These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Travellers with pre-existing medical conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical conditions that influence travel include those that compromise the immunity of the traveller and chronic underlying diseases or infirmities. The former includes HIV, transplantation, malignancy and its treatment, IgA deficiency, asplenia and use of immunocompromising drugs like corticosteroids. Chronic conditions include diabetes mellitus, end stage renal disease, diseases associated with compromised cardiac or pulmonary function and certain gastrointestinal diseases

Charles D. Ericsson

2003-01-01

2

45 CFR 152.20 - Prohibitions on pre-existing condition exclusions and waiting periods.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Prohibitions on pre-existing condition exclusions and waiting...REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS PRE-EXISTING CONDITION INSURANCE PLAN PROGRAM Benefits § 152.20 Prohibitions on pre-existing condition exclusions and...

2010-10-01

3

78 FR 30218 - Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the prescription drug, organ/tissue transplant, dialysis and durable medical equipment...the prescription drug, organ/tissue transplant, dialysis and durable medical equipment...services furnished under the organ/tissue transplant benefit to ensure that enrollees...

2013-05-22

4

5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP? 894...CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and... If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?...

2011-01-01

5

5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP? 894...CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and... If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?...

2012-01-01

6

5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP? 894...CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and... If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?...

2013-01-01

7

5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP? 894...CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and... If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?...

2014-01-01

8

5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP? 894...CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and... If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?...

2010-01-01

9

Pre-existing cardiovascular conditions and high altitude travel. Consensus statement of the Medical Commission of the Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme (UIAA MedCom) Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease.  

PubMed

The number of persons visiting high altitude regions for various purposes (recreation, business etc.), and the age of people who do so, increases. Therefore there are more and more patients who need specific and individual advice to prevent emergency situations at altitude and to deal with emergencies if the safety strategy should fail. Since literature concerning cardiocirculatory diseases at altitude is scarce and studies with a controlled setting and high evidence level are missing, UIAA MedCom has checked all available literature for specific information to enable physicians who are active in travel or high altitude medicine to advise the patients at the highest possible level of evidence. It must be pointed out that there are several other medical fields where such information is mandatory, e.g. in occupational medicine, when employees depart to high altitude destinations for business purposes. The recommendations are based on a detailed literature research (databases, handbooks and the respective references). For easier use the paper has been structured as follows: general information, cardiocirculatory system and ECG at altitude, several cardiocirculatory diseases and their specific recommendations. The commission concludes, that a general "don't go!" is no state-of-the-art advice for the patients. With the information presented here a safe trip to altitude should be possible for many patients. PMID:24675141

Donegani, Enrico; Hillebrandt, David; Windsor, Jeremy; Gieseler, Ulf; Rodway, George; Schöffl, Volker; Küpper, Thomas

2014-01-01

10

45 CFR 155.345 - Coordination with Medicaid, CHIP, the Basic Health Program, and the Pre-existing Condition...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...RELATED STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Exchange Functions in the Individual...as described in this section. (j) Transition from the Pre-existing Condition Insurance...in accordance with 45 CFR 152.45 to transition PCIP enrollees to the Exchange to...

2013-10-01

11

45 CFR 155.345 - Coordination with Medicaid, CHIP, the Basic Health Program, and the Pre-existing Condition...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...RELATED STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Exchange Functions in the Individual...as described in this section. (i) Transition from the Pre-existing Condition Insurance...in accordance with 45 CFR 152.45 to transition PCIP enrollees to the Exchange to...

2012-10-01

12

45 CFR 155.345 - Coordination with Medicaid, CHIP, the Basic Health Program, and the Pre-existing Condition...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...RELATED STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Exchange Functions in the Individual...as described in this section. (j) Transition from the Pre-existing Condition Insurance...in accordance with 45 CFR 152.45 to transition PCIP enrollees to the Exchange to...

2014-10-01

13

Adherence and tolerability of iron-containing prenatal multivitamins in pregnant women with pre-existing gastrointestinal conditions.  

PubMed

Prenatal multivitamin supplements (PMS) are recommended during pregnancy. Suboptimal adherence in women experiencing gastrointestinal (GI) conditions is thought to be attributed to the high elemental iron content in PMS. This study sought to quantify adherence and tolerability of iron-containing PMS in women with pre-existing GI conditions by recruiting women who called the Motherisk Helpline. Women with (n = 36) and without (n = 166) pre-existing GI conditions were randomised to either PregVit (n = 106) or Orifer F (n = 96). Monthly follow-up interviews were conducted to assess pill intake and GI adverse effects associated with PMS. The results of our study suggest that with the use of small size and low dose iron PMS, women with pre-existing GI conditions do not experience (1) more GI adverse effects, (2) lower adherence than women with no such conditions, and (3) may experience less severe nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. Supplementing with small tablets of low dose iron PMS should be considered. PMID:19757261

Gill, S Kaur; Nguyen, P; Koren, G

2009-10-01

14

Roots of Mold Problems and Humidity Control Measures in Institutional Buildings with Pre-Existing Mold Condition  

E-print Network

Roots of Mold Problems and Humidity Control Measures in Institutional Buildings with Pre-Existing Mold Condition Hui Chen, P.E. Research Engineering Associate III, Energy Systems Lab Song Deng, P.E. Asst. Research Engineer... moved out of the lecture room because the humidity levels could have damaged them. Measurements in the room indicated temperatures near the comfortable range of 70-72?F but relative humidity near 80%. (Chen, etc. 2000). A single-zone air...

Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H.; Garcia, J.

2004-01-01

15

Clinical prognosis, pre-existing conditions and the use of reperfusion therapy for patients with ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Some evidence-based therapies are underused in patients with a poor prognosis despite the fact that the survival gains would be highest among such patient subgroups. The extent to which this applies for acute, life-saving therapies is unknown. The impact of prognostic characteristics and pre-existing conditions on the use of reperfusion therapy among eligible patients with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction is examined. METHODS Of 2829 acute myocardial infarction patients prospectively identified in 53 acute care hospitals across Ontario, 987 presented with ST segment elevation within 12 h of symptom onset and without any absolute contraindications to reperfusion therapy. The baseline prognosis for each patient was derived from a validated risk-adjustment model of 30-day mortality. Multiple logistical regression was used to examine the relationships among reperfusion therapy, prognosis and the number of pre-existing chronic conditions after adjusting for factors such as age, sex, time since symptom onset and socioeconomic status. RESULTS Of the 987 appropriate candidates, 725 (73.5%) received reperfusion therapy (70.8% fibrinolysis, 2.6% primary angioplasty). The adjusted odds ratio of reperfusion therapy fell 4% with each 1% increase in baseline risk of death (adjusted OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.00, P=0.04) and fell 18% with each additional pre-existing condition (adjusted OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.90, P<0.001). The number rather than the type of pre-existing conditions inversely correlated with the use of reperfusion therapy. While the impact of baseline risk and pre-existing conditions was additive, pre-existing conditions exerted a greater impact on the nonuse of reperfusion therapy than did baseline risk. CONCLUSIONS A treatment-risk paradox is demonstrable even within a cohort of lower risk patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. These findings are consistent with the view that these clinical decisions are more likely to be attributable to concerns about patient frailty or side effects than to a misunderstanding of treatment benefits. PMID:16485048

Parker, Andrea B; Naylor, C David; Chong, Alice; Alter, David A

2006-01-01

16

MEDICAL INSURANCE ConditionCare  

E-print Network

- 21 - MEDICAL INSURANCE ConditionCare If you or one of your dependents have diabetes, coronary three medical insurance plans with Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield. Part of Anthem's mission.anthem.com, Colorado, MyAnthemTM login. Use MyAnthemTM to: #12;- 22 - MEDICAL INSURANCE Future Moms The program, Future

17

A Double Whammy: Health Promotion Among Cancer Survivors with Pre-Existing Functional Limitations  

PubMed Central

Purpose/Objectives To explore the experience of living with a cancer diagnosis within the context of a pre-existing functional disability and to identify strategies to promote health in this growing population of cancer survivors. Research Approach Qualitative descriptive Setting Four sites in the United States Participants 19 female cancer survivors with pre-existing disabling conditions Methodologic Approach Four focus groups were conducted. The audiotapes were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis techniques. Main Research Variables cancer survivor, disability, health promotion Findings Analytic categories included living with a cancer diagnosis, health promotion strategies, and wellness program development for survivors with pre-existing functional limitations. Participants described many challenges associated with managing a cancer diagnosis on top of living with a chronic disabling functional limitation. They identified strategies they used to maintain their health and topics to be included in health promotion programs tailored for this unique group of cancer survivors. Conclusions The “double whammy” of a cancer diagnosis for persons with pre-existing functional limitations requires modification of health promotion strategies and programs to promote wellness in this group of cancer survivors. Interpretation Nurses and other health care providers must attend to patients’ pre-existing conditions as well as the challenges of the physical, emotional, social, and economic sequelae of a cancer diagnosis. PMID:23269771

Volker, Deborah L.; Becker, Heather; Kang, Sook Jung; Kullberg, Vicki

2012-01-01

18

75 FR 45013 - Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...High-Risk Pool,'' National Institute for Health Care Reform, Center for Studying Health System Change (2010...High-Risk Pool,'' National Institute for Health Care Reform, Center for Studying Health System...

2010-07-30

19

Race/Ethnicity, Educational Attainment, and Pregnancy Complications in New York City Women with Pre-existing Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Background More women are entering pregnancy with pre-existing diabetes. Disease severity, glycaemic control, and predictors of pregnancy complications may differ by race/ethnicity or educational attainment, leading to differences in adverse pregnancy outcomes. Methods We used linked New York City hospital record and birth certificate data for 6291 singleton births among women with pre-existing diabetes between 1995 and 2003. We defined maternal race/ethnicity as non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, South Asian, and East Asian, and education level as <12, 12, and >12 years. Our outcomes were pre-eclampsia, preterm birth (PTB) (<37 weeks gestation and categorised as spontaneous or medically indicated), as well as small-for-gestational age (SGA) and large-for-gestational age (LGA). Using multivariable binomial regression, we estimated the risk ratios for pre-eclampsia, SGA, and LGA. We used multivariable multinomial regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) for PTB. Results Compared with non-Hispanic white women with pre-existing diabetes, non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women with pre-existing diabetes had a 1.50-fold increased risk of pre-eclampsia compared with non-Hispanic whites with pre-existing diabetes, after full adjustment. Non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women with pre-existing diabetes had adjusted ORs of 1.72 [adj. 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38, 2.15] and 1.65 [adj.95% CI 1.32, 2.05], respectively, for medically indicated PTB. South Asian women with pre-existing diabetes had the highest risk for having an SGA infant [adj. OR: 2.29; adj. 95% CI 1.73, 3.03]. East Asian ethnicity was not associated with these pregnancy complications. Conclusions Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and South Asian women with pre-existing diabetes may benefit from targeted interventions to improve pregnancy outcomes. PMID:24354778

James-Todd, Tamarra; Janevic, Teresa; Brown, Florence M; Savitz, David A

2014-01-01

20

Gate dielectric degradation: Pre-existing vs. generated defects  

SciTech Connect

We consider the possibility that degradation of the electrical characteristics of high-k gate stacks under low voltage stresses of practical interest is caused primarily by activation of pre-existing defects rather than generation of new ones. In nFETs in inversion, in particular, defect activation is suggested to be associated with the capture of an injected electron: in this charged state, defects can participate in a fast exchange of charge carriers with the carrier reservoir (substrate or gate electrode) that constitutes the physical process underlying a variety of electrical measurements. The degradation caused by the activation of pre-existing defects, as opposed to that of new defect generation, is both reversible and exhibits a tendency to saturate through the duration of stress. By using the multi-phonon assisted charge transport description, it is demonstrated that the trap activation concept allows reproducing a variety of experimental results including stress time dependency of the threshold voltage, leakage current, charge pumping current, and low frequency noise. Continuous, long-term degradation described by the power law time dependency is shown to be determined by the activation of defects located in the interfacial SiO{sub 2} layer of the high-k gate stacks. The findings of this study can direct process optimization efforts towards reduction of as-grown precursors of the charge trapping defects as the major factor affecting reliability.

Veksler, Dmitry, E-mail: Dmitry.Veksler@sematech.org, E-mail: gennadi.bersuker@sematech.org; Bersuker, Gennadi, E-mail: Dmitry.Veksler@sematech.org, E-mail: gennadi.bersuker@sematech.org [SEMATECH Inc., 257 Fuller Rd., Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

2014-01-21

21

Handout 2.4 Written Medication Consent Form  

E-print Network

. Date of birth: 3. Child's known allergies: 4. Name of medication (including strength): 5. Amount of the medication as it relates to the child's age, allergies or any pre- existing conditions. Also describe

Ohta, Shigemi

22

PRESENCE OF PRE-EXISTING ANTIBODIES MEDIATE SURVIVAL IN SEPSIS  

PubMed Central

Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in hospitals worldwide. Even with optimal therapy, severe sepsis results in 50% mortality, indicating variability in the response of individuals towards treatment. We hypothesize that the presence of pre-existing antibodies present in the blood before the onset of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in mice, accounts for the differences in their survival. A Plasma Enhanced Killing (PEK) assay was performed to calculate the PEK capacity of plasma i.e. the ability of plasma to augment PMN killing of bacteria. PEK was calculated as PEK= (1/log (N)) × 100; where N= number of surviving bacteria; a higher PEK indicated better bacterial killing. A range of PEK in plasma collected from mice prior to CLP was observed, documenting individual differences in bacterial killing capacity. Mortality was predicted based on plasma IL-6 levels at 24 hr post CLP. Mice predicted to die (Die-P) had a lower PEK (<14) and higher peritoneal bacterial counts 24 hr post sepsis compared to those predicted to live (Live-P) with a PEK>16. Mice with PEK<14 were 3.1 times more likely to die compared to the PEK>16 group. To understand the mechanism of defense conferred by the pre-existing antibodies, binding of IgM or IgG to enteric bacteria was documented by flow cytometry. To determine the relative contribution of IgM or IgG, the immunoglobulins were specifically immuno-depleted from the naïve plasma samples and the PEK of the depleted plasma measured. Compared to naïve plasma, depletion of IgM had no effect on the PEK. However, depletion of IgG increased PEK suggesting that an inhibitory IgG binds to antigenic sites on bacteria preventing optimal opsonization of the bacteria. These data demonstrate that prior to CLP; circulating inhibitory IgG antibodies exist that prevent bacterial killing by PMNs in a CLP model of sepsis. PMID:21921828

Moitra, Rituparna; Beal, Dominic R.; Belikoff, Bryan G.; Remick, Daniel G.

2011-01-01

23

Medical Conditions and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This population-based, case-control study examined physical illness as a risk factor for suicidal behavior. Case patients were more likely than controls to report having any serious medical conditions. Results suggest that young men with medical conditions are at increased risk for nearly lethal suicide attempts. (Contains 33 references and 3…

Ikeda, Robin M.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Simon, Thomas R.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Durant, Tonji M.; Swahn, Monica H.

2002-01-01

24

A framework for the merging of pre-existing and correspondenceless 3D statistical shape models.  

PubMed

The construction of statistical shape models (SSMs) that are rich, i.e., that represent well the natural and complex variability of anatomical structures, is an important research topic in medical imaging. To this end, existing works have addressed the limited availability of training data by decomposing the shape variability hierarchically or by combining statistical and synthetic models built using artificially created modes of variation. In this paper, we present instead a method that merges multiple statistical models of 3D shapes into a single integrated model, thus effectively encoding extra variability that is anatomically meaningful, without the need for the original or new real datasets. The proposed framework has great flexibility due to its ability to merge multiple statistical models with unknown point correspondences. The approach is beneficial in order to re-use and complement pre-existing SSMs when the original raw data cannot be exchanged due to ethical, legal, or practical reasons. To this end, this paper describes two main stages, i.e., (1) statistical model normalization and (2) statistical model integration. The normalization algorithm uses surface-based registration to bring the input models into a common shape parameterization with point correspondence established across eigenspaces. This allows the model fusion algorithm to be applied in a coherent manner across models, with the aim to obtain a single unified statistical model of shape with improved generalization ability. The framework is validated with statistical models of the left and right cardiac ventricles, the L1 vertebra, and the caudate nucleus, constructed at distinct research centers based on different imaging modalities (CT and MRI) and point correspondences. The results demonstrate that the model integration is statistically and anatomically meaningful, with potential value for merging pre-existing multi-modality statistical models of 3D shapes. PMID:24983233

Pereañez, Marco; Lekadir, Karim; Butakoff, Constantine; Hoogendoorn, Corné; Frangi, Alejandro F

2014-10-01

25

Three-dimensional numerical analysis of magma transport through a pre-existing fracture in the crust  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magmas are transported through pre-existing fractures in many repeatedly erupting volcanoes. The study of this special process of magma transport is fundamentally important to understand the mechanisms and conditions of volcanic eruptions. In this paper, we numerically simulate the magma propagation process through a pre-existing vertical fracture in the crust by using the combined finite difference method (FDM), finite element method (FEM) and discontinuous deformation analysis (DDA) approach. FDM is used to analyze magma flow in the pre-existing fracture, FEM is used to calculate the opening of the fracture during magma intrusion, and DDA is used to deal with the contact of the closed fracture surfaces. Both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) examples are presented. Parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of various physical and geometric parameters on the magma transport in the pre-existing fracture. We have considered magma chamber depth ranging from 7 km to 10 km under the crust surface, magma viscosity ranging from 2 × 10-2 to 2 × 10-7 MPa s, and the density difference between the magma and host rock ranging from 300 to 700 kg/m3. The numerical results indicate that (1) the fluid pressure p varies gradually along the depth, (2) the shape of the magma body during propagation is like a torch bar and its width ranges from 2 m to 4 m approximately in the 3D case and 10 m to 50 m in the 2D case for the same physical parameters used, (3) the crust surface around the pre-existing fracture begins to increase on both sides of the fracture, forms a trough between them, then gradually uplifts during the transport of the magma, and finally takes the shape of a crater when the magma reaches the surface. We have also examined the influence of physical and geometric parameters on the minimum overpressure for magma transport in the 3D case. The numerical results show that our numerical technique presented in this paper is an effective tool for simulating magma transport process through pre-existing fractures in the crust.

Chen, Zuan; Cheng, Xu; Huang, Xiaoge; Bai, Wuming; Jin, Zhi-He

2014-05-01

26

[Contact dermatitis to permanent make up: manifestation of a pre-existing nickel allergy].  

PubMed

During recent years demands for permanent make up and especially permanent lip liner is increasing not only in the USA but also in Germany. Adverse reactions to these products are almost unknown and not documented in literature. Declaration of contents and side effects are not required for tattoo colors, in contrast to the rules for medical treatments. Our patient developed inflammation and vesiculation within the area of tattooing three days after injection of a permanent lip liner. Treatment with steroids induced complete resolution of the lip liner-associated dermatitis. However, not only the effect of the lip liner was lost but also the natural color of her lip was partly destroyed by inflammation. Diagnostic allergy testing revealed strong delayed hypersensitivity to nickel and a mild patch test reaction to the permanent lip liner. Examination of the permanent make-up by mass spectrometry detected nickel in a concentration of 1.8 ppm. No allergic reaction could be seen when the purified red dye itself was tested. This patient with pre-existing nickel allergy developed an allergic contact dermatitis from the injection of a permanent lip liner contaminated with nickel. PMID:15967013

Jäger, Claudia; Jappe, Uta

2005-07-01

27

Evolution and metamorphosis of pre-existent structures : lasting change, Lazarus' memory  

E-print Network

As society perpetually evolves, retention of selected pre-existent building fragments (structure and inhabitation, form and use) provides necessary continuity to affirm cultural and individual identity. Within this framework ...

Olson, Richard Keith

1994-01-01

28

Travelers with Disabilities and Medical Conditions  

MedlinePLUS

... Remove Shoes Have Metal Joint Implants Have Internal Medical Devices Needs Medication Have Medically Necessary Liquids Have Medically ... What to Expect with Ports, Catheters, and Other Medical Devices Has an External Medical Device Are Breast Cancer ...

29

Solid particle impingement erosion characteristics of cylindrical surfaces, pre-existing holes and slits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The erosion characteristics of aluminum cylinders sand-blasted with both spherical and angular erodent particles were studied and compared with results from previously studied flat surfaces. The cylindrical results are discussed with respect to impact conditions. The relationship between erosion rate and pit morphology (width, depth, and width to depth ratio) is established. The aspects of (1) erosion rate versus time curves on cylindrical surfaces; (2) long-term exposures; and (3) erosion rate versus time curves with spherical and angular particles are presented. The erosion morphology and characteristics of aluminum surfaces with pre-existing circular cylindrical and conical holes of different sizes were examined using weight loss measurements, scanning electron microscopy, a profilometer, and a depth gage. The morphological features (radial and concentric rings) are discussed with reference to flat surfaces, and the erosion features with spherical microglass beads. The similarities and differences of erosion and morphological features are highlighted. The erosion versus time curves of various shapes of holes are discussed and are compared with those of a flat surface. The erosion process at slits is considered.

Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

1983-01-01

30

Chronic Medical Conditions and Risk of Sepsis  

PubMed Central

Background We sought to determine the associations between baseline chronic medical conditions and future risk of sepsis. Methods Longitudinal cohort study using the 30,239 community-dwelling participants of the REGARDS cohort. We determined associations between baseline chronic medical conditions and incident sepsis episodes, defined as hospitalization for an infection with the presence of infection plus two or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria. Results Over the mean observation time of 4.6 years (February 5, 2003 through October 14, 2011), there were 975 incident cases of sepsis. Incident sepsis episodes were associated with older age (p<0.001), white race (HR 1.39; 95% CI: 1.22–1.59), lower education (p<0.001) and income (p<0.001), tobacco use (p<0.001), and alcohol use (p?=?0.02). Incident sepsis episodes were associated with baseline chronic lung disease (adjusted HR 2.43; 95% CI: 2.05–2.86), peripheral artery disease (2.16; 1.58–2.95), chronic kidney disease (1.99; 1.73–2.29), myocardial infarction 1.79 (1.49–2.15), diabetes 1.78 (1.53–2.07), stroke 1.67 (1.34–2.07), deep vein thrombosis 1.63 (1.29–2.06), coronary artery disease 1.61 (1.38–1.87), hypertension 1.49 (1.29–1.74), atrial fibrillation 1.48 (1.21–1.81) and dyslipidemia 1.16 (1.01–1.34). Sepsis risk increased with the number of chronic medical conditions (p<0.001). Conclusions Individuals with chronic medical conditions are at increased risk of future sepsis events. PMID:23118977

Wang, Henry E.; Shapiro, Nathan I.; Griffin, Russell; Safford, Monika M.; Judd, Suzanne; Howard, George

2012-01-01

31

Metabolic effects of milk protein intake strongly depend on pre-existing metabolic and exercise status  

PubMed Central

Milk protein intake has recently been suggested to improve metabolic health. This Perspective provides evidence that metabolic effects of milk protein intake have to be regarded in the context of the individual’s pre-existing metabolic and exercise status. Milk proteins provide abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and glutamine. Plasma BCAAs and glutamine are increased in obesity and insulin resistance, but decrease after gastric bypass surgery resulting in weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity. Milk protein consumption results in postprandial hyperinsulinemia in obese subjects, increases body weight of overweight adolescents and may thus deteriorate pre-existing metabolic disturbances of obese, insulin resistant individuals. PMID:24225036

2013-01-01

32

Metabolic effects of milk protein intake strongly depend on pre-existing metabolic and exercise status.  

PubMed

Milk protein intake has recently been suggested to improve metabolic health. This Perspective provides evidence that metabolic effects of milk protein intake have to be regarded in the context of the individual's pre-existing metabolic and exercise status. Milk proteins provide abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and glutamine. Plasma BCAAs and glutamine are increased in obesity and insulin resistance, but decrease after gastric bypass surgery resulting in weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity. Milk protein consumption results in postprandial hyperinsulinemia in obese subjects, increases body weight of overweight adolescents and may thus deteriorate pre-existing metabolic disturbances of obese, insulin resistant individuals. PMID:24225036

Melnik, Bodo C; Schmitz, Gerd; John, Swen; Carrera-Bastos, Pedro; Lindeberg, Staffan; Cordain, Loren

2013-01-01

33

14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.213 Section 67.213...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.213 General...

2012-01-01

34

14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.213 Section 67.213...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.213 General...

2013-01-01

35

14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.313 Section 67.313...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.313 General...

2012-01-01

36

14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.113 Section 67.113...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.113 General...

2014-01-01

37

14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.113 Section 67.113...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.113 General...

2011-01-01

38

14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.313 Section 67.313...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.313 General...

2011-01-01

39

14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.213 Section 67.213...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.213 General...

2011-01-01

40

Dyke intrusion into a pre-existing joint network: The Aiguablava lamprophyre dyke swarm (Catalan Coastal Ranges)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A structural analysis has been performed in the Upper Permian lamprophyric dyke swarm of Aiguablava (Costa Brava, NE Iberia). Emplacement of sub-vertical dykes is related to the presence of a widespread joint network, mostly developed during the cooling and decompression of the late Variscan leucogranitic host rocks. The joint pattern consists on multiple sub-vertical joint sets among which two orthogonal sets at ? N23° and ? N113° are predominant. A sub-horizontal set is also prominent. The sub-vertical dykes have a mean N100°-N125° trend, which corresponds to the trend of one of the main joint sets. However, dyke segmentation is noticeable at the Dm- to cm-scale, and this is inferred to be related to dyke propagation and emplacement along the variably oriented pre-existing joints. A mean robust sub-horizontal NNE-SSW net dilation direction was measured from matching dyke jogs, markers in the host rock and analysis of maximum dyke thicknesses, and this is in line with the minimum principal stress axis (3) derived from a three-dimensional paleostress analysis from dyke orientations. The inferred maximum principal stress axis (1) is sub-vertical, indicating that dykes intruded under conditions of tectonic extension. Furthermore, a Mohr construction allowed calculation of the stress ratio ? = 0.29 (close to a prolate stress ellipsoid) and a driving pressure ratio R? = 0.27, which corresponds to a magmatic pressure almost equal to the intermediate principal stress axis, ?2. It is inferred that many of the pre-existing joint sets were exploited by the magma, the WNW-ESE joint set (normal to ?3) being the most favorable for dyke emplacement. The present study highlights the structural control of a pre-existing fracture network on emplacement of the Aiguablava lamprophyres in the upper crust during late Permian NNE-SSW brittle extension.

Martínez-Poza, A. I.; Druguet, E.; Castaño, L. M.; Carreras, J.

2014-09-01

41

Are There Pre-Existing Neural, Cognitive, or Motoric Markers for Musical Ability?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adult musician's brains show structural enlargements, but it is not known whether these are inborn or a consequence of long-term training. In addition, music training in childhood has been shown to have positive effects on visual-spatial and verbal outcomes. However, it is not known whether pre-existing advantages in these skills are found in…

Norton, Andrea; Winner, Ellen; Cronin, Karl; Overy, Katie; Lee, Dennis J.; Schlaug, Gottfried

2005-01-01

42

Surrogate-based optimization of hydraulic fracturing in pre-existing fracture networks  

E-print Network

Surrogate-based optimization of hydraulic fracturing in pre-existing fracture networks Mingjie Chen Keywords: Hydraulic fracturing Fractal dimension Surrogate model Optimization Global sensitivity a b s t r a c t Hydraulic fracturing has been used widely to stimulate production of oil, natural gas

Lu, Zhiming

43

An Exploratory Examination of Students' Pre-Existing Beliefs about Leadership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preparing future leaders is a long-standing priority in higher education, but doubts have been raised about whether this goal is being achieved. Pedagogical research suggests that leadership development can be improved by taking account of students' pre-existing beliefs about leadership; however, little is currently known about those beliefs.…

Caza, Arran; Rosch, David M.

2014-01-01

44

Using an Electronic Highlighter to Eliminate the Negative Effects of Pre-Existing, Inappropriate Highlighting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether using an active learning technique, electronic highlighting, can eliminate the negative effects of pre-existing, poor highlighting on reading comprehension. Participants read passages containing no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, or inappropriate highlighting. We hypothesized…

Gier, Vicki; Kreiner, David; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Herring, Daniel

2011-01-01

45

Pre-existing Renal Disease Promotes Sepsis-induced Acute Kidney Injury and Worsens Sepsis Outcome via Multiple Pathways  

PubMed Central

Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at significantly higher risk of death from sepsis, although the mechanism by which CKD increases mortality has not been investigated. We established a mouse two-stage model of pre-existing renal disease with subsequent sepsis by combining folic acid (FA) injection and sub-lethal cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery. Mice were injected with FA then made septic (FA-CLP) or were injected with vehicle then made septic (Veh-CLP). FA-CLP mice had significantly higher mortality than Veh-CLP mice. Sepsis increased serum creatinine in the FA-CLP but not in the Veh-CLP group. FA-CLP mice had more severe septic shock and significantly increased vascular permeability, plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), bacteremia, serum IL-10 and splenocyte apoptosis compared to Veh-CLP. To evaluate the contribution of vascular and immunological dysfunction, we treated FA-CLP mice with soluble Flt-1 and chloroquine. Mice treated with combination therapy showed a significant improvement in kidney injury, hemodynamics, and survival. In conclusion, the sequential FA-CLP model mimics human sepsis that is frequently complicated with pre-existing conditions including CKD. This animal model would be useful to evaluate preventative and therapeutic strategies under conditions more typical of human sepsis. PMID:18633340

Doi, Kent; Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Hu, Xuzhen; Sidransky, Karen L.; Qin, Yan; Eisner, Christoph; Schnermann, Jurgen; Yuen, Peter S. T.; Star, Robert A.

2008-01-01

46

Influence of pre-existing salt diapirs on 3D folding patterns  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 3D detachment folding instability gives rise to a wide variety of fold shapes (e.g. from dome shape structures to long en-echelon or straight anticlines) as a result of interactions between growing fold segments. The 3D growth of these folds, as well as the wavelength and lateral propagation of folds, is controlled by the physical parameters of a detachment layer and its overburden. However, the existence of initial heterogeneities, such as pre-existing salt plugs within the sedimentary cover, might affect fold development as well. We use numerical modeling to investigate how the fold pattern is affected by pre-existing salt structures. High-resolution 3D folding simulations (with and without pre-existing salt structures) were performed, in which we varied the shape, height and spacing of pre-existing diapirs. In a first geometric setup, we employed a multilayer setup and synthetic diapir distributions in order to study the influence of diapir spacing on fold spacing and patterns. In a second geometric setup, we use a diapir distribution that fits the observed exposed diapir distribution in the southeastern Zagros. Results show that the presence of diapirs does not considerably change the wavelength of the folds, which is in all cases close to the dominant folding wavelength that develops in the absence of diapirs. Yet, the presence of pre-existing structures speeds up the folding instability in those locations and also affects folding patterns as the diapirs localize the initial deformation by accommodating folding above them, which results in the diapirs being located in the core of the folds. If diapir spacing is much smaller than the dominant folding wavelength, diapirs are located in different structural positions such as fold synclines or flanks.

Fernandez, Naiara; Kaus, Boris J. P.

2014-12-01

47

Experimental observations of the effect of crystals and pre-existing bubbles on the dynamics and fragmentation of vesiculating flows  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of crystals and pre-existing gas phases on the dynamic degassing and fragmentation of magmas in a volcanic conduit have been simulated by analogue experiments. A series of decompression experiments of viscous solutions of gum rosin and acetone with and without the incorporation of particles (silicon carbide, glass beads, organic seeds) or pre-existing air bubbles have been performed in a transparent shock-tube. The addition of internal bubbles or solid particles in the starting solution shifts the fragmentation conditions towards lower acetone (volatile) contents and lower decompression ratios. The effect of solid particles depends on their number density and spatial distribution in the starting solution. A small number of sinking particles has little impact on the flow dynamics. However, a floating layer of particles provides a high concentration of surface bubbles that leads to an early fragmentation pulse. The observations also imply that the presence of crystals, if able to generate a high number density of bubbles, will lead to an earlier and deeper fragmentation of the magma in the volcanic conduit.

Mourtada-Bonnefoi, C. C.; Mader, H. M.

2004-01-01

48

Influence of pre-existing salt structures in the 3D pattern of multilayer folding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Upward movement of the Precambrian Hormuz salt in the Fars region of the Zagros is supposed to have started as early as Late Cretaceous. The Late Cretaceous - Tertiary deformation events that lead to the folding of the sedimentary cover in this area would have therefore, enhance the upward salt movement by squeezing the pre-existing salt structures. How these salt diapirs evolve under such compressive events has already been previously addressed using analogue models (e.g. Callot et al. 2012). The same authors observed that pre-existing salt structures control the size and geometry of folds in sandbox models. Our previous work has shown that 3D folding instability gives rise to a wide variety of fold shapes (e.g. from dome shape structures to long en echelon or straight anticlines), resulting of the interactions between growing fold segments. The three dimensional growth of these folds, the wavelength and the lateral propagation, is itself controlled by physical parameters. However, the existence of initial weak zones such as pre-existing salt plugs within the sedimentary cover can affect the development of such folds by localizing part of the deformation. In this study we have used numerical modeling to investigate how the fold pattern in 3D multilayer folding is affected by pre-existing salt structures. High-resolution 3D folding simulations (with and without pre-existing salt structures) were performed with the parallel code LaMEM. Cylindrically shaped diapirs with different diameters and heights have been added to a multilayer folding setup. The use of a finite element based landscape evolution model (both erosion and sedimentation) allows for initially buried salt diapirs to be exposed at the surface during folding evolution. Acknowledgements Funding was provided by the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework program (FP7/2007-2013) ERC Grant agreement #258830. 3D simulations are performed in the IBM Blue Gene/Q JUQUEEN supercomputer of the Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany References Callot, J.P., Trocme, V., Letouzey, J., Albouy, E., Jahani, S. and Sherkati S., 2012, Pre-existing salt structures and the folding of the Zagros Mountains. Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 363, 545-561, doi: 10.1144/SP363.27

Fernandez, Naiara; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Collignon, Marine

2014-05-01

49

Medical Conditions and Medication Use in Adults with Down Syndrome: A Descriptive Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: We examined the presence of medical conditions and medication use within a sample of adults with Down syndrome. Methods: Retrospective chart review using a sample of 141 adults with Down syndrome and age range of 30 to 65 years. Results: We identify 23 categories of commonly occurring medical conditions and 24 categories of medications

Kerins, Gerard; Petrovic, Kimberly; Bruder, Mary Beth; Gruman, Cynthia

2008-01-01

50

Pre-existing atrial fibrillation and risk of arterial thromboembolism and death following pneumonia: a population-based cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine the effect of pre-existing atrial fibrillation (AF) and associated therapy on the risk of arterial thromboembolism (ATE) and death following pneumonia. Design, setting and participants Population-based cohort study (1997–2012) of 88?315 patients with first-time hospitalisation with pneumonia in Northern Denmark. Results Of the included patients (median age 73.4?years), 8880 (10.1%) had pre-existing AF. The risk of ATE within 30?days of admission was 5.2% in patients with AF and 3.6% in patients without AF. After adjustment for higher age and comorbidity, the adjusted HR (aHR) with AF was 1.06 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.18). Among patients with AF, reduced risk of ATE was observed in vitamin-K antagonist users compared with non-users (aHR 0.74 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.91)). Thirty-day mortality was 20.1% in patients with AF and 13.9% in patients without AF. Corresponding 1-year mortalities were 43.7% and 30.3%. The aHRs for 30-day and 1-year mortality with AF were 1.00 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.05) and 1.01 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.05). In patients with AF, reduced mortality risk was observed in users of vitamin-K antagonists (aHR 0.70 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.77)) and ?-blockers (aHR 0.77 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.85). Increased mortality was found in digoxin users (aHR 1.16 (95% CI 1.06 to 1.28)). Conclusions Pre-existing AF is frequent in patients hospitalised with pneumonia and a marker of increased risk of ATE and death, explained by higher patient age and comorbidity. Prognosis is closely related to preadmission medical treatment for AF. PMID:25398678

Gamst, Jacob; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

2014-01-01

51

Pre-existing histological type and developmental mechanism of mucinous noncystic carcinoma of pancreas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eleven cases with mucinous noncystic carcinoma (MC) of the pancreas were studied by histology and mucin immunohistochemistry,\\u000a to elucidate the mechanism, or route of development, and pre-existing histological type of MC of the pancreas. These MCs were\\u000a observed in close approximation to, or surrounding, intraductal papillary-mucinous carcinomas (IPMCs), and were centrally\\u000a situated among ductal adenocarcinomas (DAs). Hence, the 11 cases

Koichi Suda; Bunsei Nobukawa; Shigetaka Yamasaki; Fujihiko Suzuki; Hideo Shimizu; Masaru Takase

2000-01-01

52

Medication errors in the homes of children with chronic conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundChildren with chronic conditions often have complex medication regimens, usually administered at home by their parents.ObjectiveTo describe the types of medication errors in the homes of children with chronic conditions.MethodsOur home visit methods include direct observation of administration, medication review and prescription dose checking. Parents of children with sickle cell disease and seizure disorders taking daily medications were recruited from

Kathleen E Walsh; Kathleen M Mazor; Christopher J Stille; Irma Torres; Joann L Wagner; Juliet Moretti; Kevin Chysna; Christy D Stine; G Naheed Usmani; Jerry H Gurwitz

2011-01-01

53

Bortezomib reduces pre-existing antibodies to recombinant immunotoxins in mice.  

PubMed

Recombinant immunotoxin (RIT) therapy is limited in patients by neutralizing Ab responses. Ninety percent of patients with normal immune systems make neutralizing Abs after one cycle of RIT, preventing repeated dosing. Furthermore, some patients have pre-existing Abs from environmental exposure to Pseudomonas exotoxin, the component of the RIT that elicits the neutralizing Ab response. Bortezomib is an U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved proteasome inhibitor that selectively targets and kills plasma cells that are necessary for the neutralizing Ab response. We hypothesized that bortezomib may abrogate neutralizing Ab levels, making dosing of RIT possible in mice already immune to RIT. We immunized BALB/c mice with multiple doses of SS1P, a RIT whose Ab portion targets mesothelin. Mice with elevated Ab levels were separated into groups to receive saline, bortezomib, the pentostatin/cyclophosphamide (PC) regimen, or the bortezomib/PC (BPC) combination regimen. Four weeks after finishing therapy, plasma Ab levels were assayed, and bone marrow was harvested. The bortezomib and PC regimens significantly reduced Ab levels, and we observed fewer plasma cells in the bone marrow of bortezomib-treated mice but not in PC-treated mice. The BPC combination regimen almost completely eliminated Abs and further reduced plasma cells in the bone marrow. This regimen is more effective than individual regimens and may reduce Ab levels in patients with pre-existing neutralizing Abs to Pseudomonas exotoxin, allowing RIT treatment. PMID:25560410

Manning, Michael L; Mason-Osann, Emily; Onda, Masanori; Pastan, Ira

2015-02-15

54

Myogenin induces higher oxidative capacity in pre-existing mouse muscle fibres after somatic DNA transfer  

PubMed Central

Muscle is a permanent tissue, and in the adult pronounced changes can occur in pre-existing fibres without the formation of new fibres. Thus, the mechanisms responsible for phenotype transformation in the adult might be distinct from mechanisms regulating muscle differentiation during muscle formation and growth. Myogenin is a muscle-specific, basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is important during early muscle differentiation. It is also expressed in the adult, where its role is unknown. In this study we have overexpressed myogenin in glycolytic fibres of normal adult mice by electroporation and single-cell intracellular injection of expression vectors. Myogenin had no effects on myosin heavy chain fibre type, but induced a considerable increase in succinate dehydrogenase and NADH dehydrogenase activity, with some type IIb fibres reaching the levels observed histochemically in normal type IIx and IIa fibres. mRNA levels for malate dehydrogenase were similarly altered. The size of the fibres overexpressing myogenin was reduced by 30–50 %. Thus, the transfected fibres acquired a phenotype reminiscent of the phenotype obtained by endurance training in man and other animals, with a higher oxidative capacity and smaller size. We conclude that myogenin can alter pre-existing glycolytic fibres in the intact adult animal. PMID:12598590

Ekmark, Merete; Grønevik, Eirik; Schjerling, Peter; Gundersen, Kristian

2003-01-01

55

High-level adaptation aftereffects for novel objects: the role of pre-existing representations.  

PubMed

Recent perceptual experience can strongly influence the way in which ambiguous stimuli are interpreted and categorized. A well known example is the phenomenon of adaptation aftereffects that occurs when prolonged exposure to a clear, prototypical image induce a repulsive bias in the perception of a subsequently presented ambiguous stimulus. When an ambiguous image is used as adapter, however, a facilitatory, attractive effect can be observed (priming effect). In this study, the role of a pre-existing representation in the induction of the perceptual effect was investigated, with the use of novel, unfamiliar objects (Greebles). The results of two experiments indicate that a pre-existing representation is necessary for aftereffects to be observed, but only when the contribution of low-level adaptation is controlled for. Increased familiarity with the stimuli is able to restore the repulsive effect, as indicated by a third experiment. The priming effect found for ambiguous adapters, on the other hand, seems not to be influenced by a previously stored memory representation. PMID:21440561

Daelli, Valentina

2011-06-01

56

42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS FOR COVERAGE FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE FACILITIES Administration § 494.170 Condition: Medical records. The dialysis facility must...

2013-10-01

57

42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS FOR COVERAGE FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE FACILITIES Administration § 494.170 Condition: Medical records. The dialysis facility must...

2014-10-01

58

Impact of infection or vaccination on pre-existing serological memory.  

PubMed

Once established, serum antibody responses against a specific pathogen may last a lifetime. We describe a cohort of four subjects who received smallpox vaccination, and a single subject who received multiple vaccinations, with antibody levels to unrelated antigens monitored for 1-3 years. These immunizations provided the opportunity to determine if infection/vaccination and the resulting toll-like receptor stimulation would alter antigen-specific serological memory to other antigens, including bacterial toxins (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis) and viruses (yellow fever virus, measles, mumps, rubella, Epstein-Barr virus, and varicella-zoster virus). Our results indicate that serum IgG levels are remarkably stable and infection or vaccination are unlikely to increase or decrease pre-existing antigen-specific antibody responses. PMID:22902392

Amanna, Ian J; Hammarlund, Erika; Lewis, Mathew W; Slifka, Mark K

2012-11-01

59

Model for direct bone apposition on pre-existing surfaces, during peri-implant osseointegration.  

