelerate fetal maturation, as once believed. Delivery remains the definitive treatment of choice for pre-eclampsia and should be timely. Cesarean section is not necessary and reserved for the obstetrical indications only. The expectant management may be considered for women remote from term (< 32 to 34 weeks of gestation) with stable and uncomplicated severe disease. The supportive management such as blood pressure control, seizure prevention, and fetal well-being assessment are also important to ensure the satisfactory outcome. To date, no screening test has been proved to be reliable and cost-effective. The prevention of pre-eclampsia with antioxidant therapy (vitamin C, E) has shown promise, but large, randomized trials are needed. Although controversy exists, calcium supplementation has shown no benefit in large trials, and most evidence suggests little or no benefit for low-dose aspirin as prevention in women in the low-risk category. PMID:21213502

  4. Severe hyponatraemia associated with pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Anglim, Breffini; Levins, Kirk; Bussmann, Neidin; Imcha, Mendinaro

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a multisystem disorder with incidence rates ranging from 2% to 5%. Hyponatraemia is a rare complication of pre-eclampsia. A 41-year-old, para 0+1 in vitro fertilisation monochorionic diamniotic triplet pregnancy woman presented at 25 weeks with dyspnoea and general malaise. Her antenatal course was complicated by the diagnosis of intrauterine growth restriction in triplet one at 27 weeks of gestation. At 27+3 weeks gestation, she was diagnosed as having pre-eclampsia. Subsequent biochemical analysis demonstrated hyponatraemia with serum sodium falling steadily to 117 mmol/L over the next 19 days. She was admitted to intensive care unit for stabilisation of fulminant pre-eclampsia and severe hyponatraemia at 30+5 weeks of gestation. Hypertonic saline and intravenous labetolol were administered prior to delivery by caesarean section. She recovered well postdelivery with stabilisation of her blood pressure and normalisation of her sodium level to 135 mmol/L. Awareness and frequent monitoring of hyponatraemia should become an integral part of monitoring women with pre-eclampsia. PMID:27558187

  5. Molecular association of pathogenetic contributors to pre-eclampsia (pre-eclampsia associome)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia is the most common complication occurring during pregnancy. In the majority of cases, it is concurrent with other pathologies in a comorbid manner (frequent co-occurrences in patients), such as diabetes mellitus, gestational diabetes and obesity. Providing bronchial asthma, pulmonary tuberculosis, certain neurodegenerative diseases and cancers as examples, we have shown previously that pairs of inversely comorbid pathologies (rare co-occurrences in patients) are more closely related to each other at the molecular genetic level compared with randomly generated pairs of diseases. Data in the literature concerning the causes of pre-eclampsia are abundant. However, the key mechanisms triggering this disease that are initiated by other pathological processes are thus far unknown. The aim of this work was to analyse the characteristic features of genetic networks that describe interactions between comorbid diseases, using pre-eclampsia as a case in point. Results The use of ANDSystem, Pathway Studio and STRING computer tools based on text-mining and database-mining approaches allowed us to reconstruct associative networks, representing molecular genetic interactions between genes, associated concurrently with comorbid disease pairs, including pre-eclampsia, diabetes mellitus, gestational diabetes and obesity. It was found that these associative networks statistically differed in the number of genes and interactions between them from those built for randomly chosen pairs of diseases. The associative network connecting all four diseases was composed of 16 genes (PLAT, ADIPOQ, ADRB3, LEPR, HP, TGFB1, TNFA, INS, CRP, CSRP1, IGFBP1, MBL2, ACE, ESR1, SHBG, ADA). Such an analysis allowed us to reveal differential gene risk factors for these diseases, and to propose certain, most probable, theoretical mechanisms of pre-eclampsia development in pregnant women. The mechanisms may include the following pathways: [TGFB1 or TNFA]-[IL1B]-[pre-eclampsia]; [TNFA

  6. Pre-eclampsia: its pathogenesis and pathophysiolgy.

    PubMed

    Gathiram, P; Moodley, J

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder that has a worldwide prevalence of 5-8%. It is one of the main causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality globally and accounts for 50 000-60 00 deaths annually, with a predominance in the low- and middle-income countries. It is a multi-systemic disorder however its aetiology, pathogenesis and pathophysiology are poorly understood. Recently it has been postulated that it is a two-stage disease with an imbalance between angiogenic and anti-antigenic factors. This review covers the latest thoughts on the pathogenesis and pathology of pre-eclampsia. The central hypothesis is that pre-eclampsia results from defective spiral artery remodelling, leading to cellular ischaemia in the placenta, which in turn results in an imbalance between anti-angiogenic and pro-angiogenic factors. This imbalance in favour of anti-angiogenic factors leads to widespread endothelial dysfunction, affecting all the maternal organ systems. In addition, there is foetal growth restriction (FGR). The exact aetiology remains elusive. PMID:27213853

  7. Pre-eclampsia part 2: prediction, prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Korzeniewski, Steven J; Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    An antiangiogenic state might constitute a terminal pathway for the multiple aetiologies of pre-eclampsia, especially those resulting from placental abnormalities. The levels of angiogenic and antiangiogenic proteins in maternal blood change prior to a diagnosis of pre-eclampsia, correlate with disease severity and have prognostic value in identifying women who will develop maternal and/or perinatal complications. Potential interventions exist to ameliorate the imbalance of angiogenesis and, hence, might provide opportunities to improve maternal and/or perinatal outcomes in pre-eclampsia. Current strategies for managing pre-eclampsia consist of controlling hypertension, preventing seizures and timely delivery of the fetus. Prediction of pre-eclampsia in the first trimester is of great interest, as early administration of aspirin might reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia, albeit modestly. Combinations of biomarkers typically predict pre-eclampsia better than single biomarkers; however, the encouraging initial results of biomarker studies require external validation in other populations before they can be used to facilitate intervention in patients identified as at increased risk. Angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors might also be useful in triage of symptomatic patients with suspected pre-eclampsia, differentiating pre-eclampsia from exacerbations of pre-existing medical conditions and performing risk assessment in asymptomatic women. This Review article discusses the performance of predictive and prognostic biomarkers for pre-eclampsia, current strategies for preventing and managing the condition and its long-term consequences. PMID:25003612

  8. Serum uric acid and pre-eclampsia: an update.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Gianni

    2012-06-01

    The association between uric acid (UA) and pre-eclampsia has been known for years, but the prognostic value of UA has been debated. This article will review recent evidences, evaluating UA as a prognostic factor for pre-eclampsia, both in the general population and in women with gestational hypertension, and as a predictor of disease severity and adverse maternal-fetal outcome. Finally, studies investigating UA as a putative pathogenic factor for pre-eclampsia are briefly mentioned. PMID:22894626

  9. Perinatal outcome of pre-eclampsia in parous women.

    PubMed

    Jian-Ying, Y; Xia, X

    2013-08-01

    Women with a second and recurrent pre-eclampsia pregnancy have more adverse pregnancy outcomes compared with women with pre-eclampsia in the first pregnancy. A retrospective cohort study was performed to compare the clinical characteristics and perinatal outcomes of pre-eclampsia in parous women who had complicated pre-eclampsia in previous pregnancies (n = 69) and uncomplicated pre-eclampsia in previous pregnancies (n = 312) from 2006 to 2010, in the Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital. No statistical significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of: maternal age, admission blood pressure and BMI; prenatal care times, hospitalisation time, laboratory results and incident rates of complications. The incident and delivery weeks were earlier and the renal injury, caesarean section and small for gestational age (SGA) incidence rates were higher in recurrent pre-eclampsia women. Women with recurrent pre-eclampsia had adverse perinatal outcomes when compared with parous women with pre-eclampsia who had not had pre-eclampsia in prior pregnancies. PMID:23919854

  10. Association between Asymptomatic Bacteriuria and Pre-Eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Rezavand, Negin; Veisi, Firooze; Zangane, Mrayam; Amini, Roghaye; Almasi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is one of the most common and important bacterial infections during pregnancy and can result in progressive infections and endanger maternal as well as fetal health. In this study, we assessed the relationship between asymptomatic bacteriuria and pre-eclampsia. In this case-control study, pregnant women who presented to Imam Reza Hospital in Kermanshah in 2013-14 were studied. The minimum sample size was calculated as 125 pregnant women in each group with a total of 250 subjects. There were 125 women with pre-eclampsia and 125 women without pre-eclampsia (control group). Matching was done for age, gestational age, and parity between case and control groups. Matching was verified by a P value of 0.061 for maternal age and gestational age and 0.77 for parity. The statistical analyses were done by applying the chi-squared test and determining odds ratio (OR) for having bacteriuria in univariate logistic regression as well as multivariate regression with adjusting the effect of maternal age, gestational age, and parity. Pyuria and bacteriuria were significantly more common in pre-eclampsia group than in control group. The results showed that a significant association existed between asymptomatic bacteriuria and pre-eclampsia. The rate of asymptomatic bacteriuria was 6.8 times higher in women with pre-eclampsia compared to those without pre-eclampsia. Further studies are required for better clarification of association between asymptomatic bacteriuria and pre-eclampsia. PMID:26925912

  11. Assessment of Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S. M.; Burnett, D.; Picken, A. M.; Farrell, G. W.; Wolf, P.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for distinguishing coagulation from fibrinolysis by three estimates of fibrinogen. This “fibrinogen series” together with plasma antithrombin and urinary urokinase have been compared in pregnant patients with venous thrombosis and pre-eclampsia. Evidence is presented for active coagulation during deterioration of the pre-eclampsia state and for enhanced fibrinolysis during improvement. PMID:4596483

  12. Apolipoprotein E alleles in women with severe pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, B; Rigó, J; Fintor, L; Karádi, I; Tóth, T

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the frequency of apolipoprotein E (apoE) alleles among women with severe pre-eclampsia. The presence of the three most common apoE alleles (epsilon 2, epsilon 3, epsilon 4) was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in three groups of white women: non-pregnant healthy (n = 101), pregnant healthy (n = 52), and pregnant with a diagnosis of severe pre-eclampsia (n = 54). The frequency of apo epsilon 2 was highest among women with severe pre-eclampsia (16.6%) followed by non-pregnant women (12.9%), and those experiencing a healthy pregnancy (10.6%). The higher frequency of the apo epsilon 2 allele detected among women with severe pre-eclampsia suggests that apoE may play a role in the development of pre-eclampsia. PMID:9659248

  13. Combined Screening for Early Detection of Pre-Eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jin; Shim, Sung Shin; Cha, Dong Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Although the precise pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia remains unknown, this condition continues to be a major cause of maternal and fetal mortality. Early prediction of pre-eclampsia would allow for timely initiation of preventive therapy. A combination of biophysical and biochemical markers are superior to other tests for early prediction of the development of pre-eclampsia. Apart from the use of parameters in first-trimester aneuploidy screening, cell-free fetal DNA quantification is emerging as a promising marker for prediction of pre-eclampsia. This article reviews the current research of the most important strategies for prediction of pre-eclampsia, including the use of maternal risk factors, mean maternal arterial pressure, ultrasound parameters, and biomarkers. PMID:26247944

  14. Potential role of folate in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mansi Dass; Thomas, Philip; Owens, Julie; Hague, William; Fenech, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Dietary deficiencies of folate and other B vitamin cofactors involved in one-carbon metabolism, together with genetic polymorphisms in key folate-methionine metabolic pathway enzymes, are associated with increases in circulating plasma homocysteine, reduction in DNA methylation patterns, and genome instability events. All of these biomarkers have also been associated with pre-eclampsia. The aim of this review was to explore the literature and identify potential knowledge gaps in relation to the role of folate at the genomic level in either the etiology or the prevention of pre-eclampsia. A systematic search strategy was designed to identify citations in electronic databases for the following terms: folic acid supplementation AND pre-eclampsia, folic acid supplementation AND genome stability, folate AND genome stability AND pre-eclampsia, folic acid supplementation AND DNA methylation, and folate AND DNA methylation AND pre-eclampsia. Forty-three articles were selected according to predefined selection criteria. The studies included in the present review were not homogeneous, which made pooled analysis of the data very difficult. The present review highlights associations between folate deficiency and certain biomarkers observed in various tissues of women at risk of pre-eclampsia. Further investigation is required to understand the role of folate in either the etiology or the prevention of pre-eclampsia. PMID:26359215

  15. Monocytes and macrophages in pregnancy and pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Faas, Marijke M; Spaans, Floor; De Vos, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is an important complication in pregnancy, characterized by hypertension and proteinuria in the second half of pregnancy. Generalized activation of the inflammatory response is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia. Monocytes may play a central role in this inflammatory response. Monocytes are short lived cells that mature in the circulation and invade into tissues upon an inflammatory stimulus and develop into macrophages. Macrophages are abundantly present in the endometrium and play a role in implantation and placentation in normal pregnancy. In pre-eclampsia, these macrophages appear to be present in larger numbers and are also activated. In the present review, we focused on the role of monocytes and macrophages in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia. PMID:25071761

  16. Pre-eclampsia and long-term maternal health

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David

    2012-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a syndrome of pregnancy, defined by the gestational-onset of hypertension and proteinuria, which resolves postpartum. This definition does not consider the variable multiorgan involvement of a syndrome that can include seizures, fulminating hepatic necrosis and a consumptive coagulopathy. These disparate clinical features are a consequence of an accelerated but transient metabolic syndrome with widespread maternal endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. A trigger to this maternal state is the relatively ischaemic placenta. As pregnancy progresses, the concentration of vaso-toxic factors released by the relatively ischaemic placenta gradually builds up in the maternal circulation. Those predisposed to endothelial dysfunction, e.g. women with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, are more sensitive to these placental derived factors and will develop pre-eclampsia before natural onset of labour. A woman's vulnerability to pre-eclampsia is therefore composed of a unique balance between her pre-existing maternal endothelial and metabolic health and the concentration of placental derived factors toxic to maternal endothelium. Delivery of the placenta remains the only cure. Years later, women who had pre-eclampsia are at increased risk of chronic hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, thromboembolism, hypothyroidism and even impaired memory. This article describes how a brief, usually single episode of this acute pregnancy syndrome might both identify those vulnerable to chronic disease in later life and in some cases initiate chronic disease.

  17. Mitochondrial [dys]function; culprit in pre-eclampsia?

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cathal Michael; Kenny, Louise Clare

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are extensively identified for their bioenergetic capacities; however, recently these metabolic hubs are increasingly being appreciated as critical regulators of numerous cellular signalling systems. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species have evolved as a mode of cross-talk between mitochondrial function and physiological systems, to sustain equipoise and foster adaption to cellular stress. Redox signalling mediated by exaggerated mitochondrial-ROS (reactive oxygen species) has been incriminated in a plethora of disease pathologies. Excessive production of mitochondrial ROS is intrinsically linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction is a key facilitator of oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis and metabolism. These are key pathogenic intermediaries of pre-eclampsia, hence we hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction is a pathogenic mediator of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia. We hypothesize that mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants may restrain production of ROS-mediated deleterious redox signalling pathways. If our hypothesis proves correct, therapeutic strategies directly targeting mitochondrial superoxide scavenging should be actively pursued as they may alleviate maternal vascular dysfunction and dramatically improve maternal and fetal health worldwide. PMID:27252404

  18. Improving placental blood flow in pre-eclampsia with prostaglandin A1.

    PubMed

    Toppozada, M; Medhat, I; Sallam, H; Ismail, A A; el-Badawy, E S; Abd Rabbo, S

    1992-01-01

    Prostaglandin A1 is a potent hypotensive, peripheral vasodilator, a weak oxytocic, antiplatelet aggregator. It improves the renal hemodynamics. Its effect on placental circulation was evaluated (expressed as systolic/diastolic ratio and umbilical artery resistance index) in 20 women with severe pre-eclampsia and 10 normotensive pregnant women, by using the Doppler technique. Moreover, another 10 women with severe pre-eclampsia received dextrose 5% as a placebo for comparative purposes. Significant improvements in both parameters studied were observed in the women with severe pre-eclampsia. The beneficial changes differed significantly from the recorded values when using dextrose in pre-eclampsia or prostaglandin A1 in normotensive subjects. Such promising data add another important perspective to prostaglandin A1 in severe pre-eclampsia and may open up new avenues for its use in other situations with compromised placental flow. PMID:1315092

  19. [Gravidaprotective action of phenibut in experimental pre-eclampsia].

    PubMed

    Tiurenkov, I N; Perfilova, V N; Karamysheva, V I; Popova, T A; Lebedeva, S A; Mikhaĭlova, L I; Zhakupova, G A

    2014-01-01

    It was established that the replacement of drinking water by 1.8% NaCl solution in female rats during pregnancy causes experimental pre-eclampsia (EP), as evidenced by an increase in the blood pressure, proteinuria, and edema in the control group as compared to pregnant female rats with normal drinking regime. Animals with EP exhibited disturbance of vasodilating endothelial function, microcirculation disorder, and increased coagulation and thrombogenic potential of blood. In addition, the group with EP showed evidence of the activation of lipid peroxidation (LPO) due to lower activity of antioxidant enzymes. Daily oral administration ofphenibut (25 mg/kg) in female rats with EP during pregnancy prevents the increase in blood pressure and the severity of proteinuria and edemation. Phenibut improves the vasodilator and antithrombotic endothelial functions, increases uterine blood flow, improves microcirculation, limits LPO, and increases the activity of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:25668940

  20. Interleukin-1 family cytokines and their regulatory proteins in normal pregnancy and pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Southcombe, J H; Redman, C W G; Sargent, I L; Granne, I

    2015-09-01

    Maternal systemic inflammation is a feature of pre-eclampsia, a condition in pregnancy characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. Pre-eclampsia is caused by the placenta; many placental factors contribute to the syndrome's progression, and proinflammatory cytokines have been identified previously as one such mediator. The interleukin (IL)-1 family of cytokines are key regulators of the inflammatory network, and two naturally occurring regulatory molecules for IL-1 family cytokines, IL-1RA and sST2, have been found previously to be elevated in maternal blood from women with pre-eclampsia. Here we investigate more recently identified IL-1 family cytokines and regulatory molecules, IL-1RAcP, IL-37, IL-18BP, IL-36α/β/γ/Ra and IL-38 in pre-eclampsia. Pregnant women have more circulating IL-18BP and IL-36Ra than non-pregnant women, and sIL-1RAcP is elevated from women with pre-eclampsia compared to normal pregnancies. The placenta expresses all the molecules, and IL-37 and IL-18BP are up-regulated significantly in pre-eclampsia placentas compared to those from normal pregnancies. Together, these changes contribute to the required inhibition of maternal systemic cytotoxic immunity in normal pregnancy; however, in pre-eclampsia the same profile is not seen. Interestingly, the increased circulating levels of sIL-1RAcP and increased placental IL-18BP and IL-37, the latter of which we show to be induced by hypoxic damage to the placenta, are all factors which are anti-inflammatory. While the placenta is often held responsible for the damage and clinical symptoms of pre-eclampsia by the research community, here we show that the pre-eclampsia placenta is also trying to prevent inflammatory damage to the mother. PMID:25693732

  1. Intrauterine device use and the risk of pre-eclampsia: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Parker, SE; Jick, SS; Werler, MM

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between intrauterine device (IUD) use, timing of removal prior to pregnancy, and the risk of pre-eclampsia. Design A case–control study within the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, UK. Setting Medical record database in the UK. Sample Cases of pre-eclampsia (n = 2744) were identified among pregnancies resulting in singleton deliveries from 1993 to 2010. Four controls, or pregnancies unaffected by pre-eclampsia, were matched to each case on maternal age, general practice, and year of delivery. Methods Data on IUD use were obtained from patient records. The odds ratios (ORs) for the association between IUD and pre-eclampsia were adjusted for covariates identified a priori, and analyses were stratified by BMI and number of prior deliveries. Main outcome measures Odds ratios (95% confidence intervals, 95% CIs) of pre-eclampsia in pregnancies among women with a history of IUD use, compared with women without a history of IUD use. Results Prior IUD use was associated with a reduced risk of pre-eclampsia (OR 0.76; 95% CI 0.58–0.98). The timing of removal in relation to the start of pregnancy showed an inverse association, with shorter intervals associated with a larger decrease in risk of pre-eclampsia. IUD removal within a year prior to pregnancy had an OR of 0.68 (95% CI 0.46–1.00). Among women with a prior delivery, the association between IUD use and pre-eclampsia was null. Conclusions Intrauterine device use is associated with a small decreased risk of pre-eclampsia, specifically if removed within the year prior to conception. PMID:25854682

  2. Placental histology and neutrophil extracellular traps in lupus and pre-eclampsia pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Marder, Wendy; Knight, Jason S; Kaplan, Mariana J; Somers, Emily C; Zhang, Xu; O'Dell, Alexander A; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Lieberman, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including pre-eclampsia, particularly in association with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). While significant placental abnormalities are expected in pre-eclampsia, less is known about how lupus activity and APS in pregnancy affect the placenta. We describe placental pathology from a population of lupus pregnancies, several of which were complicated by APS-related thromboses, in which pre-eclampsia and other complications developed. We performed standard histopathological placental review and quantified neutrophils and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in the intervillous space, given the recognised association of NETs with lupus, APS and pre-eclampsia. Methods Pre-eclampsia, SLE and control placentas were scored for histological features, and neutrophils were quantified on H&E and immunohistochemical staining for the granular protein myeloperoxidase. NETs were identified by extracellular myeloperoxidase staining in the setting of decondensed nuclei. Non-parametric analysis was used to evaluate differences in netting and intact neutrophils between groups, with Kruskal–Wallis testing for associations between histological findings and neutrophils. Results Placentas were evaluated from 35 pregnancies: 10 controls, 11 pre-eclampsia, 4 SLE+pre-eclampsia and 10 SLE, including one complicated by catastrophic APS and one complicated by hepatic and splenic vein thromboses during pregnancy. Intrauterine growth restriction and oligohydramnios were observed in lupus cases but not controls. Significantly more NETs were found infiltrating placental intervillous spaces in pre-eclampsia, SLE+pre-eclampsia and all 10 SLE non-pre-eclampsia cases. The ratio of NETs to total neutrophils was significantly increased in all case groups compared with controls. When present, NETs were associated with maternal vasculitis, laminar decidual necrosis, maternal

  3. Pre-eclampsia and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment in Women.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Malia S Q; Smith, Graeme N

    2016-07-01

    The underlying contributors of many cardiovascular events are often present decades before the onset of clinical symptoms, and the presence of risk factors in early life significantly influences risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). The considerable burden of CVD in women and on health care resources necessitates an emphasis on prevention and early risk screening in women, before the development of the disease itself. The 2011 update to the American Heart Association's Effectiveness-Based Guidelines for the prevention of CVD acknowledges the contribution of the common pregnancy-related medical complications to a woman's cardiovascular risk, identifying pre-eclampsia (PE), gestational hypertension, and gestational diabetes mellitus as risk factors for heart disease and stroke. The aims of this review are to examine risk factors in young women and their role in the development of premature CVD, with particular attention paid to PE as a marker of a woman's cardiovascular risk. Current screening practices will be discussed, as will their influences on identifying and reducing cardiovascular risk and subsequent disease in younger women. PMID:27031056

  4. Understanding Pre-Eclampsia Using Alzheimer's Etiology: An Intriguing Viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Bin; Nakashima, Akitoshi; Sharma, Surendra

    2016-03-01

    Characterized by hypertension and proteinuria after the 20th week of gestation, pre-eclampsia (PE) is a major cause of maternal, fetal, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Despite being recognized for centuries, PE still lacks a reliable, early means of diagnosis or prediction, and a safe and effective therapy. We have recently reported that the event of toxic protein misfolding and aggregation is a critical etiological manifestation in PE. Using comparative proteomic analysis of gestational age-matched sera from PE and normal pregnancy, we identified several proteins that appeared to be dysregulated in PE. Our efforts so far have focused on transthyretin (TTR), a transporter of thyroxine and retinol, and amyloid precursor protein whose aggregates were detected in the PE placenta. Based on these results and detection of TTR aggregates in sera from PE patients, we proposed that PE could be a disease of protein misfolding and aggregation. Protein misfolding and aggregation have long been linked with many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. However, linkage of protein misfolding and aggregation with the PE pathogenesis is a new and novel concept. This review aims to understand the roles of aggregated proteins in PE using the cues from the Alzheimer's etiology. PMID:26585303

  5. Exome sequencing in pooled DNA samples to identify maternal pre-eclampsia risk variants

    PubMed Central

    Kaartokallio, Tea; Wang, Jingwen; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Gerdhem, Paul; Jiao, Hong; Kere, Juha; Laivuori, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a common pregnancy disorder that is a major cause for maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Variants predisposing to pre-eclampsia might be under negative evolutionary selection that is likely to keep their population frequencies low. We exome sequenced samples from a hundred Finnish pre-eclamptic women in pools of ten to screen for low-frequency, large-effect risk variants for pre-eclampsia. After filtering and additional genotyping steps, we selected 28 low-frequency missense, nonsense and splice site variants that were enriched in the pre-eclampsia pools compared to reference data, and genotyped the variants in 1353 pre-eclamptic and 699 non-pre-eclamptic women to test the association of them with pre-eclampsia and quantitative traits relevant for the disease. Genotypes from the SISu project (n = 6118 exome sequenced Finnish samples) were included in the binary trait association analysis as a population reference to increase statistical power. In these analyses, none of the variants tested reached genome-wide significance. In conclusion, the genetic risk for pre-eclampsia is likely complex even in a population isolate like Finland, and larger sample sizes will be necessary to detect risk variants. PMID:27384325

  6. Exome sequencing in pooled DNA samples to identify maternal pre-eclampsia risk variants.

    PubMed

    Kaartokallio, Tea; Wang, Jingwen; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Gerdhem, Paul; Jiao, Hong; Kere, Juha; Laivuori, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a common pregnancy disorder that is a major cause for maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Variants predisposing to pre-eclampsia might be under negative evolutionary selection that is likely to keep their population frequencies low. We exome sequenced samples from a hundred Finnish pre-eclamptic women in pools of ten to screen for low-frequency, large-effect risk variants for pre-eclampsia. After filtering and additional genotyping steps, we selected 28 low-frequency missense, nonsense and splice site variants that were enriched in the pre-eclampsia pools compared to reference data, and genotyped the variants in 1353 pre-eclamptic and 699 non-pre-eclamptic women to test the association of them with pre-eclampsia and quantitative traits relevant for the disease. Genotypes from the SISu project (n = 6118 exome sequenced Finnish samples) were included in the binary trait association analysis as a population reference to increase statistical power. In these analyses, none of the variants tested reached genome-wide significance. In conclusion, the genetic risk for pre-eclampsia is likely complex even in a population isolate like Finland, and larger sample sizes will be necessary to detect risk variants. PMID:27384325

  7. Is Xanthine Oxidase, a Marker in Pre-eclampsia? A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bambrana, Vanishree; Kotur, Pushpa P

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pre-eclampsia is an obstetrics problem that affects multiple systemic functions and leads to the increased maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The objective of the study was to evaluate the plasma levels of Xanthine oxidase (XO) activity, uric acid and Nitric oxide (NO) levels in women with pre-eclampsia and normal pregnancy during antenatal and postpartum period. Materials and Methods A case control study was conducted in women with normal pregnancy (n=50) and pre-eclampsia (n=50) before and after delivery. XO activity, uric acid and NO levels were determined from samples at 30-39 weeks of gestation. The current study was conducted in association with Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of R.L. Jalappa Hospital and Research Center. The blood samples were analysed for assay of XO, uric acid and NO. The results were analysed by using SPSS software version 2013. P-value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results The plasma XO activity was elevated (p<0.001) in the pre-eclampsia compared to normotensive pregnant women before delivery and decreased after delivery (p<0.001) significantly. Uric acid level showed a significant increase in pre-eclampsia when compared to the control before delivery (p<0.001) however values were non-significant after delivery. Conclusion Placenta plays a key role in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia. Placenta removal leads to decrease trend of xanthine oxidase activity, uric acid and elevation of Nitric oxide as reversible changes in pre-eclampsia patients within 48 hours after delivery. PMID:26557508

  8. Maternal and fetal outcome in pre-eclampsia in a secondary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Aabidha, Parveen M.; Cherian, Anne G.; Paul, Emmanuel; Helan, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are one of the common causes for perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Pre-eclampsia is a condition which typically occurs after 20 weeks of gestation and has high blood pressure as the main contributing factor. The aim was to study the effects of pre-eclampsia on the mother and the fetus in rural South Indian population. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted in a secondary level hospital in rural South India. A total of 1900 antenatal women were screened for pre-eclampsia during the period August 2010 to July 2011 to study the effects on the mother and fetus. Results: Of the 1900 women screened 93 were detected with pre-eclampsia in the study. Among these, 46.23% were primigravida, 30.1% belonged to socio-economic class 4 and 48.8% were among those with BMI 26–30. The incidence of severe pre-eclampsia was higher in the unregistered women. The most common maternal complication was antepartum hemorrhage (13.9%) and the most common neonatal complication was prematurity (23.65%). Conclusions: Treating anemia and improving socioeconomic status will improve maternal and neonatal outcome in pre-eclampsia. Antenatal care and educating women on significance of symptoms will markedly improve perinatal morbidity and mortality. Prematurity, growth restriction and low birth weight are neonatal complications to be anticipated and dealt with when the mother has pre-eclampsia. A good neonatal intensive care unit will help improve neonatal outcomes. PMID:25949977

  9. The management of pre-eclampsia: what we think we know.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Franziska; Brown, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this article is to review and challenge some current concepts surrounding the diagnosis and management of pre-eclampsia as well as considering where our management might head in the future. Pre-eclampsia is a syndrome defined by the new onset of hypertension in the 2nd half of pregnancy that is generally, but not always, accompanied by proteinuria. Whilst in recent times our understanding and management of this condition have improved there are some areas where evidence and opinions differ. In this review we will discuss the diagnosis of pre-eclampsia and the concept of the 'atypical' presentation. We will outline how to identify those women with pre-eclampsia who will have a poorer pregnancy outcome. We will address the question of when to deliver and how to treat if we decide to prolong the pregnancy. Finally we acknowledge that pre-eclampsia is more than a disorder of pregnancy and has lifelong implications for the mother and infant. PMID:22036739

  10. [Uric acid and purine plasma levels as plausible markers for placental dysfunction in pre-eclampsia].

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carlos; Bertoglia, Patricio; Muñoz, Felipe; Roberts, James M

    2013-07-01

    Uric acid is the final metabolite of purine break down, such as ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, inosine and hypoxanthine. The metabolite has been used broadly as a renal failure marker, as well as a risk factor for maternal and neonatal morbidity during pre-eclamptic pregnancies. High purine levels are observed in pre-eclamptic pregnancies, but the sources of these purines are unknown. However, there is evidence that pre-eclampsia (mainly severe pre-eclampsia) is associated with an increased release of cellular fragments (or microparticles) from the placenta to the maternal circulation. These in fact could be the substrate for purine metabolism. Considering this background, we propose that purines and uric acid are part of the same physiopathological phenomenon in pre-eclampsia (i.e., placental dysfunction) and could become biomarkers for placental dysfunction and postnatal adverse events. PMID:24356738

  11. Association between risk for pre-eclampsia and HLA DR4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-17

    Dr. Kilpatrick and colleagues report results of a family study showing an association between HLA DR4 and mild and proteinuric pre-eclampsia in a British (Edinburgh) maternal population. Among 76 parous sisters of women with protein uric pre-eclampsia, they found that sisters with pregnancy-induced hypertension (pre-eclampsia with or without proteinuria) had a higher frequency of HLA DR4 antigen than did normotensive sisters. In addition, they cited unpublished findings in which they found a higher frequency of HLA DR4 antigen in a large sample of pre-eclamptic women and their babies than in appropriate controls. The authors have completed a study of HLA antigens and pregnancy outcome among a coherent of 715 black (50.9%) and white (49.1%) primigravida who were delivered at a medical center in southern USA. HLA DR typing was done by the one-color fluorescence technique with reagents. On the basis of standard criteria for diagnosis of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, 6.9 of the cohort had mild non-proteinuric pre-eclampsia, 8.8% had pregnancy-induced hypertension, and 9.5% had combined pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. Whereas black women had higher rates than white women in all three clinical categories (eg, pregnancy-induced hypertension 10.7% vs 6.8%, respectively), differences were not significant and frequencies of HLA DR4 antigen were higher among normotensives in both races (results not shown). They therefore pooled the two racial groups for analyses.

  12. Uric acid: is it time to give up routine testing in management of pre-eclampsia?

    PubMed Central

    Talaulikar, Vikram Sinai; Shehata, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Ever since it was first linked with the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia, uric acid has been a routine test requested by many care-givers managing pregnant women with hypertensive disease of pregnancy for almost 100 years. Existing evidence however suggests that it has no definitive role in prediction, diagnosis or management of pre-eclampsia. We argue against routine uric acid testing in pregnancies complicated by hypertension not only because it has become a fruitless academic exercise but also because ceasing its routine use will ensure cost-savings for the health services.

