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Sample records for pre-eclampsia

  1. Update on genetics of pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Linda

    2013-04-01

    Over half of the familial predisposition to pre-eclampsia can be attributed to genetic factors in the mother and/or fetus. The search for genetic susceptibility variants has progressed through candidate gene studies, family-based linkage studies, and most recently genome-wide association studies (GWAS). It is unlikely that any single variant has a large effect on pre-eclampsia susceptibility; studies involving thousands of samples are required to detect variants with small effect size. These exceed the resources of most individual research groups, and collaborative approaches are likely to be more fruitful. Collaboration has included meta-analysis of existing data, and recent publications offer some support to a role for thrombophilic polymorphisms in pre-eclampsia. A small number of GWAS have been published so far; the lack of replication of positive GWAS results in an independent population has been frustrating. This may be due to false positive results in the original GWAS, or lack of statistical power in the replication set. A further concern is that the pre-eclampsia syndrome is a common end-point to multiple pathologies with differing underlying genetic susceptibility, requiring ever larger sample sizes for their detection. In this climate, researchers should make every effort to record the phenotypic characteristics of their cohorts, to enable meta-analysis of independent GWAS results. The InterPregGen consortium of groups from Europe and Central Asia is conducting GWAS analysis of maternal and fetal genes in 13,000 pre-eclamptic pregnancies. This study will provide the opportunity to analyse maternal-fetal gene interactions in addition to their individual effects. Developments arising from the ever-falling costs of DNA sequencing include deep sequencing to identify rare variants with large effect sizes. The era of whole genome sequencing is likely to supplant the GWAS approach, creating challenges for data analysis, but with the potential to provide greater insights into the genetic basis of pre-eclampsia. PMID:26105842

  2. Molecular association of pathogenetic contributors to pre-eclampsia (pre-eclampsia associome)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia is the most common complication occurring during pregnancy. In the majority of cases, it is concurrent with other pathologies in a comorbid manner (frequent co-occurrences in patients), such as diabetes mellitus, gestational diabetes and obesity. Providing bronchial asthma, pulmonary tuberculosis, certain neurodegenerative diseases and cancers as examples, we have shown previously that pairs of inversely comorbid pathologies (rare co-occurrences in patients) are more closely related to each other at the molecular genetic level compared with randomly generated pairs of diseases. Data in the literature concerning the causes of pre-eclampsia are abundant. However, the key mechanisms triggering this disease that are initiated by other pathological processes are thus far unknown. The aim of this work was to analyse the characteristic features of genetic networks that describe interactions between comorbid diseases, using pre-eclampsia as a case in point. Results The use of ANDSystem, Pathway Studio and STRING computer tools based on text-mining and database-mining approaches allowed us to reconstruct associative networks, representing molecular genetic interactions between genes, associated concurrently with comorbid disease pairs, including pre-eclampsia, diabetes mellitus, gestational diabetes and obesity. It was found that these associative networks statistically differed in the number of genes and interactions between them from those built for randomly chosen pairs of diseases. The associative network connecting all four diseases was composed of 16 genes (PLAT, ADIPOQ, ADRB3, LEPR, HP, TGFB1, TNFA, INS, CRP, CSRP1, IGFBP1, MBL2, ACE, ESR1, SHBG, ADA). Such an analysis allowed us to reveal differential gene risk factors for these diseases, and to propose certain, most probable, theoretical mechanisms of pre-eclampsia development in pregnant women. The mechanisms may include the following pathways: [TGFB1 or TNFA]-[IL1B]-[pre-eclampsia]; [TNFA or INS]-[NOS3]-[pre-eclampsia]; [INS]-[HSPA4 or CLU]-[pre-eclampsia]; [ACE]-[MTHFR]-[pre-eclampsia]. Conclusions For pre-eclampsia, diabetes mellitus, gestational diabetes and obesity, we showed that the size and connectivity of the associative molecular genetic networks, which describe interactions between comorbid diseases, statistically exceeded the size and connectivity of those built for randomly chosen pairs of diseases. Recently, we have shown a similar result for inversely comorbid diseases. This suggests that comorbid and inversely comorbid diseases have common features concerning structural organization of associative molecular genetic networks. PMID:25879409

  3. Combined Screening for Early Detection of Pre-Eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jin; Shim, Sung Shin; Cha, Dong Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Although the precise pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia remains unknown, this condition continues to be a major cause of maternal and fetal mortality. Early prediction of pre-eclampsia would allow for timely initiation of preventive therapy. A combination of biophysical and biochemical markers are superior to other tests for early prediction of the development of pre-eclampsia. Apart from the use of parameters in first-trimester aneuploidy screening, cell-free fetal DNA quantification is emerging as a promising marker for prediction of pre-eclampsia. This article reviews the current research of the most important strategies for prediction of pre-eclampsia, including the use of maternal risk factors, mean maternal arterial pressure, ultrasound parameters, and biomarkers. PMID:26247944

  4. Apolipoprotein E alleles in women with severe pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, B; Rigó, J; Fintor, L; Karádi, I; Tóth, T

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the frequency of apolipoprotein E (apoE) alleles among women with severe pre-eclampsia. The presence of the three most common apoE alleles (epsilon 2, epsilon 3, epsilon 4) was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in three groups of white women: non-pregnant healthy (n = 101), pregnant healthy (n = 52), and pregnant with a diagnosis of severe pre-eclampsia (n = 54). The frequency of apo epsilon 2 was highest among women with severe pre-eclampsia (16.6%) followed by non-pregnant women (12.9%), and those experiencing a healthy pregnancy (10.6%). The higher frequency of the apo epsilon 2 allele detected among women with severe pre-eclampsia suggests that apoE may play a role in the development of pre-eclampsia. PMID:9659248

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF ANTIBODY SPECIFICITIES ASSOCIATED WITH PRE-ECLAMPSIA

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Serra E.; Parchim, Nicholas F.; Liu, Chen; Xia, Yang; Kellems, Rodney E.; Soffici, Alex R.; Daugherty, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of maternal autoantibodies has been previously associated with pre-eclampsia, although the composition of the antibody repertoire in pre-eclampsia has not been well characterized. Given this, we applied bacterial display peptide libraries to identify peptides that preferentially react with plasma antibodies from patients with pre-eclampsia (n=15) versus healthy-outcome pregnancies (n=18). Screening using fluorescence activated cell sorting identified 38 peptides that preferentially bind to antibodies from individuals with pre-eclampsia. These pre-eclampsia specific peptides possessed similar motifs of RG/SG/?WWG/S, RWWG/S, or WGWGXXR/K distinct from the angiotensin II type 1 receptor epitope AFHYESQ. Seven library-isolated peptides and a cell-surface displayed type 1 receptor epitope were used to construct a diagnostic algorithm with a training set of 18 new pre-eclamptic and 22 healthy-outcome samples from geographically distinct cohorts. Cross-validation within the training group resulted in averaged areas underneath a receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.78 and 0.72 with and without the known receptor epitope, respectively. In a small validation set (pre-eclamptic = 12, healthy = 8), the algorithm consisting only of library-isolated peptides correctly classified 10 pre-eclamptic and 6 healthy, using a predefined cutoff that achieved 61% sensitivity (95%CI: 36–83%) at 95% specificity (95%CI: 77–100%) in training set (n=40) cross-validation. Our results indicate that antibodies with specificities other than anti-angiotensin II type 1 receptor are prevalent in pre-eclampsia patients and may be useful as diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:24446060

  6. Diagnosis and management of pre-eclampsia: an update

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Judi A

    2010-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a significant, multifactorial, multiorgan disease affecting 5%–8% of all pregnancies in the US where it is the third leading cause of maternal mortality. Despite improvements in the diagnosis and management of pre-eclampsia, severe complications can occur in both the mother and the fetus, and there is no effective method of prevention. Early detection and identification of pregnant women most at risk of developing the disease have proven challenging, but recent efforts combining biochemical and biophysical markers are promising. Efforts at prevention of pre-eclampsia with aspirin and calcium have had limited success, but research on modifiable risk factors, such as obesity surgery, are encouraging. Obstetric management of severe pre-eclampsia focuses on medical management of blood pressure and prevention of seizures using magnesium sulfate, but the ultimate cure remains delivery of the fetus and placenta. Timing of delivery depends on several factors, including gestational age, fetal lung maturity, and most importantly, disease severity. Anesthetic management includes regional anesthesia with careful evaluation of the patient’s airway, volume status, and coagulation status to reduce morbidity and mortality. The potential complications of general anesthesia, including intracranial hemorrhage, in these patients make regional anesthesia the preferred choice in many cases. Nevertheless, it is important to be aware of the contraindications to neuraxial anesthesia and to prepare always for the possibility of encountering a difficult airway. PMID:21151680

  7. Angiotensin receptor agonistic autoantibodies induce pre-eclampsia in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cissy C; Zhang, Yujin; Irani, Roxanna A; Zhang, Hong; Mi, Tiejuan; Popek, Edwina J; Hicks, M John; Ramin, Susan M; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2008-08-01

    Pre-eclampsia affects approximately 5% of pregnancies and remains a leading cause of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity in the United States and the world. The clinical hallmarks of this maternal disorder include hypertension, proteinuria, endothelial dysfunction and placental defects. Advanced-stage clinical symptoms include cerebral hemorrhage, renal failure and the HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets) syndrome. An effective treatment of pre-eclampsia is unavailable owing to the poor understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. Numerous recent studies have shown that women with pre-eclampsia possess autoantibodies, termed AT(1)-AAs, that bind and activate the angiotensin II receptor type 1a (AT(1) receptor). We show here that key features of pre-eclampsia, including hypertension, proteinuria, glomerular endotheliosis (a classical renal lesion of pre-eclampsia), placental abnormalities and small fetus size appeared in pregnant mice after injection with either total IgG or affinity-purified AT(1)-AAs from women with pre-eclampsia. These features were prevented by co-injection with losartan, an AT(1) receptor antagonist, or by an antibody neutralizing seven-amino-acid epitope peptide. Thus, our studies indicate that pre-eclampsia may be a pregnancy-induced autoimmune disease in which key features of the disease result from autoantibody-induced angiotensin receptor activation. This hypothesis has obvious implications regarding pre-eclampsia screening, diagnosis and therapy. PMID:18660815

  8. Angiotensin receptor agonistic autoantibodies induce pre-eclampsia in pregnant mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cissy C; Zhang, Yujin; Irani, Roxanna A; Zhang, Hong; Mi, Tiejuan; Popek, Edwina J; Hicks, M John; Ramin, Susan M; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia affects approximately 5% of pregnancies and remains a leading cause of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity in the United States and the world1,2. The clinical hallmarks of this maternal disorder include hypertension, proteinuria, endothelial dysfunction and placental defects. Advanced-stage clinical symptoms include cerebral hemorrhage, renal failure and the HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets) syndrome. An effective treatment of pre-eclampsia is unavailable owing to the poor understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. Numerous recent studies3–5 have shown that women with pre-eclampsia possess autoantibodies, termed AT1-AAs, that bind and activate the angiotensin II receptor type 1a (AT1 receptor). We show here that key features of pre-eclampsia, including hypertension, proteinuria, glomerular endotheliosis (a classical renal lesion of pre-eclampsia), placental abnormalities and small fetus size appeared in pregnant mice after injection with either total IgG or affinity-purified AT1-AAs from women with pre-eclampsia. These features were prevented by co-injection with losartan, an AT1 receptor antagonist, or by an antibody neutralizing seven–amino-acid epitope peptide. Thus, our studies indicate that pre-eclampsia may be a pregnancy-induced autoimmune disease in which key features of the disease result from autoantibody-induced angiotensin receptor activation. This hypothesis has obvious implications regarding pre-eclampsia screening, diagnosis and therapy. PMID:18660815

  9. MBL Interferes with Endovascular Trophoblast Invasion in Pre-Eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Agostinis, Chiara; Bossi, Fleur; Masat, Elisa; Radillo, Oriano; Tonon, Maddalena; De Seta, Francesco; Tedesco, Francesco; Bulla, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    The spiral arteries undergo physiologic changes during pregnancy, and the failure of this process may lead to a spectrum of pregnancy disorders, including pre-eclampsia. Our recent data indicate that decidual endothelial cells (DECs), covering the inner side of the spiral arteries, acquire the ability to synthesize C1q, which acts as a link between endovascular trophoblast and DECs favouring the process of vascular remodelling. In this study, we have shown that sera obtained from pre-eclamptic patients strongly inhibit the interaction between extravillous trophoblast (EVT) and DECs, preventing endovascular invasion of trophoblast cells. We further demonstrated that mannose-binding lectin (MBL), one of the factor increased in pre-eclamptic patient sera, strongly inhibits the interaction of EVT with C1q interfering with the process of EVT adhesion to and migration through DECs. These data suggest that the increased level of MBL in pre-eclampsia may contribute to the failure of the endovascular invasion of trophoblast cells. PMID:22203857

  10. MBL interferes with endovascular trophoblast invasion in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Agostinis, Chiara; Bossi, Fleur; Masat, Elisa; Radillo, Oriano; Tonon, Maddalena; De Seta, Francesco; Tedesco, Francesco; Bulla, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    The spiral arteries undergo physiologic changes during pregnancy, and the failure of this process may lead to a spectrum of pregnancy disorders, including pre-eclampsia. Our recent data indicate that decidual endothelial cells (DECs), covering the inner side of the spiral arteries, acquire the ability to synthesize C1q, which acts as a link between endovascular trophoblast and DECs favouring the process of vascular remodelling. In this study, we have shown that sera obtained from pre-eclamptic patients strongly inhibit the interaction between extravillous trophoblast (EVT) and DECs, preventing endovascular invasion of trophoblast cells. We further demonstrated that mannose-binding lectin (MBL), one of the factor increased in pre-eclamptic patient sera, strongly inhibits the interaction of EVT with C1q interfering with the process of EVT adhesion to and migration through DECs. These data suggest that the increased level of MBL in pre-eclampsia may contribute to the failure of the endovascular invasion of trophoblast cells. PMID:22203857

  11. Advances in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia and related podocyte injury

    PubMed Central

    Craici, Iasmina M.; Wagner, Steven J.; Weissgerber, Tracey L.; Grande, Joseph P.; Garovic, Vesna D.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a pregnancy-specific hypertensive disorder that may lead to serious maternal and fetal complications. It is a multisystem disease that is commonly, but not always, accompanied by proteinuria. Its cause(s) remain unknown, and delivery remains the only definitive treatment. It is increasingly recognized that many pathophysiological processes contribute to this syndrome, with different signaling pathways converging at the point of systemic endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, and proteinuria. Different animal models of pre-eclampsia have proven utility for specific aspects of pre-eclampsia research, and offer insights into pathophysiology and treatment possibilities. Therapeutic interventions that specifically target these pathways may optimize pre-eclampsia management and may improve fetal and maternal outcomes. In addition, recent findings regarding placental, endothelial, and podocyte pathophysiology in pre-eclampsia provide unique and exciting possibilities for improved diagnostic accuracy. Emerging evidence suggests that testing for urinary podocytes or their markers may facilitate the prediction and diagnosis of pre-eclampsia. In this review, we explore recent research regarding placental, endothelial, and podocyte pathophysiology. We further discuss new signaling and genetic pathways that may contribute to pre-eclampsia pathophysiology, emerging screening and diagnostic strategies, and potential targeted interventions. PMID:24573315

  12. Interleukin-1 family cytokines and their regulatory proteins in normal pregnancy and pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Southcombe, J H; Redman, C W G; Sargent, I L; Granne, I

    2015-09-01

    Maternal systemic inflammation is a feature of pre-eclampsia, a condition in pregnancy characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. Pre-eclampsia is caused by the placenta; many placental factors contribute to the syndrome's progression, and proinflammatory cytokines have been identified previously as one such mediator. The interleukin (IL)-1 family of cytokines are key regulators of the inflammatory network, and two naturally occurring regulatory molecules for IL-1 family cytokines, IL-1RA and sST2, have been found previously to be elevated in maternal blood from women with pre-eclampsia. Here we investigate more recently identified IL-1 family cytokines and regulatory molecules, IL-1RAcP, IL-37, IL-18BP, IL-36?/?/?/Ra and IL-38 in pre-eclampsia. Pregnant women have more circulating IL-18BP and IL-36Ra than non-pregnant women, and sIL-1RAcP is elevated from women with pre-eclampsia compared to normal pregnancies. The placenta expresses all the molecules, and IL-37 and IL-18BP are up-regulated significantly in pre-eclampsia placentas compared to those from normal pregnancies. Together, these changes contribute to the required inhibition of maternal systemic cytotoxic immunity in normal pregnancy; however, in pre-eclampsia the same profile is not seen. Interestingly, the increased circulating levels of sIL-1RAcP and increased placental IL-18BP and IL-37, the latter of which we show to be induced by hypoxic damage to the placenta, are all factors which are anti-inflammatory. While the placenta is often held responsible for the damage and clinical symptoms of pre-eclampsia by the research community, here we show that the pre-eclampsia placenta is also trying to prevent inflammatory damage to the mother. PMID:25693732

  13. Reliable pre-eclampsia pathways based on multiple independent microarray data sets.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kaoru; Kondoh, Eiji; Chigusa, Yoshitsugu; Ujita, Mari; Murakami, Ryusuke; Mogami, Haruta; Brown, J B; Okuno, Yasushi; Konishi, Ikuo

    2015-02-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a multifactorial disorder characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations. Gene expression profiling of preeclamptic placenta have provided different and even opposite results, partly due to data compromised by various experimental artefacts. Here we aimed to identify reliable pre-eclampsia-specific pathways using multiple independent microarray data sets. Gene expression data of control and preeclamptic placentas were obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. Single-sample gene-set enrichment analysis was performed to generate gene-set activation scores of 9707 pathways obtained from the Molecular Signatures Database. Candidate pathways were identified by t-test-based screening using data sets, GSE10588, GSE14722 and GSE25906. Additionally, recursive feature elimination was applied to arrive at a further reduced set of pathways. To assess the validity of the pre-eclampsia pathways, a statistically-validated protocol was executed using five data sets including two independent other validation data sets, GSE30186, GSE44711. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed for genes in a panel of potential pre-eclampsia pathways using placentas of 20 women with normal or severe preeclamptic singleton pregnancies (n = 10, respectively). A panel of ten pathways were found to discriminate women with pre-eclampsia from controls with high accuracy. Among these were pathways not previously associated with pre-eclampsia, such as the GABA receptor pathway, as well as pathways that have already been linked to pre-eclampsia, such as the glutathione and CDKN1C pathways. mRNA expression of GABRA3 (GABA receptor pathway), GCLC and GCLM (glutathione metabolic pathway), and CDKN1C was significantly reduced in the preeclamptic placentas. In conclusion, ten accurate and reliable pre-eclampsia pathways were identified based on multiple independent microarray data sets. A pathway-based classification may be a worthwhile approach to elucidate the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia. PMID:25323968

  14. Role of kinins in mediating vascular function in healthy pregnancy and pre-eclampsia 

    E-print Network

    Moyes, Amie Jane

    2010-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a pregnancy-related disorder characterised by high blood pressure, proteinuria and oedema. The aetiology of the disease is unclear but evidence suggests that endothelial dysfunction is central to the ...

  15. Effect of Low-Dose Aspirin or Calcium Supplementation on the incidence of Pre-eclampsia

    E-print Network

    during a mother's first pregnancy. Pre- eclampsia is a multi-system disorder of unknown etiology. During were excluded if they had a history of cardiovascular, renal or endocrine problems, and medical

  16. Decidual Hemostasis, Inflammation, and Angiogenesis in Pre-Eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.; Huang, S.J.; Krikun, Graciela; Caze, Rebeca; Rahman, Mizanur; Buchwalder, Lynn F.; Schatz, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    Invasion of the decidua by extravascular trophoblasts (EVTs) is accompanied by thrombin generation from decidual cell (DC) -expressed tissue factor (TF). This TF protects against hemorrhage as EVTs breach capillaries and subsequently invade and remodel spiral arteries and arterioles. Pre-eclampsia (P-EC) is the world’s leading cause of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. It is associated with decidual hemorrhage and maternal thrombophilias, which form excess thrombin from DCs, and with maternal infections and other inflammatory conditions that are associated with excess expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1b) and tumor necrosis factor –alpha (TNF-a). In human first trimester leukocyte-free DCs: 1) thrombin enhances expression of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis; 2) thrombin, IL-1b and TNF-a increase monocyte-recruiting chemokine expression leqading to a macrophage excess in the pre-eclamptic decidua. The pathogenesis of P-EC likely stems from shallow EVT invasion leading to impaired decidual vascular remodeling. The resulting reduced uteroplacental blood flow is associated with a hypoxic placenta, which appears to secrete excess sFlt-1 into the maternal plasma. A regulatory role for DCs in vascular remodeling is indicated since impaired decidual vascular remodeling could stem from an aberrant local anti-angiogenic milieu elicited by excess sFlt-1 and/or macrophage inhibited EVT decidual invasion. PMID:21370218

  17. Is Xanthine Oxidase, a Marker in Pre-eclampsia? A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bambrana, Vanishree; Kotur, Pushpa P

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pre-eclampsia is an obstetrics problem that affects multiple systemic functions and leads to the increased maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The objective of the study was to evaluate the plasma levels of Xanthine oxidase (XO) activity, uric acid and Nitric oxide (NO) levels in women with pre-eclampsia and normal pregnancy during antenatal and postpartum period. Materials and Methods A case control study was conducted in women with normal pregnancy (n=50) and pre-eclampsia (n=50) before and after delivery. XO activity, uric acid and NO levels were determined from samples at 30-39 weeks of gestation. The current study was conducted in association with Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of R.L. Jalappa Hospital and Research Center. The blood samples were analysed for assay of XO, uric acid and NO. The results were analysed by using SPSS software version 2013. P-value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results The plasma XO activity was elevated (p<0.001) in the pre-eclampsia compared to normotensive pregnant women before delivery and decreased after delivery (p<0.001) significantly. Uric acid level showed a significant increase in pre-eclampsia when compared to the control before delivery (p<0.001) however values were non-significant after delivery. Conclusion Placenta plays a key role in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia. Placenta removal leads to decrease trend of xanthine oxidase activity, uric acid and elevation of Nitric oxide as reversible changes in pre-eclampsia patients within 48 hours after delivery. PMID:26557508

  18. Association between risk for pre-eclampsia and HLA DR4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-17

    Dr. Kilpatrick and colleagues report results of a family study showing an association between HLA DR4 and mild and proteinuric pre-eclampsia in a British (Edinburgh) maternal population. Among 76 parous sisters of women with protein uric pre-eclampsia, they found that sisters with pregnancy-induced hypertension (pre-eclampsia with or without proteinuria) had a higher frequency of HLA DR4 antigen than did normotensive sisters. In addition, they cited unpublished findings in which they found a higher frequency of HLA DR4 antigen in a large sample of pre-eclamptic women and their babies than in appropriate controls. The authors have completed a study of HLA antigens and pregnancy outcome among a coherent of 715 black (50.9%) and white (49.1%) primigravida who were delivered at a medical center in southern USA. HLA DR typing was done by the one-color fluorescence technique with reagents. On the basis of standard criteria for diagnosis of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, 6.9 of the cohort had mild non-proteinuric pre-eclampsia, 8.8% had pregnancy-induced hypertension, and 9.5% had combined pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. Whereas black women had higher rates than white women in all three clinical categories (eg, pregnancy-induced hypertension 10.7% vs 6.8%, respectively), differences were not significant and frequencies of HLA DR4 antigen were higher among normotensives in both races (results not shown). They therefore pooled the two racial groups for analyses.

  19. Anesthetic management of a case of severe pre-eclampsia with antepartum hemorrhage with pulmonary edema for caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Borkar, Sharmila; Barad, Deepa; Bharne, Sidhesh

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary edema is a rare complication of pre-eclampsia. We report a case of severe pre-eclampsia with abruptio placentae with intra-uterine fetal demise, complicated by pulmonary edema, managed under general anesthesia for caesarean section. PMID:25885621

  20. Anesthetic management of a case of severe pre-eclampsia with antepartum hemorrhage with pulmonary edema for caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Borkar, Sharmila; Barad, Deepa; Bharne, Sidhesh

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary edema is a rare complication of pre-eclampsia. We report a case of severe pre-eclampsia with abruptio placentae with intra-uterine fetal demise, complicated by pulmonary edema, managed under general anesthesia for caesarean section. PMID:25885621

  1. Unravelling the theories of pre-eclampsia: are the protective pathways the new paradigm?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Asif; Ramma, Wenda

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a vascular disorder of pregnancy where anti-angiogenic factors, systemic inflammation and oxidative stress predominate, but none can claim to cause pre-eclampsia. This review provides an alternative to the ‘two-stage model’ of pre-eclampsia in which abnormal spiral arteries modification leads to placental hypoxia, oxidative stress and aberrant maternal systemic inflammation. Very high maternal soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1 also known as sVEGFR) and very low placenta growth factor (PlGF) are unique to pre-eclampsia; however, abnormal spiral arteries and excessive inflammation are also prevalent in other placental disorders. Metaphorically speaking, pregnancy can be viewed as a car with an accelerator and brakes, where inflammation, oxidative stress and an imbalance in the angiogenic milieu act as the ‘accelerator’. The ‘braking system’ includes the protective pathways of haem oxygenase 1 (also referred as Hmox1 or HO-1) and cystathionine-?-lyase (also known as CSE or Cth), which generate carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) respectively. The failure in these pathways (brakes) results in the pregnancy going out of control and the system crashing. Put simply, pre-eclampsia is an accelerator–brake defect disorder. CO and H2S hold great promise because of their unique ability to suppress the anti-angiogenic factors sFlt-1 and soluble endoglin as well as to promote PlGF and endothelial NOS activity. The key to finding a cure lies in the identification of cheap, safe and effective drugs that induce the braking system to keep the pregnancy vehicle on track past the finishing line. PMID:25303561

  2. S-Nitrosoglutathione improves haemodynamics in early-onset pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Thomas R; Wilkinson, Ian B; Mahendru, Amita A; McEniery, Carmel M; Garner, Stephen F; Goodall, Alison H; Lees, Christoph C

    2014-01-01

    Aims To determine the effects of in vivo S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) infusion on cardiovascular function, platelet function, proteinuria and biomarker parameters in early-onset pre-eclampsia. Methods We performed an open-label dose-ranging study of GSNO in early-onset pre-eclampsia. Six women underwent GSNO infusion whilst receiving standard therapy. The dose of GSNO was increased incrementally to 100 ?g min?1 whilst maintaining blood pressure of >140/80 mmHg. Aortic augmentation index, aortic pulse wave velocity, blood pressure and maternal–fetal Doppler parameters were measured at each dose. Platelet P-selectin, protein-to-creatinine ratio and soluble anti-angiogenic factors were measured pre- and postinfusion. Results Augmentation index fell at 30 ?g min?1 S-nitrosoglutathione (?6%, 95% confidence interval 0.6 to 13%), a dose that did not affect blood pressure. Platelet P-selectin expression was reduced [mean (interquartile range), 6.3 (4.9–7.6) vs. 4.1 (3.1–5.7)% positive, P = 0.03]. Soluble endoglin levels showed borderline reduction (P = 0.06). There was a borderline significant change in pre-to-postinfusion protein-to-creatinine ratio [mean (interquartile range), 0.37 (0.09–0.82) vs. 0.23 (0.07–0.49) g mmol?1, P = 0.06]. Maternal uterine and fetal Doppler pulsatility indices were unchanged. Conclusions In early-onset pre-eclampsia, GSNO reduces augmentation index, a biomarker of small vessel tone and pulse wave reflection, prior to affecting blood pressure. Proteinuria and platelet activation are improved at doses that affect blood pressure minimally. These effects of GSNO may be of therapeutic potential in pre-eclampsia, a condition for which no specific treatment exists. Clinical studies of GSNO in early-onset pre-eclampsia will determine whether these findings translate to improvement in maternal and/or fetal outcome. PMID:24627995

  3. Unravelling the theories of pre-eclampsia: are the protective pathways the new paradigm?

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Asif; Ramma, Wenda

    2015-03-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a vascular disorder of pregnancy where anti-angiogenic factors, systemic inflammation and oxidative stress predominate, but none can claim to cause pre-eclampsia. This review provides an alternative to the 'two-stage model' of pre-eclampsia in which abnormal spiral arteries modification leads to placental hypoxia, oxidative stress and aberrant maternal systemic inflammation. Very high maternal soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1 also known as sVEGFR) and very low placenta growth factor (PlGF) are unique to pre-eclampsia; however, abnormal spiral arteries and excessive inflammation are also prevalent in other placental disorders. Metaphorically speaking, pregnancy can be viewed as a car with an accelerator and brakes, where inflammation, oxidative stress and an imbalance in the angiogenic milieu act as the 'accelerator'. The 'braking system' includes the protective pathways of haem oxygenase 1 (also referred as Hmox1 or HO-1) and cystathionine-?-lyase (also known as CSE or Cth), which generate carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) respectively. The failure in these pathways (brakes) results in the pregnancy going out of control and the system crashing. Put simply, pre-eclampsia is an accelerator-brake defect disorder. CO and H2S hold great promise because of their unique ability to suppress the anti-angiogenic factors sFlt-1 and soluble endoglin as well as to promote PlGF and endothelial NOS activity. The key to finding a cure lies in the identification of cheap, safe and effective drugs that induce the braking system to keep the pregnancy vehicle on track past the finishing line. PMID:25303561

  4. Disparities in pre-eclampsia and eclampsia among immigrant women giving birth in six industrialised countries

    PubMed Central

    Urquia, ML; Glazier, RH; Gagnon, AJ; Mortensen, LH; Nybo Andersen, A-M; Janevic, T; Guendelman, S; Thornton, D; Bolumar, F; Río Sánchez, I; Small, R; Davey, M-A; Hjern, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess disparities in pre-eclampsia and eclampsia among immigrant women from various world regions giving birth in six industrialised countries. Design Cross-country comparative study of linked population-based databases. Setting Provincial or regional obstetric delivery data from Australia, Canada, Spain and the USA and national data from Denmark and Sweden. Population All immigrant and non-immigrant women delivering in the six industrialised countries within the most recent 10-year period available to each participating centre (1995–2010). Methods Data was collected using standardised definitions of the outcomes and maternal regions of birth. Pooled data were analysed with multilevel models. Within-country analyses used stratified logistic regression to obtain odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Main outcome measures Pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and pre-eclampsia with prolonged hospitalisation (cases per 1000 deliveries). Results There were 9 028 802 deliveries (3 031 399 to immigrant women). Compared with immigrants from Western Europe, immigrants from Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America & the Caribbean were at higher risk of pre-eclampsia (OR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.63, 1.80 and 1.63; 95% CI: 1.57, 1.69) and eclampsia (OR: 2.12; 95% CI: 1.61, 2.79 and 1.55; 95% CI: 1.26, 1. 91), respectively, after adjustment for parity, maternal age and destination country. Compared with native-born women, European and East Asian immigrants were at lower risk in most industrialised countries. Spain exhibited the largest disparities and Australia the smallest. Conclusion Immigrant women from Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America & the Caribbean require increased surveillance due to a consistently high risk of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. PMID:24758368

  5. ST2 and IL-33 in Pregnancy and Pre-Eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Snider, James V.; Tannetta, Dionne S.; Child, Tim; Redman, Christopher W. G.; Sargent, Ian L.

    2011-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is associated with a mild systemic inflammatory response and an immune bias towards type 2 cytokine production, whereas pre-eclampsia is characterized by a more intense inflammatory response, associated with endothelial dysfunction and a type 1 cytokine dominance. Interleukin (IL)-33 is a newly described member of the IL-1 family, which binds its receptor ST2L to induce type 2 cytokines. A soluble variant of ST2 (sST2) acts as a decoy receptor to regulate the activity of IL-33. In this study circulating IL-33 and sST2 were measured in each trimester of normal pregnancy and in women with pre-eclampsia. While IL-33 did not change throughout normal pregnancy, or between non-pregnant, normal pregnant or pre-eclamptic women, sST2 was significantly altered. sST2 was increased in the third trimester of normal pregnancy (p<0.001) and was further increased in pre-eclampsia (p<0.001). This increase was seen prior to the onset of disease (p<0.01). Pre-eclampsia is a disease caused by placental derived factors, and we show that IL-33 and ST2 can be detected in lysates from both normal and pre-eclampsia placentas. ST2, but not IL-33, was identified on the syncytiotrophoblast layer, whereas IL-33 was expressed on perivascular tissue. In an in vitro placental perfusion model, sST2 was secreted by the placenta into the ‘maternal’ eluate, and placental explants treated with pro-inflammatory cytokines or subjected to hypoxia/reperfusion injury release more sST2, suggesting the origin of at least some of the increased amounts of circulating sST2 in pre-eclamptic women is the placenta. These results suggest that sST2 may play a significant role in pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia and increased sST2 could contribute to the type 1 bias seen in this disorder. PMID:21949719

  6. Artificial oxygen carriers rescue placental hypoxia and improve fetal development in the rat pre-eclampsia model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng; Ohta, Hidenobu; Tahara, Yu; Nakamura, Sakiko; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Nakagawa, Machiko; Oishi, Yoshihisa; Goto, Yu-ichi; Wada, Keiji; Kaga, Makiko; Inagaki, Masumi; Otagiri, Masaki; Yokota, Hideo; Shibata, Shigenobu; Sakai, Hiromi; Okamura, Kunihiro; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia affects approximately 5% of all pregnant women and remains a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The hypertension associated with pre-eclampsia develops during pregnancy and remits after delivery, suggesting that the placenta is the most likely origin of this disease. The pathophysiology involves insufficient trophoblast invasion, resulting in incomplete narrow placental spiral artery remodeling. Placental insufficiency, which limits the maternal-fetal exchange of gas and nutrients, leads to fetal intrauterine growth restriction. In this study, in our attempt to develop a new therapy for pre-eclampsia, we directly rescued placental and fetal hypoxia with nano-scale size artificial oxygen carriers (hemoglobin vesicles). The present study is the first to demonstrate that artificial oxygen carriers successfully treat placental hypoxia, decrease maternal plasma levels of anti-angiogenic proteins and ameliorate fetal growth restriction in the pre-eclampsia rat model. PMID:26471339

  7. Artificial oxygen carriers rescue placental hypoxia and improve fetal development in the rat pre-eclampsia model.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Ohta, Hidenobu; Tahara, Yu; Nakamura, Sakiko; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Nakagawa, Machiko; Oishi, Yoshihisa; Goto, Yu-Ichi; Wada, Keiji; Kaga, Makiko; Inagaki, Masumi; Otagiri, Masaki; Yokota, Hideo; Shibata, Shigenobu; Sakai, Hiromi; Okamura, Kunihiro; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia affects approximately 5% of all pregnant women and remains a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The hypertension associated with pre-eclampsia develops during pregnancy and remits after delivery, suggesting that the placenta is the most likely origin of this disease. The pathophysiology involves insufficient trophoblast invasion, resulting in incomplete narrow placental spiral artery remodeling. Placental insufficiency, which limits the maternal-fetal exchange of gas and nutrients, leads to fetal intrauterine growth restriction. In this study, in our attempt to develop a new therapy for pre-eclampsia, we directly rescued placental and fetal hypoxia with nano-scale size artificial oxygen carriers (hemoglobin vesicles). The present study is the first to demonstrate that artificial oxygen carriers successfully treat placental hypoxia, decrease maternal plasma levels of anti-angiogenic proteins and ameliorate fetal growth restriction in the pre-eclampsia rat model. PMID:26471339

  8. The nitric oxide pathway and possible therapeutic options in pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Johal, Tamanrit; Lees, Christoph C; Everett, Thomas R; Wilkinson, Ian B

    2014-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a serious multisystem disorder with diverse clinical manifestations. Although not causal, endothelial dysfunction and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability are likely to play an important role in the maternal and fetal pathophysiology of this condition. Lack of treatment modalities that can target the underlying pathophysiological changes and reverse the endothelial dysfunction frequently leads to iatrogenic preterm delivery of the fetus, causing neonatal morbidity and mortality, and the condition itself is associated with short- and longer term maternal morbidity and mortality. Drugs that target various components of the nitric oxide–soluble guanylyl cyclase pathway can help to increase NO bioavailability. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of clinical research involving these therapeutic modalities in the context of pre-eclampsia, with the focus being on the following: nitric oxide donors, including organic nitrates and S-nitrosothiols; l-arginine, the endogenous precursor of NO; inhibitors of cyclic guanosine 3?,5?-monophosphate breakdown, including sildenafil; and other novel inhibitors of NO donor metabolism. The advantages and limitations of each modality are outlined, and scope for development into established therapeutic options for pre-eclampsia is explored. PMID:24313856

  9. [Care plan for women with cesarean section and pre-eclampsia].

    PubMed

    Sabbagh-Sequera, Miriam; Loidi-García, Jose María; Romero-Vázquez, Gloria Maria

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy pathologies in general, and pre-eclampsia in particular, are problems usually treated in post-anesthesia recovery and hospitalization units. Pre-eclampsia is the most frequent form of hypertension associated with pregnancy (50%). It affects from 7% to 10% of pregnant women. It is known as pregnancy and puerperium multisystem syndrome. It is due to a reduction of the systemic perfusion generated by the vasospasms and the activation of the coagulation systems. A clinical case is presented of the immediate post-surgery period of a patient, who has been operated on cesarean section after having been diagnosed with pre-eclampsia. A nursing care plan was prepared, based on Marjory Gordon functional patterns and guided by NANDA-NOC-NIC taxonomy, where 6 nursing diagnoses, which are the basis for the fulfillment of this nursing process, are identified: Risk of infection, excess fluid volume, risk of bleeding, insufficient knowledge about its pathological process, severe pain, and anxiety. The application of this care plan leads to an improvement in the patient care and in the work organization. PMID:25482826

  10. Serum anti-carbonic anhydrase II antibodies and oxidant-antioxidant balance in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Aliyazicioglu, Rezzan; Guven, Suleyman; Mentese, Ahmet; Kolayli, Sevgi; Cengiz, Sevil; Deger, Orhan; Alver, Ahmet

    2011-10-01

    PROBLEM? The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of anti-carbonic anhydrase II antibodies (anti-CA II) antibodies in pre-eclampsia and the relationships between the autoantibodies, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant capacity (TOC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and oxidative stres index (OSI) parameters. METHOD OF STUDY? We studied 40 early and late onset pre-eclamptic patients and 40 healthy pregnant control and 39 healthy non-pregnant control subjects. Serum CA II antibodies, TAC and TOC, and MDA parameters were studied by ELISA. RESULTS? The mean values for TAC, TOC, OSI, MDA, and anti-CA II were significantly increased in patients with pre-eclampsia compared to the other groups. The anti-CA II antibody levels for the pregnant control subjects were 0.129 ± 0.04 and that for the pre-eclamptic patients were 0.282 ± 0.18. In this study, any absorbance value higher than 0.136, the mean absorbance + 2 S.D. of pregnant control subjects, was defined as positive. Positive results were obtained in 29 of 40 pre-eclamptic patients (72.5%). There were significant positive correlations between serum anti-CA II antibodies and TOC, MDA levels, and OSI levels. CONCLUSION? The results suggest that anti-CA II antibodies and impairment in oxidant-antioxidant balance may be involved in multifactorial etiology of pre-eclampsia. PMID:21244564

  11. The nitric oxide pathway and possible therapeutic options in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Johal, Tamanrit; Lees, Christoph C; Everett, Thomas R; Wilkinson, Ian B

    2014-08-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a serious multisystem disorder with diverse clinical manifestations. Although not causal, endothelial dysfunction and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability are likely to play an important role in the maternal and fetal pathophysiology of this condition. Lack of treatment modalities that can target the underlying pathophysiological changes and reverse the endothelial dysfunction frequently leads to iatrogenic preterm delivery of the fetus, causing neonatal morbidity and mortality, and the condition itself is associated with short- and longer term maternal morbidity and mortality. Drugs that target various components of the nitric oxide-soluble guanylyl cyclase pathway can help to increase NO bioavailability. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of clinical research involving these therapeutic modalities in the context of pre-eclampsia, with the focus being on the following: nitric oxide donors, including organic nitrates and S-nitrosothiols; l-arginine, the endogenous precursor of NO; inhibitors of cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate breakdown, including sildenafil; and other novel inhibitors of NO donor metabolism. The advantages and limitations of each modality are outlined, and scope for development into established therapeutic options for pre-eclampsia is explored. PMID:24313856

  12. Reduced risk of pre-eclampsia with organic vegetable consumption: results from the prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Torjusen, Hanne; Brantsæter, Anne Lise; Haugen, Margaretha; Alexander, Jan; Bakketeig, Leiv S; Lieblein, Geir; Stigum, Hein; Næs, Tormod; Swartz, Jackie; Holmboe-Ottesen, Gerd; Roos, Gun; Meltzer, Helle Margrete

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the potential health effects of eating organic food either in the general population or during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to examine associations between organic food consumption during pregnancy and the risk of pre-eclampsia among nulliparous Norwegian women. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Norway, years 2002–2008. Participants 28?192 pregnant women (nulliparous, answered food frequency questionnaire and general health questionnaire in mid-pregnancy and no missing information on height, body weight or gestational weight gain). Main outcome measure Relative risk was estimated as ORs by performing binary logistic regression with pre-eclampsia as the outcome and organic food consumption as the exposure. Results The prevalence of pre-eclampsia in the study sample was 5.3% (n=1491). Women who reported to have eaten organic vegetables ‘often’ or ‘mostly’ (n=2493, 8.8%) had lower risk of pre-eclampsia than those who reported ‘never/rarely’ or ‘sometimes’ (crude OR=0.76, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.96; adjusted OR=0.79, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.99). The lower risk associated with high organic vegetable consumption was evident also when adjusting for overall dietary quality, assessed as scores on a healthy food pattern derived by principal component analysis. No associations with pre-eclampsia were found for high intake of organic fruit, cereals, eggs or milk, or a combined index reflecting organic consumption. Conclusions These results show that choosing organically grown vegetables during pregnancy was associated with reduced risk of pre-eclampsia. Possible explanations for an association between pre-eclampsia and use of organic vegetables could be that organic vegetables may change the exposure to pesticides, secondary plant metabolites and/or influence the composition of the gut microbiota. PMID:25208850

  13. Management of late preterm and early-term pregnancies complicated by mild gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Sibai, Baha M

    2011-10-01

    Gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia is the most frequent obstetrical complication, complicating 26%-29% of all gestations in nulliparous women. In general, the diagnosis of mild gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia is made at 38 weeks or more in approximately 80% of cases. For many years, the optimal timing of delivery for patients with mild gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia at 37-0/7 to 39-6/7 weeks was unclear. Recently, investigators of the HYPITAT (Pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia after 36 weeks: induction of labor versus expectant monitoring: A comparison of maternal and neonatal outcome, maternal quality of life and costs) randomized trial evaluated maternal and neonatal complications in patients at 36-40 weeks' gestation who were randomized to either induction of labor or expectant monitoring. The results of this trial revealed that induction of labor at or after 37-0 weeks was associated with lower rate of maternal complications without increased rates of either cesarean delivery or neonatal complications. In contrast, the optimum management for those with mild hypertension/pre-eclampsia with stable maternal and fetal conditions at 34-0/7 to 36-6/7 weeks remains uncertain. Therefore, there is urgent need for research to evaluate the reasons for late preterm birth in such women as well as for a randomized trial to evaluate the optimal timing for delivery in such patients. PMID:21962629

  14. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for Pre-Eclampsia and Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Law, Kai P.; Han, Ting-Li; Tong, Chao; Baker, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy-related complications such as pre-eclampsia and preterm birth now represent a notable burden of adverse health. Pre-eclampsia is a hypertensive disorder unique to pregnancy. It is an important cause of maternal death worldwide and a leading cause of fetal growth restriction and iatrogenic prematurity. Fifteen million infants are born preterm each year globally, but more than one million of those do not survive their first month of life. Currently there are no predictive tests available for diagnosis of these pregnancy-related complications and the biological mechanisms of the diseases have not been fully elucidated. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics have all the necessary attributes to provide the needed breakthrough in understanding the pathophysiology of complex human diseases thorough the discovery of biomarkers. The mass spectrometry methodologies employed in the studies for pregnancy-related complications are evaluated in this article. Top-down proteomic and peptidomic profiling by laser mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography or capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry, and bottom-up quantitative proteomics and targeted proteomics by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry have been applied to elucidate protein biomarkers and biological mechanism of pregnancy-related complications. The proteomes of serum, urine, amniotic fluid, cervical-vaginal fluid, placental tissue, and cytotrophoblastic cells have all been investigated. Numerous biomarkers or biomarker candidates that could distinguish complicated pregnancies from healthy controls have been proposed. Nevertheless, questions as to the clinically utility and the capacity to elucidate the pathogenesis of the pre-eclampsia and preterm birth remain to be answered. PMID:26006232

  15. Low-dose calcium supplementation for preventing pre-eclampsia: a systematic review and commentary

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeyr, GJ; Belizán, JM; von Dadelszen, P

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data link low dietary calcium with pre-eclampsia. Current recommendations are for 1.5–2 g/day calcium supplementation for low-intake pregnant women, based on randomised controlled trials of ?1 g/day calcium supplementation from 20 weeks of gestation. This is problematic logistically in low-resource settings; excessive calcium may be harmful; and 20 weeks may be too late to alter outcomes. Objectives To review the impact of lower dose calcium supplementation on pre-eclampsia risk. Search strategy and selection criteria We searched PubMed and the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register. Data collection and analysis Two authors extracted data from eligible randomised and quasi-randomised trials of low-dose calcium (LDC, <1 g/day), with or without other supplements. Main results Pre-eclampsia was reduced consistently with LDC with or without co-supplements (nine trials, 2234 women, relative risk [RR] 0.38; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.28–0.52), as well as for subgroups: LDC alone (four trials, 980 women, RR 0.36; 95% CI 0.23–0.57]); LDC plus linoleic acid (two trials, 134 women, RR 0.23; 95% CI 0.09–0.60); LDC plus vitamin D (two trials, 1060 women, RR 0.49; 0.31–0.78) and a trend for LDC plus antioxidants (one trial, 60 women, RR 0.24; 95% CI 0.06–1.01). Overall results were consistent with the single quality trial of LDC alone (171 women, RR 0.30; 95% CI 0.06–1.38). LDC plus antioxidants commencing at 8–12 weeks tended to reduce miscarriage (one trial, 60 women, RR 0.06; 95% CI 0.00–1.04). Conclusions These limited data are consistent with LDC reducing the risk of pre-eclampsia; confirming this in sufficiently powered randomised controlled trials would have implications for current guidelines and their global implementation. PMID:24621141

  16. Reduced Heart Rate Variability and Altered Cardiac Conduction after Pre-Eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Malia S. Q.; Seaborn, Geoffrey E. J.; Redfearn, Damian P.; Smith, Graeme N.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy that is associated with elevated maternal risk for cardiovascular disease. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of normal pregnancy on postpartum parameters of the electrocardiogram, and furthermore to determine how a history of pre-eclampsia may affect these parameters. Ten-minute high-resolution (1000 Hz) orthogonal Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were used to measure heart rate variability (HRV). Signal-averaged P-wave and QRS complex durations were determined. Participants included non-pregnant controls, normotensive parous controls and women with a recent history of PE. While reductions in HRV induced by uncomplicated pregnancy returned to non-pregnant levels by 6–8 months postpartum HRV remained reduced in women with a history of PE compared to control groups. In addition, P-Wave and QRS complex durations were prolonged in PE subjects at 6–8 months postpartum compared to control groups. Only QRS duration was independent of differences in blood pressure. These results suggest increased sympathetic cardiac activity, and delayed myocardial conduction in women after PE; alterations consistent with cardiac remodeling and increased risk for arrhythmia. In examining the association between PE and cardiovascular disease, identification of ECG abnormalities soon after pregnancy in women with a history of PE highlights a unique opportunity for early identification and screening in this population before other risk factors become apparent. PMID:26407294

  17. Antepartum reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with pre-eclampsia and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kei; Matsushima, Miho; Matsuzawa, Yukiko; Wachi, Yuichi; Izawa, Tomoko; Sakai, Keiji; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Iwashita, Mitsutoshi

    2015-11-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by severe headache and diffuse segmental constriction of the cerebral arteries that resolves spontaneously within a few months. Pregnancy is one of the precipitating factors of RCVS and most of the reported cases occurred in the post-partum period. We report a case of RCVS that occurred in a pregnant women with pre-eclampsia during her antepartum period. A 34-year-old woman in full-term pregnancy presented with a severe and acute headache. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed multiple segmental constrictions of the cerebral arteries. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a high-intensity lesion in the left occipital lobe, consistent with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome, on fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences. The case was also complicated by severe pre-eclampsia and the patient underwent emergency cesarean section. Although her symptoms resolved rapidly, MRA revealed new lesions of arterial constriction 4?days after onset. The vasoconstriction completely resolved on MRA after 10?days and the patient was discharged without neurological sequelae. PMID:26178813

  18. Resolution of superimposed pre-eclampsia, and improvement in umbilical artery flow in a surviving twin after intrauterine demise of its co-twin.