PubMed

In the present paper, a model for the early stages of peri-implant bone regeneration is developed. This model is able to capture some important characteristics of endosseous healing, which were not incorporated in the existing models. It is a well known fact, that during peri-implant osseointegration, bone forms only by apposition on the pre-existing rigid surface, which initially consists of the implant surface and the old bone surface. In order to track the movement of the front of the newly formed bone, a moving boundary problem is formulated. Another important feature of the current model, is that the cell differentiation is considered as a gradual process, evolving in time and being influenced by the presence of growth factors. Hence, the evolution of cell differentiation level is captured in the present approach. Numerical methods, used to solve the set of partial differential equations with hyperbolic terms, defined within the domain with the moving boundary, are described. PMID:22554950

Prokharau, Pavel A; Vermolen, Fred J; García-Aznar, José Manuel

2012-07-01

60

Pre-Existing Hypertension Dominates ??T Cell Reduction in Human Ischemic Stroke  

PubMed Central

T lymphocytes may play an important role in the evolution of ischemic stroke. Depletion of ??T cells has been found to abrogate ischemia reperfusion injury in murine stroke. However, the role of ??T cells in human ischemic stroke is unknown. We aimed to determine ??T cell counts and ??T cell interleukin 17A (IL-17A) production in the clinical setting of ischemic stroke. We also aimed to determine the associations of ??T cell counts with ischemic lesion volume, measures of clinical severity and with major stroke risk factors. Peripheral blood samples from 43 acute ischemic stroke patients and 26 control subjects matched on race and gender were used for flow cytometry and complete blood count analyses. Subsequently, cytokine levels and gene expression were measured in ??T cells. The number of circulating ??T cells was decreased by almost 50% (p?=?0.005) in the stroke patients. ??T cell counts did not correlate with lesion volume on magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging or with clinical severity in the stroke patients, but ??T cells showed elevated levels of IL-17A (p?=?0.048). Decreased ??T cell counts were also associated with older age (p?=?0.004), pre-existing hypertension (p?=?0.0005) and prevalent coronary artery disease (p?=?0.03), with pre-existing hypertension being the most significant predictor of ??T cell counts in a multivariable analysis. ??T cells in human ischemic stroke are reduced in number and show elevated levels of IL-17A. A major reduction in ??T lymphocytes also occurs in hypertension and may contribute to the development of hypertension-mediated stroke and vascular disease. PMID:24840735

Adamski, Mateusz G.; Li, Yan; Wagner, Erin; Yu, Hua; Seales-Bailey, Chloe; Durkin, Helen; Hao, Qing; Soper, Steven A.; Murphy, Michael; Baird, Alison E.

2014-01-01

61

Effects of Pre-Existing Target Structure on the Formation of Large Craters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The shapes of large-scale craters and the mechanics responsible for melt generation are influenced by broad and small-scale structures present in a target prior to impact. For example, well-developed systems of fractures often create craters that appear square in outline, good examples being Meteor Crater, AZ and the square craters of 433 Eros. Pre-broken target material also affects melt generation. Kieffer has shown how the shock wave generated in Coconino sandstone at Meteor crater created reverberations which, in combination with the natural target heterogeneity present, created peaks and troughs in pressure and compressed density as individual grains collided to produce a range of shock mineralogies and melts within neighboring samples. In this study, we further explore how pre-existing target structure influences various aspects of the cratering process. We combine experimental and numerical techniques to explore the connection between the scales of the impact generated shock wave and the pre-existing target structure. We focus on the propagation of shock waves in coarse, granular media, emphasizing its consequences on excavation, crater growth, ejecta production, cratering efficiency, melt generation, and crater shape. As a baseline, we present a first series of results for idealized targets where the particles are all identical in size and possess the same shock impedance. We will also present a few results, whereby we increase the complexities of the target properties by varying the grain size, strength, impedance and frictional properties. In addition, we investigate the origin and implications of reverberations that are created by the presence of physical and chemical heterogeneity in a target.

Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Cintala, M. J.; Crawford, D. A.

2003-01-01

62

MEDICAL PHYSICS PERSONNEL FOR MEDICAL IMAGING: REQUIREMENTS, CONDITIONS OF INVOLVEMENT AND STAFFING LEVELS-FRENCH RECOMMENDATIONS.  

PubMed

The French regulations concerning the involvement of medical physicists in medical imaging procedures are relatively vague. In May 2013, the ASN and the SFPM issued recommendations regarding Medical Physics Personnel for Medical Imaging: Requirements, Conditions of Involvement and Staffing Levels. In these recommendations, the various areas of activity of medical physicists in radiology and nuclear medicine have been identified and described, and the time required to perform each task has been evaluated. Criteria for defining medical physics staffing levels are thus proposed. These criteria are defined according to the technical platform, the procedures and techniques practised on it, the number of patients treated and the number of persons in the medical and paramedical teams requiring periodic training. The result of this work is an aid available to each medical establishment to determine their own needs in terms of medical physics. PMID:25323441

Isambert, Aurélie; Le Du, Dominique; Valéro, Marc; Guilhem, Marie-Thérèse; Rousse, Carole; Dieudonné, Arnaud; Blanchard, Vincent; Pierrat, Noëlle; Salvat, Cécile

2014-10-16

63

Plaque rupture with severe pre-existing stenosis precipitating coronary thrombosis. Characteristics of coronary atherosclerotic plaques underlying fatal occlusive thrombi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ruptured atheromatous plaques were identified by step-sectioning technique as responsible for 40 of 51 recent coronary artery thrombi and 63 larger intimal haemorrhages. The degree of pre-existing luminal narrowing at the site of rupture was decisive for whether plaque rupture caused occlusive thrombosis or just intimal haemorrhage. If the pre-existing stenosis was greater than 90% (histologically determined) then plaque rupture

E Falk

1983-01-01

64

Interactions between X-ray induced transient defects and pre-existing damage precursors in DKDP crystals  

SciTech Connect

Large-aperture laser systems, currently designed to achieve high energy densities at the target location (exceeding {approx} 10{sup 11} J/m{sup 3}), will enable studies of the physics of matter and radiation under extreme conditions. As a result, their optical components, such as the frequency conversion crystals (KDP/DKDP), may be exposed to X-rays and other ionizing radiation. This in turn may lead to a change in the damage performance of these materials as they may be affected by radiation-induced effects by either forming new damage initiation centers or interacting with the pre-existing damage initiating defects (so-called damage precursors). We present an experimental study on the laser-induced bulk damage performance at 355-nm of DKDP crystals following X-ray irradiation at room temperature. Results indicate that the damage performance of the material is affected by exposure to X-rays. We attribute this behavior to a change in the physical properties of the precursors which, in turn, affect their individual damage threshold.

Negres, R A; Saw, C K; Demos, S G

2008-10-24

65

Discovery of a Pre-existing Molecular Filament Associated with Supernova Remnant G127.1+0.5  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We performed millimeter observations in CO lines toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G127.1+0.5. We found a molecular filament at 4-13 km s-1 consisting of two distinct parts: a straight part coming out of the remnant region and a curved part in the remnant region. The curved part is coincides well with the bright SNR shell detected in 1420 MHz radio continuum and mid-infrared observations in the northeastern region. In addition, redshifted line wing broadening is found only in the curved part of the molecular filament, which indicates a physical interaction. These provide strong evidences, for the first time, to confirm the association between an SNR and a pre-existing long molecular filament. Multi-band observations in the northeastern remnant shell could be explained by the interaction between the remnant shock and the dense molecular filament. RADEX radiative transfer modeling of the quiet and shocked components yield physical conditions consistent with the passage of a non-dissociative J-type shock. We argue that the curved part of the filament is fully engulfed by the remnant's forward shock. A spatial correlation between aggregated young stellar objects (YSOs) and the adjacent molecular filament close to the SNR is also found, which could be related to the progenitor's activity.

Zhou, Xin; Yang, Ji; Fang, Min; Su, Yang

2014-08-01

66

Psychological distress in an earthquake-devastated area with pre-existing high rate of suicide.  

PubMed

On 12 March 2011 an earthquake devastated the Matsunoyama and Matsudai districts of T?kamachi City, Niigata, Japan. These areas had high pre-existing suicide rates, especially among the elderly. We investigated whether mental health status became worse among the sufferers 5 months after the earthquake, and what kind of factors were implicated in any changes. A 15-item questionnaire that tapped earthquake-related variables and the Kessler 10 Psychological Distress Scale to measure psychological distress were distributed to 1923 residents aged over 40 years. The mean age (S.D.) of the total 1731 respondents (male, 805; female, 926) was 68.2 (13.1) years. Of these, we assessed K10 scores from 1346 respondents. The mean scores (S.D.) for K10 and K6 (six selected items from the K10) were 5.8 (6.3) and 3.4 (3.9), respectively. Among the respondents, 9.1% and 3.2% obtained a score of K10 ?15 and K6 ?13, respectively. These scores showed slightly higher psychological distress, especially among the elderly, in comparison with existing community-based data. Categorical regression analysis revealed significant and relatively strong effects of initial psychological impact, decrease in sleep hours, advanced age, and decrease in interpersonal relationships within the community on the K10 score. The last item suggests the importance of socio-environmental factors in post-disaster mental health. PMID:24928758

Tachibana, Akira; Kitamura, Hideaki; Shindo, Masanobu; Honma, Hiroko; Someya, Toshiyuki

2014-10-30

67

EVIDENCE FOR PRE-EXISTING DUST IN THE BRIGHT TYPE IIn SN 2010jl  

SciTech Connect

SN 2010jl was an extremely bright, Type IIn supernova (SN) which showed a significant infrared (IR) excess no later than 90 days after explosion. We have obtained Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m and JHK observations of SN 2010jl {approx}90 days post-explosion. Little to no reddening in the host galaxy indicated that the circumstellar material lost from the progenitor must lie in a torus inclined out of the plane of the sky. The likely cause of the high mid-IR flux is the reprocessing of the initial flash of the SN by pre-existing circumstellar dust. Using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative-transfer code, we have estimated that between 0.03 and 0.35 M{sub sun} of dust exists in a circumstellar torus around the SN located 6 x 10{sup 17} cm away from the SN and inclined between 60 deg. and 80 deg. to the plane of the sky. On day 90, we are only seeing the illumination of approximately 5% of this torus, and expect to see an elevated IR flux from this material up until day {approx} 450. It is likely this dust was created in a luminous blue variable (LBV) like mass-loss event of more than 3 M{sub sun}, which is large but consistent with other LBV progenitors such as {eta} Carinae.

Andrews, J. E.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Clem, J.; Landolt, A., E-mail: jandrews@phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: landolt@phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: gclayton@fenway.phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: jclem@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

2011-08-15

68

The Influence of Pre-existing Deformation on GMA Welding Distortion in Thin Steel Plates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Weld distortion is particularly problematic for large thin structures that are used in the assembly of ships. The drive toward lighter ships and thinner plate is restricted by the significant increase in distortion as the plate thickness decreases. The influence of pre-existing deformation in the plates to be joined on the resultant distortion in gas metal arc welded structure has been studied. DH-36 steel plate surface profiles were measured before and after the butt welding of two plates 1000 × 500 × 4 mm in size. Three dimensional finite element models that incorporate the initial plate profile have been created to simulate the welding process and to examine the relationship between the final welded plate profiles and the initial deformation present in the plates. Both symmetric and asymmetric models were considered. A significant variation in the unwelded base plates' initial distortion was observed. Generally, it has been found that if an out-of-plane deformation exists in a plate prior to welding, the level of distortion further increases in the same direction following welding. The final distortions are strongly related to the initial plate profiles. The residual stress distributions in the plates are also to some extent affected by the level of distortion initially present.

Davies, C. M.; Ahn, J.; Tsunori, M.; Dye, D.; Nikbin, K. M.

2015-01-01

69

The Influence of Pre-existing Deformation on GMA Welding Distortion in Thin Steel Plates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Weld distortion is particularly problematic for large thin structures that are used in the assembly of ships. The drive toward lighter ships and thinner plate is restricted by the significant increase in distortion as the plate thickness decreases. The influence of pre-existing deformation in the plates to be joined on the resultant distortion in gas metal arc welded structure has been studied. DH-36 steel plate surface profiles were measured before and after the butt welding of two plates 1000 × 500 × 4 mm in size. Three dimensional finite element models that incorporate the initial plate profile have been created to simulate the welding process and to examine the relationship between the final welded plate profiles and the initial deformation present in the plates. Both symmetric and asymmetric models were considered. A significant variation in the unwelded base plates' initial distortion was observed. Generally, it has been found that if an out-of-plane deformation exists in a plate prior to welding, the level of distortion further increases in the same direction following welding. The final distortions are strongly related to the initial plate profiles. The residual stress distributions in the plates are also to some extent affected by the level of distortion initially present.

Davies, C. M.; Ahn, J.; Tsunori, M.; Dye, D.; Nikbin, K. M.

2014-11-01

70

Crash Rates of Quebec Drivers with Medical Conditions  

PubMed Central

Using a databank that combines comprehensive medical data with the driving records of 96% of the drivers in Quebec, odds ratios were calculated for crash risk involving death or serious injury according to the diagnosis of medical conditions traditionally associated with increased crash risk. Results were controlled for age, sex, residence (rural/urban), possession of a professional licence (classes 1 – 4), previous involvement in a crash with injury or death and for the presence of other medical conditions. In addition, crash risk was calculated for drivers with multiple conditions. There was a slight to moderate increase in crash risk for most of the conditions and an incremental increase in crash risk as the number of conditions increased. PMID:24406946

Dow, Jamie; Gaudet, Michel; Turmel, Émilie

2013-01-01

71

Risk of endometrial cancer in relation to medical conditions and medication use  

PubMed Central

We studied the relation of medical conditions related to obesity and medications used for these conditions with endometrial cancer. We also investigated the association of other medical conditions and medications with risk. This US population-based case-control study included 469 endometrial cancer cases and 467 controls. Information on putative risk factors for endometrial cancer was collected through personal interviews. We asked women about their medical history and medications used for six months or longer and the number of years each medication was taken. Risk was strongly associated with increasing obesity (p for trend <0.001). Among conditions related to obesity, and after adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), and other risk factors and conditions, uterine fibroids were independently related to an increased cancer risk (adjusted OR= 1.8, 95%CI= 1.2–2.5). Although hypertension was not significantly related to endometrial cancer after adjustment for age and BMI, use of thiazide diuretics was independently associated with an increased risk (OR= 1.8, 95%CI= 1.1–3.0). Anemia was associated with decreased risk (OR= 0.6, 95%CI= 0.5–0.9). Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was related to a decreased risk (OR= 0.7, 95%CI= 0.5–0.97). To our knowledge, the observation about thiazide diuretics is novel and requires confirmation in other studies and populations. PMID:19383893

Fortuny, Joan; Sima, Camelia; Bayuga, Sharon; Wilcox, Homer; Pulick, Katherine; Faulkner, Shameka; Zauber, Ann G.; Olson, Sara H.

2009-01-01

72

Endoscopic skull base training using 3D printed models with pre-existing pathology.  

PubMed

Endoscopic base of skull surgery has been growing in acceptance in the recent past due to improvements in visualisation and micro instrumentation as well as the surgical maturing of early endoscopic skull base practitioners. Unfortunately, these demanding procedures have a steep learning curve. A physical simulation that is able to reproduce the complex anatomy of the anterior skull base provides very useful means of learning the necessary skills in a safe and effective environment. This paper aims to assess the ease of learning endoscopic skull base exposure and drilling techniques using an anatomically accurate physical model with a pre-existing pathology (i.e., basilar invagination) created from actual patient data. Five models of a patient with platy-basia and basilar invagination were created from the original MRI and CT imaging data of a patient. The models were used as part of a training workshop for ENT surgeons with varying degrees of experience in endoscopic base of skull surgery, from trainees to experienced consultants. The surgeons were given a list of key steps to achieve in exposing and drilling the skull base using the simulation model. They were then asked to list the level of difficulty of learning these steps using the model. The participants found the models suitable for learning registration, navigation and skull base drilling techniques. All participants also found the deep structures to be accurately represented spatially as confirmed by the navigation system. These models allow structured simulation to be conducted in a workshop environment where surgeons and trainees can practice to perform complex procedures in a controlled fashion under the supervision of experts. PMID:25294050

Narayanan, Vairavan; Narayanan, Prepageran; Rajagopalan, Raman; Karuppiah, Ravindran; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Wormald, Peter-John; Van Hasselt, Charles Andrew; Waran, Vicknes

2014-10-01

73

Evaluation of a pre-existing, 3-year household water treatment and handwashing intervention in rural Guatemala  

PubMed Central

Background The promotion of household water treatment and handwashing with soap has led to large reductions in child diarrhoea in randomized efficacy trials. Currently, we know little about the health effectiveness of behaviour-based water and hygiene interventions after the conclusion of intervention activities. Methods We present an extension of previously published design (propensity score matching) and analysis (targeted maximum likelihood estimation) methods to evaluate the behavioural and health impacts of a pre-existing but non-randomized intervention (a 3-year, combined household water treatment and handwashing campaign in rural Guatemala). Six months after the intervention, we conducted a cross-sectional cohort study in 30 villages (15 intervention and 15 control) that included 600 households, and 929 children <5 years of age. Results The study design created a sample of intervention and control villages that were comparable across more than 30 potentially confounding characteristics. The intervention led to modest gains in confirmed water treatment behaviour [risk difference = 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02–0.09]. We found, however, no difference between the intervention and control villages in self-reported handwashing behaviour, spot-check hygiene conditions, or the prevalence of child diarrhoea, clinical acute lower respiratory infections or child growth. Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first post-intervention follow-up study of a combined household water treatment and handwashing behaviour change intervention, and the first post-intervention follow-up of either intervention type to include child health measurement. The lack of child health impacts is consistent with unsustained behaviour adoption. Our findings highlight the difficulty of implementing behaviour-based household water treatment and handwashing outside of intensive efficacy trials. PMID:19574492

Arnold, Benjamin; Arana, Byron; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Hubbard, Alan; Colford, John M

2009-01-01

74

MEDICAL SUPPLEMENT DIRECTIONS--This form assists students in providing documentation of a medical or disability condition when petitioning for  

E-print Network

MEDICAL SUPPLEMENT DIRECTIONS--This form assists students in providing documentation of a medical with the Medical Supplement. This form must be completed by the medical provider or by Disability Services if the student is currently registered with and has provided medical documentation surrounding their condition

Amin, S. Massoud

75

Proteasome inhibition is partially effective in attenuating pre-existing immunity against recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors.  

PubMed

Pre-existing immunity against adeno-associated virus (AAV) remains a major challenge facing the clinical use of systemic administration of recombinant AAV vectors for the treatment of genetic and acquired diseases using gene therapy. In this study, we evaluated the potential of bortezomib (marketed under trade name Velcade) to abrogate a pre-existing immunity to AAV in mice, thereby allowing subsequent transduction by a recombinant AAV vector of the same serotype. We demonstrate that bortezomib efficiently reduces AAV-specific IgG titres and moderates the cytotoxic T cell response in mice that have a pre-existing immunity to AAV2/8. Significant depletion of AAV2/8-specific IgG-producing plasma cells in secondary lymphoid organs and bone marrow was observed. However, this inhibition of the immune response by bortezomib was insufficient to allow subsequent re-infection with a recombinant AAV vector of a similar serotype. We show that this shortcoming is probably due to the combination of residual antibody levels and the inability of bortezomib to completely deplete the memory B cells that are re-activated in response to a repeated infection with a recombinant AAV vector. Taken together, the results of this study argue for the use of immunosuppressive therapies that target both plasma and memory B cells for the efficient elimination of pre-existing immunity against AAV2/8 vectors. PMID:22514654

Karman, Jozsef; Gumlaw, Nathan K; Zhang, Jinhua; Jiang, Ji-Lei; Cheng, Seng H; Zhu, Yunxiang

2012-01-01

76

Creatine supplementation does not affect kidney function in an animal model with pre-existing renal failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Creatine is widely used as an ergogenic substance among athletes. Safety of prolonged creatine intake has been questioned, based upon case reports and animal data. We investigated the effect of pro- longed creatine ingestion on renal function in animals with normal kidney function or pre-existing kidney failure, respectively. Methods. Male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to four experimental groups:

Youri E. C. Taes; Joris R. Delanghe; Birgitte Wuyts; Johan van de Voorde; Norbert H. Lameire

77

Proteasome Inhibition Is Partially Effective in Attenuating Pre-Existing Immunity against Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors  

PubMed Central

Pre-existing immunity against adeno-associated virus (AAV) remains a major challenge facing the clinical use of systemic administration of recombinant AAV vectors for the treatment of genetic and acquired diseases using gene therapy. In this study, we evaluated the potential of bortezomib (marketed under trade name Velcade) to abrogate a pre-existing immunity to AAV in mice, thereby allowing subsequent transduction by a recombinant AAV vector of the same serotype. We demonstrate that bortezomib efficiently reduces AAV-specific IgG titres and moderates the cytotoxic T cell response in mice that have a pre-existing immunity to AAV2/8. Significant depletion of AAV2/8-specific IgG-producing plasma cells in secondary lymphoid organs and bone marrow was observed. However, this inhibition of the immune response by bortezomib was insufficient to allow subsequent re-infection with a recombinant AAV vector of a similar serotype. We show that this shortcoming is probably due to the combination of residual antibody levels and the inability of bortezomib to completely deplete the memory B cells that are re-activated in response to a repeated infection with a recombinant AAV vector. Taken together, the results of this study argue for the use of immunosuppressive therapies that target both plasma and memory B cells for the efficient elimination of pre-existing immunity against AAV2/8 vectors. PMID:22514654

Karman, Jozsef; Gumlaw, Nathan K.; Zhang, Jinhua; Jiang, Ji-Lei; Cheng, Seng H.; Zhu, Yunxiang

2012-01-01

78

Dementia and serious coexisting medical conditions: a double whammy.  

PubMed

Research-based information about the prevalence of other serious medical conditions in people with dementia has become available only recently, and the true prevalence is not known, primarily because many people with dementia do not have a diagnosis. The existing information is sufficient, however, to show that these other conditions are common in people with dementia. It is also clear that coexisting medical conditions increase the use and cost of health care services for people with dementia, and conversely, dementia increases the use and cost of health care services for people with other serious medical conditions. Nurses and other healthcare professionals should expect to see these relationships in their elderly patients. They should know how to recognize possible dementia and assess, or obtain an assessment of, the patient's cognitive status. They should expect the worsening of cognitive and related symptoms in acutely ill people with dementia and try to eliminate factors that cause this worsening, to the extent possible, while assuring the family that the symptoms are likely to improve once the acute phase of illness or treatment is over. Families, nurses, and other health care professionals are challenged by the complex issues involved in caring for a person with both dementia and other serious medical conditions. Greater attention to these issues by informed and thoughtful clinicians will improve outcomes for the people and their family and professional caregivers. PMID:15331302

Maslow, Katie

2004-09-01

79

Relations among Chronic Medical Conditions, Medications, and Automobile Crashes in the Elderly: A Population-based Case-Control Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Older drivers have elevated crash rates and are more likely to be injured or die if they have a crash. Medical conditions and medications have been hypothesized as determinants of crash involvement. This population- based case-control study sought to identify medical conditions and medications associated with risk of at-fault crashes among older drivers. A total of 901 drivers aged 65

Gerald McGwin; Richard V. Sims; Jeffrey M. Roseman

80

Treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain by topical capsaicin: Impact of pre-existing pain in the QUEPP-study  

PubMed Central

Background This study evaluates the impact of the duration of pre-existing peripheral neuropathic pain on the therapeutic response to the capsaicin 8% cutaneous patch. Methods The non-interventional QUEPP (QUTENZA – safety and effectiveness in peripheral neuropathic pain) study evaluated the effectiveness of Qutenza™ in 1044 non-diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathic pain, who received a single application. Follow-up visits were scheduled at weeks 1–2, 4, 8 and 12. A pre-defined co-analysis of changes in average pain intensity was performed based on the duration of pre-existing pain. Results In patients with pre-existing pain for <6 months, the mean relative change of the numeric pain rating scale score on days 7–14 to week 12 versus baseline was ?36.6% [4.6 standard error of the mean (SEM); n = 105], ?25.1% (1.9 SEM; n = 311) in patients with pain duration of 6 months to 2 years, ?22.3% (1.6 SEM; n = 391) in patients with pain for >2–10 years, and ?19.2% (2.6 SEM; n = 99) in patients with pain for >10 years. Thirty percent and 50% responder rates were 61.7% and 39.3% in patients with pre-existing pain for <6 months, 42.3% and 23.3% in patients with pain for 6 months to 2 years, 40.9% and 21.6% in patients with pain for >2–10 years, and 32.3% and 14.1% in patients with pain for >10 years. Conclusions The highest treatment response to the capsaicin 8% cutaneous patch was observed in patients with a history of pre-existing peripheral neuropathic pain of less than 6 months, suggesting that early initiation of topical treatment might be indicated. PMID:24259265

Maihöfner, CG; Heskamp, M-LS

2014-01-01

81

42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Condition: Medical records. The dialysis facility must maintain complete, accurate...including home patients who elect to receive dialysis supplies and equipment from a supplier...provider of ESRD services and all other home dialysis patients whose care is under the...

2010-10-01

82

42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415...Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule...the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two...

2014-10-01

83

Working conditions and psychotropic medication: a prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To examine whether work arrangements, physical working conditions and psychosocial working conditions are associated with\\u000a subsequent mental health problems, measured by prescribed psychotropic drugs.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Data on working conditions collected among 40–60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland (N = 6,498) were linked with the register of prescribed medication. Purchases of antidepressants (ATC class N06A), sleeping\\u000a pills and sedatives (N05B and N05C),

Mikko Laaksonen; Tea Lallukka; Eero Lahelma; Timo Partonen

84

Interaction of ascending magma with pre-existing crustal fractures in monogenetic basaltic volcanism: an experimental approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magma transport through dikes is a major component of the development of monogenetic volcanic fields. These volcanic fields are characterized by numerous volcanic centers, each typically resulting from a single eruption. Therefore, magma must be transported from source to surface at different places, which raises the question of the relative importance of (1) the self-propagation of magma through pristine rock and (2) the control exerted by pre-existing fractures. To address this issue, we have carried out a series of analogue experiments to constrain the interaction of a propagating dike through a medium with pre-existing fractures. The experiments involved the injection of air into an elastic gelatin solid, which was previously cut into its upper part to simulate pre-existing fractures. The volume of the dikes, their distance from the fractures, and the ambient stress field were systematically varied to assess their influence on potential dike-fracture interactions. The results show that distance and angle between dikes and fractures influence these interactions and the dike trajectory. Dike geometry and dynamics are also affected by both the presence of the fractures and the dike volume; dikes propagating in between fractures tend to decelerate. In nature, interactions are expected for dikes and fractures separated by less than about 200 m, and dikes with a volume less than about 10-2 km3 would experience a velocity decrease. These results highlight the influence of pre-existing fractures on the mechanics and dynamics of dikes. These heterogeneities must be considered when studying the transport of magmas within the crust.

Le Corvec, Nicolas; Menand, Thierry; Lindsay, Jan

2013-03-01

85

Sleep and Culture in Children with Medical Conditions  

PubMed Central

Objectives?To provide an integrative review of the existing literature on the interrelationships among sleep, culture, and medical conditions in children.?Methods?A comprehensive literature search was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and PsychINFO computerized databases and bibliographies of relevant articles.?Results?Children with chronic illnesses experience more sleep problems than healthy children. Cultural beliefs and practices are likely to impact the sleep of children with chronic illnesses. Few studies have examined cultural factors affecting the relationship between sleep and illness, but existing evidence suggests the relationship between sleep and illness is exacerbated for diverse groups.?Conclusions?Sleep is of critical importance to children with chronic illnesses. Cultural factors can predispose children both to sleep problems and to certain medical conditions. Additional research is needed to address the limitations of the existing literature, and to develop culturally sensitive interventions to treat sleep problems in children with chronic illnesses. PMID:20332222

Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne

2010-01-01

86

Oral leukoplakia development in patients with pre-existing oral lichen planus.  

PubMed

Oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus are conditions that have the potential to transform into squamous cell carcinoma. This article describes a series of nine patients with an initial clinical-microscopic diagnosis of lichen planus. During close follow-up, these patients developed localized areas of leukoplakia at intervals ranging from one and a half to six and a half years. While both conditions may present with white and red oral mucosal changes, their management differs with leukoplakia requiring surgical intervention, therefore accurate diagnosis is imperative. PMID:25632518

Chainani-Wu, Nita; Purnell, Daniel M; Silverman, Sol

2015-01-01

87

How do the properties of a pre-existing normal-fault population influence fault development during a subsequent phase of extension?  

E-print Network

How do the properties of a pre-existing normal-fault population influence fault development during Available online 20 July 2011 Keywords: Normal faults Experimental modeling Two-phase extension Fault of a population of pre- existing normal faults influence fault development during a subsequent phase of extension

88

42 CFR 410.38 - Durable medical equipment: Scope and conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Durable medical equipment: Scope and conditions. 410.38...HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.38...

2011-10-01

89

42 CFR 410.12 - Medical and other health services: Basic conditions and limitations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical and other health services: Basic conditions...HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.12...

2010-10-01

90

42 CFR 410.12 - Medical and other health services: Basic conditions and limitations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical and other health services: Basic conditions...HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.12...

2013-10-01

91

42 CFR 410.12 - Medical and other health services: Basic conditions and limitations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical and other health services: Basic conditions...HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.12...

2012-10-01

92

Decreased prevalence of sepsis but not mild or severe P. falciparum malaria is associated with pre-existing filarial infection  

PubMed Central

Background Enhanced inflammatory host responses have been attributed as the cellular basis for development of severe malaria as well as sepsis. In contrast to this, filarial infections have been consistently reported to be associated with an immunological hypo-responsive phenotype. This suggests that successful control of filariasis by employing mass drug administration, could potentially contribute to an increase in incidence of sepsis and cerebral malaria in human communities. A case control study was undertaken to address this critical and urgent issue. Methods Eighty-nine patients with sepsis and one hundred and ninety-six patients with P. falciparum malaria all originating from Odisha, were tested for prevalence of circulating filarial antigens - a quantitative marker of active filarial infection. Antibodies to four stage specific malarial recombinant proteins were measured by solid phase immunoassays and circulating CD4+CD25high T-cells were quantified by flow cytometry with an objective to study if pre-existing filarial infections influence antibody responses to malarial antigens or the levels of circulating T-regulatory cells in P. falciparum infected patients. Results Prevalence of filarial antigenemia was significantly less in sepsis patients as compared to controls suggesting that pre-existing filariasis could influence development of sepsis. On the other hand, levels of circulating filarial antigen were comparable in severe malaria cases and healthy controls suggesting that development of severe malaria is independent of pre-existing W. bancrofti infections. Plasma TNF-a, RANTES and antibodies to recombinant malarial proteins as well as levels of circulating CD4+ CD25high cells were comparable in malaria patients with or without filarial infections. Conclusions These observations imply that successful control of filariasis could have adverse consequences on public health by increasing the incidence of sepsis, while the incidence of severe malaria may not adversely increase as a consequence of elimination of filariasis. PMID:23837823

2013-01-01

93

Pleural effusion during bromocriptine exposure in two patients with pre-existing asbestos pleural plaques: a relationship?  

PubMed

Two patients with pleural plaques developed pleural effusion and subsequent diffuse pleural fibrosis 50 and 39 yrs after their first exposure to asbestos. The diagnosis of benign asbestos pleural effusion was suggested, but the work-up finally suggested bromocriptine-induced pleural disease in both patients. These two cases illustrate that drug-induced pleural effusion is an important differential diagnosis of benign asbestos pleural effusion. It is, moreover, possible that pre-existing asbestos pleural lesions, or even asbestos exposure, increases the risk of developing bromocriptine-induced pleural disease. PMID:9493681

Knoop, C; Mairesse, M; Lenclud, C; Gevenois, P A; De Vuyst, P

1997-12-01

94

Protective efficacy of a single immunization with capripoxvirus-vectored recombinant peste des petits ruminants vaccines in presence of pre-existing immunity.  

PubMed

Sheeppox, goatpox and peste des petits ruminants (PPR) are highly contagious ruminant diseases widely distributed in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Capripoxvirus (CPV)-vectored recombinant PPR vaccines (rCPV-PPR vaccines), which have been developed and shown to protect against both Capripox (CP) and PPR, would be critical tools in the control of these important diseases. In most parts of the world, these disease distributions overlap each other leaving concerns about the potential impact that pre-existing immunity against either disease may have on the protective efficacy of these bivalent rCPV-PPR vaccines. Currently, this question has not been indisputably addressed. Therefore, we undertook this study, under experimental conditions designed for the context of mass vaccination campaigns of small ruminants, using the two CPV recombinants (Kenya sheep-1 (KS-1) strain-based constructs) developed previously in our laboratory. Pre-existing immunity was first induced by immunization either with an attenuated CPV vaccine strain (KS-1) or the attenuated PPRV vaccine strain (Nigeria 75/1) and animals were thereafter inoculated once subcutaneously with a mixture of CPV recombinants expressing either the hemagglutinin (H) or the fusion (F) protein gene of PPRV (10(3) TCID50/animal of each). Finally, these animals were challenged with a virulent CPV strain followed by a virulent PPRV strain 3 weeks later. Our study demonstrated full protection against CP for vaccinated animals with prior exposure to PPRV and a partial protection against PPR for vaccinated animals with prior exposure to CPV. The latter animals exhibited a mild clinical form of PPR and did not show any post-challenge anamnestic neutralizing antibody response against PPRV. The implications of these results are discussed herein and suggestions made for future research regarding the development of CPV-vectored vaccines. PMID:24837763

Caufour, Philippe; Rufael, Tesfaye; Lamien, Charles Euloge; Lancelot, Renaud; Kidane, Menbere; Awel, Dino; Sertse, Tefera; Kwiatek, Olivier; Libeau, Geneviève; Sahle, Mesfin; Diallo, Adama; Albina, Emmanuel

2014-06-24

95

Individual differences in reading comprehension gains from assisted reading practice: pre existing conditions, vocabulary acquisition, and amounts of practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted a study of the effects of assisted reading practice (Shany & Biemiller, 1995). In this paper we examined the original data to find factors affecting gains in reading comprehension. We contrasted 14\\u000a children who had below median gains in reading comprehension and 15 who had above median gains. There were no significant\\u000a correlations between pre-program language and reading

Michal Shany; Andrew Biemiller

2010-01-01

96

Investigation on the Automatic Geo-Referencing of Archaeological UAV Photographs by Correlation with Pre-Existing Ortho-Photos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a method for the automatic geo-referencing of archaeological photographs captured aboard unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), termed UPs. We do so by help of pre-existing ortho-photo maps (OPMs) and digital surface models (DSMs). Typically, these pre-existing data sets are based on data that were captured at a widely different point in time. This renders the detection (and hence the matching) of homologous feature points in the UPs and OPMs infeasible mainly due to temporal variations of vegetation and illumination. Facing this difficulty, we opt for the normalized cross correlation coefficient of perspectively transformed image patches as the measure of image similarity. Applying a threshold to this measure, we detect candidates for homologous image points, resulting in a distinctive, but computationally intensive method. In order to lower computation times, we reduce the dimensionality and extents of the search space by making use of a priori knowledge of the data sets. By assigning terrain heights interpolated in the DSM to the image points found in the OPM, we generate control points. We introduce respective observations into a bundle block, from which gross errors i.e. false matches are eliminated during its robust adjustment. A test of our approach on a UAV image data set demonstrates its potential and raises hope to successfully process large image archives.

Karel, W.; Doneus, M.; Briese, C.; Verhoeven, G.; Pfeifer, N.

2014-06-01

97

Liver gene therapy by lentiviral vectors reverses anti-factor IX pre-existing immunity in haemophilic mice  

PubMed Central

A major complication of factor replacement therapy for haemophilia is the development of anti-factor neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors). Here we show that liver gene therapy by lentiviral vectors (LVs) expressing factor IX (FIX) strongly reduces pre-existing anti-FIX antibodies and eradicates FIX inhibitors in haemophilia B mice. Concomitantly, plasma FIX levels and clotting activity rose to 50–100% of normal. The treatment was effective in 75% of treated mice. FIX-specific plasma cells (PCs) and memory B cells were reduced, likely because of memory B-cell depletion in response to constant exposure to high doses of FIX. Regulatory T cells displaying FIX-specific suppressive capacity were induced in gene therapy treated mice and controlled FIX-specific T helper cells. Gene therapy proved safer than a regimen mimicking immune tolerance induction (ITI) by repeated high-dose FIX protein administration, which induced severe anaphylactoid reactions in inhibitors-positive haemophilia B mice. Liver gene therapy can thus reverse pre-existing immunity, induce active tolerance to FIX and establish sustained FIX activity at therapeutic levels. These data position gene therapy as an attractive treatment option for inhibitors-positive haemophilic patients. PMID:24106222

Annoni, Andrea; Cantore, Alessio; Della Valle, Patrizia; Goudy, Kevin; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Russo, Fabio; Bartolaccini, Sara; D'Angelo, Armando; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Naldini, Luigi

2013-01-01

98

Medical Signal-Conditioning and Data-Interface System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A general-purpose portable, wearable electronic signal-conditioning and data-interface system is being developed for medical applications. The system can acquire multiple physiological signals (e.g., electrocardiographic, electroencephalographic, and electromyographic signals) from sensors on the wearer s body, digitize those signals that are received in analog form, preprocess the resulting data, and transmit the data to one or more remote location(s) via a radiocommunication link and/or the Internet. The system includes a computer running data-object-oriented software that can be programmed to configure the system to accept almost any analog or digital input signals from medical devices. The computing hardware and software implement a general-purpose data-routing-and-encapsulation architecture that supports tagging of input data and routing the data in a standardized way through the Internet and other modern packet-switching networks to one or more computer(s) for review by physicians. The architecture supports multiple-site buffering of data for redundancy and reliability, and supports both real-time and slower-than-real-time collection, routing, and viewing of signal data. Routing and viewing stations support insertion of automated analysis routines to aid in encoding, analysis, viewing, and diagnosis.

Braun, Jeffrey; Jacobus, charles; Booth, Scott; Suarez, Michael; Smith, Derek; Hartnagle, Jeffrey; LePrell, Glenn

2006-01-01

99

Nanoparticle decoration overlayer for producing a surface enhanced Raman scattering spectrum of a pre-existing polymer surface.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new method was used for obtaining a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum of a polymer surface. SERS reactive silver nanoparticles were deposited directly onto the surface of the polymer. This differs from conventional methods of producing SERS-active samples where the analyte polymer is deposited onto a SERS reactive metal nanoparticle substrate, an approach that can only give a SERS spectrum of the buried metal-polymer interface. The new technique makes it possible to study the outermost, pre-existing surface of the polymer. We obtained a SERS spectrum of the external surface of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) using this method. The vacuum evaporation parameters of the silver nanoparticles were adjusted to optimize the SERS intensity of PMMA. We demonstrate the utility of this technique by measurements on surface-modified polymers.

Roan, Bettina; Furtak, Thomas

2007-03-01

100

Traction-induced foveal damage predisposes eyes with pre-existing posterior vitreous detachment to idiopathic macular hole formation  

PubMed Central

Aim To propose a new mechanism for the development of idiopathic macular hole in the setting of pre-existing posterior vitreous detachment (PVD). Methods Patients were examined clinically with fundus contact lens biomicroscopy and high-definition optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to characterize the structural changes in the fovea following PVD. Results Two patients presented with vitreofoveal separation and were found by high-definition OCT to have subtle foveal disruption and irregularity of the foveal contour with no evidence of a full thickness macular hole. Sequential examination of these patients demonstrated delayed formation of idiopathic macular hole. Conclusion Traction-induced inner foveal damage occurring before or coincident with spontaneous vitreofoveal separation destabilizes the fovea and predisposes some eyes to delayed macular hole formation. PMID:22388594

Besirli, C G; Johnson, M W

2012-01-01

101

Pre-existing anti-HLA antibodies negatively impact survival of pediatric aplastic anemia patients undergoing HSCT.  

PubMed

Graft failure and survival are the major problems for patients with aplastic anemia undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Previous studies showed that anti-HLA antibodies negatively impact engraftment in HSCT. This retrospective study of 51 pediatric patients with acquired aplastic anemia who underwent allogeneic HSCT at a single institution between 2006 and 2012 investigated the influence of anti-HLA antibodies on the outcome of HSCT. Serum samples collected before HSCT were tested for the presence of anti-HLA antibodies. Pre-existing anti-HLA antibodies were detected in 54.9% (28/51) of patients, among whom 39.2% (20/51) had anti-HLA class I antibodies. Anti-HLA antibodies were associated with worse five-yr survival (78.6% vs. 100%, p = 0.021) and higher treatment-related mortality (21.4% vs. 0%, p = 0.028) compared with antibody-negative patients. Anti-HLA class I antibody-positive patients had poorer five-yr survival (75.0%) than anti-HLA class I&II antibody-positive and antibody-negative patients (87.5% and 100.0%, respectively, p = 0.039). Presence of anti-HLA class I antibodies (p = 0.024) and older age (10 yr or more; p = 0.027) significantly increased the risk of post-HSCT mortality. Pre-existing anti-HLA antibodies negatively affect the outcome of HSCT in pediatric patients with aplastic anemia. Routine testing for anti-HLA antibodies concurrent with efficient treatment should be conducted prior to HSCT. PMID:25123053

Zhu, Hua; He, Jun; Cai, Junchao; Yuan, Xiaoni; Jiang, Hua; Luo, Changying; Wang, Jianmin; Luo, Chengjuan; Pan, Zhijuan; Terasaki, Paul I; Ding, Lixia; Chen, Jing

2014-11-01

102

Influence of weathering and pre-existing large scale fractures on gravitational slope failure: insights from 3-D physical modelling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using a new 3-D physical modelling technique we investigated the initiation and evolution of large scale landslides in presence of pre-existing large scale fractures and taking into account the slope material weakening due to the alteration/weathering. The modelling technique is based on the specially developed properly scaled analogue materials, as well as on the original vertical accelerator device enabling increases in the "gravity acceleration" up to a factor 50. The weathering primarily affects the uppermost layers through the water circulation. We simulated the effect of this process by making models of two parts. The shallower one represents the zone subject to homogeneous weathering and is made of low strength material of compressive strength ?l. The deeper (core) part of the model is stronger and simulates intact rocks. Deformation of such a model subjected to the gravity force occurred only in its upper (low strength) layer. In another set of experiments, low strength (?w) narrow planar zones sub-parallel to the slope surface (?wPre-existing fractures were introduced into the model by cutting it along a given plan. They have proved to be of small influence on the slope stability, except when they were associated to highly weathered zones. In this latter case the fractures laterally limited the slides. Deep seated rockslides initiation is thus directly defined by the mechanical structure of the hillslope's uppermost levels and especially by the presence of the weak zones due to the weathering. The large scale fractures play a more passive role and can only influence the shape and the volume of the sliding units.

Bachmann, D.; Bouissou, S.; Chemenda, A.

2004-11-01

103

14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

2010-01-01

104

14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

2013-01-01

105

14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

2012-01-01

106

14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

2013-01-01

107

42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...registration, but prior to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. The medical history and physical examination must...registration, but prior to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services, when the medical history and physical...

2014-10-01

108

42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...registration, but prior to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. The medical history and physical examination must...registration, but prior to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services, when the medical history and physical...

2011-10-01

109

42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...registration, but prior to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. The medical history and physical examination must...registration, but prior to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services, when the medical history and physical...

2012-10-01

110

42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...registration, but prior to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. The medical history and physical examination must...registration, but prior to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services, when the medical history and physical...

2013-10-01

111

The role of pre-existing tectonic structures and magma chamber shape on the geometry of resurgent blocks: Analogue models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A set of analogue models has been carried out to understand the role of an asymmetric magma chamber on the resurgence-related deformation of a previously deformed crustal sector. The results are then compared with those of similar experiments, previously performed using a symmetric magma chamber. Two lines of experiments were performed to simulate resurgence in an area with a simple graben-like structure and resurgence in a caldera that collapsed within the previously generated graben-like structure. On the basis of commonly accepted scaling laws, we used dry-quartz sand to simulate the brittle behaviour of the crust and Newtonian silicone to simulate the ductile behaviour of the intruding magma. An asymmetric shape of the magma chamber was simulated by moulding the upper surface of the silicone. The resulting empty space was then filled with sand. The results of the asymmetric-resurgence experiments are similar to those obtained with symmetrically shaped silicone. In the sample with a simple graben-like structure, resurgence occurs through the formation of a discrete number of differentially displaced blocks. The most uplifted portion of the deformed depression floor is affected by newly formed, high-angle, inward-dipping reverse ring-faults. The least uplifted portion of the caldera is affected by normal faults with similar orientation, either newly formed or resulting from reactivation of the pre-existing graben faults. This asymmetric block resurgence is also observed in experiments performed with a previous caldera collapse. In this case, the caldera-collapse-related reverse ring-fault is completely erased along the shortened side, and enhances the effect of the extensional faults on the opposite side, so facilitating the intrusion of the silicone. The most uplifted sector, due to an asymmetrically shaped intrusion, is always in correspondence of the thickest overburden. These results suggest that the stress field induced by resurgence is likely dictated by the geometry of the intruding magma body, and the related deformation is partially controlled by pre-existing tectonic and/or volcano-tectonic structures.

