Science.gov

Sample records for pre-employment chest radiographs

  1. The futility of universal pre-employment chest radiographs.

    PubMed Central

    Lohiya, Ghan-Shyam; Tan-Figueroa, Lilia; Lohiya, Piyush; Bui, De

    2006-01-01

    In a developmental center, a preemployment chest x-ray was required for all job applicants. We scrutinized the pros and cons of this practice through a review of the medical literature and our experience, and discussion with our colleagues. We concluded that such chest x-ray caused unwarranted radiation exposure, did not produce compliance with the tuberculosis laws, gave a false sense of security regarding workers' compensation risk management, was contrary to established occupational medicine practice guidelines, and was unnecessary and wasteful. We discontinued such chest x-rays. The purpose of the pre-employment examination should remain narrowly job related. Even long-established procedures require periodic utilization review. PMID:17225852

  2. Approach to Pediatric Chest Radiograph.

    PubMed

    Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Chest radiograph remains the first line imaging modality even today, especially in ICU settings. Hence proper interpretation of chest radiographs is crucial, which can be achieved by adopting a systematic approach and proper description and identification of abnormalities. In this review, the authors describe a short and comprehensive way of interpreting the pediatric chest radiograph. PMID:26983619

  3. Common errors in evaluating chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Mann, H

    1990-01-01

    Chest radiographs that are correctly obtained and interpreted provide valuable diagnostic information. However, some radiographs are not taken at total lung capacity, and the appearance of the lungs on film may mimic certain lung disorders. Most common interpretive pitfalls in chest radiography can be avoided by physicians who are familiar with the film appearance of varying degrees of lung inflation, technical limitations of portable radiography, and common chest abnormalities. When further definition is necessary, additional projections should be obtained. Chest fluoroscopy and computed tomography can offer further clarification, if needed. PMID:2296566

  4. Enhancement of chest radiographs using eigenimage processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bones, Philip J.; Butler, Anthony P. H.; Hurrell, Michael

    2006-08-01

    Frontal chest radiographs ("chest X-rays") are routinely used by medical personnel to assess patients for a wide range of suspected disorders. Often large numbers of images need to be analyzed. Furthermore, at times the images need to analyzed ("reported") when no radiological expert is available. A system which enhances the images in such a way that abnormalities are more obvious is likely to reduce the chance that an abnormality goes unnoticed. The authors previously reported the use of principal components analysis to derive a basis set of eigenimages from a training set made up of images from normal subjects. The work is here extended to investigate how best to emphasize the abnormalities in chest radiographs. Results are also reported for various forms of image normalizing transformations used in performing the eigenimage processing.

  5. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest radiographs required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chest radiographs required for miners. 37.3 Section... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic Examinations § 37.3 Chest radiographs required for miners. (a) Voluntary examinations. Every operator must provide to...

  6. Unsupervised segmentation of lungs from chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Payel; Antani, Sameer K.; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes our preliminary investigations for deriving and characterizing coarse-level textural regions present in the lung field on chest radiographs using unsupervised grow-cut (UGC), a cellular automaton based unsupervised segmentation technique. The segmentation has been performed on a publicly available data set of chest radiographs. The algorithm is useful for this application because it automatically converges to a natural segmentation of the image from random seed points using low-level image features such as pixel intensity values and texture features. Our goal is to develop a portable screening system for early detection of lung diseases for use in remote areas in developing countries. This involves developing automated algorithms for screening x-rays as normal/abnormal with a high degree of sensitivity, and identifying lung disease patterns on chest x-rays. Automatically deriving and quantitatively characterizing abnormal regions present in the lung field is the first step toward this goal. Therefore, region-based features such as geometrical and pixel-value measurements were derived from the segmented lung fields. In the future, feature selection and classification will be performed to identify pathological conditions such as pulmonary tuberculosis on chest radiographs. Shape-based features will also be incorporated to account for occlusions of the lung field and by other anatomical structures such as the heart and diaphragm.

  7. Bone suppression technique for chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Jane; Zhao, Hui; Hobbs, Susan K.; Wandtke, John C.; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Paul, Narinder; Foos, David

    2014-03-01

    High-contrast bone structures are a major noise contributor in chest radiographic images. A signal of interest in a chest radiograph could be either partially or completely obscured or "overshadowed" by the highly contrasted bone structures in its surrounding. Thus, removing the bone structures, especially the posterior rib and clavicle structures, is highly desirable to increase the visibility of soft tissue density. We developed an innovative technology that offers a solution to suppress bone structures, including posterior ribs and clavicles, on conventional and portable chest X-ray images. The bone-suppression image processing technology includes five major steps: 1) lung segmentation, 2) rib and clavicle structure detection, 3) rib and clavicle edge detection, 4) rib and clavicle profile estimation, and 5) suppression based on the estimated profiles. The bone-suppression software outputs an image with both the rib and clavicle structures suppressed. The rib suppression performance was evaluated on 491 images. On average, 83.06% (±6.59%) of the rib structures on a standard chest image were suppressed based on the comparison of computer-identified rib areas against hand-drawn rib areas, which is equivalent to about an average of one rib that is still visible on a rib-suppressed image based on a visual assessment. Reader studies were performed to evaluate reader performance in detecting lung nodules and pneumothoraces with and without a bone-suppression companion view. Results from reader studies indicated that the bone-suppression technology significantly improved radiologists' performance in the detection of CT-confirmed possible nodules and pneumothoraces on chest radiographs. The results also showed that radiologists were more confident in making diagnoses regarding the presence or absence of an abnormality after rib-suppressed companion views were presented

  8. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest radiographs required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chest radiographs required for miners. 37.3 Section... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.3 Chest radiographs required for miners. (a) Voluntary examinations. Every operator...

  9. Segmentation of ribs in digital chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Lin; Guo, Wei; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Ribs and clavicles in posterior-anterior (PA) digital chest radiographs often overlap with lung abnormalities such as nodules, and cause missing of these abnormalities, it is therefore necessary to remove or reduce the ribs in chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to develop a fully automated algorithm to segment ribs within lung area in digital radiography (DR) for removal of the ribs. The rib segmentation algorithm consists of three steps. Firstly, a radiograph was pre-processed for contrast adjustment and noise removal; second, generalized Hough transform was employed to localize the lower boundary of the ribs. In the third step, a novel bilateral dynamic programming algorithm was used to accurately segment the upper and lower boundaries of ribs simultaneously. The width of the ribs and the smoothness of the rib boundaries were incorporated in the cost function of the bilateral dynamic programming for obtaining consistent results for the upper and lower boundaries. Our database consisted of 93 DR images, including, respectively, 23 and 70 images acquired with a DR system from Shanghai United-Imaging Healthcare Co. and from GE Healthcare Co. The rib localization algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 98.2% with 0.1 false positives per image. The accuracy of the detected ribs was further evaluated subjectively in 3 levels: "1", good; "2", acceptable; "3", poor. The percentages of good, acceptable, and poor segmentation results were 91.1%, 7.2%, and 1.7%, respectively. Our algorithm can obtain good segmentation results for ribs in chest radiography and would be useful for rib reduction in our future study.

  10. Image analysis of chest radiographs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, J.L.

    1982-06-01

    The report demonstrates the feasibility of using a computer for automated interpretation of chest radiographs for pneumoconiosis. The primary goal of this project was to continue testing and evaluating the prototype system with a larger set of films. After review of the final contract report and a review of the current literature, it was clear that several modifications to the prototype system were needed before the project could continue. These modifications can be divided into two general areas. The first area was in improving the stability of the system and compensating for the diversity of film quality which exists in films obtained in a surveillance program. Since the system was to be tested with a large number of films, it was impractical to be extremely selective of film quality. The second area is in terms of processing time. With a large set of films, total processing time becomes much more significant. An image display was added to the system so that the computer determined lung boundaries could be verified for each film. A film handling system was also added, enabling the system to scan films continuously without attendance.

  11. Computer Analysis Of ILO Standard Chest Radiographs Of Pneumoconiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. C.; Shu, David B. C.; Tai, H. T.; Hou, W.; Kunkle, G. A.; Wang, Y.; Hoy, R. J.

    1982-11-01

    This paper presents study of computer analysis of the 1980 ILO standard chest radiographs of pneumoconiosis. Algorithms developed for detection of individual small rounded and irregular opacities have been experimented and evaluated on these standard radiographs. The density, shape, and size distribution of the detected objects in the lung field, in spite of false positives, can be used as indicators for the beginning of pneumoconiosis. This approach is potentially useful in computer-assisted screening and early detection process where the annual chest radiograph of each worker is compared with his (her) own normal radiograph obtained previously.

  12. 42 CFR 37.60 - Submitting required chest radiograph classification and miner identification documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Submitting required chest radiograph classification... OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of Chest Radiographs § 37.60 Submitting required chest radiograph classification and...

  13. Enhancement and compression of digital chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Cohn, M; Trefler, M; Young, T Y

    1990-01-01

    The application of digital technologies to chest radiography holds the promise of routine application of image processing techniques to effect image enhancement. Because of their inherent spatial resolution, however, digital chest images impose severe constraints on data storage devices. Compression of these images will relax such constraints and facilitate image transmission on a digital network. We evaluated an algorithm for enhancing digital chest images that has allowed significant data compression while improving the diagnostic quality of the image. This algorithm is based on the photographic technique of unsharp masking. Image quality was measured with respect to the task of tumor detection and compression ratios as high as 2:1 were achieved. This compression can be supplemented by irreversible methods. PMID:2299708

  14. Chest radiographic data acquisition and quality assurance in multicenter studies

    PubMed Central

    Schluchter, Mark; Wood, Beverly P.; Berdon, Walter E.; Boechat, M. Ines; Easley, Kirk A.; Meziane, Moulay; Mellins, Robert B.; Norton, Karen I.; Singleton, Edward; Trautwein, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Multicenter studies rely on data derived from different institutions. Forms can be designed to standardize the reporting process allowing reliable comparison of data. Objective The purpose of the report is to provide a standardized method, developed as a part of a multicenter study of vertically transmitted HIV, for assessing chest radiographic results. Materials and methods Eight hundred and five infants and children were studied at five centers; 3057 chest radiographs were scored. Data were entered using a forced-choice, graded response for 12 findings. Quality assurance measures and inter- rater agreement statistics are reported. Results The form used for reporting chest radiographic results is presented. Inter-rater agreement was moderate to high for most findings, with the best correlation reported for the presence of bronchovascular markings and/or reticular densities addressed as a composite question (kappa = 0.71). The presence of nodular densities (kappa = 0.56) and parenchymal consolidation (kappa = 0.57) had moderate agreement. Agreement for lung volume was low. Conclusion The current tool, developed for use in the pediatric population, is applicable to any study involving the assessment of pediatric chest radiographs for a large population, whether at one or many centers. PMID:9361051

  15. Eliminating rib shadows in chest radiographic images providing diagnostic assistance.

    PubMed

    Oğul, Hasan; Oğul, B Buket; Ağıldere, A Muhteşem; Bayrak, Tuncay; Sümer, Emre

    2016-04-01

    A major difficulty with chest radiographic analysis is the invisibility of abnormalities caused by the superimposition of normal anatomical structures, such as ribs, over the main tissue to be examined. Suppressing the ribs with no information loss about the original tissue would therefore be helpful during manual identification or computer-aided detection of nodules on a chest radiographic image. In this study, we introduce a two-step algorithm for eliminating rib shadows in chest radiographic images. The algorithm first delineates the ribs using a novel hybrid self-template approach and then suppresses these delineated ribs using an unsupervised regression model that takes into account the change in proximal thickness (depth) of bone in the vertical axis. The performance of the system is evaluated using a benchmark set of real chest radiographic images. The experimental results determine that proposed method for rib delineation can provide higher accuracy than existing methods. The knowledge of rib delineation can remarkably improve the nodule detection performance of a current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system. It is also shown that the rib suppression algorithm can increase the nodule visibility by eliminating rib shadows while mostly preserving the nodule intensity. PMID:26775736

  16. 42 CFR 37.4 - Chest radiographic examinations conducted by the Secretary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chest radiographic examinations conducted by the... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic Examinations § 37.4 Chest radiographic examinations conducted by the Secretary. (a) The Secretary will...

  17. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-film. 37.50 Section 37.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Radiographs § 37.50 Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs—film. (a) Chest radiographs must...

  18. Reassessing the standard chest radiograph for intraparenchymal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Putman, C.E.; Hoeck, B.

    1986-01-01

    The results concerning the activity or inactivity of the alveolitis determined with our proposed scoring system were comparable to those determined with gallium scanning in 68.2% of the patients with biopsy-proven sarcoidosis in our study. Certainly, further evaluation of a larger series of patients over a longer period of time will be required to more adequately evaluate this classification method. We also believe this methodology is reproducible and can be utilized by experienced interpreters of chest radiographs. If we closely reevaluate the 32% of the cases in which the radiographic results disagreed with the gallium assessment of activity, two points worthy of mention become evident. In one group the gallium indices were borderline for activity whereas in the other group the radiographic criteria were most likely indicative of irreversible parenchymal changes. When the radiographs for the latter group were reevaluated for signs of fibrosis such as volume loss, cystic changes, and alteration in vascular patterns, it was possible to delineate a significant false-positive group of patients. We will be reporting the long-term results of our observations over the next several years as well as adding more groups of patients to our initial study analysis. At that time, correlation with all other measurable parameters in determining high-intensity alveolitis versus low-intensity alveolitis will be compared to these new chest radiographic profiles.

  19. Use of chest radiographs in epidemiological investigations of pneumoconioses.

    PubMed Central

    Mulloy, K B; Coultas, D B; Samet, J M

    1993-01-01

    The International Labour Organisation (ILO) classification of radiographs of pneumoconioses was developed to limit variation in classification of parenchymal abnormalities. In this study the manner in which chest radiographs were interpreted in 134 investigations reported in four peer reviewed journals during the five year period 1985-90 was examined. The approach for applying the ILO system was poorly described in most studies. For example, of 86 investigations using more than one reader, 66.3% described the method of reconciliation, but methods were not consistent among investigations. Our results indicate a number of potential problems in application of the ILO system, and gaps in existing recommendations that should be considered. PMID:8457495

  20. Automatic segmentation of lung fields on chest radiographic images.

    PubMed

    Carreira, M J; Cabello, D; Mosquera, A

    1999-06-01

    In this work we have implemented a system for the automatic segmentation of lung fields in chest radiographic images. The image analysis process is carried out in three levels. In the first one we perform operations on the image that are independent from domain knowledge. This knowledge is implicitly and not very elaborately used in the intermediate level and used in an explicit manner in the high level block, globally corresponding to the idea of progressive segmentation. The representation of knowledge in the high level block is in the form of production rules. The control structure is in general bottom-up but there are certain hybrid control stages, in which the control is driven by the region model (main organs) we are seeking. We have applied the global system to a set of 45 posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs, obtaining a mean degree of overlap with contours drawn by radiologists of 87%. PMID:10356306

  1. A Computer-Aided Detection System for Digital Chest Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-de-Gea, Juan Manuel; García-Mateos, Ginés; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Hernández-Hernández, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Computer-aided detection systems aim at the automatic detection of diseases using different medical imaging modalities. In this paper, a novel approach to detecting normality/pathology in digital chest radiographs is proposed. The problem tackled is complicated since it is not focused on particular diseases but anything that differs from what is considered as normality. First, the areas of interest of the chest are found using template matching on the images. Then, a texture descriptor called local binary patterns (LBP) is computed for those areas. After that, LBP histograms are applied in a classifier algorithm, which produces the final normality/pathology decision. Our experimental results show the feasibility of the proposal, with success rates above 87% in the best cases. Moreover, our technique is able to locate the possible areas of pathology in nonnormal radiographs. Strengths and limitations of the proposed approach are described in the Conclusions. PMID:27372536

  2. Radiographic findings in the chest of patients following cardiac transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, K.K.; Amendola, M.A.; Tisnado, J.; Cho, S.R.; Beachley, M.C.; Lower, R.R.

    1983-04-01

    The postoperative chest radiographic findings in 38 patients undergoing orthotopic (37 patients) and heterotopic (1 patient) cardiac transplantation were evaluated. Findings were correlated with those of echocardiograms, sputum and blood cultures, and lung and heart biopsies. The radiographic manifestations in the chest of these patients are classified in the following three main categories: 1) newly formed cardiac silhouette findings due to the transplanted heart itself, i.e., changes in size and shape of the new heart and pericardial effusion resulting from the placement of a smaller heart in a larger pericardial sac. 2) infectious complications due to bacteria, fungal, and other opportunistic agents secondary to immunosuppressive therapy, and 3) usual postoperative complications following thoracomoty and open-heart surgery.

  3. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-film. 37.50 Section 37.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs—film. (a) Chest radiographs must be interpreted and...

  4. Digital replication of chest radiographs without altering diagnostic observer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Michael J.; Davies, Eric; Spizarny, David; Beute, Gordon H.; Peterson, Edward; Eyler, William R.; Gross, Barry; Chen, Ji

    1991-05-01

    A study to test the ability of a high-fidelity system to digitize chest radiographs, store the data in a computer, and reprint the film without altering diagnostic observer performance is reported. Two hundred and fifty-two (252) chest films with subtle image features indicative of interstitial disease, pulmonary nodule, or pneumothorax, along with 36 normal chest films were used in the study. Films were selected from a key word search on a computerized report archive and were graded by two experienced radiologists. Each film was digitized with 86 micron pixels and stored in 4000 X 5000 arrays using a research instrument. Replicates were printed using a commercial laser film printer (Eastman Kodak Company) having 80 micron pixels. Originals and replicates were observed separately by two different experienced radiologists. Each indicated a graded response for the three possible pathologies. The agreement of observers between responses for replicates and originals was described by the kappa statistic and compared to the agreement when rereading the original film. The final result of this study supports a hypothesis that the replicate is indistinguishable from the original.

  5. Usefulness of chest radiographs in first asthma attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Gershel, J.C.; Goldman, H.S.; Stein, R.E.K.; Shelov, S.P.; Ziprkowski, M.

    1983-08-11

    To assess the value of routine chest radiography during acute first attacks of asthma, we studied 371 consecutive children over one year of age who presented with an initial episode of wheezing. Three hundred fifty children (94.3%) had radiographic findings that were compatible with uncomplicated asthma and were considered negative. Twenty-one (5.7%) had positive findings: atelectasis and pneumonia were noted in seven, segmental atelectasis in six, pneumonia in five, multiple areas of subsegmental atelectasis in two, and pneumomediastinum in one. The patients with positive films were more likely to have a respiratory rate above 60 or a pulse rate above 160 (P < 0.001), localized rales or localized decreased breath sounds before treatment (P < 0.01), and localized rales (P < 0.005) and localized wheezing (P < 0.02) after treatment; also, these patients were admitted to the hospital more often (P < 0.001). Ninety-five percent (20 of 21) of the children with positive films could be identified before treatment on the basis of a combination of tachypnea, tachycardia, fever, and localized rales or localized decreased breath sounds. Most first-time wheezers will not have positive radiographs; careful clinical evaluation should reveal which patients will have abnormal radiographs and will therefore benefit from the procedure. 20 references, 3 tables.

  6. 42 CFR 37.51 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-digital radiography systems. 37.51 Section 37.51 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic...

  7. Fully automated scoring of chest radiographs in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Zhao; Cai, Weidong; Song, Yang; Selvadurai, Hiran; Feng, David Dagan

    2013-01-01

    We present a prototype of a fully automated scoring system for chest radiographs (CXRs) in cystic fibrosis. The system was used to analyze real, clinical CXR data, to estimate the Shwachman-Kulczycki score for the image. Images were resampled and normalized to a standard size and intensity level, then segmented with a patch-based nearest-neighbor mapping algorithm. Texture features were calculated regionally and globally, using Tamura features, local binary patterns (LBP), gray-level co-occurrence matrix and Gabor filtering. Feature selection was guided by current understanding of the disease process, in particular the reorganization and thickening of airways. Combinations of these features were used as inputs for support vector machine (SVM) learning to classify each CXR, and evaluated using two-fold cross-validation for agreement with clinician scoring. The final computed score for each image was compared with the score assigned by a physician. Using this prototype system, we analyzed 139 CXRs from an Australian pediatric cystic fibrosis registry, for which texture directionality showed greatest discriminating power. Computed scores agreed with clinician scores in 75% of cases, and up to 90% of cases in discriminating severe disease from mild disease, similar to the level of human interobserver agreement for this dataset. PMID:24110600

  8. System for pathology categorization and retrieval in chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avni, Uri; Greenspan, Hayit; Konen, Eli; Sharon, Michal; Goldberger, Jacob

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we present an overview of a system we have been developing for the past several years for efficient image categorization and retrieval in large radiograph archives. The methodology is based on local patch representation of the image content, using a bag of visual words approach and similarity-based categorization with a kernel based SVM classifier. We show an application to pathology-level categorization of chest x-ray data, the most popular examination in radiology. Our study deals with pathology detection and identification of individual pathologies including right and left pleural effusion, enlarged heart and cases of enlarged mediastinum. The input from a radiologist provided a global label for the entire image (healthy/pathology), and the categorization was conducted on the entire image, with no need for segmentation algorithms or any geometrical rules. An automatic diagnostic-level categorization, even on such an elementary level as healthy vs pathological, provides a useful tool for radiologists on this popular and important examination. This is a first step towards similarity-based categorization, which has a major clinical implications for computer-assisted diagnostics.

  9. On your toes: Detecting mediastinal air on the chest radiograph in ecstasy abusers.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Mergan; Govind, Mayuri

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal mediastinal air may be caused by inhalational illicit drug use subsequent to barotrauma resulting from coughing after deep inhalation and breath holding. It may also arise from oesophageal rupture due to retching after ingestion of the illicit drug. The history can alert the practitioner to this cause of chest pain. As chest radiographs are widely accessible and mediastinal air is easily recognisable, the chest radiograph should be included and carefully scrutinised in the diagnostic workup of chest pain in the recreational drug abuser. It is prudent to exclude oesophageal rupture, particularly in the setting of retching, before deciding on conservative and expectant management. PMID:27138662

  10. 42 CFR 37.51 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... standard digital chest radiographic images provided for use with the Guidelines for the Use of the ILO... NIOSH-approved standard digital images may be used for classifying digital chest images for pneumoconiosis. Modification of the appearance of the standard images using software tools is not permitted....

  11. Simulating nodules in chest radiographs with real nodules from multi-slice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilham, Arnold; van Ginneken, Bram

    2006-03-01

    To improve the detection of nodules in chest radiographs, large databases of chest radiographs with annotated, proven nodules are needed for training of both radiologists and computer-aided detection systems. The construction of such databases is a laborious and time-consuming task. This study presents a novel technique to produce large amounts of chest x-rays with annotated, simulated nodules. Realistic nodules in radiographs are generated using real nodules segmented from CT images. Results from an observer study indicate that the simulated nodules can not be distinguished from real nodules. This method has great potential to aid the development of automated detection systems and to generate teaching files for human observers.

  12. Effect of morphing between unenhanced and multiscale enhanced chest radiographs on pulmonary nodule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Zöhrer, Fabian; Harz, Markus T.; McEntee, Mark; Hahn, Horst K.; Haygood, Tamara; Evanoff, Michael G.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2012-02-01

    Aim: This study aims to determine the effectiveness of a novel image-processing algorithm for multi-scale enhancement of chest radiographs to improve detection and localization of real pulmonary nodules. Background: Our wavelet-based enhancement method interactively adjusts the contrast of medical images extracting the spatial frequency components at different scales, followed by a weighting procedure. This study aims to explore the usefulness of this novel procedure for chest image reporting. Method: Sixteen radiologists viewed 50 PA chest radiographs in order to localize pulmonary nodules. The databank contains 25 normal and 25 abnormal images, with multi-nodule cases. Subjects were allowed to mark unlimited number of locations followed by ranking confidence of nodule presence according to a 5-level scale. Subjects viewed all cases at least in two out of three conditions: unprocessed, enhanced and with morphing between these two. MCMR ROC and JAFROC analyses were conducted. Results: No significant differences were found in ROC AUC values across modalities and specialities. Only localization performance with morphing tool is significantly higher (F(1,8)=13.303, p=0.007) for chest expert (JAFROC FOM=0.6355) from non-chest (JAFROC FOM=0.4675) radiologists. Conclusion: Radiologists specialized in chest image interpretation performed consistently well in localizing pulmonary nodules, whereas non-chest radiologists were suffer from distracting effect of morphing tool.

  13. An improved automatic computer aided tube detection and labeling system on chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, Bharath; Brown, Matthew; Goldin, Jonathan; Cagnon, Christopher; Enzmann, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    Tubes like Endotracheal (ET) tube used to maintain patient's airway and the Nasogastric (NG) tube used to feed the patient and drain contents of the stomach are very commonly used in Intensive Care Units (ICU). The placement of these tubes is critical for their proper functioning and improper tube placement can even be fatal. Bedside chest radiographs are considered the quickest and safest method to check the placement of these tubes. Tertiary ICU's typically generate over 250 chest radiographs per day to confirm tube placement. This paper develops a new fully automatic prototype computer-aided detection (CAD) system for tube detection on bedside chest radiographs. The core of the CAD system is the randomized algorithm which selects tubes based on their average repeatability from seed points. The CAD algorithm is designed as a 5 stage process: Preprocessing (removing borders, histogram equalization, anisotropic filtering), Anatomy Segmentation (to identify neck, esophagus, abdomen ROI's), Seed Generation, Region Growing and Tube Selection. The preliminary evaluation was carried out on 64 cases. The prototype CAD system was able to detect ET tubes with a True Positive Rate of 0.93 and False Positive Rate of 0.02/image and NG tubes with a True Positive Rate of 0.84 and False Positive Rate of 0.02/image respectively. The results from the prototype system show that it is feasible to automatically detect both tubes on chest radiographs, with the potential to significantly speed the delivery of imaging services while maintaining high accuracy.

  14. 78 FR 53645 - Black Lung Benefits Act: Standards for Chest Radiographs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs 20 CFR Parts 718 and 725 RIN 1240-AA07 Black Lung Benefits Act: Standards for Chest Radiographs AGENCY: Office of Workers' Compensation Programs, Labor. ACTION: Direct final rule; withdrawal. SUMMARY: The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) published a...

  15. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vela, Rene H.; Correa, Jose

    1976-01-01

    The article describes the development of a pre-employment laboratory training program in meat processing and its successful use in conjunction with a cooperative training program in a high school agriculture curriculum. (MS)

  16. Computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs based on morphometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li, Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Straus, Christopher; Vokes, Tamara; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    Vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporosis-related fractures. It is important to detect vertebral fractures, because they are associated with increased risk of subsequent fractures, and because pharmacologic therapy can reduce the risk of subsequent fractures. Although vertebral fractures are often not clinically recognized, they can be visualized on lateral chest radiographs taken for other purposes. However, only 15-60% of vertebral fractures found on lateral chest radiographs are mentioned in radiology reports. The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs in order to assist radiologists' image interpretation. Our computerized method is based on the automated identification of upper and lower vertebral edges. In order to develop the scheme, radiologists provided morphometric data for each identifiable vertebra, which consisted of six points for each vertebra, for 25 normals and 20 cases with severe fractures. Anatomical information was obtained from morphometric data of normal cases in terms of vertebral heights, heights of vertebral disk spaces, and vertebral centerline. Computerized detection of vertebral fractures was based on the reduction in the heights of fractured vertebrae compared to adjacent vertebrae and normal reference data. Vertebral heights from morphometric data on normal cases were used as reference. On 138 chest radiographs (20 with fractures) the sensitivity of our method for detection of fracture cases was 95% (19/20) with 0.93 (110/118) false-positives per image. In conclusion, the computerized method would be useful for detection of potentially overlooked vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs.

  17. Multi-scale Morphological Image Enhancement of Chest Radiographs by a Hybrid Scheme.

    PubMed

    Alavijeh, Fatemeh Shahsavari; Mahdavi-Nasab, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Chest radiography is a common diagnostic imaging test, which contains an enormous amount of information about a patient. However, its interpretation is highly challenging. The accuracy of the diagnostic process is greatly influenced by image processing algorithms; hence enhancement of the images is indispensable in order to improve visibility of the details. This paper aims at improving radiograph parameters such as contrast, sharpness, noise level, and brightness to enhance chest radiographs, making use of a triangulation method. Here, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization technique and noise suppression are simultaneously performed in wavelet domain in a new scheme, followed by morphological top-hat and bottom-hat filtering. A unique implementation of morphological filters allows for adjustment of the image brightness and significant enhancement of the contrast. The proposed method is tested on chest radiographs from Japanese Society of Radiological Technology database. The results are compared with conventional enhancement techniques such as histogram equalization, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization, Retinex, and some recently proposed methods to show its strengths. The experimental results reveal that the proposed method can remarkably improve the image contrast while keeping the sensitive chest tissue information so that radiologists might have a more precise interpretation. PMID:25709942

  18. Multi-scale Morphological Image Enhancement of Chest Radiographs by a Hybrid Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Alavijeh, Fatemeh Shahsavari; Mahdavi-Nasab, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Chest radiography is a common diagnostic imaging test, which contains an enormous amount of information about a patient. However, its interpretation is highly challenging. The accuracy of the diagnostic process is greatly influenced by image processing algorithms; hence enhancement of the images is indispensable in order to improve visibility of the details. This paper aims at improving radiograph parameters such as contrast, sharpness, noise level, and brightness to enhance chest radiographs, making use of a triangulation method. Here, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization technique and noise suppression are simultaneously performed in wavelet domain in a new scheme, followed by morphological top-hat and bottom-hat filtering. A unique implementation of morphological filters allows for adjustment of the image brightness and significant enhancement of the contrast. The proposed method is tested on chest radiographs from Japanese Society of Radiological Technology database. The results are compared with conventional enhancement techniques such as histogram equalization, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization, Retinex, and some recently proposed methods to show its strengths. The experimental results reveal that the proposed method can remarkably improve the image contrast while keeping the sensitive chest tissue information so that radiologists might have a more precise interpretation. PMID:25709942

  19. Development of computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li, Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Nie, Yongkang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Several clinical trials indicated clearly that pharmacologic therapy for osteoporosis is effective for persons with vertebral fractures for preventing subsequent fractures. It is, therefore, important to diagnose vertebral fractures early. Although most vertebral fractures are asymptomatic, they can often be detected on lateral chest radiographs which may be obtained for other purposes. However, investigators have reported that vertebral fractures which were visible on lateral chest radiographs were underdiagnosed or underreported. Therefore, our purpose in this study was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs and to assist radiologists' image interpretation. Our computerized scheme is based on the detection of upper and lower edges of vertebrae on lateral chest images. A curved rectangular area which included a number of visible vertebrae was identified. This area was then straightened such that the upper and lower edges of the vertebrae were oriented horizontally. For detection of vertebral edges, line components were enhanced, and a multiple thresholding technique followed by image feature analysis was applied to the line enhanced image. Finally, vertebral heights determined from the detected vertebral edges were used for characterizing the shape of the vertebrae and for distinguishing fractured from normal vertebrae. Our preliminary results indicated that all of the severely fractured vertebrae in a small database were detected correctly by our computerized method.

  20. Optimum radiographic examination for consideration of compensation awards: I. General methodology and application to chest examination.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, R L; Hedgcock, M W; Williams, E A; Lyden, B J; Akin, J R; Gooding, G A; Ovenfors, C O

    1980-11-01

    A major goal of the radiologist is to devise methods to decrease health care costs and radiation exposure without sacrificing diagnostic accuracy. In a large Veterans Administration (VA) hospital, a prospective study was undertaken to determine the optimum number of radiographic projections needed to assess applicants for VA compensation for chest disease or injury claimed to be service-related. Three separate readings of every chest radiographic assessment could have been made from a single posteroanterior view. In eight cases, granulomas or mild hyperexpansion of the lungs were only appreciated using the lateral projection, but these findings were not clinically significant and did not affect decisions as to whether compensation sould be awarded. The only potentially serious lesion missed (a possible pulmonary nodule) using the posteroanterior view alone was also missed using the lateral and only suggested by the oblique views. Extrapolating these results to data on compensation examinations performed in the entire VA system (fiscal year 1978), it was concluded that limiting the radiographic examination of the chest to a single posteroanterior view would eliminate 150,000 radiographs in the evaluation of 190,000 applicants and yield an annual savings of almost $900,000. PMID:6778148

  1. Zone-based analysis for automated detection of abnormalities in chest radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, E-Fong; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Jui-Sheng; Chou, Ming-Chung; Liu, Gin-Chung

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop an automated method for detection of local texture-based and density-based abnormalities in chest radiographs. Methods: The method was based on profile analysis to detect abnormalities in chest radiographs. In the method, one density-based feature, Density Symmetry Index, and two texture-based features, Roughness Maximum Index and Roughness Symmetry Index, were used to detect abnormalities in the lung fields. In each chest radiograph, the lung fields were divided into four zones initially and then the method was applied to each zone separately. For each zone, Density Symmetry Index was obtained from the projection profile of each zone, and Roughness Maximum Index and Roughness Symmetry Index were obtained by measuring the roughness of the horizontal profiles via moving average technique. Linear discriminant analysis was used to classify normal and abnormal cases based on the three indices. The discriminant performance of the method was evaluated using ROC analysis. Results: The method was evaluated on a database of 250 normal and 250 abnormal chest images. In the optimized conditions, the zone-based performance Az of the method for zones 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.917, 0.897, 0.892, and 0.814, respectively, and the case-based performance Az of the method was 0.842. Our previous method for detection of gross abnormalities was also evaluated on the same database. The case-based performance of our previous method was 0.689. Conclusions: In comparing the previous method and the new method proposed in this study, there was a great improvement by the new method for detection of local texture-based and density-based abnormalities. The new method combined with the previous one has potential for screening abnormalities in chest radiographs.

  2. Hierarchical Markov random-field modeling for texture classification in chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Voracek, Rene; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.; Nolte, Loren W.; McAdams, Page

    1996-04-01

    A hierarchical Markov random field (MRF) modeling approach is presented for the classification of textures in selected regions of interest (ROIs) of chest radiographs. The procedure integrates possible texture classes and their spatial definition with other components present in an image such as noise and background trend. Classification is performed as a maximum a-posteriori (MAP) estimation of texture class and involves an iterative Gibbs- sampling technique. Two cases are studied: classification of lung parenchyma versus bone and classification of normal lung parenchyma versus miliary tuberculosis (MTB). Accurate classification was obtained for all examined cases showing the potential of the proposed modeling approach for texture analysis of radiographic images.

  3. Follow-up chest radiographs in Vietnam veterans: are they useful?

    PubMed

    Pollei, S; Mettler, F A; Kelsey, C A; Walters, M R; White, R E

    1986-10-01

    Agent Orange exposure and its long-term health consequences on Vietnam veterans have been widely discussed in the past few years. Myriad physical and mental disabilities have been studied with regard to exposure to various herbicides. The number of persons potentially exposed is large, since 2.4-2.8 million U.S. military personnel served in Vietnam. A case-control study was undertaken to determine if persons who served in the U.S. military in Vietnam have either cardiovascular or pulmonary effects that can be demonstrated on long-term follow-up chest radiographs. Information regarding military service in Vietnam was obtained from interviews and, in some cases, review of military records. Vietnam veterans did not have an increased prevalence of abnormalities on follow-up chest radiographs. A subset of Vietnam veterans who had greater estimated opportunities for Agent Orange exposure also did not appear to be at greater risk than the control population. PMID:3763850

  4. Novel Method to Improve Radiologist Agreement in Interpretation of Serial Chest Radiographs in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Denise A; Naqvi, Asad A; Manson, David; Flavin, Michael P; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Soboleski, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether a novel method and device, called a variable attenuation plate (VAP), which equalizes chest radiographic appearance and allows for synchronization of manual image windowing with comparison studies, would improve consistency in interpretation. Materials and Methods: Research ethics board approved the prospective cohort pilot study, which included 50 patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) undergoing two serial chest radiographs with a VAP placed on each one of them. The VAP allowed for equalization of density and contrast between the patients’ serial chest radiographs. Three radiologists interpreted all the studies with and without the use of VAP. Kappa and percent agreement was used to calculate agreement between radiologists’ interpretations with and without the plate. Results: Radiologist agreement was substantially higher with the VAP method, as compared to that with the non-VAP method. Kappa values between Radiologists A and B, A and C, and B and C were 46%, 55%, and 51%, respectively, which improved to 73%, 81%, and 66%, respectively, with the use of VAP. Discrepant report impressions (i.e., one radiologist's impression of unchanged versus one or both of the other radiologists stating improved or worsened in their impression) ranged from 24 to 28.6% without the use of VAP and from 10 to 16% with the use of VAP (χ2 = 7.454, P < 0.01). Opposing views (i.e., one radiologist's impression of improved and one of the others stating disease progression or vice versa) were reported in 7 (12%) cases in the non-VAP group and 4 (7%) cases in the VAP group (χ2 = 0.85, P = 0.54). Conclusion: Numerous factors play a role in image acquisition and image quality, which can contribute to poor consistency and reliability of portable chest radiographic interpretations. Radiologists’ agreement of image interpretation can be improved by use of a novel method consisting of a VAP and associated software and has the potential to improve

  5. Where Does It Lead? Imaging Features of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices on Chest Radiograph and CT

    PubMed Central

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Winter, Joachim; Blondin, Dirk; Fürst, Günter; Scherer, Axel; Miese, Falk R; Abbara, Suhny

    2011-01-01

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are being increasingly employed in patients suffering from cardiac rhythm disturbances. The principal objective of this article is to familiarize radiologists with pacemakers and ICDs on chest radiographs and CT scans. Therefore, the preferred lead positions according to pacemaker types and anatomic variants are introduced in this study. Additionally, the imaging features of incorrect lead positions and defects, as well as complications subsequent to pacemaker implantation are demonstrated herein. PMID:21927563

  6. Severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults: chest radiographic and CT findings

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dingyu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Zhiwei; Cao, Jian; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe adenovirus pneumonia and its associated imaging features are well-described in immunocompromised patients but are rare and poorly understood in immunocompetent adults. We sought to describe the radiographic and CT findings of severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in eight immunocompetent adults. Methods We reviewed systematically chest imaging manifestations of laboratory-confirmed severe adenovirus pneumonia in eight immunocompetent adults from April 2012 to April 2014. Results All patients showed abnormal results on initial chest radiograph and CT, with the exception of one normal initial chest radiograph. The abnormalities of the initial chest radiographs were unilateral (n=4) or bilateral (n=3), including consolidation (n=4), dense patchy opacity (n=3), ground glass opacity (GGO) (n=1), and pleural effusion (n=1). The initial CT findings consisted of unilateral (n=5) and bilateral (n=3) abnormalities, including consolidation (n=8), GGO (n=2), pleural effusion (n=3) and small nodules (n=1). Focal consolidation was the predominant finding in six patients whose initial CT scans were examined within one week after illness onset. Follow-up radiologic findings showed rapid development of bilateral consolidation within ten days after illness onset, usually accompanied by adjacent ground-glass opacity and pleural effusion. The parenchymal abnormalities began to absorb around two weeks after illness onset, with no appearances of fibrosis. Conclusions Severe adenovirus CAP in immunocompetent adults mainly appears as focal consolidation followed by rapid progression to bilateral consolidation, usually accompanied by adjacent GGO and pleural effusion, which may resemble bacterial pneumonia. Adenovirus should be considered in severe pneumonia cases with negative cultures and failure to respond to antibiotics. PMID:27162658

  7. Foreign object detection and removal to improve automated analysis of chest radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Hogeweg, Laurens; Sanchez, Clara I.; Melendez, Jaime; Maduskar, Pragnya; Ginneken, Bram van; Story, Alistair; Hayward, Andrew

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Chest radiographs commonly contain projections of foreign objects, such as buttons, brassier clips, jewellery, or pacemakers and wires. The presence of these structures can substantially affect the output of computer analysis of these images. An automated method is presented to detect, segment, and remove foreign objects from chest radiographs.Methods: Detection is performed using supervised pixel classification with a kNN classifier, resulting in a probability estimate per pixel to belong to a projected foreign object. Segmentation is performed by grouping and post-processing pixels with a probability above a certain threshold. Next, the objects are replaced by texture inpainting.Results: The method is evaluated in experiments on 257 chest radiographs. The detection at pixel level is evaluated with receiver operating characteristic analysis on pixels within the unobscured lung fields and an A{sub z} value of 0.949 is achieved. Free response operator characteristic analysis is performed at the object level, and 95.6% of objects are detected with on average 0.25 false positive detections per image. To investigate the effect of removing the detected objects through inpainting, a texture analysis system for tuberculosis detection is applied to images with and without pathology and with and without foreign object removal. Unprocessed, the texture analysis abnormality score of normal images with foreign objects is comparable to those with pathology. After removing foreign objects, the texture score of normal images with and without foreign objects is similar, while abnormal images, whether they contain foreign objects or not, achieve on average higher scores.Conclusions: The authors conclude that removal of foreign objects from chest radiographs is feasible and beneficial for automated image analysis.

  8. Postprocedural chest radiograph: Impact on the management in critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prashant K; Gupta, Kumkum; Jain, Manish; Garg, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    Postprocedural chest radiograph is done to illustrate the position of endotracheal tubes (ETTs), nasogastric and drainage tubes, indwelling catheters, and intravascular lines or any other lifesaving devices to confirm their position. These devices are intended to save life, but may be life-threatening if in the wrong place. The incidence of malposition and complications ranges from 3% to 14%, respectively. The portable chest radiograph is of tremendous value, inexpensive and can be obtained quickly at the patient's bedside in any location of the hospital. A systemic literature search was performed in PubMed and the Cochranre library by setting up the search using either single text word or combinations. Those studies were also included where the chest radiograph was compared with other imaging modalities. Its clinical efficacy, cost-effectiveness and practicality allow anesthesiologist to evaluate the post-procedural position and complications of ETT, indwelling catheters, and multi lumen intravascular lines. Knowledge of the radiological features of commonly used devices is of utmost importance. PMID:25886216

  9. Semi-automated location identification of catheters in digital chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Yankelevitz, David F.

    2007-03-01

    Localization of catheter tips is the most common task in intensive care unit imaging. In this work, catheters appearing in digital chest radiographs acquired by portable chest x-rays were tracked using a semi-automatic method. Due to the fact that catheters are synthetic objects, its profile does not vary drastically over its length. Therefore, we use forward looking registration with normalized cross-correlation in order to take advantage of a priori information of the catheter profile. The registration is accomplished with a two-dimensional template representative of the catheter to be tracked generated using two seed points given by the user. To validate catheter tracking with this method, we look at two metrics: accuracy and precision. The algorithms results are compared to a ground truth established by catheter midlines marked by expert radiologists. Using 12 objects of interest comprised of naso-gastric, endo-tracheal tubes, and chest tubes, and PICC and central venous catheters, we find that our algorithm can fully track 75% of the objects of interest, with a average tracking accuracy and precision of 85.0%, 93.6% respectively using the above metrics. Such a technique would be useful for physicians wishing to verify the positioning of catheter tips using chest radiographs.

  10. Interobserver variation in the chest radiograph component of the lung injury score.

    PubMed

    Beards, S C; Jackson, A; Hunt, L; Wood, A; Frerk, C M; Brear, G; Edwards, J D; Nightingale, P

    1995-11-01

    The lung injury score is a semi-quantitative system used in the definition and grading of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. It is composed of two, three or four equally weighted components. One component is derived from the chest radiograph, which may contribute up to 50% of the total score. A score of 1 is awarded for each quadrant on the chest radiograph which contains alveolar consolidation. We examined the interobserver variation between two anaesthetists, two radiologists and two critical care physicians who scored blindly 100 chest radiographs from patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome. There was very good agreement between the two radiologists in the total scores (kappa 0.97) and in individual scores in each of the 4 quadrants (kappa 0.97-1.0). The agreement between anaesthetists and radiologists was only fair for the total score (kappa 0.37-0.42), but moderate to good for individual quadrant scores (kappa 0.43-0.73). The agreement between the two anaesthetists was moderate for individual quadrant scores (kappa 0.44-0.60), but only fair for total score (kappa 0.34). There was poor agreement between the two critical care physicians for total score (kappa 0.05) and for individual quadrant scores (kappa 0.04-0.20). Agreement between the physicians and other observers was poor to fair for the total score (kappa 0.12-0.32) and poor to moderate for the individual quadrant scores (kappa 0.15-0.63). Both anaesthetists and physician 2 underestimated the overall chest scores (median scores 2, 3 and 1 respectively) in comparison to the radiologists (median scores 3.5). Physician 1 significantly overscored (median score 4). The chest radiograph component of the lung injury score can be consistently assessed by radiologists, but significant variations may be introduced when assessed by other clinicians. This has significant implications for the use of the lung injury score in studies of adult respiratory distress syndrome and other studies which

  11. An image-based technique to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Yuan; Luo Hui; Dobbins, James T. III; Page McAdams, H.; Wang, Xiaohui; Sehnert, William J.; Barski, Lori; Foos, David H.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Current clinical image quality assessment techniques mainly analyze image quality for the imaging system in terms of factors such as the capture system modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency, and the exposure technique. While these elements form the basic underlying components of image quality, when assessing a clinical image, radiologists seldom refer to these factors, but rather examine several specific regions of the displayed patient images, further impacted by a particular image processing method applied, to see whether the image is suitable for diagnosis. In this paper, the authors developed a novel strategy to simulate radiologists' perceptual evaluation process on actual clinical chest images. Methods: Ten regional based perceptual attributes of chest radiographs were determined through an observer study. Those included lung grey level, lung detail, lung noise, rib-lung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm-lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. Each attribute was characterized in terms of a physical quantity measured from the image algorithmically using an automated process. A pilot observer study was performed on 333 digital chest radiographs, which included 179 PA images with 10:1 ratio grids (set 1) and 154 AP images without grids (set 2), to ascertain the correlation between image perceptual attributes and physical quantitative measurements. To determine the acceptable range of each perceptual attribute, a preliminary quality consistency range was defined based on the preferred 80% of images in set 1. Mean value difference ({mu}{sub 1}-{mu}{sub 2}) and variance ratio ({sigma}{sub 1}{sup 2}/{sigma}{sub 2}{sup 2}) were investigated to further quantify the differences between the selected two image sets. Results: The pilot observer study demonstrated that our regional based physical quantity metrics of chest radiographs correlated very well with

  12. [Chest radiograph of atypical pneumonia: comparison among Chlamydia pneumoniae. Pneumonia, ornithosis, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Itoh, I; Ishida, T; Hashimoto, T; Arita, M; Osawa, M; Tachibana, H; Nishiyama, H; Takakura, S; Bando, K; Nishizawa, Y; Amitani, R; Onishi, H; Taguchi, Y

    2000-11-01

    No report has been found comparing Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) pneumonia radiographically with other atypical pneumonias, Chlamydia psittaci (C. psittaci) pneumonia and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) pneumonia. We described the chest radiographs of three kinds of pneumonia cases: 46 cases of C. pneumoniae pneumonia, 39 cases of C. psittaci pneumonia, and 131 cases of M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Radiographic shadows were categorized into main shadows and sub-shadows. The main shadows are classified from the viewpoint of the characteristics; air space consolidation(AS), ground-glass opacity(GG), reticular shadow(RS), bronchopneumonia(BP), and small nodular shadows (SN). The size, the site, and the number of the main shadows were also analyzed. In comparison among the three pneumonias, BP was the most frequent in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (0.40/case). AS predominated in C. pneumoniae pneumonia (0.67/case), and GG in C. psittaci pneumonia (0.62/case). The number of main shadows was equal, about 1.4/case in three pneumonias. Large shadows were less frequent in M. pneumoniae pneumonia than C. pneumoniae pneumonia (p = 0.02) and C. psittaci pneumonia (p = 0.01). Main shadows were more frequent in the outer zone in M. pneumoniae pneumonia than C. psittaci pneumonia (p = 0.01), and in the middle zone in C. psittaci pneumonia than in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (p = 0.02). Cases with bilateral main shadows were less common in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (9%) than C. pneumoniae pneumonia(33%, p = 0.001) and C. psittaci pneumonia(30%, p = 0.005). Thickening of bronchovascular bundles as a sub-shadow was most frequently noted in M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Some differences among the three atypical pneumonias were seen in the chest radiograph. However, no specific findings of C. pneumoniae pneumonia were shown radiographically in this study. PMID:11140079

  13. Chest Radiographic Patterns and the Transmission of Tuberculosis: Implications for Automated Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Angela; Barrie, James; Winter, Christopher; Elamy, Abdel-Halim; Tyrrell, Gregory; Long, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Computer-aided detection to identify and diagnose pulmonary tuberculosis is being explored. While both cavitation on chest radiograph and smear-positivity on microscopy are independent risk factors for the infectiousness of pulmonary tuberculosis it is unknown which radiographic pattern, were it detectable, would provide the greatest public health benefit; i.e. reduced transmission. Herein we provide that evidence. Objectives 1) to determine whether pulmonary tuberculosis in a high income, low incidence country is more likely to present with “typical” adult-type pulmonary tuberculosis radiographic features and 2) to determine whether those with “typical” radiographic features are more likely than those without such features to transmit the organism and/or cause secondary cases. Methods Over a three-year period beginning January 1, 2006 consecutive adults with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in the Province of Alberta, Canada, were identified and their pre-treatment radiographs scored by three independent readers as “typical” (having an upper lung zone predominant infiltrate, with or without cavitation but no discernable adenopathy) or “atypical” (all others). Each patient’s pre-treatment bacillary burden was carefully documented and, during a 30-month transmission window, each patient’s transmission events were recorded. Mycobacteriology, radiology and transmission were compared in those with “typical” versus “atypical” radiographs. Findings A total of 97 smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases were identified, 69 (71.1%) with and 28 (28.9%) without “typical” chest radiographs. “Typical” cases were more likely to have high bacillary burdens and cavitation (Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals: 2.75 [1.04–7.31] and 9.10 [2.51–32.94], respectively). Typical cases were also responsible for most transmission events—78% of tuberculin skin test conversions (p<0.002) and 95% of secondary cases in reported

  14. A patient image-based technique to assess the image quality of clinical chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan; Samei, Ehsan; Luo, Hui; Dobbins, James T., III; McAdams, H. Page; Wang, Xiaohui; Sehnert, William J.; Barski, Lori; Foos, David H.

