Sample records for pre-existing medical conditions

  1. 45 CFR 155.345 - Coordination with Medicaid, CHIP, the Basic Health Program, and the Pre-existing Condition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...and the Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan. 155.345 Section 155.345 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...Participation and Insurance Affordability Programs § 155.345 Coordination with Medicaid, CHIP, the...

  2. 45 CFR 155.345 - Coordination with Medicaid, CHIP, the Basic Health Program, and the Pre-existing Condition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...and the Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan. 155.345 Section 155.345 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human...Participation and Insurance Affordability Programs § 155.345 Coordination with Medicaid, CHIP, the...

  3. Sports Dermatology: Part 1 of 2 Traumatic or Mechanical Injuries, Inflammatory Conditions, and Exacerbations of Pre-existing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Emer, Jason; Sivek, Rachel; Marciniak, Brian

    2015-04-01

    Competitive athletes endure extreme bodily stress when participating in sports-related activities. An athlete's skin is particularly susceptible to a wide array of repetitive physical and environmental stressors that challenge the skin's protective function. Many unique dermatoses are well-known to the serious athlete due to countless hours of intense physical training, but are frequently unrecognized by many healthcare professionals. Sports dermatology is a distinctive, budding field of dermatology that focuses on dermatoses frequently encountered in athletes. Athletic skin problems are notoriously infectious in nature due to the inherent environment of close-contact physical activity. Nonetheless, other skin conditions can manifest or worsen with recurring mechanical or traumatic injury or exposure to environmental hazards. Additionally, sports-related activities may exacerbate other pre-existing dermatological conditions that may possibly be unknown to the athlete or clinician. The objective of this two-part review is to arm the astute physician with the fundamental knowledge of the range of dermatological conditions distinct to the competitive athlete. Knowledge of these cutaneous conditions in the context of specific sporting events will permit the clinician to manage these unique patients most effectively. Part one will focus on traumatic or mechanical injuries, inflammatory conditions, and exacerbations of pre-existing conditions frequently seen in athletes. PMID:26060516

  4. Sports Dermatology: Part 1 of 2 Traumatic or Mechanical Injuries, Inflammatory Conditions, and Exacerbations of Pre-existing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sivek, Rachel; Marciniak, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Competitive athletes endure extreme bodily stress when participating in sports-related activities. An athlete’s skin is particularly susceptible to a wide array of repetitive physical and environmental stressors that challenge the skin’s protective function. Many unique dermatoses are well-known to the serious athlete due to countless hours of intense physical training, but are frequently unrecognized by many healthcare professionals. Sports dermatology is a distinctive, budding field of dermatology that focuses on dermatoses frequently encountered in athletes. Athletic skin problems are notoriously infectious in nature due to the inherent environment of close-contact physical activity. Nonetheless, other skin conditions can manifest or worsen with recurring mechanical or traumatic injury or exposure to environmental hazards. Additionally, sports-related activities may exacerbate other pre-existing dermatological conditions that may possibly be unknown to the athlete or clinician. The objective of this two-part review is to arm the astute physician with the fundamental knowledge of the range of dermatological conditions distinct to the competitive athlete. Knowledge of these cutaneous conditions in the context of specific sporting events will permit the clinician to manage these unique patients most effectively. Part one will focus on traumatic or mechanical injuries, inflammatory conditions, and exacerbations of pre-existing conditions frequently seen in athletes.

  5. Importance of pre-existing oceanic conditions to upper ocean response induced by Super Typhoon Hai-Tang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhe-Wen; Ho, Chung-Ru; Kuo, Nan-Jung

    2008-10-01

    This study investigates upper ocean response to Super Typhoon Hai-Tang, the most intense typhoon in 2005, in the western North Pacific using multi-satellite microwave data, typhoon data and Argo profiles. Sequential merged microwave sea surface temperature (SST) images show that Hai-Tang induced four separately cooling responses after its trail in the western North Pacific during 11-18 July. Comparison between upper ocean responses of cooling SST and pre-typhoon sea surface height suggests that these cooling responses of the upper ocean to Hai-Tang are closely associated with pre-existing cyclonic circulation denoted by pre-existing negative sea surface features. Furthermore, applying Argo profiles, the physical mechanism is confirmed to be associated with pre-existing cyclonic circulations provide a relatively unstable thermodynamic structure, and therefore cold water would be brought up readily. This paper provides the rather convincing evidence that cyclonic flow and uplifted thermocline are the pre-existing conditions for intensive cooling following the typhoon passage.

  6. Realizing Health Reform’s Potential Early Implementation of Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plans: Providing an Interim Safety Net for the Uninsurable

    E-print Network

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.

    2011-06-01

    The Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) is a temporary program implemented under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to make health insurance coverage available to uninsured individuals with preexisting ...

  7. Clinical prognosis, pre-existing conditions and the use of reperfusion therapy for patients with ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrea B; Naylor, C David; Chong, Alice; Alter, David A

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Some evidence-based therapies are underused in patients with a poor prognosis despite the fact that the survival gains would be highest among such patient subgroups. The extent to which this applies for acute, life-saving therapies is unknown. The impact of prognostic characteristics and pre-existing conditions on the use of reperfusion therapy among eligible patients with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction is examined. METHODS Of 2829 acute myocardial infarction patients prospectively identified in 53 acute care hospitals across Ontario, 987 presented with ST segment elevation within 12 h of symptom onset and without any absolute contraindications to reperfusion therapy. The baseline prognosis for each patient was derived from a validated risk-adjustment model of 30-day mortality. Multiple logistical regression was used to examine the relationships among reperfusion therapy, prognosis and the number of pre-existing chronic conditions after adjusting for factors such as age, sex, time since symptom onset and socioeconomic status. RESULTS Of the 987 appropriate candidates, 725 (73.5%) received reperfusion therapy (70.8% fibrinolysis, 2.6% primary angioplasty). The adjusted odds ratio of reperfusion therapy fell 4% with each 1% increase in baseline risk of death (adjusted OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.00, P=0.04) and fell 18% with each additional pre-existing condition (adjusted OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.90, P<0.001). The number rather than the type of pre-existing conditions inversely correlated with the use of reperfusion therapy. While the impact of baseline risk and pre-existing conditions was additive, pre-existing conditions exerted a greater impact on the nonuse of reperfusion therapy than did baseline risk. CONCLUSIONS A treatment-risk paradox is demonstrable even within a cohort of lower risk patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. These findings are consistent with the view that these clinical decisions are more likely to be attributable to concerns about patient frailty or side effects than to a misunderstanding of treatment benefits. PMID:16485048

  8. [Travelers with underlying medical conditions].

    PubMed

    Cailhol, Johann

    2015-04-01

    Travelers with pre-existing medical disease are at risk of exacerbation of their underlying disease during their journey but are also more susceptible to various infectious agents, which consequences could be much more severe than in healthy subjects. Prevention and education are primordial in order to optimize the trip. Each new prescription should be checked for potential drug/drug interactions. Malaria chemoprophylaxis should be considered if applicable, as well as mechanical protection against insect-bites. Vaccinations should be recommended after weighting risks and benefits, keeping in mind that live-attenuated vaccines are not recommended in case of cellular immune suppression. Prevention of travel- related diarrhea by general hygiene measures is of particular interest in this population. Thereafter, we are discussing specific preventive measure according to different medical conditions. PMID:26058202

  9. Medical Conditions and Car Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Dischinger, Patricia C.; Ho, Shiu M.; Kufera, Joseph A.

    2000-01-01

    Most previous studies of medical conditions associated with driver safety have focused on specific diseases. This analysis is based on a linkage of police report and hospital discharge data, and correlates various medical diagnostic categories and specific conditions with police determinations of driver culpability for all drivers admitted to Maryland hospitals during a 3-year period. Using odds ratios, various conditions have been identified which are associated with an increased risk of crash culpability. Further research is needed to confirm these findings, and to determine the role of the conditions vs. the possible influence of medications prescribed to treat these conditions. PMID:11558092

  10. A Double Whammy: Health Promotion Among Cancer Survivors with Pre-Existing Functional Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Volker, Deborah L.; Becker, Heather; Kang, Sook Jung; Kullberg, Vicki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To explore the experience of living with a cancer diagnosis within the context of a pre-existing functional disability and to identify strategies to promote health in this growing population of cancer survivors. Research Approach Qualitative descriptive Setting Four sites in the United States Participants 19 female cancer survivors with pre-existing disabling conditions Methodologic Approach Four focus groups were conducted. The audiotapes were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis techniques. Main Research Variables cancer survivor, disability, health promotion Findings Analytic categories included living with a cancer diagnosis, health promotion strategies, and wellness program development for survivors with pre-existing functional limitations. Participants described many challenges associated with managing a cancer diagnosis on top of living with a chronic disabling functional limitation. They identified strategies they used to maintain their health and topics to be included in health promotion programs tailored for this unique group of cancer survivors. Conclusions The “double whammy” of a cancer diagnosis for persons with pre-existing functional limitations requires modification of health promotion strategies and programs to promote wellness in this group of cancer survivors. Interpretation Nurses and other health care providers must attend to patients’ pre-existing conditions as well as the challenges of the physical, emotional, social, and economic sequelae of a cancer diagnosis. PMID:23269771

  11. The origin of allosteric functional modulation: multiple pre-existing pathways.

    PubMed

    del Sol, Antonio; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2009-08-12

    Although allostery draws increasing attention, not much is known about allosteric mechanisms. Here we argue that in all proteins, allosteric signals transmit through multiple, pre-existing pathways; which pathways dominate depend on protein topologies, specific binding events, covalent modifications, and cellular (environmental) conditions. Further, perturbation events at any site on the protein surface (or in the interior) will not create new pathways but only shift the pre-existing ensemble of pathways. Drugs binding at different sites or mutational events in disease shift the ensemble toward the same conformations; however, the relative populations of the different states will change. Consequently the observed functional, conformational, and dynamic effects will be different. This is the origin of allosteric functional modulation in dynamic proteins: allostery does not necessarily need to invoke conformational rearrangements to control protein activity and pre-existing pathways are always defaulted to during allostery regardless of the stimulant and perturbation site in the protein. PMID:19679084

  12. 75 FR 45013 - Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ...private entities, a temporary high risk health insurance pool program to provide affordable health insurance coverage to uninsured individuals with...available for individuals to obtain health insurance coverage. This interim final rule...

  13. 78 FR 30218 - Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ...payment, the aggregate amount needed...of the PCIP program is estimated...indicate that the aggregate amount needed to pay for PCIP program expenses may...expenditure, the aggregate amount needed for the payment of program expenses...

  14. Pre-existing immunity against vaccine vectors – friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Manvendra; Van, Thi Thu Hao; Baird, Fiona J.; Coloe, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last century, the successful attenuation of multiple bacterial and viral pathogens has led to an effective, robust and safe form of vaccination. Recently, these vaccines have been evaluated as delivery vectors for heterologous antigens, as a means of simultaneous vaccination against two pathogens. The general consensus from published studies is that these vaccine vectors have the potential to be both safe and efficacious. However, some of the commonly employed vectors, for example Salmonella and adenovirus, often have pre-existing immune responses in the host and this has the potential to modify the subsequent immune response to a vectored antigen. This review examines the literature on this topic, and concludes that for bacterial vectors there can in fact, in some cases, be an enhancement in immunogenicity, typically humoral, while for viral vectors pre-existing immunity is a hindrance for subsequent induction of cell-mediated responses. PMID:23175507

  15. Successful resuscitation of serious bupivacaine intoxication in a patient with pre-existing heart failure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Christophe Favier; Manuel Da Conceiçao; Mikaïla Fassassi; Laurent Allanic; Thierry Steiner; Raphaël Pitti

    2003-01-01

    Purpose  In dogs intoxicated with bupivacaine, clonidine is effective to treat conduction disturbances and dobutamine corrects myocardial\\u000a depression. We report the case of a patient who experienced severe bupivacaine cardiotoxicity and who was treated successfully\\u000a using these medications.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Clinical features  In a patient with pre-existing heart failure a surgical procedure to fix a humeral fracture was necessary. Preoperatively,\\u000a heart failure was controlled

  16. PRESENCE OF PRE-EXISTING ANTIBODIES MEDIATE SURVIVAL IN SEPSIS

    PubMed Central

    Moitra, Rituparna; Beal, Dominic R.; Belikoff, Bryan G.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in hospitals worldwide. Even with optimal therapy, severe sepsis results in 50% mortality, indicating variability in the response of individuals towards treatment. We hypothesize that the presence of pre-existing antibodies present in the blood before the onset of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in mice, accounts for the differences in their survival. A Plasma Enhanced Killing (PEK) assay was performed to calculate the PEK capacity of plasma i.e. the ability of plasma to augment PMN killing of bacteria. PEK was calculated as PEK= (1/log (N)) × 100; where N= number of surviving bacteria; a higher PEK indicated better bacterial killing. A range of PEK in plasma collected from mice prior to CLP was observed, documenting individual differences in bacterial killing capacity. Mortality was predicted based on plasma IL-6 levels at 24 hr post CLP. Mice predicted to die (Die-P) had a lower PEK (<14) and higher peritoneal bacterial counts 24 hr post sepsis compared to those predicted to live (Live-P) with a PEK>16. Mice with PEK<14 were 3.1 times more likely to die compared to the PEK>16 group. To understand the mechanism of defense conferred by the pre-existing antibodies, binding of IgM or IgG to enteric bacteria was documented by flow cytometry. To determine the relative contribution of IgM or IgG, the immunoglobulins were specifically immuno-depleted from the naïve plasma samples and the PEK of the depleted plasma measured. Compared to naïve plasma, depletion of IgM had no effect on the PEK. However, depletion of IgG increased PEK suggesting that an inhibitory IgG binds to antigenic sites on bacteria preventing optimal opsonization of the bacteria. These data demonstrate that prior to CLP; circulating inhibitory IgG antibodies exist that prevent bacterial killing by PMNs in a CLP model of sepsis. PMID:21921828

  17. Morbidity risks among older adults with pre-existing age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Akushevich, Igor; Kravchenko, Julia; Ukraintseva, Svetlana; Arbeev, Konstantin; Kulminski, Alexander; Yashin, Anatoliy I.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-morbidity is common among older adults; however, for many aging-related diseases there is no information for U.S. elderly population on how earlier-manifested disease affects the risk of another disease manifested later during patient’s lifetime. Quantitative evaluation of risks of cancer and non-cancer diseases for older adults with pre-existing conditions is performed using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Registry data linked to the Medicare Files of Service Use (MFSU). Using the SEER-Medicare data containing individual records for 2,154,598 individuals, we empirically evaluated age patterns of incidence of age-associated diseases diagnosed after the onset of earlier manifested disease and compared these patterns with those in general population. Individual medical histories were reconstructed using information on diagnoses coded in MFSU, dates of medical services/procedures, and Medicare enrollment/disenrollment. More than threefold increase of subsequent diseases risk was observed for 15 disease pairs, majority of them were i) diseases of the same organ and/or system (e.g., Parkinson disease for patients with Alzheimer disease, HR=3.77, kidney cancer for patients with renal failure, HR=3.28) or ii) disease pairs with primary diseases being fast-progressive cancers (i.e., lung, kidney, and pancreas), e.g., ulcer (HR=4.68) and melanoma (HR=4.15) for patients with pancreatic cancer. Lower risk of subsequent disease was registered for 20 disease pairs, mostly among patients with Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, e.g., decreased lung cancer risk among patients with Alzheimer’s (HR=0.64) and Parkinson’s (HR=0.60) disease. Synergistic and antagonistic dependences in geriatric disease risks were observed among US elderly confirming known and detecting new associations of wide spectrum of age-associated diseases. The results can be used in optimization of screening, prevention and treatment strategies of chronic diseases among U.S. elderly population. PMID:24064264

  18. The Near Earth Asteroid Medical Conditions List

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael R.; Watkins, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element is one of six elements within NASA s Human Research Program (HRP) and is responsible for addressing the risk of "the inability to adequately recognize or treat an ill or injured crewmember" for exploration-class missions. The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Medical Conditions List, constructed by ExMC, is the first step in addressing the above-mentioned risk for the 13-month long NEA mission. The NEA mission is being designed by NASA's Human Space Flight Architecture Team (HAT). The purpose of the conditions list is to serve as an evidence-based foundation for determining which medical conditions could affect a crewmember during the NEA mission, which of those conditions would be of concern and require treatment, and for which conditions a gap in knowledge or technology development exists. This information is used to focus research efforts and technology development to ensure that the appropriate medical capabilities are available for exploration-class missions. Scope and Approach: The NEA Medical Conditions List is part of a broader Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), which incorporates various exploration-class design reference missions (DRMs). The conditions list contains 85 medical conditions which could occur during space flight and which are derived from several sources: Long-Term Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) in-flight occurrence data, The Space Shuttle (STS) Medical Checklist, The International Space Station (ISS) Medical Checklist, and subject matter expert opinion. Each medical condition listed has been assigned a clinical priority and a clinical priority rationale based on incidence, consequence, and mitigation capability. Implementation: The conditions list is a "living document" and as such, new conditions can be added to the list, and the priority of conditions on the list can be adjusted as the DRM changes, and as screening, diagnosis, or treatment capabilities change. The NEA medical conditions list was used recently as the basis for identifying gaps in in-flight medical evaluation (screening) capabilities. Learning Objectives: The audience will become familiar with the approach taken by NASA's Exploration Medical Capability element in addressing the risk of inability to recognize and treat medical conditions in the setting of a Near Earth Asteroid mission. Which one of the following statements is incorrect? a) The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) medical conditions list includes 85 medical conditions which could occur during space flight. b) Each condition on the NEA medical conditions list has been assigned a clinical priority and a clinical priority rationale. c) The NEA medical conditions list targets a mission to Mars. d) The NEA medical conditions list should be viewed as a "living document" where new conditions can be added and clinical priorities adjusted to address changes in the design reference mission or medical capabilities. The incorrect answer is c). The NEA medical conditions list targets a mission to a Near Earth Asteroid.

  19. Medical Conditions and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikeda, Robin M.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Simon, Thomas R.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Durant, Tonji M.; Swahn, Monica H.