Marotta, Enrica; de Vita, Sandro

2014-02-01

112

Transforming growth factor ? neutralization ameliorates pre-existing hepatic fibrosis and reduces cholangiocarcinoma in thioacetamide-treated rats.  

PubMed

Considerable evidence has demonstrated that transforming growth factor ? (TGF-?) plays a key role in hepatic fibrosis, the final common pathway for a variety of chronic liver diseases leading to liver insufficiency. Although a few studies have reported that blocking TGF-? with soluble receptors or siRNA can prevent the progression of hepatic fibrosis, as yet no evidence has been provided that TGF-? antagonism can improve pre-existing hepatic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a murine neutralizing TGF-? monoclonal antibody (1D11), in a rat model of thioacetamide (TAA)-induced hepatic fibrosis. TAA administration for 8 weeks induced extensive hepatic fibrosis, whereupon 1D11 dosing was initiated and maintained for 8 additional weeks. Comparing the extent of fibrosis at two time points, pre- and post-1D11 dosing, we observed a profound regression of tissue injury and fibrosis upon treatment, as reflected by a reduction of collagen deposition to a level significantly less than that observed before 1D11 dosing. Hepatic TGF-?1 mRNA, tissue hydroxyproline, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) levels were significantly elevated at the end of the 8 week TAA treatment. Vehicle and antibody control groups demonstrated progressive injury through 16 weeks, whereas those animals treated for 8 weeks with 1D11 showed striking improvement in histologic and molecular endpoints. During the course of tissue injury, TAA also induced cholangiocarcinomas. At the end of study, the number and area of cholangiocarcinomas were significantly diminished in rats receiving 1D11 as compared to control groups, presumably by the marked reduction of supporting fibrosis/stroma. The present study demonstrates that 1D11 can reverse pre-existing hepatic fibrosis induced by extended dosing of TAA. The regression of fibrosis was accompanied by a marked reduction in concomitantly developed cholangiocarcinomas. These data provide evidence that therapeutic dosing of a TGF-? antagonist can diminish and potentially reverse hepatic fibrosis and also reduce the number and size of attendant cholangiocarcinomas. PMID:23349909

Ling, Hong; Roux, Eric; Hempel, Donna; Tao, Jingzang; Smith, Mandy; Lonning, Scott; Zuk, Anna; Arbeeny, Cynthia; Ledbetter, Steve

2013-01-01

113

Region-Specific Integration of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neuronal Precursors into a Pre-Existing Neuronal Circuit  

PubMed Central

Enduring reorganization is accepted as a fundamental process of adult neural plasticity. The most dramatic example of this reorganization is the birth and continuously occurring incorporation of new neurons into the pre-existing network of the adult mammalian hippocampus. Based on this phenomenon we transplanted murine embryonic stem (ES)-cell derived neuronal precursors (ESNPs) into murine organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHC) and examined their integration. Using a precise quantitative morphological analysis combined with a detailed electrophysiology, we show a region-specific morphological integration of transplanted ESNPs into different subfields of the hippocampal tissue, resulting in pyramidal neuron-like embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs) in the Cornu Ammonis (CA1 and CA3) and granule neuron-like ESNs in the dentate gyrus (DG), respectively. Subregion specific structural maturation was accompanied by the development of dendritic spines and the generation of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). This cell type specific development does not depend upon NMDA-receptor-dependent synaptic transmission. The presented integration approach was further used to determine the cell-autonomous function of the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75 (P75NTR), as a possible negative regulator of ESN integration. By this means we used p75NTR-deficient ESNPs to study their integration into a WT organotypic environment. We show here that p75NTR is not necessary for integration per se but plays a suppressing role in dendritic development. PMID:23840491

Neuser, Franziska; Polack, Martin; Annaheim, Christine; Tucker, Kerry L.; Korte, Martin

2013-01-01

114

Imatinib Front-Line Therapy Is Safe and Effective in Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia With Pre-Existing Liver and/or Renal Dysfunction  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Imatinib 400 mg daily is the standard treatment for patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The safety and efficacy of imatinib in CML patients with pre-existing liver and/or renal dysfunction has not been analyzed. METHODS The authors analyzed the outcome of 259 patients with early chronic phase CML treated with imatinib (starting dose 400 mg in 50, 800 mg in 209). Pre-existing liver and/or renal dysfunction was seen in 38 (15%) and 11 (4%) patients, respectively. RESULTS Dose reductions were required in 91 (43%) of 210 patients with normal organ function, compared with 8 (73%) of 11 (P =.065) with renal dysfunction, and 19 (50%) of 38 (P =.271) with liver dysfunction. Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicities including anemia (29%, 10%, and 7% of patients with renal dysfunction, liver dysfunction, and normal organ function, respectively), neutropenia (57%, 30%, and 30%), and thrombocytopenia (43%, 30%, and 26%) were more frequent in patients with pre-existing renal dysfunction treated with high-dose imatinib. Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicities were observed at similar frequencies. Complete cytogenetic response rates, event-free survival, and overall survival were similar in all groups. CONCLUSIONS Although patients with pre-existing liver and/or renal dysfunction might have a higher rate of hematologic toxicity and require more frequent dose reductions, most patients can be adequately managed, resulting in response rates and survival similar to those without pre-existing organ dysfunction. PMID:20564631

Tong, Wei-Gang; Kantarjian, Hagop; O'Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stefan; Ravandi, Farhad; Borthakur, Gautam; Shan, Jianqin; Pierce, Sherry; Rios, Mary Beth; Cortes, Jorge

2015-01-01

115

Modeling Medical System Threats with Conditional Probabilities using Multiple-Valued Logic Decision  

E-print Network

the medical community in 2000 when it reported that more than two million serious medical errors occur every of the patient's symptoms, wrong treatment strategy selection, and errors in administration of the treatment [3Modeling Medical System Threats with Conditional Probabilities using Multiple-Valued Logic Decision

Thornton, Mitchell

116

28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...a reasonable degree of medical certainty: (i) Bone marrow biopsy or aspirate report; (ii) Peripheral white blood cell differential count report; (iii) Autopsy report; (iv) Hospital discharge summary; (v) Physician...

2012-07-01

117

28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...a reasonable degree of medical certainty: (i) Bone marrow biopsy or aspirate report; (ii) Peripheral white blood cell differential count report; (iii) Autopsy report; (iv) Hospital discharge summary; (v) Physician...

2011-07-01

118

28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...a reasonable degree of medical certainty: (i) Bone marrow biopsy or aspirate report; (ii) Peripheral white blood cell differential count report; (iii) Autopsy report; (iv) Hospital discharge summary; (v) Physician...

2010-07-01

119

Pre-existing Schistosoma japonicum infection alters the immune response to Plasmodium berghei infection in C57BL/6 mice  

PubMed Central

Background Since helminths and malaria parasites are often co-endemic, it is important to clarify the immunoregulatory mechanism that occurs during the process of co-infection. A previous study confirmed that dendritic cells (DCs) are involved in the establishment and regulation of the T-cell-mediated immune response to malaria infection. In the current study, distinct response profiles for splenic DCs and regulatory T cell (Treg) responses were assessed to evaluate the effects of a pre-existing Schistosoma japonicum infection on malaria infection. Methods Malaria parasitaemia, survival rate, brain histopathology and clinical experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) were assessed in both Plasmodium berghei ANKA-mono-infected and S. japonicum-P. berghei ANKA-co-infected mice. Cell surface/intracellular staining and flow cytometry were used to analyse the level of splenic DC subpopulations, toll-like receptors (TLRs), DC surface molecules, Tregs (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+), IFN-?/IL-10-secreting Tregs, and IFN-?+/IL-10+-Foxp3-CD4+ T cells. IFN-?, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 levels were determined in splenocyte supernatants using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The co-infected mice had significantly higher malaria parasitaemia, compared with the mono-infected mice, on days 2, 3, 7 and 8 after P. berghei ANKA infection. Mono-infected mice had a slightly lower survival rate, while clinical ECM symptoms, and brain pathology, were significantly more severe during the period of susceptibility to ECM. On days 5 and 8 post P. berghei ANKA infection, co-infected mice had significantly lower levels of CD11c+CD11b+, CD11c+CD45R/B220+, CD11c+TLR4+, CD11c+TLR9+, CD11c+MHCII+, CD11c+CD86+, IFN-?-secreting Tregs, and IFN-?+Foxp3-CD4+ T cells in single-cell suspensions of splenocytes when compared with P. berghei ANKA-mono-infected mice. Co-infected mice also had significantly lower levels of IFN-? and higher levels of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in splenocyte supernatants compared to mono-infected mice. There were no differences in the levels of IL-10-secreting Tregs or IL-10+Foxp3-CD4+ T cells between co-infected and mono-infected mice. Conclusions A Tregs-associated Th2 response plays an important role in protecting against ECM pathology. Pre-existing S. japonicum infection suppressed TLR ligand-induced DC maturation and had an anti-inflammatory effect during malaria infection not only by virtue of its ability to induce Th2 responses, but also by directly suppressing the ability of DC to produce pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:24034228

2013-01-01

120

42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS FOR COVERAGE FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE FACILITIES Administration § 494.150 Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director....

2014-10-01

121

42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS FOR COVERAGE FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE FACILITIES Administration § 494.150 Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director....

2010-10-01

122

Children with Chronic Medical Conditions: Recommendations for School Mental Health Clinicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with chronic medical conditions are typically included in regular education settings. School mental health clinicians can play a key role in enhancing the social and cognitive development of these children. This manuscript presents a review of literature indicating ways to assist children with medical conditions in schools. Information about assessment, family-centered interventions, and school reintegration programs is reviewed. Additionally,

Laura A. Nabors; Heather D. Lehmkuhl

2004-01-01

123

Schoolchildren with Dysphagia Associated with Medically Complex Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This article reviews population trends and general characteristics of children with dysphagia in schools, provides an overview of dysphagia teams and the roles of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in school and hospital settings, and describes assessment and treatment of swallowing and feeding problems in children with complex medical

Lefton-Greif, Maureen A.; Arvedson, Joan C.

2008-01-01

124

Subversion of Innate Defenses by the Interplay between DENV and Pre-Existing Enhancing Antibodies: TLRs Signaling Collapse  

PubMed Central

Background The phenomenon of antibody dependent enhancement as a major determinant that exacerbates disease severity in DENV infections is well accepted. While the detailed mechanism of antibody enhanced disease severity is unclear, evidence suggests that it is associated with both increased DENV infectivity and suppression of the type I IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. Therefore, it is imperative for us to understand the intracellular mechanisms altered during ADE infection to decipher the mechanism of severe pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings In this present work, qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and gene array analysis were conducted to determine whether DENV-antibody complex infection exerts a suppressive effect on the expression and/or function of the pathogen recognition patterns, focusing on the TLR-signaling pathway. We show here that Fc?RI and Fc?RIIa synergistically facilitated entry of DENV-antibody complexes into monocytic THP-1 cells. Ligation between DENV-antibody complexes and FcR not only down regulated TLRs gene expression but also up regulated SARM, TANK, and negative regulators of the NF-?B pathway, resulting in suppression of innate responses but increased viral production. These results were confirmed by blocking with anti-Fc?RI or anti-Fc?RIIa antibodies which reduced viral production, up-regulated IFN-? synthesis, and increased gene expression in the TLR-dependent signaling pathway. The negative impact of DENV-ADE infection on the TLR-dependent pathway was strongly supported by gene array screening which revealed that both MyD88-dependent and –independent signaling molecules were down regulated during DENV-ADE infection. Importantly, the same phenomenon was seen in PBMC of secondary DHF/DSS patients but not in PBMC of DF patients. Conclusions/Significance Our present work demonstrates the mechanism by which DENV uses pre-existing immune mediators to defeat the principal activating pathway of innate defense resulting in suppression of an array of innate immune responses. Interestingly, this phenomenon specifically occurred during the severe form of DENV infection but not in the mild form of disease. PMID:21200427

Modhiran, Naphak; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Ubol, Sukathida

2010-01-01

125

A Comparison of Expedition Medical Condition List Treatment Directives with Integrated Medical Model Simulation Data Presentation and Briefing Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This aerospace medicine clerkship project is under the direction of Dr. Sharmila Watkins and is in cooperation with Dr. Eric Kerstman and Dr. Ronak Shah. The questions of the research project are: 1. What are the main drivers of evacuation and loss of crew life (LOCL) on three Design Reference Missions (DRMs): Near Earth Asteroid (NEA), Lunar Sortie and Lunar Outpost using an inexhaustible International Space Station medical kit 2. What are the treatment designations for these driving medical conditions as listed in Expedition Medical Condition List (EMCL) 3. Do the drivers make sense in the context of the given Design Reference Mission (DRM) 4. Do any EMCL treatment designations need re-assessing.

Lewis, Robert

2013-01-01

126

Lateral propagation of active normal faults throughout pre-existing fault zones: an example from the Southern Apennines, Italy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main active structures in the Southern Apennines are represented by a set of NW-trending normal faults, which are mainly located in the axial sector of the chain. Evidences arising from neotectonics and seismology show activity of a composite seismic source, the Irpinia - Agri Valley, located across the Campania-Basilicata border. This seismic source is made up of two right-stepping, individual seismic sources forming a relay ramp. Each individual seismic source consists of a series of nearly parallel normal fault segments. The relay ramp area, located around the Vietri di Potenza town, is bounded by two seismic segments, the San Gregorio Magno Fault, to the NW, and the Pergola-Melandro Fault, to the SE. The possible interaction between the two right-stepping fault segments has not been proven yet, since the fault system of the area has never been analyzed in detail. This work is aimed at assessing the geometry of such fault system, inferring the relative age of the different fault sets by studying the crosscutting relationships, characterizing the micromechanics of fault rocks associated to the various fault sets, and understanding the modalities of lateral propagation of the two bounding fault segments. Crosscutting relationships are recognized by combining classical geological mapping with morphotectonic methods. This latter approach, which include the analysis of aerial photographs and field inspection of quaternary slope deposits, is used to identify the most recent structures among those cropping out in the field area. In the relay ramp area, normal faults crosscut different tectonic units of the Apennine chain piled up, essentially, during the Middle to Late Miocene. The topmost unit (only few tens of meter-thick) consists of a mélange containing blocks of different lithologies in a clayish matrix. The intermediate thrust sheet consists of 1-1.5 km-thick platform carbonates of late Triassic-Jurassic age, with dolomites at the base and limestones at the top, unconformably covered by Miocene clastic deposits. The lower thrust sheet is made up of deep-sea deposits of late Triassic to Eocene age, which include pelagic limestones, radiolarites, marls and turbiditic calcarenites. The relay ramp area is comprised of two main fault sets, which are NW-trending (N120-140E) and NE-trending (N60-70E). Minor E-trending (N90-100E) and NNW-trending (N160-170E) faults are also present. Maximum throws of the most developed faults, which are also characterized by the longest traces, are in the order of 300-400 m. Crosscutting relationships and morphotectonic analyses generally show that the NW-trending faults are the most recent, as also shown by the involvement of Quaternary breccias and near surface fault rocks. Our data indicate that propagation of NW-trending normal faults in the relay ramp area took place thanks to the breaking of a pre-existing structural grain made up, mainly, of NE-trending normal faults. This process determined the different multi-scale properties to the two fault sets, and somehow inhibited the lateral growth of the NW-trending normal faults.

Agosta, Fabrizio; Prosser, Giacomo; Ivo Giano, Salvatore

2013-04-01

127

28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept...condition verification from the state cancer or tumor registry that it possesses...appropriate authorities at the National Cancer Institute can make a diagnosis of...

2014-07-01

128

Adherence to Medication Regimens among Low-Income Patients with Multiple Comorbid Chronic Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These…

Mishra, Shiraz I.; Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L.

2011-01-01

129

Archean tonalites are not derived by melting of hot subducted slabs: They are produced by differentiation of mafic, hydrous magmas and melting of pre-existing crust  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Slab melting in a subduction zone has been called upon to produce high-MgO, high- silica magmas known as adakites (EOS, 2001, 82: 65-69). Adakites are rare, volumetrically minor in subduction zone settings, and appear to be associated with subduction of young, "hot" oceanic crust which is inferred to be easier to melt. These conditions are often hypothesized to have been more common in the Archean, resulting in the gregarious tonalite-trondjhemite-granite (TTG) suites thought to characterize Archean cratons. There are at least two difficulties with this hypothesis. 1) Most Archean TTGs are not compositionally similar to adakites. Although the Archean TTGs share some trace element characteristics (e.g. high Sr and low Y), they do not have the high magnesium contents that are a distinctive hallmark of adakites. The important major element characteristics of Archean TTGs are strikingly similar to modern silica-rich igneous rocks that formed through a combination of complex petrologic processes that include: fractionation of more mafic subduction-related basalts, re-melting of underplated basalt in the lower crust (+/- garnet-bearing amphibolites), and melting and assimilation of pre-existing crustal rocks. In arc settings, these processes all occur within the overriding plate, not in the subducted slab. 2) Adakites are not produced by hot slab melting, but by wet slab fluid loss or low extents of water-saturated melting. Experimental calibration of the melting conditions that formed primitive adakite magmas at Mt. Shasta, California indicate that mantle melting occurs when a water-rich fluid component released from the cooler slab encounters hotter overlying mantle at the base of the mantle wedge and melts at the vapor-saturated solidus. Melting continues as the hydrous mantle melts ascends into hotter, shallower mantle wedge, and a cool, hydrous magma is separated at the top of the wedge and delivered to the crust. Thus, the major element and trace-element signatures are in large part decoupled. The slab contributes mostly trace elements; including the elements that are used to argue for slab melting. Understanding the sources of elemental contributions to the magma is important, because of the enormous implications for models of Archean crustal composition and formation. Trace-element signatures alone suggest a major slab component, but the major elements like SiO2 were contributed to the primary melt from the mantle wedge. In our view, Archean TTGs are hybrid rocks and contain mixed trace and major element signatures that are contributed from several sources.

Grove, T. L.; Bowring, S. A.

2001-05-01

130

Cognitive impairment in common, noncentral nervous system medical conditions of adults and the elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

Common, noncentral nervous system medical conditions linked with cognitive impairment in adults and the elderly include: acute respiratory distress syndrome; cancer; chronic kidney disease; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; coronary heart disease; hypertension; obesity (bariatric surgical candidates); obstructive sleep apnea; and type 2 diabetes. Cross-condition comparison of the nature and frequency of cognitive impairment is difficult as these conditions often coexist,

Philip G. Gasquoine

2011-01-01

131

Guide to Geriatric Syndromes: Common and Often Related Medical Conditions in Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... Urinary Incontinence Related Documents PDF A Guide to Geriatric Syndromes Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources A Guide to Geriatric Syndromes: Common and Often Related Medical Conditions in ...

132

Swinburne University of Technology Disability / Medical Documentation Form Disability Services requires students to provide documentation of a disability or medical condition from a relevant professional, before  

E-print Network

Swinburne University of Technology Disability / Medical Documentation Form Disability Services requires students to provide documentation of a disability or medical condition from a relevant Guidelines" for more information). The information provided will remain confidential and be used

Liley, David

133

Systematic screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions: Still debatable  

PubMed Central

Background Assessing people's ability to drive has become a public health concern in most industrialized countries. Although age itself is not a predictive factor of an increased risk for dangerous driving, the prevalence of medical conditions that may impair driving increases with age. Because the implementation of a screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions is a public health issue, its usefulness should be judged using standardised criteria already proposed for screening for chronic disease. The aim of this paper is to propose standardised criteria suitable to assess the scientific validity of screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions, and identify potential issues to be clarified before screening can be implemented and effective. Discussion Using criteria developed for screening for chronic diseases and published studies on driving with medical conditions, we specify six criteria to judge the opportunity of screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions. This adaptation was needed because of the complexity of the natural history of medical conditions and their potential consequences on driving and road safety. We then illustrate that published studies pleading for or against screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions fail to provide the needed documentation. Individual criteria were mentioned in 3 to 72% of 36 papers pleading for or against screening. Quantitative estimates of relevant indicators were provided in at most 42% of papers, and some data, such as the definition of an appropriate unsafe driving period were never provided. Summary The standardised framework described in this paper provides a template for assessing the effectiveness (or lack of effectiveness) of proposed measures for screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions. Even if most criteria were mentioned in the published literature pleading for or against such a screening, the failure to find quantitative and evidence-based estimates of relevant indicators provides useful insight for further research. PMID:18215269

Leproust, Sandy; Lagarde, Emmanuel; Salmi, L Rachid

2008-01-01

134

28 CFR 79.26 - Proof of medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...section. (For claims relating to primary cancer of the liver, the claimant or eligible...Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept...condition verification from the state cancer or tumor registry that it...

2014-07-01

135

28 CFR 79.26 - Proof of medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...section. (For claims relating to primary cancer of the liver, the claimant or eligible...Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept...condition verification from the state cancer or tumor registry that it...

2011-07-01

136

28 CFR 79.26 - Proof of medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...section. (For claims relating to primary cancer of the liver, the claimant or eligible...Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept...condition verification from the state cancer or tumor registry that it...

2012-07-01

137

28 CFR 79.26 - Proof of medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...section. (For claims relating to primary cancer of the liver, the claimant or eligible...Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept...condition verification from the state cancer or tumor registry that it...

2013-07-01

138

Tests and Medical Conditions Associated with Dementia Diagnosis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Diagnosis of dementia in adults with intellectual disabilities requires documentation of clinically significant declines in memory and other cognitive skills, as well as changes in everyday and emotional functioning. To improve diagnostic accuracy in adults with Down syndrome, the authors examined conditions often associated with dementia, as well…

Burt, Diana B.; Primeaux-Hart, Sharon; Loveland, Katherine A.; Cleveland, Lynne A.; Lewis, Kay R.; Lesser, Jary; Pearson, Pamela L.

2005-01-01

139

Comment on “Structural controls on a carbon dioxide-driven mud volcano field in the Northern Apennines (Pieve Santo Stefano, Italy): Relations with pre-existing steep discontinuities and seismicity”  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bonini (2009, Structural controls on a carbon dioxide-driven mud volcano field in the Northern Apennines (Pieve Santo Stefano, Italy): relations with pre-existing steep discontinuities and seismicity. Journal of Structural Geology 31, 44-54) presents a 2D mechanical analysis to infer the failure conditions responsible for the seismicity distribution during an M w = 4.6 seismic sequence nucleating during 2001 in the Northern Apennines. In my view the mechanical analysis presented in this paper has some weakness or is not well constrained, in particular: 1) the assumption of a dip angle of 50°, is not consistent with the activated structures; 2) the P f = ?3 condition, difficult to be attained along a cohesionless fault dipping at 50°; 3) the isotropic stress state, i.e. ?2 = ?3, that is not consistent with the active or recent stress field in the area.

Collettini, Cristiano

2009-08-01

140

Temperature-Dependent Structural Changes of Parkinson's Alpha-Synuclein Reveal the Role of Pre-Existing Oligomers in Alpha-Synuclein Fibrillization  

PubMed Central

Amyloid fibrils of ?-synuclein are the main constituent of Lewy bodies deposited in substantial nigra of Parkinson's disease brains. ?-Synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein lacking compact secondary and tertiary structures. To enhance the understanding of its structure and function relationship, we utilized temperature treatment to study ?-synuclein conformational changes and the subsequent effects. We found that after 1 hr of high temperature pretreatment, >80°C, ?-synuclein fibrillization was significantly inhibited. However, the temperature melting coupled with circular dichroism spectra showed that ?-synuclein was fully reversible and the NMR studies showed no observable structural changes of ?-synuclein after 95°C treatment. By using cross-linking and analytical ultracentrifugation, rare amount of pre-existing ?-synuclein oligomers were found to decrease after the high temperature treatment. In addition, a small portion of C-terminal truncation of ?-synuclein also occurred. The reduction of pre-existing oligomers of ?-synuclein may contribute to less seeding effect that retards the kinetics of amyloid fibrillization. Overall, our results showed that the pre-existing oligomeric species is a key factor contributing to ?-synuclein fibrillization. Our results facilitate the understanding of ?-synuclein fibrillization. PMID:23349712

Ariesandi, Winny; Chang, Chi-Fon; Chen, Tseng-Erh; Chen, Yun-Ru

2013-01-01

141

42 CFR 110.50 - Medical records necessary for the Secretary to determine whether a covered injury was sustained.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...covered countermeasure; and (3) All medical records for one year prior to administration...countermeasure recipient's pre-existing medical history. (b) A requester may submit additional medical documentation that he or she...

2011-10-01

142

Pre-Existing Hypoxia Is Associated with Greater EEG Suppression and Early Onset of Evolving Seizure Activity during Brief Repeated Asphyxia in Near-Term Fetal Sheep  

PubMed Central

Spontaneous antenatal hypoxia is associated with high risk of adverse outcomes, however, there is little information on neural adaptation to labor-like insults. Chronically instrumented near-term sheep fetuses (125 ± 3 days, mean ± SEM) with baseline PaO2 < 17 mmHg (hypoxic group: n = 8) or > 17 mmHg (normoxic group: n = 8) received 1-minute umbilical cord occlusions repeated every 5 minutes for a total of 4 hours, or until mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) fell below 20 mmHg for two successive occlusions. 5/8 fetuses with pre-existing hypoxia were unable to complete the full series of occlusions (vs. 0/8 normoxic fetuses). Pre-existing hypoxia was associated with progressive metabolic acidosis (nadir: pH 7.08 ± 0.04 vs. 7.33 ± 0.02, p<0.01), hypotension during occlusions (nadir: 24.7 ± 1.8 vs. 51.4 ± 3.2 mmHg, p<0.01), lower carotid blood flow during occlusions (23.6 ± 6.1 vs. 63.0 ± 4.8 mL/min, p<0.01), greater suppression of EEG activity during, between, and after occlusions (p<0.01) and slower resolution of cortical impedance, an index of cytotoxic edema. No normoxic fetuses, but 4/8 hypoxic fetuses developed seizures 148 ± 45 minutes after the start of occlusions, with a seizure burden of 26 ± 6 sec during the inter-occlusion period, and 15.1 ± 3.4 min/h in the first 6 hours of recovery. In conclusion, in fetuses with pre-existing hypoxia, repeated brief asphyxia at a rate consistent with early labor is associated with hypotension, cephalic hypoperfusion, greater EEG suppression, inter-occlusion seizures, and more sustained cytotoxic edema, consistent with early onset of neural injury. PMID:23991209

Wassink, Guido; Bennet, Laura; Davidson, Joanne O.; Westgate, Jenny A.; Gunn, Alistair J.

2013-01-01

143

Pre-existing hyperlipidaemia increased the risk of new-onset anxiety disorders after traumatic brain injury: a 14-year population-based study  

PubMed Central

Objectives Anxiety disorders (ADs) are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the risk factors of new-onset ADs remain unclear. This study was aimed at evaluating the incidence and risk factors for new-onset ADs, including pre-existing hyperlipidaemia and three major comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cardiovascular disease), in patients with TBI. Setting A matched cohort study was conducted using the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database between January 1997 and December 2010. Participants A total of 3822 participants (1274 patients with TBI with hyperlipidaemia and 2548 age-matched and gender-matched patients with TBI without hyperlipidaemia). Outcome measures The incidence and HRs for the development of new-onset ADs after TBI were compared between the two groups. Results The overall incidence rate of new-onset ADs for patients with TBI with hyperlipidaemia is 142.03/10?000 person-years (PYs). Patients with TBI with hyperlipidaemia have a 1.60-fold incidence rate ratio (p<0.0001) and increased HR of ADs (1.58, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.02) compared with those without hyperlipidaemia. The incidence rates of ADs for males and females with hyperlipidaemia, respectively, were 142.12 and 292.32/10?000 PYs, which were higher than those without hyperlipidaemia (93.03 and 171.68/10?000 PYs, respectively). Stratified by age group, hyperlipidaemia is a risk factor of ADs for patients with TBI aged 65?years or younger. Conclusions Pre-existing hyperlipidaemia is an independent predictor of new-onset ADs in patients with TBI, even when controlling for other demographic and clinical variables. Female patients with pre-existing hyperlipidaemia had significantly higher risk of new-onset ADs than males, especially between the ages of 35 and 65?years. PMID:25034630

Ho, Chung-Han; Hsieh, Kuang-Yang; Liang, Fu-Wen; Li, Chia-Jung; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chio, Chung-Ching; Chang, Chin-Hung; Kuo, Jinn-Rung

2014-01-01

144

Assessing health conditions and medication use among the homeless community in Long Beach, California  

PubMed Central

Objective: Persons experiencing homelessness are a vulnerable population and are at increased risk for morbidity and all-cause mortality compared to the general population. This study sought to evaluate medication use, regular physician visits, and identify health conditions among the homeless population of Long Beach, California. Methods: Two “brown bag” medication review events were held at homeless shelters in the Long Beach area. Demographic information, medication use, and comorbid disease states were obtained through surveys. Findings: Three-fourths of the cohort (95 participants) consisted of males, and the average age of participants was 48 years. Psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular disease were the most common disease states reported at 32% and 46%, respectively and so were medications used in treating these chronic diseases. Medication adherence was found to be a significant problem in this population, where more than 30% of patients were nonadherent to medications for chronic diseases. Furthermore, foot problems, hearing and vision difficulties constitute the most commonly overlooked health problems within the homeless population. Conclusion: Based on this and other similar finding, we must accept that the homeless represent a vulnerable population, and that because of this fact, more programs should be focused at improving availability and access to health care among the homeless. Regarding the high number of reported health problems in the study, more studies are needed and more studies should incorporate screening for foot, hearing, and vision issues, both to increase awareness and to provide an opportunity for devising possible solutions to these highly preventable conditions. PMID:25114938

Chong, Mok Thoong; Yamaki, Jason; Harwood, Megan; d'Assalenaux, Richard; Rosenberg, Ettie; Aruoma, Okezie; Bishayee, Anupam

2014-01-01

145

Cladodes, leaf-like organs in Asparagus, show the significance of co-option of pre-existing genetic regulatory circuit for morphological diversity of plants  

PubMed Central

Plants in the genus Asparagus have determinate leaf-like organs called cladodes in the position of leaf axils. Because of their leaf-like morphology, axillary position, and morphological variation, it has been unclear how this unusual organ has evolved and diversified. In the previous study, we have shown that cladodes in the genus Asparagus are modified axillary shoots and proposed a model that cladodes have arisen by co-option and deployment of genetic regulatory circuit (GRC) involved in leaf development. Moreover, we proposed that the alteration of the expression pattern of genes involved in establishment of adaxial/abaxial polarity has led to the morphological diversification from leaf-like to rod-like form of cladodes in the genus. Thus, these results indicated that the co-option and alteration of pre-existing GRC play an important role in acquisition and subsequent morphological diversification. Here, we present data of further expression analysis of A. asparagoides. The results suggested that only a part of the GRC involved in leaf development appears to have been co-opted into cladode development. Based on our study and several examples of the morphological diversification, we briefly discuss the importance of co-option of pre-existing GRC and its genetic modularity in the morphological diversity of plants during evolution. PMID:22836497

Nakayama, Hokuto; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

2012-01-01

146

Suppressed neuroendocrine stress response in depressed women on job-stress related long-term sick-leave: A stable marker potentially suggestive of pre-existing vulnerability  

PubMed Central

Background We recently reported marked hyporeactivity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in depressed females on job-stress related long-term sick-leave (LTSL). This unexpected finding prompted the question whether HPA-axis hypofunction in this group results from stress exposure, or reflects pre-existing vulnerability. Here, as a first step toward addressing this question, we assessed temporal stability of HPA-axis reactivity in these subjects. Methods We used the combined dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing hormone (DEX-CRH) test to retest HPA-axis reactivity in 29 patients and 27 controls after 12 months follow-up. Clinical status and cognitive performance was also retested. Results Despite marked clinical improvement, and normalization of initially observed impairments in attention and working memory, marked HPA-axis hyporeactivity persisted in patients. A high test – retest correlation was found both at the level of ACTH (R=0.85, p<0.001) and cortisol (R=0.76, p<0.001) responses. Conclusions Hyporeactivity of the HPA was stable over 12 months in LTSL subjects, independently of clinical improvement and normalized cognitive function. The stability of this response over time suggests that decreased DEX-CRH responses in this group may be a trait rather than a state marker. This finding is compatible with a hypothesis that HPA-axis hyporeactivity may reflect a pre-existing vulnerability in these subjects. PMID:19058782

Wahlberg, Kristina; Ghatan, Per Hamid; Modell, Sieglinde; Nygren, Åke; Ingvar, Martin; Åsberg, Marie; Heilig, Markus

2009-01-01

147

Localized gastric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of high-grade malignancy in patients with pre-existing chronic lymphocytic leukemia or immunocytoma.  

PubMed

Analyses for clonality in cases of Richter's syndrome have provided evidence for a clonal evolution of high-grade lymphoma in most patients, while in others an independent cellular clone seems to exist in the secondary neoplasm. Richter's syndrome with an isolated high-grade lymphoma of the stomach has been rarely reported in patients with pre-existing B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We investigated four cases of CLL or lymphoplasmacytoid immunocytoma (LPIC) with development of a localized high-grade B cell lymphoma in the stomach. Southern blotting showed different rearrangements of the immunoglobulin light and heavy chain genes in the tumor cells of the low-grade lymphoma and the gastric tumor in two cases. Comparison of the DNA sequences of the CDR3 region of the immunoglobulin genes revealed different clones in another case. By means of chromosomal in situ hybridization, trisomy 3 was detected in two cases of high-grade lymphoma of the stomach, but not in the cells of the associated low-grade tumor. Our findings indicate that high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphomas arising localized in the stomach of patients with CLL or immunocytoma are not clonally related to the pre-existing low-grade lymphoma and, therefore indeed, present true secondary neoplasms. PMID:7723393

Ott, M M; Ott, G; Roblick, U; Linke, B; Kneba, M; de Leon, F; Müller-Hermelink, H K

1995-04-01

148

Reduction in Noise-Induced Functional Loss of the Cochleae in Mice with Pre-Existing Cochlear Dysfunction Due to Genetic Interference of Prestin  

PubMed Central

Various cochlear pathologies, such as acoustic trauma, ototoxicity and age-related degeneration, cause hearing loss. These pre-existing hearing losses can alter cochlear responses to subsequent acoustic overstimulation. So far, the knowledge on the impacts of pre-existing hearing loss caused by genetic alteration of cochlear genes is limited. Prestin is the motor protein expressed exclusively in outer hair cells in the mammalian cochlea. This motor protein contributes to outer hair cell motility. At present, it is not clear how the interference of prestin function affects cochlear responses to acoustic overstimulation. To address this question, a genetic model of prestin dysfunction in mice was created by inserting an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-CreERT2-FRT-Neo-FRT cassette into the prestin locus after the stop codon. Homozygous mice exhibit a threshold elevation of auditory brainstem responses with large individual variation. These mice also display a threshold elevation and a shift of the input/output function of the distortion product otoacoustic emission, suggesting a reduction in outer hair cell function. The disruption of prestin function reduces the threshold shifts caused by exposure to a loud noise at 120 dB (sound pressure level) for 1 h. This reduction is positively correlated with the level of pre-noise cochlear dysfunction and is accompanied by a reduced change in Cdh1 expression, suggesting a reduction in molecular responses to the acoustic overstimulation. Together, these results suggest that prestin interference reduces cochlear stress responses to acoustic overstimulation. PMID:25486270

Cai, Qunfeng; Wang, Bo; Coling, Donald; Zuo, Jian; Fang, Jie; Yang, Shiming; Vera, Krystal; Hu, Bo Hua

2014-01-01

149

DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.  

PubMed

Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (<50% of control) to polystyrene. Treatment of established 72h biofilms with 100?g/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with <25% biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100?g/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25?g/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms. PMID:25043896

Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

2014-09-18

150

Academic and Family Conditions Associated with Intrinsic Academic Motivation in Japanese Medical Students: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Intrinsic academic motivation is one of the most important psychological concepts in education, and it is related to academic outcomes in medical students. This study examined the relationships between academic and family conditions and intrinsic academic motivation. Design: Cross-sectional design. Setting: The study group consisted of…

Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabea, Yasuyoshi

2012-01-01

151

Coping and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents with a Chronic Medical Condition: A Search for Intervention Targets  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the present study was to find relevant coping factors for the development of psychological intervention programs for adolescents with a chronic medical condition. A wide range of coping techniques were studied, including cognitive coping, behavioral coping and goal adjustment coping. A total of 176 adolescents participated. They were…

Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia

2012-01-01

152

Epidemiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Portugal: Prevalence, Clinical Characterization, and Medical Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and identify its clinical characterization, and medical conditions in a paediatric population in Portugal. A school survey was conducted in elementary schools, targeting 332 808 school-aged children in the mainland and 10 910 in the Azores islands.…

Oliveira, Guiomar; Ataide, Assuncao; Marques, Carla; Miguel, Teresa S.; Coutinho, Ana Margarida; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Goncalves, Esmeralda; Lopes, Nazare Mendes; Rodrigues, Vitor; Carmona da Mota, Henrique; Vicente, Astrid Moura

2007-01-01

153

MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE SPORTS INJURIES AND MEDICAL CONDITIONS BY PHYSICAL THERAPISTS: ASSESSMENT VIA CASE SCENARIOS  

PubMed Central

Purpose/Background: Some physical therapists (PTs) provide services at sporting events, but there are limited studies investigating whether PTs are properly prepared to provide such services. The purpose of this study was to assess acute sports injury and medical condition management decision-making skills of PTs. Methods: A Web-based survey presented 17 case scenarios related to acute medical conditions and sport injuries. PTs from the Sports Physical Therapy Section of The American Physical Therapy Association were e-mailed a cover letter/Web link to the survey and invited to participate over a 30-day period. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0. Results: A total of 411 of 5158 PTs who were members of the Sports Physical Therapy Association in 2009 and had valid e-mail addresses completed the survey, of which 389 (7.5%) were appropriate for analysis. Over 75.0% of respondents felt “prepared” or “somewhat prepared” to provide immediate care for 13 out of 16 medical conditions, with seizures, spinal cord injuries, and internal organ injuries having the lowest percentages. Over 75.0% of the respondents made “appropriate” or “overly cautious” decisions for 11 of the 17 acute injury or medical condition cases. Conclusions: Results of the current study indicate that PTs felt more “prepared” and tended to make “appropriate” return to play decisions on the acute sports injury and medical condition case studies more often than coaches who participated in a similar study, regardless of level of importance of the game or whether the athlete was a starter vs. non-starter. However, for PTs who plan on assisting at sporting events, additional preparation/education may be recommended, such as what is taught in an emergency responder course. PMID:21904695

Karges, Joy Renae; Salsbery, Mitchell A.; Smith, Danna; Stanley, Erica J.

2011-01-01

154

[The working conditions of medical personnel handling the SMTA brand copper amalgam].  

PubMed

To assess the working conditions of medical staff the authors compared mercury vapor concentrations released during manipulations with various copper amalgams, TMAC-01 tableted copper amalgam manufactured by Nikitiv Mercury Plant, its foreign copper analog manufactured be "Becht" (Germany), and a new CMTA capsulated copper amalgam. Use of CMTA copper amalgam was found not hazardous for medical staff provided sanitary and hygienic regulations were adhered to. Moreover, mercury vapor concentrations released during work allow its use in rooms without ventilation cabinets, whereas tableted copper amalgams TMAC-01 and Becht may be used only in dentistry rooms equipped with such cabinets. PMID:7846722

Chuev, V P; Pobochina, V V; Chechina, G N

1994-01-01

155

Enhancing the performance of multi-crystalline silicon photovoltaic module by encapsulating high efficient Eu3+ complex into its pre-existing EVA layer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Luminescent down shifting (LDS) technique is one effective way to improve the poor response of multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules at short wavelength less than 400 nm. Eu3+ complexes are effective LDS species for PV modules due to their large stokes' shift and high luminescent quantum efficiency (LQE). Although Eu3+ complexes have been utilized in PV modules as LDS species widely, they have not been encapsulated into the pre-existing poly-ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) layer of modules between glass and solar cell by now. The aim of our work is to enhance the performance of mc-Si PV modules by encapsulating high efficient Eu3+ complexes into their pre-existing EVA layers which would not modify the well-established manufacturing process for PV modules. In this work, two Eu3+ complexes with different absorption spectrum were encapsulated into the commercial EVA layer by soaking method for the first time and used in the encapsulation of mc-Si PV modules. Hereinto, Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 (TTA = 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, TPPO = triphenylphosphine oxide) (EuTT) with absorption spectrum less than 400 nm and high LQE (0.73) improves the external quantum efficiency of mc-Si PV module from 0.05 to 0.20, which produces a 0.42% increases in its power conversion efficiency. In addition, it is found that the enhancement brought by Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 can reduce cost of power generated by mc-Si devices from US1/Wp to US0.98/Wp according to the calculation. Therefore, Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 as LDS species with high LQE and low cost is promising for enhancing the performance of mc-Si PV modules in practical application.

Wang, Tongxin; Yu, Bo; Hu, Zhijia; Wang, Xin; Zou, Gang; Zhang, Qijin

2013-03-01

156

Fitness Conferred by BCR-ABL Kinase Domain Mutations Determines the Risk of Pre-Existing Resistance in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is the first human malignancy to be successfully treated with a small molecule inhibitor, imatinib, targeting a mutant oncoprotein (BCR-ABL). Despite its successes, acquired resistance to imatinib leads to reduced drug efficacy and frequent progression of disease. Understanding the characteristics of pre-existing resistant cells is important for evaluating the benefits of first-line combination therapy with second generation inhibitors. However, due to limitations of assay sensitivity, determining the existence and characteristics of resistant cell clones at the start of therapy is difficult. Here we combined a mathematical modeling approach using branching processes with experimental data on the fitness changes (i.e., changes in net reproductive rate) conferred by BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations to investigate the likelihood, composition, and diversity of pre-existing resistance. Furthermore, we studied the impact of these factors on the response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Our approach predicts that in most patients, there is at most one resistant clone present at the time of diagnosis of their disease. Interestingly, patients are no more likely to harbor the most aggressive, pan-resistant T315I mutation than any other resistance mutation; however, T315I cells on average establish larger-sized clones at the time of diagnosis. We established that for patients diagnosed late, the relative benefit of combination therapy over monotherapy with imatinib is significant, while this benefit is modest for patients with a typically early diagnosis time. These findings, after pre-clinical validation, will have implications for the clinical management of CML: we recommend that patients with advanced-phase disease be treated with combination therapy with at least two tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:22140458

Skaggs, Brian; Gorre, Mercedes; Sawyers, Charles L.; Michor, Franziska

2011-01-01

157

How prepared are medical students to diagnose and manage common ocular conditions.  