    2011-03-01

    Current clinical image quality assessment techniques mainly analyze image quality for the imaging system in terms of factors such as the capture system DQE and MTF, the exposure technique, and the particular image processing method and processing parameters. However, when assessing a clinical image, radiologists seldom refer to these factors, but rather examine several specific regions of the image to see whether the image is suitable for diagnosis. In this work, we developed a new strategy to learn and simulate radiologists' evaluation process on actual clinical chest images. Based on this strategy, a preliminary study was conducted on 254 digital chest radiographs (38 AP without grids, 35 AP with 6:1 ratio grids and 151 PA with 10:1 ratio grids). First, ten regional based perceptual qualities were summarized through an observer study. Each quality was characterized in terms of a physical quantity measured from the image, and as a first step, the three physical quantities in lung region were then implemented algorithmically. A pilot observer study was performed to verify the correlation between image perceptual qualities and physical quantitative qualities. The results demonstrated that our regional based metrics have promising performance for grading perceptual properties of chest radiographs.

  15. Chest radiograph--a poor method for determining the size of a pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Engdahl, O; Toft, T; Boe, J

    1993-01-01

    The ability of chest radiographs to determine the size of a pneumothorax was tested in 16 patients using computed tomographic (CT) scan as a reference method. To determine if CT with a slice thickness of 12 mm could be used, its accuracy was assessed in a lung model experiment. The lung model consisted of a water-filled plastic bag (lung) fitted into a plastic chamber (hemithorax), both of approximately the same size and shape as in man. Water was drawn off in incremental steps and a CT was done after each step. The area of the pneumothorax was calculated by computer and when multiplied by slice thickness and number of slices, the total volume of the pneumothorax could be compared with the extracted amount of water. A good correlation (r = 0.99), with the line of regression close to the line of identity, was found between the CT investigation and the artificial pneumothorax. In the patients, the size of the pneumothorax, judged by radiograph using two different methods of calculation, was correlated to the size obtained by CT. The correlation was poor (r = 0.71) irrespective of method of calculation. The size of the pneumothorax estimated by CT showed a good correlation (r = 0.99) to the initial aspirated air volumes in 12 of the 16 patients treated with drainage. A cautious attitude toward the use of chest radiographs for calculations of the degree of lung collapse in patients with pneumothorax is recommended. PMID:8417891

  16. Improved texture analysis for automatic detection of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs with bone suppression images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduskar, Pragnya; Hogeweg, Laurens; Philipsen, Rick; Schalekamp, Steven; van Ginneken, Bram

    2013-03-01

    Computer aided detection (CAD) of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs (CXR) is challenging due to over-lapping structures. Suppression of normal structures can reduce overprojection effects and can enhance the appearance of diffuse parenchymal abnormalities. In this work, we compare two CAD systems to detect textural abnormalities in chest radiographs of TB suspects. One CAD system was trained and tested on the original CXR and the other CAD system was trained and tested on bone suppression images (BSI). BSI were created using a commercially available software (ClearRead 2.4, Riverain Medical). The CAD system is trained with 431 normal and 434 abnormal images with manually outlined abnormal regions. Subtlety rating (1-3) is assigned to each abnormal region, where 3 refers to obvious and 1 refers to subtle abnormalities. Performance is evaluated on normal and abnormal regions from an independent dataset of 900 images. These contain in total 454 normal and 1127 abnormal regions, which are divided into 3 subtlety categories containing 280, 527 and 320 abnormal regions, respectively. For normal regions, original/BSI CAD has an average abnormality score of 0.094+/-0.027/0.085+/-0.032 (p - 5.6×10-19). For abnormal regions, subtlety 1, 2, 3 categories have average abnormality scores for original/BSI of 0.155+/-0.073/0.156+/-0.089 (p = 0.73), 0.194+/-0.086/0.207+/-0.101 (p = 5.7×10-7), 0.225+/-0.119/0.247+/-0.117 (p = 4.4×10-7), respectively. Thus for normal regions, CAD scores slightly decrease when using BSI instead of the original images, and for abnormal regions, the scores increase slightly. We therefore conclude that the use of bone suppression results in slightly but significantly improved automated detection of textural abnormalities in chest radiographs.

  17. Quantification and visualization of relative local ventilation on dynamic chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Nakayama, Kazuya; Matsui, Takeshi; Hayashi, Norio; Matsui, Osamu

    2006-03-01

    Recently-developed dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) with a large field of view is possible to obtain breathing chest radiographs, which provide respiratory kinetics information. This study was performed to investigate the ability of dynamic chest radiography using FPD to quantify relative ventilation according to respiratory physiology. We also reported the results of primary clinical study and described the possibility of clinical use of our method. Dynamic chest radiographs of 12 subjects involving abnormal subjects during respiration were obtained using a modified FPD system (30 frames in 10 seconds). Imaging was performed in three different positions (standing, and right and left decubitus positions) to change the distribution of local ventilation by changing the lung's own gravity in each area. The distance from the lung apex to the diaphragm (abbr. DLD) was measured by the edge detection technique for use as an index of respiratory phase. We measured pixel values in each lung area and calculated correlation coefficients with DLD. Differences in the pixel values between the maximum inspiratory and expiratory frame were calculated, and the trend of distribution was evaluated by two-way analysis of variance. Pixel value in each lung area was strongly associated with respiratory phase and its time variation and distribution were consistent with known properties in respiratory physiology. Dynamic chest radiography using FPD combined with our computerized methods was capable of quantifying relative amount of ventilation during respiration, and of detecting regional differences in ventilation. In the subjects with emphysema, areas with decreased respiratory changes in pixel value are consisted with the areas with air trapping. This method is expected to be a useful novel diagnostic imaging method for supporting diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary disease, which presents with abnormalities in local ventilation.

  18. Analysis of biological tissues in infant chest for the development of an equivalent radiographic phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Pina, D. R.; Souza, Rafael T. F.; Duarte, Sergio B.; Alvarez, Matheus; Miranda, Jose R. A.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of the present study was to determine the amounts of different tissues in the chest of the newborn patient (age {<=}1 year), with the aim of developing a homogeneous phantom chest equivalent. This type of phantom is indispensable in the development of optimization procedures for radiographic techniques, including dosimetric control, which is a crucial aspect of pediatric radiology. The authors present a systematic set of procedures, including a computational algorithm, to estimate the amounts of tissues and thicknesses of the corresponding simulator material plates used to construct the phantom. Methods: The Gaussian fit of computed tomographic (CT) analysis was applied to classify and quantify different biological tissues. The methodology is summarized with a computational algorithm, which was used to quantify tissues through automated CT analysis. The thicknesses of the equivalent homogeneous simulator material plates were determined to construct the phantom. Results: A total of 180 retrospective CT examinations with anterior-posterior diameter values ranging 8.5-13.0 cm were examined. The amounts of different tissues were evaluated. The results provided elements to construct a phantom to simulate the infant chest in the posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior (PA/AP) view. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this report represents the first demonstration of an infant chest phantom dedicated to the radiology of children younger than one year. This phantom is a key element in the development of clinical charts for optimizing radiographic technique in pediatric patients. Optimization procedures for nonstandard patients were reported previously [Pina et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 49, N215-N226 (2004) and Pina et al., Appl. Radiat. Isot. 67, 61-69 (2009)]. The constructed phantom represents a starting point to obtain radiologic protocols for the infant patient.

  19. Automated localization of costophrenic recesses and costophrenic angle measurement on frontal chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduskar, Pragnya; Hogeweg, Laurens; Philipsen, Rick; van Ginneken, Bram

    2013-03-01

    Computer aided detection (CAD) of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs (CXR) is difficult because the disease has varied manifestations, like opacification, hilar elevation, and pleural effusions. We have developed a CAD research prototype for TB (CAD4TB v1.08, Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Nijmegen, The Netherlands) which is trained to detect textural abnormalities inside unobscured lung fields. If the only abnormality visible on a CXR would be a blunt costophrenic angle, caused by pleural fluid in the costophrenic recess, this is likely to be missed by texture analysis in the lung fields. The goal of this work is therefore to detect the presence of blunt costophrenic (CP) angles caused by pleural effusion on chest radiographs. The CP angle is the angle formed by the hemidiaphragm and the chest wall. We define the intersection point of both as the CP angle point. We first detect the CP angle point automatically from a lung field segmentation by finding the foreground pixel of each lung with maximum y location. Patches are extracted around the CP angle point and boundary tracing is performed to detect 10 consecutive pixels along the hemidiaphragm and the chest wall and derive the CP angle from these. We evaluate the method on a data set of 250 normal CXRs, 200 CXRs with only one or two blunt CP angles and 200 CXRs with one or two blunt CP angles but also other abnormalities. For these three groups, the CP angle location and angle measurements were accurate in 91%, 88%, and 92% of all the cases, respectively. The average CP angles for the three groups are indeed different with 71.6° +/- 22.9, 87.5° +/- 25.7, and 87.7° +/- 25.3, respectively.

  20. Potential usefulness of a video printer for producing secondary images from digitized chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Robert M.; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio; Bosworth, Eric

    1991-05-01

    Communication between radiologists and clinicians could be improved if a secondary image (copy of the original image) accompanied the radiologic report. In addition, the number of lost original radiographs could be decreased, since clinicians would have less need to borrow films. The secondary image should be simple and inexpensive to produce, while providing sufficient image quality for verification of the diagnosis. We are investigating the potential usefulness of a video printer for producing copies of radiographs, i.e. images printed on thermal paper. The video printer we examined (Seikosha model VP-3500) can provide 64 shades of gray. It is capable of recording images up to 1,280 pixels by 1,240 lines and can accept any raster-type video signal. The video printer was characterized in terms of its linearity, contrast, latitude, resolution, and noise properties. The quality of video-printer images was also evaluated in an observer study using portable chest radiographs. We found that observers could confirm up to 90 of the reported findings in the thorax using video- printer images, when the original radiographs were of high quality. The number of verified findings was diminished when high spatial resolution was required (e.g. detection of a subtle pneumothorax) or when a low-contrast finding was located in the mediastinal area or below the diaphragm (e.g. nasogastric tubes).

  1. Radiation safety education reduces the incidence of adult fingers on neonatal chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Sahota, N; Burbridge, B E; Duncan, M D

    2014-06-01

    A previous audit revealed a high frequency of adult fingers visualised on neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) chest radiographs-representing an example of inappropriate occupational radiation exposure. Radiation safety education was provided to staff and we hypothesised that the education would reduce the frequency of adult fingers visualised on NICU chest radiographs. Two cross-sectional samples taken before and after the administration of the education were compared. We examined fingers visualised directly in the beam, fingers in the direct beam but eliminated by technologists editing the image, and fingers under the cones of the portable x-ray machine. There was a 46.2% reduction in fingers directly in the beam, 50.0% reduction in fingers directly in the beam but cropped out, and 68.4% reduction in fingers in the coned area. There was a 57.1% overall reduction in adult fingers visualised, which was statistically significant (Z value - 7.48, P < 0.0001). This study supports radiation safety education in minimising inappropriate occupational radiation exposure. PMID:24705198

  2. Pneumothorax detection in chest radiographs using local and global texture signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geva, Ofer; Zimmerman-Moreno, Gali; Lieberman, Sivan; Konen, Eli; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-03-01

    A novel framework for automatic detection of pneumothorax abnormality in chest radiographs is presented. The suggested method is based on a texture analysis approach combined with supervised learning techniques. The proposed framework consists of two main steps: at first, a texture analysis process is performed for detection of local abnormalities. Labeled image patches are extracted in the texture analysis procedure following which local analysis values are incorporated into a novel global image representation. The global representation is used for training and detection of the abnormality at the image level. The presented global representation is designed based on the distinctive shape of the lung, taking into account the characteristics of typical pneumothorax abnormalities. A supervised learning process was performed on both the local and global data, leading to trained detection system. The system was tested on a dataset of 108 upright chest radiographs. Several state of the art texture feature sets were experimented with (Local Binary Patterns, Maximum Response filters). The optimal configuration yielded sensitivity of 81% with specificity of 87%. The results of the evaluation are promising, establishing the current framework as a basis for additional improvements and extensions.

  3. Use of effective detective quantum efficiency to optimise radiographic exposures for chest imaging with computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertan, Ferihan; Mackenzie, Alistair; Urbanczyk, Hannah J.; Ranger, Nicole T.; Samei, Ehsan

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the work was to test if effective detective quantum efficiency (eDQE) could be useful for optimisation of radiographic factors for computed radiography (CR) for adult chest examinations. The eDQE was therefore measured across a range of kilovoltage, with and without an anti-scatter grid. The modulation transfer function, noise power spectra, transmission factor and scatter fraction were measured with a phantom made of sheets of Aluminum and Acrylic. The entrance air kerma was selected to give an effective dose of 4.9 μSv. The effective noise equivalent quanta (eNEQ) is introduced in this work. eNEQ can be considered equal to the number of X-ray quanta equivalent in the image corrected for the amount of scatter and the blurring processes. The eNEQ was then normalised to account for slight differences in the effective dose (eNEQED). The peak eNEQED was largest at 80 kV and 100 kV with no grid and with grid respectively. At each kilovoltage, the eNEQED and eDQE were between 10% and 70% larger when the grid was not used. The results show that 80 kV without grid is the most suitable exposure conditions for CR in chest. This is consistent with clinical practice in the UK and previous publications recommending a low kV technique for CR for average sized adult chest imaging.

  4. Bone Suppression Increases the Visibility of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Chest Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Schalekamp, Steven; van Ginneken, Bram; van den Berk, Inge A. H.; Hartmann, Ieneke J. C.; Snoeren, Miranda M.; Odink, Arlette E.; van Lankeren, Winnifred; Pegge, Sjoert A. H.; Schijf, Laura J.; Karssemeijer, Nico; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chest radiographs (CXR) are an important diagnostic tool for the detection of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in critically ill patients, but their diagnostic value is limited by a poor sensitivity. By using advanced image processing, the aim of this study was to increase the value of chest radiographs in the diagnostic work up of neutropenic patients who are suspected of IPA. Methods The frontal CXRs of 105 suspected cases of IPA were collected from four institutions. Radiographs could contain single or multiple sites of infection. CT was used as reference standard. Five radiologists and two residents participated in an observer study for the detection of IPA on CXRs with and without bone suppressed images (ClearRead BSI 3.2; Riverain Technologies). The evaluation was performed separately for the right and left lung, resulting in 78 diseased cases (or lungs) and 132 normal cases (or lungs). For each image, observers scored the likelihood of focal infectious lesions being present on a continuous scale (0–100). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) served as the performance measure. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by considering only the lungs with a suspiciousness score of greater than 50 to be positive. Results The average AUC for only CXRs was 0.815. Performance significantly increased, to 0.853, when evaluation was aided with BSI (p = 0.01). Sensitivity increased from 49% to 66% with BSI, while specificity decreased from 95% to 90%. Conclusion The detection of IPA in CXRs can be improved when their evaluation is aided by bone suppressed images. BSI improved the sensitivity of the CXR examination, outweighing a small loss in specificity. PMID:25279774

  5. Unsupervised segmentation of lung fields in chest radiographs using multiresolution fractal feature vector and deformable models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Li; Chang, Koyin; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Segmenting lung fields in a chest radiograph is essential for automatically analyzing an image. We present an unsupervised method based on multiresolution fractal feature vector. The feature vector characterizes the lung field region effectively. A fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm is then applied to obtain a satisfactory initial contour. The final contour is obtained by deformable models. The results show the feasibility and high performance of the proposed method. Furthermore, based on the segmentation of lung fields, the cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) can be measured. The CTR is a simple index for evaluating cardiac hypertrophy. After identifying a suspicious symptom based on the estimated CTR, a physician can suggest that the patient undergoes additional extensive tests before a treatment plan is finalized. PMID:26530048

  6. Evaluation of the usefulness of modified biological fingerprints in chest radiographs for patient recognition and identification.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoichiro; Matsunobu, Yusuke; Morishita, Junji

    2016-07-01

    We have been developing an image-searching method to identify misfiled images in a PACS server. Developing new biological fingerprints (BFs) that would reduce the influence of differences in positioning and breathing phases to improve the performance of recognition is desirable. In our previous studies, the whole lung field (WLF) that included the shadows of the body and lungs was affected by differences in positioning and/or breathing phases. In this study, we showed the usefulness of a circumscribed lung with a rectangular region of interest and the upper half of a chest radiograph as modified BFs. We used 200 images as hypothetically misfiled images. The cross-correlation identifies the resemblance between the BFs in the misfiled images and the corresponding BFs in the database images. The modified BFs indicated better results than did WLF in a receiver operating characteristic analysis; therefore, they could be used as identifiers for patient recognition and identification. PMID:27132238

  7. Cavity contour segmentation in chest radiographs using supervised learning and dynamic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Maduskar, Pragnya Hogeweg, Laurens; Sánchez, Clara I.; Ginneken, Bram van; Jong, Pim A. de; Peters-Bax, Liesbeth; Dawson, Rodney; Ayles, Helen

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Efficacy of tuberculosis (TB) treatment is often monitored using chest radiography. Monitoring size of cavities in pulmonary tuberculosis is important as the size predicts severity of the disease and its persistence under therapy predicts relapse. The authors present a method for automatic cavity segmentation in chest radiographs. Methods: A two stage method is proposed to segment the cavity borders, given a user defined seed point close to the center of the cavity. First, a supervised learning approach is employed to train a pixel classifier using texture and radial features to identify the border pixels of the cavity. A likelihood value of belonging to the cavity border is assigned to each pixel by the classifier. The authors experimented with four different classifiers:k-nearest neighbor (kNN), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), GentleBoost (GB), and random forest (RF). Next, the constructed likelihood map was used as an input cost image in the polar transformed image space for dynamic programming to trace the optimal maximum cost path. This constructed path corresponds to the segmented cavity contour in image space. Results: The method was evaluated on 100 chest radiographs (CXRs) containing 126 cavities. The reference segmentation was manually delineated by an experienced chest radiologist. An independent observer (a chest radiologist) also delineated all cavities to estimate interobserver variability. Jaccard overlap measure Ω was computed between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation; and between the reference segmentation and the independent observer's segmentation for all cavities. A median overlap Ω of 0.81 (0.76 ± 0.16), and 0.85 (0.82 ± 0.11) was achieved between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation, and between the segmentations by the two radiologists, respectively. The best reported mean contour distance and Hausdorff distance between the reference and the automatic segmentation were

  8. Enhancement of chest radiographs obtained in the intensive care unit through bone suppression and consistent processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng; Zhong, Sikai; Yao, Liping; Shang, Yanfeng; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Portable chest radiographs (CXRs) are commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU) to detect subtle pathological changes. However, exposure settings or patient and apparatus positioning deteriorate image quality in the ICU. Chest x-rays of patients in the ICU are often hazy and show low contrast and increased noise. To aid clinicians in detecting subtle pathological changes, we proposed a consistent processing and bone structure suppression method to decrease variations in image appearance and improve the diagnostic quality of images. We applied a region of interest-based look-up table to process original ICU CXRs such that they appeared consistent with each other and the standard CXRs. Then, an artificial neural network was trained by standard CXRs and the corresponding dual-energy bone images for the generation of a bone image. Once the neural network was trained, the real dual-energy image was no longer necessary, and the trained neural network was applied to the consistent processed ICU CXR to output the bone image. Finally, a gray level-based morphological method was applied to enhance the bone image by smoothing other structures on this image. This enhanced image was subtracted from the consistent, processed ICU CXR to produce a soft tissue image. This method was tested for 20 patients with a total of 87 CXRs. The findings indicated that our method suppressed bone structures on ICU CXRs and standard CXRs, simultaneously maintaining subtle pathological changes.

  9. Computer-aided detection of malpositioned endotracheal tubes in portable chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Mao, Hongda; Zhang, Jane; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Munn, Samson; Wandtke, John

    2014-03-01

    Portable chest radiographic images play a critical role in examining and monitoring the condition and progress of critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs). For example, portable chest images are acquired to ensure that tubes inserted into the patients are properly positioned for effective treatment. In this paper, we present a system that automatically detects the position of an endotracheal tube (ETT), which is inserted into the trachea to assist patients who have difficulty breathing. The computer detection includes the detections of the lung field, spine line, and aortic arch. These detections lead to the identification of regions of interest (ROIs) used for the subsequent detection of the ETT and carina. The detection of the ETT and carina is performed within the ROIs. Our ETT and carina detection methods were trained and tested on a large number of images. The locations of the ETT and carina were confirmed by an experienced radiologist for the purpose of performance evaluation. Our ETT detection achieved an average sensitivity of 85% at less than 0.1 false-positive detections per image. The carina approach correctly identified the carina location within a 10 mm distance from the truth location for 81% of the 217 testing images. We expect our system will assist ICU clinicians to detect malpositioned ETTs and reposition malpositioned ETTs more effectively and efficiently.

  10. Pulmonary scintigraphic findings in children with pectus excavatum by the comparison of chest radiograph indices.

    PubMed

    Kao, C H; Liao, S Q; Wang, S J; Yeh, S H

    1992-11-01

    Pulmonary scintigraphy, including Xe-133 ventilation combined with Tc-99m MAA perfusion scans, was performed in 23 children (3 girls, 20 boys, ages: 2-9 years) with pectus excavatum, and the indices from lateral chest radiography were used for comparison. The findings of pulmonary scintigraphy were analyzed as 1) ventilation fractions (VF), and 2) perfusion fractions (PF) between bilateral lungs; and 3) ventilation-perfusion ratios (V/Q ratio) of both lungs. The results showed that 6 of 23 cases had impaired VF, 11 of 23 cases had impaired PF, and 7 of 23 cases had an impaired V/Q ratio in the right and left lung, respectively. The severity of sternal depression in pectus excavatum was shown as certain indices that were obtained on routine lateral chest radiographs. However, no significant correlations existed between the differences in the fractions and the indices. Our results suggest that pulmonary scintigraphy is not necessary for children with pectus excavatum to predict the severity of sternal depression and pulmonary function, because 1) pulmonary scintigraphy is very difficult to perform in children; 2) unnecessary radiation exposure should be avoided; and 3) it is not well correlated with the severity of the depressed sternum. PMID:1424376

  11. A method to produce and validate a digitally reconstructed radiograph-based computer simulation for optimisation of chest radiographs acquired with a computed radiography imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a computer model to produce realistic simulated computed radiography (CR) chest images using CT data sets of real patients. Methods Anatomical noise, which is the limiting factor in determining pathology in chest radiography, is realistically simulated by the CT data, and frequency-dependent noise has been added post-digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation to simulate exposure reduction. Realistic scatter and scatter fractions were measured in images of a chest phantom acquired on the CR system simulated by the computer model and added post-DRR calculation. Results The model has been validated with a phantom and patients and shown to provide predictions of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), tissue-to-rib ratios (TRRs: a measure of soft tissue pixel value to that of rib) and pixel value histograms that lie within the range of values measured with patients and the phantom. The maximum difference in measured SNR to that calculated was 10%. TRR values differed by a maximum of 1.3%. Conclusion Experienced image evaluators have responded positively to the DRR images, are satisfied they contain adequate anatomical features and have deemed them clinically acceptable. Therefore, the computer model can be used by image evaluators to grade chest images presented at different tube potentials and doses in order to optimise image quality and patient dose for clinical CR chest radiographs without the need for repeat patient exposures. PMID:21933979

  12. Acute, proximal aortic dissection with negative D-Dimer assay and normal portable chest radiograph: a case report.

    PubMed

    Thota, Darshan; Zanoni, Steve; Mells, Cary; Auten, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is one of the most devastating and time-sensitive diagnosis to consider in young adults with chest pain. Military medicine is represented by a larger proportion of 18- to 50-year-old individuals than is seen in the general medical population. Although uncommon in frequency, younger patients are more likely to suffer from proximal, aortic dissections. Chest radiographs and D-Dimer assays are used frequently as risk stratification tools, but have significant limitations in these more proximal dissections. Because of the frequency and lethality of nonspecific presentations, there exists a need for a sensitive screening tool. This case report presents a 43-year-old male with a concerning history and physical examination for aortic dissection, but a normal portable chest radiograph and a normal D-Dimer assay. It highlights the importance of clinical acumen in developing and maintaining a high clinical index of suspicion based on a Bayesian pretest probability model. PMID:25562879

  13. Automated characterization of perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs: Validation and calibration to observer preference

    SciTech Connect

    Samei, Ehsan; Lin, Yuan; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; Page McAdams, H.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The authors previously proposed an image-based technique [Y. Lin et al. Med. Phys. 39, 7019–7031 (2012)] to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs. In this study, an observer study was designed and conducted to validate the output of the program against rankings by expert radiologists and to establish the ranges of the output values that reflect the acceptable image appearance so the program output can be used for image quality optimization and tracking. Methods: Using an IRB-approved protocol, 2500 clinical chest radiographs (PA/AP) were collected from our clinical operation. The images were processed through our perceptual quality assessment program to measure their appearance in terms of ten metrics of perceptual image quality: lung gray level, lung detail, lung noise, rib–lung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm–lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. From the results, for each targeted appearance attribute/metric, 18 images were selected such that the images presented a relatively constant appearance with respect to all metrics except the targeted one. The images were then incorporated into a graphical user interface, which displayed them into three panels of six in a random order. Using a DICOM calibrated diagnostic display workstation and under low ambient lighting conditions, each of five participating attending chest radiologists was tasked to spatially order the images based only on the targeted appearance attribute regardless of the other qualities. Once ordered, the observer also indicated the range of image appearances that he/she considered clinically acceptable. The observer data were analyzed in terms of the correlations between the observer and algorithmic rankings and interobserver variability. An observer-averaged acceptable image appearance was also statistically derived for each quality attribute based on the collected individual acceptable ranges

  14. Morphometric Comparison of Clavicle Outlines from 3D Bone Scans and 2D Chest Radiographs: A Short-listing Tool to Assist Radiographic Identification of Human Skeletons

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Carl N.; Amidan, Brett G.; Trease, Harold E.; Guyomarch, Pierre; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Byrd, John E.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a computerized clavicle identification system, primarily designed to resolve the identities of unaccounted for US soldiers who fought in the Korean War. Elliptical Fourier analysis is used to quantify the clavicle outline shape from skeletons and postero-anterior antemortem chest radiographs to rank individuals in terms of metric distance. Similar to leading fingerprint identification systems, shortlists of the top matching candidates are extracted for subsequent human visual assessment. Two independent tests of the computerized system using 17 field-recovered skeletons and 409 chest radiographs demonstrate that true positive matches are captured within the top 5% of the sample 75% of the time. These results are outstanding given the eroded state of some field-recovered skeletons and the faintness of the 1950’s photoflurographs. These methods enhance the capability to resolve several hundred cold cases for which little circumstantial information exists and current DNA and dental record technologies cannot be applied.

  15. Morphometric comparison of clavicle outlines from 3D bone scans and 2D chest radiographs: a shortlisting tool to assist radiographic identification of human skeletons.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N; Amidan, Brett; Trease, Harold; Guyomarc'h, Pierre; Pulsipher, Trenton; Byrd, John E

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a computerized clavicle identification system primarily designed to resolve the identities of unaccounted-for U.S. soldiers who fought in the Korean War. Elliptical Fourier analysis is used to quantify the clavicle outline shape from skeletons and postero-anterior antemortem chest radiographs to rank individuals in terms of metric distance. Similar to leading fingerprint identification systems, shortlists of the top matching candidates are extracted for subsequent human visual assessment. Two independent tests of the computerized system using 17 field-recovered skeletons and 409 chest radiographs demonstrate that true-positive matches are captured within the top 5% of the sample 75% of the time. These results are outstanding given the eroded state of some field-recovered skeletons and the faintness of the 1950's photofluorographs. These methods enhance the capability to resolve several hundred cold cases for which little circumstantial information exists and current DNA and dental record technologies cannot be applied. PMID:24313347

  16. Use of a digitally reconstructed radiograph-based computer simulation for the optimisation of chest radiographic techniques for computed radiography imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Moore, C S; Avery, G; Balcam, S; Needler, L; Swift, A; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to derive an optimum radiographic technique for computed radiography (CR) chest imaging using a digitally reconstructed radiograph computer simulator. The simulator is capable of producing CR chest radiographs of adults with various tube potentials, receptor doses and scatter rejection. Methods Four experienced image evaluators graded images of average and obese adult patients at different potentials (average-sized, n=50; obese, n=20), receptor doses (n=10) and scatter rejection techniques (average-sized, n=20; obese, n=20). The quality of the images was evaluated using visually graded analysis. The influence of rib contrast was also assessed. Results For average-sized patients, image quality improved when tube potential was reduced compared with the reference (102 kVp). No scatter rejection was indicated. For obese patients, it has been shown that an antiscatter grid is indicated, and should be used in conjunction with as low a tube potential as possible (while allowing exposure times <20 ms). It is also possible to reduce receptor air kerma by 50% without adversely influencing image quality. Rib contrast did not interfere at any tube potential. Conclusions A virtual clinical trial has been performed with simulated chest CR images. Results indicate that low tube potentials (<102 kVp) are optimal for average and obese adults, the former acquired without scatter rejection, the latter with an anti-scatter grid. Lower receptor (and therefore patient doses) than those used clinically are possible while maintaining adequate image quality. PMID:22253349

  17. Are daily routine chest radiographs necessary after pulmonary surgery in adult patients?

    PubMed Central

    Reeb, Jeremie; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Olland, Anne; Massard, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether daily routine (DR) chest radiographs (CXRs) are necessary after pulmonary surgery in adult patients. Of the 66 papers found using a report search, seven presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. Four of these seven studies specifically addressed post-cardiothoracic adult patients. Three of these seven studies addressed intensive care unit (ICU) patients and included post-cardiothoracic adult patients in well-designed studies. Six of these seven studies compared the DR CXRs strategy to the clinically indicated, on-demand (OD) CXRs strategy. Another study analysed the clinical impact of ceasing to perform the DR, postoperative, post-chest tubes removal CXRs. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, study type, group studied, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are given. We conclude that, on the whole, the seven studies are unanimously in favour of forgoing DR CXRs after lung resection and advocate OD CXRs. One study suggested that hypoxic patients could benefit from a DR CXRs strategy, while other studies failed to identify any subgroup for whom performing DR CXRs was beneficial. Indeed, DR CXRs, commonly taken after thoracic surgery, have poor diagnostic and therapeutic value. Eliminating them for adult patients having undergone thoracic surgery significantly decreases the number of CXRs per patient without increasing mortality rates, length of hospital stays (LOSs), readmission rates and adverse events. Hence, current evidence shows that DR CXRs could be forgone after lung resection because OD CXRs, recommended by clinical monitoring, have a better impact on management and have not been proved to negatively affect patient outcomes. Moreover, an OD CXRs strategy lowers the cost of care. Nevertheless, an OD CXRs strategy requires close clinical monitoring by experienced surgeons and dedicated intensivists. However

  18. Application of phase congruency for discriminating some lung diseases using chest radiograph.

    PubMed

    Rijal, Omar Mohd; Ebrahimian, Hossein; Noor, Norliza Mohd; Hussin, Amran; Yunus, Ashari; Mahayiddin, Aziah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    A novel procedure using phase congruency is proposed for discriminating some lung disease using chest radiograph. Phase congruency provides information about transitions between adjacent pixels. Abrupt changes of phase congruency values between pixels may suggest a possible boundary or another feature that may be used for discrimination. This property of phase congruency may have potential for deciding between disease present and disease absent where the regions of infection on the images have no obvious shape, size, or configuration. Five texture measures calculated from phase congruency and Gabor were shown to be normally distributed. This gave good indicators of discrimination errors in the form of the probability of Type I Error (δ) and the probability of Type II Error (β). However, since 1 -  δ is the true positive fraction (TPF) and β is the false positive fraction (FPF), an ROC analysis was used to decide on the choice of texture measures. Given that features are normally distributed, for the discrimination between disease present and disease absent, energy, contrast, and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results compared to those using Gabor. Similarly, for the more difficult problem of discriminating lobar pneumonia and lung cancer, entropy and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results relative to Gabor. PMID:25918551

  19. Pattern-histogram-based temporal change detection using personal chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugurlu, Yucel; Obi, Takashi; Hasegawa, Akira; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Ohyama, Nagaaki

    1999-05-01

    An accurate and reliable detection of temporal changes from a pair of images has considerable interest in the medical science. Traditional registration and subtraction techniques can be applied to extract temporal differences when,the object is rigid or corresponding points are obvious. However, in radiological imaging, loss of the depth information, the elasticity of object, the absence of clearly defined landmarks and three-dimensional positioning differences constraint the performance of conventional registration techniques. In this paper, we propose a new method in order to detect interval changes accurately without using an image registration technique. The method is based on construction of so-called pattern histogram and comparison procedure. The pattern histogram is a graphic representation of the frequency counts of all allowable patterns in the multi-dimensional pattern vector space. K-means algorithm is employed to partition pattern vector space successively. Any differences in the pattern histograms imply that different patterns are involved in the scenes. In our experiment, a pair of chest radiographs of pneumoconiosis is employed and the changing histogram bins are visualized on both of the images. We found that the method can be used as an alternative way of temporal change detection, particularly when the precise image registration is not available.

  20. Radiation risk assessment in neonatal radiographic examinations of the chest and abdomen: a clinical and Monte Carlo dosimetry study.

    PubMed

    Makri, T; Yakoumakis, E; Papadopoulou, D; Gialousis, G; Theodoropoulos, V; Sandilos, P; Georgiou, E

    2006-10-01

    Seeking to assess the radiation risk associated with radiological examinations in neonatal intensive care units, thermo-luminescence dosimetry was used for the measurement of entrance surface dose (ESD) in 44 AP chest and 28 AP combined chest-abdominal exposures of a sample of 60 neonates. The mean values of ESD were found to be equal to 44 +/- 16 microGy and 43 +/- 19 microGy, respectively. The MCNP-4C2 code with a mathematical phantom simulating a neonate and appropriate x-ray energy spectra were employed for the simulation of the AP chest and AP combined chest-abdominal exposures. Equivalent organ dose per unit ESD and energy imparted per unit ESD calculations are presented in tabular form. Combined with ESD measurements, these calculations yield an effective dose of 10.2 +/- 3.7 microSv, regardless of sex, and an imparted energy of 18.5 +/- 6.7 microJ for the chest radiograph. The corresponding results for the combined chest-abdominal examination are 14.7 +/- 7.6 microSv (males)/17.2 +/- 7.6 microSv (females) and 29.7 +/- 13.2 microJ. The calculated total risk per radiograph was low, ranging between 1.7 and 2.9 per million neonates, per film, and being slightly higher for females. Results of this study are in good agreement with previous studies, especially in view of the diversity met in the calculation methods. PMID:16985285

  1. Radiation risk assessment in neonatal radiographic examinations of the chest and abdomen: a clinical and Monte Carlo dosimetry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makri, T.; Yakoumakis, E.; Papadopoulou, D.; Gialousis, G.; Theodoropoulos, V.; Sandilos, P.; Georgiou, E.

    2006-10-01

    Seeking to assess the radiation risk associated with radiological examinations in neonatal intensive care units, thermo-luminescence dosimetry was used for the measurement of entrance surface dose (ESD) in 44 AP chest and 28 AP combined chest-abdominal exposures of a sample of 60 neonates. The mean values of ESD were found to be equal to 44 ± 16 µGy and 43 ± 19 µGy, respectively. The MCNP-4C2 code with a mathematical phantom simulating a neonate and appropriate x-ray energy spectra were employed for the simulation of the AP chest and AP combined chest-abdominal exposures. Equivalent organ dose per unit ESD and energy imparted per unit ESD calculations are presented in tabular form. Combined with ESD measurements, these calculations yield an effective dose of 10.2 ± 3.7 µSv, regardless of sex, and an imparted energy of 18.5 ± 6.7 µJ for the chest radiograph. The corresponding results for the combined chest-abdominal examination are 14.7 ± 7.6 µSv (males)/17.2 ± 7.6 µSv (females) and 29.7 ± 13.2 µJ. The calculated total risk per radiograph was low, ranging between 1.7 and 2.9 per million neonates, per film, and being slightly higher for females. Results of this study are in good agreement with previous studies, especially in view of the diversity met in the calculation methods.

  2. Computerized detection of vertebral compression fractures on lateral chest radiographs: Preliminary results with a tool for early detection of osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li Qiang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-12-15

    Vertebral fracture (or vertebral deformity) is a very common outcome of osteoporosis, which is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Early detection of vertebral fractures is important because timely pharmacologic intervention can reduce the risk of subsequent additional fractures. Chest radiographs are used routinely for detection of lung and heart diseases, and vertebral fractures can be visible on lateral chest radiographs. However, investigators noted that about 50% of vertebral fractures visible on lateral chest radiographs were underdiagnosed or under-reported, even when the fractures were severe. Therefore, our goal was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs in order to assist radiologists' image interpretation and thus allow the early diagnosis of osteoporosis. The cases used in this study were 20 patients with severe vertebral fractures and 118 patients without fractures, as confirmed by the consensus of two radiologists. Radiologists identified the locations of fractured vertebrae, and they provided morphometric data on the vertebral shape for evaluation of the accuracy of detecting vertebral end plates by computer. In our computerized method, a curved search area, which included a number of vertebral end plates, was first extracted automatically, and was straightened so that vertebral end plates became oriented horizontally. Edge candidates were enhanced by use of a horizontal line-enhancement filter in the straightened image, and a multiple thresholding technique, followed by feature analysis, was used for identification of the vertebral end plates. The height of each vertebra was determined from locations of identified vertebral end plates, and fractured vertebrae were detected by comparison of the measured vertebral height with the expected height. The sensitivity of our computerized method for detection of fracture cases was 95% (19/20), with 1.03 (139/135) false

  3. Vascular Pedicle Width on Chest Radiograph as a Measure of Volume Overload: Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Shi, Runhua; Mahler, Simon; Gaspard, Joseph; Gorchynski, Julie; D'Etienne, James; Arnold, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Vascular pedicle width (VPW), a measurement obtained from a chest radiograph (CR), is thought to be an indicator of circulating blood volume. To date there are only a handful of studies that demonstrate a correlation between high VPW and volume overload, each utilizing different VPW values and CR techniques. Our objective was to determine a mean VPW measurement from erect and supine CRs and to determine whether VPW correlates with volume overload. Methods MEDLINE database, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched electronically for relevant articles. References from the original and review publications selected electronically were manually searched for additional relevant articles. Two investigators independently reviewed relevant articles for inclusion criteria and data extraction. Mean VPW measurements from both supine and erect CRs and their correlation with volume overload were calculated. Results Data from 8 studies with a total of 363 subjects were included, resulting in mean VPW measurements of 71 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] 64.9–77.3) and 62 mm (95% CI 49.3–75.1) for supine and erect CRs, respectively. The correlation coefficients for volume overload and VPW were 0.81 (95% CI 0.74–0.86) for both CR techniques and 0.81 (95% CI 0.72–0.87) for supine CR and 0.80 (95% CI 0.69–0.87) for erect CR, respectively. Conclusion There is a clinical and statistical correlation between VPW and volume overload. VPW may be used to evaluate the volume status of a patient regardless of the CR technique used. PMID:22224132

  4. Rib suppression in chest radiographs to improve classification of textural abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogeweg, Laurens E.; Mol, Christian; de Jong, Pim A.; van Ginneken, Bram

    2010-03-01

    The computer aided diagnosis (CAD) of abnormalities on chest radiographs is difficult due to the presence of overlapping normal anatomy. Suppression of the normal anatomy is expected to improve performance of a CAD system, but such a method has not yet been applied to the computer detection of interstitial abnormalities such as occur in tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this research is to evaluate the effect of rib suppression on a CAD system for TB. Profiles of pixel intensities sampled perpendicular to segmented ribs were used to create a local PCA-based shape model of the rib. The model was normalized to the local background intensity and corrected for gradients perpendicular to the rib. Subsequently rib suppressed images were created by subtracting the models for each rib from the original image. The effect of rib suppression was evaluated using a CAD system for TB detection. Small square image patches were sampled randomly from 15 normal and 35 TB-affected images containing textural abnormalities. Abnormalities were outlined by a radiologist and were given a subtlety rating from 1 to 5. Features based on moments of intensity distributions of Gaussian derivative filtered images were extracted. A supervised learning approach was used to discriminate between normal and diseased image patches. The use of rib suppressed images increased the overall performance of the system, as measured by the area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve, from 0.75 to 0.78. For the more subtly rated patches (rated 1-3) the performance increased from 0.62 to 0.70.

  5. [A study on chest radiographs in medical check-ups for over-staying foreigners].

    PubMed

    Yamamura, J

    2001-01-01

    During the past nine years from 1991 to 1999, Minatomachi Medical Center and other organizations have provided free medical check-ups for foreigners in Kanagawa, Tokyo and Chiba. Eighty-five percent of the total of the 2370 examined were over-staying foreigners who were not covered by national health insurance system. The ratio of male to female was two to one and the most of them were in the twenties and thirties. As for their ethnic origins from forty-three countries, the Filipinos were the largest numbers, followed by Koreans, Iranians, Bangladeshi, and Chinese/Taiwanese. As a result of chest radiographs, 82% were normal, 8.3% mostly normal, 9.6% tuberculosis shadow (TBS) including active, non active and previous, 0.09% suspected pneumonia, 0.05% suspected cardiac disease, and 0.05% suspected sarcoidosis. The TBS and active tuberculosis (ATB) rates of all examined were 9.6% and 0.69% respectively. There was no significant difference in each TBS and ATB rate between the two sexes. Seen from the age group, it was found that the more aged they were, the higher the TBS and the ATB rates were. The TBS and the ATB rates were 24.6% and 2.73% in the Koreans, 10.7% and 0% in the Chinese/Taiwanese, 10.2% and 0.65% in the Filipinos, 11.3% and 1.44% in the South-East Asians, 6.3% and 0.25% in the South Asians, 2.3% and 0% in the Iranians, 3.7% and 0% in the sub-Saharan Africans, 8.5% and 0.61% in the Latin Americans, and 0% and 0% in the Europeans/North Americans. Based on a presumed ATB rate of 0.75%, approximately two thousand cases with ATB could be calculated to exist among the estimated 270,000 over-staying foreigners. It is, therefore, important to give them more frequent medical check-ups for early detection of latent cases with ATB. PMID:11211779

  6. Validation of an image-based technique to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs with an observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; McAdams, H. Page; Foos, David H.; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    We previously proposed a novel image-based quality assessment technique1 to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs. In this paper, an observer study was designed and conducted to systematically validate this technique. Ten metrics were involved in the observer study, i.e., lung grey level, lung detail, lung noise, riblung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm-lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. For each metric, three tasks were successively presented to the observers. In each task, six ROI images were randomly presented in a row and observers were asked to rank the images only based on a designated quality and disregard the other qualities. A range slider on the top of the images was used for observers to indicate the acceptable range based on the corresponding perceptual attribute. Five boardcertificated radiologists from Duke participated in this observer study on a DICOM calibrated diagnostic display workstation and under low ambient lighting conditions. The observer data were analyzed in terms of the correlations between the observer ranking orders and the algorithmic ranking orders. Based on the collected acceptable ranges, quality consistency ranges were statistically derived. The observer study showed that, for each metric, the averaged ranking orders of the participated observers were strongly correlated with the algorithmic orders. For the lung grey level, the observer ranking orders completely accorded with the algorithmic ranking orders. The quality consistency ranges derived from this observer study were close to these derived from our previous study. The observer study indicates that the proposed image-based quality assessment technique provides a robust reflection of the perceptual image quality of the clinical chest radiographs. The derived quality consistency ranges can be used to automatically predict the acceptability of a clinical chest radiograph.