    2002-01-01

    This population-based, case-control study examined physical illness as a risk factor for suicidal behavior. Case patients were more likely than controls to report having any serious medical conditions. Results suggest that young men with medical conditions are at increased risk for nearly lethal suicide attempts. (Contains 33 references and 3…

  20. Mining FDA drug labels for medical conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) has built the initial Natural Language Processing (NLP) component to extract medications with their corresponding medical conditions (Indications, Contraindications, Overdosage, and Adverse Reactions) as triples of medication-related information ([(1) drug name]-[(2) medical condition]-[(3) LOINC section header]) for an intelligent database system, in order to improve patient safety and the quality of health care. The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) drug labels are used to demonstrate the feasibility of building the triples as an intelligent database system task. Methods This paper discusses a hybrid NLP system, called AutoMCExtractor, to collect medical conditions (including disease/disorder and sign/symptom) from drug labels published by the FDA. Altogether, 6,611 medical conditions in a manually-annotated gold standard were used for the system evaluation. The pre-processing step extracted the plain text from XML file and detected eight related LOINC sections (e.g. Adverse Reactions, Warnings and Precautions) for medical condition extraction. Conditional Random Fields (CRF) classifiers, trained on token, linguistic, and semantic features, were then used for medical condition extraction. Lastly, dictionary-based post-processing corrected boundary-detection errors of the CRF step. We evaluated the AutoMCExtractor on manually-annotated FDA drug labels and report the results on both token and span levels. Results Precision, recall, and F-measure were 0.90, 0.81, and 0.85, respectively, for the span level exact match; for the token-level evaluation, precision, recall, and F-measure were 0.92, 0.73, and 0.82, respectively. Conclusions The results demonstrate that (1) medical conditions can be extracted from FDA drug labels with high performance; and (2) it is feasible to develop a framework for an intelligent database system. PMID:23617267

  1. MEDICAL INSURANCE ConditionCare

    E-print Network

    's Health Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Fever Food & Diet Headache Smoking Women's Health Anthem about our programs to help manage these conditions. ConditionCare is included in your health plans and offers valuable tools and information that could make a real difference as you strive for better health

  2. Travelling in aeroplane with medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Singal, Kiran Kumar; Singal, Neerja; Sharma, Ram Gopal; Gupta, Parveen

    2014-02-01

    Air travel has become so common these days that about one billion people travel in one year. A few number of the persons travelling by air have suffered or are suffering from one or more medical conditions which may increase risk to passenger himself. There may be additional risk to copassengers, crew of aircraft or safety of aircraft may be compromised. The present article evaluates different medical conditions from pregnancy to cardiovascular diseases in relation to the air travel. PMID:25935969

  3. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Sharmi; Barr, Yael; Kerstman, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA s Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the "Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember." This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this risk. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to define the set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur during exploration space flight missions. The list was derived from the International Space Station Medical Checklist, the Shuttle Medical Checklist, in-flight occurrence data from the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health, and NASA subject matter experts. The list of conditions was further prioritized for eight specific design reference missions with the assistance of the ExMC Advisory Group. The purpose of the SMEMCL is to serve as an evidence-based foundation for the conditions that could affect a crewmember during flight. This information is used to ensure that the appropriate medical capabilities are available for exploration missions.

  4. Three-dimensional numerical analysis of magma transport through a pre-existing fracture in the crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zuan; Cheng, Xu; Huang, Xiaoge; Bai, Wuming; Jin, Zhi-He

    2014-05-01

    Magmas are transported through pre-existing fractures in many repeatedly erupting volcanoes. The study of this special process of magma transport is fundamentally important to understand the mechanisms and conditions of volcanic eruptions. In this paper, we numerically simulate the magma propagation process through a pre-existing vertical fracture in the crust by using the combined finite difference method (FDM), finite element method (FEM) and discontinuous deformation analysis (DDA) approach. FDM is used to analyze magma flow in the pre-existing fracture, FEM is used to calculate the opening of the fracture during magma intrusion, and DDA is used to deal with the contact of the closed fracture surfaces. Both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) examples are presented. Parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of various physical and geometric parameters on the magma transport in the pre-existing fracture. We have considered magma chamber depth ranging from 7 km to 10 km under the crust surface, magma viscosity ranging from 2 × 10-2 to 2 × 10-7 MPa s, and the density difference between the magma and host rock ranging from 300 to 700 kg/m3. The numerical results indicate that (1) the fluid pressure p varies gradually along the depth, (2) the shape of the magma body during propagation is like a torch bar and its width ranges from 2 m to 4 m approximately in the 3D case and 10 m to 50 m in the 2D case for the same physical parameters used, (3) the crust surface around the pre-existing fracture begins to increase on both sides of the fracture, forms a trough between them, then gradually uplifts during the transport of the magma, and finally takes the shape of a crater when the magma reaches the surface. We have also examined the influence of physical and geometric parameters on the minimum overpressure for magma transport in the 3D case. The numerical results show that our numerical technique presented in this paper is an effective tool for simulating magma transport process through pre-existing fractures in the crust.

  5. Asperger Syndrome: Associated Psychiatric and Medical Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2002-01-01

    This article explores the association of medical and psychiatric conditions with Asperger syndrome, based mainly on publications from the last two decades. It examines comorbidity of Asperger syndrome with mood disorders, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, tic disorders, violence and aggression,…

  6. Pregnancy in women with pre-existing lupus nephritis: predictors of fetal and maternal outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Enrico Imbasciati; Angela Tincani; Gina Gregorini; Andrea Doria; Gabriella Moroni; Gianfranca Cabiddu; Daniele Marcelli

    2008-01-01

    Background. Only few data are available on pregnancy in patients with lupus nephritis (LN) diagnosed before con- ception.Theaimofthisstudywastoidentifytheriskfactors for complicated pregnancy in women with pre-existing LN. Methods. In a multicentre study, we collected data on 113 pregnancies occurring in 81 women with pre-existing biopsy-proven LN. Primary outcomes were fetal loss including perinatal death and renal flares during and 12 months

  7. Pre-existing biotherapeutic-reactive antibodies: survey results within the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li; Fiscella, Michele; Rajadhyaksha, Manoj; Goyal, Jaya; Holland, Claire; Gorovits, Boris; Morimoto, Alyssa

    2013-07-01

    The immunogenicity profile of a biotherapeutic is determined by a multitude of product and patient-related risk factors that can influence the observed incidence and clinical consequences of immunogenicity. Pre-existing antibodies, i.e., biotherapeutic-reactive antibodies present in samples from treatment-naïve subjects, have been commonly observed during immunogenicity assessments; however their relevance in terms of the safety and efficacy of a biotherapeutic is poorly understood. An American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists-sponsored survey was conducted to gather information about the prevalence, nature, and consequences of pre-existing antibodies in clinical and nonclinical studies. The survey results indicate that pre-existing antibodies against a variety of biotherapeutics (e.g., mAbs, fusion proteins) are frequently encountered, especially in the context of autoimmune diseases, but that the methods and approaches used to detect, characterize, and report these antibodies vary. In most cases, pre-existing antibodies did not appear to have clinical consequences; however, a few of the respondents reported having observed an effect on pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, safety, and/or efficacy parameters. The findings from this survey are an important first step in evaluating the potential risks associated with the presence of pre-existing antibodies and highlight the importance of standardizing the approaches for detection and characterization of these antibodies. Cross-industry sharing of case studies and relevant data collection will help better inform biotherapeutic risk/benefit profiles and provide deeper understanding of the biological consequences of pre-existing antibodies. PMID:23620231

  8. Metabolic effects of milk protein intake strongly depend on pre-existing metabolic and exercise status.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C; Schmitz, Gerd; John, Swen; Carrera-Bastos, Pedro; Lindeberg, Staffan; Cordain, Loren

    2013-01-01

    Milk protein intake has recently been suggested to improve metabolic health. This Perspective provides evidence that metabolic effects of milk protein intake have to be regarded in the context of the individual's pre-existing metabolic and exercise status. Milk proteins provide abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and glutamine. Plasma BCAAs and glutamine are increased in obesity and insulin resistance, but decrease after gastric bypass surgery resulting in weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity. Milk protein consumption results in postprandial hyperinsulinemia in obese subjects, increases body weight of overweight adolescents and may thus deteriorate pre-existing metabolic disturbances of obese, insulin resistant individuals. PMID:24225036

  9. Surrogate-based optimization of hydraulic fracturing in pre-existing fracture networks

    E-print Network

    Lu, Zhiming

    Surrogate-based optimization of hydraulic fracturing in pre-existing fracture networks Mingjie Chen Keywords: Hydraulic fracturing Fractal dimension Surrogate model Optimization Global sensitivity a b s t r a c t Hydraulic fracturing has been used widely to stimulate production of oil, natural gas

  10. Influence of pre-existing volcanic edifice geometry on1 caldera formation2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Influence of pre-existing volcanic edifice geometry on1 caldera formation2 V. Pinel, 1 V. Pinel the stress field within the underlying crust with two main implica-4 tions for caldera formation. First before the eruption stops. Taking into account both of these effects,8 caldera formation can be initiated

  11. While visual odometry has unbounded error, navigation from pre-existing consistent scene models can generate

    E-print Network

    Kelly, Alonzo

    Page 1 Abstract While visual odometry has unbounded error, navigation from pre-existing consistent guidance system based on only vision and odometry. The visual tracking and localization aspects to dis- tortion and image overlap that are intrinsic to visual track- ing and odometry. Speed can

  12. Using an Electronic Highlighter to Eliminate the Negative Effects of Pre-Existing, Inappropriate Highlighting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gier, Vicki; Kreiner, David; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Herring, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether using an active learning technique, electronic highlighting, can eliminate the negative effects of pre-existing, poor highlighting on reading comprehension. Participants read passages containing no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, or inappropriate highlighting. We hypothesized…

  13. Opposite clear corneal incisions to correct pre-existing astigmatism in cataract surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey Lever; Elie Dahan

    2000-01-01

    In cataract surgery, the clear corneal incision (CCI) has a small flattening effect on corneal curvature, which can be used to reduce pre-existing astigmatism (PEA). Adding an identical, penetrating CCI opposite the first one can enhance the flattening effect. The paired opposite CCIs (OCCIs) are placed on the steepest meridian axis to flatten it. One CCI is used to perform

  14. Influence of pre-existing salt diapirs on 3D folding patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Naiara; Kaus, Boris J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The 3D detachment folding instability gives rise to a wide variety of fold shapes (e.g. from dome shape structures to long en-echelon or straight anticlines) as a result of interactions between growing fold segments. The 3D growth of these folds, as well as the wavelength and lateral propagation of folds, is controlled by the physical parameters of a detachment layer and its overburden. However, the existence of initial heterogeneities, such as pre-existing salt plugs within the sedimentary cover, might affect fold development as well. We use numerical modeling to investigate how the fold pattern is affected by pre-existing salt structures. High-resolution 3D folding simulations (with and without pre-existing salt structures) were performed, in which we varied the shape, height and spacing of pre-existing diapirs. In a first geometric setup, we employed a multilayer setup and synthetic diapir distributions in order to study the influence of diapir spacing on fold spacing and patterns. In a second geometric setup, we use a diapir distribution that fits the observed exposed diapir distribution in the southeastern Zagros. Results show that the presence of diapirs does not considerably change the wavelength of the folds, which is in all cases close to the dominant folding wavelength that develops in the absence of diapirs. Yet, the presence of pre-existing structures speeds up the folding instability in those locations and also affects folding patterns as the diapirs localize the initial deformation by accommodating folding above them, which results in the diapirs being located in the core of the folds. If diapir spacing is much smaller than the dominant folding wavelength, diapirs are located in different structural positions such as fold synclines or flanks.

  15. Experimental observations of the effect of crystals and pre-existing bubbles on the dynamics and fragmentation of vesiculating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourtada-Bonnefoi, C. C.; Mader, H. M.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of crystals and pre-existing gas phases on the dynamic degassing and fragmentation of magmas in a volcanic conduit have been simulated by analogue experiments. A series of decompression experiments of viscous solutions of gum rosin and acetone with and without the incorporation of particles (silicon carbide, glass beads, organic seeds) or pre-existing air bubbles have been performed in a transparent shock-tube. The addition of internal bubbles or solid particles in the starting solution shifts the fragmentation conditions towards lower acetone (volatile) contents and lower decompression ratios. The effect of solid particles depends on their number density and spatial distribution in the starting solution. A small number of sinking particles has little impact on the flow dynamics. However, a floating layer of particles provides a high concentration of surface bubbles that leads to an early fragmentation pulse. The observations also imply that the presence of crystals, if able to generate a high number density of bubbles, will lead to an earlier and deeper fragmentation of the magma in the volcanic conduit.

  16. Medical Conditions and Medication Use in Adults with Down Syndrome: A Descriptive Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerins, Gerard; Petrovic, Kimberly; Bruder, Mary Beth; Gruman, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Background: We examined the presence of medical conditions and medication use within a sample of adults with Down syndrome. Methods: Retrospective chart review using a sample of 141 adults with Down syndrome and age range of 30 to 65 years. Results: We identify 23 categories of commonly occurring medical conditions and 24 categories of medications…

  17. Influence of pre-existing salt structures in the 3D pattern of multilayer folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Naiara; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Collignon, Marine

    2014-05-01

    Upward movement of the Precambrian Hormuz salt in the Fars region of the Zagros is supposed to have started as early as Late Cretaceous. The Late Cretaceous - Tertiary deformation events that lead to the folding of the sedimentary cover in this area would have therefore, enhance the upward salt movement by squeezing the pre-existing salt structures. How these salt diapirs evolve under such compressive events has already been previously addressed using analogue models (e.g. Callot et al. 2012). The same authors observed that pre-existing salt structures control the size and geometry of folds in sandbox models. Our previous work has shown that 3D folding instability gives rise to a wide variety of fold shapes (e.g. from dome shape structures to long en echelon or straight anticlines), resulting of the interactions between growing fold segments. The three dimensional growth of these folds, the wavelength and the lateral propagation, is itself controlled by physical parameters. However, the existence of initial weak zones such as pre-existing salt plugs within the sedimentary cover can affect the development of such folds by localizing part of the deformation. In this study we have used numerical modeling to investigate how the fold pattern in 3D multilayer folding is affected by pre-existing salt structures. High-resolution 3D folding simulations (with and without pre-existing salt structures) were performed with the parallel code LaMEM. Cylindrically shaped diapirs with different diameters and heights have been added to a multilayer folding setup. The use of a finite element based landscape evolution model (both erosion and sedimentation) allows for initially buried salt diapirs to be exposed at the surface during folding evolution. Acknowledgements Funding was provided by the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework program (FP7/2007-2013) ERC Grant agreement #258830. 3D simulations are performed in the IBM Blue Gene/Q JUQUEEN supercomputer of the Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany References Callot, J.P., Trocme, V., Letouzey, J., Albouy, E., Jahani, S. and Sherkati S., 2012, Pre-existing salt structures and the folding of the Zagros Mountains. Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 363, 545-561, doi: 10.1144/SP363.27

  18. Are there pre-existing neural, cognitive, or motoric markers for musical ability?

    PubMed

    Norton, Andrea; Winner, Ellen; Cronin, Karl; Overy, Katie; Lee, Dennis J; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2005-11-01

    Adult musician's brains show structural enlargements, but it is not known whether these are inborn or a consequence of long-term training. In addition, music training in childhood has been shown to have positive effects on visual-spatial and verbal outcomes. However, it is not known whether pre-existing advantages in these skills are found in children who choose to study a musical instrument nor is it known whether there are pre-existing associations between music and any of these outcome measures that could help explain the training effects. To answer these questions, we compared 5- to 7-year-olds beginning piano or string lessons (n=39) with 5- to 7-year-olds not beginning instrumental training (n=31). All children received a series of tests (visual-spatial, non-verbal reasoning, verbal, motor, and musical) and underwent magnetic resonance imaging. We found no pre-existing neural, cognitive, motor, or musical differences between groups and no correlations (after correction for multiple analyses) between music perceptual skills and any brain or visual-spatial measures. However, correlations were found between music perceptual skills and both non-verbal reasoning and phonemic awareness. Such pre-existing correlations suggest similarities in auditory and visual pattern recognition as well a sharing of the neural substrates for language and music processing, most likely due to innate abilities or implicit learning during early development. This baseline study lays the groundwork for an ongoing longitudinal study addressing the effects of intensive musical training on brain and cognitive development, and making it possible to look retroactively at the brain and cognitive development of those children who emerge showing exceptional musical talent. PMID:16054741

  19. Pre-existing Conditions Genetic Testing, Causation, and the Justice of

    E-print Network

    Pennock, Robert T.

    public debate. Cloning or somatic cell nuclear transfer (even the terminol- ogy is controversial will require close collaboration of both scientists and ethicists. Progress on the controversy about human cloning, for instance, may be possible when scientists, ethicists, and phil- osophers of science use

  20. A historical pyroclastic flow emplaced within a pre-existing Pleistocene lava tube: Silidong, Tianchi Volcano, Changbaishan, northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhengquan; Wei, Haiquan; Liu, Yongshun; Tilling, Robert I.; Xu, Jiandong; Wu, Chengzhi; Nie, Baofeng

    2015-06-01

    Pyroclastic flow deposits recently found within a pre-existing lava tube at Tianchi Volcano represent, to the best of our knowledge, the only such reported occurrence worldwide. In this case, pyroclastic flow of Tianchi's "Millennium eruption" (~1 ka) traveled about 18 km from the summit eruptive source and poured successively into the ~560-m-long accessible segment of Silidong lava tube. Mapping of tube morphology, combined with detailed characterization of the features associated with the pumice flow deposits (e.g., adhering of pyroclastic materials on tube walls, fumarole pipes, rootless vents, and flow fronts of the deposit surface) has enabled plausible inferences regarding the original within-tube conditions and dynamic flow regime during emplacement. We propose a model of an aggrading pyroclastic flow which locally varies its sedimentation rate. The pyroclastic deposit is thicker in locations of reduced flow mobility, and the resultant variations in deposit thickness appear to control the distribution of fumarole pipes and rootless vents.

  1. Numerical modeling of the seismic response of a large pre-existing landslide in the Marmara region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdeau, Céline; Lenti, Luca; Martino, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    Turkey is one of the geologically most active regions of Europe prone to natural hazards in particular earthquakes and landslides. Detailed seismological studies show that a catastrophic event is now expected in the Marmara region along the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). On the shores of the Marmara sea, about 30km East of Istanbul and 15km North from the NAFZ, urbanization is fastly growing despite the presence of pre-existing large landslides. Whether such landslides could be reactivated under seismic shaking is a key question. In the framework of the MARsite European project, we selected one of the most critical landslides namely the Büyükçekmece landslide in order to assess its local seismic response. Based on detailed geophysical and geotechnical field investigations, a high-resolution engineering-geological model of the landslide slope was reconstructed. A numerical modeling was carried out on a longitudinal cross section of this landslide with a 2D finite difference code FLAC in order to assess the local seismic response of the slope and to evaluate the consistency of conditions suitable for the earthquake-induced reactivation of the landslide. The obtained ground-motion amplification pattern along the slope surface is very complex and is strongly influenced by properties changes between the pre-existing landslide mass and the surrounding material. Further comparisons of 2D versus 1D ground-motion amplifications on the one hand and 2D versus topographic site effects on the other hand will shed light on the parameters controlling the spatial variations of ground-motion amplifications along the slope surface.