PubMed

It is essential that primary care physicians have a solid fund of knowledge of the diagnosis and management of common eye conditions as well as ocular emergencies, as management of these diseases commonly involves appropriate referral to an ophthalmologist. Thus, it is crucial to receive comprehensive clinical knowledge of ophthalmic disease in the primary care setting during medical school. This study investigated how well prepared medical students are to diagnose and manage common ocular conditions. The study used scores from a standardized 12-question quiz administered to fourth-year medical students (N = 97; 88% response rate) and second-year medical students (N = 97; 97% response rate). The quiz comprising diagnosis and referral management questions covered the most frequently tested ophthalmology topics on board exams and assessed students' ability to recognize when referral to an ophthalmologist is appropriate. Fourth-year medical students had quiz scores ranging from 0%-94.5% with an average score of 68.7%. Second-year students had quiz scores ranging from 27.2%-86.4%, with an average score of 63.8%. Passing rate was 70%. Student's t-test showed fourth-year students had a significantly higher quiz average (P = 0.003). In general, both classes performed better on diagnostic questions (fourth-year, 73.7%; second year, 65.8%) rather than on management questions (fourth-year, 64.8%; second year, 61.8%). Both second-year and fourth-year students on average fell short on passing the ophthalmology proficiency quiz, and in general students were more adept at diagnosing rather than managing ocular conditions and emergencies. PMID:25417863

Esparaz, Elizabeth Shanika; Binder, S Bruce; Borges, Nicole J

2014-01-01

158

How prepared are medical students to diagnose and manage common ocular conditions  

PubMed Central

It is essential that primary care physicians have a solid fund of knowledge of the diagnosis and management of common eye conditions as well as ocular emergencies, as management of these diseases commonly involves appropriate referral to an ophthalmologist. Thus, it is crucial to receive comprehensive clinical knowledge of ophthalmic disease in the primary care setting during medical school. This study investigated how well prepared medical students are to diagnose and manage common ocular conditions. The study used scores from a standardized 12-question quiz administered to fourth-year medical students (N = 97; 88% response rate) and second-year medical students (N = 97; 97% response rate). The quiz comprising diagnosis and referral management questions covered the most frequently tested ophthalmology topics on board exams and assessed students’ ability to recognize when referral to an ophthalmologist is appropriate. Fourth-year medical students had quiz scores ranging from 0%-94.5% with an average score of 68.7%. Second-year students had quiz scores ranging from 27.2%–86.4%, with an average score of 63.8%. Passing rate was 70%. Student’s t-test showed fourth-year students had a significantly higher quiz average (P = 0.003). In general, both classes performed better on diagnostic questions (fourth-year, 73.7%; second year, 65.8%) rather than on management questions (fourth-year, 64.8%; second year, 61.8%). Both second-year and fourth-year students on average fell short on passing the ophthalmology proficiency quiz, and in general students were more adept at diagnosing rather than managing ocular conditions and emergencies. PMID:25417863

Esparaz, Elizabeth Shanika; Binder, S. Bruce; Borges, Nicole J.

2014-01-01

159

Urinary heavy metals and associated medical conditions in the US adult population  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health effects of heavy metals have been widely investigated, but further evaluation is required to comprehensively delineate their toxicity. Using data from the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed on 1,857 adults to examine the relationship between urinary heavy metals and various medical conditions. Cardiovascular diseases were correlated to cadmium (OR: 4.94,

Angelico Mendy; Janvier Gasana; Edgar Ramos Vieira

2012-01-01

160

Urinary heavy metals and associated medical conditions in the US adult population  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health effects of heavy metals have been widely investigated, but further evaluation is required to comprehensively delineate their toxicity. Using data from the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed on 1,857 adults to examine the relationship between urinary heavy metals and various medical conditions. Cardiovascular diseases were correlated to cadmium (OR: 4.94,

Angelico Mendy; Janvier Gasana; Edgar Ramos Vieira

2011-01-01

161

Diabetes mellitus, other medical conditions and familial history of cancer as risk factors for pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer conducted in three areas of the USA, 484 cases and 2099 controls were interviewed to evaluate the aetiologic role of several medical conditions\\/interventions, including diabetes mellitus, cholecystectomy, ulcer\\/gastrectomy and allergic states. We also evaluated risk associated with family history of cancer. Our findings support previous studies indicating that diabetes is a risk

D T Silverman; M Schiffman; J Everhart; A Goldstein; K D Lillemoe; G M Swanson; A G Schwartz; L M Brown; R S Greenberg; J B Schoenberg; L M Pottern; R N Hoover; J F Fraumeni

1999-01-01

162

Medical costs and lost productivity from health conditions at volatile organic compound-contaminated Superfund sites  

SciTech Connect

This paper estimates the health costs at Superfund sites for conditions associated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water. Health conditions were identified from published literature and registry information as occurring at excess rates in VOC-exposed populations. These health conditions were: (1) some categories of birth defects, (2) urinary tract disorders, (3) diabetes, (4) eczema and skin conditions, (5) anemia, (6) speech and hearing impairments in children under 10 years of age, and (7) stroke. Excess rates were used to estimate the excess number of cases occurring among the total population living within one-half mile of 258 Superfund sites. These sites had evidence of completed human exposure pathways for VOCs in drinking water. For each type of medical condition, an individual`s expected medical costs, long-term care costs, and lost work time due to illness or premature mortality were estimated. Costs were calculated to be approximately $330 million per year, in the absence of any remediation or public health intervention programs. The results indicate the general magnitude of the economic burden associated with a limited number of contaminants at a portion of all Superfund sites, thus suggesting that the burden would be greater than that estimated in this study if all contaminants at all Superfund sites could be taken into account.

Lybarger, J.A.; Spengler, R.F.; Brown, D.R. [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (United States). Div. of Health Studies] [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (United States). Div. of Health Studies; Lee, R.; Vogt, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); [Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perhac, R.M. Jr. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); [Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-10-01

163

New Library Buildings Part V. The Schaffer Library of Health Sciences, Albany Medical College of Union University  

PubMed Central

The new library at Albany Medical College is illustrated and described. The facility is self-contained, but physically joined to a pre-existing portion of a medical center building complex. Images PMID:4466507

Poland, Ursula H.

1974-01-01

164

Discovering medical conditions associated with periodontitis using linked electronic health records  

PubMed Central

Aim To use linked electronic medical and dental records to discover associations between periodontitis and medical conditions independent of a priori hypotheses. Materials and Methods This case-control study included 2475 patients who underwent dental treatment at the College of Dental Medicine at Columbia University and medical treatment at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. Our cases are patients who received periodontal treatment and our controls are patients who received dental maintenance but no periodontal treatment. Chi-square analysis was performed for medical treatment codes and logistic regression was used to adjust for confounders. Results Our method replicated several important periodontitis associations in a largely Hispanic population, including diabetes mellitus type I (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.30–1.99, p < 0.001) and type II (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.22–1.67, p < 0.001), hypertension (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.10–1.37, p < 0.001), hypercholesterolaemia (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.07–1.38, p = 0.004), hyperlipidaemia (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.06–1.43, p = 0.008) and conditions pertaining to pregnancy and childbirth (OR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.32–7.21, p = 0.014). We also found a previously unreported association with benign prostatic hyperplasia (OR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.05–2.10, p = 0.026) after adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, lipid and circulatory system conditions, alcohol and tobacco abuse. Conclusions This study contributes a high-throughput method for associating periodontitis with systemic diseases using linked electronic records. PMID:23495669

Boland, Mary Regina; Hripcsak, George; Albers, David J.; Wei, Ying; Wilcox, Adam B.; Wei, Jin; Li, Jianhua; Lin, Steven; Breene, Michael; Myers, Ronnie; Zimmerman, John; Papapanou, Panos N.; Weng, Chunhua

2013-01-01

165

P1 The conditioning of medical gases with hot water humidifiers  

E-print Network

During invasive mechanical ventilation due to the dryness of medical gases is necessary to provide an adequate level of conditioning. The hot water humidifiers (HWH) heat the water, thus allowing the water vapor to heat and humidify the medical gases. In the common HWH there is a contact between the medical gases and the sterile water, thus increasing the risk of patient’s colonization and infection. Recently to avoid the condensation in the inspiratory limb of the ventilator circuit, new heated ventilator circuits have been developed. In this in vitro study we evaluated the efficiency (absolute/relative humidity) of three HWH: (1) a common HWH without a heated ventilator circuit (MR 730, Fisher&Paykel, New Zeland), (2) the same HWH with a heated ventilator circuit (Mallinckrodt Dar, Italy) and (3) a new HWH (DAR HC 2000, Mallinkckrodt Dar, Italy) with a heated ventilator circuit in which the water vapor reaches the medical gases through a gorotex membrane, avoiding any direct contact between the water and gases. At a temperature of 35°C and 37°C the HWH and heated tube were evaluated. The absolute humidity (AH) and relative humidity (RH) were measured by a psychometric method. The minute ventilation, tidal volume respiratory rate and oxygen fraction were: 5.8 ± 0.1 l/min, 740 ± 258 ml, 7.5 ± 2.6 bpm and 100%, respectively. Ventilator P2 Use of a bougie during percutaneous tracheostomy

D Chiumello; M Cressoni; C De Gr; M Racagni; M Read

2004-01-01

166

Induced and pre-existing anti-polyethylene glycol antibody in a trial of every 3-week dosing of pegloticase for refractory gout, including in organ transplant recipients  

PubMed Central

Introduction Pegloticase, a PEGylated recombinant porcine uricase, is approved for treating refractory gout at a dose of 8 mg intravenous (IV) every 2 weeks. However, during phase 1 testing, pharmacokinetics supported less frequent dosing. Also, single doses of pegloticase unexpectedly induced antibodies (Ab) that bound to polyethylene glycol (PEG). We have conducted a phase 2 trial to evaluate every 3-week dosing, and to further define the Ab response to pegloticase. Organ transplant recipients were included, as they are prone to severe gout that is difficult to manage, and because treatment to prevent graft rejection might influence the immune response to pegloticase. Methods Plasma uricase activity (pUox), urate concentration (pUA), and clinical response were monitored during up to 5 infusions in 30 patients, including 7 organ transplant recipients. Depending on whether pUA <6 mg/dL was achieved and maintained, patients were classified as non (NR), persistent (PR), or transient (TR) responders. Ab to pegloticase and 10 kDa mPEG were monitored by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and specificity was further defined. Results We observed 17 PR, 12 TR, and 1 NR; 21 patients (16 PR, 5 TR) received all 5 infusions. Over the 15-week trial, pUA in PR averaged 1.0?±?0.4 mg/dL; T½ for pUox was approximately 13 days, and area under the curve after dose 5 was approximately 30% higher than after dose 1. PR showed clinical benefit and in some, tophi resolved. In 11 of 12 TR, pUox fell rapidly and hyperuricemia recurred before dose 2. In all TR and NR, loss of response to pegloticase was accompanied by Ab to PEG, which was pre-existing in half of those who had no prior exposure to pegloticase. No PR, and 1 one out of 7 organ transplant recipients, had a sustained Ab response to pegloticase. Conclusions Every 3-week dosing is effective and may enhance the utility of pegloticase for treating refractory gout. Ab to PEG, which were pre-existing or induced by treatment, caused rapid loss of efficacy and increased the risk of infusion reactions. Organ transplant recipients can benefit from pegloticase, and may be less prone than non-recipients to developing anti-PEG Ab. Investigation of immunosuppressive strategies to minimize anti-PEG Ab is warranted. Trial registration ClincalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00111657 PMID:24602182

2014-01-01

167

Pre-Existing Adenovirus Immunity Modifies a Complex Mixed Th1 and Th2 Cytokine Response to an Ad5/HIV-1 Vaccine Candidate in Humans  

PubMed Central

The results of the recent Step Study highlight a need to clarify the effects of pre-existing natural immunity to a vaccine vector on vaccine-induced T-cell responses. To investigate this interaction, we examined the relationship between pre-existing Ad5 immunity and T-cell cytokine response profiles in healthy, HIV-uninfected recipients of MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag vaccine (HVTN 050, ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00849732). Participants were grouped by baseline Ad5 neutralizing antibody titer as either Ad5-seronegative (titer ?18; n?=?36) or Ad5-seropositive (titer >200; n?=?34). Samples from vaccine recipients were analyzed for immune responses to either HIV-1 Gag peptide pools or Ad5 empty vector using an ex vivo assay that measures thirty cytokines in the absence of long-term culture. The overall profiles of cytokine responses to Gag and Ad5 had similar combinations of induced Th1- and Th2-type cytokines, including IFN-?, IL-2, TNF-?, IP-10, IL-13, and IL-10, although the Ad5-specific responses were uniformly higher than the Gag-specific responses (p<0.0001 for 9 out of 11 significantly expressed analytes). At the peak response time point, PBMC from Ad5-seronegative vaccinees secreted significantly more IP-10 in response to Gag (p?=?0.008), and significantly more IP-10 (p?=?0.0009), IL-2 (p?=?0.006) and IL-10 (p?=?0.05) in response to Ad5 empty vector than PBMC from Ad5-seropositive vaccinees. Additionally, similar responses to the Ad5 vector prior to vaccination were observed in almost all subjects, regardless of Ad5 neutralizing antibody status, and the levels of secreted IFN-?, IL-10, IL-1Ra and GM-CSF were blunted following vaccination. The cytokine response profile of Gag-specific T cells mirrored the Ad5-specific response present in all subjects before vaccination, and included a number of Th1- and Th2-associated cytokines not routinely assessed in current vaccine trials, such as IP-10, IL-10, IL-13, and GM-CSF. Together, these results suggest that vector-specific humoral responses may reduce vaccine-induced T-cell responses by previously undetected mechanisms. PMID:21533229

Pine, Samuel O.; Kublin, James G.; Hammer, Scott M.; Borgerding, Joleen; Huang, Yunda; Casimiro, Danilo R.; McElrath, M. Juliana

2011-01-01

168

Prompt Reduction in Use of Medications for Comorbid Conditions After Bariatric Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Bariatric surgery leads to weight loss, but it is unclear whether surgery reduces conditions associated with obesity. We explored\\u000a this by assessing the change in use of medications to treat diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia in the year\\u000a following surgery.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  This is a cohort study using administrative data from 2002 to 2005 from seven Blue Cross\\/Blue Shield Plans. We compared

Jodi B. Segal; Jeanne M. Clark; Andrew D. Shore; Francesca Dominici; Thomas Magnuson; Thomas M. Richards; Jonathan P. Weiner; Eric B. Bass; Albert W. Wu; Martin A. Makary

2009-01-01

169

Specific medical conditions associated with clinically significant depressive symptoms in men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To define specific medical conditions associated with clinically significant depressive symptoms in men.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A cross-sectional study was conducted in a community-based sample of Australian men (N = 1,195, aged 35–80 years; for 2002–2005). Depression was defined by: (1) symptomatic depression (current symptoms) or (2)\\u000a current prescription for antidepressant(s) or (3) previously diagnosed depression. Logistic regression was used to determine\\u000a prevalence odds ratios (OR)

Evan Atlantis; Kylie Lange; Robert D. Goldney; Sean Martin; Matthew T. Haren; Anne Taylor; Peter D. O’Loughlin; Villis Marshall; Wayne Tilley; Gary A. Wittert

170

Problematic versus non-problematic ecstasy/MDMA use: the influence of drug usage patterns and pre-existing psychiatric factors.  

PubMed

Recreational ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine; MDMA) use has been increasingly associated with a number of psychiatric symptoms and psychological problems. However, previous studies assessing possible psychopathological effects have not identified whether users consider their ecstasy use "problematic" or not. In addition, research has generally failed to address the potential role of premorbid psychiatric status. This study aimed to assess whether premorbid psychiatric history and/or patterns of ecstasy use would be associated with the degree of self-reported problems attributable to ecstasy. Problematic ecstasy users (n = 53) who had reported problems attributable to their ecstasy use were compared with non-problematic ecstasy users (n = 62), polydrug controls (n = 62) and illegal drug-naive controls (n = 111) on a recreational drug use questionnaire; a questionnaire, which ascertained personal and family psychiatric histories, and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Problematic ecstasy users exhibited significantly higher scores on a number of dimensions of the BSI compared to illegal drug-naive and/or polydrug controls. Problematic ecstasy users also exhibited significantly elevated scores on somatization, depression, anxiety and negative psychobiology compared to non-problematic ecstasy users. BSI scores for the non-problematic ecstasy users did not differ from polydrug or illegal drug-naive controls. Problematic ecstasy users reported significantly higher levels of ecstasy use, including lifetime consumption, average dosage and binge consumption compared to non-problematic ecstasy users. Additionally, a greater number of problematic ecstasy users reported personal and family psychiatric histories compared to controls and non-problematic ecstasy users. This study demonstrates two distinct ecstasy using groups: non-problematic ecstasy users who are not showing signs of psychopathology and problematic ecstasy users who are showing evidence of a range of symptoms. This data therefore partially supports the link between ecstasy dosage and negative psychological sequelae, but highlights the importance of the need to consider ecstasy-related attributions, pre-existing mental health status and vulnerability. PMID:16574716

Soar, K; Turner, J J D; Parrott, A C

2006-05-01

171

Modeling Pre-Existing Immunity to Adenovirus in Rodents: Immunological Requirements for Successful Development of a Recombinant Adenovirus Serotype 5-based Ebola Vaccine  

PubMed Central

Pre-existing immunity (PEI) to human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) worldwide is the primary limitation to routine clinical use of Ad5-based vectors in immunization platforms. Using systemic and mucosal PEI induction models in rodents (mice and guinea pigs), we assessed the influence of PEI on the type of adaptive immune response elicited by an Ad5-based vaccine for Ebola with respect to immunization route. Splenocytes isolated from vaccinated animals revealed that immunization by the same route in which PEI was induced significantly compromised Ebola Zaire glycoprotein (ZGP)-specific IFN-?+ CD8+ T cells and ZGP-specific multifunctional CD8+ T cell populations. ZGP-specific IgG1 antibody levels were also significantly reduced and a sharp increase in serum anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibody (NAB) titers noted following immunization. These immune parameters correlated with poor survival after lethal challenge with rodent-adapted Ebola Zaire virus (ZEBOV). Although the number of IFN-?+ CD8+ T cells was reduced in animals given the vaccine by a different route from that used for PEI induction, the multifunctional CD8+ T cell response was not compromised. Survival rates in these groups were higher than when PEI was induced by the same route as immunization. These results suggest that antigen-specific multi-functional CD8+ T cell and Th2 type antibody responses compromised by PEI to Ad5 are required for protection from Ebola. They also illustrate that methods for induction of PEI used in pre-clinical studies must be carefully evaluated for successful development of novel Ad5-based vaccines. PMID:23915419

Choi, Jin Huk; Schafer, Stephen C.; Zhang, Lihong; Juelich, Terry; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Croyle, Maria A.

2013-01-01

172

Hospital characteristics and racial disparities in hospital mortality from common medical conditions.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: Less is known about racial disparities in mortality from medical conditions than for procedures. We determined whether black-white disparities in risk-adjusted hospital mortality exist for five common conditions (myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, cerebral vascular accident, gastrointestinal hemorrhage and pneumonia), and to determine the role of hospital characteristics. METHODS: We used the 2003 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Where a mortality disadvantage for black patients was demonstrated, additional analyses assessed whether the degree of disparity varied by hospital characteristics. RESULTS: Mortality for black patients was equivalent to or lower than that for white patients for four of the five conditions. Black patients were more likely than white patients to die from gastrointestinal hemorrhage (1.5% vs. 1.1%, p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, hospital racial composition was the only characteristic associated with degree of disparity for gastrointestinal hemorrhage, with hospitals discharging fewer black patients demonstrating greater disparity. CONCLUSIONS: In a large, multistate sample, there was no evidence of disparities in mortality for four of five common conditions. Black-white racial disparities in mortality from gastrointestinal hemorrhage, however, may be associated with hospital racial composition. PMID:17913113

Pippins, Jennifer R.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Haas, Jennifer S.

2007-01-01

173

Symptoms and quality of life indicators among children with chronic medical conditions  

PubMed Central

Background Children with chronic conditions often experience numerous symptoms, but few research studies examine patterns of symptoms and quality of life (QoL) indicators. Objective To examine if reliable latent classes of children with chronic medical conditions can be identified based on the clustering of symptoms and QoL indicators. Methods Structured interviews were conducted with children ages 9 to 21 living with chronic medical conditions (N = 90). Multiple symptoms (e.g., pain, sleep, fatigue, and depression) and QoL indicators (e.g., life satisfaction and social support) were measured. Physical health and emotional, social, and school functioning were measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL). Latent class analysis was used to classify each child into a latent class whose members report similar patterns of responses. Results A three-class solution had the best model fit. Class 1 (high-symptom group; n = 15, 16.7%) reported the most problems with symptoms and the lowest scores on the QoL indicators. Class 2 (moderate-symptom group; n = 39, 43.3%) reported moderate levels of both symptoms and QoL indicators. Class 3 (low-symptom group; n = 36, 40.0%) reported the lowest levels of symptoms and the highest scores on the QoL indicators. Conclusions The three latent classes identified in this study were distributed along the severity continuum. All symptoms and QoL indicators appeared to move in the same direction (e.g. worse symptoms with lower QoL). The PedsQL psychosocial health summary score (combining emotional, social, and school functioning scores) discriminated well between children with different levels of disease burden. PMID:24411513

Chung, Hyewon; Amtmann, Dagmar; Salem, Rana; Park, Ryoungsun; Askew, Robert L.

2013-01-01

174

Quality of Depression Care for People with Coincident Chronic Medical Conditions  

PubMed Central

Objective Depression is common and associated with poor outcomes for people with chronic medical conditions (CMCs). The goals of this study were (1) to determine the effect of CMCs on the use and quality of depression care and (2) to understand whether the patient-provider relationship mediates the relationship between CMCs and depression care quality. Method Using data from the 1997-1998 National Survey of Alcohol, Drug, and Mental Health Problems (Healthcare for Communities), the relationships between CMCs, depression recognition, receipt of minimally adequate depression care, and the patient-provider relationship were assessed with multivariate linear and logistic regression models for 1,309 adults who met criteria for major depressive disorder. Results Depressed patients with a CMC were more likely to have their depression recognized by a provider (OR=2.10; 95% CI 1.32-3.35) and to take antidepressant medications (32% vs. 19%, p=0.02) than those without a CMC. However, having a CMC was not associated with receiving minimally adequate depression care or patient satisfaction. Depression recognition was associated with number of medical visits (OR=1.12; 95% CI 1.09-1.15), having a usual source of care (OR=3.57; 95% CI 2.26-5.63), and provider trust (OR=1.07; 95% CI 1.04-1.11). Conclusion Depressed people with a comorbid CMC are more likely to have their depression recognized than those without a CMC, though were no more likely to receive minimally adequate depression care. Aspects of the patient-provider relationship, including trust and continuity of care, may help to explain the increased rate of depression recognition among patients with severe CMCs. PMID:19061679

Reynolds, Charles F.; Cleary, Paul D.

2008-01-01

175

Systematic review and metasummary of attitudes toward research in emergency medical conditions.  

PubMed

Emergency departments are challenging research settings, where truly informed consent can be difficult to obtain. A deeper understanding of emergency medical patients' opinions about research is needed. We conducted a systematic review and meta-summary of quantitative and qualitative studies on which values, attitudes, or beliefs of emergent medical research participants influence research participation. We included studies of adults that investigated opinions toward emergency medicine research participation. We excluded studies focused on the association between demographics or consent document features and participation and those focused on non-emergency research. In August 2011, we searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Scirus, PsycINFO, AgeLine and Global Health. Titles, abstracts and then full manuscripts were independently evaluated by two reviewers. Disagreements were resolved by consensus and adjudicated by a third author. Studies were evaluated for bias using standardised scores. We report themes associated with participation or refusal. Our initial search produced over 1800 articles. A total of 44 articles were extracted for full-manuscript analysis, and 14 were retained based on our eligibility criteria. Among factors favouring participation, altruism and personal health benefit had the highest frequency. Mistrust of researchers, feeling like a 'guinea pig' and risk were leading factors favouring refusal. Many studies noted limitations of informed consent processes in emergent conditions. We conclude that highlighting the benefits to the participant and society, mitigating risk and increasing public trust may increase research participation in emergency medical research. New methods for conducting informed consent in such studies are needed. PMID:23665997

Limkakeng, Alexander T; de Oliveira, Lucas Lentini Herling; Moreira, Tais; Phadtare, Amruta; Garcia Rodrigues, Clarissa; Hocker, Michael B; McKinney, Ross; Voils, Corrine I; Pietrobon, Ricardo

2014-06-01

176

HIGHLIGHTING DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CONDITIONAL AND UNCONDITIONAL QUANTILE REGRESSION APPROACHES THROUGH AN APPLICATION TO ASSESS MEDICATION ADHERENCE  

PubMed Central

The quantile regression (QR) framework provides a pragmatic approach in understanding the differential impacts of covariates along the distribution of an outcome. However, the QR framework that has pervaded the applied economics literature is based on the conditional quantile regression method. It is used to assess the impact of a covariate on a quantile of the outcome conditional on specific values of other covariates. In most cases, conditional quantile regression may generate results that are often not generalizable or interpretable in a policy or population context. In contrast, the unconditional quantile regression method provides more interpretable results as it marginalizes the effect over the distributions of other covariates in the model. In this paper, the differences between these two regression frameworks are highlighted, both conceptually and econometrically. Additionally, using real-world claims data from a large US health insurer, alternative QR frameworks are implemented to assess the differential impacts of covariates along the distribution of medication adherence among elderly patients with Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23616446

BORAH, BIJAN J.; BASU, ANIRBAN

2014-01-01

177

Factors associated with geographic variation in cost per episode of care for three medical conditions  

PubMed Central

Objective To identify associations between market factors, especially relative reimbursement rates, and the probability of surgery and cost per episode for three medical conditions (cataract, benign prostatic neoplasm, and knee degeneration) with multiple treatment options. Methods We use 2004–2006 Medicare claims data for elderly beneficiaries from sixty nationally representative communities to estimate multivariate models for the probability of surgery and cost per episode of care as a function local market factors, including Medicare physician reimbursement for surgical versus non-surgical treatment and the availability of primary care and specialty physicians. We used Symmetry’s Episode Treatment Groups (ETG) software to group claims into episodes for the three conditions (n?=?540,874 episodes). Results Higher Medicare reimbursement for surgical episodes and greater availability of the relevant specialists are significantly associated with more surgery and higher cost per episode for all three conditions, while greater availability of primary care physicians is significantly associated with less frequent surgery and lower cost per episode. Conclusion Relative Medicare reimbursement rates for surgical vs. non-surgical treatments and the availability of both primary care physicians and relevant specialists are associated with the likelihood of surgery and cost per episode. PMID:24949281

2014-01-01

178

Functional status and well-being of patients with chronic conditions. Results from the Medical Outcomes Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enhancing daily functioning and well-being is an increasingly advocated goal in the treatment of patients with chronic conditions. We evaluated the functioning and well-being of 9385 adults at the time of office visits to 362 physicians in three US cities, using brief surveys completed by both patients and physicians. For eight of nine common chronic medical conditions, patients with the

Anita L. Stewart; Sheldon Greenfield; Ron D. Hays; Kenneth Wells; William H. Rogers; Sandra D. Berry; Elizabeth A. McGlynn; Ware John E. Jr

1989-01-01

179

Influence of pre-existing fabrics on fault kinematics and rift geometry of interacting segments: Analogue models based on the Albertine Rift (Uganda), Western Branch-East African Rift System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study aims at showing how far pre-existing crustal weaknesses left behind by Proterozoic mobile belts, that pass around cratonic Archean shields (Tanzania Craton to the southeast and Congo Craton to the northwest), control the geometry of the Albertine Rift. Focus is laid on the development of the Lake Albert and Lake Edward/George sub-segments and between them the greatly uplifted Rwenzori Mountains, a horst block located within the rift and whose highest peak rises to >5000 m above mean sea level. In particular we study how the southward propagating Lake Albert sub-segment to the north interacts with the northward propagating Lake Edward/George sub-segment south of it, and how this interaction produces the structures and geometry observed in this section of the western branch of the East African Rift, especially within and around the Rwenzori horst. We simulate behaviour of the upper crust by conducting sandbox analogue experiments in which pre-cut rubber strips of varying overstep/overlap connected to a basal sheet and oriented oblique and/or orthogonal to the extension vector, are placed below the sand-pack. The points of connection present velocity discontinuities to localise deformation, while the rubber strips represent ductile domain affected by older mobile belts. From fault geometry of developing rift segments in plan view and section cuts, we study kinematics resulting from a given set of boundary conditions, and results are compared with the natural scenario. Three different basal model-configurations are used to simulate two parallel rifts that propagate towards each other and interact. Wider overstep (model SbR3) produces an oblique transfer zone with deep grabens (max. 7.0 km) in the adjoining segments. Smaller overlap (model SbR4) ends in offset rift segments without oblique transfer faults to join the two, and produces moderately deep grabens (max. 4.6 km). When overlap doubles the overstep (model SbR5), rifts propagate sub-orthogonal to the extension direction and form shallow valleys (max. 2.9 km). Relative ratios of overlap/overstep between rift segments dictate the kind of transition zone that develops and whether or not a block (like the Rwenzoris) is captured and rotates; hence determining the end-member geometry. Rotation direction is controlled by pre-existing fabrics. Fault orientation, fault kinematics, and block rotation (once in play) reinforce each other; and depending on the local kinematics, different parts of a captured block may rotate with variable velocities but in the same general direction. Mechanical strength anisotropy of pre-structured crust only initially centres fault nucleation and propagation parallel to the grain of weakness of the basement, but at later stages of a protracted period of crustal extension, such boundaries are locally defied.

Aanyu, K.; Koehn, D.

2011-02-01

180

Which common clinical conditions should medical students be able to manage by graduation? A perspective from Australian interns.  

PubMed

The objectives of the study were to report the development of a core curriculum that details the clinical conditions medical students should be able to manage upon graduation; and to canvass the opinion of interns (first-year postgraduate doctors) regarding their perceptions of the level of skill required to manage each condition. Literature relating to core curriculum development and training of junior medical officers was reviewed and stakeholders in the education and training of medical students and junior doctors in the state of New South Wales, Australia (intern supervisors, academics, registrars, nurses and interns) were consulted. The final curriculum spanned 106 conditions, 77 'differentiated' and 29 'undifferentiated'. Four levels of skill at which conditions should potentially be managed were also identified: 'Theoretical knowledge only'; 'Recognize symptoms and signs without supervision'; Initiate preliminary investigations, management and/or treatment without supervision'; and 'Total investigation, management and/or treatment without supervision'. The list of conditions in the curriculum was converted to a survey format and a one-in-two random sample of interns (n = 193) practising in New South Wales who graduated from the state's three medical schools were surveyed regarding the level of skill required for managing each clinical condition at graduation. A total of 51.3% of interns responded to the survey. Interns felt they should be able to initiate preliminary investigation, management and/or treatment for most conditions in the curriculum, with more than half acknowledging this level of management for 53 of the differentiated and 28 of the undifferentiated conditions. It is concluded that developing core curricula in medical education can involve multiple stakeholders, including junior doctors as the consumers of educational experiences. The data gathered may be useful to medical schools revising their curricula. PMID:12098452

Rolfe, I E; Pearson, S-A; Sanson-Fisher, R W; Ringland, C; Bayley, S; Hart, A; Kelly, S

2002-01-01

181

Perceptions of the impact of depression and anxiety and the medication for these conditions on safety in the workplace  

PubMed Central

Background: The number of people taking prescribed medication for anxiety and depression has increased greatly, but little is known of how this medication impacts on safety at work. Aims: To examine the relation between anxiety and depression, prescribed medication, performance, and safety in the workplace. Methods: The research involved nine focus groups with sufferers of anxiety and depression to investigate experiences of mental health problems and the impact of psychotropic drugs. A further three focus groups were conducted with staff in human resources, personnel, occupational health, and health and safety departments, to explore organisational perspectives. The sample comprised 74 individuals drawn from a wide range of occupational sectors. Finally, the results were presented to a panel of experts from occupational medicine, general practice, psychology, health and safety, and psychiatry, to consider the implications for practice. Results: Workers reported that both the symptoms and the medication impaired work performance. Participants described accidents which they attributed to their condition or to the medication. Workers with responsibilities for others, such as teachers, healthcare workers, and managers appeared to present a particular safety risk. Healthcare workers believed that they placed themselves and their patients at risk when carrying out medical procedures. Conclusions: Respondents in this study felt that their symptoms of anxiety and depression and the medication they took to treat these conditions placed them at risk with respect to safety in the workplace. Drawing on the results, the authors outline areas for improvement in the management of mental health problems at work. PMID:16046606

Haslam, C; Atkinson, S; Brown, S; Haslam, R

2005-01-01

182

Trends, productivity losses, and associated medical conditions among toxoplasmosis deaths in the United States, 2000-2010.  

PubMed

Few studies have quantified toxoplasmosis mortality, associated medical conditions, and productivity losses in the United States. We examined national multiple cause of death data and estimated productivity losses caused by toxoplasmosis during 2000-2010. A matched case-control analysis examined associations between comorbid medical conditions and toxoplasmosis deaths. In total, 789 toxoplasmosis deaths were identified during the 11-year study period. Blacks and Hispanics had the highest toxoplasmosis mortality compared with whites. Several medical conditions were associated with toxoplasmosis deaths, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), lymphoma, leukemia, and connective tissue disorders. The number of toxoplasmosis deaths with an HIV codiagnosis declined from 2000 to 2010; the numbers without such a codiagnosis remained static. Cumulative disease-related productivity losses for the 11-year period were nearly $815 million. Although toxoplasmosis mortality has declined in the last decade, the infection remains costly and is an important cause of preventable death among non-HIV subgroups. PMID:25200264

Cummings, Patricia L; Kuo, Tony; Javanbakht, Marjan; Sorvillo, Frank

2014-11-01

183

Agreement Between Self-Report and Medical Record Prevalence of 16 Chronic Conditions in the Alaska EARTH Study.  

PubMed

The gold standard for health information is the health record. Hospitalization and outpatient diagnoses provide health systems with data on which to project health costs and plan programmatic changes. Although health record information may be reliable and perceived as accurate, it may not include population-specific information and may exclude care provided outside a specific health care facility. Sole reliance on medical record information may lead to underutilization of health care services and inadequate assessment of population health status. In this study, we analyzed agreement, without assuming a gold standard, between self-reported and recorded chronic conditions in an American Indian/Alaska Native cohort. Self-reported health history was collected from 3821 adult participants of the Alaska EARTH study during 2004-2006. Participant medical records were electronically accessed and reviewed. Self-reported chronic conditions were underreported in relation to the medical record and both information sources reported the absence more reliably than the presence of conditions (across conditions, median positive predictive value = 64%, median negative predictive value = 94%). Agreement was affected by age, gender, and education. Differences between participant- and provider-based prevalence of chronic conditions demonstrate why health care administrators and policy makers should not rely exclusively on medical record-based administrative data for a comprehensive evaluation of population health. PMID:24399443

Koller, Kathryn R; Wilson, Amy S; Asay, Elvin D; Metzger, Jesse S; Neal, Diane E

2014-01-01

184

Management of Osteoporosis among the Elderly with Other Chronic Medical Conditions  

PubMed Central

Osteoporosis is a highly prevalent chronic disease in the US and worldwide. The most serious consequence of this disorder is fractures, which have a serious negative impact on quality of life and are often the trigger for accelerated deterioration, ultimately ending in death. Despite the availability of effective preventive treatments, osteoporosis is frequently underdiagnosed and/or undertreated, particularly among the elderly, who are also at greatest risk. In addition, the presence of co-morbid medical conditions may be both a barrier to osteoporosis care and a risk factor for falls; thus individuals with multiple co-morbid conditions may be a particularly high-risk group. The management of osteoporosis involves improving bone health via adequate nutrition, calcium and vitamin D supplements, and fall prevention strategies. Although these measures are important in the management of all patients, most elderly patients are likely to need additional pharmacological therapy to adequately reduce their fracture risk. Several pharmacological treatments have been shown to significantly reduce the risk of fracture, including bisphosphonates (e.g. alendronate, risedronate, ibandronate, zoledronic acid), denosumab, raloxifene, calcitonin and teriparatide. Despite recent advances in osteoporosis care, additional action is urgently needed to improve the quality of life of osteoporotic patients in general and of elderly patients in particular, since fracture outcomes are typically poorer in older than in younger patients. This article reviews the current status of osteoporosis management, emphasizing the need to improve osteoporosis care, with a particular focus on the US, by the use of quality- improvement measures and incentives, which might result in an increased awareness and improved treatment for this debilitating disease. PMID:22715862

Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Safford, Monika M.

2013-01-01

185

Adipositas athletica: a group of neglected conditions associated with medical risks.  

PubMed

At the 2008 Olympics, the body weight of the athletes varied from 28 to 181 kg and many Olympic athletes therefore today have a stature far from the ancient Greek athletic ideals. Athletes and sports associated with leanness and their medical problems have been researched extensively. However, there has been less focus on those athletes, who may gain a competitive advantage by having excess body fat, being large or oversized. The present review introduces for the first time the concept of Adipositas athletica and gives a description and classification of these athletes. Adipositas athletica is defined as having a higher than "athletic normal" (Greek Olympic ideals) fat mass and being an elite athlete. The condition is divided into subgroups based on the intent or non-intent to increase body fat per se. Another factor is the intent to increase body mass as well as increasing physiological factors such as strength or endurance. It is concluded that most of the sports-medicine community-physicians, researchers and nutritionists - has neglected these oversized and obese athletes, their long- and short-term morbidity and mortality, their eating problems and the use of performance-enhancing drugs. Although some data on overweight and obese athletes exist, the most remarkable finding when reviewing the literature is the paucity of data. Many unanswered questions remain and great strides remain to be made. PMID:21545536

Berglund, L; Sundgot-Borgen, J; Berglund, B

2011-10-01

186

Medical Conditions and Healthcare Utilization among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Group Homes in New York City  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The shift in living situations for adults with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (IDDD) from family homes to group homes has raised questions about their healthcare needs and access to appropriate healthcare services. This study was undertaken to describe the disability characteristics and medical conditions in a sample of adults…

Levy, Joel M.; Botuck, Shelly; Damiani, Marco R.; Levy, Philip H.; Dern, Thomas A.; Freeman, Stephen E.

2006-01-01

187

Nine children over the age of one year with full trisomy 13: a case series describing medical conditions.  

PubMed

Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), identified by Patau and colleagues [1960; Lancet 1: 790-793] is the third most common autosomal condition. Population studies indicate less than one in 10 children reaches their first birthday. In the face of mixed findings and recommendations for treatment, additional research is needed to further determine what contributes to longevity and implications for treatment for presenting medical conditions. The purpose of the present study is to report on presenting medical conditions and the presence or absence of the specific conditions (age at survey completion). Data on nine survivors (seven female, two male) with trisomy 13 indicated mean gestational age of approximately 36?weeks, birth weight ranging from 1100 to 3290?g and mean length of 45.3?cm. Length of hospital stay after birth varied. The majority of infants presented with well-known physical characteristics. Medical conditions and their treatment varied at birth and at survey completion. Notably, several infants' cardiac anomalies resolved without surgical intervention. Surgeries were provided for a range of conditions including gastrostomy tube placement to address feeding issues and removal of intestinal blockage. There were no reports of holoprosencephaly. Implications and recommendations are provided. PMID:25323598

Bruns, Deborah A; Campbell, Emily

2014-12-01

188

Oral Assessment and Postgraduate Medical Examinations: Establishing Conditions for Validity, Reliability and Fairness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this review was to examine the practice of oral assessment in postgraduate medical education in the context of the core assessment constructs of validity, reliability and fairness. Although oral assessment has a long history in the certification process of medical specialists and is a well-established part of such proceedings for a…

Memon, Muhammed Ashraf; Joughin, Gordon Rowland; Memon, Breda

2010-01-01

189

Living in the Community: Persons with Mental Retardation and Allied Medical Conditions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The review summarizes research (1978-1989) on the medical needs of persons with mental retardation living in institutional and community settings. Specifically it addresses six questions: (1) do mentally retarded persons in institutions have more serious medical needs than their community counterparts? (2) when people with mental retardation are…

DePaepe, Paris A.; Hayden, Mary F.

1990-01-01

190

Men in extreme conditions: some medical and psychological aspects of the Auschwitz concentration camp.  

PubMed

The second world war ended many years ago. Most of those who survived the stay at the German concentration camp at Auschwitz have already died of the consequences of their imprisonment; those still alive are already in the last third of their life. Is there any point in returning to the experiences of those days? Consideration of the mental hygiene of former prisoners cautions us that perhaps we should not do it. But consideration of the general interest holds that we are not entitled to ignore any knowledge that can contribute to social development--including medicine and psychology--even if acquired under unspeakably awful conditions. In addition, since the war new generations have grown up that play an increasingly significant role in various spheres of life but have little concrete information about those events; they can neither rationally nor emotionally understand how the horrors connected with fascism and the war could have happened. In a sense it is encouraging that they cannot grasp such inhuman behavior; nevertheless, we must adhere to the following motto: "Nothing must be forgotten, nobody will be forgotten." We owe it to those millions who did not survive--both the victims of the Holocaust and those who fought against it. These are arguments in favor of returning to the facts that are ineffaceably recorded somewhere in our memories. In doing so, however, we must remember that at times we are revisiting experiences of a boy of 14 as recalled by a 50-year-old man. The material below, examining the medical as well as psychological aspects of imprisonment at Auschwitz, is based on my own memories, as an adolescent imprisoned at Auschwitz. I have tried to move from this individual account to more general statements, although the methodological apparatus on which scientific analysis is usually based is absent. PMID:6622601

Radil-Weiss, T

1983-08-01

191

42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant under the supervision of a qualified social worker, and in accordance with the plan of care. The...

2013-10-01

192

42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant under the supervision of a qualified social worker, and in accordance with the plan of care. The...

2011-10-01

193

42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant under the supervision of a qualified social worker, and in accordance with the plan of care. The...

2010-10-01

194

42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant under the supervision of a qualified social worker, and in accordance with the plan of care. The...