  7. The Effect Of Pixel Size On The Detection Rate Of Early Pulmonary Sarcoidosis In Digital Chest Radiographic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMahon, Heber; Vyborny, Carl; Powell, Gregory; Doi, Kunio; Metz, Charles E.

    1984-08-01

    In digital radiography the pixel size used determines the potential spatial resolution of the system. The need for spatial resolution varies depending on the subject matter imaged. In many areas, including the chest, the minimum spatial resolution requirements have not been determined. Sarcoidosis is a disease which frequently causes subtle interstitial infiltrates in the lungs. As the initial step in an investigation designed to determine the minimum pixel size required in digital chest radiographic systems, we have studied 1 mm pixel digitized images on patients with early pulmonary sarcoidosis. The results of this preliminary study suggest that neither mild interstitial pulmonary infiltrates nor other abnormalities such as pneumothoraces may be detected reliably with 1 mm pixel digital images.

  8. Pseudolesion of the chest. A conglomerate shadow on the lateral radiograph.

    PubMed

    Stark, P; Lester, R G; Greene, R E

    1985-04-01

    A pseudolesion encountered in the lateral chest roentgenogram of normal patients is described. This concatenation of shadows can produce an opacity which projects over the distal aortic arch and can simulate a mass or pneumonia. This pseudolesion can be found in 4 to 5 percent of normal lateral chest films and is formed by superimposition of normal upper lobe vascular structures. PMID:3979146

  9. Computer-aided detection of interstitial abnormalities in chest radiographs using a reference standard based on computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhaeva, Yulia; Prokop, Mathias; Tax, David M. J.; De Jong, Pim A.; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.; Ginneken, Bram van

    2007-12-15

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system is presented for the localization of interstitial lesions in chest radiographs. The system analyzes the complete lung fields using a two-class supervised pattern classification approach to distinguish between normal texture and texture affected by interstitial lung disease. Analysis is done pixel-wise and produces a probability map for an image where each pixel in the lung fields is assigned a probability of being abnormal. Interstitial lesions are often subtle and ill defined on x-rays and hence difficult to detect, even for expert radiologists. Therefore a new, semiautomatic method is proposed for setting a reference standard for training and evaluating the CAD system. The proposed method employs the fact that interstitial lesions are more distinct on a computed tomography (CT) scan than on a radiograph. Lesion outlines, manually drawn on coronal slices of a CT scan of the same patient, are automatically transformed to corresponding outlines on the chest x-ray, using manually indicated correspondences for a small set of anatomical landmarks. For the texture analysis, local structures are described by means of the multiscale Gaussian filter bank. The system performance is evaluated with ROC analysis on a database of digital chest radiographs containing 44 abnormal and 8 normal cases. The best performance is achieved for the linear discriminant and support vector machine classifiers, with an area under the ROC curve (A{sub z}) of 0.78. Separate ROC curves are built for classification of abnormalities of different degrees of subtlety versus normal class. Here the best performance in terms of A{sub z} is 0.90 for differentiation between obviously abnormal and normal pixels. The system is compared with two human observers, an expert chest radiologist and a chest radiologist in training, on evaluation of regions. Each lung field is divided in four regions, and the reference standard and the probability maps are converted into

  10. Synchronization of radiograph film exposure with the inspiratory pause. Effect on the appearance of bedside chest radiographs in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Langevin, P B; Hellein, V; Harms, S M; Tharp, W K; Cheung-Seekit, C; Lampotang, S

    1999-12-01

    The appearance of portable chest radiographs (CXRs) may be affected by changes in ventilation, particularly when patients are mechanically ventilated. Synchronization of the CXR with the ventilatory cycle should limit the influence of respiratory variation on the appearance of the CXR. This study evaluates the effect of synchronizing the CXR film exposure with ventilation on the appearance of the radiograph. Twenty-five patients who remained intubated postoperatively, were mechanically ventilated, and required a CXR were enrolled in this triple-blind, randomized prospective study. Each patient received one radiograph using conventional techniques and another using the interface. The sequence of the two films was randomized, and the two films were taken on the same patient within a few minutes of each other. Hence, each patient served as his own control and the position of the patient, source-film distance, intensity (Kvp), and duration of the exposure (mAs) were identical for the two films. Five board-certified radiologists were then asked to compare paired films for clarity of lines and tubes, definition of the pulmonary vasculature, visibility of the mediastinum, definition of the diaphragm, and degree of lung inflation. Radiologists were also asked to choose which films they preferred. A majority of board certified radiologists preferred CXRs taken with the interface in 21 of 25 patients (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, four of the five criteria evaluated were improved (p < 0.05) on synchronized CXRs. Synchronization of the bedside CXR with the end of inspiration ensures that they are always obtained at maximal inflation, which improves the appearance of a majority of radiographs by at least one of five criteria. PMID:10588630

  11. Integration of temporal subtraction and nodule detection system for digital chest radiographs into picture archiving and communication system (PACS): four-year experience.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shuji; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Matsuo, Yoshio; Okafuji, Takashi; Kamitani, Takeshi; Honda, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Keiji; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Sugiyama, Naoki; Doi, Kunio

    2008-03-01

    Since May 2002, temporal subtraction and nodule detection systems for digital chest radiographs have been integrated into our hospital's picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Image data of digital chest radiographs were stored in PACS with the digital image and communication in medicine (DICOM) protocol. Temporal subtraction and nodule detection images were produced automatically in an exclusive server and delivered with current and previous images to the work stations. The problems that we faced and the solutions that we arrived at were analyzed. We encountered four major problems. The first problem, as a result of the storage of the original images' data with the upside-down, reverse, or lying-down positioning on portable chest radiographs, was solved by postponing the original data storage for 30 min. The second problem, the variable matrix sizes of chest radiographs obtained with flat-panel detectors (FPDs), was solved by improving the computer algorithm to produce consistent temporal subtraction images. The third problem, the production of temporal subtraction images of low quality, could not be solved fundamentally when the original images were obtained with different modalities. The fourth problem, an excessive false-positive rate on the nodule detection system, was solved by adjusting this system to chest radiographs obtained in our hospital. Integration of the temporal subtraction and nodule detection system into our hospital's PACS was customized successfully; this experience may be helpful to other hospitals. PMID:17333415

  12. 49 CFR 219.502 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 219.502 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.502 Pre-employment alcohol testing. (a) A railroad may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment...

  13. 49 CFR 219.502 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 219.502 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.502 Pre-employment alcohol testing. (a) A railroad may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment...

  14. 49 CFR 219.502 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 219.502 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.502 Pre-employment alcohol testing. (a) A railroad may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment...

  15. 49 CFR 219.502 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 219.502 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.502 Pre-employment alcohol testing. (a) A railroad may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment...

  16. 49 CFR 219.502 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 219.502 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.502 Pre-employment alcohol testing. (a) A railroad may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment...

  17. Radiographer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of radiographer, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general as well as those specific to the occupation of radiographer. The following skill areas are covered in the…

  18. Radiographic evaluation of the patient with chest pain of suspected myocardial origin

    SciTech Connect

    Green, C.E.; Satler, L.F.; Elliott, L.P.

    1984-11-01

    The evaluation of the patient with suspected angina pectoris is discussed and an approach presented which makes use of radiologic tests in conjunction with exercise testing to quickly and efficiently determine the likelihood and severity of coronary artery disease. The relative merits and limitations of chest radiography, cardiac fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, and coronary arteriography are discussed.

  19. Artifacts in chest radiographs with a third-generation computed radiography system.

    PubMed

    Volpe, J P; Storto, M L; Andriole, K P; Gamsu, G

    1996-03-01

    Photostimulable phosphor computed radiography (CR) is a developing and increasingly widespread technology. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to familiarize readers with the appearance and cause of image artifacts that can occur in a third-generation computed radiographic system. Artifacts are described that relate to imaging plates, image readers, image processing, and film processing. PMID:8623644

  20. 42 CFR 37.42 - Chest radiograph specifications-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... one, the facility must provide a clean gown. Facilities must be heated to a comfortable temperature... resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), image signal-to-noise and detective quantum efficiency must... aligned to the grid; (10) Radiographs must not be made when the environmental temperatures and humidity...

  1. The usefulness of computed tomography in detecting asbestos-related pleural abnormalities in people who had indeterminate chest radiographs: the Libby, MT, experience.

    PubMed

    Muravov, Oleg I; Kaye, Wendy E; Lewin, Michael; Berkowitz, Zahava; Lybarger, Jeffrey A; Campolucci, Sharon S; Parker, John E

    2005-01-01

    This epidemiological study was conducted to determine whether high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is useful to screen for pulmonary abnormalities in people exposed to vermiculite containing asbestos. During June-September 2001, we evaluated HRCT of 353 people in Libby, MT, who had been exposed to asbestiform minerals associated with vermiculite. Of these, 334 participants of the summer 2000 medical testing program underwent HRCT of the chest at St. John's Lutheran Hospital and 19 eligible people who recently had undergone an HRCT scan at the same facility and under the same testing protocol allowed the study reviewers to use that scan. All 353 study participants were former vermiculite mine/mill workers (n = 55), their household contacts (n = 99), and people exposed to vermiculite through recreational or other activities (n = 199). Participants' 2000 medical testing results indicated only one of the three B-reader chest radiograph reviewers had reported a pleural abnormality (indeterminate chest radiograph). Three expert computer tomography (CT) scan evaluators reviewed the HRCT scans and identified pleural abnormalities in 98 (27.8%) of the 353 participants whose previous chest radiographs were classified indeterminate. Of these 98 people, 69 (70.4%) were either former vermiculite mine/mill workers or household contacts, and 40 (40.8%) showed pleural calcification on HRCT. Thirty out of the 40 people with pleural calcification reported having no occupational exposure to either Libby vermiculite or asbestos. Our findings indicate that low-dose HRCT can be considered for screening certain former vermiculite mine/mill workers and their household contacts who have indeterminate chest radiographs and may be useful for diagnosing a suspicious finding on a chest radiograph, particularly in a high-risk person. PMID:15881982

  2. Assessment of congestive heart failure in chest radiographs. Observer performance with two common film-screen systems.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, L; Sundin, A; Smedby, O; Albrektsson, P

    1990-09-01

    The effect of observer variations and film-screen quality on the diagnosis of congestive heart failure based on chest radiographs was studied in 27 patients. For each patient, two films were exposed, one with the Kodak Lanex Medium system and one with the Agfa MR 400 system. The films were presented to three observers who assessed the presence of congestive heart failure on a three-graded scale. The results showed no significant difference between the two systems but large systematic differences between the observers. There were also differences between the two ratings by the same observer that could not be explained by the film-screen factor. It is concluded that the choice between these two systems is of little importance in view of the interobserver and intraobserver variability that can exist within the same department. PMID:2261292

  3. 49 CFR 219.501 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 219.501 Section 219... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.501 Pre-employment drug testing. (a) Prior to the first time a covered employee performs covered service for...

  4. 49 CFR 219.501 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 219.501 Section 219... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.501 Pre-employment drug testing. (a) Prior to the first time a covered employee performs covered service for...

  5. 49 CFR 219.501 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 219.501 Section 219... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.501 Pre-employment drug testing. (a) Prior to the first time a covered employee performs covered service for...

  6. A comparative study for chest radiograph image retrieval using binary texture and deep learning classification.

    PubMed

    Anavi, Yaron; Kogan, Ilya; Gelbart, Elad; Geva, Ofer; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-08-01

    In this work various approaches are investigated for X-ray image retrieval and specifically chest pathology retrieval. Given a query image taken from a data set of 443 images, the objective is to rank images according to similarity. Different features, including binary features, texture features, and deep learning (CNN) features are examined. In addition, two approaches are investigated for the retrieval task. One approach is based on the distance of image descriptors using the above features (hereon termed the "descriptor"-based approach); the second approach ("classification"-based approach) is based on a probability descriptor, generated by a pair-wise classification of each two classes (pathologies) and their decision values using an SVM classifier. Best results are achieved using deep learning features in a classification scheme. PMID:26736908

  7. Comparison of two methods for evaluating image quality of chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, C.; Sund, P.; Tingberg, A.; Keddache, S.; Mansson, L. G.; Almen, A.; Mattsson, S.

    2000-04-01

    The Imix radiography system (Oy Imix Ab, Finland) consists of an intensifying screen, optics, and a CCD camera. An upgrade of this system (Imix 2000) with a red-emitting screen and new optics has recently been released. The image quality of Imix (original version), Imix 2000, and two storage-phosphor systems, Fuji FCR 9501 and Agfa ADC70 was evaluated in physical terms (DQE) and with visual grading of the visibility of anatomical structures in clinical images (141 kV). PA chest images of 50 healthy volunteers were evaluated by experienced radiologists. All images were evaluated on Siemens Simomed monitors, using the European Quality Criteria. The maximum DQE values for Imix, Imix 2000 Agfa and Fuji were 11%, 14%, 17% and 19%, respectively (141 kV, 5 (mu) Gy). Using the visual grading, the observers rated the systems in the following descending order: Fuji, Imix 2000, Agfa, and Imix. Thus, the upgrade to Imix 2000 resulted in higher DQE values and a significant improvement in clinical image quality. The visual grading agrees reasonably well with the DQE results; however, Imix 2000 received a better score than what could be expected from the DQE measurements.

  8. Lung segmentation in chest radiographs using anatomical atlases with nonrigid registration.

    PubMed

    Candemir, Sema; Jaeger, Stefan; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Musco, Jonathan P; Singh, Rahul K; Zhiyun Xue; Karargyris, Alexandros; Antani, Sameer; Thoma, George; McDonald, Clement J

    2014-02-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is developing a digital chest X-ray (CXR) screening system for deployment in resource constrained communities and developing countries worldwide with a focus on early detection of tuberculosis. A critical component in the computer-aided diagnosis of digital CXRs is the automatic detection of the lung regions. In this paper, we present a nonrigid registration-driven robust lung segmentation method using image retrieval-based patient specific adaptive lung models that detects lung boundaries, surpassing state-of-the-art performance. The method consists of three main stages: 1) a content-based image retrieval approach for identifying training images (with masks) most similar to the patient CXR using a partial Radon transform and Bhattacharyya shape similarity measure, 2) creating the initial patient-specific anatomical model of lung shape using SIFT-flow for deformable registration of training masks to the patient CXR, and 3) extracting refined lung boundaries using a graph cuts optimization approach with a customized energy function. Our average accuracy of 95.4% on the public JSRT database is the highest among published results. A similar degree of accuracy of 94.1% and 91.7% on two new CXR datasets from Montgomery County, MD, USA, and India, respectively, demonstrates the robustness of our lung segmentation approach. PMID:24239990

  9. Elimination of routine chest radiographs following off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: A randomized controlled trial study

    PubMed Central

    Forouzannia, Seyed Khalil; Sarvi, Ali; Sarebanhassanabadi, Mohammadtaghi; Nafisi-Moghadam, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Post cardiac surgery routine chest radiographs (CXRs), ordered without any clinical and laboratory indications, is a standard obligatory practice in many cardiothoracic centers. Routine CXRs incur cost, manpower, and radiation. The objective of this study is to assess early outcome in off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) patients with postoperative routine versus clinically indicated CXR protocols. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial conducted on 231 OPCAB candidates in Afshar Cardiac Center, Yazd, Iran. Patients were categorized into two groups. All 118 patients in group A had routine postoperative CXRs. The 113 patients in group B were selectively exposed to CXR only on clinical indications. All patients were postoperatively followed up for 30 days. Data gathered from both groups were statistically analyzed. Results: Routine postoperative CXRs obtained in 118 OPCAB group A candidates showed abnormal findings in 20 patients that did not require new intervention. One month follow-up of these patients showed no complications. In 113 OPCAB candidates of group B, 7 on-demand CXRs were obtained on clinical evaluation that required added intervention. In a 1-month follow-up of this group, five patients presented with symptomatic complaints. On re-examination, none needed readmission, intervention, or paraclinical evaluation. No complications were observed due to CXR elimination. Conclusion: The study suggests that postoperative CXR selected on clinical grounds in place of routine CXR does not change early postoperative outcome of OPCAB procedure. PMID:26682202

  10. Chest radiographic image quality: comparison of asymmetric screen-film, digital storage phosphor, and digital selenium drum systems--preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Beute, G H; Flynn, M J; Eyler, W R; Samei, E; Spizarny, D L; Zylak, C J

    1998-01-01

    Conventional screen-film radiography does not display all regions of the thorax satisfactorily. Three chest radiographic techniques display both the lung and the mediastinum with good contrast. These techniques are asymmetric screen-film (ASF), digital storage phosphor (DSP), and digital selenium drum (DSD) imaging. ASF systems use two asymmetric screen-film combinations to produce a wide-latitude image of the thorax with good contrast in the lungs. In DSP systems, image data are acquired digitally with a wide dynamic range by using the optical output of a photostimulable phosphor plate; in DSD systems, the wide-range digital image data are acquired by using the electronic charge generated on a drum coated with a thin layer of amorphous selenium. The appearance of a DSP or DSD radiograph is then determined by user-selected image processing operations: tone scaling, spatial frequency processing, and dynamic range compensation. Digital chest radiographs processed with strong regional equalization provide both excellent contrast in the lungs and effective display of the mediastinum and chest wall. At visual comparison, the high lung contrast and good mediastinal, retrocardiac, and subdiaphragmatic detail provided by the DSD method distinguish it from the other two methods. PMID:9599395

  11. Eye-position study of the effects of a verbal prompt and pictorial backgrounds on the search for lung nodules in chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundel, Harold L.; Nodine, Calvin F.; Toto, Lawrence C.

    1999-05-01

    Peripherally inconspicuous nodules on chest radiographs are frequently missed by competent readers. In order to find a peripherally inconspicuous nodule the reader must inspect the nodule site with the central vision and decide if the features at the site are sufficiently characteristic to report a nodule. The experiment reported here was carried out to examine the effect of a nodule prompt and distraction by unrelated native abnormalities on the location and recognition of inconspicuous lung nodules on chest x-ray images. On two occasions separated by 3 years, 4 radiologists had their eye- position recorded while viewing 24 chest radiographs, 12 with prominent native abnormalities and 12 with no abnormalities. An inconspicuous nodule was simulated in the lungs of half of the radiographs on the first viewing and in the other half on the second viewing. For the first viewing, the readers were instructed to report any abnormalities. For the second viewing the readers were told to report any abnormalities including nodules. A nodule prompt triggers a scanning strategy that sends the central vision to high probability nodule sites early in search and at the same time relaxes the criteria used to evaluate nodule features resulting in more true positives and false positives without a change in absolute detectability. Prominent native abnormalities, unrelated to nodules, do not affect the search strategy but competitively inhibit the nodule feature recognition mechanism.

  12. 49 CFR 655.41 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 655.41 Section 655.41..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.41 Pre-employment drug testing. (a)(1) Before allowing a covered employee...

  13. 22 CFR 146.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 146.545 Section...

  14. 22 CFR 229.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 229.545 Section...

  15. Pre-Employment Training Resource Manual. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC.

    A collection of background notes and lesson plans from the pre-employment training programs under way at three refugee processing centers in Indonesia, the Philippines, and Thailand is presented. The pre-employment component of an educational program that also includes intensive English as a second language and cultural orientation training…

  16. 49 CFR 655.41 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 655.41 Section 655.41..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.41 Pre-employment drug testing. (a)(1) Before allowing a covered employee...

  17. 49 CFR 655.41 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 655.41 Section 655.41..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.41 Pre-employment drug testing. (a)(1) Before allowing a covered employee...

  18. 49 CFR 655.41 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 655.41 Section 655.41..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.41 Pre-employment drug testing. (a)(1) Before allowing a covered employee...

  19. 49 CFR 655.41 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 655.41 Section 655.41..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.41 Pre-employment drug testing. (a)(1) Before allowing a covered employee...

  20. The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs in a mixed medical–surgical intensive care unit is low

    PubMed Central

    Graat, Marleen E; Choi, Goda; Wolthuis, Esther K; Korevaar, Johanna C; Spronk, Peter E; Stoker, Jaap; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs (CXRs) in critically ill patients is unknown. We conducted this study to evaluate how frequently unexpected predefined major abnormalities are identified with daily routine CXRs, and how often these findings lead to a change in care for intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Method This was a prospective observational study conducted in a 28-bed, mixed medical–surgical ICU of a university hospital. Results Over a 5-month period, 2,457 daily routine CXRs were done in 754 consecutive ICU patients. The majority of these CXRs did not reveal any new predefined major finding. In only 5.8% of daily routine CXRs (14.3% of patients) was one or more new and unexpected abnormality encountered, including large atelectases (24 times in 20 patients), large infiltrates (23 in 22), severe pulmonary congestion (29 in 25), severe pleural effusion (13 in 13), pneumothorax/pneumomediastinum (14 in 13), and malposition of the orotracheal tube (32 in 26). Fewer than half of the CXRs with a new and unexpected finding were ultimately clinically relevant; in only 2.2% of all daily routine CXRs (6.4% of patients) did these radiologic abnormalities result in a change to therapy. Subgroup analysis revealed no differences between medical and surgical patients with regard to the incidence of new and unexpected findings on daily routine CXRs and the effect of new and unexpected CXR findings on daily care. Conclusion In the ICU, daily routine CXRs seldom reveal unexpected, clinically relevant abnormalities, and they rarely prompt action. We propose that this diagnostic examination be abandoned in ICU patients. PMID:16420655

  1. Ossification of the Medial Clavicular Epiphysis on Chest Radiographs: Utility and Diagnostic Accuracy in Identifying Korean Adolescents and Young Adults under the Age of Majority.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soon Ho; Yoo, Hye Jin; Yoo, Roh Eul; Lim, Hyun Ju; Yoon, Jeong Hwa; Park, Chang Min; Lee, Sang Seob; Yoo, Seong Ho

    2016-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the utility and diagnostic accuracy of the ossification grade of medial clavicular epiphysis on chest radiographs for identifying Korean adolescents and young adults under the age of majority. Overall, 1,151 patients (age, 16-30) without any systemic disease and who underwent chest radiography were included for ossification grading. Two radiologists independently classified the ossification of the medial clavicular epiphysis from chest radiographs into five grades. The age distribution and inter-observer agreement on the ossification grade were assessed. The diagnostic accuracy of the averaged ossification grades for determining whether the patient is under the age of majority was analyzed by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Two separate inexperienced radiologists assessed the ossification grade in a subgroup of the patients after reviewing the detailed descriptions and image atlases developed for ossification grading. The median value of the ossification grades increased with increasing age (from 16 to 30 years), and the trend was best fitted by a quadratic function (R-square, 0.978). The inter-observer agreements on the ossification grade were 0.420 (right) and 0.404 (left). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.922 (95% CI, 0.902-0.942). The averaged ossification scores of 2.62 and 4.37 provided 95% specificity for a person < 19 years of age and a person ≥ 19 years of age, respectively. A preliminary assessment by inexperienced radiologists resulted in an AUC of 0.860 (95% CI, 0.740-0.981). The age of majority in Korean adolescents and young adults can be estimated using chest radiographs. PMID:27550480

  2. The prevalence of chondrocalcinosis (CC) of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint on chest radiographs and correlation with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Guillermo; Baynes, Keith; Mautz, Alan; DuBois, Melissa; Cerniglia, Ross; Ryan, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    Digital imaging combined with picture archiving and communication system (PACS) access allows detailed image retrieval and magnification. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals preferentially deposit in fibrocartilages, the cartilage of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint being one such structure. We sought to determine if examination of the AC joints on magnified PACS imaging of chest films would be useful in identifying chondrocalcinosis (CC). Retrospective radiographic readings and chart reviews involving 1,920 patients aged 50 or more who had routine outpatient chest radiographs over a 4-month period were performed. Knee radiographs were available for comparison in 489 patients. Medical records were reviewed to abstract demographics, chest film reports, and diagnoses. AC joint CC was identified in 1.1 % (21/1,920) of consecutive chest films. Patients with AC joint CC were 75 years of age versus 65.4 in those without CC (p<0.0002). Four hundred eighty-nine patients had knee films. Six of these patients had AC joint CC, and of these, five also had knee CC (83 %). Of the 483 without AC joint CC, 62 (12 %) had knee CC (p=0.002). Patients with AC joint CC were more likely to have a recorded history of CPPD crystal deposition disease than those without AC joint CC (14 versus 1 %, p=0.0017). The prevalence of AC joint CC increases with age and is associated with knee CC. A finding of AC joint CC should heighten suspicion of pseudogout or secondary osteoarthritis in appropriate clinical settings and, in a young patient, should alert the clinician to the possibility of an associated metabolic condition. PMID:23609408

  3. Using Standardized Interpretation of Chest Radiographs to Identify Adults with Bacterial Pneumonia—Guatemala, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Wortham, Jonathan M.; Gray, Jennifer; Verani, Jennifer; Contreras, Carmen Lucia; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Moir, Juan Carlos; Reyes Marroquin, Emma Lissette; Castellan, Rigoberto; Arvelo, Wences; Lindblade, Kim; McCracken, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacterial pneumonia is a leading cause of illness and death worldwide, but quantifying its burden is difficult due to insensitive diagnostics. Although World Health Organization (WHO) protocol standardizes pediatric chest radiograph (CXR) interpretation for epidemiologic studies of bacterial pneumonia, its validity in adults is unknown. Methods Patients (age ≥15 years) admitted with respiratory infections to two Guatemalan hospitals between November 2007 and March 2012 had urine and nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) swabs collected; blood cultures and CXR were also performed at physician clinical discretion. ‘Any bacterial infection’ was defined as a positive urine pneumococcal antigen test, isolation of a bacterial pneumonia pathogen from blood culture, or detection of an atypical bacterial pathogen by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) specimens. ‘Viral infection’ was defined as detection of viral pathogens by PCR of NP/OP specimens. CXRs were interpreted according to the WHO protocol as having ‘endpoint consolidation’, ‘other infiltrate’, or ‘normal’ findings. We examined associations between bacterial and viral infections and endpoint consolidation. Findings Urine antigen and/or blood culture results were available for 721 patients with CXR interpretations; of these, 385 (53%) had endpoint consolidation and 253 (35%) had other infiltrate. Any bacterial infection was detected in 119 (17%) patients, including 106 (89%) pneumococcal infections. Any bacterial infection (Diagnostic Odds Ratio [DOR] = 2.9; 95% confidence Interval (CI): 1.3–7.9) and pneumococcal infection (DOR = 3.4; 95% CI: 1.5–10.0) were associated with ‘endpoint consolidation’, but not ‘other infiltrate’ (DOR = 1.7; 95% CI: 0.7–4.9, and 1.7; 95% CI: 0.7–4.9 respectively). Viral infection was not significantly associated with ‘endpoint consolidation’, ‘other infiltrate,’ or ‘normal’ findings

  4. Elimination of daily routine chest radiographs in a mixed medical–surgical intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Graat, Marleen E.; Kröner, Anke; Spronk, Peter E.; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Stoker, Jaap; Vroom, Margreeth B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of elimination of daily routine chest radiographs (CXRs) in a mixed medical–surgical intensive care unit (ICU) on utility of on demand CXRs, length of stay (LOS) in ICU, readmission rate, and mortality rate. Design and setting Prospective, nonrandomized, controlled study in a 28-bed ICU. Analysis included data of all admitted ICU patients during 5 months before and after elimination of daily routine CXRs. Results Before elimination, 2457 daily routine CXRs and 1437 on demand CXRs were obtained from 754 patients. After elimination, 1267 CXRs were obtained from 622 patients. The ratio of CXRs/patient day decreased from 1.1 ± 0.3 to 0.6 ± 0.4 (p < 0.05). Elimination did not result in a change in utility and timing of on demand CXRs. The absolute diagnostic and therapeutic value of on demand CXRs increased with elimination of daily routine CXRs: before intervention, 147 unexpected predefined abnormalities were found (10.2% of all on demand CXRs in 15.9% of all patients), of which 57 (3.9%) in 6.4% of all patients led to a change in therapy. After intervention, 156 unexpected predefined abnormalities were found (11.6%; p < 0.05), of which 61 (4.8%) in 9.5% of all patients (p < 0.05) led to a change in therapy. The LOS in ICU, readmission rate and ICU, and hospital mortality rate were not influenced by the change in strategy. Conclusions Elimination of daily routine CXRs reduced the number of CXRs in a mixed medical–surgical ICU, while not affecting readmission rate and ICU and hospital mortality rates. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-007-0542-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users PMID:17333118

  5. The Development of Expertise in Radiology: In Chest Radiograph Interpretation, "Expert" Search Pattern May Predate "Expert" Levels of Diagnostic Accuracy for Pneumothorax Identification.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brendan S; Rainford, Louise A; Darcy, Sarah P; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Toomey, Rachel J

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate the development of chest radiograph interpretation skill through medical training by measuring both diagnostic accuracy and eye movements during visual search. Materials and Methods An institutional exemption from full ethical review was granted for the study. Five consultant radiologists were deemed the reference expert group, and four radiology registrars, five senior house officers (SHOs), and six interns formed four clinician groups. Participants were shown 30 chest radiographs, 14 of which had a pneumothorax, and were asked to give their level of confidence as to whether a pneumothorax was present. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was carried out on diagnostic decisions. Eye movements were recorded with a Tobii TX300 (Tobii Technology, Stockholm, Sweden) eye tracker. Four eye-tracking metrics were analyzed. Variables were compared to identify any differences between groups. All data were compared by using the Friedman nonparametric method. Results The average area under the ROC curve for the groups increased with experience (0.947 for consultants, 0.792 for registrars, 0.693 for SHOs, and 0.659 for interns; P = .009). A significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was found between consultants and registrars (P = .046). All four eye-tracking metrics decreased with experience, and there were significant differences between registrars and SHOs. Total reading time decreased with experience; it was significantly lower for registrars compared with SHOs (P = .046) and for SHOs compared with interns (P = .025). Conclusion Chest radiograph interpretation skill increased with experience, both in terms of diagnostic accuracy and visual search. The observed level of experience at which there was a significant difference was higher for diagnostic accuracy than for eye-tracking metrics. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27322975

  6. Comparison of gated radionuclide scans and chest radiographs. Assessment of left ventricular impairment in patients with coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Bianco, J A; Reinke, D B; Makey, D G; Shafer, R B

    1980-03-01

    Diagnostic efficacy of gated cardiac blood pool imaging was studied in 41 consecutive patients with LV ejection fractions (LVEF) less than or equal to 0.50. Eighty percent of patients were receiving therapy for LV failure at the time of the study. All patients had documented coronary-artery disease (CAD). Chest x-ray films were interpreted blindly by a senior radiologist. Cardiothoracic ratio of less than or equal to 0.50 was recorded as normal. Radionuclide assessment of LV function contributes importantly to the diagnostic and screening value of chest x-ray films. Patients with coronary disease and clinical evidence of heart failure should have radioisotopic studies even if chest x-ray film findings are normal. In patients with coronary artery disease and enlarged LV on chest films, radionuclide study of left ventricular performance aids in defining LV impairment, and in the prognostication of subsequent clinical course. PMID:6444573

  7. Evidence base for pre-employment medical screening.

    PubMed

    Pachman, Joseph

    2009-07-01

    This paper examines the evidence base for the use of pre-employment/pre-placement medical examinations. The use of pre-employment examinations is often driven more by cultural practices than evidence. There is a lack of evidence on their effectiveness in preventing health-related occupational risks. Hypertension screening is highlighted as a common pre-employment practice for which there is no standardized criteria to use to determine fitness for work. There are inherent problems in screening for psychiatric disorders and substance abuse as well as potential for racial bias and other unintended negative effects. This paper questions the economic case for this practice and also expresses concerns about paternalism related to identified risk factors. Health assessments should only be included when appropriate to the task environment and the general use of pre-employment exams and drug screening should be eliminated. Generally, a health assessment by questionnaire should suffice. Occupational health providers should advise against the application of physical or mental standards that are not relevant to fulfilment of the essential job functions. Consensus development regarding best practice, as well as consideration for acquiring outcome data related to pre-employment practice, is recommended. PMID:19649367

  8. Evaluation of the image quality of ink-jet printed paper copies of digital chest radiographs as compared with film: a receiver operating characteristic study.

    PubMed

    Lyttkens, K; Kirkhorn, T; Kehler, M; Andersson, B; Ebbesen, A; Hochbergs, P; Jarlman, O; Lindberg, C G; Holmer, N G

    1994-05-01

    Paper copies of digital radiographs printed with the continuous ink-jet technique have proved to be of a high enough quality for demonstration purposes. We present a study on the image quality of ink-jet printed paper copies of digital chest radiographs, based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Eighty-three digital radiographs of a chest phantom with simulated tumors in the mediastinum and right lung, derived from a computed radiography (CR) system were presented in two series of hard copies as ink-jet printed paper copies and as laser recorded film. The images, with a matrix of 1,760 x 2,140 pixels, were printed with a spatial resolution of 10 pixels/mm in the CR film recorder as well as in the ink-jet printer. On film, every image was recorded in two versions, one optimized for the mediastinum and one for the lungs. On paper, only one image was printed; this constituted an effort to optimize both the mediastinum and the lungs. The ink-jet printed images, printed on a matt coated paper, were viewed as on-sight images with reflected light. The examinations were reviewed by six radiologists, and ROC curves were constructed. No significant difference was found between the performance of film and that of ink-jet paper prints. Because the cost for a paper copy is only a tenth of that of film, remarkable cost reductions can be achieved by using the ink jet technique instead. Our results show that further quality studies of ink-jet printed images are worthwhile. PMID:8075185

  9. Routine chest x-ray examinations in occupational medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenburg, N.J.

    1982-01-01

    To collect some data on the yield of the chest x-ray examination in pre-employment health evaluations, a retrospective study was carried out. Pre-employment chest x-ray examination reports on 3,266 applicants were reviewed in Eastman Kodak Company's Medical Department in Rochester, N.Y. All radiographs were interpreted by Board-certified radiologists. For the purpose of this study, positive findings were restricted to the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems. The findings included items that would not be considered completely normal. However, many were of no clinical significance. An important point in regard to the findings is that 80% of the applicants were under the age of 35. The data are summarized in Table 1. Positive findings were noted in 52 (1.6%) radiographs. Of these, 25 (0.7%) had some radiologic finding that was relevant in terms of clinical follow-up, appropriate job placement or deferment of employment. Only two of the 3,266 applicants were not employed because of the x-ray examination findings. Results suggests that a selective program, based on clinical history and examination and on past and proposed job exposure, might be appropriate.

  10. An 81-year-old man with an abnormal right-sided heart shadow on chest radiograph.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rahman; Khan, M Rehan; Fan, Tai-Hwang M; Ruff, Genina; Ramanathan, Kodangudi B

    2015-02-01

    An 81-year-old man presented with a 1-week history of dry cough. He also complained of mild dyspnea, wheezing, and low-grade fever. He denied hemoptysis, fever, rashes, or chest pain. The patient's medical history included coronary artery bypass surgery, hypertension, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and COPD. The patient was a retired welder and an ex-smoker. PMID:25644917

  11. 18 CFR 1317.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pre-employment... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1317.545...

  12. 18 CFR 1317.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pre-employment... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1317.545...

  13. 18 CFR 1317.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pre-employment... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1317.545...

  14. 18 CFR 1317.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pre-employment... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1317.545...

  15. 18 CFR 1317.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Pre-employment inquiries... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1317.545...

  16. 49 CFR 655.42 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... testing procedures set forth in 49 CFR Part 40. (e) The employer must not allow a covered employee to... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 655.42 Section 655... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN...

  17. 49 CFR 655.42 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... testing procedures set forth in 49 CFR Part 40. (e) The employer must not allow a covered employee to... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 655.42 Section 655... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN...

  18. 49 CFR 655.42 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... testing procedures set forth in 49 CFR Part 40. (e) The employer must not allow a covered employee to... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 655.42 Section 655... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN...

  19. 28 CFR 54.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 54.545 Pre-employment... an applicant for employment, including whether such applicant is “Miss” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex....

  20. 49 CFR 655.42 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... testing procedures set forth in 49 CFR Part 40. (e) The employer must not allow a covered employee to... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 655.42 Section 655... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN...

  1. 49 CFR 655.42 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... testing procedures set forth in 49 CFR Part 40. (e) The employer must not allow a covered employee to... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 655.42 Section 655... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN...

  2. 29 CFR 36.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in..., including whether such applicant is “Miss” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry...

  3. 29 CFR 36.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in..., including whether such applicant is “Miss” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry...

  4. 34 CFR 106.60 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 106.60 Section 106.60 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or...

  5. 7 CFR 15a.60 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 15a.60 Section 15a.60 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in...

  6. Pre-Employment Laboratory Education. Child Care Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Instructional Materials Center.

    This guidebook is designed for use in teaching students enrolled in secondary pre-employment laboratory education (PELE) child care programs. The first of two major sections includes an overview for teachers in planning, conducting, and evaluating a child care program. Specific topics discussed in section 1 include (1) the school-operated center,…

  7. The x-ray light valve: A potentially low-cost, digital radiographic imaging system--a liquid crystal cell design for chest radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Szeto, Timothy C.; Webster, Christie Ann; Koprinarov, Ivaylo; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-03-15

    Digital x-ray radiographic systems are desirable as they offer high quality images which can be processed, transferred, and stored without secondary steps. However, current clinical systems are extraordinarily expensive in comparison to film-based systems. Thus, there is a need for an economical digital imaging system for general radiology. The x-ray light valve (XLV) is a novel digital x-ray detector concept with the potential for high image quality and low cost. The XLV is comprised of a photoconductive detector layer and liquid crystal (LC) cell physically coupled in a sandwich structure. Upon exposure to x rays, charge is collected at the surface of the photoconductor, causing a change in the reflective properties of the LC cell. The visible image so formed can subsequently be digitized with an optical scanner. By choosing the properties of the LC cell in combination with the appropriate photoconductor thickness and bias potentials, the XLV can be optimized for various diagnostic imaging tasks. Specifically for chest radiography, we identified three potentially practical reflective cell designs by selecting from those commonly used in LC display technology. The relationship between reflectance and x-ray exposure (i.e., the characteristic curve) was determined for all three cells using a theoretical model. The results indicate that the reflective electrically controlled birefringence (r-ECB) cell is the preferred choice for chest radiography, provided that the characteristic curve can be shifted towards lower exposures. The feasibility of the shift of the characteristic curve is shown experimentally. The experimental results thus demonstrate that an XLV based on the r-ECB cell design exhibits a characteristic curve suitable for chest radiography.

  8. Pre-employment screening and cardiovascular intervention program.

    PubMed

    Mostardi, R A; Porterfield, J A; King, S; Wiedman, K; Sherman, B

    1986-01-01

    Pre-employment screening and health maintenance on the job has been an area of concern for both hospitals and industry. Can various disease processes be ' prevented and can money be saved in the process are some basic questions. A program in Akron, OH involving police officers has been set up to examine these and other questions. This program is being presented as a model for use in a variety of settings since the components have a broad range of application. The components include; pre-employment screening, mandatory health standards, and comprehensive intervention program. This program has been very successful in Akron and it is suggested that the model can have a significant impact in business and industrial settings. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1986;8(1):42-47. PMID:18802247

  9. Effect of Picture Archiving and Communication System Image Manipulation on the Agreement of Chest Radiograph Interpretation in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Denise A.; Naqvi, Asad Ahmed; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth; Flavin, Michael P.; Manson, David; Soboleski, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Variability in image interpretation has been attributed to differences in the interpreters’ knowledge base, experience level, and access to the clinical scenario. Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) has allowed the user to manipulate the images while developing their impression of the radiograph. The aim of this study was to determine the agreement of chest radiograph (CXR) impressions among radiologists and neonatologists and help determine the effect of image manipulation with PACS on report impression. Materials and Methods: Prospective cohort study included 60 patients from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit undergoing CXRs. Three radiologists and three neonatologists reviewed two consecutive frontal CXRs of each patient. Each physician was allowed manipulation of images as needed to provide a decision of “improved,” “unchanged,” or “disease progression” lung disease for each patient. Each physician repeated the process once more; this time, they were not allowed to individually manipulate the images, but an independent radiologist presets the image brightness and contrast to best optimize the CXR appearance. Percent agreement and opposing reporting views were calculated between all six physicians for each of the two methods (allowing and not allowing image manipulation). Results: One hundred percent agreement in image impression between all six observers was only seen in 5% of cases when allowing image manipulation; 100% agreement was seen in 13% of the cases when there was no manipulation of the images. Conclusion: Agreement in CXR interpretation is poor; the ability to manipulate the images on PACS results in a decrease in agreement in the interpretation of these studies. New methods to standardize image appearance and allow improved comparison with previous studies should be sought to improve clinician agreement in interpretation consistency and advance patient care. PMID:27274414

  10. Classification of radiological errors in chest radiographs, using support vector machine on the spatial frequency features of false- negative and false-positive regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Donovan, Tim; Brennan, Patrick C.; Dix, Alan; Manning, David J.

    2011-03-01

    Aim: To optimize automated classification of radiological errors during lung nodule detection from chest radiographs (CxR) using a support vector machine (SVM) run on the spatial frequency features extracted from the local background of selected regions. Background: The majority of the unreported pulmonary nodules are visually detected but not recognized; shown by the prolonged dwell time values at false-negative regions. Similarly, overestimated nodule locations are capturing substantial amounts of foveal attention. Spatial frequency properties of selected local backgrounds are correlated with human observer responses either in terms of accuracy in indicating abnormality position or in the precision of visual sampling the medical images. Methods: Seven radiologists participated in the eye tracking experiments conducted under conditions of pulmonary nodule detection from a set of 20 postero-anterior CxR. The most dwelled locations have been identified and subjected to spatial frequency (SF) analysis. The image-based features of selected ROI were extracted with un-decimated Wavelet Packet Transform. An analysis of variance was run to select SF features and a SVM schema was implemented to classify False-Negative and False-Positive from all ROI. Results: A relative high overall accuracy was obtained for each individually developed Wavelet-SVM algorithm, with over 90% average correct ratio for errors recognition from all prolonged dwell locations. Conclusion: The preliminary results show that combined eye-tracking and image-based features can be used for automated detection of radiological error with SVM. The work is still in progress and not all analytical procedures have been completed, which might have an effect on the specificity of the algorithm.

  11. 29 CFR 1604.7 - Pre-employment inquiries as to sex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. 1604.7 Section 1604.7... DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX § 1604.7 Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. A pre-employment inquiry may ask “Male... directly or indirectly any limitation, specification, or discrimination as to sex shall be unlawful...

  12. 29 CFR 1604.7 - Pre-employment inquiries as to sex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. 1604.7 Section 1604.7... DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX § 1604.7 Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. A pre-employment inquiry may ask “Male... directly or indirectly any limitation, specification, or discrimination as to sex shall be unlawful...

  13. 29 CFR 1604.7 - Pre-employment inquiries as to sex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. 1604.7 Section 1604.7... DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX § 1604.7 Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. A pre-employment inquiry may ask “Male... directly or indirectly any limitation, specification, or discrimination as to sex shall be unlawful...

  14. 29 CFR 1604.7 - Pre-employment inquiries as to sex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. 1604.7 Section 1604.7... DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX § 1604.7 Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. A pre-employment inquiry may ask “Male... directly or indirectly any limitation, specification, or discrimination as to sex shall be unlawful...

  15. 29 CFR 1604.7 - Pre-employment inquiries as to sex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. 1604.7 Section 1604.7... DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX § 1604.7 Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. A pre-employment inquiry may ask “Male... directly or indirectly any limitation, specification, or discrimination as to sex shall be unlawful...

  16. 78 FR 38452 - Agency Information Collection (VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist) Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist) Activities... ``OMB Control No. 2900-0524.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: VA Police Officer Pre-Employment... checks on applicants seeking employment as VA police officers. VA will use the data collected...

  17. 78 FR 18425 - Proposed Information Collection VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist); Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist); Comment... applicant's qualification and suitability as a VA police officer. DATES: Written comments and... information technology. Title: VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist, VA Form 0120. OMB...

  18. Computer aided detection of lung cancer in the absence of the cancer on chest radiographs: effect of the computer-aided detection on radiologists' performance on cancer-free cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osicka, Teresa; Freedman, Matthew T.; Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Lure, Fleming; Xu, Xin-Wei; Lin, Jesse; Zhang, Ron; Zhao, Hui

    2005-04-01

    Using data from a clinical trial of a commercial CAD system for lung cancer detection we separately analyzed the location, if any, selected on each film by 15 radiologists as they interpreted chest radiographs, 160 of which did not contain cancers. On the cancer-free cases, the radiologists showed statistically significant difference in decisions while using the CAD (p-value 0.002). Average specificity without computer assistance was 78%, and with computer assistance 73%. In a clinical trial with CAD for lung cancer detection there are multiple machine false positives. On chest radiographs of older current or former smokers, there are many scars that can appear like cancer to the interpreting radiologists. We are reporting on the radiologists' false positives and on the effect of machine false positive detections on observer performance on cancer-free cases. The only difference between radiologists occurred when they changed their initial true negative decision to false positive (p-value less than 0.0001), average confidence level increased, on the scale from 0.0 to 100.0, from 16.9 (high confidence of non-cancer) to 53.5 (moderate confidence cancer was present). We are reporting on the consistency of misinterpretation by multiple radiologists when they interpret cancer-free radiographs of smokers in the absence of CAD prompts. When multiple radiologists selected the same false positive location, there was usually a definite abnormality that triggered this response. The CAD identifies areas that are of sufficient concern for cancer that the radiologists will switch from a correct decision of no cancer to mark a false positive, previously overlooked, but suspicious appearing cancer-free area; one that has often been marked by another radiologist without the use of the CAD prompt. This work has implications on what should be accepted as ground truth in ROC studies: One might ask, "What a false positive response means?" when the finding, clinically, looks like cancer

  19. Technique for chest radiography for pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, E.N.

    1982-01-01

    Routine radiographic chest examinations have been performed using a variety of techniques. Although chest radiography is one of the most commonly performed radiographic examinations, it is often difficult to obtain consistently good quality roentgenograms. This publication provides a simple guide and relatively easy solution to the many problems that radiologic technologists might encounter. The language is purposely relatively simple and care has been taken to avoid difficult mathematical and physical explanations. The intent is to provide an easily referrable text for those who may encounter difficulties in producing acceptable chest radiographs.

  20. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, R.D.; Cohen, M.; Broderick, N.J.; Conces, D.J. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology.