  13. Adverse neonatal outcomes in women with pre-eclampsia in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Kiondo, Paul; Tumwesigye, Nazarius Mbona; Wandabwa, Julius; Wamuyu-Maina, Gakenia; Bimenya, Gabriel S; Okong, Pius

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pre-eclampsia, which is more prevalent in resource-limited settings, contributes significantly to maternal, fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. However, the factors associated with these adverse outcomes are poorly understood in low resource settings. In this paper we examine the risk factors for adverse neonatal outcomes among women with pre-eclampsia at Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. Methods Pre-eclampsia, which is more prevalent in resource-limited settings, contributes significantly to maternal, fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. However, the factors associated with these adverse outcomes are poorly understood in low resource settings. In this paper we examine the risk factors for adverse neonatal outcomes among women with pre-eclampsia at Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. Resuls Predictors of adverse neonatal outcomes were: preterm delivery (OR 5.97, 95% CI: 2.97-12.7) and severe pre-eclampsia (OR 5.17, 95% CI: 2.36-11.3). Conclusion Predictors of adverse neonatal outcomes among women with pre-eclampsia were preterm delivery and severe pre-eclampsia. Health workers need to identify women at risk, offer them counseling and, refer them if necessary to a hospital where they can be managed successfully. This may in turn reduce the neonatal morbidity and mortality associated with pre-eclampsia. PMID:24643210

  14. Differential Gene Expression Analysis of Placentas with Increased Vascular Resistance and Pre-Eclampsia Using Whole-Genome Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Centlow, M.; Wingren, C.; Borrebaeck, C.; Brownstein, M. J.; Hansson, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a pregnancy complication characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. There are several factors associated with an increased risk of developing pre-eclampsia, one of which is increased uterine artery resistance, referred to as “notching”. However, some women do not progress into pre-eclampsia whereas others may have a higher risk of doing so. The placenta, central in pre-eclampsia pathology, may express genes associated with either protection or progression into pre-eclampsia. In order to search for genes associated with protection or progression, whole-genome profiling was performed. Placental tissue from 15 controls, 10 pre-eclamptic, 5 pre-eclampsia with notching, and 5 with notching only were analyzed using microarray and antibody microarrays to study some of the same gene product and functionally related ones. The microarray showed 148 genes to be significantly altered between the four groups. In the preeclamptic group compared to notch only, there was increased expression of genes related to chemotaxis and the NF-kappa B pathway and decreased expression of genes related to antigen processing and presentation, such as human leukocyte antigen B. Our results indicate that progression of pre-eclampsia from notching may involve the development of inflammation. Increased expression of antigen-presenting genes, as seen in the notch-only placenta, may prevent this inflammatory response and, thereby, protect the patient from developing pre-eclampsia. PMID:21490790

  15. Maternal adiposity as an independent risk factor for pre-eclampsia: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Wang, P; Liu, H; He, X; Zhang, J; Yan, H; Xu, D; Wang, B

    2013-06-01

    Studies investigating the association between maternal adiposity and risk of pre-eclampsia showed contradictory results. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to estimate the effect of maternal adiposity on pre-eclampsia. We reviewed 1,286 abstracts and finally included 29 prospective cohort studies with 1,980,761 participants and 67,075 pre-eclampsia events. We pooled data with a random-effects model, and obtained risk estimates for five predetermined bodyweight groups: low, normal-weight (reference), overweight, obese and severely obese. In the cohort studies that unadjusted for pre-eclampsia risk factors, the pooled unadjusted relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for pre-eclampsia of overweight, obese and severely obese women were 1.58 (95% CI 1.44-1.72, P < 0.001), 2.68 (95% CI 2.39-3.01, P < 0.001) and 3.12 (95% CI 2.24-4.36, P < 0.001), respectively. In those cohorts that adjusted for pre-eclampsia risk factors, the pooled unadjusted RRs for pre-eclampsia of overweight, obese and severely obese women were 1.70 (95% CI 1.60-1.81, P < 0.001), 2.93 (95% CI 2.58-3.33, P < 0.001) and 4.14 (95% CI 3.61-4.75, P < 0.001), respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed maternal adiposity was associated with increased risk of pre-eclampsia in both nulliparous and multiparas women. In conclusion, overweight or obese pregnant women have a substantially increased risk of pre-eclampsia, and maternal adiposity is an independent risk factor of pre-eclampsia. PMID:23530552

  16. Pregnancy-Onset Habitual Snoring, Gestational Hypertension, and Pre-eclampsia: Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    O’BRIEN, Louise M.; BULLOUGH, Alexandra S.; OWUSU, Jocelynn T.; TREMBLAY, Kimberley A.; BRINCAT, Cynthia A.; CHAMES, Mark C.; KALBFLEISCH, John D.; CHERVIN, Ronald D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to prospectively examine the impact of chronic vs. pregnancy-onset habitual snoring on gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and gestational diabetes. Study Design Third trimester pregnant women were recruited from a large, tertiary medical center, between March 2007 and December 2010 and screened for the presence and duration of habitual snoring, as a known marker for sleep-disordered breathing. Clinical diagnoses of gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and gestational diabetes were obtained. Results Of 1,719 pregnant women, 34% reported snoring, with 25% reporting pregnancy-onset snoring. After adjusting for confounders pregnancy-onset, but not chronic snoring, was independently associated with gestational hypertension (odds ratio 2.36, 95%CI 1.48–3.77, p<0.001) and pre-eclampsia (odds ratio 1.59, 95%CI 1.06–2.37 p=0.024) but not gestational diabetes. Conclusion New-onset snoring during pregnancy is a strong risk factor for gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia. In view of the significant morbidity and healthcare costs associated with hypertensive diseases of pregnancy, simple screening of pregnant women may have clinical utility. Trial registration: Clinical Trials NCT01030003 PMID:22999158

  17. IFPA Senior Award Lecture: making sense of pre-eclampsia - two placental causes of preeclampsia?

    PubMed

    Redman, C W; Sargent, I L; Staff, A C

    2014-02-01

    Incomplete spiral artery remodelling is the first of two stages of pre-eclampsia, typically of early onset. The second stage comprises dysregulated uteroplacental perfusion and placental oxidative stress. Oxidatively stressed syncytiotrophoblast (STB) over-secretes proteins that perturb maternal angiogenic balance and are considered to be pre-eclampsia biomarkers. We propose that, in addition and more fundamentally, these STB-derived proteins are biomarkers of a cellular (STB) stress response, which typically involves up-regulation of some proteins and down-regulation of others (positive and negative stress proteins respectively). Soluble vascular growth factor receptor-1 (sVEGFR-1) and reduced growth factor (PlGF) then exemplify positive and negative STB stress response proteins in the maternal circulation. Uncomplicated term pregnancy is associated with increasing sVEGFR-1 and decreasing PlGF, which can be interpreted as evidence of increasing STB stress. STB pathology, at or after term (for example focal STB necrosis) demonstrates this stress, with or without pre-eclampsia. We review the evidence that when placental growth reaches its limits at term, terminal villi become over-crowded with diminished intervillous pore size impeding intervillous perfusion with increasing intervillous hypoxia and STB stress. This type of STB stress has no antecedent pathology, so the fetuses are well-grown, as typifies late onset pre-eclampsia, and prediction is less effective than for the early onset syndrome because STB stress is a late event. In summary, abnormal placental perfusion and STB stress contribute to the pathogenesis of early and late onset pre-eclampsia. But the former has an extrinsic cause - poor placentation, whereas the latter has an intrinsic cause, 'microvillous overcrowding', as placental growth reaches its functional limits. This model explains important features of late pre-eclampsia and raises questions of how antecedent medical risk factors such as

  18. Unravelling the theories of pre-eclampsia: are the protective pathways the new paradigm?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Asif; Ramma, Wenda

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a vascular disorder of pregnancy where anti-angiogenic factors, systemic inflammation and oxidative stress predominate, but none can claim to cause pre-eclampsia. This review provides an alternative to the ‘two-stage model’ of pre-eclampsia in which abnormal spiral arteries modification leads to placental hypoxia, oxidative stress and aberrant maternal systemic inflammation. Very high maternal soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1 also known as sVEGFR) and very low placenta growth factor (PlGF) are unique to pre-eclampsia; however, abnormal spiral arteries and excessive inflammation are also prevalent in other placental disorders. Metaphorically speaking, pregnancy can be viewed as a car with an accelerator and brakes, where inflammation, oxidative stress and an imbalance in the angiogenic milieu act as the ‘accelerator’. The ‘braking system’ includes the protective pathways of haem oxygenase 1 (also referred as Hmox1 or HO-1) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (also known as CSE or Cth), which generate carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) respectively. The failure in these pathways (brakes) results in the pregnancy going out of control and the system crashing. Put simply, pre-eclampsia is an accelerator–brake defect disorder. CO and H2S hold great promise because of their unique ability to suppress the anti-angiogenic factors sFlt-1 and soluble endoglin as well as to promote PlGF and endothelial NOS activity. The key to finding a cure lies in the identification of cheap, safe and effective drugs that induce the braking system to keep the pregnancy vehicle on track past the finishing line. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Pharmacology of the Gasotransmitters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-6 PMID:25303561

  19. Disparities in pre-eclampsia and eclampsia among immigrant women giving birth in six industrialised countries

    PubMed Central

    Urquia, ML; Glazier, RH; Gagnon, AJ; Mortensen, LH; Nybo Andersen, A-M; Janevic, T; Guendelman, S; Thornton, D; Bolumar, F; Río Sánchez, I; Small, R; Davey, M-A; Hjern, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess disparities in pre-eclampsia and eclampsia among immigrant women from various world regions giving birth in six industrialised countries. Design Cross-country comparative study of linked population-based databases. Setting Provincial or regional obstetric delivery data from Australia, Canada, Spain and the USA and national data from Denmark and Sweden. Population All immigrant and non-immigrant women delivering in the six industrialised countries within the most recent 10-year period available to each participating centre (1995–2010). Methods Data was collected using standardised definitions of the outcomes and maternal regions of birth. Pooled data were analysed with multilevel models. Within-country analyses used stratified logistic regression to obtain odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Main outcome measures Pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and pre-eclampsia with prolonged hospitalisation (cases per 1000 deliveries). Results There were 9 028 802 deliveries (3 031 399 to immigrant women). Compared with immigrants from Western Europe, immigrants from Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America & the Caribbean were at higher risk of pre-eclampsia (OR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.63, 1.80 and 1.63; 95% CI: 1.57, 1.69) and eclampsia (OR: 2.12; 95% CI: 1.61, 2.79 and 1.55; 95% CI: 1.26, 1. 91), respectively, after adjustment for parity, maternal age and destination country. Compared with native-born women, European and East Asian immigrants were at lower risk in most industrialised countries. Spain exhibited the largest disparities and Australia the smallest. Conclusion Immigrant women from Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America & the Caribbean require increased surveillance due to a consistently high risk of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. PMID:24758368

  20. Artificial oxygen carriers rescue placental hypoxia and improve fetal development in the rat pre-eclampsia model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng; Ohta, Hidenobu; Tahara, Yu; Nakamura, Sakiko; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Nakagawa, Machiko; Oishi, Yoshihisa; Goto, Yu-ichi; Wada, Keiji; Kaga, Makiko; Inagaki, Masumi; Otagiri, Masaki; Yokota, Hideo; Shibata, Shigenobu; Sakai, Hiromi; Okamura, Kunihiro; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia affects approximately 5% of all pregnant women and remains a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The hypertension associated with pre-eclampsia develops during pregnancy and remits after delivery, suggesting that the placenta is the most likely origin of this disease. The pathophysiology involves insufficient trophoblast invasion, resulting in incomplete narrow placental spiral artery remodeling. Placental insufficiency, which limits the maternal-fetal exchange of gas and nutrients, leads to fetal intrauterine growth restriction. In this study, in our attempt to develop a new therapy for pre-eclampsia, we directly rescued placental and fetal hypoxia with nano-scale size artificial oxygen carriers (hemoglobin vesicles). The present study is the first to demonstrate that artificial oxygen carriers successfully treat placental hypoxia, decrease maternal plasma levels of anti-angiogenic proteins and ameliorate fetal growth restriction in the pre-eclampsia rat model. PMID:26471339

  1. Serum anti-carbonic anhydrase II antibodies and oxidant-antioxidant balance in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Aliyazicioglu, Rezzan; Guven, Suleyman; Mentese, Ahmet; Kolayli, Sevgi; Cengiz, Sevil; Deger, Orhan; Alver, Ahmet

    2011-10-01

    PROBLEM  The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of anti-carbonic anhydrase II antibodies (anti-CA II) antibodies in pre-eclampsia and the relationships between the autoantibodies, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant capacity (TOC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and oxidative stres index (OSI) parameters. METHOD OF STUDY  We studied 40 early and late onset pre-eclamptic patients and 40 healthy pregnant control and 39 healthy non-pregnant control subjects. Serum CA II antibodies, TAC and TOC, and MDA parameters were studied by ELISA. RESULTS  The mean values for TAC, TOC, OSI, MDA, and anti-CA II were significantly increased in patients with pre-eclampsia compared to the other groups. The anti-CA II antibody levels for the pregnant control subjects were 0.129 ± 0.04 and that for the pre-eclamptic patients were 0.282 ± 0.18. In this study, any absorbance value higher than 0.136, the mean absorbance + 2 S.D. of pregnant control subjects, was defined as positive. Positive results were obtained in 29 of 40 pre-eclamptic patients (72.5%). There were significant positive correlations between serum anti-CA II antibodies and TOC, MDA levels, and OSI levels. CONCLUSION  The results suggest that anti-CA II antibodies and impairment in oxidant-antioxidant balance may be involved in multifactorial etiology of pre-eclampsia. PMID:21244564

  2. [Care plan for women with cesarean section and pre-eclampsia].

    PubMed

    Sabbagh-Sequera, Miriam; Loidi-García, Jose María; Romero-Vázquez, Gloria Maria

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy pathologies in general, and pre-eclampsia in particular, are problems usually treated in post-anesthesia recovery and hospitalization units. Pre-eclampsia is the most frequent form of hypertension associated with pregnancy (50%). It affects from 7% to 10% of pregnant women. It is known as pregnancy and puerperium multisystem syndrome. It is due to a reduction of the systemic perfusion generated by the vasospasms and the activation of the coagulation systems. A clinical case is presented of the immediate post-surgery period of a patient, who has been operated on cesarean section after having been diagnosed with pre-eclampsia. A nursing care plan was prepared, based on Marjory Gordon functional patterns and guided by NANDA-NOC-NIC taxonomy, where 6 nursing diagnoses, which are the basis for the fulfillment of this nursing process, are identified: Risk of infection, excess fluid volume, risk of bleeding, insufficient knowledge about its pathological process, severe pain, and anxiety. The application of this care plan leads to an improvement in the patient care and in the work organization. PMID:25482826

  3. The nitric oxide pathway and possible therapeutic options in pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Johal, Tamanrit; Lees, Christoph C; Everett, Thomas R; Wilkinson, Ian B

    2014-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a serious multisystem disorder with diverse clinical manifestations. Although not causal, endothelial dysfunction and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability are likely to play an important role in the maternal and fetal pathophysiology of this condition. Lack of treatment modalities that can target the underlying pathophysiological changes and reverse the endothelial dysfunction frequently leads to iatrogenic preterm delivery of the fetus, causing neonatal morbidity and mortality, and the condition itself is associated with short- and longer term maternal morbidity and mortality. Drugs that target various components of the nitric oxide–soluble guanylyl cyclase pathway can help to increase NO bioavailability. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of clinical research involving these therapeutic modalities in the context of pre-eclampsia, with the focus being on the following: nitric oxide donors, including organic nitrates and S-nitrosothiols; l-arginine, the endogenous precursor of NO; inhibitors of cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate breakdown, including sildenafil; and other novel inhibitors of NO donor metabolism. The advantages and limitations of each modality are outlined, and scope for development into established therapeutic options for pre-eclampsia is explored. PMID:24313856

  4. S-Nitrosoglutathione improves haemodynamics in early-onset pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Thomas R; Wilkinson, Ian B; Mahendru, Amita A; McEniery, Carmel M; Garner, Stephen F; Goodall, Alison H; Lees, Christoph C

    2014-01-01

    Aims To determine the effects of in vivo S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) infusion on cardiovascular function, platelet function, proteinuria and biomarker parameters in early-onset pre-eclampsia. Methods We performed an open-label dose-ranging study of GSNO in early-onset pre-eclampsia. Six women underwent GSNO infusion whilst receiving standard therapy. The dose of GSNO was increased incrementally to 100 μg min−1 whilst maintaining blood pressure of >140/80 mmHg. Aortic augmentation index, aortic pulse wave velocity, blood pressure and maternal–fetal Doppler parameters were measured at each dose. Platelet P-selectin, protein-to-creatinine ratio and soluble anti-angiogenic factors were measured pre- and postinfusion. Results Augmentation index fell at 30 μg min−1 S-nitrosoglutathione (−6%, 95% confidence interval 0.6 to 13%), a dose that did not affect blood pressure. Platelet P-selectin expression was reduced [mean (interquartile range), 6.3 (4.9–7.6) vs. 4.1 (3.1–5.7)% positive, P = 0.03]. Soluble endoglin levels showed borderline reduction (P = 0.06). There was a borderline significant change in pre-to-postinfusion protein-to-creatinine ratio [mean (interquartile range), 0.37 (0.09–0.82) vs. 0.23 (0.07–0.49) g mmol−1, P = 0.06]. Maternal uterine and fetal Doppler pulsatility indices were unchanged. Conclusions In early-onset pre-eclampsia, GSNO reduces augmentation index, a biomarker of small vessel tone and pulse wave reflection, prior to affecting blood pressure. Proteinuria and platelet activation are improved at doses that affect blood pressure minimally. These effects of GSNO may be of therapeutic potential in pre-eclampsia, a condition for which no specific treatment exists. Clinical studies of GSNO in early-onset pre-eclampsia will determine whether these findings translate to improvement in maternal and/or fetal outcome. PMID:24627995

  5. Acute Maternal Infection and Risk of Pre-Eclampsia: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Minassian, Caroline; Thomas, Sara L.; Williams, David J.; Campbell, Oona; Smeeth, Liam

    2013-01-01

    Background Infection in pregnancy may be involved in the aetiology of pre-eclampsia. However, a clear association between acute maternal infection and pre-eclampsia has not been established. We assessed whether acute urinary tract infection, respiratory tract infection, and antibiotic drug prescriptions in pregnancy (a likely proxy for maternal infection) are associated with an increased risk of pre-eclampsia. Methods and Findings We used a matched nested case-control design and data from the UK General Practice Research Database to examine the association between maternal infection and pre-eclampsia. Primiparous women aged at least 13 years and registered with a participating practice between January 1987 and October 2007 were eligible for inclusion. We selected all cases of pre-eclampsia and a random sample of primiparous women without pre-eclampsia (controls). Cases (n = 1533) were individually matched with up to ten controls (n = 14236) on practice and year of delivery. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pre-eclampsia comparing women exposed and unexposed to infection using multivariable conditional logistic regression. After adjusting for maternal age, pre-gestational hypertension, diabetes, renal disease and multifetal gestation, the odds of pre-eclampsia were increased in women prescribed antibiotic drugs (adjusted odds ratio 1.28;1.14–1.44) and in women with urinary tract infection (adjusted odds ratio 1.22;1.03–1.45). We found no association with maternal respiratory tract infection (adjusted odds ratio 0.91;0.72–1.16). Further adjustment for maternal smoking and pre-pregnancy body mass index made no difference to our findings. Conclusions Women who acquire a urinary infection during pregnancy, but not those who have a respiratory infection, are at an increased risk of pre-eclampsia. Maternal antibiotic prescriptions are also associated with an increased risk. Further research is required to elucidate the underlying

  6. Reduced risk of pre-eclampsia with organic vegetable consumption: results from the prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Torjusen, Hanne; Brantsæter, Anne Lise; Haugen, Margaretha; Alexander, Jan; Bakketeig, Leiv S; Lieblein, Geir; Stigum, Hein; Næs, Tormod; Swartz, Jackie; Holmboe-Ottesen, Gerd; Roos, Gun; Meltzer, Helle Margrete

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the potential health effects of eating organic food either in the general population or during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to examine associations between organic food consumption during pregnancy and the risk of pre-eclampsia among nulliparous Norwegian women. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Norway, years 2002–2008. Participants 28 192 pregnant women (nulliparous, answered food frequency questionnaire and general health questionnaire in mid-pregnancy and no missing information on height, body weight or gestational weight gain). Main outcome measure Relative risk was estimated as ORs by performing binary logistic regression with pre-eclampsia as the outcome and organic food consumption as the exposure. Results The prevalence of pre-eclampsia in the study sample was 5.3% (n=1491). Women who reported to have eaten organic vegetables ‘often’ or ‘mostly’ (n=2493, 8.8%) had lower risk of pre-eclampsia than those who reported ‘never/rarely’ or ‘sometimes’ (crude OR=0.76, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.96; adjusted OR=0.79, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.99). The lower risk associated with high organic vegetable consumption was evident also when adjusting for overall dietary quality, assessed as scores on a healthy food pattern derived by principal component analysis. No associations with pre-eclampsia were found for high intake of organic fruit, cereals, eggs or milk, or a combined index reflecting organic consumption. Conclusions These results show that choosing organically grown vegetables during pregnancy was associated with reduced risk of pre-eclampsia. Possible explanations for an association between pre-eclampsia and use of organic vegetables could be that organic vegetables may change the exposure to pesticides, secondary plant metabolites and/or influence the composition of the gut microbiota. PMID:25208850

  7. Effect of selenium on markers of risk of pre-eclampsia in UK pregnant women: a randomised, controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Rayman, Margaret P; Searle, Elizabeth; Kelly, Lynne; Johnsen, Sigurd; Bodman-Smith, Katherine; Bath, Sarah C; Mao, Jinyuan; Redman, Christopher W G

    2014-07-14

    Pre-eclampsia is a serious hypertensive condition of pregnancy associated with high maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Se intake or status has been linked to the occurrence of pre-eclampsia by our own work and that of others. We hypothesised that a small increase in the Se intake of UK pregnant women of inadequate Se status would protect against the risk of pre-eclampsia, as assessed by biomarkers of pre-eclampsia. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot trial, we randomised 230 primiparous pregnant women to Se (60 μg/d, as Se-enriched yeast) or placebo treatment from 12 to 14 weeks of gestation until delivery. Whole-blood Se concentration was measured at baseline and 35 weeks, and plasma selenoprotein P (SEPP1) concentration at 35 weeks. The primary outcome measure of the present study was serum soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (sFlt-1), an anti-angiogenic factor linked with the risk of pre-eclampsia. Other serum/plasma components related to the risk of pre-eclampsia were also measured. Between 12 and 35 weeks, whole-blood Se concentration increased significantly in the Se-treated group but decreased significantly in the placebo group. At 35 weeks, significantly higher concentrations of whole-blood Se and plasma SEPP1 were observed in the Se-treated group than in the placebo group. In line with our hypothesis, the concentration of sFlt-1 was significantly lower at 35 weeks in the Se-treated group than in the placebo group in participants in the lowest quartile of Se status at baseline (P= 0·039). None of the secondary outcome measures was significantly affected by treatment. The present finding that Se supplementation has the potential to reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women of low Se status needs to be validated in an adequately powered trial. PMID:24708917

  8. Interleukin 10 gene promoter polymorphisms in women with early-onset pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, S; Sri Manjari, K; Ramaiah, A; Sunitha, T; Nallari, P; Jyothy, A; Venkateshwari, A

    2014-11-01

    Pre-eclampsia is one of the most serious disorders of human pregnancy and T helper type 1 (Th1)/Th2 imbalance plays a major role in its aetiology. The Th2 cytokine, interleukin (IL)-10, plays a significant role in the maintenance of pregnancy. The present study is aimed at understanding the role of IL-10 promoter polymorphisms (-1082 G/A; -592 A/C and -819 C/T) and their haplotypes in early-onset pre-eclampsia. A total of 120 patients and an equal number of women with normal pregnancy, from Government Maternity Hospital, Petlaburz, Hyderabad, India, were considered for the present study. A standard amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) was carried out for genotyping followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Appropriate statistical methods were applied to test for the significance of the results. It was found that the IL-10 -819 C allele (P = 0·003) and -592 A (P = 0·005) allele frequencies increased significantly in patients compared to controls. No significant difference was found with regard to -1082 promoter polymorphism. Haplotype analysis of the IL-10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed a significant association with ACC haplotype with a twofold increased risk in patients compared to controls. The frequencies of two common IL-10 haplotypes (GCC and ATA) did not show any significant difference. Further, the diplotype analysis revealed five genotypes: -1082A with -819C (P = 0·0016); -1082G with -819C (P = 0·0018); -819C with -592C (P = 0·001); -1082A with -592C (P = 0·032); and -1082G with -592C (P = 0·005) associated with the disease. These findings support the concept of contribution of IL-10 gene polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of early-onset pre-eclampsia. PMID:24962617

  9. Interleukin 10 gene promoter polymorphisms in women with early-onset pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Sowmya, S; Sri Manjari, K; Ramaiah, A; Sunitha, T; Nallari, P; Jyothy, A; Venkateshwari, A

    2014-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is one of the most serious disorders of human pregnancy and T helper type 1 (Th1)/Th2 imbalance plays a major role in its aetiology. The Th2 cytokine, interleukin (IL)-10, plays a significant role in the maintenance of pregnancy. The present study is aimed at understanding the role of IL-10 promoter polymorphisms (−1082 G/A; −592 A/C and −819 C/T) and their haplotypes in early-onset pre-eclampsia. A total of 120 patients and an equal number of women with normal pregnancy, from Government Maternity Hospital, Petlaburz, Hyderabad, India, were considered for the present study. A standard amplification refractory mutation system–polymerase chain reaction (ARMS–PCR) was carried out for genotyping followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Appropriate statistical methods were applied to test for the significance of the results. It was found that the IL-10 −819 C allele (P = 0·003) and −592 A (P = 0·005) allele frequencies increased significantly in patients compared to controls. No significant difference was found with regard to −1082 promoter polymorphism. Haplotype analysis of the IL-10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed a significant association with ACC haplotype with a twofold increased risk in patients compared to controls. The frequencies of two common IL-10 haplotypes (GCC and ATA) did not show any significant difference. Further, the diplotype analysis revealed five genotypes: −1082A with −819C (P = 0·0016); −1082G with −819C (P = 0·0018); −819C with −592C (P = 0·001); −1082A with −592C (P = 0·032); and −1082G with −592C (P = 0·005) associated with the disease. These findings support the concept of contribution of IL-10 gene polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of early-onset pre-eclampsia. PMID:24962617

  10. Remifentanil in emergency caesarean section in pre-eclampsia complicated by thrombocytopenia and abnormal liver function.

    PubMed

    Johannsen, E K; Munro, A J

    1999-10-01

    We describe the use of remifentanil in a woman with severe pre-eclampsia who presented for emergency caesarean section. Remifentanil was effective in obtunding the hypertensive response to laryngoscopy and intubation. Previous studies have found no significant adverse effects of remifentanil on the neonate. With its short duration of action, the use of this new opioid has several potential advantages in the above setting. Further studies are required to explore the use of remifentanil as an adjunct to obstetric general anaesthesia. PMID:10520397

  11. Management of late preterm and early-term pregnancies complicated by mild gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Sibai, Baha M

    2011-10-01

    Gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia is the most frequent obstetrical complication, complicating 26%-29% of all gestations in nulliparous women. In general, the diagnosis of mild gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia is made at 38 weeks or more in approximately 80% of cases. For many years, the optimal timing of delivery for patients with mild gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia at 37-0/7 to 39-6/7 weeks was unclear. Recently, investigators of the HYPITAT (Pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia after 36 weeks: induction of labor versus expectant monitoring: A comparison of maternal and neonatal outcome, maternal quality of life and costs) randomized trial evaluated maternal and neonatal complications in patients at 36-40 weeks' gestation who were randomized to either induction of labor or expectant monitoring. The results of this trial revealed that induction of labor at or after 37-0 weeks was associated with lower rate of maternal complications without increased rates of either cesarean delivery or neonatal complications. In contrast, the optimum management for those with mild hypertension/pre-eclampsia with stable maternal and fetal conditions at 34-0/7 to 36-6/7 weeks remains uncertain. Therefore, there is urgent need for research to evaluate the reasons for late preterm birth in such women as well as for a randomized trial to evaluate the optimal timing for delivery in such patients. PMID:21962629

  12. Reduced Heart Rate Variability and Altered Cardiac Conduction after Pre-Eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Malia S. Q.; Seaborn, Geoffrey E. J.; Redfearn, Damian P.; Smith, Graeme N.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy that is associated with elevated maternal risk for cardiovascular disease. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of normal pregnancy on postpartum parameters of the electrocardiogram, and furthermore to determine how a history of pre-eclampsia may affect these parameters. Ten-minute high-resolution (1000 Hz) orthogonal Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were used to measure heart rate variability (HRV). Signal-averaged P-wave and QRS complex durations were determined. Participants included non-pregnant controls, normotensive parous controls and women with a recent history of PE. While reductions in HRV induced by uncomplicated pregnancy returned to non-pregnant levels by 6–8 months postpartum HRV remained reduced in women with a history of PE compared to control groups. In addition, P-Wave and QRS complex durations were prolonged in PE subjects at 6–8 months postpartum compared to control groups. Only QRS duration was independent of differences in blood pressure. These results suggest increased sympathetic cardiac activity, and delayed myocardial conduction in women after PE; alterations consistent with cardiac remodeling and increased risk for arrhythmia. In examining the association between PE and cardiovascular disease, identification of ECG abnormalities soon after pregnancy in women with a history of PE highlights a unique opportunity for early identification and screening in this population before other risk factors become apparent. PMID:26407294

  13. Reduced Heart Rate Variability and Altered Cardiac Conduction after Pre-Eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Malia S Q; Seaborn, Geoffrey E J; Redfearn, Damian P; Smith, Graeme N

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy that is associated with elevated maternal risk for cardiovascular disease. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of normal pregnancy on postpartum parameters of the electrocardiogram, and furthermore to determine how a history of pre-eclampsia may affect these parameters. Ten-minute high-resolution (1000 Hz) orthogonal Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were used to measure heart rate variability (HRV). Signal-averaged P-wave and QRS complex durations were determined. Participants included non-pregnant controls, normotensive parous controls and women with a recent history of PE. While reductions in HRV induced by uncomplicated pregnancy returned to non-pregnant levels by 6-8 months postpartum HRV remained reduced in women with a history of PE compared to control groups. In addition, P-Wave and QRS complex durations were prolonged in PE subjects at 6-8 months postpartum compared to control groups. Only QRS duration was independent of differences in blood pressure. These results suggest increased sympathetic cardiac activity, and delayed myocardial conduction in women after PE; alterations consistent with cardiac remodeling and increased risk for arrhythmia. In examining the association between PE and cardiovascular disease, identification of ECG abnormalities soon after pregnancy in women with a history of PE highlights a unique opportunity for early identification and screening in this population before other risk factors become apparent. PMID:26407294

  14. Pre-eclampsia renamed and reframed: Intra-abdominal hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sawchuck, Diane J; Wittmann, Bernd K

    2014-11-01

    This hypothesis proposes pre-eclampsia is caused by intra-abdominal hypertension in pregnancy. Sustained or increasing intra-abdominal pressure ⩾12mmHg causes impaired venous return to the heart, systemic vascular resistance, ischemia reperfusion injury, intestinal permeability, translocation of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin to the liver, cytotoxic immune response, systemic inflammatory response, pressure transmission to thoracic and intra-cranial compartments, and multi-organ dysfunction. This hypothesis is predicated on Pascal's law, evidence founded in the intra-abdominal hypertension literature, and the adapted equation ΔIAP-P=ΔIAVF/Cab, where ΔIAP-P=change in intra-abdominal pressure in pregnancy, ΔIAVF=change in intra-abdominal vector force (volume and force direction) and Cab=abdominal compliance. Factors causing increased intra-abdominal pressure in pregnancy include: progressive uterine expansion, obstetrical factors that increase intra-uterine volume excessively or acutely, maternal anthropometric measurements that affect intra-abdominal pressure thresholds, maternal postures that increase abdominal force direction, abdominal compliance that is decreased, diminished with advancing gestation, or has reached maximum expansion, habitation at high altitude, and rapid drops in barometric pressure. We postulate that the threshold for lipopolysaccharide translocation depends on the magnitude of intra-abdominal pressure, the intestinal microbiome complex, and the degree of intestinal permeability. We advance that delivery cures pre-eclampsia through the mechanism of abdominal decompression. PMID:25189485

  15. The Prognostic Role of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Autoantibody in Non-Gravid Hypertension and Pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Jinghui; Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Suli; Wu, Ye; Wang, Pengli; Liu, Huirong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Angiotensin II type 1 receptor autoantibody (AT1-AA) is found in patients with non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia, but the relationship is uncertain. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between AT1-AA and high blood pressure using meta-analysis, and to evaluate the prognosis value of AT1-AA for hypertensive diseases. Literature search from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were conducted using keywords “hypertension” or “pre-eclampsia,” “angiotensin II receptor type 1 autoantibody,” and its aliases from April 1999 to December 2015. Studies evaluating the association between AT1-AA and non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia were included in this analysis. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed based on the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale with some modifications. Two researchers then independently reviewed all included studies and extracted all relevant data. Association between AT1-AA and hypertension was tested with pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Finally, we evaluated whether AT1-AA predicted the prognosis of hypertension by using a summary receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve and sensitivity analysis. Ten studies were finally included in this meta-analysis. AT1-AA showed more significant association with pre-eclampsia than that with non-gravid hypertension (pooled OR 32.84, 95% CI 17.19–62.74; and pooled OR 4.18, 95% CI 2.20–7.98, respectively). Heterogeneity among studies was also detected probably due to different hypertensive subtypes and AT1-AA measuring methods. Area under summary ROC curve (AUC) of pre-eclampsia was 0.92 (sensitivity 0.76; specificity 0.86). Area under the ROC curve of overall hypertensive diseases or non-gravid hypertension was lower than that of pre-eclampsia (0.86 and 0.72, respectively) with lower sensitivities (0.46 and 0.26, respectively). The major limitation of this analysis was the publication bias due to lack of unpublished data

  16. Comparison of serum trace element levels in patients with or without pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Farzin, Leila; Sajadi, Fattaneh

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In developing countries, nutritional deficiency of essential trace elements is a common health problem, particularly among pregnant women because of increased requirements of various nutrients. Accordingly, this study was initiated to compare trace elements status in women with or without pre-eclampsia. Materials and Methods: In this study, serum trace elements including zinc (Zn), selenium (Se), copper (Cu), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) were determined by using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) in 60 patients and 60 healthy subjects. Results: There was no significant difference in the values of Cu between two groups (P > 0.05). A significant difference in Zn, Se, Ca and Mg levels were observed between patients with pre-eclampsia and control group (P < 0.001, P<0.01, P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively). Zn, Se, Ca and Mg levels were found to be 76.49 ± 17.62 μg/ dl, 8.82 ± 2.10 μg/ dl, 8.65 ± 2.14 mg/dl and 1.51 ± 0.34 mg/dl in Pre-eclamptic cases, and these values were found statistically lower compared to the controls (100.61 ± 20.12 μg/dl, 10.47 ± 2.78 μg/dl, 9.77 ± 3.02 mg/dl and 1.78 ± 0.27 mg/dl, respectively). While Cu levels were 118.28 ± 16.92 and 116.55 ± 15.23 μg/dl in the patients and the healthy subjects, respectively. In addition, no significant difference was found between two groups with respect to Hemoglobin Concentration (HbC) and Total White Blood Cell Count (TWBC) (P>0.05). Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the levels of Zn, Se, Ca and Mg are significantly altered in pregnant women with pre-eclampsia. This research shows that these deficiencies can not due to hemodilution. PMID:23825993

  17. Cord compression may rapidly influence the expression of placental angiogenic genes in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Järvenpää, J; Vuoristo, J T; Ukkola, O; Hirvikoski, P; Savolainen, E-R; Raudaskoski, T; Ryynänen, M

    2008-05-01

    Gene expression studies have demonstrated the altered expression level of placental angiogenesis related genes in severe pre-eclampsia (PE). In cord compression, the transportation of oxygen from the placenta to the fetus is blocked, and it is speculated that during blockade the originally hypoxic placenta may become hyperoxic. We compared the placental gene expression profiles of one pre-eclamptic patient with cord compression (the index patient) to the profiles of patients with PE and those of normal pregnancy controls (including one woman with cord compression). The gene expression of the cord compression PE patient resembled that observed in the normal pregnancies. We hypothesize that umbilical blockade may in a short period of time lead to placental hyperoxia, which in turn has an effect on angiogenic gene expression profile. PMID:18387671

  18. Distortion of maternal-fetal angiotensin II type 1 receptor allele transmission in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, L; Crawshaw, S; Baker, P N; Brookfield, J F; Broughton Pipkin, F; Kalsheker, N

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the fetal angiotensin II type 1 receptor genotype in pre-eclampsia. DESIGN: Case-control study. POPULATION: Forty-one maternal-fetal pairs from pre-eclamptic pregnancies and 80 maternal-fetal pairs from normotensive pregnancies. METHODS: Maternal and fetal DNA was genotyped at three diallelic polymorphisms, at nucleotides 573, 1062, and 1166, in the coding exon of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene, and at a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in its 3' flanking region. RESULTS: Allele and genotype frequencies at the four polymorphic regions investigated did not differ between pre-eclamptic and normotensive groups, in either fetal or maternal samples. Mothers heterozygous for the dinucleotide repeat allele designated A4 transmitted this allele to the fetus in 15 of 18 informative pre-eclamptic pregnancies and in eight of 26 normotensive pregnancies. This was greater than the expected probability in pre-eclamptic pregnancies (p=0.04) and less than expected in normotensive pregnancies (p<0.005). The 573T variant, which is in partial linkage disequilibrium with the A4 allele, showed a similar distortion of maternal-fetal transmission. CONCLUSION: Angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene expression in the fetus may contribute to the aetiology of pre-eclampsia. It is unclear whether susceptibility is conferred by the fetal genotype acting alone, or by allele sharing by mother and fetus. Possible mechanisms for the effect of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene are suggested by the association of the 573T variant with low levels of surface receptor expression on platelets. If receptor expression is similarly genetically determined in the placenta, responsiveness to angiotensin II may be affected, with the potential to influence placentation or placental prostaglandin secretion. PMID:9719367

  19. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphism (Glu298Asp) and development of pre-eclampsia: a case-control study and a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Christina KH; Casas, Juan P; Savvidou, Makrina D; Sahemey, Manpreet K; Nicolaides, Kypros H; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2006-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia is thought to have an important genetic component. Recently, pre-eclampsia has been associated in some studies with carriage of a common eNOS gene Glu298Asp polymorphism, a variant that leads to the replacement of glutamic acid by aspartic acid at codon 298. Method Healthy women with singleton pregnancies were recruited from 7 district general hospitals in London, UK. Women at high risk of pre-eclampsia were screened by uterine artery Doppler velocimetry at 22–24 weeks of gestation and maternal blood was obtained to genotype the eNOS Glu298Asp polymorphism. Odds ratios (OR) and 95%CI, using logistic regression methods, were obtained to evaluate the association between the Glu298Asp polymorphism and pre-eclampsia. A meta-analysis was then undertaken of all published studies up to November 2005 examining the association of eNOS Glu298Asp genotype and pre-eclampsia. Results 89 women with pre-eclampsia and 349 controls were included in the new study. The Glu298Asp polymorphism in a recessive model was not significantly associated with pre-eclampsia (adjusted-OR: 0.83 [95%CI: 0.30–2.25]; p = 0.7). In the meta-analysis, under a recessive genetic model (1129 cases & 2384 controls) women homozygous for the Asp298 allele were not at significantly increased risk of pre-eclampsia (OR: 1.28 [95%CI: 0.76–2.16]; p = 0.34). A dominant model (1334 cases & 2894 controls) was associated with no increase of risk of pre-eclampsia for women carriers of the Asp298 allele (OR: 1.12 [95%CI: 0.84–1.49]; p = 0.42). Conclusion From the data currently available, the eNOS Glu298Asp polymorphism is not associated with a significant increased risk of pre-eclampsia. However, published studies have been underpowered, much larger studies are needed to confirm or refute a realistic genotypic risk of disease, but which might contribute to many cases of pre-eclampsia in the population. PMID:16542455

  20. Genetic recapitulation of human pre-eclampsia risk during convergent evolution of reduced placental invasiveness in eutherian mammals

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Michael G.; Crespi, Bernard J.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between phenotypic variation arising through individual development and phenotypic variation arising through diversification of species has long been a central question in evolutionary biology. Among humans, reduced placental invasion into endometrial tissues is associated with diseases of pregnancy, especially pre-eclampsia, and reduced placental invasiveness has also evolved, convergently, in at least 10 lineages of eutherian mammals. We tested the hypothesis that a common genetic basis underlies both reduced placental invasion arising through a developmental process in human placental disease and reduced placental invasion found as a derived trait in the diversification of Euarchontoglires (rodents, lagomorphs, tree shrews, colugos and primates). Based on whole-genome analyses across 18 taxa, we identified 1254 genes as having evolved adaptively across all three lineages exhibiting independent evolutionary transitions towards reduced placental invasion. These genes showed strong evidence of enrichment for associations with pre-eclampsia, based on genetic-association studies, gene-expression analyses and gene ontology. We further used in silico prediction to identify a subset of 199 genes that are likely targets of natural selection during transitions in placental invasiveness and which are predicted to also underlie human placental disorders. Our results indicate that abnormal ontogenies can recapitulate major phylogenetic shifts in mammalian evolution, identify new candidate genes for involvement in pre-eclampsia, imply that study of species with less-invasive placentation will provide useful insights into the regulation of placental invasion and pre-eclampsia, and recommend a novel comparative functional-evolutionary approach to the study of genetically based human disease and mammalian diversification. PMID:25602073

  1. Nitroso-Redox Balance and Mitochondrial Homeostasis Are Regulated by STOX1, a Pre-Eclampsia-Associated Gene

    PubMed Central

    Doridot, Ludivine; Châtre, Laurent; Ducat, Aurélien; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Lombès, Anne; Méhats, Céline; Barbaux, Sandrine; Calicchio, Rosamaria

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Storkhead box 1 (STOX1) is a winged-helix transcription factor that is implicated in the genetic forms of a high-prevalence human gestational disease, pre-eclampsia. STOX1 overexpression confers pre-eclampsia-like transcriptomic features to trophoblastic cell lines and pre-eclampsia symptoms to pregnant mice. The aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of STOX1 on free radical equilibrium and mitochondrial function, both in vitro and in vivo. Results: Transcriptome analysis of STOX1-transgenic versus nontransgenic placentas at 16.5 days of gestation revealed alterations of mitochondria-related pathways. Placentas overexpressing STOX1 displayed altered mitochondrial mass and were severely biased toward protein nitration, indicating nitroso-redox imbalance in vivo. Trophoblast cells overexpressing STOX1 displayed an increased mitochondrial activity at 20% O2 and in hypoxia, despite reduction of the mitochondrial mass in the former. STOX1 overexpression is, therefore, associated with hyperactive mitochondria, resulting in increased free radical production. Moreover, nitric oxide (NO) production pathways were activated, resulting in peroxynitrite formation. At low oxygen pressure, STOX1 overexpression switched the free radical balance from reactive oxygen species (ROS) to reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in the placenta as well as in a trophoblast cell line. Innovation: In pre-eclamptic placentas, NO interacts with ROS and generates peroxynitrite and nitrated proteins as end products. This process will deprive the maternal organism of NO, a crucial vasodilator molecule. Conclusion: Our data posit STOX1 as a genetic switch in the ROS/RNS balance and suggest an explanation for elevated blood pressure in pre-eclampsia. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 819–834. PMID:24738702