2012-10-01

195

Diabetes mellitus, other medical conditions and familial history of cancer as risk factors for pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

In a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer conducted in three areas of the USA, 484 cases and 2099 controls were interviewed to evaluate the aetiologic role of several medical conditions/interventions, including diabetes mellitus, cholecystectomy, ulcer/gastrectomy and allergic states. We also evaluated risk associated with family history of cancer. Our findings support previous studies indicating that diabetes is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, as well as a possible complication of the tumour. A significant positive trend in risk with increasing years prior to diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was apparent (P-value for test of trend = 0.016), with diabetics diagnosed at least 10 years prior to diagnosis having a significant 50% increased risk. Those treated with insulin had risks similar to those not treated with insulin (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6 and 1.5 respectively), and no trend in risk was associated with increasing duration of insulin treatment. Cholecystectomy also appeared to be a risk factor, as well as a consequence of the malignancy. Subjects with a cholecystectomy at least 20 years prior to the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer experienced a 70% increased risk, which was marginally significant. In contrast, subjects with a history of duodenal or gastric ulcer had little or no elevated risk (OR = 1.2; confidence interval = 0.9–1.6). Those treated by gastrectomy had the same risk as those not receiving surgery, providing little support for the hypothesis that gastrectomy is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A significant 40% reduced risk was associated with hay fever, a non-significant 50% decreased risk with allergies to animals, and a non-significant 40% reduced risk with allergies to dust/moulds. These associations, however, may be due to chance since no risk reductions were apparent for asthma or several other types of allergies. In addition, we observed significantly increased risks for subjects reporting a first-degree relative with cancers of the pancreas (OR = 3.2), colon (OR = 1.7) or ovary (OR = 5.3) and non-significantly increased risks for cancers of the endometrium (OR = 1.5) or breast (OR = 1.3). The pattern is consistent with the familial predisposition reported for pancreatic cancer and with the array of tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10468306

Silverman, D T; Schiffman, M; Everhart, J; Goldstein, A; Lillemoe, K D; Swanson, G M; Schwartz, A G; Brown, L M; Greenberg, R S; Schoenberg, J B; Pottern, L M; Hoover, R N; Fraumeni, J F

1999-01-01

196

Effect of Providing Conditional Economic Compensation on Uptake of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Kenya  

PubMed Central

IMPORTANCE Novel strategies are needed to increase the uptake of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) in sub-Saharan Africa and enhance the effectiveness of male circumcision as an HIV prevention strategy. OBJECTIVE To determine whether small economic incentives could increase circumcision prevalence by addressing reported economic barriers to VMMC and behavioral factors such as present-biased decision making. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized clinical trial conducted between June 22, 2013, and February 4, 2014, among 1504 uncircumcised men aged 25 to 49 years in Nyanza region, Kenya. VMMC services were provided free of charge and participants were randomized to 1 of 3 intervention groups or a control group. INTERVENTIONS Participants in the 3 intervention groups received varying amounts of compensation conditional on undergoing circumcision at 1 of 9 study clinics within 2 months of enrollment. Compensation took the form of food vouchers worth 200 Kenya shillings (?US $2.50), 700 Kenya shillings (?US $8.75), or 1200 Kenya shillings (?US $15.00), which reflected a portion of transportation costs and lost wages associated with getting circumcised. The control group received no compensation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES VMMC uptake within 2 months. RESULTS Analysis of data for 1502 participants with complete data showed that VMMC uptake within 2 months was higher in the US $8.75 group (6.6%; 95% CI, 4.3%–9.5% [25 of 381]) and the US $15.00 group (9.0%; 95% CI, 6.3%–12.4% [34 of 377]) than in the US $2.50 group (1.9%; 95% CI, 0.8%–3.8% [7 of 374]) and the control group (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.6%–3.5% [6 of 370]). In logistic regression analysis, the US $8.75 group had significantly higher VMMC uptake than the control group (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.3; 95% CI, 1.7–10.7), as did the US $15.00 group (AOR 6.2; 95% CI, 2.6–15.0). Effect sizes for the US $8.75 and US $15.00 groups did not differ significantly (P = .20). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among uncircumcised men in Kenya, compensation in the form of food vouchers worth approximately US $8.75 or US $15.00, compared with lesser or no compensation, resulted in a modest increase in the prevalence of circumcision after 2 months. The effects of more intense promotion or longer implementation require further investigation. PMID:25042290

Thirumurthy, Harsha; Masters, Samuel H.; Rao, Samwel; Bronson, Megan A.; Lanham, Michele; Omanga, Eunice; Evens, Emily; Agot, Kawango

2014-01-01

197

The prevalence of the pre-existing hepatitis C viral variants and the evolution of drug resistance in patients treated with the NS3-4a serine protease inhibitor telaprevir  

SciTech Connect

Telaprevir (VX-950), a novel hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3-4A serine protease inhibitor, has demonstrated substantial antiviral activity in patients infected with HCV genotype 1. Some patients experience viral breakthrough, which has been shown to be associated with emergence of telaprevir-resistant HCV variants during treatment. The exact mechanisms underlying the rapid selection of drug resistant viral variants during dosing are not fully understood. In this paper, we develop a two-strain model to study the pre-treatment prevalence of the mutant virus and derive an analytical solution of the mutant frequency after administration of the protease inhibitor. Our analysis suggests that the rapid increase of the mutant frequency during therapy is not due to mutant growth but rather due to the rapid and profound loss of wild-type virus, which uncovers the pre-existing mutant variants. We examine the effects of backward mutation and hepatocyte proliferation on the pre-existence of the mutant virus and the competition between wild-type and drug resistant virus during therapy. We then extend the simple model to a general model with multiple viral strains. Mutations during therapy do not play a significant role in the dynamics of various viral strains, although they are capable of generating low levels of HCV variants that would otherwise be completely suppressed because of fitness disadvantages. Hepatocyte proliferation may not affect the pretreatment frequency of mutant variants, but is able to influence the quasispecies dynamics during therapy. It is the relative fitness of each mutant strain compared with wild-type that determines which strain(s) will dominate the virus population. The study provides a theoretical framework for exploring the prevalence of pre-existing mutant variants and the evolution of drug resistance during treatment with other protease inhibitors or HCV polymerase inhibitors.

Rong, Libin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01

198

Does continuing medical education by peer review really work?  

PubMed Central

A peer review of breast operation statistics was conducted. Standards for the proportion of biopsies positive for cancer, and for length of postoperative stay following operation for benign and malignant conditions were developed and each surgeon was informed of his performance and how it compared with that of his colleagues. The same parameters of care were reviewed one year later to study changes in performance. Low volume of clinical material, failure of two surgeons to change, and a steady general improvement in all parameters in the years prior to the presentation of the peer review, confused the demonstration of improvement in the year after the educational effort. There was a statistically significant improvement in the proportion of biopsies positive for cancer, reflecting reduction in unnecessary biopsies, but the pre-existing annual improvement in reducing postoperative stays was not accelerated. Does continuing medical education by peer review really work? Probably. PMID:4704094

Devitt, James E.

1973-01-01

199

Manchester Clinical Placement Index (MCPI). Conditions for Medical Students' Learning in Hospital and Community Placements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The drive to quality-manage medical education has created a need for valid measurement instruments. Validity evidence includes the theoretical and contextual origin of items, choice of response processes, internal structure, and interrelationship of a measure's variables. This research set out to explore the validity and potential utility of an…

Dornan, Tim; Muijtjens, Arno; Graham, Jennifer; Scherpbier, Albert; Boshuizen, Henny

2012-01-01

200

Skin diseases and conditions among students of a medical college in southern India  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Skin diseases are a common problem among young adults. There is paucity of data about it among medical students. This study aimed to find out the pattern of skin disorders and to describe their association with various socio-demographic factors among medical students. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2011 in a medical college in Mangalore, Karnataka. Two-hundred and seventy eight medical students were chosen from the 4th, 6th and 8th semester through convenient sampling method. Data on hair and skin morbidities suffered over past 1 year and its associated factors were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Most of the participants 171 (61.5%) were of the age group 20-21 years and majority were females 148 (53.2%). The most common hair/skin morbidities suffered in the past one year were acne 185 (66.6%), hair loss 165 (59.3%), and sun tan 147 (52.9%). Fungal infection (P = 0.051) and severe type of acne (P = 0.041) were seen significantly more among males while hair morbidities like hair loss (P = 0.003), split ends of hairs (P < 0.0001) and dandruff (P =0.006) were seen significantly more among female students. Patterned baldness (P = 0.018) and sun tan (P < 0.0001) were significantly more among non-Mangalorean students than native Mangaloreans. Presence of dandruff was significantly associated with hair loss (P = 0.039) and usage of sunscreen was found to protect from developing sun tans (P = 0.049). Conclusion: Skin disorders, particularly the cosmetic problems are very common among medical students. Gender and place of origin were found to significantly influence the development of certain morbidities. PMID:24616849

Joseph, Nitin; Kumar, Ganesh S; Nelliyanil, Maria

2014-01-01

201

Written Medication Consent Form This is a double-sided form  

E-print Network

through #23. 1. Child's first and last name: 2. Date of birth: 3. Child's known allergies: 4. Name as it relates to the child's age, allergies or any pre- existing conditions. Also describe situations when

202

The Association of Pre-Existing Left Atrial Fibrosis with Clinical Variables in Patients Referred for Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence after ablation is associated with left atrial (LA) fibrosis on late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We sought to determine pre-ablation, clinical characteristics that associate with the extent of LA fibrosis in patients undergoing catheter ablation for AF. METHODS AND RESULTS Consecutive patients presenting for catheter ablation of AF were enrolled and underwent LGE-MRI prior to initial AF ablation. The extent of fibrosis as a percentage of total LA myocardium was calculated in all patients prior to ablation. The cohort was divided into quartiles based on the percentage of fibrosis. Of 60 patients enrolled in the cohort, 13 had <5% fibrosis (Group 1), 15 had 5–7% fibrosis (Group 2), 17 had 8–13% fibrosis (Group 3), and 15 had 14–36% fibrosis (Group 4). The extent of LA fibrosis was positively associated with time in continuous AF, and the presence of persistent or longstanding persistent AF. However, no statistically significant difference was observed in the presence of comorbid conditions, age, BMI, LA volume, or family history of AF among the four groups. After adjusting for diabetes and hypertension in a multivariable linear regression model, paroxysmal AF remained independently and negatively associated with the extent of fibrosis (?4.0 ± 1.8, P = 0.034). CONCLUSION The extent of LA fibrosis in patients undergoing AF ablation is associated with AF type and time in continuous AF. Our results suggest that the presence and duration of AF are primary determinants of increased atrial LGE. PMID:25368540

Dewire, Jane; Khurram, Irfan M; Pashakhanloo, Farhad; Spragg, David; Marine, Joseph E; Berger, Ronald D; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Rickard, John; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Calkins, Hugh; Nazarian, Saman

2014-01-01

203

Apparatus for detecting at least one predetermined condition and providing an informational signal in response thereto in a medication infusion system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A medication infusion system provides redundant safety and includes condition detecting and informational alarm signal generating apparatus for indicating if (1) a fluid leak occurs in different portions of the system; (2) a programmable input from a patient or physician would result in exceeding a safe dosage limit; (3) the reservoir containing medication has been filled; (4) the intended medication pumping does not correlate with the pumping actually effected; (5) battery voltage is low; (6) the medication reserve is low; and (7) the system has been switched off. The apparatus may provide subcutaneous electrical, thermal, or audible stimulation to the patient and also provides a signal which a physician may monitor. The stimulation may be coded to separately identify each above-listed deviation in nominal system performance. In addition, the number of medication requests are correlated with actual medication dispensing to assure proper operation. An identification scheme is provided which matches the patient with his or her corresponding medication.

Fischell, Robert E. (Inventor)

1986-01-01

204

PubMed search strategies for the identification of etiologic associations between hypothalamic-pituitary disorders and other medical conditions.  

PubMed

Biomedical literature has enormously grown in the last decades and become broadly available through online databases. Ad-hoc search methods, created on the basis of research field and goals, are required to enhance the quality of searching. Aim of this study was to formulate efficient, evidence-based PubMed search strategies to retrieve articles assessing etiologic associations between a condition of interest and hypothalamic-pituitary disorders (HPD). Based on expert knowledge, 17 MeSH (Medical Subjects Headings) and 79 free terms related to HPD were identified to search PubMed. Using random samples of abstracts retrieved by each term, we estimated the proportion of articles containing pertinent information and formulated two strings (one more specific, one more sensitive) for the detection of articles focusing on the etiology of HPD, that were then applied to retrieve articles identifying possible etiologic associations between HPD and three diseases (malaria, LHON and celiac disease) considered not associated to HPD, and define the number of abstracts needed to read (NNR) to find one potentially pertinent article. We propose two strings: one sensitive string derived from the combination of articles providing the largest literature coverage in the field and one specific including combined terms retrieving ?40% of potentially pertinent articles. NNR were 2.1 and 1.6 for malaria, 3.36 and 2.29 for celiac disease, 2.8 and 2.2 for LHON, respectively. For the first time, two reliable, readily applicable strings are proposed for the retrieval of medical literature assessing putative etiologic associations between HPD and other medical conditions of interest. PMID:23196809

Guaraldi, Federica; Grottoli, Silvia; Arvat, Emanuela; Mattioli, Stefano; Ghigo, Ezio; Gori, Davide

2013-12-01

205

76 FR 15798 - Special Conditions: Boeing 747-468, Installation of a Medical Lift  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...findings, which are part of the Model 747-300 certification basis...certification basis for the Model 747-400. The special conditions...displacement of the center of gravity from the airplane centerline...requirements, which are part of the Model 747-300 certification...

2011-03-22

206

75 FR 27662 - Special Conditions: Boeing 747-468, Installation of a Medical Lift  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...findings, which are part of the Model 747-300 certification basis...certification basis for the Model 747-400. The special conditions...displacement of the center of gravity from the airplane centerline...requirements, which are part of the Model 747-300 certification...

2010-05-18

207

Syndromes of Brain Dysfunction Presenting with Cognitive Impairment or Behavioral Disturbance: Delirium, Dementia, and Mental Disorders Caused by a General Medical Condition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The disorders under consideration are the result of identifiable conditions. Historically, an arbitrary distinction has been\\u000a made between “organic” conditions, associated with a presumably clear pathological basis, and “functional” conditions, or\\u000a psychiatric disorders that lacked obvious disease processes. Delirium, however, is a disorder of cognitive dysfunction that\\u000a lacks a well-understood pathophysiology despite unequivocal association with multiple and various medical conditions.

Keith E. Isenberg; Keith Garcia

208

Special Medical Conditions Associated with Catatonia in the Internal Medicine Setting: Hyponatremia-Inducing Psychosis and Subsequent Catatonia  

PubMed Central

Diagnosis and treatment of catatonia in the psychiatry consultation service is not infrequent. Usually, the patient either presents to the Emergency Department or develops catatonia on the medical floor. This condition manifests with significant behavioral changes (from mildly decreased speech output to complete mutism) that interfere with the ability to communicate. After structural brain disorders are excluded, one of the diagnoses that always should be considered is catatonia. However, the causes of catatonia are numerous, ranging from psychiatric causes to a plethora of medical illnesses. Therefore, it is not surprising that there are many proposed underlying mechanisms of catatonia and that controversy persists about the etiology of specific cases. There are only 6 reports of hyponatremia-induced catatonia and psychosis in the literature. Here, we present the case of a 30-year-old woman with catatonia and psychosis induced by hyponatremia, and we use this report to exemplify the multitude of biologic causes of catatonia and to propose a new way to look at the neuroanatomical basis of processing, particularly the vertical processing systems we believe are involved in catatonia. PMID:25102520

Novac, Andrei A; Bota, Daniela; Witkowski, Joanne; Lipiz, Jorge; Bota, Robert G

2014-01-01

209

Frontal White Matter Alterations in Short-Term Medicated Panic Disorder Patients without Comorbid Conditions: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study  

PubMed Central

The frontal cortex might play an important role in the fear network, and white matter (WM) integrity could be related to the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD). A few studies have investigated alterations of WM integrity in PD. The aim of this study was to determine frontal WM integrity differences between patients with PD without comorbid conditions and healthy control (HC) subjects by using diffusion tensor imaging. Thirty-six patients with PD who had used medication within 1 week and 27 age- and sex-matched HC subjects participated in this study. Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all participants. Panic Disorder Severity Scale and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) scores were assessed. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was used for image analysis. TBSS analysis showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in frontal WM and WM around the frontal lobe, including the corpus callosum of both hemispheres, in patients with PD compared to HC subjects. Moreover, voxel-wise correlation analysis revealed that the BAI scores for patients with PD were positively correlated with their FA values for regions showing group differences in the FA of frontal WM of both hemispheres. Altered integrity in frontal WM of patients with PD without comorbid conditions might represent the structural pathophysiology in these patients, and these changes could be related to clinical symptoms of PD. PMID:24788587

Kim, Borah; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Kang Soo; Kim, Youngki; Choi, Tai Kiu; Kim, Yun Tai; Lee, Sang-Hyuk

2014-01-01

210

Apparatus for detecting a condition of a medication infusion system and providing an informational signal in response thereto  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A medication infusion system having a means for providing an informational signal when (1) medication in the reservoir falls below a threshold level; (2) a fluid leak occurs in different portions of the system; and (3) the intended medication pumping does not correlate with the pumping actually affected.

Fischell, Robert E. (Inventor)

1988-01-01

211

Association between perceived unmet health care needs and risk of adverse health outcomes among patients with chronic medical conditions  

PubMed Central

Background Adults with chronic medical conditions are more likely to report unmet health care needs. Whether unmet health care needs are associated with an increased risk of adverse health outcomes is unclear. Methods Adults with at least one self-reported chronic condition (arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, hypertension, mood disorder, stroke) from the 2001 and 2003 cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey were linked to national hospitalization data. Participants were followed from the date of their survey until March 31, 2005, for the primary outcomes of all-cause and cause-specific admission to hospital. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, 30-day and 1-year all-cause readmission to hospital, and in-hospital death. Negative binomial regression models were used to estimate the association between unmet health care needs, admission to hospital, and length of stay, with adjustment for socio-demographic variables, health behaviours, and health status. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between unmet needs, readmission, and in-hospital death. Further analyses were conducted by type of unmet need. Results Of the 51 932 adults with self-reported chronic disease, 15.5% reported an unmet health care need. Participants with unmet health care needs had a risk of all-cause admission to hospital similar to that of patients with no unmet needs (adjusted rate ratio [RR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.94–1.15). When stratified by type of need, participants who reported issues of limited resource availability had a slightly higher risk of hospital admission (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.09–1.28). There was no association between unmet needs and length of stay, readmission, or in-hospital death. Interpretation Overall, unmet health care needs were not associated with an increased risk of admission to hospital among those with chronic conditions. However, certain types of unmet needs may be associated with higher or lower risk. Whether unmet needs are associated with other measures of resource use remains to be determined. PMID:23687534

Ronksley, Paul E; Sanmartin, Claudia; Quan, Hude; Ravani, Pietro; Tonelli, Marcello; Manns, Braden; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

2013-01-01

212

Concurrent Medical Conditions and Health Care Use and Needs among Children with Learning and Behavioral Developmental Disabilities, National Health Interview Survey, 2006-2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies document various associated health risks for children with developmental disabilities (DDs). Further study is needed by disability type. Using the 2006-2010 National Health Interview Surveys, we assessed the prevalence of numerous medical conditions (e.g. asthma, frequent diarrhea/colitis, seizures), health care use measures (e.g. seeing a…

Schieve, Laura A.; Gonzalez, Vanessa; Boulet, Sheree L.; Visser, Susanna N.; Rice, Catherine E.; Braun, Kim Van Naarden; Boyle, Coleen A.

2012-01-01

213

42 CFR 484.18 - Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...reasonable expectation that the patient's medical, nursing, and...adequately by the agency in the patient's place of residence...medications and treatments, any safety measures to protect against...items. If a physician refers a patient under a plan of care...

2010-10-01

214

Medical Conditions, Levels of Care Needs, and Health-Related Outcomes of Persons with Mental Retardation: A Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This literature review analyzes 47 studies and reports on the type and range of medical care, resources, and support services needed to maintain individuals with mental retardation in the community; health-related outcomes; barriers to the provision of community-based medical services; and availability and access to services. (Author/JDD)

Hayden, Mary F.; DePaepe, Paris A.

1991-01-01

215

42 CFR 484.18 - Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...reasonable expectation that the patient's medical, nursing, and...adequately by the agency in the patient's place of residence...medications and treatments, any safety measures to protect against...items. If a physician refers a patient under a plan of care...

2014-10-01

216

Medical Assistants  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For a concise summary of the medical assistant profession the Medical Assistants entry in the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook is must read. The site covers topics ranging from the nature of the profession, working conditions, earnings, and more. The section on training, qualifications and advancement will be of special interest to medical assistant faculty and students. The section on sources of addition information will also be a good launching point for anyone seeking additional online resources.

2006-11-01

217

Conditions?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research interests in feral hogs typically involve their negative impacts on ecosystems or their potential as a disease reservoir, especially with disease transmission to domestic swine. Authors within scientific literature state that feral hogs were captured as part of their research, but usually fail to mention specific conditions in which hogs were captured. Novice researchers of feral hogs must rely

A. Christy Wyckoff; Scott E. Henke; Kurt C. VerCauteren

218

Medical Request for Special Housing or Meal Plan Consideration Medical accommodations may be requested by students with physical and/or nutritional conditions. All requests will be reviewed on a  

E-print Network

Medical Request for Special Housing or Meal Plan Consideration Medical accommodations may. Our policy requires that the following medical information be completed by you and your attending: ____________________________________________________________________________________________ Briefly explain your medical request for special housing or meal plan consideration

Mather, Patrick T.

219

Medical audit in general practice. I: Effects on doctors' clinical behaviour for common childhood conditions. North of England Study of Standards and Performance in General Practice.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE--To estimate the effects of medical audit, particularly setting clinical standards, on general practitioners' clinical behaviour. DESIGN--Before and after study strengthened by a replicated Latin square. SETTING--62 training general practices in the north of England. SUBJECTS--92 general practitioner trainers, 84 (91%) of whom completed the study; random sample of 3500 children consulting one of these trainers for any of five conditions--acute cough, acute vomiting, bedwetting, itchy rash, and recurrent wheezy chest--stratified by doctor consulted, condition, and age. INTERVENTIONS--Clinical standard set by each of 10 small groups of general practitioner trainers for one randomly selected childhood condition. Each group also experienced a different type of medical audit, randomly selected, for each of the four other study conditions (receiving a clinical standard set by another trainer group, tabulated data comparing clinical performance with that of all other groups, tabulated data from only their own group, and nothing ("control" condition)). MAIN MEASURES--Content of initial consultation divided into: history, examination, investigation, diagnosis, and management (abstracted from medical records and "enhancement forms" completed by doctors). RESULTS--There was increased prescribing of bronchodilators for acute cough, oral rehydration fluids for acute vomiting, antibiotics for itchy rash, and bronchodilators and oral steroids for recurrent wheezy chest and reduced prescribing of antibiotics for acute cough and recurrent wheezy chest and tricyclic antidepressants for bedwetting. Fewer children were "discharged." Each change was consistent with the standard and either limited to doctors who set a standard for that condition or significantly greater for them than all other doctors. CONCLUSION--Setting clinical standards improved prescribing and follow up. PMID:1611372

1992-01-01

220

Parent & Educators' Drug Reference: A Guide to Common Medical Conditions & Drugs Used in School-Aged Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book provides a guide to more than 180 drugs used for children. An introduction precedes the four major sections of the guide. Section 1 provides an overview of pharmacology and therapeutics in chapters on the basics of pharmacology, the language of pharmacology and therapeutics, compliance, side effects, medications in school, and drug…

Agins, Alan P.

221

Teachers' Drug Reference: A Guide to Medical Conditions and Drugs Commonly Used in School-Aged Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book provides a guide to approximately 175 drugs used with children. An introduction precedes the three major sections of the guide. Section 1 provides an overview of pharmacology and therapeutics in chapters on the basics of pharmacology, the language of pharmacology and therapeutics, compliance, side effects, and medications in school.…

Agins, Alan P.

222

Chronic Medical Conditions and Major Depressive Disorder: Differential Role of Positive Religious Coping among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks and Non-Hispanic Whites  

PubMed Central

Background: This study was aimed to investigate the main and buffering effects of positive religious coping on the association between the number of chronic medical conditions and major depressive disorder (MDD) among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks and Non-Hispanic Whites. Methods: This cross-sectional study used data from the National Survey of American Life, 2001 and 2003. This study enrolled 3,570 African Americans, 1,438 Caribbean Blacks and 891 Non-Hispanic Whites. Number of chronic conditions and positive religious coping were independent variables, 12-month MDD was the outcome and socio-economic characteristics were controls. We fitted the following three ethnic-specific logistic regressions for data analysis. In Model I, we included the number of chronic conditions and controls. In Model II, we added the main effect of religious coping. In Model III, we included an interaction between religious coping and number of chronic conditions. Results: Based on Model I, number of chronic conditions was associated with higher odds of 12-month MDD among all race/ethnic groups. Model II showed a significant and negative association between religious coping and MDD among Caribbean Blacks (odds ratio [OR] =0.55, 95% confidence Interval [CI] =0.39-0.77), but not African Americans or Hispanic Whites. Model III suggested that, only among Caribbean Blacks, the effect of chronic medical conditions on MDD is smaller in the presence of high positive religious coping (OR for interaction = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.55-0.96). Conclusions: Although the association between multiple chronic conditions and MDD may exist regardless of race and ethnicity, race/ethnicity may shape how positive religious coping buffers this association. This finding sheds more light onto race and ethnic differences in protective effects of religiosity on mental health of populations. PMID:24829727

Assari, Shervin

2014-01-01

223

Medication Adherence  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A key component in the management of health-care conditions is the use of prescribed medications. The effectiveness of medications\\u000a and their long-term benefits depends on adherence to the prescriber’s instructions [1]. Adherence is defined as the extent\\u000a to which people follow the instructions they are given for prescribed treatments [2]; it involves consumer choice and is intended\\u000a to be non-judgmental,

Hayden B. Bosworth

224

Chronic Condition Combinations and Health Care Expenditures and Out-of-Pocket Spending Burden Among Adults, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2009 and 2011  

PubMed Central

Introduction Little is known about how combinations of chronic conditions in adults affect total health care expenditures. Our objective was to estimate the annual average total expenditures and out-of-pocket spending burden among US adults by combinations of conditions. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study using 2009 and 2011 data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. The sample consisted of 9,296 adults aged 21 years or older with at least 2 of the following 4 highly prevalent chronic conditions: arthritis, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, and hypertension. Unadjusted and adjusted regression techniques were used to examine the association between chronic condition combinations and log-transformed total expenditures. Logistic regressions were used to analyze the relationship between chronic condition combinations and high out-of-pocket spending burden. Results Among adults with chronic conditions, adults with all 4 conditions had the highest average total expenditures ($20,016), whereas adults with diabetes/hypertension had the lowest annual total expenditures ($7,116). In adjusted models, adults with diabetes/hypertension and hypertension/arthritis had lower health care expenditures than adults with diabetes/heart disease (P < .001). In adjusted models, adults with all 4 conditions had higher expenditures compared with those with diabetes and heart disease. However, the difference was only marginally significant (P = .04). Conclusion Among adults with arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, and hypertension, total health care expenditures differed by type of chronic condition combinations. For individuals with multiple chronic conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes, new models of care management are needed to reduce the cost burden on the payers. PMID:25633487

Raval, Amit D.; Sambamoorthi, Usha

2015-01-01

225

Patient's condition--severe but stable. The press and the medical community: mutual expectations surrounding the health of national leaders.  

PubMed

A value system that espouses the right of an individual to guard his privacy has moral, theoretical and practical validity, while equal weight must be given, morally, conceptually and socially, to a concept that extols freedom of expression and the public's right to know. The built-in contradiction between these two schools of thought is expressed, inter alia, in the inter-relationship between the media and the medical community when the health of a national leader ceases to be his private affair and becomes the legitimate concern of the public. In Israel, no set rules exist regarding how such situations are reported. This article aims to suggest such a procedure. PMID:17180827

Benziman, Uzi

2006-11-01

226

Imagining life with an ostomy: Does a video intervention improve quality-of-life predictions for a medical condition that may elicit disgust??  

PubMed Central

Objective To test a video intervention as a way to improve predictions of mood and quality-of-life with an emotionally evocative medical condition. Such predictions are typically inaccurate, which can be consequential for decision making. Method In Part 1, people presently or formerly living with ostomies predicted how watching a video depicting a person changing his ostomy pouch would affect mood and quality-of-life forecasts for life with an ostomy. In Part 2, participants from the general public read a description about life with an ostomy; half also watched a video depicting a person changing his ostomy pouch. Participants’ quality-of-life and mood forecasts for life with an ostomy were assessed. Results Contrary to our expectations, and the expectations of people presently or formerly living with ostomies, the video did not reduce mood or quality-of-life estimates, even among participants high in trait disgust sensitivity. Among low-disgust participants, watching the video increased quality-of-life predictions for ostomy. Conclusion Video interventions may improve mood and quality-of-life forecasts for medical conditions, including those that may elicit disgust, such as ostomy. Practice implications Video interventions focusing on patients’ experience of illness continue to show promise as components of decision aids, even for emotionally charged health states such as ostomy. PMID:23177398

Angott, Andrea M.; Comerford, David A.; Ubel, Peter A.

2014-01-01

227

Medical Device Safety  

MedlinePLUS

A medical device is any product used to diagnose, cure, or treat a condition, or to prevent disease. They range ... may need one in a hospital. To use medical devices safely Know how your device works. Keep instructions ...

228

Effect of Hot-Attribute Aged Ginger Tea on Chinese Medical Pulse Condition of Healthy Young Humans  

PubMed Central

Young individuals typically have a dry-heat (?? zào rè) constitution and feel overly stimulated. This study observes specialties on the right-bar (?? yòu gu?n) section of the radial-arterial pulse of healthy young subjects, and investigates pulse variations induced by different attribute foods. Chinese medical doctors grouped thirty subjects into heat and non-heat constitutions. Each subject took water, aged ginger tea, and coconut water, well recognized as neutral, hot, and cold drinks, on different visits. The current study observed physiological signals induced by the samples using novel noninvasive sphygmography and a blood pressure monitor. As the baseline bigger percussion wave, dicrotic wave, and area in the sphygmogram of the non-heat constitution subjects, this work suggests that blood vessels of these subjects may be more relaxed than that of the heat constitution ones. Stroke volume increased and pulse pressure decreased in the non-heat constitution subjects after taking aged ginger tea, which may elevate arterial compliance corresponding to maintaining an estimated radial-arterial diameter in our study. However, the percussion wave widened and the valley increased in the heat constitution subjects after taking aged ginger tea. This corresponds to the markedly reduced radial-arterial diameter, indicating tighter blood vessels than the baseline status. Accordingly, this study confirms that selecting foods with attributes opposite to personal constitutions is important for reestablishing a healthy cold-heat balance within the human body. Moreover, novel noninvasive sphygmography may be a useful instrument to classify scientifically the heat personal constitution and the responses to different attribute foods. PMID:24716108

Chao, Dan-Ping; Tyan, Chu-Chang; Chen, Jian-Jung; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Sheen, Lee-Yan

2011-01-01

229

Serum IgM concentrations in normal, fit horses and horses with lymphoma or other medical conditions.  

PubMed

The purposes of this study were to (1) prospectively establish serum IgM and IgG concentrations in normal, fit, adult horses over time and (2) determine the accuracy of serum IgM concentrations for diagnosing lymphoma. Serial IgM and IgG concentrations were measured with a radial immunodiffusion assay in 25 regularly exercised horses at 6-week intervals. Horses had serum IgM concentrations ranging from 50 to 242 mg/dL over 5 months, with 20% of horses having IgM < or = 60 mg/dL. The normal range for IgM in fit horses should be considered 103 +/- 40 mg/dL and a cut-point for an IgM deficiency, < or = 23 mg/dL. IgG concentrations ranged from 1,372 to 3,032 mg/dL. Retrospectively, medical records of adult horses (n = 103) admitted to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals for which serum IgM was measured were examined. Horses were categorized as "lymphoma negative" (n = 34) or "lymphoma positive" (n = 18). The sensitivity and specificity of a serum IgM concentration (< or = 60 mg/dL) for detecting equine lymphoma was 50 and 35%, respectively. At the new cut-point (< or = 23 mg/dL), the sensitivity was low at 28% and the specificity improved to 88%. The negative predictive values at various population prevalences indicate that a horse with a high serum IgM (> 23 mg/dL) is unlikely to have lymphoma, whereas the positive predictive value (70%) does not allow for reliable determination of lymphoma in a horse with serum IgM < or = 23 mg/dL. Therefore, serum IgM concentrations should not be used as a screening test for equine lymphoma. PMID:12774976

Perkins, G A; Nydam, D V; Flaminio, M J B F; Ainsworth, D M

2003-01-01

230

Diurnal and twenty-four hour patterning of human diseases: acute and chronic common and uncommon medical conditions.  

PubMed

The symptom intensity and mortality of human diseases, conditions, and syndromes exhibit diurnal or 24 h patterning, e.g., skin: atopic dermatitis, urticaria, psoriasis, and palmar hyperhidrosis; gastrointestinal: esophageal reflux, peptic ulcer (including perforation and hemorrhage), cyclic vomiting syndrome, biliary colic, hepatic variceal hemorrhage, and proctalgia fugax; infection: susceptibility, fever, and mortality; neural: frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe seizures, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, hereditary progressive dystonia, and pain (cancer, post-surgical, diabetic neuropathic and foot ulcer, tooth caries, burning mouth and temporomandibular syndromes, fibromyalgia, sciatica, intervertebral vacuum phenomenon, multiple sclerosis muscle spasm, and migraine, tension, cluster, hypnic, and paroxysmal hemicranial headache); renal: colic and nocturnal enuresis and polyuria; ocular: bulbar conjunctival redness, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, intraocular pressure and anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, and recurrent corneal erosion syndrome; psychiatric/behavioral: major and seasonal affective depressive disorders, bipolar disorder, parasuicide and suicide, dementia-associated agitation, and addictive alcohol, tobacco, and heroin cravings and withdrawal phenomena; plus autoimmune and musculoskeletal: rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, axial spondylarthritis, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Knowledge of these and other 24 h patterns of human pathophysiology informs research of their underlying circadian and other endogenous mechanisms, external temporal triggers, and more effective patient care entailing clinical chronopreventive and chronotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25129839

Smolensky, Michael H; Portaluppi, Francesco; Manfredini, Roberto; Hermida, Ramon C; Tiseo, Ruana; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda L; L Haus, Erhard

2014-07-18

231

Pediatric complex chronic conditions classification system version 2: updated for ICD-10 and complex medical technology dependence and transplantation  

PubMed Central

Background The pediatric complex chronic conditions (CCC) classification system, developed in 2000, requires revision to accommodate the International Classification of Disease 10th Revision (ICD-10). To update the CCC classification system, we incorporated ICD-9 diagnostic codes that had been either omitted or incorrectly specified in the original system, and then translated between ICD-9 and ICD-10 using General Equivalence Mappings (GEMs). We further reviewed all codes in the ICD-9 and ICD-10 systems to include both diagnostic and procedural codes indicative of technology dependence or organ transplantation. We applied the provisional CCC version 2 (v2) system to death certificate information and 2 databases of health utilization, reviewed the resulting CCC classifications, and corrected any misclassifications. Finally, we evaluated performance of the CCC v2 system by assessing: 1) the stability of the system between ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes using data which included both ICD-9 codes and ICD-10 codes; 2) the year-to-year stability before and after ICD-10 implementation; and 3) the proportions of patients classified as having a CCC in both the v1 and v2 systems. Results The CCC v2 classification system consists of diagnostic and procedural codes that incorporate a new neonatal CCC category as well as domains of complexity arising from technology dependence or organ transplantation. CCC v2 demonstrated close comparability between ICD-9 and ICD-10 and did not detect significant discontinuity in temporal trends of death in the United States. Compared to the original system, CCC v2 resulted in a 1.0% absolute (10% relative) increase in the number of patients identified as having a CCC in national hospitalization dataset, and a 0.4% absolute (24% relative) increase in a national emergency department dataset. Conclusions The updated CCC v2 system is comprehensive and multidimensional, and provides a necessary update to accommodate widespread implementation of ICD-10. PMID:25102958

2014-01-01

232

Something is amiss in Denmark: A comparison of preventable hospitalisations and readmissions for chronic medical conditions in the Danish Healthcare system and Kaiser Permanente  

PubMed Central

Background As many other European healthcare systems the Danish healthcare system (DHS) has targeted chronic condition care in its reform efforts. Benchmarking is a valuable tool to identify areas for improvement. Prior work indicates that chronic care coordination is poor in the DHS, especially in comparison with care in Kaiser Permanente (KP), an integrated delivery system based in the United States. We investigated population rates of hospitalisation and readmission rates for ambulatory care sensitive, chronic medical conditions in the two systems. Methods Using a historical cohort study design, age and gender adjusted population rates of hospitalisations for angina, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and hypertension, plus rates of 30-day readmission and mortality were investigated for all individuals aged 65+ in the DHS and KP. Results DHS had substantially higher rates of hospitalisations, readmissions, and mean lengths of stay per hospitalisation, than KP had. For example, the adjusted angina hospitalisation rates in 2007 for the DHS and KP respectively were 1.01/100 persons (95%CI: 0.98-1.03) vs. 0.11/100 persons (95%CI: 0.10-0.13/100 persons); 21.6% vs. 9.9% readmission within 30 days (OR = 2.53; 95% CI: 1.84-3.47); and mean length of stay was 2.52 vs. 1.80 hospital days. Mortality up through 30 days post-discharge was not consistently different in the two systems. Conclusions There are substantial differences between the DHS and KP in the rates of preventable hospitalisations and subsequent readmissions associated with chronic conditions, which suggest much opportunity for improvement within the Danish healthcare system. Reductions in hospitalisations also could improve patient welfare and free considerable resources for use towards preventing disease exacerbations. These conclusions may also apply for similar public systems such as the US Medicare system, the NHS and other systems striving to improve the integration of care for persons with chronic conditions. PMID:22192270

2011-01-01

233

Potential interactions of prescription and over-the-counter medications having antioxidant capabilities with radiation and chemotherapy.  

PubMed

Oncology patients undergoing radiation treatment and chemotherapy routinely use prescription and/or over-the counter medications either as part of pre-existing comorbid conditions or in the context of conventional treatment management. A growing amount of data suggest that commonly used pharmaceuticals possess antioxidant properties, which may also partially explain some of their therapeutic efficacy. Clinical research is continuing on how such agents interact during chemotherapy and radiation when oxidative mechanisms of action are involved. Historically, such discussions centered on the category of dietary supplements, natural health products, fruits and vegetables, along with established protectant medications. Evidence confirms that some pharmaceutical agents exhibit antioxidant properties similar to dietary supplements, protectants, and may hence hinder the efficacy of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Awareness by both healthcare providers and patients in this area is often lacking. After reviewing some of the more common and well-established pharmaceuticals, which include those prescribed during cancer treatment, caution needs to be advised especially in regards to the use of corticosteroids, as long-term randomized outcome studies ensuring safety in this area are still outstanding. PMID:25220632

Lemmo, Walter

2014-09-13

234

Acute behavioral crises in psychiatric inpatients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD): Recognition of concomitant medical or non-ASD psychiatric conditions predicts enhanced improvement.  

PubMed

During adolescence, some individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) engage in severe challenging behaviors, such as aggression, self-injury, disruption, agitation and tantrums. We aimed to assess risk factors associated with very acute behavioral crises in adolescents with ASD admitted to a dedicated neurobehavioral unit. We included retrospectively in 2008 and 2009 29 adolescents and young adults with ASD hospitalized for severe challenging behaviors and proposed a guideline (Perisse et al., 2010) that we applied prospectively for 29 patients recruited for the same indications between 2010 and 2012. In total, 58 patients were admitted (n=70 hospitalizations, mean age=15.66 (±4.07) years, 76% male). We systematically collected data describing socio-demographic characteristics, clinical variables (severity, presence of language, cognitive level), comorbid organic conditions, etiologic diagnosis of the episode, and treatments. We explored predictors of Global Assessment Functioning Scale (GAFS) score and duration of hospitalization at discharge. All but 2 patients exhibited severe autistic symptoms and intellectual disability (ID), and two-thirds had no functional verbal language. During the inpatient stay (mean=84.3 (±94.9) days), patients doubled on average their GAFS scores (mean=17.66 (±9.05) at admission vs. mean=31.4 (±9.48) at discharge). Most common etiologies for acute behavioral crises were organic causes [n=20 (28%), including epilepsy: n=10 (14%) and painful medical conditions: n=10 (14%)], environmental causes [n=17 (25%) including lack of treatment: n=11 (16%) and adjustment disorder: n=6 (9%)], and non-ASD psychiatric condition [n=33 (48%) including catatonia: n=5 (7%), major depressive episode: n=6 (9%), bipolar disorder: n=4 (6%), schizophrenia: n=6 (9%), other/unknown diagnosis: n=12 (17%)]. We found no influence of age, gender, socio-economic status, migration, level of ID, or history of seizure on improvement of GAFS score at discharge. Severity of autism at admission was the only negative predictor (p<.001). Painful medical conditions (p=.04), non-ASD psychiatric diagnoses (p=.001), prior usage of specialized ASD care programs (p=.004), functional language (p=.007), as well as a higher number of challenging behaviors upon admission (p=.001) were associated with higher GAFS scores at discharge. Clinical severity at admission, based on the number of challenging behaviors (r=.35, p=.003) and GAFS score (r=-.32, p=.008) was correlated with a longer inpatient stay. Longer hospitalization was however correlated (r=.27, p=.03) with higher GAFS score at discharge even after adjustment for confounding factors. Challenging behaviors among adolescents with ASD may stem from diverse risk factors, including environmental problems, comorbid acute psychiatric conditions, or somatic illness such as epilepsy or acute pain. The management of these behavioral challenges requires a unified, multidisciplinary approach. PMID:25575287

Guinchat, Vincent; Cravero, Cora; Diaz, Lautaro; Périsse, Didier; Xavier, Jean; Amiet, Claire; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Bodeau, Nicolas; Wachtel, Lee; Cohen, David; Consoli, Angèle

2015-03-01

235

Diagnosis: medical and psychosocial conditions  

E-print Network

Centers are located throughout the state The Facts About Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Alcohol Syndrome? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is the most preventable cause of cognitive impairments are said to have Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). Although the physical characteristics of FAS may subside

Garfunkel, Eric

236

Pregnancy outcome in women with pre-existing lupus nephritis.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to assess the fetal and maternal outcome in a cohort of patients with lupus nephritis. Twenty-four pregnancies in 22 women with lupus nephritis occurring between 1991 and 2000 were analysed retrospectively. Lupus nephritis was biopsy proven before pregnancy in all cases. Women were followed from the beginning of pregnancy up to 6 months postpartum. Close fetal-maternal monitoring and frequent laboratory investigations were applied routinely to all patients. All women were prescribed steroid therapy from the beginning of the pregnancy. There were 18 live births, four spontaneous abortions and two stillbirths. Of the 18 live births, 14 were premature and four were term deliveries, representing a 25% fetal loss rate and 58% prematurity rate. There were two fetuses with congenital heart block. We recorded hypertension in 42%, proteinuria in 50% and pre-eclampsia in 25% of our patients. Proteinuria was irreversible in four cases. No maternal deaths or postpartum exacerbation of the disease were recorded in the study period. All renal flares were reversed postpartum. Patients positive for antiphospholipid antibodies had a worse perinatal outcome. Hypertension, proteinuria and antiphospholipid antibodies appear to be associated with adverse perinatal outcome and pregnancy complications. Pregnancy is not contraindicated in women with lupus nephritis, but is associated with significant fetal and maternal risks. PMID:16147600

Soubassi, L; Haidopoulos, D; Sindos, M; Pilalis, A; Chaniotis, D; Diakomanolis, E; Antsaklis, A; Zerefos, N

2004-09-01

237

Dangerous fatigue conditions: a study of police work and law enforcement administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sleep deprivation data from various nations have shown a lack of sleep contributing to a number of severe and destructive workplace accidents. Here, a triangulated research strategy focusing on pre?existing data, survey administration, and personal interviews from multiple law enforcement agencies (police, sheriff, and highway patrol) was implemented to study conditions which induce dangerous levels of fatigue in law enforcement

Scott R. Senjo

2011-01-01

238

Therapeutic Antioxidant Medical Gas  

PubMed Central

Medical gases are pharmaceutical gaseous molecules which offer solutions to medical needs and include traditional gases, such as oxygen and nitrous oxide, as well as gases with recently discovered roles as biological messenger molecules, such as carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulphide. Medical gas therapy is a relatively unexplored field of medicine; however, a recent increasing in the number of publications on medical gas therapies clearly indicate that there are significant opportunities for use of gases as therapeutic tools for a variety of disease conditions. In this article, we review the recent advances in research on medical gases with antioxidant properties and discuss their clinical applications and therapeutic properties. PMID:19177183

Nakao, Atsunori; Sugimoto, Ryujiro; Billiar, Timothy R; McCurry, Kenneth R

2009-01-01

239

Artificial oxygen carrier with pharmacologic actions of adenosine-5'-triphosphate, adenosine, and reduced glutathione formulated to treat an array of medical conditions.  