  1. Protecting Job Applicants' Privacy Rights When Using Pre-Employment Honesty Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John W.; And Others

    The estimates of employees who steal range from approximately 20 percent to 40 percent. While researchers are still attempting to quantify both the total frequency and cost of employee theft, the existence of meaningful amounts of theft by employees is widely accepted. Professionally developed pre-employment honesty tests do not appear to infringe…

  2. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training. General Agricultural Mechanics Volume II. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This course outline, the second volume of a two-volume set, consists of lesson plans for pre-employment laboratory training in general agricultural mechanics. Covered in the eight lessons included in this volume are cold metal work, soldering, agricultural safety programs, farm shops, farm structures, farm and ranch electrification, soil and water…

  3. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training. General Agricultural Mechanics Volume I. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This course outline, the first volume of a two-volume set, consists of lesson plans for pre-employment laboratory training in general agricultural mechanics. Covered in the 12 lessons included in this volume are selecting tractors and engines, diagnosing engine conditions, servicing electrical systems, servicing cooling systems, servicing fuel and…

  4. Student Pre-Employment Career Skills. "SPECS." (Opening the Door to Employment).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Joseph

    This resource book consists of lessons and resource materials designed to assist teachers in conducting group and individual activities to help students develop pre-employment career skills. Provided first are instructional units addressing the following topics: self-appraisal (interests, attitudes, and aptitudes; goal setting and decision making;…

  5. Pre-Employment Laboratory Education. Home Furnishings/Interior Design Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Instructional Materials Center.

    This guidebook is designed for use in teaching students enrolled in pre-employment laboratory education (PELE) home furnishing/interior design programs. The first of two major sections includes an overview for teachers on planning, conducting, and evaluating a home furnishings/interior design program. Specific topics discussed in section 1 include…

  6. 42 CFR 37.43 - Approval of radiographic facilities that use film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic... their ability to make high quality diagnostic chest radiographs by submitting to NIOSH six or more sample chest radiographs made and processed at the applicant facility and which are of acceptable...

  7. New developed DR detector performs radiographs of hand, pelvic and premature chest anatomies at a lower radiation dose and/or a higher image quality.

    PubMed

    Precht, Helle; Tingberg, Anders; Waaler, Dag; Outzen, Claus Bjørn

    2014-02-01

    A newly developed Digital Radiography (DR) detector has smaller pixel size and higher fill factor than earlier detector models. These technical advantages should theoretically lead to higher sensitivity and higher spatial resolution, thus making dose reduction possible without scarifying image quality compared to previous DR detector versions. To examine whether the newly developed Canon CXDI-70C DR detector provides an improved image quality and/or allows for dose reductions in hand and pelvic bone examinations as well as premature chest examinations, compared to the previous (CXDI-55C) DR detector version. A total of 450 images of a technical Contrast-Detail phantom were imaged on a DR system employing various kVp and mAs settings, providing an objective image quality assessment. In addition, 450 images of anthropomorphic phantoms were taken and analyzed by three specialized radiologists using Visual Grading Analysis (VGA). The results from the technical phantom studies showed that the image quality expressed as IQFINV values was on average approximately 45 % higher with the CXDI-70C detector compared to the CXDI-55C detector. Consistently, the VGA results from the anatomical phantom studies indicated that by using the CXDI-70C detector, diagnostic image quality could be maintained at a dose reduction of in average 30 %, depending on anatomy and kVp level. This indicates that the CXDI-70C detector is significantly more sensitive than the previous model, and supports a better clinical image quality. By using the newly developed DR detector a significant dose reduction is possible while maintaining image quality. PMID:24221693

  8. 42 CFR 37.44 - Approval of radiographic facilities that use digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (45 CFR Part 160 and Subparts A, C, and E of Part 164). ... quality digital chest radiographs by submitting to NIOSH digital radiographic image files of a test object... digital radiographic image files from six or more sample chest radiographs that are of acceptable...

  9. 42 CFR 37.44 - Approval of radiographic facilities that use digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF... quality digital chest radiographs by submitting to NIOSH digital radiographic image files of a test object... digital radiographic image files from six or more sample chest radiographs that are of acceptable...

  10. Pre-employment screening and health management for safety forces-methods and techniques.

    PubMed

    Mostardi, R A; Porterfield, J A; King, S; Urycki, S

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical report is to describe the process by which safety forces (police and fire) are tested prior to employment (pre-employment screening) and the periodic evaluations used to maintain such standards. The process began by testing 350 male police volunteers and developing a series of age stratified norms. These norms are used to compare incoming recruits such that candidates of a given age are compared to norms developed from police officers of the same age. The purposes of this report are to describe the clinical tests used in the pre-employment screening, to report the normative data and to describe the methods of comparing data obtained from applicants to the established norms. The proper management of high risk employees through pre-employment screening and intervention programs has been viewed as being necessary both for the individual employee in reducing injury and disease and for the municipality for cost saving purposes. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1990;11(9):398-401. PMID:18787271

  11. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Having a pain in your chest can be scary. It does not always mean that you are having a heart attack. There can be many other causes, ... embolism Costochondritis - an inflammation of joints in your chest Some of these problems can be serious. Get ...

  12. [Chest pain].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability. PMID:25533261

  13. Chest tomosynthesis: technical and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Ase Allansdotter; Vikgren, Jenny; Bath, Magnus

    2014-02-01

    The recent implementation of chest tomosynthesis is built on the availability of large, dose-efficient, high-resolution flat panel detectors, which enable the acquisition of the necessary number of projection radiographs to allow reconstruction of section images of the chest within one breath hold. A chest tomosynthesis examination obtains the increased diagnostic information provided by volumetric imaging at a radiation dose comparable to that of conventional chest radiography. There is evidence that the sensitivity of chest tomosynthesis may be at least three times higher than for conventional chest radiography for detection of pulmonary nodules. The sensitivity increases with increasing nodule size and attenuation and decreases for nodules with subpleural location. Differentiation between pleural and subpleural lesions is a known pitfall due to the limited depth resolution in chest tomosynthesis. Studies on different types of pathology report increased detectability in favor of chest tomosynthesis in comparison to chest radiography. The technique provides improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence in the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography and facilitates the exclusion of pulmonary lesions in a majority of patients, avoiding the need for computed tomography (CT). However, motion artifacts can be a cumbersome limitation and breathing during the tomosynthesis image acquisition may result in severe artifacts significantly affecting the detectability of pathology. In summary, chest tomosynthesis has been shown to be superior to chest conventional radiography for many tasks and to be able to replace CT in selected cases. In our experience chest tomosynthesis is an efficient problem solver in daily clinical work. PMID:24481756

  14. Filters For Chest Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, N.; Paron, J.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of low dose radiography is achieved by a judicious combination of proper kV selection, fast film-screen systems and beam filtration. A systematic study of filters was undertaken to evaluate the improvements that can be realized in terms of patient Entrance Skin Exposures (ESE) for chest radiographs. The Picker CD 135 Generator and the Automatic Chest Filmer with dynamic phototiming were used for the study. The kV dependence of ESE with various amounts of zinc and aluminum filtration is presented. The effect of filtration on image contrast is discussed. The variations of ESE with phantom thickness under different filtration conditions are also considered. It was found that the ESE can be reduced by as much as a factor of 1.8 ± .1 with no significant increase in tube loading.

  15. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... section 203 of the Act (see 30 CFR part 90). Positive findings with regard to pneumoconiosis will be... CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of Chest Radiographs §...

  16. Psychogenic Dyspnea and Therapeutic Chest Radiograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Kenneth R.; Endres, Jennifer K.; Kaufman, Nathaniel D.

    2007-01-01

    Conversion disorders, the physical expression of unresolved psychological pain, can be associated with mourning. This case report is third in a series of articles by the authors on childhood mourning reflecting the effects of multiple losses (K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2005; K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2006). In this case report, perception…

  17. Development and evaluation of a computer-aided diagnostic scheme for lung nodule detection in chest radiographs by means of two-stage nodule enhancement with support vector classification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Sheng; Suzuki, Kenji; MacMahon, Heber

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To develop a computer-aided detection (CADe) scheme for nodules in chest radiographs (CXRs) with a high sensitivity and a low false-positive (FP) rate. Methods: The authors developed a CADe scheme consisting of five major steps, which were developed for improving the overall performance of CADe schemes. First, to segment the lung fields accurately, the authors developed a multisegment active shape model. Then, a two-stage nodule-enhancement technique was developed for improving the conspicuity of nodules. Initial nodule candidates were detected and segmented by using the clustering watershed algorithm. Thirty-one shape-, gray-level-, surface-, and gradient-based features were extracted from each segmented candidate for determining the feature space, including one of the new features based on the Canny edge detector to eliminate a major FP source caused by rib crossings. Finally, a nonlinear support vector machine (SVM) with a Gaussian kernel was employed for classification of the nodule candidates. Results: To evaluate and compare the scheme to other published CADe schemes, the authors used a publicly available database containing 140 nodules in 140 CXRs and 93 normal CXRs. The CADe scheme based on the SVM classifier achieved sensitivities of 78.6% (110/140) and 71.4% (100/140) with averages of 5.0 (1165/233) FPs/image and 2.0 (466/233) FPs/image, respectively, in a leave-one-out cross-validation test, whereas the CADe scheme based on a linear discriminant analysis classifier had a sensitivity of 60.7% (85/140) at an FP rate of 5.0 FPs/image. For nodules classified as ''very subtle'' and ''extremely subtle,'' a sensitivity of 57.1% (24/42) was achieved at an FP rate of 5.0 FPs/image. When the authors used a database developed at the University of Chicago, the sensitivities was 83.3% (40/48) and 77.1% (37/48) at an FP rate of 5.0 (240/48) FPs/image and 2.0 (96/48) FPs /image, respectively. Conclusions: These results compare favorably to those described for

  18. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging test that uses powerful magnetic fields and radio waves to create pictures of the chest (thoracic area). ... no side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of ...

  19. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Restrictive cardiomyopathy Superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction Thoracic aortic aneurysm Thymus tumor Tumors of the chest Consult your ... Restrictive cardiomyopathy SVC obstruction Swollen lymph nodes Thoracic aortic aneurysm Patient Instructions Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge ...

  20. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case.

  1. Chest drainage.

    PubMed

    Carter, Chris

    2014-07-15

    As an intensive care nurse with experience of caring for critically ill patients in the UK and on deployed operations overseas, I found the CPD article useful in reviewing the pathophysiology of a pneumothorax, use of intrapleural chest drains, observations that should be recorded, and nursing care and management of a patient with an intrapleural chest drain. Reflecting on the time out activities in the CPD article was valuable. PMID:25005418

  2. 42 CFR 37.43 - Approval of radiographic facilities that use film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest... demonstrating their ability to make high quality diagnostic chest radiographs by submitting to NIOSH six or more sample chest radiographs made and processed at the applicant facility and which are of acceptable...

  3. [Chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. PMID:21640287

  4. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Aortic rupture, chest x-ray Lung cancer, frontal chest x-ray Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray Coal ... cancer - chest x-ray Lung nodule, right middle lobe - chest x-ray Lung mass, right upper lung - ...

  5. 42 CFR 37.6 - Chest roentgenographic examinations conducted by the Secretary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chest roentgenographic examinations conducted by... Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.6 Chest roentgenographic examinations conducted by the Secretary. (a) The Secretary will give chest radiographs or make arrangements with an appropriate...

  6. 42 CFR 37.60 - Submitting required chest roentgenograms and miner identification documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Submitting required chest roentgenograms and miner... Chest Roentgenographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of Chest Radiographs § 37.60 Submitting required chest roentgenograms and miner identification...

  7. The evolving role of physiotherapists in pre-employment screening for workplace injury prevention: are functional capacity evaluations the answer?

    PubMed Central

    Legge, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal injuries account for the largest proportion of workplace injuries. In an attempt to predict, and subsequently manage, the risk of sprains and strains in the workplace, employers are turning to pre-employment screening. Functional capacity evaluations (FCEs) are increasing in popularity as a tool for pre-employment screening despite limited published evidence for their validity in healthy working populations. Objectives This narrative review will present an overview of the state of the evidence for pre-employment functional testing, propose a framework for decision-making to determine the suitability of assessment tools, and discuss the role and potential ethical challenges for physiotherapists conducting pre-employment functional testing. Major Findings Much of the evidence surrounding the validity of functional testing is in the context of the injured worker and prediction of return to work. In healthy populations, FCE components, such as aerobic fitness and manual handling activities, have demonstrated predictability of workplace injury in a small number of studies. This predictability improves when workers' performance is compared with the job demands. This job-specific approach is also required to meet anti-discrimination requirements. There are a number of practical limitations to functional testing, although these are not limited to the pre-employment domain. Physiotherapists need to have a clear understanding of the legal requirements and potential ethical challenges that they may face when conducting pre-employment functional assessments (PEFAs). Conclusions Further research is needed into the efficacy of pre-employment testing for workplace injury prevention. Physiotherapists and PEFAs are just one part of a holistic approach to workplace injury prevention. PMID:24124346

  8. What Is Chest MRI?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive ... creates detailed pictures of the structures in your chest, such as your chest wall, heart, and blood ...

  9. Pneumothorax in the Supine Patient: Subtle Radiographic Signs.

    PubMed

    Rierson, Davis; Bueno, Juliana

    2016-07-01

    Routine posteroanterior chest radiographs and computed tomography scans are more sensitive for detecting pneumothoraces than anteroposterior chest radiographs. However, supine chest radiographs are commonly performed as part of the initial and routine assessment of trauma and critically ill patients. Rates of occult pneumothorax can be as high as 50% and have a significant impact in the mortality of these patients; thus, a prompt diagnosis of this entity is important. This pictorial essay will illustrate the pleural anatomy, explain the distribution of air within the pleural space in the supine position, and review the radiologic findings that characterize this entity. PMID:27105051

  10. Work Values, Cognitive Strategies, and Applicant Reactions in a Structured Pre-Employment Interview for Ethical Integrity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawlowski, Donna R.; Hollwitz, John

    2000-01-01

    Notes that companies emphasize ethical behavior, and schools and professional groups devote many resources to applied ethics training. Describes initial construct validation of a structured ethical integrity pre-employment interview. Reviews evidence relating to cognitive and impression management strategies used when college students encounter an…

  11. Who Is in Control of Your Life? A Pre-Employment Package Containing Group Leader Training Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Doris E.; Watson, Martha

    This pre-employment training package consists of a group leader training guide and five units of instructional materials dealing with self-esteem, decision making, solving communication problems, values clarification, and stress management. The leader's guide covers using package materials, recruiting a group, preparing for and presenting the…

  12. Male Pectoral Implants: Radiographic Appearance of Complications.

    PubMed

    Kuzmiak, Cherie M; Damitz, Lynn; Burke, Rachael; Hwang, Michael

    2016-03-01

    There has been a significant surge in aesthetic chest surgery for men in the last several years. Male chest enhancement is performed with surgical placement of a solid silicone pectoral implant. In the past, male chest correction and implantation were limited to the treatment of men who had congenital absence or atrophy of the pectoralis muscle and pectus excavatum deformity. But today, the popularization of increased chest and pectoral size fostered by body builders has more men desiring chest correction with implantation for non-medical reasons. We present a case of a 44-year-old, male with a displaced left pectoral implant with near extrusion and with an associated peri-implant soft tissue mass and fluid collection. While the imaging of these patients is uncommon, our case study presents the radiographic findings of male chest enhancement with associated complications. PMID:27200162

  13. Chest radiography in acute aortic syndrome: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Ashish; Rajendran, Surendran; Yung, Wai Heng; Babu, Suresh Balasubramanian; Peh, Wilfred C

    2016-08-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is a group of life-threatening diseases of the thoracic aorta that usually present to the emergency department. It includes aortic dissection, aortic intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer. Rare aortic pathologies of aorto-esophageal fistula and mycotic aneurysm may also be included in this list. All these conditions require urgent treatment with complex clinical care and management. Most patients who present with chest pain are evaluated with a chest radiograph in the emergency department. It is important that maximum diagnostic information is extracted from the chest radiograph as certain signs on the chest radiograph are extremely useful in pointing towards the diagnosis of acute aortic syndrome. PMID:27282377

  14. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your ...

  15. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... leaks from inside the lung into the chest ( pneumothorax ) Fluid buildup in the chest (called a pleural ... on the reason a chest tube is inserted. Pneumothorax usually improves, but sometimes needs minimally invasive surgery. ...

  16. [Radiographic assessment of pulmonary hypertension: Methodical aspects].

    PubMed

    Korobkova, I Z; Lazutkina, V K; Nizovtsova, L A; Riden, T V

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a menacing complication of a number of diseases, which is responsible for high mortality rates and considerably poorer quality of life in a patient. The timely detection for pulmonary hypertension allows timely initiation of treatment, thus improvement in prognosis in the patient. Chest X-ray is the most commonly used radiographic technique for various causes. Physicians' awareness about the radiographic manifestations of pulmonary hypertension may contribute to the earlier detection of this severe disease. Owing to the natural contrast of reflected structures, a chest X-ray film gives a unique opportunity to assess pulmonary circulation vessels, to reveal the signs of pulmonary hypertension, and to estimate trends in the course of the disease. The paper details a procedure for analysis and the normal radiographic anatomy of pulmonary circulation vessels, gives the present classification of pulmonary hypertension, and sets forth its X-ray semiotics. PMID:26552229

  17. Work related respiratory symptoms in radiographers.

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, J; Inskip, H; Wield, G; Coggon, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the prevalence of work related symptoms among radiographers compared with a control group of physiotherapists. METHOD--A postal questionnaire was used to collect information from radiographers and physiotherapists who registered in the United Kingdom during 1985-9. RESULTS--Satisfactory questionnaires were returned by 2354 (65%) of the radiographers and 3048 (69%) of the physiotherapists. There was a clear excess of work related symptoms among the radiographers. In particular, they were more likely to complain of symptoms that were worse at work, mouth soreness, sore, itchy, or runny eyes, persistent blocked nose, persistent itchy nose or sneezing, sore throat, headache, and of lower respiratory tract symptoms, which were also worse on workdays. These symptoms were associated particularly with the use of automatic processing machines. 235 radiographers gave a history of wheeze or chest tightness that had been worse at work or on days when at work. CONCLUSIONS--Work related symptoms suggesting irritation of the eyes and upper airways were more common in radiographers than controls, and may be related to exposure to x ray film processing chemicals. Men and women who reported work related wheeze or chest tightness will be followed up in more detail to assess the prevalence of occupational asthma in the cohort. PMID:8704868

  18. Exercises in chest X-ray diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.A.; Cowan, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    In the fifty exercises which form the first part of the book, radiographs are combined with a group of questions designed to test the readers clinical and radiological knowledge. The exercises cover all the common and many of the rarer cardiothoracic disorders which are revealed on the chest x-ray. Increasingly, computed tomography is used in the differential diagnosis of thoracic problems, and several examples have been included.

  19. [Development of breathing chest radiography: study of exposure timing].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Inoue, Hitoshi

    2003-08-01

    The flat-panel detector (FPD) has been introduced into clinical practice. A modified FPD, which has the ability to obtain dynamic chest radiographs, was introduced into our hospital, and clinical testing is ongoing. Both the inspiratory and expiratory phases have to be included in dynamic chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the most appropriate chest radiography signal for observation of the respiratory process. We prepared ten protocol patterns that differed in terms of respiratory phase at X-ray exposure, exposure duration, and signal multiplicity. We also performed preliminary experiments and administered several questionnaires to ten volunteers. The volunteers breathed according to vocal and visual signals, and their respiratory waves were recorded by spirometer. The most appropriate protocol was similar to the method used for conventional chest radiography. PMID:12960952

  20. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Prostate Ultrasound Video: IMRT Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Pediatric MRI Radiology and You About ... Prostate Ultrasound Video: IMRT Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Pediatric MRI Radiology and You About ...

  1. Chest pain in children.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, A. K.; Robson, W. L.; Cho, H.

    1996-01-01

    Chest pain is usually a benign symptom in children. The most common identifiable causes are musculoskeletal. Often, no cause can be identified. Cardiac disorders are uncommon causes of chest pain children. Most causes can be diagnosed from history and physical examination. Treatment should be directed at the underlying cause. For idiopathic chest pain, reassurance and regular follow-up examinations are important. PMID:8704491

  2. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  3. American College of Chest Physicians

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Certification (MOC) CHEST GAIN NSCLC CHEST SEEK Innovation, Simulation, and Training Center Professional Representative Education Program ( ... of Certification (MOC) CHEST GAIN NSCLC CHEST SEEK Innovation, Simulation, and Training Center Professional Representative Education Program ( ...

  4. Developing a Plan for Placing Graduates of a Pre-Employment Training Program. Self-Paced Instructional Module. Module Number XII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Kenneth L.; And Others

    One of 33 self-paced instructional modules for training industry services leaders, this module contains three sequential learning activities on developing a plan for placing graduates of a pre-employment training program. (Industry services are manpower services provided by public agencies to new or expanding private industries.) The first…

  5. Impact of patient photos on visual search during radiograph interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Applegate, Kimberly; DeSimone, Ariadne; Chung, Alex; Tridandanpani, Srini

    2016-03-01

    To increase detection of mislabeled medical imaging studies evidence shows it may be useful to include patient photographs during interpretation. This study examined how inclusion of photos impacts visual search. Ten radiologists viewed 21 chest radiographs with and without a photo of the patient while search was recorded. Their task was to note tube/line placement. Eye-tracking data revealed that presence of the photo reduced the number of fixations and total dwell on the chest image as a result of periodically looking at the photo. Average preference for having photos was 6.10 on 0-10 scale and neck and chest were preferred areas.

  6. Image processing in digital chest radiography: effect on diagnostic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Manninen, H; Partanen, K; Lehtovirta, J; Matsi, P; Soimakallio, S

    1992-01-01

    The usefulness of digital image processing of chest radiographs was evaluated in a clinical study. In 54 patients, chest radiographs in the posteroanterior projection were obtained by both 14 inch digital image intensifier equipment and the conventional screen-film technique. The digital radiographs (512 x 512 image format) viewed on a 625 line monitor were processed in three different ways: (1) standard display; (2) digital edge enhancement for the standard display; and (3) inverse intensity display. The radiographs were interpreted independently by three radiologists. The diagnoses were confirmed by CT, follow-up radiographs and clinical records. Chest abnormalities of the films analyzed included 21 primary lung tumors, 44 pulmonary nodules, 16 cases with mediastinal disease and 17 cases with pneumonia/atelectasis. Interstitial lung disease, pleural plaques, and pulmonary emphysema were found in 30, 18 and 19 cases, respectively. The sensitivity of conventional radiography when averaged overall findings was better than that of the digital techniques (P less than 0.001). The differences in diagnostic accuracy measured by sensitivity and specificity between the three digital display modes were small. Standard image display showed better sensitivity for pulmonary nodules (0.74 vs 0.66; P less than 0.05) but poorer specificity for pulmonary emphysema (0.85 vs. 0.93; P less than 0.05) compared with inverse intensity display. We conclude that when using 512 x 512 image format, the routine use of digital edge enhancement and tone reversal at digital chest radiographs is not warranted. PMID:1563421

  7. Use of chest sonography in acute-care radiology☆

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, C.; Valentino, M.; Rimondi, M.R.; Branchini, M.; Baleni, M. Casadio; Barozzi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis of acute lung disease is a daily challenge for radiologists working in acute-care areas. It is generally based on the results of chest radiography performed under technically unfavorable conditions. Computed tomography (CT) is undoubtedly more accurate in these cases, but it cannot always be performed on critically ill patients who need continuous care. The use of thoracic ultrasonography (US) has recently been proposed for the study of acute lung disease. It can be carried out rapidly at the bedside and does not require any particularly sophisticated equipment. This report analyzes our experience with chest sonography as a supplement to chest radiography in an Emergency Radiology Unit. We performed chest sonography – as an adjunct to chest radiography – on 168 patients with acute chest pathology. Static and dynamic US signs were analyzed in light of radiographic findings and, when possible, CT. The use of chest US improved the authors' ability to provide confident diagnoses of acute disease of the chest and lungs. PMID:23397048

  8. Gallium-67 scans of the chest in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.J.; Garay, S.M.; Greene, J.B.; Tiu, S.; Banner, H.; McCauley, D.I.

    1987-07-01

    Eighty-six (/sup 67/Ga)citrate chest scans were performed in 71 adult patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Forty-five of these patients also had Kaposi's sarcoma. Only 29 of 57 abnormal scans were correlated with abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiographs were negative for 27 scans and unavailable for one. Several scan patterns were seen. Diffusely increased lung uptake was seen most commonly with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, but also other infections and noninfectious inflammatory conditions. Focal uptake corresponding to regional lymph node groups occurred most often with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare but aslo with lymphoma. Localized intrapulmonary uptake was seen in bacterial pneumonias. Perihilar activity occurred in two cases. When chest radiographs were abnormal and /sup 67/Ga scans negative, the most common diagnosis was pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma.

  9. Radiographic scale grid for supervoltage radiographs.

    PubMed

    Wong, J T

    1975-01-01

    This paper deals with the construction and practical application of a radiographic scale grid incorporated into high energy radiation therapy machines in making port radiographs. The gadet is designed especially for the numerous small radiation therapy departments in community hospitals and private practices that do not have the sophistication provided by a simulator. PMID:812144

  10. Detection and labeling ribs on expiration chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Mira; Jin, Jesse S.; Wilson, Laurence S.

    2003-06-01

    Typically, inspiration is preferred when xraying the lungs. The x-ray technologist will ask a patient to be still and to take a deep breath and to hold it. This not only reduces the possibility of a blurred image but also enhances the quality of the image since air-filled lungs are easier to see on x-ray film. However, inspiration causes low density in the inner part of lung field. That means that ribs in the inner part of lung field have lower density than the other parts nearer to the border of the lung field. That is why edge detection algorithms often fail to detect ribs. Therefore to make rib edges clear we try to produce an expiration lung field using a 'hemi-elliptical cavity.' Based on the expiration lung field, we extract the rib edges using canny edge detector and a new connectivity method, called '4 way with 10-neighbors connectivity' to detect clavicle and rib edge candidates. Once the edge candidates are formed, our system selects the best candidates using knowledge-based constraints such as a gradient, length and location. The edges can be paired and labeled as superior rib edge and inferior rib edge. Then the system uses the clavicle, which is obtained in a same method for the rib edge detection, as a landmark to label all detected ribs.

  11. 42 CFR 37.41 - Chest radiograph specifications-film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... device must provide rectangular collimation and must be of the type described in 21 CFR 1020.31(d), (e... 60 Hz. (g) Capacitor discharge and field emission units may be used if the model of such units...

  12. 42 CFR 37.41 - Chest radiograph specifications-film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... device must provide rectangular collimation and must be of the type described in 21 CFR 1020.31(d), (e... 60 Hz. (g) Capacitor discharge and field emission units may be used if the model of such units...

  13. Phantom tumour of the lung in a patient with renal failure misdiagnosed as chest infection

    PubMed Central

    Althomali, Sarah Ali; Almalki, Mazen Mohammed; Mohiuddin, Syed Atif

    2014-01-01

    Phantom or vanishing tumour of the lung is a rare finding on chest radiographs that has been reported secondary to heart failure or chronic kidney disease. It has been described as an interlobular effusion of the transverse or oblique fissure of the right lung. Although it is uncommon, it should always be considered as a differential diagnosis for a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung zone because it can be easily mistaken for a lung mass or infiltration. We herein present a case involving a patient with chronic kidney disease and a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung that was diagnosed as a chest infection. The patient did not respond to various antibiotics and showed a poor response to diuretics, the standard treatment for phantom tumour. However, the patient markedly improved after dialysis, and the radiographic chest opacity disappeared. PMID:24943144

  14. Phantom tumour of the lung in a patient with renal failure misdiagnosed as chest infection.

    PubMed

    Althomali, Sarah Ali; Almalki, Mazen Mohammed; Mohiuddin, Syed Atif

    2014-01-01

    Phantom or vanishing tumour of the lung is a rare finding on chest radiographs that has been reported secondary to heart failure or chronic kidney disease. It has been described as an interlobular effusion of the transverse or oblique fissure of the right lung. Although it is uncommon, it should always be considered as a differential diagnosis for a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung zone because it can be easily mistaken for a lung mass or infiltration. We herein present a case involving a patient with chronic kidney disease and a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung that was diagnosed as a chest infection. The patient did not respond to various antibiotics and showed a poor response to diuretics, the standard treatment for phantom tumour. However, the patient markedly improved after dialysis, and the radiographic chest opacity disappeared. PMID:24943144

  15. [Optimal beam quality for chest digital radiography].

    PubMed

    Oda, Nobuhiro; Tabata, Yoshito; Nakano, Tsutomu

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the optimal beam quality for chest computed radiography (CR), we measured the radiographic contrast and evaluated the image quality of chest CR using various X-ray tube voltages. The contrast between lung and rib or heart increased on CR images obtained by lowering the tube voltage from 140 to 60 kV, but the degree of increase was less. Scattered radiation was reduced on CR images with a lower tube voltage. The Wiener spectrum of CR images with a low tube voltage showed a low value under identical conditions of amount of light stimulated emission. The quality of chest CR images obtained using a lower tube voltage (80 kV and 100 kV) was evaluated as being superior to those obtained with a higher tube voltage (120 kV and 140 kV). Considering the problem of tube loading and exposure in clinical applications, a tube voltage of 90 to 100 kV (0.1 mm copper filter backed by 0.5 mm aluminum) is recommended for chest CR. PMID:25410333

  16. 42 CFR 37.44 - Approval of radiographic facilities that use digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL... facility approval. (1) Facilities seeking approval must demonstrate the ability to make high quality... radiographic image files from six or more sample chest radiographs that are of acceptable quality to one...

  17. 42 CFR 37.8 - Radiographic examination at miner's expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radiographic examination at miner's expense. 37.8 Section 37.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest...

  18. 42 CFR 37.80 - Availability of records for radiographs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Availability of records for radiographs. 37.80 Section 37.80 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest...

  19. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum: an important differential in acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Francesca; McCullough, Chris; Rahman, Asif

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with pleuritic chest pain that was present on waking and localised to the left costal margin with no radiation. He was otherwise asymptomatic and denied preceding trauma, heavy lifting, coughing or recent vomiting. Observations and examination were unremarkable; however, a chest radiograph showed a pneumomediastinum. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is a rare condition that tends to follow a benign clinical course. A CT of the chest is generally only indicated if the chest X-ray fails to show an SPM in patients for whom there is a high index of clinical suspicion. A contrast-enhanced swallow study is only indicated if there is suspicion of an oesophageal tear or rupture. Evidence suggests that patients with SPM can be managed conservatively and observed for 24 h. PMID:25432910

  20. Comparison of scanning equalization and conventional chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Wandtke, J C; Plewes, D B

    1989-09-01

    A clinical comparison study of scanning equalization radiography (SER) and conventional chest radiography was performed with the latest prototype SER system. Conventional chest radiography was performed at 120 kVp with Lanex regular screens (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY) and Kodak Ortho-G or Ortho-C film (Eastman Kodak). The 253 volunteer patients were examined with both techniques. The chest radiographs were interpreted by four radiologists. The study group was composed of 58 normal and 195 abnormal posteroanterior and lateral chest radiographs. In 31 cases there were two major radiologic diagnoses. The number of correct interpretations increased when the SER images were examined, compared with the conventional Ortho-G (chi 2 = 4.17, P less than .05) and conventional Ortho-C (chi 2 = 16.9, P less than .001) radiographs. The overall accuracy of disease detection improved for all radiologists with the SER system. There was no disease category in which the accuracy of interpretation decreased when the SER system was used. The SER system is a clinically reliable method of improving image quality and increasing diagnostic accuracy. PMID:2772170

  1. Learning from others: effects of viewing another person's eye movements while searching for chest nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litchfield, Damien; Ball, Linden J.; Donovan, Tim; Manning, David J.; Crawford, Trevor

    2008-03-01

    We report a study that investigated whether experienced and inexperienced radiographers benefit from knowing where another person looked during pulmonary nodule detection. Twenty-four undergraduate radiographers (1 year of experience) and 24 postgraduate radiographers (5+ years of experience) searched 42 chest x-rays for nodules and rated how confident they were in their decisions. Eye movements were also recorded. Performance was compared across three within-participant conditions: (1) free search - where radiographers could identify nodules as normal; (2) image preview - where radiographers were first shown each chest x-ray for 20 seconds before they could then proceed to mark the location of any nodules; and (3) eye movement preview - which was identical to image preview except that the 20 second viewing period displayed an overlay of the real-time eye movements of another radiographer's scanpath for that image. For this preview condition half of each group were shown where a novice radiographer looked, and the other half were shown where an experienced radiologist looked. This was not made known to the participants until after the experiment. Performance was assessed using JAFROC analysis. Both groups of radiographers performed better in the eye movement preview condition compared with the image preview or free search conditions, with inexperienced radiographers improving the most. We discuss our findings in terms of the task-specific information interpreted from eye movement previews, task difficulty across images, and whether it matters if radiographers are previewing the eye movements of an expert or a novice.

  2. Low-dose digital computed radiography in pediatric chest imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kogutt, M.S.; Jones, J.P.; Perkins, D.D.

    1988-10-01

    A prototype digital computed radiographic imaging system that uses laser-stimulated luminescence was evaluated for its ability to achieve reproducible, high-detail, low-dose pediatric chest radiographs. Using this system, we performed a total of 401 examinations in infants and children, and achieved an 85% reduction in radiation dose, as compared with that delivered when film-screen techniques were used. We also achieved satisfactory image resolution, and the images obtained were of acceptable diagnostic quality. A direct comparison of analog and digital radiographs showed that comparable quality and clinical acceptability could be readily maintained between the two techniques. This study shows that high-quality images can be produced by this system at radiation doses reduced by 85% when compared with doses from standard radiographic techniques.

  3. Chest CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... pictures to create a very detailed, three-dimensional (3D) model of organs. Sometimes, a substance called contrast dye is injected into a vein in your arm for the CT scan. This substance highlights areas in your chest, which ...

  4. Chest Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... your neck and your abdomen. It includes the ribs and breastbone. Inside your chest are several organs, ... and collapsed lung Pleural disorders Esophagus disorders Broken ribs Thoracic aortic aneurysms Disorders of the mediastinum, the ...

  5. Shadows bordering the lung on radiographs of normal and obese persons

    PubMed Central

    Gluck, M. C.; Twigg, H. L.; Ball, M. F.; Rhodes, P. G.

    1972-01-01

    The thickness of the shadows that accompany ribs or border the lungs on the chest postero-anterior radiographs of 22 obese patients and 22 normal-weight subjects was measured, when present, at several rib levels. A similar measurement was made of accompanying rib shadows on chest postero-anterior radiographs of eight obese patients after weight reduction. Statistical analysis showed that there were significantly thicker soft tissue shadows adjacent to the ribs of obese subjects compared to normal-weight persons and of obese subjects before as compared to after weight reduction. Such shadows are more frequent and are seen at more rib levels of the obese. In addition, the following pertinent features are discussed: the mechanism by which soft tissue projects a radiographic shadow, the factors affecting its appearance, and the significance of such shadows as a variant of the normal chest radiograph and not as a manifestation of pathology. Images PMID:5034601

  6. Visual simulation of radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Laguna, G.

    1985-01-18

    A method for computer simulation of radiographs has been added to the LLNL version of the solid modeler TIPS-1 (Technical Information Processing System-1). This new tool will enable an engineer to compare an actual radiograph of a solid to its computer-generated counterpart. The appearance of discrepancies between the two can be an indication of flaws in the solid object. Simulated radiographs can also be used to preview the placement of x-ray sources to focus on areas of concern before actual radiographs are made.

  7. Chest wall tumour following iodized talc pleurodesis

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, John W.; Bennett, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    Jackson, J. W., and Bennett, M. H. (1973).Thorax, 28, 788-793. Chest wall tumour following iodized talc pleurodesis. A man of 37 had an iodized talc pleurodesis carried out for recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax. There was no history of industrial exposure to asbestos. Two years later he presented with pain in the right chest and radiographs at that time showed some localized pleural thickening at the site of the thoracoscopy cannulation for introduction of talc. A provisional diagnosis of talc granuloma, chemical abscess or tumour was made and exploratory thoracotomy revealed a tumour involving the chest wall, lung, and pleura which, on histological examination, showed adenocarcinoma of varying degrees of differentiation and in some parts also presenting a more squamoid appearance. Numerous doubly refractile talc particles were intimately associated with the tumour and fibrous tissue. Shortly after excision the patient developed evidence of systemic dissemination of the disease and died four months later. The possibility of this tumour being induced by the talc is discussed. A brief review is made of the various forms of talc used in surgery over the past 40 years and attention is drawn to the significance of the proportion of asbestos mineral which is present in talc as mined in various parts of the world. We do not consider that this is a case of mesothelioma of the pleura. Images PMID:4787992

  8. Diagnostic radiology peer review: a method inclusive of all interpreters of radiographic examinations regardless of specialty.

    PubMed

    Hopper, K D; Rosetti, G F; Edmiston, R B; Madewell, J E; Beam, L M; Landis, J R; Miller, K L; Ricci, J A; McCauslin, M A

    1991-08-01

    A proposed method of assessing the quality of diagnostic radiographic examinations includes peer review designed to evaluate physicians, including nonradiologists, involved in the performance and interpretation of such examinations. A pilot project evaluated this system with randomly selected Pennsylvania Blue Shield data files of 10 providers billing for chest radiography interpretations during the second quarter of 1989. Of the 98 chest radiographs reviewed blindly, all inadequately marked radiographs and incomplete written reports were produced by nonradiologists. Technical quality of images obtained by radiologists did not significantly differ from that of images obtained by nonradiologists (P = .189). All five interpretive errors that could have seriously affected the patient's health care were produced by nonradiologists (P = .019). Four of these serious errors were made by providers billing for fewer than 25 radiographs. While administrative and time cost limitations are obvious, this method of peer review encompasses all physicians billing for a particular radiographic service, irrespective of specialty. PMID:2068327

  9. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  10. [Chest wall reconstruction after resection of malignant chest wall tumors].

    PubMed

    Ayabe, H; Oka, T; Akamine, S; Takahashi, T; Nagayasu, T

    1998-05-01

    Full-thickness chest wall resection is performed for complete removal of primary and secondary malignant chest wall tumors. Large defects of the chest wall after resection must be repaired to maintain adequate ventilation, to protect important intrathoracic structures, and to preserve cosmetic integrity. Various materials have been utilized over the years to replace the rigid chest wall. At present, Marlex mesh and a composite of Marlex mesh and methylmethacrylate are frequently used to reconstruct rigid chest wall defects. On the other hand, to replace the soft part of the chest wall and cover the rigid materials, pedicled muscle flaps, myocutaneous flaps, or omentum are used. Major pedicled flaps include the pectoralis major, rectus abdominis and latissimus dorsi muscular, and musculocutaneous flaps. Techniques are now available to repair any chest wall site, and to restore chest continuity in patients whose tumors are curatively resected. PMID:9656244

  11. RETOUCHING OF RADIOGRAPHS.

    PubMed

    IRVINE, R F

    1964-06-13

    Underexposed or underdeveloped radiographs which could have been used for teaching or publication were treated prior to photographing with a technique similar to that used for photographic negative retouching. This method enables these radiographs to be used for diagnostic demonstration, where before they would have been condemned as unsuitable for reproduction. The method is simple and requires very little experience or equipment. PMID:14156836

  12. Are dental radiographs safe?

    PubMed

    Abbott, P

    2000-09-01

    Dental patients are often aware that radiation has the potential to harm them but they do not usually understand how or why and what potential harmful effects may arise from dental radiographs. The potential for undesirable effects must be balanced against the benefits obtained from radiographs. Dentists should address the concerns of patients who question the need for radiographs and allow them to make an informed decision. Data are available that relate radiation exposure levels from medical and dental radiographs to normal background exposure levels and allow comparisons with everyday risks in life. Recognized radiation authorities publish guidelines to help dentists with their use of radiographs, although, due to the time lag associated with testing and the publication of results, some of the published data may not always be entirely relevant to currently used X-ray machines and techniques. Dentists also have professional obligations not only to limit the use of radiographs to potentially beneficial situations but also to take good quality diagnostic radiographs, to limit the doses used, to use good radiation safety measures and to use modern equipment to achieve the best possible films. Radiographs must then be properly developed and viewed under appropriate conditions to gain the maximum possible diagnostic information from each exposure. PMID:11062940

  13. Chest compressions in an infant with osteogenesis imperfecta type II: No new rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Sewell, R D; Steinberg, M A

    2000-11-01

    The case report of a newborn female with osteogenesis imperfecta type II who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with manual chest compressions for several minutes is presented. Chest radiographs taken before and after the chest compressions were administered were reviewed by several radiologists from 3 different hospitals and demonstrated no new radiographically visible rib fractures. Collagen analysis, the patient's clinical appearance, and clinical course, as well as a consultant's opinion aided in confirmation of the diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta type II. A review of 4 previous studies concerning rib fractures and CPR is included. This unique case supports previous articles that have concluded that rib fractures rarely, if ever, result from CPR in pediatrics, even in children with a lethal underlying bone disease, such as osteogenesis imperfecta type II. cardiopulmonary resuscitation, chest compressions, osteogenesis imperfecta, rib fractures, bone disease. PMID:11061808

  14. Spatial resolution and chest nodule detection: an interesting incidental finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, R. J.; McEntee, M. F.; Ryan, J. T.; Evanoff, M. G.; Hayes, A.; Brennan, P. C.

    2010-02-01

    This study reports an incidental finding from a larger work. It examines the relationship between spatial resolution and nodule detection for chest radiographs. Twelve examining radiologists with the American Board of Radiology read thirty chest radiographs in two conditions - full (1500 × 1500 pixel) resolution, and 300 × 300 pixel resolution linearly interpolated to 1500 × 1500 pixels. All images were surrounded by a 10-pixel sharp grey border to aid in focussing the observer's eye when viewing the comparatively unsharp interpolated images. Fifteen of the images contained a single simulated pulmonary nodule. Observers were asked to rate their confidence that a nodule was present on each radiograph on a scale of 1 (least confidence, certain no lesion is present) to 6 (most confidence, certain a lesion was present). All other abnormalities were to be ignored. No windowing, levelling or magnification of the images was permitted and viewing distance was constrained to approximately 70cm. Images were displayed on a 3 megapixel greyscale monitor. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was applied to the results of the readings using the Dorfman-Berbaum-Metz multiplereader, multiple-case method. No statistically significant differences were found with either readers and cases treated as random or with cases treated as fixed. Low spatial frequency information appears to be sufficient for the detection of chest lesion of the type used in this study.

  15. Chest Pain (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... coronary arteries. Heart attack — A heart attack, or myocardial infarction (MI), occurs when the surface covering of a ... chest pain Criteria for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction Outpatient evaluation of the adult with chest pain ...

  16. Use and effectiveness of chest radiography and low-back radiography in screening

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, L.P.; Rachlin, J.A.

    1986-10-01

    One of the Food and Drug Administration's educational programs to optimize the use of medical radiation is the investigation of the efficacy of selected x-ray film examinations. The goal of this program is to provide clinical information needed to aid physicians in their judgment. The routine chest-radiograph screening examination has been studied, and recommendations for five applications of chest-radiograph screening have been published. These recommendations, plus results of FDA research on the efficacy of low-back radiography, are discussed.

  17. Sonography of the Pediatric Chest.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yonggeng; Kapur, Jeevesh

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, pediatric chest diseases are evaluated with chest radiography. Due to advancements in technology, the use of sonography has broadened. It has now become an established radiation-free imaging tool that may supplement plain-film findings and, in certain cases, the first-line modality for evaluation of the pediatric chest. This pictorial essay will demonstrate the diagnostic potential of sonography, review a spectrum of pediatric chest conditions, and discuss their imaging features and clinical importance. PMID:27009313

  18. Paratracheal lymphadenopathy: radiographic findings and correlation with CT

    SciTech Connect

    Mueler, N.L.; Webb, W.R.; Gamsu, G.

    1985-09-01

    Possible signs of paratracheal lymphadenopathy on the posteroanterior (PA) chest radiograph were assessed in 98 patients and correlated with computed tomography (CT). The nodes were normal is size in 62 patients and enlarged in 36. While the lateral contour of the superior vena cava (SVC) was convex in 46 patients (47%), 81 (83%) had an increased density in the region of the SVC. When all four parameters were combined, lymphadenopathy could be detected on the PA view in 87 patients (89%). CT demonstrated that the enlarged nodes were anterolateral rather than directly lateral to the trachea and also immediately posterior to the SVC, explaining the findings on the PA radiograph.

  19. [Acute Chest Pain].

    PubMed

    Gmür, Christian

    2016-02-17

    Acute chest pain is a frequent consultation reason in general practice as well as in emergency departments. With the help of history, physical examination, ECG, laboratory and newly developed risk scores, potentially life-threatening diseases and high-risk patients may be detected and treated early, quickly and cost-effectively. New biomarkers and their combination with risk scores can increase the negative predictive value to exclude certain diseases. PMID:26886697

  20. Boerhaave's syndrome - tension hydropneumothorax and rapidly developing hydropneumothorax: two radiographic clues in one case.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Ho, Lam; Tran Van, Ngoc; Le, Thuong Vu

    2016-07-01

    Boerhaave's syndrome is a rare and severe condition with high mortality partly because of its atypical presentation resulting in delayed diagnosis and management. Diagnostic clues play an important role in the approach to this syndrome. Here, we report a 48 year-old male patient hospitalized with fever and left chest pain radiating into the interscapular area. Two chest radiographs undertaken 22 h apart showed a rapidly developing tension hydropneumothorax. The amylase level in the pleural fluid was high. The fluid in the chest tube turned bluish after the patient drank methylene blue. The diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome was suspected based on the aforementioned clinical clues and confirmed at the operation. The patient recovered completely with the use of antibiotics and surgical treatment. In this case, we describe key findings on chest radiographs that are useful in diagnosing Boerhaave's syndrome. PMID:27512563

  1. Boerhaave's syndrome – tension hydropneumothorax and rapidly developing hydropneumothorax: two radiographic clues in one case

    PubMed Central

    Tran Van, Ngoc; Le, Thuong Vu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Boerhaave's syndrome is a rare and severe condition with high mortality partly because of its atypical presentation resulting in delayed diagnosis and management. Diagnostic clues play an important role in the approach to this syndrome. Here, we report a 48 year‐old male patient hospitalized with fever and left chest pain radiating into the interscapular area. Two chest radiographs undertaken 22 h apart showed a rapidly developing tension hydropneumothorax. The amylase level in the pleural fluid was high. The fluid in the chest tube turned bluish after the patient drank methylene blue. The diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome was suspected based on the aforementioned clinical clues and confirmed at the operation. The patient recovered completely with the use of antibiotics and surgical treatment. In this case, we describe key findings on chest radiographs that are useful in diagnosing Boerhaave's syndrome. PMID:27512563

  2. Radiographic Assessment for Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Radiographic Assessment for Back Pain What are Radiographic Assessments? When Should I get an X-ray for Low Back Pain? Other Reasons for Having an X-ray What ... What are Radiographic Assessments? Radiographic assessments for low back pain involve the use of X-rays to determine ...