  2. Syncytiotrophoblast Extracellular Vesicles from Pre-Eclampsia Placentas Differentially Affect Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Tannetta, Dionne S.; Hunt, Kathryn; Jones, Chris I.; Davidson, Naomi; Coxon, Carmen H.; Ferguson, David; Redman, Christopher W.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Sargent, Ian L.; Tucker, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) complicates around 3% of all pregnancies and is one of the most common causes of maternal mortality worldwide. The pathophysiology of PE remains unclear however its underlying cause originates from the placenta and manifests as raised blood pressure, proteinuria, vascular or systemic inflammation and hypercoagulation in the mother. Women who develop PE are also at significantly higher risk of subsequently developing cardiovascular (CV) disease. In PE, the failing endoplasmic reticulum, oxidative and inflammatory stressed syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta sheds increased numbers of syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicles (STBEV) into the maternal circulation. Platelet reactivity, size and concentration are also known to be altered in some women who develop PE, although the underlying reasons for this have not been determined. In this study we show that STBEV from disease free placenta isolated ex vivo by dual placental perfusion associate rapidly with platelets. We provide evidence that STBEV isolated from normal placentas cause platelet activation and that this is increased with STBEV from PE pregnancies. Furthermore, treatment of platelets with aspirin, currently prescribed for women at high risk of PE to reduce platelet aggregation, also inhibits STBEV-induced reversible aggregation of washed platelets. Increased platelet reactivity as a result of exposure to PE placenta derived STBEVs correlates with increased thrombotic risk associated with PE. These observations establish a possible direct link between the clotting disturbances of PE and dysfunction of the placenta, as well as the known increased risk of thromboembolism associated with this condition. PMID:26551971

  3. Pre-eclampsia and the vascular endothelial growth factor: a new aspect.

    PubMed

    Liberis, A; Stanulov, G; Ali, E Chafouz; Hassan, A; Pagalos, A; Kontomanolis, E N

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a multi-system disorder of human gestation characterized by hypertension, proteinuria, and edema, which resolves with placental delivery. This disease affects 3-14% of all pregnancies worldwide and 5-8% in the USA. Furthermore PE remains one of the leading causes of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. One of the most important goals in obstetrics is the early identification of the patient with an increased risk for PE. This paper unifies the essential and validated findings of past and current scientific investigation which encompass the relationship between PE and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF and its receptors have acquired great interest due to their vital role in neovascularization (vasculogenesis and angiogenesis) in a variety of physical and pathological processes such as the female reproductive cycle, PE, and tumorigenesis. VEGF is secreted in response to tissue hypoxia and endothelial cell damage. Alterations in the circulating levels of this factor may therefore identify those pregnancies with a high possibility of developing PE. This review will summarize the present authors' current understanding of the role of circulating VEGF in the pathogenesis, clinical diagnosis, and prediction of PE. PMID:27048010

  4. Early serum markers of pre-eclampsia: are we stepping forward?

    PubMed

    Laganà, Antonio Simone; Favilli, Alessandro; Triolo, Onofrio; Granese, Roberta; Gerli, Sandro

    2016-09-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a multisystemic disorder of human pregnancy, clinically characterized by hypertension, proteinuria, oedema and platelet aggregation; the syndrome includes vasoconstriction, resulting in maternal hypertension, reduced uterine blood flow, impairment of placenta-vascular endothelial integrity with increased permeability and activation of the coagulation cascade. The aetiopathogenesis of PE remains still unknown, although the central role played by the placenta seems to be crucial. To date, increasing efforts are trying to create an unique and robust biochemical pattern in serum to predict PE. Although the recent data, the definition of an early biochemical pattern in serum to predict PE is still far from reaching the final shape. This stalemate could be due, at least in part, to lack of robust and reproducible methodology (inclusion/exclusion criteria during enrolment, period and type of sample collection, type of sample analysis and interpretation of results) across the different studies. Considering these assumptions, the aim of the current paper is to review the available data about early serum markers of PE. PMID:26512423

  5. Endocan of the maternal placenta tissue is increased in pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xinwen; Bian, Yiding; Wu, Yanming; Huang, Yajing; Wang, Kai; Duan, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Pre-eclampsia (PE) is associated with intravascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Interestingly, endocan plays a predominant role in the vascular inflammation and is considered as a biomarker of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to explore whether the endocan levels in serum and placenta were different between pregnant women with PE and the normal pregnancies. Methods: Total 22 patients, including 10 normal pregnant women and 12 patients with PE, were included in this study. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the location of endocan. Then, the mRNA and protein levels of endocan in placenta were detected using qRT-PCR and western blotting. Serum endocan concentration was measured by ELISA. Results: Endocan protein was present in the human placenta, and the mRNA and protein levels of placenta tissues were elevated (P < 0.05) in the normal pregnancy with third trimester than those with first trimester. Furthermore, the expression of endocan mRNA and protein were increased in the placenta tissues of PE compared with in the normal pregnancy (P < 0.05); however, the endocan concentration of maternal serum did not have significant differences. Conclusion: Endocan may play a role in the progression of pregnancy and has a potential to be a new marker for the detective of PE. PMID:26823798

  6. Polymorphisms of the IL27 gene in a Chinese Han population complicated with pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Li, Yuan; Yao, Yuan; Li, Hua; Liang, Hongda; Xin, Miaomiao; Wang, Liqin; Zhao, Lei; Lin, Jizheng; Liu, Shiguo

    2016-01-01

    IL-27 could inhibit the development of Th17 cells, and the Th17/regulatory T-cell imbalance may reverse maternal tolerance in pre-eclampsia (PE). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between genetic polymorphisms in IL27 with PE. Three SNPs in IL27 (rs153109, rs17855750, and rs181206) were genotyped in a Chinese Han cohort of 1040 PE patients and 1247 normal pregnant women using the TaqMan allelic discrimination real-time PCR method. The CC genotypic distribution of rs153109 was significantly higher among cases than controls (19.1% versus 13.3%, odds ratio [OR]: 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23-1.93, p < 0.001), and the CT genotype was found to be significantly lower in cases than controls (41.7% versus 49.0%, OR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.63-0.88, p < 0.001), disputing existing reports indicating the allele frequency of rs153109 is not significantly different between PE patients and controls. Additionally, the CC genotype of rs153109 was significantly more prevalent in PE cases than controls using a recessive model (p < 0.001). The allelic and genotypic frequencies of rs17855750 and rs181206 were not significantly different between two groups. Our results reveal that IL27 polymorphisms may be involved in the development of PE in Chinese Han population. PMID:26971578

  7. Twin Chorionicity and the Risk of Hypertensive Disorders: Gestational Hypertension and Pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Bartnik, Pawel; Kosinska-Kaczynska, Katarzyna; Kacperczyk, Joanna; Ananicz, Wojciech; Sierocińska, Aleksandra; Wielgos, Miroslaw; Szymusik, Iwona

    2016-08-01

    Twin gestation is known to be a risk factor for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. However, the relationship between hypertensive disorders (pre-eclampsia (PE) and gestational hypertension (GH)) and chorionicity of twin pregnancy is unclear, and published data is conflicting. We decided to analyze the relationship between placentation and prevalence of hypertensive disorders. It was a retrospective cohort study. 312 twin pregnancies delivered between 2009 and 2014 were analyzed, 79 of which were monochorionic and 233 dichorionic. The occurrence of PE and GH was established according to American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' (ACOG) guidelines. Hypertensive disorders were diagnosed significantly more often in dichorionic than in monochorionic twin pregnancies (19.7% vs. 8.9%; OR = 2.53 95% CI 1.04-6.45; p = .03). PE occurred more frequently in DCP (13.3% vs. 3.8%; OR = 3.88 95% CI 1.09-16.46; p = .02). There were no differences between those two groups in the prevalence of GH (6.4% vs. 5.1%; p = .79). The logistic regression model for the occurrence of PE included chorionicity, mother's age lower than 18 or higher than 40, pre-gestational obesity, in vitro fertilization, primiparity, gestational age at delivery, gestational diabetes, and active smoking. It showed that dichorionicity remained an independent risk factor for PE (adjusted OR = 4.97.0 95% CI 1.06-23.38; p = .04). Dichorionicity seems to be a risk factor for PE but not for GH development. PMID:27160962

  8. Restraint of Trophoblast Invasion of the Uterus by Decorin: Role in Pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Pinki; Siddiqui, Mohammad Fyyaz; Lala, Peeyush K

    2016-03-01

    Decorin (DCN) is a leucine-rich, TGF-β binding proteoglycan produced by mesenchymal cells including chondrocytes, dermal fibroblasts, and uterine decidual cells. It exerts multiple physiological functions including collagen fibrillogenesis, myogenesis, angiostasis, and restraining placental invasiveness. We discovered that decidua-derived DCN restrains proliferation, migration, and invasion of extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells of the human placenta in a TGF-β-independent manner. These functions were differentially mediated by binding of DCN to multiple tyrosine kinase receptors (TKR) including EGFR, IGFR1, and VEGFR2. DCN blocked VEGFR-2 dependent EVT cell migration and endovascular differentiation by inhibiting P38MAPK and ERK1/2 pathways.We identified the avid VEGFR2 binding site in DCN protein as a 12 amino acids (LGTNPLKSSGIE) span in the Leucine-rich-repeat (LRR) 5 region of domain III. A single amino acid mutation (substitution of K to A) of DCN at this site abrogated VEGFR-2- dependent DCN actions. Also, DCN mRNA expression, measured with in situ hybridization, was selectively upregulated in decidual cells in placentas from mothers suffering from pre-eclampsia (PE), whereas the expression levels remained unchanged in chorionic villus mesenchymal cells. This difference between PE and control placentas was present at all gestational ages, indicating the pathogenic role of DCN in PE. We hypothesize that increased blood DCN levels could be a candidate biomarker for PE. PMID:26554635

  9. Association of anemia, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia with seasonality: a realist systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hlimi, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal patterns influencing maternal health have been documented globally and are of particular importance for women in developing countries who disproportionately suffer from anemia, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. This paper adopts a realist systematic approach to investigate the maternal outcome of anemia and eclampsia in relation to seasonality. A review of 23 published studies shows a statistically significant link between these maternal disorders and seasonality in developing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa and Central and South Asia. Anemia and eclampsia tend to decrease during the dry season, only to increase with greater rainfall, low and cold temperatures. Numerous studies suggest that the seasonality of anemia and eclampsia is associated with changes in malaria transmission. This was observed during the rainy season, suggesting a potential seasonal relationship with malaria as a driver of these disorders in Sub-Saharan Africa. Anemia and eclampsia were principally exacerbated among primigravidae and young women. Food insecurity, access to antenatal care, poverty, and environmental factors may also play a crucial role in the predisposition to these disorders. More research is required to identify the seasonal link between malaria and eclampsia particularly as climate change may exacerbate the rate of the disorders in tropical and sub-tropical areas. PMID:25555235

  10. Polymorphisms of the IL27 gene in a Chinese Han population complicated with pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Li, Yuan; Yao, Yuan; Li, Hua; Liang, Hongda; Xin, Miaomiao; Wang, Liqin; Zhao, Lei; Lin, Jizheng; Liu, Shiguo

    2016-01-01

    IL-27 could inhibit the development of Th17 cells, and the Th17/regulatory T-cell imbalance may reverse maternal tolerance in pre-eclampsia (PE). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between genetic polymorphisms in IL27 with PE. Three SNPs in IL27 (rs153109, rs17855750, and rs181206) were genotyped in a Chinese Han cohort of 1040 PE patients and 1247 normal pregnant women using the TaqMan allelic discrimination real-time PCR method. The CC genotypic distribution of rs153109 was significantly higher among cases than controls (19.1% versus 13.3%, odds ratio [OR]: 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23–1.93, p < 0.001), and the CT genotype was found to be significantly lower in cases than controls (41.7% versus 49.0%, OR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.63–0.88, p < 0.001), disputing existing reports indicating the allele frequency of rs153109 is not significantly different between PE patients and controls. Additionally, the CC genotype of rs153109 was significantly more prevalent in PE cases than controls using a recessive model (p < 0.001). The allelic and genotypic frequencies of rs17855750 and rs181206 were not significantly different between two groups. Our results reveal that IL27 polymorphisms may be involved in the development of PE in Chinese Han population. PMID:26971578

  11. Association of maternal sleep practices with pre-eclampsia, low birth weight, and stillbirth among Ghanaian women

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Jocelynn T.; Anderson, Frank J.; Coleman, Jerry; Oppong, Samuel; Seffah, Joseph D.; Aikins, Alfred; O’Brien, Louise M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess sleep practices, and investigate their relationship with maternal and fetal outcomes, among pregnant Ghanaian women. Methods In a cross-sectional study conducted at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana, between June and July 2011, postpartum women were interviewed within 48 hours of delivery about sleep quality and practices during pregnancy. Interviews were coupled with a systematic review of participants’ medical charts for key outcomes including maternal hypertension, pre-eclampsia, premature delivery, low birth weight, and stillbirth. Results Most women reported poor sleep quality during pregnancy. Snoring during pregnancy was independently associated with pre-eclampsia (odds ratio [OR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4–8.5; P=0.007). The newborns of women who reported supine sleep during pregnancy were at increased risk of low birth weight (OR, 5.0; 95% CI, 1.2–20.2; P=0.025) and stillbirth (OR, 8.0; 95% CI, 1.5–43.2; P=0.016). Low birth weight was found to mediate the relationship between supine sleep and stillbirth. Conclusion The present findings in an African population demonstrate that maternal sleep, a modifiable risk factor, has a significant role in pre-eclampsia, low birth weight, and subsequently stillbirth. PMID:23507553

  12. Mechanism of vascular dysfunction due to circulating factors in women with pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Kao, Cindy K; Morton, Jude S; Quon, Anita L; Reyes, Laura M; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Davidge, Sandra T

    2016-04-01

    Circulating factors have been proposed to play a major role in the pathophysiology of endothelial dysfunction in pre-eclampsia (PE), which is defined as new-onset hypertension with proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation. However, the mechanisms leading to altered vascular reactivity remain unclear. We hypothesized that circulating factors lead to endothelial dysfunction by increasing oxidative stress and reducing nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin (PG) bioavailability. Pregnant rat uterine and mesenteric arteries were incubated overnight with 3% normotensive (NP) or PE plasma collected from women upon admission to hospital. Responses to methacholine (MCh) were obtained using wire myography to assess endothelial function pathways. Vascular superoxide level was measured via dihydroethidium staining and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression via Western blots. PE plasma significantly increased superoxide levels and impaired endothelial dysfunction in uterine arteries (Emax 79.9±5.6% compared with 44.9±6.3%, P=0.0004), which was restored in the presence of oxidant scavengers or PG synthesis inhibition. Uterine artery vasodilation was abolished in the presence of pan-NOS inhibitor (P<0.0001) in both NP- and PE-treated vessels, but inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-dependent vasodilation was present only in NP-treated arteries. Uterine arteries exposed to PE plasma exhibit an increased endothelial NOS expression and a decreased iNOS expression. PE plasma did not alter endothelial function in mesenteric arteries, suggesting that the effect of circulating factors was vascular-bed-specific. We have shown that circulating factors lead to endothelial dysfunction via altered oxidative stress and vasodilator pathways. The present study contributes to our understanding of the pathophysiology and finding a potential target for intervention in PE. PMID:26733722

  13. Early Pregnancy Biomarkers in Pre-Eclampsia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pensée; van den Berg, Caroline; Alfirevic, Zarko; O'Brien, Shaughn; Röthlisberger, Maria; Baker, Philip Newton; Kenny, Louise C; Kublickiene, Karolina; Duvekot, Johannes J

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) complicates 2%-8% of all pregnancies and is an important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to reduce these complications and to develop possible treatment modalities, it is important to identify women at risk of developing PE. The use of biomarkers in early pregnancy would allow appropriate stratification into high and low risk pregnancies for the purpose of defining surveillance in pregnancy and to administer interventions. We used formal methods for a systematic review and meta-analyses to assess the accuracy of all biomarkers that have been evaluated so far during the first and early second trimester of pregnancy to predict PE. We found low predictive values using individual biomarkers which included a disintegrin and metalloprotease 12 (ADAM-12), inhibin-A, pregnancy associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A), placental growth factor (PlGF) and placental protein 13 (PP-13). The pooled sensitivity of all single biomarkers was 0.40 (95% CI 0.39-0.41) at a false positive rate of 10%. The area under the Summary of Receiver Operating Characteristics Curve (SROC) was 0.786 (SE 0.02). When a combination model was used, the predictive value improved to an area under the SROC of 0.893 (SE 0.03). In conclusion, although there are multiple potential biomarkers for PE their efficacy has been inconsistent and comparisons are difficult because of heterogeneity between different studies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for high quality, large-scale multicentre research in biomarkers for PE so that the best predictive marker(s) can be identified in order to improve the management of women destined to develop PE. PMID:26404264

  14. Early Pregnancy Biomarkers in Pre-Eclampsia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pensée; van den Berg, Caroline; Alfirevic, Zarko; O’Brien, Shaughn; Röthlisberger, Maria; Baker, Philip Newton; Kenny, Louise C.; Kublickiene, Karolina; Duvekot, Johannes J.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) complicates 2%–8% of all pregnancies and is an important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to reduce these complications and to develop possible treatment modalities, it is important to identify women at risk of developing PE. The use of biomarkers in early pregnancy would allow appropriate stratification into high and low risk pregnancies for the purpose of defining surveillance in pregnancy and to administer interventions. We used formal methods for a systematic review and meta-analyses to assess the accuracy of all biomarkers that have been evaluated so far during the first and early second trimester of pregnancy to predict PE. We found low predictive values using individual biomarkers which included a disintegrin and metalloprotease 12 (ADAM-12), inhibin-A, pregnancy associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A), placental growth factor (PlGF) and placental protein 13 (PP-13). The pooled sensitivity of all single biomarkers was 0.40 (95% CI 0.39–0.41) at a false positive rate of 10%. The area under the Summary of Receiver Operating Characteristics Curve (SROC) was 0.786 (SE 0.02). When a combination model was used, the predictive value improved to an area under the SROC of 0.893 (SE 0.03). In conclusion, although there are multiple potential biomarkers for PE their efficacy has been inconsistent and comparisons are difficult because of heterogeneity between different studies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for high quality, large-scale multicentre research in biomarkers for PE so that the best predictive marker(s) can be identified in order to improve the management of women destined to develop PE. PMID:26404264

  15. The use of pulse wave velocity in predicting pre-eclampsia in high-risk women.

    PubMed

    Katsipi, Irene; Stylianou, Kostas; Petrakis, Ioannis; Passam, Andrew; Vardaki, Eleftheria; Parthenakis, Fragkiskos; Makrygiannakis, Antonios; Daphnis, Eugene; Kyriazis, John

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we evaluated the diagnostic utility of pulse wave velocity (PWV) alone or in combination with other diagnostic markers in predicting pre-eclampsia (PE) in high-risk women. Pregnant women at high risk for PE were recruited between 22 and 26 weeks of gestation and were assessed for (a) PWV, (b) serum levels of the placental soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) protein and uric acid and (c) 24-h urinary protein and calcium excretion. Sensitivities and specificities were derived from receiver operating characteristic curves. Of 118 women recruited, 11 and 10 women developed early-onset PE (<34 weeks) and late-onset PE (≥34 weeks), respectively. Of the five diagnostic markers tested, PWV showed the highest detection rate for all cases (21) of PE (81%) and for early-onset PE (82%) at a fixed 10% false-positive rate (FPR), and when combined with sFlt-1, these figures increased to 90% and 92%, respectively. Despite the reduced ability of PWV to predict late-onset PE (detection rate 20%), the combination of PWV with sFlt-1 achieved a detection rate of 50% at a fixed 10% FPR. A suggested cutoff value of 9 m/s for PWV resulted in optimal sensitivity (91%) and specificity (86%) for predicting early-onset PE. This study is the first to show that PWV may be a potentially promising predictor of early-onset PE in women at high risk for PE. The combination of PWV with sFlt-1 may further improve the screening efficacy for predicting PE. PMID:24621469

  16. Prospective assessment of neurodevelopment in children following a pregnancy complicated by severe pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Warshafsky, Chelsie; Walker, Mark; Wen, Shi-Wu; Smith, Graeme N

    2016-01-01

    Objective To prospectively examine whether children of women with a pregnancy affected by severe pre-eclampsia (PE), compared to children of women without a PE-affected pregnancy, have differences in neurodevelopmental performance up to 5 years of age. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary care centre. Participants Women were recruited following a PE-affected pregnancy. After each PE participant was recruited, the next normotensive woman without a prior history of PE and matched by parity, maternal age and race was invited to participate. Women with a history of chronic hypertension, diabetes or renal disease were excluded. Total enrolment included 129 PE-affected and 140 normotensive mothers. Outcome measures The primary outcome measure was failure of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ). The ASQ was completed yearly, until age 5. Results A significant difference was found in the proportion of ASQ categories failed in year 3 (p<0.05), and this approached significance in years 1 and 4 (p<0.10 and p<0.15, respectively). At year 1, the number of ASQ categories failed was significantly greater among children born to PE mothers. A subgroup analysis revealed that a significant proportion of PE children born preterm (<37 weeks) failed the ASQ in years 3 and 4 (p<0.05), and when failed, those who were preterm failed significantly more categories (p<0.05). A trend towards increased failure in the gross motor category was found. There was a significant positive correlation between maternal lifetime CVD risk score and number of ASQ categories failed at years 1 and 3 (p<0.05). Conclusions Severe PE is associated with other adverse pregnancy outcomes, including intrauterine growth restriction and preterm birth, all of which are associated with increased neurodevelopment delays. Thus, PE indicates a need for early screening and intervention at the neurodevelopmental level to improve children's long-term health, with larger studies required to tease out

  17. Placental microRNA expression in pregnancies complicated by superimposed pre-eclampsia on chronic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    VASHUKOVA, ELENA S.; GLOTOV, ANDREY S.; FEDOTOV, PAVEL V.; EFIMOVA, OLGA A.; PAKIN, VLADIMIR S.; MOZGOVAYA, ELENA V.; PENDINA, ANNA A.; TIKHONOV, ANDREI V.; KOLTSOVA, ALLA S.; BARANOV, VLADISLAV S.

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a complication of pregnancy that affects 5–8% of women after 20 weeks of gestation. It is usually diagnosed based on the de novo onset of hypertension and proteinuria. Preexisting hypertension in women developing PE, also known as superimposed PE on chronic hypertension (SPE), leads to elevated risk of maternal and fetal mortality. PE is associated with an altered microRNA (miRNA) expression pattern in the placenta, suggesting that miRNA deregulation is involved in the pathogenesis of PE. Whether and how the miRNA expression pattern is changed in the SPE placenta remains unclear. The present study analyzed the placental miRNA expression profile in pregnancies complicated by SPE. miRNA expression profiles in SPE and normal placentas were investigated using an Ion Torrent sequencing system. Sequencing data were processed using a comprehensive analysis pipeline for deep miRNA sequencing (CAP-miRSeq). A total of 22 miRNAs were identified to be deregulated in placentas from patients with SPE. They included 16 miRNAs previously known to be associated with PE and 6 novel miRNAs. Among the 6 novel miRNAs, 4 were upregulated (miR-518a, miR-527, miR-518e and miR-4532) and 2 downregulated (miR-98 and miR-135b) in SPE placentas compared with controls. The present results suggest that SPE is associated with specific alterations in the placental miRNA expression pattern, which differ from alterations detected in PE placentas, and therefore, provide novel targets for further investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying SPE pathogenesis. PMID:27176897

  18. Analysis of cardiovascular oscillations: A new approach to the early prediction of pre-eclampsia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malberg, H.; Bauernschmitt, R.; Voss, A.; Walther, T.; Faber, R.; Stepan, H.; Wessel, N.

    2007-03-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a serious disorder with high morbidity and mortality occurring during pregnancy; 3%-5% of all pregnant women are affected. Early prediction is still insufficient in clinical practice. Although most pre-eclamptic patients show pathological uterine perfusion in the second trimester, this parameter has a positive predictive accuracy of only 30%, which makes it unsuitable for early, reliable prediction. The study is based on the hypothesis that alterations in cardiovascular regulatory behavior can be used to predict PE. Ninety-six pregnant women in whom Doppler investigation detected perfusion disorders of the uterine arteries were included in the study. Twenty-four of these pregnant women developed PE after the 30th week of gestation. During pregnancy, additional several noninvasive continuous blood pressure recordings were made over 30 min under resting conditions by means of a finger cuff. The time series extracted of systolic as well as diastolic beat-to-beat pressures and the heart rate were studied by variability and coupling analysis to find predictive factors preceding genesis of the disease. In the period between the 18th and 26th weeks of pregnancy, three special variability and baroreflex parameters were able to predict PE several weeks before clinical manifestation. Discriminant function analysis of these parameters was able to predict PE with a sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and a positive predictive value of 70%. The combined clinical assessment of uterine perfusion and cardiovascular variability demonstrates the best current prediction several weeks before clinical manifestation of PE.

  19. Maternal ophthalmic artery Doppler velocimetry in pre-eclampsia in Southwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olatunji, Richard Busayo; Adekanmi, Ademola Joseph; Obajimi, Millicent Olubunmi; Roberts, Olumuyiwa Adebola; Ojo, Temitope Olumuyiwa

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia (PE) poses a serious challenge to maternal and fetal health in Africa. It is associated with hemodynamic changes that may affect the internal carotid/ophthalmic artery circulation with consequent neuro-ophthalmic manifestations. Ophthalmic artery Doppler (OAD) ultrasound is an important tool that can be used to detect hemodynamic changes in PE and monitor its severity. In this study, we evaluated hemodynamic changes on OAD ultrasound in the ophthalmic arteries of pre-eclamptic women and compared these with values in healthy pregnant women. Methods OAD parameters, such as, peak systolic velocity, peak diastolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, pulsatility index, and peak ratio, were measured on transorbital triplex ultrasound scan with a 7–10 MHz multifrequency linear transducer in 42 consenting pre-eclamptic patients and 41 pregnant controls matched for maternal age, gestational age, and parity at the Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Ibadan. Univariate, bivariate, and receiver operating characteristic curve data analyses were performed. P<0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results Mean resistivity index, pulsatility index, and peak systolic velocity were significantly lower in pre-eclamptic patients than in the controls. Mean peak diastolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, and peak ratio were significantly higher in the pre-eclamptic group. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the resistivity index (sensitivity 75%, specificity 77.8%) could distinguish mild from severe PE while the peak ratio (sensitivity 90.5%, specificity 81.3%) could accurately detect PE. Conclusion OAD ultrasound can be used to monitor patients with PE for early detection of progression to severe forms before cerebral complications develop. OAD screening of patients at high risk for PE can also detect early changes of hemodynamic derangement. PMID:26229508

  20. Prevention and management of severe pre-eclampsia/eclampsia in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An evidence-based strategy exists to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality associated with severe pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (PE/E), but it may be difficult to implement in low-resource settings. This study examines whether facilities that provide emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC) in Afghanistan have the capacity to manage severe PE/E cases. Methods A further analysis was conducted of the 2009–10 Afghanistan EmONC Needs Assessment. Assessors observed equipment and supplies available, and services provided at 78 of the 127 facilities offering comprehensive EmONC services and interviewed 224 providers. The providers also completed a written case scenario on severe PE/E. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize facility and provider characteristics. Student t-test, one-way ANOVA, and chi-square tests were performed to determine whether there were significant differences between facility types, doctors and midwives, and trained and untrained providers. Results The median number of severe PE/E cases in the past year was just 5 (range 0–42) at comprehensive health centers (CHCs) and district hospitals, compared with 44 (range 0–130) at provincial hospitals and 108 (range 32–540) at regional and specialized hospitals (p < 0.001). Most facilities had the drugs and supplies needed to treat severe PE/E, including the preferred anticonvulsant, magnesium sulfate (MgSO4). One-third of the smallest facilities and half of larger facilities reported administering a second-line drug, diazepam, in some cases. In the case scenario, 96% of doctors and 89% of midwives recognized that MgSO4 should be used to manage severe PE/E, but 42% of doctors and 58% of midwives also thought diazepam had a role to play. Providers who were trained on the use of MgSO4 scored significantly higher than untrained providers on six of 20 items in the case scenario. Providers at larger facilities significantly outscored those at smaller facilities on five items. There

  1. Promoter hypomethylation of TIMP3 is associated with pre-eclampsia in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuqian; Zhang, Xiaojing; Li, Qiaoli; Xu, Jiawei; Zhou, Xinyao; Wang, Teng; Xing, Qinghe; Liu, Yun; Wang, Lei; He, Lin; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2013-03-01

    A study by Yuen RK, Penaherrera MS, von Dadelszen P, McFadden DE, Robinson WP. DNA methylation profiling of human placentas reveals promoter hypomethylation of multiple genes in early-onset preeclampsia. Eur J Hum Genet 2010;18:1006-1012 based on a Canadian population found the tissue inhibitor of the metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) gene to be hypomethylated in pre-eclampsia (PE) placentas and to be a potential prenatal marker for early onset PE. To further explore the role of TIMP3 in PE and to investigate whether the TIMP3 promoter shows the same methylation pattern in the Han Chinese population, we analyzed a complete methylation assay of TIMP3 including the promoter region studied in the Canadian report and the neighboring CpG island in placentas (cases n = 41, controls n = 22) maternal peripheral blood (cases n = 3; controls n = 6) and umbilical cord blood (cases n = 7; controls n = 8) using MassArray EpiTyper (Sequenom, San Diego, CA, USA). Our results confirmed the finding of aberrant TIMP3 promoter methylation in PE placentas (mean = 0.405) compared with those in controls (mean = 0.534, P = 9.40 × 10(-7)). A tissue-specific methylation pattern between placentas (mean = 0.459) and bloods (mean = 0.961, P = 6.91 × 10(-13)) was also demonstrated in our clinical samples. Furthermore, a nearly 2-fold increase in TIMP3 expression for the hypomethylated promoter was found in PE placentas (P = 0.007), pointing to a negative relationship between TIMP3 methylation and the expression (R = -0.758, P = 0.029). In conclusion, we replicated the findings of Yuen et al. in our Han Chinese-based study, confirming that TIMP3 is likely to be involved in the etiology of PE and that hypomethylated and placenta-specific TIMP3 may be a potential marker for early diagnosis of PE in maternal plasma. PMID:23172037

  2. T594M mutation of the epithelial sodium channel beta-subunit gene in pre-eclampsia and eclampsia in Black South African women.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, R J; Roberts, C B; Rom, L; Moodley, J

    2004-09-01

    The possible role of the beta-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel T594M polymorphism in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy has not been examined. This study compared Black South African women with pre-eclampsia (n= 204), early onset pre-eclampsia (n= 67), eclampsia (n= 120) and gestational hypertension (n= 78) with 338 women from the same ethnic group who had full-term normotensive pregnancies, for the presence of the T594M polymorphism. The variant allele was detected in 1.7% to 3.8% of the various patient groups and in 3.6% of the control group reflecting no significant difference. These results suggest that the T594M polymorphism in the sodium channel beta-subunit is not associated with the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia or gestational hypertension. PMID:15327619

  3. Clinical accuracy of a low cost portable blood pressure device in pregnancy and pre-eclampsia: the Nissei DS-400.

    PubMed

    de Greeff, Annemarie; Shennan, Andrew H

    2015-07-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy cause significant maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly in developing countries. This study evaluated the accuracy of the Nissei DS-400, a low cost blood pressure (BP) device, in pregnancy according to the British Hypertension Society protocol. Forty-five pregnant women (15 with pre-eclampsia), were recruited from a large teaching hospital. Nine sequential same-arm BP measurements were taken from each woman by trained observers, alternating between mercury sphygmomanometry and the device. The Nissei DS-400 achieved the highest accuracy grade (A/A) in all subjects (n = 45) and in pregnancy alone (n = 30). The mean difference ± standard deviation between the standard and the device in pregnancy were -1.0 ± 5.1 mmHg and -1.1 ± 5.0 mmHg for systolic and diastolic BP, respectively, and -2.6 ± 5.9 mmHg and -3.4 ± 5.8 mmHg in all subjects. The Nissei-DS 400 can be recommended for clinical use in pregnancy and has potential as a good screening tool for pre-eclampsia in low resource settings. PMID:25911652

  4. The role of maternal serumbeta-HCG and PAPP-A levels at gestational weeks 10 to 14 in the prediction of pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Ozdamar, Ozkan; Gun, Ismet; Keskin, Ugur; Kocak, Necmettin; Mungen, Ercument

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to detect whether maternal serum free β-hCG and PAPP-A levels and NT measurements vary between normal pregnancies and those that subsequently develop pre-eclampsia and to evaluate the role of these screening serum analytes in the prediction of pre-eclampsia. Methods: Using a case-control study design, we identified all women who had been screened by double test within 11+0 and 13+6 weeks of gestation and who had developed pre-eclampsia during the subsequent pregnancy course, over a 6-year period between January 2006 and December 2012 at two tertiary referral hospital. All women who had undergone a double test during that time, without a diagnosis of pre-eclampsia and who had not had any adverse obstetric outcomes, were also identified, and three women among them were randomly selected as controls for each case. Maternal and neonatal data were abstracted from the medical records and PAPP-A, β-hCG, NT and CRL MoM values were compared between the two groups. Results: Although β-hCG values show no statistically significant difference (p=0.882), PAPP-A levels were significantly reduced in the pre-eclampsia group compared to the control group (p<0.001). NT and CRL values showed no significant difference between the two groups (p=0.674 and p=0.558, respectively). Conclusion: Measuring PAPP-A in the first trimester may be useful in the prediction of pre-eclampsia. PMID:24948981

  5. Clinical risk factors for pre-eclampsia determined in early pregnancy: systematic review and meta-analysis of large cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Emily; Medcalf, Karyn E; Park, Alison L

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop a practical evidence based list of clinical risk factors that can be assessed by a clinician at ≤16 weeks’ gestation to estimate a woman’s risk of pre-eclampsia. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies. Data sources PubMed and Embase databases, 2000-15. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Cohort studies with ≥1000 participants that evaluated the risk of pre-eclampsia in relation to a common and generally accepted clinical risk factor assessed at ≤16 weeks’ gestation. Data extraction Two independent reviewers extracted data from included studies. A pooled event rate and pooled relative risk for pre-eclampsia were calculated for each of 14 risk factors. Results There were 25 356 688 pregnancies among 92 studies. The pooled relative risk for each risk factor significantly exceeded 1.0, except for prior intrauterine growth restriction. Women with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome had the highest pooled rate of pre-eclampsia (17.3%, 95% confidence interval 6.8% to 31.4%). Those with prior pre-eclampsia had the greatest pooled relative risk (8.4, 7.1 to 9.9). Chronic hypertension ranked second, both in terms of its pooled rate (16.0%, 12.6% to 19.7%) and pooled relative risk (5.1, 4.0 to 6.5) of pre-eclampsia. Pregestational diabetes (pooled rate 11.0%, 8.4% to 13.8%; pooled relative risk 3.7, 3.1 to 4.3), prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) >30 (7.1%, 6.1% to 8.2%; 2.8, 2.6 to 3.1), and use of assisted reproductive technology (6.2%, 4.7% to 7.9%; 1.8, 1.6 to 2.1) were other prominent risk factors. Conclusions There are several practical clinical risk factors that, either alone or in combination, might identify women in early pregnancy who are at “high risk” of pre-eclampsia. These data can inform the generation of a clinical prediction model for pre-eclampsia and the use of aspirin prophylaxis in pregnancy. PMID:27094586

  6. The Prognostic Role of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Autoantibody in Non-Gravid Hypertension and Pre-eclampsia: A Meta-analysis and Our Studies.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jinghui; Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Suli; Wu, Ye; Wang, Pengli; Liu, Huirong

    2016-04-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor autoantibody (AT1-AA) is found in patients with non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia, but the relationship is uncertain.The aim of the present study was to assess the association between AT1-AA and high blood pressure using meta-analysis, and to evaluate the prognosis value of AT1-AA for hypertensive diseases.Literature search from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were conducted using keywords "hypertension" or "pre-eclampsia," "angiotensin II receptor type 1 autoantibody," and its aliases from April 1999 to December 2015.Studies evaluating the association between AT1-AA and non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia were included in this analysis. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale with some modifications.Two researchers then independently reviewed all included studies and extracted all relevant data. Association between AT1-AA and hypertension was tested with pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Finally, we evaluated whether AT1-AA predicted the prognosis of hypertension by using a summary receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve and sensitivity analysis.Ten studies were finally included in this meta-analysis. AT1-AA showed more significant association with pre-eclampsia than that with non-gravid hypertension (pooled OR 32.84, 95% CI 17.19-62.74; and pooled OR 4.18, 95% CI 2.20-7.98, respectively). Heterogeneity among studies was also detected probably due to different hypertensive subtypes and AT1-AA measuring methods. Area under summary ROC curve (AUC) of pre-eclampsia was 0.92 (sensitivity 0.76; specificity 0.86). Area under the ROC curve of overall hypertensive diseases or non-gravid hypertension was lower than that of pre-eclampsia (0.86 and 0.72, respectively) with lower sensitivities (0.46 and 0.26, respectively).The major limitation of this analysis was the publication bias due to lack of unpublished data and the language limitation during

  7. Effect of supplementation during pregnancy with L-arginine and antioxidant vitamins in medical food on pre-eclampsia in high risk population: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Espino, Salvador; Avila-Vergara, Marco Antonio; Ibarra, Isabel; Ahued, Roberto; Godines, Myrna; Parry, Samuel; Macones, George; Strauss, Jerome F

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that a relative deficiency in L-arginine, the substrate for synthesis of the vasodilatory gas nitric oxide, may be associated with the development of pre-eclampsia in a population at high risk. Design Randomised, blinded, placebo controlled clinical trial. Setting Tertiary public hospital in Mexico City. Participants Pregnant women with a history of a previous pregnancy complicated by pre-eclampsia, or pre-eclampsia in a first degree relative, and deemed to be at increased risk of recurrence of the disease were studied from week 14-32 of gestation and followed until delivery. Interventions Supplementation with a medical food—bars containing L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins, antioxidant vitamins alone, or placebo—during pregnancy. Main outcome measure Development of pre-eclampsia/eclampsia. Results 222 women were allocated to the placebo group, 228 received L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins, and 222 received antioxidant vitamins alone. Women had 4-8 prenatal visits while receiving the bars. The incidence of pre-eclampsia was reduced significantly (χ2=19.41; P<0.001) in women randomised to L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins compared with placebo (absolute risk reduction 0.17 (95% confidence interval 0.12 to 0.21). Antioxidant vitamins alone showed an observed benefit, but this effect was not statistically significant compared with placebo (χ2=3.76; P=0.052; absolute risk reduction 0.07, 0.005 to 0.15). L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins compared with antioxidant vitamins alone resulted in a significant effect (P=0.004; absolute risk reduction 0.09, 0.05 to 0.14). Conclusions Supplementation during pregnancy with a medical food containing L-arginine and antioxidant vitamins reduced the incidence of pre-eclampsia in a population at high risk of the condition. Antioxidant vitamins alone did not have a protective effect for prevention of pre-eclampsia. Supplementation with L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins needs to be