    PubMed

    Narasimhulu, Deepa M; Karakash, Scarlett; Rankin, Linda; Minkoff, Howard

    2015-09-01

    Pre-eclampsia has a progressive clinical course, and is only cured by delivery of the placenta. We report a 30-year-old G1P0 with dichorionic twins, discordant growth and chronic hypertension who developed superimposed pre-eclampsia in her 21st week of gestation. After intrauterine demise of the severely growth-restricted twin, the superimposed pre-eclampsia resolved. The surviving twin initially had absent end diastolic flow, which resolved after the demise. A healthy 1935-g neonate with Apgar 9/9 was delivered at 34 weeks. Antenatal resolution of pre-eclampsia is extremely rare and resolution of superimposed pre-eclampsia has not, to our knowledge, been reported. PMID:26096469

  19. Transthoracic echocardiographic assessment of haemodynamics in severe pre-eclampsia and HIV in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A T; Dyer, R A; Gibbs, M; Nel, L; Castro, J M; Swanevelder, J L

    2015-09-01

    Haemodynamic and cardiac structural changes in severe pre-eclampsia and in pregnant women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have not been clearly established. We performed transthoracic echocardiography on 105 women. Women with pre-eclampsia demonstrated (mean (SD), untreated vs treated) preserved fractional shortening (40 (7.1)% vs. 41 (8.6)%), a non-dilated left ventricle (4.5 (0.49) cm vs. 4.4 (0.44) cm), increased mitral valve E/septal e' (10.5 (3.3) vs. 10.6 (2.8)), and preserved tricuspid annular plane systolic exertion (2.6 (0.36) cm vs. 2.4 (0.51) cm). Women with HIV infection demonstrated (mean (SD), HIV-positive vs healthy) a reduced cardiac index (2.8 (0.64) ml.min(-1) .m(-2) vs. 3.1 (0.7) ml.min(-1) .m(-2) , p = 0.029), reduced septal s' tissue Doppler velocity (8.5 (1.5) cm.s(-1) vs. 9.3 (1.7) cm.s(-1) , p = 0.042), increased left ventricular end-diastolic area (7.6 (2.1) cm2 vs. 6.3 (1.7) cm2 , p = 0.004), and reduced right ventricular s' and e' velocity (s' velocity 14.7 (3.1) cm.s(-1) vs. 7.0 (2.9) cm.s(-1) p = 0.001, e' velocity 16.3 (4.1) cm.s(-1) vs. 18.7 (3.4) cm.s(-1) , p = 0.013). The mitral value E/septal e' was > 8 in 39% of patients with HIV. Fractional shortening (< 28%) was reduced in 10% of healthy women, and mitral valve E/septal e' ratios were > 8 in 38% of that group. Women with pre-eclampsia demonstrated preserved systolic function, with diastolic dysfunction. Women with HIV demonstrated reduced left and right ventricular systolic function, with increased ventricular dilatation. PMID:25891669

  20. TH17 cells in human recurrent pregnancy loss and pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Fu, Binqing; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2014-11-01

    T helper 17 (TH17) cells have been identified as a new lineage of helper T cells and have been shown to be important in host defense against extracellular infectious agents, autoimmune disease and chronic inflammatory diseases. Recently, TH17 cells have also been shown to participate in successful pregnancy, as well as in the pathogenesis of diseases of pregnancy, such as recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) and pre-eclampsia (PE). Here, we review our current knowledge of TH17 cells in human RSA and PE. We also discuss how the local uterine microenvironment affects the differentiation of TH17 cells and the mechanisms that regulate TH17 cells during pregnancy. Research into TH17 cells will not only advance our understanding of TH17-related pregnancy complications, but will also facilitate the design of novel therapies for reproductive diseases. PMID:25027967

  1. Relationship between urinary albumin and albumin/creatinine ratio during normal pregnancy and pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Risberg, A; Larsson, A; Olsson, K; Lyrenäs, S; Sjöquist, M

    2004-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a serious complication of pregnancy and it is important to detect the condition as early as possible. Albuminuria is an important symptom of pre-eclampsia and repeated urine analyses to screen for the condition are part of the standard antenatal care. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether measurement of the urine albumin/creatinine ratio in spot samples could be a complement to the dipstick method and could reduce the need for 24-h urine collections. Urine samples were collected for 24 h in weeks 12, 24 and 36 of pregnancy from both normotensive women and women who developed hypertension or who had pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) when they entered the study. The 24-h albumin excretion was significantly correlated to the albumin/creatinine ratio in all measurements (Pearson correlation coefficient). In week 12, the values were: n = 44, r = 0.964, p < 0.001 (normotensive group) and in the PIH group: n = 8, r = 0.789, p < 0.05. In week 24, the correlation values were r = 1.0 and p < 0.001 in both the normotensive group (n = 41) and in the PIH group (n = 11). In week 36 the correlation values were r = 0.791 and p < 0.001 in the normotensive group (n = 39) and r = 1.0 and p < 0.001 in the PIH group (n = 16). Microalbuminuria was defined as urine albumin excretion higher than 30 mg/24 h and this corresponded to an albumin/creatinine ratio of 2.9. Microalbuminuria was found in three persons in the PIH group and in two persons in the normotensive group. Overt albuminuria (> 300 mg/24 h) was found in one of the 46 normotensive women (2%) and in 3 of the 19 PIH women (16%). In all these women the high albumin values had been detected by using the albumin/creatinine ratio method. In conclusion, it has been found that the albumin excretion in urine correlates significantly to the albumin/creatinine ratio during pregnancy. The urinary albumin/creatinine ratio appears to be a good alternative to the dipstick method and to 24-h urine collections. PMID:15025425

  2. Nitroso-Redox Balance and Mitochondrial Homeostasis Are Regulated by STOX1, a Pre-Eclampsia-Associated Gene

    PubMed Central

    Doridot, Ludivine; Châtre, Laurent; Ducat, Aurélien; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Lombès, Anne; Méhats, Céline; Barbaux, Sandrine; Calicchio, Rosamaria

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Storkhead box 1 (STOX1) is a winged-helix transcription factor that is implicated in the genetic forms of a high-prevalence human gestational disease, pre-eclampsia. STOX1 overexpression confers pre-eclampsia-like transcriptomic features to trophoblastic cell lines and pre-eclampsia symptoms to pregnant mice. The aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of STOX1 on free radical equilibrium and mitochondrial function, both in vitro and in vivo. Results: Transcriptome analysis of STOX1-transgenic versus nontransgenic placentas at 16.5 days of gestation revealed alterations of mitochondria-related pathways. Placentas overexpressing STOX1 displayed altered mitochondrial mass and were severely biased toward protein nitration, indicating nitroso-redox imbalance in vivo. Trophoblast cells overexpressing STOX1 displayed an increased mitochondrial activity at 20% O2 and in hypoxia, despite reduction of the mitochondrial mass in the former. STOX1 overexpression is, therefore, associated with hyperactive mitochondria, resulting in increased free radical production. Moreover, nitric oxide (NO) production pathways were activated, resulting in peroxynitrite formation. At low oxygen pressure, STOX1 overexpression switched the free radical balance from reactive oxygen species (ROS) to reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in the placenta as well as in a trophoblast cell line. Innovation: In pre-eclamptic placentas, NO interacts with ROS and generates peroxynitrite and nitrated proteins as end products. This process will deprive the maternal organism of NO, a crucial vasodilator molecule. Conclusion: Our data posit STOX1 as a genetic switch in the ROS/RNS balance and suggest an explanation for elevated blood pressure in pre-eclampsia. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 819–834. PMID:24738702

  3. Genetic recapitulation of human pre-eclampsia risk during convergent evolution of reduced placental invasiveness in eutherian mammals.

    PubMed

    Elliot, Michael G; Crespi, Bernard J

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between phenotypic variation arising through individual development and phenotypic variation arising through diversification of species has long been a central question in evolutionary biology. Among humans, reduced placental invasion into endometrial tissues is associated with diseases of pregnancy, especially pre-eclampsia, and reduced placental invasiveness has also evolved, convergently, in at least 10 lineages of eutherian mammals. We tested the hypothesis that a common genetic basis underlies both reduced placental invasion arising through a developmental process in human placental disease and reduced placental invasion found as a derived trait in the diversification of Euarchontoglires (rodents, lagomorphs, tree shrews, colugos and primates). Based on whole-genome analyses across 18 taxa, we identified 1254 genes as having evolved adaptively across all three lineages exhibiting independent evolutionary transitions towards reduced placental invasion. These genes showed strong evidence of enrichment for associations with pre-eclampsia, based on genetic-association studies, gene-expression analyses and gene ontology. We further used in silico prediction to identify a subset of 199 genes that are likely targets of natural selection during transitions in placental invasiveness and which are predicted to also underlie human placental disorders. Our results indicate that abnormal ontogenies can recapitulate major phylogenetic shifts in mammalian evolution, identify new candidate genes for involvement in pre-eclampsia, imply that study of species with less-invasive placentation will provide useful insights into the regulation of placental invasion and pre-eclampsia, and recommend a novel comparative functional-evolutionary approach to the study of genetically based human disease and mammalian diversification. PMID:25602073

  4. Factors associated with pre-eclampsia and quality care of affected teenagers during labour within health region H. in Kwa-Zulu Natal.

    PubMed

    Dlamini, N J

    1997-12-01

    This is a descriptive, exploratory study which aimed at identifying the factors that are associated with pre-eclampsia in teenagers. The study also aimed at assessing the quality of midwifery care during labour in teenagers with pre-eclampsia so that recommendations can be made based on empirical findings. The study was done within Health Region H of KwaZulu-Natal Province in South Africa. A structured interview schedule was designed to tap information from pre-eclamptic teenagers in an attempt to identify factors associated with pre-eclampsia. A checklist was also designed and administered to assess the care of a pre-eclamptic teenager during labour. The study revealed that factors like age, nulliparity and socio-economic status were associated with pre-eclampsia. In as far as the rest of the factors, there was no relationship as indicated in previous studies. The study also revealed that teenagers affected by pre-eclampsia delayed in attending the antenatal clinic resulting in the control of the disease being difficult. In as far as midwifery care, the study revealed that psychological and social care, as well as the hygienic state of patients was not satisfactory. Based on the findings of the study, it is recommended that health education on prevention of pre-eclampsia should be done on an ongoing process, while carers for teenage mothers should be given inservice education programmes on psychosocial care. The physical environment for maternity units must be improved. PMID:9538699

  5. Pre-eclampsia has an adverse impact on maternal and fetal health.

    PubMed

    Lin, Saunders; Leonard, Dean; Co, Mary A M; Mukhopadhyay, Dhriti; Giri, Badri; Perger, Lena; Beeram, Madhava R; Kuehl, Thomas J; Uddin, Mohammad N

    2015-04-01

    Pre-eclampsia (preE) is a multifaceted complication found uniquely in the pregnant patient and one that has puzzled scientists for years. PreE is not a single disorder, but a complex syndrome that is produced by various pathophysiological triggers and mechanisms affecting about 5% of obstetrical patients. PreE is a major cause of premature delivery and maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. PreE is characterized by de novo development of hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation and affects nearly every organ system, with the most severe consequences being eclampsia, pulmonary edema, intrauterine growth restriction, and thrombocytopenia. PreE alters the intrauterine environment by modulating the pattern of hormonal signals and activating the detrimental cellular signaling that has been transported to the fetus. The fetus has to adapt to this intrauterine environment with detrimental signals. The adaptive changes increase the risk of disease later in life. This review defines the predisposition and causes of preE and the cellular signaling detrimental to maternal health during preE. Moreover, the risk factors for diseases that are transmitted to the offspring have been addressed in this review. The detrimental signaling molecules that have been overexpressed in preE patients raises the possibility that those signals could be therapeutically blocked one day. PMID:25468481

  6. Syncytiotrophoblast Extracellular Vesicles from Pre-Eclampsia Placentas Differentially Affect Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Tannetta, Dionne S.; Hunt, Kathryn; Jones, Chris I.; Davidson, Naomi; Coxon, Carmen H.; Ferguson, David; Redman, Christopher W.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Sargent, Ian L.; Tucker, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) complicates around 3% of all pregnancies and is one of the most common causes of maternal mortality worldwide. The pathophysiology of PE remains unclear however its underlying cause originates from the placenta and manifests as raised blood pressure, proteinuria, vascular or systemic inflammation and hypercoagulation in the mother. Women who develop PE are also at significantly higher risk of subsequently developing cardiovascular (CV) disease. In PE, the failing endoplasmic reticulum, oxidative and inflammatory stressed syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta sheds increased numbers of syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicles (STBEV) into the maternal circulation. Platelet reactivity, size and concentration are also known to be altered in some women who develop PE, although the underlying reasons for this have not been determined. In this study we show that STBEV from disease free placenta isolated ex vivo by dual placental perfusion associate rapidly with platelets. We provide evidence that STBEV isolated from normal placentas cause platelet activation and that this is increased with STBEV from PE pregnancies. Furthermore, treatment of platelets with aspirin, currently prescribed for women at high risk of PE to reduce platelet aggregation, also inhibits STBEV-induced reversible aggregation of washed platelets. Increased platelet reactivity as a result of exposure to PE placenta derived STBEVs correlates with increased thrombotic risk associated with PE. These observations establish a possible direct link between the clotting disturbances of PE and dysfunction of the placenta, as well as the known increased risk of thromboembolism associated with this condition. PMID:26551971

  7. Early Pregnancy Biomarkers in Pre-Eclampsia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pensée; van den Berg, Caroline; Alfirevic, Zarko; O'Brien, Shaughn; Röthlisberger, Maria; Baker, Philip Newton; Kenny, Louise C; Kublickiene, Karolina; Duvekot, Johannes J

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) complicates 2%-8% of all pregnancies and is an important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to reduce these complications and to develop possible treatment modalities, it is important to identify women at risk of developing PE. The use of biomarkers in early pregnancy would allow appropriate stratification into high and low risk pregnancies for the purpose of defining surveillance in pregnancy and to administer interventions. We used formal methods for a systematic review and meta-analyses to assess the accuracy of all biomarkers that have been evaluated so far during the first and early second trimester of pregnancy to predict PE. We found low predictive values using individual biomarkers which included a disintegrin and metalloprotease 12 (ADAM-12), inhibin-A, pregnancy associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A), placental growth factor (PlGF) and placental protein 13 (PP-13). The pooled sensitivity of all single biomarkers was 0.40 (95% CI 0.39-0.41) at a false positive rate of 10%. The area under the Summary of Receiver Operating Characteristics Curve (SROC) was 0.786 (SE 0.02). When a combination model was used, the predictive value improved to an area under the SROC of 0.893 (SE 0.03). In conclusion, although there are multiple potential biomarkers for PE their efficacy has been inconsistent and comparisons are difficult because of heterogeneity between different studies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for high quality, large-scale multicentre research in biomarkers for PE so that the best predictive marker(s) can be identified in order to improve the management of women destined to develop PE. PMID:26404264

  8. Maternal ophthalmic artery Doppler velocimetry in pre-eclampsia in Southwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olatunji, Richard Busayo; Adekanmi, Ademola Joseph; Obajimi, Millicent Olubunmi; Roberts, Olumuyiwa Adebola; Ojo, Temitope Olumuyiwa

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia (PE) poses a serious challenge to maternal and fetal health in Africa. It is associated with hemodynamic changes that may affect the internal carotid/ophthalmic artery circulation with consequent neuro-ophthalmic manifestations. Ophthalmic artery Doppler (OAD) ultrasound is an important tool that can be used to detect hemodynamic changes in PE and monitor its severity. In this study, we evaluated hemodynamic changes on OAD ultrasound in the ophthalmic arteries of pre-eclamptic women and compared these with values in healthy pregnant women. Methods OAD parameters, such as, peak systolic velocity, peak diastolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, pulsatility index, and peak ratio, were measured on transorbital triplex ultrasound scan with a 7–10 MHz multifrequency linear transducer in 42 consenting pre-eclamptic patients and 41 pregnant controls matched for maternal age, gestational age, and parity at the Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Ibadan. Univariate, bivariate, and receiver operating characteristic curve data analyses were performed. P<0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results Mean resistivity index, pulsatility index, and peak systolic velocity were significantly lower in pre-eclamptic patients than in the controls. Mean peak diastolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, and peak ratio were significantly higher in the pre-eclamptic group. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the resistivity index (sensitivity 75%, specificity 77.8%) could distinguish mild from severe PE while the peak ratio (sensitivity 90.5%, specificity 81.3%) could accurately detect PE. Conclusion OAD ultrasound can be used to monitor patients with PE for early detection of progression to severe forms before cerebral complications develop. OAD screening of patients at high risk for PE can also detect early changes of hemodynamic derangement. PMID:26229508

  9. Early Pregnancy Biomarkers in Pre-Eclampsia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pensée; van den Berg, Caroline; Alfirevic, Zarko; O’Brien, Shaughn; Röthlisberger, Maria; Baker, Philip Newton; Kenny, Louise C.; Kublickiene, Karolina; Duvekot, Johannes J.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) complicates 2%–8% of all pregnancies and is an important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to reduce these complications and to develop possible treatment modalities, it is important to identify women at risk of developing PE. The use of biomarkers in early pregnancy would allow appropriate stratification into high and low risk pregnancies for the purpose of defining surveillance in pregnancy and to administer interventions. We used formal methods for a systematic review and meta-analyses to assess the accuracy of all biomarkers that have been evaluated so far during the first and early second trimester of pregnancy to predict PE. We found low predictive values using individual biomarkers which included a disintegrin and metalloprotease 12 (ADAM-12), inhibin-A, pregnancy associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A), placental growth factor (PlGF) and placental protein 13 (PP-13). The pooled sensitivity of all single biomarkers was 0.40 (95% CI 0.39–0.41) at a false positive rate of 10%. The area under the Summary of Receiver Operating Characteristics Curve (SROC) was 0.786 (SE 0.02). When a combination model was used, the predictive value improved to an area under the SROC of 0.893 (SE 0.03). In conclusion, although there are multiple potential biomarkers for PE their efficacy has been inconsistent and comparisons are difficult because of heterogeneity between different studies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for high quality, large-scale multicentre research in biomarkers for PE so that the best predictive marker(s) can be identified in order to improve the management of women destined to develop PE. PMID:26404264

  10. Analysis of cardiovascular oscillations: A new approach to the early prediction of pre-eclampsia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malberg, H.; Bauernschmitt, R.; Voss, A.; Walther, T.; Faber, R.; Stepan, H.; Wessel, N.

    2007-03-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a serious disorder with high morbidity and mortality occurring during pregnancy; 3%-5% of all pregnant women are affected. Early prediction is still insufficient in clinical practice. Although most pre-eclamptic patients show pathological uterine perfusion in the second trimester, this parameter has a positive predictive accuracy of only 30%, which makes it unsuitable for early, reliable prediction. The study is based on the hypothesis that alterations in cardiovascular regulatory behavior can be used to predict PE. Ninety-six pregnant women in whom Doppler investigation detected perfusion disorders of the uterine arteries were included in the study. Twenty-four of these pregnant women developed PE after the 30th week of gestation. During pregnancy, additional several noninvasive continuous blood pressure recordings were made over 30 min under resting conditions by means of a finger cuff. The time series extracted of systolic as well as diastolic beat-to-beat pressures and the heart rate were studied by variability and coupling analysis to find predictive factors preceding genesis of the disease. In the period between the 18th and 26th weeks of pregnancy, three special variability and baroreflex parameters were able to predict PE several weeks before clinical manifestation. Discriminant function analysis of these parameters was able to predict PE with a sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and a positive predictive value of 70%. The combined clinical assessment of uterine perfusion and cardiovascular variability demonstrates the best current prediction several weeks before clinical manifestation of PE.

  11. eNOS Deficiency Acts through Endothelin to Aggravate sFlt-1–Induced Pre-Eclampsia–Like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Hagaman, John R.; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Maeda, Nobuyo; Jennette, J. Charles; Faber, James E.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Smithies, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Excess soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 secreted from the placenta causes pre-eclampsia–like features by antagonizing vascular endothelial growth factor signaling, which can lead to reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity; the effect of this concomitant decrease in eNOS activity is unknown. We tested whether the decrease in nitric oxide occurring in female mice lacking eNOS aggravates the pre-eclampsia–like phenotype induced by increased sFlt-1. Untreated eNOS-deficient female mice had higher BP than wild-type mice. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of sFlt-1 increased systolic BP by approximately 27 mmHg and led to severe loss of fenestration of glomerular capillary endothelial cells in both eNOS-deficient and wild-type mice. However, only the eNOS-deficient sFlt-1 mice exhibited severe foot process effacement. Compared with wild-type sFlt-1 mice, eNOS-deficient sFlt-1 mice also showed markedly higher urinary albumin excretion (467±74 versus 174±23 ?g/d), lower creatinine clearance (126±29 versus 452±63 ?l/min), and more severe endotheliosis. Expression of preproendothelin-1 (ET-1) and its ETA receptor in the kidney was higher in eNOS-deficient sFlt-1 mice than in wild-type sFlt-1 mice. Furthermore, the selective ETA receptor antagonist ambrisentan attenuated the increases in BP and urinary albumin excretion and ameliorated endotheliosis in both wild-type and eNOS-deficient sFlt-1 mice. Ambrisentan improved creatinine clearance and podocyte effacement in eNOS-deficient sFlt-1 mice. In conclusion, reduced maternal eNOS/nitric oxide exacerbates the sFlt1-related pre-eclampsia–like phenotype through activation of the endothelin system. PMID:22282588

  12. Risk of prematurity, low birthweight and pre?eclampsia in relation to working hours and physical activities: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bonzini, Matteo; Coggon, David; Palmer, Keith T

    2007-01-01

    Background Occupational activities are suspected of having an adverse impact on outcomes of pregnancy. Aim To assess the evidence relating three major adverse outcomes (preterm delivery, low birthweight (LBW) and pre?eclampsia/gestational hypertension) to five common occupational exposures (prolonged working hours, shift work, lifting, standing and heavy physical workload). Methods A systematic search of Medline and Embase (1966–December 2005) using combinations of keywords and medical subject heading terms was conducted. For each relevant paper, standard details were abstracted that were then used to summarise the design features of studies, to rate their methodological quality (completeness of reporting and potential for important bias or confounding) and to provide estimates of effect. For studies with similar definitions of exposure and outcome, pooled estimates of relative risk (RR) in meta?analysis were calculated. Results 53 reports were identified—35 on preterm delivery, 34 on birth weight and 9 on pre?eclampsia or gestational hypertension. These included 21 cohort investigations. For pre?term delivery, extensive evidence relating to each of the exposures of interest was found. Findings were generally consistent and tended to rule out a more than moderate effect size (RR >1.4). The larger and most complete studies were less positive, and pooled estimates of risk pointed to only modest or null effects. For small?for?gestational age, the position was similar, but the evidence base was more limited. For pre?eclampsia and gestational hypertension, it was too small to allow firm conclusions. Conclusions The balance of evidence is not sufficiently compelling to justify mandatory restrictions on any of the activities considered in this review. However, given some uncertainties in the evidence base and the apparent absence of important beneficial effects, it may be prudent to advise against long working hours, prolonged standing and heavy physical work, particularly late in pregnancy. Our review identifies several priorities for future investigation. PMID:17095552

  13. A KIR B centromeric region present in Africans but not Europeans protects pregnant women from pre-eclampsia

    E-print Network

    Nakimuli, Annettee; Chazara, Olympe; Hiby, Susan E.; Farrell, Lydia; Tukwasibwe, Stephen; Jayaraman, Jyothi; Traherne, James A.; Trowsdale, John; Colucci, Francesco; Lougee, Emma; Vaughan, Robert W.; Elliott, Alison M.; Byamugisha, Josaphat; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Mirembe, Florence; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Parham, Peter; Norman, Paul J.; Moffett, Ashley

    2015-01-05

    birth to adolescence. We observed that tB regions containing KIR2DS1 provide a protective effect for pre-eclampsia in Europeans (8). In con- trast, we now show that in Ugandans KIR cB regions charac- terized by KIR2DS5, KIR2DP1 and KIR2DL1 (cB01 and cB03... /HLA-C variants in diverse European and African populations now suggest that the unusual repro- ductive strategies characteristic of modern humans compared to other hominids could also be a cause of balancing selection. The evolution of the large neonatal brain...

  14. Prevention and management of severe pre-eclampsia/eclampsia in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An evidence-based strategy exists to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality associated with severe pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (PE/E), but it may be difficult to implement in low-resource settings. This study examines whether facilities that provide emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC) in Afghanistan have the capacity to manage severe PE/E cases. Methods A further analysis was conducted of the 2009–10 Afghanistan EmONC Needs Assessment. Assessors observed equipment and supplies available, and services provided at 78 of the 127 facilities offering comprehensive EmONC services and interviewed 224 providers. The providers also completed a written case scenario on severe PE/E. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize facility and provider characteristics. Student t-test, one-way ANOVA, and chi-square tests were performed to determine whether there were significant differences between facility types, doctors and midwives, and trained and untrained providers. Results The median number of severe PE/E cases in the past year was just 5 (range 0–42) at comprehensive health centers (CHCs) and district hospitals, compared with 44 (range 0–130) at provincial hospitals and 108 (range 32–540) at regional and specialized hospitals (p?

  15. What is the place of genetics in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia?

    PubMed

    Broughton Pipkin, F

    1999-12-01

    It is most unlikely that there is a single 'pre-eclampsia (PE) gene'. We are probably looking for a cluster of polymorphisms which, possibly in conjunction with environmental factors, predispose to the development of the condition. Accurate phenotyping is vital for any genetic studies of PE, and since the disease is only clinically-detectable in the second half of pregnancy, is particularly difficult. It is increasingly likely that there is a fetal genetic contribution which can only be examined after birth. Candidate genes examined on the basis of displayed or hypothetical pathophysiological effects, but for which no evidence of association or linkage has been found have included HLA-DRbeta, HLA-G, and tumour necrosis factor alpha (chromosome 6), angiotensin-converting enzyme (chromosome 17) and CuZn superoxide dismutase (chromosome 21). Chromosomal exclusion mapping and a pedigree study suggest a role for genes on chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 9 or 18. Two genes concerned with clotting, those for factor 5 and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, lie on chromosome 1. Both have polymorphisms present in significantly higher frequency in women with PE, as well as showing functional abnormality. They probably predispose to the development of the condition, without being necessary for it. The angiotensinogen (Aogen) gene also lies on chromosome 1. The renin-angiotensin system may be activated during the early stages of PE and subsequently suppressed. In some populations, a relatively common polymorphism is present in raised frequency in women with PE, but it is also raised in non-pregnant hypertensive subjects. However, it is in partial linkage disequilibrium with another polymorphism which shows significantly distorted transmission from mother to fetus in PE pregnancies. Furthermore, its expression is significantly raised in the decidual spiral arteries; abnormal placentation is a feature of PE. We have also shown that a relatively common polymorphism in the angiotensin AT1 receptor gene (chromosome 3) is associated with raised density of the receptor. Thus far, studies of candidate genes have been on a small scale and have very much reflected the pathophysiological research interests of the investigators. The multifaceted nature of PE and the difficulties of accurate phenotyping require the accumulation of a large, very carefully phenotyped, database. It is hoped that funding will become available this year in the UK to allow the collection of such a database. The introduction of chip technology should allow genome scanning of the resource. PMID:10567760

  16. Retinal Vein Occlusion and Pregnancy, Pre-Eclampsia, and Eclampsia: The Results from a Nationwide, Population-Based Study Using the National Claim Database

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyung Ha; Park, Kyu Hyung; Woo, Se Joon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence of retinal vein occlusion (RVO) in pregnant women and in the subpopulation of pregnant women with pre-eclampsia/eclampsia compared to that in the age-matched general female population to determine if there is increased risk of RVO in pregnancy. Design Nationwide population-based retrospective study using data entered into the Korean national health claims database from 2007 to 2011. Setting and Participants Of the incident RVO cases in the database, RVO cases that occurred during the pregnancy-associated period, which spanned a 52-week period from 40-weeks-before to 12-weeks-after childbirth, were identified. Of these cases, the presence of pre-eclampsia/eclampsia was determined. Main Outcome and Measure The standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of RVO in the general pregnant population and in the pregnant population with pre-eclampsia/eclampsia were determined with respect to the age-matched general female population. Results Pregnancy-related RVO was identified in 33 cases from the 1.8 million women who experience childbirth during the study period, while the expected number of cases calculated by the direct standardization to the age-matched general population was 113. Of the 33 patients, 12 patients (36.4%) had pre-eclampsia or eclampsia. The SIR for the general pregnant population in reference to the age-matched general female population was 0.29 (95% CI, 0.20–0.41). In contrast, the SIR for the pregnant population with pre-eclampsia/eclampsia in reference to the age-matched general female population and the age-matched general pregnant population was 67.50 (95% CI, 34.88–117.92) and 246.50 (95% CI, 127.37–430.59), respectively. Conclusions and Relevance The results suggest that pre-eclampsia/eclampsia is a risk factor for RVO, while pregnancy itself may not be a risk factor for RVO. PMID:25774513

  17. Colour Doppler ultrasound of spiral artery blood flow in the prediction of pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Gebb, Juliana; Dar, Pe'er

    2011-06-01

    Pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction are responsible for significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Identifying pregnancies at highest risk for their development would allow increased surveillance in individual pregnancies and also allow therapeutic trials to decrease their incidences in the future. To date, multiple attempts to develop a screening test for these disorders have met with limited success. Proposed screening methods have included maternal serum biochemical parameters as well as ultrasonographic markers. Uterine artery Doppler, direct evaluation of the spiral arteries using colour and spectral Doppler, three-dimensional placental volume analysis and, most recently, three-dimensional power Doppler angiography have all been suggested. Although an adequate screening method remains elusive, advances in ultrasound technology have improved our ability to observe the pathophysiologic changes that occur with these conditions early in pregnancy, bringing us closer to a reproducible screening model. PMID:21377937

  18. Translating research into policy and practice in developing countries: a case study of magnesium sulphate for pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Aaserud, Morten; Lewin, Simon; Innvaer, Simon; Paulsen, Elizabeth J; Dahlgren, Astrid T; Trommald, Mari; Duley, Lelia; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Oxman, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    Background The evidence base for improving reproductive health continues to grow. However, concerns remain that the translation of this evidence into appropriate policies is partial and slow. Little is known about the factors affecting the use of evidence by policy makers and clinicians, particularly in developing countries. The objective of this study was to examine the factors that might affect the translation of randomised controlled trial (RCT) findings into policies and practice in developing countries. Methods The recent publication of an important RCT on the use of magnesium sulphate to treat pre-eclampsia provided an opportunity to explore how research findings might be translated into policy. A range of research methods, including a survey, group interview and observations with RCT collaborators and a survey of WHO drug information officers, regulatory officials and obstetricians in 12 countries, were undertaken to identify barriers and facilitators to knowledge translation. Results It proved difficult to obtain reliable data regarding the availability and use of commonly used drugs in many countries. The perceived barriers to implementing RCT findings regarding the use of magnesium sulphate for pre-eclampsia include drug licensing and availability; inadequate and poorly implemented clinical guidelines; and lack of political support for policy change. However, there were significant regional and national differences in the importance of specific barriers. Conclusion The policy changes needed to ensure widespread availability and use of magnesium sulphate are variable and complex. Difficulties in obtaining information on availability and use are combined with the wide range of barriers across settings, including a lack of support from policy makers. This makes it difficult to envisage any single intervention strategy that might be used to promote the uptake of research findings on magnesium sulphate into policy across the study settings. The publication of important trials may therefore not have the impacts on health care that researchers hope for. PMID:16262902

  19. Serum screening with Down's syndrome markers to predict pre-eclampsia and small for gestational age: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Rachel K; Cnossen, Jeltsje S; Langejans, Marloes; Robson, Stephen C; Kleijnen, Jos; ter Riet, Gerben; Mol, Ben W; van der Post, Joris AM; Khan, Khalid S

    2008-01-01

    Background Reliable antenatal identification of pre-eclampsia and small for gestational age is crucial to judicious allocation of monitoring resources and use of preventative treatment with the prospect of improving maternal/perinatal outcome. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the accuracy of five serum analytes used in Down's serum screening for prediction of pre-eclampsia and/or small for gestational age. Methods The data sources included Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, Medion (inception to February 2007), hand searching of relevant journals, reference list checking of included articles, contact with experts. Two reviewers independently selected the articles in which the accuracy of an analyte used in Downs's serum screening before the 25th gestational week was associated with the occurrence of pre-eclampsia and/or small for gestational age without language restrictions. Two authors independently extracted data on study characteristics, quality and results. Results Five serum screening markers were evaluated. 44 studies, testing 169,637 pregnant women (4376 pre-eclampsia cases) and 86 studies, testing 382,005 women (20,339 fetal growth restriction cases) met the selection criteria. The results showed low predictive accuracy overall. For pre-eclampsia the best predictor was inhibin A>2.79MoM positive likelihood ratio 19.52 (8.33,45.79) and negative likelihood ratio 0.30 (0.13,0.68) (single study). For small for gestational age it was AFP>2.0MoM to predict birth weight < 10th centile with birth < 37 weeks positive likelihood ratio 27.96 (8.02,97.48) and negative likelihood ratio 0.78 (0.55,1.11) (single study). A potential clinical application using aspirin as a treatment is given as an example. There were methodological and reporting limitations in the included studies thus studies were heterogeneous giving pooled results with wide confidence intervals. Conclusion Down's serum screening analytes have low predictive accuracy for pre-eclampsia and small for gestational age. They may be a useful means of risk assessment or of use in prediction when combined with other tests. PMID:18680570

  20. Usability and Feasibility of PIERS on the Move: An mHealth App for Pre-Eclampsia Triage

    PubMed Central

    Cloete, Garth; Dunsmuir, Dustin T; Payne, Beth A; von Dadelszen, Peter; Dumont, Guy A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal death and morbidity in low-resource countries due to delays in case identification and a shortage of health workers trained to manage the disorder. Pre-eclampsia Integrated Estimate of RiSk (PIERS) on the Move (PotM) is a low cost, easy-to-use, mobile health (mHealth) platform that has been created to aid health workers in making decisions around the management of hypertensive pregnant women. PotM combines two previously successful innovations into a mHealth app: the miniPIERS risk assessment model and the Phone Oximeter. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the usability of PotM (with mid-level health workers) for iteratively refining the system. Methods Development of the PotM user interface involved usability testing with target end-users in South Africa. Users were asked to complete clinical scenario tasks, speaking aloud to give feedback on the interface and then complete a questionnaire. The tool was then evaluated in a pilot clinical evaluation in Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town. Results After ethical approval and informed consent, 37 nurses and midwives evaluated the tool. During Study 1, major issues in the functionality of the touch-screen keyboard and date scroll wheels were identified (total errors n=212); during Study 2 major improvements in navigation of the app were suggested (total errors n=144). Overall, users felt the app was usable using the Computer Systems Usability Questionnaire; median (range) values for Study 1 = 2 (1-6) and Study 2 = 1 (1-7). To demonstrate feasibility, PotM was used by one research nurse for the pilot clinical study. In total, more than 500 evaluations were performed on more than 200 patients. The median (interquartile range) time to complete an evaluation was 4 min 55 sec (3 min 25 sec to 6 min 56 sec). Conclusions By including target end-users in the design and evaluation of PotM, we have developed an app that can be easily integrated into health care settings in low- and middle-income countries. Usability problems were often related to mobile phone features (eg, scroll wheels, touch screen use). Larger scale evaluation of the clinical impact of this tool is underway. PMID:25887292

  1. Genetic dissection of the pre-eclampsia susceptibility locus on chromosome 2q22 reveals shared novel risk factors for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew P.; Brennecke, Shaun P.; East, Christine E.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Roten, Linda T.; Proffitt, J. Michael; Melton, Phillip E.; Fenstad, Mona H.; Aalto-Viljakainen, Tia; Mäkikallio, Kaarin; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Laivuori, Hannele; Austgulen, Rigmor; Blangero, John; Moses, Eric K.; Pouta, Anneli; Kivinen, Katja; Ekholm, Eeva; Hietala, Reija; Sainio, Susanna; Saisto, Terhi; Uotila, Jukka; Klemetti, Miira; Inkeri Lokki, Anna; Georgiadis, Leena; Huovari, Elina; Kortelainen, Eija; Leminen, Satu; Lähdesmäki, Aija; Mehtälä, Susanna; Salmen, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is an idiopathic pregnancy disorder promoting morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. Delivery of the fetus is the only means to resolve severe symptoms. Women with pre-eclamptic pregnancies demonstrate increased risk for later life cardiovascular disease (CVD) and good evidence suggests these two syndromes share several risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms. To elucidate the genetic architecture of pre-eclampsia we have dissected our chromosome 2q22 susceptibility locus in an extended Australian and New Zealand familial cohort. Positional candidate genes were prioritized for exon-centric sequencing using bioinformatics, SNPing, transcriptional profiling and QTL-walking. In total, we interrogated 1598 variants from 52 genes. Four independent SNP associations satisfied our gene-centric multiple testing correction criteria: a missense LCT SNP (rs2322659, P = 0.0027), a synonymous LRP1B SNP (rs35821928, P = 0.0001), an UTR-3 RND3 SNP (rs115015150, P = 0.0024) and a missense GCA SNP (rs17783344, P = 0.0020). We replicated the LCT SNP association (P = 0.02) and observed a borderline association for the GCA SNP (P = 0.07) in an independent Australian case–control population. The LRP1B and RND3 SNP associations were not replicated in this same Australian singleton cohort. Moreover, these four SNP associations could not be replicated in two additional case–control populations from Norway and Finland. These four SNPs, however, exhibit pleiotropic effects with several quantitative CVD-related traits. Our results underscore the genetic complexity of pre-eclampsia and present novel empirical evidence of possible shared genetic mechanisms underlying both pre-eclampsia and other CVD-related risk factors. PMID:23420841

  2. Improved Assay for Quantifying a Redox Form of Angiotensinogen as a Biomarker for Pre-Eclampsia: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahgozar, Soheila; Amirian, Tayebeh; Qi, Miao; Shahshahan, Zahra; Entezar-E-Ghaem, Mansureh; Ghasemi Tehrani, Hatav; Miroliaei, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Objective Angiotensinogen exists in two distinct redox forms in plasma, the oxidized sulfhydryl-bridge form and the reduced, unbridged, free thiol form. The oxidized form of angiotensinogen compared to the free thiol form preferentially interacts with renin resulting in increased generation of angiotensin. The predictive potential of the ratio of free-thiol to oxidized angiotensinogen in the plasma for pre-eclampsia was first suggested by the Read group in ref 10. We propose an improved method for determining the ratio and validate the method in a larger cohort of pregnant women. Methods Plasma samples from 115 individuals with pre-eclampsia and from 55 healthy pregnant control subjects were collected sequentially over a 2 year period. Using two distinct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) the plasma levels of total and free thiol angiotensinogen were quantified. The oxidized angiotensinogen plasma level is derived by subtracting the level of free thiol, reduced angiotensinogen from the total angiotensinogen levels in the plasma. Results The relative proportion of free thiol angiotensinogen, expressed as a percentage of that observed with an in-house standard, is significantly decreased in pre-eclamptic patients (70.85% ± 29.49%) (mean ± SD) as compared to healthy pregnant controls (92.98 ± 24.93%) (mean ± SD) p ? 0.0001. The levels of total angiotensinogen did not differ between the two groups. Conclusion Patients with pre-eclampsia had substantially lower levels of free thiol angiotensinogen compared to healthy pregnant controls, whilst maintaining similar total angiotensinogen levels in the plasma. Hence, elevated levels of plasma oxidized angiotensinogen may be a contributing factor to hypertension in the setting of pre-eclampsia. PMID:26312482

  3. Effect of calcium-vitamin D supplementation on metabolic profiles in pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Asemi, Zatollah; Tabassi, Zohreh; Heidarzadeh, Zahra; Khorammian, Hassan; Sabihi, Sima-Sadat; Samimi, Mansooreh