  3. Clinical predictors of radiographic abnormalities among infants with bronchiolitis in a paediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute viral respiratory exacerbation is one of the most common conditions encountered in a paediatric emergency department (PED) during winter months. We aimed at defining clinical predictors of chest radiography prescription and radiographic abnormalities, among infants with bronchiolitis in a paediatric emergency department. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of children less than 2 years of age with clinical bronchiolitis, who presented for evaluation at the paediatric emergency department of an urban general hospital in France. Detailed information regarding historical features, examination findings, and management were collected. Clinical predictors of interest were explored in multivariate logistic regression models. Results Among 410 chest radiographs blindly interpreted by two experts, 40 (9.7%) were considered as abnormal. Clinical predictors of chest radiography achievement were age (under three months), feeding difficulties, fever over 38°C, hypoxia under than 95% of oxygen saturation, respiratory distress, crackles, and bronchitis rales. Clinical predictors of radiographic abnormalities were fever and close to significance hypoxia and conjunctivitis. Conclusion Our study provides arguments for reducing chest radiographs in infants with bronchiolitis. For infants with clinical factors such as age less than three months, feeding difficulties, respiratory distress without hypoxia, isolated crackles or bronchitis rales, careful clinical follow-up should be provided instead of chest radiography. PMID:24906343

  4. Establishing Standards for Side-by-Side Radiographic Comparisons.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ann H; Lanfear, Alicja K; Maxwell, Ashley B

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to evaluate the use of various anatomical features that are visible in standard radiographs and to develop a standard system of assessing concordant features for making positive identifications through radiographic comparison.The radiographs used in the study include craniofacial (n = 41), chest (n = 100), and proximal femur (n = 49), which were made available by the North Carolina Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. Radiographs were scored for number of concordant features and were analyzed using classification decision trees. The accuracy of the classification tree models was evaluated using a receiver operating characteristic.Two or more points of concordance are required in lateral cranial radiographs for a 97% probability of a positive identification. If more than 1 concordant feature exists on the cervical vertebrae, there is a 99% probability of correct identification. For thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, 4 or more concordant features are required for a 98% probability of correct identification. If there are 1 or more femoral head and neck concordant features, the probability of a correct identification is 94% and 97%, respectively. This study established the minimum number of concordant areas needed to confirm positive identifications in 3 standard radiographic views. PMID:26999427

  5. Weld radiograph enigmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemian, Wartan A.

    1986-01-01

    Weld radiograph enigmas are features observed on X-ray radiographs of welds. Some of these features resemble indications of weld defects, although their origin is different. Since they are not understood, they are a source of concern. There is a need to identify their causes and especially to measure their effect on weld mechanical properties. A method is proposed whereby the enigmas can be evaluated and rated, in relation to the full spectrum of weld radiograph indications. Thie method involves a signature and a magnitude that can be used as a quantitive parameter. The signature is generated as the diference between the microdensitometer trace across the radiograph and the computed film intensity derived from a thickness scan along the corresponding region of the sample. The magnitude is the measured difference in intensity between the peak and base line values of the signature. The procedure is demonstated by comparing traces across radiographs of a weld sample before and after the introduction of a hole and by a system based on a MacIntosh mouse used for surface profiling.

  6. Viewing Another Person's Eye Movements Improves Identification of Pulmonary Nodules in Chest X-Ray Inspection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litchfield, Damien; Ball, Linden J.; Donovan, Tim; Manning, David J.; Crawford, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Double reading of chest x-rays is often used to ensure that fewer abnormalities are missed, but very little is known about how the search behavior of others affects observer performance. A series of experiments investigated whether radiographers benefit from knowing where another person looked for pulmonary nodules, and whether the expertise of…

  7. Comparison of Computed Tomography and Chest Radiography in the Detection of Rib Fractures in Abused Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Walton, John W.; Rosas, Angela J.; Coulter, Kevin P.; Rogers, Kristen K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Chest radiographs (CXR) are the standard method for evaluating rib fractures in abused infants. Computed tomography (CT) is a sensitive method to detect rib fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare CT and CXR in the evaluation of rib fractures in abused infants. Methods: This retrospective study included all 12 abused infants…

  8. [Optimization of the chest computed tomography scan by varying the position of the arms].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoriaki; Masuda, Takanori; Imada, Naoyuki; Maruyama, Naoya; Inada, Satoshi; Ishibashi, Tooru; Satou, Tomoyasu

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography automatic exposure control (CT-AEC) technique is calculated from a localizer radiograph. When we perform neck and chest CT examination, at first, we acquire localizer radiograph and neck images by placing the arm in a lowered position. Next, the arm is raised for the chest scan. Therefore, the localizer radiograph and subject information are different in the chest scan. In this situation, the chest scan with the use of the CT-AEC causes radiation over-dose. The purpose of this study is to optimize the CT-AEC by controlling noise index (NI), and make a chest CT scan condition considering the position of the arms. We measured the image noise (SD) in the phantom by using CT-AEC. In addition, dose length product (DLP) was recorded. Moreover, we examined the correlation with the clinical images. The results of our experiments show that radiation dose can be reduced with the image quality kept by controlling NI. PMID:22821158

  9. Advanced radiographic imaging techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, J. B.; Brown, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Examination of the nature and operational constraints of conventional X-radiographic and neutron imaging methods, providing a foundation for a discussion of advanced radiographic imaging systems. Two types of solid-state image amplifiers designed to image X rays are described. Operational theory, panel construction, and performance characteristics are discussed. A closed-circuit television system for imaging neutrons is then described and the system design, operational theory, and performance characteristics are outlined. Emphasis is placed on a description of the advantages of these imaging systems over conventional methods.

  10. Pleural-based changes on chest x-ray after irradiation for primary breast cancer: correlation with findings on computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, G.; Kurtz, D.W.; Lichter, A.S.

    1983-10-01

    In treating breast cancer with excisional biopsy and irradiation, a volume of lung underlying the breast and chest wall receives significant doses of irradiation. This irradiation can produce pleural and pulmonary changes that can be seen on routine chest radiographs. In five such cases, we have examined pre and post-treatment computerized tomograms of the chest and show that these radiographic changes are pleural-based and lie within the high dose radiation volume. Failure to correct radiation treatment plans for the influence of lung density results in an increased dose to lung and pleura that could, in theory, exacerbate pulmonary and pleural radiation effects.

  11. Neutron radiographic viewing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leysath, W.; Brown, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Neutron radiographic viewing system consisting of camera head and control processor is developed for use in nondestructive testing applications. Camera head consists of neutron-sensitive image intensifier system, power supply, and SEC vidicon camera head. Both systems, with their optics, are housed on test mount.

  12. Radiographic intensifying screen

    SciTech Connect

    Ochiai, T.

    1985-02-26

    A radiographic intensifying screen comprising a substrate and a fluorescent layer provided thereon and consisting essentially of a binder and a radioluminescent phosphor dispersed therein. The binder comprises linear polyester resin or linear polyester resin crosslinked with a crosslinking agent. The screen exhibits improved physical properties.

  13. Investigation and management of patients with pleuritic chest pain presenting to the accident and emergency department.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K; Raghuram, A

    1999-01-01

    The assessment of a patient with pleuritic chest pain calls for a high degree of clinical acumen and a high degree of suspicion that the diagnosis might be pulmonary embolism. This area is one of the most difficult in A&E medicine (and indeed chest medicine). One error is to "think the best" when considering the diagnosis in such patients but experience soon teaches to "think PE" and diagnose less serious conditions only when pulmonary embolism has been excluded. A key consideration is the presence of risk factors. Because the diagnosis is difficult, there should be no hesitation in requesting a senior opinion or referring to the inpatient medical team. We have produced an algorithm (fig 1) for the investigation and management of pleuritic chest pain as discussed in this article. Three questions relating to this article are: (1) Can pulmonary embolism be the diagnosis in a patient with pleuritic chest pain but a normal chest radiograph, ECG, and arterial blood gases? (2) What is the chest radiograph abnormality which is most likely to alert you to the possibility of pulmonary embolism? (3) What percentage of patients with a low clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism but a high probability V/Q scan will have pulmonary embolism demonstrated on pulmonary angiography? The three key references are The PIOPED Investigators, Dalen, and Fennerty. PMID:9918289

  14. A Monte Carlo estimation of effective dose in chest tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sabol, John M.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: The recent introduction of digital tomosynthesis imaging into routine clinical use has enabled the acquisition of volumetric patient data within a standard radiographic examination. Tomosynthesis requires the acquisition of multiple projection views, requiring additional dose compared to a standard projection examination. Knowledge of the effective dose is needed to make an appropriate decision between standard projection, tomosynthesis, and CT for thoracic x-ray examinations. In this article, the effective dose to the patient of chest tomosynthesis is calculated and compared to a standard radiographic examination and to values published for thoracic CT. Methods: Radiographic technique data for posterior-anterior (PA) and left lateral (LAT) radiographic chest examinations of medium-sized adults was obtained from clinical sites. From these data, the average incident air kerma for the standard views was determined. A commercially available tomosynthesis system was used to define the acquisition technique and geometry for each projection view. Using Monte Carlo techniques, the effective dose of the PA, LAT, and each tomosynthesis projection view was calculated. The effective dose for all projections of the tomosynthesis sweep was summed and compared to the calculated PA and LAT values and to the published values for thoracic CT. Results: The average incident air kerma for the PA and left lateral clinical radiographic examinations were found to be 0.10 and 0.40 mGy, respectively. The effective dose for the PA view of a patient of the size of an average adult male was determined to be 0.017 mSv (ICRP 60) [0.018 mSv (ICRP 103)]. For the left lateral view of the same sized patient, the effective dose was determined to be 0.039 mSv (ICRP 60) [0.050 mSv (ICRP 103)]. The cumulative mA s for a tomosynthesis examination is recommended to be ten times the mA s of the PA image. With this technique, the effective dose for an average tomosynthesis examination was

  15. Outpatient radiographic exposure in the first five years of life

    SciTech Connect

    Fosarelli, P.D.; DeAngelis, C.

    1987-06-01

    Young children receive a variety of diagnostic radiographs over time. In some cases the exposure to radiation may be unwarranted because the films may yield confusing results, or may also need to be repeated because of poor technical quality. Even when the results are clearly negative, the subsequent treatment may proceed as if the film had been positive because of the child's clinical condition. The cumulative effect of such low-dose radiation on infants and children over time is unknown. The number and types of outpatient radiographs received by a cohort of poor children from a hospital-based continuity clinic during their first 5 years of life were reviewed. Also noted were the reason for obtaining the film, whether it was positive for that reason or another, whether the child had a chronic condition that prompted the use of radiograph, and the child's sex, race, and age when the film was obtained. Of the 218 children, 132 (60.6%) received 349 sets of films in their first 5 years. There was no difference in the number of films by race or sex. Chest and posttrauma bone or joint films accounted for 315 sets of films or 90.3% of the total. Overall, 25.8% of the 267 chest films were positive; this varied by age. Only 15% of the chest films were positive in the first year compared with 29 to 49% in the second through fifth years (p less than 0.001). Cough was the respiratory symptom most reliably associated with a positive chest film, both for the cohort (p less than 0.0001) and for children in the first year of life (p less than 0.01).

  16. Chest imaging features of patients afflicted with Influenza A (H1N1) in a Malaysian tertiary referral centre

    PubMed Central

    Bux, SI; Mohd. Ramli, N; Ahmad Sarji, S; Kamarulzaman, A

    2010-01-01

    This is a retrospective descriptive study of the chest imaging findings of 118 patients with confirmed A(H1N1) in a tertiary referral centre. About 42% of the patients had positive initial chest radiographic (CXR) findings. The common findings were bi-basal air-space opacities and perihilar reticular and alveolar infiltrates. In select cases, high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging showed ground-glass change with some widespread reticular changes and atelectasis. PMID:21611071

  17. Radiologists remember mountains better than radiographs, or do they?

    PubMed

    Evans, Karla K; Marom, Edith M; Godoy, Myrna C B; Palacio, Diana; Sagebiel, Tara; Cuellar, Sonia Betancourt; McEntee, Mark; Tian, Charles; Brennan, Patrick C; Haygood, Tamara Miner

    2016-01-01

    Expertise with encoding material has been shown to aid long-term memory for that material. It is not clear how relevant this expertise is for image memorability (e.g., radiologists' memory for radiographs), and how robust over time. In two studies, we tested scene memory using a standard long-term memory paradigm. One compared the performance of radiologists to naïve observers on two image sets, chest radiographs and everyday scenes, and the other radiologists' memory with immediate as opposed to delayed recognition tests using musculoskeletal radiographs and forest scenes. Radiologists' memory was better than novices for images of expertise but no different for everyday scenes. With the heterogeneity of image sets equated, radiologists' expertise with radiographs afforded them better memory for the musculoskeletal radiographs than forest scenes. Enhanced memory for images of expertise disappeared over time, resulting in chance level performance for both image sets after weeks of delay. Expertise with the material is important for visual memorability but not to the same extent as idiosyncratic detail and variability of the image set. Similar memory decline with time for images of expertise as for everyday scenes further suggests that extended familiarity with an image is not a robust factor for visual memorability. PMID:26870748

  18. Incentive spirometry versus routine chest physiotherapy for prevention of pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hall, J C; Tarala, R; Harris, J; Tapper, J; Christiansen, K

    1991-04-20

    We entered 876 patients into a clinical trial aimed at preventing pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. Patients either received conventional chest physiotherapy or were encouraged to perform maximal inspiratory manoeuvres for 5 min during each hour while awake, using an incentive spirometer. The incidence of pulmonary complications did not differ significantly between the groups: incentive spirometry 68 of 431 (15.8%, 95% CI 14.0-17.6%), and chest physiotherapy 68 of 445 (15.3%, CI 13.6-17.0%). Nor was there a difference between the groups in the incidence of positive clinical signs, pyrexia, abnormal chest radiographs, pathogens in sputum, respiratory failure (PO2 less than 60 mm Hg), or length of stay in hospital. We conclude that prophylactic incentive spirometry and chest physiotherapy are of equivalent clinical efficacy in the general management of patients undergoing abdominal surgery. PMID:1678039

  19. Male chest enhancement: pectoral implants.

    PubMed

    Benito-Ruiz, J; Raigosa, J M; Manzano-Surroca, M; Salvador, L

    2008-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the pectoral muscle implant for male chest enhancement in 21 patients. The markings and technique are thoroughly described. The implants used were manufactured and custom made. The candidates for implants comprised three groups: group 1 (18 patients seeking chest enhancement), group 2 (1 patient with muscular atrophy), and group 3 (2 patients with muscular injuries). Because of the satisfying results obtained, including significant enhancement of the chest contour and no major complications, this technique is used for an increasing number of male cosmetic surgeries. PMID:17676376

  20. Painful Chest Wall Swellings: Tietze Syndrome or Chest Wall Tumor?

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Tevfik; Gunal, Nesimi; Gulbahar, Gultekin; Kocer, Bulent; Han, Serdar; Eryazgan, Mehmet Ali; Ozsoy, Arzu; Naldoken, Seniha; Alhan, Aslıhan; Sakinci, Unal

    2016-04-01

    Background Tietze syndrome (TS) is an inflammatory condition characterized by chest pain and swelling of costochondral junction. Primary chest wall tumors may mimic TS. In this article, we report our experience of approximately 121 patients initially diagnosed as TS and determined chest wall tumor in some cases at the follow-up. Methods This is a retrospective review of patients diagnosed as TS by clinical examination, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, routine laboratory tests, and computed tomography (CT) of chest: all treated and followed up between March 2001 and July 2012. There were 121 cases (41 males and 80 females; mean age, 39.6 ± 3.2 years) of TS. Results In 27 patients with initial normal radiological findings, the size of swellings had doubled during the follow-up period (mean, 8.51 ± 2.15 months). These patients were reevaluated with chest CT and bone scintigraphy and then early diagnostic biopsy was performed. Pathologic examination revealed primary chest wall tumor in 13 patients (5 malignant, 8 benign). CT had a sensitivity of 92.3% and a specificity of 64.2% in detection of tumors (kappa: 0.56, p = 0.002), whereas the sensitivity and the specificity of bone scan were 84.6 and 35.7%, respectively (kappa: 0.199, p = 0.385). Conclusion Primary chest wall tumors could mimic TS. Bone scintigraphy or CT is not specific enough to determine malignant and other benign disorders of costochondral junction. Therefore, clinicians should follow TS patients more closely, and in case of increasing size of swelling, early diagnostic biopsy should be considered. PMID:25742551

  1. Colonic interposition: radiographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Agha, F P; Orringer, M B

    1984-04-01

    This report reviews the clinical and radiographic features of 40 patients who underwent visceral esophageal substitution with colon for benign or malignant lesions of the esophagus. The incidence and radiographic identification of complications are discussed. All patients were routinely examined with barium esophagrams on postoperative day 10. If an anastomotic leak was suspected clinically before this time, studies were performed using water-soluble iodinated contrast material. Follow-up barium esophagrams were obtained 1-96 months after operation (average, 60 months) in 24 patients. Eight patients (21%) demonstrated asymptomatic "jejunization" of the colonic mucosa with no attributable clinical manifestations; this finding resolved in 1-3 months, without sequelae, and has not been reported before. The spectrum of ischemic changes in the colonic segment included mucosal edema, spasm, ulceration, loss of haustration, and frank necrosis. Radiographically detectable early postoperative complications included anastomotic leak in six (three pharyngocolic, three cervical esophagocolic) and aspiration of barium into the tracheobronchial tree due to incoordinated swallowing in eight. Late postoperative complications included anastomotic narrowing (12) malfunctioning of the colon due to impaired emptying (five), recurrent aspiration pneumonia (three), small bowel obstruction (three), transhiatal herniation of small bowel through the diaphragmatic hiatus (one), and reflux into the retained bypassed esophagus (one). PMID:6608225

  2. Large Format Radiographic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J. S. Rohrer; Lacey Stewart; M. D. Wilke; N. S. King; S. A Baker; Wilfred Lewis

    1999-08-01

    Radiographic imaging continues to be a key diagnostic in many areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiographic recording systems have taken on many form, from high repetition-rate, gated systems to film recording and storage phosphors. Some systems are designed for synchronization to an accelerator while others may be single shot or may record a frame sequence in a dynamic radiography experiment. While film recording remains a reliable standby in the radiographic community, there is growing interest in investigating electronic recording for many applications. The advantages of real time access to remote data acquisition are highly attractive. Cooled CCD camera systems are capable of providing greater sensitivity with improved signal-to-noise ratio. This paper begins with a review of performance characteristics of the Bechtel Nevada large format imaging system, a gated system capable of viewing scintillators up to 300 mm in diameter. We then examine configuration alternatives in lens coupled and fiber optically coupled electro-optical recording systems. Areas of investigation include tradeoffs between fiber optic and lens coupling, methods of image magnification, and spectral matching from scintillator to CCD camera. Key performance features discussed include field of view, resolution, sensitivity, dynamic range, and system noise characteristics.

  3. Radiographic quality control devices.

    PubMed

    2000-04-01

    In this study, we evaluate eight radiographic quality control (QC) devices, which noninvasively measure the output from a variety of diagnostic x-ray production systems. When used as part of a quality assurance (QA) program, radiographic QC devices help ensure that x-ray equipment is working within acceptable limits. This in turn helps ensure that high-quality images are achieved with appropriate radiation doses and that resources are used efficiently (for example, by minimizing the number of repeat exposures required). Our testing focused on the physical performance, ease of use, and service and maintenance characteristics that affect the use of these devices for periodic, routine measurements of x-ray system parameters. We found that all the evaluated models satisfactorily measure all the parameters normally needed for a QA program. However, we did identify a number of differences among the models--particularly in the range of exposure levels that can be effectively measured and the ease of use. Three models perform well for a variety of applications and are very easy to use; we rate them Preferred. Three additional models have minor limitations but otherwise perform well; we rate them Acceptable. We recommend against purchasing two models because, although each performs acceptably for most applications, neither model can measure low levels of radiation. This Evaluation covers devices designed to measure the output of x-ray tubes noninvasively. These devices, called radiographic quality control (QC) devices, or QC meters, are typically used by medical physicists, x-ray engineers, biomedical engineers, and suitably trained radiographic technologists to make QC measurements. We focus on the use of these devices as part of an overall quality assurance (QA) program. We have not evaluated their use for other applications, such as acceptance testing. To be included in this study, a device must be able to measure the exposure- and kVp-related characteristics of most x

  4. Chest drainage systems in use.

    PubMed

    Zisis, Charalambos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Lazaridis, George; Lampaki, Sofia; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-03-01

    A chest tube is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum. It is used to remove air in the case of pneumothorax or fluid such as in the case of pleural effusion, blood, chyle, or pus when empyema occurs from the intrathoracic space. It is also known as a Bülau drain or an intercostal catheter. Insertion of chest tubes is widely performed by radiologists, pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons. Large catheters or small catheters are used based on each situation that the medical doctor encounters. In the current review we will focus on the chest drain systems that are in use. PMID:25815304

  5. Chest drainage systems in use

    PubMed Central

    Zisis, Charalambos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Lazaridis, George; Lampaki, Sofia; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    A chest tube is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum. It is used to remove air in the case of pneumothorax or fluid such as in the case of pleural effusion, blood, chyle, or pus when empyema occurs from the intrathoracic space. It is also known as a Bülau drain or an intercostal catheter. Insertion of chest tubes is widely performed by radiologists, pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons. Large catheters or small catheters are used based on each situation that the medical doctor encounters. In the current review we will focus on the chest drain systems that are in use. PMID:25815304

  6. No Value for Routine Chest Radiography in the Work-Up of Early Stage Cervical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hoogendam, Jacob P.; Zweemer, Ronald P.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; de Jong, Pim A.; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.; Verheijen, René H. M.; Veldhuis, Wouter B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Evidence supporting the recommendation to include chest radiography in the work-up of all cervical cancer patients is limited. We investigated the diagnostic value of routine chest radiography in cervical cancer staging. Methods All consecutive cervical cancer patients who presented at our tertiary referral center in the Netherlands (January 2006 – September 2013), and for whom ≥6 months follow-up was available, were included. As part of the staging procedure, patients underwent a routine two-directional digital chest radiograph. Findings were compared to a composite reference standard consisting of all imaging studies and histology obtained during the 6 months following radiography. Results Of the 402 women who presented with cervical cancer, 288 (71.6%) underwent chest radiography and had ≥6 months follow-up. Early clinical stage (I/II) cervical cancer was present in 244/288 (84.7%) women, while 44 (15.3%) presented with advanced disease (stage III/IV). The chest radiograph of 1 woman – with advanced pre-radiograph stage (IVA) disease – showed findings consistent with pulmonary metastases. Radiographs of 7 other women – 4 early, 3 advanced stage disease – were suspicious for pulmonary metastases which was confirmed by additional imaging in only 1 woman (with pre-radiograph advanced stage (IIIB) disease) and excluded in 6 cases, including all women with early stage disease. In none of the 288 women were thoracic skeletal metastases identified on imaging or during 6 months follow up. Radiography was unremarkable in 76.4% of the study population, and showed findings unrelated to the cervical carcinoma in 21.2%. Conclusion Routine chest radiography was of no value for any of the early stage cervical cancer patients presenting at our tertiary center over a period of 7.7 years. PMID:26135733

  7. The “dirty chest”—correlations between chest radiography, multislice CT and tobacco burden

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, J; Goltz, J P; Lorenz, F; Obermann, A; Kirchner, E M; Kickuth, R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Cigarette smoking-induced airway disease commonly results in an overall increase of non-specific lung markings on chest radiography. This has been described as “dirty chest”. As the morphological substrate of this condition is similar to the anthracosilicosis of coal workers, we hypothesised that it is possible to quantify the radiological changes using the International Labour Organization (ILO) classification of pneumoconiosis. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether there is a correlation between the extent of cigarette smoking and increased lung markings on chest radiography and to correlate the chest radiographic scores with findings on CT studies. Methods In a prospective analysis a cohort of 85 smokers was examined. The cigarette consumption was evaluated in pack years (defined as 20 cigarettes per day over 1 year). Film reading was performed by two board-certified radiologists. Chest radiographs were evaluated for the presence of thickening of bronchial walls, the presence of linear or nodular opacities, and emphysema. To correlate the smoking habits with the increase of overall lung markings in chest radiography, the ILO profusion score was converted to numbers ranging from zero to nine. Chest radiographs were rated according to the complete set of standard films of the revised ILO classification. Results 63/85 (74%) of the smokers showed an increase in overall lung markings on chest radiography; 32 (37%) had an ILO profusion score of <1/1, 29 (34%) had an ILO profusion score of <2/2 and 2 (2%) had an ILO score of ≥2/2. There was a significant positive linear correlation between the increase of overall lung markings on chest radiography and the cigarette consumption quantified as pack years (r=0.68). The majority of the heavy smokers (>40 pack years) showed emphysema; there was no significant difference between the prevalence of emphysema as diagnosed by CT (62%) or chest radiography (71%) (p<0.05).The most common findings in CT

  8. Prevalence of radiographic asbestosis in crocidolite miners and millers at Wittenoom, Western Australia.

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, W O; De Klerk, N H; Musk, A W; Armstrong, B K; Glancy, J J; Hobbs, M S

    1986-01-01

    An estimate has been made of the prevalence of unrecognised pneumoconiosis in former crocidolite workers from Wittenoom, Western Australia. All plain chest radiographs relating to a one in six random sample (1025 men) of all former Wittenoom workers who had never entered a compensation claim to the Pneumoconiosis Medical Board of Western Australia were sought from Perth teaching hospitals and from the Perth Chest Clinic where compulsory examination of all workers in the mining industry takes place. Radiographs were recovered for 83% of the men and read independently by two observers. By means of logistic regression analysis a current prevalence of parenchymal abnormality (defined as a radiographic profusion of small opacities of category 1/0 or greater on the ILO classification) of nearly 20% was calculated after adjustment for age, time since first exposure, and cumulative exposure level. One hundred men randomly selected from those known to be alive in the sample were invited to attend for a new radiographic examination. Seventy four men attended and the predicted prevalence was confirmed. It is estimated from these data that there were between 450 and 900 former Wittenoom workers in Australia at the end of 1980 who had radiographic abnormality consistent with pneumoconiosis but had not claimed compensation or had asbestosis diagnosed. The data are consistent with there being no threshold dose of crocidolite exposure for the development of radiographic abnormality in this group. PMID:3013280

  9. Radiographic solution contamination.

    PubMed

    Hardman, P K; Tilmon, M F; Taylor, T S

    1987-06-01

    Contamination of processor solutions adversely affects the image quality of radiographic films. The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of developer or fixer contaminant that was necessary to produce a significant densitometric change in the base plus fog, speed, or contrast optical density readings for panoramic film. Significant differences in base plus fog (after 16 mL of fixer contaminant was added to developer), speed index (after 4 mL), and contrast index (after 8 mL) were observed in comparison with control values. PMID:3473399

  10. Progressive dyspnea associated with a crazy-paving appearance on a chest computed tomography scan.

    PubMed

    Maimon, Nimrod; Paul, Narinder; Downey, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    A 'crazy-paving' appearance of the lungs on computed tomography scanning of the chest was first described nearly 20 years ago in patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and was thought to be characteristic of this condition. However, this pattern has subsequently been reported in a variety of pulmonary diseases and is now considered to be nonspecific. The present report describes a case of a 74-year-old man in whom congestive heart failure presented with a crazy-paving appearance of the lungs on a chest computed tomography scan. This uncommon association illustrates the importance of the correlation of clinical and radiographic information. PMID:16896429

  11. A 42-Year-Old Woman With Abnormal Chest CT Scan and Chylous Ascites.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Yadav, Ruchi; Arrossi, Andrea V; Mehta, Atul C; Faress, Jihane A

    2016-01-01

    A 42-year-old white woman presented to the pulmonary clinic for evaluation of abnormal chest imaging. Twenty years prior to presentation, she was noted to have an abnormal chest radiograph during a routine preemployment evaluation. A subsequent bronchoscopy was nondiagnostic. She was followed up with annual imaging, which demonstrated little or no progression of her disease. She remained symptom free throughout this period. A year before her visit to the pulmonary clinic, she developed abdominal discomfort and was found to have ascites. Subsequently, she underwent three paracenteses with analysis revealing chylous fluid. She was a nonsmoker without a history of exposures or travel. PMID:26757302

  12. A rib abnormality mimicking pulmonary nodule: a pitfall in the plain chest x-ray.

    PubMed

    Akturk, Yeliz; Günes, Serra Ozbal; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2016-01-01

    The ribs show a wide range of normal and pathologic radiographic appearences as well as congenital variations. Intrathoracic ribs are isolated and rare anomalies. They are usually super-numerary, more often right-sided, and involve the middle part of the thorax. We describe a case with intrathorasic rib abnormality mimicking a peripheral metastatic lung nodule in the plain chest x-ray and emphasize the use of coronal and sagittal reformatted images in thorasic imaging. Utilisation of multiplanar reformatted images in chest computerised tomography increase diagnostic quality. PMID:27374213

  13. An unusual cause for a relatively common radiographic abnormality.

    PubMed

    Odedra, Anand; Farrugia, Mark; Babiker, Zahir

    2014-01-01

    A 59-year-old Indian woman presented to the respiratory clinic with chest pains, long-standing swallowing difficulties and a chest radiograph, which was reported as showing a shadow in the right paratracheal region. A CT scan was obtained and was reported as demonstrating a right-sided paratracheal lymph node and varicosities adjacent to the inferior vena cava. Histology from an endobronchial ultrasound-guided biopsy revealed a heavily blood-stained sample but showed no evidence of granulomas or malignancy. Subsequently, the images were reviewed, with the conclusion that they were actually of an engorged azygos vein compressing the oesophagus. MRI confirmed the absence of mediastinal lymphadenopathy and the presence of a prominent hemiazygos vein compressing the oesophagus. This case highlights the importance of including anatomical abnormalities in the differential diagnosis and reassessing patients when the history and investigations do not correlate. PMID:25540206

  14. Contamination of dental radiographic solutions.

    PubMed

    Tamburus, J R; Pardini, L C; Watanabe, P C

    1995-01-01

    Thirteen groups of periapical radiographic films were evaluated to determine and compare within and between groups the effects of contamination of the fixer solution with developing solution during radiographic processing. An aluminum penetrometer was used as the radiographic object to produce different optical densities. The images were compared using radiographic density and contrast as parameters. There were significant differences between the control groups and the groups processed with a contaminated fixer solution. No statistically significant differences were observed in the intragroup comparisons. PMID:8688649

  15. Paratracheal lymphadenopathy: radiographic findings and correlation with CT.

    PubMed

    Müller, N L; Webb, W R; Gamsu, G

    1985-09-01

    Possible signs of paratracheal lymphadenopathy on the posteroanterior (PA) chest radiograph were assessed in 98 patients and correlated with computed tomography (CT). The nodes were normal in size in 62 patients and enlarged (greater than 15 mm) in 36. Among the latter group, widening of the right paratracheal stripe was seen in 11 (31%) and enlargement of the azygos node in 15 (42%). While the lateral contour of the superior vena cava (SVC) was convex in 46 patients (47%), 81 (83%) had an increased density in the region of the SVC. When all four parameters were combined, lymphadenopathy could be detected on the PA view in 87 patients (89%). CT demonstrated that the enlarged nodes were anterolateral rather than directly lateral to the trachea and also immediately posterior to the SVC, explaining the findings on the PA radiograph. PMID:4023240

  16. Computer enhancement of radiographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekaney, A.; Keane, J.; Desautels, J.

    1973-01-01

    Examination of three relevant noise processes and the image degradation associated with Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) X-ray/scanning system was conducted for application to computer enhancement of radiographs using MSFC's digital filtering techniques. Graininess of type M, R single coat and R double coat X-ray films was quantified as a function of density level using root-mean-square (RMS) granularity. Quantum mottle (including film grain) was quantified as a function of the above film types, exposure level, specimen material and thickness, and film density using RMS granularity and power spectral density (PSD). For various neutral-density levels the scanning device used in digital conversion of radiographs was examined for noise characteristics which were quantified by RMS granularity and PSD. Image degradation of the entire pre-enhancement system (MG-150 X-ray device; film; and optronics scanner) was measured using edge targets to generate modulation transfer functions (MTF). The four parameters were examined as a function of scanning aperture sizes of approximately 12.5 25 and 50 microns.

  17. [Chest ultrasonography in pleurapulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gallego Gómez, M P; García Benedito, P; Pereira Boo, D; Sánchez Pérez, M

    2014-01-01

    Although the initial diagnosis and follow-up of pleuropulmonary disease are normally done with plain chest films and the gold standard for chest disease is computed tomography, diverse studies have established the usefulness of chest ultrasonography in the diagnosis of different pleuropulmonary diseases like pleural effusion and lung consolidation, among others. In this article, we show the different ultrasonographic patterns for pleuropulmonary disease. The availability of ultrasonography in different areas (ICU, recovery areas) makes this technique especially important for critical patients because it obviates the need to transfer the patient. Moreover, ultrasonography is noninvasive and easy to repeat. On the other hand, it enables the direct visualization of pleuropulmonary disease that is necessary for interventional procedures. PMID:22819690

  18. 10 CFR 34.46 - Supervision of radiographers' assistants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Radiation Safety Requirements § 34.46 Supervision of radiographers' assistants. Whenever a radiographer's assistant uses radiographic exposure devices,...

  19. 10 CFR 34.46 - Supervision of radiographers' assistants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Radiation Safety Requirements § 34.46 Supervision of radiographers' assistants. Whenever a radiographer's assistant uses radiographic exposure devices,...

  20. 10 CFR 34.46 - Supervision of radiographers' assistants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Radiation Safety Requirements § 34.46 Supervision of radiographers' assistants. Whenever a radiographer's assistant uses radiographic exposure devices,...

  1. Chest Radiography using Patient-Specific Digitally-Prepared Compensating Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Naimuddin, Shaikh; Dobbins, James T.; Mistretta, Charles A.; Peppler, Walter W.; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J.; Cusma, Jack T.; McDermott, John C.; Kudva, Bakki V.; Melbve, Kenneth M.

    1985-09-01

    We have used a prototype digital beam attenuator (DBA) system to generate patient-specific digitally-prepared compensating filters for chest radiography of a human subject. The compensated radiographs demonstrate substantially more information in areas such as the mediastinum and upper abdomen which normally are underpenetrated in conventional chest radiographs. The compensated image was acquired with high contrast, high speed film-screen receptors improving the visibility of pulmonary parenchymal detail while minimizing patient radiation exposure. Currently we are limited by a two-hour preparation time and position the attenuator manually. We are developing a second generation DBA system featuring fast (15 second) fabrication times and automatic positioning of the attenuator. We expect that these features will relieve some of the misregistration errors present in our initial examination.

  2. Digital and conventional chest images: observer performance with Film Digital Radiography System.

    PubMed

    Goodman, L R; Foley, W D; Wilson, C R; Rimm, A A; Lawson, T L

    1986-01-01

    The Film Digital Radiography System (FilmDRS) is a device with a laser optical film digitizer, 2,000 X 2,000 X 12-bit memory, and a 1,000-line video display. To evaluate the adequacy of this device for general radiography of the chest, four readers independently analyzed both radiographs and the corresponding video display of the digitized chest images of 150 patients, consisting of 100 images of abnormalities and 50 normal images. The overall results indicate equal sensitivity for the two systems. The FilmDRS, with interactive windowing, proved superior in the detection of hilar and mediastinal disease. X-ray film was superior in allowing detection of hyperlucent states. There was equivalent sensitivity for other disease categories. Superior specificity was achieved with conventional radiographs. PMID:3940392

  3. [Panoramic radiographs in dental diagnostics].

    PubMed

    van der Stelt, P F

    2016-04-01

    Panoramic radiographs are frequently used in dental practice in addition to bitewing radiographs and periapical radiographs. The way a panoramic photograph is created is different from that of a projection image, such as bitewing and periapical radiographs. As a result, the sharpness of detail is much less, and overlap of structures occurs in different areas of the image. Consequently the diagnostic utility is limited to the recognition of anomalies for which small details play a lesser role. The advantage of a panoramic radiograph is that structures over a large area are shown in their relative location. Because of the lower resolution and the higher dose of radiation to the patient compared with a series of intraoral images, the panoramic radiograph is not indicated during a periodic check-up. If clinical inspection indicates a need for it and as a supplement to an intraoral radiograph, a panoramic radiograph can, however, be appropriate in cases of abnormalities that extend over a larger area, such as tumours and developmental disorders. PMID:27073808

  4. [Imaging signs in chest diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Krombach, G A

    2016-08-01

    Signs in chest imaging are defined as typical findings which can be easily recognized on x‑ray photographs or computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest. They are caused by different typical pathophysiological processes. Due to the association of a certain pathophysiological cause with a given sign, knowledge and use of these signs can allow the possible differential diagnoses to be narrowed down. If other imaging findings and clinical data are additionally taken into account, the diagnosis can be made with a high degree of confidence in many cases. PMID:27369549

  5. Chest pain syndromes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Gagan

    2012-08-01

    Chest pain syndromes in pregnancy include numerous catastrophic cardiovascular events. Acute myocardial infarction, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and amniotic fluid embolism are the most important causes of nonobstetric mortality and morbidity in pregnancy. Each of these could result in poor maternal and fetal outcomes if not diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. However, their diagnosis and management is limited by fetal risks of diagnostic procedures, dangers of pharmacotherapy and interventions that have neither been widely studied nor validated. This article reviews the current literature on epidemiology, risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of 4 potentially lethal chest pain syndromes in pregnancy. PMID:22813362

  6. Contemporary management of flail chest.

    PubMed

    Vana, P Geoff; Neubauer, Daniel C; Luchette, Fred A

    2014-06-01

    Thoracic injury is currently the second leading cause of trauma-related death and rib fractures are the most common of these injuries. Flail chest, as defined by fracture of three or more ribs in two or more places, continues to be a clinically challenging problem. The underlying pulmonary contusion with subsequent inflammatory reaction and right-to-left shunting leading to hypoxia continues to result in high mortality for these patients. Surgical stabilization of the fractured ribs remains controversial. We review the history of management for flail chest alone and when combined with pulmonary contusion. Finally, we propose an algorithm for nonoperative and surgical management. PMID:24887787

  7. Assessment of low-contrast detectability for compressed digital chest images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Larry T.; Insana, Michael F.; McFadden, Michael A.; Hall, Timothy J.; Cox, Glendon G.

    1994-04-01

    The ability of human observers to detect low-contrast targets in screen-film (SF) images, computed radiographic (CR) images, and compressed CR images was measured using contrast detail (CD) analysis. The results of these studies were used to design a two- alternative forced-choice (2AFC) experiment to investigate the detectability of nodules in adult chest radiographs. CD curves for a common screen-film system were compared with CR images compressed up to 125:1. Data from clinical chest exams were used to define a CD region of clinical interest that sufficiently challenged the observer. From that data, simulated lesions were introduced into 100 normal CR chest films, and forced-choice observer performance studies were performed. CR images were compressed using a full-frame discrete cosine transform (FDCT) technique, where the 2D Fourier space was divided into four areas of different quantization depending on the cumulative power spectrum (energy) of each image. The characteristic curve of the CR images was adjusted so that optical densities matched those of the SF system. The CD curves for SF and uncompressed CR systems were statistically equivalent. The slope of the CD curve for each was - 1.0 as predicted by the Rose model. There was a significant degradation in detection found for CR images compressed to 125:1. Furthermore, contrast-detail analysis demonstrated that many pulmonary nodules encountered in clinical practice are significantly above the average observer threshold for detection. We designed a 2AFC observer study using simulated 1-cm lesions introduced into normal CR chest radiographs. Detectability was reduced for all compressed CR radiographs.

  8. Clinical utility of wavelet compression for resolution-enhanced chest radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriole, Katherine P.; Hovanes, Michael E.; Rowberg, Alan H.

    2000-05-01

    This study evaluates the usefulness of wavelet compression for resolution-enhanced storage phosphor chest radiographs in the detection of subtle interstitial disease, pneumothorax and other abnormalities. A wavelet compression technique, MrSIDTM (LizardTech, Inc., Seattle, WA), is implemented which compresses the images from their original 2,000 by 2,000 (2K) matrix size, and then decompresses the image data for display at optimal resolution by matching the spatial frequency characteristics of image objects using a 4,000- square matrix. The 2K-matrix computed radiography (CR) chest images are magnified to a 4K-matrix using wavelet series expansion. The magnified images are compared with the original uncompressed 2K radiographs and with two-times magnification of the original images. Preliminary results show radiologist preference for MrSIDTM wavelet-based magnification over magnification of original data, and suggest that the compressed/decompressed images may provide an enhancement to the original. Data collection for clinical trials of 100 chest radiographs including subtle interstitial abnormalities and/or subtle pneumothoraces and normal cases, are in progress. Three experienced thoracic radiologists will view images side-by- side on calibrated softcopy workstations under controlled viewing conditions, and rank order preference tests will be performed. This technique combines image compression with image enhancement, and suggests that compressed/decompressed images can actually improve the originals.

  9. Nationwide surveys of chest, abdomen, lumbosacral spine radiography, and upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopy: a summary of findings.

    PubMed

    Spelic, David C; Kaczmarek, Richard V; Hilohi, Mike C; Moyal, Albert E

    2010-03-01

    This paper reports findings from Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends surveys conducted in 2001, 2002, and 2003 of clinical facilities that perform routine radiographic examinations of the adult chest, abdomen, lumbosacral spine, and upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examinations. Randomly identified clinical facilities were surveyed in approximately 40 participating states. For the surveyed radiographic exams, additional facilities that use computed radiography or digital radiography were surveyed to ensure adequate sample sizes for determining comparative statistics. State radiation control personnel performed site visits and collected data on patient exposure, radiographic/fluoroscopic technique factors, image quality, and quality-control and quality-assurance practices. Results of the NEXT surveys are compared with those of previous surveys conducted in 1964 and 1970 by the U.S. Public Health Service and the Food and Drug Administration. An estimated 155 million routine adult chest exams were performed in 2001. Average patient entrance skin air kerma from chest radiography at facilities using digital-based imaging modalities was found to be significantly higher (p < 0.001), but not so for routine abdomen or lumbosacral spine radiography. Digital-based imaging showed a substantial reduction in patient exposure for the radiographic portion of the routine upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopy exam. Long-term trends in surveyed diagnostic examinations show that average patient exposures are at their lowest levels. Of concern is the observation that a substantial fraction of surveyed non-hospital sites indicated they do not regularly have a medical physics survey conducted on their radiographic equipment. These facilities are likely unaware of the radiation doses they administer to their patients. PMID:20147791

  10. Crush injuries of the chest

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, I. A.; Bargh, W.; Cruickshank, A. N.; Duthie, W. H.

    1969-01-01

    Fifty-four patients previously treated for a severe chest injury in an artificial ventilation unit have been followed up. An attempt has been made to determine their state of health and activity. Particular attention has been paid to their respiratory function. The significance of the findings has been discussed. Images PMID:4899979

  11. Chest physiotherapy in acute bronchiolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, M S; Martin, J A; Cartlidge, P H; Ng, Y K; Wright, N A

    1985-01-01

    Forty four children with acute bronchiolitis were given twice daily chest physiotherapy in addition to standard supportive measures and were compared with 46 controls who were not given physiotherapy. There was no clinically discernable benefit on the course of their illness. PMID:3907510

  12. Device Assists Cardiac Chest Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichstadt, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest compression. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.

  13. A 34-Year-Old Woman With Recurrent Right-Sided Chest Pain and Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Albores, Jeffrey; Fishbein, Gregory; Bando, Joanne

    2015-11-01

    A 34-year-old woman presented with her third episode of acute-onset right-sided chest pain and dyspnea. She had two prior similar occurrences of right-sided sharp, pleuritic chest pain with radiation to the back and dyspnea. Chest radiographs during these presentations revealed a small apical right-sided pneumothorax that was managed conservatively with high-flow oxygen. All three presentations were associated with vigorous exercise and the first day of her menses. She denied cough, hemoptysis, fever, smoking history, airplane travel, scuba diving, or trauma during these presentations. The patient has been trying to conceive for the past year but has been unsuccessful because of uterine fibroids but no history of endometriosis. PMID:26527442

  14. Robust learning-based parsing and annotation of medical radiographs.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yimo; Peng, Zhigang; Krishnan, Arun; Zhou, Xiang Sean

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a learning-based algorithm for automatic medical image annotation based on robust aggregation of learned local appearance cues, achieving high accuracy and robustness against severe diseases, imaging artifacts, occlusion, or missing data. The algorithm starts with a number of landmark detectors to collect local appearance cues throughout the image, which are subsequently verified by a group of learned sparse spatial configuration models. In most cases, a decision could already be made at this stage by simply aggregating the verified detections. For the remaining cases, an additional global appearance filtering step is employed to provide complementary information to make the final decision. This approach is evaluated on a large-scale chest radiograph view identification task, demonstrating a very high accuracy ( > 99.9%) for a posteroanterior/anteroposterior (PA-AP) and lateral view position identification task, compared with the recently reported large-scale result of only 98.2% (Luo, , 2006). Our approach also achieved the best accuracies for a three-class and a multiclass radiograph annotation task, when compared with other state of the art algorithms. Our algorithm was used to enhance advanced image visualization workflows by enabling content-sensitive hanging-protocols and auto-invocation of a computer aided detection algorithm for identified PA-AP chest images. Finally, we show that the same methodology could be utilized for several image parsing applications including anatomy/organ region of interest prediction and optimized image visualization. PMID:20876012

  15. [Radiographic disappearance of lanthanum].

    PubMed

    Pastori, Giordano

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, Cerny and Kunzendorf in the New England Journal of Medicine Images in clinical medicine, showed the radiographic appearance of lanthanum for the first time. After many years we noticed the inverse phenomenon. In a peritoneal dialysis patient treated with lanthanum carbonate, we had two radiography of the abdomen for monitoring the peritoneal catheter. In the first radiography contrast material was seen in colon. In the most recent radiography contrast material disappeared. The patient was always taking the same dose of lanthanum carbonate (1000 mg bid), although at the time of the first radiography he took the chewable tablets, for the last radiography he took the new powder formulation. We found a report in literature highlighting this phenomenon meanwhile indicating a greater chelating effect for the powder. Our hypothesis is that despite the same lanthanum dose, powder provides a greater surface area of binding and a more dispersed bowel distribution to explain a masked radio-opacity. Considering the wide availability of the powder, this must be taken into account especially in evaluating therapeutic compliance. PMID:25774580

  16. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound, weather-resistant, equipped...

  17. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  18. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  19. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound, weather-resistant, equipped...

  20. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  1. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound, weather-resistant, equipped...