  2. DOES PRE-EXISTING DIABETES AFFECT PROSTATE CANCER PROGNOSIS? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Claire F.; Stein, Kelly B.; Barone, Bethany B.; Peairs, Kimberly S.; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Derr, Rachel L.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Carducci, Michael A.; Brancati, Frederick L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To summarize the influence of pre-existing diabetes on mortality and morbidity in men with prostate cancer. Methods We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE from inception through October 1, 2008. Search terms were related to diabetes, cancer, and prognosis. Studies were included if they reported an original data analysis of prostate cancer prognosis, compared outcomes between men with and without diabetes, and were in English. Titles, abstracts, and articles were reviewed independently by two authors. Conflicts were settled by consensus or third review. We abstracted data on study design, analytic methods, outcomes, and quality. We summarized mortality and morbidity outcomes qualitatively and conducted a preliminary meta-analysis to quantify the risk of long-term (>3 months), overall mortality. Results 11 articles were included in the review. 1/4 studies found increased prostate-cancer mortality, 1/2 studies found increased non-prostate cancer mortality, and 1/1 study found increased 30-day mortality. Data from 4 studies could be included in a preliminary meta-analysis for long-term, overall mortality and produced a pooled hazard ratio of 1.57 (95% CI: 1.12-2.20). Diabetes was also associated with receiving radiation therapy, complication rates, recurrence, and treatment failure. Conclusions Our analysis suggests that pre-existing diabetes affects the treatment and outcomes of men with prostate cancer. PMID:20145631

  3. Relevance of a pre-existing measles immunity prior immunization with a recombinant measles virus vector

    PubMed Central

    Knuchel, Marlyse C.; Marty, René R.; Morin, Teldja Neige Azzouz; Ilter, Orhan; Zuniga, Armando; Naim, Hussein Y.

    2013-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) vectors are promising candidates for designing new recombinant vaccines since the parental live vaccines have a well-known safety and efficacy record. Like all viral vectors, the MV vector efficacy in inducing a protecting immune answer could be affected by the pre-existing immunity among the human population. In order to determine the optimal immunization route and regimen, we mimicked a MV pre-immunity by passively administrating MV neutralizing antibodies (MV-nAb) prior intramuscular (i.m.) and/or intranasal (i.n.) immunization with recombinant MV expressing the SIV-gag antigen (rMV-SIVgag). Our results revealed that 500 mIU of MV-nAb allowed the induction of a humoral and cellular immune response against the vector and the transgene, while higher titers of the MV-nAb were significantly inhibitory. In a prime-boost regimen, in the presence of MV-nAb, the intranasal-intramuscular (i.n.-i.m.) or intramuscular-intramuscular (i.m.-i.m.) routes induced higher humoral immune responses against the vector and the transgene (SIV-gag). In naive animals, cellular immune response was significantly higher by i.m. immunization; however, MV pre-immunity did not seem to affect the cellular immune response after an i.n. immunization. In summary, we show that a pre-existing immunity of up to 500 mIU anti-MV neutralizing antibodies had little effect on the replication of rMV and did not inhibit the induction of significant humoral and cellular immune responses in immune-competent mice. PMID:23324399

  4. Numerical Study on Coalescence of Pre-Existing Flaw Pairs in Rock-Like Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan-Qiang; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen

    2014-11-01

    The present numerical study, which is an extension of our previous numerical analysis on cracking processes of a single pre-existing flaw, focuses on the coalescence of two pre-existing parallel open flaws in rock subjected to a uniaxial compressive loading. To facilitate a systematic investigation, the arrangements of the flaw pair are classified into 11 categories. Simulations engaging AUTODYN are conducted on each category. The numerical results are compared with some published physical experimental test results. Eleven typical coalescence patterns are obtained, which are in good agreement with the experimental results, which include two coalescence patterns obtained in flaw pair arrangements (II) and (VIII?) not being reported in previous studies. The information gathered in the simulations helps identify the type (tensile/shear) of each crack segment involved in the coalescence. Most of the coalescence cracks initiate at or around the flaw tips, except those in flaw pair arrangements (II) and (IX') with a very short ligament length, in which the coalescence cracks initiate on the flaw surfaces away from the flaw tip regions. Based on the numerical simulation results, the properties of the 11 coalescence patterns are obtained. Except those in flaw pair arrangements (II) and (IX'), the other coalescence patterns can be interpreted with respect to the basic crack types—tensile wing crack, horsetail crack and anti-wing crack. In addition, based on the type of crack segments involved in coalescence, namely tensile and shear, the coalescence can be classified into T mode (tensile mode), S mode (shear mode) and TS mode (mixed tensile-shear mode).

  5. Effects of Pre-Existing Target Structure on the Formation of Large Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Cintala, M. J.; Crawford, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    The shapes of large-scale craters and the mechanics responsible for melt generation are influenced by broad and small-scale structures present in a target prior to impact. For example, well-developed systems of fractures often create craters that appear square in outline, good examples being Meteor Crater, AZ and the square craters of 433 Eros. Pre-broken target material also affects melt generation. Kieffer has shown how the shock wave generated in Coconino sandstone at Meteor crater created reverberations which, in combination with the natural target heterogeneity present, created peaks and troughs in pressure and compressed density as individual grains collided to produce a range of shock mineralogies and melts within neighboring samples. In this study, we further explore how pre-existing target structure influences various aspects of the cratering process. We combine experimental and numerical techniques to explore the connection between the scales of the impact generated shock wave and the pre-existing target structure. We focus on the propagation of shock waves in coarse, granular media, emphasizing its consequences on excavation, crater growth, ejecta production, cratering efficiency, melt generation, and crater shape. As a baseline, we present a first series of results for idealized targets where the particles are all identical in size and possess the same shock impedance. We will also present a few results, whereby we increase the complexities of the target properties by varying the grain size, strength, impedance and frictional properties. In addition, we investigate the origin and implications of reverberations that are created by the presence of physical and chemical heterogeneity in a target.

  6. Pre-existing astrocytes form functional perisynaptic processes on neurons generated in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Krzisch, Marine; Temprana, Silvio G; Mongiat, Lucas A; Armida, Jan; Schmutz, Valentin; Virtanen, Mari A; Kocher-Braissant, Jacqueline; Kraftsik, Rudolf; Vutskits, Laszlo; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Bergami, Matteo; Gage, Fred H; Schinder, Alejandro F; Toni, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    The adult dentate gyrus produces new neurons that morphologically and functionally integrate into the hippocampal network. In the adult brain, most excitatory synapses are ensheathed by astrocytic perisynaptic processes that regulate synaptic structure and function. However, these processes are formed during embryonic or early postnatal development and it is unknown whether astrocytes can also ensheathe synapses of neurons born during adulthood and, if so, whether they play a role in their synaptic transmission. Here, we used a combination of serial-section immuno-electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and electrophysiology to examine the formation of perisynaptic processes on adult-born neurons. We found that the afferent and efferent synapses of newborn neurons are ensheathed by astrocytic processes, irrespective of the age of the neurons or the size of their synapses. The quantification of gliogenesis and the distribution of astrocytic processes on synapses formed by adult-born neurons suggest that the majority of these processes are recruited from pre-existing astrocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of astrocytic glutamate re-uptake significantly reduced postsynaptic currents and increased paired-pulse facilitation in adult-born neurons, suggesting that perisynaptic processes modulate synaptic transmission on these cells. Finally, some processes were found intercalated between newly formed dendritic spines and potential presynaptic partners, suggesting that they may also play a structural role in the connectivity of new spines. Together, these results indicate that pre-existing astrocytes remodel their processes to ensheathe synapses of adult-born neurons and participate to the functional and structural integration of these cells into the hippocampal network. PMID:24748560

  7. Gene Therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI Is Effective in Cats Without Pre-Existing Immunity to AAV8

    PubMed Central

    Ferla, Rita; O'Malley, Thomas; Calcedo, Roberto; O'Donnell, Patricia; Wang, Ping; Cotugno, Gabriella; Claudiani, Pamela; Wilson, James M.; Haskins, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Liver gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) 2/8 vectors is being considered for therapy of systemic diseases like mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI), a lysosomal storage disease due to deficiency of arylsulfatase B (ARSB). We have previously reported that liver gene transfer with AAV2/8 results in sustained yet variable expression of ARSB. We hypothesized that the variability we observed could be due to pre-existing immunity to wild-type AAV8. To test this, we compared the levels of AAV2/8-mediated transduction in MPS VI cats with and without pre-existing immunity to AAV8. In addition, since levels of lysosomal enzymes as low as 5% of normal are expected to be therapeutic, we evaluated the impact of pre-existing immunity on MPS VI phenotypic rescue. AAV2/8 administration to MPS VI cats without pre-existing neutralizing antibodies to AAV8 resulted in consistent and dose-dependent expression of ARSB, urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) reduction, and femur length amelioration. Conversely, animals with pre-existing immunity to AAV8 showed low levels of ARSB expression and limited phenotypic improvement. Our data support the use of AAV2/8-mediated gene transfer for MPS VI and other systemic diseases, and highlight that pre-existing immunity to AAV8 should be considered in determining subject eligibility for therapy. PMID:23194248

  8. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.16 Proof of medical condition...the claimant suffered from or suffers from leukemia. Proof that the claimant contracted leukemia must be made either by using the...

  9. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.16 Proof of medical condition...the claimant suffered from or suffers from leukemia. Proof that the claimant contracted leukemia must be made either by using the...

  10. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.16 Proof of medical condition...the claimant suffered from or suffers from leukemia. Proof that the claimant contracted leukemia must be made either by using the...

  11. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.16 Proof of medical condition...the claimant suffered from or suffers from leukemia. Proof that the claimant contracted leukemia must be made either by using the...

  12. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.16 Proof of medical condition...the claimant suffered from or suffers from leukemia. Proof that the claimant contracted leukemia must be made either by using the...

  13. Bayesian Hierarchical Rule Modeling for Predicting Medical Conditions

    E-print Network

    McCormick, Tyler H.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a statistical modeling technique, called the Hierarchical Association Rule Model (HARM), that predicts a patient’s possible future medical conditions given the patient’s current and past history of reported ...

  14. A Model for Subglacial Flooding Along a Pre-Existing Hydrological Network during the Rapid Drainage of Supraglacial Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S.; Tsai, V. C.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly large numbers of supraglacial lakes form and drain every summer on the Greenland Ice Sheet. Presently, about 15% of the lakes drain rapidly within the timescale of a few hours, and the vertical discharge of water during these events may find a pre-existing subglacial hydrological network, particularly late in the melt season. Here, we present a model for subglacial flooding applied specifically to such circumstances. Given the short timescale of events, we treat ice and bed as purely elastic and assume that the fluid flow in the subglacial conduit is fully turbulent. We evaluate the effect of initial conduit opening, wi, on the rate of flood propagation and along-flow profiles of field variables. We find that floods propagate much faster, particularly in early times, for larger wi. For wi = 10 and 1 cm, for example, floods travel about 68% and 50% farther than in the fully coupled ice/bed scenario after 2 hours of drainage, respectively. Irrespective of the magnitude of wi, we also find that there exists a region of positive pressure gradient. This reversal of pressure gradient draws water in from the farfield and causes the conduit to narrow, respecting mass continuity. While the general shape of the profiles appears similar, greater conduit opening is found for larger wi. For wi = 10 and 1 cm, for example, the elastostatic conduit opening at the point of injection is about 1.39 and 1.26 times that of the fully coupled ice/bed scenario after 2 hours of drainage. The hypothesis of a pre-existing thin film of water is consistent with the spirit of contemporary state-of-the-art continuum models for subglacial hydrology. This also results in avoiding the pressure singularity, which is inherent in classical hydro-fracture models applied to fully coupled ice/bed scenarios, thus opening an avenue for integrating the likes of our model within continuum hydrological models. Furthermore, we foresee that the theory presented can be used to potentially infer subglacial hydrological conditions, particularly wi, given accurate observations of ice surface displacement during drainage events.

  15. 43 CFR 404.53 - Does this rule provide authority for the transfer of pre-existing facilities from Federal to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404.53 Does this rule...pre-existing facilities or pre-existing components of any water system from Federal to private ownership, or from...

  16. 43 CFR 404.53 - Does this rule provide authority for the transfer of pre-existing facilities from Federal to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404.53 Does this rule...pre-existing facilities or pre-existing components of any water system from Federal to private ownership, or from...

  17. 43 CFR 404.53 - Does this rule provide authority for the transfer of pre-existing facilities from Federal to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404.53 Does this rule...pre-existing facilities or pre-existing components of any water system from Federal to private ownership, or from...

  18. EVIDENCE FOR PRE-EXISTING DUST IN THE BRIGHT TYPE IIn SN 2010jl

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J. E.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Clem, J.; Landolt, A., E-mail: jandrews@phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: landolt@phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: gclayton@fenway.phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: jclem@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    SN 2010jl was an extremely bright, Type IIn supernova (SN) which showed a significant infrared (IR) excess no later than 90 days after explosion. We have obtained Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m and JHK observations of SN 2010jl {approx}90 days post-explosion. Little to no reddening in the host galaxy indicated that the circumstellar material lost from the progenitor must lie in a torus inclined out of the plane of the sky. The likely cause of the high mid-IR flux is the reprocessing of the initial flash of the SN by pre-existing circumstellar dust. Using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative-transfer code, we have estimated that between 0.03 and 0.35 M{sub sun} of dust exists in a circumstellar torus around the SN located 6 x 10{sup 17} cm away from the SN and inclined between 60 deg. and 80 deg. to the plane of the sky. On day 90, we are only seeing the illumination of approximately 5% of this torus, and expect to see an elevated IR flux from this material up until day {approx} 450. It is likely this dust was created in a luminous blue variable (LBV) like mass-loss event of more than 3 M{sub sun}, which is large but consistent with other LBV progenitors such as {eta} Carinae.

  19. Holistic approach of pre-existing flaws on the decay of two limestones.

    PubMed

    Dewanckele, J; Boone, M A; De Kock, T; De Boever, W; Brabant, L; Boone, M N; Fronteau, G; Dils, J; Van Hoorebeke, L; Jacobs, P; Cnudde, V

    2013-03-01

    This study aims to understand the influence of the microfacies and the determination of pre-existing flaws on the weathering behavior of two types of limestones. Therefore, both Lede and Noyant limestones were independently weathered by strong acid tests and freeze-thaw cycles. In order to characterize the weathering patterns inside the stones, a combination of high resolution X-ray CT, SEM-EDS and thin section microscopy was used. The advantage of high resolution X-ray CT is its non-destructive character and the obtained 3D structural information. By using this technique, a time-lapse sequence of the weathering patterns was obtained for both gypsum crust formation as well as crack formation due to freezing and thawing. This way, a clear link could be made with the initial non-weathered state. Thin section microscopy and SEM-EDS provided additional chemical information. The focus of this study lies in the processes that occur in the bioclast fragments in the stone and the influence of the surrounding cement or matrix. The results show that weathering patterns vary for both limestones although the causes of weathering were similar. In case of the Noyant stone, the weathering by crystallizing gypsum was mainly restricted to the microporous matrix of the stone, while in case of the Lede stone, several foraminifera and shell fragments were preferentially recrystallized. In general, the underlying microstructure determines the weathering pattern of the stone. PMID:23410862

  20. The Influence of Pre-existing Deformation on GMA Welding Distortion in Thin Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. M.; Ahn, J.; Tsunori, M.; Dye, D.; Nikbin, K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Weld distortion is particularly problematic for large thin structures that are used in the assembly of ships. The drive toward lighter ships and thinner plate is restricted by the significant increase in distortion as the plate thickness decreases. The influence of pre-existing deformation in the plates to be joined on the resultant distortion in gas metal arc welded structure has been studied. DH-36 steel plate surface profiles were measured before and after the butt welding of two plates 1000 × 500 × 4 mm in size. Three dimensional finite element models that incorporate the initial plate profile have been created to simulate the welding process and to examine the relationship between the final welded plate profiles and the initial deformation present in the plates. Both symmetric and asymmetric models were considered. A significant variation in the unwelded base plates' initial distortion was observed. Generally, it has been found that if an out-of-plane deformation exists in a plate prior to welding, the level of distortion further increases in the same direction following welding. The final distortions are strongly related to the initial plate profiles. The residual stress distributions in the plates are also to some extent affected by the level of distortion initially present.

  1. Plasticity induced by pre-existing defects during high strain-rate loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringa, Eduardo

    2014-03-01

    High strain-rate deformation of metals has been typically studied for perfect monocrystals. Computational advances now allow more realistic simulations of materials including defects, which lower the Hugoniot Elastic Limit, and lead to microstructures differing from the ones from perfect monocrystals. As pre-existing defects one can consider vacancy clusters, dislocation loops, grain boundaries, etc. New analysis tools allow analysis of dislocation densities and twin fractions, for both f.c.c. and b.c.c. metals. Recent results for defective single crystal Ta [Tramontina et al.., High Energy Den. Phys. 10, 9 (2014), and Ruestes et al., Scripta Mat. 68, 818 (2013)], and for polycrystalline b.c.c metals [Tang et al., Mat. Sci. Eng. A 580, 414 (2013), and Gunkelmann et al., Phys. Rev. B 86, 144111 (2012)] will be highlighted, alongside new results for nanocrystalline Cu, Ta, Fe, and Zr [Ruestes et al., Scripta Mat. 71, 9 (2014)]. This work has been carried out in collaboration with D. Tramontina, C. Ruestes, E. Millan, J. Rodriguez-Nieva, M.A. Meyers, Y. Tang, H. Urbassek, N. Gunkelmann, A. Stukowski, M. Ruda, G. Bertolino, D. Farkas, A. Caro, J. Hawreliak, B. Remington, R. Rudd, P. Erhart, R. Ravelo, T. Germann, N. Park, M. Suggit, S. Michalik, A. Higginbotham and J. Wark. Funding by PICT2008-1325 and SeCTyP U.N. Cuyo.