    2012-04-01

    Increased metabolic profiles during pregnancy are associated with an increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and remain a significant medical challenge. To our knowledge, no reports are available indicating the effects of calcium-vitamin D supplementation on metabolic profiles among pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia. This study was designed to determine the effects of consumption calcium-vitamin D supplements on metabolic profiles among Iranian pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia. This randomized single-blind controlled clinical trial was performed among 49 pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia, primigravida, aged 18-35 year old who were carrying singleton pregnancy at their third trimester. Subjects were randomly assigned to consume the placebo (n = 25) or calcium-vitamin D supplements (n = 24) for 9 weeks. Calcium-vitamin D supplements were containing 500 mg carbonate calcium plus 200 IU vitamin D3. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 9 week intervention to measures of Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG) and serum lipid profiles. Consumption of calcium-vitamin D supplements resulted in decreased FPG and serum triglycerides levels as compared to the placebo (-9.1 vs. 0.5 mg dL(-1); p = 0.03, -11.7 vs. 49.9 mg dL(-1); p = 0.001, respectively). No significant differences were found comparing calcium-vitamin D supplements and the placebo in terms of their effect on serum total-, HDL-, LDL-cholesterol levels. Within-group differences in the placebo group revealed a significant increase in serum triglycerides levels (+49.9 mg dL(-1), p < 0.0001). In conclusion, consumption of calcium-vitamin D supplements for 9 weeks during pregnancy among pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia resulted in decreased FPG and serum triglycerides levels as compared to the placebo group, but could not affect serum total-, HDL-, LDL-cholesterol levels. PMID:24163957

  4. Severe pre-eclampsia complicated by HELLP syndrome alterations in the structure of the umbilical cord (morphometric and immunohistochemical study)

    PubMed Central

    Balsak, Deniz; Togrul, Cihan; Ekinci, Cenap; Cavus, Yunus; Tahaoglu, Ali Emre; Deveci, Engin; Gül, Talip; Karaman, Evren; Ekinci, Aysun; Sakar, Nafi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphometric and immunohistochemistry in umbilical cords from patients with severe pre-eclampsia with and without haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets (HELLP) syndrome. The patient and control groups were similar according to baseline obstetric characteristics. White blood cell count in patients with HELLP syndrome and the control group was significantly increased among patients with HELLP syndrome (p < 0.001). Morphometric examination and endothelial core length were significantly different between the groups. In the umbilical cord cross-section of the HELLP group, endothelial cell degeneration in the vessel wall and basement membrane thickening were observed. In the muscle layer of blood vessels, the following disorders were found: increased collagen fibres in the muscle cell, hyperplasia and separation of muscle fibres as well as edema in the intermediate connective tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that endothelial cells, basal membrane and fibroblast cells in the HELLP group expressed high levels of CD44. Vessel wall and amniotic epithelial basement membrane thickening were observed in the HELLP group. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) was expressed. Fibroblast and smooth muscle cells were fusiform and showed a positive reaction to immunohistochemical staining of ?-actin smooth muscle. PMID:26019650

  5. Accuracy of serum uric acid as a predictive test for maternal complications in pre-eclampsia: bivariate meta-analysis and decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Corine M; van Pampus, Maria G; Groen, Henk; Aarnoudse, Jan G; van den Berg, Paul P; Mol, Ben W J

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the accuracy and clinical value of serum uric acid in predicting maternal complications in women with pre-eclampsia. An existing meta-analysis on the subject was updated. The accuracy of serum uric acid for the prediction of maternal complications was assessed with a bivariate model estimating a summary Receiver Operating Characteristic (sROC) curve. Subsequently, a clinical decision analysis was performed, in which three alternative strategies were modelled: (I) expectant management with monitoring until spontaneous labour; (II) induction of labour; (III) serum uric acid as test for predicting maternal complications. In the latter strategy, accuracy data of serum uric acid derived from the sROC curve were used to assess the value of serum uric acid in the management of women with pre-eclampsia. In this strategy, women with an increased serum uric acid were supposed to have labour induced, whereas women with serum uric acid levels below the threshold were managed expectantly. The decision whether to use the policy expectant management, to induce labour or to test serum uric acid levels, is based on the expected utility of each strategy. The expected utility depends on the probability of occurrence of severe maternal complications (i.e. severe hypertension, haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count (HELLP syndrome) or eclampsia) and the mode of delivery (caesarean section versus vaginal delivery). Valuation of the outcomes was performed using a distress ratio, which expresses how much worse a complication of pre-eclampsia is valued as compared to a caesarean section. Eight studies, testing 1565 women with pre-eclampsia, met the inclusion criteria. If the distress ratio was 10, the strategy regarding serum uric acid would be the preferred strategy when the probability of complications was between 2.9 and 6.3%. At higher complication rates induction of labour would be preferred, whereas at lower complication rates expectant management would be the best treatment option. These findings were stable in sensitivity analyses, using different distress ratios. Based on the decision analysis, serum uric acid seems to be a useful test in the management of pre-eclampsia under realistic assumptions. PMID:19540647

  6. Recombinant Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor 121 Attenuates Autoantibody-Induced Features of Pre-eclampsia in Pregnant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Athar H.; Irani, Roxanna A.; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Blackwell, Sean C.; Ramin, Susan M.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a serious hypertensive disorder of pregnancy characterized by excessive production of a soluble form of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-1, termed soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1). This placental-derived factor is believed to be a key contributor to the clinical features of PE. Women with PE are also characterized by the presence of autoantibodies, termed angiotensin type 1 receptor activating autoantibody (AT1-AA), that activate the major angiotensin receptor, AT1. These autoantibodies cause clinical features of PE and elevated sFlt-1 when injected into pregnant mice. The research reported here used this autoantibody-injection model of PE to assess the therapeutic potential of recombinant VEGF121, a relatively stable form of the natural ligand. METHODS Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from women with PE was injected into pregnant mice with or without continuous infusion of recombinant VEGF121. Injected mice were monitored for symptoms of PE. RESULTS As a result of infusion of recombinant VEGF121 autoantibody-induced hypertension (systolic blood pressure) was reduced from 159 ± 5 to 124 ± 5 mm Hg, proteinuria from 111 ± 16 to 40 ± 5 mg protein/mg creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels from 31 ± 1 mg/ dl to 18 ± 2 mg/dl, P < 0.05. Histological analysis revealed that autoantibody-induced glomerular damage including the narrowing of Bowman’s space and occlusion of capillary loop spaces was largely prevented by VEGF121 infusion. Finally, impaired placental angiogenesis resulting from AT1-AA injection was significantly improved by VEGF121 infusion. CONCLUSIONS The infusion of recombinant VEGF121 significantly attenuated autoantibody-induced features of PE. PMID:21183928

  7. Objective prioritization of positional candidate genes at a quantitative trait locus for pre-eclampsia on 2q22.

    PubMed

    Moses, E K; Fitzpatrick, E; Freed, K A; Dyer, T D; Forrest, S; Elliott, K; Johnson, M P; Blangero, J; Brennecke, S P

    2006-08-01

    Pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (PE/E) is a common, serious medical disorder of human pregnancy. Familial association of PE/E has been recognized for decades, but the genetics are complex and poorly understood. In an attempt to identify PE/E susceptibility genes, we embarked on a positional cloning strategy using 34 Australian and New Zealand PE/E pedigrees. An initial 10-cM resolution genome scan revealed a putative susceptibility locus spanning a broad region on chromosome 2 that overlaps an independently determined linkage signal seen in Icelandic PE pedigrees. Subsequent fine mapping using 25 additional short tandem repeat (STR) markers in this region and non-parametric multipoint linkage analysis did not change the overall position. Under a strict diagnosis of PE, we obtained significant evidence of linkage on 2q with a peak log-of-odds ratio score (LOD) of 3.43 near marker D2S151 at 155 cM. To prioritize positional candidate genes at the 2q locus for detailed analysis, we applied an objective prioritization strategy that integrates quantitative bioinformatics, assessment of differential gene expression and association analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Highest priority was assigned to the activin receptor gene ACVR2. This gene also showed >10-fold differential gene expression in human decidual tissue from normotensive and PE individuals. We genotyped five known SNPs in this gene in our pedigrees and performed tests for association and linkage disequilibrium. One SNP (rs1424954) showed strong preliminary evidence of association with PE (P = 0.007), whereas two others (rs1364658 and rs1895694) exhibited nominal evidence (P < 0.05). Haplotype analysis revealed no additional association information. There was evidence of weak linkage disequilibrium among these SNPs. The highest observed LD occurred between the two strongest associated SNPs, suggesting that the observed signals may be the signature of an observed functional variant. PMID:16809377

  8. Antenatal blood pressure for prediction of pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, and small for gestational age babies: development and validation in two general population cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Silverwood, Richard J; de Stavola, Bianca L; Inskip, Hazel; Cooper, Cyrus; Godfrey, Keith M; Crozier, Sarah; Fraser, Abigail; Nelson, Scott M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Tilling, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Study question Can routine antenatal blood pressure measurements between 20 and 36 weeks’ gestation contribute to the prediction of pre-eclampsia and its associated adverse outcomes? Methods This study used repeated antenatal measurements of blood pressure from 12?996 women in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) to develop prediction models and validated these in 3005 women from the Southampton Women’s Survey (SWS). A model based on maternal early pregnancy characteristics only (BMI, height, age, parity, smoking, existing and previous gestational hypertension and diabetes, and ethnicity) plus initial mean arterial pressure was compared with a model additionally including current mean arterial pressure, a model including the deviation of current mean arterial pressure from a stratified normogram, and a model including both at different gestational ages from 20-36 weeks. Study answer and limitations The addition of blood pressure measurements from 28 weeks onwards improved prediction models compared with use of early pregnancy risk factors alone, but they contributed little to the prediction of preterm birth or small for gestational age. Though multiple imputation of missing data was used to increase the sample size and minimise selection bias, the validation sample might have been slightly underpowered as the number of cases of pre-eclampsia was just below the recommended 100. Several risk factors were self reported, potentially introducing measurement error, but this reflects how information would be obtained in clinical practice. What this study adds The addition of routinely collected blood pressure measurements from 28 weeks onwards improves predictive models for pre-eclampsia based on blood pressure in early pregnancy and other characteristics, facilitating a reduction in scheduled antenatal care. Funding, competing interests, data sharing UK Wellcome Trust, US National Institutes of Health, and UK Medical Research Council. Other funding sources for authors are detailed in the full online paper. With the exceptions of CM-W, HMI, and KMG there were no competing interests. PMID:26578347

  9. The Effect of Multi mineral-Vitamin D Supplementation on Pregnancy Outcomes in Pregnant Women at Risk for Pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Asemi, Zatollah; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to determine the favorable effects of multi mineral-Vitamin D supplementation on pregnancy outcomes among women at risk for pre-eclampsia. Methods: This randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted among 46 women at risk for pre-eclampsia at 27 weeks’ gestation with positive roll-over test. Pregnant women were randomly assigned to receive either the multi mineral-Vitamin D supplements (n = 23) or the placebo (n = 23) for 9-week. Multi mineral-Vitamin D supplements were containing 800 mg calcium, 200 mg magnesium, 8 mg zinc, and 400 IU Vitamin D3. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 9-week intervention to measure related factors. Newborn's outcomes were determined. Results: Although no significant difference was seen in newborn's weight and head circumference between the two groups, mean newborns’ length (51.3 ± 1.7 vs. 50.3 ± 1.2 cm, P = 0.03) was significantly higher in multi mineral-Vitamin D group than that in the placebo group. Compared to the placebo, consumption of multi mineral-Vitamin D supplements resulted in increased levels of serum calcium (+0.19 vs. ?0.08 mg/dL, P = 0.03), magnesium (+0.15 vs. ?0.08 mg/dL, P = 0.03), zinc (+8.25 vs. ?21.38 mg/dL, P = 0.001) and Vitamin D (+3.79 vs. ?1.37 ng/ml, P = 0.01). In addition, taking multi mineral-Vitamin D supplements favorably influenced systolic blood pressure (SBP) (?1.08 vs. 6.08 mmHg, P = 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (?0.44 vs. 3.05 mmHg, P = 0.02). Conclusions: Multi mineral-Vitamin D supplementation for 9-week in pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia resulted in increased newborn's length, increased circulating levels of maternal serum calcium, magnesium, zinc and Vitamin D, and led to decreased maternal SBP and DBP. PMID:26288706

  10. Double blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of esomeprazole to treat early onset pre-eclampsia (PIE Trial): a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Cluver, Catherine A; Walker, Susan P; Mol, Ben W; Theron, Gerard B; Hall, David R; Hiscock, Richard; Hannan, N; Tong, S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pre-eclampsia is a major complication of pregnancy, globally responsible for 60?000 maternal deaths per year, and far greater numbers of fetal losses. There is no definitive treatment other than delivery. A drug that can quench the disease process could be useful to treat early onset pre-eclampsia, as it could allow pregnancies to safely continue to a gestation where fetal outcomes are significantly improved. We have generated preclinical data to show esomeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor used for gastric reflux, has potent biological effects that makes it a worthwhile therapeutic candidate. Esomeprazole potently decreases soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) and soluble endoglin secretion from placenta and endothelial cells, and has biological actions to mitigate endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Methods and analysis We propose undertaking a phase II, double blind, randomised controlled clinical trial to examine whether administering 40?mg esomeprazole daily may prolong gestation in women with early onset pre-eclampsia. We will recruit 120 women (gestational age of 26+0 to 31+6?weeks) who will be randomised to receive either esomeprazole or an identical placebo. The primary outcome will be the number of days from randomisation to delivery. Secondary outcomes include maternal, fetal and neonatal composite and individual outcomes. Maternal outcomes include maternal death, eclampsia, pulmonary oedema, severe renal impairment, cerebral vascular events and liver haematoma or rupture. Neonatal outcomes include neonatal death within 6?weeks after the due date, intraventricular haemorrhage, necrotising enterocolitis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. We will examine whether esomeprazole can decrease serum sFlt-1 and soluble endoglin levels and we will record the safety of esomeprazole in these pregnancies. Ethics and dissemination This study has ethical approval (Protocol V.2.4, M14/09/038, Federal Wide assurance Number 00001372, IRB0005239), and is registered with NHREC (ID 3649) and the Pan African Clinical Trial Registry (PACTR201504000771349). Data will be presented at international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. PMID:26510725

  11. Should cervical favourability play a role in the decision for labour induction in gestational hypertension or mild pre-eclampsia at term? An exploratory analysis of the HYPITAT trial

    PubMed Central

    Tajik, P; van der Tuuk, K; Koopmans, CM; Groen, H; van Pampus, MG; van der Berg, PP; van der Post, JA; van Loon, AJ; de Groot, CJM; Kwee, A; Huisjes, AJM; van Beek, E; Papatsonis, DNM; Bloemenkamp, KW; van Unnik, GA; Porath, M; Rijnders, RJ; Stigter, RH; de Boer, K; Scheepers, HC; Zwinderman, AH; Bossuyt, PM; Mol, BW

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine whether cervical favourability (measured by cervical length and the Bishop score) should inform obstetricians’ decision regarding labour induction for women with gestational hypertension or mild pre-eclampsia at term. Design A post hoc analysis of the Hypertension and Pre-eclampsia Intervention Trial At Term (HYPITAT). Setting Obstetric departments of six university and 32 teaching and district hospitals in the Netherlands. Population A total of 756 women diagnosed with gestational hypertension or pre-eclampsia between 36 + 0 and 41 + 0 weeks of gestation randomly allocated to induction of labour or expectant management. Methods Data were analysed using logistic regression modelling. Main outcome measures The occurrence of a high-risk maternal situation defined as either maternal complications or progression to severe disease. Secondary outcomes were caesarean delivery and adverse neonatal outcomes. Results The superiority of labour induction in preventing high-risk situations in women with gestational hypertension or mild pre-eclampsia at term varied significantly according to cervical favourability. In women who were managed expectantly, the longer the cervix the higher the risk of developing maternal high-risk situations, whereas in women in whom labour was induced, cervical length was not associated with a higher probability of maternal high-risk situations (test of interaction P = 0.03). Similarly, the beneficial effect of labour induction on reducing the caesarean section rate was stronger in women with an unfavourable cervix. Conclusion Against widely held opinion, our exploratory analysis showed that women with gestational hypertension or mild pre-eclampsia at term who have an unfavourable cervix benefited more from labour induction than other women. Trial registration The trial has been registered in the clinical trial register as ISRCTN08132825. PMID:22703475

  12. Acute presentation of gestational diabetes insipidus with pre-eclampsia complicated by cerebral vasoconstriction: a case report and review of the published work.

    PubMed

    Mor, Amir; Fuchs, Yael; Zafra, Kathleen; Haberman, Shoshana; Tal, Reshef

    2015-08-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus (GDI) is a rare, self-limited complication of pregnancy. As it is related to excess placental vasopressinase enzyme activity, which is metabolized in the liver, GDI is more common in pregnancies complicated by conditions associated with liver dysfunction. We present a case of a 41-year-old woman at 38 weeks' gestation who presented with pre-eclampsia with severe features, including impaired liver function and renal insufficiency. Following cesarean section she was diagnosed with GDI, which was further complicated by cerebral vasoconstriction as demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography. This case raises the possibility that cerebral vasoconstriction may be related to the cause of GDI. A high index of suspicion of GDI should be maintained in patients who present with typical signs and symptoms, especially in the setting of pregnancy complications associated with liver dysfunction. PMID:25832854

  13. Presence of auto-antibody against two placental proteins, annexin A1 and vitamin D binding protein, in sera of women with pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Behrouz, Gharesi-Fard; Farzaneh, Ghaderi-shabankareh; Leila, Jafarzadeh; Jaleh, Zolghadri; Eskandar, Kamali-Sarvestani

    2013-09-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) is one of the most complex and life-threatening pregnancy disorders. PE is characterized by maternal hypertension and proteinuria. There is much evidence to support an immunological etiology for PE and auto-immunity is considered a predisposing factor for PE. The aim of the present study was the investigation of placental proteins as targets for auto-antibodies in PE patients. 2D-PAGE technique was used for separation of the total human placental proteins. After separation, protein spots were transferred to the PVDF membranes and blotted with sera from 20 PE patients and compared with membranes blotted with 20 sera from normal women. MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry technique was used for identification of differentially blotted spots. Moreover, the results of mass analysis were confirmed using western blot with commercial mAbs and RT-PCR technique. The results indicated that two placental proteins, annexin A1 and vitamin D binding protein (DBP), might be targeted by PE sera. The expression of annexin A1 and DBP was also confirmed at RNA level using the RT-PCR technique. Furthermore, the mass results were confirmed by western blotting with commercial mAbs against two targeted proteins. The data of the present study suggest two new placental proteins, annexin A1 and DBP, as placental immune targets. Considering the relation among vitamin D deficiency, increased risk of PE, and the role of annexin A1 in the resolution of inflammation, production of antibody against annexin A1 and DBP may be considered a new auto-immune hypothesis in pre-eclampsia that calls for further investigation in future work. PMID:23830177

  14. Fish Oil Supplementation does not Reduce Risks of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension, or Pre-Eclampsia: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing; Ji, Xinran; Zhang, Lei; Hou, Zhaohui; Li, Chundong; Tong, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background The effects of gestational supplementation with fish oil on risks for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), and pre-eclampsia (PE) have not been confirmed. In this study, a meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of fish oil supplementation on these gestational complications. Material/Methods Randomized controlled human trials that investigated the effects of fish oil supplementation in pregnant women were identified by a systematic search of Medline, Embase, and Cochrane’s Library, and references of related reviews and studies up to December 2014. Relative risks (RRs) for GDM, PIH, and PE were the outcomes of interest. Fixed-effects or random-effects models were applied according to the heterogeneity. Results Thirteen comparisons from 11 published articles, including more than 5000 participants, were included. The results showed that fish oil supplementation was not associated with reduced risks for GDM (RR=1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.85–1.32, p=0.60), PIH (RR=1.03, 95% CI: 0.89–1.20, p=0.66), or PE (RR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.74–1.16, p=0.51). No statistically significant heterogeneity was detected for the comparison of each outcome. The effects of fish oil on these gestational complications were consistent between women with low-risk and high-risk pregnancies. Conclusions Gestational supplementation with fish oil during the second or third trimester of pregnancy is not associated with reduced risks for GDM, PIH, or PE. Other possible benefits of fish oil supplementation during pregnancy warrant further evaluation. PMID:26256041

  15. Analysis of Polymorphisms in Interleukin-10, Interleukin-6, and Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist in Mexican-Mestizo Women with Pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Valencia Villalvazo, Elith Yazmin; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Romero Arauz, Juan Fernando; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Coronel, Agustín; Carlos Falcón, Juan; Hernández Rivera, Jaime; Ibarra, Roberto; Polanco Reyes, Lucila

    2012-01-01

    Due to the fact that studies seeking associations of polymorphisms in regulatory regions of cytokine genes with pre-eclampsia (PE) have not always been consistent in different population analyses, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible association between rs1800896 of interleukin-10 (IL-10), rs1800795 of interleukin-6 (IL-6), and the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in intron 2 of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), as well as gene–gene interactions between these three polymorphisms with the presence of PE in Mexican-Mestizo women and one Amerindian population from México (Maya). A case–control study was performed where 411 pre-eclamptic cases and 613 controls were genotyped. For the rs1800896 of IL-10 and rs1800795 of IL-6, we used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allelic discrimination and for the VNTR of IL-1Ra, PCR. Allele frequency differences were assessed by Chi-squared test; logistic regression was used to test for associations; a gene–gene interaction was conducted. Genotypic and allelic distribution of the polymorphisms was similar in our population. The estimated of the gene–gene interaction between the polymorphisms did not differ significantly. However, we observed important differences in the distribution of the alleles and genotypes of the three polymorphisms analyzed between Mestiza-Mexicanas and Maya-Mestizo women. In conclusion, we did not find an association between polymorphisms in IL-10, IL-6, and IL-1Ra and PE in Mexican-Mestizo and Maya-Mestizo women. To our knowledge, this is the first time that these three polymorphisms were analyzed together with gene–gene interaction in women with PE. PMID:23013217

  16. Translating research into maternal health care policy: a qualitative case study of the use of evidence in policies for the treatment of eclampsia and pre-eclampsia in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Karen; Lewin, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Background Few empirical studies of research utilisation have been conducted in low and middle income countries. This paper explores how research information, in particular findings from randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews, informed policy making and clinical guideline development for the use of magnesium sulphate in the treatment of eclampsia and pre-eclampsia in South Africa. Methods A qualitative case-study approach was used to examine the policy process. This included a literature review, a policy document review, a timeline of key events and the collection and analysis of 15 interviews with policy makers and academic clinicians involved in these policy processes and sampled using a purposive approach. The data was analysed thematically and explored theoretically through the literature on agenda setting and the policy making process. Results Prior to 1994 there was no national maternal care policy in South Africa. Consequently each tertiary level institution developed its own care guidelines and these recommended a range of approaches to the management of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. The subsequent emergence of new national policies for maternal care, including for the treatment of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, was informed by evidence from randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews. This outcome was influenced by a number of factors. The change to a democratic government in the mid 1990s, and the health reforms that followed, created opportunities for maternal health care policy development. The new government was open to academic involvement in policy making and recruited academics from local networks into key policy making positions in the National Department of Health. The local academic obstetric network, which placed high value on evidence-based practice, brought these values into the policy process and was also linked strongly to international evidence based medicine networks. Within this context of openness to policy development, local researchers acted as policy entrepreneurs, bringing attention to priority health issues, and to the use of research evidence in addressing these. This resulted in the new national maternity care guidelines being informed by evidence from randomised controlled trials and recommending explicitly the use of magnesium sulphate for the management of eclampsia. Conclusion Networks of researchers were important not only in using research information to shape policy but also in placing issues on the policy agenda. A policy context which created a window of opportunity for new research-informed policy development was also crucial. PMID:19091083

  17. A Risk Prediction Model for the Assessment and Triage of Women with Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy in Low-Resourced Settings: The miniPIERS (Pre-eclampsia Integrated Estimate of RiSk) Multi-country Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Beth A.; Hutcheon, Jennifer A.; Ansermino, J. Mark; Hall, David R.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Bhutta, Shereen Z.; Biryabarema, Christine; Grobman, William A.; Groen, Henk; Li, Jing; Magee, Laura A.; Merialdi, Mario; Nakimuli, Annettee; Qu, Ziguang; Sikandar, Rozina; Sass, Nelson; Sawchuck, Diane; Steyn, D. Wilhelm; Widmer, Mariana; Zhou, Jian; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia/eclampsia are leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity, particularly in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs). We developed the miniPIERS risk prediction model to provide a simple, evidence-based tool to identify pregnant women in LMICs at increased risk of death or major hypertensive-related complications. Methods and Findings From 1 July 2008 to 31 March 2012, in five LMICs, data were collected prospectively on 2,081 women with any hypertensive disorder of pregnancy admitted to a participating centre. Candidate predictors collected within 24 hours of admission were entered into a step-wise backward elimination logistic regression model to predict a composite adverse maternal outcome within 48 hours of admission. Model internal validation was accomplished by bootstrapping and external validation was completed using data from 1,300 women in the Pre-eclampsia Integrated Estimate of RiSk (fullPIERS) dataset. Predictive performance was assessed for calibration, discrimination, and stratification capacity. The final miniPIERS model included: parity (nulliparous versus multiparous); gestational age on admission; headache/visual disturbances; chest pain/dyspnoea; vaginal bleeding with abdominal pain; systolic blood pressure; and dipstick proteinuria. The miniPIERS model was well-calibrated and had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC ROC) of 0.768 (95% CI 0.735–0.801) with an average optimism of 0.037. External validation AUC ROC was 0.713 (95% CI 0.658–0.768). A predicted probability ?25% to define a positive test classified women with 85.5% accuracy. Limitations of this study include the composite outcome and the broad inclusion criteria of any hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. This broad approach was used to optimize model generalizability. Conclusions The miniPIERS model shows reasonable ability to identify women at increased risk of adverse maternal outcomes associated with the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. It could be used in LMICs to identify women who would benefit most from interventions such as magnesium sulphate, antihypertensives, or transportation to a higher level of care. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:24465185

  18. Doppler ultrasound of the uterine arteries: the importance of bilateral notching in the prediction of pre-eclampsia, placental abruption or delivery of a small-for-gestational-age baby.

    PubMed

    Harrington, K; Cooper, D; Lees, C; Hecher, K; Campbell, S

    1996-03-01

    The use of Doppler studies of the uterine arteries in the prediction of pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth retardation has had mixed success. The introduction of color Doppler imaging and the use of the "notch' to define an abnormal waveform have helped to improve the predictive value of uterine artery Doppler screening. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of uterine artery Doppler in a group of women of mixed race and parity. This study was a prospective, cross-sectional analysis of 1326 unselected women who were screened with continuous wave uterine Doppler at 19-21 weeks, as part of a fetal anomaly/dating scan. A total of 214 women with abnormal uterine artery waveforms (notching) were referred for assessment at 24 weeks; 191 attended and had color Doppler imaging/pulsed Doppler studies of both uterine arteries. Data from 185 pregnancies were suitable for analysis. There were abnormal uterine Doppler findings (uni- or bilateral notching) in 110 patients at 24 weeks; 48 had bilateral notching. The sensitivity of notching for the prediction of proteinuric pregnancy-induced hypertension (PPIH) was similar in primiparas (76.9%), multiparas (77.7%), African-Caribbean women (82.6%) and Caucasian women (71.4%). The sensitivity of bilateral notching for the prediction of PPIH requiring delivery before 34 weeks was 81.2%, and 57.6% for babies small for gestational age (SGA), with positive predictive values of 27% (PPIH), 31.2% (SGA) and 37.5% (any complication). Patients with persistent bilateral notching are particularly at risk of developing PPIH or delivering an SGA baby before 34 weeks' gestation; they warrant increased surveillance, and may be a group that could benefit from prophylactic therapies. PMID:8705410

  19. Effectiveness and safety of 1 vs 4?h blood pressure profile with clinical and laboratory assessment for the exclusion of gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia: a retrospective study in a university affiliated maternity hospital

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Elizabeth Anne; Carins, Thomas A; Hannigan, Yolanda; Bardien, Nadia; Shub, Alexis; Walker, Susan P

    2015-01-01

    Objective We asked whether 60 compared with 240?min observation is sufficiently informative and safe for pregnancy day assessment (PDAC) of suspected pre-eclampsia (PE). Design A retrospective study of 209 pregnant women (475 PDAC assessments, 6?months) with routinely collected blood pressure (BP), symptom and laboratory information. We proposed a 60?min screening algorithm comprising: absence of symptoms, normal laboratory parameters and ?1high-BP reading (systolic blood pressure, SBP 140?mm?Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure, DBP 90?mm?Hg or higher). We also evaluated two less inclusive screening algorithms. We determined short-term outcomes (within 4?h): severe hypertension, proteinuric hypertension and pregnancy-induced hypertension, as well as long-term outcome: PE-related diagnoses up to the early puerperium. We assessed performance of alternate screening algorithms performance using 2×2 tables. Results 1 in 3 women met all screen negative criteria at 1?h. Their risk of hypertension requiring treatment in the next 3?h was 1.8% and of failing to diagnose proteinuric hypertensive PE at 4?h was 5.1%. If BP triggers were 5?mm?Hg lower, 1 in 6 women would be screen-negative of whom 1.1% subsequently develops treatment-requiring hypertension and 4.5% demonstrate short-term proteinuric hypertension. We present sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive likelihood ratios for alternate screening algorithms. Conclusions We endorse further research into the safest screening test where women are considered for discharge after 60?min. Safety, patient and staff satisfaction should be assessed prospectively. Any screening test should be used in conjunction with good clinical care to minimise maternal and perinatal hazards of PE. PMID:26582404

  20. Adequately Diversified Dietary Intake and Iron and Folic Acid Supplementation during Pregnancy Is Associated with Reduced Occurrence of Symptoms Suggestive of Pre-Eclampsia or Eclampsia in Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sutapa; Fledderjohann, Jasmine; Vellakkal, Sukumar; Stuckler, David

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective Pre-eclampsia or Eclampsia (PE or E) accounts for 25% of cases of maternal mortality worldwide. There is some evidence of a link to dietary factors, but few studies have explored this association in developing countries, where the majority of the burden falls. We examined the association between adequately diversified dietary intake, iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy and symptoms suggestive of PE or E in Indian women. Methods Cross-sectional data from India’s third National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3, 2005-06) was used for this study. Self-reported symptoms suggestive of PE or E during pregnancy were obtained from 39,657 women aged 15-49 years who had had a live birth in the five years preceding the survey. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association between adequately diversified dietary intake, iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy and symptoms suggestive of PE or E after adjusting for maternal, health and lifestyle factors, and socio-demographic characteristics of the mother. Results In their most recent pregnancy, 1.2% (n=456) of the study sample experienced symptoms suggestive of PE or E. Mothers who consumed an adequately diversified diet were 34% less likely (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.51-0.87) to report PE or E symptoms than mothers with inadequately diversified dietary intake. The likelihood of reporting PE or E symptoms was also 36% lower (OR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.47-0.88) among those mothers who consumed iron and folic acid supplementation for at least 90 days during their last pregnancy. As a sensitivity analysis, we stratified our models sequentially by education, wealth, antenatal care visits, birth interval, and parity. Our results remained largely unchanged: both adequately diversified dietary intake and iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy were associated with a reduced occurrence of PE or E symptoms. Conclusion Having a adequately diversified dietary intake and iron and folic acid supplementation in pregnancy was associated with a reduced occurrence of symptoms suggestive of PE or E in Indian women. PMID:25785774

  1. The global impact of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Duley, Lelia

    2009-06-01

    Over half a million women die each year from pregnancy related causes, 99% in low and middle income countries. In many low income countries, complications of pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death amongst women of reproductive years. The Millennium Development Goals have placed maternal health at the core of the struggle against poverty and inequality, as a matter of human rights. Ten percent of women have high blood pressure during pregnancy, and preeclampsia complicates 2% to 8% of pregnancies. Preeclampsia can lead to problems in the liver, kidneys, brain and the clotting system. Risks for the baby include poor growth and prematurity. Although outcome is often good, preeclampsia can be devastating and life threatening. Overall, 10% to 15% of direct maternal deaths are associated with preeclampsia and eclampsia. Where maternal mortality is high, most of deaths are attributable to eclampsia, rather than preeclampsia. Perinatal mortality is high following preeclampsia, and even higher following eclampsia. In low and middle income countries many public hospitals have limited access to neonatal intensive care, and so the mortality and morbidity is likely to be considerably higher than in settings where such facilities are available. The only interventions shown to prevent preeclampsia are antiplatelet agents, primarily low dose aspirin, and calcium supplementation. Treatment is largely symptomatic. Antihypertensive drugs are mandatory for very high blood pressure. Plasma volume expansion, corticosteroids and antioxidant agents have been suggested for severe preeclampsia, but trials to date have not shown benefit. Optimal timing for delivery of women with severe preeclampsia before 32 to 34 weeks' gestation remains a dilemma. Magnesium sulfate can prevent and control eclamptic seizures. For preeclampsia, it more than halves the risk of eclampsia (number needed to treat 100, 95% confidence interval 50 to 100) and probably reduces the risk of maternal death. A quarter of women have side effects, primarily flushing. With clinical monitoring serious adverse effects are rare. Magnesium sulfate is the anticonvulsant of choice for treating eclampsia; more effective than diazepam, phenytoin, or lytic cocktail. Although it is a low cost effective treatment, magnesium sulfate is not available in all low and middle income countries; scaling up its use for eclampsia and severe preeclampsia will contribute to achieving the Millennium Development Goals. PMID:19464502

  2. Pre-Eclampsia, Birth Weight, and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Joshua R.; McDermott, Suzanne; Bao, Haikun; Hardin, James; Gregg, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are primarily inherited, but perinatal or other environmental factors may also be important. In an analysis of 87,677 births from 1996 through 2002, insured by the South Carolina Medicaid program, birth weight was significantly inversely associated with the odds of ASD (OR = 0.78, p = 0.001 for each additional…

  3. [Reduced and oxidized glutathione of the placenta in pregnancy complicated by pre-eclampsia].

    PubMed

    Neves, J; Cruz, A S; Azevedo, I; Vaz, A C; Vasco, P; Santos, P J; Bicho, M P

    1997-05-01

    Significative enhancement of free radical formation (FRO) in vivo is an important feature of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP), namely preeclampsia (PIH). The latest investigations about the pathology of HDP, showed the contribution of placental circulation to the development and evolution of such disease. The placental bed can be a potential source of FRO or activation of cells that can produce FRO. Glutathione, is an important molecule for cellular protection against damage, is a cofactor of many enzymes, in particular, for the glutathione peroxidase of the placental tissue; this enzyme in the placenta bed prevent the production of thromboxan and lipoperoxides; the latter are potentially damaging to the endothelium cells and can cause vasoconstriction, the most important feature of PIH. The activity of that enzyme is deficient in PIH. We studied, by fluorometric assay, the concentrations of the two states of glutathione in placental homogenates (PLH) from pregnant women without pathology (PWN) and from pregnant women with PIH (PWPIH). The data showed significant low concentrations in the PLH of the two states of glutathione in the PWN against high concentrations of this molecule in the PLH from PWPIH. This feature can result from a deficient user of the glutathione by the cellular mechanism for prevention against oxidative factors. In addition, our study shows a biochemical marker that is suggestive that the placental bed is a potential source of FRO production in PIH. PMID:9312980

  4. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Directed Pathway Analysis of Maternal Pre-Eclampsia Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Hannah E. J.; Melton, Phillip E.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Freed, Katy A.; Kalionis, Bill; Murthi, Padma; Brennecke, Shaun P.; Keogh, Rosemary J.; Moses, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Preeclampsia (PE) is a serious hypertensive pregnancy disorder with a significant genetic component. Numerous genetic studies, including our own, have yielded many susceptibility genes from distinct functional groups. Additionally, transcriptome profiling of tissues at the maternal-fetal interface has likewise yielded many differentially expressed genes. Often there is little overlap between these two approaches, although genes identified in both approaches are significantly associated with PE. We have thus taken a novel integrative bioinformatics approach of analysing pathways common to the susceptibility genes and the PE transcriptome. Methods Using Illumina Human Ht12v4 and Wg6v3 BeadChips, transcriptome profiling was conducted on n = 65 normotensive and n = 60 PE decidua basalis tissues collected at delivery. The R software package libraries lumi and limma were used to preprocess transcript data for pathway analysis. Pathways were analysed and constructed using Pathway Studio. We examined ten candidate genes, which are from these functional groups: activin/inhibin signalling—ACVR1, ACVR1C, ACVR2A, INHA, INHBB; structural components—COL4A1, COL4A2 and M1 family aminopeptidases—ERAP1, ERAP2 and LNPEP. Results/Conclusion Major common regulators/targets of these susceptibility genes identified were AGT, IFNG, IL6, INHBA, SERPINE1, TGFB1 and VEGFA. The top two categories of pathways associated with the susceptibility genes, which were significantly altered in the PE decidual transcriptome, were apoptosis and cell signaling (p < 0.001). Thus, susceptibility genes from distinct functional groups share similar downstream pathways through common regulators/targets, some of which are altered in PE. This study contributes to a better understanding of how susceptibility genes may interact in the development of PE. With this knowledge, more targeted functional analyses of PE susceptibility genes in these key pathways can be performed to examine their contributions to the pathogenesis and severity of PE. PMID:26010865

  5. [Precipitable C4-poor immune complexes in HELLP syndrome and pre-eclampsia].

    PubMed

    Boenig, G; Euler, H H; Wulf, H

    1991-01-01

    In 16 patients with HELLP syndrome and 10 patients with preeclampsia, laser nephelometric analysis of PEG-precipitated immunocomplexes revealed a decrease in the complement component C4. This is interpreted as a further indication of an immunologic component in the pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:1776314

  6. Are Maternal Genitourinary Infection and Pre-Eclampsia Associated with ADHD in School-Aged Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Joshua R.; McDermott, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the hypothesis that maternal genitourinary infection (GU) infection is associated with increased risk of ADHD. Method: The authors obtained linked Medicaid billing data for pregnant women and their children in South Carolina, with births from 1996 through 2002 and follow-up data through 2008. Maternal GU infections and…

  7. [Pre-eclampsia from the perspective of inter-professional collaboration].

    PubMed

    Jank?, P; Jank?, K; Unzeitig, V

    2009-12-01

    Preeclampsia-eclampsia is a syndrome which covers the area of influence belonging to gynecologists-obstetricians. However the internists, especially those who work as consultants in obstetric departments, are interested in diagnostics and therapy of this problem as well. Though internists working in the outdoor-departments do not face the problems of preeclampsia so often, it will be usefull to inform them about the latest trends in diagnostics and therapy ofthis syndrome, which may be very risky in pregnancy. The physicians in general (except the gynecologists) consider preeclampsia mostely as one form of hypertension that appears sometimes during gravidity and they do not realy appreciate the complex danger ofthis illness for the both, mother and child. The objective ofthis paper is to inform the general medical public, especially the internists and general practitioners about the modern view ofthe main problems of preeclampsia e.g. the pathogenesis, diagnostics and the up to day therapy of this high risky syndrome joined with pregnancy. PMID:20070032

  8. Impedance Cardiographic (ICG) Assessment of Pregnant Women With Severe Hypertension to Assess Impact of Standard Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-11

    Pregnancy; Proteinuria, With Hypertension (Severe Pre-eclampsia); Delivery; Proteinuria, With Gestational Hypertension (Pre-eclampsia, Severe); Pregnancy; Hypertension, Gestational Hypertension, With Albuminuria (Severe Pre-eclampsia)

  9. Placental hypoxia, endoplasmic reticulum stress and maternal endothelial sensitisation by sFLT1 in pre-eclampsia

    E-print Network

    Charnock-Jones, D. Stephen

    2015-07-18

    The human placenta is a multifunctional organ that grows and adapts to increasing fetal demand and fluctuations in the intrauterine environment. It is subjected to physiological and pathological changes in local oxygenation, both of which induce...

  10. Determination of Risk Factors for Pre-eclampsia and Eclampsia in a Tertiary Hospital of India: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bej, Punyatoya; Chhabra, Pragti; Sharma, Arun Kumar; Guleria, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia and eclampsia (PE) are pregnancy specific syndromes that contribute to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The identification of its predisposing factors in the pre-pregnancy and initial stage of pregnancy will help in reducing the morbidity and mortality. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the risk factors for PE among pregnant women in a tertiary level hospital. Materials and Methods: In this study, 122 women who delivered beyond 22 weeks of gestation and diagnosed as preeclampsia or eclampsia were selected. Simultaneously, 122 controls with no diagnosis of preeclampsia or eclampsia were selected from the post natal ward. Cases and controls were administered the same pre-tested questionnaire containing different risk factors. Results and Conclusion: Logistic regression was applied in the statistical analysis. The factors that were found to be significant predictors of risk for development of PE were family history of preeclampsia (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 18.57 [1.93-178.16], P = 0.011), higher calorie intake (adjusted OR 14.12 [6.41-43.23] body mass index (adjusted P < 0.001), employment (adjusted OR 6.35 [1.56-25.82] P = 0.010], less protein intake (adjusted OR 3.87 [1.97-8.01] P < 0.001), increased OR 5.86 [02.48-13.8] P < 0.001), mild physical activities (adjusted OR 3.46 [1.06-11.24] P = 0.039). Past history of hypertension and diabetes mellitus were also associated with development of PE.

  11. Magnesium Therapy in Pre-eclampsia Prolongs Analgesia Following Spinal Anaesthesia with Fentanyl and Bupivacaine: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Seyhan, Tülay Özkan; Bezen, Olgaç; Sungur, Mukadder Orhan; Kalelio?lu, ?brahim; Karadeniz, Meltem; Koltka, Kemalettin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Magnesium has anti-nociceptive effects and potentiates opioid analgesia following its systemic and neuraxial administration. However, there is no study evaluating the effects of intravenous (IV) magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) therapy on spinal anaesthesia characteristics in severely pre-eclamptic patients. Aims: The aim of this study was to compare spinal anaesthesia characteristics in severely pre-eclamptic parturients treated with MgSO4 and healthy preterm parturients undergoing caesarean section. Thus, our primary outcome was regarded as the time to first analgesic request following spinal anaesthesia. Study Design: Case-control Study. Methods: Following approval of Institutional Clinical Research Ethics Committee and informed consent of the patients, 44 parturients undergoing caesarean section with spinal anaesthesia were enrolled in the study in two groups: Healthy preterm parturients (Group C) and severely pre-eclamptic parturients with IV MgSO4 therapy (Group Mg). Following blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sampling, spinal anaesthesia was induced with 9 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine and 20 ?g fentanyl. Serum and CSF magnesium levels, onset of sensory block at T4 level, highest sensory block level, motor block characteristics, time to first analgesic request, maternal haemodynamics as well as side effects were evaluated. Results: Blood and CSF magnesium levels were higher in Group Mg. Sensory block onset at T4 were 257.1±77.5 and 194.5±80.1 sec in Group C and Mg respectively (p=0.015). Time to first postoperative analgesic request was significantly prolonged in Group Mg than in Group C (246.1±52.8 and 137.4±30.5 min, respectively, p<0.001; with a mean difference of 108.6 min and 95% CI between 81.6 and 135.7). Side effects were similar in both groups. Group C required significantly more fluids. Conclusion: Treatment with IV MgSO4 in severe pre-eclamptic parturients significantly prolonged the time to first analgesic request compared to healthy preterm parturients, which might be attributed to the opioid potentiation of magnesium. PMID:25207186

  12. Decidual natural killer cell receptor expression is altered in pregnancies with impaired vascular remodeling and a higher risk of pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Alison E; Whitley, Guy S; Thilaganathan, Baskaran; Cartwright, Judith E

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, a specialized type of NK cell accumulates in the lining of the uterus (decidua) and interacts with semiallogeneic fetal trophoblast cells. dNK cells are functionally and phenotypically distinct from PB NK and are implicated in regulation of trophoblast transformation of the uterine spiral arteries, which if inadequately performed, can result in pregnancy disorders. Here, we have used uterine artery Doppler RI in the first trimester of pregnancy as a proxy measure of the extent of transformation of the spiral arteries to identify pregnancies with a high RI, indicative of impaired spiral artery remodeling. We have used flow cytometry to examine dNK cells isolated from these pregnancies compared with those from pregnancies with a normal RI. We report a reduction in the proportion of dNK cells from high RI pregnancies expressing KIR2DL/S1,3,5 and LILRB1, receptors for HLA-C and HLA-G on trophoblast. Decreased LILRB1 expression in the decidua was examined by receptor blocking in trophoblast coculture and altered dNK expression of the cytokines CXCL10 and TNF-?, which regulate trophoblast behavior. These results indicate that dNK cells from high RI pregnancies may display altered interactions with trophoblast via decreased expression of HLA-binding cell-surface receptors, impacting on successful transformation of the uterus for pregnancy. PMID:25381387

  13. Ruptured subcapsular hematoma of the liver due to pre-eclampsia presenting as interstitial pregnancy and the role of intra-abdominal packing.