  8. Maternal outcomes of magnesium sulphate and diazepam use in women with severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kassie, Gizat M.; Negussie, Dereje; Ahmed, Jemal H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Preferred anticonvulsant used to treat and prevent fits in eclampsia currently is magnesium sulphate. Clinical monitoring of tendon reflexes, respiration rate and measuring hourly urine output should be done to ensures safe administration of magnesium sulphate Objective This study was conducted to evaluate maternal outcomes of magnesium sulphate and diazepam use in the management of severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia in Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods A retrospective hospital based cross-sectional comparative study was conducted using data collection format. Data was collected from the hospital delivery care register and patient chart records of all pregnant women who presented with the diagnosis of severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia in two years and three months period from January, 2010 to April, 2012. Data analysis was done by SPSS version 16.0. A P-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant in all tests. Results A total of 357 patient charts, 217 from magnesium sulphate and 140 from diazepam treated pregnant women group, were reviewed and analyzed. Three pregnant women from the magnesium sulphate treated group and eleven pregnant women from diazepam treated group had at least one convulsion after taking the drug. Greater proportion of patients in the magnesium sulphate treated group had less than four days postpartum stay as compared to the diazepam treated patients (82.3% versus 66.2%). Seizure occurrence, duration of postpartum hospital stays and birth outcome had a statistically significant association with the type of anticonvulsant used. Conclusions Magnesium sulphate is more effective than diazepam in the management of severe pre-eclamptic and eclamptic pregnant women in terms of seizure prevention, shortening postpartum hospital stay and reducing maternal morbidities. PMID:25035717

  9. Phase I pilot clinical trial of antenatal maternally administered melatonin to decrease the level of oxidative stress in human pregnancies affected by pre-eclampsia (PAMPR): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Sebastian R; Lim, Rebecca; Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Alers, Nicole O; Wallace, Euan M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pre-eclampsia is a common pregnancy condition affecting between 3% and 7% of women. Unfortunately, the exact pathophysiology of the disease is unknown and as such there are no effective treatments that exist notwithstanding prompt delivery of the fetus and culprit placenta. As many cases of pre-eclampsia occur in preterm pregnancies, it remains a significant cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Recently, in vitro and animal studies have highlighted the potential role of antioxidants in mitigating the effects of the disease. Melatonin is a naturally occurring antioxidant hormone and provides an excellent safety profile combined with ease of oral administration. We present the protocol for a phase I pilot clinical trial investigating the efficacy and side effects of maternal treatment with oral melatonin in pregnancies affected by preterm pre-eclampsia. Methods and analysis We propose undertaking a single-arm open label clinical trial recruiting 20 women with preterm pre-eclampsia (24+0–35+6 weeks). We will take baseline measurements of maternal and fetal well-being, levels of oxidative stress, ultrasound Doppler studies and other biomarkers of pre-eclampsia. Women will then be given oral melatonin (10 mg) three times daily until delivery. The primary outcome will be time interval between diagnosis and delivery compared to historical controls. Secondary outcomes will compare the baseline measurements previously mentioned with twice-weekly measurements during treatment and then 6 weeks postpartum. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from Monash Health Human Research Ethics Committee B (HREC 13076B). Data will be presented at international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number ACTRN12613000476730 (ANZCTR). PMID:24056493

  10. Serum screening with Down's syndrome markers to predict pre-eclampsia and small for gestational age: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Rachel K; Cnossen, Jeltsje S; Langejans, Marloes; Robson, Stephen C; Kleijnen, Jos; ter Riet, Gerben; Mol, Ben W; van der Post, Joris AM; Khan, Khalid S

    2008-01-01

    Background Reliable antenatal identification of pre-eclampsia and small for gestational age is crucial to judicious allocation of monitoring resources and use of preventative treatment with the prospect of improving maternal/perinatal outcome. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the accuracy of five serum analytes used in Down's serum screening for prediction of pre-eclampsia and/or small for gestational age. Methods The data sources included Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, Medion (inception to February 2007), hand searching of relevant journals, reference list checking of included articles, contact with experts. Two reviewers independently selected the articles in which the accuracy of an analyte used in Downs's serum screening before the 25th gestational week was associated with the occurrence of pre-eclampsia and/or small for gestational age without language restrictions. Two authors independently extracted data on study characteristics, quality and results. Results Five serum screening markers were evaluated. 44 studies, testing 169,637 pregnant women (4376 pre-eclampsia cases) and 86 studies, testing 382,005 women (20,339 fetal growth restriction cases) met the selection criteria. The results showed low predictive accuracy overall. For pre-eclampsia the best predictor was inhibin A>2.79MoM positive likelihood ratio 19.52 (8.33,45.79) and negative likelihood ratio 0.30 (0.13,0.68) (single study). For small for gestational age it was AFP>2.0MoM to predict birth weight < 10th centile with birth < 37 weeks positive likelihood ratio 27.96 (8.02,97.48) and negative likelihood ratio 0.78 (0.55,1.11) (single study). A potential clinical application using aspirin as a treatment is given as an example. There were methodological and reporting limitations in the included studies thus studies were heterogeneous giving pooled results with wide confidence intervals. Conclusion Down's serum screening analytes have low predictive accuracy for pre-eclampsia

  11. Usability and Feasibility of PIERS on the Move: An mHealth App for Pre-Eclampsia Triage

    PubMed Central

    Cloete, Garth; Dunsmuir, Dustin T; Payne, Beth A; von Dadelszen, Peter; Dumont, Guy A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal death and morbidity in low-resource countries due to delays in case identification and a shortage of health workers trained to manage the disorder. Pre-eclampsia Integrated Estimate of RiSk (PIERS) on the Move (PotM) is a low cost, easy-to-use, mobile health (mHealth) platform that has been created to aid health workers in making decisions around the management of hypertensive pregnant women. PotM combines two previously successful innovations into a mHealth app: the miniPIERS risk assessment model and the Phone Oximeter. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the usability of PotM (with mid-level health workers) for iteratively refining the system. Methods Development of the PotM user interface involved usability testing with target end-users in South Africa. Users were asked to complete clinical scenario tasks, speaking aloud to give feedback on the interface and then complete a questionnaire. The tool was then evaluated in a pilot clinical evaluation in Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town. Results After ethical approval and informed consent, 37 nurses and midwives evaluated the tool. During Study 1, major issues in the functionality of the touch-screen keyboard and date scroll wheels were identified (total errors n=212); during Study 2 major improvements in navigation of the app were suggested (total errors n=144). Overall, users felt the app was usable using the Computer Systems Usability Questionnaire; median (range) values for Study 1 = 2 (1-6) and Study 2 = 1 (1-7). To demonstrate feasibility, PotM was used by one research nurse for the pilot clinical study. In total, more than 500 evaluations were performed on more than 200 patients. The median (interquartile range) time to complete an evaluation was 4 min 55 sec (3 min 25 sec to 6 min 56 sec). Conclusions By including target end-users in the design and evaluation of PotM, we have developed an app that can be easily integrated into health

  12. Susceptibility allele-specific loss of miR-1324-mediated silencing of the INO80B chromatin-assembly complex gene in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Oudejans, Cees B M; Michel, Omar J; Janssen, Rob; Habets, Rob; Poutsma, Ankie; Sistermans, Erik A; Weiss, Marjan M; Incarnato, Danny; Oliviero, Salvatore; Kleiverda, Gunilla; Van Dijk, Marie; Arngrímsson, Reynir

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the elucidation of the genetics underlying multifactorial diseases such as pre-eclampsia remains complex. Given the current day availability of genome-wide linkage- and expression data pools, we applied pathway-guided genome-wide meta-analysis guided by the premise that the functional network underlying these multifactorial syndromes is under selective genetic pressure. This approach drastically reduced the genomic region of interest, i.e. 2p13 linked with pre-eclampsia in Icelandic families, from 8 679 641 bp (region with linkage) to 45 264 bp (coding exons of prioritized genes) (0.83%). Mutation screening of the candidate genes (n = 13) rapidly reduced the minimal critical region and showed the INO80B gene, encoding a novel winged helix domain (pfam14465) and part of the chromatin-remodeling complex, to be linked to pre-eclampsia. The functional defect in placental cells involved a susceptibility allele-dependent loss-of-gene silencing due to increased INO80B RNA stability as a consequence of differential binding of miR-1324 to the susceptibility allele of rs34174194. This risk allele is located at position 1 in an absolutely conserved 7-mer (UUGUCUG) in the 3-UTR of INO80B immediately downstream of a variant Pumillio Recognition Element (UGUANAAG). These data support that pre-eclampsia genes affect a conserved fundamental mechanism that evolved as a consequence of hemochorial placentation. Functionally, this involves founder-dependent, placentally expressed paralogous genes that regulate an essential trophoblast differentiation pathway but act at different entry points. PMID:25143393

  13. Effect of calcium-vitamin D supplementation on metabolic profiles in pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Asemi, Zatollah; Tabassi, Zohreh; Heidarzadeh, Zahra; Khorammian, Hassan; Sabihi, Sima-Sadat; Samimi, Mansooreh

    2012-04-01

    Increased metabolic profiles during pregnancy are associated with an increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and remain a significant medical challenge. To our knowledge, no reports are available indicating the effects of calcium-vitamin D supplementation on metabolic profiles among pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia. This study was designed to determine the effects of consumption calcium-vitamin D supplements on metabolic profiles among Iranian pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia. This randomized single-blind controlled clinical trial was performed among 49 pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia, primigravida, aged 18-35 year old who were carrying singleton pregnancy at their third trimester. Subjects were randomly assigned to consume the placebo (n = 25) or calcium-vitamin D supplements (n = 24) for 9 weeks. Calcium-vitamin D supplements were containing 500 mg carbonate calcium plus 200 IU vitamin D3. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 9 week intervention to measures of Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG) and serum lipid profiles. Consumption of calcium-vitamin D supplements resulted in decreased FPG and serum triglycerides levels as compared to the placebo (-9.1 vs. 0.5 mg dL(-1); p = 0.03, -11.7 vs. 49.9 mg dL(-1); p = 0.001, respectively). No significant differences were found comparing calcium-vitamin D supplements and the placebo in terms of their effect on serum total-, HDL-, LDL-cholesterol levels. Within-group differences in the placebo group revealed a significant increase in serum triglycerides levels (+49.9 mg dL(-1), p < 0.0001). In conclusion, consumption of calcium-vitamin D supplements for 9 weeks during pregnancy among pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia resulted in decreased FPG and serum triglycerides levels as compared to the placebo group, but could not affect serum total-, HDL-, LDL-cholesterol levels. PMID:24163957

  14. Genetic dissection of the pre-eclampsia susceptibility locus on chromosome 2q22 reveals shared novel risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew P; Brennecke, Shaun P; East, Christine E; Dyer, Thomas D; Roten, Linda T; Proffitt, J Michael; Melton, Phillip E; Fenstad, Mona H; Aalto-Viljakainen, Tia; Mäkikallio, Kaarin; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Laivuori, Hannele; Austgulen, Rigmor; Blangero, John; Moses, Eric K

    2013-07-01

    Pre-eclampsia is an idiopathic pregnancy disorder promoting morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. Delivery of the fetus is the only means to resolve severe symptoms. Women with pre-eclamptic pregnancies demonstrate increased risk for later life cardiovascular disease (CVD) and good evidence suggests these two syndromes share several risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms. To elucidate the genetic architecture of pre-eclampsia we have dissected our chromosome 2q22 susceptibility locus in an extended Australian and New Zealand familial cohort. Positional candidate genes were prioritized for exon-centric sequencing using bioinformatics, SNPing, transcriptional profiling and QTL-walking. In total, we interrogated 1598 variants from 52 genes. Four independent SNP associations satisfied our gene-centric multiple testing correction criteria: a missense LCT SNP (rs2322659, P = 0.0027), a synonymous LRP1B SNP (rs35821928, P = 0.0001), an UTR-3 RND3 SNP (rs115015150, P = 0.0024) and a missense GCA SNP (rs17783344, P = 0.0020). We replicated the LCT SNP association (P = 0.02) and observed a borderline association for the GCA SNP (P = 0.07) in an independent Australian case-control population. The LRP1B and RND3 SNP associations were not replicated in this same Australian singleton cohort. Moreover, these four SNP associations could not be replicated in two additional case-control populations from Norway and Finland. These four SNPs, however, exhibit pleiotropic effects with several quantitative CVD-related traits. Our results underscore the genetic complexity of pre-eclampsia and present novel empirical evidence of possible shared genetic mechanisms underlying both pre-eclampsia and other CVD-related risk factors. PMID:23420841

  15. A pre-eclampsia-associated Epstein-Barr virus antibody cross-reacts with placental GPR50.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Serra E; Parchim, Nicholas F; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang; Soffici, Alex R; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2016-07-01

    To characterize antibody specificities associated with pre-eclampsia (PE), bacterial displayed peptide library screening and evolution was applied to identify peptide epitopes recognized by plasma antibodies present in women with PE near the time of delivery. Pre-eclamptic women exhibited elevated IgG1 titers towards a peptide epitope KRPSCIGCK within the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1). EBNA-1 epitope antibodies cross-reacted with a similar epitope within the extracellular N-terminus of the human G protein-coupled receptor, GPR50, expressed in human placental tissue and immortalized placental trophoblast cells. We observed increased antibody binding activity to epitopes from EBNA-1 and GPR50 among women with PE (n=42) compared to healthy-outcome pregnancies (n=43) and nulligravid samples (n=21). The EBNA-1 peptide potently blocked binding of the PE-associated antibody to the GPR50 epitope (IC50=58-81pM). These results reveal the existence of molecular mimicry between EBNA-1 and placental GPR50, supporting a mechanism for IgG1 deposition in the pre-eclamptic placenta. PMID:27181993

  16. Ultrasound Microbubble-Mediated Delivery of Integrin-Linked Kinase Gene Improves Endothelial Progenitor Cells Dysfunction in Pre-Eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Kai; Yan, Ting; Luo, Qingqing; Zheng, Yanfang; Liu, Xiaoxia; Huang, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a specific vascular complication in pregnancy whose precise mechanism is still unclear. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), the precursor of endothelial cells, might be impaired in patients with PE and hold a great promise for the treatment of PE. In the present study, we analyzed the EPCs number and expression of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in PE patients. We confirmed that both EPCs number and ILK expression were diminished in PE patients. Next, we transfected EPCs with ILK gene using ultrasonic microbubble technique (UMT) for the first time, as UMT is a novel type of gene transfer technology showing promising applications in stem cells apart from EPCs. To further investigate the transfection efficiency of UMT, RT-PCR analysis and western blot were used to examine the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein level of ILK. After transfection of the ILK gene, EPCs function was tested to illustrate the role of ILK in cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and secretion. The results of the in vitro study suggested that UMT, a novel gene delivery system, could be considered a potent physical method for EPCs transfection. Moreover, the growth and angiogenetic properties of EPCs are enhanced by introducing ILK. This study may afford a new trend for EPCs transfection and gene therapy in PE. PMID:24564279

  17. Innate and adaptive immune interactions at the fetal-maternal interface in healthy human pregnancy and pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Peter; Nanan, Ralph Kay Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immune tolerance of the fetus is indispensable for a healthy pregnancy outcome. Nowhere is this immune tolerance more important than at the fetal-maternal interface - the decidua, the site of implantation, and placentation. Indeed, many lines of evidence suggest an immunological origin to the common pregnancy-related disorder, pre-eclampsia. Within the innate immune system, decidual NK cells and antigen presenting cells (including dendritic cells and macrophages) make up a large proportion of the decidual leukocyte population, and are thought to modulate vascular remodeling and trophoblast invasion. On the other hand, within the adaptive immune system, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are crucial for ensuring immune tolerance toward the semi-allogeneic fetus. Additionally, another population of CD4(+)HLA-G(+) suppressor T cells has also been identified as a potential player in the maintenance of immune tolerance. More recently, studies are beginning to unravel the potential interactions between the innate and the adaptive immune system within the decidua, that are required to maintain a healthy pregnancy. In this review, we discuss the recent advances exploring the complex crosstalk between the innate and the adaptive immune system during human pregnancy. PMID:24734032

  18. Placental hypoxia, endoplasmic reticulum stress and maternal endothelial sensitisation by sFLT1 in pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Charnock-Jones, D. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The human placenta is a multifunctional organ that grows and adapts to increasing fetal demand and fluctuations in the intrauterine environment. It is subjected to physiological and pathological changes in local oxygenation, both of which induce adaptive changes. In early pregnancy a low PO2 is the normal physiological state and this is not hypoxic—there is no perturbation of ATP/ADP ratios and, if the placenta is sampled very rapidly, little HIF1α is detected in human first-trimester placental villi. Nonetheless, HIF1α can be increased and activated by culture. However, the placenta does show evidence of stress under pathological conditions. For example, in cases of pre-eclampsia where delivery by caesarean section is necessitated for maternal well-being before 34 weeks’ gestation, placental endoplasmic reticulum stress is evident. Cases delivered ≥34 weeks are indistinguishable from normal term controls. One consequence of placental stress, whether oxidative, related to the endoplasmic reticulum or immunological, is that factors are released into the maternal circulation, which affects the endothelium, leading to the maternal syndrome. Soluble FLT1 may contribute directly to this and the most likely mechanism is direct action on the maternal endothelium. sFLT1 is able to form a heterodimer with cell surface VEGF receptors and is therefore able to have a dominant negative effect (in addition to acting as a competitive inhibitor by simply binding vascular endothelial growth factor A [VEGFA] and placental growth factor [PlGF]). This leads in vitro to the sensitisation of endothelial cells to low levels of TNFα. PMID:26228018

  19. Feasibility of nephrinuria as a screening tool for the risk of pre-eclampsia: prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Tianyue; Furuta, Itsuko; Akaishi, Rina; Kawabata, Kosuke; Chiba, Kentaro; Umazume, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Satoshi; Yamada, Takahiro; Morikawa, Mamoru; Minakami, Hisanori

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the possibility of nephrinuria as a screening tool for the risk of pre-eclampsia (PE). Design Prospective observational study. Setting A single university hospital. Changes in urinary nephrin:creatinine ratio (NCR, ng/mg) and protein:creatinine ratio (PCR, mg/mg) in pregnancy were determined. Significant proteinuria in pregnancy (SPIP) was defined as PCR>0.27. PE was diagnosed in women with both SPIP and hypertension. Participants 89 pregnant women in whom neither hypertension nor SPIP was present at enrolment, providing 31, 125 and 93 random urine samples during first, second and third trimesters, respectively. Results PE developed in 14 of the 89 women. NCR increased with increasing PCR in 14 women with PE (correlation coefficient, 0.862; p<0.0001). In contrast, NCR did not change significantly despite significant increases in PCR in 75 women with normotensive pregnancies defined as neither SPIP nor hypertension, indicating that there was little increase in nephrinuria over the physiological range of proteinuria in pregnancy. Relative risk of later development of PE among asymptomatic second and third trimester women with NCR (ng/mg) >122 (95th centile value for 75 women with normotensive pregnancies) was 5.93 (95% CI 2.59 to 13.6; 60% (6/10) vs 10% (8/79)) and 13.5 (95% CI 3.31 to 55.0; 75% (6/8) vs 5.5% (2/36)), respectively, compared with women with NCR≤122 at that time. Conclusions Nephrinuria was unlikely to increase in normal pregnancy. A certain NCR cut-off may efficiently differentiate women at higher risk of PE. PMID:27486123

  20. Placental hypoxia, endoplasmic reticulum stress and maternal endothelial sensitisation by sFLT1 in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Charnock-Jones, D Stephen

    2016-04-01

    The human placenta is a multifunctional organ that grows and adapts to increasing fetal demand and fluctuations in the intrauterine environment. It is subjected to physiological and pathological changes in local oxygenation, both of which induce adaptive changes. In early pregnancy a low PO2 is the normal physiological state and this is not hypoxic-there is no perturbation of ATP/ADP ratios and, if the placenta is sampled very rapidly, little HIF1α is detected in human first-trimester placental villi. Nonetheless, HIF1α can be increased and activated by culture. However, the placenta does show evidence of stress under pathological conditions. For example, in cases of pre-eclampsia where delivery by caesarean section is necessitated for maternal well-being before 34 weeks' gestation, placental endoplasmic reticulum stress is evident. Cases delivered ≥34 weeks are indistinguishable from normal term controls. One consequence of placental stress, whether oxidative, related to the endoplasmic reticulum or immunological, is that factors are released into the maternal circulation, which affects the endothelium, leading to the maternal syndrome. Soluble FLT1 may contribute directly to this and the most likely mechanism is direct action on the maternal endothelium. sFLT1 is able to form a heterodimer with cell surface VEGF receptors and is therefore able to have a dominant negative effect (in addition to acting as a competitive inhibitor by simply binding vascular endothelial growth factor A [VEGFA] and placental growth factor [PlGF]). This leads in vitro to the sensitisation of endothelial cells to low levels of TNFα. PMID:26228018

  1. Criteria-Based Audit of Quality of Care to Women with Severe Pre-Eclampsia and Eclampsia in a Referral Hospital in Accra, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Srofenyoh, Emmanuel K.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia are one of the major causes of maternal mortality globally. Reducing maternal morbidity and mortality demands optimizing quality of care. Criteria-based audits are a tool to define, assess and improve quality of care. The aim of this study was to determine applicability of a criteria-based audit to assess quality of care delivered to women with severe hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, and to assess adherence to protocols and quality of care provided at a regional hospital in Accra, Ghana. Methods Checklists for management of severe preeclampsia, hypertensive emergency and eclampsia were developed in an audit cycle based on nine existing key clinical care protocols. Fifty cases were audited to assess quality of care, defined as adherence to protocols. Analysis was stratified for complicated cases, defined as (imminent) eclampsia, perinatal mortality and/or one or more WHO maternal near miss C-criteria. Results Mean adherence to the nine protocols ranged from 15–85%. Protocols for ‘plan for delivery’ and ‘magnesium sulphate administration’ were best adhered to (85%), followed by adherence to protocols for ‘eclampsia’ (64%), ‘severe pre-eclampsia at admission’ (60%), ‘severe pre-eclampsia ward follow-up’ (53%) and ‘hypertensive emergency’ (53%). Protocols for monitoring were least adhered to (15%). No difference was observed for severe disease. Increased awareness, protocol-based training of staff, and clear task assignment were identified as contributors to better adherence. Conclusion A criteria-based audit is an effective tool to determine quality of care, identify gaps in standard of care, and allow for monitoring and evaluation in a health facility, ultimately resulting in improved quality of care provided and reduced maternal morbidity and mortality. In our audit, good adherence was observed for plan for delivery and treatment with magnesium sulphate. Substandard adherence to a number of

  2. Health System Barriers to Access and Use of Magnesium Sulfate for Women with Severe Pre-Eclampsia and Eclampsia in Pakistan: Evidence for Policy and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bigdeli, Maryam; Zafar, Shamsa; Assad, Hafeez; Ghaffar, Adbul

    2013-01-01

    Severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia are rare but serious complications of pregnancy that threaten the lives of mothers during childbirth. Evidence supports the use of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) as the first line treatment option for severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. Eclampsia is the third major cause of maternal mortality in Pakistan. As in many other Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMIC), it is suspected that MgSO4 is critically under-utilized in the country. There is however a lack of information on context-specific health system barriers that prevent optimal use of this life-saving medicine in Pakistan. Combining quantitative and qualitative methods, namely policy document review, key informant interviews, focus group discussions and direct observation at health facility, we explored context-specific health system barriers and enablers that affect access and use of MgSO4 for severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia in Pakistan. Our study finds that while international recommendations on MgSO4 have been adequately translated in national policies in Pakistan, the gap remains in implementation of national policies into practice. Barriers to access to and effective use of MgSO4 occur at health facility level where the medicine was not available and health staff was reluctant to use it. Low price of the medicine and the small market related to its narrow indications acted as disincentives for effective marketing. Results of our survey were further discussed in a multi-stakeholder round-table meeting and an action plan for increasing access to this life-saving medicine was identified. PMID:23555626

  3. Antenatal blood pressure for prediction of pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, and small for gestational age babies: development and validation in two general population cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Silverwood, Richard J; de Stavola, Bianca L; Inskip, Hazel; Cooper, Cyrus; Godfrey, Keith M; Crozier, Sarah; Fraser, Abigail; Nelson, Scott M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Tilling, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Study question Can routine antenatal blood pressure measurements between 20 and 36 weeks’ gestation contribute to the prediction of pre-eclampsia and its associated adverse outcomes? Methods This study used repeated antenatal measurements of blood pressure from 12 996 women in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) to develop prediction models and validated these in 3005 women from the Southampton Women’s Survey (SWS). A model based on maternal early pregnancy characteristics only (BMI, height, age, parity, smoking, existing and previous gestational hypertension and diabetes, and ethnicity) plus initial mean arterial pressure was compared with a model additionally including current mean arterial pressure, a model including the deviation of current mean arterial pressure from a stratified normogram, and a model including both at different gestational ages from 20-36 weeks. Study answer and limitations The addition of blood pressure measurements from 28 weeks onwards improved prediction models compared with use of early pregnancy risk factors alone, but they contributed little to the prediction of preterm birth or small for gestational age. Though multiple imputation of missing data was used to increase the sample size and minimise selection bias, the validation sample might have been slightly underpowered as the number of cases of pre-eclampsia was just below the recommended 100. Several risk factors were self reported, potentially introducing measurement error, but this reflects how information would be obtained in clinical practice. What this study adds The addition of routinely collected blood pressure measurements from 28 weeks onwards improves predictive models for pre-eclampsia based on blood pressure in early pregnancy and other characteristics, facilitating a reduction in scheduled antenatal care. Funding, competing interests, data sharing UK Wellcome Trust, US National Institutes of Health, and UK Medical Research Council. Other

  4. Differentiation of ICOS+ and ICOS- recent thymic emigrant regulatory T cells (RTE T regs) during normal pregnancy, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wagner, M I; Jöst, M; Spratte, J; Schaier, M; Mahnke, K; Meuer, S; Zeier, M; Steinborn, A

    2016-01-01

    Two different subsets of naturally occurring regulatory T cells (nTregs), defined by their expression of the inducible co-stimulatory (ICOS) molecule, are produced by the human thymus. To examine the differentiation of ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) CD45RA(+) CD31(+) recent thymic emigrant (RTE) T regs during normal pregnancy and in the presence of pre-eclampsia or haemolysis elevated liver enzymes low platelet (HELLP)-syndrome, we used six-colour flow cytometric analysis to determine the changes in the composition of the ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) T reg pools with CD45RA(+) CD31(+) RTE T regs, CD45RA(+) CD31(-) mature naive (MN) T regs, CD45RA(-) CD31(+) and CD45RA(-) CD31(-) memory Tregs. With the beginning of pregnancy until term, we observed a strong differentiation of both ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) CD45RA(+) CD31(+) RTE, but not CD45RA(+) CD31(-) MN T regs, into CD45RA(-) CD31(-) memory T regs. At the end of pregnancy, the onset of spontaneous term labour was associated with a significant breakdown of ICOS(+) CD45RA(-) CD31(-) memory T regs. However, in the presence of pre-eclampsia, there was a significantly increased differentiation of ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) CD45RA(+) CD31(+) RTE T regs into CD45RA(-) CD31(+) memory T regs, wherein the lacking differentiation into CD45RA(-) CD31(-) memory T regs was partially replaced by the increased differentiation of ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) CD45RA(+) CD31(-) MN Tregs into CD45RA(-) CD31(-) memory T regs. In patients with HELLP syndrome, this alternatively increased differentiation of CD45RA(-) CD31(-) MN T regs seemed to be exaggerated, and presumably restored the suppressive activity of magnetically isolated ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) T regs, which were shown to be significantly less suppressive in pre-eclampsia patients, but not in HELLP syndrome patients. Hence, our findings propose that the regular differentiation of both ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) CD45RA(+) CD31(+) RTE T regs ensures a healthy pregnancy course, while their disturbed differentiation is

  5. Association Between Gene Polymorphisms on Chromosome 1 and Susceptibility to Pre-Eclampsia: An Updated Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guixin; Zhao, Jinheng; Yi, Jianping; Luan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This meta-analysis enabled us to obtain a precise estimation of the association between gene polymorphisms on chromosome 1 (MTHFR, AGT, F5, IL-10, LEPR) and the susceptibility to pre-eclampsia (PE) in order to reach a uniform conclusion. MATERIAL AND METHODS Web of Science, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochran Library (CENTRAL), and Chinese databases (Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure-CNKI and Wan Fang) were electronically searched to select relevant studies for this meta-analysis. We selected 95 case-control studies investigating 5 genes (MTHFR, AGT, F5, IL-10, and LEPR) with 8 SNPs. Odds ratios (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used for estimating the association. RESULTS A total of 16 646 PE patients and 28 901 normal-pregnancy patients were included in this meta-analysis. The overall results suggested that rs1801133 of MTHFR (OR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.05-1.13) and rs6025 of F5 (OR=1.53, 95%CI: 1.07-2.20) are significantly associated with PE, whereas rs1801131 of MTHFR, rs699 and rs4762 of AGT, rs1800896 and rs1800871 of IL-10, and rs1137101 of LEPR have no significant association with PE. Subgroup analysis by ethnicity revealed that, except for MTHFR rs1801133 and F5 rs6025 in Caucasians, which were significantly associated with an increased risk of PE, none of these SNPs were significantly associated with PE. As suggested by a symmetric funnel plot in conjunction with the Egger's test, there was no significant publication bias in MTHFR rs1801133 (P=0.318) and rs1801131 (P=0.204), F5 rs6025 (P=0.511), LEPR rs1137101 (P=0.511), AGT rs4762 (P=0.215) and rs699 (P=0.482), IL-10 rs1800871 (P=0.955), and rs1800896 (P=0.144). CONCLUSIONS This meta-analysis provides evidence that MTHFR rs1801133 and F5 rs6025 are associated with an increased risk of PE, especially in Caucasians. However, we do not have sufficient evidence to conclude there is a significant association between other gene polymorphisms and PE. PMID:27348238

  6. Overlap of proteomics biomarkers between women with pre-eclampsia and PCOS: a systematic review and biomarker database integration

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Gulafshana Hafeez; Galazis, Nicolas; Docheva, Nikolina; Layfield, Robert; Atiomo, William

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do any proteomic biomarkers previously identified for pre-eclampsia (PE) overlap with those identified in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). SUMMARY ANSWER Five previously identified proteomic biomarkers were found to be common in women with PE and PCOS when compared with controls. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Various studies have indicated an association between PCOS and PE; however, the pathophysiological mechanisms supporting this association are not known. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A systematic review and update of our PCOS proteomic biomarker database was performed, along with a parallel review of PE biomarkers. The study included papers from 1980 to December 2013. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS In all the studies analysed, there were a total of 1423 patients and controls. The number of proteomic biomarkers that were catalogued for PE was 192. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Five proteomic biomarkers were shown to be differentially expressed in women with PE and PCOS when compared with controls: transferrin, fibrinogen α, β and γ chain variants, kininogen-1, annexin 2 and peroxiredoxin 2. In PE, the biomarkers were identified in serum, plasma and placenta and in PCOS, the biomarkers were identified in serum, follicular fluid, and ovarian and omental biopsies. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION The techniques employed to detect proteomics have limited ability in identifying proteins that are of low abundance, some of which may have a diagnostic potential. The sample sizes and number of biomarkers identified from these studies do not exclude the risk of false positives, a limitation of all biomarker studies. The biomarkers common to PE and PCOS were identified from proteomic analyses of different tissues. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS This data amalgamation of the proteomic studies in PE and in PCOS, for the first time, discovered a panel of five biomarkers for PE which are common to women with PCOS, including transferrin

  7. Association Between Gene Polymorphisms on Chromosome 1 and Susceptibility to Pre-Eclampsia: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guixin; Zhao, Jinheng; Yi, Jianping; Luan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background This meta-analysis enabled us to obtain a precise estimation of the association between gene polymorphisms on chromosome 1 (MTHFR, AGT, F5, IL-10, LEPR) and the susceptibility to pre-eclampsia (PE) in order to reach a uniform conclusion. Material/Methods Web of Science, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochran Library (CENTRAL), and Chinese databases (Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure-CNKI and Wan Fang) were electronically searched to select relevant studies for this meta-analysis. We selected 95 case-control studies investigating 5 genes (MTHFR, AGT, F5, IL-10, and LEPR) with 8 SNPs. Odds ratios (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used for estimating the association. Results A total of 16 646 PE patients and 28 901 normal-pregnancy patients were included in this meta-analysis. The overall results suggested that rs1801133 of MTHFR (OR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.05–1.13) and rs6025 of F5 (OR=1.53, 95%CI: 1.07–2.20) are significantly associated with PE, whereas rs1801131 of MTHFR, rs699 and rs4762 of AGT, rs1800896 and rs1800871 of IL-10, and rs1137101 of LEPR have no significant association with PE. Subgroup analysis by ethnicity revealed that, except for MTHFR rs1801133 and F5 rs6025 in Caucasians, which were significantly associated with an increased risk of PE, none of these SNPs were significantly associated with PE. As suggested by a symmetric funnel plot in conjunction with the Egger’s test, there was no significant publication bias in MTHFR rs1801133 (P=0.318) and rs1801131 (P=0.204), F5 rs6025 (P=0.511), LEPR rs1137101 (P=0.511), AGT rs4762 (P=0.215) and rs699 (P=0.482), IL-10 rs1800871 (P=0.955), and rs1800896 (P=0.144). Conclusions This meta-analysis provides evidence that MTHFR rs1801133 and F5 rs6025 are associated with an increased risk of PE, especially in Caucasians. However, we do not have sufficient evidence to conclude there is a significant association between other gene polymorphisms and PE. PMID:27348238

  8. Predicting the risk of pre-eclampsia between 11 and 13 weeks gestation by combining maternal characteristics and serum analytes, PAPP-A and free β-hCG

    PubMed Central

    GOETZINGER, Katherine R.; SINGLA, Ashima; GERKOWICZ, Sabrina; DICKE, Jeffrey M.; GRAY, Diana L.; ODIBO, Anthony O.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine if a simplified model for predicting pre-eclampsia can be developed by combining first trimester serum analytes, PAPP-A and free β-hCG, and maternal characteristics. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients seen for first-trimester aneuploidy screening from 2003–2009. The 5th, 10th, 90th and 95th percentiles for the analyte-MoMs for our population were determined and evaluated for association with pre-eclampsia. Univariate and backward stepwise logistic regression analyses were performed and the area under the ROC curves (AUC) used to determine the best models for predicting pre-eclampsia. Results Among 4,020 women meeting the inclusion criteria, outcome data was available for 3,716 (93%). There were 293 cases of pre-eclampsia. The final model identified a history of pre-gestational diabetes (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.7–3.9), chronic hypertension (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.7–3.9), maternal BMI >25 (aOR 2.5, 95% CI 1.9–3.4), African American race (aOR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3–2.6), and PAPP-A MoM <10th percentile (aOR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.4) to be significant predictors of pre-eclampsia. (AUC= 0.70, 95% CI 0.65–0.72) Conclusion Low first-trimester PAPP-A levels are associated with the development of pre-eclampsia; however, the model was only modestly efficient in its predictive ability. PMID:20936638

  9. The Effect of Multi mineral-Vitamin D Supplementation on Pregnancy Outcomes in Pregnant Women at Risk for Pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Asemi, Zatollah; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to determine the favorable effects of multi mineral-Vitamin D supplementation on pregnancy outcomes among women at risk for pre-eclampsia. Methods: This randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted among 46 women at risk for pre-eclampsia at 27 weeks’ gestation with positive roll-over test. Pregnant women were randomly assigned to receive either the multi mineral-Vitamin D supplements (n = 23) or the placebo (n = 23) for 9-week. Multi mineral-Vitamin D supplements were containing 800 mg calcium, 200 mg magnesium, 8 mg zinc, and 400 IU Vitamin D3. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 9-week intervention to measure related factors. Newborn's outcomes were determined. Results: Although no significant difference was seen in newborn's weight and head circumference between the two groups, mean newborns’ length (51.3 ± 1.7 vs. 50.3 ± 1.2 cm, P = 0.03) was significantly higher in multi mineral-Vitamin D group than that in the placebo group. Compared to the placebo, consumption of multi mineral-Vitamin D supplements resulted in increased levels of serum calcium (+0.19 vs. −0.08 mg/dL, P = 0.03), magnesium (+0.15 vs. −0.08 mg/dL, P = 0.03), zinc (+8.25 vs. −21.38 mg/dL, P = 0.001) and Vitamin D (+3.79 vs. −1.37 ng/ml, P = 0.01). In addition, taking multi mineral-Vitamin D supplements favorably influenced systolic blood pressure (SBP) (−1.08 vs. 6.08 mmHg, P = 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (−0.44 vs. 3.05 mmHg, P = 0.02). Conclusions: Multi mineral-Vitamin D supplementation for 9-week in pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia resulted in increased newborn's length, increased circulating levels of maternal serum calcium, magnesium, zinc and Vitamin D, and led to decreased maternal SBP and DBP. PMID:26288706

  10. Double blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of esomeprazole to treat early onset pre-eclampsia (PIE Trial): a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Cluver, Catherine A; Walker, Susan P; Mol, Ben W; Theron, Gerard B; Hall, David R; Hiscock, Richard; Hannan, N; Tong, S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pre-eclampsia is a major complication of pregnancy, globally responsible for 60 000 maternal deaths per year, and far greater numbers of fetal losses. There is no definitive treatment other than delivery. A drug that can quench the disease process could be useful to treat early onset pre-eclampsia, as it could allow pregnancies to safely continue to a gestation where fetal outcomes are significantly improved. We have generated preclinical data to show esomeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor used for gastric reflux, has potent biological effects that makes it a worthwhile therapeutic candidate. Esomeprazole potently decreases soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) and soluble endoglin secretion from placenta and endothelial cells, and has biological actions to mitigate endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Methods and analysis We propose undertaking a phase II, double blind, randomised controlled clinical trial to examine whether administering 40 mg esomeprazole daily may prolong gestation in women with early onset pre-eclampsia. We will recruit 120 women (gestational age of 26+0 to 31+6 weeks) who will be randomised to receive either esomeprazole or an identical placebo. The primary outcome will be the number of days from randomisation to delivery. Secondary outcomes include maternal, fetal and neonatal composite and individual outcomes. Maternal outcomes include maternal death, eclampsia, pulmonary oedema, severe renal impairment, cerebral vascular events and liver haematoma or rupture. Neonatal outcomes include neonatal death within 6 weeks after the due date, intraventricular haemorrhage, necrotising enterocolitis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. We will examine whether esomeprazole can decrease serum sFlt-1 and soluble endoglin levels and we will record the safety of esomeprazole in these pregnancies. Ethics and dissemination This study has ethical approval (Protocol V.2.4, M14/09/038, Federal Wide assurance Number 00001372, IRB

  11. Genome-wide association study of pre-eclampsia detects novel maternal single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy-number variants in subsets of the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study cohort.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linlu; Bracken, Michael B; DeWan, Andrew T

    2013-07-01

    A genome-wide association study was undertaken to identify maternal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy-number variants (CNVs) associated with pre-eclampsia. Case-control analysis was performed on 1070 Afro-Caribbean (n = 21 cases and 1049 controls) and 723 Hispanic (n = 62 cases and 661 controls) mothers and 1257 mothers of European ancestry (n = 50 cases and 1207 controls) from the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study. European ancestry subjects were genotyped on Illumina Human610-Quad and Afro-Caribbean and Hispanic subjects were genotyped on Illumina Human1M-Duo BeadChip microarrays. Genome-wide SNP data were analyzed using PLINK. CNVs were called using three detection algorithms (GNOSIS, PennCNV, and QuantiSNP), merged using CNVision, and then screened using stringent criteria. SNP and CNV findings were compared to those of the Study of Pregnancy Hypertension in Iowa (SOPHIA), an independent pre-eclampsia case-control dataset of Caucasian mothers (n = 177 cases and 116 controls). A list of top SNPs were identified for each of the HAPO ethnic groups, but none reached Bonferroni-corrected significance. Novel candidate CNVs showing enrichment among pre-eclampsia cases were also identified in each of the three ethnic groups. Several variants were suggestively replicated in SOPHIA. The discovered SNPs and copy-number variable regions present interesting candidate genetic variants for pre-eclampsia that warrant further replication and investigation. PMID:23551011

  12. Acute presentation of gestational diabetes insipidus with pre-eclampsia complicated by cerebral vasoconstriction: a case report and review of the published work.