  2. Dendritic spine dynamics in synaptogenesis after repeated LTP inductions: Dependence on pre-existing spine density

    PubMed Central

    Oe, Yuki; Tominaga-Yoshino, Keiko; Hasegawa, Sho; Ogura, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    Not only from our daily experience but from learning experiments in animals, we know that the establishment of long-lasting memory requires repeated practice. However, cellular backgrounds underlying this repetition-dependent consolidation of memory remain largely unclear. We reported previously using organotypic slice cultures of rodent hippocampus that the repeated inductions of LTP (long-term potentiation) lead to a slowly developing long-lasting synaptic enhancement accompanied by synaptogenesis distinct from LTP itself, and proposed this phenomenon as a model system suitable for the analysis of the repetition-dependent consolidation of memory. Here we examined the dynamics of individual dendritic spines after repeated LTP-inductions and found the existence of two phases in the spines' stochastic behavior that eventually lead to the increase in spine density. This spine dynamics occurred preferentially in the dendritic segments having low pre-existing spine density. Our results may provide clues for understanding the cellular bases underlying the repetition-dependent consolidation of memory. PMID:23739837

  3. Differentiation of pre-existing trapped methane from thermogenic methane in an igneous-intruded coal by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dias, Robert F.; Lewan, Michael D.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Kotarba, Maciej J.

    2014-01-01

    So as to better understand how the gas generation potential of coal changes with increasing rank, same-seam samples of bituminous coal from the Illinois Basin that were naturally matured to varying degrees by the intrusion of an igneous dike were subjected to hydrous pyrolysis (HP) conditions of 360 °C for 72 h. The accumulated methane in the reactor headspace was analyzed for ?13C and ?2H, and mol percent composition. Maximum methane production (9.7 mg/g TOC) occurred in the most immature samples (0.5 %Ro), waning to minimal methane values at 2.44 %Ro (0.67 mg/g TOC), and rebounding to 3.6 mg/g TOC methane in the most mature sample (6.76 %Ro). Methane from coal with the highest initial thermal maturity (6.76 %Ro) shows no isotopic dependence on the reactor water and has a microbial ?13C value of ?61‰. However, methane from coal of minimal initial thermal maturity (0.5 %Ro) shows hydrogen isotopic dependence on the reaction water and has a ?13C value of ?37‰. The gas released from coals under hydrous pyrolysis conditions represents a quantifiable mixture of ancient (270 Ma) methane (likely microbial) that was generated in situ and trapped within the rock during the rapid heating by the dike, and modern (laboratory) thermogenic methane that was generated from the indigenous organic matter due to thermal maturation induced by hydrous pyrolysis conditions. These findings provide an analytical framework for better assessment of natural gas sources and for differentiating generated gas from pre-existing trapped gas in coals of various ranks.

  4. Yellowstone Hotspot Melting And Its Relation To Pre-Existing Crustal Structures And Great Basin Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glen, J. M.; Ponce, D. A.; Sepulveda, E.

    2004-12-01

    Topography and geophysical data suggest that the path of Yellowstone hotspot (YSHS) volcanism was controlled by pre-existing crustal structures associated with the Snake River Plain (SRP), and that Great Basin (GB) extension is intimately tied to hotspot melting. From its point of inception (Glen and Ponce, 2002), the YSHS migrated south to the southern Snake River Plain (SRP) where it began a steady migration northeast along the eastern SRP to its present position under the Yellowstone caldera. In doing so, however, it had to move through a 90° counter-clockwise turn that is not consistent with a fixed hotspot and its predicted path based on plate motions, and assuming a fixed hotspot. We present evidence suggesting that the SRPs western and eastern branches form a continuous deep crustal structure that guided YSHS volcanism along a track from its inception in eastern Oregon to its present position under the Yellowstone caldera. The western and eastern segments of the SRP, which are interpreted to have different origins and ages, nonetheless form a single topographic depression that curves 180° along a circular arc. Also associated with the SRP is a broad and continuous gravity anomaly indicating a relatively deep-seated crustal structure extending across the western and eastern SRP. Heat flow data, which show an uninterrupted corridor of high heat flow values extending from Yellowstone caldera through the SRP to the inferred inception point of the hotspot, might reflect either the thermal footprint of the hotspot's path or the control on heat flow by a regional-scale crustal discontinuity. While the path of the hotspot could have been directed by crustal structures, the location and timing of mid- to late-Tertiary extension in the GB might, in turn, have been controlled by hotspot melting. Well known is the age-progressive hotspot track along the eastern SRP, presently marked by active volcanism at the Yellowstone caldera. Less well known, is a second age-progressive track trending northwest across the Oregon Plateau ending at the historically active Newberry craters. The present locations of these active melting fronts, at Yellowstone and Newberry, coincide with the eastern and western margins, respectively, of the GB. This remarkable correlation, while suggesting a link between hotspot melting and GB extension, does not reveal whether melting controls the bounds of GB extension or whether GB extension controls the propagation of hotspot volcanism. Another characteristic of GB extension, however, that might reflect a causal relation between magmatism and rifting, is the geometry and orientation of basins and ranges in the GB. The trends of basins and ranges fan out from north-northwest in the eastern GB to northeast in the west. When extrapolated, these trends intersect near the SRP close to where the age-progressive YSHS trend began ˜ 12-14 Ma, suggesting a relationship between the formation of the GB and this period of the hotspot's path. We infer that this fracturing pattern is related to the SRP, perhaps induced by the ˜ 12-14 m.y. old hotspot, and that subsequent extension in the GB exploited these pre-existing crustal weaknesses.

  5. MEDICAL SUPPLEMENT DIRECTIONS--This form assists students in providing documentation of a medical or disability condition when petitioning for

    E-print Network

    Amin, S. Massoud

    MEDICAL SUPPLEMENT DIRECTIONS--This form assists students in providing documentation of a medical with the Medical Supplement. This form must be completed by the medical provider or by Disability Services if the student is currently registered with and has provided medical documentation surrounding their condition

  6. The role of pre-existing faults in the structural evolution of thrust systems: Insights from the Ligurian Alps (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Lorenzo; Dallagiovanna, Giorgio; Seno, Silvio

    2010-01-01

    New structural and stratigraphic data for a selected area of the Ligurian Alps are combined in order to assess and discuss the role played by extensional structures in the southernmost segment of the Western Alps during thrusting. Restored cross-sections and field data suggest that the structural style in the external sector of the chain may depend upon the presence of pre-orogenic normal faults ascribed to three extensional events linked to different geodynamic contexts: (i) Permian post-Variscan plate reorganisation, (ii) Mesozoic rifting-drifting phases leading to the opening of the Alpine Tethys, and (iii) Eocenic development of the European foreland basins. During positive inversion in Eocene times, a thin-skinned thrust system developed in this area, followed by a thick-skinned phase. In both situations the inherited extensional structures played fundamental roles: during the thin-skinned phase they conditioned the thrusting sequence, also producing large-scale buckle folds and partial reactivations; during the thick-skinned phase the strain was compartmentalized and partitioned by pre-existing faults. The kinematic model of the external sectors of the Ligurian chain also allows the re-assessment of the Alpine evolution of the front-foreland transition, including: (i) indirect confirmation that in the Eocene the Ligurian Briançonnais and Dauphinois domains were not separated by the Valais-Pyrenean oceanic basin; (ii) that the thin-skinned phase progressively changed into thick-skinned; (iii) the assertion that there were no significant deformations from the Oligocene to the present-day, and the Corsica-Sardinia block rotation only produced a change in orientation of previously formed structures and normal fault system development.

  7. Relations among Chronic Medical Conditions, Medications, and Automobile Crashes in the Elderly: A Population-based Case-Control Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald McGwin; Richard V. Sims; Jeffrey M. Roseman

    Older drivers have elevated crash rates and are more likely to be injured or die if they have a crash. Medical conditions and medications have been hypothesized as determinants of crash involvement. This population- based case-control study sought to identify medical conditions and medications associated with risk of at-fault crashes among older drivers. A total of 901 drivers aged 65

  8. Squaring the Circle: Impact Craters as a Diagnostic of Pre-Existing Sub-Surface Target Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C. S.

    2015-05-01

    Pre-existing inhomogeneities in target geology affect the geometry of impact craters. I explore the effects of target faulting on the evolution and final geometry of impact crater models and the use of craters as a probe of sub-surface morphology.

  9. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415...Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule...the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two...

  10. 41 CFR 105-64.208 - What special conditions apply to release of medical records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... What special conditions apply to release of medical records? 105-64.208 Section 105-64.208... What special conditions apply to release of medical records? Medical records containing information that may have an...

  11. 41 CFR 105-64.208 - What special conditions apply to release of medical records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... What special conditions apply to release of medical records? 105-64.208 Section 105-64.208... What special conditions apply to release of medical records? Medical records containing information that may have an...

  12. 41 CFR 105-64.208 - What special conditions apply to release of medical records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... What special conditions apply to release of medical records? 105-64.208 Section 105-64.208... What special conditions apply to release of medical records? Medical records containing information that may have an...

  13. The experience of altered states of consciousness in shamanic ritual: the role of pre-existing beliefs and affective factors.

    PubMed

    Polito, Vince; Langdon, Robyn; Brown, Jac

    2010-12-01

    Much attention has been paid recently to the role of anomalous experiences in the aetiology of certain types of psychopathology, e.g. in the formation of delusions. We examine, instead, the top-down influence of pre-existing beliefs and affective factors in shaping an individual's characterisation of anomalous sensory experiences. Specifically we investigated the effects of paranormal beliefs and alexithymia in determining the intensity and quality of an altered state of consciousness (ASC). Fifty five participants took part in a sweat lodge ceremony, a traditional shamanic ritual which was unfamiliar to them. Participants reported significant alterations in their state of consciousness, quantified using the 'APZ' questionnaire, a standardized measure of ASC experience. Participants endorsing paranormal beliefs compatible with shamanic mythology, and those showing difficulty identifying feelings scored higher on positive dimensions of ASC experience. Our findings demonstrate that variation in an individual's characterisation of anomalous experiences is nuanced by pre-existing beliefs and affective factors. PMID:20558090

  14. The Prescribed Pediatric Center: A Medical Day Treatment Program for Children with Complex Medical Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppert, Elizabeth S.; Karst, Thomas O.; Brogan, Mark G.

    1998-01-01

    The Prescribed Pediatric Center (Toledo, Ohio) is a community-based, multidisciplinary program for infants and children with chronic, complex medical conditions. This article describes program beginnings; the planning process; and the program's growth, development, and components. Initial program evaluation indicates positive effects on some…

  15. Do patient age and medical condition influence medical advice to stop smoking?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CONOR P. M AGUIRE; J AMES RYAN; A LAN KELLY; D ESMOND; D AVIS COAKLEY; J. B ERNARD WALSH

    2000-01-01

    Objective: to determine whether the age and medical condition of a patient influences hospital-based doctors' decision making when advising patients to stop smoking cigarettes. Methods: we presented 142 doctors from four grades (consultant, registrar, senior house officer and house officer) and four specialities (medicine, surgery, psychiatry and anaesthetics), based in a Dublin teaching hospital, with 20 clinical vignettes. Each vignette

  16. Evaluation of accelerated stability test conditions for medicated chewing gums.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Lauretta; Conte, Ubaldo; Nhamias, Alain; Grenier, Pascal; Vergnault, Guy

    2013-10-01

    The overall stability of medicated chewing gums is investigated under different storage conditions. Active substances with different chemical stabilities in solid state are chosen as model drugs. The dosage form is a three layer tablet obtained by direct compression. The gum core contains the active ingredient while the external layers are formulated to prevent gum adhesion to the punches of the tableting machine. Two accelerated test conditions (40°C/75% RH and 30°C/65% RH) are performed for 6 months. Furthermore, a long-term stability test at room conditions is conducted to verify the predictability of the results obtained from the stress tests. Some drugs are stable in all the conditions tested, but other drugs, generally considered stable in solid dosage forms, have shown relevant stability problems particularly when stress test conditions are applied to this particular semi-solid dosage forms. For less stable drugs, the stress conditions of 40°C/75% RH are not always predictable of chewing gum stability at room temperature and may produce false negative; intermediate conditions, 30°C/65% RH, are more predictive for this purpose, the results of drug content found after 6 months at intermediate stress conditions and 12 months at room conditions are generally comparable. But the results obtained show that only long-term conditions stability tests gave consistent results. During aging, the semi solid nature of the gum base itself, may also influence the drug delivery rate during chewing and great attention should be given also to the dissolution stability. PMID:22794248

  17. Phenotypic T Cell Exhaustion in a Murine Model of Bacterial Infection in the Setting of Pre-Existing Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rohit; Wagener, Maylene; Breed, Elise R.; Liang, Zhe; Yoseph, Benyam P.; Burd, Eileen M.; Farris, Alton B.

    2014-01-01

    While much of cancer immunology research has focused on anti-tumor immunity both systemically and within the tumor microenvironment, little is known about the impact of pre-existing malignancy on pathogen-specific immune responses. Here, we sought to characterize the antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response following a bacterial infection in the setting of pre-existing pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Mice with established subcutaneous pancreatic adenocarcinomas were infected with Listeria monocytogenes, and antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses were compared to those in control mice without cancer. While the kinetics and magnitude of antigen-specific CD8+ T cell expansion and accumulation was comparable between the cancer and non-cancer groups, bacterial antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and total CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in cancer mice exhibited increased expression of the coinhibitory receptors BTLA, PD-1, and 2B4. Furthermore, increased inhibitory receptor expression was associated with reduced IFN-? and increased IL-2 production by bacterial antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in the cancer group. Taken together, these data suggest that cancer's immune suppressive effects are not limited to the tumor microenvironment, but that pre-existing malignancy induces phenotypic exhaustion in T cells by increasing expression of coinhibitory receptors and may impair pathogen-specific CD8+ T cell functionality and differentiation. PMID:24796533

  18. Impact of Acute Malaria on Pre-Existing Antibodies to Viral and Vaccine Antigens in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Banga, Simran; Coursen, Jill D.; Portugal, Silvia; Tran, Tuan M.; Hancox, Lisa; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Harty, John T.; Crompton, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-induced immunity depends on long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) that maintain antibody levels. A recent mouse study showed that Plasmodium chaubaudi infection reduced pre-existing influenza-specific antibodies—raising concerns that malaria may compromise pre-existing vaccine responses. We extended these findings to P. yoelii infection, observing decreases in antibodies to model antigens in inbred mice and to influenza in outbred mice, associated with LLPC depletion and increased susceptibility to influenza rechallenge. We investigated the implications of these findings in Malian children by measuring vaccine-specific IgG (tetanus, measles, hepatitis B) before and after the malaria-free 6-month dry season, 10 days after the first malaria episode of the malaria season, and after the subsequent dry season. On average, vaccine-specific IgG did not decrease following acute malaria. However, in some children malaria was associated with an accelerated decline in vaccine-specific IgG, underscoring the need to further investigate the impact of malaria on pre-existing vaccine-specific antibodies. PMID:25919588

  19. 42 CFR 410.12 - Medical and other health services: Basic conditions and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical and other health services: Basic conditions...HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.12...

  20. 42 CFR 410.12 - Medical and other health services: Basic conditions and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical and other health services: Basic conditions...HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.12...

  1. Lentivirus-mediated platelet gene therapy of murine hemophilia A with pre-existing anti-FVIII immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kuether, E. L.; Schroeder, J. A.; Fahs, S. A.; Cooley, B. C.; Chen, Y.; Montgomery, R. R.; Wilcox, D. A.; Shi, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The development of inhibitory antibodies, referred to as inhibitors, against exogenous FVIII in a significant subset of patients with hemophilia A remains a persistent challenge to the efficacy of protein replacement therapy. Our previous studies using the transgenic approach provided proof-of-principle that platelet-specific expression could be successful for treating hemophilia A in the presence of inhibitory antibodies. Objective To investigate a clinically translatable approach for platelet gene therapy of hemophilia A with pre-existing inhibitors. Methods Platelet-FVIII expression in pre-immunized FVIIInull mice was introduced by transplantation of lentivirus-transduced bone marrow or enriched hematopoietic stem cells. FVIII expression was determined by a chromogenic assay. The transgene copy number per cell was quantitated by real time PCR. Inhibitor titer was measured by Bethesda assay. Phenotypic correction was assessed by the tail clipping assay and an electrolytic-induced venous injury model. Integration sites were analyzed by LAM-PCR. Results Therapeutic levels of platelet-FVIII expression were sustained long-term without evoking an anti-FVIII memory response in the transduced pre-immunized recipients. The tail clip survival test and the electrolytic injury model confirmed that hemostasis was improved in the treated animals. Sequential bone marrow transplants showed sustained platelet-FVIII expression resulting in phenotypic correction in pre-immunized secondary and tertiary recipients. Conclusions Lentivirus-mediated platelet-specific gene transfer improves hemostasis in hemophilic A mice with pre-existing inhibitors, indicating that this approach may be a promising strategy for gene therapy of hemophilia A even in the high-risk setting of pre-existing inhibitory antibodies. PMID:22632092

  2. Protective efficacy of a single immunization with capripoxvirus-vectored recombinant peste des petits ruminants vaccines in presence of pre-existing immunity.