    PubMed

    Ngene, N C; Amin, N; Moodley, J

    2015-01-01

    Ruptured subcapsular hematoma of the liver (RSHL) can mimic ruptured interstitial pregnancy because each of these conditions occasionally presents at the same gestational period and both do manifest hemodynamic instability. The similarities between the two conditions pose a diagnostic challenge, especially in an un-booked patient. We report a case of an un-booked primigravida, at 21 weeks of gestation, who arrived at a regional hospital with evidence of intra-abdominal bleeding and hypovolemic shock. She was diagnosed as potentially having a ruptured interstitial pregnancy. During the ensuing emergency laparotomy, RSHL was discovered, the area around the ruptured liver capsule was packed with large abdominal swabs, and the patient recovered. This case report illustrates the need to consider RSHL in patients presenting with features of ruptured interstitial pregnancy, as this will assist in the planning of intraoperative care. We also describe abdominal packing and highlight the need for this essential surgical intervention to be taught to doctors practising in low-resource settings. PMID:25666012

  14. Cytokine production by non-stimulated peripheral blood NK cells and lymphocytes in early-onset severe pre-eclampsia without HELLP.

    PubMed

    Bueno-Sánchez, J C; Agudelo-Jaramillo, B; Escobar-Aguilerae, L F; Lopera, A; Cadavid-Jaramillo, A P; Chaouat, G; Maldonado-Estrada, J G

    2013-04-01

    Preeclampsia involves an exacerbated maternal inflammatory response that suggests a possible role of innate immunity. NK cells can promote this kind of response through cytokine production and the expression of activating or inhibitory receptors. The aims of the present study were to explore cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, as well as cytotoxic ability and receptor expression for HLA-E and HLA-G molecules in peripheral natural killer (NK) cells of women with early-onset severe preeclampsia without HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzyme levels and a low platelet count) syndrome. The expression of the ILT2, KIRDL4, NKG2A, and NKG2C receptors and of cytotoxic activity was measured in non-stimulated NK cells, whereas the intracellular expression of IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, IL-12, IFN?, TNF and VEGF, was assessed in non-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells subsets using flow cytometry. Circulating soluble HLA-G was also determined by ELISA. The intracellular cytokines tested were significantly higher in NK cell subsets from severely preeclamptic women compared with the control group. On the other hand, the percentage of NK cells expressing NKG2A or NKG2C and the cytotoxic activity of NK cells were significantly higher in severely preeclamptic women. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between urine protein concentration and soluble human leukocyte antigen G (soluble HLA-G) in serum. We conclude that patients with early-onset severe preeclampsia without HELLP syndrome have increased NK cell function related to cytokine production, cytotoxicity and expression of lectin-like receptors such as NKG2. PMID:23415844

  15. Pre-eclampsia Is Associated with an Increase in Trophoblast Glycogen Content and Glycogen Synthase Activity, Similar to that Found in Hydatidiform Moles

    E-print Network

    contentofsyncytiotrophoblast microvesi- cles purified from the placental chorionic villi of 10 primigravid women a 10-fold increase in glycogen content (223±117 ,tg glycogen/ mg protein), when compared with controls matched for gesta- tional age at delivery (23±18 ,ag glycogen/mg protein) (P

  16. 32 CFR 732.16 - Emergency care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... pregnancy in a manner that a delay, caused by referral to a USMTF or USTF, would jeopardize the welfare of... delivery. (4) Severe pre-eclampsia. (5) Hemorrhage, second and third trimester. (6) Ectopic pregnancy...

  17. 32 CFR 732.16 - Emergency care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pregnancy in a manner that a delay, caused by referral to a USMTF or USTF, would jeopardize the welfare of... delivery. (4) Severe pre-eclampsia. (5) Hemorrhage, second and third trimester. (6) Ectopic pregnancy...

  18. 32 CFR 732.16 - Emergency care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pregnancy in a manner that a delay, caused by referral to a USMTF or USTF, would jeopardize the welfare of... delivery. (4) Severe pre-eclampsia. (5) Hemorrhage, second and third trimester. (6) Ectopic pregnancy...

  19. 32 CFR 732.16 - Emergency care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pregnancy in a manner that a delay, caused by referral to a USMTF or USTF, would jeopardize the welfare of... delivery. (4) Severe pre-eclampsia. (5) Hemorrhage, second and third trimester. (6) Ectopic pregnancy...

  20. Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy: A Systematic Review of International Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Gillon, Tessa E. R.; Pels, Anouk; von Dadelszen, Peter; MacDonell, Karen; Magee, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are developed to assist health care providers in decision-making. We systematically reviewed existing CPGs on the HDPs (hypertensive disorders of pregnancy) to inform clinical practice. Methodology & Principal Findings MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Methodology Register, Health Technology Assessments, and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (Ovid interface), Grey Matters, Google Scholar, and personal records were searched for CPGs on the HDPs (Jan/03 to Nov/13) in English, French, Dutch, or German. Of 13 CPGs identified, three were multinational and three developed for community/midwifery use. Length varied from 3–1188 pages and three guidelines did not formulate recommendations. Eight different grading systems were identified for assessing evidence quality and recommendation strength. No guideline scored ?80% on every domain of the AGREE II, a tool for assessing guideline methodological quality; two CPGs did so for 5/6 domains. Consistency was seen for (i) definitions of hypertension, proteinuria, chronic and gestational hypertension; (ii) pre-eclampsia prevention for women at increased risk: calcium when intake is low and low-dose aspirin, but not vitamins C and E or diuretics; (iii) antihypertensive treatment of severe hypertension; (iv) MgSO4 for eclampsia and severe pre-eclampsia; (v) antenatal corticosteroids at <34 wks when delivery is probable within 7 days; (vi) delivery for women with severe pre-eclampsia pre-viability or pre-eclampsia at term; and (vii) active management of the third stage of labour with oxytocin. Notable inconsistencies were in: (i) definitions of pre-eclampsia and severe pre-eclampsia; (ii) target BP for non-severe hypertension; (iii) timing of delivery for women with pre-eclampsia and severe pre-eclampsia; (iv) MgSO4 for non-severe pre-eclampsia, and (v) postpartum maternal monitoring. Conclusions Existing international HDP CPGs have areas of consistency with which clinicians and researchers can work to develop auditable standards, and areas of inconsistency that should be addressed by future research. PMID:25436639

  1. Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ESR1) Gene Polymorphisms in Pre-eclamptic Saudi Patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Beshbishy, Hesham A.; Tawfeek, Manal A.; Al-Azhary, Nevin M.; Mariah, Reham A.; Habib, Fawzia A.; Aljayar, Lamya; Alahmadi, Abrar F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Pre-eclampsia causes maternal mortality worldwide. Estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) gene polymorphisms were responsible for cardiovascular diseases. This case control study was conducted to investigate whether 2 polymorphic genes of ESR1 are associated with pre-eclampsia among Saudi women in Madina city, Saudi Arabia. Methods: Blood samples from 97 pre-eclamptic and 94 healthy pregnant women were analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction method. All the subjects were recruited randomly from outpatient clinics of Madina Maternity Children Hospital (MMCH), Madina, Saudi Arabia, between Dec. 2012 and Jan. 2014. Results: There was no association between pre-eclampsia and PvuII and XbaI ESR1 gene polymorphisms individually. TT/AA and TT/AG genotype combination existed significantly in pre-eclamptic patients compared to control. The frequency of PvuII and XbaI combined TT/AA genotypes between pre-eclamptic women was 36.1% vs 9.6%, however, frequency of PvuII and XbaI combined TT/AG genotypes between pre-eclamptic women was 3.1% vs 17%, compared to control. The homozygous T-A haplotype carriers showed high pre-eclampsia risk, independent of pregnancy, BMI and smoking status (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 3.26, 95% confidence interval (CI):1.71-9.21). The heterozygous T-A haplotype carriers did not differ from that of non-carriers (adjusted OR: 1.12, 95% CI: 0.47-2.75). No association was observed between pre-eclampsia and T-G, C-G and C-A haplotype of PvuII and XbaIESR1 gene polymorphisms. Conclusions: T-A haplotype of homozygous associated with pre eclampsia not heterozygous carriers of ESR 1 PvuII and XbaI gene polymorphisms elicited high risk of pre-eclampsia. GG genotype of XbaI polymorphism decreased pre-eclampsia risk. Further studies using larger sample size are recommended to investigate the ESR 1 gene polymorphisms associated with pre-eclampsia. PMID:26430422

  2. [Pregnancy-induced hypertension complicated by acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bahloul, M; Ayedi, M; Dammak, H; Trabelsi, K; Bouaziz, M

    2004-03-01

    The acute pancreatitis is a rare complication during the pregnancy. Causes are dominated by the gallstones and hyperlipidemia. This case report describes a 35-year-old pregnant woman who developed acute pancreatitis while suffering from a severe pre-eclampsia syndrome. Since she had no gallstones or other known aetiological factors of acute pancreatitis, the possibility of an etiologic role of pancreatic ischaemic changes associated with eclampsia is discussed. Evolution was marked with multi-organ system failure and poor outcome. Our experience and the previously reported case suggest that pre-eclampsia could be added to the list of causes of the acute pancreatitis. PMID:15030867

  3. ISSUE 59 JULY 2009 Learning curve

    E-print Network

    Rambaut, Andrew

    including Crohn's disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Subsequent studies have found many other with an increased risk of heart disease and variants that confer protection against type 1 diabetes. The Cancer nervosa, pre-eclampsia, Wilms' tumour (a cancer of the kidney that affects children) and congenital heart

  4. 78 FR 40147 - Scientific Information Request on Vitamin D and Calcium

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... intermediate outcomes Pre-eclampsia High blood pressure with or without proteinuria Timing As described for KQ... intermediate outcomes such as hypertension, blood pressure, and bone mineral density? Populations As described for KQ 1, with the exception that for blood pressure and other CVD intermediate outcomes, only...

  5. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10897 Role of corin in trophoblast invasion and uterine

    E-print Network

    -deficient mice developed high blood pressure and proteinuria, characteristics of pre-eclampsia. In these mice-eclampsia. Pregnancy poses a serious challenge for maintaining normal blood pressure. Pregnancy-induced hypertension is a cardiac hormone that regulates blood pressure and sodium homeostasis15 . In mice, lack of CORIN prevents

  6. Comp. by:dshanthi Date:1/8/05 Time:15:46:44 Stage:First Proof File Path:// spsind002s/serials/PRODENV/000000~1/001BFD~1/S00000~1/00D23E~1/000000~3/

    E-print Network

    Haig, David

    and Cooper, 2001; Walker, 2000). Preeclampsia is also frequently associated with edema and Current Topics, but not in the fetus. Severe complications of pre- eclampsia can include acute renal failure, cerebral edema, cerebral hemor- rhage, seizures (eclampsia), pulmonary edema, thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, coagulopathy

  7. Riboflavin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... seem to reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia.Lactic acidosis (a serious blood-acid imbalance) in people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). ... evidence that riboflavin may be useful for treating lactic acidosis in patients ... with thiamine, folic acid, and vitamin B12, might decrease the risk of ...

  8. Breathing during sleep: Studies related to upper airway calibre in pregnancy 

    E-print Network

    Izci, Bilgay

    2007-01-01

    in the nonpregnant women (p = 0.01) but similar in women with pre-eclampsia and pregnant women (p > 0.3). When seated, pregnant women had wider UAs than nonpregnant women (p < 0.02). There was a non-significant trend for pregnant women to have narrower airways than...

  9. Transmission line models to simulate the impedance of the uterine vasculature during the ovarian cycle and pregnancy

    E-print Network

    Chesler, Naomi C.

    cycle and pregnancy Yanmei Zhu a , Benjamin J. Sprague a,b , Terrance M. Phernetton b , Ronald R) decreases approximately 2-fold. In healthy pregnancies, uterine blood flow increases by 20­50-fold, again adequately with pregnancy is a hallmark of pre-eclampsia [8­11]. Increases in uterine vascular compliance

  10. Spontaneous subdural hematoma associated with preeclampsia: a case report and litterature review

    PubMed Central

    Oudghiri, Nezha; Behat, Mehdi; Elchhab, Nada; Doumiri, Mouhssine; Tazi, Anas Saoud

    2014-01-01

    A patient with pre-eclampsia at 31 weeks’ gestation developed neurologic signs. Computerized tomography revealed a large cranial subdural hematoma. This diagnostic should be considered in any pre-eclamptic patient demonstrating neurological symptoms and must be treated effectively because of the poor maternel and fetal prognosis. Our patient was succesfully treated. PMID:25829978

  11. A Study on Atherogenic Indices of Pregnancy Induced Hypertension Patients as Compared to Normal Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Mauchumi Saikia; Paul, Anindita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) includes Gestational hypertension, Pre-eclampsia and Eclampsia and is one of the most common obstetric complication. Worldwide about 76,000 pregnant women die each year from pre-eclampsia and related hypertensive disorders. The aetiology of Pre-eclampsia is unknown but it is thought to be related to abnormal development of placenta. Several studies have shown the presence of reduced endothelial function in pre-eclamptic pregnancy. Endothelial dysfunction is also a feature of atherosclerosis. Aim To assess fasting lipid profile and atherogenic indices in women diagnosed with pre-eclampsia as well as in women with normal pregnancy and to correlate the findings of pre-eclamptic women with that of normal pregnant women, in an attempt to utilize the data for the development of a new clinical approach for early recognition and prevention of risk of future cardiovascular diseases in women with PIH. Materials and Methods This case-control study was conducted on 50 pre-eclampsia patients who were in third trimester of pregnancy (Case group). A control group of 50 age and gestational age matched normal pregnant women was taken. Strict inclusion and exclusion criteria were followed. Fasting Lipid profile parameters were assessed and used to calculate the atherogenic indices namely Atherogenic index of plasma (AIP), Cardiac risk ratio (CRR) and Atherogenic coefficient (AC). Statistical Analysis was done by using student’s t-test. Mann-Whitney U-test was used wherever applicable and correlations between the variables were estimated by Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Results There was an extremely significant (p<0.0001) increase in Atherogenic indices (AIP, CRR and AC) in case group as compared to the control group. A positive and significant correlation of systolic blood pressure with AIP (r=0.3583), CRR (r=0.3137), AC (r=0.3193) was found in cases. There was a positive and significant correlation between gestational age and atherogenic indices in the case group. Conclusion Women with pre-eclampsia present abnormalities in lipid profile and these lipids turn out to be a risk factor for cardiovascular complications. Evaluation of the atherogenic indices during pregnancy may help prevent this risk. PMID:26393117

  12. Systemic and uteroplacental renin–angiotensin system in normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by an increase in many of the different components of the circulating renin–angiotensin system [RAS]. However, the physiological mechanisms of stimulated RAS activity during pregnancy are unknown. Even less understood is how this system may be altered in pre-eclampsia, a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. Additional studies have shown the presence of a local tissue specific RAS in the uteroplacental unit of normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies. Differences in normal pregnant and pre-eclamptic RAS component regulation may provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for the clinical pathological features of pre-eclampsia. Specifically, this review summarizes the key findings in the circulating and uteroplacental RAS in normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies. PMID:19124433

  13. Health after pregnancy in the mother with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kaaja, Risto; Gordin, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Progression of retinopathy and nephropathy in women with diabetes occurs, at least temporarily, during pregnancy and postpartum. However, normotensive pregnancy seems to have no detrimental effects regarding the long-term progression of any microvascular complication. Increased risk from pregnancy induced hypertension without proteinuria and with proteinuria (pre-eclampsia) relates mainly to the association with kidney disease in diabetes, and poor glycemic control. A history of pre-eclampsia or pregnancy induced hypertension is an important prognostic factor for micro- and macro-vascular complications later in life. Data regarding the long-term effects of hypertensive pregnancies on late complications of diabetes suggest that women with diabetes should be monitored regularly and nephroprotective treatment initiated early. PMID:26258813

  14. Management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Hind N; Arian, Sara E; Sibai, Baha M

    2014-07-01

    Hypertensive disorders are the most common medical complication of pregnancy, with an incidence of 5-10%, and a common cause of maternal mortality in the USA. Incidence of pre-eclampsia has increased by 25% in the past two decades. In addition to being among the lethal triad, there are likely up to 100 other women who experience 'near miss' significant maternal morbidity that stops short of death for every pre-eclampsia-related mortality. The purpose of this review is to present the new task force statement and novel definitions, as well as management approaches to each of the hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. The increased understanding of the pathophysiology of hypertension in pregnancy, as well as advances in medical therapy to minimize risks of fetal toxicity and teratogenicity, will improve our ability to prevent and treat hypertension in pregnancy. Fetal programming and fetal origins of adult disease theories extrapolate the benefit of such therapy to future generations. PMID:25259900

  15. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Doan-Wiggins, L

    1987-08-01

    Pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, or pregnancy-induced hypertension, is an uncommon but life-threatening complication of pregnancy associated with significant perinatal morbidity. When superimposed on underlying chronic hypertension, its impact on the fetus becomes even greater. Although the pathophysiology of the disease has not been fully defined, vasospasm appears to be the principal, underlying, etiologic mechanism. Therapy of the disease is principally aimed at controlling convulsions with magnesium sulfate and controlling hypertension with the antihypertensive agent hydralazine. Because development of the disease depends on the presence of trophoblastic tissue, the only true cure for pre-eclampsia/eclampsia is removal of the trophoblast through delivery of the infant. The timing and type of delivery is dependent on the severity of the disease and gestational age of the infant. PMID:3308427

  16. Moving beyond silos: How do we provide distributed personalized medicine to pregnant women everywhere at scale? Insights from PRE-EMPT.

    PubMed

    von Dadelszen, Peter; Magee, Laura A; Payne, Beth A; Dunsmuir, Dustin T; Drebit, Sharla; Dumont, Guy A; Miller, Suellen; Norman, Jane; Pyne-Mercier, Lee; Shennan, Andrew H; Donnay, France; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2015-10-01

    While we believe that pre-eclampsia matters-because it remains a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide-we are convinced that the time has come to look beyond single clinical entities (e.g. pre-eclampsia, postpartum hemorrhage, obstetric sepsis) and to look for an integrated approach that will provide evidence-based personalized care to women wherever they encounter the health system. Accurate outcome prediction models are a powerful way to identify individuals at incrementally increased (and decreased) risks associated with a given condition. Integrating models with decision algorithms into mobile health (mHealth) applications could support community and first level facility healthcare providers to identify those women, fetuses, and newborns most at need of facility-based care, and to initiate lifesaving interventions in their communities prior to transportation. In our opinion, this offers the greatest opportunity to provide distributed individualized care at scale, and soon. PMID:26433496

  17. Who is the elderly primigravida in Nigeria?

    PubMed

    Ojo, A; Oronsaye, U

    1988-02-01

    A retrospective study of 792 primigravidae, divided into four age-groups, was made in order to detect which group showed features of the elderly primigravida. Adolescent primigravidae showed significantly highest incidences of pre-eclampsia, anemia, premature labor and cephalopelvic disproportion. The 20-24 year age-group showed the least incidence of pregnancy and labor complications. The 25-29 year age-group showed significantly increased incidences of uterine fibroids, pre-eclampsia, post-term pregnancy, premature labor, slow labor, fetal distress, failed induction, vacuum and cesarean section deliveries, when compared with the 20-24 year age-group. Most of the complications in the 25-29 year age-group were continued into 30-34 years. A woman 25 years and above in her first pregnancy in Nigeria should be termed "elderly primigravida". PMID:2892738

  18. Inadequate vitamin D status in pregnancy: evidence for supplementation.

    PubMed

    Finer, Sarah; Khan, Khalid S; Hitman, Graham A; Griffiths, Chris; Martineau, Adrian; Meads, Catherine

    2012-02-01

    The role of vitamin D in maintaining a healthy pregnancy has seen emerging interest among clinicians and researchers in recent years. The functions of this hormone are widespread and complex, and during pregnancy and breastfeeding it facilitates crucial transfer of calcium from mother to child for skeletal development. Aside from the role of vitamin D in bone development and health, a myriad of other physiological actions are now known, and it is hypothesized that maternal deficiency may increase susceptibility to adverse pregnancy events during pregnancy such as pre-eclampsia. The role of vitamin D in pregnancy and breastfeeding is summarized and applied to the knowledge from studies associating vitamin D deficiency with a range of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including pre-eclampsia and childhood asthma. Current clinical guidelines for vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy are discussed in the context of the available evidence. The need for robust randomized controlled trials to address areas of existing uncertainty is highlighted. PMID:22007763

  19. [Spontaneous hepatic rupture during an uncomplicated twin pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Fat, B Chung; Terzibachian, J J; Grisey, A; Houzé, J P; Faller, J P; Leung, F; de Lapparent, T; Maillet, R; Riethmuller, D

    2011-01-01

    Liver subcapsular haematoma and its consequence, spontaneous hepatic rupture, are very rare complications of pregnancy. They are mainly associated with pre-eclampsia. The diagnosis is difficult and the maternal and fetal mortality rates are high. We report the case of a spontaneous hepatic rupture on a normal liver during an uncomplicated twin pregnancy with a favorable outcome for both the mother and the newborns. PMID:21183383

  20. Delayed diagnosis of PRES and eclampsia in a concealed pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dag, Zeynep Ozcan; Simsek, Yavuz; Turkel, Yakup; Tulmac, Ozlem Banu; Isik, Yuksel

    2014-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia and eclampsia are well-known risk factors of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Early recognition and proper treatment result in complete reversibility of this disease. Concealed pregnancy obstacles a safe prenatal care and a safe planned delivery, because of latency in the diagnosis. We present a case of unrecognized posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, eclampsia and premature delivery due to concealed pregnancy. PMID:25883727

  1. Electronic readout enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with organic field-effect transistors as a preeclampsia prognostic.

    PubMed

    Hammock, Mallory L; Knopfmacher, Oren; Ng, Tse Nga; Tok, Jeffrey B-H; Bao, Zhenan

    2014-09-17

    Organic field-effect transistor (OFET) sensors can meet the need for portable and real-time diagnostics. An electronicreadout enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using OFETs for the detection of a panel of three biomarkers in complex media to create a pre-eclampsia prognostic is demonstrated, along with biodetection utilizing a fully inkjet-printed and flexible OFET to underscore our ability to produce disposable devices. PMID:25047764

  2. Leptin receptor gene polymorphisms in severely pre-eclamptic women.

    PubMed

    Rigó, János; Szendei, György; Rosta, Klára; Fekete, Andrea; Bögi, Krisztina; Molvarec, Attila; Rónai, Zsolt; Vér, Agota

    2006-09-01

    Variants of the leptin receptor gene (LEPR) may modulate the effect of elevated serum leptin levels in pre-eclampsia. The aim of our study was to evaluate the LEPR gene polymorphisms Lys109Arg (A109G) and Gln223Arg (A223G) in severely pre-eclamptic women. In a case-control study, we analyzed blood samples from 124 severely pre-eclamptic patients and 107 healthy control women by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The Pearson chi2 test was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The association was adjusted for maternal age, pre-pregnancy body mass index and primiparity with logistic regression analysis. Pregnant women with the LEPR 223G allele (223A/G or 223G/G genotype) had almost double the risk of developing severe pre-eclampsia compared with patients with the 223A/A genotype (adjusted OR = 1.92, 95% CI: 1.07-3.41). Genotype variants of LEPR A109G alone did not affect the risk of severe pre-eclampsia. Haplotype estimation of A109G and A223G polymorphisms of the LEPR gene revealed that the G-A haplotype versus other pooled haplotypes was significantly less common in the pre-eclamptic group (p < 0.01), while the G-G haplotype versus others was overrepresented among severely pre-eclamptic patients (p < 0.01), compared with controls. In conclusion, our data indicate that LEPR A223G polymorphism may individually modify the risk of severe pre-eclampsia. PMID:17071538

  3. Adiposity and hyperglycaemia in pregnancy and related health outcomes in European ethnic minorities of Asian and African origin: a review

    PubMed Central

    Jenum, Anne Karen; Sommer, Christine; Sletner, Line; Mørkrid, Kjersti; Bærug, Anne; Mosdøl, Annhild

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnic minorities in Europe have high susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and, in some groups, also cardiovascular disease (CVD). Pregnancy can be considered a stress test that predicts future morbidity patterns in women and that affects future health of the child. Objective To review ethnic differences in: 1) adiposity, hyperglycaemia, and pre-eclampsia during pregnancy; 2) future risk in the mother of obesity, T2DM and CVD; and 3) prenatal development and possible influences of maternal obesity, hyperglycaemia, and pre-eclampsia on offspring's future disease risk, as relevant for ethnic minorities in Europe of Asian and African origin. Design Literature review. Results Maternal health among ethnic minorities is still sparsely documented. Higher pre-pregnant body mass index (BMI) is found in women of African and Middle Eastern descent, and lower BMI in women from East and South Asia compared with women from the majority population. Within study populations, risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is considerably higher in many minority groups, particularly South Asians, than in the majority population. This increased risk is apparent at lower BMI and younger ages. Women of African origin have higher risk of pre-eclampsia. A GDM pregnancy implies approximately seven-fold higher risk of T2DM than normal pregnancies, and both GDM and pre-eclampsia increase later risk of CVD. Asian neonates have lower birth weights, and mostly also African neonates. This may translate into increased risks of later obesity, T2DM, and CVD. Foetal overgrowth can promote the same conditions. Breastfeeding represents a possible strategy to reduce risk of T2DM in both the mother and the child. Conclusions Ethnic minority women in Europe with Asian and African origin and their offspring seem to be at increased risk of T2DM and CVD, both currently and in the future. Pregnancy is an important window of opportunity for short and long-term disease prevention. PMID:23467680

  4. Gene expression profiling of pre-eclamptic placentae by RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kaartokallio, Tea; Cervera, Alejandra; Kyllönen, Anjuska; Laivuori, Krista; Laivuori, Hannele; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a common and complex pregnancy disorder that often involves impaired placental development. In order to identify altered gene expression in pre-eclamptic placenta, we sequenced placental transcriptomes of nine pre-eclamptic and nine healthy pregnant women in pools of three. The differential gene expression was tested both by including all the pools in the analysis and by excluding some of the pools based on phenotypic characteristics. From these analyses, we identified altogether 53 differently expressed genes, a subset of which was validated by qPCR in 20 cases and 19 controls. Furthermore, we conducted pathway and functional analyses which revealed disturbed vascular function and immunological balance in pre-eclamptic placenta. Some of the genes identified in our study have been reported by numerous microarray studies (BHLHE40, FSTL3, HK2, HTRA4, LEP, PVRL4, SASH1, SIGLEC6), but many have been implicated in only few studies or have not previously been linked to pre-eclampsia (ARMS2, BTNL9, CCSAP, DIO2, FER1L4, HPSE, LOC100129345, LYN, MYO7B, NCMAP, NDRG1, NRIP1, PLIN2, SBSPON, SERPINB9, SH3BP5, TET3, TPBG, ZNF175). Several of the molecules produced by these genes may have a role in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia, and some could qualify as biomarkers for prediction or detection of this pregnancy complication. PMID:26388242

  5. A clinical characteristic analysis of pregnancy-associated intracranial haemorrhage in China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhu-Wei; Lin, Li; Gao, Wan-Li; Feng, Li-Min

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) occurring during pregnancy and the puerperium is an infrequent but severe complication with a high mortality and poor prognosis. Until recently, previous studies have mainly focused on the effect of different treatments on prognosis. However, few studies have provided solid evidence to clarify the key predisposing factors affecting the prognosis of ICH. In the present study, based on a unique sample with a high ICH incidence and mortality rate, we described the main clinical characteristics of ICH patients and found that the prognosis of patients who underwent surgical intervention was not better than that of patients who received other treatment modalities. However, pre-eclampsia patients had higher maternal and neonatal mortality rates than other aetiology groups. Furthermore, univariate regression analysis identified onset to diagnosis time (O-D time) and pre-eclampsia as the only factors showing independent correlation with poor maternal outcomes (modified Rankin Scale, mRS ? 3), and only O-D time was identified as a predictor of maternal mortality. These results revealed that the aetiology of ICH and O-D time might be crucial predisposing factors to prognosis, especially for patients with pre-eclampsia. The study highlighted a novel direction to effectively improve the prognosis of pregnancy-associated ICH. PMID:25819941

  6. Pregnancy complications in polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Katulski, Krzysztof; Czyzyk, Adam; Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Genazzani, Andrea R; Meczekalski, Blazej

    2015-02-01

    Infertility is a widely disputed problem affecting patients suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). As a serious dysfunction, it frequently occurs in PCOS patients. It is, therefore, important to devote more attention to pregnancy in PCOS sufferers. According to various data, the risk of miscarriage in PCOS women is three times higher than the risk of miscarriage in healthy women. Unfortunately, the risk of most frequent pregnancy pathologies is also higher for PCOS patients, as gestational diabetes (GD), pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia, and small for gestational age (SGA) children. Impaired glucose tolerance and GD in pregnant PCOS patients occur more frequently than in healthy women. A quadruple increase in the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension linked to arterial wall stiffness has also been observed in PCOS patients. The risk of pre-eclampsia, the most severe of all complications, is also four times higher in those suffering from PCOS. Pre-eclampsia is also more frequent in patients presenting additional risk factors accompanying PCOS, such as obesity or GD. At that point, it should be mentioned that PCOS patients are under 2.5 higher risk of giving birth to SGA children than healthy women. It appears that SGA can be linked to insulin resistance and insulin-dependent growth dysfunction. Therefore, PCOS pregnant women are patients of special obstetrical care. PMID:25356655

  7. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Louise E.; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  8. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Heather A.; Basit, Saima; Harpsøe, Maria C.; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Jess, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Existing data on pregnancy complications in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are inconsistent. To address these inconsistencies, we investigated potential associations between IBD, IBD-related medication use during pregnancy, and pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, preterm delivery, Apgar score, and congenital abnormalities. Methods We conducted a cohort study in >85,000 Danish National Birth Cohort women who were pregnant in the period 1996-2002 and had information on IBD, IBD-related medication use (systemic or local corticosteroids, 5-aminosalicylates), pregnancy outcomes and potential confounders. We evaluated associations between IBD and adverse pregnancy/birth outcomes using Cox regression and log-linear binomial regression. Results IBD was strongly and significantly associated with severe pre-eclampsia, preterm premature rupture of membranes and medically indicated preterm delivery in women using systemic corticosteroids during pregnancy (hazard ratios [HRs] >7). IBD was also associated with premature preterm rupture of membranes in women using local corticosteroid medications (HR 3.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33-8.20) and with medically indicated preterm delivery (HR 1.91, 95% CI 0.99-3.68) in non-medicated women. Furthermore, IBD was associated with low 5-minute Apgar score in term infants (risk ratio [RR] 2.19, 95% CI 1.03-4.66). Finally, Crohn’s disease (but not ulcerative colitis) was associated with major congenital abnormalities in the offspring (RR 1.85, 95% CI 1.06-3.21). No child with a congenital abnormality born to a woman with IBD was exposed to systemic corticosteroids in utero. Conclusion Women with IBD are at increased risk of severe pre-eclampsia, medically indicated preterm delivery, preterm premature rupture of membranes, and delivering infants with low Apgar score and major congenital malformations. These associations are only partly explained by severe disease as reflected by systemic corticosteroid use. PMID:26083614

  9. Increased planned delivery contributes to declining rates of pregnancy hypertension in Australia: a population-based record linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Christine L; Algert, Charles S; Morris, Jonathan M; Ford, Jane B

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since the 1990s, pregnancy hypertension rates have declined in some countries, but not all. Increasing rates of early planned delivery (before the due date) have been hypothesised as the reason for the decline. The aim of this study was to explore whether early planned delivery can partly explain the declining pregnancy hypertension rates in Australia. Design Population-based record linkage study utilising linked birth and hospital records. Setting and participants A cohort of 1?076?122 deliveries in New South Wales, Australia, 2001–2012. Outcome measures Pregnancy hypertension (including gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia) was the main outcome; pre-eclampsia was a secondary outcome. Results From 2001 to 2012, pregnancy hypertension rates declined by 22%, from 9.9% to 7.7%, and pre-eclampsia by 27%, from 3.3% to 2.4% (trend p<0.0001). At the same time, planned deliveries increased: prelabour caesarean section by 43% (12.9–18.4%) and labour inductions by 10% (24.8–27.2%). Many maternal risk factors for pregnancy hypertension significantly increased (p<0.01) over the study period including nulliparity, age ?35?years, diabetes, overweight and obesity, and use of assisted reproductive technologies; some risk factors decreased including multifetal pregnancies, age <20?years, autoimmune diseases and previous pregnancy hypertension. Given these changes in risk factors, the pregnancy hypertension rate was predicted to increase to 10.5%. Examination of annual gestational age distributions showed that pregnancy hypertension rates actually declined from 38?weeks gestation and were steepest from 41?weeks; at least 36% of the decrease could be attributed to planned deliveries. The risk factors for pregnancy hypertension were also risk factors for planned delivery. Conclusions It appears that an unanticipated consequence of increasing early planned deliveries is a decline in the incidence of pregnancy hypertension. Women with risk factors for hypertension were relatively more likely to be selected for early delivery. PMID:26438140

  10. Gestational Exposure to Elevated Testosterone Levels Induces Hypertension via Heightened Vascular Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Signaling in Rats1

    PubMed Central

    Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar; More, Amar S.; Hankins, Gary D.; Yallampalli, Chandra; Sathishkumar, Kunju

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pre-eclampsia is a life-threatening pregnancy disorder whose pathogenesis remains unclear. Plasma testosterone levels are elevated in pregnant women with pre-eclampsia and polycystic ovary syndrome, who often develop gestational hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that increased gestational testosterone levels induce hypertension via heightened angiotensin II signaling. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with vehicle or testosterone propionate from Gestational Day 15 to 19 to induce a 2-fold increase in plasma testosterone levels, similar to levels observed in clinical conditions like pre-eclampsia. A subset of rats in these two groups was given losartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist by gavage during the course of testosterone exposure. Blood pressure levels were assessed through a carotid arterial catheter and endothelium-independent vascular reactivity through wire myography. Angiotensin II levels in plasma and angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in mesenteric arteries were also examined. Blood pressure levels were significantly higher on Gestational Day 20 in testosterone-treated dams than in controls. Treatment with losartan during the course of testosterone exposure significantly attenuated testosterone-induced hypertension. Plasma angiotensin II levels were not significantly different between control and testosterone-treated rats; however, elevated testosterone levels significantly increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor protein levels in the mesenteric arteries. In testosterone-treated rats, mesenteric artery contractile responses to angiotensin II were significantly greater, whereas contractile responses to K+ depolarization and phenylephrine were unaffected. The results demonstrate that elevated testosterone during gestation induces hypertension in pregnant rats via heightened angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated signaling, providing a molecular mechanism linking elevated maternal testosterone levels with gestational hypertension. PMID:24855104

  11. Levels of Serum Calcium and Magnesium in Pre-eclamptic and Normal Pregnancy: A Study from Coastal India

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, Aparna; Rao, Kavyarashmi; Devi, Ullal Harshini; Shetty, Harish; Kumari, Sucheta; Shetty, Prasanna Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pre-eclampsia is one of the major causes of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Though the aetiology is obscure, recent studies indicate that serum levels of calcium and magnesium may have a role in pre-eclampsia. Aim: The aim of this study was to find out the relationship of serum levels of calcium and magnesium in pre-eclamptic pregnancies compared to normal pregnancies in women from southern coastal India. Settings and Design: This study was done in a medical college hospital in southern coastal India. Materials and Methods: The blood samples from 60 pre-eclamptic women and an equal number of controls were analysed for calcium and magnesium levels. Data on Body Mass Index, maternal and gestational ages, serum calcium and magnesium were compared between the two groups. Outcome of pregnancy was analysed in both the groups and compared. Statistical Analysis: Data was expressed as Mean ± Standard Deviation. Data analysis was done by SPSS version 20. Comparison of serum levels of the elements between the two groups was performed by Independent t-test and Chi-square test and P-value of < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The serum calcium concentration was significantly lower in the pre-eclamptic group compared to normotensives (7.84 ± 0.87 mg/dl Vs 8.97± 0.69 mg/dl, p<0.001) whereas the levels of serum magnesium showed a marginal difference in both the groups. (1.43± 0.55 mg/dl Vs, 1.57 ± 0.72 mg/dl P 0.257) The study also showed that pre-eclamptic women were older, their BMI was higher and birth weight of babies lower compared to normotensives. Conclusion: According to the results of our research, intake of supplements, mainly calcium may help in the reduction of incidence of pre-eclampsia especially in a population of a developing country like ours where the nutrition is poor. Not many studies have been done in developing countries to assess the role of these elements in pre-eclampsia. The actual role of magnesium and calcium supplements needs further investigation. PMID:25177604

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced in the human placenta during labour

    E-print Network

    Veerbeek, J. H. W.; Tissot Van Patot, M. C.; Burton, G. J.; Yung, H. W.

    2014-11-15

    , *, M.C. Tissot Van Patot a, G.J. B a Centre for Trophoblast Research, Department of Physiology, Development, and Neuros b University Medical Center Utrecht, Division of Perinatology, Department of Obstetrics, a r t i c l e i n f o Article history... pathways implies heterogeneity in causation of early- and late-onset pre- eclampsia. J Pathol 2014;234(2):262e76. [11] Tissot van Patot MC, Murray AJ, Beckey V, Cindrova-Davies T, Johns J, Zwerdlinger L, et al. Human placental metabolic adaptation...

  13. Maternal morbidity and preterm birth in 22 low- and middle-income countries: a secondary analysis of the WHO Global Survey dataset

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Preterm birth (PTB) (<37weeks) complicates approximately 15 million deliveries annually, 60% occurring in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Several maternal morbidities increase the risk of spontaneous (spPTB) and provider-initiated (piPTB) preterm birth, but there is little data from LMICs. Method We used the WHO Global Survey to analyze data from 172,461 singleton deliveries in 145 facilities across 22 LMICs. PTB and six maternal morbidities (height <145 cm, malaria, HIV/AIDS, pyelonephritis/UTI, diabetes and pre-eclampsia) were investigated. We described associated characteristics and developed multilevel models for the risk of spPTB/piPTB associated with maternal morbidities. Adverse perinatal outcomes (Apgar <7 at 5 minutes, NICU admission, stillbirth, early neonatal death and low birthweight) were determined. Results 8.2% of deliveries were PTB; one-quarter of these were piPTB. 14.2% of piPTBs were not medically indicated. Maternal height <145 cm (AOR 1.30, 95% CI 1.10–1.52), pyelonephritis/UTI (AOR 1.16, 95% CI 1.01–1.33), pre-gestational diabetes (AOR 1.41, 95% CI 1.09–1.82) and pre-eclampsia (AOR 1.25, 95% CI 1.05–1.49) increased odds of spPTB, as did malaria in Africa (AOR 1.67, 95%CI 1.32-2.11) but not HIV/AIDS (AOR 1.17, 95% CI 0.79-1.73). Odds of piPTB were higher with maternal height <145 cm (AOR 1.47, 95% CI 1.23-1.77), pre-gestational diabetes (AOR 2.51, 95% CI 1.81-3.47) and pre-eclampsia (AOR 8.17, 95% CI 6.80-9.83). Conclusions Maternal height <145 cm, diabetes and pre-eclampsia significantly increased odds of spPTB and piPTB, while pyelonephritis/UTI and malaria increased odds of spPTB only. Strategies to reduce PTB and associated newborn morbidity/mortality in LMICs must prioritize antenatal screening/treatment of these common conditions and reducing non-medically indicated piPTBs where appropriate. PMID:24484741

  14. Outcome of teenage pregnancy and labour: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, C S; Giri, A K; Sarkar, B

    1991-07-01

    During the period of study of 3 years (1985-1987), 4698 (18.68%) cases of labour in teenage mothers were recorded out of a total of 25,142 deliveries in the obstetric unit. Preponderance of primigravida (76.6%) and cases from rural areas (51.3%) were recorded. Antenatal care was nil or inadequate in 48.6% cases. Eclampsia and pre-eclampsia affected teenage mothers (10.6%) were much more frequent than mothers of 20 years of age and above (5.2%). Incidence of 30% low birth weight baby, 20.1% prematurity and 16.4% perinatal mortality were recorded. PMID:1940413

  15. Renal arteriovenous fistula revealed by severe hypertension during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Morgane; Lousquy, Ruben; Rossignol, Mathias; Bonnin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    A 35-year-old woman developed severe hypertension resistant to antihypertensive treatment during the second trimester of pregnancy at 24?weeks gestation. Doppler ultrasonography achieved the diagnosis of idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula in the left kidney associated with parenchymal hypoperfusion. A Caesarean section was performed 6?days after the diagnosis because of severe pre-eclampsia. After delivery, the symptoms disappeared. Fistula persisted after follow-up for over 1?year but with a dramatic decrease in its blood flow and normalisation of the left kidney hemodynamics. Nevertheless, embolisation was performed without complications to prevent recurrence during the next pregnancy expected by the patient. PMID:24105385

  16. Maternal body mass index and risk of birth and maternal health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Abe, S K; Kanda, M; Narita, S; Rahman, M S; Bilano, V; Ota, E; Gilmour, S; Shibuya, K

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based cohort studies of maternal body mass index (BMI) and risk of adverse birth and health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and the British Nursing Index were searched from inception to February 2014. Forty-two studies were included. Our study found that maternal underweight was significantly associated with higher risk of preterm birth (odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.27), low birthweight (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.50-1.84) and small for gestational age (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.69-2.02). Compared with mothers with normal BMI, overweight or obese mothers were at increased odds of gestational diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, caesarean delivery and post-partum haemorrhage. The population-attributable risk (PAR) indicated that if women were entirely unexposed to overweight or obesity during the pre-pregnancy or early pregnancy period, 14% to 35% fewer women would develop gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia or pregnancy-induced hypertension in Brazil, China, India, Iran or Thailand. The highest PAR of low birthweight attributable to maternal underweight was found in Iran (20%), followed by India (18%), Thailand (10%) and China (8%). Treatment and prevention of maternal underweight, overweight or obesity may help reduce the burden on maternal and child health in developing countries. PMID:26094567

  17. Blood pressure goals and treatment in pregnant patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Asher; Karovitch, Alan; Carson, Michael P

    2015-03-01

    As the age of pregnant women and prevalence of obesity and diabetes are increasing, so is the prevalence of medical disorders during pregnancy, particularly hypertension and the associated CKD. Pregnancy can worsen kidney function in women with severe disease, and hypertension puts them at risk for pre-eclampsia and the associated complications. There are no specific guidelines for hypertension management in this population, and tight control will not prevent pre-eclampsia. Women with end-stage kidney disease should be placed on intense dialysis regimens to improve obstetric outcomes, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are best avoided. This article will review the rationale for a management plan that includes a multidisciplinary team to discuss risks and develop a plan before conception, antepartum monitoring for maternal and fetal morbidity, individualization of medical management using medications with established records during pregnancy, and balancing the level of blood pressure control proved to protect kidney function against the potential effects that aggressive blood pressure control could have on the fetal-placental unit. PMID:25704354

  18. Neurological aspects of eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S V

    1998-02-18

    Eclampsia accounts for a third of maternal mortality in developing countries. The neurological manifestations of eclampsia consist of seizures and alteration of sensorium or coma on a background of pre-eclampsia. Occasionally there can be focal neurological deficits too. Recent studies with CT scan and MRI have demonstrated the presence of cerebral edema and/or cerebral hemorrhage in eclampsia. EEG in patients with eclampsia has revealed evidence of diffuse cerebral dysfunction (delta waves) and epileptiform transients (spikes or sharp waves). There is also evidence of extensive vasculopathy within the brain parenchyma. A variety of mechanisms have been suggested to explain these changes, the most important being failure of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow that leads to cerebral edema and hemorrhage. There is considerable controversy regarding the treatment of seizures in eclampsia. Recent studies have shown that magnesium sulfate is superior to phenytoin or diazepam in the treatment of eclamptic seizures and prevention of eclamptic seizures in women with pre-eclampsia. PMID:9562320

  19. [Clinical guideline for detection and diagnosis of hypertensive pregnancy disease].