    PubMed

    Mor, Amir; Fuchs, Yael; Zafra, Kathleen; Haberman, Shoshana; Tal, Reshef

    2015-08-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus (GDI) is a rare, self-limited complication of pregnancy. As it is related to excess placental vasopressinase enzyme activity, which is metabolized in the liver, GDI is more common in pregnancies complicated by conditions associated with liver dysfunction. We present a case of a 41-year-old woman at 38 weeks' gestation who presented with pre-eclampsia with severe features, including impaired liver function and renal insufficiency. Following cesarean section she was diagnosed with GDI, which was further complicated by cerebral vasoconstriction as demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography. This case raises the possibility that cerebral vasoconstriction may be related to the cause of GDI. A high index of suspicion of GDI should be maintained in patients who present with typical signs and symptoms, especially in the setting of pregnancy complications associated with liver dysfunction. PMID:25832854

  13. Fish Oil Supplementation does not Reduce Risks of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension, or Pre-Eclampsia: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing; Ji, Xinran; Zhang, Lei; Hou, Zhaohui; Li, Chundong; Tong, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background The effects of gestational supplementation with fish oil on risks for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), and pre-eclampsia (PE) have not been confirmed. In this study, a meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of fish oil supplementation on these gestational complications. Material/Methods Randomized controlled human trials that investigated the effects of fish oil supplementation in pregnant women were identified by a systematic search of Medline, Embase, and Cochrane’s Library, and references of related reviews and studies up to December 2014. Relative risks (RRs) for GDM, PIH, and PE were the outcomes of interest. Fixed-effects or random-effects models were applied according to the heterogeneity. Results Thirteen comparisons from 11 published articles, including more than 5000 participants, were included. The results showed that fish oil supplementation was not associated with reduced risks for GDM (RR=1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.85–1.32, p=0.60), PIH (RR=1.03, 95% CI: 0.89–1.20, p=0.66), or PE (RR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.74–1.16, p=0.51). No statistically significant heterogeneity was detected for the comparison of each outcome. The effects of fish oil on these gestational complications were consistent between women with low-risk and high-risk pregnancies. Conclusions Gestational supplementation with fish oil during the second or third trimester of pregnancy is not associated with reduced risks for GDM, PIH, or PE. Other possible benefits of fish oil supplementation during pregnancy warrant further evaluation. PMID:26256041

  14. A Label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring Workflow Identifies a Subset of Pregnancy Specific Glycoproteins as Potential Predictive Markers of Early-onset Pre-eclampsia*

    PubMed Central

    Blankley, Richard T.; Fisher, Christal; Westwood, Melissa; North, Robyn; Baker, Philip N.; Walker, Michael J.; Williamson, Andrew; Whetton, Anthony D.; Lin, Wanchang; McCowan, Lesley; Roberts, Claire T.; Cooper, Garth J. S.; Unwin, Richard D.; Myers, Jenny E.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a serious complication of pregnancy with potentially life threatening consequences for both mother and baby. Presently there is no test with the required performance to predict which healthy first-time mothers will go on to develop PE. The high specificity, sensitivity, and multiplexed nature of selected reaction monitoring holds great potential as a tool for the verification and validation of putative candidate biomarkersfor disease states. Realization of this potential involves establishing a high throughput, cost effective, reproducible sample preparation workflow. We have developed a semi-automated HPLC-based sample preparation workflow before a label-free selected reaction monitoring approach. This workflow has been applied to the search for novel predictive biomarkers for PE. To discover novel candidate biomarkers for PE, we used isobaric tagging to identify several potential biomarker proteins in plasma obtained at 15 weeks gestation from nulliparous women who later developed PE compared with pregnant women who remained healthy. Such a study generates a number of “candidate” biomarkers that require further testing in larger patient cohorts. As proof-of-principle, two of these proteins were taken forward for verification in a 100 women (58 PE, 42 controls) using label-free SRM. We obtained reproducible protein quantitation across the 100 samples and demonstrated significant changes in protein levels, even with as little as 20% change in protein concentration. The SRM data correlated with a commercial ELISA, suggesting that this is a robust workflow suitable for rapid, affordable, label-free verification of which candidate biomarkers should be taken forward for thorough investigation. A subset of pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) had value as novel predictive markers for PE. PMID:23897580

  15. The Effect of High Dose Folic Acid throughout Pregnancy on Homocysteine (Hcy) Concentration and Pre-Eclampsia: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sayyah-Melli, Manizheh; Ghorbanihaghjo, Amir; Alizadeh, Mahasti; Kazemi-Shishvan, Maryamalsadat; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Bidadi, Sanam

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a pregnancy-related multi-systemic hypertensive disorder and affects at least 5% of pregnancies. This randomized clinical trial aimed at assessing the effect of low doses and high doses of folic acid on homocysteine (Hcy) levels, blood pressure, urea, creatinine and neonatal outcome. A randomized clinical trial was done at Alzahra Teaching Hospital, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences from April 2008 to March 2013. Four-hundred and sixty nulliparous pregnant women were randomly assigned into two groups. Group 1 (n = 230) received 0.5 mg of folic acid and group 2 (n = 230) received 5 mg of folic acid per daily. They were followed until delivery. Blood pressure and laboratory changes, including plasma Hcy levels, were measured and compared between the groups. Homocysteine concentrations were significantly higher at the time of delivery in group 1 (13.17±3.89 μmol/l) than in group 2 (10.31±3.54, μmol/l) (p<0.001). No statistically significant differences were observed in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.84 and 0.15, respectively). Birth weight was significantly higher in group 2 (p = 0.031) and early abortion was significantly higher in group 1 than group 2 (p = 0.001). This study has provided evidence that a high dosage of folic acid supplements throughout pregnancy reduces Hcy concentrations at the time of delivery. Trial Registration: Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials IRCT201402175283N9 PMID:27166794

  16. The PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitory pathway is altered in pre-eclampsia and regulates T cell responses in pre-eclamptic rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mei; Zhang, Yonghong; Liu, Zhaozhao; Sun, Guoqiang; Mor, Gil; Liao, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    The programmed cell death-1(PD-1)/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway is critical to immune homeostasis by promoting regulatory T (Treg) development and inhibiting effector T (such as Th17) cell responses. However, the association between the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway and the Treg/Th17 imbalance has not been fully investigated in pre-eclampsia (PE). In this study, we observed an inverse correlation between the percentages of Treg and Th17 cells, and the expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 on the two subsets also changed in PE compared with normal pregnancy. We further explored their relationship in vivo using the L-NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) induced PE-like rat models, also characterized by Treg/Th17 imbalance. Administration of PD-L1-Fc protein provides a protective effects on the pre-eclamptic models, both to the mother and the fetuses, by reversing Treg/Th17 imbalance through inhibiting PI3K/AKT/m-TOR signaling and enhancing PTEN expression. In addition, we also observed a protective effect of PD-L1-Fc on the placenta by reversing placental damages. These results suggested that altered PD-1/PD-L1 pathway contributed to Treg/Th17 imbalance in PE. Treatment with PD-L1-Fc posed protective effects on pre-eclamptic models, indicating that the use of PD-L1-Fc might be a potential therapeutic target in PE treatment. PMID:27277012

  17. The PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitory pathway is altered in pre-eclampsia and regulates T cell responses in pre-eclamptic rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mei; Zhang, Yonghong; Liu, Zhaozhao; Sun, Guoqiang; Mor, Gil; Liao, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    The programmed cell death-1(PD-1)/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway is critical to immune homeostasis by promoting regulatory T (Treg) development and inhibiting effector T (such as Th17) cell responses. However, the association between the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway and the Treg/Th17 imbalance has not been fully investigated in pre-eclampsia (PE). In this study, we observed an inverse correlation between the percentages of Treg and Th17 cells, and the expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 on the two subsets also changed in PE compared with normal pregnancy. We further explored their relationship in vivo using the L-NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) induced PE-like rat models, also characterized by Treg/Th17 imbalance. Administration of PD-L1-Fc protein provides a protective effects on the pre-eclamptic models, both to the mother and the fetuses, by reversing Treg/Th17 imbalance through inhibiting PI3K/AKT/m-TOR signaling and enhancing PTEN expression. In addition, we also observed a protective effect of PD-L1-Fc on the placenta by reversing placental damages. These results suggested that altered PD-1/PD-L1 pathway contributed to Treg/Th17 imbalance in PE. Treatment with PD-L1-Fc posed protective effects on pre-eclamptic models, indicating that the use of PD-L1-Fc might be a potential therapeutic target in PE treatment. PMID:27277012

  18. In-Vitro Study of the Effect of Anti-Hypertensive Drugs on Placental Hormones and Angiogenic Proteins Synthesis in Pre-Eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Gangooly, Subrata; Jauniaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Antihypertensive drugs lower the maternal blood pressure in pre-eclampsia (PE) by direct or central vasodilatory mechanisms but little is known about the direct effects of these drugs on placental functions. Objective The aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of labetolol, hydralazine, α-methyldopa and pravastatin on the synthesis of placental hormonal and angiogenic proteins know to be altered in PE. Design Placental villous explants from late onset PE (n = 3) and normotensive controls (n = 6) were cultured for 3 days at 10 and 20% oxygen (O2) with variable doses anti-hypertensive drugs. The levels of activin A, inhibin A, human Chorionic Gonadotrophin (hCG), soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and soluble endoglin (sEng) were measured in explant culture media on day 1, 2 and 3 using standard immunoassays. Data at day 1 and day 3 were compared. Results Spontaneous secretion of sEndoglin and sFlt-1 were higher (p<0.05) in villous explants from PE pregnancies compared to controls. There was a significant time dependant decrease in the secretion of sFlt-1 and sEndoglin in PE cases, which was seen only for sFlt-1 in controls. In both PE cases and controls the placental protein secretions were not affected by varying doses of anti-hypertensive drugs or the different O2 concentration cultures, except for Activin, A which was significantly (p<0.05) higher in controls at 10% O2. Interpretation Our findings suggest that the changes previously observed in maternal serum hormones and angiogenic proteins level after anti-hypertensive treatment in PE could be due to a systemic effect of the drugs on maternal blood pressure and circulation rather than a direct effect of these drugs on placental biosynthesis and/or secretion. PMID:25251016

  19. Analysis of Polymorphisms in Interleukin-10, Interleukin-6, and Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist in Mexican-Mestizo Women with Pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Valencia Villalvazo, Elith Yazmin; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Romero Arauz, Juan Fernando; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Coronel, Agustín; Carlos Falcón, Juan; Hernández Rivera, Jaime; Ibarra, Roberto; Polanco Reyes, Lucila

    2012-01-01

    Due to the fact that studies seeking associations of polymorphisms in regulatory regions of cytokine genes with pre-eclampsia (PE) have not always been consistent in different population analyses, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible association between rs1800896 of interleukin-10 (IL-10), rs1800795 of interleukin-6 (IL-6), and the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in intron 2 of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), as well as gene–gene interactions between these three polymorphisms with the presence of PE in Mexican-Mestizo women and one Amerindian population from México (Maya). A case–control study was performed where 411 pre-eclamptic cases and 613 controls were genotyped. For the rs1800896 of IL-10 and rs1800795 of IL-6, we used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allelic discrimination and for the VNTR of IL-1Ra, PCR. Allele frequency differences were assessed by Chi-squared test; logistic regression was used to test for associations; a gene–gene interaction was conducted. Genotypic and allelic distribution of the polymorphisms was similar in our population. The estimated of the gene–gene interaction between the polymorphisms did not differ significantly. However, we observed important differences in the distribution of the alleles and genotypes of the three polymorphisms analyzed between Mestiza-Mexicanas and Maya-Mestizo women. In conclusion, we did not find an association between polymorphisms in IL-10, IL-6, and IL-1Ra and PE in Mexican-Mestizo and Maya-Mestizo women. To our knowledge, this is the first time that these three polymorphisms were analyzed together with gene–gene interaction in women with PE. PMID:23013217

  20. Systematic Review of Micro-RNA Expression in Pre-Eclampsia Identifies a Number of Common Pathways Associated with the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Adam M.; Currie, Gemma; Delles, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a complex, multi-systemic condition of pregnancy which greatly impacts maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. MicroRNAs (miRs) are differentially expressed in PE and may be important in helping to understand the condition and its pathogenesis. Methods Case-control studies investigating expression of miRs in PE were collected through a systematic literature search. Data was extracted and compared from 58 studies to identify the most promising miRs associated with PE pathogenesis and identify areas of methodology which could account for often conflicting results. Results Some of the most frequently differentially expressed miRs in PE include miR-210, miR-223 and miR-126/126* which associate strongly with the etiological domains of hypoxia, immunology and angiogenesis. Members of the miR-515 family belonging to the imprinted chromosome 19 miR cluster with putative roles in trophoblast invasion were also found to be differentially expressed. Certain miRs appear to associate with more severe forms of PE such as miR-210 and the immune-related miR-181a and miR-15 families. Patterns of miR expression may help pinpoint key pathways (e.g. IL-6/miR-223/STAT3) and aid in untangling the heterogeneous nature of PE. The detectable presence of many PE-associated miRs in antenatal circulatory samples suggests their usefulness as predictive biomarkers. Further progress in ascertaining the clinical value of miRs and in understanding how they might contribute to pathogenesis is predicated upon resolving current methodological challenges in studies. These include differences in diagnostic criteria, cohort characteristics, sampling technique, RNA isolation and platform-dependent variation in miR profiling. Conclusion Reviewing studies of PE-associated miRs has revealed their potential as informants of underlying target genes and pathways relating to PE pathogenesis. However, the incongruity in results across current studies hampers their

  1. Translating research into maternal health care policy: a qualitative case study of the use of evidence in policies for the treatment of eclampsia and pre-eclampsia in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Karen; Lewin, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Background Few empirical studies of research utilisation have been conducted in low and middle income countries. This paper explores how research information, in particular findings from randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews, informed policy making and clinical guideline development for the use of magnesium sulphate in the treatment of eclampsia and pre-eclampsia in South Africa. Methods A qualitative case-study approach was used to examine the policy process. This included a literature review, a policy document review, a timeline of key events and the collection and analysis of 15 interviews with policy makers and academic clinicians involved in these policy processes and sampled using a purposive approach. The data was analysed thematically and explored theoretically through the literature on agenda setting and the policy making process. Results Prior to 1994 there was no national maternal care policy in South Africa. Consequently each tertiary level institution developed its own care guidelines and these recommended a range of approaches to the management of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. The subsequent emergence of new national policies for maternal care, including for the treatment of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, was informed by evidence from randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews. This outcome was influenced by a number of factors. The change to a democratic government in the mid 1990s, and the health reforms that followed, created opportunities for maternal health care policy development. The new government was open to academic involvement in policy making and recruited academics from local networks into key policy making positions in the National Department of Health. The local academic obstetric network, which placed high value on evidence-based practice, brought these values into the policy process and was also linked strongly to international evidence based medicine networks. Within this context of openness to policy development

  2. A Risk Prediction Model for the Assessment and Triage of Women with Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy in Low-Resourced Settings: The miniPIERS (Pre-eclampsia Integrated Estimate of RiSk) Multi-country Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Beth A.; Hutcheon, Jennifer A.; Ansermino, J. Mark; Hall, David R.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Bhutta, Shereen Z.; Biryabarema, Christine; Grobman, William A.; Groen, Henk; Li, Jing; Magee, Laura A.; Merialdi, Mario; Nakimuli, Annettee; Qu, Ziguang; Sikandar, Rozina; Sass, Nelson; Sawchuck, Diane; Steyn, D. Wilhelm; Widmer, Mariana; Zhou, Jian; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia/eclampsia are leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity, particularly in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs). We developed the miniPIERS risk prediction model to provide a simple, evidence-based tool to identify pregnant women in LMICs at increased risk of death or major hypertensive-related complications. Methods and Findings From 1 July 2008 to 31 March 2012, in five LMICs, data were collected prospectively on 2,081 women with any hypertensive disorder of pregnancy admitted to a participating centre. Candidate predictors collected within 24 hours of admission were entered into a step-wise backward elimination logistic regression model to predict a composite adverse maternal outcome within 48 hours of admission. Model internal validation was accomplished by bootstrapping and external validation was completed using data from 1,300 women in the Pre-eclampsia Integrated Estimate of RiSk (fullPIERS) dataset. Predictive performance was assessed for calibration, discrimination, and stratification capacity. The final miniPIERS model included: parity (nulliparous versus multiparous); gestational age on admission; headache/visual disturbances; chest pain/dyspnoea; vaginal bleeding with abdominal pain; systolic blood pressure; and dipstick proteinuria. The miniPIERS model was well-calibrated and had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC ROC) of 0.768 (95% CI 0.735–0.801) with an average optimism of 0.037. External validation AUC ROC was 0.713 (95% CI 0.658–0.768). A predicted probability ≥25% to define a positive test classified women with 85.5% accuracy. Limitations of this study include the composite outcome and the broad inclusion criteria of any hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. This broad approach was used to optimize model generalizability. Conclusions The miniPIERS model shows reasonable ability to identify women at increased risk of adverse maternal outcomes associated with the hypertensive

  3. Effectiveness and safety of 1 vs 4 h blood pressure profile with clinical and laboratory assessment for the exclusion of gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia: a retrospective study in a university affiliated maternity hospital

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Elizabeth Anne; Carins, Thomas A; Hannigan, Yolanda; Bardien, Nadia; Shub, Alexis; Walker, Susan P

    2015-01-01

    Objective We asked whether 60 compared with 240 min observation is sufficiently informative and safe for pregnancy day assessment (PDAC) of suspected pre-eclampsia (PE). Design A retrospective study of 209 pregnant women (475 PDAC assessments, 6 months) with routinely collected blood pressure (BP), symptom and laboratory information. We proposed a 60 min screening algorithm comprising: absence of symptoms, normal laboratory parameters and ≤1high-BP reading (systolic blood pressure, SBP 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure, DBP 90 mm Hg or higher). We also evaluated two less inclusive screening algorithms. We determined short-term outcomes (within 4 h): severe hypertension, proteinuric hypertension and pregnancy-induced hypertension, as well as long-term outcome: PE-related diagnoses up to the early puerperium. We assessed performance of alternate screening algorithms performance using 2×2 tables. Results 1 in 3 women met all screen negative criteria at 1 h. Their risk of hypertension requiring treatment in the next 3 h was 1.8% and of failing to diagnose proteinuric hypertensive PE at 4 h was 5.1%. If BP triggers were 5 mm Hg lower, 1 in 6 women would be screen-negative of whom 1.1% subsequently develops treatment-requiring hypertension and 4.5% demonstrate short-term proteinuric hypertension. We present sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive likelihood ratios for alternate screening algorithms. Conclusions We endorse further research into the safest screening test where women are considered for discharge after 60 min. Safety, patient and staff satisfaction should be assessed prospectively. Any screening test should be used in conjunction with good clinical care to minimise maternal and perinatal hazards of PE. PMID:26582404

  4. Live-born diploid fetus complicated with partial molar pregnancy presenting with pre-eclampsia, maternal anemia, and seemingly huge placenta: A rare case of confined placental mosaicism and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kaoru; Kondoh, Eiji; Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Fujita, Kohei; Mogami, Haruta; Chigusa, Yoshitsugu; Konishi, Ikuo

    2016-08-01

    A partial molar pregnancy almost always ends in miscarriage due to a triploid fetus. We describe a rare case of a singleton, partial molar pregnancy with a seemingly huge placenta, which continued to delivery of a live-born diploid baby. A 27-year-old primigravida suffered from severe pre-eclampsia and progressive anemia. The uterus was enormously enlarged for the gestational age. A cesarean section was performed because of deterioration of maternal status at 25 weeks' gestation, when more than 3000 mL blood spouted concurrently with the delivery of the placenta. The histological examination showed congestion in the decidua, which indicated disturbance of maternal venous return from the intervillous space. The chromosome complement of the placenta and the neonate were 69,XXX and 46,XX, respectively. We also reviewed all published cases of a singleton, partial molar pregnancy. A literature search yielded 18 cases of a singleton, diploid fetus with partial molar pregnancy. The mean gestational age at delivery was 24.5 ± 6.2 weeks, and fetuses survived outside the uterus in only four cases (22.2%). Intriguingly, previous reports numbered 10 cases with diploid placenta as well as five cases with no karyotyping of the placenta, indicating that they may have included a complete mole in a twin pregnancy or placental mesenchymal dysplasia. In conclusion, this was the first case of placentomegaly that presented manifestations of excessive abdominal distension and maternal severe anemia, and the second case of a singleton, partial molar pregnancy confirmed by chromosome analysis resulting in a diploid living baby. PMID:27225660

  5. Adequately Diversified Dietary Intake and Iron and Folic Acid Supplementation during Pregnancy Is Associated with Reduced Occurrence of Symptoms Suggestive of Pre-Eclampsia or Eclampsia in Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sutapa; Fledderjohann, Jasmine; Vellakkal, Sukumar; Stuckler, David

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective Pre-eclampsia or Eclampsia (PE or E) accounts for 25% of cases of maternal mortality worldwide. There is some evidence of a link to dietary factors, but few studies have explored this association in developing countries, where the majority of the burden falls. We examined the association between adequately diversified dietary intake, iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy and symptoms suggestive of PE or E in Indian women. Methods Cross-sectional data from India’s third National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3, 2005-06) was used for this study. Self-reported symptoms suggestive of PE or E during pregnancy were obtained from 39,657 women aged 15-49 years who had had a live birth in the five years preceding the survey. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association between adequately diversified dietary intake, iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy and symptoms suggestive of PE or E after adjusting for maternal, health and lifestyle factors, and socio-demographic characteristics of the mother. Results In their most recent pregnancy, 1.2% (n=456) of the study sample experienced symptoms suggestive of PE or E. Mothers who consumed an adequately diversified diet were 34% less likely (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.51-0.87) to report PE or E symptoms than mothers with inadequately diversified dietary intake. The likelihood of reporting PE or E symptoms was also 36% lower (OR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.47-0.88) among those mothers who consumed iron and folic acid supplementation for at least 90 days during their last pregnancy. As a sensitivity analysis, we stratified our models sequentially by education, wealth, antenatal care visits, birth interval, and parity. Our results remained largely unchanged: both adequately diversified dietary intake and iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy were associated with a reduced occurrence of PE or E symptoms. Conclusion Having a adequately diversified dietary

  6. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate placental c-myc and hTERT in normal and pathological pregnancies; c-myc as a novel fetal DNA epigenetic marker for pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Rahat, Beenish; Hamid, Abid; Ahmad Najar, Rauf; Bagga, Rashmi; Kaur, Jyotdeep

    2014-10-01

    Placental development is known for its resemblance with tumor development, such as in the expression of oncogenes (c-myc) and telomerase (hTERT). The expression of c-myc and hTERT is up-regulated during early pregnancy and gestational trophoblastic diseases (GTDs). To determine the role of DNA methylation [via methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM)] and histone modifications [via chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay)] in regulating the differential expression of c-myc and hTERT during normal gestation and their dysregulation during placental disorders, we obtained placental samples from 135 pregnant women, in five groups: normal first, second and third trimester (n = 30 each), pre-eclamptic pregnancy (n = 30) and molar pregnancy (n = 15). Two placental cell lines (JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo) and isolated first-trimester cytotrophoblasts were also studied. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed decreased mRNA expression levels of c-myc and hTERT, which were associated with a higher level of H3K9me3 (1.5-fold, P < 0.05) and H3K27me3 (1.9-fold, P < 0.05), respectively, in third-trimester placental villi versus first-trimester villi. A significantly lower level of H3K27me3 in molar placenta was associated with a higher mRNA expression of c-myc and hTERT. The development of pre-eclampsia (PE) was associated with increased methylation (P < 0.001) and H3K27me3 (P < 0.01) at the c-myc promoter and reduced H3K9me3 (P < 0.01) and H3K27me3 (P < 0.05) at the hTERT promoter. Further, mRNA expression of c-myc and hTERT was strongly correlated in molar villi (r = 0.88, P < 0.01) and JEG-3 cells (r = 0.99, P < 0.02). Moreover, on the basis of methylation data, we demonstrate the potential of c-myc as a fetal DNA epigenetic marker for pre-eclamptic pregnancies. Thus we suggest a role for epigenetic mechanisms in regulating differential expression of c-myc and hTERT during placental development and use of the c-myc promoter region as a potential fetal DNA marker in the case of

  7. Pre-Eclampsia, Birth Weight, and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Joshua R.; McDermott, Suzanne; Bao, Haikun; Hardin, James; Gregg, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are primarily inherited, but perinatal or other environmental factors may also be important. In an analysis of 87,677 births from 1996 through 2002, insured by the South Carolina Medicaid program, birth weight was significantly inversely associated with the odds of ASD (OR = 0.78, p = 0.001 for each additional…

  8. The global impact of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Duley, Lelia

    2009-06-01

    Over half a million women die each year from pregnancy related causes, 99% in low and middle income countries. In many low income countries, complications of pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death amongst women of reproductive years. The Millennium Development Goals have placed maternal health at the core of the struggle against poverty and inequality, as a matter of human rights. Ten percent of women have high blood pressure during pregnancy, and preeclampsia complicates 2% to 8% of pregnancies. Preeclampsia can lead to problems in the liver, kidneys, brain and the clotting system. Risks for the baby include poor growth and prematurity. Although outcome is often good, preeclampsia can be devastating and life threatening. Overall, 10% to 15% of direct maternal deaths are associated with preeclampsia and eclampsia. Where maternal mortality is high, most of deaths are attributable to eclampsia, rather than preeclampsia. Perinatal mortality is high following preeclampsia, and even higher following eclampsia. In low and middle income countries many public hospitals have limited access to neonatal intensive care, and so the mortality and morbidity is likely to be considerably higher than in settings where such facilities are available. The only interventions shown to prevent preeclampsia are antiplatelet agents, primarily low dose aspirin, and calcium supplementation. Treatment is largely symptomatic. Antihypertensive drugs are mandatory for very high blood pressure. Plasma volume expansion, corticosteroids and antioxidant agents have been suggested for severe preeclampsia, but trials to date have not shown benefit. Optimal timing for delivery of women with severe preeclampsia before 32 to 34 weeks' gestation remains a dilemma. Magnesium sulfate can prevent and control eclamptic seizures. For preeclampsia, it more than halves the risk of eclampsia (number needed to treat 100, 95% confidence interval 50 to 100) and probably reduces the risk of maternal death. A quarter of women have side effects, primarily flushing. With clinical monitoring serious adverse effects are rare. Magnesium sulfate is the anticonvulsant of choice for treating eclampsia; more effective than diazepam, phenytoin, or lytic cocktail. Although it is a low cost effective treatment, magnesium sulfate is not available in all low and middle income countries; scaling up its use for eclampsia and severe preeclampsia will contribute to achieving the Millennium Development Goals. PMID:19464502

  9. [Nursing practice in maternity intensive care units. Severe pre-eclampsia in a primigravida].

    PubMed

    Carmona-Guirado, A J; Escaño-Cardona, V; García-Cañedo, F J

    2015-01-01

    39 year old woman, pregnant for 31+5 weeks, who came to our intensive care unit (ICU) referred from the emergency department of the hospital, having swollen ankles, headache and fatigue at moderate effort. We proceeded to take blood pressure (158/96 mmHg) and assess lower limb edema. The fetal heart rate monitoring was normal. Knowledgeable and user of healthy guidelines during her pregnancy, she did not follow any treatment. Single mother, she worried about her fetus (achieved through in vitro fertilization), her mother offered to help for any mishap. We developed an Individualized Care Plan. For data collection we used: Rating 14 Virginia Henderson Needs and diagnostic taxonomy NANDA, NOC, NIC. Nursing diagnoses of "fluid volume excess" and "risk of impaired maternal-fetal dyad" were detected, as well as potential complications such as eclampsia and fetal prematurity. Our overall objectives (NOC) were to integrate the woman in the process she faced and that she knew how to recognize the risk factors inherent in her illness. Nursing interventions (NIC) contemplated the awareness and treatment of her illness and the creation of new healthy habits. The work of nursing Maternal ICU allowed women to help maintain maximum maternal and fetal well-being by satisfying any of her needs. Mishandling of the situation leads into a framework of high morbidity and mortality in our units. PMID:25600462

  10. Are Maternal Genitourinary Infection and Pre-Eclampsia Associated with ADHD in School-Aged Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Joshua R.; McDermott, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the hypothesis that maternal genitourinary infection (GU) infection is associated with increased risk of ADHD. Method: The authors obtained linked Medicaid billing data for pregnant women and their children in South Carolina, with births from 1996 through 2002 and follow-up data through 2008. Maternal GU infections and…

  11. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Directed Pathway Analysis of Maternal Pre-Eclampsia Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Hannah E. J.; Melton, Phillip E.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Freed, Katy A.; Kalionis, Bill; Murthi, Padma; Brennecke, Shaun P.; Keogh, Rosemary J.; Moses, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Preeclampsia (PE) is a serious hypertensive pregnancy disorder with a significant genetic component. Numerous genetic studies, including our own, have yielded many susceptibility genes from distinct functional groups. Additionally, transcriptome profiling of tissues at the maternal-fetal interface has likewise yielded many differentially expressed genes. Often there is little overlap between these two approaches, although genes identified in both approaches are significantly associated with PE. We have thus taken a novel integrative bioinformatics approach of analysing pathways common to the susceptibility genes and the PE transcriptome. Methods Using Illumina Human Ht12v4 and Wg6v3 BeadChips, transcriptome profiling was conducted on n = 65 normotensive and n = 60 PE decidua basalis tissues collected at delivery. The R software package libraries lumi and limma were used to preprocess transcript data for pathway analysis. Pathways were analysed and constructed using Pathway Studio. We examined ten candidate genes, which are from these functional groups: activin/inhibin signalling—ACVR1, ACVR1C, ACVR2A, INHA, INHBB; structural components—COL4A1, COL4A2 and M1 family aminopeptidases—ERAP1, ERAP2 and LNPEP. Results/Conclusion Major common regulators/targets of these susceptibility genes identified were AGT, IFNG, IL6, INHBA, SERPINE1, TGFB1 and VEGFA. The top two categories of pathways associated with the susceptibility genes, which were significantly altered in the PE decidual transcriptome, were apoptosis and cell signaling (p < 0.001). Thus, susceptibility genes from distinct functional groups share similar downstream pathways through common regulators/targets, some of which are altered in PE. This study contributes to a better understanding of how susceptibility genes may interact in the development of PE. With this knowledge, more targeted functional analyses of PE susceptibility genes in these key pathways can be performed to examine their contributions to the pathogenesis and severity of PE. PMID:26010865

  12. [The hormonal factors regulating water-electrolyte exchange in the pathogenesis of the hemodynamic disorders in pre-eclampsia].

    PubMed

    Zaporozhan, V M; Hozhenko, A I; Svirs'kyĭ, O O; Zalins'kyĭ, O O

    2000-01-01

    Study of indices of different endocrine links of female organisms with gestosis of the 2nd half of pregnancy with the search of degree of taking part of this hormones in the forming of basic syndromes of hestosis and guiding line to fundamental approach in medicinal practice with gestosis. Decrease of natrium content in CBV at the same time with decrease of intravascular volume of it and decrease of excretion of it with urine in the dynamics of gestosis confirms hestosis development and retention of natrium in the expectorant women's organism with primary delay of it in tissues. Energization of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-tromboxane system, changes of prostaglandin-tromboxane link in blood contributed to forming of arterial hypertension and edema. With taking into account revealed changes of hormonal levels at the background of progressive hypovolemia, decrease of speed of excretion of natrium with urine and speed of glomerular filtration, differentiate approach in prescription for hypotensive and diuretic agents is recommended for the avoidance of possible hardening of state of expectorant woman with gestosis. PMID:10867862

  13. Precision test for precision medicine: opportunities, challenges and perspectives regarding pre-eclampsia as an intervention window for future cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Niu, Jian-Min; Ji, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Zhuoli; Wang, Peizhong P; Ling, Xue-Feng B; Li, Yu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) comprise a spectrum of syndromes that range in severity from gestational hypertension and pre-eclamplsia (PE) to eclampsia, as well as chronic hypertension and chronic hypertension with superimposed PE. HDP occur in 2% to 10% of pregnant women worldwide, and impose a substantial burden on maternal and fetal/infant health. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in women. The high prevalence of non-obstructive coronary artery disease and the lack of an efficient diagnostic workup make the identification of CVD in women challenging. Accumulating evidence suggests that a previous history of PE is consistently associated with future CVD risk. Moreover, PE as a maladaptation to pregnancy-induced hemodynamic and metabolic stress may also be regarded as a “precision” testing result that predicts future cardiovascular risk. Therefore, the development of PE provides a tremendous, early opportunity that may lead to changes in maternal and infant future well-being. However, the underlying pathogenesis of PE is not precise, which warrants precision medicine-based approaches to establish a more precise definition and reclassification. In this review, we proposed a stage-specific, PE-targeted algorithm, which may provide novel hypotheses that bridge the gap between Big Data-generating approaches and clinical translational research in terms of PE prediction and prevention, clinical treatment, and long-term CVD management. PMID:27347303

  14. IFPA Meeting 2013 Workshop Report II: use of 'omics' in understanding placental development, bioinformatics tools for gene expression analysis, planning and coordination of a placenta research network, placental imaging, evolutionary approaches to understanding pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, W E; Adamson, L; Carter, A M; Collins, S; Cox, B; Elliot, M G; Ermini, L; Gruslin, A; Hoodless, P A; Huang, J; Kniss, D A; McGowen, M R; Post, M; Rice, G; Robinson, W; Sadovsky, Y; Salafia, C; Salomon, C; Sled, J G; Todros, T; Wildman, D E; Zamudio, S; Lash, G E

    2014-02-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At the IFPA meeting 2013 twelve themed workshops were presented, five of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively covered areas of new technologies for placenta research: 1) use of 'omics' in understanding placental development and pathologies; 2) bioinformatics and use of omics technologies; 3) planning and coordination of a placenta research network; 4) clinical imaging and pathological outcomes; 5) placental evolution. PMID:24315655

  15. Hemodynamic and hemorheological profiles in women with proteinuric hypertension of pregnancy and in pregnant controls.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, L; Siekmann, U

    1989-01-01

    We obtained blood samples from 52 patients with pre-eclampsia and from 40 pregnant controls for measurement of plasma urate levels, hematocrit, white cell count and various hemorheological parameters. We also used impedance cardiography to measure cardiac output in both groups and from the results derived values for total peripheral resistance and oxygen transport. Central venous pressure was measured with a superior vena cava catheter in patients with pre-eclampsia but not in controls. Women with pre-eclampsia had significantly lower cardiac output and central venous pressure when compared with a control group. A modest correlation was observed between central venous pressure and cardiac output. The majority of pre-eclamptic patients had significantly raised hematocrit, leucocyte count, uric acid and red cell aggregation. Red cell deformability was significantly decreased in patients with pre-eclampsia. Most patients with severe pre-eclampsia (BP diast. greater than 100 mmHg) had a low Antithrombin III and colloid osmotic pressure level. The leucocyte count was raised when compared with the women with moderate pre-eclampsia. Oxygen delivery was reduced in patients with pre-eclampsia because of impaired rheological properties of their blood. PMID:2694970

  16. Spontaneous reversal of mirror syndrome in a twin pregnancy after a single fetal death.

    PubMed

    Pirhonen, Jouko P; Hartgill, Tom W

    2004-09-10

    The case report illustrates that pre-eclampsia like symptoms can arise as a consequence of pathological changes in a single feto-placental unit of a twin pregnancy and may resolve spontaneously when the cause is removed. PMID:15294378

  17. Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim (Bactrim or Septra) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidney infection for the mother, preterm birth and pre-eclampsia (dangerously high blood pressure). Are there any other ... a greater risk for pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, placenta abruption (when the placenta breaks away from ...