PubMed

Effective artificial oxygen carriers may offer a solution to tackling current transfusion medicine challenges such as blood shortages, red blood cell storage lesions, and transmission of emerging pathogens. These products, could provide additional therapeutic benefits besides oxygen delivery for an array of medical conditions. To meet these needs, we developed a hemoglobin (Hb)-based oxygen carrier, HemoTech, which utilizes the concept of pharmacologic cross-linking. It consists of purified bovine Hb cross-linked intramolecularly with open ring adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) and intermolecularly with open ring adenosine, and conjugated with reduced glutathione (GSH). In this composition, ATP prevents Hb dimerization, and adenosine promotes formation of Hb polymers as well as counteracts the vasoconstrictive and pro-inflammatory properties of Hb via stimulation of adenosine receptors. ATP also serves as a regulator of vascular tone through activation of purinergic receptors. GSH blocks Hb's extravasation and glomerular filtration by lowering the isoelectric point, as well as shields heme from nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species. HemoTech and its manufacturing technology have been broadly tested, including viral and prion clearance validation studies and various nonclinical pharmacology, toxicology, genotoxicity, and efficacy tests. The clinical proof-of-concept was carried out in sickle cell anemia subjects. The preclinical and clinical studies indicate that HemoTech works as a physiologic oxygen carrier and has efficacy in treating: (i) acute blood loss anemia by providing a temporary oxygen bridge while stimulating an endogenous erythropoietic response; (ii) sickle cell disease by counteracting vaso-occlusive/inflammatory episodes and anemia; and (iii) ischemic vascular diseases particularly thrombotic and restenotic events. The pharmacologic cross-linking of Hb with ATP, adenosine, and GSH showed usefulness in designing an artificial oxygen carrier for multiple therapeutic indications. PMID:24980041

Simoni, Jan; Simoni, Grace; Moeller, John F; Feola, Mario; Wesson, Donald E

2014-08-01

240

Nontraumatic dental condition-related visits to emergency departments on weekdays, weekends and night hours: findings from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care survey  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether the rates of nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC)-related emergency department (ED) visits are higher during the typical working hours of dental offices and lower during night hours, as well as the associated factors. Methods We analyzed data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 1997 through 2007 using multivariate binary and polytomous logistic regression adjusted for survey design to determine the effect of predictors on specified outcome variables. Results Overall, 4,726 observations representing 16.4 million NTDC-related ED visits were identified. Significant differences in rates of NTDC-related ED visits were observed with 40%–50% higher rates during nonworking hours and 20% higher rates on weekends than the overall average rate of 170 visits per hour. Compared with 19–33 year olds, subjects < 18 years old had significantly higher relative rates of NTDC-related ED visits during nonworking hours [relative rate ratio (RRR) = 1.6 to 1.8], whereas those aged 73 and older had lower relative rates during nonworking hours (RRR = 0.4; overall P = 0.0005). Compared with those having private insurance, Medicaid and self-pay patients had significantly lower relative rates of NTDC visits during nonworking and night hours (RRR = 0.6 to 0.7, overall P < 0.0003). Patients with a dental reason for visit were overrepresented during the night hours (RRR = 1.3; overall P = 0.04). Conclusion NTDC-related visits to ED occurred at a higher rate during nonworking hours and on weekends and were significantly associated with age, patient-stated reason for visit and payer type. PMID:24039453

Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Fischer, Melissa Christine; Sadeghi, Saba Noori; Xiang, Qun; Szabo, Aniko

2013-01-01

241

Medical manslaughter.  

PubMed

On November 29, 2011 Dr Conrad Murray was sentenced to four years in prison after being convicted of the involuntary manslaughter of Michael Jackson. Expert witness statements indicated that Murray's actions were an "extreme departure from the standard of care", particularly with regard to (1) inappropriately treating insomnia with a surgical anaesthetic (propofol); (2) failing to acquire sufficiently informed consent; (3) administering propofol without the necessary monitoring equipment; (4) delaying contacting the emergency services; and (5) making ineffective resuscitation efforts. Further medical evidence argued that Murray's care of Jackson contained "17 egregious violations", defined as acts that posed a foreseeable danger to the patient's life. These deficiencies, it was stated, constituted gross negligence. Such events might seem remote from daily medical practice in Ireland. However, medical errors resulting in patient death are reported to be unfortunately frequent, even if such fatalities are rarely as dramatic, or as public, as that of Michael Jackson. Medical care is not necessarily straightforward, and any treatment outcome is dependent on clinician skill, the nature of the intervention, and on the pathological condition of the patient. Regardless of these latter two factors, a poor outcome still may occur through physician omissions or the commission of errors or violations. Merry and McCall Smith distinguish between errors and violations on the following basis: (1) errors are not deliberate, and result in unintentional actions and consequences; (2) violations, on the other hand, entail a deliberate deviation from accepted rules or norms. It was alleged that much of Dr Murray's professional conduct in this case fell into the latter category. PMID:23472376

Lyons, B

2013-01-01

242

Abortion - medical  

MedlinePLUS

Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion ... A medical, or nonsurgical, abortion can be done within 7 weeks from the first day of the woman's last ...

243

Medication Errors  

MedlinePLUS

... for Healthcare Research and Quality: Medical Errors and Patient Safety Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Medication Safety Department of Veterans Affairs National Center for Patient Safety Institute for Safe Medication Practices To Err is ...

244

Medical Matrix  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Medical Matrix is a Web resource that offers a database of Internet clinical medicine resources. Medical Matrix categorizes resources by disease, specialty, and other interest areas. It is designed as a "home page" for a physician's or healthworker's computer. Medical Matrix is a project of the Internet Working Group of the American Medical Informatics Association.

245

MEDICAL "DEPRIVATION."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE SOCIAL AND MEDICAL PROBLEM TODAY HAS SHIFTED FROM PROVIDING FOR THE EMERGENCY MEDICAL NEEDS OF THE INDIGENT SICK TO RAISING THE LEVEL OF LOWER CLASS PARTICIPATION IN THE BENEFITS OF MODERN MEDICINE. GREATER ATTENTION IS BEING FOCUSED ON MEDICAL DEPRIVATION SUFFERED BY LARGE SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION WHO DO NOT SHARE EQUALLY IN MEDICAL

SUCHMAN, EDWARD A.

246

Exploration Medical Capability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember. This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this goal and our current areas of interest. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to identify medical conditions of concern during exploration missions. The list was derived from space flight medical incidents, the shuttle medical checklist, the International Space Station medical checklist, and expert opinion. The conditions on the list were prioritized according to mission type by a panel comprised of flight surgeons, physician astronauts, engineers, and scientists. From the prioritized list, the ExMC element determined the capabilities needed to address the medical conditions of concern. Where such capabilities were not currently available, a gap was identified. The element s research plan outlines these gaps and the tasks identified to achieve the desired capabilities for exploration missions. This poster is being presented to inform the audience of the gaps and tasks being investigated by ExMC and to encourage discussions of shared interests and possible future collaborations.

Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David; Wu, Jimmy; Barsten, Kristina

2010-01-01

247

41 CFR 60-250.23 - Medical examinations and inquiries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...activities, including voluntary medical histories, which are part of an employee...this section regarding the medical condition or history of any applicant or employee...this section regarding the medical condition or history of any applicant or...

2011-07-01

248

41 CFR 60-300.23 - Medical examinations and inquiries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...activities, including voluntary medical histories, which are part of an employee...this section regarding the medical condition or history of any applicant or employee...this section regarding the medical condition or history of any applicant or...

2011-07-01

249

41 CFR 60-741.23 - Medical examinations and inquiries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...activities, including voluntary medical histories, which are part of an employee...this section regarding the medical condition or history of any applicant or employee...this section regarding the medical condition or history of any applicant or...

2011-07-01

250

77 FR 20637 - Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Information on Prescription Medication Adherence AGENCY: Department of Health and Human...problem of prescription medication non-adherence in adults with chronic conditions. The...organizations in efforts to improve medication adherence in adults with chronic conditions....

2012-04-05

251

Mania in the medically ill  

Microsoft Academic Search

Manic symptoms frequently occur in patients with comorbid medical disorders and present a diagnostic and treatment challenge.\\u000a Manic symptoms may be due to an independent psychiatric illness, may be induced or precipitated by a medical condition, or\\u000a may result from medication or substance use. The presence of manic symptoms in medically ill patients can lead to misdiagnosis\\u000a or complicate the

Monica Arora; Joan Daughton

2007-01-01

252

Oral Medication  

MedlinePLUS

... over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money by finding the right type and ... Options? Is There a Danger of Interactions? How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? We Can Help (Long) - we-can-help-long. ...

253

Initial evaluation of patients reporting a work-related stress or bullying Psychological disorders linked with working conditions are internationally recognized as an  

E-print Network

urgent management, a simple conflict situation with no psychological repercussions, and intermediateInitial evaluation of patients reporting a work-related stress or bullying Sir, Psychological. The disorder may correspond to a de novo diagnosis or to the aggravation of a pre-existing condition

Boyer, Edmond

254

[Medical technology and medical education].  

PubMed

The education of medical professionals is divided into medical studies, postgraduate training leading to the qualification as a specialist, and continuing professional development. During education, all scientific knowledge and practical skills are to be acquired, which enable the physician to practice responsibly in a specialized medical area. In the present article, relevant curricula are analyzed regarding the consideration of medical device-related topics, as the clinical application of medical technology has reached a central position in modern patient care. Due to the enormous scientific and technical progress, this area has become as important as pharmacotherapy. Our evaluation shows that medical device-related topics are currently underrepresented in the course of medical education and training and should be given greater consideration in all areas of medical education. Possible solutions are presented. PMID:20700785

von Mallek, D; Biersack, H-J; Mull, R; Wilhelm, K; Heinz, B; Mellert, F

2010-08-01

255

MEDICAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCE Deselection of applicants  

E-print Network

MEDICAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCE Deselection of applicants (for medics and vets) Competition arrangements. Criminal Record Check (for medics and vets) All offers of a place on this course will be subject. Those of you being offered a place (conditional or unconditional) for Medical or Veterinary Sciences

Dixon, Peter

256

Sleep Pattern in Medical Students and Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Sleep disturbances is a distressing and disabling condition that affects many people, and can affect on quality of work and education of medical students and residents. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders in medical students and residents. Methods: A representative sample of medical students and residents of Iran University of medical students

Mir Farhad; Ghalhe Bandi; Siyamak Kaffashi BS

2009-01-01

257

Medical Dictionary of Popular Medical Terms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by MedicineNet.com, this free and constantly revised encylopedic dictionary of classic and contemporary medical terms contains over 9,000 entries. Written entirely by physicians for both professional and non-professional readers, the dictionary also includes "pertinent scientific items, abbreviations, acronyms, jargon, institutions, projects, symptoms, syndromes, eponyms, medical history -- all having to do with medicine and the biomedical sciences, particularly anything of value and of interest." Users can browse the dictionary by alphabetical entry or conduct a keyword search. The length of dictionary entries vary widely, and some are quite brief. Some, however (mostly conditions or diseases), include links to detailed articles and related forums at the MedicineNet main site. While new medical information sites seem to pop up every day, the depth of Medterms, the frequent updates, and its doctor-only editors mark it as a notable resource.

258

Anxious patients in the medical setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the setting of the general hospital, up to 60% of patients may present with psychological symptoms. Some of these are psychiatric presentations or complications of medical conditions, while others are medical presentations or complications of psychiatric conditions. A significant number have emotional reactions, commonly anxiety and depression (1,2) . Medical illness may mimic anxiety disorders and anxiety may mimic

Wilfred C G Peh; Lee Pheng Soon; Tham Tat Yean; L H Peh

259

Mycobacterial bone marrow infections at a medical centre in Taiwan, 2001-2009.  

PubMed

Mycobacterial bone marrow (BM) infection is the most common diagnosis established by BM examinations for fever of unknown origin. In this study, clinical features and outcomes of patients who fulfilled the criteria for BM infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) at a medical centre in Taiwan from 2001 to 2009 were investigated. The BM histopathological findings were also analysed. A total of 24 patients (16 men, eight women) with mycobacterial BM infections were found. Of these, nine (38%) were positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and six (25%) had no pre-existing immunocompromised conditions. MTB isolates were obtained from 11 (46%) patients and NTM species were isolated from 10 (42%) patients, including M. avium complex (MAC, n = 7) and M. kansasii (n = 3). Patients with MTB infections were significantly older than those with NTM infections (60·5 vs. 47·7 years, P = 0·043) and were less likely to have a positive BM culture (45% vs. 100%, P = 0·012). The 90-day survival rates for MTB and NTM BM infections were 68% and 60%, respectively (P = 0·61). In addition, the presence of BM granulomas was significantly more common in patients with MTB BM infections than in those with NTM infections (82% vs. 30%, P = 0·030). In Taiwan, the importance of NTM was not inferior to MTB and besides MAC, M. kansasii might be an important pathogen in non-HIV-infected patients. The presence of BM granulomas and caseation provides valuable information regarding early treatment pending culture results. PMID:24168831

Lin, S-H; Lai, C-C; Huang, S-H; Hung, C-C; Hsueh, P-R

2014-07-01

260

Exploration Medical System Demonstration Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) mission will present significant new challenges including hazards to crew health created by exploring a beyond low earth orbit destination, traversing the terrain of asteroid surfaces, and the effects of variable gravity environments. Limited communications with ground-based personnel for diagnosis and consultation of medical events require increased crew autonomy when diagnosing conditions, creating treatment plans, and executing procedures. Scope: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will be a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to show an end-to-end medical system assisting the Crew Medical Officers (CMO) in optimizing medical care delivery and medical data management during a mission. NEA medical care challenges include resource and resupply constraints limiting the extent to which medical conditions can be treated, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and rendering of medical care by a non-clinician. The system demonstrates the integration of medical technologies and medical informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making. Project Objectives: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a) Reduce and possibly eliminate the time required for a crewmember and ground personnel to manage medical data from one application to another. b) Demonstrate crewmember's ability to access medical data/information via a software solution to assist/aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c) Develop a common data management architecture that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all crew health and life sciences activities. d) Develop a common data management architecture that allows for scalability, extensibility, and interoperability of data sources and data users. e) Lower total cost of ownership for development and sustainment of peripheral hardware and software that use EMSD for data management f) Provide better crew health via the reduction in crew errors, crew time, and ground time.

Chin, D. A.; McGrath, T. L.; Reyna, B.; Watkins, S. D.

2011-01-01

261

Medical Care Costs Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury over the Full Spectrum of Disease: A Controlled Population-Based Study  

PubMed Central

Abstract Data on traumatic brain injury (TBI) economic outcomes are limited. We used Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) resources to estimate long-term medical costs for clinically-confirmed incident TBI across the full range of severity after controlling for pre-existing conditions and co-occurring injuries. All Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents with diagnoses indicative of potential TBI from 1985–2000 (n=46,114) were identified, and a random sample (n=7175) was selected for medical record review to confirm case status, and to characterize as definite (moderate/severe), probable (mild), or possible (symptomatic) TBI. For each case, we identified one age- and sex-matched non-TBI control registered in REP in the same year (±1 year) as case's TBI. Cases with co-occurring non-head injuries were assessed for non-head-injury severity and assigned similar non-head-injury-severity controls. The 1145 case/control pairs for 1988–2000 were followed until earliest death/emigration of either member for medical costs 12 months before and up to 6 years after baseline (i.e., injury date for cases and comparable dates for controls). Differences between case and control costs were stratified by TBI severity, as defined by evidence of brain injury; comparisons used Wilcoxon signed-rank plus multivariate modeling (adjusted for pre-baseline characteristics). From baseline until 6 years, each TBI category exhibited significant incremental costs. For definite and probable TBI, most incremental costs occurred within the first 6 months; significant long-term incremental medical costs were not apparent among 1-year survivors. By contrast, cost differences between possible TBI cases and controls were not as great within the first 6 months, but were substantial among 1-year survivors. Although mean incremental costs were highest for definite cases, probable and possible cases accounted for>90% of all TBI events and 66% of total incremental costs. Preventing probable and possible events might facilitate substantial reductions in TBI-associated medical care costs. PMID:22414023

Brown, Allen W.; Hall Long, Kirsten; Ransom, Jeanine E.; Mandrekar, Jay; Osler, Turner M.; Malec, James F.

2012-01-01

262

Exploration Medical System Demonstration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that allows for scalability, extensibility, and interoperability of data sources and data users. f. Lower total cost of ownership for development and sustainment of peripheral hardware and software that use EMSD for data management. g. Provide a better standard of healthcare for crew members through reductions in the time required by crew and ground personnel to provide medical treatment and the number of crew errors experienced during treatment.

Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

2014-01-01

263

Medical Device Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Medical Devices Print this page Share this page E-mail ... Medical Product Safety Network Emergency Situations (Medical Devices) Medical Device Safety Search the Medical Device Safety Section Medical ...

264

Medication Guide  

MedlinePLUS

... for heavy smokers. Prescription First-Line Medications: Other Bupropion Bupropion, also known as Zyban®, helps to reduce nicotine withdrawal symptoms and the urge to smoke. Bupropion can be used safely with nicotine replacement products. ...

265

Medical Imaging.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

Barker, M. C. J.

1996-01-01

266

Botox (Medical)  

MedlinePLUS

... from any list. Close without sharing. Give Us Feedback Botox (Medical) Your name First Name MI Laast ... Your message: Close without sending Thank you. Your feedback will help us improve this site. Close What ...

267

[Modern medical science and Military Medical Academy].  

PubMed

The article presents the information about the main directions of scientific investigations of Military Medical Academy and their results during the period of 1999-2000. The scientific work was conducted in conformity with demands of orders and directives of RF Ministry of Defense. 12 integrated scientific problems were formed in the annual plans of the Academy's research work. Together with traditional directions the new ones connected with the experience of troops medical support during the armed conflicts, liquidation of consequences of extreme situations, participation of military contingents in peace-making operations were developed. The complex clinical investigations of specific features of combat pathology due to firearms used by the enemy during the military operations in Afghanistan and in the Northern Caucasus are going on. In the most of clinical departments the problems of etiology, pathogenesis and treatment of servicemen' diseases under peacetime conditions are the main directions of scientific investigations. Every year the Academy's rationalizers and inventors produce 60-70 inventions and more than 500 rationalization proposals. Since 1995 the Academy publishes the journal "Clinical medicine and pathophysiology" and since 1999--"Bulletin of Russian Military Medical Academy". The Academy's scientific potential comprises 194 professors, 295 associate professors, 349 Doctors and 894 Candidates of Science, 20 Honoured Scientists of RF, 57 members and corresponding members of academies (Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Russian Academy of Natural Sciences and other social academies). PMID:16259295

Ga?dar, B V; Lobzin, Iu V; Chursin, I G; Tsygan, V N

2005-08-01

268

Medical News Today  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website presents Medical News Today, an organization based in the United Kingdom, aimed at providing "the latest news headlines from the world of medicine and healthcare today and every day." The site offers 19 pages of recent news headline lists, with each headline hyperlinked to its article (or part of its article). Most article pages contain an original URL or some other contact or source information. In addition, the article pages allow site visitors to write an opinion piece about the article, as well as view other visitors' opinions. This website also provides search engines for medical abbreviations and terms, and links to information about healthcare, conditions, and patient resources.

269

Medical Products Research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ventrex Laboratories, Inc. develops, manufactures and markets a line of medical diagnostic assays based on biochemical techniques, in particular immunochemical techniques. Their products are sold worldwide to hospitals and medical laboratories for use in testing blood samples and other biological fluids. Analysis of a patient's body fluids, compared with normal values, aids a physician in confirming or otherwise diagnosing a suspected disease condition. NERAC's rapid information retrieval has provided Ventrex invaluable up-to-date information, and has permitted large scale savings. NERAC's service was particularly important in the development of a new product in the company's Ventre/Sep line, which is used in radioimmunoassays.

1982-01-01

270

Modelling the formation of H 2SO 4-H 2O particles in rural, urban and marine conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The factors which affect the formation of new sulphuric acid particles in different atmospheric conditions are investigated. An atmospheric chemistry gas phase box model coupled to a three mode integral aerosol dynamics model is used. The simulations show the dependence of the concentration of nucleation mode particles on initial pre-existing particles, the intensity of UV radiation, the emissions of dimethylsulphide (DMS) and the ratio of emissions of hydrocarbons (HC) and NO x present in the atmosphere. Eight different basic cases are simulated in urban, rural and marine conditions. The effects of pre-existing particles as a sink of sulphuric acid are clearly seen. The increased UV radiation is also seen to enhance particle formation via sulphuric acid route significantly.

Pirjola, Liisa; Kulmala, Markku

271

[A medical-pharmaceutical partnership model as a contributor to the success in conditioning regimen for allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adults: a cross-reflection on our organizations].  

PubMed

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplant (allo-SCT) remains the only cure for many hematological malignancies and some benign and congenital diseases. Busulfan, proposed in its injectable form, has quickly become a mainstay of pharmacological and myeloablative (or non-myeloablative) conditioning. This is following the outbreak in 2010 of a multicenter international clinical phase II trial, we tested the robustness and reliability of our organization in a complex model of organization and multifactorial partnership. In this type "BuCy2" protocol based on a classical treatment duration of 4 consecutive days, the administration of IV busulfan is given in one single daily infusion instead of the conventional 16 infusions, while keeping the same total dose. Under these conditions, the treatment is totally secured using a therapeutic drug monitoring of busulfan, applied in real-time. The process is technically complex and requires the very close cooperation of the teams involved. A strength, weakness, opportunity and threat (SWOT) analysis has been constructed; it fully supports continuous quality improvement to the triple benefit of the nursing chain, the patients and their environment. Several critical points were identified and corrected. The experiment strongly contributes to the safety and security of the medication circuit at the hospital and, improves the performance of allo-SCT. It also contributes to the protection of all actors in the health field and their working environment via a well-functioning quality management system. PMID:22645281

Bourget, Philippe; Falaschi, Ludivine; Suarez, Felipe; Galland, Valérie; Blot, Dominique; Trompette, Caroline; Sibon, David; Fontbrune, Flore Sicre de; Merlette, Christophe; Vidal, Fabrice; Corriol, Odile; Giraud, Bérénice; Broissand, Christine; Clement, Rozenn; Hermine, Olivier

2012-06-01

272

AIR CONDITIONER REQUEST EXTREME MEDICAL CIRCUMSTANCES  

E-print Network

? _____________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Type of allergy or significant medical condition: __________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Are allergy injections given No OR essential Yes No to the management of allergy? Is the use of an air conditioner

273

Usage of pioglitazone at Medanta, the Medicity  

PubMed Central

Pioglitazone improves glycemic control by acting as an insulin sensitizer and is used in the management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pioglitazone has recently been at the center of a controversy with regards to its safety. There is no clear consensus on how, when and in what dose the drug should be used in the management of diabetes. We have summarized our strategy on pioglitazone use in Type 2 diabetes in a large private tertiary care center - Medanta, the Medicity- which may help in generating further thought about positioning of this anti-diabetic molecule. We use pioglitazone as the fourth in the pecking order of oral anti-diabetic agents. We typically use pioglitazone in a dose of 15 mg/day. We avoid using pioglitazone with insulin. We do not use pioglitazone under following situations: In the presence of significant or proven cardiac disease, in patients who are struggling with their weight or need to lose weight, in patients at high risk for osteoporotic fractures, in patients with macular edema, in patients with pre-existing bladder cancer and would discontinue in case hematuria or any other symptom of bladder cancer develops. We continue to use the drug in patients well controlled on it without any evident side-effects or contraindications. PMID:24701440

Mithal, Ambrish; Kaur, Parjeet; Bansal, Beena; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Wasir, Jasjeet S.; Jevalikar, Ganesh; Mahendru, Shama

2014-01-01

274

Medical genetics  

SciTech Connect

This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

1995-10-01

275

Medical leasing.  

PubMed

Leases for medical space can have far-reaching (and sometimes unintentional) consequences for the future of the practice and the costs of the business. In order to prevent hardship and expense down the line, it is especially important to review the lease to make sure that it reflects the practice's goals, needs, and structure. This article provides a number of provisions that are especially crucial to review and negotiate when leasing medical space, including use restrictions, assignment and subleasing clauses, build-out terms, and legal compliance requirements. PMID:22594070

Holden, Elizabeth A

2012-01-01

276

Medical Instrumentation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn about the sorts of devices designed by biomedical engineers and the many other engineering specialties that are required in their design of medical diagnostics, therapeutic aids, surgical devices and procedures, and replacement parts. They discuss the special considerations that must be made when dealing with the human body, such as being minimally invasive, biocompatible, keeping sterile, lightweight, corrosion resistant, long lasting and electrically safe. They also explore how "form fits function." Students gain an appreciation for the amazing devices that improve our quality of life. This lesson serves as a starting point for students to begin to ponder how the medical devices in their everyday lives work.

Techtronics Program,

277

Myasthenia Gravis Medication Information Card (Drugs to be Avoided or Used with Caution in Myasthenia Gravis)  

MedlinePLUS

... Name __________________________________________________ Phone ( _______ ) ____________ or ( _______ ) _____________ Other Medical Conditions: ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ Current Medications: ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ MYASTHENIA GRAVIS MEDICATION INFORMATION CARD Drugs to be Avoided or ... the MGFA web site; reference document “Medications and Myasthenia Gravis (A Reference for Health Care Professionals.” www.myasthenia. ...

278

Recent Medical Device Recalls  

MedlinePLUS

... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Medical Devices Print this page Share this page E-mail this page Home Medical Devices Medical Device Safety Medical Device Recalls Medical Device ...

279

POLICY ON INVOLUNTARY LEAVE OF ABSENCE FOR MEDICAL REASONS  

E-print Network

a student's behaviors associated with a psychiatric, psychological, or other medical condition interferes whether an assessment of the student's psychological, psychiatric, or other medical condition should with the Director of Counseling and Psychological Services ("CAPS") or other University health professional

Carter, John

280

[Medical geography].  

PubMed

Hippocrates already noted that geographical factors such as climate, relief, geology but also settlement patterns had influenced the distribution of diseases. The task of medical geography is to investigate the associations between geographical factors and diseases. Thereby, geographic techniques and concepts are applied on health problems. Of particular importance is the mapping of diseases whose causes are environmental-related. In addition, epidemiological, ecological but also social scientific studies play an important part in the investigation of the associations between geographical factors and diseases. In order to understand the associations between the spatial distribution of diseases and environmental exposures, geographic information systems as well as statistical analyses have recently become more important. Some authors regard medical geography merely as supporting discipline of medicine. Nevertheless, as men and environment future and as they play an important part in the diffusion of diseases being regarded as defeated, medical geography will play an important part concerning medical questions. Especially travel medicine will rely on geographic knowledge, if a patient has to be consulted who plans to travel to an unknown country of which knowledge on the geographical distribution and ecology of diseases will be necessary. PMID:17974122

Hauri, D

2007-10-17

281

Medical genetics  

SciTech Connect

This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

1989-01-01

282

Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions  

E-print Network

Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions Appendix II The unique geology, hydrology and instream habitat. This chapter examines how environmental conditions in the Deschutes watershed affect, the discussion characterizes the environmental conditions within three watershed areas: the Lower Deschutes

283

Medical imaging.  

PubMed Central

There is now a wide choice of medical imaging to show both focal and diffuse pathologies in various organs. Conventional radiology with plain films, fluoroscopy and contrast medium have many advantages, being readily available with low-cost apparatus and a familiarity that almost leads to contempt. The use of plain films in chest disease and in trauma does not need emphasizing, yet there are still too many occasions when the answer obtainable from a plain radiograph has not been available. The film may have been mislaid, or the examination was not requested, or the radiograph had been misinterpreted. The converse is also quite common. Examinations are performed that add nothing to patient management, such as skull films when CT will in any case be requested or views of the internal auditory meatus and heal pad thickness in acromegaly, to quote some examples. Other issues are more complicated. Should the patient who clinically has gall-bladder disease have more than a plain film that shows gall-stones? If the answer is yes, then why request a plain film if sonography will in any case be required to 'exclude' other pathologies especially of the liver or pancreas? But then should cholecystography, CT or scintigraphy be added for confirmation? Quite clearly there will be individual circumstances to indicate further imaging after sonography but in the vast majority of patients little or no extra information will be added. Statistics on accuracy and specificity will, in the case of gall-bladder pathology, vary widely if adenomyomatosis is considered by some to be a cause of symptoms or if sonographic examinations 'after fatty meals' are performed. The arguments for or against routine contrast urography rather than sonography are similar but the possibility of contrast reactions and the need to limit ionizing radiation must be borne in mind. These diagnostic strategies are also being influenced by their cost and availability; purely pragmatic considerations are not infrequently the overriding factor. Non-invasive methods will be preferred, particularly sonography as it is far more acceptable by not being claustrophobic and totally free of any known untoward effects. There is another quite different but unrelated aspect. The imaging methods, apart from limited exceptions, cannot characterize tissues as benign or malignant, granulomatous or neoplastic; cytology or histology usually provides the answer. Sonography is most commonly used to locate the needle tip correctly for percutaneous sampling of tissues. Frequently sonography with fine needle aspiration cytology or biopsy is the least expensive, safest and most direct route to a definitive diagnosis. Abscesses can be similarly diagnosed but with needles or catheters through which the pus can be drained. The versatility and mobility of sonography has spawned other uses, particularly for the very ill and immobile, for the intensive therapy units and for the operating theatre, as well in endosonography. The appointment of more skilled sonographers to the National Health Service could make a substantial contribution to cost-effective management of hospital services. Just when contrast agents and angiography have become safe and are performed rapidly, they are being supplanted by scanning methods. They are now mainly used for interventional procedures or of pre-operative 'road maps' and may be required even less in the future as MRI angiography and Doppler techniques progress. MRI will almost certainly extent its role beyond the central nervous system (CNS) should the equipment become more freely available, especially to orthopaedics. Until then plain films, sonography or CT will have to suffice. Even in the CNS there are conditions where CT is more diagnostic, as in showing calculations in cerebral cysticercosis. Then, too, in most cases CT produces results comparable to MRI apart from areas close to bone, structures at the base of the brain, in the posterior fossa and in the spinal cord. Scintigraphy for pulmonary infarcts and bone metastases and in renal disease in children plays

Kreel, L.

1991-01-01

284

Treating Child Obesity and Associated Medical Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With American children on course to grow into the most obese generation of adults in history, Sonia Caprio argues that it is critical to develop more effective strategies for preventing childhood obesity and treating serious obesity-related health complications. She notes that although pediatricians are concerned about the obesity problem, most…

Caprio, Sonia

2006-01-01

285

29 CFR 1630.14 - Medical examinations and inquiries specifically permitted.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...this section regarding the medical condition or history of the applicant shall be...this section regarding the medical condition or history of any employee shall be...activities, including voluntary medical histories, which are part of an...

2011-07-01

286

Maternal medication, drug use, and breastfeeding.  

PubMed

This article reviews the necessary skills required for clinicians to make informed decisions about the use of medications in breastfeeding women. Even without specific data on certain medications, this review of kinetic principles, mechanisms of medication entry into breast milk, and important infant factors can aid in clinical decision making. In addition, the article reviews common medical conditions (eg, depression, hypertension, infections) in breastfeeding women and their appropriate treatment. PMID:25455573

Rowe, Hilary; Baker, Teresa; Hale, Thomas W

2015-01-01

287

INITIAL MEDICAL REVIEW -ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATE For use of this form, see AR 40-501; the proponent agency is OTSG  

E-print Network

INITIAL MEDICAL REVIEW - ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATE For use of this form, see AR 40 of this information is to provide medical information of sufficient detail to ensure uniformity in medical evaluation. Used to evaluate soldiers in terms of medical conditions and physical defects which may require medical

de Lijser, Peter

288

Medical Dictionary  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For nurses and other health care professionals who seek to distinguish the habitus from the humerus, this online medical dictionary provided by MedicineNet will be a place to bookmark for repeat visits. The dictionary contains well-written explanations for over 16,000 medical terms, and users can go ahead and browse around, or enter keywords or phrases into the search engine that resides on the page. The site also features a âÂÂWord of the DayâÂÂ, and visitors can also look through recent news items that address different health issues and also look over the latest entries to the dictionary. The site is rounded out by a list of the âÂÂTop 10 MedtermsâÂÂ, which is also a good way to start exploring the materials here.

2007-03-31

289

Medical Thoracoscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

As opposed to ‘video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery’ which requires general anesthesia, double-lumen tracheal intubation and single lung ventilation, medical thoracoscopy (or ‘pleuroscopy’) is frequently performed in the respiratory endoscopy suite using local anesthesia. It can be done by well-trained physicians, either pulmonologists or thoracic surgeons, and its main indication is related to diagnosis and treatment of pleural effusions. Also, pneumothorax can

Francisco Rodríguez-Panadero

2008-01-01

290

10 CFR 712.14 - Medical assessment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...suicide, homicide, or physical harm; or (5) Medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease, endocrine disease, cerebrovascular or other neurologic disease, or the use of drugs for the treatment of conditions that may adversely...

2010-01-01

291

10 CFR 712.14 - Medical assessment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...suicide, homicide, or physical harm; or (5) Medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease, endocrine disease, cerebrovascular or other neurologic disease, or the use of drugs for the treatment of conditions that may adversely...

2013-01-01

292

10 CFR 712.14 - Medical assessment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...suicide, homicide, or physical harm; or (5) Medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease, endocrine disease, cerebrovascular or other neurologic disease, or the use of drugs for the treatment of conditions that may adversely...

2012-01-01

293

10 CFR 712.14 - Medical assessment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...suicide, homicide, or physical harm; or (5) Medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease, endocrine disease, cerebrovascular or other neurologic disease, or the use of drugs for the treatment of conditions that may adversely...

2014-01-01

294

10 CFR 712.14 - Medical assessment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...suicide, homicide, or physical harm; or (5) Medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease, endocrine disease, cerebrovascular or other neurologic disease, or the use of drugs for the treatment of conditions that may adversely...

2011-01-01

295

20 CFR 220.110 - Medically disabled.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...are based on medically acceptable clinical and laboratory techniques. (c) Addiction to alcohol or drugs. If a claimant has a condition diagnosed as addiction to alcohol or drugs, this condition will not, by itself, be a basis for...

2011-04-01

296

20 CFR 220.110 - Medically disabled.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...are based on medically acceptable clinical and laboratory techniques. (c) Addiction to alcohol or drugs. If a claimant has a condition diagnosed as addiction to alcohol or drugs, this condition will not, by itself, be a basis for...

2014-04-01

297

20 CFR 220.110 - Medically disabled.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...are based on medically acceptable clinical and laboratory techniques. (c) Addiction to alcohol or drugs. If a claimant has a condition diagnosed as addiction to alcohol or drugs, this condition will not, by itself, be a basis for...

2013-04-01

298

20 CFR 220.110 - Medically disabled.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...are based on medically acceptable clinical and laboratory techniques. (c) Addiction to alcohol or drugs. If a claimant has a condition diagnosed as addiction to alcohol or drugs, this condition will not, by itself, be a basis for...

2010-04-01

299

20 CFR 220.110 - Medically disabled.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...are based on medically acceptable clinical and laboratory techniques. (c) Addiction to alcohol or drugs. If a claimant has a condition diagnosed as addiction to alcohol or drugs, this condition will not, by itself, be a basis for...

2012-04-01

300

Medical Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In re-listening to the lectures of Charles Townes shortly after the invention of the laser (e.g., in the Boston Science Museum), one can already have a realistic vision of the potentialities of this new tool in the field of medical therapy, as evidenced by the use of the laser in ophthalmology to cure retinal detachment in the 1960's. Since then, applications have flourished in the domain of therapy. We will thus illustrate here only some of the main fields of application of medical lasers. On the opposite, the use of lasers in medical imaging is, with one exception in ophthalmology, still at the development level. It is becoming a diagnostic tool in addition to high performance imaging facilities that are often very expensive (such as CT scan, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging). Even if progress is sometimes slow, one can now image with light inside the human body, in spite of the strong scattering of light by tissues, in the same way as a pathologist sees surgical specimens.

Boccara, A. Claude; Mordon, Serge

2015-10-01

301

Medical foods for Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition associated with cognitive loss, behavioural changes, functional ability decline and caregiver burden. Given the worldwide public health impact of AD, novel interventions to reduce suffering experienced by AD patients need to be developed. Foods may offer a mechanism for intervention complementary to drugs, devices, biologicals and vaccines. Apart from foods with health claims (including dietary supplements), medical foods are also being explored as an intervention option. The purpose of this article is to describe how medical foods may complement other interventions for AD patients by: (i) defining what a medical food is; (ii) discussing whether AD is a condition amenable to medical food intervention; (iii) reviewing current clinical trial data on medical foods used in participants with AD; and (iv) highlighting steps needed to establish a more comprehensive framework for developing medical foods for AD. While medical foods may be defined differently in other countries, the US Orphan Drug Act of 1998 defined a medical food as a food formulated for enteral intake, taken under physician supervision, and intended to meet the distinctive nutritional requirements identified for a disease or condition. For AD to be amenable to medical food intervention, it must: (i) result in limited or impaired capacity to ingest, digest, absorb or metabolize ordinary foodstuff or certain nutrients; or (ii) have unique, medically determined nutrient requirements; and (iii) require dietary management that cannot be achieved by modification of the normal diet alone. While these criteria are most likely met in advanced AD, identifying unique nutritional requirements in early AD that cannot be met by normal diet modification requires a better understanding of AD pathophysiology. A PubMed search using the terms 'medical food' and 'Alzheimer', limited to clinical trials published in English with human participants with AD aged >65 years and supplemented by other articles known to meet the inclusion criteria, revealed that only two medical foods, AC-1202 and Souvenaid® with Fortasyn Connect™, have clinical trial results available for discussion. As medical food development for AD is a relatively new endeavour, a window of opportunity exists for all stakeholders to develop a comprehensive framework for assuring that medical food interventions for AD achieve the highest possible scientific and ethical standards to warrant commercialization. PMID:21534638

Shah, Raj C

2011-06-01

302

Smoking cessation medications  

MedlinePLUS

Smoking cessation - medications; Smokeless tobacco - medications; Medications for stopping tobacco ... Creating a plan to help you deal with smoking urges. Getting support from a doctor, counselor, or ...

303

Antimalarial medications in dermatology. A review.  

PubMed

Antimalarial medications are effective for the treatment of a variety of dermatologic conditions. Their use is often curtailed by concern for adverse reactions, including ophthalmologic side effects; however, recent evidence points to a greater margin of safety with these medications than was previously appreciated. This article reviews the pharmacology of antimalarial medications as well as indications and safe guidelines for their use in the treatment of dermatologic conditions. PMID:2060155

Weiss, J S

1991-04-01

304

Radiation burden of assistant medical technicians at a medical accelerator  

PubMed Central

A survey of a CLINAC 2100 C medical accelerator showed residual short half-life radiation after switching off the accelerator. This led to a dose of radiation for the medical employees when the patient was handled. The dose rate was measured with a dose rate meter FH40G, and annual dose for an assistant medical technician (AMT) was estimated under conservative conditions. In the assumed situation of 1000 patient treatment fractions with high-energy photons, an AMT would get an annual dose of 960 ?Sv, while the monthly dosimeter records would show zero, if the dose received is below threshold of 100 ?Sv. PMID:19893712

Gründel, M.; Güthoff, F.

2008-01-01

305

Implantable medical devices MRI safe.  

PubMed

Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

2013-01-01

306

Medical clip  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An X-ray transparent and biological inert medical clip for treating aneurisms and the like is described. A graphite reinforced composite film is molded into a unitary structure having a pair of hourglass-like cavities hinged together with a pair of jaws for grasping the aneurism extending from the wall of one cavity. A silicone rubber pellet is disposed in the other cavity to exert a spring force through the hinge area to normally bias the jaws into contact with each other.

Baucom, R. M. (inventor)

1983-01-01

307

Medical Mystery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity (on pages 15-23) combines interactive role-playing and graphing to introduce learners to the health affects of pollen. In the first part, learners role-play a detective on a medical case and the main character in the case. Learners formulate a hypothesis about a patient's illness. In the second part, learners graph evidence based on pollen counts and create a "final report" about what caused the patient's health problem. This activity smoothly combines health education, environmental science, and math.

Museum, University O.; Nebraska Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth Development

2001-01-01

308

Medical Mysteries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Rice University presents Medical Mysteries (or MedMyst for short) "an Internet-based adventure...in which you are on a mission to discover the causes of diseases." Designed for middle and high school students, MedMyst offers an engaging, multimedia approach to learning about infectious diseases and the immune system, as well as pharmacology, chemistry, public health policy, and more. MedMyst also includes three downloadable mini-labs that expand on concepts covered in the multimedia adventure. The Web site also includes loads of useful links.

2008-05-21

309

Inflight Medical Events in the Shuttle Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since the first launch of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the astronauts and their flight surgeons have dealt with a variety of inflight medical issues. A review will be provided of these issues as well as medications used in the treatment of these medical problems. Detailed medical debriefs are conducted by the flight ,surgeon with the individual crewmembers three days after landing. These debriefs were review for Shuttle flights from 1988 through 1999 to determine the frequency of inflight medical events. Medical events were grouped by ICD category and the frequency of medical events within those categories were reviewed. The ICD category of Symptoms, Signs and Ill-defined Conditions had the most medical events. Facial fullness and headache were the most common complaints within this category. The ICD category of Respiratory System had the next most common medical events with sinus congestion being the most common complaint. This was followed by Digestive System complaints and Nervous System/Sense Organ complaints. A variety of inflight medical events have occurred throughout the Shuttle program. Fortunately, the majority of these problems have been minor and have been well within the capability of the medical equipment flown and the skills of the Crew Medical Officers. Medical ,problems/procedures that are routine on the ground often present unique problems in the space flight environment. It is important that the flight surgeon understand the common medical problems encountered.

Baisden, Denise L.; Effenhauser, R. K.; Wear, Mary L.

1999-01-01

310

In-flight Medical Emergencies  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Research and data regarding in-flight medical emergencies during commercial air travel are lacking. Although volunteer medical professionals are often called upon to assist, there are no guidelines or best practices to guide their actions. This paper reviews the literature quantifying and categorizing in-flight medical incidents, discusses the unique challenges posed by the in-flight environment, evaluates the legal aspects of volunteering to provide care, and suggests an approach to managing specific conditions at 30,000 feet. Methods: We conducted a MEDLINE search using search terms relevant to aviation medical emergencies and flight physiology. The reference lists of selected articles were reviewed to identify additional studies. Results: While incidence studies were limited by data availability, syncope, gastrointestinal upset, and respiratory complaints were among the most common medical events reported. Chest pain and cardiovascular events were commonly associated with flight diversion. Conclusion: When in-flight medical emergencies occur, volunteer physicians should have knowledge about the most common in-flight medical incidents, know what is available in on-board emergency medical kits, coordinate their therapy with the flight crew and remote resources, and provide care within their scope of practice. PMID:24106549

Chandra, Amit; Conry, Shauna

2013-01-01

311

Thinking About Medical School?  

E-print Network

Thinking About Medical School? Explore the DO Difference! Osteopathic Medical Education Training's Osteopathic Medical Schools · Meet with Medical School Admission Officers · Learn about osteopathic medicine and medical schools · Discover the best ways to prepare for medical school When Where Pre-Health Advisor

de Lijser, Peter

312

Medical Marketing Semi MedicalMarketingSemi  

E-print Network

U.S. ARMY Medical Marketing Semi WELCOME U.S.ARMY MedicalMarketingSemi Virginia Tech DATE: 23 October 2014 TIME: 8:00 am - 8:00 pm LOCATION: On Campus The Medical Marketing Semi is an operationally flexible, mobile medical exhibit. The MMS has various peripheral multi-media systems and displays

Buehrer, R. Michael

313

Using Home Visits to Understand Medication Errors in Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current research methods are not well designed to detect medication errors that occur at home. We developed home visit methods to investigate home medication errors in children with chronic conditions. These methods include observation of parent administration of medication to the child by a trained nurse observer who takes detailed ethnographic notes; review of all prescription and over-the-counter medications for

Kathleen E. Walsh; Christopher J. Stille; Kathleen M. Mazor; Jerry H. Gurwitz

314

REVIEW Open Access Overview of medical errors and adverse events  

E-print Network

REVIEW Open Access Overview of medical errors and adverse events Maité Garrouste-Orgeas1 hospitalized patients to experience medical errors, due to the complexity of their conditions, need for urgent interventions, and considerable workload fluctuation. Medication errors are the most common medical errors

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

315

Prioritizing Medical Resources for Exploration Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Long duration missions beyond low Earth orbit introduce new constraints to the medical system. Factors such as the inability to evacuate to Earth in a timely manner, communication delay, limitations in available medical equipment, and the clinical background of the crew will all have an impact on the assessment and treatment of medical conditions. The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element of NASAs Human Research Program seeks to improve the way the element derives its mitigation strategies for the risk of "Unacceptable Health and Mission Outcomes Due to Limitation of In-flight Medical Capabilities."