    PubMed

    Caufour, Philippe; Rufael, Tesfaye; Lamien, Charles Euloge; Lancelot, Renaud; Kidane, Menbere; Awel, Dino; Sertse, Tefera; Kwiatek, Olivier; Libeau, Geneviève; Sahle, Mesfin; Diallo, Adama; Albina, Emmanuel

    2014-06-24

    Sheeppox, goatpox and peste des petits ruminants (PPR) are highly contagious ruminant diseases widely distributed in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Capripoxvirus (CPV)-vectored recombinant PPR vaccines (rCPV-PPR vaccines), which have been developed and shown to protect against both Capripox (CP) and PPR, would be critical tools in the control of these important diseases. In most parts of the world, these disease distributions overlap each other leaving concerns about the potential impact that pre-existing immunity against either disease may have on the protective efficacy of these bivalent rCPV-PPR vaccines. Currently, this question has not been indisputably addressed. Therefore, we undertook this study, under experimental conditions designed for the context of mass vaccination campaigns of small ruminants, using the two CPV recombinants (Kenya sheep-1 (KS-1) strain-based constructs) developed previously in our laboratory. Pre-existing immunity was first induced by immunization either with an attenuated CPV vaccine strain (KS-1) or the attenuated PPRV vaccine strain (Nigeria 75/1) and animals were thereafter inoculated once subcutaneously with a mixture of CPV recombinants expressing either the hemagglutinin (H) or the fusion (F) protein gene of PPRV (10(3) TCID50/animal of each). Finally, these animals were challenged with a virulent CPV strain followed by a virulent PPRV strain 3 weeks later. Our study demonstrated full protection against CP for vaccinated animals with prior exposure to PPRV and a partial protection against PPR for vaccinated animals with prior exposure to CPV. The latter animals exhibited a mild clinical form of PPR and did not show any post-challenge anamnestic neutralizing antibody response against PPRV. The implications of these results are discussed herein and suggestions made for future research regarding the development of CPV-vectored vaccines. PMID:24837763

  3. Persistent paranoid delusions following the September 11 terrorist attacks in a man with no pre-existing mental illness.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Roy R; Beddingfield, John J

    2006-03-01

    The effects of modern day terrorism on mental health are not well understood. Described here is a 51-year-old male with no pre-existing mental illness who developed paranoid delusions related to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks shortly after they occurred. After about two years of treatment with quetiapine the patient was no longer delusional about terrorism but experienced extensive paranoid delusions about commonly encountered persons, requiring treatment which continues to the current time. Clinicians should be aware of the possible impact of terrorist activities on the mental health of vulnerable individuals. PMID:16553109

  4. Framework for preventing accidental falls in hospitals - management plan for ADL, medication and medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shogo; Tsuru, Satoko; Iizuka, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    Prevention and reduction of medical accidents is essential. Among medical accidents, accidental falls remain a serious problem. While "assessment score sheets" have already been used in hospitals to prevent accidental falls, satisfactory results have not actually been achieved. In this study, we aim to establish a methodology for preventing accidental falls. We consider that the 'management plan' for each patient includes three factors. A plan of instructions for patients on actions they can take for safety in their ADL (Activities of Daily Living) is essential as a base. Second, a plan to keep up with any short term change in a patient's state is needed, because the state of a hospitalized patient will usually be temporarily affected by medication and changing medical conditions. We develop a model for preventing accidental falls, which enable us to design appropriate management plan for each patient. Then, we develop a prototype system based on the designed model. Finally, we address the result of verification of the model, by applying the prototype system into actual cases in hospitals. PMID:19592884

  5. 45 CFR 155.345 - Coordination with Medicaid, CHIP, the Basic Health Program, and the Pre-existing Condition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS EXCHANGE ESTABLISHMENT STANDARDS AND OTHER RELATED STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Exchange Functions in the Individual Market:...

  6. Roots of Mold Problems and Humidity Control Measures in Institutional Buildings with Pre-Existing Mold Condition 

    E-print Network

    Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H.; Garcia, J.

    2004-01-01

    . Mold in buildings is a serious problem since previous studies indicate that it can lead to or aggravate health problems including headaches, breathing difficulties, allergic reactions, and aggravation of asthma systems (United States Environmental...

  7. Roots of Mold Problems and Humidity Control Measures in Institutional Buildings with Pre-Existing Mold Condition

    E-print Network

    Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H.; Garcia, J.

    2004-01-01

    . Mold in buildings is a serious problem since previous studies indicate that it can lead to or aggravate health problems including headaches, breathing difficulties, allergic reactions, and aggravation of asthma systems (United States Environmental...

  8. Indium-111-labeled white blood cells in the detection of osteomyelitis complicated by a pre-existing condition

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.; Velchik, M.G.; Alavi, A.; Mandell, G.A.; Esterhai, J.L.; Goll, S.

    1988-06-01

    Forty-six patients (23M, 23F) ranging in age from 19 to 79 yr with a clinical history of a nonunion fracture, surgery, diabetes or a soft-tissue infection were studied with (/sup 111/In)oxine WBCs to detect osteomyelitis. There were 27 true-positive, nine true-negative, two false-positive and one false-negative. The false-positives and the false-negative occurred in patients with soft-tissue infections overlying the area of interest. All diagnoses were confirmed by intraoperative bone biopsies and cultures. Bone biopsy and scan were performed within 2 days of each other in 39 patients. The overall sensitivity was 97% (27/28), specificity, 82% (9/11) and the diagnostic accuracy, 92% (36/39). The remaining seven patients had negative (/sup 111/In)WBC scans several months after positive bone biopsies and definite antibiotic treatment. This suggests that (In)WBC scans become negative after appropriate therapy is undertaken. Interobserver data was obtained from four nuclear physicians of varying experience blinded to clinical information. A high degree of agreement was found in over 90% of the cases. This study demonstrates the utility of (/sup 111/In)WBC scans in the diagnosis and follow-up of complicated osteomyelitis and a high level of interobserver agreement in scan interpretation.

  9. Mechanical and microstructural development of Carrara marble with pre-existing strain variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruijn, Rolf H. C.; Kunze, Karsten; Mainprice, David; Burlini, Luigi

    2011-04-01

    A series of two-stage torsion experiments on Carrara marble were conducted to constrain the influence of known prior deformation on rheological response and microstructural evolution. Comparison with previous experimental data on Carrara marble flow and fabric evolution during single-stage torsion deformation experiments provided direct insights into the significance of initial deformation at various conditions. Our experiments were conducted at 727 °C temperature and 300 MPa confining pressure, while maintaining a constant strain rate of 3 × 10 - 4 s - 1 on the periphery of the cylindrical samples. Under these conditions, the marble is known to deform in power-law ( n = 6-10) ductile flow. All torsion experiments were performed with a Paterson type gas-medium testing machine equipped with a torsion actuator module. Prior (D1) and subsequent (D2) deformation are accomplished by two torsion experiments in sequence on same sample segments. The effect of D1 strain history is investigated during D2 by applying counter-clockwise torsion to a sandwich sample consisting of three segments with different D1 rotation sense. D2 samples experienced continued, first and reversed shearing deformation in top, centre and bottom segments, respectively. D2 bulk strain was chosen equal to D1 strain in top and bottom segments. D1 experiments followed the typical single-stage deformation behaviour of Carrara marble under the applied experimental conditions. Yielding was followed by strain hardening until a peak stress was reached at a shear strain around 1, after which work softening occurred. Weakening gradually evolved into a constant stress regime. During hardening, a shear microstructure and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) developed. Afterwards the volume fraction of smaller dynamic recrystallised grains increased continuously, resulting in a recrystallisation microstructure and CPO at shear strains of 5 and higher. The new D2 experiments displayed a strain variation between homogeneously deformed sample segments that increased with increasing D1 strain. The stress-strain behaviour of the D2 bulk sandwich samples showed less pronounced work-hardening and -softening when compared with single-stage deformation experiments. Furthermore, constant flow stress was attained at increasingly lower strain with increasing D1 strain. In most D2 segments, fabric development is equivalent to single-stage experiments at corresponding absolute strain. The fabrics differed markedly from those in single-stage experiments in the case of reversed two-stage deformation at moderate strain (D1 shear strain 1 and 2.6). Experiments show that grain shape by shearing of relict grains is defined by finite strain and thus affected by strain reversal. Recrystallisation is controlled by absolute strain and not influenced by strain reversal.

  10. Unfolding of E. coli ribosomes: evidence for pre-existing breaks in the large subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Scafati, A R; Araco, A; Belli, M; Falbo, V; Giorgi, C; Maggini, M

    1976-01-01

    An investigation has been made on structure modifications of E. coli ribosomes following EDTA treatment. When completely deprived of magnesium, the small subunit sediments at 16S while the large one, in the same conditions, shows two components at 17S and 21S. Unfolding causes in both subunits an increase in radius of gyration without substantial change in molecular weight, as shown by light scattering measurements. The occurence of the slower 17S component besides the 21S one has to be connected with a fraction of the large subunit population which presents nucleolytic breaks in its RNA chain. These breaks do not cause fragmentation of the unfolded subunit but lead to a more open configuration sedimenting at lower velocity. PMID:823531

  11. Multiple Chronic Medical Conditions and Associated Driving Risk: A Systematic Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shawn C. Marshall; Malcolm Man-Son-Hing

    2011-01-01

    Background: Numerous medical conditions can affect one's ability to operate a motor vehicle. The likelihood of having multiple medical conditions increases with advancing age; however, the interplay of the associated impairments has not been previously addressed in the literature.Objective: To identify the incremental risks for the effects of multiple chronic medical conditions on driving ability and crash risk.Methods: A comprehensive

  12. Dioxins from medical waste incineration: Normal operation and transient conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong; Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Yan, Mi; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2015-07-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are key pollutants in waste incineration. At present, incinerator managers and official supervisors focus only on emissions evolving during steady-state operation. Yet, these emissions may considerably be raised during periods of poor combustion, plant shutdown, and especially when starting-up from cold. Until now there were no data on transient emissions from medical (or hospital) waste incineration (MWI). However, MWI is reputed to engender higher emissions than those from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI). The emission levels in this study recorded for shutdown and start-up, however, were significantly higher: 483 ± 184 ng Nm(-3) (1.47 ± 0.17 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)) for shutdown and 735 ng Nm(-3) (7.73 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)) for start-up conditions, respectively. Thus, the average (I-TEQ) concentration during shutdown is 2.6 (3.8) times higher than the average concentration during normal operation, and the average (I-TEQ) concentration during start-up is 4.0 (almost 20) times higher. So monitoring should cover the entire incineration cycle, including start-up, operation and shutdown, rather than optimised operation only. This suggestion is important for medical waste incinerators, as these facilities frequently start up and shut down, because of their small size, or of lacking waste supply. Forthcoming operation should shift towards much longer operating cycles, i.e., a single weekly start-up and shutdown. PMID:26159561

  13. The Challenges and Future Considerations Regarding Pregnancy-related Outcomes in Women with Pre-Existing Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harsimran; Murphy, Helen R.; Hendrieckx, Christel; Ritterband, Lee; Speight, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Ineffective management of blood glucose levels during preconception and pregnancy hasbeen associated with severe maternal and fetal complications in women with pre-existing diabetes. Studies have demonstrated that preconception counseling and pre-pregnancy care can dramatically reduce these risks. However, pregnancy-related outcomes in women with diabetes continue to be less than ideal. This review highlights and discusses a variety of patient, provider, and organizational factors that can contribute to these suboptimal outcomes. Based on the findings of studies reviewed and authors' clinical and research experiences, recommendations have been proposed focusing on various aspects of care provided, including improved accessibility to effective preconception and pregnancy-related care and better organized clinic consultations that are sensitive to women's diabetes and pregnancy needs. PMID:24013963

  14. Aggravation of Pre-Existing Atrioventricular Block, Wenckebach Type, Provoked by Application of X-Ray Contrast Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Brodmann, Marianne, E-mail: marianne.brodmann@meduni-graz.at; Seinost, Gerald [Medizinische Universitaet Graz, Division of Angiology, Department of Internal Medicine (Austria); Stark, Gerhard [LKH Deutschlandsberg, Department of Internal Medicine (Austria); Pilger, Ernst [Medizinische Universitaet Graz, Division of Angiology, Department of Internal Medicine (Austria)

    2006-12-15

    Background. Significant bradycardia followed by cardiac arrest related to single bolus administration of X-ray contrast medium into a peripheral artery has not, to our knowledge, been described in the literature. Methods and Results. While performing a percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of the left superficial femoral artery in a 68-year old patient with a pre-existing atrioventricular (AV) block, Wenckebach type, he developed an AV block III after a single bolus injection of intra-arterial X-ray contrast medium. Conclusion. We believe that application of contrast medium causes a transitory ischemia in the obstructed vessel and therefore elevation of endogenous adenosine. In the case of a previously damaged AV node this elevation of endogenous adenosine may be responsible for the development of a short period of third-degree AV block.

  15. The dual PPAR?/? agonist tesaglitazar blocks progression of pre-existing atherosclerosis in APOE*3Leiden.CETP transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    van der Hoorn, JWA; Jukema, JW; Havekes, LM; Lundholm, E; Camejo, G; Rensen, PCN; Princen, HMG

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We have evaluated the effects of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)?/? agonist on the progression of pre-existing atherosclerotic lesions in APOE*3Leiden.cholesteryl ester transfer protein (E3L.CETP) transgenic mice. Experimental approach E3L.CETP mice were fed a high-cholesterol diet for 11 weeks to induce atherosclerosis, followed by a low-cholesterol diet for 4 weeks to obtain a lower plasma total cholesterol level of ?10 mmol·L?1. Mice were divided into three groups, which were either killed before (baseline) or after an 8 week treatment period with low-cholesterol diet without (control) or with the PPAR?/? agonist tesaglitazar (10 µg·kg?1·day?1). Atherosclerosis was assessed in the aortic root. Key results: Treatment with tesaglitazar significantly reduced plasma triglycerides, total cholesterol, CETP mass and CETP activity, and increased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. At baseline, substantial atherosclerosis had developed. During the 8 week low-cholesterol diet, atherosclerosis progressed in the control group with respect to lesion area and severity, whereas tesaglitazar inhibited lesion progression during this period. Tesaglitazar reduced vessel wall inflammation, as reflected by decreased monocyte adhesion and macrophage area, and modified lesions to a more stabilized phenotype, with increased smooth muscle cell content in the cap and collagen content. Conclusions and implications: Dual PPAR?/? agonism with tesaglitazar markedly improved the atherogenic triad by reducing triglycerides and very low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and increasing high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and additionally reduced cholesterol-induced vessel wall activation. These actions resulted in complete inhibition of progression and stabilization of pre-existing atherosclerotic lesions in E3L.CETP mice. PMID:19220285

  16. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...registration, but prior to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. The medical history and physical examination...registration, but prior to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services, when the medical history and physical...

  17. 14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

  18. 14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

  19. 14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

  20. 14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

  1. Selected medical conditions and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Talamini, R.; Franceschi, S.; Favero, A.; Negri, E.; Parazzini, F.; La Vecchia, C.

    1997-01-01

    Several diseases are known or suspected to be associated with altered levels of hormones and growth factors that may influence breast cancer risk. To elucidate this possibility, we studied the relationship between 23 medical conditions or procedures and breast cancer risk by means of data from a multicentric case-control study conducted between 1991 and 1994 in six Italian areas. The study included 2569 histologically confirmed incident cases of breast cancer (median age 55 years, range 23-74 years) and 2588 control women (median age 56 years, range 20-74 years) admitted to the same hospitals as cases for a variety of acute conditions unrelated to known or suspected risk factors for breast cancer. After allowance for education, parity and body mass index, elevated odds ratios (ORs) emerged for history of diabetes mellitus in post-menopausal women (OR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.0), hypertension in pregnancy (OR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.0-3.4) and breast nodules (OR = 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.7). Risk decreases were associated with ovarian ablation for ovarian cysts (OR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.3-0.7) and with thyroid nodules (OR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-0.9) but not with the combination of any type of benign thyroid disease. While most examined conditions seemed unrelated to breast cancer risk, the association with late-onset diabetes is of special interest as it suggests a role of hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance in breast cancer promotion. It also points to preventive lifestyle modifications. PMID:9184190

  2. Guide to Geriatric Syndromes: Common and Often Related Medical Conditions in Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Syndromes: Common and Often Related Medical Conditions in Older Adults Tools and Tips Printer-friendly PDF Click here ... living longer and healthier lives. Even so, many older adults develop one or more related medical problems called ...

  3. 42 CFR 418.106 - Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE...Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical...areas. All controlled drugs listed in Schedules II...of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of...

  4. Region-Specific Integration of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neuronal Precursors into a Pre-Existing Neuronal Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Neuser, Franziska; Polack, Martin; Annaheim, Christine; Tucker, Kerry L.; Korte, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Enduring reorganization is accepted as a fundamental process of adult neural plasticity. The most dramatic example of this reorganization is the birth and continuously occurring incorporation of new neurons into the pre-existing network of the adult mammalian hippocampus. Based on this phenomenon we transplanted murine embryonic stem (ES)-cell derived neuronal precursors (ESNPs) into murine organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHC) and examined their integration. Using a precise quantitative morphological analysis combined with a detailed electrophysiology, we show a region-specific morphological integration of transplanted ESNPs into different subfields of the hippocampal tissue, resulting in pyramidal neuron-like embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs) in the Cornu Ammonis (CA1 and CA3) and granule neuron-like ESNs in the dentate gyrus (DG), respectively. Subregion specific structural maturation was accompanied by the development of dendritic spines and the generation of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). This cell type specific development does not depend upon NMDA-receptor-dependent synaptic transmission. The presented integration approach was further used to determine the cell-autonomous function of the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75 (P75NTR), as a possible negative regulator of ESN integration. By this means we used p75NTR-deficient ESNPs to study their integration into a WT organotypic environment. We show here that p75NTR is not necessary for integration per se but plays a suppressing role in dendritic development. PMID:23840491

  5. A critical shock mach number for particle acceleration in the absence of pre-existing cosmic rays: M=?5

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek/Gravitation and AstroParticle Physics Amsterdam (GRAPPA), University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Yamazaki, Ryo, E-mail: j.vink@uva.nl [Department of Physics and Mathematics, College of Science and Engineering, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan)

    2014-01-10

    It is shown that, under some generic assumptions, shocks cannot accelerate particles unless the overall shock Mach number exceeds a critical value M>?5. The reason is that for M??5 the work done to compress the flow in a particle precursor requires more enthalpy flux than the system can sustain. This lower limit applies to situations without significant magnetic field pressure. In case that the magnetic field pressure dominates the pressure in the unshocked medium, i.e., for low plasma beta, the resistivity of the magnetic field makes it even more difficult to fulfill the energetic requirements for the formation of shock with an accelerated particle precursor and associated compression of the upstream plasma. We illustrate the effects of magnetic fields for the extreme situation of a purely perpendicular magnetic field configuration with plasma beta ? = 0, which gives a minimum Mach number of M = 5/2. The situation becomes more complex, if we incorporate the effects of pre-existing cosmic rays, indicating that the additional degree of freedom allows for less strict Mach number limits on acceleration. We discuss the implications of this result for low Mach number shock acceleration as found in solar system shocks, and shocks in clusters of galaxies.