    PubMed

    Lagunes-Espinosa, Alma Luisa; Ríos-Castillo, Brenda; Peralta-Pedrero, María Luisa; del Rocío Cruz-Cruz, Polita; Sánchez-Ambríz, Slivia; Sánchez-Santana, Joaquín Renato; Ramírez-Mota, Carolina; Zavaleta-Vargas, Norma Octavia; López-Cisneros, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (HDP) are the main complication and cause of maternal and perinatal death. Pre-eclampsia represents a 34%, according to the Secretaría de Salud de México. To offer the family physicians tools for the opportune detection and diagnosis of HDP a clinical guideline was developmented. Clinical questions were formulated and structured. A standardized sequence to search for Practice Guidelines, based on the key words: hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, pre-eclampsia. Tripdatabase, MDConsult, National Guideline Clearinghouse, Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence were used. In addition, Cochrane Library Plus, Science Direct and OVID were used. Most of the recommendations were taken from guidelines selected and supplemented with the remaining material. The information is expressed in levels of evidence and grade of recommendation according to the characteristics of the study design and type of publications. To reduce morbidity and mortality from HDP health professionals should identify risk factors; conduct a close monitoring and early diagnosis. It is essential to provide information to the pregnant patient on alarm data and behavior to follow. This clinical practice guide offers current evidence for screening and diagnosis of HDP in primary care. PMID:21703152

  20. Periodontal Disease: A Possible Risk-Factor for Adverse Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Anuj Singh; Katoch, Vartika; Rajguru, Sneha A; Rajpoot, Nami; Singh, Pinojj; Wakhle, Sonal

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion in subgingival sites especially of gram-negative organisms are initiators for periodontal diseases. The periodontal pathogens with persistent inflammation lead to destruction of periodontium. In recent years, periodontal diseases have been associated with a number of systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular-disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic respiratory diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes including pre-term low-birth weight (PLBW) and pre-eclampsia. The factors like low socio-economic status, mother's age, race, multiple births, tobacco and drug-abuse may be found to increase risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. However, the same are less correlated with PLBW cases. Even the invasion of both aerobic and anerobic may lead to inflammation of gastrointestinal tract and vagina hence contributing to PLBW. The biological mechanism involved between PLBW and Maternal periodontitis is the translocation of chemical mediators of inflammation. Pre-eclampsia is one of the commonest cause of both maternal and fetal morbidity as it is characterized by hypertension and hyperprotenuria. Improving periodontal health before or during pregnancy may prevent or reduce the occurrences of these adverse pregnancy outcomes and, therefore, reduce the maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Hence, this article is an attempt to review the relationship between periodontal condition and altered pregnancy outcome. PMID:26229389

  1. Periodontal Disease: A Possible Risk-Factor for Adverse Pregnancy Outcome.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Anuj Singh; Katoch, Vartika; Rajguru, Sneha A; Rajpoot, Nami; Singh, Pinojj; Wakhle, Sonal

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial invasion in subgingival sites especially of gram-negative organisms are initiators for periodontal diseases. The periodontal pathogens with persistent inflammation lead to destruction of periodontium. In recent years, periodontal diseases have been associated with a number of systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular-disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic respiratory diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes including pre-term low-birth weight (PLBW) and pre-eclampsia. The factors like low socio-economic status, mother's age, race, multiple births, tobacco and drug-abuse may be found to increase risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. However, the same are less correlated with PLBW cases. Even the invasion of both aerobic and anerobic may lead to inflammation of gastrointestinal tract and vagina hence contributing to PLBW. The biological mechanism involved between PLBW and Maternal periodontitis is the translocation of chemical mediators of inflammation. Pre-eclampsia is one of the commonest cause of both maternal and fetal morbidity as it is characterized by hypertension and hyperprotenuria. Improving periodontal health before or during pregnancy may prevent or reduce the occurrences of these adverse pregnancy outcomes and, therefore, reduce the maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Hence, this article is an attempt to review the relationship between periodontal condition and altered pregnancy outcome. PMID:26229389

  2. The risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women who are overweight or obese

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The prevalence of obesity amongst women bearing children in Australia is rising and has important implications for obstetric care. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and impact of mothers being overweight and obese in early to mid-pregnancy on maternal, peripartum and neonatal outcomes. Methods A secondary analysis was performed on data collected from nulliparous women with a singleton pregnancy enrolled in the Australian Collaborative Trial of Supplements with antioxidants Vitamin C and Vitamin E to pregnant women for the prevention of pre-eclampsia (ACTS). Women were categorized into three groups according to their body mass index (BMI): normal (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2); overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m2) and; obese (BMI 30-34.9 kg/m2). Obstetric and perinatal outcomes were compared by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Of the 1661 women included, 43% were overweight or obese. Obese women were at increased risk of pre-eclampsia (relative risk (RR) 2.99 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.88, 4.73], p < 0.0001) and gestational diabetes (RR 2.10 [95%CI 1.17, 3.79], p = 0.01) compared with women with a normal BMI. Obese and overweight women were more likely to be induced and require a caesarean section compared with women of normal BMI (induction - RR 1.33 [95%CI 1.13, 1.57], p = 0.001 and 1.78 [95%CI 1.51, 2.09], p < 0.0001, caesarean section - RR 1.42 [95%CI 1.18, 1.70], p = 0.0002 and 1.63 [95%CI 1.34, 1.99], p < 0.0001). Babies of women who were obese were more likely to be large for gestational age (LFGA) (RR 2.08 [95%CI 1.47, 2.93], p < 0.0001) and macrosomic (RR 4.54 [95%CI 2.01, 10.24], p = 0.0003) compared with those of women with a normal BMI. Conclusion The rate of overweight and obesity is increasing amongst the Australian obstetric population. Women who are overweight and obese have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. In particular, obese women are at increased risk of gestational diabetes, pregnancy induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia. Effective preventative strategies are urgently needed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN00416244 PMID:20849609

  3. Prevention of congenital malformations and other adverse pregnancy outcomes with 4.0 mg of folic acid: community-based randomized clinical trial in Italy and the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 a Cochrane review confirmed that folic acid (FA) supplementation prevents the first- and second-time occurrence of neural tube defects (NTDs). At present some evidence from observational studies supports the hypothesis that FA supplementation can reduce the risk of all congenital malformations (CMs) or the risk of a specific and selected group of them, namely cardiac defects and oral clefts. Furthermore, the effects on the prevention of prematurity, foetal growth retardation and pre-eclampsia are unclear. Although the most common recommendation is to take 0.4 mg/day, the problem of the most appropriate dose of FA is still open. The aim of this project is to assess the effect a higher dose of peri-conceptional FA supplementation on reducing the occurrence of all CMs. Other aims include the promotion of pre-conceptional counselling, comparing rates of selected CMs, miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, small for gestational age, abruptio placentae. Methods/Design This project is a joint effort by research groups in Italy and the Netherlands. Women of childbearing age, who intend to become pregnant within 12 months are eligible for the studies. Women are randomly assigned to receive 4 mg of FA (treatment in study) or 0.4 mg of FA (referent treatment) daily. Information on pregnancy outcomes are derived from women-and-physician information. We foresee to analyze the data considering all the adverse outcomes of pregnancy taken together in a global end point (e.g.: CMs, miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, small for gestational age). A total of about 1,000 pregnancies need to be evaluated to detect an absolute reduction of the frequency of 8%. Since the sample size needed for studying outcomes separately is large, this project also promotes an international prospective meta-analysis. Discussion The rationale of these randomized clinical trials (RCTs) is the hypothesis that a higher intake of FA is related to a higher risk reduction of NTDs, other CMs and other adverse pregnancy outcomes. Our hope is that these trials will act as catalysers, and lead to other large RCTs studying the effects of this supplementation on CMs and other infant and maternal outcomes. Trial registration Italian trial: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01244347. Dutch trial: Dutch Trial Register ID: NTR3161. PMID:24884885

  4. Hypertension in women

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Fadi G; Mansur, Sulaf J; Xing, Dongqi; Oparil, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in both men and women. The prevalence and severity of hypertension rise markedly with age, and blood pressure control becomes more difficult with aging in both genders, particularly in women. In addition, there are forms of hypertension that occur exclusively in women, e.g., hypertension related to menopause, oral contraceptive use, or pregnancy (e.g., chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia or eclampsia). Randomized controlled trials show that antihypertensive therapy provides similar reductions in major cardiovascular events in men and women. Therefore, gender should not influence decisions on selection of blood pressure lowering therapies, except for consideration of gender-specific side effects or contraindications for use in women who are or may become pregnant. This article reviews the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in women, as well as recent guidelines for management of hypertension in women. PMID:25028640

  5. Keap1-Nrf2 regulated redox signaling in utero: Priming of disease susceptibility in offspring.

    PubMed

    Chapple, Sarah J; Puszyk, William M; Mann, Giovanni E

    2015-11-01

    Intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia or intrauterine growth restriction alters the redox status of the developing fetus. Such pregnancy-related diseases in most cases do not have a readily identifiable genetic cause, and epigenetic 'priming' mechanisms in utero may predispose both mother and child to later-life onset of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The concept of 'fetal programing' or 'developmental priming' and its association with an increased risk of disease in childhood or adulthood has been reviewed extensively. This review focuses on adaptive changes in the in utero redox environment during normal pregnancy and the consequences of alterations in redox control associated with pregnancies characterized by oxidative stress. We evaluate the evidence that the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway is important for protecting the fetus against adverse conditions in utero and may itself be subject to epigenetic priming, potentially contributing to an increased risk of vascular disease and insulin resistance in later life. PMID:26279476

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced in the human placenta during labour

    PubMed Central

    Veerbeek, J.H.W.; Tissot Van Patot, M.C.; Burton, G.J.; Yung, H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Placental endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been postulated in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), but its activation remains elusive. Oxidative stress induced by ischaemia/hypoxia-reoxygenation activates ER stress in vitro. Here, we explored whether exposure to labour represents an in vivo model for the study of acute placental ER stress. ER stress markers, GRP78, P-eIF2? and XBP-1, were significantly higher in laboured placentas than in Caesarean-delivered controls localised mainly in the syncytiotrophoblast. The similarities to changes observed in PE/IUGR placentas suggest exposure to labour can be used to investigate induction of ER stress in pathological placentas. PMID:25434970

  7. Assessment of Foetal DNA in Maternal Blood – A Useful Tool in the Hands of Prenatal Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, K. O.; Hoopmann, M.; Kozlowski, P.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years, first trimester screening between 11+ and 13+ weeks of gestation has become one of the most important ultrasound examinations in pregnancy, as it allows physicians to predict several pregnancy complications including pre-eclampsia or pre-term birth. Screening for trisomies 21/18 and 13 using maternal and gestational age, foetal nuchal translucency, and maternal serum biochemistry was formerly the main reason for first trimester screening. However, today this is only one part of the overall examination. In the near future, the analysis of foetal DNA obtained from maternal blood will be used to supplement first trimester screening for aneuploidy or even replace current screening methods. In this review we show how prenatal medicine specialists can use foetal DNA analysis. PMID:25258455

  8. A Short History of Sonography in Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, S.

    2013-01-01

    The history of sonography in Obstetrics and Gynaecology dates from the classic 1958 Lancet paper of Ian Donald and his team from Glasgow. Fifty years on it is impossible to conceive of practising Obstetrics and Gynaecology without one of the many forms of ultrasound available today. Technological developments such as solid state circuitry, real time imaging, colour and power Doppler, transvaginal sonography and 3/4D imaging have been seized by clinical researchers to enhance the investigation and management of patients in areas as diverse as assessment of fetal growth and wellbeing, screening for fetal anomalies, prediction of pre-eclampsia and preterm birth, detection of ectopic gestation, evaluation of pelvic masses, screening for ovarian cancer and fertility management. Ultrasound guided procedures are now essential components of fetal therapy and IVF treatment. This concise history is written by someone who has witnessed each of these advances throughout the ultrasound era and is able to give perspective to these momentous happenings. PMID:24753947

  9. Obesity and fetal-maternal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dinatale, Angela; Ermito, Santina; Fonti, Ilenia; Giordano, Rosalba; Cacciatore, Alessandra; Romano, Mattea; La Rosa, Beatrice

    2010-01-01

    In women Obesity has a significant impact on every aspect of female reproductive life both in terms of infertility and early pregnancy complications. It is linked to a number of adverse obstetric outcomes as well as increased maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. These complications include miscarriage, congenital abnormalities, pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, iatrogenic preterm delivery, post-dates pregangy with increased rates of induction of labour, caesarian section and complications during and following operative procedures, post-partum haemorrhage, shoulder dystocia, infection, venous thromboembolism and increased hospital day. It is important to consider obese pregnant women as a high risk group with a linear increase in risk of complications associated with their degree of obesity. PMID:22439052

  10. Delayed presentation and diagnosis of metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mnyani, C N; Hull, J C; Mbakaza, M B; Krim, A O A; Nicolaou, E

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is rare in women of reproductive age. If diagnosed, the underlying cirrhosis is associated with infertility in the majority of cases. There is limited literature on HCC in pregnancy, even more so for cases of metastatic disease. We present a case of delayed presentation and diagnosis of metastatic HCC in pregnancy. A 30-year-old pregnant woman presented at 23 weeks’ gestation and was diagnosed as HIV-infected, with anaemia. She was initiated on an efavirenz-based fixed-dose combination and oral haematinics. She subsequently presented at 32 weeks’ gestation with dyspnoea, and was diagnosed with pre-eclampsia. She was also found to have hepatosplenomegaly and ascites. She went into spontaneous preterm labour at 32 weeks and 4 days. A diagnosis of metastatic HCC was made postpartum, based on the radiological findings and biochemistry. We discuss the challenges of diagnosing metastatic HCC in pregnancy. PMID:26636159

  11. What are the roles of macrophages and monocytes in human pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Tang, Mao-Xing; Hu, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Zhao-Zhao; Kwak-Kim, Joanne; Liao, Ai-Hua

    2015-11-01

    During pregnancy, the maternal immune system is challenged by the semi-allogeneic fetus, which leads to systemic and local immunity. Systemic immunity, including enhanced innate immunity with increased activation of monocytes, is induced by various placental factors. Maternal immune adaptations are most evident at the feto-maternal interface, where macrophages are enriched and communicate with various decidual leukocytes. These cells are not only contributing to the protection of the growing fetus from microorganisms, but also aiding placental development by promoting trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodeling, and the parturition process. Thus, monocytes and macrophages concurrently play important roles throughout the trimesters. Dysregulation of these cells may thus lead to pregnancy complications, such as pre-eclampsia and preterm labor. In this review, monocytes and macrophage subsets and their roles in normal and pathological pregnancies are reviewed. PMID:26340023

  12. Clinical manifestations of obstructive sleep apnoea in pregnancy: more than snoring and witnessed apnoeas.

    PubMed

    Bourjeily, G; Barbara, N; Larson, L; He, M

    2012-07-01

    Sleep disordered breathing and its symptoms have been associated with a multitude of fetal and maternal complications including gestational hypertensive disorders, gestational diabetes and possibly pre-term labour and other markers of alterations in fetal wellbeing. The disease remains underdiagnosed in the general population but likely also in pregnancy, mostly because providers do not appropriately screen for the disorder. Sleep disordered breathing may manifest differently in women, since women report more fatigue and less snoring than men do. This paper discusses typical presentations of sleep disordered breathing but also reports some less obvious presentations to help providers recognise those manifestations and screen for the disorder when warranted. Our case series describes patients with diagnoses such as chronic hypertension, pre-eclampsia, pulmonary hypertension, nocturnal asthma and panic attacks, who were diagnosed with sleep disordered breathing and offered treatment with CPAP during pregnancy. PMID:22663313

  13. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following an inadvertent dural puncture during an emergency laparotomy for ischemic colitis – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Reena; Kubisz-Pudelko, Agnieszka; Reid, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-neuroradiological syndrome characterized by various symptoms of neurological disease. It has commonly been reported in association with acute hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, sepsis, and exposure to immunosuppressants. Here, we report on a normotensive woman who developed a severe frontal headache, visual disturbances, and hypertension 3 days after undergoing an emergency laparotomy for ischemic colitis during which she suffered an inadvertent dural puncture. Neuro-imaging revealed features consistent with PRES. The patient went on to make a good recovery, being discharged 21 days postoperatively, with only minor visual disturbances and memory problems. This case highlights the importance of awareness of PRES to all specialties. On reviewing the literature, we feel that PRES may be a potential differential diagnosis to post-procedural neurological symptoms in those patients undergoing routine procedures such as spinal anesthetics or lumbar punctures. PMID:24600245

  14. CD31 and Factor VIII in angiogenesis of normal and pre-eclamptic human placentas.

    PubMed

    Uras, N; Oguz, S S; Zergeroglu, S; Akdag, A; Polat, B; Dizdar, E A; Dilmen, U

    2012-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate normal and pre-eclamptic placental vasculature by using CD31 and Factor VIII. We evaluated placentas of 37 pre-eclamptic women by using immunohistochemical staining with CD31 and Factor VIII antibodies. Individual microvessels in the placental tissues were counted at × 100 and × 400 magnification. Microvessel counts were lower in placentas of pre-eclamptic patients compared with healthy controls after staining with CD31 (26.5?±?5.7 vs 103.9?±?8.2, p pre-eclampsia. PMID:22779955

  15. Dipping your feet in the water: podocytes in urine.

    PubMed

    Sir Elkhatim, Rashid; Li, Jordan Y Z; Yong, Tuck Y; Gleadle, Jonathan M

    2014-05-01

    Podocyte injury and loss plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of many kidney diseases. Studies have shown that podocyte-related markers and products can be detected in the urine of patients with glomerular diseases such as focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, diabetic nephropathy and pre-eclampsia. Therefore, detecting the loss of podocytes in the urine provides a useful noninvasive technique of gathering information about the disease type and/or activity of glomerular diseases. Currently, urine podocyte-related protein markers, mRNA, microRNA and exosomes have been used with varying degrees of success to study glomerular diseases. The determination of urinary podocyte loss may become an important noninvasive tool in the evaluation of glomerular diseases. PMID:24724555

  16. Successful Pregnancy Following Assisted Reproduction in Woman With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    de Macedo, José Fernando; de Macedo, Gustavo Capinzaiki; Campos, Luciana Aparecida; Baltatu, Ovidiu Constantin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus have a poor prognosis of pregnancy, since it is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity, including spontaneous miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal death and pre-term delivery. We report a case with successful pregnancy in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and hypertension. A 39-year-old nulliparous woman presented with systemic lupus erythematosus with antinuclear and antiphospholipid antibodies, hypertension and recurrent pregnancy loss presented for assisted reproduction. The patient responded well to enoxaparin and prednisone during both assisted reproduction and prenatal treatment. This case report indicates that prescription of immunosuppressant and blood thinners can be safely recommended throughout the whole prenatal period in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Enoxaparin and prednisone may be prescribed concurrently during pregnancy. PMID:26376400

  17. Current trends in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome with desire for children

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Margalida E; Prat, Maria O; Checa, Miguel Angel; Carreras, Ramon C

    2009-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most frequent endocrine diseases, affects approximately 5%–10% of women of childbearing age and constitutes the most common cause of female sterility regardless of the need or not for treatment, a change in lifestyle is essential for the treatment to work and ovulation to be restored. Obesity is the principal reason for modifying lifestyle since its reduction improves ovulation and the capacity for pregnancy and lowers the risk of miscarriage and later complications that may occur during pregnancy (gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, etc). When lifestyle modification is not sufficient, the first step in ovulation induction is clomiphene citrate. The second-step recommendation is either exogenous gonadotrophins or laparoscopic ovarian surgery. Recommended third-line treatment is in vitro fertilization. Metformin use in PCOS should be restricted to women with glucose intolerance. PMID:19536311

  18. Thrombophilia in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Walker, I.

    2000-01-01

    Thrombophilia can be defined as a predisposition to thrombosis. Abnormalities in haemostasis that are associated with clinical thrombophilia include heritable defects, such as mutations in the genes encoding the natural anticoagulants antithrombin, protein C, and protein S, or clotting factors prothrombin and factor V, and acquired defects, such as antiphospholipids. Women with thrombophilic defects have been shown to be at increased risk, not only of pregnancy associated thromboembolism, but also of other vascular complications of pregnancy, including pre-eclampsia and fetal loss. Routine thrombophilia screening of all women attending antenatal clinics is not recommended. Because some thrombophilic defects—for example, type 1 antithrombin deficiency and antiphospholipids—are associated with a high risk of recurrent thrombosis or other pregnancy complications, it is suggested that selected women (those with a personal or confirmed family history of venous thromboembolism or with a history of recurrent fetal loss) are screened for these defects to allow pregnancy management planning. Key Words: thrombophilia • pregnancy PMID:11002758

  19. Impact of interventions to prevent and manage preeclampsia and eclampsia on stillbirths

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia and Eclampsia are relatively common complications of pregnancy, leading to considerable maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. We sought to review the effect of aspirin, calcium supplementation, antihypertensive agents and magnesium sulphate on risk stillbirths. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted to identify studies evaluating the above interventions. We used a standardized abstraction and grading format and performed meta-analyses where data were available from more than one studies. The estimated effect on stillbirths was determined by applying the standard Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG) rules for multiple outcomes. For interventions with insufficient evidence for overall effect, a Delphi process was undertaken to estimate effectiveness. Results We identified 82 relevant studies. For aspirin, maganesium sulphate and use of antihypertensive we found an insignificant decrease in stillbirth and perinatal mortality. For calcium supplementation, there was a borderline significant reduction in stillbirths (RR 0.81, 95 % CI 0.63-1.03). We undertook a Delphi consultation among experts to assess the potential impact of a package of interventions for the management of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia (antihypertensive, magnesium sulphate and C-section if needed). The Delphi process suggested 20% reduction each in both antepartum and intrapartum stillbirths with the use of this package. Conclusions Despite promising benefits of calcium supplementation and aspirin use cases on maternal morbidity and eclampsia in high risk cases, further work is needed to ascertain their benefits in relation to stillbirths. The Delphi process undertaken for assessing potential impact of a package of interventions indicated that this could be associated with 20% reduction in stillbirths, for input into LiST. PMID:21501457

  20. Decidual natural killer cells regulate vessel stability: implications for impaired spiral artery remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Rupsha; Whitley, Guy St.J.; Thilaganathan, Baskaran; Cartwright, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    Decidual NK (dNK) cells are present during uterine spiral artery remodelling, an event that is crucial for successful placentation and the provision of an adequate blood supply to the developing fetus. Spiral artery remodelling is impaired in the pregnancy complication pre-eclampsia. Although dNK cells are known to play active roles at the maternal–fetal interface, little is known about their effect on endothelial integrity, an important component of vessel stability. We present a study in which we have modelled dNK–endothelium interactions, using first-trimester dNK cells isolated from both normal pregnancies and those with impaired spiral artery remodelling. dNK cells were isolated from first-trimester pregnancies, screened by uterine artery Doppler ultrasound to determine resistance indices (RI) that relate to the extent of spiral artery remodelling. dNK culture supernatant from normal-RI pregnancies (but not high-RI pregnancies) destabilised endothelial tube-like structures in Matrigel, and normal-RI dNK cells induced endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and tumour necrosis factor-? expression to a greater extent than high-RI dNK cells. We have established a functional role for dNK cells in the disruption of endothelial structures and have suggested how impairment of this process may be contributing to the reduced vessel remodelling in pregnancies with a high uterine artery resistance index. These findings have implications for our understanding of the pathology of pre-eclampsia and other pregnancy disorders where remodelling is impaired. PMID:26004035

  1. Gestational and Pregestational Diabetes Mellitus in Omani Women

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Heija, Adel T.; Al-Bash, Majeda; Mathew, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) among pregnant women in Oman and compare their obstetric and perinatal outcomes. Methods: This retrospective study assessed the obstetric and perinatal outcomes of pregnant Omani women with GDM or PGDM who delivered at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, between January 2009 and December 2010. Results: There were a total of 5,811 deliveries during the study period. Of the 5,811 women who gave birth, 639 women were found to have diabetes mellitus (11.0%). A total of 581 of the diabetic women had GDM (90.9%) and only 58 (9.1%) had PGDM. Women with PGDM had a significantly higher incidence of pre-eclampsia (P = 0.022), preterm deliveries (P <0.001) and Caesarean sections (P <0.001). Neonatal complications, such as respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), neonatal hypoglycaemia, neonatal jaundice and subsequent admission to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) were significantly higher for neonates born to mothers with PGDM compared to those born to mothers with GDM (P <0.001). The corrected perinatal mortality rates for women with PGDM and GDM were 34.5 and 13.7 per 1,000 live births, respectively. Conclusion: In this Omani cohort, women with PGDM were at higher risk of developing obstetric and perinatal complications such as pre-eclampsia, preterm delivery and Caesarean delivery compared to women with GDM. In addition, neonates who had mothers with PGDM had higher rates of RDS, neonatal hypoglycaemia, neonatal jaundice and admission to the NICU. PMID:26629376

  2. Acute Lung Injury Complicating Blood Transfusion in Post-Partum Hemorrhage: Incidence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Teofili, Luciana; Bianchi, Maria; Zanfini, Bruno A.; Catarci, Stefano; Sicuranza, Rossella; Spartano, Serena; Zini, Gina; Draisci, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Background We retrospectively investigated the incidence and risk factors for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) among patients transfused for post-partum hemorrhage (PPH). Methods We identified a series of 71 consecutive patients with PPH requiring the urgent transfusion of three or more red blood cell (RBC) units, with or without transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and/or platelets (PLT). Clinical records were then retrieved and examined for respiratory distress events. According to the 2004 consensus definition, cases of new-onset hypoxemia, within 6 hours after transfusion, with bilateral pulmonary changes, in the absence of cardiogenic pulmonary edema were identified as TRALI. If an alternative risk factor for acute lung injury was present, possible TRALI was diagnosed. Results Thirteen cases of TRALI and 1 case of possible TRALI were identified (overall incidence 19.7%). At univariate analysis, patients with TRALI received higher number of RBC, PLT and FFP units and had a longer postpartum hospitalization. Among the diseases occurring in pregnancy- and various pre-existing comorbidities, only gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, significantly increased the risk to develop TRALI (p = 0.006). At multivariate analysis including both transfusion- and patient-related risk factors, pregnancy-related, hypertensive disorders were confirmed to be the only predictors for TRALI, with an odds ratio of 27.7 ( 95% CI 1.27–604.3, p=0.034). Conclusions Patients suffering from PPH represent a high-risk population for TRALI. The patients with gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, not receiving anti-hypertensive therapy, have the highest risk. Therefore, a careful monitoring of these patients after transfusions is recommended. PMID:25408855

  3. Clinical cardiovascular risk during young adulthood in offspring of hypertensive pregnancies: insights from a 20-year prospective follow-up birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Esther F; Lewandowski, Adam J; Aye, Christina; Williamson, Wilby; Boardman, Henry; Huang, Rae-Chi; Mori, Trevor A; Newnham, John; Beilin, Lawrence J; Leeson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Offspring of hypertensive pregnancies have increased cardiovascular risk factors during childhood. We hypothesised that offspring of hypertensive pregnancies would demonstrate increased clinical levels of hypertension by young adult life, which would be proportional to the severity of the pregnancy complication. Design Prospective birth cohort study Setting Tertiary obstetric hospital. Participants 2868 young adult offspring of women enrolled during pregnancy into the Western Australia Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Main outcome measures Cardiovascular risk, including incidence of hypertension and metabolic disease, in those born to hypertensive compared to normotensive pregnancies. Results Young adult offspring of hypertensive pregnancies were 2.5 times (95% CI 1.32 to 4.56, p=0.004) more likely to have global lifetime risk (QRISK) scores above the 75th centile. Thirty per cent of 20?year olds with hypertensive blood pressures were born following a hypertensive pregnancy. Pre-eclampsia or hypertension resulting in preterm birth associated with a threefold (95% CI 1.3 to 7.0, p=0.01) greater risk of being hypertensive by age 20?years, with no differences in body mass index. Whereas pregnancy-induced hypertension associated with a smaller 3±1?mm?Hg blood pressure rise (p=0.001) and a twofold (95% CI 1.5 to 2.8, p=0.001) greater risk of being obese or overweight. Risk factor associations were consistent throughout early life and independent of other birth-factors. Conclusions Incidence of offspring hypertension was significantly increased in those whose mothers had a more complicated pregnancy history, including preterm birth and pre-eclampsia. PMID:26105032

  4. Decidual natural killer cells regulate vessel stability: implications for impaired spiral artery remodelling.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Rupsha; Whitley, Guy St J; Thilaganathan, Baskaran; Cartwright, Judith E

    2015-08-01

    Decidual NK (dNK) cells are present during uterine spiral artery remodelling, an event that is crucial for successful placentation and the provision of an adequate blood supply to the developing fetus. Spiral artery remodelling is impaired in the pregnancy complication pre-eclampsia. Although dNK cells are known to play active roles at the maternal-fetal interface, little is known about their effect on endothelial integrity, an important component of vessel stability. We present a study in which we have modelled dNK-endothelium interactions, using first-trimester dNK cells isolated from both normal pregnancies and those with impaired spiral artery remodelling. dNK cells were isolated from first-trimester pregnancies, screened by uterine artery Doppler ultrasound to determine resistance indices (RI) that relate to the extent of spiral artery remodelling. dNK culture supernatant from normal-RI pregnancies (but not high-RI pregnancies) destabilised endothelial tube-like structures in Matrigel, and normal-RI dNK cells induced endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and tumour necrosis factor-? expression to a greater extent than high-RI dNK cells. We have established a functional role for dNK cells in the disruption of endothelial structures and have suggested how impairment of this process may be contributing to the reduced vessel remodelling in pregnancies with a high uterine artery resistance index. These findings have implications for our understanding of the pathology of pre-eclampsia and other pregnancy disorders where remodelling is impaired. PMID:26004035

  5. Selenium and other elements in human maternal and umbilical serum, as determined simultaneously by proton-induced X-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Hyvoenen-Dabek, M.; Nikkinen-Vilkki, P.; Dabek, J.T.

    1984-04-01

    Using PIXE (proton-induced X-ray emission), we simultaneously determined the concentrations of Se, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, and Pb in blood serum from 56 pregnant women, 25 healthy controls, and 31 others with twin pregnancy or some complicating condition (diabetes, hypertension, epilepsy, hepatosis gravidarum, pre-eclampsia, small baby), and in cord-blood serum from 21 newborns. Pellets, pressed from the serum samples after addition of yttrium as an internal standard, mixing, and evaporating at 30 degrees C with or without reduced pressure (less than 1 kPa), were bombarded by 2.2 MeV protons from a Van de Graaff accelerator in the air and the induced X-rays collected by a Ge(Li) detector. Relative to mean Se values for early six- to 12-week pregnancy (0.045 ppm), those for 35-42 week pregnancy (0.028 ppm) were low (p less than 0.001). Umbilical cord blood serum showed even lower values (0.016 ppm, p less than 0.001)--findings in harmony with the incidence pattern of Keshan cardiomyopathy. Pb crossed the placenta; values for cord serum were not significantly different from those in pregnancy serum. Cu, Zn, Fe, and Ca showed the significant expected patterns in the different groups. Compared with the late-pregnancy controls, Fe was high in mothers of small-birth-weight babies (1.70 ppm, p less than 0.02). Br was high in pre-eclampsia (3.59 ppm, p less than 0.05) and mothers with twins (3.61 ppm, p less than 0.05).

  6. The use of magnesium sulfate for women with severe preeclampsia or eclampsia diagnosed during the postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Vigil-De Gracia, Paulino; Ludmir, Jack

    2015-12-01

    This was a systematic review of randomized controlled trials comparing anticonvulsants with placebo or no anticonvulsant for prevention (a) of eclampsia in women with severe preeclampsia diagnosed during the postpartum period or diagnosed before delivery but without previous treatment and (b) prevention of seizures recurrence in women with eclampsia postpartum. We did not find study with full inclusion criteria. However, a total of two randomised controlled trials meet inclusion criteria as subgroup analysis; one for severe preeclampsia diagnosed during the postpartum period and one for eclampsia postpartum. For severe preeclampsia diagnosed during postpartum, there was no clear difference between the groups reporting eclampsia (relative risk: 0.54, 95% confidence interval: 0.16-1.80). For seizure recurrence, magnesium sulfate was superior to diazepam, but there was no significant difference compared with phenytoin. No conclusion can be drawn on the role of magnesium sulfate post partum as established in antepartum pre-eclampsia/eclampsia management because of lack of powered randomised controlled trials. PMID:25373431

  7. Acute actions and novel targets of matrix metalloproteinases in the heart and vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Chow, A K; Cena, J; Schulz, R

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been shown to play significant roles in a number of physiological as well as pathological processes. Best known to proteolyse components of the extracellular matrix, MMPs have recently been discovered to also target a growing list of proteins apart from these, both inside and outside the cell. MMPs have also been traditionally thought of as enzymes involved in chronic processes such as angiogenesis, remodelling and atherosclerosis on a days-week time-scale. However they are now understood to also act acutely in response to oxidative stress on a minutes time-scale on non-extracellular matrix substrates. This review focuses on the acute actions and both extracellular and intracellular targets of two prominent MMP family members, MMP-2 and -9, in cardiovascular diseases including ischaemia/reperfusion injury, inflammatory heart disease, septic shock and pre-eclampsia. Also discussed are various ways of regulating MMP activity, including post-translational mechanisms, the endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases and pharmacological inhibitors. A comprehensive understanding of MMP biology is necessary for the development of novel pharmacological therapies to combat the impact of cardiovascular disease. PMID:17592511

  8. Biological Functions of Thyroid Hormone in Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Chie-Pein; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormone, 3,3,5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3), modulates several physiological processes, including cellular growth, differentiation, metabolism, inflammation and proliferation, via interactions with thyroid hormone response elements (TREs) in the regulatory regions of target genes. Infection and inflammation are critical processes in placental development and pregnancy-related diseases. In particular, infection is the leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. However, to date, no successful approach has been developed for the effective diagnosis of infection in preterm infants. Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a serious disorder that adversely affects ~5% of human pregnancies. Recent studies identified a multiprotein complex, the inflammasome, including the Nod-like receptor (NLR) family of cytosolic pattern recognition receptors, the adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC) and caspase-1, which plays a vital role in the placenta. The thyroid hormone modulates inflammation processes and is additionally implicated in placental development and disease. Therefore, elucidation of thyroid hormone receptor-regulated inflammation-related molecules, and their underlying mechanisms in placenta, should facilitate the identification of novel predictive and therapeutic targets for placental disorders. This review provides a detailed summary of current knowledge with respect to identification of useful biomarkers and their physiological significance in placenta. PMID:25690032

  9. Essential basic and emergency obstetric and newborn care: from education and training to service delivery and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Otolorin, Emmanuel; Gomez, Patricia; Currie, Sheena; Thapa, Kusum; Dao, Blami

    2015-06-01

    Approximately 15% of expected births worldwide will result in life-threatening complications during pregnancy, delivery, or the postpartum period. Providers skilled in emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC) services are essential, particularly in countries with a high burden of maternal and newborn mortality. Jhpiego and its consortia partners have implemented three global programs to build provider capacity to provide comprehensive EmONC services to women and newborns in these resource-poor settings. Providers have been educated to deliver high-impact maternal and newborn health interventions, such as prevention and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia and management of birth asphyxia, within the broader context of quality health services. This article describes Jhpiego's programming efforts within the framework of the basic and expanded signal functions that serve as indicators of high-quality basic and emergency care services. Lessons learned include the importance of health facility strengthening, competency-based provider education, global leadership, and strong government ownership and coordination as essential precursors to scale-up of high impact evidence-based maternal and newborn interventions in low-resource settings. PMID:26115858

  10. [Prolactin and its cleaved 16 kDa fragment].

    PubMed

    Lkhider, Mustapha; Seddiki, Touria; Ollivier-Bousquet, Michèle

    2010-12-01

    Prolactin, owing to its origins, actions and molecular forms, is an ubiquitous and pleiotropic hormone. Indeed prolactin, initially thought to be essentially synthesized in the hypophysis, is also produced by several tissues in mammals. It is involved in more than 300 different biological activities, such as reproduction, developmental immunity and behaviour. It is also described under several molecular forms resulting from co- or post-translational modifications and enzymatic cleavage. Among these, the 16 kDa form, derived from native prolactin, has received particular attention because of its inhibitory effect on angiogenesis. Recent results have suggested an important role of tissue enzymes in the production of this form in several tissues (retina, myocardium and mammary gland). The cleavage leading to the production of 16 kDa prolactin may occur outside the cells, in the interstitial medium and therefore in the vicinity of blood capillaries. This process implies tissue-specific mechanisms of regulation. A better knowledge of the location of the cleavage and of the regulation of these activities of the cleaving enzymes is now essential for controlling the processes. This knowledge will allow a better understanding of the relationships between some pathologies (cardiomyopathy, pre-eclampsia, retinopathy) and modification of the production of the anti-angiogenic form of prolactin. PMID:21187043

  11. A step-by-step diagnosis of exclusion in a twin pregnancy with acute respiratory failure due to non-fatal amniotic fluid embolism: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Vasilios E; Dragoumanis, Christos; Theodorou, Vassiliki; Konstantonis, Dimitrios; Pneumatikos, Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory failure may develop during the later stages of pregnancy and is usually associated with tocolysis or other co-existing conditions such as pneumonia, sepsis, pre-eclampsia or amniotic fluid embolism syndrome. Case presentation We present the case of a 34-year-old healthy woman with a twin pregnancy at 31 weeks and 6 days who experienced acute respiratory failure, a few hours after administration of tocolysis (ritodrine), due to preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Her chest discomfort was significantly ameliorated after the ritodrine infusion was stopped and a Cesarean section was performed 48 hours later under spinal anesthesia; however, 2 hours after surgery she developed severe hypoxemia, hypotension, fever and mild coagulopathy. The patient was intubated and transferred to the intensive care unit where she made a quick and uneventful recovery within 3 days. As there was no evidence for drug- or infection-related thromboembolic or myocardial causes of respiratory failure, we conclude that our patient experienced a rare type of non-fatal amniotic fluid embolism. Conclusion In spite of the lack of solid scientific support for our diagnosis, we conclude that our patient suffered an uncommon type of amniotic fluid embolism syndrome and we believe that this report highlights the need for extreme vigilance and a high index of suspicion for such a diagnosis in any pregnant individual. PMID:18505548

  12. Review of fortified food and beverage products for pregnant and lactating women and their impact on nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Huffman, Sandra L

    2011-10-01

    Fortified beverages and supplementary foods, when given during pregnancy, have been shown to have positive effects on preventing maternal anaemia and iron deficiency. Studies show that use of micronutrient fortified supplementary foods, especially those containing milk and/or essential fatty acids during pregnancy, increase mean birthweight by around 60-73 g. A few studies have also shown that fortified supplementary foods have impacts on increasing birth length and reducing preterm delivery. Fortification levels have ranged generally from 50% to 100% of the recommended nutrient intake (RNI). Iron, zinc, copper, iodine, selenium, vitamins A, D, E, C, B1, B2, B6, and B12, folic acid, niacin and pantothenic acid are important nutrients that have been included in fortified beverages and supplemental foods for pregnant and lactating women. While calcium has been shown to reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia and maternal mortality, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and manganese can have negative impacts on organoleptic properties, so many products tested have not included these nutrients or have done so in a limited way. Fortified food supplements containing milk and essential fatty acids offer benefits to improving maternal status and pregnancy outcome. Fortified beverages containing only multiple micronutrients have been shown to reduce micronutrient deficiencies such as anaemia and iron deficiency. PMID:21929634

  13. Nutritional management of the low birth weight/preterm infant in community settings: a perspective from the developing world.