  2. Chest pain in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Tonino, S H; Nur, E; Otten, H M; Wykrzykowska, J J; Hoekstra, J B L; Biemond, B J

    2013-06-01

    The differential diagnosis of chest pain in a patient with sickle cell disease is difficult and may encompass several serious conditions, including chest syndrome, pulmonary embolism and infectious complications. In this manuscript we provide an overview on the various underlying diseases that may cause chest pain in patients with sickle cell disease and provide clues for a proper diagnostic workup. PMID:23799317

  3. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  4. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  5. Industrial application of radiographic paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domanus, J. C.; Ruault, P. A.

    1980-03-01

    The paper presents the results of a comparison made among high speed Kodak Industrex D X-ray film, Industrex Instant 600 and 620, and Agfa Gevaert Structuric IC radiograph papers. It is shown that the quality of the radiographic image was tested by the use of standard and special IQIs as well as Al step wedges and artificial and natural defects. The speeds, contrasts, and exposure latitudes were calculated from the characteristic curves. An analysis is made of the quality of information available in the radiograph and the merits of the constant exposure technique are stressed. Finally, conclusions are drawn about information quality, sensitometric properties, equipment, and areas of application for radiographic paper.

  6. Radiographically Severe but Clinically Mild Reexpansion Pulmonary Edema following Decompression of a Spontaneous Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Harner, William E; Crawley, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    The case is a 48-year-old female who presented with mild dyspnea on exertion and cough with unremarkable vital signs and was found to have a large right sided pneumothorax. She underwent small bore chest tube decompression with immediate reexpansion of the collapsed lung. However, she rapidly developed moderate hypoxemia and radiographic evidence of reexpansion pulmonary edema (REPE) on both the treated and contralateral sides. Within a week, she had a normal chest X-ray and was asymptomatic. This case describes a rare complication of spontaneous pneumothorax and highlights the lack of correlation between symptoms, sequelae, and radiographic severity of pneumothorax and reexpansion pulmonary edema. Proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms include increased production of reactive oxygen species with subsequent loss of surfactant and increased vascular permeability, and loss of vasoregulatory tone. PMID:25165607

  7. Evaluation of suspected aspirated beverage can pull tab: radiographs may not be enough.

    PubMed

    Kotsenas, Amy L; Campeau, Norbert G; Oeckler, Richard A; Kuzo, Ronald S

    2014-01-01

    A 67-year-old male presented to the emergency department with concern for accidental aspiration of an aluminum beverage can pull tab. Neck and chest radiographs did not reveal an aspirated foreign body. Despite ongoing complaint of dysgeusia and adamancy of aspiration by the patient, he was discharged to home without recommendation for further follow-up. Seven months later, a computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest performed as part of an unrelated lung cancer work up confirmed the presence of a left mainstem bronchus metallic foreign body compatible with a pull tab. This case report illustrates the poor negative predictive value of radiographs for a suspected aluminum foreign body and demonstrates the superiority of CT for this purpose. In such presentations it is imperative to have a low threshold for performing further diagnostic evaluation with CT due to the relatively high radiolucency of aluminum. PMID:25580344

  8. Noninvasive radiographic assessment of cardiovascular function in acute and chronic respiratory failure

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.J.; Matthay, R.A.

    1981-04-01

    Noninvasive radiographic techniques have provided a means of studying the natural history and pathogenesis of cardiovascular performance in acute and chronic respiratory failure. Chest radiography, radionuclide angiocardiography and thallium-201 imaging, and M mode and cross-sectional echocardiography have been employed. Each of these techniques has specific uses, attributes and limitations. For example, measurement of descending pulmonary arterial diameters on the plain chest radiograph allows determination of the presence or absence of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Right and left ventricular performance can be evaluated at rest and during exercise using radionuclide angiocardiography. The biventricular response to exercise and to therapeutic interventions also can be assessed with this approach. Evaluation of the pulmonary valve echogram and echocardiographic right ventricular dimensions have been shown to reflect right ventricular hemodynamics and size. Each of these noninvasive techniques has been applied to the study of patients with respiratory failure and has provided important physiologic data.

  9. Radiographic findings in liveborn triploidy.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, K G; Houston, C S; Newman, D E; Wood, B J

    1989-01-01

    The detailed radiographic features of triploidy, a fatal congenital disorder with 69 chromosomes, have not previously been reported. Radiographs of ten liveborn infants with chromosomally confirmed triploidy showed six findings highly suggestive of this diagnosis: harlequin orbits, small anterior fontanelle, gracile ribs, diaphyseal overtubulation of long bones, upswept clavicles and antimongoloid pelvis. Sixteen other less specific findings showed many similarities to those found in trisomy 18. PMID:2748230

  10. Film holder for radiographing tubing

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Earl V.; Foster, Billy E.

    1976-01-01

    A film cassette is provided which may be easily placed about tubing or piping and readily held in place while radiographic inspection is performed. A pair of precurved light-impervious semi-rigid plastic sheets, hinged at one edge, enclose sheet film together with any metallic foils or screens. Other edges are made light-tight with removable caps, and the entire unit is held securely about the object to be radiographed with a releasable fastener such as a strip of Velcro.

  11. Scanning radiographic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, R.D.

    1980-04-01

    Visual display of dental, medical or other radiographic images is realized with an x-ray tube in which an electron beam is scanned through an x-y raster pattern on a broad anode plate, the scanning being synchronized with the x-y sweep signals of a cathode ray tube display and the intensity signal for the display being derived from a small x-ray detector which receives x-rays that have passed through the subject to be imaged. Positioning and support of the detector are provided for by disposing the detector in a probe which may be attached to the x-ray tube at any of a plurality of different locations and by providing a plurality of such probes of different configuration in order to change focal length, to accommodate to different detector placements relative to the subject, to enhance patient comfort and to enable production of both periapical images and wider angle pantomographic images. High image definition with reduced radiation dosage is provided for by a lead glass collimator situated between the x-ray tube and subject and having a large number of spaced-apart minute radiation transmissive passages convergent on the position of the detector. Releasable mounting means enable changes of collimator in conjunction with changes of the probe to change focal length. A control circuit modifies the x-y sweep signals applied to the x-ray tube and modulates electron beam energy and current in order to correct for image distortions and other undesirable effects which can otherwise be present in a scanning x-ray system.

  12. Computed tomography of the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    In this reference book readers have access to information pertaining to the role of thoracic CT, its limitations, normal anatomy and variations, scanning techniques, confusing artifacts, and pathologic anatomy. Major sections provide detailed, explicit data on lung cancer staging, the thoracic inlet, the heart, the esophagus, CT-guided invasive techniques, and the pediatric chest CT. Controversies are explored fully and presented fairly. This book is profusely illustrated with almost 500 CT scans for greater recognition and comprehension of the material presented.

  13. Radiology of occupational chest disease

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A. ); Kreel, L.

    1989-01-01

    Radiologic manifestations of occupational lung disease are summarized and classified in this book according to the ILO system. The interpretation of chest roentgenograms outlines the progression of each disease and is accompanied with clinically-oriented explanations. Some of the specific diseases covered include asbestosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, silicosis, non-mining inhalation of silica and silicates, beryllium induced disease, inhalation of organics and metallics, and occupationally induced asthma.

  14. Cleidocranial Dysplasia: A Clinico-radiographic Spectrum with Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Purva Prakash; Barpande, Suresh Ramchandra; Bhavthankar, Jyoti Dilip; Humbe, Jayanti G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the clavicles, characteristic craniofacial malformations, and the presence of numerous supernumerary and unerupted teeth. It affects bones derived from both intra-membranous and endochondral ossification. Incidence has been reported as 1 in 10,00,000. It is caused by mutation in the gene encoding transcription factor Core Binding Factor Subunit Alpha l (CBFAl) or Runt related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). Case Report: This presentation discusses the clinical and radiographic features of a familial case of cleidocranial dysplasia occurring in a father and a child. All the clinical and radiographic features, except that of the chest x-ray, were more prominent in the child than the father. This supports the fact that CCD is transmitted by an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance with high penetrance and variable expressivity. It is sporadic in about 40% of cases. Each child of an individual with CCD has a 50% chance of in heriting the mutation. Conclusion: Diagnosis is mostly made on the basis of clinical and radiographic features. Molecular genetic testing such as sequence analysis or deletion analysis can be used in cleidocranial dysplasia. Some cases are diagnosed through incidental findings by physicians, treating patients for unrelated conditions. Treatment of these patients requires a multidisciplinary approach which includes orthopaedic and dental corrections along with management of any complications of cleidocranial dysplasia. PMID:27299035

  15. Automatic anatomically selective image enhancement in digital chest radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Sezan, M.I. ); Minerbo, G.N. ); Schaetzing, R. )

    1989-06-01

    The authors develop a technique for automatic anatomically selective enhancement of digital chest radiographs. Anatomically selective enhancement is motivated by the desire to simultaneously meet the different enhancement requirements of the lung field and the mediastinum. A recent peak detection algorithm and a set of rules are applied to the image histogram to determine automatically a gray-level threshold between the lung field and mediastinum. The gray-level threshold facilitates anatomically selective gray-scale modification and/or unsharp masking. Further, in an attempt to suppress possible white-band or black-band artifacts due to unsharp masking at sharp edges, local-contrast adaptivity is incorporated into anatomically selective unsharp masking by designing an anatomy-sensitive emphasis parameter which varies asymmetrically with positive and negative values of the local image contrast.

  16. Computer-Aided Diagnostic System For Mass Survey Chest Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Yoshizumi; Kinoshita, Yasuhiro; Emori, Yasufumi; Yoshimura, Hitoshi

    1988-06-01

    In order to support screening of chest radiographs on mass survey, a computer-aided diagnostic system that automatically detects abnormality of candidate images using a digital image analysis technique has been developed. Extracting boundary lines of lung fields and examining their shapes allowed various kind of abnormalities to be detected. Correction and expansion were facilitated by describing the system control, image analysis control and judgement of abnormality in the rule type programing language. In the experiments using typical samples of student's radiograms, good results were obtained for the detection of abnormal shape of lung field, cardiac hypertrophy and scoliosis. As for the detection of diaphragmatic abnormality, relatively good results were obtained but further improvements will be necessary.

  17. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI{sub vol} and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose

  18. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDIvol and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose metrics

  19. National Survey of Radiation Doses of Pediatric Chest Radiography in Korea: Analysis of the Factors Affecting Radiation Doses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo Hyun; Goo, Hyun Woo; Yang, Dong Hyun; Oh, Sang Young; Kim, Hyeog Ju; Lee, Kwang Yong; Lee, Jung Eun

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate radiation doses in pediatric chest radiography in a national survey and to analyze the factors that affect radiation doses. Materials and Methods The study was based on the results of 149 chest radiography machines in 135 hospitals nationwide. For each machine, a chest radiograph was obtained by using a phantom representing a 5-year-old child (ATOM® dosimetry phantom, model 705-D, CIRS, Norfolk, VA, USA) with each hospital's own protocol. Five glass dosimeters (M-GD352M, Asahi Techno Glass Corporation, Shizuoka, Japan) were horizontally installed at the center of the phantom to measure the dose. Other factors including machine's radiography system, presence of dedicated pediatric radiography machine, presence of an attending pediatric radiologist, and the use of automatic exposure control (AEC) were also evaluated. Results The average protocol for pediatric chest radiography examination in Korea was 94.9 peak kilovoltage and 4.30 milliampere second. The mean entrance surface dose (ESD) during a single examination was 140.4 microgray (µGy). The third quartile, median, minimum and maximum value of ESD were 160.8 µGy, 93.4 µGy, 18.8 µGy, and 2334.6 µGy, respectively. There was no significant dose difference between digital and non-digital radiography systems. The use of AEC significantly reduced radiation doses of pediatric chest radiographs (p < 0.001). Conclusion Our nationwide survey shows that the third quartile, median, and mean ESD for pediatric chest radiograph is 160.8 µGy, 93.4 µGy, and 140.4 µGy, respectively. No significant dose difference is noticed between digital and non-digital radiography systems, and the use of AEC helps significantly reduce radiation doses. PMID:22977329

  20. A comparative study of collimation in bedside chest radiography for preterm infants in two teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Stollfuss, J.; Schneider, K.; Krüger-Stollfuss, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Unnecessary exposure of the abdomen, arms or head may lead to a substantial increase of the radiation dose in portable chest X-rays on the neonatal intensive care unit. The objective was to identify potential factors influencing inappropriate exposure of non-thoracic structures in two teaching hospitals. Methods The study analysed 200 consecutive digital chest radiographs in 20 preterm neonates (mean gestation 25 ± 1 weeks). Demographical data, tube settings and exposure parameters were recorded. To grade the collimation, we used a scoring system with a maximum of 12 exposed non-thoracic structures. Length of gestation, age, the radiographer, years of experience in performing X-rays and the number of in situ catheters or lines, were correlated with collimation quality. Results There was no significant difference between the rates of optimal images obtained in the two hospitals (0.32 vs 0.39, n.s.). Scores showed that most suboptimal images had only mildly reduced image quality (1.40 ± 1.38 vs 1.20 ± 1.43, n.s.). Length of gestation or presence of surgical drains, catheters and tubes had no obvious effects on the exposure of non-thoracic structures. Large intra-individual variation in optimal collimation (14–86%) was noted for the radiographers in both hospitals; this was unrelated to their respective years of experience. Conclusion In our study, the only identifiable factor influencing the collimation of portable chest radiographs in preterm infants was the radiographer’s dedication and awareness. There were no apparent differences between the hospitals investigated. Exposure of non-thoracic structures was relatively frequent and mainly involved the proximal humeri. PMID:26937444

  1. Single exposure simultaneous acquisition of digital and conventional radiographs utilizing unaltered dose.

    PubMed

    Oestmann, J W; Greene, R

    1988-11-01

    We describe the simultaneous acquisition of digital and conventional radiographs with a single standard radiographic exposure. A digitizable storage phosphor (ST Imaging Plate, FujiTM) is sandwiched into a radiographic cassette (X-Omatic, KodakTM) behind a conventional radiographic film-screen combination (Lanex medium screens, OC film, KodakTM). The barium fluorohalide storage phosphor is digitized with a helium-neon laser scanner (TCR 201, ToshibaTM), and the conventional radiograph is processed in the standard fashion (M7B, KodakTM). The storage phosphor is exposed by the "wasted" radiation normally exiting the back of the film-screen combination (32% of the cassette entrance dose at 141 kVp). At a standard exposure (6.3 mAs), the conventional radiograph is of unaltered quality, and the digital image appears to have an adequate signal-to-noise ratio for chest studies despite the lower exposure dose. This technique produces twin images of identical spatial and temporal registration and avoids the added radiation exposure normally required to carry out comparative studies. PMID:3234405

  2. Radiographic assessment of splinting bandages.

    PubMed

    Wytch, R; Ashcroft, G P; McKenzie, G; Wardlaw, D; Ledingham, W M

    1991-01-01

    The physical attenuation of X-rays by a variety of splinting bandages was measured and compared with the subjective opinion of nine radiologists. The radiolucency of the bandages and their interference with the interpretation of bony detail on radiographs (using a radiographic knee phantom) was assessed. Plaster-of-Paris (POP) bandages produced the greatest attenuation of X-rays and the greatest interference with interpretation of bony detail. All the polyurethane resin impregnated fabric bandages produced less attenuation than POP, but variations occurred due to the fabric type and knit of the bandage. The lowest attenuation occurred in those bandages using cotton, polyester or polypropylene fabric, and in all but one instance these caused least interference in radiographic interpretation. The exception was the polyester bandage, where the coarse knit of the fabric produced a large difference in X-ray beam absorption between the air spaces and the bandage. The distracting mesh pattern on the radiograph interfered with radiographic visualization. The glass fibre bandages caused intermediate attenuation, being better than POP but not as radiolucent as the non-glass fabrics. PMID:2030030

  3. Universal radiographic screening for tuberculosis among inmates upon admission to jail.

    PubMed Central

    Layton, M C; Henning, K J; Alexander, T A; Gooding, A L; Reid, C; Heyman, B M; Leung, J; Gilmore, D M; Frieden, T R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the efficacy of radiographic screening for tuberculosis in correctional facilities. METHODS: Inmates at an admission facility in New York, NY, were screened for tuberculosis by registry cross-match, symptom interviews, tuberculin testing, and chest radiography. RESULTS: Thirty-two cases of tuberculosis were detected among 4172 inmate admissions (767 cases per 100,000). Twenty-five inmates (78%) were previously diagnosed but incompletely treated; all were identified by registry cross-match. Seven inmates (22%) were newly diagnosed, of whom four (57%) were asymptomatic, had negative skin tests, and were detected only by their abnormal radiographs. CONCLUSIONS: Screening strategies that limit radiographic testing to inmates with either positive skin tests or symptoms may result in missed opportunities for diagnosing active tuberculosis. PMID:9279270

  4. Radiographic Inspection of Fueled Clads

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy J. Roney; Karen M. Wendt

    2005-04-01

    Five general purpose heat source (GPHS) fueled clads were radiographically inspected at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The girth weld region of each clad had previously passed visual examination, ring gauge test, and leak test but showed “positive” indications on the ultrasonic (UT) test. Positive ultrasonic indications are allowable under certain weld conditions; radiographic inspection provides a secondary nonintrusive means of clad inspection and may confirm allowable anomalies from the UT inspection. All the positive UT indications were found to exhibit allowable weld shield fusion or mismatch conditions. No indication of void defects was found. One additional clad (FCO371) was deemed unacceptable for radiographic inspection due to an unknown black substance that obscured the angular origin on the weld so that the angular offset to the UT indication could not be found.

  5. Chest wall resection for extrapulmonary tumor.

    PubMed

    Long, W P; Kline, R; Levine, E A

    1997-09-01

    Despite progress in early detection of breast cancer, a minority of women continue to present with extensive disease which may necessitate chest wall resection. Between 1992 and 1996, 14 patients were treated by surgical resection of the chest wall and reconstruction by the LSU Sections of Surgical Oncology and Plastic Surgery. Indications included resection of primary tumor, resection of recurrent tumor, and resection of radiation therapy induced damage to the chest wall. We report chest wall excision and reconstruction with no operative mortality and minor surgical morbidity in 21% of cases. Local control was achieved in 13 of 14 cases. Additionally we report uniform success in the palliation of ulcerating, painful, or infected chest wall lesions. Approximately 25% of patients treated for breast cancer and followed up for more than 6 months have remained free of disease. Chest wall resection is a useful modality in selected patients with extensive disease. PMID:9316348

  6. Tonsillolith: A Panoramic Radiograph Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Babu B., Balaji; Tejasvi M.L., Avinash; Avinash, C.K. Anulekha; B., Chittaranjan

    2013-01-01

    Tonsilloliths are calcifications within a tonsillar crypt, involve primarily the palatine tonsil caused by dystrophic calcification as a result of chronic inflammation. Tonsilloliths are very uncommon and are microscopic. Tonsillar concretions sometimes produce symptoms which include non-specific chronic halitosis, irritable cough, dysphagia, otalgia and foreign body-like sensation or foul taste. Patients with tonsillolithiasis may also be asymptomatic, with their lesions being discovered incidentally on panoramic radiographs. This article presents an unusual case of multiple bilateral and asymptomatic tonsilloliths which were found during a routine panoramic radiographic examination. PMID:24298535

  7. Analog enhancement of radiographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Nachazel, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper shows how analog methods for edge sharpening, contrast enhancement, and expansion of the range of gray levels of particular interest are effective for easy on-line application to video viewing of X-ray roentgenograms or to fluoroscopy. The technique for analog enhancement of radiographic images is a modified version of the system designed by Fuchs et al. (1972), whereby an all directional second derivative signal called detail signal is used to produce both vertical and horizontal enhancement of the image. Particular attention is given to noise filtration and contrast enhancement. Numerous radiographs supplement the text.

  8. Technique for chest compressions in adult CPR

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chest compressions have saved the lives of countless patients in cardiac arrest as they generate a small but critical amount of blood flow to the heart and brain. This is achieved by direct cardiac massage as well as a thoracic pump mechanism. In order to optimize blood flow excellent chest compression technique is critical. Thus, the quality of the delivered chest compressions is a pivotal determinant of successful resuscitation. If a patient is found unresponsive without a definite pulse or normal breathing then the responder should assume that this patient is in cardiac arrest, activate the emergency response system and immediately start chest compressions. Contra-indications to starting chest compressions include a valid Do Not Attempt Resuscitation Order. Optimal technique for adult chest compressions includes positioning the patient supine, and pushing hard and fast over the center of the chest with the outstretched arms perpendicular to the patient's chest. The rate should be at least 100 compressions per minute and any interruptions should be minimized to achieve a minimum of 60 actually delivered compressions per minute. Aggressive rotation of compressors prevents decline of chest compression quality due to fatigue. Chest compressions are terminated following return of spontaneous circulation. Unconscious patients with normal breathing are placed in the recovery position. If there is no return of spontaneous circulation, then the decision to terminate chest compressions is based on the clinical judgment that the patient's cardiac arrest is unresponsive to treatment. Finally, it is important that family and patients' loved ones who witness chest compressions be treated with consideration and sensitivity. PMID:22152601

  9. Chest pain evaluation in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Foy, Andrew J; Filippone, Lisa

    2015-07-01

    Chest pain is a common complaint in the emergency department. Recognition of chest pain symptoms and electrocardiographic changes consistent with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) can lead to prompt initiation of goal-directed therapy. Cardiac troponin testing confirms the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, but does not reveal the mechanism of injury. When patients with chest pain rule out for ACS the use of advanced, noninvasive testing has not been found to be associated with better patient outcomes. PMID:26042885

  10. A preliminary study for exploring the luminance ratio of liquid-crystal displays required for display of radiographs.

    PubMed

    Takarabe, Shinya; Morishita, Junji; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Akamine, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Matsuo, Yoshio; Hattori, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    Medical-grade liquid-crystal displays (LCDs) with high contrast ratio (CR) values have recently been developed and become available for soft-copy reading. When the LCD is used under ambient light conditions, the luminance ratio (LR) is a more appropriate indicator than the CR. Our aim was to explore the LR required for LCDs for soft-copy reading by comparing the effective LR values with the LR of the LCD. We defined "the luminance ratio in an image (LRimg)", the ratio of the maximum to minimum luminance in a radiograph displayed on the LCD, as the effective LR values required for the LCD. The maximum LRimg values in chest radiographs and those in mammograms ranged from 109 to 143 and 372 to 431, respectively. The LR of the LCD was higher than the LRimg values of the radiographs. Our results indicate that currently available medical-grade LCDs have enough LR for display of radiographs. PMID:24002707

  11. Hydatid disease of the chest

    PubMed Central

    Xanthakis, D.; Efthimiadis, M.; Papadakis, G.; Primikirios, N.; Chassapakis, G.; Roussaki, A.; Veranis, N.; Akrivakis, A.; Aligizakis, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Ninety-one cases of hydatid disease of the chest are reported. Eighty-eight were involving the lung, two the chest wall, and one the mediastinum. All the patients were treated surgically. Conservative operations (simple removal of the parasite and closure of the remaining cavity) were performed in 78 patients, 37 unruptured and 41 ruptured cysts. Late postoperative complications occurred in eleven. In 10 patients, recurrent haemoptysis was the main symptom due to residual cavity in four, bronchiectatic changes in two, and unknown aetiology in four. In one patient, recurrence of multiple cysts occurred in the affected lobe. Radical operations were carried out in 10 patients, including segmental resection in four and lobectomy in six. Conservative operations were performed in all cases of unruptured cysts, with the exception of a giant cyst in which resection was the operation of choice. For ruptured cysts with mild infection conservative operation was also performed. Resection was necessary only in patients with ruptured cysts with suppuration, bronchiectatic changes, and giant cysts replacing a whole lobe. There was no mortality. We believe that conservative operation is the treatment of choice for hydatid disease of the lung. Indications for resection are very limited. Images

  12. Chest Computed Tomography Findings in HIV-Infected Individuals in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Emily; Wittman, Catherine; Gingo, Matthew; Fernainy, Khaled; Fuhrman, Carl; Kessinger, Cathy; Weinman, Renee; McMahon, Deborah; Leader, Joseph; Morris, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Background Chest radiographic abnormalities were common in HIV-infected individuals in the pre-combination antiretroviral therapy era, but findings may differ now due to a changing spectrum of pulmonary complications. Methods Cross-sectional study of radiographic abnormalities in an HIV-infected outpatient population during the antiretroviral therapy era. Demographics, chest computed tomography, and pulmonary function tests were obtained in HIV-infected volunteers without acute respiratory illness from the University of Pittsburgh HIV/AIDS clinic. Overall prevalence of radiographic abnormalities and potential risk factors for having any abnormality, nodules, or emphysema were evaluated using univariate and multivariable analyses. Results A majority of the 121 participants (55.4%) had a radiographic abnormality with the most common being emphysema (26.4%), nodules (17.4%), and bronchiectasis (10.7%). In multivariate models, age (odds ratio [OR] per year  = 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.14, p<0.001), pneumonia history (OR  = 3.60, 95% CI  = 1.27–10.20, p = 0.016), and having ever smoked (OR  = 3.66, p = 0.013, 95% CI  = 1.31–10.12) were significant predictors of having any radiographic abnormality. Use of antiretroviral therapy, CD4 cell count, and HIV viral load were not associated with presence of abnormalities. Individuals with radiographic emphysema were more likely to have airway obstruction on pulmonary function tests. Only 85.8% participants with nodules had follow-up imaging resulting in 52.4% having stable nodules, 23.8% resolution of their nodules, 4.8% development of a new nodule, and 4.8% primary lung cancer. Conclusions Radiographic abnormalities remain common in HIV-infected individuals with emphysema, nodules, and bronchiectasis being the most common. Age, smoking, and pneumonia were associated with radiographic abnormalities, but HIV-associated factors did not seem to predict risk. PMID:25409510

  13. Quantitative analysis of rib kinematics based on dynamic chest bone images: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. An image-processing technique for separating bones from soft tissue in static chest radiographs has been developed. The present study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic bone images in quantitative analysis of rib movement. Dynamic chest radiographs of 16 patients were obtained using a dynamic flat-panel detector and processed to create bone images by using commercial software (Clear Read BS, Riverain Technologies). Velocity vectors were measured in local areas on the dynamic images, which formed a map. The velocity maps obtained with bone and original images for scoliosis and normal cases were compared to assess the advantages of bone images. With dynamic bone images, we were able to quantify and distinguish movements of ribs from those of other lung structures accurately. Limited rib movements of scoliosis patients appeared as a reduced rib velocity field, resulting in an asymmetrical distribution of rib movement. Vector maps in all normal cases exhibited left/right symmetric distributions of the velocity field, whereas those in abnormal cases showed asymmetric distributions because of locally limited rib movements. Dynamic bone images were useful for accurate quantitative analysis of rib movements. The present method has a potential for an additional functional examination in chest radiography. PMID:26158097

  14. Dynamic chest radiography with a flat-panel detector (FPD): ventilation-perfusion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, R.; Sanada, S.; Fujimura, M.; Yasui, M.; Tsuji, S.; Hayashi, N.; Okamoto, H.; Nanbu, Y.; Matsui, O.

    2011-03-01

    Pulmonary ventilation and blood flow are reflected in dynamic chest radiographs as changes in X-ray translucency, i.e., pixel values. This study was performed to investigate the feasibility of ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) study based on the changes in pixel value. Sequential chest radiographs of a patient with ventilation-perfusion mismatch were obtained during respiration using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system. The lung area was recognized and average pixel value was measured in each area, tracking and deforming the region of interest. Inter-frame differences were then calculated, and the absolute values were summed in each respiratory phase. The results were visualized as ventilation, blood flow, V/Q ratio distribution map and compared to distribution of radioactive counts on ventilation and perfusion scintigrams. In the results, abnormalities were appeared as a reduction of changes in pixel values, and a correlation was observed between the distribution of changes in pixel value and those of radioactivity counts (Ventilation; r=0.78, Perfusion; r=0.77). V/Q mismatch was also indicated as mismatch of changes in pixel value, and a correlation with V/Q calculated by radioactivity counts (r=0.78). These results indicated that the present method is potentially useful for V/Q study as an additional examination in conventional chest radiography.

  15. Radiographic findings of Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Nishant Mukesh; Davalos, Eric A.; Varma, Rajeev K.

    2015-01-01

    The extremely rare Proteus Syndrome is a hamartomatous congenital syndrome with substantial variability between clinical patient presentations. The diagnostic criteria consist of a multitude of clinical findings including hemihypertrophy, macrodactyly, epidermal nevi, subcutaneous hamartomatous tumors, and bony abnormalities. These clinical findings correlate with striking radiographic findings. PMID:27186241

  16. Routine radiographic assessment of the scoliotic spine.

    PubMed

    Farren, J

    1981-04-01

    This paper is designed to give a brief account of the radiographic criteria necessary in order to demonstrate and evaluate the scoliotic spine. However, additional specialised radiographic examinations, including myelography, angiography, laminography and intravenous urography are occasionally necessary. PMID:7280196

  17. Radiographically guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pleural fluid collections.

    PubMed

    Merriam, M A; Cronan, J J; Dorfman, G S; Lambiase, R E; Haas, R A

    1988-12-01

    We reviewed the outcome of guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pleural fluid collections in 18 patients over a 5-year period. Catheter positioning was guided by fluoroscopy in 10 (56%) cases, CT in seven (39%), and sonography in one (6%). Included were 16 patients with empyemas and one each with a sterile hematoma and transudate. In nine of the patients, previous surgical chest tube drainage had been unsuccessful. The majority of collections were treated with a 12- or 14-French catheter and closed underwater seal drainage. Twelve (80%) of the 15 patients who had an adequate trial of guided drainage were cured. Propyliodone oil suspension contrast sinography after catheter placement showed two clinically unsuspected bronchopleural fistulas. Although an extensive multilocular pleural collection was a contraindication to percutaneous catheter drainage, the thick fibrous peel of a chronic empyema was not. Drainage of pleural fluid collections with radiographic guidance ensures proper catheter placement and is successful in a high percentage of cases. PMID:3055887

  18. A More Efficient, Radiation-Free Alternative to Systematic Chest X-Ray for the Detection of Embolized Seeds to the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Morrier, Janelle; Chretien, Mario; Martin, Andre-Guy; Vigneault, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of a seed-migration detector and to compare its performance to fluoroscopy and postoperative chest radiographs. Methods and Materials: A gamma scintillation survey meter was converted to a seed-migration detector by adding a shield on the probe detection window. The detector response to three {sup 125}I seed activities was characterized for different source-to-detector distances in water. The detector was used to perform a chest evaluation on 737 patients at their first postoperative visit. When the detector showed positive activity, seed migration was confirmed by taking a chest radiograph and by looking at the region with fluoroscopy. Results: One hundred and three patients (14.0%) presented at least one embolized seed. This accounts for 123 of the 39,887 seeds. Eighty-seven, 12, and 4 patients had respectively one, two, and three seed embolization. Compared with the seed-migration detector, detection based on fluoroscopy would have led to 13 false-negative detections (of 103, or 12.6%), and the radiograph would have resulted in 31 or 30.1%. More important, standard chest X-ray would have required a survey and extra radiation dose to lung to 100% of the patients, rather than the 14% who required it. Conclusions: The usual recommendation to perform chest radiographs at the first follow-up visit to scan lungs for embolized seeds should be revised because of the high false-negative rate. Scintillator-based gamma counter detector provides superior detection sensitivity and should be adopted as a standard of practice. Chest X-ray could be limited to documenting cases of positive migration.

  19. Radiographic amplifier screens: Fabrication process and characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szepesi, Z. P.

    1977-01-01

    The fabrication process and transfer characteristics for solid state radiographic image transducers (radiographic amplifier screens) is described. These screens were developed for use in real time nondestructive evaluation procedures that require large format radiographic images with contrast and resolution capabilities unavailable with conventional fluoroscopic screens. This work was directed toward screens usable for inmotion, on-line radiographic inspection by means of closed circuit television.

  20. 42 CFR 37.42 - Chest radiograph specifications-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... pairs per millimeter. The storage phosphor cassette or digital image detector must be positioned either vertically or horizontally so that the image includes the apices and costophrenic angles of both right and... described, then two side-by-side images can be obtained that together include the apices and...

  1. 78 FR 35575 - Black Lung Benefits Act: Standards for Chest Radiographs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... 1980. See 45 FR 13678, 13680-81 (February 29, 1980). Codified at 20 CFR 718.102, 718.202, and Appendix... standards on NIOSH's then-current regulations, which HHS had published on August 1, 1978. 43 FR 33713... generally 45 FR 13680-81 (February 29, 1980). Although NIOSH later revised two of the 42 CFR part...

  2. 78 FR 35549 - Black Lung Benefits Act: Standards for Chest Radiographs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... X-rays in 1980. See 45 FR 13678, 13680-81 (February 29, 1980). Codified at 20 CFR 718.102, 718.202... standards on NIOSH's then-current regulations, which HHS had published on August 1, 1978. 43 FR 33713... generally 45 FR 13680-81 (February 29, 1980). Although NIOSH later revised two of the 42 CFR part...

  3. ROC Analysis of Chest Radiographs Using Computed Radiography and Conventional Analog Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, Craig A.; Brown, Kathy; Hayrapetian, Alek S.; Kangarloo, Hooshang; Balter, Stephen; Huang, H. K.

    1989-05-01

    Receiver operating characteristic is used to compare the image quality of films obtained digitally using computed radiography (CR) and conventionally using analog film following fluoroscopic examination. Similar radiological views were obtained by both modalities. Twenty-four cases, some with a solitary noncalcified nodule and/or pneumothorax, were collected. Ten radiologists have been tested viewing analog and CR digital films separately. Final results indicate that there is no statistically significant difference in the ability to detect either a pneumothorax or a solitary noncalcified nodule when comparing CR digital film with conventional analog film. However, there is a trend that indicated the area under the ROC curves for detection of either a pneumothorax or solitary noncalcified nodule were greater for the analog film than for the digital film.

  4. Chest neoplasms with infectious etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Chen, Melissa M; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago; Carrillo, Jorge; Restrepo, Catalina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of thoracic tumors have known or suspected viral etiologies. Oncogenic viruses can be classified by the type of genomic material they contain. Neoplastic conditions found to have viral etiologies include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoid granulomatosis, Kaposi’s sarcoma, Castleman’s disease, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, leukemia and lymphomas. Viruses involved in these conditions include Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus 8, human papillomavirus, Simian virus 40, human immunodeficiency virus, and Human T-lymphotropic virus. Imaging findings, epidemiology and mechanism of transmission for these diseases are reviewed in detail to gain a more thorough appreciation of disease pathophysiology for the chest radiologist. PMID:22224176

  5. Bronchial cancer - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a chest x-ray of a person with bronchial cancer. This is a front view. The lungs are the two dark ... white areas visible in the middle of the chest. The light areas that appear as subtle branches ...

  6. 21 CFR 892.1840 - Radiographic film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiographic film. 892.1840 Section 892.1840 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1840 Radiographic film. (a) Identification. Radiographic film is a device that consists of a thin sheet of radiotransparent material coated on one or...

  7. [Wooden chests for the midwife's equipment].

    PubMed

    Carlén-Nilsson, C

    1993-01-01

    In the museum of medical history in Lund there are several wooden chests containing partly identical instruments apparently belonging to a midwife. The instruments dated from before 1900, e.g. lancets and horn cups for blood-letting, a pewter enema syringe, a wooden stethoscope, a "tobacco pipe" and glass bottles. The use of the tobacco pipe was first puzzling, but it appeared to be a breast reliver. What do we know about the date of the chests? One chest has belonged to Kjersti Nilsdotter, a midwife educated in Lund 1872-1873. Her certificate was in the chest. From Ronnie Hunt, Minnesota we have got information about another chest of the same type. That belonged to Nelly Gustafsson, a midwife educated in Lund probably about 1870. She emigrated to USA and was a practising midwife in Lindstrom, Minnesota from about 1900. PMID:11639439

  8. Intercostal hemangioma of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Hamzík, Julian

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a case of a 36-year-old patient who had six months’ pain of the thoracic spine and left chest. A soft slowly growing resistance was present on the dorso-lateral side of the left chest wall, in the range of the seventh to ninth rib. According to the medical history, the patient did not have any prior trauma and malignancy. A well-defined tumor of the left chest wall with calcifications, which grew to the seventh and eighth intercostal space, was present on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) scans. The patient underwent resection of the tumor with the chest wall and reconstruction with polypropylene mesh. Histologically, it was a venous hemangioma, one of very rare tumors of the chest wall. PMID:27212983

  9. [How to do - the chest tube drainage].

    PubMed

    Klopp, Michael; Hoffmann, Hans; Dienemann, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    A chest tube is used to drain the contents of the pleural space to reconstitute the physiologic pressures within the pleural space and to allow the lungs to fully expand. Indications for chest tube placement include pneumothorax, hemothorax, pleural effusion, pleural empyema, and major thoracic surgery. The most appropriate site for chest tube placement is the 4th or 5th intercostal space in the mid- or anterior- axillary line. Attention to technique in placing the chest tube is vital to avoid complications from the procedure. Applying the step-by-step technique presented, placement of a chest tube is a quick and safe procedure. Complications - frequently occurring when the tube is inserted with a steel trocar - include hemothorax, dislocation, lung lacerations, and injury to organs in the thoracic or abdominal cavity." PMID:25734676

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia in primary care: clinical assessment and the usability of chest radiography

    PubMed Central

    Moberg, A.B.; Taléus, U.; Garvin, P.; Fransson, S.-G.; Falk, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the diagnostic value of different clinical and laboratory findings in pneumonia and to explore the association between the doctor’s degree of suspicion and chest X-ray (CXR) result and to evaluate whether or not CXR should be used routinely in primary care, when available. Design A three-year prospective study was conducted between September 2011 and December 2014. Setting Two primary care settings in Linköping, Sweden. Subjects A total of 103 adult patients with suspected pneumonia in primary care. Main outcome measures The physicians recorded results of a standardized medical physical examination, including laboratory results, and rated their suspicion into three degrees. The outcome of the diagnostic variables and the degree of suspicion was compared with the result of CXR. Results Radiographic pneumonia was reported in 45% of patients. When the physicians were sure of the diagnosis radiographic pneumonia was found in 88% of cases (p < 0.001), when quite sure the frequency of positive CXR was 45%, and when not sure 28%. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) ≥ 50mg/L were associated with the presence of radiographic pneumonia when the diagnosis was suspected (p < 0.001). Conclusion This study indicates that CXR can be useful if the physician is not sure of the diagnosis, but when sure one can rely on one’s judgement without ordering CXR. Key pointsThere are different guidelines but no consensus on how to manage community-acquired pneumonia in primary care.When the physician is sure of the diagnosis the judgement is reliable without chest X-ray and antibiotics can be safely prescribed.Chest X-ray can be useful in the assessment of pneumonia in primary care, when the physician is not sure of the diagnosis. PMID:26849394

  11. Acute non-traumatic gastrothorax: presentation of a case with chest pain and atypical radiologic findings.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepwant; Mackeith, Pieter; Gopal, Dipesh Pravin

    2016-01-01

    A previously well 71-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Department with acute-onset left-sided chest pain. She was haemodynamically stable with unremarkable systemic examination. Her electrocardiogram and troponin were within normal limits and her chest radiograph showed a raised left hemi-diaphragm. Two hours after admission, this woman became acutely breathless, and suffered a pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there was a return of spontaneous circulation and regained consciousness. A repeat clinical assessment revealed a new left-sided dullness to percussion with contralateral percussive resonance on respiratory examination. CXR revealed a left pan-hemi-thoracic opacity whilst better definition using CT-pulmonary angiography (CTPA) indicated an acute tension gastrothorax secondary to a large left-sided diaphragmatic hernia. Nasogastric (NG) tube insertion was used to decompress the stomach and the patient underwent uncomplicated emergency laparoscopic hernia reduction. She remained well at 1-year follow-up. PMID:27027934

  12. Chest imaging and lung function impairment after long-term occupational exposure to low concentrations of chrysotile.

    PubMed

    Spyratos, Dionisios; Chloros, Diamantis; Haidich, Bettina; Dagdilelis, Loukas; Markou, Stamatia; Sichletidis, Lazaros

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the investigation of radiographic findings in relation to lung function after occupational exposure to permissible levels of relatively pure chrysotile (0.5-3% amphiboles). We studied 266 out of the total 317 employees who have worked in an asbestos cement factory during the period 1968-2004 with chest x-ray, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and lung function tests. Sensitivity of chest x-ray was 43% compared to HRCT. Abnormal HRCT findings were found in 75 subjects (67%) and were related to age, occupational exposure duration, and spirometric data. The presence of parenchymal or visceral pleural lesions (exclusively or as the predominant abnormality) was being accompanied by lower total lung capacity and diffusion capacity. HRCT was much more sensitive than chest x-ray for occupational chrysotile exposure. Lung function impairment was related with parenchymal but not with pleural HRCT abnormalities. PMID:22524648

  13. A clinical and radiographic study of coir workers.

    PubMed Central

    Uragoda, C G

    1975-01-01

    Processing of coir, which is the fibre obtained from the husk of the coconut, is a dusty procedure; 779 workers in two coir processing factories in Sri Lanka were examined clincally and radiographically for evidence of respiratory disease. Respiratory symptoms were present in 20 (2-6%) of them, which is no higher than in the general population. Respiratory disease such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, byssinosis, and pulmonary tuberculosis which may occur from occupational exposures were considered, but there was no evidence to suggest a definite association between these conditions and coir dust. Twenty-two workers had abnormal chest radiographs, but when compared with a control group of 591 workers from an engineering firm where lesions were found in 20 cases, there was no significant difference. In the opinion of the medical officer, management and workers of the large factory investigated, coir dust does not produce any respiratory disability. The chemical composition of coir dust is similar to that of sisal which is also relatively inert. PMID:1125129

  14. Chest CT findings of influenza virus‐associated pneumonia in 12 adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Jiro; Bandoh, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Objective  In this study, we describe the chest computed tomography findings of influenza virus‐associated pneumonia in adult patients. Methods  Our retrospective study included 12 adult patients who had proven influenza virus ‐ associated pneumonia. Results  Out of 12 patients, six were diagnosed as having pure influenza virus pneumonia, five as having bronchopneumonia caused by bacteria associated with influenza A infection, and one as having a cryptogenic organizing pneumonia associated with influenza A infection. Conclusion  Radiographic findings of influenza virus pneumonia in adult patients consist of ground‐glass attenuation. Localized patchy consolidations were observed in cases of bronchopneumonia. PMID:19453425

  15. Procarbazine-induced interstitial pneumonitis with a normal chest x-ray: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Garbes, I.D.; Henderson, E.S.; Gomez, G.A.; Bakshi, S.P.; Parthasarathy, K.L.; Castillo, N.B.

    1986-01-01

    Pulmonary toxicity due to cytotoxic drugs is well described in the literature. This is most commonly described in association with bleomycin, busulfan, and methotrexate. This report presents a case of interstitial pneumonitis with a normal chest x-ray that is most certainly due to procarbazine. In addition, the role of gallium-67 citrate scintigraphy in early diagnosis is discussed. This is especially important since discontinuation of the drug before radiographic manifestations of pulmonary toxicity become evident may prevent permanent pulmonary injury and its sequelae.

  16. Radiographic instrumentation for DPM experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, Archie L.; Debnam, W. J.; Simchick, Richard T.; Barber, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    New developments in x-ray radiography that may be applicable to containerless experimentation are presented. The two features discussed are the use of radiography to determine the position and shape of the solid-liquid interface and, with the aid of appropriate markers, the flow patterns in either the surface or bulk of the liquid state. Both surface energy and fluid viscosity measurements can be made with the aid of the described radiographic system.

  17. Non-Radiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Eshed, Iris

    2015-12-01

    The term non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nrAxSpA) was coined for patients who have a clinical picture of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) but do not exhibit radiographic sacroiliitis. The ASAS classification criteria for nrAxSpA, ensuring the recruitment of homogenous study cohorts, were accepted in 2009, although the respective diagnostic criteria for daily clinical practice have not yet been developed. The clinical diagnosis should be based on the composite of clinical symptoms and signs of the disease, HLA B27 status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of sacroiliac joints. Notably, a negative MRI or HLA B27 does not exclude the diagnosis in patients with a high clinical suspicion for nrAxSpA. The prevalence of nrAxSpA is similar to that of AS, but the former has a higher female preponderance. The rate of progression of nrAxSpA to the radiographic stage of disease (AS) ranges from 10% to 20% over 2 years. Current treatment strategies for nrAxSpA are the same as for AS and include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. While this review summarizes the current achievements in the field of nrAxSpA, further understanding of the epidemiology and natural history of the disease and, particularly, mechanisms of inflammation and subsequent new bone formation is essential for the development of new treatment strategies for nrAxSpA patients. PMID:26897981

  18. Investigation of the dosimetry of chest tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Zachrisson, Sara; Månsson, Lars Gunnar; Båth, Magnus

    2009-02-01

    Chest tomosynthesis has recently been introduced to healthcare as a low-dose alternative to CT or as a tool for improved diagnostics in chest radiography with only a modest increase in radiation dose to the patient. However, no detailed description of the dosimetry for this type of examination has been presented. The aim of this work was therefore to investigate the dosimetry of chest tomosynthesis. The chest tomosynthesis examination was assumed to be performed using a stationary detector and a vertically moving x-ray tube, exposing the patient from different angles. The Monte Carlo based computer software PCXMC was used to determine the effective dose delivered to a standard-sized patient from various angles using different assumptions of the distribution of the effective dose over the different projections. The obtained conversion factors between input dose measures and effective dose for chest tomosynthesis for different angular intervals were then compared with the horizontal projection. The results indicate that the error introduced by using conversion factors for the PA projection in chest radiography for estimating the effective dose of chest tomosynthesis is small for normally sized patients, especially if a conversion factor between KAP and effective dose is used.

  19. [A rare case of chest pain].