  18. Coagulation problems in human pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Redman, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Coagulation problems in pregnancy are primarily associated with overactivity of the intrinsic clotting system. This accounts for the increased incidence of thrombo-embolism during pregnancy. Where specific obstetric complications cause clotting problems the common underlying feature is usually placental pathology as in abruptio placentae, pre-eclampsia or hydatidiform mole. Abnormal activation of the clotting system is an early, and occasionally the first detectable feature of pre-eclampsia, but there is no evidence that this is a primary change. Therefore the role of anticoagulant treatment in the management of pre-eclampsia remains questionable. A new test for estimating factor VIII consumption is proving to be a sensitive index of early activation of the clotting system and can be used for the diagnosis of early pre-eclampsia. PMID:382170

  19. 32 CFR 732.16 - Emergency care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pregnancy in a manner that a delay, caused by referral to a USMTF or USTF, would jeopardize the welfare of... delivery. (4) Severe pre-eclampsia. (5) Hemorrhage, second and third trimester. (6) Ectopic pregnancy...

  20. 32 CFR 732.16 - Emergency care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... pregnancy in a manner that a delay, caused by referral to a USMTF or USTF, would jeopardize the welfare of... delivery. (4) Severe pre-eclampsia. (5) Hemorrhage, second and third trimester. (6) Ectopic pregnancy...

  1. 32 CFR 732.16 - Emergency care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pregnancy in a manner that a delay, caused by referral to a USMTF or USTF, would jeopardize the welfare of... delivery. (4) Severe pre-eclampsia. (5) Hemorrhage, second and third trimester. (6) Ectopic pregnancy...

  2. 32 CFR 732.16 - Emergency care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pregnancy in a manner that a delay, caused by referral to a USMTF or USTF, would jeopardize the welfare of... delivery. (4) Severe pre-eclampsia. (5) Hemorrhage, second and third trimester. (6) Ectopic pregnancy...

  3. Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ESR1) Gene Polymorphisms in Pre-eclamptic Saudi Patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Beshbishy, Hesham A.; Tawfeek, Manal A.; Al-Azhary, Nevin M.; Mariah, Reham A.; Habib, Fawzia A.; Aljayar, Lamya; Alahmadi, Abrar F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Pre-eclampsia causes maternal mortality worldwide. Estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) gene polymorphisms were responsible for cardiovascular diseases. This case control study was conducted to investigate whether 2 polymorphic genes of ESR1 are associated with pre-eclampsia among Saudi women in Madina city, Saudi Arabia. Methods: Blood samples from 97 pre-eclamptic and 94 healthy pregnant women were analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction method. All the subjects were recruited randomly from outpatient clinics of Madina Maternity Children Hospital (MMCH), Madina, Saudi Arabia, between Dec. 2012 and Jan. 2014. Results: There was no association between pre-eclampsia and PvuII and XbaI ESR1 gene polymorphisms individually. TT/AA and TT/AG genotype combination existed significantly in pre-eclamptic patients compared to control. The frequency of PvuII and XbaI combined TT/AA genotypes between pre-eclamptic women was 36.1% vs 9.6%, however, frequency of PvuII and XbaI combined TT/AG genotypes between pre-eclamptic women was 3.1% vs 17%, compared to control. The homozygous T-A haplotype carriers showed high pre-eclampsia risk, independent of pregnancy, BMI and smoking status (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 3.26, 95% confidence interval (CI):1.71-9.21). The heterozygous T-A haplotype carriers did not differ from that of non-carriers (adjusted OR: 1.12, 95% CI: 0.47-2.75). No association was observed between pre-eclampsia and T-G, C-G and C-A haplotype of PvuII and XbaIESR1 gene polymorphisms. Conclusions: T-A haplotype of homozygous associated with pre eclampsia not heterozygous carriers of ESR 1 PvuII and XbaI gene polymorphisms elicited high risk of pre-eclampsia. GG genotype of XbaI polymorphism decreased pre-eclampsia risk. Further studies using larger sample size are recommended to investigate the ESR 1 gene polymorphisms associated with pre-eclampsia. PMID:26430422

  4. Cardiac Angiogenic Imbalance Leads to Peri-partum Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Ian S.; Rana, Sarosh; Shahul, Sajid; Rowe, Glenn C; Jang, Cholsoon; Liu, Laura; Hacker, Michele R.; Rhee, Julie S.; Mitchell, John; Mahmood, Feroze; Hess, Phil; Farrell, Caitlin; Koulisis, Nicole; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Burke, Suzanne D.; Tudorache, Igor; Bauersachs, Johann; del Monte, Federica; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Arany, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    Peri-partum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a frequently fatal disease that affects women near delivery, and occurs more frequently in women with pre-eclampsia and/or multiple gestation. The etiology of PPCM, or why it associates with pre-eclampsia, remains unknown. We show here that PPCM is associated with a systemic angiogenic imbalance, accentuated by pre-eclampsia. Mice that lack cardiac PGC-1α, a powerful regulator of angiogenesis, develop profound PPCM. Importantly, the PPCM is entirely rescued by pro-angiogenic therapies. In humans, the placenta in late gestation secretes VEGF inhibitors like soluble Flt1 (sFlt1), and this is accentuated by multiple gestation and pre-eclampsia. This anti-angiogenic environment is accompanied by sub-clinical cardiac dysfunction, the extent of which correlates with circulating levels of sFlt1. Exogenous sFlt1 alone caused diastolic dysfunction in wildtype mice, and profound systolic dysfunction in mice lacking cardiac PGC-1α. Finally, plasma samples from women with PPCM contained abnormally high levels of sFlt1. These data strongly suggest that PPCM is in large part a vascular disease, caused by excess anti-angiogenic signaling in the peri-partum period. The data also explain how late pregnancy poses a threat to cardiac homeostasis, and why pre-eclampsia and multiple gestation are important risk factors for the development of PPCM. PMID:22596155

  5. Variability of arterial blood pressure in normal and hypertensive pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Oney, T; Meyer-Sabellek, W

    1990-12-01

    In normal pregnancy the circadian blood pressure rhythm is similar to that in the non-pregnant state, with the highest blood pressure values in the morning and the lowest at midnight. This rhythm is lost in patients with pre-eclampsia. Women with severe pre-eclampsia show a reversed circadian rhythm, with a nocturnal increase in blood pressure during the sleeping phase. Although the reasons for this nocturnal hypertension in severe pre-eclampsia are poorly understood, the results suggest that pre-eclamptic women are endangered by hypertensive emergencies, mostly at night. Therefore blood pressure measurement should be extended to the night, and antihypertensive treatment must be adapted to the demands of a reversed circadian rhythm in relevant subgroups of patients. PMID:2082002

  6. Role of adiponectin on antioxidant profile: evaluation during healthy and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Eleuterio, Níbia Mariana; Palei, Ana C T; Machado, Jackeline S Rangel; Tanus-Santos, Jose E; Cavalli, Ricardo C; Sandrim, Valeria C

    2016-08-01

    The study of adipokines and oxidative stress has aided in understanding pre-eclampsia physiopathology. Therefore, our group aimed to evaluate the correlation between the adipokines (adiponectin and leptin) and the oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (MDA-TBARS) and antioxidant activity of plasma [ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP)] in healthy pregnant women and patients with gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia. We found a significant negative correlation between MDA-TBARS and adiponectin (r = -0.40, p = 0.0042), suggesting a relationship between antioxidant levels and this adipokine in healthy pregnancies which is altered in patients with gestational hypertension or pre-eclampsia. PMID:26935256

  7. Hypertension in diabetic pregnancy: impact and long-term outlook.

    PubMed

    Colatrella, Antonietta; Loguercio, Valentina; Mattei, Luca; Trappolini, Massimo; Festa, Camilla; Stoppo, Michela; Napoli, Angela

    2010-08-01

    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy can be chronic, pregestational or just diagnosed before the 20th week, or newly diagnosed in the second half of pregnancy. Any type of hypertension is more frequent in diabetic pregnancies with a different distribution among different types of diabetes. Most of the evidence is for pre-eclampsia associated with a marked increase in primary caesarean section, preterm birth and more need for neonatal intensive care. Different risk factors and pregnancy outcomes would support the hypothesis that pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension might be largely separate entities, but this position is not unanimously accepted. Chronic hypertension increases with age and duration of diabetes, predicting increased rates of prematurity and neonatal morbidity, especially when associated with superimposed pre-eclampsia. Long-term consequences are observed in women whose pregnancy was complicated by hypertension such as chronic hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20832742

  8. Do hypertensive diseases of pregnancy disrupt neurocognitive development in offspring?

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Andrew J O; Robinson, Monique; Newnham, John P; Pennell, Craig E

    2012-03-01

    The current study sought to determine whether hypertensive diseases of pregnancy (gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia) are associated with neurocognitive outcomes in middle childhood. Participants were members of the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Data were available for 1389 children (675 females; mean age = 10.59 years; SD = 0.19). Twenty-five per cent of these participants were offspring of pregnancies complicated by either gestational hypertension (n = 279), or pre-eclampsia (n = 34). Verbal ability at age 10 years was assessed with the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test - Revised (PPVT-R), and non-verbal ability with Ravens Colored Progressive Matrices (RCPM). Separate multivariable regression analyses, incorporating sociodemographic, antenatal, obstetric and postnatal covariates, investigated the effect of a two- (normotensive pregnancy vs. hypertensive pregnancy) and three-level (normotensive pregnancy vs. gestational hypertension vs. pre-eclampsia) predictor variable on PPVT-R and RCPM scores. Offspring of pregnancies complicated by maternal hypertension (gestational hypertension or pre-eclampsia) had a mean PPVT-R score that was 1.83 ([95% confidence interval (CI) -3.48, -0.17], P = 0.03) points lower than children from normotensive pregnancies. Multivariable regression analysis also identified a significant inverse association between the three-level predictor variable and offspring PPVT-R scores (P = 0.02). Gestational hypertension (without pre-eclampsia) reduced offspring PPVT-R scores by 1.71 points [95% CI -3.39, -0.03] and pre-eclampsia led to a reduction of 3.53 points [95% CI -8.41, 1.35], although this latter association did not achieve statistical significance. There was no effect of the two- (P = 0.99) or three-level (P = 0.92) predictor variable on RCPM scores. Maternal hypertensive diseases of pregnancy are a risk factor for a small reduction in offspring verbal ability. PMID:22324495

  9. Multiple concomitant cranial nerve palsies secondary to preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Gilca, Marina; Luneau, Katie

    2015-06-01

    A 32-year-old primigravid woman developed pre-eclampsia after delivery of twins along with left fifth, sixth, and seventh cranial neuropathies. She also had evidence of hepatic and renal involvement. Results of patient evaluation were otherwise unremarkable, and the palsies completely resolved over 3 months after treatment with valacyclovir and systemic corticosteroids. PMID:25768245

  10. Analysis of purine metabolites in maternal serum for evaluating the risk of gestosis.

    PubMed

    Senyavina, N V; Khaustova, S A; Grebennik, T K; Pavlovich, S V

    2013-09-01

    Metabolome analysis of the serum from pregnant patients aimed at detection of low-molecular-weight biomarkers of gestation process disorders indicated a relationship between the metabolic profile of maternal serum and risk of gestosis. In women with pre-eclampsia or preterm delivery, analysis of serum purine metabolites revealed changes in the metabolite concentrations, associated with pregnancy complications. PMID:24288739

  11. Human placenta-derived stromal cells decrease inflammation, placental injury and blood pressure in hypertensive pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Chiasson, Valorie L; Pinzur, Lena; Raveh, Shani; Abraham, Eytan; Jones, Kathleen A; Bounds, Kelsey R; Ofir, Racheli; Flaishon, Liat; Chajut, Ayelet; Mitchell, Brett M

    2016-04-01

    Pre-eclampsia, the development of hypertension and proteinuria or end-organ damage during pregnancy, is a leading cause of both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, and there are no effective clinical treatments for pre-eclampsia aside from delivery. The development of pre-eclampsia is characterized by maladaptation of the maternal immune system, excessive inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. We have reported that detection of extracellular RNA by the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3 and 7 is a key initiating signal that contributes to the development of pre-eclampsia. PLacental eXpanded (PLX-PAD) cells are human placenta-derived, mesenchymal-like, adherent stromal cells that have anti-inflammatory, proangiogenic, cytoprotective and regenerative properties, secondary to paracrine secretion of various molecules in response to environmental stimulation. We hypothesized that PLX-PAD cells would reduce the associated inflammation and tissue damage and lower blood pressure in mice with pre-eclampsia induced by TLR3 or TLR7 activation. Injection of PLX-PAD cells on gestational day 14 significantly decreased systolic blood pressure by day 17 in TLR3-induced and TLR7-induced hypertensive mice (TLR3 144-111 mmHg; TLR7 145-106 mmHg; both P<0.05), and also normalized their elevated urinary protein:creatinine ratios (TLR3 5.68-3.72; TLR7 5.57-3.84; both P<0.05). On gestational day 17, aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation responses improved significantly in TLR3-induced and TLR7-induced hypertensive mice that received PLX-PAD cells on gestational day 14 (TLR3 35-65%; TLR7 37-63%; both P<0.05). In addition, markers of systemic inflammation and placental injury, increased markedly in both groups of TLR-induced hypertensive mice, were reduced by PLX-PAD cells. Importantly, PLX-PAD cell therapy had no effects on these measures in pregnant control mice or on the fetuses. These data demonstrate that PLX-PAD cell therapy can safely reverse pre-eclampsia-like features during

  12. Inadequate vitamin D status in pregnancy: evidence for supplementation.

    PubMed

    Finer, Sarah; Khan, Khalid S; Hitman, Graham A; Griffiths, Chris; Martineau, Adrian; Meads, Catherine

    2012-02-01

    The role of vitamin D in maintaining a healthy pregnancy has seen emerging interest among clinicians and researchers in recent years. The functions of this hormone are widespread and complex, and during pregnancy and breastfeeding it facilitates crucial transfer of calcium from mother to child for skeletal development. Aside from the role of vitamin D in bone development and health, a myriad of other physiological actions are now known, and it is hypothesized that maternal deficiency may increase susceptibility to adverse pregnancy events during pregnancy such as pre-eclampsia. The role of vitamin D in pregnancy and breastfeeding is summarized and applied to the knowledge from studies associating vitamin D deficiency with a range of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including pre-eclampsia and childhood asthma. Current clinical guidelines for vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy are discussed in the context of the available evidence. The need for robust randomized controlled trials to address areas of existing uncertainty is highlighted. PMID:22007763

  13. Urine protein concentration estimation for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Hiten D; Bramham, Kate; Weston, Andrew J; Ward, Malcolm A; Thompson, Andrew J; Chappell, Lucy C

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances have been made in the study of urinary proteomics as a diagnostic tool for renal disease and pre-eclampsia which requires accurate measurement of urinary protein. We compared different protein assays (Bicinchoninic acid (BCA), Lowry and Bradford) against the 'gold standard' amino-acid assay in urine from 43 women (8 non-pregnant, 34 pregnant, including 8 with pre-eclampsia). BCA assay was superior to both Lowry and Bradford assays (Bland Altman bias: 0.08) compared to amino-acid assay, which performed particularly poorly at higher protein concentrations. These data highlight the need to use amino-acid or BCA assays for unprocessed urine protein estimation. PMID:26103798

  14. Genome-Wide Identification of Epigenetic Hotspots Potentially Related to Cardiovascular Risk in Adult Women after a Complicated Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Oudejans, Cees; Poutsma, Ankie; Michel, Omar; Mulders, Joyce; Visser, Allerdien; van Dijk, Marie; Nauta, Tessa; Bokslag, Anouk; Paulus, Walter; de Haas, Andreas; Koolwijk, Pieter; de Groot, Christianne J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The physiological demands of pregnancy on the maternal cardiovascular system can catapult women into a metabolic syndrome that predisposes to atherosclerosis in later life. We sought to identify the nature of the epigenomic changes associated with the increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adult women following pre-eclampsia. Findings We assessed the genome wide epigenetic profile by methyl-C sequencing of monozygotic parous twin sister pairs discordant for a severe variant of pre-eclampsia. In the adult twin sisters at risk for CVD as a consequence of a complicated pregnancy, a set of 12 differentially methylated regions with at least 50% difference in methylation percentage and the same directional change was found to be shared between the affected twin sisters and significantly different compared to their unaffected monozygous sisters. Conclusion The current epigenetic marker set will permit targeted analysis of differentially methylated regions potentially related to CVD risk in large cohorts of adult women following complicated pregnancies. PMID:26870946

  15. [Antihypertensive treatment in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Souza, Alex R; Amorim, Melania R; Costa, Aurélio A R; Neto, Carlos N

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy hypertensive disorders represent a frequent gestational pathology. It is one of the most important causes of maternal demise and perinatal morbidity/mortality in the world. Antihypertensive treatment is part of a vast therapeutic arsenal used for prevention of severe complications. However, data from literature research have been controversial about benefits of antihypertensive treatment. We performed a literature review about antihypertensive treatment in severe pre-eclampsia, describing drugs' pharmacological particularities and scientific evidences about their efficacy and safety. It is not controversial that treatment of hypertensive emergency must be instituted. The ideal medication used in those cases is not defined, therefore the real benefits of maintenance antihypertensive treatment in pre-eclampsia remains unclear. PMID:20353709

  16. Moving beyond silos: How do we provide distributed personalized medicine to pregnant women everywhere at scale? Insights from PRE-EMPT.

    PubMed

    von Dadelszen, Peter; Magee, Laura A; Payne, Beth A; Dunsmuir, Dustin T; Drebit, Sharla; Dumont, Guy A; Miller, Suellen; Norman, Jane; Pyne-Mercier, Lee; Shennan, Andrew H; Donnay, France; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2015-10-01

    While we believe that pre-eclampsia matters-because it remains a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide-we are convinced that the time has come to look beyond single clinical entities (e.g. pre-eclampsia, postpartum hemorrhage, obstetric sepsis) and to look for an integrated approach that will provide evidence-based personalized care to women wherever they encounter the health system. Accurate outcome prediction models are a powerful way to identify individuals at incrementally increased (and decreased) risks associated with a given condition. Integrating models with decision algorithms into mobile health (mHealth) applications could support community and first level facility healthcare providers to identify those women, fetuses, and newborns most at need of facility-based care, and to initiate lifesaving interventions in their communities prior to transportation. In our opinion, this offers the greatest opportunity to provide distributed individualized care at scale, and soon. PMID:26433496

  17. Management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Hind N; Arian, Sara E; Sibai, Baha M

    2014-07-01

    Hypertensive disorders are the most common medical complication of pregnancy, with an incidence of 5-10%, and a common cause of maternal mortality in the USA. Incidence of pre-eclampsia has increased by 25% in the past two decades. In addition to being among the lethal triad, there are likely up to 100 other women who experience 'near miss' significant maternal morbidity that stops short of death for every pre-eclampsia-related mortality. The purpose of this review is to present the new task force statement and novel definitions, as well as management approaches to each of the hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. The increased understanding of the pathophysiology of hypertension in pregnancy, as well as advances in medical therapy to minimize risks of fetal toxicity and teratogenicity, will improve our ability to prevent and treat hypertension in pregnancy. Fetal programming and fetal origins of adult disease theories extrapolate the benefit of such therapy to future generations. PMID:25259900

  18. HELLP syndrome: a diagnostic conundrum with severe complications.

    PubMed

    Rao, Devika; Chaudhari, Nikulkumar Kumar; Moore, Robert Michael; Jim, Belinda

    2016-01-01

    The HELLP (haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets) syndrome is believed to be part of the spectrum of pre-eclampsia, which falls within the category of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Maternal and fetal complications are more severe in HELLP as opposed to pre-eclampsia alone. We describe a 26-year-old primigravida woman with no medical history who presents with signs of HELLP with marked transaminitis and mild disseminated intravascular coagulation at 35 weeks of gestation who required emergent delivery of the fetus; the patient also sustained acute kidney injury requiring continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration and a prolonged intensive care unit admission. Remarkably, with supportive care, all laboratory derangements, including renal function, normalised after 4 weeks. We discuss the diagnostic conundrum when faced with the possible diagnosis of HELLP in discriminating from its many imitators in order to assume proper treatment. PMID:27535735

  19. Systemic and uteroplacental renin–angiotensin system in normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by an increase in many of the different components of the circulating renin–angiotensin system [RAS]. However, the physiological mechanisms of stimulated RAS activity during pregnancy are unknown. Even less understood is how this system may be altered in pre-eclampsia, a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. Additional studies have shown the presence of a local tissue specific RAS in the uteroplacental unit of normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies. Differences in normal pregnant and pre-eclamptic RAS component regulation may provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for the clinical pathological features of pre-eclampsia. Specifically, this review summarizes the key findings in the circulating and uteroplacental RAS in normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies. PMID:19124433

  20. Identification of the primary outcomes that result from deficient spiral arterial modification in pregnant mice

    PubMed Central

    Croy, B. Anne; Burke, Suzanne D.; Barrette, Valerie F.; Zhang, Jianhong.; Hatta, Kota; Smith, Graeme N.; Bianco, Juares; Yamada, Aureo T.; Adams, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia, an acute complication of human pregnancy, is associated within complete physiological modification of decidual spiral arteries. This is thought to promote oxidative stress from perfusion/reperfusion of the placenta and to restrict placental and fetal growth. Alymphoid (genotype Rag2−/−/Il2rg−/−) mice, sufficient in dendritic and myeloid cell functions, lack spiral arterial modification with individual spiral arteries having ~1.7x the vascular resistance and 0.66x the blood velocity of +/+ mice. Their placentae are measurably hypoxic yet neither placental growth nor fetal survival is impaired and gestational hypertension is not seen. Thus, lymphocytes rather than vascular adaptations appear to be the pivotal contributors to the clinical complications of pre-eclampsia. PMID:22279618

  1. Adiposity and hyperglycaemia in pregnancy and related health outcomes in European ethnic minorities of Asian and African origin: a review

    PubMed Central

    Jenum, Anne Karen; Sommer, Christine; Sletner, Line; Mørkrid, Kjersti; Bærug, Anne; Mosdøl, Annhild

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnic minorities in Europe have high susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and, in some groups, also cardiovascular disease (CVD). Pregnancy can be considered a stress test that predicts future morbidity patterns in women and that affects future health of the child. Objective To review ethnic differences in: 1) adiposity, hyperglycaemia, and pre-eclampsia during pregnancy; 2) future risk in the mother of obesity, T2DM and CVD; and 3) prenatal development and possible influences of maternal obesity, hyperglycaemia, and pre-eclampsia on offspring's future disease risk, as relevant for ethnic minorities in Europe of Asian and African origin. Design Literature review. Results Maternal health among ethnic minorities is still sparsely documented. Higher pre-pregnant body mass index (BMI) is found in women of African and Middle Eastern descent, and lower BMI in women from East and South Asia compared with women from the majority population. Within study populations, risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is considerably higher in many minority groups, particularly South Asians, than in the majority population. This increased risk is apparent at lower BMI and younger ages. Women of African origin have higher risk of pre-eclampsia. A GDM pregnancy implies approximately seven-fold higher risk of T2DM than normal pregnancies, and both GDM and pre-eclampsia increase later risk of CVD. Asian neonates have lower birth weights, and mostly also African neonates. This may translate into increased risks of later obesity, T2DM, and CVD. Foetal overgrowth can promote the same conditions. Breastfeeding represents a possible strategy to reduce risk of T2DM in both the mother and the child. Conclusions Ethnic minority women in Europe with Asian and African origin and their offspring seem to be at increased risk of T2DM and CVD, both currently and in the future. Pregnancy is an important window of opportunity for short and long-term disease prevention. PMID:23467680

  2. Treatment with sildenafil prevents impairment of learning in rats born to pre-eclamptic mothers.

    PubMed

    Cauli, O; Herraiz, S; Pellicer, B; Pellicer, A; Felipo, V

    2010-12-01

    Pre-eclampsia is an important hypertensive pregnancy disorder and a main cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Children born from mothers with pre-eclampsia may present cognitive deficits. The mechanisms leading to this cognitive impairment remain unclear and no treatments to improve it have been tested. Pre-eclampsia is associated with impaired regulation of the nitric oxide-3'-5'guanosine monophosphate cyclic (cGMP) pathway, which modulates some cognitive functions. We hypothesized that alterations in the NO-cGMP pathway would be involved in the mechanisms leading to cognitive impairment in rats born to pre-eclamptic mothers and that treatment with sildenafil, an inhibitor of the phosphodiesterase that degrades cGMP, could restore their cognitive function. To test these hypotheses, we used an animal model of pre-eclampsia in rats: pregnant rats treated with l-nitro-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. Using this model, we assessed: (1) whether rats born to pre-eclamptic mothers show reduced learning ability and/or altered motor activity or coordination when they are 2 months-old; (2) whether cognitive impairment is associated with reduced function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in brain in vivo; and (3) whether treatment of the mothers with sildenafil prevents this cognitive and motor alterations. The results reported show that the ability to learn a conditional discrimination task in a Y maze is reduced in rats born to pre-eclamptic mothers. This impairment was associated with reduced function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in brain in vivo, as assessed by microdialysis in freely moving rats. Treatment with sildenafil restores the function of this pathway and learning ability. PMID:20832451

  3. Leptin receptor gene polymorphisms in severely pre-eclamptic women.

    PubMed

    Rigó, János; Szendei, György; Rosta, Klára; Fekete, Andrea; Bögi, Krisztina; Molvarec, Attila; Rónai, Zsolt; Vér, Agota

    2006-09-01

    Variants of the leptin receptor gene (LEPR) may modulate the effect of elevated serum leptin levels in pre-eclampsia. The aim of our study was to evaluate the LEPR gene polymorphisms Lys109Arg (A109G) and Gln223Arg (A223G) in severely pre-eclamptic women. In a case-control study, we analyzed blood samples from 124 severely pre-eclamptic patients and 107 healthy control women by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The Pearson chi2 test was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The association was adjusted for maternal age, pre-pregnancy body mass index and primiparity with logistic regression analysis. Pregnant women with the LEPR 223G allele (223A/G or 223G/G genotype) had almost double the risk of developing severe pre-eclampsia compared with patients with the 223A/A genotype (adjusted OR = 1.92, 95% CI: 1.07-3.41). Genotype variants of LEPR A109G alone did not affect the risk of severe pre-eclampsia. Haplotype estimation of A109G and A223G polymorphisms of the LEPR gene revealed that the G-A haplotype versus other pooled haplotypes was significantly less common in the pre-eclamptic group (p < 0.01), while the G-G haplotype versus others was overrepresented among severely pre-eclamptic patients (p < 0.01), compared with controls. In conclusion, our data indicate that LEPR A223G polymorphism may individually modify the risk of severe pre-eclampsia. PMID:17071538

  4. [Maternal refusal to consent to a cesarean delivery, stillbirth].

    PubMed

    Defline, A; Obadia, M; El Djerbi, A; Plevy, P; Lepercq, J

    2014-01-01

    The doctor-lawyer perspective that we discuss is a maternal refusal to consent to a cesarean delivery for a fetal indication in June 2011. Despite repeated information of the risks during a three-week hospitalization for pre-eclampsia, after being assured of the proper understanding of the seriousness of the situation by the patient and spouse, and after consideration to transfer to another hospital, the reiterated refusal led to a late fetal extraction resulting in term stillbirth. PMID:23972774

  5. Assessing perinatal depression as an indicator of risk for pregnancy-associated cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Lauren; Lecour, Sandrine; Wedegärtner, Sonja; Kindermann, Ingrid; Böhm, Michael; Sliwa, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular conditions associated with pregnancy are serious complications. In general, depression is a well-known risk indicator for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Mental distress and depression are associated with physiological responses such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Both inflammation and oxidative stress have been implicated in the pathophysiology of CVDs associated with pregnancy. This article discusses whether depression could represent a risk indicator for CVDs in pregnancy, in particular in pre-eclampsia and peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). PMID:27213860

  6. Pregnancy complications in polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Katulski, Krzysztof; Czyzyk, Adam; Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Genazzani, Andrea R; Meczekalski, Blazej

    2015-02-01

    Infertility is a widely disputed problem affecting patients suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). As a serious dysfunction, it frequently occurs in PCOS patients. It is, therefore, important to devote more attention to pregnancy in PCOS sufferers. According to various data, the risk of miscarriage in PCOS women is three times higher than the risk of miscarriage in healthy women. Unfortunately, the risk of most frequent pregnancy pathologies is also higher for PCOS patients, as gestational diabetes (GD), pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia, and small for gestational age (SGA) children. Impaired glucose tolerance and GD in pregnant PCOS patients occur more frequently than in healthy women. A quadruple increase in the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension linked to arterial wall stiffness has also been observed in PCOS patients. The risk of pre-eclampsia, the most severe of all complications, is also four times higher in those suffering from PCOS. Pre-eclampsia is also more frequent in patients presenting additional risk factors accompanying PCOS, such as obesity or GD. At that point, it should be mentioned that PCOS patients are under 2.5 higher risk of giving birth to SGA children than healthy women. It appears that SGA can be linked to insulin resistance and insulin-dependent growth dysfunction. Therefore, PCOS pregnant women are patients of special obstetrical care. PMID:25356655

  7. Gene expression profiling of pre-eclamptic placentae by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kaartokallio, Tea; Cervera, Alejandra; Kyllönen, Anjuska; Laivuori, Krista

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a common and complex pregnancy disorder that often involves impaired placental development. In order to identify altered gene expression in pre-eclamptic placenta, we sequenced placental transcriptomes of nine pre-eclamptic and nine healthy pregnant women in pools of three. The differential gene expression was tested both by including all the pools in the analysis and by excluding some of the pools based on phenotypic characteristics. From these analyses, we identified altogether 53 differently expressed genes, a subset of which was validated by qPCR in 20 cases and 19 controls. Furthermore, we conducted pathway and functional analyses which revealed disturbed vascular function and immunological balance in pre-eclamptic placenta. Some of the genes identified in our study have been reported by numerous microarray studies (BHLHE40, FSTL3, HK2, HTRA4, LEP, PVRL4, SASH1, SIGLEC6), but many have been implicated in only few studies or have not previously been linked to pre-eclampsia (ARMS2, BTNL9, CCSAP, DIO2, FER1L4, HPSE, LOC100129345, LYN, MYO7B, NCMAP, NDRG1, NRIP1, PLIN2, SBSPON, SERPINB9, SH3BP5, TET3, TPBG, ZNF175). Several of the molecules produced by these genes may have a role in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia, and some could qualify as biomarkers for prediction or detection of this pregnancy complication. PMID:26388242

  8. Gene expression profiling of pre-eclamptic placentae by RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kaartokallio, Tea; Cervera, Alejandra; Kyllönen, Anjuska; Laivuori, Krista; Laivuori, Hannele; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a common and complex pregnancy disorder that often involves impaired placental development. In order to identify altered gene expression in pre-eclamptic placenta, we sequenced placental transcriptomes of nine pre-eclamptic and nine healthy pregnant women in pools of three. The differential gene expression was tested both by including all the pools in the analysis and by excluding some of the pools based on phenotypic characteristics. From these analyses, we identified altogether 53 differently expressed genes, a subset of which was validated by qPCR in 20 cases and 19 controls. Furthermore, we conducted pathway and functional analyses which revealed disturbed vascular function and immunological balance in pre-eclamptic placenta. Some of the genes identified in our study have been reported by numerous microarray studies (BHLHE40, FSTL3, HK2, HTRA4, LEP, PVRL4, SASH1, SIGLEC6), but many have been implicated in only few studies or have not previously been linked to pre-eclampsia (ARMS2, BTNL9, CCSAP, DIO2, FER1L4, HPSE, LOC100129345, LYN, MYO7B, NCMAP, NDRG1, NRIP1, PLIN2, SBSPON, SERPINB9, SH3BP5, TET3, TPBG, ZNF175). Several of the molecules produced by these genes may have a role in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia, and some could qualify as biomarkers for prediction or detection of this pregnancy complication. PMID:26388242

  9. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Louise E.; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  10. Aberrant Endometrial Features of Pregnancy in Diabetic NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Suzanne D.; Dong, Hongmei; Hazan, Aleah D.; Croy, B. Anne

    2010-01-01

    Objective Pregnancies in diabetic women are at 4–12 more risk for pre-eclampsia, an urgent, acute onset complication of mid to late gestation, than pregnancies in normal women. Hallmarks of pre-eclampsia are hypertension, proteinuria and incomplete modification of endometrial spiral arteries. Transient, pro-angiogenic lymphocytes called uterine Natural Killer (uNK) cells are implicated in human and rodent spiral artery modification. We studied mid to late gestations in spontaneously type 1 diabetic NOD mice to ask if diabetes alters uNK cell homing and/or function. Research design and method Normoglycemic, prediabetic and diabetic NOD mice and controls were mated. Lymphocytes and endometrial endothelium and decidua were studied histologically and in functional assays. Results Conception accelerated progression to overt diabetes in NOD females who had limited spiral artery development, heavier placentae and lighter fetuses displaying numerous birth defects compared with controls. UNK cell numbers were reduced in the decidua basalis of diabetic females while interferon-γ production was elevated. In diabetic NOD mice, decidual expression of the endothelial cell addressin MAdCAM-1 was aberrant in position while VCAM-1 expression was reduced. Assays of lymphocyte adhesion to tissue sections under shear forces indicated that diabetes compromises the potential homing functions of both endometrial endothelium and peripheral NK cells. Conclusions In diabetes, gestational endometrium has immune and vascular defects that likely to contribute to murine fetal loss and birth defects. Analogous problems and pre-eclampsia in diabetic women may involve similar mechanisms. PMID:17827401

  11. Scientific basis for the content of routine antenatal care. I. Philosophy, recent studies, and power to eliminate or alleviate adverse maternal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Villar, J; Bergsjø, P

    1997-01-01

    Recent literature was reviewed to identify elements of antenatal care which are of proven benefit in preventing or ameliorating adverse outcomes in the mother such as bleeding, anemia, pre-eclampsia, sepsis and genitourinary infection, and obstructed labor. Recent trials indicate that while fewer routine visits for low-risk women do not jeopardize a positive pregnancy outcome, patients may be less satisfied. None of the many factors which can cause bleeding during pregnancy can be eliminated through antenatal care, although risk factors can be identified through history-taking. Counseling on what to do is the best option. Routine iron supplementation against anemia is not necessary in well-nourished populations, but circumstantial evidence suggests that iron and folate should be provided for every pregnant woman in areas of high anemia prevalence. Hemoglobin determination as a routine test is more important near week 30 of term rather than early in pregnancy. Recent trials do not support routine aspirin to prevent pre-eclampsia among low-risk women, nor is there evidence that anti-hypertensive treatment of mild pre-eclampsia will prevent more serious disease. Improved detection and care may, however, lead to better outcomes. Urine culture and dipstick for leucocyte esterase and nitrite with subsequent treatment of positive cases will reduce the risk of pyelonephritis and appear to be cost-effective. Serological screening and treatment of syphilis is inexpensive and cost-effective, while obstructed labor can be anticipated in multiparas based upon obstetrical history; hospital delivery should be secured. PMID:9033238

  12. Pregnancy close to the edge: an immunosuppressive infiltrate in the chorionic plate of placentas from uncomplicated egg cell donation.