Shah, R. V.; Kerstman, E. L.

2015-01-01

316

Medical expertise, existential suffering and ending life.  

PubMed

In this article, I assess the position that voluntary euthanasia (VE) and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) ought not to be accepted in the cases of persons who suffer existentially but who have no medical condition, because existential questions do not fall within the domain of physicians' professional expertise. I maintain that VE and PAS based on suffering arising from medical conditions involves existential issues relevantly similar to those confronted in connection with existential suffering. On that basis I conclude that if VE and PAS based on suffering arising from medical conditions is taken to fall within the domain of medical expertise, it is not consistent to use the view that physicians' professional expertise does not extend to existential questions as a reason for denying requests for VE and PAS from persons who suffer existentially but have no medical condition. PMID:23869046

Varelius, Jukka

2014-02-01

317

Medically unexplained physical symptoms in medical practice: a psychiatric perspective.  

PubMed Central

Clusters of medically unexplained physical symptoms have been referred to in the literature by many different labels, including somatization, symptom-based conditions, and functional somatic syndromes, among many others. The traditional medical perspective has been to classify and study these symptoms and functional syndromes separately. In psychiatry, current taxonomies (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder, 4th edition, and The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision) classify these syndromes together under the rubric of somatoform disorders. In this article we approach medically unexplained physical symptoms from a psychiatric perspective and discuss the common features that unite multiple unexplained symptoms or functional somatic syndromes as a class. Included in this article is a discussion of nosological issues, clinical assessment, how these syndromes are viewed within the various medical specialties, and clinical management and treatment. PMID:12194898

Escobar, Javier I; Hoyos-Nervi, Constanza; Gara, Michael

2002-01-01

318

Disability & Medical Leave Resources A Guide for Employees  

E-print Network

Disability & Medical Leave Resources A Guide for Employees This guide is a resource for you if you are experiencing difficulties at work related to a disability or chronic medical condition. For example, you may: have a serious health condition and need medical leave be returning to work with restrictions

Saffman, Mark

319

International Space Station Medical Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is currently the leader, in conjunction with our Russian counterpart co-leads, of the Multilateral Medical Policy Board (MMPB), the Multilateral Medical Operations Panel (MMOP), which coordinates medical system support for International Space Station (ISS) crews, and the Multilateral Space Medicine Board (MSMB), which medically certifies all crewmembers for space flight on-board the ISS. These three organizations have representatives from NASA, RSA-IMBP (Russian Space Agency- Institute for Biomedical Problems), GCTC (Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center), ESA (European Space Agency), JAXA (Japanese Space Agency), and CSA (Canadian Space Agency). The policy and strategic coordination of ISS medical operations occurs at this level, and includes interactions with MMOP working groups in Radiation Health, Countermeasures, Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA), Informatics, Environmental Health, Behavioral Health and Performance, Nutrition, Clinical Medicine, Standards, Post-flight Activities and Rehabilitation, and Training. Each ISS Expedition has a lead Crew Surgeon from NASA and a Russian Crew Surgeon from GCTC assigned to the mission. Day-to-day issues are worked real-time by the flight surgeons and biomedical engineers (also called the Integrated Medical Group) on consoles at the MCC (Mission Control Center) in Houston and the TsUP (Center for Flight Control) in Moscow/Korolev. In the future, this may also include mission control centers in Europe and Japan, when their modules are added onto the ISS. Private medical conferences (PMCs) are conducted regularly and upon crew request with the ISS crew via private audio and video communication links from the biomedical MPSR (multipurpose support room) at MCC Houston. When issues arise in the day-to-day medical support of ISS crews, they are discussed and resolved at the SMOT (space medical operations team) meetings, which occur weekly among the International Partners. Any medical or life science issue that is not resolved at the SMOT can be taken to the Mission Management Team meeting, which occurs biweekly from MCC-Houston. This meeting includes the other International Partners and all flight support and console position representatives via teleconference. ISS Crew Surgeons have handled many medical conditions on orbit; including skin rashes, dental abscesses, lacerations, and STT segment EKG changes. Fortunately to date, there have not been any forced medical evacuations from the ISS. This speaks well for the implementation of the primary, secondary and even tertiary prevention strategies invoked by the Integrated Medical Group, as there were several medical evacuations during the previous Russian space stations.

Jones, Jeffrey A.

2008-01-01

320

Gastrointestinal medications and breastfeeding.  

PubMed

Medications used to treat gastrointestinal symptoms are increasingly being used as more have been gained nonprescription status. Most of the gastrointestinal medications, such as laxatives, antacids, and antidiarrheal agents, are used short term. Women who breastfeed should be aware of the risks of taking any medications, whether prescription or nonprescription. There is little information describing transfer into breast milk for many of these products. Cimetidine, atropine, cascara, cisapride, loperamide, magnesium sulfate, and senna are the only products identified by the AAP as compatible with breast feeding. Metoclopramide is listed by the AAP as a drug whose effect on nursing infants is unknown but may be of potential concern, although studies published to date have not reported any adverse effects. The safest laxatives and antidiarrheals are those that are not absorbed and should be considered first-line therapy for conditions of constipation or loose stools. Famotidine and nizatidine are excreted into breast milk to a lesser extent than cimetidine or ranitidine and may be the preferred histamine antagonists. Despite the limited data on the use of cisapride in nursing women, it is considered safe by the AAP and may be preferred over metoclopramide for first-line prescription treatment of heartburn. Although most of these agents appear safe in the nursing infant, caretakers should be aware of the potential adverse reactions that may occur in infants whose mothers require these products. PMID:10205441

Hagemann, T M

1998-09-01

321

Medical muddle.  

PubMed

Nanette Gartrell, MD, is a psychiatrist and researcher whose investigations have documented the mental health and psychological well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people over the past four decades. Nanette is the principal investigator of an ongoing longitudinal study of lesbian families in which the children were conceived by donor insemination. Now in its 27th year, this project has been cited internationally in the debates over equality in marriage, foster care, and adoption. Previously on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and the University of California, San Francisco, Nanette is currently a Visiting Distinguished Scholar at the Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law. In 2013, Nanette received the Association of Women Psychiatrists Presidential Commendation Award for "selfless and enduring vision, leadership, wisdom, and mentorship in the fields of women's mental health, ethics, and gender research." At the age of 63, Nanette experienced a 3 ½ month period of intractable, incapacitating dizziness for which there was never a clear diagnosis. PMID:24400630

Gartrell, Nanette

2014-01-01

322

22 CFR 71.10 - Emergency medical assistance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...required on a routine basis to sustain life; (5) Preventive or protective medications and medical supplies and equipment (vaccinations, inoculations, etc.) required to combat epidemic conditions (general or intramural); (6) Childbirth...

2012-04-01

323

22 CFR 71.10 - Emergency medical assistance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...required on a routine basis to sustain life; (5) Preventive or protective medications and medical supplies and equipment (vaccinations, inoculations, etc.) required to combat epidemic conditions (general or intramural); (6) Childbirth...

2013-04-01

324

22 CFR 71.10 - Emergency medical assistance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...required on a routine basis to sustain life; (5) Preventive or protective medications and medical supplies and equipment (vaccinations, inoculations, etc.) required to combat epidemic conditions (general or intramural); (6) Childbirth...

2014-04-01

325

22 CFR 71.10 - Emergency medical assistance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...required on a routine basis to sustain life; (5) Preventive or protective medications and medical supplies and equipment (vaccinations, inoculations, etc.) required to combat epidemic conditions (general or intramural); (6) Childbirth...

2011-04-01

326

Narcolepsy and Other Comorbid Medical Illnesses  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Patients with narcolepsy may suffer from a host of other comorbid medical and psychiatric conditions. These include eating\\u000a disorders and obesity, diabetes, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine headaches, cognitive dysfunction and psychosocial\\u000a impairment. The associations between narcolepsy and many of these comorbid medical problems have not been clearly defined,\\u000a and there are often conflicting data in the medical literature. Nevertheless, it

Lori A. Panossian; Alon Y. Avidan

327

Federal Medication Terminologies  

Cancer.gov

The Federal Medication (FedMed) interagency collaboration is organizing an agreed set of standard, comprehensive, freely and easily accessible Federal Medication Terminologies (FMT) to improve the exchange and public availability of medication information.

328

Medical Device Reliability BIOMATERIALS  

E-print Network

-generation packaging, where conformal coatings will serve as the primary interface between the deviceMedical Device Reliability BIOMATERIALS Our goal is to provide medical device manufacturers, and consistency of active implantable medical devices. These devices, including pacemakers, cardiac defibrillators

329

Biomedical Ethics & Medical Humanities  

E-print Network

BEMH Biomedical Ethics & Medical Humanities Scholarly Concentration Stanford University School? The Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities Scholarly Concentration is part of the new initiative at Stanford interactions, neonatology, issues of limited resources, ethics of medical advances, informed consent issues

Ford, James

330

Glaucoma Medical Updates  

MedlinePLUS

... Change Get Involved Research Grants Special Events Glaucoma Medical Updates Latest Medical News Updates From the Outside Looking In: Sophisticated ... Informed Sign up to receive the most recent medical and research updates . Further Information The most recent ...

331

Teaching Medical Ethics to Medical Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The evolution and goals of teaching medical ethics, the nature of medical ethics, and integrating such teaching into the curriculum are examined. Because moral considerations are as much a part of medical decisions as technical considerations, teaching is best done in the context of real cases. (Author/MLW)

Loewy, Erich H.

1986-01-01

332

Security and Privacy for Implantable Medical Devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Protecting implantable medical devices against attack without compromising patient health requires balancing security and privacy goals with traditional goals such as safety and utility. Implantable medical devices monitor and treat physiological conditions within the body. These devices - including pacemakers, implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs), drug delivery systems, and neurostimulators - can help manage a broad range of ailments, such as

Daniel Halperin; Thomas S. Heydt-benjamin; Kevin Fu; Tadayoshi Kohno; William H. Maisel

2008-01-01

333

Medical Uses of the Birth Control Pill  

MedlinePLUS

Medical Uses of the Birth Control Pill Posted under Health Guides . Updated 26 March 2014. +Related Content Key Facts Besides birth control, there are many ... kinds of medical conditions can be helped with birth control pills? Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) : is a ...

334

The Ranger medic.  

PubMed

The Ranger medic (military occupational specialty 91B) provides advanced trauma management across the operational spectrum in which the 75th Ranger Regiment is employed. Ranger medic duties, both in combat environments and in training, medical training, professional progression, and medical assets in the Ranger battalion are detailed. Ranger medic training management tools and techniques are discussed and illustrated. The role of the combat lifesaver, force modernization, and interoperability issues facing the medical team are discussed. The Ranger medic is a capable special operations tactical medic. PMID:11370201

Pappas, C G

2001-05-01

335

Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Projects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During missions to the Moon or Mars, the crew will need medical capabilities to diagnose and treat disease as well as for maintaining their health. The Exploration Medical Capability Element develops medical technologies, medical informatics, and clinical capabilities for different levels of care during space missions. The work done by team members in this Element is leading edge technology, procedure, and pharmacological development. They develop data systems that protect patient's private medical information, aid in the diagnosis of medical conditions, and act as a repository of relevant NASA life sciences experimental studies. To minimize the medical risks to crew health the physicians and scientists in this Element develop models to quantify the probability of medical events occurring during a mission. They define procedures to treat an ill or injured crew member who does not have access to an emergency room and who must be cared for in a microgravity environment where both liquids and solids behave differently than on Earth. To support the development of these medical capabilities, the Element manages the development of medical technologies that prevent, monitor, diagnose, and treat an ill or injured crewmember. The Exploration Medical Capability Element collaborates with the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), the Department of Defense, other Government-funded agencies, academic institutions, and industry.

Wu, Jimmy; Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David

2010-01-01

336

Medication adherence behaviors of Medicare beneficiaries  

PubMed Central

Background Medication adherence is crucial for positive outcomes in the management of chronic conditions. Comprehensive medication consultation can improve medication adherence by addressing intentional and unintentional nonadherence. The Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit has eliminated some cost barriers. We sought to examine variables that impact self-reported medication adherence behaviors in an ambulatory Medicare-beneficiary population and to identify the factors that influence what information is provided during a pharmacist consultation. Methods Medicare beneficiaries who attended health fairs in northern California were offered medication therapy management (MTM) services during which demographic, social, and health information, and responses to survey questions regarding adherence were collected. Beneficiaries were also asked which critical elements of a consultation were typically provided by their community pharmacist. Survey responses were examined as a function of demographic, socioeconomic, and health-related factors. Results Of the 586 beneficiaries who were provided MTM services, 575 (98%) completed the adherence questions. Of responders, 406 (70%) reported taking medications “all of the time”. Of the remaining 169 (30%), the following reasons for nonadherence were provided: 123 (73%) forgetfulness; 18 (11%) side effects; and 17 (10%) the medication was not needed. Lower adherence rates were associated with difficulty paying for medication, presence of a medication-related problem, and certain symptomatic chronic conditions. Of the 532 who completed survey questions regarding the content of a typical pharmacist consultation, the topics included: 378 (71%) medication name and indication; 361 (68%) administration instructions; 307 (58%) side effects; 257 (48%) missed-dose instructions; and 245 (46%) interactions. Subsidy recipients and non-English speakers were significantly less likely to be counseled on drug name, indication, and side effects. The presence of certain health conditions was also associated with missing consultation elements. Conclusion While Medicare beneficiaries are generally adherent to medication therapy, adherence barriers must be identified and addressed during comprehensive medication consultation. PMID:25258521

Carr-Lopez, Sian M; Shek, Allen; Lastimosa, Janine; Patel, Rajul A; Woelfel, Joseph A; Galal, Suzanne M; Gundersen, Berit

2014-01-01

337

32 CFR 732.21 - Medical board.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Chronic conditions requiring a medical board include (but are not limited to): (1) Arthritis, (2) Asthma, (3) Diabetes, (4) Gout, (5) Heart disease, (6) Hypertension, (7) Peptic ulcer disease, (8) Psychiatric...

2012-07-01

338

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers: Seeing with Sound.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains how diagnostic medical sonographers use special equipment to direct high frequency sound waves into areas of a patient's body. Describes specialties within the occupation, working conditions, employment and outlook, earnings, and necessary training and qualifications. (JOW)

Lacey, Alan

2001-01-01

339

Medications to Treat Bed-Wetting  

MedlinePLUS

... Us You are here Home » Medications to Treat Bed-wetting: Desmopressin Acetate (DDAVP) Imipramine Anticholinergics Summary Desmopressin ... DDAVP is a drug to treat children with bed-wetting. Although DDAVP does not cure the condition, ...

340

Prescription Medications for the Treatment of Obesity  

MedlinePLUS

Prescription Medications for the Treatment of Obesity WIN Weight-control Information Network U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Introduction Obesity is a chronic condition that affects many people. ...

341

UVM Alana Gear MEDICAL HISTORY FORM  

E-print Network

Control) 4. Please list any allergies that you have, including: medications, food, plants, and insects condition, epilepsy, dietary restrictions, eating disorders, food allergies) 6. Are you allergic to BEE

Hayden, Nancy J.

342

UVM OUTING CLUB MEDICAL HISTORY FORM  

E-print Network

Control) 4. Please list any allergies that you have, including: medications, food, plants, and insects condition, epilepsy, dietary restrictions, eating disorders, food allergies) 6. Are you allergic to BEE

Hayden, Nancy J.

343

Home Healthcare Medical Devices: A Checklist  

MedlinePLUS

... not using it. Contact your doctor and home healthcare team often to review your health condition. * Check ... assurance of their safety and effectiveness. A home healthcare medical device is any product or equipment used ...

344

Can UK healthcare workers remotely support medical education in the developing world?: Focus group evaluation  

PubMed Central

Objectives To evaluate the feasibility of providing regular, live, text-based teaching to medical students and junior doctors in Somaliland using a dedicated case-based medical education website (www.MedicineAfrica.com). Design Review of MedicineAfrica database for details of teaching sessions held in Somaliland from December 2008-October 2010 and evaluation of user experiences through focus groups. Setting King's College Hospital, London, UK and Ahmoud University, Borama, Somaliland. Participants Final year medical students, newly graduated interns and second year interns at Ahmoud University, Borama, Somaliland. Main outcome measures Qualitative and quantitative user rating of online case-based tutorials in the context of pre-existing educational opportunities available to them. Results Regular online teaching sessions are received enthusiastically by students and junior doctors and are reported to improve their clinical practice. Conclusions Despite technological limitations in Somaliland, a live text-based teaching service can be delivered effectively and streamlined with local curricula. This represents an alternative to traditional static teaching methodologies currently used in international medical education. PMID:22908028

Bowen, JST; Southgate, RJ; Ali, AM; Little, SJ; Liakos, A; Greaves, F; Strachan, JM; Baraco, AFH; Adem, G; Abdillahi, M; Handuleh, J; Reed, K; Walker, F; Zeron, J; Strachan, M; Bowen, S; Hellyer, T; Hersheson, J; Whitwell, S; Fyfe, M; Phillips, JC; Trim, C; Johnson, O; Leather, AJM; Al-Hadithy, N; Finlayson, AET

2012-01-01

345

Probiotics and medical nutrition therapy.  

PubMed

Probiotics have been defined by The Food Agricultural Organization/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) as "live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit to the host." They have been used for centuries in the form of dairy-based fermented products, but the potential use of probiotics as a form of medical nutrition therapy has not received formal recognition. A detailed literature review (from 1950 through February 2004) of English-language articles was undertaken to find articles showing a relationship between probiotic use and medical conditions. Medical conditions that have been reportedly treated or have the potential to be treated with probiotics include diarrhea, gastroenteritis, irritable bowel syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis), cancer, depressed immune function, inadequate lactase digestion, infant allergies, failure-to-thrive, hyperlipidemia, hepatic diseases, Helicobacter pylori infections, genitourinary tract infections, and others. The use of probiotics should be further investigated for possible benefits and side-effects in patients affected by these medical conditions. PMID:15481739

Brown, Amy C; Valiere, Ana

2004-01-01

346

Probiotics and Medical Nutrition Therapy  

PubMed Central

Probiotics have been defined by The Food Agricultural Organization/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) as “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit to the host.” They have been used for centuries in the form of dairy-based fermented products, but the potential use of probiotics as a form of medical nutrition therapy has not received formal recognition. A detailed literature review (from 1950 through February 2004) of English-language articles was undertaken to find articles showing a relationship between probiotic use and medical conditions. Medical conditions that have been reportedly treated or have the potential to be treated with probiotics include diarrhea, gastroenteritis, irritable bowel syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis), cancer, depressed immune function, inadequate lactase digestion, infant allergies, failure-to-thrive, hyperlipidemia, hepatic diseases, Helicobacter pylori infections, genitourinary tract infections, and others. The use of probiotics should be further investigated for possible benefits and side-effects in patients affected by these medical conditions. PMID:15481739

Brown, Amy C.; Valiere, Ana

2006-01-01

347

Hypermagnesemia Induced by Massive Cathartic Ingestion in an Elderly Woman without Pre-existing Renal Dysfunction  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 76-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for unresponsiveness and hypotension. She had developed constipation that had led to ileus and had received 34 g of magnesium citrate (Magcolol P ® ) orally the day before. She was lethargic, her blood pressure was less than 50 mmHg, and electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed sinus ar- rest with junctional escape rhythm. Her

Makoto KONTANI; Akinori HARA; Shinji OHTA; Takayuki IKEDA

2005-01-01

348

ORIGINAL PAPER The Effect of Pre-Existing Affect on the SexualResponses of Women  

E-print Network

stress disorder (PTSD) provides support for an associ- ation between trauma-related cues and negative affective res- ponses. For example, women with PTSD, as compared to womenwithnotraumaorabusehistory

349

Atomistic simulation of the influence of pre-existing stress on the interpretation of nanoindentation data  

E-print Network

in tension and that the modulus calculated from the true contact area is essentially independent of the press also be determined.2­4 The test relies on the continuous monitoring of force and displacement as the indenter penetrates the sample.5­8 The resulting force-displacement curves are used to determine

Brenner, Donald W.

350

Pore Water Characteristics Following a Release of Neat Ethanol onto Pre-existing NAPL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neat ethanol (75.7 L) was released into the upper capillary zone in a continuous-flow, sand-packed aquifer tank (8.2 m3) with an average seepage velocity of 0.75 m\\/day. This model aquifer system contained a residual nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) that extended from the capillary zone to 10 cm below the water table. Maximum aqueous concentrations of ethanol were 20% v\\/v in

Brent P. Stafford; Natalie L. Cápiro; Pedro J. J. Alvarez; William G. Rixey

2009-01-01

351

Pre-Existing Background Knowledge Influences Socioeconomic Differences in Preschoolers' Word Learning and Comprehension  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the current study is to explore the influence of knowledge on socioeconomic discrepancies in word learning and comprehension. After establishing socioeconomic differences in background knowledge (Study 1), the authors presented children with a storybook that incorporates this knowledge (Study 2). Results indicated that middle-income…

Kaefer, Tanya; Neuman, Susan B.; Pinkham, Ashley M.

2015-01-01

352

Seeing orange: prawns tap into a pre-existing sensory bias of the Trinidadian guppy  

PubMed Central

Sensory bias, a predisposition towards certain signals, has been implicated in the origin of mate preferences in some species. A risk associated with these biases is that they can be co-opted by predators as sensory lures. Here we propose that the orange spots on the brown pincers of a diurnal, predatory species of prawn function as lures for Trinidadian guppies, which have a sensory bias for orange. We exposed female guppies to (i) a life-like model of this Trinidadian prawn with orange, green or no spots on the pincers or (ii) a live, novel (non-Trinidadian) crustacean (crayfish), also with spotted pincers. First, we provide evidence that guppies sympatric with the prawn recognized our model as a potential predator. Next, we found that guppies spent more time in the dangerous head region of the model prawn with orange-spotted pincers compared with unspotted pincers. Finally, we show that allopatric, but not sympatric, guppies spent more time in the vicinity of the head of a live crayfish when orange spots were added to its pincers than when brown spots were added. Our results suggest that the orange spots on prawn pincers can act as a sensory lure. PMID:22593111

De Serrano, Alexandra R.; Weadick, Cameron J.; Price, Anna C.; Rodd, F. Helen

2012-01-01

353

Identification of an Alternate Maxillary Apical Base Landmark from Pre-existing Substitutions  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Background: Cephalometrically the position of maxilla is usually assessed by point A, which is one of the most common cephalometric landmarks used for spatial analysis of maxilla, however in certain scenarios we require a alternative landmark. Aims: In this study a nearest alternative maxillary apical base landmark was identified for Point A substitutions given by different authors. Methods and Material: A cross sectional study was conducted on thirty (30) good quality lateral cephalograms. Only those lateral cephalograms were selected where Point A was easily identified. Landmarks: Sella (S), Nasion (N), Point A and three substitution points Y, L, X were traced. Angles formed by SN with Point A (Angle SNA) and three substitution points (Angle SNY, SNX, SNL) were measured. Correlation of angle SNA with angles SNY, SNX and SNL were derived. Statistical analysis used Results: Mean and standard deviation for Angles SNA, SNY, SNL and SNX were calculated individually for males and females. ‘T’ Test was applied to determine statistical significance for all the parameters i.e Age, Angles SNA, SNY, SNL and SNX respectively. Karl Pearson correlation coefficient was carried out to determine the statistical significant correlation for Angle SNA with SNY, SNL and SNX. Results: A mean value of 82.8° ±1.9°, 83.1° ±1.8°, 78.3° ±2.9° and 78.7° ±2.7° for Angle's SNA, SNY, SNL and SNX respectively was observed. A statistically significant correlation was observed between angles SNA & SNY, SNL, SNX & strong positive correlation was observed with angle SNY. Conclusions: We conclude that Point Y is the most nearing maxillary apical base landmark to Point A. Hence maxillary apical base landmark can be substituted by Point Y where identification of point A is not obvious. PMID:25568586

Patel, Kunal S.; Kulkarni, Narayan; Singh, Varun Pratap; Parikh, Kartik

2014-01-01

354

Pre-existent Asymmetry in the Human Cyclooxygenase-2 Sequence Homodimer*  

PubMed Central

Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthase-2 (PGHS-2), also known as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is a sequence homodimer. However, the enzyme exhibits half-site heme and inhibitor binding and functions as a conformational heterodimer having a catalytic subunit (Ecat) with heme bound and an allosteric subunit (Eallo) lacking heme. Some recombinant heterodimers composed of a COX-deficient mutant subunit and a native subunit (i.e. Mutant/Native PGHS-2) have COX activities similar to native PGHS-2. This suggests that the presence of heme plus substrate leads to the subunits becoming lodged in a semi-stable Eallo-mutant/Ecat-Native?heme form during catalysis. We examined this concept using human PGHS-2 dimers composed of combinations of Y385F, R120Q, R120A, and S530A mutant or native subunits. With some heterodimers (e.g. Y385F/Native PGHS-2), heme binds with significantly higher affinity to the native subunit. This correlates with near native COX activity for the heterodimer. With other heterodimers (e.g. S530A/Native PGHS-2), heme binds with similar affinities to both subunits, and the COX activity approximates that expected for an enzyme in which each monomer contributes equally to the net COX activity. With or without heme, aspirin acetylates one-half of the subunits of the native PGHS-2 dimer, the Ecat subunits. Subunits having an S530A mutation are refractory to acetylation. Curiously, aspirin acetylates only one-quarter of the monomers of S530A/Native PGHS-2 with or without heme. This implies that there are comparable amounts of two noninterchangeable species of apoenzymes, Eallo-S530A/Ecat-Native and Eallo-Native/Ecat-S530A. These results suggest that native PGHS-2 assumes a reasonably stable, asymmetric Eallo/Ecat form during its folding and processing. PMID:23955344

Dong, Liang; Sharma, Narayan P.; Jurban, Brice J.; Smith, William L.

2013-01-01

355

Pre-existence and clonal selection of MET amplification in EGFR mutant NSCLC  

PubMed Central

Summary MET amplification activates ERBB3/PI3K/AKT signaling in EGFR mutant lung cancers, and causes resistance to EGFR kinase inhibitors. We demonstrate that MET activation by its ligand, HGF, also induces drug resistance, but through GAB1 signaling. Using high-throughput FISH analyses in both cell lines and in lung cancer patients, we identify subpopulations of cells with MET amplification prior to drug exposure. Surprisingly, HGF accelerates the development of MET amplification both in vitro and in vivo. EGFR kinase inhibitor resistance, due to either MET amplification or autocrine HGF production, was cured in vivo by combined EGFR and MET inhibition. These findings highlight the potential to prospectively identify treatment naïve EGFR mutant lung cancer patients who will benefit from initial combination therapy. PMID:20129249

Turke, Alexa B.; Zejnullahu, Kreshnik; Wu, Yi-Long; Song, Youngchul; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Lifshits, Eugene; Toschi, Luca; Rogers, Andrew; Mok, Tony; Sequist, Lecia; Lindeman, Neal I.; Murphy, Carly; Akhavanfard, Sara; Yeap, Beow Y.; Xiao, Yun; Capelletti, Marzia; Iafrate, A. John; Lee, Charles; Christensen, James G.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Jänne, Pasi A.

2010-01-01

356

Psychosocial predictors of attitudes toward physician empathy in clinical encounters among 4732 1st year medical students: A report from the CHANGES study?  

PubMed Central

Objective Medical school curricula intended to promote empathy varies widely. Even the most effective curricula leave a significant group of students untouched. Pre-existing student factors influence their response to learning experiences. We examined the individual predictors of first semester medical students’ attitudes toward the value of physician empathy in clinical encounters. Methods First year students (n = 4732) attending a stratified random sample of 49 US medical schools completed an online questionnaire that included measures of dispositional characteristics, attitudes and beliefs, self-concept and well-being. Results Discomfort with uncertainty, close-mindedness, dispositional empathy, elitism, medical authoritarianism, egalitarianism, self-concept and well-being all independently predicted first year medical students’ attitudes toward the benefit of physician empathy in clinical encounters. Conclusion Students vary on their attitude toward the value of physician empathy when they start medical school. The individual factors that predict their attitudes toward empathy may also influence their response to curricula promoting empathic care. Practice implications Curricula in medical school promoting empathic care may be more universally effective if students’ preexisting attitudes are taken into account. Messages about the importance of physician empathy may need to be framed in ways that are consistent with the beliefs and prior world-views of medical students. PMID:25065328

van Ryn, Michelle; Hardeman, Rachel R.; Phelan, Sean M.; Burke, Sara E.; Przedworski, Julia; Allen, Michele L.; Burgess, Diana J.; Ridgeway, Jennifer; White, Richard O.; Dovidio, John F.

2014-01-01

357

Health Conditions Associated with Psoriasis  

MedlinePLUS

... Cycle Team NPF DIY Medical Professionals Donate Donate Psoriasis About Psoriasis Symptoms and Diagnosis Types of Psoriasis ... Online YouTube Twitter Facebook Health Conditions Associated with Psoriasis Individuals with psoriasis are at an elevated risk ...

358

The Medical Passport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A Working Group on Medical Passports was established in 2002 by the International Association of Medical Regulatory Authorities. The goal of this group was to develop a fast-track registration process for highly qualified medical practitioners wishing to move from one jurisdiction to another. A "medical passport" would be available only to…

Ineson, Sue; Seeling, Stephen S.

2005-01-01

359

New Program: NIH Medical  

E-print Network

+ New Program: NIH Medical Research ©2010 Howard Hughes Medical Institute + Research Scholars RESEARCH? ©2010 Howard Hughes Medical Institute translational or clinical research project. · HHMI Medical Fellows work at any academic or nonprofit research institution in the U.S., except the NIH

Bushman, Frederic

360

STS-3 medical report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The medical operations report for STS-3, which includes a review of the health of the crew before, during, and immediately after the third Shuttle orbital flight is presented. Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical 'kit' carried in flight, tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results, hematology and immunology analyses, medical microbiology, food and nutrition, potable water, shuttle toxicology, radiological health, and cabin acoustic noise. Environmental effects of shuttle launch and landing medical information management, and management, planning, and implementation of the medical program are also dicussed.

Pool, S. L. (editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (editor); Mason, J. A. (editor)

1982-01-01

361

Medical anthropology and the physician assistant profession.  

PubMed

Medical anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that investigates how culture influences people's ideas and behaviors regarding health and illness. Medical anthropology contributes to the understanding of how and why health systems operate the way they do, how different people understand and interact with these systems and cultural practices, and what assets people use and challenges they may encounter when constructing perceptions of their own health conditions. The goal of this article is to highlight the methodological tools and analytical insights that medical anthropology offers to the study of physician assistants (PAs). The article discusses the field of medical anthropology; the advantages of ethnographic and qualitative research; and how medical anthropology can explain how PAs fit into improved health delivery services by exploring three studies of PAs by medical anthropologists. PMID:25522028

Henry, Lisa R

2015-01-01

362

ABOUTTHEMEDICALCOLLEGE A Premier Medical School  

E-print Network

..........................................37 Research Education....................................... 39 Medical Scientist Training ProgramABOUTTHEMEDICALCOLLEGE A Premier Medical School MEDICAL SCHOOL ACADEMIC BULLETIN 2012­2013 #12;2 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE OF WISCONSIN MEDICAL SCHOOL ACADEMIC BULLETIN 2012-2013 Vision, Mission, and Accreditation

363

ABOUTTHEMEDICALCOLLEGE A Premier Medical School  

E-print Network

..........................................37 Research Education....................................... 39 Medical Scientist Training ProgramABOUTTHEMEDICALCOLLEGE A Premier Medical School MEDICAL SCHOOL ACADEMIC BULLETIN 2011­2012 #12;2 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE OF WISCONSIN MEDICAL SCHOOL ACADEMIC BULLETIN 2011­2012 Vision, Mission, and Accreditation

364

Sex differences in fear conditioning in posttraumatic stress disorder  

PubMed Central

Background Women are twice as likely as men to develop Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Abnormal acquisition of conditioned fear has been suggested as a mechanism for the development of PTSD. While some studies of healthy humans suggest that women are either no different or express less conditioned fear responses during conditioning relative to men, differences in the acquisition of conditioned fear between men and women diagnosed with PTSD has not been examined. Methods Thirty-one participants (18 men; 13 women) with full or subsyndromal PTSD completed a fear conditioning task. Participants were shown computer-generated colored circles that were paired (CS+) or unpaired (CS?) with an aversive electrical stimulus and skin conductance levels were assessed throughout the task. Results Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significant sex by stimulus interaction during acquisition. Women had greater differential conditioned skin conductance responses (CS + trials compared to CS? trials) than did men, suggesting greater acquisition of conditioned fear in women with PTSD. Conclusions In contrast to studies of healthy individuals, we found enhanced acquisition of conditioned fear in women with PTSD. Greater fear conditioning in women may either be a pre-existing vulnerability trait or an acquired phenomenon that emerges in a sex-dependent manner after the development of PTSD. Characterizing the underlying mechanisms of these differences is needed to clarify sex-related differences in the pathophysiology of PTSD. PMID:23107307

Inslicht, Sabra S.; Metzler, Thomas J.; Garcia, Natalia M.; Pineles, Suzanne L.; Milad, Mohammed R.; Orr, Scott P.; Marmar, Charles R.; Neylan, Thomas C.

2013-01-01

365

Medical Physics Panel Discussion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The panel discussion will explore opportunities and vistas in medical physics research and practice, medical imaging, teaching medical physics to undergraduates, and medical physics curricula as a recruiting tool for physics departments. Panel members consist of representatives from NSBP (Paul Guèye and Steven Avery), NIH/NIBIB (Richard Baird), NIST (Christopher Soares), AAPM (Howard Amols), ASTRO (Prabhakar Tripuraneni), and Jefferson Lab (Stan Majewski and Drew Weisenberger). Medical Physicists are part of Departments of Radiation Oncology at hospitals and medical centers. The field of medical physics includes radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. It also ranges from basic researcher (at college institutions, industries, and laboratories) to applications in clinical environments.

Guèye, Paul; Avery, Steven; Baird, Richard; Soares, Christopher; Amols, Howard; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Drew

2006-03-01

366

MEDIC: Medical embedded device for individualized care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Objective: Presented work highlights the development and initial validation of a medical embedded device for individualized care (MEDIC), which is based on a novel software architecture, enabling sensor management and disease prediction capabil- ities, and commercially available microelectronic components, sensors and conven- tional personal digital assistant (PDA) (or a cell phone). Methods and materials: In this paper, we present

Winston H. Wu; Alex A. T. Bui; Maxim A. Batalin; Lawrence K. Au; Jonathan D. Binney; William J. Kaiser

2008-01-01

367

STS-1 medical report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The report includes a review of the health of the crew before, during and immediately after the first Shuttle orbital flight (April 12-14, 1981). Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical kit carried inflight; tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results; hematology and immunology analyses; medical microbiology; food and nutrition; potable water; shuttle toxicology; radiological health; cabin acoustical noise. Also included is information on: environmental effects of Shuttle launch and landing, medical information management; and management, planning and implementation of the medical program.

Pool, S. L. (editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (editor); Mason, J. A. (editor)

1981-01-01

368

Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs' Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities  

PubMed Central

Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS) staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs' decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. The data analysis revealed the following theme: “degree of perceived risk in EMS staffs and their patients.” This theme consisted of two main categories: (1) patient's condition' and (2) the context of the EMS mission'. The patent's condition category emerged from “physical health statuses,” “socioeconomic statuses,” and “cultural background” subcategories. The context of the EMS mission also emerged from two subcategories of “characteristics of the mission” and EMS staffs characteristics'. EMS system managers can consider adequate technical, informational, financial, educational, and emotional supports to facilitate the decision making of their staffs. Also, development of an effective and user-friendly checklist and scoring system was recommended for quick and easy recognition of patients' needs for transportation in a prehospital situation. PMID:24891953

Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz

2014-01-01

369

Why is dementia different? Medical students' views about deceiving people with dementia.  

PubMed

Objectives: Care of patients with dementia raises challenging ethical issues, including the use of deception in clinical practice. This study aimed to determine the extent to which medical students agree that ethical arguments for and against deceiving patients in general apply to patients with dementia. Method: Qualitative study using six focus groups (n = 21) and 10 interviews (n = 10) with undergraduate students in years 1, 3 and 5 at a UK medical school. Analysis using initial coding followed by comparison of data with a pre-existing framework concerning deception in clinical practice. Results: Arguments for and against deceiving patients with dementia overlapped with those previously described in relation to clinical practice in general. However, the majority of participants highlighted issues unique to dementia care that warranted additional consideration. Three key dementia-specific considerations identified were capacity (understanding, retaining and emotional processing), perceived vulnerability and family dynamics. Students expressed uncertainty as to their ability to make judgements about honest communication with patients with dementia and their families. Conclusion: Dementia adds additional complexity to clinical judgements about the acceptability of deception in practice. Medical students have a number of unmet learning needs with regard to communicating with patients with dementia and their families. Existing ethical frameworks may provide a helpful starting point for education about dementia care. PMID:25345669

Tullo, Ellen StClair; Lee, Richard Philip; Robinson, Louise; Allan, Louise

2014-10-27

370

Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients.  

PubMed

In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21-85 years) and 73 years (range, 30-90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3-3,585 days) and 219 days (24-3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4-5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Nakao, Toshiya; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Mori, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Teramachi, Hitomi

2014-11-01

371

Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients  

PubMed Central

In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21–85 years) and 73 years (range, 30–90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3–3,585 days) and 219 days (24–3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4–5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

KIMURA, MICHIO; USAMI, EISEKI; IWAI, MINA; NAKAO, TOSHIYA; YOSHIMURA, TOMOAKI; MORI, HIROMI; SUGIYAMA, TADASHI; TERAMACHI, HITOMI

2014-01-01

372

Medications: Myths Versus Facts  

MedlinePLUS

... supplements can take a toll on your body’s chemistry and alter the effectiveness of some medications. One ... Many include stimulants that can have an adverse reaction with blood pressure medication, Dr. Fletcher said. “You ...

373

Emergency Medical Services  

MedlinePLUS

... need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people and ... emergencies, you need help where you are. Emergency medical technicians, or EMTs, do specific rescue jobs. They ...

374

Mental Health Medications  

MedlinePLUS

... their doctor before stopping their medication. How are antipsychotics taken and how do people respond to them? ... gradually tapered off, never stopped suddenly. How do antipsychotics interact with other medications? Antipsychotics can produce unpleasant ...

375

Inhaled Asthma Medications  

MedlinePLUS

... metered – dose inhaler (MDI), which uses a chemical propellant to push the medication out of the inhaler. ... powder inhalers (DPIs) deliver medication without using chemical propellants, but they require a strong and fast inhalation. ...

376

General Medical Surveillance Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Background on the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is presented. The purpose of the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the program are discussed.

1993-01-01

377

Using Medications Safely  

MedlinePLUS

... health systems play an important role in preventing medication errors. To make sure you use medicines safely and effectively, ASHP recommends that you: Keep a list of all medications that you take (prescribed drugs, nonprescription medicines, herbal ...

378

Medical Treatments for Fibroids  

MedlinePLUS

... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications En Español Medical Treatments for Fibroids Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... the symptoms of fibroids. Once you stop the treatment, fibroids often grow back and symptoms return. Medications are ...

379

Hay Fever Medications  

MedlinePLUS

... fever symptoms. These medications prevent the effects of histamine during an allergic reaction. Antihistamines are available as ... allergens, the medication can prevent the release of histamine and other chemicals. As a result, allergy symptoms ...

380

Medical Physics Publishing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Medical Physics Publishing is a nonprofit, membership organization founded in 1985 to provide affordable books in medical physics and related fields. The books are written by and for technologists, physicists, residents, and radiologists

2003-10-10

381

Medication/Drug Allergy  

MedlinePLUS

... Allergy & Clinical Immunology View full profile Medication/Drug Allergy Allergies to medications/drugs are complicated because they ... Calendar Read the News View Daily Pollen Count Allergy Treatment Programs, Adult At National Jewish Health, some ...

382

American Medical Association  

MedlinePLUS

... language to describe healthcare services. AMA Code of Medical Ethics Since 1847, the AMA has provided guidance on ... Psychiatry JAMA Surgery Virtual Mentor - A Forum for Medical Ethics AMA Membership Join / Renew Your Membership AMA MVP ...

383

Selecting a Medical Professional  

MedlinePLUS

... Board of Directors Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Report Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Join/Renew Donate ANA ... Board of Directors Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Report Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Search ANAUSA.org Selecting ...

384

[Medical leadership competency].  

PubMed

With all these changes in health care systems the physicians' professional duties are about to undergo changes as well. Especially economic, administrative and legal aspects are becoming more and more important in medical care. In order to take responsibility with respect to leadership aspects a profound professionalisation is required. The Curriculum Medical Leadership edited by the German Medical Association provides an extensive example of a framework for continuing professional development (CPD) courses in medical leadership. PMID:19545080

Barth, Sonja; Jonitz, Günther

2009-01-01

385

42 CFR 34.5 - Postponement of medical examination.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...determine his/her physical or mental condition. The examination shall be postponed for aliens who have an acute infectious disease until the condition is resolved. The alien shall be referred for medical care as necessary. [56 FR...

2013-10-01

386

42 CFR 34.5 - Postponement of medical examination.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...determine his/her physical or mental condition. The examination shall be postponed for aliens who have an acute infectious disease until the condition is resolved. The alien shall be referred for medical care as necessary. [56 FR...

2011-10-01

387

42 CFR 34.5 - Postponement of medical examination.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...determine his/her physical or mental condition. The examination shall be postponed for aliens who have an acute infectious disease until the condition is resolved. The alien shall be referred for medical care as necessary. [56 FR...

2010-10-01

388

42 CFR 34.5 - Postponement of medical examination.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...determine his/her physical or mental condition. The examination shall be postponed for aliens who have an acute infectious disease until the condition is resolved. The alien shall be referred for medical care as necessary. [56 FR...

2012-10-01

389

42 CFR 34.5 - Postponement of medical examination.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...determine his/her physical or mental condition. The examination shall be postponed for aliens who have an acute infectious disease until the condition is resolved. The alien shall be referred for medical care as necessary. [56 FR...

2014-10-01

390

History of Medical Physics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traces the development of basic radiation physics that underlies much of today's medical physics and looks separately at the historical development of two major subfields of medical physics: radiation therapy and nuclear medicine. Indicates that radiation physics has made important contributions to solving biomedical problems in medical

Laughlin, John S.

1983-01-01

391

MEDICAL EDUCATION FACULTY DEVELOPMENT  

E-print Network

MEDICAL EDUCATION FACULTY DEVELOPMENT GRANT APPLICATION Purpose The Office of the Associate Dean for Faculty Development ­ Medical Education is pleased to announce a new pilot program to support faculty development in medical education at all levels. Faculty Development grants are awards given to faculty who

Goldman, Steven A.