  6. Cross-reactive and pre-existing antibodies to therapeutic antibodies-Effects on treatment and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    van Schie, Karin A; Wolbink, Gerrit-Jan; Rispens, Theo

    2015-07-01

    The potential for immunogenicity is an ever-present concern during the development of biopharmaceuticals. Therapeutic antibodies occasionally elicit an antibody response in patients, which can result in loss of response or adverse effects. However, antibodies that bind a drug are sometimes found in pre-treatment serum samples, with the amount depending on drug, assay, and patient population. This review summarizes published data on pre-existing antibodies to therapeutic antibodies, including rheumatoid factors, anti-allotype antibodies, anti-hinge antibodies, and anti-glycan antibodies. Unlike anti-idiotype antibodies elicited by the drug, pre-formed antibodies in general appear to have little consequences during treatment. In the few cases where (potential) clinical consequences were encountered, antibodies were characterized and found to bind a distinct, unusual epitope of the therapeutic. Immunogenicity testing strategies should therefore always include a proper level of antibody characterization, especially when pre-formed antibodies are present. This minimizes false-positives, particularly due to rheumatoid factors, and helps to judge the potential threat in case a genuine pre-dose antibody reactivity is identified. PMID:25962087

  7. The effect of pre-existing affect on the sexual responses of women with and without a history of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Rellini, Alessandra H; Elinson, Samantha; Janssen, Erick; Meston, Cindy M

    2012-04-01

    Women with a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) are at greater risk for experiencing sexual problems in their adult lives. Yet, little is known about the possible role of cognitive and affective mechanisms in the development of sexual arousal difficulties in this population. This study investigated the role of pre-existing affect (affect prior to exposure to sexual stimuli) on genital responses, subjective sexual arousal, and affect elicited during the presentation of erotic film excerpts in a community sample of 25 women with and 25 women without a history of CSA. The CSA group showed greater pre-existing negative affect and smaller genital responses to the erotic film stimuli compared to the NSA group. Findings support a moderating effect of CSA, in that pre-existing negative affect was associated with strength of genital responses in the NSA but not in the CSA group. The results did not support a mediation model of pre-existing negative affect as an explanation for smaller physiological sexual responses in the CSA group. Taken together, the findings suggest that pre-existing affect may be more relevant for women with no history of CSA and call for more research on factors implicated in impaired sexual responses in women with a history of CSA. PMID:21667233

  8. Graduate Studies Office, California Institute of Technology CONDITIONS FOR STUDENTS ON MEDICAL LEAVE

    E-print Network

    Greer, Julia R.

    Graduate Studies Office, California Institute of Technology CONDITIONS FOR STUDENTS ON MEDICAL LEAVE 1) A student on medical leave is expected to be in treatment and focus on getting healthy students on medical leave are eligible for coverage on Caltech's Health Care Benefit plan for up to one

  9. Legal framework conditions for the reprocessing of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Großkopf, Volker; Jäkel, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The processing of single-use products is permissible pursuant to medical device law. This is apparent both from the wording of the German Law on Medical Devices and from the purpose and the objectives underpinning the legislative materials. The prerequisite for processing is, however, compliance with the the Joint Recommendation of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and the Prevention of Infection at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) and the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Products (BfArM).For medical devices in the category "critical C", the RKI/BfArM-recommendation provides that the processor's quality management system must be certified by a body accredited by the Central Authority of the Federal States for Health Protection with regard to Medicinal Products and Medical Devices (Zentralstelle der Länder für Gesundheitsschutz bei Arzneimitteln und Medizinprodukten, ZLG). The certification must be carried out in accordance with EN ISO 13485:2003+AC:2007.On April 4, 2008 the Federal Health Ministry (Bundesministerium für Gesundheit, BMG) presented a progress report on the processing of medical devices. The BMG concludes that the legal framework for the processing of medical devices is sufficient, and that a prohibition on the processing of single-use products is inappropriate. PMID:20204096

  10. Systematic screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions: Still debatable

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandy Leproust; Emmanuel Lagarde; L Rachid Salmi

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessing people's ability to drive has become a public health concern in most industrialized countries. Although age itself is not a predictive factor of an increased risk for dangerous driving, the prevalence of medical conditions that may impair driving increases with age. Because the implementation of a screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions is a public health

  11. Automatic Detection Of Vaccine Adverse Reactions By Incorporating Historical Medical Conditions

    E-print Network

    Karypis, George

    Automatic Detection Of Vaccine Adverse Reactions By Incorporating Historical Medical Conditions This paper extends the state of art by bringing the historical medical conditions into the vaccine adverse with certain vaccines. We propose a novel measure called dual-lift for this task. It is shown that the dual

  12. Role of Medical Conditions in the Exacerbation of Self-Injurious Behavior: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosch, Joni; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This descriptive study of 25 patients (ages 3 to 35) with severe/profound mental retardation and self-injurious behavior (SIB) found that 7 patients had previously undiagnosed medical conditions likely to cause pain or discomfort. Six of the seven patients experienced decreased SIB with treatment of their medical conditions. Results support the…

  13. Estimating the Reactivation Potential of Pre-Existing Fractures in Subsurface Granitoids from Outcrop Analogues and in-Situ Stress Modeling: Implications for EGS Reservoir Stimulation with an Example from Thuringia (Central Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasch, N.; Ustaszewski, K. M.; Siegburg, M.; Navabpour, P.; Hesse, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Mid-German Crystalline Rise (MGCR) in Thuringia (central Germany) is part of the European Variscan orogen and hosts large extents of Visean granites (c. 350 Ma), locally overlain by up to 3 km of Early Permian to Mid-Triassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks. A geothermal gradient of 36°C km-1 suggests that such subsurface granites form an economically viable hot dry rock reservoir at > 4 km depth. In order to assess the likelihood of reactivating any pre-existing fractures during hydraulic reservoir stimulation, slip and dilation tendency analyses (Morris et al. 1996) were carried out. For this purpose, we determined orientations of pre-existing fractures in 14 granite exposures along the southern border fault of an MGCR basement high. Additionally, the strike of 192 Permian magmatic dikes affecting the granite was considered. This analysis revealed a prevalence of NW-SE-striking fractures (mainly joints, extension veins, dikes and subordinately brittle faults) with a maximum at 030/70 (dip azimuth/dip). Borehole data and earthquake focal mechanisms reveal a maximum horizontal stress SHmax trending N150°E and a strike-slip regime. Effective in-situ stress magnitudes at 4.5 km depth, assuming hydrostatic conditions and frictional equilibrium along pre-existing fractures with a friction coefficient of 0.85 yielded 230 and 110 MPa for SHmax and Shmin, respectively. In this stress field, fractures with the prevailing orientations show a high tendency of becoming reactivated as dextral strike-slip faults if stimulated hydraulically. To ensure that a stimulation well creates fluid connectivity on a reservoir volume as large as possible rather than dissipating fluids along existing fractures, it should follow a trajectory at the highest possible angle to the orientation of prevailing fractures, i.e. subhorizontal and NE-SW-oriented. References: Morris, A., D. A. Ferrill, and D. B. Henderson (1996), Slip-tendency analysis and fault reactivation, Geology, 24, 275-278.

  14. Swinburne University of Technology Disability / Medical Documentation Form Disability Services requires students to provide documentation of a disability or medical condition from a relevant professional, before

    E-print Network

    Liley, David

    be accompanied by the qualified health professional's stamp or business card: Disability Information (To impairment Physical Disability Mental Health Condition Learning Disability Neurological Condition Medical

  15. Schoolchildren with Dysphagia Associated with Medically Complex Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefton-Greif, Maureen A.; Arvedson, Joan C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews population trends and general characteristics of children with dysphagia in schools, provides an overview of dysphagia teams and the roles of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in school and hospital settings, and describes assessment and treatment of swallowing and feeding problems in children with complex medical…

  16. Crack propagation from a pre-existing flaw at a notch root. I. Introduction and general form of the stress intensity factors at the initial crack tip

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Baptiste Leblond; Pierre Mouro

    2000-01-01

    This paper and its companion are devoted to the study of crack kinking from some small pre-existing crack originating from a notch root (the notch root radius being zero). Both the notch boundaries and the initial crack are allowed to be curved; also, the geometry of the body and the loading are totally arbitrary. The ingredients required are knowledge of

  17. Effect of the pre-existing carbides on the grain boundary network during grain boundary engineering in a nickel based alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tingguang [Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Xia, Shuang, E-mail: xs@shu.edu.cn [Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Li, Hui [Key Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Zhou, Bangxin [Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Bai, Qin [Key Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Grain boundary engineering was carried out on an aging-treated nickel based Alloy 690, which has precipitated carbides at grain boundaries. Electron backscatter diffraction technique was used to investigate the grain boundary networks. Results show that, compared with the solution-annealed samples, the aging-treated samples with pre-existing carbides at grain boundaries need longer duration or higher temperature during annealing after low-strain tensile deformation for forming high proportion of low-? coincidence site lattice grain boundaries (more than 75%). The reason is that the primary recrystallization is inhibited or retarded owing to that the pre-existing carbides are barriers to grain boundaries migration. - Highlights: • Study of GBE as function of pre-existing GB carbides, tensile strain and annealing • Recrystallization of GBE is inhibited or retarded by the pre-existing carbides. • Retained carbides after annealing show the original GB positions. • More than 80% of special GBs were formed after the modification of GBE processing. • Multiple twinning during recrystallization is the key process of GBE.

  18. Modeling fault kinematics, segment interaction and transfer zone geometry as a function of pre-existing fabrics: the Albertine rift, East African Rift System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin Aanyu; Daniel Koehn

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the development of the Rwenzori Mountains, an uplift horst block within the northern-most segment of the western branch of the East African Rift System (EARS). Attention is drawn to the role of pre-existing crustal weaknesses left behind by Proterozoic mobile belts that pass around cratonic Archean shields namely the Tanzanian Craton to the southeast and the

  19. The role of pre-existing Precambrian structures in rift evolution: The Albertine and Rhino grabens, Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katumwehe, Andrew B.; Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Atekwana, Estella A.

    2015-04-01

    We integrated Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Digital Elevation Models (DEM), airborne magnetic, radiometric and three-dimensional Full Tensor Gravity Gradiometry (3D-FTG) data to investigate the role of Precambrian structures in the evolution of the largely amagmatic Miocene-Recent aged Albertine and Rhino grabens in Uganda. These grabens represent the northern segment of the Western Branch of the East African Rift System (EARS). The two NE-trending grabens are connected by a right-stepping transfer zone and they extend within the Archean-Paleoproterozoic Northeast Congo block which represents the northeastern extension of the Congo craton. Our results show the following and highlight the importance of pre-existing structures in the evolution of continental rift systems: (1) The NE-extent of the Albertine full-graben is controlled by NE-trending Precambrian fabric and the graben terminates at its northeastern end when it encounters a multiply folded Precambrian basement terrain with poorly-developed NW-trending structural grain. Additionally, the northeastern termination of the Albertine graben coincides with the presence of NW-trending right-stepping high-density bodies within the Precambrian terrain. (2) The transfer zone between the Albertine and Rhino grabens is controlled by NE-trending Precambrian structures which might have facilitated the development of relay ramp faults. (3) Strain localization within the better-developed southeastern border fault of the Rhino half-graben is facilitated by the presence of Precambrian structures better aligned in a NE-direction in the southeastern part of the basin compared to its northwestern part. (4) Further to the northeast, the Rhino graben is segmented and transitions into a narrower ENE-trending half-graben with a better-developed border fault on its northwestern side. This segmentation coincides with the presence of N-trending Precambrian structures. (5) The Rhino graben terminates farther northeast against the NW-trending Precambrian Aswa shear zone; a prominent structure with complex, but generally NW-trending fabric.

  20. The impact of pre-existing antibody on subsequent immune responses to meningococcal A-containing vaccines.

    PubMed

    Idoko, Olubukola T; Okolo, Seline N; Plikaytis, Brian; Akinsola, Adebayo; Viviani, Simonetta; Borrow, Ray; Carlone, George; Findlow, Helen; Elie, Cheryl; Kulkarni, Prasad S; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Ota, Martin; Kampmann, Beate

    2014-07-16

    Major epidemics of serogroup A meningococcal meningitis continue to affect the African meningitis belt. The development of an affordable conjugate vaccine against the disease became a priority for World Health Organization (WHO) in the late 1990s. Licensing of meningococcal vaccines has been based on serological correlates of protection alone, but such correlates might differ in different geographical regions. If high pre-vaccination antibody concentrations/titers impacts on the response to vaccination and possibly vaccine efficacy, is not clearly understood. We set out to define the pre-vaccination Meningococcal group A (Men A) antibody concentrations/titers in The Gambia and study their impact on the immunogenicity of Men A containing vaccines. Data from subjects originally enrolled in studies to test the safety and immunogenicity of the MenA vaccine recently developed for Africa meningococcal A polysaccharide conjugated to tetanus toxoid, MenAfriVac(®) (PsA-TT) were analyzed. Participants had been randomized to receive either the study vaccine PsA-TT or the reference quadrivalent plain polysaccharide vaccine containing meningococcal groups A, C, W, and Y, Mencevax(®) ACWY, GlaxoSmithKline (PsACWY) in a 2:1 ratio. Venous blood samples were collected before and 28 days after vaccination. Antibodies were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for geometric mean concentrations and serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) for functional antibody. The inter age group differences were compared using ANOVA and the pre and post-vaccination differences by t test. Over 80% of the ?19 year olds had pre-vaccination antibody concentrations above putatively protective concentrations as compared to only 10% of 1-2 year olds. Ninety-five percent of those who received the study vaccine had ?4-fold antibody responses if they had low pre-vaccination concentrations compared to 76% of those with high pre-vaccination concentrations. All subjects with low pre-vaccination titers attained ?4-fold responses as compared to 76% with high titers where study vaccine was received. Our data confirm the presence of high pre-vaccination Men A antibody concentrations/titers within the African meningitis belt, with significantly higher concentrations in older individuals. Although all participants had significant increase in antibody levels following vaccination, the four-fold or greater response in antibody titers were significantly higher in individuals with lower pre-existing antibody titers, especially after receiving PsA-TT. This finding may have some implications for vaccination strategies adopted in the future. PMID:24863486

  1. Pre-Existing Mutations in Reverse Transcriptase of Hepatitis B Virus in Treatment-Naive Chinese Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-Hui; Huang, Ling; Wang, Deng-yu; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, Guo-ping; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    High rate of viral replication and lacking of proofreading activity in hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase lead to the generation of mutations in HBV virus. Mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) region of HBV polymerase are demonstrated to be strongly associated with drug resistance during antiviral treatment. However, the presence of mutations as well as its clinical significance in treatment-naïve hepatitis patients (defined as pre-existing mutations) need to be further investigated. In the present study, a total of 168 serum samples from treatment-naive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients were collected, and the RT region of HBV polymerase was sequenced. The results showed that pre-existing mutations in the RT region of HBV polymerase were detected in 43 of 168 (25.6%) treatment-naive CHB patients within which there were no well-characterized primary nucleotide analogs (NAs) resistance sites. Three dominant sites at rt191, rt207 and rt226 were found mutant in 7(16.28%), 8(18.60%), and 14(32.56%) samples respectively among these 43 patients. No significant correlation was found between pre-existing mutations and gender, age, HBV genotype, ALT, HBeAg or HBV DNA loads. However, patients with pre-existing RT mutations under HBeAg sero-negative status exhibited decreased HBV DNA loads, which contributed to the decreased HBV DNA loads in the total HBeAg sero-negative patients. The above investigation indicated that there was a prevalence of pre-existing mutations in RT region of HBV polymerase which might affect the serum HBV DNA level in treatment-naive CHB patients. Its effects on the occurrence of NAs resistance and the prognosis after treatment need to be further investigated. PMID:25821965

  2. Adherence to medication regimens among low-income patients with multiple comorbid chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shiraz I; Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L

    2011-11-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These factors included medication side effects, fear of harm from medication, fear of dependence on medication, complex instructions, suboptimal communications with doctor, suspicion about doctors' and pharmaceutical companies' motives in prescribing medication, and the high cost ofmedications. Participants also identified motivators, both internal (self-initiated) and external (initiated by family, doctor, support groups),to ensure adherence to multiple medications. These motivators included self-discipline, sense of personal responsibility, faith, support from family members and doctors, and focused health education and self-management support. Three themes emerged that enhanced understanding of the complexity of adherence to multiple medications: (1) reaching one's own threshold for medication adherence, (2) lack of shared information and decision making, and (3) taking less than the prescribed medication. Further analysis of the data revealed that the patients perceived a lack of shared decision making in the management of their comorbid chronic conditions and their medication regimen. PMID:22308877

  3. A Comparison of Expedition Medical Condition List Treatment Directives with Integrated Medical Model Simulation Data Presentation and Briefing Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This aerospace medicine clerkship project is under the direction of Dr. Sharmila Watkins and is in cooperation with Dr. Eric Kerstman and Dr. Ronak Shah. The questions of the research project are: 1. What are the main drivers of evacuation and loss of crew life (LOCL) on three Design Reference Missions (DRMs): Near Earth Asteroid (NEA), Lunar Sortie and Lunar Outpost using an inexhaustible International Space Station medical kit 2. What are the treatment designations for these driving medical conditions as listed in Expedition Medical Condition List (EMCL) 3. Do the drivers make sense in the context of the given Design Reference Mission (DRM) 4. Do any EMCL treatment designations need re-assessing.