    PubMed

    Bodócsi, Beáta; Koncz, István; Hum, Zsigmond; Serfőző, Orsolya; Pap-Szekeres, József; Szabó, István

    2016-09-01

    Chest pain is a common symptom in patients who visit Emergency Departments. The main task is to exclude life-threatening diseases such as acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolization and dissection of thoracic aorta. The authors present the history of a patient, who had an intense chest pain for 7 hours. In accordance with the diagnostic algorithm of chest pain, ECG, blood collection, chest X-ray and chest computed tomography angiography were performed. Acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolization and dissection of the thoracic aorta were excluded, however, chest computed tomography CT revealed a huge hiatal hernia as an incidental finding. An emergency surgical repair was performed and the patient recovered without any complications. The authors emphasize that the diagnostic algorithms focus on the confirmation or rejection of possible life threatening diseases in case of chest pain. However, it should be kept in mind that rarer causes may occur, which may require involvement of the relevant disciplines and multidisciplinary thinking. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(36), 1445-1448. PMID:27596512

  20. Role of conventional chest radiography in diagnosis and exclusion of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Pratt, P C

    1987-05-01

    Although recognizing that the subject is controversial, most authors of textbooks about diagnostic radiology conclude that chest radiography is of little value for either confirmation or exclusion of the diagnosis of emphysema. Yet several reports in the literature show a high degree of accuracy in the interpretation of films for presence of this disease. Some of the controversy results from continuing confusion over the current definition of emphysema in terms of lung structure rather than symptoms or physiologic evidence relating to impaired ventilation. Many autopsy studies have shown that emphysema is often present at postmortem examination and can involve as much as 30 percent of the lung tissue, even in subjects with no respiratory symptoms or impairment during life. Since radiographs deal with structure rather than function, interpreters of chest films should have the intention to recognize the presence of structural emphysema. The correct recognition of emphysema is useful even in a patient without symptoms, and the ability to exclude this diagnosis in symptomatic patients is of equal, if not greater value. The degree of success reported in various studies depends upon the criteria used and the strictness applied by the authors in matching their interpretations to the presence or absence of structural emphysema. This review of existing literature deals solely with papers in which radiographic observations have been related to morphologic evidence of emphysema in inflation-fixed autopsy lung specimens. It identifies reasons for discrepancies among reports and emphasizes the very high predictive value of validated radiographic criteria. Applications of radiographic interpretation both for diagnosis and for exclusion of emphysema in clinical situations are described. PMID:3555069

  1. Compensation, radiographic changes, and survival in applicants for asbestosis compensation.

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, W O; Musk, A W; Glancy, J J; de Klerk, N H; Yin, R; Mele, R; Carr, N G; Armstrong, B K; Hobbs, M S

    1985-01-01

    The survival of 354 claimants for compensation for pulmonary asbestosis among former workers of the Wittenoom crocidolite mine and mill in Western Australia has been examined. There were 118 deaths up to December 1982. The median time between start of work and claim for compensation was 17 years. The standardised mortality ratio (SMR) for deaths from all causes was 2.65 (p less than 0.0001). The SMR for pneumoconiosis was 177.2 (p less than 0.0001), bronchitis and emphysema 2.6 (p = 0.04), tuberculosis 44.6 (p less than 0.0001), respiratory cancer (including five deaths from malignant pleural mesothelioma) 6.4 (p less than 0.0001), gastrointestinal cancer 1.6 (p = 0.22), all other cancers 1.6 (p = 0.17), heart disease 1.4 (p = 0.07), and all other causes 2.18 (p = 0.004). Plain chest radiographs taken within two years of claiming compensation were found for 238 subjects and were categorised independently by two observers according to the International Labour Organisation criteria without knowledge of exposure or compensation details. Profusion of radiographic opacities, age at claiming compensation, work in the Wittenoom mill, and degree of disability awarded by the pneumoconiosis medical board were significant predictors of survival, but total estimated exposure to asbestos was not. Radiographic profusion and degree of disability were, however, predictable by total exposure. The median survival from claim for compensation was 17 years in subjects with ILO category 1 pneumoconiosis, 12 years in category 2, and three years in category 3. PMID:2990524

  2. Plain radiographic diagnosis of thrombosis of left atrial appendage in mitral valve disease

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, S.; Watabe, T.; Kuribayashi, S.; Ootaki, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Sugihara, M.; Kawada, S.; Koide, S.; Shohtsu, A.; Tomoda, H.

    1983-01-01

    Conventional posteroanterior chest radiographs of 42 patients with mitral valve disease who had had surgery were analyzed, and particular attention was directed to the presence or absence of the convexity of the left lower midcardiac border (left artrial segment). The flatness or concavity of this segment, despite other evidence of left atrial enlargement, was observed in six (60%) of 10 patients who had left atrial thrombosis, and in three (9%) of 32 patients who did not have thrombosis (false positive diagnosis). Four of the 10 patients who had left atrial thrombosis did not show this finding on the radiographs (false negative diagnosis). One of these four had a thrombus only against the posterior wall of the body of the left atrium. Therefore, the accuracy in the diagnosis of thrombosis of the left atrial appendage was 66.7% (six of nine) for patients who had thrombosis of the appendage. Standard chest radiographs are important in the evaluation of the patient with thrombosis of the left atrial appendage.

  3. Prevalence of radiographic appearance of pneumoconiosis in an unexposed blue collar population

    SciTech Connect

    Castellan, R.M.; Sanderson, W.T.; Petersen, M.R.

    1985-05-01

    Blue collar employees currently working in environments free from exposure to respiratory hazards were examined with chest radiography and a standard occupational history questionnaire. Workers who had worked for a total of 5 yr or more in previous jobs with possible hazardous respiratory exposures were excluded. Each radiograph was read independently by 3 NIOSH-certified ''B'' readers. For small opacities, the median profusion was accepted as a summary reading. The 1,422 readable films represented a population of 50.6% males, 49.4% females, 52.5% whites, 44.2% blacks, 47.0% current smokers, and 38.5% nonsmokers. The mean age was 33.8 yr, with a range from 16 to 70 yr. Small opacities of profusion greater than or equal to 1/0 were identified in only 3 (0.21%) of the radiographs--2 with small rounded opacities and 1 with small irregular opacities. Small irregular opacities of profusion category greater than or equal to 0/1 were statistically associated with age, gender, and pack-years of smoking. The results suggest that using the median of 3 independent readings should rarely result in interpretation of chest radiographs as ''positive'' for pneumoconiosis in active workers who have not had significant dust exposure.

  4. Impacts to the chest of PMHSs - Influence of impact location and load distribution on chest response.

    PubMed

    Holmqvist, Kristian; Svensson, Mats Y; Davidsson, Johan; Gutsche, Andreas; Tomasch, Ernst; Darok, Mario; Ravnik, Dean

    2016-02-01

    The chest response of the human body has been studied for several load conditions, but is not well known in the case of steering wheel rim-to-chest impact in heavy goods vehicle frontal collisions. The aim of this study was to determine the response of the human chest in a set of simulated steering wheel impacts. PMHS tests were carried out and analysed. The steering wheel load pattern was represented by a rigid pendulum with a straight bar-shaped front. A crash test dummy chest calibration pendulum was utilised for comparison. In this study, a set of rigid bar impacts were directed at various heights of the chest, spanning approximately 120mm around the fourth intercostal space. The impact energy was set below a level estimated to cause rib fracture. The analysed results consist of responses, evaluated with respect to differences in the impacting shape and impact heights on compression and viscous criteria chest injury responses. The results showed that the bar impacts consistently produced lesser scaled chest compressions than the hub; the Middle bar responses were around 90% of the hub responses. A superior bar impact provided lesser chest compression; the average response was 86% of the Middle bar response. For inferior bar impacts, the chest compression response was 116% of the chest compression in the middle. The damping properties of the chest caused the compression to decrease in the high speed bar impacts to 88% of that in low speed impacts. From the analysis it could be concluded that the bar impact shape provides lower chest criteria responses compared to the hub. Further, the bar responses are dependent on the impact location of the chest. Inertial and viscous effects of the upper body affect the responses. The results can be used to assess the responses of human substitutes such as anthropomorphic test devices and finite element human body models, which will benefit the development process of heavy goods vehicle safety systems. PMID:26687541

  5. Compression of digital chest x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Michael; Trefler, Martin; Young, Tzay S.

    1990-07-01

    The application of digital technologies to chest radiography holds the promise of routine application of intage processing techniques to effect image enhancement. However, due to their inherent spatial resolution, digital chest images impose severe constraints on data storage devices. Compression of these images will relax such constraints and facilitate image transmission on a digital network. We have evaluated image processing algorithms aimed at compression of digital chest images while improving the diagnostic quality of the image. The image quality has been measured with respect to the task of tumor detection. Compression ratios of as high as 2:1 have been achieved. This compression can then be supplemented by irreversible methods.

  6. Classification of chest wall diseases.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, E; Gulotta, C

    1993-01-01

    Several disorders of the thoracic cage are known to cause respiratory failure, by means of relatively simple mechanisms, such as the increased work of breathing, which results in alveolar hypoventilation. A variety of pathogenic mechanisms may be considered, as functions of the types of thoracic disorders present. As causes of these additional potential mechanisms, we considered the following: 1) ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) inhomogeneity; 2) inability to cough; 3) malformation or acquired defect of the respiratory centres; and 4) excess blood volume and fluid retention, which aggravate work of breathing and V/Q inhomogeneity. All of these disorders can be grouped into two major categories (which nevertheless have some of the pathophysiology in common): the mechanical syndrome and the neuromuscular or paralytic syndrome. In this paper we discuss chest wall diseases falling into the first category; namely, kyphoscoliosis, fibrothorax, thoracoplasty, ankylosing spondylitis and obesity-hypoventilation. Congenital deformities of the thoracic cage, which do not have important effects on ventilatory apparatus (e.g. pectus excavatum and pectus carinatum), were also considered. PMID:8472068

  7. Validation of the International Labour Office Digitized Standard Images for Recognition and Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconiosis

    PubMed Central

    Halldin, Cara N.; Petsonk, Edward L.; Laney, A. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Chest radiographs are recommended for prevention and detection of pneumoconiosis. In 2011, the International Labour Office (ILO) released a revision of the International Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconioses that included a digitized standard images set. The present study compared results of classifications of digital chest images performed using the new ILO 2011 digitized standard images to classification approaches used in the past. Materials and Methods Underground coal miners (N = 172) were examined using both digital and film-screen radiography (FSR) on the same day. Seven National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-certified B Readers independently classified all 172 digital radiographs, once using the ILO 2011 digitized standard images (DRILO2011-D) and once using digitized standard images used in the previous research (DRRES). The same seven B Readers classified all the miners’ chest films using the ILO film-based standards. Results Agreement between classifications of FSR and digital radiography was identical, using a standard image set (either DRILO2011-D or DRRES). The overall weighted κ value was 0.58.Somespecific differences in the results were seen and noted. However, intrareader variability in this study was similar to the published values and did not appear to be affected by the use of the new ILO 2011 digitized standard images. Conclusions These findings validate the use of the ILO digitized standard images for classification of small pneumoconiotic opacities. When digital chest radiographs are obtained and displayed appropriately, results of pneumoconiosis classifications using the 2011 ILO digitized standards are comparable to film-based ILO classifications and to classifications using earlier research standards. PMID:24507420

  8. SU-E-I-48: The Behavior of AEC in Scan Regions Outside the Localizer Radiograph FOV: An In Phantom Study of CT Systems From Four Vendors

    SciTech Connect

    Supanich, M; Bevins, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This review of scanners from 4 major manufacturers examines the clinical impact of performing CT scans that extend into areas of the body that were not acquired in the CT localizer radiograph. Methods: Anthropomorphic chest and abdomen phantoms were positioned together on the tables of CT scanners from 4 different vendors. All of the scanners offered an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) option with both lateral and axial tube current modulation. A localizer radiograph was taken covering the entire extent of both phantoms and then the scanner's Chest-Abdomen-Pelvis (CAP) study was performed with the clinical AEC settings employed and the scan and reconstruction range extending from the superior portion of the chest phantom through the inferior portion of the abdomen phantom. A new study was then initiated with a localizer radiograph extending the length of the chest phantom (not covering the abdomen phantom). The same CAP protocol and AEC settings were then used to scan and reconstruct the entire length of both phantoms. Scan parameters at specific locations in the abdomen phantom from both studies were investigated using the information contained in the DICOM metadata of the reconstructed images. Results: The AEC systems on all scanners utilized different tube current settings in the abdomen phantom for the scan completed without the full localizer radiograph. The AEC system behavior was also scanner dependent with the default manual tube current, the maximum tube current and the tube current at the last known position observed as outcomes. Conclusion: The behavior of the AEC systems of CT scanners in regions not covered by the localizer radiograph is vendor dependent. To ensure optimal image quality and radiation exposure it is important to include the entire planned scan region in the localizer radiograph.

  9. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  10. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light ... location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities ...

  11. Imaging of diseases of the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, P.; Dee, P.; Wilson, A.

    1988-01-01

    This book promises to be the first intermediate length chest imaging book that successfully integrates material on the newer modalities (MRI, Nuclear Medicine) with that on conventional techniques (plain film radiography).

  12. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-03-01

    The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence arises mainly from case stories and empiric knowledge. For segmental dysfunction, clinical features of musculoskeletal chest pain have been characterized in a few clinical trials. This article summarizes the most commonly encountered syndromes of focal musculoskeletal disorders in clinical practice. PMID:20380955

  13. [Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma of the Chest Wall].

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Genkichi; Yoneshima, Yasuto; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kitagawa, Dai; Kinjo, Nao; Ohgaki, Kippei; Maehara, Shinichiro; Teramoto, Seiichi; Adachi, Eisuke; Ikeda, Yoichi; Mine, Mari

    2016-08-01

    A 79-year-old man complaining of an anterior chest mass with pain had an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. A mass, 7 cm in size, with destruction of the right 4th rib was found on chest computed tomography. A F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) corresponding to the lesion showed an abnormal accumulation of FDG with the standardized uptake value(SUV) max=16.19. A malignant tumor of the chest wall origin was suspected and the tumor was resected with the 3th, 4th, and 5th ribs. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma. He died of local recurrence about 5 months after the operation. PMID:27476566

  14. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  15. Thymic carcinoma presenting as atypical chest pain.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Sadiq; Connelly, Tara; Keita, Luther; Blazkova, Sylvie; Veerasingam, Dave

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a 2-month history of atypical chest pain was referred to the chest pain clinic by the general practitioner. Exercise stress test was positive and subsequent coronary angiogram revealed significant triple vessel disease with left ventricular impairment requiring a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). The patient had a chest X-ray as part of the preoperative work up. Chest X-ray revealed a large anterior mediastinal mass. Subsequent thorax CT revealed a 7.2 cm anterior mediastinal mass. CT-guided biopsy of the mass revealed the diagnosis of a poorly differentiated thymic basaloid carcinoma. The patient was successfully treated with concomitant surgery involving complete resection of the mass and a CABG procedure. PMID:26607199

  16. Image quality for five modern chest radiography techniques: a modified FROC study with an anthropomorphic chest phantom.

    PubMed

    Månsson, L G; Kheddache, S; Lanhede, B; Tylén, U

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the image quality for one conventional and four digital chest radiography techniques. Three storage phosphor systems, one selenium drum system, and one film-screen system were compared using a modified receiver-operating-characteristics method. Simulated pathology was randomly positioned over the parenchymal regions and the mediastinum of an anthropomorphic phantom. Eight observers (four chest radiologists, one specialist in general radiology, one hospital physicist, and two radiographers) evaluated 60 images for each technique. The selenium drum system (Philips, Eindhoven, The Netherlands) rated best for the detection of parenchymal nodules. Together with the storage phosphor system of generation IIIN (Philips/Fuji), the selenium drum system also rated best for detection of thin linear structures. The storage phosphor system of generation V (Fuji) rated best for the detection of mediastinal nodules. The first generation of the storage phosphor system from Agfa (Mortsel, Belgium) rated worst for the detection of parenchymal nodules and thin linear structures. These differences were significant (p < 0.0001). Averaging the results for all test objects, the selenium drum system and the storage phosphor system of generation V were significantly better than the other systems tested. The film/screen system performed significantly better than the first-generation storage phosphor system from Agfa, equal to the generation IIIN storage phosphor system (Philips/Fuji) and significantly worse than the selenium drum system (Philips) and the generation-V storage phosphor system (Fuji). The conclusion is therefore that the image quality of selenium-based digital technique and of the more recent generations of storage phosphor systems is superior to both conventional technique and storage phosphor systems using image plates of older types. PMID:10602958

  17. Fluoroscopic chest tube insertion and patient care.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. D.; Shaver, M. L.; Disher, A. C.; Miller, T. Q.

    1992-01-01

    Catheters and chest tubes may be placed under fluoroscopic control to reduce pleural effusions. This procedure has been adopted as a routine procedure at the UCLA School of Medicine in Los Angeles, California to improve patient care. This technique was modified for the placement of large chest tubes, which can be placed by a radiologist without multiple attempts or complications. Our experience with 2234 patients who underwent this procedure between 1977 and 1990 is described. PMID:1404463

  18. Management of chest trauma: a review.

    PubMed

    Adebonojo, S A

    1993-01-01

    The incidence of chest trauma has increased significantly since the turn of the century especially in developed countries where rapid means of transportation has become part of daily life. Although gunshot wounds (GSWs) were the commonest causes of chest trauma in wartime, road traffic accidents (RTAs) have become the scourge of peacetime and modern civilization. Chest trauma is more common in males during the 2nd to the 5th decades of life with an average age of 40 years reducing their life expectancy by another 40 years at the most productive and active period of their lives. Despite improvement in ambulance service and rapid mobilization of victims from the scene of accident, about 10% of chest injured patients will die on the spot and another 5% die within an hour of reaching the hospital. Of the remaining 85%, five percent will require emergency thoracotomy for various reasons while 80% will respond to resuscitative measures and tube thoracostomy drainage alone. The primary aims in the management of chest trauma are prompt restoration of normal cardiorespiratory functions, control of haemorrhage, treatment of associated injuries and prevention of sepsis. Although the overall survival rate of trauma has improved in recent years, deaths are often due to airway obstruction, exsanguinating haemorrhage, flail chest, tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade and associated intracranial, intraabdominal and skeletal injuries. PMID:8398932

  19. [Differential diagnosis "non-cardiac chest pain"].

    PubMed

    Frieling, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) are recurrent angina pectoris like pain without evidence of coronary heart diesease in conventional diagnostic evaluation. The prevalence of NCCP is up to 70% and may be detected in this order at all levels of the medical health care system (general practitioner, emergency department, chest pain unit, coronary care). Reduction of quality of life in NCCP is comparable, partially even higher compared to cardiac chest pain. Reasons for psychological strain are symptom recurrence in app. 50%, nonspecific diagnosis with resulting uncertainty and insufficient integration of other medical disciplines in diagnostic work-up. Managing of patients with NCCP has to be interdisciplinary because non cardiac causes of chest pain may be found frequently. This are musculosceletal in app. 40%, gastrointestinal in app. 20%, psychiatric in app. 10% and pulmonary and mediastinal diseases in app. 5% of cases. Also gastroenterological expertise is required because here gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in app. 60%, hypercontractile esophageal motility disorders with nutcracker, jackhammer esophagus or distal esophageal spasmus or achalasia in app. 20% and other esophageal alterations (e. g. infectious esophageal inflammation, drug-induced ulcer, rings, webs, eosinophilic esophagits) in app. 30% of cases may be detected as cause of chest pain may. This implicates that regular interdisciplinary round wards and interdisciplinary management of chest pain units are mandatory. PMID:26230070

  20. How to remove a chest drain.

    PubMed

    Allibone, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    RATIONALE AND KEY POINTS: This article aims to help nurses to undertake the removal of a chest drain in a safe, effective and patient-centred manner. This procedure requires two practitioners. The chest drain will have been inserted aseptically to remove air, blood, fluid or pus from the pleural cavity. ▶ Chest drains may be small or wide bore depending on the underlying condition and clinical setting. They may be secured with a mattress suture and/or an anchor suture. ▶ Chest drains are usually removed under medical instructions when the patient's lung has inflated, the underlying condition has resolved, there is no evidence of respiratory compromise or failure, and their anticoagulation status has been assessed as satisfactory. ▶ Chest drains secured with a mattress suture should be removed by two practitioners. One practitioner is required to remove the tube and the other to tie the mattress suture (if present) and secure the site. REFLECTIVE ACTIVITY: Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How reading this article will change your practice. 2. How this article could be used to educate patients with chest drains. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26443174

  1. Surgical stabilization of traumatic flail chest.

    PubMed Central

    París, F; Tarazona, V; Blasco, E; Cantó, A; Casillas, M; Pastor, J; París, M; Montero, R

    1975-01-01

    Since 1970 we have stabilized the ribs to correct paradoxical movement of the chest wall in chest injuries, using an original technique, in order to avoid as far as possible the need for long-term chest wall stabilization by intermittent positive pressure respiration (IPPR). The technical details of surgical stabilization are described, and the different types of stainless steel struts are shown. Type I was originally used either as an intramedullary nail or as an external brace. Types II and III were designed for external fixation of the strut to the rib. Treatment of 29 patients with severe flail chest, classified into four groups is shown: group I was treated by IPPR, group II by IPPR plus surgical stabilization, group III by surgical stabilization only, and group IV by surgical stabilization after exploratory thoracotomy. The clinical results are discussed. We conclude that surgical stabilization of the paradoxial movement of the chest wall can avoid the use of the respirator or at least reduce the interval of IPPR to a short period during the initial recovery from trauma. Using type III struts, we have obtained stabilization of the flail chest in all cases even in patients with severe anterior paradoxical movement. The patients' tolerance of surgical stainless steel struts was good. Images PMID:1105874

  2. Developments in Dual-Energy Single-Exposure Chest Radiography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Jung-Tsuoe

    1990-01-01

    Conventional chest radiography is the most commonly performed technique for the detection and diagnosis of lung cancer, which is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Nevertheless, a high percentage of cancer tumors are missed with this technique. One reason for errors is the overlap of tumor image with bone image in a chest radiograph. Dual-energy radiography has been suggested as the most effective method to eliminate bone contrast for better lung tumor visualization. Dual-energy radiography also provides a bone image from which benign nodules can be identified by the presence of nodule calcification. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of a film-screen based dual-energy, single-exposure technique in lung nodule detection and to improve its performance by both hardware and software developments to increase the accuracy of lung cancer diagnosis. Our previous implementation of the technique resulted in small residual tissue contrast and incomplete tissue subtraction due to screen selection and x-ray beam hardening, respectively. Hardware developments, including uses of a new screen pair (Y_2O _2S/CaWO_4) and a K-edge filter (europium), were studied to improve residual tissue contrast by increasing the energy separation. As software developments, a three-dimensional interpolation algorithm and noise suppression methods were studied to achieve complete tissue subtraction and noise reduction, respectively. The results show that the Y_2O _2S/CaWO_4 performed better than LaOBr/CaWO_4; the use of K-edge filter produced more residual tissue contrast than that obtained without it; the interpolation algorithm effectively compensated for beam hardening and resulted in more complete tissue subtraction than image subtraction; and the noise suppression methods reduced noise by half. Even though the dual-exposure technique performed better than the single-exposure technique in a simulated lung nodule detection study, the difference between

  3. Adult Hirschprung disease: radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Mindelzun, R E; Hicks, S M

    1986-09-01

    Hirschprung disease is usually diagnosed in infancy. Occasionally patients reach adulthood without diagnosis or treatment. Four cases of adult Hirschprung disease are described. The principal radiographic findings are a markedly dilated, feces-filled colon above the zone of transition; a narrowed rectum; a cone- or funnel-shaped zone of transition; and a mosaic colonic pattern caused by collapsed redundant mucosa after colonic cleansing. In an adult, identification on a barium enema examination of an abrupt, smooth transition zone in the rectum with proximal colonic dilatation, in conjunction with an appropriate clinical history, should suggest the diagnosis of adult Hirschprung disease. PMID:3737900

  4. Retrospective evaluation of exposure index (EI) values from plain radiographs reveals important considerations for quality improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Mothiram, Ursula; Brennan, Patrick C; Robinson, John; Lewis, Sarah J; Moran, Bernadette

    2013-12-15

    Following X-ray exposure, radiographers receive immediate feedback on detector exposure in the form of the exposure index (EI). To identify whether radiographers are meeting manufacturer-recommended EI (MREI) ranges for routine chest, abdomen and pelvis X-ray examinations under a variety of conditions and to examine factors affecting the EI. Data on 5000 adult X-ray examinations including the following variables were collected: examination parameters, EI values, patient gender, date of birth, date and time of examination, grid usage and the presence of implant or prosthesis. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize each data set and the Mann–Whitney U test was used to determine significant differences, with P < 0.05 indicating significance for all tests. Most examinations demonstrated EI values that were outside the MREI ranges, with significantly higher median EI values recorded for female patient radiographs than those for male patients for all manufacturers, indicating higher detector exposures for all units except for Philips digital radiography (DR), where increased EI values indicate lower exposure (P = 0.01). Median EI values for out of hours radiography were also significantly higher compared with normal working hours for all technologies (P ≤ 0.02). Significantly higher median EI values were demonstrated for Philips DR chest X-rays without as compared to those with the employment of a grid (P = 0.03), while significantly lower median EI values were recorded for Carestream Health computed radiography (CR) chest X-rays when an implant or prosthesis was present (P = 0.02). Non-adherence to MREIs has been demonstrated with EI value discrepancies being dependent on patient gender, time/day of exposure, grid usage and the presence of an implant or prosthesis. Retrospective evaluation of EI databases is a valuable tool to assess the need of quality improvement in routine DR.

  5. Retrospective evaluation of exposure index (EI) values from plain radiographs reveals important considerations for quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mothiram, Ursula; Brennan, Patrick C; Robinson, John; Lewis, Sarah J; Moran, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Following X-ray exposure, radiographers receive immediate feedback on detector exposure in the form of the exposure index (EI). Purpose To identify whether radiographers are meeting manufacturer-recommended EI (MREI) ranges for routine chest, abdomen and pelvis X-ray examinations under a variety of conditions and to examine factors affecting the EI. Methods Data on 5000 adult X-ray examinations including the following variables were collected: examination parameters, EI values, patient gender, date of birth, date and time of examination, grid usage and the presence of implant or prosthesis. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize each data set and the Mann–Whitney U test was used to determine significant differences, with P < 0.05 indicating significance for all tests. Results Most examinations demonstrated EI values that were outside the MREI ranges, with significantly higher median EI values recorded for female patient radiographs than those for male patients for all manufacturers, indicating higher detector exposures for all units except for Philips digital radiography (DR), where increased EI values indicate lower exposure (P = 0.01). Median EI values for out of hours radiography were also significantly higher compared with normal working hours for all technologies (P ≤ 0.02). Significantly higher median EI values were demonstrated for Philips DR chest X-rays without as compared to those with the employment of a grid (P = 0.03), while significantly lower median EI values were recorded for Carestream Health computed radiography (CR) chest X-rays when an implant or prosthesis was present (P = 0.02). Conclusions Non-adherence to MREIs has been demonstrated with EI value discrepancies being dependent on patient gender, time/day of exposure, grid usage and the presence of an implant or prosthesis. Retrospective evaluation of EI databases is a valuable tool to assess the need of quality improvement in routine DR. PMID:26229619

  6. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  7. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  8. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  9. 42 CFR 37.4 - Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations. 37.4... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.4 Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations. (a) Every plan for chest...

  10. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  11. 42 CFR 37.4 - Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations. 37.4... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.4 Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations. (a) Every plan for chest...

  12. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  13. Early radiographic changes in radiation bone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, M.; Tanimoto, K.; Wada, T.

    1986-06-01

    A chronologic series of periapical radiographs was evaluated for the purpose of detecting damage to bone and tooth-supporting tissues in a patient receiving radiation therapy for a basal cell carcinoma of the mandibular gingiva. Widening of the periodontal space was one of the early radiographic changes observed. It is suggested, from the sequence of radiographic changes, that radiation-induced changed in the circulatory system of the bone might be primarily responsible for the resulting changes.

  14. Photographic Effect Of Darkroom Exposure On Radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollen, R. H.

    1982-12-01

    Fogging of radiographic films can be characterized by a photographically equivalent radiographic exposure dose (Ex-eq). It is shown that within the limits of the experiments Ex-eq is independent of the moment of fogging i.e. before or after the radiographic imaging, and of the radiation intensity levels in the radiographic beam in case of no-screenexposure, but is dependent in case of an exposure with fluorescent screens and fogging by light. A dependent Ex-eq causes apparent sensitometric anomalies. The study warns against darkroom light fogging mainly when unloading cassettes.

  15. Observer POD for radiographic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzler, Daniel; Ewert, Uwe; Müller, Christina; Pitkänen, Jorma

    2015-03-01

    The radiographic testing (RT) is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method capable of finding volumetric and open planar defects depending on their orientation. The radiographic contrast is higher for larger penetrated length of the defect in a component. Even though, the detectability of defects does not only depend on the contrast, but also on the noise, the defect area and the geometry of the defect. The currently applied Probability of Detection (POD) approach uses a detection threshold that is only based on a constant noise level or on a constant contrast threshold. This does not reflect accurately the results of evaluations by human observers. A new approach is introduced, using the widely applied POD evaluation and additionally a detection threshold depending on the lateral area and shape of the indication. This work shows the process of calculating the POD curves with simulated data by the modeling software aRTist and with artificial reference data of different defect types, such as ASTM E 476 EPS plates, flat bottom holes and notches. Additional experiments with different operators confirm that the depth of a defect, the lateral area and shape of its indication contribute with different weight to the detectability of the defect if evaluated by human operators on monitors.

  16. Observer POD for radiographic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kanzler, Daniel E-mail: uwe.ewert@bam.de Ewert, Uwe E-mail: uwe.ewert@bam.de Müller, Christina E-mail: uwe.ewert@bam.de; Pitkänen, Jorma

    2015-03-31

    The radiographic testing (RT) is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method capable of finding volumetric and open planar defects depending on their orientation. The radiographic contrast is higher for larger penetrated length of the defect in a component. Even though, the detectability of defects does not only depend on the contrast, but also on the noise, the defect area and the geometry of the defect. The currently applied Probability of Detection (POD) approach uses a detection threshold that is only based on a constant noise level or on a constant contrast threshold. This does not reflect accurately the results of evaluations by human observers. A new approach is introduced, using the widely applied POD evaluation and additionally a detection threshold depending on the lateral area and shape of the indication. This work shows the process of calculating the POD curves with simulated data by the modeling software aRTist and with artificial reference data of different defect types, such as ASTM E 476 EPS plates, flat bottom holes and notches. Additional experiments with different operators confirm that the depth of a defect, the lateral area and shape of its indication contribute with different weight to the detectability of the defect if evaluated by human operators on monitors.

  17. Digital processing of radiographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. D.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    1973-01-01

    Some techniques are presented and the software documentation for the digital enhancement of radiographs. Both image handling and image processing operations are considered. The image handling operations dealt with are: (1) conversion of format of data from packed to unpacked and vice versa; (2) automatic extraction of image data arrays; (3) transposition and 90 deg rotations of large data arrays; (4) translation of data arrays for registration; and (5) reduction of the dimensions of data arrays by integral factors. Both the frequency and the spatial domain approaches are presented for the design and implementation of the image processing operation. It is shown that spatial domain recursive implementation of filters is much faster than nonrecursive implementations using fast fourier transforms (FFT) for the cases of interest in this work. The recursive implementation of a class of matched filters for enhancing image signal to noise ratio is described. Test patterns are used to illustrate the filtering operations. The application of the techniques to radiographic images of metallic structures is demonstrated through several examples.

  18. Signal/Noise and Sensitometry Limitations in Chest Radiography: Implications of Regional Exposure Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plewes, D. B.; Shaw, C. G.; Ivanovich, M.

    1985-09-01

    The field of medical imaging has experienced many significant advances in recent years with the evolution of a host of computer assisted imaging methods. This growth has also been evident in the areas of more conventional radiography through improved resolution and sensitivity in screen/film technologies. However, in spite of these improvements the fundamental principles of radiographic projection imaging have not significantly changed since its earliest demonstration. A case in point is the nature of the irradiation technique itself which routinely uses a field. of radiation of spatially uniform intensity. These uniform fields can result in large variations in transmitted exposure when used in radio graphy of the chest, head and neck. These wide exposure variations often exceed the useful exposure range of conventional radiographic film/screen combinations and result in large portions of the image being rendered with suboptimal contrast. In chest radiography this is particularly evident, resulting in images where the thick mediastinal, diaphragmatic and heart regions are rendered with negligible contrast when the thinner lung zones are properly. exposed.

  19. Development of patient collation system by kinetic analysis for chest dynamic radiogram with flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; Kodera, Yoshie

    2006-03-01

    In the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) environment, it is important that all images be stored in the correct location. However, if information such as the patient's name or identification number has been entered incorrectly, it is difficult to notice the error. The present study was performed to develop a system of patient collation automatically for dynamic radiogram examination by a kinetic analysis, and to evaluate the performance of the system. Dynamic chest radiographs during respiration were obtained by using a modified flat panel detector system. Our computer algorithm developed in this study was consisted of two main procedures, kinetic map imaging processing, and collation processing. Kinetic map processing is a new algorithm to visualize a movement for dynamic radiography; direction classification of optical flows and intensity-density transformation technique was performed. Collation processing consisted of analysis with an artificial neural network (ANN) and discrimination for Mahalanobis' generalized distance, those procedures were performed to evaluate a similarity of combination for the same person. Finally, we investigated the performance of our system using eight healthy volunteers' radiographs. The performance was shown as a sensitivity and specificity. The sensitivity and specificity for our system were shown 100% and 100%, respectively. This result indicated that our system has excellent performance for recognition of a patient. Our system will be useful in PACS management for dynamic chest radiography.

  20. Radiographic Comparison of Human Lung Shape During Normal Gravity and Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, D. B.; Friedman, P. J.; West, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Chest radiographs in five seated normal volunteers at 1 G and 0 G were made with a view toward comparing human lung shape during normal gravity and weightlessness. Lung shape was assessed by measuring lung heights and widths in upper, middle and lower lung regions. No significant differences were found between any of the 1-G and 0-G measurements, although there was a slight tendency for the lung to become shorter and wider at 0 G. The evidence that gravity causes regional differences in ventilation by direct action on the lung is consistent with the theoretical analysis of West and Matthews (1972).

  1. Vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR): a review of indications, normal radiographic appearance and complications.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Shawn E; Effmann, Eric L; Song, Kit; Swanson, Jonathon O; Bompadre, Viviana; Phillips, Grace S

    2015-04-01

    Vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) is increasingly used in the treatment of thoracic insufficiency, idiopathic and neuromuscular scoliosis and chest wall defects in children. In contrast to spinal fusion surgery, the VEPTR allows for growth while stabilizing the deformity. We illustrate the common indications and normal radiographic appearance of the three common configurations of VEPTR (cradle-to-cradle assembly, cradle with lumbar extension assembly, cradle-to-ala hook assembly). There is a relatively high rate of reported complications with VEPTR in the literature. We discuss the potential complications of VEPTR, including infection, rib fracture, dislodged hardware and neurological injury, with an emphasis on imaging diagnosis. PMID:25241040

  2. Evaluation of entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, L.; Lunelli, N.; Paschuk, S.; Oliveira, A.; Ferreira, J. L.; Schelin, H.; Miguel, C.; Denyak, V.; Kmiecik, C.; Tilly, J.; Khoury, H.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography. An evaluation of 301 radiographical examinations in anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) (166 examinations) and lateral (LAT) (135 examinations) projections was performed. The analyses were performed on patients grouped by age; the groups included ages 0-1 y, 1-5 y, 5-10 y, and 10-15 y. The entrance surface air kerma was determined with DoseCal software (Radiological Protection Center of Saint George's Hospital, London) and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Two different exposure techniques were compared. The doses received by patients who had undergone LAT examinations were 40% higher, on average, those in AP/PA examinations because of the difference in tube voltage. A large high-dose “tail” was observed for children up to 5 y old. An increase in tube potential and corresponding decrease in current lead to a significant dose reduction. The difference between the average dose values for different age ranges was not practically observed, implying that the exposure techniques are still not optimal. Exposure doses received using the higher tube voltage and lower current-time product correspond to the international diagnostic reference levels.

  3. Correlation of radiographic thoracic area and oxygenation impairment in bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Dassios, Theodore; Curley, Anna; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Morley, Colin; Ross-Russell, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that radiographically-assessed hyperinflation in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is related to the degree of oxygenation impairment. Our objective was to explore the relation of chest radiographic thoracic area (CRTA) with right-to-left shunt, right shift of the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve and ventilation/perfusion ratio (VA/Q) in infants with BPD. Twenty-two infants born at median (IQR) gestation of 26 (24-28) weeks with BPD were prospectively studied at 39 (30-69) days. Inspired oxygen (FiO2) was varied to obtain transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2) values between 85 and 96%. Shunt, shift and VA/Q were derived by plotting and analysing pairs of SpO2 and FiO2. CRTA was measured by free hand-tracing the perimeter of the thoracic area in anterio-posterior chest radiographs. Median (IQR) shunt was 8 (1-14)%, shift was 13 (11-19)kPa and VA/Q 0.42 (0.30-0.48). Median (IQR) CRTA/kg was 2495 (1962-2838)mm(2) and was significantly related to shift (r=0.674, p<0.001), VA/Q (r=-0.633, p<0.001), weight at study (r=-0.457, p=0.003) and day of life (r=-0.406, p=0.009), but not to shunt. CRTA in BPD is significantly related to oxygenation impairment as quantified by shift and VA/Q. CRTA can be used as a simple radiographic test to quantify BPD severity. PMID:26410458

  4. Quantitative kinetic analysis of lung nodules by temporal subtraction technique in dynamic chest radiography with a flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; Kodera, Yoshie; Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru

    2007-03-01

    Early detection and treatment of lung cancer is one of the most effective means to reduce cancer mortality; chest X-ray radiography has been widely used as a screening examination or health checkup. The new examination method and the development of computer analysis system allow obtaining respiratory kinetics by the use of flat panel detector (FPD), which is the expanded method of chest X-ray radiography. Through such changes functional evaluation of respiratory kinetics in chest has become available. Its introduction into clinical practice is expected in the future. In this study, we developed the computer analysis algorithm for the purpose of detecting lung nodules and evaluating quantitative kinetics. Breathing chest radiograph obtained by modified FPD was converted into 4 static images drawing the feature, by sequential temporal subtraction processing, morphologic enhancement processing, kinetic visualization processing, and lung region detection processing, after the breath synchronization process utilizing the diaphragmatic analysis of the vector movement. The artificial neural network used to analyze the density patterns detected the true nodules by analyzing these static images, and drew their kinetic tracks. For the algorithm performance and the evaluation of clinical effectiveness with 7 normal patients and simulated nodules, both showed sufficient detecting capability and kinetic imaging function without statistically significant difference. Our technique can quantitatively evaluate the kinetic range of nodules, and is effective in detecting a nodule on a breathing chest radiograph. Moreover, the application of this technique is expected to extend computer-aided diagnosis systems and facilitate the development of an automatic planning system for radiation therapy.

  5. The value of radiographic findings for the progression of pandemic 2009 influenza A/H1N1 virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most illnesses caused by pandemic influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 virus (A/H1N1) infection are acute and self-limiting among children. However, in some children, disease progression is rapid and may require hospitalization and transfer to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). We investigated factors associated with rapid disease progression among children admitted to hospital for A/H1N1 infection, particularly findings on initial chest radiographs. Methods In this retrospective study, we investigated the records of children who had received a laboratory or clinical diagnosis of A/H1N1 infection and were admitted to the largest children’s hospital in Japan between May 2009 and March 2010. The medical records were reviewed for age, underlying diseases, vital signs on admission, initial chest radiographic findings, and clinical outcomes. According to chest radiographic findings, patients were classified into 4 groups, as follows: [1] normal (n = 46), [2] hilar and/or peribronchial markings alone (n = 64), [3] consolidation (n = 64), and [4] other findings (n = 29). Factors associated with clinical outcomes were analyzed using logistic regression. Results Two hundreds and three patients (median 6.8 years) were enrolled in this study. Fifteen percent (31/203) of patients were admitted to PICU. Among 31 patients, 39% (12/31) of patients required mechanical ventilation (MV). When the initial chest radiographic findings were compared between patients with consolidation (n = 64) and those without consolidation (n = 139), a higher percentage of patients with consolidation were admitted to PICU (29.7% vs.8.6%, P < 0.001) and required MV (17.2% vs. 0.7%, P < 0.001). These findings remain significant when the data were analyzed with the logistic regression (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Consolidation on initial chest radiographs was the most significant factor to predict clinical course of hospitalized children with the 2009 A/H1N1 infection. PMID

  6. Use of a titanium alloy (Chest Way) in the surgical stabilization of flail chest.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tomoki; Matsuzaki, Tomohiko; Aruga, Naohiro; Imamura, Naoko; Hamanaka, Rurika; Ikoma, Yoichiro; Masuda, Ryota; Iwazaki, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    To avoid the complications of internal pneumatic stabilization for flail chest, we performed stabilization of the chest wall with a metal bar using the Nuss procedure. Here, we used a highly elastic lightweight biocompatible titanium alloy Chest Way (Solve Corporation, Kanagawa, Japan), enabling magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was a 37-year-old man who sustained injuries in a car crash. Gradually increasing subcutaneous emphysema was present. Bilateral pleural drainage and tracheal intubation were conducted on the scene, and a peripheral venous line was established. The patient was then transferred to our hospital by helicopter. A titanium alloy Chest Way was inserted to manage his flail chest accompanied by multiple rib fractures on the left side. Two days later, artificial respiration was no longer required. PMID:26096325

  7. A Review of Esophageal Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Coss-Adame, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is a term that encompasses all causes of chest pain after a cardiac source has been excluded. This article focuses on esophageal sources for chest pain. Esophageal chest pain (ECP) is common, affects quality of life, and carries a substantial health care burden. The lack of a systematic approach toward the diagnosis and treatment of ECP has led to significant disability and increased health care costs for this condition. Identifying the underlying cause(s) or mechanism(s) for chest pain is key for its successful management. Common etiologies include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and psychological conditions, including panic disorder and anxiety. However, the pathophysiology of this condition is not yet fully understood. Randomized controlled trials have shown that proton pump inhibitor therapy (either omeprazole, lansoprazole, or rabeprazole) can be effective. Evidence for the use of antidepressants and the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline is fair. Psychological treatments, notably cognitive behavioral therapy, may be useful in select patients. Surgery is not recommended. There remains a large unmet need for identifying the phenotype and prevalence of pathophysiologic mechanisms of ECP as well as for well-designed multicenter clinical trials of current and novel therapies. PMID:27134590

  8. A Review of Esophageal Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Coss-Adame, Enrique; Rao, Satish S C

    2015-11-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is a term that encompasses all causes of chest pain after a cardiac source has been excluded. This article focuses on esophageal sources for chest pain. Esophageal chest pain (ECP) is common, affects quality of life, and carries a substantial health care burden. The lack of a systematic approach toward the diagnosis and treatment of ECP has led to significant disability and increased health care costs for this condition. Identifying the underlying cause(s) or mechanism(s) for chest pain is key for its successful management. Common etiologies include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and psychological conditions, including panic disorder and anxiety. However, the pathophysiology of this condition is not yet fully understood. Randomized controlled trials have shown that proton pump inhibitor therapy (either omeprazole, lansoprazole, or rabeprazole) can be effective. Evidence for the use of antidepressants and the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline is fair. Psychological treatments, notably cognitive behavioral therapy, may be useful in select patients. Surgery is not recommended. There remains a large unmet need for identifying the phenotype and prevalence of pathophysiologic mechanisms of ECP as well as for well-designed multicenter clinical trials of current and novel therapies. PMID:27134590

  9. Changes of nodule detection after radiologists read bone opacity suppressed chest radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Freedman, Matthew T.

    2012-03-01

    A bone opacity suppressed technique using shape-index processing approach has been developed for frontal chest radiography. The image function preserves original lung image textures but equalizing the image contrast of the lungs as a part of post-processing. To determine the benefit of this computerized processing, particular on the investigation of the effect of the bone opacity removal, we conducted a reader study where radiologists read standard chest radiograph alone (unaided) followed by bone opacity suppressed image (aided). Posterioranterior (PA) standard chest radiographs in 368 subjects (122 had confirmed lung cancer) were used for this study. Fifteen Board Certified radiologists participated in the reader study. Each radiologist interpreted the standard image and then the bone suppressed image. Each reader recorded the location of the most suspicious nodule, if any, their level of suspicion and recommendation for clinical action. Detailed analyses were performed to evaluate the observers' performance by tabulating changes of nodule detection inclusive of false-negative turned to true-positive (FN->TP), true-positive turned to false-negative (TP->FN), false-positive turned to turn-negative (FP->TN), and turn-negative turned to false-positive (TN- >FP). Our results indicated that changing rates of FN->TP was 12.35%, TP->FN was 1.37%, FP->TN was 1.14%, and TN->FP was 4.82%, respectively. We also found that 81.85% of the FN->TP events occurred at nodules significantly covered by the rib (50% or more area overlapped with bone opacity). Two major situations caused TP->FN events: (1) other nodule like areas were also enhanced and (2) non-solid nodules were well preserved but less suspicious with the contract equalization.

  10. Quantitative analysis of rib movement based on dynamic chest bone images: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, R.; Sanada, S.; Oda, M.; Mitsutaka, M.; Suzuki, K.; Sakuta, K.; Kawashima, H.

    2014-03-01

    Rib movement during respiration is one of the diagnostic criteria in pulmonary impairments. In general, the rib movement is assessed in fluoroscopy. However, the shadows of lung vessels and bronchi overlapping ribs prevent accurate quantitative analysis of rib movement. Recently, an image-processing technique for separating bones from soft tissue in static chest radiographs, called "bone suppression technique", has been developed. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic bone images created by the bone suppression technique in quantitative analysis of rib movement. Dynamic chest radiographs of 10 patients were obtained using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD). Bone suppression technique based on a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) was applied to the dynamic chest images to create bone images. Velocity vectors were measured in local areas on the dynamic bone images, which formed a map. The velocity maps obtained with bone and original images for scoliosis and normal cases were compared to assess the advantages of bone images. With dynamic bone images, we were able to quantify and distinguish movements of ribs from those of other lung structures accurately. Limited rib movements of scoliosis patients appeared as reduced rib velocity vectors. Vector maps in all normal cases exhibited left-right symmetric distributions, whereas those in abnormal cases showed nonuniform distributions. In conclusion, dynamic bone images were useful for accurate quantitative analysis of rib movements: Limited rib movements were indicated as a reduction of rib movement and left-right asymmetric distribution on vector maps. Thus, dynamic bone images can be a new diagnostic tool for quantitative analysis of rib movements without additional radiation dose.

  11. 21 CFR 892.1840 - Radiographic film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiographic film. 892.1840 Section 892.1840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1840 Radiographic film. (a)...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1840 - Radiographic film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic film. 892.1840 Section 892.1840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1840 Radiographic film. (a)...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1840 - Radiographic film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiographic film. 892.1840 Section 892.1840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1840 Radiographic film. (a)...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1840 - Radiographic film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiographic film. 892.1840 Section 892.1840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1840 Radiographic film. (a)...

  15. Doping explosive materials for neutron radiographic enhancement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golliher, K. G.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of studies relating to the selection of doping materials of high neutron absorption usable for enhancing the neutron radiographic imaging of explosive mixtures, without interfering with the proper chemical reaction of the explosives. The results of the studies show that gadolinium oxide is an excellent material for doping explosive mixtures to enhance the neutron radiographic image.

  16. [Allergy to radiographic contrast media].