    PubMed

    Schonkeren, Dorrith; Swings, Godelieve; Roberts, Drucilla; Claas, Frans; de Heer, Emile; Scherjon, Sicco

    2012-01-01

    In pregnancies achieved after egg donation (ED) tolerance towards a completely allogeneic fetus is mediated by several complex immunoregulatory mechanisms, of which numerous aspects are still unknown. A distinct lesion not described previously in the literature, was repeatedly found in the chorionic plate in a substantial portion of placentas from ED pregnancies, but never in placentas from normal term pregnancies. The aim of this study was to assess its origin and its cellular composition. The relation between the lesion, the clinical and histological parameters were assessed. In addition we investigated the relation with the number of HLA-mismatches and KIR genotype of mother and child.In ten out of twenty-six (38.5%) placentas from ED pregnancies an inflammatory lesion was present in the chorionic plate. A significantly lower incidence of pre-eclampsia was found in the group with the lesion; 0% versus 45.5%. A significant relation was found between this lesion and the presence of intervillositis, chronic deciduitis, presence of plasma cells and fibrin deposition in the decidua. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation with X/Y-chromosome probes showed that the majority of cells present in the lesion are of maternal origin. The expression of the macrophage marker CD14+ and of the type 2 macrophage (M2) marker CD163+ was significantly higher in the lesion. The incidence of a fetal HLA-C2 genotype was significantly higher in cases with a lesion compared to the group without the lesion. In conclusion, a striking relationship was observed between the presence of a not previously described inflammatory lesion in the chorionic plate and the absence of pre-eclampsia in ED pregnancies. The lesion consists of mainly maternal cells with a higher expression of the macrophage marker CD14+ and the M2 marker CD163+. These findings suggest a protective immune mechanism which might contribute to the prevention of severe clinical complications like pre-eclampsia. PMID:22479322

  13. Abnormal expression of plasminogen activator inhibitors in patients with gestational trophoblastic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Estellés, A.; Grancha, S.; Gilabert, J.; Thinnes, T.; Chirivella, M.; España, F.; Aznar, J.; Loskutoff, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We previously reported significantly elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in plasma and placenta from pregnant women with severe pre-eclampsia, and pre-eclampsia is a frequent problem in molar pregnancies. As increases in PAI-1 may contribute to the placental alterations that occur in pre-eclampsia, we have begun to investigate changes in PAI-1 as well as PAI-2 and several other components of the fibrinolytic system in patients with trophoblastic disease. Significant increases in plasma PAI-1 and decreases in plasma PAI-2 levels were observed in molar pregnancies when compared with the levels in normal pregnant women of similar gestational age. PAI-1 antigen levels also were increased, and PAI-2 levels were decreased in placenta from women with molar pregnancies compared with placenta obtained by spontaneous abortion. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed strong positive and specific staining of PAI-1 in trophoblastic epithelium in molar pregnancies and relatively weak staining of PAI-2. No association between the distribution of PAI-1 and vitronectin was found, and no specific signal for tissue type PA, urokinase type PA, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or interleukin-1 was detected. In situ hybridization revealed an increase in PAI-1 but not PAI-2 mRNAs in placenta from molar pregnancies in comparison with placenta from abortions. These results demonstrate increased PAI-1 protein and mRNA in trophoblastic disease and suggest that localized elevated levels of PAI-1 may contribute to the hemostatic problems associated with this disorder. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8863672

  14. Pregnancy outcomes associated with viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Reddick, K L B; Jhaveri, R; Gandhi, M; James, A H; Swamy, G K

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) to pregnancy-related complications including gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preterm birth (PTB), intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), pre-eclampsia, antepartum haemorrhage and cholestasis. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was queried for all pregnancy-related discharges, pregnancy complications and viral hepatitis from 1995 to 2005. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between HBV, HCV, HBV + HCV and pregnancy-related complications including GDM, PTB, IUGR, pre-eclampsia, antepartum haemorrhage, cholestasis and caesarean delivery. Model covariates included maternal age, race, insurance status, substance use and medical complications including liver complication, hypertension, HIV, anaemia, thrombocytopenia and sexually transmitted infections. Of 297 664 pregnant women data available for analysis, 1446 had a coded diagnosis of HBV, HCV or both. High-risk behaviours, such as smoking, alcohol and substance use were higher in women with either HBV or HCV. Women with HBV had an increased risk for PTB (aOR 1.65, CI [1.3, 2.0]) but a decreased risk for caesarean delivery (aOR 0.686, CI [0.53, 0.88]). Individuals with HCV had an increased risk for GDM (aOR 1.6, CI [1.0, 2.6]). Individuals with both HBV and HCV co-infection had an increased risk for antepartum haemorrhage (aOR 2.82, CI [1.1, 7.2]). There was no association of viral hepatitis with IUGR or pre-eclampsia. Women with hepatitis have an increased risk for complications during pregnancy. Research to determine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of counselling patients about potential risks for adverse outcomes is warranted. PMID:21692952

  15. The use and misuse of animal analog models of human pregnancy disorders.

    PubMed

    Clark, David A

    2014-06-01

    It has been suggested that the differences between placentation in humans and rodents, such as mice, are sufficient to render human pregnancy unique and to justify ignoring data generated using mice. Detailed examination of the placenta-decidua interaction and decidual NK cell composition in humans, and mice, show that the principles are the same. Indeed, the rat placenta is useful in showing an intermediary arrangement between humans and mice. This is consistent with the thesis of Darwin that structures of older species evolve with development of new species to provide a survival advantage. Molecular details may differ between species, but also between individuals given gene polymorphisms. Human data on interaction of HLA-C2 with NK cell KIR receptors has been used to suggest that human pregnancy problems such as recurrent miscarriage, fetal growth retardation, and pre-eclampsia are due to lack of activation of true uterine NK cell (TuNK) functions that promote trophoblast cell growth and invasion which prevents such problems. But when TuNKs bear certain KIR phenotypes, pathology results. It is shown that such mechanisms could only be pertinent in less than one-third of recurrent miscarriage patients. Activated blood-type NK cells that enter the uterus (BuNKs) remain the major effector of pregnancy loss in humans, and this is consistent with data from the mouse. The importance of activated BuNKs in pre-eclampsia and fetal growth retardation merits further investigation as pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction are also manifest in the CBAxDBA/2 mouse model where activated NK cells are the initiator of abortions. PMID:24725995

  16. A multi-centre phase IIa clinical study of predictive testing for preeclampsia: improved pregnancy outcomes via early detection (IMPROvED)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background 5% of first time pregnancies are complicated by pre-eclampsia, the leading cause of maternal death in Europe. No clinically useful screening test exists; consequentially clinicians are unable to offer targeted surveillance or preventative strategies. IMPROvED Consortium members have pioneered a personalised medicine approach to identifying blood-borne biomarkers through recent technological advancements, involving mapping of the blood metabolome and proteome. The key objective is to develop a sensitive, specific, high-throughput and economically viable early pregnancy screening test for pre-eclampsia. Methods/Design We report the design of a multicentre, phase IIa clinical study aiming to recruit 5000 low risk primiparous women to assess and refine innovative prototype tests based on emerging metabolomic and proteomic technologies. Participation involves maternal phlebotomy at 15 and 20 weeks’ gestation, with optional testing and biobanking at 11 and 34 weeks. Blood samples will be analysed using two innovative, proprietary prototype platforms; one metabolomic based and one proteomic based, both of which outperform current biomarker based screening tests at comparable gestations. Analytical and clinical data will be collated and analysed via the Copenhagen Trials Unit. Discussion The IMPROvED study is expected to refine proteomic and metabolomic panels, combined with clinical parameters, and evaluate clinical applicability as an early pregnancy predictive test for pre-eclampsia. If ‘at risk’ patients can be identified, this will allow stratified care with personalised fetal and maternal surveillance, early diagnosis, timely intervention, and significant health economic savings. The IMPROvED biobank will be accessible to the European scientific community for high quality research into the cause and prevention of adverse pregnancy outcome. Trial registration Trial registration number NCT01891240 The IMPROvED project is funded by the seventh framework

  17. [Hypertensive emergencies in adults: a practical review].

    PubMed

    Sosner, Philippe; Plouin, Pierre-François; Herpin, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    Hypertensive emergencies must be distinguished from severe blood pressure elevations without acute target organ damage. Clinical examination (chest pain, dyspnoea, neurological disorders, ECG, retinal examination) and laboratory tests (blood and urine tests, cerebral imaging in case of neurological disorders) have to be immediately performed. Immediate referral to an intensive care unit is indicated, and an intravenous antihypertensive therapy has to be implemented. Blood pressure objectives depend on the associated acute pathology (myocardial infarction, pulmonary oedema, aortic dissection, severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia of pregnancy, hypertensive encephalopathy, retinopathy, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke treated or not with thrombolysis). PMID:20547034

  18. [Hypertension in pregnancy with special reference to its treatment].

    PubMed

    Ukleja-Adamowicz, M; Nartowicz, E; Adamowicz, A

    Definition and classification of the arterial hypertension in pregnancy are discussed. An emphasis is on the problems of differential diagnosis between pre-eclampsia and other forms of hypertension. Use of hypotensive drugs in pregnant patients with particular reference to emergencies is also discussed. The treatment of pregnant women with hypertension is still a problem which require close co-operation of both an obstetrician and internist. Follow-up after labour is GP duty to find out if the patient remains hypertensive. If so, etiology of the disease should be again searched. PMID:1488337

  19. Perinatal neuroblastoma: a hidden bullet in the chest

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Harohalli Iyer; Mohanty, Pankaj Kumar; Razak, Abdul; Nagesh, N Karthik

    2014-01-01

    A neonate with antenatally diagnosed intrathoracic mass by ultrasound scan was delivered uneventfully at 35 weeks gestation by caesarean section due to pre-eclampsia and fluctuating hypertension in the mother. The intrathoracic mass was echogenic and the diagnosis was inconclusive. At 12 h of life the baby deteriorated acutely, in terms of increased oxygen requirement, ventilatory care, heart rate fluctuation, hypotension requiring inotropic support and died despite intensive care support. The parents were counselled that an autopsy would be invaluable in providing a diagnosis given the antenatal finding of an intrathoracic mass. The final diagnosis of neuroblastoma was performed at postmortem. PMID:24827646

  20. α-Methyldopa-induced hepatitis during the postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Kashkooli, Soleiman; Baraty, Brandon; Kalantar, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman, with a history of pre-eclampsia, was diagnosed with α-methyldopa-induced hepatotoxicity, after she presented with severe jaundice and hepatitis 8 weeks following delivery. Laboratory investigations and liver biopsy ruled out other causes of hepatitis. She continued to improve clinically after cessation of α-methyldopa, and was discharged 10 days after admission. This case report emphasises that it may not be possible to predict which patients may develop α-methyldopa-induced hepatitis, hence regular monitoring of liver function tests during treatment should be implemented. PMID:24577181

  1. Thrombophilia related issues in women and children.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Ron; Brenner, Benjamin

    2005-02-01

    Women experience increased thrombotic risk at pregnancy and puerperium as well as during hormonal therapy with oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy. Physiological and anatomical changes in pregnancy contribute to the hypercoagulable situation. Women with thrombophilia have an increased risk for venous and arterial thromboembolism as well as for gestational vascular complications including fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption, and fetal growth restriction. Children are at increased thrombotic risk, particularly at the neonatal period, and may express thrombosis often in association with thrombophilia. This article will focuses on the clinical association, pathogenesis, and treatment of thrombophilia-related issues in women and children. PMID:15706481

  2. Late postpartum eclampsia complicated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case report and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihong; Wang, Yacong; Shi, Liang; Cao, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare but serious clinical-neuroradiological entity characterized by headache, vomiting, visual disturbances, altered mental status, seizures, and unconsciousness associated with the characteristic imaging findings including sub-cortical vasogenic edema at the bilateral parietal and occipital lobes. We describe a case of 28-year-old PRES patient secondary to delayed maternal postpartum eclampsia. This patient was not initially diagnosed with pre-eclampsia and PRES. The diagnosis was established after magnetic resonance imaging. After treatment this patient’s PRES resolved. Early diagnosis and treatment are the keys to reverse PRES. A literature review for PRES is provided in this report. PMID:26807372

  3. Facial nerve paralysis and partial brachial plexopathy after epidural blood patch: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shahien, Radi; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2011-01-01

    We report a complication related to epidural analgesia for delivery in a 24- year-old woman who was admitted with mild pre-eclampsia and for induction of labor. At the first postpartum day she developed a postdural puncture headache, which was unresponsive to conservative measures. On the fifth day an epidural blood patch was done, and her headache subsided. Sixteen hours later she developed paralysis of the right facial nerve, which was treated with prednisone. Seven days later she complained of pain in the left arm and the posterior region of the shoulder. She was later admitted and diagnosed with partial brachial plexopathy. PMID:21386953

  4. Maternal complications in pregnancy with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Vidushi; Agarwal, Nutan

    2016-09-01

    Maternal complications of diabetes in pregnancy include obstetric complications such as pre-eclampsia, preterm labour, polyhydramnios, increased operative delivery and increased infective morbidity. These can be minimized with optimal glycaemic control. Additionally, pregnancies with overt/pregestational diabetes may have diabetes related complications such as hypoglycaemia, worsening of retinopathy, nephropathy and diabetic ketoacidosis. Women with pre-existing diabetic vasculopathy should be managed with multi-disciplinary approach with maternal and foetal surveillance to detect any deterioration. Such patients have a poor pregnancy outcome. Gastropathy and coronary artery disease in diabetics is a contraindication to pregnancy. PMID:27582159

  5. Hypercalcaemia due to parathyroid carcinoma presenting in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ryan G; Elston, Marianne S; Gill, Anthony J; Marsh, Deborah; Beer, Ian; Wolmarans, Louise; Conaglen, John V; Meyer-Rochow, Goswin Y

    2012-04-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) in pregnancy may be associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Medical management of pHPT in pregnancy is limited, and surgery is the only definitive therapeutic option. The ideal timing for surgery is mid-second trimester, but surgery may also be safely performed in the third trimester. Delayed parathyroid surgery may result in a hypercalcaemic crisis postpartum owing to loss of active placental calcium transfer. We present a case of parathyroid carcinoma in pregnancy presenting with pre-eclampsia at 32 weeks' gestation. PMID:22188427

  6. Antithrombin deficiency in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Durai, Shivani; Tan, Lay Kok; Lim, Serene

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 39-year-old, gravida 3 para 2, Chinese female with a history of inherited type 1 Antithrombin deficiency and multiple prior episodes of venous thromboembolism. She presented at 29+4 weeks' gestation with severe pre-eclampsia complicated by haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome. She subsequently underwent an emergency caesarean section for non-reassuring fetal status, which was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony, requiring a B-Lynch suture intraoperatively. PMID:27207982

  7. Further case of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome due to a deletion in EP300.

    PubMed

    Foley, Patricia; Bunyan, David; Stratton, John; Dillon, Michelle; Lynch, Sally Ann

    2009-05-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a heterogeneous disorder with approximately 45-55% of patients showing mutations in the CREB binding protein and a further 3% of patients having mutations in EP300. We report a male child with a deletion of exons 3-8 of the EP300 gene who has RSTS. He has a milder skeletal phenotype, a finding that has been described in other cases with EP300 mutations. The mother suffered from pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome in the pregnancy. She subsequently developed a mullerian tumor of her cervix 6 years after the birth of her son. PMID:19353645

  8. Managing pregnancy in inflammatory rheumatological diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Historically, pregnancy in women with many inflammatory rheumatic diseases was not considered safe and was discouraged. Combined care allows these pregnancies to be managed optimally, with the majority of outcomes being favorable. Disease activity at the time of conception and anti-phospholipid antibodies are responsible for most complications. Disease flares, pre-eclampsia, and thrombosis are the main maternal complications, whereas fetal loss and intrauterine growth restriction are the main fetal complications. Antirheumatic drugs used during pregnancy and lactation to control disease activity are corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, sulphasalzine, and azathioprine. Vaginal delivery is possible in most circumstances, with cesarean section being reserved for complications. PMID:21371350

  9. Does pre-pregnancy BMI determine blood pressure during pregnancy? A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zuithoff, Peter; Browne, Joyce L; Amelia, Dwirani; Baharuddin, Mohammad; Grobbee, Diederick E; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate if pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) determines blood pressure throughout pregnancy and to explore the role of gestational weight gain in this association. In addition, the effects of pre-pregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain on the occurrence of gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia were investigated. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Maternal and child health primary care referral centre, Jakarta, Indonesia. Population and measurements 2252 pregnant women visiting Budi Kemuliaan Hospital and its branch for regular antenatal care visits from July 2012 to April 2015. Pre-pregnancy BMI (kg/m2) was based on self-reported pre-pregnancy weight and measured height at first visit. Gestational weight gain was calculated as weight at the day of delivery minus the pre-pregnancy weight. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured during pregnancy at every visit. Linear mixed models were used to analyse this relation with repeated blood pressure measures as the outcome and pre-pregnancy BMI as the predictor. When looking at gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia as outcomes, (multiple) logistic regression was used in the analysis. Results Independent of pre-pregnancy BMI, SBP and DBP increased by 0.99 mm Hg/month and 0.46 mm Hg/month, respectively. Higher pre-pregnancy BMI was associated with higher pregnancy SBP (0.25 mm Hg/kg/m2; 95% CI 0.17 to 0.34; p<0.01) and DBP (0.18 mm Hg/kg/m2; 0.13 to 0.24; p<0.01) in adjusted analysis. Every 1 kg/m2 higher pre-pregnancy BMI was associated with 6% and 9% higher odds for gestational hypertension (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.06; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.09; p<0.01) and pre-eclampsia (aOR 1.09; 1.04 to 1.14; p<0.01). Accounting for gestational weight gain did not attenuate these associations. Conclusions Pre-pregnancy BMI determines the level, but not the change, of blood pressure in pregnancy and is linked to higher odds for gestational hypertension and

  10. Cardiovascular disease screening.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Jennifer Y; Hameed, Afshan B

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death amongst women worldwide. Cardiovascular risk assessment and primary prevention are important strategies to improve morbidity and mortality. In additional to the traditional risk factors, pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes increment future risk of developing cardiovascular complications. Additionally, several serum biomarkers are valuable measures for both risk assessment and predictors of clinical outcomes in women. The purpose of this review is to describe current risk stratification schemes as well as outline the role of obstetric history and serum biomarkers in adjusting risk stratification in women. PMID:26143091

  11. Anaesthesia for lower-segment caesarean section: Changing perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Sean Brian; Leong, Sng Ban; Heng, Alex Sia Tiong

    2010-01-01

    The number of caesarean sections has increased over the last two decades, especially in the developed countries. Hence, it has increasingly become a greater challenge to provide care for the parturient, but this has given obstetric anaesthetists a greater opportunity to contribute to obstetric services. While caesarean deliveries were historically performed using general anaesthesia, there is a recent significant move towards regional anaesthesia. Unique problems that patients with obesity and pre-eclampsia present will be discussed in the present article. New medications and devices now used in obstetric anaesthesia will change the practice and perspectives of our clinical practice. PMID:21189878

  12. The effects of deprivation of prostaglandin precursors on vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II and on the kidney in the pregnant rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P M; Broughton Pipkin, F

    1979-01-01

    1 Pregnant rabbits were deprived of essential fatty acids from day ten of pregnancy, and results compared with a control group on a normal diet. 2 At term, cannulation of jugular and carotid vessels was performed under anaesthesia, to study the vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II and basal blood pressure. 3 Plasma renin levels, urinary electrolytes and protein were measured. 4 Placental and renal tissue was examined histologically. 5 Though no changes were found in tissues, blood or urine, a markedly significant increase in response to angiotensin II was found in the group deprived of essential fatty acids. This parallels the findings in vascular response in human pre-eclampsia. PMID:760889

  13. Expression of prostacyclin and thromboxane synthases in placenta and placental bed after pre-eclamptic pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Wetzka, B; Charnock-Jones, D S; Viville, B; Cooper, J C; Nüsing, R; Zahradnik, H P; Smith, S K

    1996-11-01

    Prostacyclin and thromboxane are potent antagonistic regulators of vascular tone and platelet aggregation. In pre-eclampsia, the ratio of their metabolites is decreased. Little is known about the local regulation of intrauterine prostacyclin and thromboxane production in this condition. Placenta and placental bed biopsies were obtained from uncomplicated and pre-eclamptic pregnancies. Prostacyclin synthase (PCS) and thromboxane synthase (TXS) and their mRNA's were localized by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies and in situ hybridization. Protein and mRNA levels were quantified by immunoblot and RNase protection assay. PCS-like immunoreactivity was found in endothelial cells and leiomyocytes, whereas fetal and maternal macrophages showed positive staining for TXS. Their mRNA was localized to trophoblast and endothelium, and TXS mRNA could also be detected in macrophages. Quantitative analysis showed no significant difference in intrauterine protein or mRNA expression after pre-eclampsia. The prostacyclin and thromboxane production seems to be compartmentalized within the uteroplacental unit. The expression of their synthesizing enzymes might be regulated post-transcriptionally. Additional regulation of prostaglandin production could be metabolically or on the substrate level and requires further elucidation. PMID:8916205

  14. Cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 in human placenta and placental bed after normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Wetzka, B; Nüsing, R; Charnock-Jones, D S; Schäfer, W; Zahradnik, H P; Smith, S K

    1997-10-01

    In pre-eclampsia, the ratio of prostacyclin:thromboxane production rate is decreased favouring the vasoconstrictive thromboxane. One of the rate-limiting steps in prostaglandin synthesis is cyclooxygenase (COX) activity. Therefore, we investigated the expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in human placenta and placental bed. Tissue specimens from the 29th to 40th week of pregnancy were obtained from Caesarean sections after uncomplicated and pre-eclamptic pregnancies before the onset of labour. COX-1 and COX-2 were localized immunohistochemically with the identification of positive cells by double immunofluorescence staining. The protein and mRNA levels were analysed by immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Expression of both COX-1 and COX-2 could be observed in placenta and placental bed. COX-1-like immunoreactivity was observed in most cell types with strongest staining in macrophages. Only macrophages, endothelium, vascular leiomyocytes and fibroblasts stained positively for COX-2. In placenta, COX-1 and -2 expression was unchanged after pre-eclampsia. In placental bed, protein and mRNA levels of COX-1 were increased in the pre-eclamptic group (P < 0.05), whereas COX-2 expression did not differ significantly from normal pregnancies. An increased expression of COX-1 could be involved in the pathophysiology of pre-eclamptic changes within the placental bed. A therapy with drugs inhibiting COX-1 might be beneficial in this condition. PMID:9402302

  15. Obstetric nephrology: lupus and lupus nephritis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stanhope, Todd J; White, Wendy M; Moder, Kevin G; Smyth, Andrew; Garovic, Vesna D

    2012-12-01

    SLE is a multi-organ autoimmune disease that affects women of childbearing age. Renal involvement in the form of either active lupus nephritis (LN) at the time of conception, or a LN new onset or flare during pregnancy increases the risks of preterm delivery, pre-eclampsia, maternal mortality, fetal/neonatal demise, and intrauterine growth restriction. Consequently, current recommendations advise that the affected woman achieve a stable remission of her renal disease for at least 6 months before conception. Hormonal and immune system changes in pregnancy may affect disease activity and progression, and published evidence suggests that there is an increased risk for a LN flare during pregnancy. The major goal of immunosuppressive therapy in pregnancy is control of disease activity with medications that are relatively safe for a growing fetus. Therefore, the use of mycophenolate mofetil, due to increasing evidence supporting its teratogenicity, is contraindicated during pregnancy. Worsening proteinuria, which commonly occurs in proteinuric renal diseases toward the end of pregnancy, should be differentiated from a LN flare and/or pre-eclampsia, a pregnancy-specific condition clinically characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. These considerations present challenges that underscore the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach when caring for these patients, including a nephrologist, rheumatologist, and obstetrician who have experience with these pregnancy-related complications. This review discusses the pathogenesis, maternal and fetal risks, and management pertinent to SLE patients with new onset or a history of LN predating pregnancy. PMID:22879437

  16. The importance of being a regulatory T cell in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Clark, David A

    2016-08-01

    Natural Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (nTregs) defined by expression of the Foxp3 marker generated in the thymus against self autoantigens prevent systemic autoimmune and inflammatory disease. A second population of Tregs induced by exogenous antigens in the periphery (iTregs) are currently thought to play a key role in preventing infertility, recurrent pregnancy loss (occult and clinically-evident), pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and premature birth in outbred matings where the father is histoincompatible with the mother. Curiously, when iTregs are ablated in mice, fertility is usually not impaired and resorption rates in matings with allogeneic males can range from 0% to 100% in individual females. Analysis of possible explanations suggest iTregs prevent abortions by countering effects of environmental stressors. Depletion of iTregs at mid-pregnancy in mice only causes abortions in an artificial transgenic model. Effects of iTreg depletion on pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and premature birth remain to be tested. Tregs induced during pregnancy may also affect the health of offspring in post natal life as well as the health of the mother. PMID:27219894

  17. Role of nitric oxide in maternal hemodynamics and hormonal changes in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Salas, S P

    1998-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is characterized by a significant reduction in total peripheral vascular resistance and decreased pressor responsiveness to vasodilator agents. This review will consider whether nitric oxide (NO) contributes to these changes, and whether a deficiency of NO produces a preeclampsia like syndrome. The biosynthesis of NO increases in pregnant animals, as assessed by the raised plasma concentration, urinary excretion and metabolic production rate of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), the second messenger of NO. In addition, urinary excretion of nitrate, the stable metabolites of NO, increases during pregnancy, paralleling the rise in cGMP. Several studies provide convincing evidence indicating that expression and activity of different NO synthases (NOS) are increased in gravid animals. Acute blockade of NOS causes a dose response increase in blood pressure and reverses the blunted vasopressor response to vasoconstrictor agents. Long-term NOS inhibition produces a pre-eclampsia like syndrome, characterized by maternal hypertension, proteinuria, thrombocytopenia, and renal damage, and lower litter size and fetal weight. Both acute and chronic responses are reduced when L-arginine, the substrate for NOS, is administered in high doses, indicating that these changes are specific to NO inhibition. In conclusion, present data suggest that a disturbance in NO release may contribute to the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia. PMID:9830512

  18. Maternal body mass index and risk of birth and maternal health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Abe, S K; Kanda, M; Narita, S; Rahman, M S; Bilano, V; Ota, E; Gilmour, S; Shibuya, K

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based cohort studies of maternal body mass index (BMI) and risk of adverse birth and health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and the British Nursing Index were searched from inception to February 2014. Forty-two studies were included. Our study found that maternal underweight was significantly associated with higher risk of preterm birth (odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.27), low birthweight (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.50-1.84) and small for gestational age (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.69-2.02). Compared with mothers with normal BMI, overweight or obese mothers were at increased odds of gestational diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, caesarean delivery and post-partum haemorrhage. The population-attributable risk (PAR) indicated that if women were entirely unexposed to overweight or obesity during the pre-pregnancy or early pregnancy period, 14% to 35% fewer women would develop gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia or pregnancy-induced hypertension in Brazil, China, India, Iran or Thailand. The highest PAR of low birthweight attributable to maternal underweight was found in Iran (20%), followed by India (18%), Thailand (10%) and China (8%). Treatment and prevention of maternal underweight, overweight or obesity may help reduce the burden on maternal and child health in developing countries. PMID:26094567

  19. Periodontal Disease: A Possible Risk-Factor for Adverse Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Anuj Singh; Katoch, Vartika; Rajguru, Sneha A; Rajpoot, Nami; Singh, Pinojj; Wakhle, Sonal

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion in subgingival sites especially of gram-negative organisms are initiators for periodontal diseases. The periodontal pathogens with persistent inflammation lead to destruction of periodontium. In recent years, periodontal diseases have been associated with a number of systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular-disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic respiratory diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes including pre-term low-birth weight (PLBW) and pre-eclampsia. The factors like low socio-economic status, mother's age, race, multiple births, tobacco and drug-abuse may be found to increase risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. However, the same are less correlated with PLBW cases. Even the invasion of both aerobic and anerobic may lead to inflammation of gastrointestinal tract and vagina hence contributing to PLBW. The biological mechanism involved between PLBW and Maternal periodontitis is the translocation of chemical mediators of inflammation. Pre-eclampsia is one of the commonest cause of both maternal and fetal morbidity as it is characterized by hypertension and hyperprotenuria. Improving periodontal health before or during pregnancy may prevent or reduce the occurrences of these adverse pregnancy outcomes and, therefore, reduce the maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Hence, this article is an attempt to review the relationship between periodontal condition and altered pregnancy outcome. PMID:26229389

  20. Adverse pregnancy outcomes and cardiovascular risk factor management.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Puja K; Minissian, Margo; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading health threat to American women. In addition to establish risk factors for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking, and obesity, adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) including pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, and gestational diabetes are now recognized as factors that increase a woman's risk for future CVD. CVD risk factor burden is disproportionately higher in those of low socioeconomic status and in ethnic/racial minority women. Since younger women often use their obstetrician/gynecologist as their primary health provider, this is an opportune time to diagnose and treat CVD risk factors early. Embedding preventive care providers such as nurse practitioners or physician assistants within OB/GYN practices can be considered, with referral to family medicine or internist for ongoing risk assessment and management. The American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association (ASA) stroke prevention guidelines tailored to women recommend that women with a history of pre-eclampsia can be evaluated for hypertension and other CVD risk factors within 6 months to 1-year post-partum. Given the burden and impact of CVD on women in our society, the entire medical community must work to establish feasible practice and referral patterns for assessment and treatment of CVD risk factors. PMID:26159741

  1. Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Cardiovascular Risk Factor Management

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Puja K.; Minissian, Margo; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading health threat to American women. In addition to established risk factors for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking, and obesity, adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) including pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, and gestational diabetes are now recognized as factors that increase a woman’s risk for future CVD. CVD risk factor burden is disproportionately higher in those of low socioeconomic status and in ethnic/racial minority women. Since younger women often use their obstetrician/gynecologist as their primary health provider, this is an opportune time to diagnose and treat CVD risk factors early. Embedding preventive care providers such as nurse practitioners or physician assistants within OB/GYN practices can be considered, with referral to family medicine or internist for ongoing risk assessment and management. The American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association (ASA) stroke prevention guidelines tailored to women recommend that women with a history of pre-eclampsia be evaluated for hypertension and other CVD risk factors within 6 months to 1 year post-partum. Given the burden and impact of CVD on women our society, the entire medical community must work to establish feasible practice and referral patterns for assessment and treatment of CVD risk factors. PMID:26159741

  2. Association of Gestational Hypertensive Disorders with Retinopathy of prematurity: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Priscilla Y. L.; Tang, Shu-Min; Au, Sunny C. L.; Rong, Shi-Song; Lau, Henry H. W.; Ko, Simon T. C.; Ng, Danny S. C.; Chen, Li Jia; Yam, Jason C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The role of gestational hypertensive disorders, which includes both pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension, in the development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has been controversial. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the association between gestational hypertensive disoders and ROP. Eligible studies published up to June 5, 2016 were identified from MEDLINE and EMBASE that evaluated the association between the two conditions. Totally 1142 published records were retrieved for screening, 925 of them eligible for detailed evaluation. Finally 19 studies involving 45281 infants with 5388 cases of ROP met our criteria for meta-analysis. Gestational hypertensive disorders were not associated with ROP (unadjusted OR: 0.89; P = 0.38; adjusted OR: 1.35; P = 0.18). Subgroup analyses also revealed no significant association between ROP with pre-eclampsia (unadjusted OR: 0.85; P = 0.29; adjusted OR:1.29; P = 0.28) or with gestational hypertension (unadjusted OR: 1.10; P = 0.39; adjusted OR: 1.25; P = 0.60) separately. Sensitivity analysis indicated our results were robust. We concluded no significant association between gestational hypertensive disorders and ROP. More large scale well-conducted prospective cohorts on the topic are needed. PMID:27491726

  3. Periodontal Disease: A Possible Risk-Factor for Adverse Pregnancy Outcome.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Anuj Singh; Katoch, Vartika; Rajguru, Sneha A; Rajpoot, Nami; Singh, Pinojj; Wakhle, Sonal

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial invasion in subgingival sites especially of gram-negative organisms are initiators for periodontal diseases. The periodontal pathogens with persistent inflammation lead to destruction of periodontium. In recent years, periodontal diseases have been associated with a number of systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular-disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic respiratory diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes including pre-term low-birth weight (PLBW) and pre-eclampsia. The factors like low socio-economic status, mother's age, race, multiple births, tobacco and drug-abuse may be found to increase risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. However, the same are less correlated with PLBW cases. Even the invasion of both aerobic and anerobic may lead to inflammation of gastrointestinal tract and vagina hence contributing to PLBW. The biological mechanism involved between PLBW and Maternal periodontitis is the translocation of chemical mediators of inflammation. Pre-eclampsia is one of the commonest cause of both maternal and fetal morbidity as it is characterized by hypertension and hyperprotenuria. Improving periodontal health before or during pregnancy may prevent or reduce the occurrences of these adverse pregnancy outcomes and, therefore, reduce the maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Hence, this article is an attempt to review the relationship between periodontal condition and altered pregnancy outcome. PMID:26229389

  4. Gestational weight gain, prepregnancy body mass index related to pregnancy outcomes in KAZERUN, FARS, IRAN

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaei, Mozhgan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate associations between pregnancy outcomes and prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain among pregnant women who regularly attended health centers of Kazerun, Fars, Iran. Methods: In this descriptive study records from 5172 pregnant women were considered in this study, based on the methodology criteria. Women were distributed across 4 prepregnancy categories according to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) (1990) classification of body mass index, and to 4 end-of-pregnancy categories according to median weekly gestational weight gain. Results: The risks for gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and preterm premature rupture of membranes were higher for those who were overweight or obese before becoming pregnant (P < 0.05). Moreover, a gestational weight gain of 0.50 kg per week or greater was associated with a higher risk for gestational hypertension, preterm premature rupture of membranes, and fetal macrosomia (P < 0.05). Women in the highest quartile for weight gain (≥ 0.59 kg per week) were at higher risk for pre-eclampsia (P < 0.05). Discussion: The results seems to indicate that excessive gestational weight gain and high prepregnancy body mass index were associated with increased risks for adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:22439074

  5. ENDOCRINOLOGY IN PREGNANCY: Influence of maternal vitamin D status on obstetric outcomes and the fetal skeleton.

    PubMed

    Moon, Rebecca J; Harvey, Nicholas C; Cooper, Cyrus

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin D status has been increasingly associated with wide-ranging clinical outcomes. There is now a wealth of observational studies reporting on its associations with obstetric complications, including pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes and the mode and timing of delivery. The findings are inconsistent, and currently there is a lack of data from high-quality intervention studies to confirm a causal role for vitamin D in these outcomes. This is similarly true with regards to fetal development, including measures of fetal size and skeletal mineralisation. Overall, there is an indication of possible benefits of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy for offspring birthweight, calcium concentrations and bone mass as well as for reduced maternal pre-eclampsia. However, for none of these outcomes is the current evidence base conclusive, and the available data justify the instatement of high-quality randomised placebo controlled trials in a range of populations and health care settings to establish the potential efficacy and safety of vitamin D supplementation to improve particular outcomes. PMID:25862787

  6. Stroke in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Feske, Steven K

    2007-11-01

    Although pregnancy-associated stroke is uncommon, the risk of stroke is greatly increased above the low baseline rate in young patients during late pregnancy and, even more so, during the puerperium. Stroke is a major contributor to the serious morbidity and mortality of pregnancy. The physiological hormonally mediated changes in circulation, vascular tissue structure, and coagulability, and the pathological state of pre-eclampsia-eclampsia contribute to this increased risk of stroke. Pregnancy-associated strokes are roughly evenly divided among hemorrhagic strokes, mainly from rupture of aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs); ischemic strokes, mainly from late pregnancy and postpartum cerebral venous thrombosis; and strokes associated with pre-eclampsia-eclampsia, with a contribution from cardioembolism, especially in populations at risk from a high rate of underlying rheumatic valvular heart disease. Awareness of the types of stroke to expect during pregnancy will facilitate early diagnosis. This article discusses the pathogenesis of pregnancy-associated stroke, its epidemiology, and some diagnostic and therapeutic issues unique to pregnancy. PMID:17940923

  7. The Salivary Scavenger and Agglutinin (SALSA) in Healthy and Complicated Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Reichhardt, Martin Parnov; Jarva, Hanna; Lokki, Anna Inkeri; Laivuori, Hannele; Vuorela, Piia; Loimaranta, Vuokko; Glasner, Andreas; Siwetz, Monika; Huppertz, Berthold; Meri, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. The etiology is not clear, but an immune attack towards components of placenta or fetus has been indicated. This involves activation of the complement system in the placenta. We have previously described the presence of the complement-regulating protein salivary scavenger and agglutinin (SALSA) in amniotic fluid. In this study we investigated the potential role of SALSA in pregnancy by analyzing its presence in amniotic fluid and placental tissue during healthy and complicated pregnancies. SALSA levels in amniotic fluid increased during pregnancy. Before 20 weeks of gestation the levels were slightly higher in patients who later developed pre-eclampsia than in gestation age-matched controls. In the placenta of pre-eclamptic patients syncytial damage is often followed by the formation of fibrinoid structures. SALSA was found clustered into these fibrinoid structures in partial co-localization with complement C1q and fibronectin. In vitro analysis showed direct protein binding of SALSA to fibronectin. SALSA binds also to fibrin/fibrinogen but did not interfere with the blood clotting process in vitro. Thus, in addition to antimicrobial defense and epithelial differentiation, the data presented here suggest that SALSA, together with fibronectin and C1q, may be involved in the containment of injured placental structures into fibrinoids. PMID:26828433

  8. Role of calcium supplementation during pregnancy in reducing risk of developing gestational hypertensive disorders: a meta-analysis of studies from developing countries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypertension in pregnancy stand alone or with proteinuria is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity in the world. Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown that an inverse relationship exists between calcium intake and development of hypertension in pregnancy though the effect varies based on baseline calcium intake and pre-existing risk factors. The purpose of this review was to evaluate preventive effect of calcium supplementation during pregnancy on gestational hypertensive disorders and related maternal and neonatal mortality in developing countries. Methods A literature search was carried out on PubMed, Cochrane Library and WHO regional databases. Data were extracted into a standardized excel sheet. Identified studies were graded based on strengths and limitations of studies. All the included studies were from developing countries. Meta-analyses were generated where data were available from more than one study for an outcome. Primary outcomes were maternal mortality, eclampsia, pre-eclampsia, and severe preeclampsia. Neonatal outcomes like neonatal mortality, preterm birth, small for gestational age and low birth weight were also evaluated. We followed standardized guidelines of Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG) to generate estimates of effectiveness of calcium supplementation during pregnancy in reducing maternal and neonatal mortality in developing countries, for inclusion in the Lives Saved Tool (LiST). Results Data from 10 randomized controlled trials were included in this review. Pooled analysis showed that calcium supplementation during pregnancy was associated with a significant reduction of 45% in risk of gestational hypertension [Relative risk (RR) 0.55; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.36-0.85] and 59% in the risk of pre-eclampsia [RR 0.41; 95 % CI 0.24-0.69] in developing countries. Calcium supplementation during pregnancy was also associated with a significant reduction in neonatal mortality

  9. Prevention of congenital malformations and other adverse pregnancy outcomes with 4.0 mg of folic acid: community-based randomized clinical trial in Italy and the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 a Cochrane review confirmed that folic acid (FA) supplementation prevents the first- and second-time occurrence of neural tube defects (NTDs). At present some evidence from observational studies supports the hypothesis that FA supplementation can reduce the risk of all congenital malformations (CMs) or the risk of a specific and selected group of them, namely cardiac defects and oral clefts. Furthermore, the effects on the prevention of prematurity, foetal growth retardation and pre-eclampsia are unclear. Although the most common recommendation is to take 0.4 mg/day, the problem of the most appropriate dose of FA is still open. The aim of this project is to assess the effect a higher dose of peri-conceptional FA supplementation on reducing the occurrence of all CMs. Other aims include the promotion of pre-conceptional counselling, comparing rates of selected CMs, miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, small for gestational age, abruptio placentae. Methods/Design This project is a joint effort by research groups in Italy and the Netherlands. Women of childbearing age, who intend to become pregnant within 12 months are eligible for the studies. Women are randomly assigned to receive 4 mg of FA (treatment in study) or 0.4 mg of FA (referent treatment) daily. Information on pregnancy outcomes are derived from women-and-physician information. We foresee to analyze the data considering all the adverse outcomes of pregnancy taken together in a global end point (e.g.: CMs, miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, small for gestational age). A total of about 1,000 pregnancies need to be evaluated to detect an absolute reduction of the frequency of 8%. Since the sample size needed for studying outcomes separately is large, this project also promotes an international prospective meta-analysis. Discussion The rationale of these randomized clinical trials (RCTs) is the hypothesis that a higher intake of FA is related to a higher risk reduction of

  10. Increased planned delivery contributes to declining rates of pregnancy hypertension in Australia: a population-based record linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Christine L; Algert, Charles S; Morris, Jonathan M; Ford, Jane B

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since the 1990s, pregnancy hypertension rates have declined in some countries, but not all. Increasing rates of early planned delivery (before the due date) have been hypothesised as the reason for the decline. The aim of this study was to explore whether early planned delivery can partly explain the declining pregnancy hypertension rates in Australia. Design Population-based record linkage study utilising linked birth and hospital records. Setting and participants A cohort of 1 076 122 deliveries in New South Wales, Australia, 2001–2012. Outcome measures Pregnancy hypertension (including gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia) was the main outcome; pre-eclampsia was a secondary outcome. Results From 2001 to 2012, pregnancy hypertension rates declined by 22%, from 9.9% to 7.7%, and pre-eclampsia by 27%, from 3.3% to 2.4% (trend p<0.0001). At the same time, planned deliveries increased: prelabour caesarean section by 43% (12.9–18.4%) and labour inductions by 10% (24.8–27.2%). Many maternal risk factors for pregnancy hypertension significantly increased (p<0.01) over the study period including nulliparity, age ≥35 years, diabetes, overweight and obesity, and use of assisted reproductive technologies; some risk factors decreased including multifetal pregnancies, age <20 years, autoimmune diseases and previous pregnancy hypertension. Given these changes in risk factors, the pregnancy hypertension rate was predicted to increase to 10.5%. Examination of annual gestational age distributions showed that pregnancy hypertension rates actually declined from 38 weeks gestation and were steepest from 41 weeks; at least 36% of the decrease could be attributed to planned deliveries. The risk factors for pregnancy hypertension were also risk factors for planned delivery. Conclusions It appears that an unanticipated consequence of increasing early planned deliveries is a decline in the incidence of pregnancy hypertension. Women with risk

  11. Maternal deaths associated with eclampsia in South Africa: Lessons to learn from the confidential enquiries into maternal deaths, 2005 - 2007.