  4. Patterns and Pre-existing Risk Factors of 30-day Mortality after a Primary Discharge Diagnosis of Syncope or Near Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Derose, Stephen F.; Gabayan, Gelareh Z.; Chiu, Vicki Y.; Sun, Benjamin C.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The risk of short-term mortality after an emergency department (ED) visit for syncope is poorly understood, resulting in prognostic uncertainty and frequent hospital admission. The authors determined patterns and risk factors for short-term mortality after a diagnosis of syncope or near syncope to aid in medical decision-making. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed of adult members of Kaiser Permanente Southern California seen at 11 EDs from 2002 to 2006 with a primary discharge diagnosis of syncope or near syncope (ICD-9 780.2). The outcome was 30-day mortality. Proportional hazards time-to-event regression models were used to identify risk factors. Results There were 22,189 participants with 23,951 ED visits, resulting in 307 deaths by 30 days. A relatively lower risk of death was reached within two weeks for ages 18 to 59 years, but not until three months or more for ages 60 and older. Pre-existing comorbidities associated with increased mortality included heart failure (hazard ratio [HR] 14.3 in ages 18 to 59 years, HR 3.09 in ages 60 to 79 years, HR 2.34 in ages 80 years plus, all P < 0.001), diabetes (HR 1.49, P = 0.002), seizure (HR 1.65, P = 0.016), and dementia (HR 1.41, P = 0.034). If the index visit followed one or more visits for syncope in the previous 30 days, it was associated with increased mortality (HR 1.86, P = 0.024). Absolute risk of death at 30 days was under 0.2% in those under 60 years without heart failure and >2.5% across all ages in those with heart failure. Conclusions The low risk of death after an ED visit for syncope or near syncope in patients younger than 60 years old without heart failure, may be helpful when deciding who to admit for inpatient evaluation. The presence of one or more comorbidities that predict death, and a prior visit for syncope, should be considered in clinical decisions and risk stratification tools for patients with syncope. Close clinical follow-up seems advisable in patients 60 years and older due to a prolonged risk of death. PMID:22594351

  5. Adherence to Medication Regimens among Low-Income Patients with Multiple Comorbid Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Shiraz I.; Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These…

  6. 947. Effects of Natural Pre-Existing Humoral Immunity to AAV on Administration of AAV2-NTN to the Brain of Non-Human Primates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marie A. Printz; Christopher D. Herzog; Alistair Wilson; Dawn Gammon; Richard Lin; Roberto Calcedo; Biplob Dass; Medhi Gasmi; Jeffrey H. Kordower; Raymond T. Bartus

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of antibodies (ab) to wild type AAV2 in humans is estimated to be 50-90%, with ?30% developing neutralizing ab (Nab). In an attempt to mimic pre-existing immunity in animal models, many groups have immunized naive animals in order to study its effect on gene transfer. One limitation of this approach is that direct inoculation with high titers of

  7. Medication Adherence of Patients with Selected Rheumatic Conditions: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Harrold, Leslie R.; Andrade, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence with medication treatment has been found to occur in large proportions of patients with a broad range of chronic conditions. Our aim was to perform a systematic review of the literature examining adherence with treatments for inflammatory rheumatic conditions to assess the magnitude of the problem in this patient population. Methods A MEDLINE search of English language literature was performed to identify studies published between January 1, 1985 and November 30, 2007 that evaluated adherence with chronic medications needed in the treatment of rheumatic conditions. Results A total of 20 articles met the criteria for evaluation, the majority of which focused on the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the studies examined the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications and disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Adherence was assessed based on self-report, pill counts, pharmacy dispensings, openings of pill containers using electronic devices, laboratory assays, and physician assessment. Adherence varied greatly based on the adherence measure used, arthritic condition evaluated and medication under study. Overall, the highest rates of adherence were based on self-reports for a wide variety of medications and conditions (range of persons reporting adherence was 30 to 99%), while the lowest adherence rates were for allopurinol based on pharmacy dispensings (18–26%). Conclusions Adherence has not been widely examined for most chronic inflammatory rheumatic conditions and the few studies that exist used different definitions and populations, thus limiting any conclusions. However, the current literature does suggest that nonadherence is a substantial problem. PMID:18336875

  8. University of Central Florida Certification of Health Care Provider Form for Employee's Serious Health Condition (Family and Medical Leave Act)

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    must generally maintain records and documents relating to medical certifications, recertifications, or medical histories of employees created for FMLA purposes as confidential medical records in separate files/records Health Condition (Family and Medical Leave Act) Page 1 of 2 University of Central Florida, Human

  9. Medical Condition Documentation Form Individuals qualified to complete this form are those who have been trained in the assessment and

    E-print Network

    Delgado, Mauricio

    Medical Condition Documentation Form Individuals qualified to complete this form are those who have of the student. In order to determine eligibility and to provide services, we require documentation of the student's condition. Please complete only one Medical Condition Documentation Form for each condition

  10. Pre-existing Epithelial Diversity in Normal Human Livers: A Tissue-tethered Cytometric Analysis in Portal/Periportal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Isse, Kumiko; Lesniak, Andrew; Grama, Kedar; Maier, John; Specht, Susan; Castillo-Rama, Marcela; Lunz, John; Roysam, Badrinath; Michalopoulos, George; Demetris, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Routine light microscopy identifies two distinct epithelial cell populations in normal human livers: hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells (BEC). Considerable epithelial diversity, however, arises during disease states when a variety of hepatocyte-BEC hybrid cells appear. This has been attributed to activation and differentiation of putative hepatic progenitor cells (HPC) residing in the Canals of Hering and/or metaplasia of pre-existing mature epithelial cells. A novel analytic approach consisting of multiplex labeling, high resolution whole slide imaging (WSI), and automated image analysis was used to determine if more complex epithelial cell phenotypes pre-existed in normal adult human livers, which might provide an alternative explanation for disease-induced epithelial diversity. “Virtually digested” WSI enabled quantitative cytometric analyses of individual cells displayed in a variety of formats (e.g. scatter plots) while still tethered to the WSI and tissue structure. We employed biomarkers specifically-associated with mature epithelial forms (HNF4? for hepatocytes, CK19 and HNF1? for BEC) and explored for the presence of cells with hybrid biomarker phenotypes. Results showed abundant hybrid cells in portal bile duct BEC, canals of Hering, and immediate periportal hepatocytes. These bi-potential cells likely serve as a reservoir for the epithelial diversity of ductular reactions, appearance of hepatocytes in bile ducts, and the rapid and fluid transition of BEC to hepatocytes, and vice versa. Conclusion Novel imaging and computational tools enable increased information extraction from tissue samples and quantify the considerable pre-existent hybrid epithelial diversity in normal human liver. This computationally-enabled tissue analysis approach offers much broader potential beyond the results presented here. PMID:23150208

  11. Effects of pre-existing ice crystals on cirrus clouds and comparison between different ice nucleation parameterizations with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Liu, X.; Zhang, K.

    2015-02-01

    In order to improve the treatment of ice nucleation in a more realistic manner in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.3 (CAM5.3), the effects of pre-existing ice crystals on ice nucleation in cirrus clouds are considered. In addition, by considering the in-cloud variability in ice saturation ratio, homogeneous nucleation takes place spatially only in a portion of the cirrus cloud rather than in the whole area of the cirrus cloud. Compared to observations, the ice number concentrations and the probability distributions of ice number concentration are both improved with the updated treatment. The pre-existing ice crystals significantly reduce ice number concentrations in cirrus clouds, especially at mid- to high latitudes in the upper troposphere (by a factor of ~10). Furthermore, the contribution of heterogeneous ice nucleation to cirrus ice crystal number increases considerably. Besides the default ice nucleation parameterization of Liu and Penner (2005, hereafter LP) in CAM5.3, two other ice nucleation parameterizations of Barahona and Nenes (2009, hereafter BN) and Kärcher et al. (2006, hereafter KL) are implemented in CAM5.3 for the comparison. In-cloud ice crystal number concentration, percentage contribution from heterogeneous ice nucleation to total ice crystal number, and pre-existing ice effects simulated by the three ice nucleation parameterizations have similar patterns in the simulations with present-day aerosol emissions. However, the change (present-day minus pre-industrial times) in global annual mean column ice number concentration from the KL parameterization (3.24 × 106 m-2) is less than that from the LP (8.46 × 106 m-2) and BN (5.62 × 106 m-2) parameterizations. As a result, the experiment using the KL parameterization predicts a much smaller anthropogenic aerosol long-wave indirect forcing (0.24 W m-2) than that using the LP (0.46 W m-2) and BN (0.39 W m-2) parameterizations.

  12. Prevalence of chronic medical conditions among inmates in the Texas prison system.

    PubMed

    Harzke, Amy J; Baillargeon, Jacques G; Pruitt, Sandi L; Pulvino, John S; Paar, David P; Kelley, Michael F

    2010-05-01

    Given the rapid growth and aging of the US prison population in recent years, the disease profile and health care needs of inmates portend to have far-reaching public health implications. Although numerous studies have examined infectious disease prevalence and treatment in incarcerated populations, little is known about the prevalence of non-infectious chronic medical conditions in US prison populations. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of selected non-infectious chronic medical conditions among inmates in the Texas prison system. The study population consisted of the total census of inmates who were incarcerated in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice for any duration from September 1, 2006 through August 31, 2007 (N=234,031). Information on medical diagnoses was obtained from a system-wide electronic medical record system. Overall crude prevalence estimates for the selected conditions were as follows: hypertension, 18.8%; asthma, 5.4%; diabetes, 4.2%; ischemic heart disease, 1.7%; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 0.96%; and cerebrovascular disease, 0.23%. Nearly one quarter (24.5%) of the study population had at least one of the selected conditions. Except for asthma, crude prevalence estimates of the selected conditions increased monotonically with age. Nearly two thirds (64.6%) of inmates who were >or=55 years of age had at least one of the selected conditions. Except for diabetes, crude prevalence estimates for the selected conditions were lower among Hispanic inmates than among non-Hispanic White inmates and African American inmates. Although age-standardized prevalence estimates for the selected conditions did not appear to exceed age-standardized estimates from the US general population, a large number of inmates were affected by one or more of these conditions. As the prison population continues to grow and to age, the burden of these conditions on correctional and community health care systems can be expected to increase. PMID:20393884

  13. [Quality and efficiency of medical care for workers exposed to conditions violating sanitary and hygienic rules].

    PubMed

    Simonova, N I; Kondrova, N S

    2010-01-01

    The authors analyzed results of organizing and performing preliminary and periodic medical examinations of workers exposed to conditions violating sanitary and hygienic rules, exemplified by Bashkortostan Republic. The analysis also covered some parameters of occupational morbidity changes since 1968 to 2008. To increase diagnostic efficiency for occupational diseases, according to the authors, one needs a whole system of evaluation and management of occuupational risks on basis of continuous development of compatible information databases concerning work conditions and workers' health parameters. PMID:20737703

  14. Evaluation of treatment effects in obese children with co-morbid medical or psychiatric conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for effective treatments for pediatric overweight is well known. We evaluated the applicability of an evidence-based treatment in an applied clinic setting that includes children with severe obesity and comorbid medical or psychiatric conditions. Forty-eight overweight children and their fa...

  15. Epidemiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Portugal: Prevalence, Clinical Characterization, and Medical Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Guiomar; Ataide, Assuncao; Marques, Carla; Miguel, Teresa S.; Coutinho, Ana Margarida; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Goncalves, Esmeralda; Lopes, Nazare Mendes; Rodrigues, Vitor; Carmona da Mota, Henrique; Vicente, Astrid Moura

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and identify its clinical characterization, and medical conditions in a paediatric population in Portugal. A school survey was conducted in elementary schools, targeting 332 808 school-aged children in the mainland and 10 910 in the Azores islands.…

  16. HealthDoc: Customizing patient information and health education by medical condition and personal characteristics

    E-print Network

    DiMarco, Chrysanne

    HealthDoc: Customizing patient information and health education by medical condition and personal a comprehensive approach to the customization of patient-information and health-education materials through of ontological and linguistic knowledge sources. 1 Customizing patient-education material Present-day health-education

  17. Academic and Family Conditions Associated with Intrinsic Academic Motivation in Japanese Medical Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabea, Yasuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Intrinsic academic motivation is one of the most important psychological concepts in education, and it is related to academic outcomes in medical students. This study examined the relationships between academic and family conditions and intrinsic academic motivation. Design: Cross-sectional design. Setting: The study group consisted of…

  18. The role of pre-existing discontinuities in the development of extensional faults: An analog modeling perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Lorenzo; Basili, Roberto; Toscani, Giovanni; Burrato, Pierfrancesco; Seno, Silvio; Valensise, Gianluca

    2015-05-01

    Several mountainous regions are currently affected by syn- or post-orogenic active extension. We investigate how a newly-formed normal fault interacts with structures inherited from a previous contractional phase. To this end, we use analog models that adopt an innovative technique for performing a precut that mimics such inherited structures into a clay layer; this clay layer is laid on top of a master fault simulated by two rigid blocks sliding along an inclined plane. We carry out six experiments with variously oriented precuts and compare the results with those obtained in a reference isotropic experiment. All other conditions are identical for all seven realizations. Fault evolution is monitored by taking closely-spaced snapshots analyzed through the Digital Image Correlation method. We find that the upward propagation of the normal fault can be either accelerated or decelerated depending on the presence of a precut and its orientation. Such precuts can also promote or inhibit the formation of bending-moment faults. These interactions between master fault and precut also affect the shape of the fault-related syncline-anticline pair.

  19. Working with Students in the Medication Era: Do We All Have to Know How to Diagnose and Treat Mental Conditions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alishio, Kip

    2005-01-01

    A marked increase in the number of college students on medications for depression, attention deficit disorder, and other conditions may have intimidated counselors and educators into believing that they all need to be medical experts. The widespread practice of medicalizing behavior and experience contrasts dramatically with the approach in which…

  20. The impact of risk factors and pre-existing conditions on the mortality of burn patients and the precision of predictive admission-scoring systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Germann; U. Barthold; R. Lefering; T. Raff; B. Hartmann

    1997-01-01

    Clinical experience has shown that concomitant diseases and risk factors have a significant influence on the patient's outcome. Since none of the currently available score systems consider the impact of concomitant diseases or risk factors on burn trauma mortality, the present study was planned to further evaluate the role of these factors. Four hundred and ninety-eight patients could be included

  1. How prepared are medical students to diagnose and manage common ocular conditions.

    PubMed

    Esparaz, Elizabeth Shanika; Binder, S Bruce; Borges, Nicole J

    2014-01-01

    It is essential that primary care physicians have a solid fund of knowledge of the diagnosis and management of common eye conditions as well as ocular emergencies, as management of these diseases commonly involves appropriate referral to an ophthalmologist. Thus, it is crucial to receive comprehensive clinical knowledge of ophthalmic disease in the primary care setting during medical school. This study investigated how well prepared medical students are to diagnose and manage common ocular conditions. The study used scores from a standardized 12-question quiz administered to fourth-year medical students (N = 97; 88% response rate) and second-year medical students (N = 97; 97% response rate). The quiz comprising diagnosis and referral management questions covered the most frequently tested ophthalmology topics on board exams and assessed students' ability to recognize when referral to an ophthalmologist is appropriate. Fourth-year medical students had quiz scores ranging from 0%-94.5% with an average score of 68.7%. Second-year students had quiz scores ranging from 27.2%-86.4%, with an average score of 63.8%. Passing rate was 70%. Student's t-test showed fourth-year students had a significantly higher quiz average (P = 0.003). In general, both classes performed better on diagnostic questions (fourth-year, 73.7%; second year, 65.8%) rather than on management questions (fourth-year, 64.8%; second year, 61.8%). Both second-year and fourth-year students on average fell short on passing the ophthalmology proficiency quiz, and in general students were more adept at diagnosing rather than managing ocular conditions and emergencies. PMID:25417863

  2. How prepared are medical students to diagnose and manage common ocular conditions

    PubMed Central

    Esparaz, Elizabeth Shanika; Binder, S. Bruce; Borges, Nicole J.

    2014-01-01

    It is essential that primary care physicians have a solid fund of knowledge of the diagnosis and management of common eye conditions as well as ocular emergencies, as management of these diseases commonly involves appropriate referral to an ophthalmologist. Thus, it is crucial to receive comprehensive clinical knowledge of ophthalmic disease in the primary care setting during medical school. This study investigated how well prepared medical students are to diagnose and manage common ocular conditions. The study used scores from a standardized 12-question quiz administered to fourth-year medical students (N = 97; 88% response rate) and second-year medical students (N = 97; 97% response rate). The quiz comprising diagnosis and referral management questions covered the most frequently tested ophthalmology topics on board exams and assessed students’ ability to recognize when referral to an ophthalmologist is appropriate. Fourth-year medical students had quiz scores ranging from 0%-94.5% with an average score of 68.7%. Second-year students had quiz scores ranging from 27.2%–86.4%, with an average score of 63.8%. Passing rate was 70%. Student’s t-test showed fourth-year students had a significantly higher quiz average (P = 0.003). In general, both classes performed better on diagnostic questions (fourth-year, 73.7%; second year, 65.8%) rather than on management questions (fourth-year, 64.8%; second year, 61.8%). Both second-year and fourth-year students on average fell short on passing the ophthalmology proficiency quiz, and in general students were more adept at diagnosing rather than managing ocular conditions and emergencies. PMID:25417863

  3. A Review of Therapeutic Uses of Mirtazapine in Psychiatric and Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Voronovich, Zoya; Carley, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature examining the use of mirtazapine with an emphasis on its therapeutic benefits for psychiatric patients with comorbid medical conditions. Data Sources: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Global Health, and AGRICOLA were searched using the terms mirtazapine OR Remeron. Limits were English language, human, year 1980–2012, treatment and prevention, and therapy. Study Selection: Two hundred ninety-three articles were identified. Data Extraction: Identified articles were reviewed with a focus on indications and therapeutic benefits in patients with medical comorbidities. Results: Mirtazapine is an effective antidepressant with unique mechanisms of action. It is characterized by a relatively rapid onset of action, high response and remission rates, a favorable side-effect profile, and several unique therapeutic benefits over other antidepressants. Mirtazapine has also shown promise in treating some medical disorders, including neurologic conditions, and ameliorating some of the associated debilitating symptoms of weight loss, insomnia, and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Conclusions: Mirtazapine offers clinicians multiple therapeutic advantages especially when treating patients with comorbid medical illness. PMID:24511451

  4. Beliefs and Attitudes about Influenza Immunization among Parents of Children with Chronic Medical Conditions over a Two-Year Period

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chyongchiou J. Lin; Mary Patricia Nowalk; Richard K. Zimmerman; Feng-Shou Ko; Lisa Zoffel; Alejandro Hoberman; Diana H. Kearney

    2006-01-01

    Influenza vaccination is recommended for children with chronic medical conditions yet is infrequently performed. The reasons for low influenza vaccination rates in this group have not been well studied. We assessed and compared parents of children with chronic medical conditions regarding their beliefs and attitudes about influenza vaccination in 2003 and 2004. Parents of 2- to 13-year-old children with chronic

  5. Receipt of Prescription Contraception by Commercially Insured Women With Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    DeNoble, Anna E.; Hall, Kelli S.; Xu, Xiao; Zochowski, Melissa K.; Piehl, Kenneth; Dalton, Vanessa K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess differences in receipt of prescription contraception among women with and without chronic medical conditions. Methods This observational study used 3 years of administrative claims records for insured women aged 21–45 years who were enrolled in a commercial insurance company in Michigan between 2004 and 2009. Women were considered to have a chronic medical condition if they had at least two claims for one of the following conditions, in order of prevalence in our study population: hypertension, asthma, hypothyroidism, diabetes, obesity, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, or systemic lupus erythematosus. Our primary outcome was receipt of prescription contraception, defined by a pharmacy claim or diagnostic or procedural code. We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate the association of chronic condition status with the odds of receiving prescription contraception within 3 years, adjusting for age, community-level socioeconomic status, total outpatient visits, and cervical cancer screening. Results Of 11,649 women studied, 16.0% (n=1,862) had at least one of the chronic conditions we considered. Of those with a chronic condition, 33.5% (n=623) received prescription contraception during the 3-year study period compared to 41.1% (n=4,018) of those without a chronic condition (p<0.001). After adjusting for covariates, women with a chronic condition remained less likely than women without a chronic condition to have received prescription contraception (adjusted odds ratio=0.85; 95% CI 0.76, 0.96; p=0.010). Conclusion Despite a greater risk for adverse outcomes with an unplanned pregnancy, women with these chronic conditions were less likely to receive prescription contraception. PMID:24807345