392

Continuing Medical 2015 Conferences  

E-print Network

Office of Continuing Medical Education 2015 Conferences March 20-21, 2015 ~ http://tinyurl.com/mr6 to Practice UC Davis Conference Center Davis, California September 19-20, 2015 Ultrasound Update 2015 Hilton Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

393

The Integrated Medical Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the goals and approach for the Integrated Medical Model (IMM). The IMM is a software decision support tool that forecasts medical events during spaceflight and optimizes medical systems during simulations. It includes information on the software capabilities, program stakeholders, use history, and the software logic.

Butler, Douglas J.; Kerstman, Eric

2010-01-01

394

Marijuana: Modern Medical Chimaera  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Marijuana has been used medically since antiquity. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in medical applications of various cannabis preparations. These drugs have been cited in the medical literature as potential secondary treatment agents for severe pain, muscle spasticity, anorexia, nausea, sleep disturbances, and numerous…

Lamarine, Roland J.

2012-01-01

395

Considering a Medical Career  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains resources for those interested in pursuing a medical career. There is information on applying to medical school and making financial arrangements to pay for schooling, possible careers options within the medical field, and a listing of accredited degree programs.

Colleges, The A.

2009-03-16

396

Classical Conditioning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

!!Classical Conditioning!! Classical conditioning is the use of Pavlovian conditioning procedures where a neutral stimulus becomes capable of evoking a response through pairing with an unconditioned stimulus. Click the link below to get an introduction into classical conditioning. Introduction to Classical Conditioning Now that you\\'ve been introduced to classical conditioning, view the clip at the link below, ...

Mrs. Palacios, Miss Miller, Mr. Rowser

2008-04-01

397

[Use of functional packages of medical stuff by military level of medical service of the Armed Forces].  

PubMed

Authors submitted results of recent developments made by The Kirov Military-Medical Academy and OOO "Special medical equipment" in accordance with State defence order in the area of modernization of the system of organizational equipment of military level of medical service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. Along with other samples of organizational equipment, new functional equipment of medical stuff was developed and approved as supply. New equipment of medical stuff meets modern requirements and is highly valuated by medical services of foreign countries. Authors came to conclusion that functional equipment which is approved as supply and included into the Supply rate provides operational flexibility of set-up/tear-down stages of medical evacuation under the conditions of battlefield, allows to deliver medical aid on the basis of innovative medical technologies. PMID:24611304

Miroshnichenko, Iu V; Kononov, V N; Miliaev, A V; Stupnikov, A V; Slobodeniuk, A V

2013-11-01

398

Overview of experimental studies of biological effects of medical ultrasound caused by gas body activation and inertial cavitation.  

PubMed

Ultrasound exposure can induce bioeffects in mammalian tissue by the nonthermal mechanism of gas body activation. Pre-existing bodies of gas may be activated even at low-pressure amplitudes. At higher-pressure amplitudes, violent cavitation activity with inertial collapse of microbubbles can be generated from latent nucleation sites or from the destabilization of gas bodies. Mechanical perturbation at the activation sites leads to biological effects on nearby cells and structures. Shockwave lithotripsy was the first medical ultrasound application for which significant cavitational bioeffects were demonstrated in mammalian tissues, including hemorrhage and injury in the kidney. Lithotripter shockwaves can also cause hemorrhage in lung and intestine by activation of pre-existing gas bodies in these tissues. Modern diagnostic ultrasound equipment develops pressure amplitudes sufficient for inertial cavitation, but the living body normally lacks suitable cavitation nuclei. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are suspensions of microscopic gas bodies created to enhance the echogenicity of blood. Ultrasound contrast agent gas bodies also provide nuclei for inertial cavitation. Bioeffects from contrast-aided diagnostic ultrasound depend on pressure amplitude, UCA dose, dosage delivery method and image timing parameters. Microvascular leakage, capillary rupture, cardiomyocyte killing, inflammatory cell infiltration, and premature ventricular contractions have been reported for myocardial contrast echocardiography with clinical ultrasound machines and clinically relevant agent doses in laboratory animals. Similar bioeffects have been reported in intestine, skeletal muscle, fat, lymph nodes and kidney. These microscale bioeffects could be induced unknowingly in diagnostic examinations; however, the medical significance of bioeffects of diagnostic ultrasound with contrast agents is not yet fully understood in relation to the clinical setting. PMID:16989895

Miller, Douglas L

2007-01-01

399

Comorbidity Between Psychiatric and General Medical Disorders in Homeless Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homeless veterans have numerous co-occurring medical and behavioral health problems. Identification of common patterns of\\u000a comorbid conditions may help providers to determine severity of medical conditions and triage health care more effectively.\\u000a In this study we identify such patterns of comorbid medical and psychiatric disorders using cluster analysis and we evaluate\\u000a relationships between these patterns and sociodemographic factors. We used

Gerald Goldstein; James F. Luther; Gretchen L. Haas; Adam J. Gordon; Cathleen Appelt

2009-01-01

400

Optimizing Medical Kits for Space Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) uses Monte Carlo methodologies to predict the occurrence of medical events, their mitigation, and the resources required during space flight. The model includes two modules that utilize output from a single model simulation to identify an optimized medical kit for a specified mission scenario. This poster describes two flexible optimization routines built into SAS 9.1. The first routine utilizes a systematic process of elimination to maximize (or minimize) outcomes subject to attribute constraints. The second routine uses a search and mutate approach to minimize medical kit attributes given a set of outcome constraints. There are currently 273 unique resources identified that are used to treat at least one of 83 medical conditions currently in the model.

Minard, Charles G.; FreiredeCarvalho, Mary H.; Iyengar, M. Sriram

2010-01-01

401

Psychological Factors Affecting Cardiologic Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are substantial data supporting a strong relationship between cardiovascular diseases and psychological conditions. However, the criteria for scientific validation of the entities currently subsumed under the DSM-IV category of ’Psychological factors affecting a medical condition’ have never been clearly enumerated and the terms ’psychological symptoms’ and ’personality traits’ that do not satisfy traditional psychiatric criteria are not well defined;

C. Rafanelli; R. Roncuzzi; F. Ottolini; M. Rigatelli

2007-01-01

402

Prevention of medication errors.  

PubMed

Medication error is the most frequent source of medical error that is associated with adverse events, and, in many cases, is preventable. Medication errors can occur at any step in the medication process. Medication error prevention and reduction begins with a systematic approach to their detection. An important approach to mitigating errors involves the reduction of variation in task performance using tested techniques and technologies from other industries. The most important component of error prevention and reduction is the proactive promotion of a safety culture by organizational leadership, with sustained education and support for users. PMID:15777824

Lehmann, Christoph U; Kim, George R

2005-03-01

403

The Nurse's Medication Day  

PubMed Central

The medication administration stage of the medication-use process is especially vulnerable to error because errors are least likely to be caught before reaching the patient. Medication administration, however, remains poorly understood. In this article we describe medication administration as observed in an ethnographic study conducted on one medical and one surgical unit. A central finding was that medication administration entailed a complex mixture of varied and often competing demands that temporally structured the nurses' entire workday. Articulation work was evident in time management strategies nurses used to handle demands from institutional policies, technical devices, patients, the physical environment, and the medications themselves. The average number of doses of medication per patient was more than double the number policy groups have indicated. Medication administration is neither simply the giving of drugs nor does it have clearly defined temporal boundaries. Because of its inseparability from other nurses' work, medication administration inherently entails interruption, thereby calling into question the current emphasis on reducing interruptions as a tactic to decrease medication errors. PMID:21693688

Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski; Sandelowski, Margarete; Mark, Barbara

2014-01-01

404

Medical management of osteoid osteoma  

PubMed Central

Objective To see if the results of managing osteoid osteoma with medical treatment alone is comparable to those after surgery or other ablative therapy. Design A case series. Setting A tertiary care centre. Patients Eleven patients with osteoid osteoma treated over a 5-year period. The condition was diagnosed from a typical history, patient age, standard radiography, computed tomography, bone scanning, complete blood count and measurement of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Interventions Continued medical treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for 6 months after pain ceased. Surgery was done only in those who refused or could not tolerate medical treatment. Main results Medical treatment successfully controlled the pain in all patients. Two patients decided to undergo surgery because of intolerance to the NSAIDS. In 7 patients the symptoms resolved after a mean time of 2.5 years. Two patients were still taking NSAIDS 5 years from the time of diagnosis. Conclusions The natural history of osteoid osteoma is self-limited so patients should be offered non-operative treatment, reserving ablative treatment for those who are unable or unwilling to take NSAIDs until their symptoms resolve. PMID:12500919

Ilyas, Imran; Younge, Derek A.

2002-01-01

405

The medicalization of life  

PubMed Central

Two contributions from Dr Ivan Illich follow. The first, in which he sets out his primary thesis of the medicalization of life, is a section from Dr Illich's book `Medical Nemesis'. (It is reprinted with the permission of the author and his publishers, Messrs Calder and Boyars.) The second is a transcript of the paper which Dr Illich read at the conference organized by the London Medical Group on iatrogenic disease. Both are ultimately addressed to the recipients of medical care, the general public, although the second paper is specifically addressed to young doctors and medical students. For Dr Illich the world is suffering from too much medical interference, and a medical edifice has been built which is one of the threats to the real life of human beings - a threat which so far has been disguised as care. PMID:809583

Illich, Ivan

1975-01-01

406

Online Medical Terminology Course  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For those entering the medical field, developing a working knowledge of medical terminology can be a daunting task. Des Moines University provides this short introductory course, which allows the user to develop a basic understanding of the origin and composition of medical terms. The course is divided into thirteen sections based on the different systems of the body (circulatory, nervous, digestive, respiratory, urinary, reproductive and musculoskeletal) and also defines words pertaining to cancer and medication. The site supplies not only the definitions of three hundred terms, but the skills to evaluate and understand new terms as well. This is an excellent resource for medical administrative staff, assistants, transcriptionists and anyone else entering the medical field with little or no previous experience in medical terminology.

2007-02-25

407

Determining medical fitness to drive: physicians' responsibilities in Canada.  

PubMed Central

Current legislation indicates that physicians in Canada have a legal responsibility to know which medical conditions may impede driving ability, to detect these conditions in their patients and to discuss with their patients the implications of these conditions. The requirements to report unfit drivers vary among the provinces, and the interpretations of the law vary among the courts; therefore, physicians' risks of liability are unclear. Physicians may be sued by their patients if they fail to counsel the patients on the dangers of driving associated with certain medications or medical conditions. Physicians may also face legal action by victims of motor vehicle accidents caused by their patients if the court decides that the physicians could have foreseen the danger of their patients' continuing to drive. Physicians' legal responsibilities to report patients with certain medical conditions override their ethical responsibilities to keep patients' medical histories confidential. PMID:2914258

Coopersmith, H G; Korner-Bitensky, N A; Mayo, N E

1989-01-01

408

Medical marijuana: A panacea or scourge  

PubMed Central

Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) has been used for recreational and medical purposes since ages. Marijuana smoking is an evil, which is on the rise with about 180.6 million active users worldwide. The recent legalization of marijuana in Uruguay has generated global interest. The purpose of this short review is to describe the various preparations, uses and adverse effects of medical marijuana. It also deals with the adverse effects of marijuana smoking when used for recreational purposes. ased on the current literature, medical use of marijuana is justified in certain conditions as an alternative therapy. PMID:24778478

Kashyap, Surender; Kashyap, Kartikeya

2014-01-01

409

Reprocessing of Reusable Medical Devices  

MedlinePLUS

... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Medical Devices Print this page Share this page E-mail ... Reusable Medical Devices or Reprocessing Reprocessing of Reusable Medical Devices Reusable medical devices are devices that health care ...

410

Lancaster Medical School Admissions Policy  

E-print Network

Lancaster Medical School Admissions Policy Introduction: About our medical degree programme The medical degree programme at Lancaster University aims to equip graduates with the requisite knowledge placement is encouraged through frequent, timely feedback and the annual appraisal scheme. Lancaster Medical

Diggle, Peter J.

411

Graduate Studies in Medical Biophysics  

E-print Network

Graduate Studies in Medical Biophysics Leading Edge Biomedical Research at the University. 8 Medical Biophysics Graduate Faculty p. 10 Faculty & Project Descriptions - Biology p. 11 Medical Faculty & Project Descriptions - Physics p. 78 Index of Faculty p. 115 Dept Medical Biophysics

Sokolowski, Marla

412

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL AUTHORITY  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL AUTHORITY June 30, 2009 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL Authority Members Oklahoma State University Medical Authority Tulsa, Oklahoma We have audited the accompanying statements of financial position of the Oklahoma State University Medical Authority (the

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

413

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL AUTHORITY  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL AUTHORITY June 30, 2010 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL Authority Members Oklahoma State University Medical Authority Tulsa, Oklahoma We have audited the accompanying statements of financial position of the Oklahoma State University Medical Authority (the

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

414

Over-the-Counter Medications in Pregnancy.  

PubMed

Many pregnant women take over-the-counter (OTC) medications despite the absence of randomized controlled trials to guide their use during pregnancy. Most data come from case-control and cohort studies. In 1979, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began reviewing all prescription and OTC medications to develop risk categories for use in pregnancy. Most OTC medications taken during pregnancy are for allergy, respiratory, gastrointestinal, or skin conditions, as well as for general analgesia. Acetaminophen, which is used by about 65% of pregnant women, is generally considered safe during any trimester. Cold medications are also commonly used and are considered safe for short-term use outside of the first trimester. Many gastrointestinal medications are now available OTC. Histamine H2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors have not demonstrated significant fetal effects. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are generally not recommended in pregnancy, especially during organogenesis and in the third trimester. There are even fewer data regarding use of individual herbal supplements. Ginger is considered safe and effective for treating nausea in pregnancy. Topical creams are considered safe based on small studies and previous practice. All OTC medication use should be discussed with patients, and the effects of the symptoms should be balanced with the risks and benefits of each medication. Because of the expanding OTC market, formalized studies are warranted for patients to make a safe and informed decision about OTC medication use during pregnancy. PMID:25369643

Servey, Jessica; Chang, Jennifer

2014-10-15

415

Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) is a project under the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element managed by the Human Research Program (HRP). The vision for the EMSD is to utilize ISS as a test bed to show that several medical technologies needed for an exploration mission and medical informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making can be integrated into a single system and used by the on-orbit crew in an efficient and meaningful manner. Objectives: a) Reduce and even possibly eliminate the time required for on-orbit crew and ground personnel (which include Surgeon, Biomedical Engineer (BME) Flight Controller, and Medical Operations Data Specialist) to access and move medical data from one application to another. b) Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information using an intuitive and crew-friendly software solution to assist/aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c) Develop a common data management framework and architecture that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all crew health and life sciences activities.

Chin, Duane

2012-01-01

416

Medical Physicists and AAPM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), a member society of the AIP is the largest professional society of medical physicists in the world with nearly 5700 members. Members operate in medical centers, university and community hospitals, research laboratories, industry, and private practice. Medical physics specialties include radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. The majority of AAPM members are based in hospital departments of radiation oncology or radiology and provide technical support for patient diagnosis and treatment in a clinical environment. Job functions include support of clinical care, calibration and quality assurance of medical devices such as linear accelerators for cancer therapy, CT, PET, MRI, and other diagnostic imaging devices, research, and teaching. Pathways into a career in medical physics require an advanced degree in medical physics, physics, engineering, or closely related field, plus clinical training in one or more medical physics specialties (radiation therapy physics, imaging physics, or radiation safety). Most clinically based medical physicists also obtain certification from the American Board of Radiology, and some states require licensure as well.

Amols, Howard

2006-03-01

417

Medical School AdmissionsMedical School AdmissionsMedical School AdmissionsMedical School Admissions Monday, April 23rd  

E-print Network

Medical School AdmissionsMedical School AdmissionsMedical School AdmissionsMedical School Part 1: Admissions Presentations and Upcoming Changes in Medical Education, 6:30 ­ 8:00 pm · Greg. of Admissions: The Medical College of Wisconsin · Kurt Hansen Asst. Dean of Admissions: UW School of Medicine

Sheridan, Jennifer

418

Medical Research: What's it worth?  

E-print Network

Medical Research: What's it worth? Estimating the economic benefits from medical research in the UK For the Medical Research Council, the Wellcome Trust and the Academy of Medical Sciences November 2008 #12;a2 Medical Research: What's it worth? Estimating the economic benefits from medical research in the UK Report

Rambaut, Andrew

419

Medical Surveillance for Former Workers  

SciTech Connect

The Former Hanford Worker Medical Monitoring Program, directed by the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program at the University of Washington, served former production and other non-construction workers who were potentially exposed to workplace hazards while working for the USDOE or its contractors at Hanford. The USDOE Former Workers Program arose from Congressional action in the Defense Authorization of 1993 (Public Law 102). Section 3162 stated that, “The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and ongoing medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such employment.” (This also covers former employees of USDOE contractors and subcontractors.) The key objective has been to provide these former workers with medical evaluations in order to determine whether workers have experienced significant risk due to workplace exposure to hazards. Exposures to asbestos, beryllium, and noise can produce specific medical conditions: asbestosis, berylliosis, and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Each of these conditions can be identified by specific, non-invasive screening tests, which are widely available. Treatments are also available for individuals affected by these conditions. This project involved two phases. Phase I involved a needs and risk assessment, characterizing the nature and extent of workplace health hazards which may have increased the risk for long-term health effects. We categorized jobs and tasks by likelihood of exposures to specific workplace health hazards; and located and established contact with former Hanford workers. Phase II involved implementation of medical monitoring programs for former workers whose individual work history indicated significant risk for adverse health effects. We identified 118,000 former workers, employed from 1943 to 1997. After excluding current workers, construction workers, and deceased workers, the total estimated number of former workers eligible for screening was 72,611. By September, 2006, 53,010 workers had been contacted, 20,298 responded, 2,835 were eligible and authorized, and 2,773 workers were ultimately screened. The cohort was 80% male, 85% white, and had a mean age of 63 years (range 24-96 years) at the time of first exam. Participants completed an occupational health history survey prior to the medical exam. Former Hanford workers were considered eligible for an exam if they reported exposure to asbestos, beryllium, or noise, or if a review of their Hanford work history indicated possible or probable exposure to one of these three hazards. We also invited any former Hanford worker who requested an exam to participate, regardless of documentation of exposure. The screening exam included a problem-focused physical exam, along with screening tests for one or more of three specific medical conditions: asbestosis (chest X-ray and spirometry), berylliosis (chest X-ray, spirometry, and beryllium-induced lymphocyte proliferation test), and NIHL (audiometry). We assisted ill workers in filing appropriate workers’ compensation claims, and facilitated appropriate follow-up medical care. This program has made an important contribution to the health of former DOE contractor workers at the Hanford defense nuclear site.

Tim Takaro

2009-05-29

420

Determinants of AntiPsychotic Medication Compliance in a Multicultural Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficacy of medication in controlling or ameliorating symptoms of psychotic conditions is well established in clinical trials, but medication effectiveness in mental health services is considerably affected by the extent to which clients actually comply to their prescribed medication. This study aimed to assess the relative influence of demographic, medication, social support and relationship variables on perceived compliance with

Stephen J. Ziguras; Steven Klimidis; Tim J. R. Lambert; Alun C. Jackson

2001-01-01

421

Cognitive and medical features of chromosomal aneuploidy.  

PubMed

This chapter describes the physical characteristics, medical complications, and cognitive and psychological profiles that are associated with chromosomal aneuploidy conditions, a group of conditions in which individuals are born with one or more additional chromosome. Overall, chromosomal aneuploidy conditions occur in approximately 1 in 250 children. Information regarding autosomal disorders including trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), and trisomy 18 (Edward syndrome) are presented. Sex chromosome aneuploidy conditions such as Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY), XYY, trisomy X, and Turner syndrome (45,X), in addition to less frequently occurring tetrasomy and pentasomy conditions are also covered. Treatment recommendations and suggestions for future research directions are discussed. PMID:23622175

Hutaff-Lee, Christa; Cordeiro, Lisa; Tartaglia, Nicole

2013-01-01

422

Medical education in Malaysia.  

PubMed

Malaysia has a long history of medical education, with Singapore becoming the first medical school to serve the region after its foundation in 1905. The first school to be established in Kuala Lumpur after independence from the British was the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Malaya in 1963. Whilst today there are 21 public and private medical schools, all offering a 5 year undergraduate programme, some private schools have diversified by developing international collaboration and conduct twinning or credit-transfer programmes. All medical schools require accreditation by the National Accreditation Board and the Malaysian Medical Council. Although the criteria for accreditation is comprehensive and covers a broad range of areas of assessment, it is debatable whether it always matches the needs of the country. The dramatic increase in medical schools in the last two decades has posed challenges in terms of maintenance of quality, physical infrastructure and suitably qualified faculty. PMID:18464135

Lim, Victor K E

2008-01-01

423

Double standards in special medical research: questioning the discrepancy between requirements for medical research involving incompetent adults and medical research involving children.  

PubMed

Medical research represents a substantial departure from conventional medical care. Medical care is patient-orientated, with decisions based on the best interests and/or wishes of the person receiving the care. In contrast, medical research is future-directed. Primarily it aims to contribute new knowledge about illness or disease, or new knowledge about interventions, such as drugs, that impact upon some human condition. Current State and Territory laws and research ethics guidelines in Australia relating to the review of medical research appropriately acknowledge that the functions of medical care and medical research differ. Prior to a medical research project commencing, the study must be reviewed and approved by a Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC). For medical research involving incompetent adults, some jurisdictions require an additional, independent safeguard by way of tribunal or court approval of medical research protocols. This extra review process reflects the uncertainty of medical research involvement, and the difficulties surrogate decision-makers of incompetent adults face in making decisions about others, and deliberating about the risks and benefits of research involvement. Parents of children also face the same difficulties when making decisions about their child's research involvement. However, unlike the position concerning incompetent adults, there are no similar safeguards under Australian law in relation to the approval of medical research involving children. This column questions why this discrepancy exists with a view to generating further dialogue on the topic. PMID:24218780

Stepanov, Nikola A; Smith, Malcolm K

2013-09-01

424

Career Investigation: Medical Illustration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Believe it or not, artists can actually have careers in their passion area. Dig deeper into Medical Illustration, a field requiring a mind for science and a talent for drawing. Aspects covered include an overview, work environment, high school preparation, college requirements and career outlook (including salary). Medical Illustration Medical Illustrators are those rare individuals who have both a demonstrated artistic ability and a detailed knowledge of human and animal anatomy, as well as ...

Ms. Dobyns

2011-12-11

425

Skylab medical technology utilization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To perform the extensive medical experimentation on man in a long-term, zero-g environment, new medical measuring and monitoring equipment had to be developed, new techniques in training and operations were required, and new methods of collecting and analyzing the great amounts of medical data were developed. Examples of technology transfers to the public sector resulted from the development of new equipment, methods, techniques, and data. This paper describes several of the examples that stemmed directly from Skylab technology.

Stonesifer, J. C.

1974-01-01

426

Anxiety and medical disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anxiety symptoms and disorders are associated with a range of general medical disorders. This association may be a physiologic\\u000a consequence of the general medical disorder, a psychologic reaction to the experience of having a medical illness, a side\\u000a effect of treatment, or a chance occurrence. This article briefly reviews the associations of panic disorder with seizure\\u000a disorder, Klüver-Bucy syndrome, mitral

Jacqueline E. Muller; Liezl Koen; Dan J. Stein

2005-01-01

427

[Perspectives in medical liability].  

PubMed

The progressive increase of medical negligence law suits requires an updated analysis of the current situation of medical liability in Chile. The application of a new criminal procedure will avoid criminal prosecution of doctors, transferring to the civil courts the pecuniary sanctions for malpractice. Medical negligence and damage inflicted by doctors that require compensation are explained. The most likely evolution of medical liability is proposed, through an increase in civil liability insurance and the necessary standardization of rules applicable to professional liability. PMID:18769798

Pizarro W, Carlos

2008-04-01

428

PHARMACOLOGY MEDICAL SCHOOL  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY MEDICAL SCHOOL 2011 ANNUAL AND HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY #12; MISSION The mission of the Department of Pharmacology is to provide quality educational programs related

Thomas, David D.

429

Medical services at ultra-endurance foot races in remote environments: medical issues and consensus guidelines.  

PubMed

An increasing participation in ultra-endurance foot races is cause for greater need to ensure the presence of appropriate medical care at these events. Unique medical challenges result from the extreme physical demands these events place on participants, the often remote settings spanning broad geographical areas, and the potential for extremes in weather conditions and various environmental hazards. Medical issues in these events can adversely affect race performance, and there is the potential for the presentation of life-threatening issues such as exercise-associated hyponatremia, severe altitude illnesses, and major trauma from falls or animal attacks. Organization of a medical support system for ultra-endurance foot races starts with a determination of the level of medical support that is appropriate and feasible for the event. Once that is defined, various legal considerations and organizational issues must be addressed, and medical guidelines and protocols should be developed. While there is no specific or universal standard of medical care for ultra-endurance foot races since a variety of factors determine the level and type of medical services that are appropriate and feasible, the minimum level of services that each event should have in place is a plan for emergency transport of injured or ill participants, pacers, spectators and event personnel to local medical facilities. PMID:24748459

Hoffman, Martin D; Pasternak, Andy; Rogers, Ian R; Khodaee, Morteza; Hill, John C; Townes, David A; Scheer, Bernd Volker; Krabak, Brian J; Basset, Patrick; Lipman, Grant S

2014-08-01

430

PRE-MEDICAL PROFESSIONS Medical professional schools  

E-print Network

requirements required for application to the following medical professional schools include: chiropractic offered in January and also April through September each year. Chiropractic (DC) Each professional school sets its own prerequisites and requirements. There is no admissions test for chiropractic schools

431

Medical issues in synchronized skating.  

PubMed

Synchronized skating is a unique sport of team skating and currently represents the largest competitive discipline in U.S. Figure Skating. Synchronized skating allows skaters to compete as part of a team with opportunities to represent their country in international competitions. As the popularity of the sport continues to grow, more of these athletes will present to sports medicine clinics with injuries and illnesses related to participation in synchronized skating. The purpose of this article is to review the common injuries and medical conditions affecting synchronized skaters. PMID:24225524

Abbott, Kristin; Hecht, Suzanne

2013-01-01

432

MEDICAL SCIENCES DIVISION SENIOR CLERICAL OFFICER (OXFORD MEDICAL ALUMNI)  

E-print Network

1 MEDICAL SCIENCES DIVISION SENIOR CLERICAL OFFICER (OXFORD MEDICAL ALUMNI) Grade 4 , Salary. Oxford Medical Alumni exists to advance the cause of medical education by promoting the interests to establish a mutually beneficial relationship between the Medical Sciences and its alumni and to promote

Oxford, University of

433

Medical Student Health Promotion: The Increasing Role of Medical Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The author proposes courses of action for medical schools to increase positive health promotion among medical students. Method: This article will review the current literature on medical student health care. Strategies of action for medical schools are proposed for increasing student wellness. Results: Medical schools can positively…

Estabrook, Kristi

2008-01-01

434

Domestic Medical Tourism: A Neglected Dimension of Medical Tourism Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

To date, the literature on medical tourism has focused almost exclusively on international medical tourism, or medical services outsourced to other countries. However, there are a growing number of patients who travel for medical care within their own country. Medical tourism experts have suggested that competition introduced from abroad, combined with healthcare reform, may stimulate improvement in health care offerings

Simon Hudson; Xiang Li

2011-01-01

435

Domestic Medical Tourism: A Neglected Dimension of Medical Tourism Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

To date, the literature on medical tourism has focused almost exclusively on international medical tourism, or medical services outsourced to other countries. However, there are a growing number of patients who travel for medical care within their own country. Medical tourism experts have suggested that competition introduced from abroad, combined with health care reform, may stimulate improvement in health care

Simon Hudson; Xiang Li

2012-01-01

436

Medical Knowledge Bases.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Few commonly available, successful computer-based tools exist in medical informatics. Faculty expertise can be included in computer-based medical information systems. Computers allow dynamic recombination of knowledge to answer questions unanswerable with print textbooks. Such systems can also create stronger ties between academic and clinical…

Miller, Randolph A.; Giuse, Nunzia B.

1991-01-01

437

Medical informatics: reasoning methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The progress of medical informatics has been characterized by the development of a wide range of reasoning methods. These reasoning methods are based on organizing principles that make use of the various relations existing in medical domains: associations, probabilities, causality, functional relationships, temporal relations, locality, similarity, and clinical practice. Some, such as those based on associations and probabilities have been

William J. Long

2001-01-01

438

Access to Medical Records.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although confidentiality with regard to medical records is supposedly protected by the American Medical Associaton's principles of Ethics and the physician-patient privilege, there are a number of laws that require a physician to release patient information to public authorities without the patient's consent. These exceptions include birth and…

Cooper, Nancy

439

Microwave medical devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes several new microwave medical devices that either were or are being developed at MMTC, Inc. in cooperation with the following institutions: Celsion Corporation, Columbia, Maryland (microwave balloon catheters); Montefiore Medical Center (MMC), Bronx, New York (microwave balloon catheters, dual microwave antennas, and microwave poration); and the University of California at San Francisco (conformal array antennas). The individuals

F. Sterzer

2002-01-01

440

Medical Services Assistant Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to develop 12th-grade multiple competencies courses, this curriculum prepares the student to assist a physician, dentist, or other health professional with the management of a medical office and to perform basic health services procedures. Course descriptions are provided for the two courses in the curriculum: medical services assistant…

Leeman, Phyllis A.

441

Medical Practice Makes Perfect  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cedaron Medical Inc., was founded in 1990 as a result of a NASA SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) grant from Johnson Space Center to develop a Hand Testing and Exercise Unit for use in space. From that research came Dexter, a comprehensive workstation that creates a paperless environment for medical data management.

1998-01-01

442

Medication adherence: WHO cares?  

PubMed

The treatment of chronic illnesses commonly includes the long-term use of pharmacotherapy. Although these medications are effective in combating disease, their full benefits are often not realized because approximately 50% of patients do not take their medications as prescribed. Factors contributing to poor medication adherence are myriad and include those that are related to patients (eg, suboptimal health literacy and lack of involvement in the treatment decision-making process), those that are related to physicians (eg, prescription of complex drug regimens, communication barriers, ineffective communication of information about adverse effects, and provision of care by multiple physicians), and those that are related to health care systems (eg, office visit time limitations, limited access to care, and lack of health information technology). Because barriers to medication adherence are complex and varied, solutions to improve adherence must be multifactorial. To assess general aspects of medication adherence using cardiovascular disease as an example, a MEDLINE-based literature search (January 1, 1990, through March 31, 2010) was conducted using the following search terms: cardiovascular disease, health literacy, medication adherence, and pharmacotherapy. Manual sorting of the 405 retrieved articles to exclude those that did not address cardiovascular disease, medication adherence, or health literacy in the abstract yielded 127 articles for review. Additional references were obtained from citations within the retrieved articles. This review surveys the findings of the identified articles and presents various strategies and resources for improving medication adherence. PMID:21389250

Brown, Marie T; Bussell, Jennifer K

2011-04-01

443

Medical ultrasound imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy are shown. Systems using both linear and non-linear propagation of ultrasound are described. The blood velocity

Jørgen Arendt Jensen

2007-01-01

444

Medical Laboratory Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

445

Emergency Medical Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of emergency medical technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 4 units specific to the occupation of emergency medical technician. The following…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

446

Medical Psychology in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the state of medical psychology in Canada and explores some current controversies and challenges for the future of the field. The practice of psychology in Canadian medical settings is influenced by the country's universal healthcare system and by the need to provide adequate care to a diverse and widely dispersed population. Although Canada's licensing system does not

Alisha Ali

2001-01-01

447

Medical Imaging: A Review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rapid progress of medical science and the invention of various medicines have benefited mankind and the whole civilization. Modern science also has been doing wonders in the surgical field. But, the proper and correct diagnosis of diseases is the primary necessity before the treatment. The more sophisticate the bio-instruments are, better diagnosis will be possible. The medical images plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and therapy of doctor and teaching and researching etc. Medical imaging is often thought of as a way to represent anatomical structures of the body with the help of X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. But often it is more useful for physiologic function rather than anatomy. With the growth of computer and image technology medical imaging has greatly influenced medical field. As the quality of medical imaging affects diagnosis the medical image processing has become a hotspot and the clinical applications wanting to store and retrieve images for future purpose needs some convenient process to store those images in details. This paper is a tutorial review of the medical image processing and repository techniques appeared in the literature.

Ganguly, Debashis; Chakraborty, Srabonti; Balitanas, Maricel; Kim, Tai-Hoon

448

Skylab medical operational support  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To support the medical research and the maintenance of crew health during the three Skylab missions, a medical operational support team was organized. The functions of this team ranged from medical data management to medical systems engineering monitoring during the flights. The capability to expand preflight and postflight medical research and analysis was supplied through the use of the Skylab mobile laboratories. These mobile laboratories were not only capable of being transported to the recovery ship for postflight use, but also served as a preflight test area for gathering crewman baseline data. The laboratories contained experiment hardware identical to that of the flight orbital workshop and a laboratory diagnostic facility that duplicated many of the capabilities of ground-based clinical laboratories.

Primeaux, G. R.; Spross, F. R.

1974-01-01

449

Antiparkinsonian medication and pathological gambling.  

PubMed

Parkinson's disease is a common condition, usually treated by dopaminergic agents, both ergot and non-ergot. Many behavioural abnormalities are associated with such usage, including impulse control disorders (ICDs), dopamine dysregulation syndrome and 'punding'. Pathological gambling, a form of ICD, comprises persistent and maladaptive gambling of various types that disrupts personal, family or occupational activity. Pathological gambling may be associated with other abnormal actions such as pathological shopping, hoarding and hypersexuality. The incidence varies widely from study to study but may be up to 7% of users of dopaminergic agents. Recognition of this problem has led drug regulatory agencies to add precautions concerning pathological gambling to official drug information for the entire class of antiparkinsonian medications. The literature is not entirely consistent and opinions differ greatly, but pramipexole (a dopamine D2 and D3 agonist), and perhaps ropinirole (also a D2/D3 agonist), may be especially likely to be associated with pathological gambling, although the precise nature of the relationship is unclear. Treatment involves reducing the dose of the medication or switching to another medication; unfortunately, the Parkinson's disease may worsen. The mechanism of this adverse effect is believed to be excessive dopaminergic stimulation but probably not specifically involving D3 receptors. A parallel to addictive behaviour with stimulant drugs has been noted. PMID:18399709

Lader, Malcolm

2008-01-01

450

ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.  

PubMed

These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:24421543

2013-10-01

451

ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.  

PubMed

These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:24421430

2013-11-01

452

ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.  

PubMed

These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:24474828

2013-12-01

453

ISMP Medication Error Report Analysis.  

PubMed

These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:24421529

2013-09-01

454

Medical ice slurry production device  

DOEpatents

The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL); Oras, John (Des Plaines, IL); Son, HyunJin (Naperville, IL)

2008-06-24

455

Exploration Medical Capability - Technology Watch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of the Technology Watch process are to identify emerging, high-impact technologies that augment current ExMC development efforts, and to work with academia, industry, and other government agencies to accelerate the development of medical care and research capabilities for the mitigation of potential health issues that could occur during space exploration missions. The establishment of collaborations with these entities is beneficial to technology development, assessment and/or insertion. Such collaborations also further NASA s goal to provide a safe and healthy environment for human exploration. The Tech Watch project addresses requirements and capabilities identified by knowledge and technology gaps that are derived from a discrete set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur on exploration missions. These gaps are addressed through technology readiness level assessments, market surveys, collaborations and distributed innovation opportunities. Ultimately, these gaps need to be closed with respect to exploration missions, and may be achieved through technology development projects. Information management is a key aspect to this process where Tech Watch related meetings, research articles, collaborations and partnerships are tracked by the HRP s Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element. In 2011, ExMC will be introducing the Tech Watch external website and evidence wiki that will provide access to ExMC technology and knowledge gaps, technology needs and requirements documents.

Krihak, Michael; Watkins, Sharmila; Barr, Yael; Barsten, Kristina; Fung, Paul; Baumann, David

2011-01-01

456

Medical education in Japan.  

PubMed

There are 79 medical schools in Japan--42 national, 8 prefectural (i.e., founded by a local government), and 29 private--representing approximately one school for every 1.6 million people. Undergraduate medical education is six years long, typically consisting of four years of preclinical education and then two years of clinical education. High school graduates are eligible to enter medical school. In 36 schools, college graduates are offered admission, but they account for fewer than 10% of the available positions. There were 46,800 medical students in 2006; 32.8% were women. Since 1990, Japanese medical education has undergone significant changes, with some medical schools implementing integrated curricula, problem-based learning tutorials, and clinical clerkships. A model core curriculum was proposed by the government in 2001 that outlined a core structure for undergraduate medical education, with 1,218 specific behavioral objectives. A nationwide common achievement test was instituted in 2005; students must pass this test to qualify for preclinical medical education. It is similar to the United States Medical Licensing Examination step 1, although the Japanese test is not a licensing examination. The National Examination for Physicians is a 500-item examination that is administered once a year. In 2006, 8,602 applicants took the examination, and 7,742 of them (90.0%) passed. A new law requires postgraduate training for two years after graduation. Residents are paid reasonably, and the work hours are limited to 40 hours a week. In 2004, a matching system was started; the match rate was 95.6% (46.2% for the university hospitals and 49.4% for other teaching hospitals). Sustained and meaningful change in Japanese medical education is continuing. PMID:17122471

Kozu, Tadahiko

2006-12-01

457

The Integrated Medical Model - Optimizing In-flight Space Medical Systems to Reduce Crew Health Risk and Mission Impacts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a decision support tool used by medical system planners and designers as they prepare for exploration planning activities of the Constellation program (CxP). IMM provides an evidence-based approach to help optimize the allocation of in-flight medical resources for a specified level of risk within spacecraft operational constraints. Eighty medical conditions and associated resources are represented in IMM. Nine conditions are due to Space Adaptation Syndrome. The IMM helps answer fundamental medical mission planning questions such as What medical conditions can be expected? What type and quantity of medical resources are most likely to be used?", and "What is the probability of crew death or evacuation due to medical events?" For a specified mission and crew profile, the IMM effectively characterizes the sequence of events that could potentially occur should a medical condition happen. The mathematical relationships among mission and crew attributes, medical conditions and incidence data, in-flight medical resources, potential clinical and crew health end states are established to generate end state probabilities. A Monte Carlo computational method is used to determine the probable outcomes and requires up to 25,000 mission trials to reach convergence. For each mission trial, the pharmaceuticals and supplies required to diagnose and treat prevalent medical conditions are tracked and decremented. The uncertainty of patient response to treatment is bounded via a best-case, worst-case, untreated case algorithm. A Crew Health Index (CHI) metric, developed to account for functional impairment due to a medical condition, provides a quantified measure of risk and enables risk comparisons across mission scenarios. The use of historical in-flight medical data, terrestrial surrogate data as appropriate, and space medicine subject matter expertise has enabled the development of a probabilistic, stochastic decision support tool capable of optimizing in-flight medical systems based on crew and mission parameters. This presentation will illustrate how to apply quantitative risk assessment methods to optimize the mass and volume of space-based medical systems for a space flight mission given the level of crew health and mission risk.

Kerstman, Eric; Walton, Marlei; Minard, Charles; Saile, Lynn; Myers, Jerry; Butler, Doug; Lyengar, Sriram; Fitts, Mary; Johnson-Throop, Kathy

2009-01-01

458

Examination of cross contamination risks between hospitals by external medical staff via cross-sectional intercept survey of hand hygiene  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Work in hospitals is supported by contributions of life sciences industry representatives (IR) in various ways of fields. Close contact between them, caretakers and patients is unavoidable, even in situations where hygiene is critical. The present study investigates whether IR display comparable levels of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination after being exposed to a shared environment for a minimum of 4 hours. Material and methods: An anonymous survey to sample a group of healthcare professionals for traces of fingertip contamination was performed. We used dip slides (S. aureus and MRSA) to evaluate 311 healthcare professionals at the medical exhibition MEDICA. After applying exclusion criteria 298 participants remained valid, they consisted of 208 industry representatives, 49 nurses and 41 physicians. Results: IR where engaged in hospitals, operating rooms and outpatient clinics (82%, 41.8%, 51.9% respectively). 65.9% of IR (vs. 48.8% physicians and 40.8% nurses) carried a microbiological burden ?104 CFU (colony forming units). Neither S. aureus (?104 CFU) in IR (40.9%) did show statistical differences in contamination patterns in comparison to physicians (43.9%, p=0.346) and nurses (36.7%, p=0.878) nor did MRSA (physicians p=0.579, nurses p=0.908). We were unable to differentiate transient from pre-existing permanent colonization. Conclusion: Exposure to the same environment may result in similar hand contamination patterns of IR when compared caregivers. This supports the concern that industry representatives can cause cross infection between hospitals and hygiene sensitive areas like operation room, intensive care unit and central sterilization units particularly. Further study is required to clarify whether pre-existing bacterial colonization is an influencing factor and how industry is taking care of this to create a safe working environment for their employees, the customers and ultimately the patients. PMID:25152856

Schiffers, Hank; Zaatreh, Sarah; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

2014-01-01

459

Teaching Ethics in Medical School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the literature regarding the teaching of ethics in medical schools. Defines medical ethics and attempts to determine the scope of medical ethics teaching. Discusses ways medical ethics could be taught and how that teaching can be assessed. Calls for increased attention into the teaching of medical ethics. (TW)

Ewan, Christine

1986-01-01

460

MEDICAL CENTRE Welfare W tch  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTRE Welfare W tch Medical Centre Health Check Patient Participation THE RESPONSE. #12;INTRODUCTION The University Medical Centre is a GP Practice on the campus of the University Medical Centre and our practice population is made up of approximately 75% 16-24 year olds. The Medical

Banaji,. Murad

461

Medical evaluation and management of urolithiasis  

PubMed Central

Nephrolithiasis is a highly prevalent condition with a high recurrence rate that has a large impact on the quality of life of those affected. It also poses a great financial burden on society. There have been great advancements in the surgical treatment of stone disease over the past several decades. The evolution of surgical technique appears to have overshadowed the importance of prevention of stone disease despite evidence showing medical therapies significantly decreasing stone recurrence rates. Herein we review the metabolic evaluation of stone formers with the use of specific blood and urine tests. We complete our discussion with a review of the medical management of stone formers providing both general recommendations as well as reviewing focused therapies for specific metabolic abnormalities and medical conditions. PMID:21789078

Semins, Michelle Jo; Matlaga, Brian R.

2010-01-01

462

75 FR 41986 - Medical Devices; Pediatric Uses of Devices; Requirements for Submission of Information on...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...FDA-2009-N-0458] RIN 0910-AG29 Medical Devices; Pediatric Uses of Devices...a Disease or Condition That a Device Is Intended to Treat, Diagnose...of readily available pediatric medical device information as a part of...

2010-07-20

463

32 CFR 158.7 - Guidance for contractor medical and dental fitness.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...impairing symptoms in the deployed environment. (xxx) Chronic medical conditions that require ongoing treatment with antipsychotics, lithium, or anticonvulsants. (k) Exceptions to Medical Standards (Waivers). If a contractor believes an...

2012-07-01

464

32 CFR 158.7 - Guidance for contractor medical and dental fitness.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...impairing symptoms in the deployed environment. (xxx) Chronic medical conditions that require ongoing treatment with antipsychotics, lithium, or anticonvulsants. (k) Exceptions to Medical Standards (Waivers). If a contractor believes an...

2014-07-01

465

32 CFR 158.7 - Guidance for contractor medical and dental fitness.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...impairing symptoms in the deployed environment. (xxx) Chronic medical conditions that require ongoing treatment with antipsychotics, lithium, or anticonvulsants. (k) Exceptions to Medical Standards (Waivers). If a contractor believes an...

2013-07-01