    PubMed

    Moodley, J

    2010-11-01

    Eclampsia is the commonest direct cause of maternal death in South Africa. The latest Saving Mothers Report (2005-2007) indicates that there were 622 maternal deaths due to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Of these, 334 (55.3%) were due to eclampsia; of the eclamptic deaths, 50 were over the age of 35 years and 83 were under 20 years old. Avoidable factors involved patient related factors (mainly delay in seeking help), administrative factors (mainly delay in transport) and health personnel issues (mainly due to delay in referring patients). The major causes of death were cerebrovascular accidents and cardiac failure. The majority of deaths due to cardiac failure were due to pulmonary oedema. To reduce deaths from eclampsia, more attention must be given to the detection of pre-eclampsia; the provision of information on the advantages of antenatal care to the population at large and training of health professions in the management of obstetric emergencies. PMID:21081020

  12. Infertility today: the management of female medical causes.

    PubMed

    Tinneberg, Hans-Rudolf; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    It has to be suspected that some environmentally hazardous substances have genotoxic properties, revealing their reproductive toxicity at a later stage only. Cancer, including childhood cancer, is more common than usually expected. Undesirable side effects of surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation can be premature ovarian failure or even premature menopause. In cases of autoimmune disease, autoantibodies can directly affect maturation of oocytes in the follicle, fertilization, and implantation. Spontaneous abortions are more common in patients with autoimmune disease. Thrombophilia is known to display a higher rate of spontaneous abortions as well as pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth retardation. Infections are a common threat to pregnancy. Metabolic syndrome is increasingly frequent in western countries and often associated with hyperandrogenemia and polycystic disease. Women with inflammatory bowel disease such as Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis usually have no problems conceiving. In conclusion, even though infertility is a multifactorial disease, various medical and non-medical conditions can be attributed to it. PMID:24140222

  13. Extracellular vesicles and reproduction-promotion of successful pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tannetta, Dionne; Dragovic, Rebecca; Alyahyaei, Zahraa; Southcombe, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-bound complexes secreted from cells under both physiological and pathological conditions. They contain proteins, nucleic acids and lipids and act as messengers for cell-cell communication and signalling, particularly between immune cells. EV research is a rapidly evolving and expanding field, and it appears that all biological fluids contain very large numbers of EVs; they are produced from all cells that have been studied to date, and are known to have roles in several reproductive processes. This review analyses the evidence for the role of EVs throughout human reproduction, starting with the paternal and maternal gametes, followed by the establishment and continuation of successful pregnancies, with specific focus, where possible, on the interaction of EVs with the maternal immune system. Importantly, variations within the EV populations are identified in various reproductive disorders, such as pre-term labour and pre-eclampsia. PMID:24954226

  14. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting as postpartum headache.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mariam; Salahuddin, Ayesha; Mathew, Namitha R; Nandhagopal, Ramachandiran

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum headache is described as headache and neck or shoulder pain during the first 6 weeks after delivery. Common causes of headache in the puerperium are migraine headache and tension headache; other causes include pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, post-dural puncture headache, cortical vein thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome, brain tumor, cerebral ischemia, meningitis, and so forth. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare cause of postpartum headache. It is usually associated with papilledema, headache, and elevated intracranial pressure without any focal neurologic abnormality in an otherwise healthy person. It is more commonly seen in obese women of reproductive age group, but rare during pregnancy and postpartum. We present a case of IIH who presented to us 18 days after cesarean section with severe headache and was successfully managed. PMID:26818168

  15. Smoking can be good for you.

    PubMed

    Wolf, R; Orion, E; Matz, H; Maitra, S; Rowland-Payne, C

    2004-04-01

    Smoking is without doubt one of the greatest causes of avoidable illness and death in the modern world. Most well known is the relationship between smoking and numerous cancers, cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease. Smoking and most especially nicotine, are, however, sometimes beneficial in certain diseases, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, allergic alveolitis, nausea and vomiting of pregnancy, pre-eclampsia, fibroids, carcinoma of body of uterus, ulcerative colitis, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous stomatitis and ulceration, pemphigus, herpes simplex and acne. In the immensely justifiable enthusiasm to discredit this dangerous activity, the mechanisms behind these beneficial effects tend to have been un-discussed or ignored. It is the aim of this paper to spur interest in the reasons for these effects. If the mechanisms are elucidated, therapeutic advances may be possible. PMID:17147565

  16. A second delivery after heart transplantation – a case study

    PubMed Central

    Kalinka, Jarosław; Szubert, Maria; Zdziennicki, Andrzej; Chojnowski, Krzysztof; Maciejewski, Marek; Piestrzeniewicz, Katarzyna; Drożdż, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy after organ transplantation is becoming relatively common. We present the case of a heart transplant recipient who gave birth to a second child. Despite the fact that the transplanted heart seems to adapt well to the changes caused by pregnancy, gestation in patients after heart transplantation may be complicated by hypertension, pre-eclampsia, or preterm labor. In this article, we consider the issues of preterm uterine contractions, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and several other complications in pregnant patients with transplanted hearts. We also present current opinions regarding the use of glucocorticoids as a form of preventing breathing disorders in neonates as well as breast-feeding by mothers receiving immunosuppressive agents. Pregnancies in heart transplant recipients should be considered high-risk. A second successful delivery of a healthy child remains a challenge for such patients and their doctors. PMID:26336446

  17. Pregnancy outcomes in Southeast Asian migrant workers at Southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Hanprasertpong, T; Hanprasertpong, J

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to determine the pregnancy outcomes and identify predictive factors of adverse outcomes in pregnant migrant workers who delivered at Songklanagarind Hospital from January 2002 to December 2012. Two hundred and forty migrant worker pregnancies were enrolled. Pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, pre-term birth and foetal intrauterine growth restriction found were 15, 7.9, 13.7 and 3.7%, respectively. No stillbirth was found. Apgar score was

  18. Development of prenatal screening--A historical overview.

    PubMed

    Cuckle, Howard; Maymon, Ron

    2016-02-01

    The first prenatal screening test to be introduced was based on a single maternal serum marker of neural tube defects. Since then various prenatal screening concepts have been developed, the most successful being Down syndrome risk estimation using multiple serum and ultrasound markers. Today a completely new approach to aneuploidy screening is available based on maternal plasma cell-free DNA testing. This has the potential to markedly improve screening performance but routine testing is currently too expensive in a public health setting. However, it can be cost-effective when used in combination with existing multi-maker tests. Some are beginning to broaden prenatal screening to include pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia that can be prevented using soluble low-dose aspirin treatment started before 16 weeks of gestation. Prenatal screening for cardiac abnormalities, fragile X syndrome and recessive genetic disorders is underutilized and public health planners should considered a more widespread application of available methods. PMID:26764253

  19. Disease-Modifying Drug Possibly Linked to Placental Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Salahudheen, Sultan M.; Begam, Muzibunnisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) such as interferon (IFN)-β and glatiramer acetate are often prescribed to slow disability progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, adverse pregnancy outcomes have been reported with these medications. We report the rare occurrence of severe placental complications in a 30-year-old pregnant woman with MS who continued to take IFN-β during her first trimester. She presented at the Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, in 2013 with early-onset fetal growth restriction. At 30 gestational weeks, she developed severe pre-eclampsia. The baby was delivered via emergency Caesarean section and was discharged at the age of two months. Continuation of IFN-β during pregnancy may have contributed to the development of placental insufficiency in this patient. Increased education regarding the risks of DMDs for pregnant patients with MS is very important to ensure successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27606121

  20. [Takayashu and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Belyamani, L; Azendour, H; Elmoqadem, A; Kouach, J; Zidouh, S; Drissi Kamili, N

    2009-06-01

    Takayashu arteritis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the large arteries, usually affecting the aorta and its large branches and the pulmonary arteries, with a higher incidence during the childbearing years. We report the case of a 33-year-old patient, primigravida with Takayashu arteritis diagnosed three years ago. At 37 weeks of gestation, she was admitted for a pre-eclampsia and a left ventricular insufficiency. Elective caesarean section under general anesthesia after joint decision between the attending obstetrician and the medical and anesthetic consultants, and allowed the extraction of a hypotrophic baby. The association of pregnancy with Takayashu's arteritis is almost always uneventful. It is associated with high values of maternal blood pressure and severe intra-uterine growth retardation. PMID:18930177

  1. Exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy: Impact on pregnancy complications and outcome.

    PubMed

    Ali, Z; Hansen, A V; Ulrik, C S

    2016-05-01

    Asthma is common among pregnant women, and the incidence of asthma exacerbations during pregnancy is high. This literature review provides an overview of the impact of exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy on pregnancy-related complications. The majority of published retrospective studies reveal that asthma exacerbations during pregnancy increase the risk of pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, placental abruption and placenta praevia. Furthermore, these women also have higher risk for breech presentation, haemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, caesarean delivery, maternal admission to the intensive care unit and longer postpartum hospital stay. Asthma has been associated with increased risk of intrauterine growth retardation, small-for-gestational age, low birth weight, infant hypoglycaemia and preterm birth, but more recent prospective studies have not revealed significant associations with regard to these outcomes. In conclusion, asthma exacerbations during pregnancy are associated with complications of pregnancy, labour and delivery. Prevention of exacerbations is essential to reduce the risk of complications and poor outcome. PMID:26467747

  2. Recruiting American Indian Women for a Genetic Epidemiology Study

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, M.; Best, L.

    2010-01-01

    Due to previous negative experiences, some American Indian communities are distrustful of research in general and genetic research in particular. The Turtle Mountain Community College was awarded a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant with 3 aims: (1) to study possible genetic influences on pre-eclampsia, (2) to encourage tribal college students to consider biomedical careers and (3) to develop the local research infrastructure. Retrospectively identified case (91) and control (188) participants were recruited into Phase I over a 3-year period and additional participants (71) were concurrently recruited from a prenatal clinic into a prospective case/control study, Phase II. This paper describes some of the challenges and solutions we encountered in the process of recruiting American Indian participants into a genetic epidemiologic study. PMID:20616521

  3. Full-term abdominal extrauterine pregnancy complicated by post-operative ascites with successful outcome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Advanced abdominal (extrauterine) pregnancy is a rare condition with high maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Because the placentation in advanced abdominal pregnancy is presumed to be inadequate, advanced abdominal pregnancy can be complicated by pre-eclampsia, which is another condition with high maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis and management of advanced abdominal pregnancy is difficult. Case presentation We present the case of a 33-year-old African woman in her first pregnancy who had a full-term advanced abdominal pregnancy and developed gross ascites post-operatively. The patient was successfully managed; both the patient and her baby are apparently doing well. Conclusion Because most diagnoses of advanced abdominal pregnancy are missed pre-operatively, even with the use of sonography, the cornerstones of successful management seem to be quick intra-operative recognition, surgical skill, ready access to blood products, meticulous post-operative care and thorough assessment of the newborn. PMID:23302289

  4. Racial Differences in C-Reactive Protein Levels During Normal Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Picklesimer, Amy H; Jared, Heather L.; Moss, Kevin; Offenbacher, Steven; Beck, James D; Boggess, Kim A

    2008-01-01

    Objective Characterization of serum C-Reactive Protein (CRP) levels in a diverse population of healthy pregnant women using a high sensitivity assay. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis of a cohort of 775 pregnant women. CRP measured on serum specimens drawn <26 weeks gestation using highly sensitive ELISA kits. Results Median CRP was 4.8 mg/L (inter-quartile range 0.63 – 15.7). Black women had higher median CRP values than whites (7.68 mg/L vs 2.59 mg/L, p<.001). Black women demonstrated higher levels of CRP even after controlling for known confounding factors such as smoking and maternal weight. Conclusion Pregnancy is an inflammatory stressor. The etiology of racial differences is unclear, but may be important for understanding racial disparities in the incidence inflammatory disorders such as preterm labor and pre-eclampsia. PMID:18539258

  5. Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy and in postpartum period: treatment and latest recommendations.

    PubMed

    Vandana; Kumar, Amit; Khatuja, Ritu; Mehta, Sumita

    2014-05-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is the second most common endocrine disorder, only after diabetes mellitus, affecting females in reproductive age group. Pregnancy is associated with profound repercussions on the thyroid status of a lady. Thyroid dysfunctions such as hypothyroidism, thyrotoxicosis and thyroid nodules may develop during pregnancy leading to abortion, placental abruptions, pre-eclampsia, preterm delivery and reduced intellectual function in the offspring. Thus, maintenance of euthyroid state is of utmost important for maternal and fetal well being during pregnancy as well as after. The Endocrine Society has issued latest guidelines regarding the diagnosis and management of thyroid dysfunction related to pregnancy. All the clinicians should be well aware of the latest recommendations regarding management of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy and in postpartum phase and practice them accordingly. PMID:24510157

  6. A Short History of Sonography in Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, S.

    2013-01-01

    The history of sonography in Obstetrics and Gynaecology dates from the classic 1958 Lancet paper of Ian Donald and his team from Glasgow. Fifty years on it is impossible to conceive of practising Obstetrics and Gynaecology without one of the many forms of ultrasound available today. Technological developments such as solid state circuitry, real time imaging, colour and power Doppler, transvaginal sonography and 3/4D imaging have been seized by clinical researchers to enhance the investigation and management of patients in areas as diverse as assessment of fetal growth and wellbeing, screening for fetal anomalies, prediction of pre-eclampsia and preterm birth, detection of ectopic gestation, evaluation of pelvic masses, screening for ovarian cancer and fertility management. Ultrasound guided procedures are now essential components of fetal therapy and IVF treatment. This concise history is written by someone who has witnessed each of these advances throughout the ultrasound era and is able to give perspective to these momentous happenings. PMID:24753947

  7. Roles and regulation of the matrix metalloproteinase system in parturition.

    PubMed

    Geng, Junnan; Huang, Cong; Jiang, Siwen

    2016-04-01

    Significant tissue destruction, repair, and remodeling are involved in parturition, which involves fetal membrane rupture, cervical ripening, and uterine contraction and its subsequent involution. Extracellular matrix degradation and remodeling by proteolytic enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), are required for the final steps of parturition. MMPs participate in physiological degradation and remodeling through their proteolytic activities on specific substrates, and are balanced by the action of their inhibitors. Disruption to this balance can result in pathological stress that ends with preterm or post-term birth or pre-eclampsia. In this review, we examine the roles and regulation of the MMP system in physiological and pathological labor, and propose a model that illustrates the mechanisms by which the MMP system contributes to these processes. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 276-286, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26888468

  8. When a pregnancy required a neurological consultation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ferraldeschi, M; Tari Capone, F; Di Lisi, F; Patella, R; Ceschim, V; Cao, M; Cannoni, S; Rasura, M

    2012-11-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a transient clinical and neuroradiological syndrome characterized by clinical signs and symptoms including hypertension, seizures, altered mental status, headache, and vision changes and characteristic features on head computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. PRES is most commonly reported in the literature in association with obstetric patients suffering from pre-eclampsia or eclampsia. In the acute setting, it is important to recognize the characteristics of PRES and immediately treat patients' emerging conditions that are hypertension and seizures. The following case report describes a pregnant patient who presented clinical characteristics of eclampsia with recurrent episodes of seizure and hypertension complicated by PRES. This case highlights the importance of early recognition and treatment of this condition that is usually transient and completely reversible, but can lead to ischemic injury and irreversible brain damage. PMID:23306742

  9. Obstetric management of obesity in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jarvie, Eleanor; Ramsay, Jane E

    2010-04-01

    Rates of obesity among the pregnant population have increased substantially and adiposity has a damaging effect on every aspect of female reproductive life. This review summarises epidemiological data concerning obesity-related complications of pregnancy. Obesity is linked to a number of adverse obstetric outcomes as well as increased maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. These complications include miscarriage, congenital abnormalities, pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, iatrogenic preterm delivery, postdates pregnancy with increased rates of induction of labour, caesarean section, postpartum haemorrhage, shoulder dystocia, infection, venous thromboembolism, and increased hospital stay. It is important to consider obese pregnant women as a high risk group with a linear increase in risk of complications associated with their degree of obesity. Their obstetric management should be consultant-led and involve a multidisciplinary team approach to improve outcome. PMID:19880362

  10. Disease-Modifying Drug Possibly Linked to Placental Insufficiency: Severe placental complications in a pregnant woman with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Salahudheen, Sultan M; Begam, Muzibunnisa A

    2016-08-01

    Disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) such as interferon (IFN)-β and glatiramer acetate are often prescribed to slow disability progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, adverse pregnancy outcomes have been reported with these medications. We report the rare occurrence of severe placental complications in a 30-year-old pregnant woman with MS who continued to take IFN-β during her first trimester. She presented at the Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, in 2013 with early-onset fetal growth restriction. At 30 gestational weeks, she developed severe pre-eclampsia. The baby was delivered via emergency Caesarean section and was discharged at the age of two months. Continuation of IFN-β during pregnancy may have contributed to the development of placental insufficiency in this patient. Increased education regarding the risks of DMDs for pregnant patients with MS is very important to ensure successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27606121

  11. Clinical and Preclinical Use of LOX-1-Specific Antibodies in Diagnostics and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    De Siqueira, Jonathan; Abdul Zani, Izma; Russell, David A; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi

    2015-11-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (SR-E1, LOX-1, OLR1) was first discovered as a vascular receptor for modified lipoprotein particles nearly 20 years ago. Since then, in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated an association between LOX-1, a soluble form (sLOX-1) and a number of diseases including atherosclerosis, arthritis, hypertension and pre-eclampsia. However, converting such discoveries into tools and drugs for routine clinical use is dependent on translational preclinical and clinical studies but such studies have only begun to emerge in the past decade. In this review, we identify the key clinical applications and corresponding criteria that need to be addressed for the effective use of LOX-1-related probes and molecules for patient benefit in different disease states. PMID:26385009

  12. Current trends in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome with desire for children

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Margalida E; Prat, Maria O; Checa, Miguel Angel; Carreras, Ramon C

    2009-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most frequent endocrine diseases, affects approximately 5%–10% of women of childbearing age and constitutes the most common cause of female sterility regardless of the need or not for treatment, a change in lifestyle is essential for the treatment to work and ovulation to be restored. Obesity is the principal reason for modifying lifestyle since its reduction improves ovulation and the capacity for pregnancy and lowers the risk of miscarriage and later complications that may occur during pregnancy (gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, etc). When lifestyle modification is not sufficient, the first step in ovulation induction is clomiphene citrate. The second-step recommendation is either exogenous gonadotrophins or laparoscopic ovarian surgery. Recommended third-line treatment is in vitro fertilization. Metformin use in PCOS should be restricted to women with glucose intolerance. PMID:19536311

  13. Repeated dosing of digoxin-fragmented antibody in preterm eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Adair, C D; Buckalew, V M; Kipikasa, J; Torres, C; Stallings, S P; Briery, C M

    2009-02-01

    Early onset eclampsia has significant morbidity and mortality for both the mother and fetus. No effective treatment exists at present except delivery and seizure prophylaxis with magnesium sulfate. We report the novel use of a fragmented ovine antibody against digoxin for the treatment of eclampsia. A 16-year-old primagravida at 29 weeks 5/7 days gestation presented with clinical diagnosis of eclampsia and was treated with compassionate off-label use of digoxin-fragmented ovine antibody (Digibind Glaxo Smith Kline, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA). Improvement of her underlying disorder during a 48 h treatment window was noted without adverse maternal or neonatal outcome. We suggest digoxin-fragmented ovine antibody as a possible intervention in preterm pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia or eclampsia. PMID:19177044

  14. [Pregnancies in hemodialysis and in patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease : epidemiology, management and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Panaye, Marine; Jolivot, Anne; Lemoine, Sandrine; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Doret, Muriel; Morelon, Emmanuel; Juillard, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    Pregnancy in patients presenting end-stage renal disease is rare and there are currently no recommendations for the management of these patients. In hemodialysis patients, reduced fertility and medical reluctance limit the frequency of pregnancies. Although the prognosis has significantly improved, a significant risk for unfavorable maternal (pre-eclampsia, eclampsia) and fetal (pre-term birth, intrauterine growth restriction, still death) outcome still remains. Increasing dialysis dose with the initiation of daily dialysis sessions, early adaptation of medications to limit teratogenicity and management of chronic kidney disease complications (anemia, hypertension) are required. A tight coordination between nephrologists and obstetricians remains the central pillar of the care. In peritoneal dialysis, pregnancy is also possible with modification of the exchange protocol and reducing volumes. PMID:25457994

  15. Role of Heme Oxygenase, Leptin, Coenzyme Q10 and Trace Elements in Pre-eclamptic Women.

    PubMed

    Abo-Elmatty, Dina M; Badawy, Ehsan A; Hussein, Jihan S; Elela, Somaya Abo; Megahed, Hoda A

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study to evaluate heme oxygenase (COHb), leptin and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in pre-eclamptic women. Also Zinc, copper, Iron, total iron binding capacity, Ferritin and uric acid were assessed. 120 female subjects were included in this study. They were divided into, 60 female with normal pregnancy attending the outpatient clinic, 60 pre-eclamptic patients were recruited from obstetrics and gynaecology department El-kasr El-Aini hospital. The results showed that in pre-eclampatic group, leptin level was significantly increased while COHb and CoQ10 was significantly decreased. It is concluded that hemeoxygenase, leptin and coenzyme CoQ10 can be considered as new markers for prediction of pre-eclampsia. PMID:24082464

  16. Maternal arterial elasticity in the first trimester as a predictor of birthweight.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Clare; O'Higgins, Amy; Segurado, Ricardo; Turner, Michael J; Stuart, Bernard; Kennelly, Máireád M

    2016-07-01

    The early detection of foetal growth restriction and macrosomia is an important goal of modern obstetric care. Aberrant foetal growth is an important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Current modalities for detecting the abnormal foetal growth are often inadequate. Pulse wave analysis using applanation tonometry is a simple and non-invasive test that provides information about the cardiovascular system. Arterial elasticity has previously been implicated in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia and cardiovascular disease. Our study examined the relationship between maternal arterial elasticity and birthweight by using pulse wave analysis. We discovered that increased large artery elasticity predicted a larger baby at birth. Large artery elasticity therefore has the potential to act as a useful screening tool which may help in the prediction of women who are at risk of aberrant foetal growth. PMID:26800380

  17. [Bariatric surgery and pregnancy: literature review].

    PubMed

    Ferrand Miranda, Pedro; Contreras Rivas, Tomas; Leigh Pacciarini, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has currently reached epidemic proportions, both in Chile and in the world. This condition is associated to a variety of maternal complications in all stages of the vital cycle and during pregnancy. Medical treatment has not proved successful thus resulting in an increase in bariatric surgery in recent years, even when it is not first line treatment. This literature review aims to report updated results of surgical treatment for obesity before and during pregnancy with respect to fertility, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension. It also looks into the possible effects of surgery on fetal development, and its relation to premature delivery, fetal macrosomy, low birth weight and neural tube defects, as well as effects on maternal and fetal outcomes, mainly in nutrition. Lastly, we suggest some recommendations that arise from this review on the role of contraception, nutrition and time between surgery and pregnancy. PMID:25192021

  18. The Role of Decidual Macrophages During Normal and Pathological Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ning, Fen; Liu, Huishu; Lash, Gendie E

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages perform many specific functions including host defense, homeostasis, angiogenesis, and tissue development. Macrophages are the second most abundant leukocyte population in the non-pregnant endometrium and pregnant decidua and likely play a central role in the establishment and maintenance of normal pregnancy. Importantly, aberrantly activated uterine macrophages can affect trophoblast function and placental development, which may result in various adverse pregnancy outcomes ranging from pre-eclampsia to fetal growth restriction or demise. Only by fully understanding the roles of macrophage in pregnancy will we be able to develop interventions for the treatment of these various pregnancy complications. This review discusses the general origin and classification of monocytes and macrophages and focuses on the phenotype and functional roles of decidual macrophage at the maternal-fetal interface in normal pregnancy, as well as discussing the potential contribution of the abnormal state of these cells to various aspects of pregnancy pathologies. PMID:26750089

  19. Pheochromocytoma in pregnancy: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    George, J; Tan, J Y L

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in pregnancy that can result in significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The common causes include pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension and essential hypertension. Although phaeochromocytoma is a rare cause of hypertension in pregnancy, it can lead to potentially life-threatening cardiovascular complications for the mother and increased fetal mortality if left undiagnosed and untreated. The diagnosis can be confirmed by measurement of plasma and urinary catecholamines and their metabolities followed by radiological localization of the tumour. Surgical resection of the tumour after adequate pre-operative control of hypertension using sequential alpha- followed by beta-blockers is the definitive treatment. In pregnancy, depending on the gestation at which diagnosis is made, the optimal timing for surgery is during the late first or early second trimester. When the pregnancy is more advanced, medical management followed by combined caesarean section and tumour resection closer to term is preferred.

  20. Successful Pregnancy Following Assisted Reproduction in Woman With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    de Macedo, José Fernando; de Macedo, Gustavo Capinzaiki; Campos, Luciana Aparecida; Baltatu, Ovidiu Constantin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus have a poor prognosis of pregnancy, since it is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity, including spontaneous miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal death and pre-term delivery. We report a case with successful pregnancy in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and hypertension. A 39-year-old nulliparous woman presented with systemic lupus erythematosus with antinuclear and antiphospholipid antibodies, hypertension and recurrent pregnancy loss presented for assisted reproduction. The patient responded well to enoxaparin and prednisone during both assisted reproduction and prenatal treatment. This case report indicates that prescription of immunosuppressant and blood thinners can be safely recommended throughout the whole prenatal period in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Enoxaparin and prednisone may be prescribed concurrently during pregnancy. PMID:26376400

  1. Human chronic gonadotropin concentrations in very early pregnancy and subsequent preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Rabie, Nader Z; Magann, Everett F

    2014-09-01

    Evaluation of: Asvold BO, Vatten LJ, Tanbo TG, Eskild A. Concentrations of human chorionic gonadotrophin in very early pregnancy and subsequent pre-eclampsia: a cohort study. Hum. Reprod. 29(6), 1153-1160 (2014). A total of 2405 consecutive singleton pregnancies were followed to determine if early HCG levels were associated with the development of preeclampsia. All pregnancies were conceived by in vitro fertilization, which allowed very accurate gestational age dating. HCG levels were obtained on day 12, and grouped into 4 categories (<50, 50-99, 100-149, ≥ 150). HCG levels less than 50 were associated with an odds ratio of 2.3 (95% CI: 1.2-4.7) for preeclampsia and and odds ratio of 4.2 (95% CI: 1.4-12.2) for severe preeclampsia. Early HCG levels may serve as a marker for the detection of preeclampsia. PMID:25335537

  2. A comparison between 24-hour and 2-hour urine collection for the determination of proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Somanathan, N; Farrell, T; Galimberti, A

    2003-07-01

    Proteinuria is one of the fundamental criteria for the diagnosis of pre-eclampsia with quantitative assessment based on the 24-hour urine protein estimation as the gold standard. This study was undertaken to determine whether a 2-hour protein estimation correlated with that of a formal 24-hour collection. Thirty women with proteinuric hypertension were recruited. There was significant correlation between the 2-hour and 24-hour urine protein levels (Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.76 (P 0.000). A positive 2-hour test was associated more closely with significant levels of 24-hour proteinuria than dipstick analysis alone. We conclude from this study that a random 2-hour sample could be used for the initial assessment of proteinuria and so avoid the delay associated with 24-hour quantification of urinary protein. PMID:12881076

  3. Predicting the development of pregnancy-associated hypertension. The place of standardised blood-pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Gallery, E D; Hunyor, S N; Ross, M; Györy, A Z

    1977-06-18

    82 initially normotensive pregnant women with no known history of renal disease were seen at monthly intervals from 16 weeks' amenorrhoea onwards, and their blood-pressure (B.P.) was measured sitting and lying on their left side. 15 developed hypertension (B.P. greater than 135/85 mm Hg lying on the left side) in late pregnancy. When these women were compared with the 67 who remained normotensive throughout, their B.P.s were found to be significantly higher even in early pregnancy, although individual patients were not always separable in this way. When B.P. measured in this rigidly standardised manner was compared with routine antenatal clinic values, it was apparent that the latter did not detect the difference between the two groups. Women who develop hypertension in the third trimester of pregnancy (pre-eclampsia) may represent a separate group from entirely normal pregnant women from the beginning of pregnancy. PMID:68380

  4. Successful pregnancy with autoimmune cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Braga, António; Braga, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy with liver cirrhosis is a rare and dangerous event that exposes mother and fetus to potentially lethal risks. During pregnancy, hepatic decompensation could suffice and the development of hepatic failure and encephalopathy could occur. The incidence of obstetric complications is also increased with a high rate of pre-eclampsia, postpartum bleeding, preterm delivery and stillbirth. We report a case of a 27-year-old woman with autoimmune hepatitis and liver cirrhosis complicated by splenomegaly, oesophageal varices and severe thrombocytopaenia. During pregnancy, close clinical and analytical surveillance was performed. She was medicated with corticosteroids, azathioprine and propranolol. At the 25th week of gestation, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed to control oesophageal varices. This patient had an uneventful pregnancy until 37 weeks. At 37th week of gestation, after spontaneous rupture of membranes, signs of acute fetal distress were observed, and an urgent caesarean was performed. Good neonatal and maternal outcomes were achieved. PMID:26825934

  5. What are the roles of macrophages and monocytes in human pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Tang, Mao-Xing; Hu, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Zhao-Zhao; Kwak-Kim, Joanne; Liao, Ai-Hua

    2015-11-01

    During pregnancy, the maternal immune system is challenged by the semi-allogeneic fetus, which leads to systemic and local immunity. Systemic immunity, including enhanced innate immunity with increased activation of monocytes, is induced by various placental factors. Maternal immune adaptations are most evident at the feto-maternal interface, where macrophages are enriched and communicate with various decidual leukocytes. These cells are not only contributing to the protection of the growing fetus from microorganisms, but also aiding placental development by promoting trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodeling, and the parturition process. Thus, monocytes and macrophages concurrently play important roles throughout the trimesters. Dysregulation of these cells may thus lead to pregnancy complications, such as pre-eclampsia and preterm labor. In this review, monocytes and macrophage subsets and their roles in normal and pathological pregnancies are reviewed. PMID:26340023

  6. Vitamin supplementation in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Ensuring that a woman is well-nourished, both before and during pregnancy, is crucial for the health of the woman and that of the unborn child.(1) Maternal deficiency in key nutrients has been linked to pre-eclampsia, restricted fetal growth, neural tube defects, skeletal deformity and low birth weight.(1,2) Many nutritional supplements containing vitamins, minerals and other micronutrients are heavily marketed to women for all stages of pregnancy. However, much of the evidence for vitamin supplementation in pregnancy comes from studies carried out in low-income countries,(3) where women are more likely to be undernourished or malnourished than within the UK population. The challenges lie in knowing which supplements are beneficial and in improving uptake among those at most need. Here we summarise current UK guidance for vitamin supplementation in pregnancy and review the evidence behind it. PMID:27405305

  7. Hypertensive crisis during pregnancy and postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Too, Gloria T; Hill, James B

    2013-08-01

    Hypertension affects 10% of pregnancies, many with underlying chronic hypertension, and approximately 1-2% will undergo a hypertensive crisis at some point during their lives. Hypertensive crisis includes hypertensive urgency and emergency; the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists describes a hypertensive emergency in pregnancy as persistent (lasting 15 min or more), acute-onset, severe hypertension, defined as systolic BP greater than 160 mmHg or diastolic BP >110 mmHg in the setting of pre-eclampsia or eclampsia. Pregnancy may be complicated by hypertensive crisis, with lower blood pressure threshold for end-organ damage than non-pregnant patients. Maternal assessment should include a thorough history. Fetal assessment should include heart rate tracing, ultrasound for growth and amniotic assessment, and Doppler evaluation if growth restriction is suspected. Initial management of hypertensive emergency (systolic BP >160 mmHg or diastolic BP >110 mmHg in the setting of pre-eclampsia or eclampsia) generally includes the rapid reduction of blood pressure through the use of intravenous antihypertensive medications, with goal systolic blood pressure between 140 mmHg and 150 mmHg and diastolic pressure between 90 mmHg and 100 mmHg. First-line intravenous drugs include labetalol and hydralazine, but other agents may be used, including esmolol, nicardipine, nifedipine, and, as a last resort, sodium nitroprusside. Among patients with hypertensive urgency, slower blood pressure reduction can be provided with oral agents. The objective of this article is to review the current understanding, diagnosis, and management of hypertensive crisis during pregnancy and the postpartum period. PMID:23916027

  8. Inter-pregnancy weight change impacts placental weight and is associated with the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in the second pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The inter-pregnancy period is considered a teachable moment when women are receptive to weight- management guidance aimed at optimising pregnancy outcome in subsequent pregnancies. In population based studies inter-pregnancy weight change is associated with several adverse pregnancy outcomes but the impact on placental size is unknown. Methods The association between inter-pregnancy weight change and the primary risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in the second pregnancy was investigated in 12,740 women with first two consecutive deliveries at a single hospital using logistic regression. Results Compared with women who were weight stable, weight loss (>1BMI unit) between pregnancies was associated with an increased risk of spontaneous preterm delivery, low placental weight and small for gestational age (SGA) birth, while weight gain (>3BMI units) increased the risk of pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, emergency caesarean section, placental oversize and large for gestational age (LGA) birth at the second pregnancy. The relationship between weight gain and pre-eclampsia risk was evident in women who were overweight at first pregnancy only (BMI ≥25 units), while that between weight loss and preterm delivery was confined to women with a healthy weight at first pregnancy (BMI <25 units). In contrast, the association between weight loss and SGA was independent of first pregnancy BMI. A higher percentage of women who were obese at first pregnancy were likely to experience a large weight gain (P < 0.01) or weight loss (P < 0.001) between consecutive pregnancies compared with the normal BMI reference group. Conclusion Inter-pregnancy weight change in either direction increases the risk of a number of contrasting pregnancy complications, including extremes of placental weight. The placenta may lie on the causal pathway between BMI change and the risk of LGA or SGA birth. PMID:24450357

  9. Knowledge of midwives about hypertensive disorders during pregnancy in primary healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Ngwekazi, Nompumelelo L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many factors or medical conditions may influence the outcome of pregnancy, which in turn, may increase infant and maternal morbidity and mortality. One such condition is an increase in blood pressure (BP). Setting The study was conducted in maternity obstetrical units (MOUs) in primary healthcare clinics (PHCs) in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Objectives To determine the knowledge about hypertensive disorders during pregnancy (HDPs) of registered midwives working in MOUs in PHCs. Methods A quantitative descriptive correlation research design was applied. A simple random sample of 43 (44%) rural and urban clinics was selected, and all registered midwives (n = 101) working in these clinics completed a self-administered questionnaire. Data were collected over a period of 1 month. The reliability and validity of the methodology were supported by experts and a pilot study. Descriptive statistics including various statistical tests to determine any associations between variables using a 95% confidence interval were applied. Results A gap in the knowledge of midwives about HDPs was identified. Only 56.4% of the participants correctly answered the questions on the clinical manifestations of severe pre-eclampsia and 68.3% on the factors affecting BP, whereas 27.7% had no understanding about pre-eclampsia. Significant statistical differences were identified in the knowledge of staff in clinics where doctors visit regularly versus those in clinics where there are no visits (p = 0.04), and between experience of midwives and management of HDPs (p = 0.02). Conclusion The knowledge of midwives is deficient regarding HDPs. Continuous professional development is critical in midwifery both in theory and in clinical practice. PMID:27247155

  10. Pregnancies in liver and kidney transplant recipients: a review of the current literature and recommendation.

    PubMed

    Blume, C; Pischke, S; von Versen-Höynck, F; Günter, H H; Gross, M M

    2014-11-01

    In this article, we focus on the biggest groups of organ transplant recipients, patients with a kidney or liver graft. Among these patients, about one sixth included women of childbearing potential. Therefore, the wish of getting pregnant is frequent in these peculiar patients, and careful planning and management of the pregnancies requires the expertise of obstetricians, midwives and transplant experts. Altogether, the outcome of the pregnancies in these women is acceptable. About 75% off all pregnancies ended successfully with live births, and this is comparable if not superior to pregnancies in healthy women. This success might be caused not only by the special and intensive care provided to these high-risk pregnancies by the transplant centres but also by the low rate of unplanned pregnancies. The risk of rejections and organ loss after delivery is about 10%, and it is slightly enhanced in liver transplant recipients (LTRs) in comparison to kidney graft recipients (KTRs) but the number of organ losses in direct association with a pregnancy is rare. However, there is not only a higher frequency of pregnancy-associated disorders such as pre-eclampsia and preterm delivery but also an acceleration of hypertension, new-onset diabetes mellitus and newly arising infections also favoured by the maintained immunosuppressive therapy. This implies a specialized 'control system' for these pregnant women that comprises ultrasound and Doppler investigation for risk assessment, infection screening, suitable therapy and the choice of non-teratogenic immunosuppressives. Antihypertensive treatment must be well balanced and adjusted to the possible growth-retarding effect on the foetus as well as on the co-morbidity of the mother. Finally, supplementation of vitamin D and iron is much more important in these transplanted women than in healthy pregnant women as vitamin D deficiency and anaemia are discussed to have an impact on pre-eclampsia and preterm delivery. These claims are