    PubMed

    Vionnet, Julien; Petitpierre, Stéphanie; Fumeaux, Alexandre; Meuli, Reto; Spertini, Francois; Comte, Denis

    2013-04-17

    Allergy to radiographic contrast media Hypersensitivity reactions to radio-contrast media are common in the daily practice. These products are responsible for immediate (< or = 1 hour after administration) and non immediate (> 1 hour after administration) hypersensitivity reactions. A diagnostic work-up by an allergologist with skin tests and in some cases provocation tests is of value in reducing the risk of recurrent hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media. A careful selection of the patients is required because the incidence of breakthrough reactions is still concerning, even with proper premedication. Practical recommendations are presented in this article. For gadolinium-based contrast agents, data in the literature is not sufficient for suggesting guidelines. PMID:23667970

  17. Improvement of the clinical use of computed radiography for mobile chest imaging: Image quality and patient dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rill, Lynn Neitzey

    Chest radiography is technically difficult because of the wide variation of tissue attenuations in the chest and limitations of screen-film systems. Mobile chest radiography, performed bedside on hospital inpatients, presents additional difficulties due to geometrical and equipment limitations inherent to mobile x-ray procedures and the severity of illness in patients. Computed radiography (CR) offers a new approach for mobile chest radiography by utilizing a photostimulable phosphor. Photostimulable phosphors are more efficient in absorbing lower-energy x-rays than standard intensifying screens and overcome some image quality limitations of mobile chest imaging, particularly because of the inherent latitude. This study evaluated changes in imaging parameters for CR to take advantage of differences between CR and screen-film radiography. Two chest phantoms, made of acrylic and aluminum, simulated x-ray attenuation for average-sized and large- sized adult chests. The phantoms contained regions representing the lungs, heart and subdiaphragm. Acrylic and aluminum disks (1.9 cm diameter) were positioned in the chest regions to make signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements for different combinations of imaging parameters. Disk thicknesses (contrast) were determined from disk visibility. Effective dose to the phantom was also measured for technique combinations. The results indicated that using an anti-scatter grid and lowering x- ray tube potential improved the SNR significantly; however, the dose to the phantom also increased. An evaluation was performed to examine the clinical applicability of the observed improvements in SNR. Parameter adjustments that improved phantom SNRs by more than 50% resulted in perceived image quality improvements in the lung region of clinical mobile chest radiographs. Parameters that produced smaller improvements in SNR had no apparent effect on clinical image quality. Based on this study, it is recommended that a 3:1 grid be used for

  18. A method to optimize the processing algorithm of a computed radiography system for chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2007-09-01

    A test methodology using an anthropomorphic-equivalent chest phantom is described for the optimization of the Agfa computed radiography "MUSICA" processing algorithm for chest radiography. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lung, heart and diaphragm regions of the phantom, and the "system modulation transfer function" (sMTF) in the lung region, were measured using test tools embedded in the phantom. Using these parameters the MUSICA processing algorithm was optimized with respect to low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution. Two optimum "MUSICA parameter sets" were derived respectively for maximizing the CNR and sMTF in each region of the phantom. Further work is required to find the relative importance of low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution in chest images, from which the definitive optimum MUSICA parameter set can then be derived. Prior to this further work, a compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was applied to a range of clinical images. A group of experienced image evaluators scored these images alongside images produced from the same radiographs using the MUSICA parameter set in clinical use at the time. The compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was shown to produce measurably better images. PMID:17709364

  19. Value of routine preoperative chest x-rays: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Archer, C; Levy, A R; McGregor, M

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency with which routine postoperative chest x-rays lead to clinically relevant new information. All articles in English, French and Spanish relating to routine chest radiography in North American or European populations were reviewed, using the Medline database and references listed in reviews and periodicals published from 1966 to 1992, inclusive. Twenty-one reports which supplied sufficient information were included for meta-analysis. On average, abnormalities were found in 10% of routine preoperative chest films. In only 1.3% of films were the abnormalities unexpected, i.e., were not already known or would not otherwise have been detected (95% CI: 0 to 2.8%). These findings were of sufficient importance to cause modification of management in only 0.1% (95% CI: 0 to 0.6%). The frequency with which the new information influenced health could not be estimated. Assuming only the direct cost to the health care system of each radiograph ($23), each finding which influenced management in any way would cost $23,000. It is concluded that in North American or European populations when a reliable history and a clinical examination are carried out, the cost of this test is so high relation to the clinical information provided that it is no longer justifiable. PMID:8269561

  20. Deep learning with non-medical training used for chest pathology identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar, Yaniv; Diamant, Idit; Wolf, Lior; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we examine the strength of deep learning approaches for pathology detection in chest radiograph data. Convolutional neural networks (CNN) deep architecture classification approaches have gained popularity due to their ability to learn mid and high level image representations. We explore the ability of a CNN to identify different types of pathologies in chest x-ray images. Moreover, since very large training sets are generally not available in the medical domain, we explore the feasibility of using a deep learning approach based on non-medical learning. We tested our algorithm on a dataset of 93 images. We use a CNN that was trained with ImageNet, a well-known large scale nonmedical image database. The best performance was achieved using a combination of features extracted from the CNN and a set of low-level features. We obtained an area under curve (AUC) of 0.93 for Right Pleural Effusion detection, 0.89 for Enlarged heart detection and 0.79 for classification between healthy and abnormal chest x-ray, where all pathologies are combined into one large class. This is a first-of-its-kind experiment that shows that deep learning with large scale non-medical image databases may be sufficient for general medical image recognition tasks.

  1. Eye-tracking AFROC study of the influence of experience and training on chest x-ray interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, David; Ethell, Susan C.; Crawford, Trevor

    2003-05-01

    Four observer groups with different levels of expertise were tested in an investigation into the comparative nature of expert performance. The radiological task was the detection and localization of significant pulmonary nodules in postero-anterior vies of the chest in adults. Three test banks of 40 images were used. The observer groups were 6 experienced radiographers prior to a six month training program in chest image interpretation, the same radiographers after their tr4aining program, and 6 fresher undergraduate radiography students. Eye tracking was carried out on all observers to demonstrate differences in visual activity and nodule detection performance was measured with an AFROC technique. Detection performances of the four groups showed the radiologists and radiographers after training were measurably superior at the task. The eye-tracking parameters saccadic length, number of fixations visual coverage and scrutiny timer per film were measured for all subjects and compared. The missed nodules fixated and not fixated were also determined for the radiologist group. Results have shown distinct stylistic differences in the visual scanning strategies between the experienced and inexperienced observers that we believe can be generalized into a description of characteristics of expert versus non-expert performance. The findings will be used in the educational program of image interpretation for non-radiology practitioners.

  2. Treatment of Morbidity with Atypical Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cott, Arthur

    1987-01-01

    The appropriate management of atypical chest pain requires an integration of medical and behavioural treatments. Unnecessary medicalization can increase morbidity. A sensitivity to the behavioural factors contributing to symptoms and disability may reduce both. The purpose of this paper is to provide physicians with a cognitive-behavioural perspective of the nature of morbidity and disability associated with chronic chest discomfort; some strategies for detecting heretofore unsuspected disability associated with chronic chest pain and related discomfort in patients with organic findings (both cardiac and non-cardiac), as well those with no identifiable disease process or organic cause; and some simple behavioural and cognitive-behavioural therapeutic techniques for treating and preventing such problems. PMID:21263912

  3. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest

    PubMed Central

    Winge, Rikke; Berg, Jais O.; Albret, Rikke; Krag, Christen

    2012-01-01

    A large aterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore-Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure® (VAC®) resulted in immediate chest wall stability and a decrease in the patient's need for respiratory support. Shortly thereafter, the VAC® was discontinued and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU). This case report is the first to describe the successful use of VAC® as an adjuvant to a one-stage procedure for large thoracic wall reconstruction, allowing sufficient temporary external fixation to eliminate paradoxical respiration and plausibly shorten the stay in the ICU. No adverse effects on flap healing or haemodynamics were recorded. It is likely that external VAC® can improve thoracic stability and pulmonary function in a patient with flail chest and decrease the need for mechanical ventilation. PMID:24765464

  4. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest.

    PubMed

    Winge, Rikke; Berg, Jais O; Albret, Rikke; Krag, Christen

    2012-05-29

    A large aterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore-Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure® (VAC®) resulted in immediate chest wall stability and a decrease in the patient's need for respiratory support. Shortly thereafter, the VAC® was discontinued and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU). This case report is the first to describe the successful use of VAC® as an adjuvant to a one-stage procedure for large thoracic wall reconstruction, allowing sufficient temporary external fixation to eliminate paradoxical respiration and plausibly shorten the stay in the ICU. No adverse effects on flap healing or haemodynamics were recorded. It is likely that external VAC® can improve thoracic stability and pulmonary function in a patient with flail chest and decrease the need for mechanical ventilation. PMID:24765464

  5. Noninvasive ventilation in large postoperative flail chest.

    PubMed

    Piastra, Marco; De Luca, Daniele; Zorzi, Giulia; Ruggiero, Antonio; Antonelli, Massimo; Conti, Giorgio; Pietrini, Domenico

    2008-12-01

    An 11-year-old male developed a severe respiratory failure due to a iatrogenic flail chest following a surgery for removing a large chest wall area. A rare Ewing sarcoma was histologically diagnosed and intensive chemotherapy was administered. Postoperatively, because of the failure in ventilation weaning, the patient was electively extubated and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation through face-mask was provided. Respiratory support avoided asynchronous paradoxical movements and achieved pneumatic stabilization. Clinical and respiratory improvement allowed a successful weaning from ventilator. PMID:18798557

  6. Homicidal tandem bullet wound of the chest.

    PubMed

    Bentley, A J; Busuttil, A; Clifton, B; Sibbald, P

    1997-03-01

    An unusual case of a homicidal gunshot wound to the chest is reported in which two bullets were fired in unison as tandem bullets from a handgun. At autopsy, two intact bullets were retrieved from the body of the victim, yet there was only one entrance wound and a single bullet track across the chest wall and thoracic organs. An examination of the weapon and ammunition supported the likelihood of tandem bullets and suggested the probable mechanism for this event. Very few similar cases have been documented. PMID:9095302

  7. Misdiagnosed Chest Pain: Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Inci, Sinan; Gundogdu, Fuat; Gungor, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Eroglu, Atila

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain is one of themost common complaints expressed by patients presenting to the emergency department, and any initial evaluation should always consider life-threatening causes. Esophageal rupture is a serious condition with a highmortality rate. If diagnosed, successful therapy depends on the size of the rupture and the time elapsed between rupture and diagnosis.We report on a 41-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department complaining of left-sided chest pain for two hours. PMID:27122690

  8. [Coronary artery dissection following blunt chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Seven, Ekim; Henningsen, Kristoffer; Abildgaard, Ulrik

    2015-03-16

    A previously healthy 38-year-old man was admitted to hospital with chest pain. The day before the patient had been to a karate session and had received multiple punches and kicks to the chest region. An ECG showed Q-waves in V1 and V2 and flattening of the T-waves in V1-V6. Levels of cardiac enzyme markers were elevated. The patient subsequently underwent coronary angiography with supplemental optical coherence tomography that revealed a bifurcate dissection involving the proximal parts of left ramus interventricularis anterior and circumflex coronary artery. Two drug-eluting stents were implanted with good angiographic result. PMID:25786846

  9. Chest wall reconstruction after resection using hernia repair piece

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yimin; Zhang, Guofei; Zhu, Zhouyu

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of chest wall tumor is very important link of chest wall tumor resection. Many implants have been reported to be used to reconstruct the chest wall, such as steelwire, titanium mesh and polypropylene mesh. It is really hard for clinicians to decide which implant is the best one to replace the chest wall. We herein report a 68-year-old man who had underwent a chest wall reconstruction with a hernia repair piece and a Dacron hernia repair piece. The patient has maintained an excellent cosmetic and functional outcome since surgery, which proves that the hernia piece still has its place in reconstruction of chest wall. PMID:27293859

  10. Performing chest x-rays at inspiration in uncooperative children: the effect of exercises with a training program for radiology technicians.

    PubMed

    Langen, Heinz-Jakob; Kohlhauser-Vollmuth, Christiane; Sengenberger, Corinna; Bielmeier, Johann; Jocher, Renate; Eschmann, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Objective. It is difficult to acquire a chest X-ray of a crying infant at maximum inspiration. A computer program was developed for technician training. Method. Video clips of 3 babies were used and the moment of deepest inspiration was determined in the single-frame view. 12 technicians simulated chest radiographs at normal video speed by pushing a button. The computer program stopped the video and calculated the period of time to the optimal instant for a chest X-ray. Demonstration software can be tested at website online. Every technician simulated 10 chest X-rays for each of the 3 video clips. The technicians then spent 40 minutes practicing performing chest X-rays at optimal inspiration. The test was repeated after 5, 20, and 40 minutes of practice. Results. 6 participants showed a significant improvement after exercises (collective 1). Deviation from the optimal instant for taking an X-ray at inspiration decreased from 0.39 to 0.22 s after 40 min of practice. 6 technicians showed no significant improvement (collective 2). Deviation decreased from a low starting value of 0.25 s to 0.21 s. Conclusion. The tested computer program improves the ability of radiology technicians to take a chest X-ray at optimal inspiration in a crying child. PMID:25120930

  11. Radiographic Evaluation of Valvular Heart Disease With Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Correlation.

    PubMed

    Lempel, Jason K; Bolen, Michael A; Renapurkar, Rahul D; Azok, Joseph T; White, Charles S

    2016-09-01

    Valvular heart disease is a group of complex entities with varying etiologies and clinical presentations. There are a number of imaging tools available to supplement clinical evaluation of suspected valvular heart disease, with echocardiography being the most common and clinically established, and more recent emergence of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as additional supportive techniques. Yet even with these newer and more sophisticated modalities, chest radiography remains one of the earliest and most common diagnostic examinations performed during the triage of patients with suspected cardiac dysfunction. Recognizing the anatomic and pathologic features of cardiac radiography including the heart's adaptation to varying hemodynamic changes can provide clues to the radiologist regarding the underlying etiology. In this article, we will elucidate several principles relating to chamber modifications in response to pressure and volume overload as well as radiographic appearances associated with pulmonary fluid status and cardiac dysfunction. We will also present a pattern approach to optimize analysis of the chest radiograph for valvular heart disease, which will help guide the radiologist down a differential diagnostic pathway and create a more meaningful clinical report. PMID:27548877

  12. Radiographic parenchymal opacity, matching perfusion defect, and normal ventilation: a sign of pulmonary embolism. Work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, E.B.; Sostman, H.D.; Gottschalk, A.

    1987-05-01

    By conventional criteria, perfusion defects that correspond to radiographic parenchymal opacities of similar size have less diagnostic significance for pulmonary embolism (PE) than perfusion defects in areas that are radiographically clear, regardless of the findings on ventilation scan. It was proposed that the demonstration of normal ventilation in areas with matched radiographic opacity and perfusion defects does support the diagnosis of PE. To test this hypothesis, a retrospective review was done of selected cases from a consecutive series of 85 pulmonary angiography studies. Cases were reviewed if the following criteria were met: chest radiography, ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy, and angiography of the relevant regions had all been performed within 24 hours of one another, and there was a radiographic opacity corresponding to the perfusion defect. Sixteen cases fulfilled these criteria. Six patients had normal ventilation in the regions of the radiographic infiltrate and perfusion defect, and all had PE. No patient had an area of opacity and perfusion defect and normal ventilation without PE.

  13. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  14. Coccidioidomycosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows the affects of a fungal infection, coccidioidomycosis. In the middle of the left lung (seen on the ... defined borders. Other diseases that may explain these x-ray findings include lung abscesses, chronic pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic ...

  15. Effect of gravity on chest wall mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bettinelli, D; Kays, C; Bailliart, O; Capderou, A; Techoueyres, P; Lachaud, J L; Vaïda, P; Miserocchi, G

    2002-02-01

    Chest wall mechanics was studied in four subjects on changing gravity in the craniocaudal direction (G(z)) during parabolic flights. The thorax appears very compliant at 0 G(z): its recoil changes only from -2 to 2 cmH(2)O in the volume range of 30-70% vital capacity (VC). Increasing G(z) from 0 to 1 and 1.8 G(z) progressively shifted the volume-pressure curve of the chest wall to the left and also caused a fivefold exponential decrease in compliance. For lung volume <30% VC, gravity has an inspiratory effect, but this effect is much larger going from 0 to 1 G(z) than from 1 to 1.8 G(z). For a volume from 30 to 70% VC, the effect is inspiratory going from 0 to 1 G(z) but expiratory from 1 to 1.8 G(z). For a volume greater than approximately 70% VC, gravity always has an expiratory effect. The data suggest that the chest wall does not behave as a linear system when exposed to changing gravity, as the effect depends on both chest wall volume and magnitude of G(z). PMID:11796685

  16. Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Tonziello, Gilda; Valentinotti, Romina; Arbore, Enrico; Cassetti, Paolo; Luzzati, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall Symptoms: — Medication: Ciprofloxacin Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Non-typhoid Salmonella extra-intestinal infections usually develop in infants and in adult patients with pre-existing predisposing conditions. Blood stream infections and urinary tract infections are the most common clinical presentations, but other sites of infection may be involved as well. Case Report: We describe a case of invasive salmonellosis caused by Salmonella typhimurium involving the chest wall in a 73-year-old man. The patient had suffered from gastroenteritis followed by left basal pneumonia with pleural effusion 7 weeks before. The CT scan of the chest wall showed a pericostal abscess with shirt-stud morphology near the left last cartilaginous arch. The abscess was surgically drained and patient was cured after a 40-day ciprofloxacin treatment. Conclusions: A review of the literature on extra-intestinal non-typhoid salmonellosis shows that pleuropulmonary and soft-tissue infections are uncommon. We argue that non-typhoid Salmonella might be considered as a possible cause of chest wall abscess in individuals with recent history of gastroenteritis complicated by pneumonia and pleural effusion. PMID:24298305

  17. Uncommon Flaps for Chest Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Matros, Evan; Disa, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    The omentum, external oblique musculocutaneous, and thoracoepigastric flaps are uncommonly used for chest wall reconstruction. Nevertheless, awareness and knowledge of these flaps is essential for reconstructive surgeons because they fill specific niche indications or serve as lifeboats when workhorse flaps are unavailable. The current report describes the anatomic basis, technical aspects of flap elevation, and indications for these unusual flaps. PMID:22294943

  18. [Functional Outcome after Chest Wall Stabilisation].

    PubMed

    Kyriss, T; Lenz, U; Friedel, G

    2016-09-01

    This overview reviews the current literature to compare the functional results after surgical and conservative treatment of patients with flail chest and multiple rib fractures. Regarding functional aspects, patients in the early phase after a thoracic trauma are those that benefit most from the stabilisation of the chest wall by internal fixation of the ribs. Patients recover faster from restrictive respiratory disorders, have less pain and return to the workplace earlier after an operation compared with those that receive conservative treatment. In the medium term, however, patients that are treated conservatively also achieve normal pulmonary function values and become free of pain. The period of convalescence after blunt thoracic trauma is generally underestimated. Future studies of the functional outcome after severe chest injuries should take this into account and the development of functional parameters should be monitored for at least 24 months. A prospective data collection of early and long-term surgical results in registries would be suitable to evaluate benefits and indications of chest wall stabilisation. PMID:27607891

  19. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage § 56.6133...

  20. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage § 56.6133...

  1. Computerized scheme for detection of diffuse lung diseases on CR chest images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Roberto R., Jr.; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Feng; Li, Qiang; Doi, Kunio

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a new computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for detection of diffuse lung disease in computed radiographic (CR) chest images. One hundred ninety-four chest images (56 normals and 138 abnormals with diffuse lung diseases) were used. The 138 abnormal cases were classified into three levels of severity (34 mild, 60 moderate, and 44 severe) by an experienced chest radiologist with use of five different patterns, i.e., reticular, reticulonodular, nodular, air-space opacity, and emphysema. In our computerized scheme, the first moment of the power spectrum, the root-mean-square variation, and the average pixel value were determined for each region of interest (ROI), which was selected automatically in the lung fields. The average pixel value and its dependence on the location of the ROI were employed for identifying abnormal patterns due to air-space opacity or emphysema. A rule-based method was used for determining three levels of abnormality for each ROI (0: normal, 1: mild, 2: moderate, and 3: severe). The distinction between normal lungs and abnormal lungs with diffuse lung disease was determined based on the fractional number of abnormal ROIs by taking into account the severity of abnormalities. Preliminary results indicated that the area under the ROC curve was 0.889 for the 44 severe cases, 0.825 for the 104 severe and moderate cases, and 0.794 for all cases. We have identified a number of problems and reasons causing false positives on normal cases, and also false negatives on abnormal cases. In addition, we have discussed potential approaches for improvement of our CAD scheme. In conclusion, the CAD scheme for detection of diffuse lung diseases based on texture features extracted from CR chest images has the potential to assist radiologists in their interpretation of diffuse lung diseases.

  2. A computer-aided diagnosis approach for emphysema recognition in chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Coppini, Giuseppe; Miniati, Massimo; Monti, Simonetta; Paterni, Marco; Favilla, Riccardo; Ferdeghini, Ezio Maria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is twofold: (i) to develop a CAD system for the assessment of emphysema by digital chest radiography and (ii) to test it against CT imaging. The system is based on the analysis of the shape of lung silhouette as imaged in standard chest examination. Postero-anterior and lateral views are processed to extract the contours of the lung fields automatically. Subsequently, the shape of lung silhouettes is described by polyline approximation and the computed feature-set processed by a neural network to estimate the probability of emphysema. Images of radiographic studies from 225 patients were collected and properly annotated to build an experimental dataset named EMPH. Each patient had undergone a standard two-views chest radiography and CT for diagnostic purposes. In addition, the images (247) from JSRT dataset were used to evaluate lung segmentation in postero-anterior view. System performances were assessed by: (i) analyzing the quality of the automatic segmentation of the lung silhouette against manual tracing and (ii) measuring the capabilities of emphysema recognition. As to step i, on JSRT dataset, we obtained overlap percentage (Ω) 92.7±3.3%, Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) 95.5±3.7% and average contour distance (ACD) 1.73±0.87 mm. On EMPH dataset we had Ω=93.1±2.9%, DSC=96.1±3.5% and ACD=1.62±0.92 mm, for the postero-anterior view, while we had Ω=94.5±4.6%, DSC=91.0±6.3% and ACD=2.22±0.86 mm, for the lateral view. As to step ii, accuracy of emphysema recognition was 95.4%, with sensitivity and specificity 94.5% and 96.1% respectively. According to experimental results our system allows reliable and inexpensive recognition of emphysema on digital chest radiography. PMID:22522287

  3. [The dental radiograph: pitfalls and surprises].

    PubMed

    Bakx, S; Syriopoulos, K

    2015-05-01

    Guidelines allow retakes of dental radiographs of up to 10%. In the general practice the percentage of retakes is considerably higher. In intraoral radiography film positioning and faults in directing the collimator are the most common reasons for retakes. The use of film holders and correctly aiming the collimator decrease the risk of failure. In panoramic radiography the positioning of the patient in the x-ray machine and the palatoglossal air space are the main causes of failure of radiographs. A systematic approach, a thorough check of the radiation area for artefacts and the use of the available laser lines decrease the risk of a diagnostically unacceptable radiograph. PMID:26210220

  4. End-to-End Radiographic Systems Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, A.; Kwan, T.; Buescher, K.; Snell, C.; Adams, K.

    1999-07-23

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop a validated end-to-end radiographic model that could be applied to both x-rays and protons. The specific objectives were to link hydrodynamic, transport, and magneto-hydrodynamic simulation software for purposes of modeling radiographic systems. In addition, optimization and analysis algorithms were to be developed to validate physical models and optimize the design of radiographic facilities.

  5. Radiographic findings in congenital lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, M.; Boxt, L.M.

    1980-07-01

    Because lead crosses the placenta throughout pregnancy, the fetus is at risk for lead poisoning. A full term, asymptomatic child was born with congenital lead poisoning secondary to maternal pica. Radiographic findings of a dense cranial vault, lead lines, and delayed skeletal and deciduous dental development were noted at birth. After chelation therapy, when the patient was seven months old, radiographs revealed normal skeletal maturation. Tooth eruption did not occur until 15 months of age. Newborn infants with these radiographic findings should be screened for subclinical, congenital lead poisoning.

  6. Mastitis, a Radiographic, Clinical, and Histopathologic Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Reddy, Vijaya; Solmos, Gene; Watkins, Latanja; Cimbaluk, David; Bitterman, Pincas; Ghai, Ritu; Gattuso, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Mastitis is a benign inflammatory process of the breast with heterogeneous histopathological findings, which clinically and radiographically may mimic a mammary carcinoma. We undertook a retrospective study on 37 cases of mastitis in our institution to correlate the radiographic imaging features and the clinical presentation with the histopathological findings. Histologically, there were 21 granulomatous, 7 fibrous, 3 plasma cell, 3 lupus, 2 lymphocytic, and 1 case of acute mastitis. Radiographically, 16/25 (64%) patients with ultrasound studies showed irregular hypoechoic masses suspicious for malignancy. Clinically, 38% of patients had an associated systemic disease. PMID:25940456

  7. Results Of A Six-State Pilot Study To Collect Exposure, Technique And Processing Data In Chest Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. F.; Conway, B. J.; Suleiman, O. H.; Koustenis, G. H.; Showalter, C. K.

    1984-08-01

    The routine measurement of exposures for a reference dimension patient in diagnostic radiology is regarded as an important part of an effective quality assurance program. The most frequent radiologic examination conducted in the United States is chest radiography. If manual techniques are used to conduct the exam, the procedure for measuring exposure to the reference patient is straight-forward. However, if automatic exposure controlled (AEC) techniques are used, a patient-equivalent chest phantom must be employed to reproducibly attenuate the x-ray beam. This is of particular importance if exposures are to be compared among AEC systems with different entrance x-ray spectra. Exposure monitoring is just part of the quality assurance story. Radiographic techniques, filtration, scatter reduction, film/screen use, and film processing performance (among other factors) must also be assessed, in order to effectively evaluate and modify these exposures so that they provide appropriate image quality. The first four factors are relatively easy to determine through measurement or documentation. Poor processor performance, potentially a major cause of abnormally high patient exposure, is more difficult to assess. We have designed, constructed and tested a Lucite/aluminum patient-equivalent attenuation chest phantom (LucAl) to use in the estimation of standard posteroanterior (22-23 cm) patient exposures for both manual and AEC chest systems. A sensitometric procedure that can be used to assess relative processor performance has also been developed. This paper describes these two procedures and their use in a six-State pilot study to monitor and evaluate exposure, technique and processor data in chest radiography. Results from approximately 200 chest systems will be summarized.

  8. Algorithm of chest wall keloid treatment.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiao; Zhang, Mingzi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ru; Wang, Youbin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-08-01

    Keloids are common in the Asian population. Multiple or huge keloids can appear on the chest wall because of its tendency to develop acne, sebaceous cyst, etc. It is difficult to find an ideal treatment for keloids in this area due to the limit of local soft tissues and higher recurrence rate. This study aims at establishing an individualized protocol that could be easily applied according to the size and number of chest wall keloids.A total of 445 patients received various methods (4 protocols) of treatment in our department from September 2006 to September 2012 according to the size and number of their chest wall keloids. All of the patients received adjuvant radiotherapy in our hospital. Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to assess the treatment effect by both doctors and patients. With mean follow-up time of 13 months (range: 6-18 months), 362 patients participated in the assessment of POSAS with doctors.Both the doctors and the patients themselves used POSAS to evaluate the treatment effect. The recurrence rate was 0.83%. There was an obvious significant difference (P < 0.001) between the before-surgery score and the after-surgery score from both doctors and patients, indicating that both doctors and patients were satisfied with the treatment effect.Our preliminary clinical result indicates that good clinical results could be achieved by choosing the proper method in this algorithm for Chinese patients with chest wall keloids. This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment. PMID:27583896

  9. Algorithm of chest wall keloid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiao; Zhang, Mingzi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ru; Wang, Youbin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Keloids are common in the Asian population. Multiple or huge keloids can appear on the chest wall because of its tendency to develop acne, sebaceous cyst, etc. It is difficult to find an ideal treatment for keloids in this area due to the limit of local soft tissues and higher recurrence rate. This study aims at establishing an individualized protocol that could be easily applied according to the size and number of chest wall keloids. A total of 445 patients received various methods (4 protocols) of treatment in our department from September 2006 to September 2012 according to the size and number of their chest wall keloids. All of the patients received adjuvant radiotherapy in our hospital. Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to assess the treatment effect by both doctors and patients. With mean follow-up time of 13 months (range: 6–18 months), 362 patients participated in the assessment of POSAS with doctors. Both the doctors and the patients themselves used POSAS to evaluate the treatment effect. The recurrence rate was 0.83%. There was an obvious significant difference (P < 0.001) between the before-surgery score and the after-surgery score from both doctors and patients, indicating that both doctors and patients were satisfied with the treatment effect. Our preliminary clinical result indicates that good clinical results could be achieved by choosing the proper method in this algorithm for Chinese patients with chest wall keloids. This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment. PMID:27583896

  10. [Chest Wall Reconstruction Using Titanium Plates Sandwiched Between Sheets after Resection of Chest Wall Chondrosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Endoh, Makoto; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hirohisa; Suzuki, Jun; Watarai, Hikaru; Hamada, Akira; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Takahashi, Ai; Nakahashi, Kenta; Sugawara, Masato; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2016-07-01

    Extensive chest wall resection carries the risk of difficult reconstruction and surgical complications. We report our experience on chest wall reconstruction using titanium plates for a wide thoracic defect after tumor resection. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with chondrosarcoma of the 6th rib on the right. He needed extensive chest wall resection because of skip lesions on 4th rib noted on operative inspection, leaving a defect measuring 33 × 20 cm. Reconstruction using 5 transverse titanium plates sandwiched between an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene patch and a polypropylene mesh sheet stabilized the chest wall. This reconstruction allowed successful separation from ventilatory support after operation. The postoperative course was uneventful, and he was discharged on postoperative day 20. The advantages of this form of reconstruction over conventional prostheses are rigidity, and stability and usability. PMID:27365062

  11. Psoriasis, guttate on the arms and chest (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... guttate (drop-shaped) psoriasis on the arms and chest. Guttate psoriasis is a rare form of psoriasis. ... streptococcal infection, appears rapidly and affects the face, chest, and nearest limbs. The patches are small and ...

  12. Coughing Wheezing Shortness of Breath Tightness in Chest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Coughing Wheezing Shortness of Breath Tightness in Chest Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... short of breath or feel tightness in your chest, you might have asthma. If you do, you ...

  13. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of...

  14. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of...

  15. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of...

  16. Noncardiac chest pain: epidemiology, natural course and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fass, Ronnie; Achem, Sami R

    2011-04-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is defined as recurrent chest pain that is indistinguishable from ischemic heart pain after a reasonable workup has excluded a cardiac cause. Noncardiac chest pain is a prevalent disorder resulting in high healthcare utilization and significant work absenteeism. However, despite its chronic nature, noncardiac chest pain has no impact on patients' mortality. The main underlying mechanisms include gastroesophageal reflux, esophageal dysmotility and esophageal hypersensitivity. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is likely the most common cause of noncardiac chest pain. Esophageal dysmotility affects only the minority of noncardiac chest pain patients. Esophageal hypersensitivity may be present in non-GERD-related noncardiac chest pain patients regardless if esophageal dysmotility is present or absent. Psychological co-morbidities such as panic disorder, anxiety, and depression are also common in noncardiac chest pain patients and often modulate patients' perception of disease severity. PMID:21602987

  17. Coughing Wheezing Shortness of Breath Tightness in Chest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Coughing Wheezing Shortness of Breath Tightness in Chest Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table ... you cough a lot, wheeze, are short of breath or feel tightness in your chest, you might ...

  18. Tube thoracostomy; chest tube implantation and follow up

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Porpodis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an urgent medical situation that requires urgent treatment. We can divide this entity based on the etiology to primary and secondary. Chest tube implantation can be performed either in the upper chest wall or lower. Both thoracic surgeons and pulmonary physicians can place a chest tube with minimal invasive techniques. In our current work, we will demonstrate chest tube implantation to locations, methodology and tools. PMID:25337405

  19. Development of a simulator for radiographic image optimization.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Mark; Xu, X George; Yazici, Birsen

    2005-06-01

    A software package, incorporating two computational patient phantoms, has been developed for optimizing X-ray radiographic imaging. A tomographic phantom, visible photographic Man tomographic phantom (VIP-Man), constructed from Visible Human anatomical color images is used to simulate the scattered portion of an X-ray system using the Electron Gamma Shower National Research Council (EGSnrc) Monte Carlo code. The primary portion of an X-ray image is simulated using the projection ray-tracing method through the Visible Human CT data set. To produce a realistic image, the software simulates quantum noise, blurring effects, lesions, detector absorption efficiency, and other imaging artifacts. The primary and scattered portions of an X-ray chest image are combined to form a final image for future observer studies and image quality analysis. Absorbed doses in organs and tissues of the segmented VIP-Man phantom were also obtained from the Monte Carlo simulations. This paper presents methods of the simulator and preliminary results. PMID:15899304

  20. Bacterial adherence and contamination during radiographic processing.

    PubMed

    Bachman, C E; White, J M; Goodis, H E; Rosenquist, J W

    1990-11-01

    Oral fluids are potential contaminants of radiographic processors. This investigation measured bacterial contamination in a radiographic processing room during times of high and low clinical activity and processing effects on five types of microorganisms. Cultures in the clinical setting, during high and low activity, were taken by brain-heart infusion agar plates placed near automatic processors. Site samples were taken of entrance, developer, fixer, water, and exit surfaces. Measurements of processing effects were accomplished by intentional contamination of films run in series through an automatic processor. Site samples were again taken of the processor. In the clinical setting colony-forming units increased with activity. Radiographic processing after intentional contamination decreased colony-forming units on films, but they increased for all processing solutions. Bacteria on radiographic film survived processing. Although processing procedures significantly reduce the number of bacteria on films, the potential for contamination and cross-contamination remains. PMID:2122350

  1. Radiographic Kinetics of Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Syed, Ali; Raval, Amar; Pridjian, Andrew; Birbe, Ruth; Trabulsi, Edouard J

    2016-07-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is a common entity often managed surgically with excellent survival benefits. We report a rare case of sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma with aggressive growth kinetics after palliative resection captured radiographically. PMID:27041470

  2. Solid state radiographic image amplifiers, part C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szepesi, Z.

    1971-01-01

    The contrast sensitivity of the radiographic amplifiers, both the storage type and nonstorage type, their absolute sensitivity, and the reproducibility of fabrication were investigated. The required 2-2T quality level was reached with the radiographic storage screen. The sensitivity threshold was 100 to 200 mR with 45 to 100 kV filtered X-rays. The quality level of the radiographic amplifier screen (without storage) was 4-4T; for a 6 mm (0.25 in.) thick aluminum specimen, a 1 mm (0.040 in.) diameter hole in a 0.25 mm (0.010 in.) thick penetrameter was detected. Its sensitivity threshold was 2 to 6 mR/min. The developed radiographic screens are applicable for uses in nondestructive testing.

  3. Film adhesive enhances neutron radiographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    Resolution of neutron radiographic images of thermally conductive film is increased by replacing approximately 5 percent of aluminum powder, which provides thermal conductivity, with gadolinium oxide. Oxide is also chemically stable.

  4. Investigating the use of an antiscatter grid in chest radiography for average adults with a computed radiography imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Wood, T J; Avery, G; Balcam, S; Needler, L; Smith, A; Saunderson, J R; Beavis, A W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate via simulation a proposed change to clinical practice for chest radiography. The validity of using a scatter rejection grid across the diagnostic energy range (60–125 kVp), in conjunction with appropriate tube current–time product (mAs) for imaging with a computed radiography (CR) system was investigated. Methods: A digitally reconstructed radiograph algorithm was used, which was capable of simulating CR chest radiographs with various tube voltages, receptor doses and scatter rejection methods. Four experienced image evaluators graded images with a grid (n = 80) at tube voltages across the diagnostic energy range and varying detector air kermas. These were scored against corresponding images reconstructed without a grid, as per current clinical protocol. Results: For all patients, diagnostic image quality improved with the use of a grid, without the need to increase tube mAs (and therefore patient dose), irrespective of the tube voltage used. Increasing tube mAs by an amount determined by the Bucky factor made little difference to image quality. Conclusion: A virtual clinical trial has been performed with simulated chest CR images. Results indicate that the use of a grid improves diagnostic image quality for average adults, without the need to increase tube mAs, even at low tube voltages. Advances in knowledge: Validated with images containing realistic anatomical noise, it is possible to improve image quality by utilizing grids for chest radiography with CR systems without increasing patient exposure. Increasing tube mAs by an amount determined by the Bucky factor is not justified. PMID:25571914

  5. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  6. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  7. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  8. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  9. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  10. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  11. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  12. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  13. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  14. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  15. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  16. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  17. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  18. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  19. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest roentgenograms required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chest roentgenograms required for miners. 37.3... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.3 Chest roentgenograms required for miners. (a) Voluntary examinations. Every operator...

  20. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest roentgenograms required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chest roentgenograms required for miners. 37.3... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.3 Chest roentgenograms required for miners. (a) Voluntary examinations. Every operator...

  1. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  2. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  3. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  4. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  5. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest roentgenograms required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chest roentgenograms required for miners. 37.3... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.3 Chest roentgenograms required for miners. (a) Voluntary examinations. Every operator...

  6. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  7. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  8. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  9. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  10. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  11. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  12. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  13. Radiation recommendation series: administratively required dental radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Administrative requirements for radiographs are found in many segments of the United States health care system. This document presents an FDA radiation recommendation on administratively required dental x-ray examinations. In general, such examinations are not requested to further the patient's dental health, but rather as a means of monitoring claims. However, the administrative use of radiographs that have been taken in the normal course of patient care is usually appropriate, as long as the patient's right to privacy is respected.

  14. Verifying X-Radiographs With Computed Tomographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Jagatjit; Pascua, Antonio G.

    1991-01-01

    Nondestructive technique gives added confidence in inspection. Ambiguous indications in radiographic inspections of metal castings checked by computed tomography. Fast and inexpensive conventional x-ray inspection used to make film image of overall casting, and slower, more costly computed tomography used to reinspect relatively few parts of casting presenting possible diffraction patterns or other difficult-to-interpret features. Method effective in resolving ambiguities in radiographs of turbine blades. Provides same information as metallurgical sectioning.

  15. Radiographic abnormalities and exposure to asbestos-contaminated vermiculite in the community of Libby, Montana, USA.

    PubMed Central

    Peipins, Lucy A; Lewin, Michael; Campolucci, Sharon; Lybarger, Jeffrey A; Miller, Aubrey; Middleton, Dan; Weis, Christopher; Spence, Michael; Black, Brad; Kapil, Vikas

    2003-01-01

    Mining, handling, processing, and personal or commercial use of asbestos-contaminated vermiculite have led to widespread contamination of the Libby, Montana, area. We initiated a medical testing program in response to reports of respiratory illness in the community. The purpose of this analysis was to identify and quantify asbestos-related radiographic abnormalities among persons exposed to vermiculite in Libby and to examine associations between these outcomes and participants' self-reported exposures. A cross-sectional interview and medical testing were conducted in Libby from July through November 2000 and from July through September 2001. A total of 7,307 persons who had lived, worked, or played in Libby for at least 6 months before 31 December 1990 completed the interview. Of those, 6,668 participants > or = 18 years of age received chest radiographs to assess the prevalence of pleural and interstitial abnormalities. We observed pleural abnormalities in 17.8% of participants and interstitial abnormalities in < 1% of participants undergoing chest radiography. We examined 29 occupational, recreational, household, and other exposure pathways in the analysis. The prevalence of pleural abnormalities increased with increasing number of exposure pathways, ranging from 6.7% for those who reported no apparent exposures to 34.6% for those who reported > or = 12 pathways. The factors most strongly associated with pleural abnormalities were being a former W.R. Grace worker, being older, having been a household contact of a W.R. Grace worker, and being a male. In addition to being a former W.R. Grace worker, environmental exposures and other nonoccupational risk factors were also important predictors of asbestos-related radiographic abnormalities. PMID:14594627

  16. Low-Level Fiber-induced Radiographic Changes Caused by Libby Vermiculite

    PubMed Central

    Rohs, Amy M.; Lockey, James E.; Dunning, Kari K.; Shukla, Rakesh; Fan, Huihao; Hilbert, Tim; Borton, Eric; Wiot, Jerome; Meyer, Cristopher; Shipley, Ralph T.; LeMasters, Grace K.; Kapil, Vikas

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: From 1921 to 1990, vermiculite ore from Libby, Montana, was shipped worldwide for commercial and residential use. A 1980 study of a manufacturing facility using Libby vermiculite was the first to demonstrate a small but significant prevalence of pleural chest radiographic changes associated with amphibole fibers contained in the ore. Objectives: This follow-up study of the original cohort evaluated the extent of radiographic changes and cumulative fiber exposure (CFE) 25 years after cessation of exposure. Methods: From the original cohort of 513 workers, 431 (84%) were living and available for participation and exposure reconstruction. Of these, 280 (65%) completed both chest radiographs and interviews. Primary outcomes were pleural and/or interstitial changes. Measurements and Main Results: Pleural and interstitial changes were demonstrated in 80 (28.7%) and 8 (2.9%) participants, respectively. Of those participants with low lifetime CFE of less than 2.21 fiber/cc-years, 42 (20%) had pleural changes. A significant (P < 0.001) exposure–response relationship of pleural changes with CFE was demonstrated, ranging from 7.1 to 54.3% from the lowest to highest exposure quartile. Removal of individuals with commercial asbestos exposure did not alter this trend. Conclusions: This study indicates that exposure within an industrial process to Libby vermiculite ore is associated with pleural thickening at low lifetime CFE levels. The propensity of the Libby amphibole fibers to dramatically increase the prevalence of pleural changes 25 years after cessation of exposure at low CFE levels is a concern in view of the wide national distribution of this ore for commercial and residential use. PMID:18063841

  17. [Indications for and frequency of intraoral radiographs].

    PubMed

    Poorterman, J H G

    2015-05-01

    Radiographs are essential in dental practice today. Due to the exposure of patients to X-rays every radiograph has to be justified. The advantages and disadvantages of risks and diagnostic rewards have to be weighed against one another whenever X-ray imaging is considered. An important factor in this respect is the usefulness (in terms of sensitivity and specificity) of a radiograph and along with that, the monitoring of the quality of the entire process, from positioning the photo up to and including the development or scanning of it. Both for children and adults the indication for taking radiographs must be made on an individual basis. The most important considerations are: caries experience, oral hygiene and nutritional habits and exposure to fluorides. Based on these factors an individual risk assessment can be made and the possible benefit of bitewing radiographs for the dental treatment can be determined. European guidelines give advice on the indications and frequency of radiographs in, among other fields, periodontology, endodontology and implantology. PMID:26210219

  18. The 'ABC' of examining foot radiographs.

    PubMed Central

    Pearse, Eyiyemi O.; Klass, Benjamin; Bendall, Stephen P.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report a simple systematic method of assessing foot radiographs that improves diagnostic accuracy and can reduce the incidence of inappropriate management of serious forefoot and midfoot injuries, particularly the Lisfranc-type injury. STUDY GROUP AND METHODS: Five recently appointed senior house officers (SHOs), with no casualty or Orthopaedic experience prior to their appointment, were shown a set of 10 foot radiographs and told the history and examination findings recorded in the casualty notes of each patient within 6 weeks of taking up their posts. They were informed that the radiographs might or might not demonstrate an abnormality. They were asked to make a diagnosis and decide on a management plan. The test was repeated after they were taught the 'ABC' method of evaluating foot radiographs. RESULTS: Diagnostic accuracy improved after SHOs were taught a systematic method of assessing foot radiographs. The proportion of correct diagnoses increased from 0.64 to 0.78 and the probability of recognising Lisfranc injuries increased from 0 to 0.6. CONCLUSIONS: The use of this simple method of assessing foot radiographs can reduce the incidence of inappropriate management of serious foot injuries by casualty SHOs, in particular the Lisfranc type injury. PMID:16263015

  19. Installation for producing radiographic layer images

    SciTech Connect

    Kinanen, I.

    1984-11-06

    The purpose of the invention is to create a mechanically uncomplicated installation for producing radiographic layer images, making it possible to use small radiation dosages and, however, to collect sufficiently information on the object by one exposure, whereby separation of the superimposed layers from each other in a desired way for visualization can be accomplished by means of tomosynthesis. The installation includes radiation generating means collimating means for confining the radiation and focusing it on an object to be radiographed, e.g. a patient, means for detecting the radiation passed through the object and means for storing and processing the information contained in said detection. Said collimating means comprise a collimation unit including at least two separate, narrow, contiguous, substantially parallel collimating slots for producing narrow, fan-shaped beams, said slots being arranged preferably in alignment with the longitudinal axis of the object to be radiographed. The installation also includes means for displacing said collimating slots and the object to be radiographed in relation to each other at least substantially in alignment with the normal of said collimating slots, those parts of the object selected to be radiographed being arranged to be exposed to radiation by said narrow fan-shaped beams from a number of different directions. The information obtained from the object to be radiographed is stored preferably in digital form and processed for visualization.

  20. SU-E-I-94: Automated Image Quality Assessment of Radiographic Systems Using An Anthropomorphic Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, J; Wilson, J; Zhang, Y; Samei, E; Ravin, Carl E.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In a large, academic medical center, consistent radiographic imaging performance is difficult to routinely monitor and maintain, especially for a fleet consisting of multiple vendors, models, software versions, and numerous imaging protocols. Thus, an automated image quality control methodology has been implemented using routine image quality assessment with a physical, stylized anthropomorphic chest phantom. Methods: The “Duke” Phantom (Digital Phantom 07-646, Supertech, Elkhart, IN) was imaged twice on each of 13 radiographic units from a variety of vendors at 13 primary care clinics. The first acquisition used the clinical PA chest protocol to acquire the post-processed “FOR PRESENTATION” image. The second image was acquired without an antiscatter grid followed by collection of the “FOR PROCESSING” image. Manual CNR measurements were made from the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions of the phantom in each image. An automated image registration algorithm was used to estimate the CNR of the same insert using similar ROIs. Automated measurements were then compared to the manual measurements. Results: Automatic and manual CNR measurements obtained from “FOR PRESENTATION” images had average percent differences of 0.42%±5.18%, −3.44%±4.85%, and 1.04%±3.15% in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions, respectively; measurements obtained from “FOR PROCESSING” images had average percent differences of -0.63%±6.66%, −0.97%±3.92%, and −0.53%±4.18%, respectively. The maximum absolute difference in CNR was 15.78%, 10.89%, and 8.73% in the respective regions. In addition to CNR assessment of the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts, the automated method also provided CNR estimates for all 75 contrast-detail inserts in each phantom image. Conclusion: Automated analysis of a radiographic phantom has been shown to be a fast, robust, and objective means for assessing radiographic