    PubMed

    Imdad, Aamer; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2013-03-01

    Globally, about 20 million infants are born with low birth weight (LBW; <2500 g). Of all LBW infants, approximately 95% are born in developing countries. The greatest incidence of LBW occurs in South-Central Asia; the second greatest is in Africa. The two main reasons for LBW are preterm birth (<37 weeks) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), which are risk factors for increased morbidity and mortality in newborn infants. Maternal nutrition status is one of the most important risk factors for LBW/IUGR. Providing balanced protein energy and multiple micronutrient supplements to pregnant women will reduce incidence of IUGR. Calcium supplementation during pregnancy will reduce the incidence of pre-eclampsia and preterm birth in developing countries. Exclusive breastfeeding is protective for a mother and her infant and has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in infancy. Kangaroo mother care for preterm infants will reduce severe morbidity and mortality as well. Community-based intervention packages are among the most effective methods of reducing morbidity and mortality in mothers and children. Future research should focus on improving triage of preterm and IUGR infants. Exclusive breastfeeding should be promoted, and appropriate alternative food supplements should be provided when breastfeeding is not possible. PMID:23445841

  14. Micronutrients and pregnancy; effect of supplementation on pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Every year more than 20 million infants are born with low birth weight worldwide. About 3.6 million infants die during the neonatal period. More than one third of child deaths are thought to be attributable to maternal and child under nutrition. Objectives To systematically review the effect of supplementing various combinations and types of micronutrients on the course and outcomes of pregnancy. Methods Electronic search of Medline, Pub Med, Health Internetwork access to Research Initiative, and Google Scholar databases was conducted. Outcomes of interest were birth weight, low birth weight, small size for gestational age, prenatal mortality and neonatal mortality. After exclusion of irrelevant /incomplete ones, 17 out of 115 articles were considered for the final analysis. Findings Majority of the articles reviewed favored the supplementation of micronutrients to pregnant mother. Some studies suggested calcium supplementation is associated with a significant protective benefit in the prevention of pre-eclampsia. The remaining articles reviewed, showed significant benefit of Multiple Micronutrients supplementation during pregnancy in reducing low birth weight, small for Gestational Age births as compared to the usual iron-folate supplements. Conclusions Supplying micronutrients, mainly multiple micronutrients have beneficial effect in reducing the risk of low birth weight and other complications. Further studies at various combination and doses of micronutrient supplements are recommended. PMID:23368953

  15. Magnesium in disease

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Although the following text will focus on magnesium in disease, its role in healthy subjects during physical exercise when used as a supplement to enhance performance is also noteworthy. Low serum magnesium levels are associated with metabolic syndrome, Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension; consequently, some individuals benefit from magnesium supplementation: increasing magnesium consumption appears to prevent high blood pressure, and higher serum magnesium levels are associated with a lower risk of developing a metabolic syndrome. There are, however, conflicting study results regarding magnesium administration with myocardial infarction with and without reperfusion therapy. There was a long controversy as to whether or not magnesium should be given as a first-line medication. As the most recent trials have not shown any difference in outcome, intravenous magnesium cannot be recommended in patients with myocardial infarction today. However, magnesium has its indication in patients with torsade de pointes and has been given successfully to patients with digoxin-induced arrhythmia or life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Magnesium sulphate as an intravenous infusion also has an important established therapeutic role in pregnant women with pre-eclampsia as it decreases the risk of eclamptic seizures by half compared with placebo. PMID:26069818

  16. Pregnancy Weight Gain Limitation by a Supervised Nutritional Program Influences Placental NF-?B/IKK Complex Expression and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zerón, Hugo Mendieta; Flores, Alejandro Parada; Chávez, Araceli Amaya; Alanís, Adriana Garduño; Ferreyra, María del Carmen Colín; Benítez, Jonnathan Guadalupe Santillán; Castañeda, Violeta Saraí Morales; García, Ma. Victoria Domínguez

    2013-01-01

    Objective Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) pathway and oxidative stress participate in endothelial dysfunction, which is one of the causes of pre-eclampsia. Among the human antioxidant mechanisms, there are the enzymes catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Our aim was to measure NF-?B, its inhibitor (IKK) and oxidative stress in placenta and umbilical cord of pregnant women submitted to a supervised nutritional program. Methods Two groups were conformed: A) 14 pregnant women with individualized nutritional counseling, and B) 12 pregnant women without nutritional guidance. NF-?B and IKK were assessed by real time PCR (RT-PCR). Enzymatic activity of CAT, GPx, lipoperoxidation (LPO) and SOD were also evaluated. Results Pregnant women that followed a supervised nutritional program had lower levels of systolic (p=0.03) and diastolic pressure (p=0.043) although they were heavier than the control group (p=0.048). Among all the women, the Spearman correlation was positive between weight gain and placental NF-?B expression (1, p?0.01). In the placenta, women with nutritional advice had lower enzymatic activity of GPx (p?0.038) and showed a tendency of IKK to be higher than in women without a nutritional supervised program. Conclusion A supervised nutritional program in pregnancy offers a proven option to control weight gain, hypertension, NF-?B/IKK complex expression and oxidative stress reactions in the placenta. PMID:23772281

  17. Risks associated with obesity in pregnancy, for the mother and baby: a systematic review of reviews.

    PubMed

    Marchi, J; Berg, M; Dencker, A; Olander, E K; Begley, C

    2015-08-01

    Maternal obesity is linked with adverse outcomes for mothers and babies. To get an overview of risks related to obesity in pregnant women, a systematic review of reviews was conducted. For inclusion, reviews had to compare pregnant women of healthy weight with women with obesity, and measure a health outcome for mother and/or baby. Authors conducted full-text screening, quality assurance using the AMSTAR tool and data extraction steps in pairs. Narrative analysis of the 22 reviews included show gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, depression, instrumental and caesarean birth, and surgical site infection to be more likely to occur in pregnant women with obesity compared with women with a healthy weight. Maternal obesity is also linked to greater risk of preterm birth, large-for-gestational-age babies, foetal defects, congenital anomalies and perinatal death. Furthermore, breastfeeding initiation rates are lower and there is greater risk of early breastfeeding cessation in women with obesity compared with healthy weight women. These adverse outcomes may result in longer duration of hospital stay, with concomitant resource implications. It is crucial to reduce the burden of adverse maternal and foetal/child outcomes caused by maternal obesity. Women with obesity need support to lose weight before they conceive, and to minimize their weight gain in pregnancy. PMID:26016557

  18. The proprotein convertase furin is required for trophoblast syncytialization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z; Zhang, Q; Lu, X; Wang, R; Wang, H; Wang, Y-L; Zhu, C; Lin, H-Y; Wang, H

    2013-01-01

    The multinucleated syncytial trophoblast, which forms the outermost layer of the placenta and serves multiple functions, is differentiated from and maintained by cytotrophoblast cell fusion. Deficiencies in syncytial trophoblast differentiation or maintenance likely contribute to intrauterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia, two common gestational diseases. The cellular and molecular mechanisms governing trophoblast syncytialization are poorly understood. We report here that the proprotein convertase furin is highly expressed in syncytial trophoblast in the first trimester human placentas, and expression of furin in the syncytiotrophoblast is significantly lower in the placentas from pre-eclamptic patients as compared with their gestational age-matched control placentas. Using multiple experimental models including induced fusion of choriocarcinoma BeWo cells and spontaneous fusion of primary cultured cytotrophoblast cells or placental explants, we demonstrate that cytotrophoblast cell fusion and syncytialization are accompanied by furin expression. Furin-specific siRNAs or inhibitors inhibit cell fusion in BeWo cells, as well as trophoblast syncytialization in human placental explants. Furthermore, type 1 IGF receptor (IGF1R) is indicated in this study as a substrate of furin, and processing of IGF1R by furin is an essential mechanism for syncytialization. Finally, using lentivirus-mediated RNAi targeting to mouse trophectoderm, we demonstrate that furin function is required for the development of syncytiotrophoblast structure in the labyrinth layer, as well as for normal embryonic development. PMID:23598405

  19. Immunohistochemical detection of terminal complement complex and S protein in normal and pre-eclamptic placentae.

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, F; Radillo, O; Candussi, G; Nazzaro, A; Mollnes, T E; Pecorari, D

    1990-01-01

    Terminal complement complex and S protein were searched for in term placentae obtained from 13 women with normal pregnancy and 15 patients with moderate or severe form of pre-eclampsia. Terminal complement complex was found to localize in the fibrinoid material of the decidua of the basal plate, in the stroma of the chorionic villi and in the vessel walls, as subendothelial deposits. S protein had a quite different distribution, being detected in the syncytiotrophoblast located both in the chorionic villi and in the decidua of the basal plate (DBP) and also on the endothelial cells of fetal stem vessels. Mild deposits of C3 were found in the decidua of the basal plate and also in the stroma and on the basal membranes of the villi. Reactivity for C9 neoantigen was also observed in the cytoplasm of some cells, which were recognized to be macrophages by the presence in their cytoplasm of acid phosphatase and by their reaction with a monoclonal antibody specific for macrophages. Differences in complement deposition in normal and pre-eclamptic placentae were essentially quantitative. Possible mechanisms of complement activation are discussed. Images p238-a PMID:2357851

  20. Immunohistochemical detection of terminal complement complex and S protein in normal and pre-eclamptic placentae.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, F; Radillo, O; Candussi, G; Nazzaro, A; Mollnes, T E; Pecorari, D

    1990-05-01

    Terminal complement complex and S protein were searched for in term placentae obtained from 13 women with normal pregnancy and 15 patients with moderate or severe form of pre-eclampsia. Terminal complement complex was found to localize in the fibrinoid material of the decidua of the basal plate, in the stroma of the chorionic villi and in the vessel walls, as subendothelial deposits. S protein had a quite different distribution, being detected in the syncytiotrophoblast located both in the chorionic villi and in the decidua of the basal plate (DBP) and also on the endothelial cells of fetal stem vessels. Mild deposits of C3 were found in the decidua of the basal plate and also in the stroma and on the basal membranes of the villi. Reactivity for C9 neoantigen was also observed in the cytoplasm of some cells, which were recognized to be macrophages by the presence in their cytoplasm of acid phosphatase and by their reaction with a monoclonal antibody specific for macrophages. Differences in complement deposition in normal and pre-eclamptic placentae were essentially quantitative. Possible mechanisms of complement activation are discussed. PMID:2357851

  1. Implications of the angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism in health and disease: a snapshot review

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    This review considers the 250+ papers concerning the association of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion polymorphism (rs1799752) and various disease conditions published in 2009. The deletion allele occurs in approximately 55% of the population and is associated with increased activity of the ACE enzyme. It might be predicted that the D allele, therefore, might be associated with pathologies involving increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system. The D allele was seen to be associated with an increased risk of hypertension, pre-eclampsia, heart failure, cerebral infarct, diabetic nephropathy, encephalopathy, asthma, severe hypoglycaemia in diabetes, gastric cancer (in Caucasians) and poor prognosis following kidney transplant. On the positive side, the D allele appears to offer protection against schizophrenia and chronic periodontitis and confers greater up-per-body strength in old age. The I allele, meanwhile, offers improved endurance/athletic performance and aerobic capacity as determined by lung function tests, although it does increase the risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma and obstructive sleep apnoea in hypertensives. PMID:21537387

  2. [Placental 3D Doppler angiography: current and upcoming applications].

    PubMed

    Duan, J; Perdriolle-Galet, E; Chabot-Lecoanet, A-C; Callec, R; Beaumont, M; Chavatte-Palmer, P; Tsatsaris, V; Morel, O

    2015-02-01

    The placental dysfunction, which seems to be caused by a defect of trophoblastic invasion and impaired uterine vascular remodeling since the first trimester, is responsible in a non-exclusive way for the chronic placental hypoxia, resulting secondarily in the intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR) and/or pre-eclampsia (PE). The quality of utero-placental vasculature is essential for a proper fetal development and a successful progress of pregnancy. However, the in vivo assessment of placental vascularization with non-invasive methods is complicated by the small size of placental terminal vessel and its complex architecture. Moreover, imaging with contrast agent is not recommended to pregnant women. Until recently, the fetal and maternal vascularization could only be evaluated through pulse Doppler of uterine arteries during pregnancy, which has little clinical value for utero-placental vascularization defects assessment. Recently, a non-invasive study, without use of contrast agent for vasculature evaluation of an organ of interest has become possible by the development of 3D Doppler angiography technique. The objective of this review was to make an inventory of its current and future applications for utero-placental vasculature quantification. The main findings of the literature on the assessment of utero-placental vascularization in physiological situation and major placental vascular dysfunction pathologies such as PE and IUGR were widely discussed. PMID:25307617

  3. Extravillous trophoblast-associated ADAM12 exerts pro-invasive properties, including induction of integrin beta 1-mediated cellular spreading.

    PubMed

    Biadasiewicz, Katarzyna; Fock, Valerie; Dekan, Sabine; Proestling, Katharina; Velicky, Philipp; Haider, Sandra; Knöfler, Martin; Fröhlich, Camilla; Pollheimer, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    ADAM12, consisting of a membrane-bound (ADAM12L) and a secreted (ADAM12S) form, is expressed exclusively in regenerating and developing tissue as well as in certain cancer types. Strong ADAM12 expression levels have been noticed in the human placenta, and deregulated ADAM12S levels were associated with various pregnancy-related disorders including pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. However, the role of ADAM12 in trophoblast motility has not been investigated so far. Hence, the present study aimed to investigate the specific function of the protease by using different primary trophoblast cell models. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses of first trimester placental tissue and differentiating primary first trimester cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) indicated strong upregulation of both of the ADAM12 isoforms during extravillous trophoblast differentiation. Functional assays involving short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown studies in primary CTBs and first trimester explant cultures revealed a significant repression of trophoblast motility upon partial loss of ADAM12. Conversely, isoform-specific overexpression in the ADAM12-negative trophoblast cell line SGHPL-5 enhanced the invasive capacity of these cells. We further confirmed proteolytic activity of trophoblast-derived ADAM12S by demonstrating its potential to degrade insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3. Finally, we suggest that ADAM12S exerts its pro-migratory function in trophoblasts by inducing integrin beta 1-mediated cellular spreading. PMID:24695627

  4. Utility of proteomics in obstetric disorders: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Núñez, Jónathan; Valdés-Yong, Magel

    2015-01-01

    The study of proteomics could explain many aspects of obstetric disorders. We undertook this review with the aim of assessing the utility of proteomics in the specialty of obstetrics. We searched the electronic databases of MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, BVS Bireme, and SciELO, using various search terms with the assistance of a librarian. We considered cohort studies, case-control studies, case series, and systematic review articles published until October 2014 in the English or Spanish language, and evaluated their quality and the internal validity of the evidence provided. Two reviewers extracted the data independently, then both researchers simultaneously revised the data later, to arrive at a consensus. The search retrieved 1,158 papers, of which 965 were excluded for being duplicates, not relevant, or unrelated studies. A further 86 papers were excluded for being guidelines, protocols, or case reports, along with another 64 that did not contain relevant information, leaving 43 studies for inclusion. Many of these studies showed the utility of proteomic techniques for prediction, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, monitoring, and prognosis of pre-eclampsia, perinatal infection, premature rupture of membranes, preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, and ectopic pregnancy. Proteomic techniques have enormous clinical significance and constitute an invaluable weapon in the management of obstetric disorders that increase maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. PMID:25926758

  5. Use of oral anti-diabetic agents in pregnancy: a pragmatic approach.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Bharti; Gupta, Yashdeep; Singla, Rajiv; Kalra, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is the gold standard for treatment of hyperglycemia during pregnancy, when lifestyle measures do not maintain glycemic control during pregnancy. However, recent studies have suggested that certain oral hypoglycemic agents (metformin and glyburide) may be safe and be acceptable alternatives. There are no serious safety concerns with metformin, despite it crossing the placenta. Neonatal outcomes are also comparable, with benefit of reductions in neonatal hypoglycemia, maternal hypoglycemia and weight gain, and improved treatment satisfaction. Glibenclamide is more effective in lowering blood glucose in women with gestational diabetes, and with a lower treatment failure rate than metformin. Although generally well-tolerated, some studies have reported higher rates of pre-eclampsia, neonatal jaundice, longer stay in the neonatal care unit, macrosomia, and neonatal hypoglycaemia. There is also paucity of long-term follow-up data on children exposed to oral agents in utero. This review aims to provide an evidence-based approach, concordant with basic and clinical pharmacological knowledge, which will help medical practitioners use oral anti-diabetic agents in a rational and pragmatic manner. Pubmed search was made using Medical Subject Headings (MESH) terms "Diabetes" and "Pregnancy" and "Glyburide"; "Diabetes" and "Pregnancy" and "Metformin". Limits were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analysis. The expert reviews on the topic were also used for discussion. Additional information (studies/review) pertaining to discussion under sub-headings like safety during breastfeeding; placental transport; long-term safety data were searched (pubmed/cross-references/expert reviews). PMID:25709972

  6. Use of Oral Anti-Diabetic Agents in Pregnancy: A Pragmatic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Bharti; Gupta, Yashdeep; Singla, Rajiv; Kalra, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is the gold standard for treatment of hyperglycemia during pregnancy, when lifestyle measures do not maintain glycemic control during pregnancy. However, recent studies have suggested that certain oral hypoglycemic agents (metformin and glyburide) may be safe and be acceptable alternatives. There are no serious safety concerns with metformin, despite it crossing the placenta. Neonatal outcomes are also comparable, with benefit of reductions in neonatal hypoglycemia, maternal hypoglycemia and weight gain, and improved treatment satisfaction. Glibenclamide is more effective in lowering blood glucose in women with gestational diabetes, and with a lower treatment failure rate than metformin. Although generally well-tolerated, some studies have reported higher rates of pre-eclampsia, neonatal jaundice, longer stay in the neonatal care unit, macrosomia, and neonatal hypoglycaemia. There is also paucity of long-term follow-up data on children exposed to oral agents in utero. This review aims to provide an evidence-based approach, concordant with basic and clinical pharmacological knowledge, which will help medical practitioners use oral anti-diabetic agents in a rational and pragmatic manner. Pubmed search was made using Medical Subject Headings (MESH) terms “Diabetes” and “Pregnancy” and “Glyburide”; “Diabetes” and “Pregnancy” and “Metformin”. Limits were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analysis. The expert reviews on the topic were also used for discussion. Additional information (studies/review) pertaining to discussion under sub-headings like safety during breastfeeding; placental transport; long-term safety data were searched (pubmed/cross-references/expert reviews). PMID:25709972

  7. [Takayasu's arteritis in pregnancy: report seven cases].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pacheco, José Antonio; Estrada-Altamirano, Ariel; Valenzuela-Jirón, Arlen; Maya-Quiñones, José Luis; Carvajal-Valencia, Javier Andrés; Chacón-Solís, Armando Rogerio

    2011-03-01

    Takayasu's arteritis is a chronic and non-specific disease of young women in reproductive age that primarily affects the aorta, its branches and the pulmonary artery. Ramirez Cueto G. and Fernandez Del Castillo C. et al. published a case of pregnancy in Mexico and Takayasu's arteritis in 1968. There are no reports of this disease in pregnancy since. The purpose of this study is to describe the clinical course and perinatal outcome of seven pregnant patients with known diagnosis of Takayasu arteritis. The clinical course, laboratory findings, angiographic findings and perinatal outcomes were assessed in retrospect in seven pregnant patients with diagnosis of Takayasu's arteritis seen at the National Institute of Perinatology Isidro Espinosa Reyes (Mexico) during the period 2002-2010. The results of the conducted follow-up of 7 patients pregnant with Takayasu's arteritis were: 3 patients were complicated with pre-eclampsia and 2 newborn presented intrauterine growth restriction. Disease activity wasn't observed during pregnancy. No cases of congestive heart failure, brain ischemia or maternal deaths were presented. There were no fetal deaths. We didn't observed induced activity during pregnancy in the cases presented. The most common mother complication was type renovascular hypertension with added severe preeclampsia, which determined the presence of intrauterine growth restriction. There were no maternal or perinatal deaths. PMID:21966796

  8. LAGB in pregnancy: slippage after hyperemesis gravidarum. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Pilone, Vincenzo; Di Micco, Rosa; Monda, Angela; Villamaina, Elisabetta; Gentile, Maurizio; Forestieri, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Bariatric surgery procedures are more and more performed in women of reproductive age, whose fertility often increases after weight loss, so they frequently become pregnant. In this condition they require appropriate management, according to the type of procedure, malabsorptive or restrictive. If health risks related to obesity (gestational diabetes, pregnancy induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia) decrease after weight loss, other risks related to bariatric procedures could appear. LAGB is a safe and well-tolerated procedure, but some complications could appear more frequently during pregnancy; some symptoms could be suggestive for important complications, that if not treated in the best way could threaten mother and child's health. Emesis of the first trimester could favor slippage, thus influencing feeding and fetal growth. The slippage of the band is a common complication of LAGB, that usually does not lead to serious conditions, but in our case the pregnant risked a lot because of malnutrition. The purpose of this article is to present an obstetric case study of a woman who experienced this complication postbariatric surgery and the implications for mother and child. A correct diagnosis and management of the clinical case led to a positive conclusion, thus underlining bariatric surgery and its complications should be known and taken into account by every physician. PMID:23064305

  9. Biological functions of thyroid hormone in placenta.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Chie-Pein; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormone, 3,3,5-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3), modulates several physiological processes, including cellular growth, differentiation, metabolism, inflammation and proliferation, via interactions with thyroid hormone response elements (TREs) in the regulatory regions of target genes. Infection and inflammation are critical processes in placental development and pregnancy-related diseases. In particular, infection is the leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. However, to date, no successful approach has been developed for the effective diagnosis of infection in preterm infants. Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a serious disorder that adversely affects ~5% of human pregnancies. Recent studies identified a multiprotein complex, the inflammasome, including the Nod-like receptor (NLR) family of cytosolic pattern recognition receptors, the adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC) and caspase-1, which plays a vital role in the placenta. The thyroid hormone modulates inflammation processes and is additionally implicated in placental development and disease. Therefore, elucidation of thyroid hormone receptor-regulated inflammation-related molecules, and their underlying mechanisms in placenta, should facilitate the identification of novel predictive and therapeutic targets for placental disorders. This review provides a detailed summary of current knowledge with respect to identification of useful biomarkers and their physiological significance in placenta. PMID:25690032

  10. The role of visfatin (PBEF/Nampt) in pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Pavlová, Tereza; Novák, Jan; Bienertová-Vašk?, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Visfatin (PBEF/Nampt) is an adipocytokine that exerts pleiotropic effects within the human body, particularly affecting its metabolism and immunity. Visfatin was originally identified as being secreted by peripheral blood lymphocytes acting as a pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF). However, it was subsequently reported to be expressed in almost every tissue of the human body, with visceral fat deposits being the main source of visfatin. In addition to its secreted form, visfatin may also be found intracellularly where it functions as a nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt). Visfatin maternal plasma concentrations increase during pregnancy, suggesting its important role in this complicated process. Alterations in visfatin level also take place in patients during pregnancy complications. This review focuses on the ones that most commonly occur in connection with visfatin: preterm labor, pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes mellitus. The review aims to provide a better understanding of the role of visfatin during pregnancy and the causes of its alteration in maternal plasma, highlighting the potential use of visfatin as a diagnostic marker of pregnancy complications in the future. PMID:26451650

  11. Hypomagnesemic disorders.

    PubMed

    Dacey, M J

    2001-01-01

    Adequate magnesium stores are vitally important for life. Critically ill patients will almost always have diminished levels of circulating magnesium, and this predisposes them to a variety of adverse effects, some life threatening. The causes of hypomagnesemia are many and varied, but in the critically ill, losses from the kidneys, often secondary to medications and from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, predominate. The measurement of magnesium is not straightforward, although many clinicians are now switching to the use of ionized magnesium from ion selective electrodes. The use of supplemental magnesium in acute flares of asthma has some support in medical literature, especially for those patients with severe disease who fail traditional therapy. Magnesium holds the preeminent position in the treatment of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia in the minds of most obstetricians, who have decades of experience showing it to be both effective and safe. Magnesium is clearly useful for certain types of ventricular tachycardia, and probably assists in the treatment of several types of supraventricular tachycardia. Its role in acute myocardial ischemia is less certain, although there is no benefit once reperfusion therapy has already been carried out. Finally, the role of magnesium in the treatment of acute cerebral insults is an exciting area of active investigation with initial studies suggesting much promise. PMID:11219227

  12. Fetal–maternal interface impedance parallels local NADPH oxidase related superoxide production

    PubMed Central

    Guedes-Martins, L.; Silva, E.; Gaio, A.R.; Saraiva, J.; Soares, A.I.; Afonso, J.; Macedo, F.; Almeida, H.

    2015-01-01

    Blood flow assessment employing Doppler techniques is a useful procedure in pregnancy evaluation, as it may predict pregnancy disorders coursing with increased uterine vascular impedance, as pre-eclampsia. While the local causes are unknown, emphasis has been put on reactive oxygen species (ROS) excessive production. As NADPH oxidase (NOX) is a ROS generator, it is hypothesized that combining Doppler assessment with NOX activity might provide useful knowledge on placental bed disorders underlying mechanisms. A prospective longitudinal study was performed in 19 normal course, singleton pregnancies. Fetal aortic isthmus (AoI) and maternal uterine arteries (UtA) pulsatility index (PI) were recorded at two time points: 20–22 and 40–41 weeks, just before elective Cesarean section. In addition, placenta and placental bed biopsies were performed immediately after fetal extraction. NOX activity was evaluated using a dihydroethidium-based fluorescence method and associations to PI values were studied with Spearman correlations. A clustering of pregnancies coursing with higher and lower PI values was shown, which correlated strongly with placental bed NOX activity, but less consistently with placental tissue. The study provides evidence favoring that placental bed NOX activity parallels UtA PI enhancement and suggests that an excess in oxidation underlies the development of pregnancy disorders coursing with enhanced UtA impedance. PMID:25912167

  13. Advances in understanding and treating liver diseases during pregnancy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Hirokazu; Kamimura, Hiroteru; Kobayashi, Yuji; Nomoto, Minoru; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease in pregnancy is rare but pregnancy-related liver diseases may cause threat to fetal and maternal survival. It includes pre-eclampsia; eclampsia; haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome; acute fatty liver of pregnancy; hyperemesis gravidarum; and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Recent basic researches have shown the various etiologies involved in this disease entity. With these advances, rapid diagnosis is essential for severe cases since the decision of immediate delivery is important for maternal and fetal survival. The other therapeutic options have also been shown in recent reports based on the clinical trials and cooperation and information sharing between hepatologist and gynecologist is important for timely therapeutic intervention. Therefore, correct understandings of diseases and differential diagnosis from the pre-existing and co-incidental liver diseases during the pregnancy will help to achieve better prognosis. Therefore, here we review and summarized recent advances in understanding the etiologies, clinical courses and management of liver disease in pregnancy. This information will contribute to physicians for diagnosis of disease and optimum management of patients. PMID:25954092

  14. Postnatal diagnosis of maternal congenital heart disease: missed opportunities.

    PubMed

    Vashisht, Ananya; Katakam, Narmada; Kausar, Samina; Patel, Neena; Stratton, Jane

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old primigravida with no known comorbidities presented to the emergency department at 29+6/40 gestation, with breathlessness. The initial diagnosis was pulmonary embolism, which was later revised following initial investigations and considered to be pre-eclampsia/HELLP (haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets) syndrome. Following caesarean section and delivery of a live baby, the patient had episodes of cyanotic hypoxia and was admitted to intensive care. A provisional diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary hypertension was performed. Decompensation led to transfer to a specialist intensive care unit for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, where a diagnosis of patent ductus arteriosus and Eisenmenger's syndrome was made. Heart disease is the leading indirect cause of maternal death, and Eisenmenger's syndrome in pregnancy carries a 50-65% mortality. A literature review demonstrated that this is the only reported case of a postnatal diagnosis of Eisenmenger's syndrome. We considered missed opportunities to make an earlier diagnosis, so that patients and doctors will benefit from the lessons we learnt. PMID:26370636

  15. Co-evolution of NK receptors and HLA ligands in humans is driven by reproduction.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Ashley; Colucci, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    Allogeneic individuals co-exist during pregnancy in eutherian mammals. Maternal and fetal cells intermingle at the site of placental attachment in the uterus, where the arteries are remodeled to supply the fetus with oxygen and nutrients. This access by placental cells to the maternal supply line determines the growth and birth weight of the baby and is subject to stabilizing selection. Invading placental trophoblast cells express human leukocyte antigen class I ligands (HLA-E, HLA-G, and HLA-C) for receptors on maternal uterine natural killer (NK) and myelomonocytic cells, CD94/NKG2, leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor (LILR), and killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR). Of these, only the KIR/HLA-C system is highly polymorphic. Different combinations of maternal KIR and fetal HLA-C variants are correlated with low birth weight and pre-eclampsia or high birth weight and obstructed labor, the two extremes of the obstetric dilemma. This situation has arisen because of the evolution of bipedalism and subsequently, in the last million years, larger brains. At this point, the human system began to reach a balance between KIR A and KIR B haplotypes and C1 and C2 epitopes of HLA-C alleles that reflects a functional compromise between the competing demands of immunity and reproduction. PMID:26284484

  16. Born from pre-eclamptic pregnancies predisposes infants to altered cortisol metabolism in the first postnatal year.

    PubMed

    Broughton Pipkin, Fiona; Mistry, Hiten D; Roy, Chandrima; Dick, Bernhard; Waugh, Jason; Chikhi, Rebecca; Kurlak, Lesia O; Mohaupt, Markus G

    2015-12-01

    Pre-eclampsia leads to disturbed fetal organ development, including metabolic syndrome, attributed to altered pituitary-adrenal feedback loop. We measured cortisol metabolites in infants born from pre-eclamptic and normotensive women and hypothesised that glucocorticoid exposure would be exaggerated in the former. Twenty-four hour urine was collected from infants at months 3 and 12. Cortisol metabolites and apparent enzyme activities were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. From 3 to 12 months, excretion of THS, THF and pregnandiol had risen in both groups; THF also rose in the pre-eclamptic group. No difference was observed with respect to timing of the visit or to hypertensive status for THE or total F metabolites (P>0.05). All apparent enzymes activities, except 17?-hydroxylase, were lower in infants at 12 compared to 3 months in the normotensive group. In the pre-eclamptic group, only 11?-HSD activities were lower at 12 months.17?-hydroxylase and 11?-HSD activities of tetrahydro metabolites were higher in the pre-eclamptic group at 3 months (P<0.05). 11?-hydroxylase activity increased in the pre-eclamptic group at 12 months. Cortisol excretion, determined by increased 11?-hydroxylase, compensates for high 11?-HSD-dependent cortisol degradation at 3 months and at 12 months counterbalances the reduced cortisol substrate availability in infants born from pre-eclamptic mothers. PMID:26378058

  17. Three-dimensional ultrasound evaluation of the placenta.

    PubMed

    Hata, T; Tanaka, H; Noguchi, J; Hata, K

    2011-02-01

    Conventional two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound has been widely used for the evaluation of the placenta during pregnancy. This 2D ultrasound evaluation includes the morphology, anatomy, location, implantation, anomaly, size, and color/power and pulsed Doppler sonographic assessment of the placenta. The introduction of three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound would facilitate the novel assessment of the placenta, such as surface-rendered imaging and volume measurement. With the recent advances in 3D power Doppler (3DPD) ultrasound as well as quantitative 3DPD histogram analysis, quantitative and qualitative assessments of the vascularization and blood flow of the placenta have become feasible. These novel techniques may assist in the evaluation of the feto-placental function, and offer potential advantages relative to conventional 2D sonographic assessments. 3D ultrasound may be an important modality in future placental research, in the evaluation of feto-placental insufficiency in clinical practice, and in the prediction of fetal growth restriction and pre-eclampsia, although some limitations regarding the assessment of the placenta employing 3D ultrasound still remain unresolved. PMID:21115197

  18. Placental abruption and perinatal death.

    PubMed

    Kyrklund-Blomberg, N B; Gennser, G; Cnattingius, S

    2001-07-01

    Studies of risk factors for abruptio placentae (AP) are partly conflicting and studies of risk factors for perinatal death in these pregnancies are scarce. Using the population-based Swedish Birth Registry from 1987 to 1993, we were able to study these risks in 795,459 singleton pregnancies. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) for risk of AP and risk of perinatal death in pregnancies with and without AP. Risk factors for AP were: age, primiparity, high parity, not cohabiting with infant's father, low education, smoking, infertility, pregestational diabetes, essential hypertension, pregnancy-induced hypertensive diseases, preterm premature rupture of membranes, preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) births. Risk factors for perinatal death in pregnancies with placental abruption were smoking (1--9 and > or =10 cigarettes/day; OR 1.4 and 1.7 respectively), severe pre-eclampsia (OR 2.0) and SGA (OR 1.9), whereas in pregnancies without abruption, risks were also increased in maternal age > or =35 years, primiparity, infertility, essential hypertension and pregestational diabetes. These findings support the theory that, in cases of AP, a general impairment of the placenta and/or a defect placentation may be fatal. PMID:11489159

  19. Identifying implementation bottlenecks for maternal and newborn health interventions in rural districts of the United Republic of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Stefan; Marchant, Tanya; Mbaruku, Godfrey; Temu, Silas; Manzi, Fatuma; Hanson, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate effective coverage of maternal and newborn health interventions and to identify bottlenecks in their implementation in rural districts of the United Republic of Tanzania. Methods Cross-sectional data from households and health facilities in Tandahimba and Newala districts were used in the analysis. We adapted Tanahashi’s model to estimate intervention coverage in conditional stages and to identify implementation bottlenecks in access, health facility readiness and clinical practice. The interventions studied were syphilis and pre-eclampsia screening, partograph use, active management of the third stage of labour and postpartum care. Findings Effective coverage was low in both districts, ranging from only 3% for postpartum care in Tandahimba to 49% for active management of the third stage of labour in Newala. In Tandahimba, health facility readiness was the largest bottleneck for most interventions, whereas in Newala, it was access. Clinical practice was another large bottleneck for syphilis screening in both districts. Conclusion The poor effective coverage of maternal and newborn health interventions in rural districts of the United Republic of Tanzania reinforces the need to prioritize health service quality. Access to high-quality local data by decision-makers would assist planning and prioritization. The approach of estimating effective coverage and identifying bottlenecks described here could facilitate progress towards universal health coverage for any area of care and in any context. PMID:26240459

  20. Do Molecular Signals from the Conceptus Influence Endometrium Decidualization in Rodents?

    PubMed Central

    Herington, Jennifer L.; Bany, Brent M.

    2010-01-01

    A critical period in establishing pregnancy occurs after the onset of implantation but before placental development. Evidence strongly suggests that abnormalities occurring during this period can result in pregnancy termination or in pre-eclampsia; the latter may lead to small-for-gestational-weight offspring that are likely to be unhealthy. Clearly, events occurring in the endometrium during the implantation process are crucial for proper fetal development and for optimal offspring health. In several mammalian species bi-directional communication between the conceptus and endometrium during implantation is required for successful pregnancy. Although different implantation and placentation modes occur in different mammalian species, common aspects of this bi-directional signaling may exist. The molecular signals from the trophoblast cells of the conceptus, which direct endometrial changes during implantation progression, are well known in some non-rodent species. Currently, we know little about such signaling in rodents during implantation progression, when the endometrium undergoes decidualization. This review focuses on data that support the hypothesis that paracrine signals from the rodent conceptus influence decidualization. Where possible, these findings are compared and contrasted to information currently known in other species that exhibit different implantation modes. PMID:19551814

  1. Cardiology for gynecologists--a minireview.

    PubMed

    Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin; Rees, Margaret

    2013-08-01

    Despite cardiovascular disease (CVD) being by far the most common cause of death in women worldwide, awareness is low. Myocardial infarction occurs 10 years later in women than in men. Symptoms may be atypical: dyspnea rather than chest pain. Also more women than men have myocardial infarction with normal coronary angiography, probably due to microvascular disease or coronary spasm. The prognosis of non-obstructive disease is now recognized to be the same than for obstructive disease. The conventional risk factors for CVD are the same for both genders but have a different impact for women. One example is psychosocial stress and angina pectoris can more often be induced by mental stress in women than in men. Also there are risk factors specific to women such as a history of pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension or diabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Furthermore atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke more in women than in men. However, 6 out of 10 deaths from CVD can be prevented by a healthy life style and dealing with preexisting risk factors. Hence it is important that gynecologists who start seeing women at an earlier age than cardiologists should be aware of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23727147

  2. Effect of subacute exposure to lead and estrogen on immature pre-weaning rat leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Villagra, R.; Tchernitchin, N.N.; Tchernitchin, A.N.

    1997-02-01

    Lead is an environmental pollutant known to cause damage to human health, affecting specially the central nervous system, reproductive organs, the immune system and kidney. From the perspective or reproduction, lead affects both men and women. Reported effects in women include infertility, miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, pregnancy hypertension and premature delivery. In experimental animals, lead affects female reproductive organs through different mechanisms. The heavy metal may interact at the enzyme level. It may interfere with the action of reproductive hormones at the target organ, modifying the activity of estrogen receptors in the pregnant uterus and inhibiting responses where estrogens play a role. Lead may induce imprinting mechanism, causing persistent changes in uterine estrogen receptors and ovary LH receptors following perinatal exposure. Finally, it may interfere at the level of hypothalamus-pituitary, decreasing pituitary response to growth hormone releasing factor, affecting levels of FSH and LH and increasing blood levels of glucocorticoids, which modify the action of estrogens in the uterus. This study examines the mechanisms of lead-induced interference with female reproductive and immune functions. 33 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Decidual cytokines and pregnancy complications: focus on spontaneous miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Lash, Gendie E; Ernerudh, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The establishment of pregnancy requires the co-ordinated implantation of the embryo into the receptive decidua, placentation, trophoblast invasion of the maternal decidua and myometrium in addition to remodelling of the uterine spiral arteries. Failure of any of these steps can lead to a range of pregnancy complications, including miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, placenta accreta and pre-term birth. Cytokines are small multifunctional proteins often derived from leucocytes and have primarily been described through their immunomodulatory actions. The maternal-fetal interface is considered to be immunosuppressed to allow development of the semi-allogeneic placental fetal unit. However, cytokine profiles of the decidua and different decidual cell types suggest that the in vivo situation might be more complex. Data suggest that decidual-derived cytokines not only play roles in immunosuppression, but also in other aspects of the establishment of pregnancy, including the regulation of trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodelling. This review focuses on the potential role of decidua-derived cytokines in the aetiology of unexplained spontaneous miscarriage. PMID:25771398

  4. Difficulties in obstetric practice in a hill subdivision.

    PubMed

    Ray, A

    1996-04-01

    The present study includes 2249 cases of delivery over a period of 4 years. Difficulties faced, complications and their management were highlighted. Teen-age pregnancy was 14.98% while 52.33% cases were in the age group of 20-25 years. A total of 26.30% cases were booked. There were 53.66% primigravida cases, 43.88% cases from gravida II to gravida IV and 2.44% were grande multipara. Noted complications were pre-eclampsia 7.4%, eclampsia 0.4% and pulmonary tuberculosis 3.7%. All the patients were anaemic. Severe anaemia was noted in 3% cases, moderate in 21% cases and mild in 76% cases. Abortion cases both spontaneous and induced or criminal were 17.02%. While considering the total number of pregnancy cases, caesarean section was performed in 4.22%. Male babies were 51.30% whereas 48.68% were females. Majority (41.48%) of the babies weighed between 2.1 and 2.5 kg range. Fresh and macerated stillbirths were 7.4%. PMID:8854624

  5. Magnesium Metabolism and its Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, R

    2003-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and plays an important physiological role in many of its functions. Magnesium balance is maintained by renal regulation of magnesium reabsorption. The exact mechanism of the renal regulation is not fully understood. Magnesium deficiency is a common problem in hospital patients, with a prevalence of about 10%. There are no readily available and easy methods to assess magnesium status. Serum magnesium and the magnesium tolerance test are the most widely used. Measurement of ionised magnesium may become more widely available with the availability of ion selective electrodes. Magnesium deficiency and hypomagnesaemia can result from a variety of causes including gastrointestinal and renal losses. Magnesium deficiency can cause a wide variety of features including hypocalcaemia, hypokalaemia and cardiac and neurological manifestations. Chronic low magnesium state has been associated with a number of chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, and osteoporosis. The use of magnesium as a therapeutic agent in asthma, myocardial infarction, and pre-eclampsia is also discussed. Hypermagnesaemia is less frequent than hypomagnesaemia and results from failure of excretion or increased intake. Hypermagnesaemia can lead to hypotension and other cardiovascular effects as well as neuromuscular manifestations. Causes and management of hypermagnesaemia are discussed. PMID:18568054

  6. Vitamin D supplementation for women during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    De-Regil, Luz Maria; Palacios, Cristina; Ansary, Ali; Kulier, Regina; Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency is thought to be common among pregnant women. Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy has been suggested as an intervention to protect against adverse gestational outcomes. Objectives To examine whether supplements with vitamin D alone or in combination with calcium or other vitamins and minerals given to women during pregnancy can safely improve maternal and neonatal outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 October 2011), the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (31 October 2011), the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (28 October 2011) and also contacted relevant organisations (8 April 2011). Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised trials with randomisation at either individual or cluster level, evaluating the effect of supplementation with vitamin D alone or in combination with other micronutrients for women during pregnancy. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently i) assessed the eligibility of studies against the inclusion criteria ii) extracted data from included studies, and iii) assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. Data were checked for accuracy. Main results The search strategy identified 34 potentially eligible references. We included six trials assessing a total of 1023 women, excluded eight studies, and 10 studies are still ongoing. Five trials involving 623 women compared the effects of vitamin D alone versus no supplementation/placebo and one trial with 400 women compared the effects of vitamin D and calcium versus no supplementation. Only one trial with 400 women reported on pre-eclampsia: women who received 1200 IU vitamin D along with 375 mg of elemental calcium per day were as likely to develop pre-eclampsia as women who received no supplementation (average risk ratio (RR) 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.33 to 1.35). Data from four trials involving 414 women consistently show that women who received vitamin D supplements had higher concentrations of vitamin D in serum at term than those women who received no intervention or a placebo; however the magnitude of the response was highly heterogenous. Data from three trials involving 463 women suggest that women who receive vitamin D supplements during pregnancy less frequently had a baby with a birthweight below 2500 grams than those women receiving no treatment or placebo; statistical significance was borderline (RR 0.48; 95% CI 0.23 to 1.01). In terms of other conditions, there were no significant differences in adverse side effects including nephritic syndrome (RR 0.17; 95% CI 0.01 to 4.06; one trial, 135 women); stillbirths (RR 0.17; 95% CI 0.01 to 4.06; one trial, 135 women) or neonatal deaths (RR 0.17; 95% CI 0.01 to 4.06; one trial, 135 women) between women who received vitamin D supplements in comparison with women who received no treatment or placebo. No studies reported on preterm birth, maternal death, admission to neonatal intensive care unit/special nursery or Apgar scores. Authors' conclusions Vitamin D supplementation in a single or continued dose during pregnancy increases serum vitamin D concentrations as measured by 25-hydroxyvitamin D at term. The clinical significance of this finding and the potential use of this intervention as a part of routine antenatal care are yet to be determined as the number of high quality trials and outcomes reported is too limited to draw conclusions on its usefulness and safety. Further rigorous randomised trials are required to evaluate the role of vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy. PMID:22336854

  7. Inhibition of DDAH1, but not DDAH2, results in apoptosis of a human trophoblast cell line in response to TRAIL

    PubMed Central

    Lumicisi, B.A.; Cartwright, J.E.; Leslie, K.; Wallace, A.E.; Whitley, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does inhibition of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) increase the sensitivity of trophoblasts to TRAIL-induced apoptosis? SUMMARY ANSWER Inhibition of DDAH1, but not DDAH2, increases the sensitivity of trophoblasts to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Successful human pregnancy is dependent on adequate trophoblast invasion and remodelling of the maternal spiral arteries. Increased trophoblast apoptosis is seen in pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia. The mechanism underlying this increase is unknown. We have previously shown that nitric oxide (NO) is involved in regulating trophoblast motility and invasion, and have also demonstrated an important role for NO in regulating trophoblast sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. DDAH is an enzyme that metabolizes asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of NO synthesis, previously shown to be elevated in the plasma of pre-eclamptic mothers. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This study used the human extravillous trophoblast-derived cell line SGHPL-4 cells. All experiments were performed at least three times. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS The effect of DDAH on trophoblast apoptosis was examined using siRNA and time-lapse microscopy. Changes in the expression of DDAH were followed by PCR and western blot analysis. Receptor expression was followed by flow cytometry. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Inhibiting the expression of DDAH1, but not DDAH2, resulted in a significant increase in the sensitivity of the EVT cell line SGHPL-4 to tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) induced apoptosis (P < 0.01). This response could be mimicked by the addition of Asymmetric Dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of NO synthesis and the substrate for both isoforms of DDAH. We further showed that this increased sensitivity to apoptosis is accompanied by a significant increase in the expression of TRAIL receptor 2 (TR2; P < 0.05) but not TRAIL receptor 1 (TR1). LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION This study was performed only in vitro using a well characterized trophoblast cell line, SGHPL-4, derived from first trimester extravillous trophoblasts. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS This study provides new insight into the role of the DDAH/ADMA pathway in the regulation of trophoblast function. Both dysregulation of DDAH and the accumulation of ADMA have been associated with the development of pre-eclampsia. This is the first study to implicate the DDAH/ADMA pathway as a mechanism that might underlie the poor trophoblast invasion seen in this common pregnancy disorder. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) B.A.L. was supported by a grant from Action Medical Research UK (SP4577). A.E.W. was supported by a grant from the Wellcome Trust (091550). There are no competing interests and the authors have no conflict interest to declare. PMID:26082478

  8. Study protocol: Cost effectiveness of two strategies to implement the NVOG guidelines on hypertension in pregnancy: An innovative strategy including a computerised decision support system compared to a common strategy of professional audit and feedback, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypertensive disease in pregnancy remains the leading cause of maternal mortality in the Netherlands. Seventeen percent of the clinical pregnancies are complicated by hypertension and 2% by preeclampsia. The Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG) has developed evidence-based guidelines on the management of hypertension in pregnancy and chronic hypertension. Previous studies showed a low adherence rate to other NVOG guidelines and a large variation in usual care in the different hospitals. An explanation is that the NVOG has no general strategy of practical implementation and evaluation of its guidelines. The development of an effective and cost effective implementation strategy to improve adherence to the guidelines on hypertension in pregnancy is needed. Methods/Design The objective of this study is to assess the cost effectiveness of an innovative implementation strategy of the NVOG guidelines on hypertension including a computerised decision support system (BOS) compared to a common strategy of professional audit and feedback. A cluster randomised controlled trial with an economic evaluation alongside will be performed. Both pregnant women who develop severe hypertension or pre-eclampsia and professionals involved in the care for these women will participate. The main outcome measures are a combined rate of major maternal complications and process indicators extracted from the guidelines. A total of 472 patients will be included in both groups. For analysis, descriptive as well as regression techniques will be used. A cost effectiveness and cost utility analysis will be performed according to the intention-to-treat principle and from a societal perspective. Cost effectiveness ratios will be calculated using bootstrapping techniques. PMID:20819222

  9. Adverse fetomaternal outcome among pregnant overweight women

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Shazia; Bibi, Seema; Makhdoom, Asadullah; Farooq, Sumaiya; SM, Tahir; Qazi, Roshan Ara

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the adverse fetometernal out come in overweight and normal weight pregnant women. Methods: This comparative cohort study was conducted from 1st October 2010 to 30 September 2012. Total 200 gravid women 100 were overweight and 100 normal weight pregnant women with gestational age for 08-40 weeks were included. Women having BMI (25 – 29.9 Kg/m2) were measured overweight and included in group A and 100 women having normal BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 as controls were in-group B. Chi-square test was applied to compare the proportion of maternal and fetal outcomes. Significant P – value of < 0.05 was considered. Results: The age range was between 30 to 45 years with mean age of 30±4.1 years in both groups. Overweight pregnant women had significantly high frequency of pre-eclampsia (27% versus 9% in controls), PIH (24% versus 8% in controls), gestational diabetes mellitus (22% versus 5% in controls), prolonged labour (4% versus 6% in controls), Caesarean section (44% versus 16% in controls), Wound infection (3% versus 2% in controls) and Postpartum Hemorrhage (5% versus 2% in controls). P-value < 0.001 was considered significance. Fetal complications in overweight pregnant women compared to controls i.e. Still birth (13% versus 2%), Early neonatal death (11% versus 1%), shoulder dystocia (5% versus 1%) and NICU admission (47% versus 10%). Results were statistically significant except shoulder dystocia. Conclusion: We conclude that the result of present study indicates obesity exerts deleterious effect, both on fetal and maternal outcome. PMID:26101496

  10. The Ubiquitin Ligase ASB4 Promotes Trophoblast Differentiation through the Degradation of ID2

    PubMed Central

    Townley-Tilson, W. H. Davin; Wu, Yaxu; Ferguson, James E.; Patterson, Cam

    2014-01-01

    Vascularization of the placenta is a critical developmental process that ensures fetal viability. Although the vascular health of the placenta affects both maternal and fetal well being, relatively little is known about the early stages of placental vascular development. The ubiquitin ligase Ankyrin repeat, SOCS box-containing 4 (ASB4) promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation to vascular lineages and is highly expressed early in placental development. The transcriptional regulator Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (ID2) negatively regulates vascular differentiation during development and is a target of many ubiquitin ligases. Due to their overlapping spatiotemporal expression pattern in the placenta and contrasting effects on vascular differentiation, we investigated whether ASB4 regulates ID2 through its ligase activity in the placenta and whether this activity mediates vascular differentiation. In mouse placentas, ASB4 expression is restricted to a subset of cells that express both stem cell and endothelial markers. Placentas that lack Asb4 display immature vascular patterning and retain expression of placental progenitor markers, including ID2 expression. Using JAR placental cells, we determined that ASB4 ubiquitinates and represses ID2 expression in a proteasome-dependent fashion. Expression of ASB4 in JAR cells and primary isolated trophoblast stem cells promotes the expression of differentiation markers. In functional endothelial co-culture assays, JAR cells ectopically expressing ASB4 increased endothelial cell turnover and stabilized endothelial tube formation, both of which are hallmarks of vascular differentiation within the placenta. Co-transfection of a degradation-resistant Id2 mutant with Asb4 inhibits both differentiation and functional responses. Lastly, deletion of Asb4 in mice induces a pathology that phenocopies human pre-eclampsia, including hypertension and proteinuria in late-stage pregnant females. These results indicate that ASB4 mediates vascular differentiation in the placenta via its degradation of ID2. PMID:24586788

  11. The morphometry of materno—fetal oxygen exchange barrier in a baboon model of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Samson, J.E.; Mari, G.; Dick, E.J.; Hubbard, G.B.; Ferry, R.J.; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N.E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction More than one-fourth of U.S. women are overweight; more than one-third are obese. Maternal obesity has been linked to an increased incidence of stillbirths, fetal macrosomia, fetal intrauterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia. The placenta plays a key role in the nutrients and oxygen supply to the fetus. The data about structural changes in the placental villous membrane (VM), a major component of the feto-maternal nutrient and oxygen exchange barrier, during obesity are sparse and inconsistent. Our objective was to evaluate the morphometric changes in the placental exchange barrier in a baboon model of obesity. Materials and methods The previously described baboon model of maternal obesity was studied. We compared 4 obese to 4 non-obese baboons. Placental stereology with the use of transmission electron microscopy was performed to estimate VM oxygen diffusing capacities and morphometry. Results The specific placental oxygen diffusing capacities per unit of fetal weight were similar in baboons and humans. Maternal leptin concentrations correlated negatively with placental basement membrane thickness (r = ?0.78, p < 0.05), while fetal leptin levels correlated negatively with endothelial thickness of fetal capillaries (r = ?0.78, p < 0.05). The total and specific villous membrane oxygen diffusing capacities were not different between the two groups. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of placental oxygen diffusing capacities and placental ultrastructural changes in a baboon model of obesity. Previously reported placental inflammation in maternal obesity is not associated with changes in the VM diffusing capacities and ultrastructure. PMID:21872927

  12. Global alteration in gene expression profiles of deciduas from women with idiopathic recurrent pregnancy loss

    PubMed Central

    Krieg, S.A.; Fan, X.; Hong, Y.; Sang, Q.-X.; Giaccia, A.; Westphal, L.M.; Lathi, R.B.; Krieg, A.J.; Nayak, N.R.

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) occurs in ?5% of women. However, the etiology is still poorly understood. Defects in decidualization of the endometrium during early pregnancy contribute to several pregnancy complications, such as pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and are believed to be important in the pathogenesis of idiopathic RPL. We performed microarray analysis to identify gene expression alterations in the deciduas of idiopathic RPL patients. Control patients had one antecedent term delivery, but were undergoing dilation and curettage for current aneuploid miscarriage. Gene expression differences were evaluated using both pathway and gene ontology (GO) analysis. Selected genes were validated using quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (qRT–PCR). A total of 155 genes were found to be significantly dysregulated in the deciduas of RPL patients (>2-fold change, P < 0.05), with 22 genes up-regulated and 133 genes down-regulated. GO analysis linked a large percentage of genes to discrete biological functions, including immune response (23%), cell signaling (18%) and cell invasion (17.1%), and pathway analysis revealed consistent changes in both the interleukin 1 (IL-1) and IL-8 pathways. All genes in the IL-8 pathway were up-regulated while genes in the IL-1 pathway were down-regulated. Although both pathways can promote inflammation, IL-1 pathway activity is important for normal implantation. Additionally, genes known to be critical for degradation of the extracellular matrix, including matrix metalloproteinase 26 and serine peptidase inhibitor Kazal-type 1, were also highly up-regulated. In this first microarray approach to decidual gene expression in RPL patients, our data suggest that dysregulation of genes associated with cell invasion and immunity may contribute significantly to idiopathic recurrent miscarriage. PMID:22505054

  13. Safety of pertussis vaccination in pregnant women in UK: observational study

    PubMed Central

    King, Bridget; Bryan, Phil

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the safety of pertussis vaccination in pregnancy. Design Observational cohort study. Setting The UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Participants 20?074 pregnant women with a median age of 30 who received the pertussis vaccine and a matched historical unvaccinated control group. Main outcome measure Adverse events identified from clinical diagnoses during pregnancy, with additional data from the matched child record identified through mother-child linkage. The primary event of interest was stillbirth (intrauterine death after 24 weeks’ gestation). Results There was no evidence of an increased risk of stillbirth in the 14 days immediately after vaccination (incidence rate ratio 0.69, 95% confidence interval 0.23 to 1.62) or later in pregnancy (0.85, 0.44 to 1.61) compared with historical national rates. Compared with a matched historical cohort of unvaccinated pregnant women, there was no evidence that vaccination accelerated the time to delivery (hazard ratio 1.00, 0.97 to 1.02). Furthermore, there was no evidence of an increased risk of stillbirth, maternal or neonatal death, pre-eclampsia or eclampsia, haemorrhage, fetal distress, uterine rupture, placenta or vasa praevia, caesarean delivery, low birth weight, or neonatal renal failure, all serious events that can occur naturally in pregnancy. Conclusion In women given pertussis vaccination in the third trimester, there is no evidence of an increased risk of any of an extensive predefined list of adverse events related to pregnancy. In particular, there was no evidence of an increased risk of stillbirth. Given the recent increases in the rate of pertussis infection and morbidity and mortality in neonates, these early data provide initial evidence for evaluating the safety of the vaccine in pregnancy for health professionals and the public and can help to inform vaccination policy making. PMID:25015137

  14. Essential pre-pregnancy and pregnancy interventions for improved maternal, newborn and child health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The statistics related to pregnancy and its outcomes are staggering: annually, an estimated 250000-280000 women die during childbirth. Unfortunately, a large number of women receive little or no care during or before pregnancy. At a period of critical vulnerability, interventions can be effectively delivered to improve the health of women and their newborns and also to make their pregnancy safe. This paper reviews the interventions that are most effective during preconception and pregnancy period and synergistically improve maternal and neonatal outcomes. Among pre-pregnancy interventions, family planning and advocating pregnancies at appropriate intervals; prevention and management of sexually transmitted infections including HIV; and peri-conceptual folic-acid supplementation have shown significant impact on reducing maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. During pregnancy, interventions including antenatal care visit model; iron and folic acid supplementation; tetanus Immunisation; prevention and management of malaria; prevention and management of HIV and PMTCT; calcium for hypertension; anti-Platelet agents (low dose aspirin) for prevention of Pre-eclampsia; anti-hypertensives for treating severe hypertension; management of pregnancy-induced hypertension/eclampsia; external cephalic version for breech presentation at term (>36 weeks); management of preterm, premature rupture of membranes; management of unintended pregnancy; and home visits for women and children across the continuum of care have shown maximum impact on reducing the burden of maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality. All of the interventions summarized in this paper have the potential to improve maternal mortality rates and also contribute to better health care practices during preconception and periconception period. PMID:25178042

  15. Heme oxygenase induction attenuates TNF-?-induced hypertension in pregnant rodents

    PubMed Central

    George, Eric M.; Stout, Jacob M.; Stec, David E.; Granger, Joey P.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy initiated by placental insufficiency and chronic ischemia. In response, several pathways activated in the placenta are responsible for the maternal syndrome, including increased production of the anti-angiogenic protein, sFlt-1, and inflammatory cytokines, especially tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?). Previous studies have demonstrated that heme oxygenase (HO) induction can block TNF-? pathways in vitro and attenuate placental ischemia-induced sFlt-1 in vivo. Here, we investigated whether HO-1 induction could attenuate TNF-?-induced hypertension in pregnant rats. In response to TNF-? infusion (100 ng/day i.p.), maternal mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased vs. control animals (104 ± 3 vs. 119 ± 3 mmHg). HO-1 induction had no effect in control animals, but significantly decreased MAP in TNF-?-infused animals (108 ± 2 mmHg). Placental vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was decreased in response to TNF-? infusion (92 ± 4 vs. 76 ± 2 pg/mg). Placental sFlt-1 was increased by TNF-? infusion (758 ± 45 vs. 936 ± 46 pg/mg, p < 0.05), which trended to normalization by HO-1 induction (779 ± 98 pg/mg). In contrast, HO-1 induction had no significant effect on placental VEGF in TNF-?-infused animals. Taken together, these data suggest that one of the key mechanisms by which HO exerts cytoprotective actions in the placenta during inflammation due to chronic ischemia is through suppression of sFlt-1. Further work elucidating the bioactive metabolites of HO-1 in innate inflammatory responses to placental ischemia is warranted. PMID:26347650

  16. Alterations in Polyadenylation and Its Implications for Endocrine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeld, Anders; Plass, Mireya; Krogh, Anders; Friis-Hansen, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-mRNA is cleaved at the poly(A) site and a poly(A) tail is added – a process necessary for normal mRNA formation. Genes with multiple poly(A) sites can undergo alternative polyadenylation (APA), producing distinct mRNA isoforms with different 3? untranslated regions (3? UTRs) and in some cases different coding regions. Two thirds of all human genes undergo APA. The efficiency of the polyadenylation process regulates gene expression and APA plays an important part in post-transcriptional regulation, as the 3? UTR contains various cis-elements associated with post-transcriptional regulation, such as target sites for micro-RNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Implications of alterations in polyadenylation for endocrine disease: Alterations in polyadenylation have been found to be causative of neonatal diabetes and IPEX (immune dysfunction, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked) and to be associated with type I and II diabetes, pre-eclampsia, fragile X-associated premature ovarian insufficiency, ectopic Cushing syndrome, and many cancer diseases, including several types of endocrine tumor diseases. Perspectives: Recent developments in high-throughput sequencing have made it possible to characterize polyadenylation genome-wide. Antisense elements inhibiting or enhancing specific poly(A) site usage can induce desired alterations in polyadenylation, and thus hold the promise of new therapeutic approaches. Summary: This review gives a detailed description of alterations in polyadenylation in endocrine disease, an overview of the current literature on polyadenylation and summarizes the clinical implications of the current state of research in this field. PMID:23658553

  17. Allelic imbalance modulates surface expression of the tolerance-inducing HLA-G molecule on primary trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Djurisic, S; Teiblum, S; Tolstrup, C K; Christiansen, O B; Hviid, T V F

    2015-03-01

    The HLA-G molecule is expressed on trophoblast cells at the feto-maternal interface, where it interacts with local immune cells, and upholds tolerance against the semi-allogeneic fetus. Aberrant HLA-G expression in the placenta and reduced soluble HLA-G levels are observed in pregnancy complications, partly explained by HLA-G polymorphisms which are associated with differences in the alternative splicing pattern and of the stability of HLA-G mRNA. Of special importance is a 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism located in the 3'-untranslated region of the HLA-G gene. In the current study, we present novel evidence for allelic imbalance of the 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism, using a very accurate and sensitive Digital droplet PCR technique. Allelic imbalance in heterozygous samples was observed as differential expression levels of 14 bp insertion/deletion allele-specific mRNA transcripts, which was further associated with low levels of HLA-G surface expression on primary trophoblast cells. Full gene sequencing of HLA-G allowed us to study correlations between HLA-G extended haplotypes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms and HLA-G surface expression. We found that a 1:1 expression (allelic balance) of the 14 bp insertion/deletion mRNA alleles was associated with high surface expression of HLA-G and with a specific HLA-G extended haplotype. The 14 bp del/del genotype was associated with a significantly lower abundance of the G1 mRNA isoform, and a higher abundance of the G3 mRNA isoform. Overall, the present study provides original evidence for allelic imbalance of the 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism, which influences HLA-G surface expression on primary trophoblast cells, considered to be important in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia and other pregnancy complications. PMID:25425608

  18. Tissue-Specific Education of Decidual NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Shiqiu; Kennedy, Philippa R.; Gardner, Lucy; Farrell, Lydia E.; Chazara, Olympe; Ivarsson, Martin A.; Hiby, Susan E.; Colucci, Francesco; Moffett, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    During human pregnancy, fetal trophoblast cells invade the decidua and remodel maternal spiral arteries to establish adequate nutrition during gestation. Tissue NK cells in the decidua (dNK) express inhibitory NK receptors (iNKR) that recognize allogeneic HLA-C molecules on trophoblast. Where this results in excessive dNK inhibition, the risk of pre-eclampsia or growth restriction is increased. However, the role of maternal, self–HLA-C in regulating dNK responsiveness is unknown. We investigated how the expression and function of five iNKR in dNK is influenced by maternal HLA-C. In dNK isolated from women who have HLA-C alleles that carry a C2 epitope, there is decreased expression frequency of the cognate receptor, KIR2DL1. In contrast, women with HLA-C alleles bearing a C1 epitope have increased frequency of the corresponding receptor, KIR2DL3. Maternal HLA-C had no significant effect on KIR2DL1 or KIR2DL3 in peripheral blood NK cells (pbNK). This resulted in a very different KIR repertoire for dNK capable of binding C1 or C2 epitopes compared with pbNK. We also show that, although maternal KIR2DL1 binding to C2 epitope educates dNK cells to acquire functional competence, the effects of other iNKR on dNK responsiveness are quite different from those in pbNK. This provides a basis for understanding how dNK responses to allogeneic trophoblast affect the outcome of pregnancy. Our findings suggest that the mechanisms that determine the repertoire of iNKR and the effect of self-MHC on NK education may differ in tissue NK cells compared with pbNK. PMID:26320253

  19. Notch-dependent RBPJ? inhibits proliferation of human cytotrophoblasts and their differentiation into extravillous trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Velicky, P; Haider, S; Otti, G R; Fiala, C; Pollheimer, J; Knöfler, M

    2014-08-01

    Abnormal development of invasive trophoblasts has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human pregnancy diseases such as pre-eclampsia. However, critical signalling pathways controlling formation and differentiation of these cells have been poorly elucidated. Here, we provide evidence that the canonical Notch pathway, operating through Notch-dependent activation of its key regulatory transcription factor RBPJ?, controls proliferation and differentiation in villous explant cultures and primary trophoblasts of early pregnancy. Immunofluorescence of first trimester placental tissue revealed expression of RBPJ? and its co-activators, the MAML proteins, in nuclei of proliferative cell column trophoblasts (CCT) and differentiated, extravillous trophoblasts (EVTs). However, RBPJ? expression, transcript levels of the Notch target gene HES1 and activity of a Notch/RBPJ?-dependent luciferase reporter decreased during in vitro differentiation of primary cytotrophoblasts on fibronectin. Silencing of RBPJ? using silencing RNAs (siRNAs) increased proliferation of CCTs in floating villous explant cultures analysed by outgrowth and BrdU labelling. Similarly, down-regulation of the transcription factor enhanced BrdU incorporation in isolated primary cultures. However, motility of these cells was not affected. In addition, gene silencing of RBPJ? increased cyclin D1 expression in the two trophoblast model systems as well as markers of the differentiated, EVT, i.e. integrin ?1, ADAM12 and T-cell factor 4. In summary, the data suggest that Notch-dependent RBPJ? activity could be required for balanced rates of trophoblast proliferation and differentiation in human placental anchoring villi preventing exaggerated trophoblast overgrowth as well as premature formation of EVTs. PMID:24850908

  20. The lost children.

    PubMed

    Smith, S

    1999-03-01

    Women who have lost children to perinatal complications, are subjected to pain and grief continuously; however their agony increases on remembrance days such as birthdate, or on Mother's Day. Fathers, siblings and grandparents suffer too. Common disorders of pregnancy, such as pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), or the more serious pre-eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or eclampsia, can lead to devastating effects such as miscarriage, stillbirth, or neonatal death; or at the very least, a sick infant. With many of these consequences, the loss of the dreams, hopes and plans that parents have made is imminent. The investigation of the psychosocial aspects of 'high-risk' pregnancy has never been fully addressed. However, the threat of loss, or the actual experience, may provoke the onset of a potential psychological crisis during the perinatal period. Therefore, it is important that these issues be addressed by the nurse in order to aid the development of coping mechanisms to enable women and their families to deal with what may happen. This may be done by predicting the stages of the bereavement process experienced by these women and their family members, as outlined in the Kubler-Ross model of bereavement (1969), which is indicative of many types of grief reactions. Other issues including the restriction in activity, uncertainty of pregnancy outcomes, disruption in work or career activities, financial strains, and reduced labour and birthing options, become concerns for high-risk pregnant women. The way women deal with these issues and the pathways nurses can take to help these women develop effective coping strategies, will be addressed also. PMID:10514603

  1. A rare presentation of aplasia cutis congenita after feto-reduction in a trichorionic-triamniotic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vettori, D J; Jairath, P

    2015-10-24

    Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) is rare skin disorder of newborns that has been linked to both assisted reproductive technology (ART) and feto-reduction procedures. ACC is characterized by well-demarcated lesions that are devoid of all skin layers. Group-V ACC presents with a distinctive and symmetrical distribution pattern. It is thought to result from an insult to the fetus after concomitant twin demise and is almost exclusively reported in monochorionic gestations.A 41-year-old female with an in vitro fertilization (IVF) assisted tri-chorionic gestation subsequently underwent selective feto-reduction of Fetus C. The patient delivered two pre-term neonates secondary to pre-eclampsia. The initial exam of Twin B showed extensive, well-demarcated, symmetrical areas devoid of any skin over the anterior and lateral trunk, extending up the lateral thoracic walls. Chest and abdominal viscera were visible through a thin fibrous membrane. The skin defects were managed conservatively with twice-daily dressings of Aquaphor®, and Vaseline® gauze. The areas of aplasia slowly contracted, though residual scarring was noted. After four weeks in the NICU, most of the areas were healed.ACC in multi-fetal pregnancies is a rare, but well-described complication. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case in a tri-chorionic IVF gestation after feto-reduction. With increased incidence of ART-associated pregnancies and the use of feto-reduction for higher order gestations, this may become more common. Neonates often require specialized intensive care. Conservative management usually will suffice, although surgical grafting may be required. Physicians should be aware of this condition and counsel their feto-reduction patients of the risk. PMID:26485557

  2. Preterm Prelabor Rupture of Membranes and Outcome of Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants in the German Neonatal Network

    PubMed Central

    Hanke, Kathrin; Hartz, Annika; Manz, Maike; Bendiks, Meike; Heitmann, Friedhelm; Orlikowsky, Thorsten; Müller, Andreas; Olbertz, Dirk; Kühn, Thomas; Siegel, Jens; von der Wense, Axel; Wieg, Christian; Kribs, Angela; Stein, Anja; Pagel, Julia; Herting, Egbert; Göpel, Wolfgang; Härtel, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Objective It was the aim of our study to evaluate the independent effect of preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM) as a cause of preterm delivery on mortality during primary hospital stay and significant morbidities in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants < 32 weeks of gestation. Design Observational, epidemiological study design. Setting Population-based cohort, German Neonatal Network (GNN). Population 6102 VLBW infants were enrolled in GNN from 2009-2012, n=4120 fulfilled criteria for primary analysis (< 32 gestational weeks, no pre-eclampsia, HELLP (highly elevated liver enzymes and low platelets syndrome) or placental abruption as cause of preterm birth). Methods Multivariable logistic regression analyses included PPROM as potential risk factors for adverse outcomes and well established items such as gestational age in weeks, birth weight, antenatal steroids, center, inborn delivery, multiple birth, gender and being small-for-gestational-age. Results PPROM as cause of preterm delivery had no independent effect on the risk of early-onset sepsis, clinical sepsis and blood-culture proven sepsis, while gestational age proved to be the most important contributor to sepsis risk. The diagnosis of PPROM was associated with an increased risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD; OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.02-1.55, p=0.03) but not with other major outcomes. Conclusions The diagnosis of PPROM per se is not associated with adverse outcome in VLBW infants < 32 weeks apart from a moderately increased risk for BPD. Randomized controlled trials with primary neonatal outcomes are needed to determine which subgroup of VLBW infants benefit from expectant or intentional management of PPROM. PMID:25856083

  3. Transcriptional regulation of human thromboxane synthase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.D.; Baek, S.J.; Fleischer, T

    1994-09-01

    The human thromboxane synthase (TS) gene encodes a microsomal enzyme catalyzing the conversion of prostaglandin endoperoxide into thromboxane A{sub 2}(TxA{sub 2}), a potent inducer of vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation. A deficiency in platelet TS activity results in bleeding disorders, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Increased TxA{sub 2} has been associated with many pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular disease, pulmonary hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and thrombosis in sickle cell patients. Since the formation of TxA{sub 2} is dependent upon TS, the regulation of TS gene expression may presumably play a crucial role in vivo. Abrogation of the regulatory mechanism in TS gene expression might contribute, in part, to the above clinical manifestations. To gain insight into TS gene regulation, a 1.7 kb promoter of the human TS gene was cloned and sequenced. RNase protection assay and 5{prime} RACE protocols were used to map the transcription initiation site to nucleotide A, 30 bp downstream from a canonical TATA box. Several transcription factor binding sites, including AP-1, PU.1, and PEA3, were identified within this sequence. Transient expression studies in HL-60 cells transfected with constructs containing various lengths (0.2 to 5.5 kb) of the TS promoter/luciferase fusion gene indicated the presence of multiple repressor elements within the 5.5 kb TS promoter. However, a lineage-specific up-regulation of TS gene expression was observed in HL-60 cells induced by TPA to differentiate along the macrophage lineage. The increase in TS transcription was not detectable until 36 hr after addition of the inducer. These results suggest that expression of the human TS gene may be regulated by a mechanism involving repression and derepression of the TS promoter.

  4. Obstetric Outcome in Early and Late Onset Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Easmin, S; Chowdhury, T A; Islam, M R; Beg, A; Jahan, M K; Latif, T; Dhar, S; Alam, M N; Akhter, M

    2015-07-01

    Obstetric outcome in early onset and late onset GDM was compared in a prospective study conducted at the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology in BIRDEM, Dhaka, Bangladesh. A total 120 pregnant women were recruited purposively for the study in which 60 were early onset GDM and 60 were late onset GDM during study period of January 2008 to December 2009. Patients were followed up in different periods of gestation, during delivery and early postpartum period & findings were compared between two groups. BMI & family history of diabetes were significantly higher in early GDM group (p<0.05). Evidence of increased glycaemia was observed in early GDM group & difference of glycaemic status was statistically significant (p<0.05). Insulin was needed in 85% of early onset GDM and 55% in late onset GDM. There was also significant difference (p<0.05). In this study, 23.3% of early onset GDM group developed pre-eclampsia while in late onset GDM it was 10% and was statistically significant (p<0.05). Regarding intrapartum & postpartum complications - perineal tear, PPH wound infection, puerperal sepsis were more in early onset than late onset GDM group with no significant difference. Regarding foetal outcome, 8.3% early GDM group delivered asphyxiated baby in comparison to 3.3% in late GDM group. Twenty percent (20%) of early onset GDM group had to admit their babies in neonatal unit while in late onset group it was 5%. There was significant difference between two groups (p<0.05). Neonatal hypoglycaemia was also statistically significantly (p<0.05) higher in early GDM group. Neonatal hyper-bilirubinaemia, RDS, perinatal death was more in early onset GDM subjects. Early onset GDM subjects are high risk subgroup & have significant deleterious effect on maternal and perinatal outcome than late GDM groups. PMID:26329938

  5. Heme oxygenase and the immune system in normal and pathological pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Ozen, Maide; Zhao, Hui; Lewis, David B.; Wong, Ronald J.; Stevenson, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is an immunotolerant state. Many factors, including environmental, socioeconomic, genetic, and immunologic changes by infection and/or other causes of inflammation, may contribute to inter-individual differences resulting in a normal or pathologic pregnancy. In particular, imbalances in the immune system can cause many pregnancy-related diseases, such as infertility, abortions, pre-eclampsia, and preterm labor, which result in maternal/fetal death, prematurity, or small-for-gestational age newborns. New findings imply that myeloid regulatory cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs) may mediate immunotolerance during normal pregnancy. Effector T cells (Teffs) have, in contrast, been implicated to cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. Furthermore, feto-maternal tolerance affects the developing fetus. It has been shown that the Treg/Teff balance affects litter size and adoptive transfer of pregnancy-induced Tregs can prevent fetal rejection in the mouse. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has a protective role in many conditions through its anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, and anti-proliferative actions. HO-1 is highly expressed in the placenta and plays a role in angiogenesis and placental vascular development and in regulating vascular tone in pregnancy. In addition, HO-1 is a major regulator of immune homeostasis by mediating crosstalk between innate and adaptive immune systems. Moreover, HO-1 can inhibit inflammation-induced phenotypic maturation of immune effector cells and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and promote anti-inflammatory cytokine production. HO-1 may also be associated with T-cell activation and can limit immune-based tissue injury by promoting Treg suppression of effector responses. Thus, HO-1 and its byproducts may protect against pregnancy complications by its immunomodulatory effects, and the regulation of HO-1 or its downstream effects has the potential to prevent or treat pregnancy complications and prematurity. PMID:25964759

  6. Adverse Obstetric and Perinatal Outcomes following Treatment of Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Haggar, Fatima A.; Pereira, Gavin; Preen, David; Holman, C. D'Arcy; Einarsdottir, Kristjana

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate obstetric and perinatal outcomes among female survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancers and their offspring. Methods Using multivariate analysis of statewide linked data, outcomes of all first completed pregnancies (n?=?1894) in female survivors of AYA cancer diagnosed in Western Australia during the period 1982–2007 were compared with those among females with no cancer history. Comparison pregnancies were matched by maternal age-group, parity and year of delivery. Results Compared with the non-cancer group, female survivors of AYA cancer had an increased risk of threatened abortion (adjusted relative risk 2.09, 95% confidence interval 1.51–2.74), gestational diabetes (2.65, 2.08–3.57), pre-eclampsia (1.32, 1.04–1.87), post-partum hemorrhage (2.83, 1.92–4.67), cesarean delivery (2.62, 2.22–3.04), and maternal postpartum hospitalization>5 days (3.01, 1.72–5.58), but no excess risk of threatened preterm delivery, antepartum hemorrhage, premature rupture of membranes, failure of labor to progress or retained placenta. Their offspring had an increased risk of premature birth (<37 weeks: 1.68, 1.21–2.08), low birth weight (<2500 g: 1.51, 1.23–2.12), fetal growth restriction (3.27, 2.45–4.56), and neonatal distress indicated by low Apgar score (<7) at 1 minute (2.83, 2.28–3.56), need for resuscitation (1.66, 1.27–2.19) or special care nursery admission (1.44, 1.13–1.78). Congenital abnormalities and perinatal deaths (intrauterine or ?7 days of birth) were not increased among offspring of survivors. Conclusion Female survivors of AYA cancer have moderate excess risks of adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes arising from subsequent pregnancies that may require additional surveillance or intervention. PMID:25485774

  7. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Christian K; Laye, Matthew J

    2012-04-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause versus treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction (including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity); and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life. PMID:23798298

  8. Three-Dimensional Segmented Poincaré Plot Analyses SPPA3 Investigates Cardiovascular and Cardiorespiratory Couplings in Hypertensive Pregnancy Disorders.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Claudia; Voss, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hypertensive pregnancy disorders affect 6-8% of gestations representing the most common complication of pregnancy for both mother and fetus. The aim of this study was to introduce a new three-dimensional coupling analysis methods - the three-dimensional segmented Poincaré plot analyses (SPPA3) - to establish an effective approach for the detection of hypertensive pregnancy disorders and especially pre-eclampsia (PE). A cubic box model representing the three-dimensional phase space is subdivided into 12?×?12?×?12 equal predefined cubelets according to the range of the SD of each investigated signal. Additionally, we investigated the influence of rotating the cloud of points and the size of the cubelets (adapted or predefined). All single probabilities of occurring points in a specific cubelet related to the total number of points are calculated. In this study, 10 healthy non-pregnant women, 66 healthy pregnant women, and 56 hypertensive pregnant women (chronic hypertension, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and PE) were investigated. From all subjects, 30?min of beat-to-beat intervals (BBI), respiration (RESP), non-invasive systolic (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were continuously recorded and analyzed. Non-rotated adapted SPPA3 discriminated best between hypertensive pregnancy disorders and PE concerning coupling analysis of two or three different systems (BBI, DBP, RESP and BBI, SBP, DBP) reaching an accuracy of up to 82.9%. This could be increased to an accuracy of up to 91.2% applying multivariate analysis differentiating between all pregnant women and PE. In conclusion, SPPA3 could be a useful method for enhanced risk stratification in pregnant women. PMID:25429364

  9. Blood dendritic cells: “canary in the coal mine” to predict chronic inflammatory disease?

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Brodie; Abdel-Ghaffar, Khaled A.; Gamal, Ahmed Y.; Baban, Babak; Cutler, Christopher W.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of risk factors for chronic inflammatory diseases are unknown. This makes personalized medicine for assessment, prognosis, and choice of therapy very difficult. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that low-grade subclinical infections may be an underlying cause of many chronic inflammatory diseases and thus may contribute to secondary outcomes (e.g., cancer). Many diseases are now categorized as inflammatory-mediated diseases that stem from a dysregulation in host immunity. There is a growing need to study the links between low-grade infections, the immune responses they elicit, and how this impacts overall health. One such link explored in detail here is the extreme sensitivity of myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) in peripheral blood to chronic low-grade infections and the role that these mDCs play in arbitrating the resulting immune responses. We find that emerging evidence supports a role for pathogen-induced mDCs in chronic inflammation leading to increased risk of secondary clinical disease. The mDCs that are elevated in the blood as a result of low-grade bacteremia often do not trigger a productive immune response, but can disseminate the pathogen throughout the host. This aberrant trafficking of mDCs can accelerate systemic inflammatory disease progression. Conversely, restoration of dendritic cell homeostasis may aid in pathogen elimination and minimize dissemination. Thus it would seem prudent when assessing chronic inflammatory disease risk to consider blood mDC numbers, and the microbial content (microbiome) and activation state of these mDCs. These may provide important clues (“the canary in the coal mine”) of high inflammatory disease risk. This will facilitate development of novel immunotherapies to eliminate such smoldering infections in atherosclerosis, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and pre-eclampsia. PMID:24478766

  10. Adenoviral Delivery of VEGF121 Early in Pregnancy Prevents Spontaneous Development of Preeclampsia in BPH/5 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Ashley K.; Hoffmann, Darren S.; Weydert, Christine J.; Butler, Scott D.; Zhou, Yi; Sharma, Ram V.; Davisson, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    An imbalance in circulating pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors is postulated to play a causal role in pre-eclampsia (PE). We have described an inbred mouse strain, BPH/5, which spontaneously develops a PE-like syndrome including late-gestational hypertension, proteinuria, and poor feto-placental outcomes. Here we tested the hypothesis that an angiogenic imbalance during pregnancy in BPH/5 mice leads to the development of PE-like phenotypes in this model. Similar to clinical findings, plasma from pregnant BPH/5 showed reduced levels of free vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PGF) compared to C57BL/6 controls. This was paralleled by a marked decrease in VEGF protein and Pgf mRNA in BPH/5 placentae. Surprisingly, antagonism by the soluble form of the FLT1 receptor (sFLT1) did not appear to be the cause of this reduction, as sFLT1 levels were unchanged or even reduced in BPH/5 compared to controls. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of VEGF121 (Ad-VEGF) via tail vein at e7.5 normalized both the plasma free VEGF levels in BPH/5 and restored the in vitro angiogenic capacity of serum from these mice. Ad-VEGF also reduced the incidence of fetal resorptions and prevented the late-gestational spike in blood pressure and proteinuria observed in BPH/5. These data underscore the importance of dysregulation of angiogenic factors in the pathogenesis of PE, and suggest the potential utility of early pro-angiogenic therapies in treating this disease. PMID:21079047

  11. Animal models of human placentation--a review.

    PubMed

    Carter, A M

    2007-04-01

    This review examines the strengths and weaknesses of animal models of human placentation and pays particular attention to the mouse and non-human primates. Analogies can be drawn between mouse and human in placental cell types and genes controlling placental development. There are, however, substantive differences, including a different mode of implantation, a prominent yolk sac placenta, and fewer placental hormones in the mouse. Crucially, trophoblast invasion is very limited in the mouse and transformation of uterine arteries depends on maternal factors. The mouse also has a short gestation and delivers poorly developed young. Guinea pig is a good alternative rodent model and among the few species known to develop pregnancy toxaemia. The sheep is well established as a model in fetal physiology but is of limited value for placental research. The ovine placenta is epitheliochorial, there is no trophoblast invasion of uterine vessels, and the immunology of pregnancy may be quite different. We conclude that continued research on non-human primates is needed to clarify embryonic-endometrial interactions. The interstitial implantation of human is unusual, but the initial interaction between trophoblast and endometrium is similar in macaques and baboons, as is the subsequent lacunar stage. The absence of interstitial trophoblast cells in the monkey is an important difference from human placentation. However, there is a strong resemblance in the way spiral arteries are invaded and transformed in the macaque, baboon and human. Non-human primates are therefore important models for understanding the dysfunction that has been linked to pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction. Models that are likely to be established in the wake of comparative genomics include the marmoset, tree shrew, hedgehog tenrec and nine-banded armadillo. PMID:17196252

  12. Oxfordshire Women and Their Children's Health (OxWATCH): protocol for a prospective cohort feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, S; Petrovic, G; Chevassut, A; Brook, L; Higgins, N; Kenworthy, Y; Selwood, M; Snelgar, T; Arnold, L; Boardman, H; Heneghan, C; Leeson, P; Redman, C; Granne, I

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Some specific pregnancy disorders are known to be associated with increased incidence of long-term maternal ill health (eg, gestational diabetes with late onset type 2 diabetes; pre-eclampsia with arterial disease). To what degree these later health conditions are a consequence of the woman's constitution prior to pregnancy rather than pregnancy itself triggering changes in a woman's health is unknown. Additionally, there is little prospective evidence for the impact of pre-pregnancy risk factors on the outcome of pregnancy. To understand the importance of pre-pregnancy health requires the recruitment of women into a long-term cohort study before their first successful pregnancy. The aim of this feasibility study is to test recruitment procedures and acceptability of participation to inform the planning of a future large-scale cohort study. Methods The prospective cohort feasibility study will recruit nulliparous women aged 18–40?years. Women will be asked to complete a questionnaire to assess the acceptability of our recruitment and data collection procedures. Baseline biophysical, genetic, socioeconomic, behavioural and psychological assessments will be conducted and samples of blood, urine, saliva and DNA will be collected. Recruitment feasibility and retention rates will be assessed. Women who become pregnant will be recalled for pregnancy and postpregnancy assessments. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol was approved by South Central Portsmouth REC (Ref: 12/SC/0492). The findings from the study will be disseminated through peer reviewed journals, national and international conference presentations and public events. Trial registration number http://www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT02419898. PMID:26553837

  13. Heme oxygenase and the immune system in normal and pathological pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Maide; Zhao, Hui; Lewis, David B; Wong, Ronald J; Stevenson, David K

    2015-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is an immunotolerant state. Many factors, including environmental, socioeconomic, genetic, and immunologic changes by infection and/or other causes of inflammation, may contribute to inter-individual differences resulting in a normal or pathologic pregnancy. In particular, imbalances in the immune system can cause many pregnancy-related diseases, such as infertility, abortions, pre-eclampsia, and preterm labor, which result in maternal/fetal death, prematurity, or small-for-gestational age newborns. New findings imply that myeloid regulatory cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs) may mediate immunotolerance during normal pregnancy. Effector T cells (Teffs) have, in contrast, been implicated to cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. Furthermore, feto-maternal tolerance affects the developing fetus. It has been shown that the Treg/Teff balance affects litter size and adoptive transfer of pregnancy-induced Tregs can prevent fetal rejection in the mouse. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has a protective role in many conditions through its anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, and anti-proliferative actions. HO-1 is highly expressed in the placenta and plays a role in angiogenesis and placental vascular development and in regulating vascular tone in pregnancy. In addition, HO-1 is a major regulator of immune homeostasis by mediating crosstalk between innate and adaptive immune systems. Moreover, HO-1 can inhibit inflammation-induced phenotypic maturation of immune effector cells and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and promote anti-inflammatory cytokine production. HO-1 may also be associated with T-cell activation and can limit immune-based tissue injury by promoting Treg suppression of effector responses. Thus, HO-1 and its byproducts may protect against pregnancy complications by its immunomodulatory effects, and the regulation of HO-1 or its downstream effects has the potential to prevent or treat pregnancy complications and prematurity. PMID:25964759

  14. What health professionals should know about the health effects of air pollution and climate change on children and pregnant mothers

    PubMed Central

    Poursafa, Parinaz; Kelishadi, Roya

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health professionals face the adverse health effects of climate change and air pollution in their practices. This review underscores the effects of these environmental factors on maternal and children's health, as the most vulnerable groups to climate change and air pollution. METHODS: We reviewed electronic databases for a search of the literature to find relevant studies published in English from 1990 to 2011. RESULTS: Environmental factors, notably climate change and air pollution influence children's health before conception and continue during pregnancy, childhood, and adolescence. Experts have suggested that such health hazards may represent the greatest public health challenge that humanity has faced. The accumulation of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, primarily from burning fossil fuels, results in warming which has an impact on air pollution particularly on levels of ozone and particulates. Heat-related health effects include increased rates of pregnancy complications, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, low birth weight, renal effects, vector-borne diseases as malaria and dengue, increased diarrheal and respiratory disease, food insecurity, decreased quality of foods (notably grains), malnutrition, water scarcity, exposures to toxic chemicals, worsened poverty, natural disasters and population displacement. Air pollution has many adverse health effects for mothers and children. In addition to short-term effects like premature labour, intrauterine growth retardation, neonatal and infant mortality rate, malignancies (notably leukaemia and Hodgkin lymphoma), respiratory diseases, allergic disorders and anaemia, exposure to criteria air pollutants from early life might be associated with increase in stress oxidative, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction which in turn might have long-term effects on chronic non-communicable diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Health professionals have an exclusive capability to help prevent and reduce the harmful effects of environmental factors for high-risk groups, and should consider this capacity in their usual practice. PMID:22224116

  15. Three-Dimensional Segmented Poincaré Plot Analyses SPPA3 Investigates Cardiovascular and Cardiorespiratory Couplings in Hypertensive Pregnancy Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Claudia; Voss, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hypertensive pregnancy disorders affect 6–8% of gestations representing the most common complication of pregnancy for both mother and fetus. The aim of this study was to introduce a new three-dimensional coupling analysis methods – the three-dimensional segmented Poincaré plot analyses (SPPA3) – to establish an effective approach for the detection of hypertensive pregnancy disorders and especially pre-eclampsia (PE). A cubic box model representing the three-dimensional phase space is subdivided into 12?×?12?×?12 equal predefined cubelets according to the range of the SD of each investigated signal. Additionally, we investigated the influence of rotating the cloud of points and the size of the cubelets (adapted or predefined). All single probabilities of occurring points in a specific cubelet related to the total number of points are calculated. In this study, 10 healthy non-pregnant women, 66 healthy pregnant women, and 56 hypertensive pregnant women (chronic hypertension, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and PE) were investigated. From all subjects, 30?min of beat-to-beat intervals (BBI), respiration (RESP), non-invasive systolic (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were continuously recorded and analyzed. Non-rotated adapted SPPA3 discriminated best between hypertensive pregnancy disorders and PE concerning coupling analysis of two or three different systems (BBI, DBP, RESP and BBI, SBP, DBP) reaching an accuracy of up to 82.9%. This could be increased to an accuracy of up to 91.2% applying multivariate analysis differentiating between all pregnant women and PE. In conclusion, SPPA3 could be a useful method for enhanced risk stratification in pregnant women. PMID:25429364

  16. Prevalence and clinical correlates of the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy at Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Teklu, Sisay; Gaym, Asheber

    2006-01-01

    A one-year longitudinal study was conducted at Tikur Anbessa central referral Hospital to assess the prevalence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP), to see the socio-demographic and clinical parameters and pregnancy outcome of pregnancies afflicted by these complications. Out of 3424 deliveries conducted during the study period, 183 (5.3%) mothers were found to have one form of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, 85.2% were cases of pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH),the majority (78.2%) were severe pre eclampsia and eclampsia; the remaining 14.8% had pregnancy aggravated hypertension (PAH) or chronic hypertension. Preterm delivery rate was 48.6% for all cases of HDP. Intervention rate was high with 44.3% induction of labor and 44.3% caesarian section, which is much higher than the over all intervention rate in the hospital's obstetric population during the studied period. Prenatal mortality rate (PNMR), case fatality rate (CFR) and intra uterine growth restriction (IUGR) were 300/1000 deliveries, 27/1000 deliveries and 41.6% respectively in mothers with HDP. Severe hypertension, high urine protein and high uric acid level were found to be associated with higher CFR, and poor prenatal outcome. The study provides base line data on HDP in a hospital obstetric population in Ethiopia. Important peculiar findings in this study were a very high rate of severe disease, PNMR and CFR compared to other institutional studies. There is a need to conduct nation wide multi center study on HDP in order to have national base line data on this important pregnancy complication. PMID:17447359

  17. [Pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of amniotic fluid embolism (anaphylactoid syndrome of pregnancy): case report with lethal outcome and overview].

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, M; Zahm, D-M; Remmler, K; Pfeiffer, L; Victor, L; Schirmeister, W

    2003-05-01

    A 35-years old gravida IV and para II underwent caesarean section because of fetal distress following induction of labour. During operation the patient developed disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), severe haemorrhage and shock necessitating massive blood transfusion,hysterectomy with pelvic packing, and high-dose catecholamines. Ultimately, recombinant factor VIIa was given to control bleeding. During the first 24 hours after operation, both clinical and laboratory findings showed that the severe DIC was on the course to recovery.However, the patient subsequently developed multiple organ dysfunction syndrome with respiratory and renal failure requiring mechanical ventilation and haemodialysis.All therapeutical efforts could not help that the patient passed away due to an inevitable multiple organ failure on the 12th day after the operation. Given the constellation of diagnostic and clinical findings, the most likely diagnosis was amniotic fluid embolism (AFE), a rare complication of pregnancy. The following differential diagnoses were less likely or excluded in this reported patient: pre-eclampsia/pregnancy-induced hypertension,HELLP syndrome,anaphylaxis,uterine rupture, transfusion reactions,pulmonary embolism. AFE occurs rarely, and because studies in animal models cannot reproduce accurately the pathophysiological and clinical alterations seen in humans, its pathogenesis remains unclear. It has been proposed that the clinical syndrome of AFE occurs when fetal antigens pass the maternal immunological barrier in susceptible mothers. The recognition of fetal antigens by maternal immune system subsequently triggers the release of endogenous mediators that are responsible for dramatic pathophysiological disturbances.Furthermore, the components of amniotic fluid initiate the DIC. These events are more consistent with septic shock and anaphylactic shock than with an embolic process and it was proposed that the term "amniotic fluid embolism" be changed to "anaphylactoid syndrome of pregnancy". At present, no therapy has been found to consistently improve outcomes in women with AFE.Patients who survive the initial insult are at high risk for multiple organ failure. The mortality of AFE remains high. PMID:12750826

  18. The significance of under- or overweight during childhood as a risk factor for hypertensive diseases in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leeners, Brigitte; Rath, Werner; Kuse, Sabine; Irawan, Claudia; Neumaier-Wagner, Peruka

    2006-10-01

    Hypertensive diseases in pregnancy are still a major cause of foetal and maternal mortality. Known risk factors allow identification of only a small number of patients at risk of developing such a complication. However, better knowledge of the risk profile would improve an early adequate monitoring of these pregnancies. We therefore investigated the correlation between under- or overweight during childhood and the development of hypertensive diseases during pregnancy. The study was designed as a cross-sectional case control study. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 2600 women, who had contacted the German pre-eclampsia self-help group for information on hypertensive diseases in pregnancy and 1233 control women recruited in different hospitals. Diagnosis according to criteria of the international society for hypertensive diseases in pregnancy was based on medical records. 766 women with a hypertensive disease during their pregnancy and 951 control women with normal pregnancies were evaluated after verifying for exclusion criteria and complete data sets. Student t-test, chi square test and multivariate logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. A history of under- (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.23-3.61) or overweight (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.01-2.12) during childhood is associated with an increased risk for hypertensive diseases in pregnancy, which is at least partly independent of pre-pregnancy BMI. In combination with other risk factors, a history of under- or overweight during childhood will help to identify patients at risk for hypertensive diseases in pregnancy. PMID:16567065

  19. Pregnancy-Associated Heart Failure: A Comparison of Clinical Presentation and Outcome between Hypertensive Heart Failure of Pregnancy and Idiopathic Peripartum Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ntusi, Ntobeko B. A.; Badri, Motasim; Gumedze, Freedom; Sliwa, Karen; Mayosi, Bongani M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims There is controversy regarding the inclusion of patients with hypertension among cases of peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM), as the practice has contributed significantly to the discrepancy in reported characteristics of PPCM. We sought to determine whether hypertensive heart failure of pregnancy (HHFP) (i.e., peripartum cardiac failure associated with any form of hypertension) and PPCM have similar or different clinical features and outcome. Methods and Results We compared the time of onset of symptoms, clinical profile (including electrocardiographic [ECG] and echocardiographic features) and outcome of patients with HHFP (n = 53; age 29.6 ± 6.6 years) and PPCM (n = 30; age 31.5 ± 7.5 years). The onset of symptoms was postpartum in all PPCM patients, whereas it was antepartum in 85% of HHFP cases (p<0.001). PPCM was more significantly associated with the following features than HHFP (p<0.05): twin pregnancy, smoking, cardiomegaly with lower left ventricular ejection fraction on echocardiography, and longer QRS duration, QRS abnormalities, left atrial hypertrophy, left bundle branch block, T wave inversion and atrial fibrillation on ECG. By contrast, HHFP patients were significantly more likely (p<0.05) to have a family history of hypertension, hypertension and pre-eclampsia in a previous pregnancy, tachycardia at presentation on ECG, and left ventricular hypertrophy on echocardiography. Chronic heart failure, intra-cardiac thrombus and pulmonary hypertension were found significantly more commonly in PPCM than in HHFP (p<0.05). There were 5 deaths in the PPCM group compared to none among HHFP cases (p = 0.005) during follow-up. Conclusion There are significant differences in the time of onset of heart failure, clinical, ECG and echocardiographic features, and outcome of HHFP compared to PPCM, indicating that the presence of hypertension in pregnancy-associated heart failure may not fit the case definition of idiopathic PPCM. PMID:26252951

  20. Maternal mortality in a rural referral hospital in the Niger Delta, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Igberase, G O; Ebeigbe, P N

    2007-04-01

    Almost two decades after the safe motherhood initiative, maternal mortality figures remain very high in Nigeria. Very few studies are available on the features of maternal mortality in rural Nigeria. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and causes of maternal mortality in a rural referral hospital in the Niger Delta, Nigeria. An audit of 115 consecutive maternal mortalities over a 10-year period at a rural-based tertiary hospital was undertaken. There were 5,153 deliveries and 115 maternal deaths during the study period, with a maternal mortality ratio of 2,232/100,000 live births. The most common causes of maternal mortalities were puerperal sepsis, abortion complications, pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, prolonged obstructed labour, haemorrhage accounting for 33%, 22.6%, 17.4%, 13.0% and 7.8%, respectively. The percentage mortality for unbooked was 10 times that for booked patients. Unbooked status is a risk factor for maternal mortality as this was statistically significant p < 0.0001. Traditional birth attendants were involved in the initial management of at least two-fifths (38.2%) of the non-abortion mortalities while half had been managed in private hospitals and maternities. Maternal mortality will continue to increase unless appropriate steps are taken to improve the use of antenatal care, thereby reducing unbooked emergencies. Hospitals need to be equipped with facilities for emergency obstetric care. Continuous programmes that will integrate TBAs and orthodox practices should be put in place as this will reduce delays and improve referral systems. PMID:17464810

  1. Cesarean Section Rates and Indications in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Multi-Country Study from Medecins sans Frontieres

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kathryn; Cortier, Hilde; Maldonado, Fernando; Mashant, Tshiteng; Ford, Nathan; Trelles, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The World Health Organization considers Cesarean section rates of 5–15% to be the optimal range for targeted provision of this life saving intervention. However, access to safe Cesarean section in resource-limited settings is much lower, estimated at 1–2% reported in sub-Saharan Africa. This study reports Cesarean sections rates and indications in Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi, and Sierra Leone, and describe the main parameters associated with maternal and early neonatal mortality. Methods Women undergoing Cesarean section from August 1 2010 to January 31 2011 were included in this prospective study. Logistic regression was used to model determinants of maternal and early neonatal mortality. Results 1276 women underwent a Cesarean section, giving a frequency of 6.2% (range 4.1–16.8%). The most common indications were obstructed labor (399, 31%), poor presentation (233, 18%), previous Cesarean section (184, 14%), and fetal distress (128, 10%), uterine rupture (117, 9%) and antepartum hemorrhage (101, 8%). Parity >6 (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]?=?8.6, P?=?0.015), uterine rupture (aOR?=?20.5; P?=?.010), antepartum hemorrhage (aOR?=?13.1; P?=?.045), and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (aOR?=?42.9; P?=?.017) were associated with maternal death. Uterine rupture (aOR?=?6.6, P<0.001), anterpartum hemorrhage (aOR?=?3.6, P<0.001), and cord prolapse (aOR?=?2.7, P?=?0.017) were associated with early neonatal death. Conclusions This study demonstrates that target Cesarean section rates can be achieved in sub-Saharan Africa. Identifying the common indications for Cesarean section and associations with mortality can target improvements in antenatal services and emergency obstetric care. PMID:22962616

  2. Psychosocial deprivation in women with gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with poor fetomaternal prognoses: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Cosson, Emmanuel; Bihan, Hélène; Reach, Gérard; Vittaz, Laurence; Carbillon, Lionel; Valensi, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prognoses associated with psychosocial deprivation in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Design Observational study considering the 1498 multiethnic women with GDM who gave birth between January 2009 and February 2012. Setting Four largest maternity units in the northeastern suburban area of Paris. Participants The 994 women who completed the Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centers (EPICES) questionnaire. Main outcome measure Main complications of GDM (large infant for gestational age (LGA), shoulder dystocia, caesarean section, pre-eclampsia). Results Psychosocial deprivation (EPICES score ?30.17) affected 577 women (56%) and was positively associated with overweight/obesity, parity and non-European origin, and negatively associated with family history of diabetes, fruit and vegetable consumption and working status. The psychosocially deprived women were diagnosed with GDM earlier, received insulin treatment during pregnancy more often and were more likely to have LGA infants (15.1% vs 10.6%, OR=1.5 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.2), p<0.05) and shoulder dystocia (3.1% vs 1.2%, OR=2.7 (0.97 to 7.2), p<0.05). In addition to psychosocial deprivation, LGA was associated with greater parity, obesity, history of GDM, ethnicity, excessive gestational weight gain and insulin therapy. A multivariate analysis using these covariates revealed that the EPICES score was independently associated with LGA infants (per 10 units, OR=1.12 (1.03 to 1.20), p<0.01). Conclusions In our area, psychosocial deprivation is common in women with GDM and is associated with earlier GDM diagnoses and greater insulin treatment, an increased likelihood of shoulder dystocia and, independently of obesity, gestational weight gain and other confounders with LGA infants. PMID:25748416

  3. The Quality of Clinical Maternal and Neonatal Healthcare – A Strategy for Identifying ‘Routine Care Signal Functions’

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Stephan; De Allegri, Manuela; Gabrysch, Sabine; Chinkhumba, Jobiba; Sarker, Malabika; Muula, Adamson S.

    2015-01-01

    Background A variety of clinical process indicators exists to measure the quality of care provided by maternal and neonatal health (MNH) programs. To allow comparison across MNH programs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), a core set of essential process indicators is needed. Although such a core set is available for emergency obstetric care (EmOC), the ‘EmOC signal functions’, a similar approach is currently missing for MNH routine care evaluation. We describe a strategy for identifying core process indicators for routine care and illustrate their usefulness in a field example. Methods We first developed an indicator selection strategy by combining epidemiological and programmatic aspects relevant to MNH in LMICs. We then identified routine care process indicators meeting our selection criteria by reviewing existing quality of care assessment protocols. We grouped these indicators into three categories based on their main function in addressing risk factors of maternal or neonatal complications. We then tested this indicator set in a study assessing MNH quality of clinical care in 33 health facilities in Malawi. Results Our strategy identified 51 routine care processes: 23 related to initial patient risk assessment, 17 to risk monitoring, 11 to risk prevention. During the clinical performance assessment a total of 82 cases were observed. Birth attendants’ adherence to clinical standards was lowest in relation to risk monitoring processes. In relation to major complications, routine care processes addressing fetal and newborn distress were performed relatively consistently, but there were major gaps in the performance of routine care processes addressing bleeding, infection, and pre-eclampsia risks. Conclusion The identified set of process indicators could identify major gaps in the quality of obstetric and neonatal care provided during the intra- and immediate postpartum period. We hope our suggested indicators for essential routine care processes will contribute to streamlining MNH program evaluations in LMICs. PMID:25875252

  4. A stereological perspective on placental morphology in normal and complicated pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Terry M

    2009-07-01

    Stereology applied to randomly-generated thin sections allows minimally-biased and economical quantitation of the 3D structure of the placenta from molecular to whole-organ levels. With these sampling and estimation tools, it is possible to derive global quantities (tissue volumes, interface surface areas, tubule lengths and particle numbers), average values (e.g. mean cell size or membrane thickness), spatial relationships (e.g. between compartments and immunoprobes) and functional potential (e.g. diffusive conductance). This review indicates ways in which stereology has been used to interpret the morphology of human and murine placentas including the processes of villous growth, trophoblast differentiation, vascular morphogenesis and diffusive transport. In human placenta, global quantities have shown that villous maturation involves differential growth of fetal capillaries and increases in endothelial cell number. Villous trophoblast is a continuously renewing epithelium and, through much of gestation, exhibits a steady state between increasing numbers of nuclei in cytotrophoblast (CT) and syncytiotrophoblast (ST). The epithelium gradually becomes thinner because its surface expands at a faster rate than its volume. These changes help to ensure that placental diffusing capacity matches the growth in fetal mass. Comparable events occur in the murine placenta. Some of these processes are perturbed in complicated pregnancies: 1) fetoplacental vascular growth is compromised in pregnancies accompanied by maternal asthma, 2) changes in trophoblast turnover occur in pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction, and 3) uteroplacental vascular development is impoverished, but diffusive transport increases, in pregnant mice exposed to particulate urban air pollution. Finally, quantitative immunoelectron microscopy now permits more rigorous analysis of the spatial distributions of interesting molecules between subcellular compartments or shifts in distributions following experimental manipulation. PMID:19141109

  5. Chronic sleep loss during pregnancy as a determinant of stress: impact on pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Palagini, Laura; Gemignani, Angelo; Banti, Susanna; Manconi, Mauro; Mauri, Mauro; Riemann, Dieter

    2014-08-01

    Short sleep duration, poor sleep quality, and insomnia frequently characterize sleep in pregnancy during all three trimesters. We aimed: (i) to review the clinical evidence of the association between conditions of sleep loss during pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes; and (ii) to discuss the potential pathophysiological mechanisms that may be involved. A systematic search of cross-sectional, longitudinal studies using Medline, Embase, and PsychINFO, and MeSH headings and key words for conditions of sleep loss such as 'insomnia', 'poor sleep quality', 'short sleep duration', and 'pregnancy outcome' was made for papers published between January 1, 1960 and July 2013. Twenty studies met inclusion criteria for sleep loss and pregnancy outcome: seven studies on prenatal depression, three on gestational diabetes, three on hypertension, pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, six on length of labor/type of delivery, eight on preterm birth, and three on birth grow/birth weight. Two main results emerged: (i) conditions of chronic sleep loss are related to adverse pregnancy outcomes; and (ii) chronic sleep loss yields a stress-related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and abnormal immune/inflammatory, reaction, which, in turn, influences pregnancy outcome negatively. Chronic sleep loss frequently characterizes sleep throughout the course of pregnancy and may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Common pathophysiological mechanisms emerged as being related to stress system activation. We propose that in accordance to the allostatic load hypothesis, chronic sleep loss during pregnancy may also be regarded as both a result of stress and a physiological stressor per se, leading to stress 'overload'. It may account for adverse pregnancy outcomes and somatic and mental disorders in pregnancy. PMID:24994566

  6. Utero-placental Doppler ultrasound for improving pregnancy outcome

    PubMed Central

    Stampalija, Tamara; Gyte, Gillian ML; Alfirevic, Zarko

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired placentation can cause some of the most important obstetrical complications such as pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction and has been linked to increased fetal morbidity and mortality. The failure to undergo physiological trophoblastic vascular changes is reflected by the high impedance to the blood flow at the level of the uterine arteries. Doppler ultrasound study of utero-placental blood vessels, using waveform indices or notching, may help to identify the ‘at-risk’ women in the first and second trimester of pregnancy, such that interventions might be used to reduce maternal and fetal morbidity and/or mortality. Objectives To assess the effects on pregnancy outcome, and obstetric practice, of routine utero-placental Doppler ultrasound in first and second trimester of pregnancy in pregnant women at high and low risk of hypertensive complications. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (June 2010) and the reference lists of identified studies. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of Doppler ultrasound for the investigation of utero-placental vessel waveforms in first and second trimester compared with no Doppler ultrasound. We have excluded studies where uterine vessels have been assessed together with fetal and umbilical vessels. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed the studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and carried out data extraction. We checked data entry. Main results We found two studies involving 4993 participants. The methodological quality of the trials was good. Both studies included women at low risk for hypertensive disorders, with Doppler ultrasound of the uterine arteries performed in the second trimester of pregnancy. In both studies, pathological finding of uterine arteries was followed by low-dose aspirin administration. We identified no difference in short-term maternal and fetal clinical outcomes. We identified no randomised studies assessing the utero-placental vessels in the first trimester or in women at high risk for hypertensive disorders. Authors’ conclusions Present evidence failed to show any benefit to either the baby or the mother when utero-placental Doppler ultrasound was used in the second trimester of pregnancy in women at low risk for hypertensive disorders. Nevertheless, this evidence cannot be considered conclusive with only two studies included. There were no randomised studies in the first trimester, or in women at high risk. More research is needed to investigate whether the use of utero-placental Doppler ultrasound may improve pregnancy outcome. PMID:20824875

  7. Autoantibody-mediated angiotensin receptor activation contributes to preeclampsia through TNF-alpha signaling

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Roxanna A.; Zhang, Yujin; Zhou, Cissy Chenyi; Blackwell, Sean C.; Hicks, M. John; Ramin, Susan M.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a prevalent life-threatening hypertensive disorder of pregnancy whose pathophysiology remains largely undefined. Recently, a circulating maternal autoantibody, the angiotensin II type I receptor agonistic autoantibody (AT1-AA), has emerged as a contributor to disease features. Increased circulating maternal tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) is also associated with the disease, however it is unknown if this factor directly contributes to preeclamptic symptoms. Here we report that this autoantibody increases the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-? in the circulation of AT1-AA-injected pregnant mice, but not in non-pregnant mice. Co-injection of AT1-AA with a TNF-? neutralizing antibody reduced cytokine availability in AT1-AA-injected pregnant mice. Moreover, TNF-? blockade in AT1-AA-injected pregnant mice significantly attenuated the key features of preeclampsia. Autoantibody-induced hypertension was reduced from 131±4 to 110±4 mmHg and proteinuria was reduced from 212±25 to 155±23 ?g albumin/mg creatinine (both P<0.05). Injection of PE-IgG increased the serum levels of circulating soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and soluble endoglin (sEng) (34.1±5.1, 2.4±0.3 ng/ml, respectively), and co-injection with the TNF-? blocker significantly reduced their levels (21.7±3.4, 1.2±0.4 ng/ml, respectively). Renal damage and placental abnormalities were also decreased by TNF-alpha blockade. Lastly, the elevated circulating TNF-? in preeclamptic patients is significantly correlated to the AT1-AA bioactivity in our patient cohort. Similarly, the autoantibody, through AT1 receptor mediated TNF-? induction, contributed to increased sFlt-1, sEng secretion and increased apoptosis in cultured human villous explants. Overall, AT1-AA is a novel candidate that induces TNF-?, a cytokine which may play an important pathogenic role in preeclampsia. Keywords: Basic Science; Experimental models; Pre-eclampsia/pregnancy; Angiotensin receptors; Inflammation. PMID:20351341

  8. Oxidative stress markers in hypertensive states of pregnancy: preterm and term disease

    PubMed Central

    Kurlak, Lesia O.; Green, Amanda; Loughna, Pamela; Broughton Pipkin, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Discussion continues as to whether de novo hypertension in pregnancy with significant proteinuria (pre-eclampsia; PE) and non-proteinuric new hypertension (gestational hypertension; GH) are parts of the same disease spectrum or represent different conditions. Non-pregnant hypertension, pregnancy and PE are all associated with oxidative stress. We have established a 6 weeks postpartum clinic for women who experienced a hypertensive pregnancy. We hypothesized that PE and GH could be distinguished by markers of oxidative stress; thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and antioxidants (ferric ion reducing ability of plasma; FRAP). Since the severity of PE and GH is greater pre-term, we also compared pre-term and term disease. Fifty-eight women had term PE, 23 pre-term PE, 60 had term GH and 6 pre-term GH, 11 pre-existing (essential) hypertension (EH) without PE. Limited data were available from normotensive pregnancies (n = 7) and non-pregnant controls (n = 14). There were no differences in postpartum TBARS or FRAP between hypertensive states; TBARS (P = 0.001) and FRAP (P = 0.009) were lower in plasma of non-pregnant controls compared to recently-pregnant women. Interestingly FRAP was higher in preterm than term GH (P = 0.013). In PE and GH, TBARS correlated with low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (P = 0.036); this association strengthened with inclusion of EH (P = 0.011). The 10 year Framingham index for cardiovascular risk was positively associated with TBARS (P = 0.003). Oxidative stress profiles do not differ between hypertensive states but appear to distinguish between recently-pregnant and non-pregnant states. This suggests that pregnancy may alter vascular integrity with changes remaining 6 weeks postpartum. LDL-cholesterol is a known determinant of oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease and we have shown this association to be present in hypertensive pregnancy further emphasizing that such a pregnancy may be revealing a pre-existing cardiovascular risk. PMID:25202276

  9. The effects of vitamin D3 on lipogenesis in the liver and adipose tissue of pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eun-Jin; Lee, Jae-Eon; An, Sung-Min; Lee, Jae Ho; Kwon, Hyeog Soong; Kim, Byoung Chul; Kim, Seon Jong; Kim, Joo Man; Hwang, Dae Youn; Jung, Young-Jin; Yang, Seung Yun; Kim, Seung Chul; An, Beum-Soo

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is a worldwide individual and public health issue, and contributes to the development of numerous chronic diseases. In particular, maternal obesity has harmful effects on both the mother and child during and after pregnancy. The digestion and metabolism of food are controlled by endocrine factors, including insulin, glucagon and estrogen. These hormonal factors are differentially regulated during pregnancy due to the specialized hormonal environment during this period. In the present study, we examined the effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3), an active hormonal form of nutritional vitamin D3, on lipid metabolism in pregnant rats. The body weight of rats treated with VD3 was significantly reduced compared to that of the rats in the control group. In addition, histological analysis demonstrated that the amount of fat stored in adipocytes was reduced by treatment with VD3. To determine the role of VD3 in lipid metabolism, the expression levels of lipid metabolism?associated genes were measured in the rat adipose tissue and liver. VD3 negatively regulated the expression of various lipogenic genes, including fatty acid synthase (FAS), stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), in both the adipose tissue and liver. However, the regulators of lipogenic enzymes such as, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR-?) and insulin-induced gene 2 (INSIG2) were differentially regulated by VD3 in a tissue?specific manner. On the whole, these findings suggest that VD3 regulates lipid metabolism and deposition in the liver and adipose tissue, and thereby reduces fat in pregnant animals, as well as body weight. Our results suggest that the alteration of lipogenesis through the administration of VD3 may help to reduce excessive weight gain during pregnancy and prevent obesity?related pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, hypertension and issues with labor. PMID:26239543

  10. Leptin receptor (LEPR) SNP polymorphisms in HELLP syndrome patients determined by quantitative real-time PCR and melting curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown overexpression of leptin in microarray experiments in pre-eclampsia (PE) and in hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome. We decided to study four leptin receptor (LEPR) SNP polymorphisms in HELLP syndrome patients by using quantitative real-time PCR and melting curve analysis. Methods DNA was isolated from blood samples from 83 normotensive pregnant women and 75 HELLP syndrome patients. Four SNPs, LEPR c.326A>G (K109), LEPR c.668A>G (Q223R), LEPR c.1968G>C (K656N) and LEPR c.3024A>G (S1008) were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and melting curve analysis. Investigators were blinded to clinical outcomes. Results LEPR c.326A>G, LEPR c.668A>G, LEPR c.1968G>C and LEPR c.3024A>G allele, genotype and haplotype polymorphisms were not different in HELLP syndrome patients and normotensive healthy pregnants. There were strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between loci c.326A>G and c.6687A>G (D' = 0.974), and c.668A>G and c.1968G>C (D' = 0.934), and c.326A>G and c.1968G>C (D' = 0.885), and c.1968G>C and c.3024A>G (D' = 1.0). However, linkages of c.3024A>G with c.668A>G (D' = 0.111) and c.326A>G (D' = 0.398) were weak. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed for all polymorphisms. However the LEPR c.326A>G AG genotype was twice more frequent and the (AG AG GG AG) haplotype was three times more frequent in HELLP syndrome patients. The introduced quantitative real-time PCR combined with melting curve analysis is a fast and reliable method for the determination of LEPR SNPs. Conclusion Although certain LEPR haplotypes are more frequent in HELLP syndrome, we conclude that there is no compelling evidence that the four studied LEPR SNP polymorphisms associated with the development of HELLP syndrome. PMID:20149225

  11. SFlt-1 Elevates Blood Pressure by Augmenting Endothelin-1-Mediated Vasoconstriction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hassani Lahsinoui, Hajar; Vogt, Liffert; van der Post, Joris; Peters, Stephan; Afink, Gijs; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie; van den Born, Bert-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Scavenging of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) elevates blood pressure (BP) in patients receiving anti-angiogenic therapy. Similarly, inhibition of circulation VEGF by its soluble receptor fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) underlies BP elevation in pre-eclampsia. Both phenotypes are characterized by augmented production of endothelin-1 (ET-1), suggesting a role for ET-1 in anti-angiogenic hypertension. We aimed to assess the effect of VEGF inhibition on ET-1-induced contractility and downstream ET-1 signaling. Approach and Results Male C57BL/6N mice were treated with either sFlt-1 or vehicle and BP was assessed via tail-cuff. Mean arterial pressure of sFlt-1-treated mice markedly increased compared to vehicle-treated controls (N?=?11–12, p<0.05). After sacrifice, carotid and mesenteric arteries were isolated for isometric tension measurements. ET-1-induced contractions were similar in mesenteric arteries of vehicle and sFlt-1-treated mice, but augmented in carotid segments of sFlt-1-treated mice compared to controls (N?=?9–10, p<0.05). The increased contraction in carotid segments could be completely abrogated by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin (N?=?9–10, p<0.05), indicating heightened prostaglandin-mediated vasoconstriction. This was associated with a shift towards procontractile ETB signaling in sFlt-1-treated mice, possibly explaining the increased ET-1-induced prostaglandin-mediated vasoconstriction. In line with the ex vivo findings, sFlt-1-induced BP elevation could be prevented in vivo by oral treatment with either a high-dose of the COX inhibitor aspirin (N?=?7) or with picotamide (N?=?9), a dual thromboxane A2 synthase inhibitor and receptor antagonist. Conclusions VEGF inhibition augments the pressor response to ET-1. The cyclooxygenase-thromboxane signaling route downstream of ET-1 might be a possible target to prevent BP elevation during VEGF inhibition. PMID:24632840

  12. Vitamin D during pregnancy and maternal, neonatal and infant health outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thorne-Lyman, Andrew; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Vitamin D has well-defined classical functions related to calcium metabolism and bone health but also has non-classical effects that may influence other aspects of health. There has been considerable recent interest in the role of vitamin D on outcomes related to pregnancy and young child health but few efforts have been made to systematically consolidate this evidence to inform the research and policy agenda for low income countries. A systematic review was undertaken to identify intervention and observational studies of vitamin D supplementation, intake, or status (25-hydroxy-vitamin D) during pregnancy on perinatal and infant health outcomes. Data from trials and observational studies isolating the effect of vitamin D supplementation and intake were extracted and study quality was evaluated. Meta-analysis was used to pool effect estimates. We identified 5 randomized trials with outcomes of relevance to our review. All had small sample size and dosage amount, duration, and frequency varied as did the ability to correct deficiency. Pooled analysis of trials using fixed effects models suggested protective effects of supplementation on low birthweight (3 trials, Risk ratio (RR)=0.40 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.23, 0.71]) and non-significant but suggestive effects of daily supplementation on small-for-gestational age (SGA) (2 trials, RR=0.67, [0.40, 1.11]. No effect on preterm delivery (<37 weeks) was evident (2 trials, RR=0.77 [0.35, 1.66]). Little evidence from trials exists to evaluate the effect of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy on maternal, perinatal or infant health outcomes. Based on both trials and observational studies, we recommend that future research explore SGA, preterm delivery, pre-eclampsia, and maternal and childhood infections, as outcomes of interest. Trials should focus on populations with a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, explore the relevance of timing of supplementation, and the dosage used in such trials should be sufficient to correct deficiency. PMID:22742603

  13. Birth-weight, insulin levels, and HOMA-IR in newborns at term

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated that low and high birth-weight at birth are risk factors of developing diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine if the abnormal birth-weight is related with hyperinsulinemia and elevated index of the Homeostasis Model assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) at birth, in at term newborns. Methods Newborns with gestational age between 38 and 41?weeks, products of normal pregnancies of healthy mothers aged 18 to 39?years, were eligible to participate. Small-for-gestational age (SGA) and large-for-gestational age (LGA) newborns were compared with appropriate-for-gestational (AGA) age newborns. Incomplete or unclear data about mother’s health status, diabetes, gestational diabetes, history of gestational diabetes, hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, and other conditions that affect glucose metabolism were exclusion criteria. Hyperinsulinemia was defined by serum insulin levels ?13.0 ?U/mL and IR by HOMA-IR ?2.60. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the odds ratio (OR) that computes the association between birth-weight (independent variable) with hyperinsulinemia and HOMA-IR index (dependent variables). Results A total of 107 newborns were enrolled; 13, 22, and 72 with SGA, LGA, and AGA, respectively. Hyperinsulinemia was identified in 2 (15.4%), 6 (27.3%), and 5 (6.9%) with SGA, LGA, and AGA (p=0.03), whereas IR in 3 (23.1%), 8 (36.4%), and 10 (13.9%) newborns with SGA, LGA and AGA (p=0.06). The LGA showed a strong association with hyperinsulinemia (OR 5.02; CI 95%, 1.15-22.3; p=0.01) and HOMA-IR (OR 3.54; CI 95%, 1.03-12.16; p=0.02); although without statistical significance, the SGA showed a tendency of association with hyperinsulinemia (OR 2.43; CI 95%, 0.43-17.3 p=0.29) and HOMA-IR (OR 1.86; CI 95%, 0.33-9.37; p=0.41). Conclusions Our results suggest that LGA is associated with hyperinsulinemia and elevated HOMA-IR at birth whereas the SGA show a tendency of association. PMID:22770114

  14. Glucocorticoid Metabolism in Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy: Analysis of Plasma and Urinary Cortisol and Cortisone

    PubMed Central

    Kosicka, Katarzyna; Siemi?tkowska, Anna; Krzy?cin, Mariola; Br?borowicz, Grzegorz H.; Resztak, Matylda; Majchrzak-Celi?ska, Aleksandra; Chuchracki, Marek; G?ówka, Franciszek K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to analyze the plasma and urinary cortisol (F) and cortisone (E) levels in normotensive and hypertensive pregnant women. The parameters known to reflect the function of 11?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11?-HSD2) were calculated to verify the changes in glucocorticoid balance over the course of gestational hypertension (GH) and pre-eclampsia (PE). Materials and Methods This retrospective case-control study included women in the third trimester of pregnancy, diagnosed with: GH (n = 29), PE (n = 26), or chronic hypertension (CH; n = 22). Normotensive women in their third trimester of pregnancy were also included (controls; n = 43). The plasma and urinary F and E levels were measured with the HPLC-FLD method. The 11?-HSD2 function was estimated by calculating the following ratios: plasma F/E and urinary free F to urinary free E (UFF/UFE). A statistical analysis was performed based on case-control structure. Results and Discussion PE was characterized by lower plasma F levels (639.0 nmol/L), UFF/Cr levels (3.80 ?g/mmol) and F/E ratio (3.46) compared with that of the controls (811.7 nmol/L, 6.28 ?g/mmol and 5.19, respectively) with marked abnormalities observed in the changes of F/E and UFF/UFE ratios with advancing gestation. GH patients showed significant disparities in the urinary steroid profile with lower UFF/UFE ratio (0.330 vs. 0.401) compared with the normotensive controls and abnormal changes in the UFF/UFE throughout pregnancy. The observed tendency towards lower F/E and UFF/UFE ratios in PE and GH patients may reflect more intensive F metabolism over the course of those disorders. In the normal pregnancy group, the plasma F/E and UFF/UFE ratios tended to present inverse correlations with advancing gestation. This trend was much less marked in PE and GH patients, suggesting that the abnormalities in 11?-HSD2 functions progressed with the GA. The birth weights of neonates born from pre-eclamptic pregnancies were lower than those from uncomplicated pregnancies, although only when the babies were born prematurely. Children born at term to normotensive mothers or mothers suffering from PE had comparable birth weights. PMID:26637176

  15. Reducing stillbirths: interventions during labour

    PubMed Central

    Darmstadt, Gary L; Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Haws, Rachel A; Menezes, Esme V; Soomro, Tanya; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2009-01-01

    Background Approximately one million stillbirths occur annually during labour; most of these stillbirths occur in low and middle-income countries and are associated with absent, inadequate, or delayed obstetric care. The low proportion of intrapartum stillbirths in high-income countries suggests that intrapartum stillbirths are largely preventable with quality intrapartum care, including prompt recognition and management of intrapartum complications. The evidence for impact of intrapartum interventions on stillbirth and perinatal mortality outcomes has not yet been systematically examined. Methods We undertook a systematic review of the published literature, searching PubMed and the Cochrane Library, of trials and reviews (N = 230) that reported stillbirth or perinatal mortality outcomes for eight interventions delivered during labour. Where eligible randomised controlled trials had been published after the most recent Cochrane review on any given intervention, we incorporated these new trial findings into a new meta-analysis with the Cochrane included studies. Results We found a paucity of studies reporting statistically significant evidence of impact on perinatal mortality, especially on stillbirths. Available evidence suggests that operative delivery, especially Caesarean section, contributes to decreased stillbirth rates. Induction of labour rather than expectant management in post-term pregnancies showed strong evidence of impact, though there was not enough evidence to suggest superior safety for the fetus of any given drug or drugs for induction of labour. Planned Caesarean section for term breech presentation has been shown in a large randomised trial to reduce stillbirths, but the feasibility and consequences of implementing this intervention routinely in low-/middle-income countries add caveats to recommending its use. Magnesium sulphate for pre-eclampsia and eclampsia is effective in preventing eclamptic seizures, but studies have not demonstrated impact on perinatal mortality. There was limited evidence of impact for maternal hyperoxygenation, and concerns remain about maternal safety. Transcervical amnioinfusion for meconium staining appears promising for low/middle income-country application according to the findings of many small studies, but a large randomised trial of the intervention had no significant impact on perinatal mortality, suggesting that further studies are needed. Conclusion Although the global appeal to prioritise access to emergency obstetric care, especially vacuum extraction and Caesarean section, rests largely on observational and population-based data, these interventions are clearly life-saving in many cases of fetal compromise. Safe, comprehensive essential and emergency obstetric care is particularly needed, and can make the greatest impact on stillbirth rates, in low-resource settings. Other advanced interventions such as amnioinfusion and hyperoxygenation may reduce perinatal mortality, but concerns about safety and effectiveness require further study before they can be routinely included in programs. PMID:19426469

  16. Acute renal failure in pregnancy: our experience.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rohina S; Mishra, Vineet V; Jasani, Anil F; Gumber, Manoj

    2014-03-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a serious medical complication during pregnancy, and, in the post-partum period, is associated with significant maternal morbidity and mortality as well as fetal loss. The objective of our study is to find the etiology and maternal outcome of ARF during pregnancy. The study was conducted at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of the Institute of Kidney Disease and Research Center, Ahmedabad, India from January 2009 to January 2011. Fifty previously healthy patients who developed ARF, diagnosed on oliguria and serum creatinine >2 mg%, were included in the study. Patients with a known history of renal disease, diabetes and hypertension were excluded from the study. All patients were followed-up for a period of six months. Patient re-cords, demographic data, urine output on admission and preceding history of antepartum hemorrhage (APH), post-partum hemorrhage (PPH), septicemia, operative interventions and retained product of conception were noted and need for dialysis was considered. Patients were thoroughly examined and baseline biochemical investigations and renal and obstetrical ultrasound were performed on each patient and bacterial culture sensitivity on blood, urine or vaginal swabs were performed in selected patients. The age range was 19-38 years (mean 26 ± 3.8). The first trimester, second trimester and puerperal groups comprised of four (8%), 25 (50%) and 21 patients (42%), respectively. Hemorrhage was the etiology for ARF in 15 (30%), APH in ten (20%) and PPH in five (10%) patients. Eleven (22%) patients had lower segment cesarian section (LSCS) while 36 (78%) patients had normal vaginal delivery. In 20 (40%) patients, puerperal sepsis was the etiological factor, while pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and HELLP syndrome accounted for 18 (36%) patients. Two (4%) patients had disseminated intravascular coagulation on presentation while one (2%) patient was diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome. Maternal mortality was 12% (n = 6). Of the 38 (88%) surviving patients, 21 (42%) had complete recovery of renal function, eight (16%) patients had partial and 15 (30%) patients required dialysis on a long-term basis. ARF in pregnancy is associated with poor maternal and renal outcome if not detected and treated in time. PMID:24626025

  17. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, Antony M.; Odell, Adam F.; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Issitt, Theo; Ulyatt, Clare; Walker, John H.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2012-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial VEGFR levels are modulated during this response. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cell regulates VEGF-A bioavailability and cell survival. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This may partly underlie endothelial dysfunction seen in many pathologies.

  18. Maternal obesity is associated with a reduction in placental taurine transporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Ditchfield, A M; Desforges, M; Mills, T A; Glazier, J D; Wareing, M; Mynett, K; Sibley, C P; Greenwood, S L

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Maternal obesity increases the risk of poor pregnancy outcome including stillbirth, pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction and fetal overgrowth. These pregnancy complications are associated with dysfunctional syncytiotrophoblast, the transporting epithelium of the human placenta. Taurine, a ?-amino acid with antioxidant and cytoprotective properties, has a role in syncytiotrophoblast development and function and is required for fetal growth and organ development. Taurine is conditionally essential in pregnancy and fetal tissues depend on uptake of taurine from maternal blood. We tested the hypothesis that taurine uptake into placental syncytiotrophoblast by the taurine transporter protein (TauT) is lower in obese women (body mass index (BMI)?30?kg?m?2) than in women of ideal weight (BMI 18.5–24.9?kg?m?2) and explored potential regulatory factors. Subjects/Methods: Placentas were collected from term (37–42-week gestation), uncomplicated, singleton pregnancies from women with BMI 19–49?kg?m?2. TauT activity was measured as the Na+-dependent uptake of 3H-taurine into placental villous fragments. TauT expression in membrane-enriched placental samples was investigated by western blot. In vitro studies using placental villous explants examined whether leptin or IL-6, adipokines/cytokines that are elevated in maternal obesity, regulates TauT activity. Results: Placental TauT activity was significantly lower in obese women (BMI?30) than women of ideal weight (P<0.03) and inversely related to maternal BMI (19–49?kg?m?2; P<0.05; n=61). There was no difference in TauT expression between placentas of ideal weight and obese class III (BMI?40) subjects. Long-term exposure (48?h) of placental villous explants to leptin or IL-6 did not affect TauT activity. Conclusions: Placental TauT activity at term is negatively related to maternal BMI. We propose that the reduction in placental TauT activity in maternal obesity could lower syncytiotrophoblast taurine concentration, compromise placental development and function, and reduce the driving force for taurine efflux to the fetus, thereby increasing the risk of poor pregnancy outcome. PMID:25547282

  19. A systematic review of the relationship between severe maternal morbidity and post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of severe maternal morbidity is increasing in high-income countries as a consequence, in part, of increased obstetric intervention and increasingly complex medical needs of women who become pregnant. Access to emergency obstetric care means that for the majority of women in these countries, an experience of severe maternal morbidity is unlikely to result in loss of life. However, little is known about the subsequent impact on postnatal psychological health resulting in an evidence gap to support provision of appropriate care for these women. There has recently been increasing recognition that childbirth can be a cause of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The combination of experiencing a life-threatening complication and its management may culminate in psychological trauma. This systematic review examined the association between women’s experience of severe maternal morbidity during labour, at the time of giving birth or within the first week following birth, and PTSD and its symptoms. Methods Relevant literature was identified through multiple databases, including MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, Web of Science, Cochrane library and the British Library, using predetermined search strategies. The search terms included "post-traumatic stress disorder", "PTSD", "stress disorders, post-traumatic", "maternal morbidity", “pregnancy complications” “puerperal disorders”, "obstetric labo(u)r complication", "postpartum h(a)emorrhage", "eclampsia”. Studies identified were categorised according to pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The quality of included studies was assessed using the relevant CASP appraisal tools. Results Eleven primary studies met review criteria. Evidence of a relationship between severe maternal morbidity and PTSD/PTSD symptoms was inconsistent and findings varied between studies. Nevertheless, there is some evidence that severe pre-eclampsia is a risk factor for PTSD and its symptoms, an association possibly mediated by other factors such as fetal/neonatal condition. Conclusions Despite the absence of robust evidence regarding the relationship between severe maternal morbidity and PTSD/PTSD symptoms, it is crucially important that clinicians and policy makers are aware of a potential higher risk of PTSD among women who experience severe morbidity. Further studies are now needed to confirm this risk as well as to understand underlying mechanisms in order to minimise the longer term psychiatric impact of severe maternal morbidity. PMID:23140343

  20. Interventions for the control of diarrhoeal diseases among young children: prevention of low birth weight*

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Ann; Feachem, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of low birth weight (LBW) on diarrhoea morbidity and mortality is analysed and interventions to increase birth weights are reviewed. Birth weight is a major determinant of infant mortality and, in developed countries at least, its effect on neonatal mortality is independent of socioeconomic status. We have located no satisfactory data on LBW as a determinant of diarrhoea mortality or morbidity. The strong association between LBW and mortality, however, makes it likely that there is an association between LBW and diarrhoea mortality in developing countries where diarrhoea is a major cause of infant death. Poor maternal nutrition, certain infections, pre-eclampsia, arduous work after mid-pregnancy, short birth intervals, and teenage pregnancy are likely to be causally associated with LBW in developing countries. Tobacco and alcohol consumption are additional risk factors. Of the interventions examined, maternal food supplementation has been the most studied. If targeted to mothers at nutritional risk, and if the food is consumed in addition to the usual diet, the prevalence of LBW can be expected to be reduced. However, food supplementation can be expensive and the results from carefully supervised feeding trials may be better than those that can be achieved in national programmes. The effect of supplementation with iron, zinc or folate requires further study. If it were possible to intervene in maternal nutrition, health and life-style in a developing country in a way that reduced the prevalence of LBW from around 30% to around 15%, a fall in the infant mortality rate of around 26% would be expected. The fall in infant diarrhoea mortality rate might be similar. The scarce data on relative risk of morbidity by birth weight do not allow any comparable computations for morbidity reductions to be made. This review confirms that whatever its association with diarrhoea, LBW is an important determinant of infant mortality. For the more general goal of reducing infant mortality it is necessary to know more about the nature, etiology, and prevention of LBW in developing countries. PMID:3886185

  1. Levothyroxine treatment and pregnancy outcome in women with subclinical hypothyroidism undergoing assisted reproduction technologies: systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs.

    PubMed

    Velkeniers, B; Van Meerhaeghe, A; Poppe, K; Unuane, D; Tournaye, H; Haentjens, P

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous meta-analyses of observational data indicate that pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. Potential benefits of levothyroxine (LT4) supplementation remain unclear, and no systematic review or meta-analysis of trial findings is available in a setting of assisted reproduction technologies (ART). METHODS Relevant trials published until August 2012 were identified by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register databases and bibliographies of retrieved publications without language restrictions. RESULTS From 630 articles retrieved, we included three trials with data on 220 patients. One of these three trials stated 'live delivery' as outcome. LT4 treatment resulted in a significantly higher delivery rate, with a pooled relative risk (RR) of 2.76 (95% confidence limits 1.20-6.44; P = 0.018; I(2) = 70%), a pooled absolute risk difference (ARD) of 36.3% (3.5-69.0%: P = 0.030) and a summary number needed to treat (NNT) of 3 (1-28) in favour of LT4 supplementation. LT4 treatment significantly lowered miscarriage rate with a pooled RR of 0.45 (0.24-0.82; P = 0.010; I(2) = 26%), a pooled ARD of -31.3% (-48.2 to -14.5%: P < 0.001) and a summary NNT of 3 (2-7) in favour of LT4 supplementation. LT4 treatment had no effect on clinical pregnancy (RR 1.75; 0.90-3.38; P = 0.098; I(2) = 82%). In an ART setting, no data are available on the effects of LT4 supplementation on premature delivery, arterial hypertension, placental abruption or pre-eclampsia. CONCLUSIONS Our meta-analyses provide evidence that LT4 supplementation should be recommended to improve clinical pregnancy outcome in women with subclinical hypothyroidism and/or thyroid autoimmunity undergoing ART. Further research is needed to determine pregnancy outcome after close monitoring of thyroid function to maintain thyroid-stimulating hormone and free T4 levels within the trimester-specific reference ranges for pregnancy. PMID:23327883

  2. Differential effects of complement activation products c3a and c5a on cardiovascular function in hypertensive pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Lillegard, Kathryn E; Loeks-Johnson, Alex C; Opacich, Jonathan W; Peterson, Jenna M; Bauer, Ashley J; Elmquist, Barbara J; Regal, Ronald R; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Regal, Jean F

    2014-11-01

    Early-onset pre-eclampsia is characterized by decreased placental perfusion, new-onset hypertension, angiogenic imbalance, and endothelial dysfunction associated with excessive activation of the innate immune complement system. Although our previous studies demonstrated that inhibition of complement activation attenuates placental ischemia-induced hypertension using the rat reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model, the important product(s) of complement activation has yet to be identified. We hypothesized that antagonism of receptors for complement activation products C3a and C5a would improve vascular function and attenuate RUPP hypertension. On gestational day (GD) 14, rats underwent sham surgery or vascular clip placement on ovarian arteries and abdominal aorta (RUPP). Rats were treated once daily with the C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRA), PMX51 (acetyl-F-[Orn-P-(D-Cha)-WR]), the C3a receptor antagonist (C3aRA), SB290157 (N(2)-[(2,2-diphenylethoxy)acetyl]-l-arginine), or vehicle from GD 14-18. Both the C3aRA and C5aRA attenuated placental ischemia-induced hypertension without affecting the decreased fetal weight or decreased concentration of free circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also present in this model. The C5aRA, but not the C3aRA, attenuated placental ischemia-induced increase in heart rate and impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. The C3aRA abrogated the acute pressor response to C3a peptide injection, but it also unexpectedly attenuated the placental ischemia-induced increase in C3a, suggesting nonreceptor-mediated effects. Overall, these results indicate that both C3a and C5a are important products of complement activation that mediate the hypertension regardless of the reduction in free plasma VEGF. The mechanism by which C3a contributes to placental ischemia-induced hypertension appears to be distinct from that of C5a, and management of pregnancy-induced hypertension is likely to require a broad anti-inflammatory approach. PMID:25150279