  6. Diabetes mellitus, other medical conditions and familial history of cancer as risk factors for pancreatic cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D T Silverman; M Schiffman; J Everhart; A Goldstein; K D Lillemoe; G M Swanson; A G Schwartz; L M Brown; R S Greenberg; J B Schoenberg; L M Pottern; R N Hoover; J F Fraumeni

    1999-01-01

    In a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer conducted in three areas of the USA, 484 cases and 2099 controls were interviewed to evaluate the aetiologic role of several medical conditions\\/interventions, including diabetes mellitus, cholecystectomy, ulcer\\/gastrectomy and allergic states. We also evaluated risk associated with family history of cancer. Our findings support previous studies indicating that diabetes is a risk

  7. Medical Treatment of Aortic Aneurysms in Marfan Syndrome and other Heritable Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Christine H. Attenhofer; Greutmann, Matthias; Connolly, Heidi M.; Weber, Roland; Rohrbach, Marianne; Oxenius, Angela; Kretschmar, Oliver; Luscher, Thomas F.; Matyas, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms can be triggered by genetic disorders such as Marfan syndrome (MFS) and related aortic diseases as well as by inflammatory disorders such as giant cell arteritis or atherosclerosis. In all these conditions, cardiovascular risk factors, such as systemic arterial hypertension, may contribute to faster rate of aneurysm progression. Optimal medical management to prevent progressive aortic dilatation and aortic dissection is unknown. ?-blockers have been the mainstay of medical treatment for many years despite limited evidence of beneficial effects. Recently, losartan, an angiotensin II type I receptor antagonist (ARB), has shown promising results in a mouse model of MFS and subsequently in humans with MFS and hence is increasingly used. Several ongoing trials comparing losartan to ?-blockers and/or placebo will better define the role of ARBs in the near future. In addition, other medications, such as statins and tetracyclines have demonstrated potential benefit in experimental aortic aneurysm studies. Given the advances in our understanding of molecular mechanisms triggering aortic dilatation and dissection, individualized management tailored to the underlying genetic defect may be on the horizon of individualized medicine. We anticipate that ongoing research will address the question whether such genotype/pathogenesis-driven treatments can replace current phenotype/syndrome-driven strategies and whether other forms of aortopathies should be treated similarly. In this work, we review currently used and promising medical treatment options for patients with heritable aortic aneurysmal disorders. PMID:24527681

  8. Genome-wide Reinforcement of Cohesin Binding at Pre-existing Cohesin Sites in Response to Ionizing Radiation in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom-Jun; Li, Yehua; Zhang, Jinglan; Xi, Yuanxin; Li, Yumei; Yang, Tao; Jung, Sung Yun; Pan, Xuewen; Chen, Rui; Li, Wei; Wang, Yi; Qin, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The cohesin complex plays a central role in genome maintenance by regulation of chromosome segregation in mitosis and DNA damage response (DDR) in other phases of the cell cycle. The ATM/ATR phosphorylates SMC1 and SMC3, two core components of the cohesin complex to regulate checkpoint signaling and DNA repair. In this report, we show that the genome-wide binding of SMC1 and SMC3 after ionizing radiation (IR) is enhanced by reinforcing pre-existing cohesin binding sites in human cancer cells. We demonstrate that ATM and SMC3 phosphorylation at Ser1083 regulate this process. We also demonstrate that acetylation of SMC3 at Lys105 and Lys106 is induced by IR and this induction depends on the acetyltransferase ESCO1 as well as the ATM/ATR kinases. Consistently, both ESCO1 and SMC3 acetylation are required for intra-S phase checkpoint and cellular survival after IR. Although both IR-induced acetylation and phosphorylation of SMC3 are under the control of ATM/ATR, the two forms of modification are independent of each other and both are required to promote reinforcement of SMC3 binding to cohesin sites. Thus, SMC3 modifications is a mechanism for genome-wide reinforcement of cohesin binding in response to DNA damage response in human cells and enhanced cohesion is a downstream event of DDR. PMID:20501661

  9. Mortality patterns associated with the 1918 influenza pandemic in Mexico: evidence for a spring herald wave and lack of pre-existing immunity in older populations

    PubMed Central

    Chowell, Gerardo; Viboud, Cécile; Simonsen, Lone; Miller, Mark A.; Acuna-Soto, Rodolfo

    2010-01-01

    Background While the mortality burden of the devastating 1918 influenza pandemic has been carefully quantified in the US, Japan, and European countries, little is known about the pandemic experience elsewhere. Here, we compiled extensive archival records to quantify the pandemic mortality patterns in two Mexican cities, Mexico City and Toluca. Methods We applied seasonal excess mortality models to age-specific respiratory mortality rates for 1915–1920 and quantified the reproduction number from daily data. Results We identified 3 pandemic waves in Mexico City in spring 1918, fall 1918, and winter 1920, characterized by unusual excess mortality in 25–44 years old. Toluca experienced 2-fold higher excess mortality rates than Mexico City, but did not have a substantial 3rd wave. All age groups including those over 65 years experienced excess mortality during 1918–20. Reproduction number estimates were below 2.5 assuming a 3-day generation interval. Conclusion Mexico experienced a herald pandemic wave with elevated young adult mortality in spring 1918, similar to the US and Europe. In contrast to the US and Europe, there was no mortality sparing in Mexican seniors, highlighting potential geographical differences in pre-existing immunity to the 1918 virus. We discuss the relevance of our findings to the 2009 pandemic mortality patterns. PMID:20594109

  10. Waivers for disqualifying medical conditions in U.S. Naval aviation personnel.

    PubMed

    Bailey, D A; Gilleran, L G; Merchant, P G

    1995-05-01

    In the United States Navy, many diagnoses are considered disqualifying for aviation duty, but aircrew may be "waived" to return to flight duties after resolution of the disease or appropriate treatment of the condition. Personnel with waivers are usually subject to more frequent physical examinations and/or special diagnostic procedures. Although the Naval Aerospace and Operational Medical Institute promulgates written aeromedical guidelines as to which diseases may be waived and which may not, waivers are granted on a case-by-case basis considering not only the diagnosis, but the age, experience, and type of aviation duty of the individual in question. This study was undertaken to determine which conditions were most and least likely to be waived. We reviewed all records of aviators entered into the Naval Aviation Medical Data Retrieval System who had been diagnosed with a condition considered disqualifying for aviation duty, totaling over 39,000 records. Cases were stratified by diagnosis and aviation duty, and the percentage waived was calculated for major diagnostic groups. Among designated aviation personnel, approximately 68% of all aviators with a disqualifying diagnosis were recommended for a waiver. Otolaryngologic, musculoskeletal, and cardiovascular disorders accounted for nearly 50% of diagnoses in personnel recommended for a waiver. Fear of flying, personality disorders, and adjustment disorders were the three diagnoses least likely to be granted a waiver. The most frequently occurring disqualifying diagnoses were allergic rhinitis, obesity, disorders of refraction and accommodation, urolithiasis, and alcohol dependence. PMID:7619031

  11. [The requirements of standard and conditions of interchangeability of medical articles].

    PubMed

    Men'shikov, V V; Lukicheva, T I

    2013-11-01

    The article deals with possibility to apply specific approaches under evaluation of interchangeability of medical articles for laboratory analysis. The development of standardized analytical technologies of laboratory medicine and formulation of requirements of standards addressed to manufacturers of medical articles the clinically validated requirements are to be followed. These requirements include sensitivity and specificity of techniques, accuracy and precision of research results, stability of reagents' quality in particular conditions of their transportation and storage. The validity of requirements formulated in standards and addressed to manufacturers of medical articles can be proved using reference system, which includes master forms and standard samples, reference techniques and reference laboratories. This approach is supported by data of evaluation of testing systems for measurement of level of thyrotrophic hormone, thyroid hormones and glycated hemoglobin HB A1c. The versions of testing systems can be considered as interchangeable only in case of results corresponding to the results of reference technique and comparable with them. In case of absence of functioning reference system the possibilities of the Joined committee of traceability in laboratory medicine make it possible for manufacturers of reagent sets to apply the certified reference materials under development of manufacturing of sets for large listing of analytes. PMID:24640115

  12. Cryptococcosis-related deaths and associated medical conditions in the United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Barragan, Noel C; Sorvillo, Frank; Kuo, Tony

    2014-12-01

    Cryptococcosis is an invasive mycotic infection primarily affecting immunocompromised individuals. The objective of this study was to describe cryptococcosis mortality and associated medical conditions in the US for the period 2000-2010. Cryptococcosis-related deaths were identified from the national multiple-cause-of-death dataset. Mortality trends and comparison analyses were performed on overall cases of cryptococcosis and by subset [i.e. clinical manifestations of disease and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status]. A matched case-control analysis was also conducted to describe the associations between this disease and comorbid medical conditions. A total of 3210 cryptococcosis-related deaths were identified. Cerebral cryptococcosis was the most commonly reported clinical manifestation of the disease. Approximately one-fifth of the decedents (n = 616) had a co-diagnosis of HIV. Mortality rates were highest among men, blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans and older adults. Poisson regression analysis indicated a 6.52% annual decrease in mortality rates for the study period. HIV (MOR = 35.55, 95% CI 27.95-45.22) and leukaemia (MOR = 16.10, 95% CI 11.24-23.06) were highly associated with cryptococcosis-related deaths. Cryptococcosis mortality declined significantly during 2000-2010. However, the disease continues to cause appreciable mortality in the US. With the majority of decedents having no HIV co-diagnosis, there is still much to be learned about the epidemiology of this mycosis. PMID:25135153

  13. The efficacy of sodium bicarbonate in preventing contrast-induced nephropathy in patients with pre-existing renal insufficiency: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Liang, Long; Chen, Wenbo; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore the efficacy of sodium bicarbonate in preventing contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). Methods We searched PubMed, Medline and the Cochrane Library from 1 January 2004 to 1 August 2014. The effect estimate was expressed as a pooled OR with 95% CI, using the fixed-effects or random-effects model. Results 20 randomised controlled trials (n=4280) were identified. Hydration with sodium bicarbonate was associated with a significant decrease in CIN among patients with pre-existing renal insufficiency (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.96; p=0.027). However, moderate heterogeneity was noted across trials (I2=48%; p=0.008). Subgroup analyses indicated a better effect of sodium bicarbonate in studies using low-osmolar (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.93; p=0.024) compared with iso-osmolar contrast agents (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.34; p=0.351). The odds of CIN with sodium bicarbonate were lower in studies including only patients undergoing emergency (OR 0.16, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.51; p=0.002) compared with elective procedures (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.06; p=0.105). Sodium bicarbonate was more beneficial in patients given a bolus injection before procedures (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.54; p=0.004) compared with continuous infusion (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.05; p=0.091). Sodium bicarbonate plus N-acetylcysteine (OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.79; p=0.024) was better than sodium bicarbonate alone (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.03; p=0.071). The effect of sodium bicarbonate was considered greater in papers published before (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.41; p=0.000) compared with after 2008 (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.16; p=0.302). However, no significant differences were found in mortality (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.32; p=0.263) or requirement for dialysis (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.52 to 2.25; p=0.841). Conclusions Sodium bicarbonate is effective in preventing CIN among patients with pre-existing renal insufficiency. However, it fails to lower the risks of dialysis and mortality and therefore cannot improve the clinical prognosis of patients with CIN. PMID:25783425

  14. Influence of pre-existing basement faults on the structural evolution of the Zagros Simply Folded belt: 3D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, Jonas B.; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    The Simply Folded Belt of the Zagros orogen is characterized by elongated fold trains symptomatically defining the geomorphology along this mountain range. The Zagros orogen results from the collision of the Arabian and the Eurasian plates. The Simply Folded Belt is located southwest of the Zagros suture zone. An up to 2 km thick salt horizon below the sedimentary sequence enables mechanical and structural detachment from the underlying Arabian basement. Nevertheless, deformation within the basement influences the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt. It has been shown that thrusts in form of reactivated normal faults can trigger out-of-sequence deformation within the sedimentary stratigraphy. Furthermore, deeply rooted strike-slip faults, such as the Kazerun faults between the Fars zone in the southeast and the Dezful embayment and the Izeh zone, are largely dispersing into the overlying stratigraphy, strongly influencing the tectonic evolution and mechanical behaviour. The aim of this study is to reveal the influence of basement thrusts and strike-slip faults on the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt depending on the occurrence of intercrustal weak horizons (Hormuz salt) and the rheology and thermal structure of the basement. Therefore, we present high-resolution 3D thermo-mechnical models with pre-existing, inversively reactivated normal faults or strike-slip faults within the basement. Numerical models are based on finite difference, marker-in-cell technique with (power-law) visco-plastic rheology accounting for brittle deformation. Preliminary results show that deep tectonic structures present in the basement may have crucial effects on the morphology and evolution of a fold-and-thrust belt above a major detachment horizon.

  15. Photosynthetic traits around budbreak in pre-existing needles of Sakhalin spruce (Picea glehnii) seedlings grown under elevated CO2 concentration assessed by chlorophyll fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Kitao, Mitsutoshi; Tobita, Hiroyuki; Utsugi, Hajime; Komatsu, Masabumi; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Maruyama, Yutaka; Koike, Takayoshi

    2012-08-01

    To assess the effects of elevated CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) on the photosynthetic properties around spring budbreak, we monitored the total leaf sugar and starch content, and chlorophyll fluorescence in 1-year-old needles of Sakhalin spruce (Picea glehnii Masters) seedlings in relation to the timing of budbreak, grown in a phytotron under natural daylight at two [CO(2)] levels (ambient: 360??mol mol(-1) and elevated: 720??mol mol(-1)). Budbreak was accelerated by elevated [CO(2)] accompanied with earlier temporal declines in the quantum yield of PSII electron transport (?(PSII)) and photochemical quenching (q(L)). Plants grown under elevated [CO(2)] showed pre-budbreak leaf starch content twice as high with no significant difference in ?(PSII) from ambient-CO(2)-grown plants when compared at the same measurement [CO(2)], i.e., 360 or 720??mol mol(-1), suggesting that the enhanced pre-budbreak leaf starch accumulation might not cause down-regulation of photosynthesis in pre-existing needles under elevated [CO(2)]. Conversely, lower excitation pressure adjusted for the efficiency of PSII photochemistry ((1?-?q(P)) F(v)'/F(m)') was observed in plants grown under elevated [CO(2)] around budbreak when compared at their growth [CO(2)] (i.e., comparing (1?-?q(P)) F(v)'/F(m)' measured at 720??mol mol(-1) in elevated-CO(2)-grown plants with that at 360??mol mol(-1) in ambient-CO(2)-grown plants), which suggests lower rate of photoinactivation of PSII in the elevated-CO(2)-grown plants around spring budbreak. The degree of photoinhibition, as indicated by the overnight-dark-adapted F(v)/F(m), however, showed no difference between CO(2) treatments, thereby suggesting that photoprotection during the daytime or the repair of PSII at night was sufficient to alleviate differences in the rate of photoinactivation. PMID:22705862

  16. Hospital characteristics and racial disparities in hospital mortality from common medical conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Pippins, Jennifer R.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Haas, Jennifer S.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Less is known about racial disparities in mortality from medical conditions than for procedures. We determined whether black-white disparities in risk-adjusted hospital mortality exist for five common conditions (myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, cerebral vascular accident, gastrointestinal hemorrhage and pneumonia), and to determine the role of hospital characteristics. METHODS: We used the 2003 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Where a mortality disadvantage for black patients was demonstrated, additional analyses assessed whether the degree of disparity varied by hospital characteristics. RESULTS: Mortality for black patients was equivalent to or lower than that for white patients for four of the five conditions. Black patients were more likely than white patients to die from gastrointestinal hemorrhage (1.5% vs. 1.1%, p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, hospital racial composition was the only characteristic associated with degree of disparity for gastrointestinal hemorrhage, with hospitals discharging fewer black patients demonstrating greater disparity. CONCLUSIONS: In a large, multistate sample, there was no evidence of disparities in mortality for four of five common conditions. Black-white racial disparities in mortality from gastrointestinal hemorrhage, however, may be associated with hospital racial composition. PMID:17913113

  17. Pathological Gambling: Relationship to Obesity, Self-Reported Chronic Medical Conditions, Poor Lifestyle Choices, and Impaired Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Black, Donald W.; Shaw, Martha; McCormick, Brett; Allen, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Background Pathological gambling (PG) is an important public health problem that is prevalent, costly to society, and associated with substance misuse, depression, domestic violence, crime, and suicide. Despite these challenges, little is known about the physical health and medical correlates of PG. The goal of this project was to assess self-reported chronic medical conditions, medication usage, lifestyle choices, health care utilization, quality of life variables, and body mass index (BMI) in persons with and without PG. Methods Subjects with PG and community controls were systematically assessed for their medical health, lifestyle choices, medication usage, and health care utilization. We administered the Medical Outcome Study Short-Form 36 Health Survey to assess perceived health and quality of life. BMI was calculated for all subjects. Obesity was defined as having a BMI ? 30 kg/m2. Results We compared 95 subjects with DSM-IV PG (South Oaks Gambling Screen [SOGS] score ? 5) and 91 control subjects without PG (SOGS ? 2) selected through random digit dialing from the general community. PG subjects and controls were similar in age and gender. Persons with PG had more medical and mental health conditions than controls, and were more likely to avoid regular exercise, smoke ? 1 pack/day, drink ? 5 servings of caffeine daily, and watch television ? 20 hours/week. They had more emergency department visits for physical and mental health conditions, were more likely to have been psychiatrically hospitalized in the past year, and were more likely to take psychotropic medication. They were less likely to have had regular dental visits and were more likely to put off medical care due to financial problems. Severity of gambling was positively correlated with number of medical conditions. Persons with PG had poorer self-reported health perceptions on all but one SF-36 subscale. Importantly, persons with PG had a higher BMI than controls and were more likely to be obese. Conclusions PG is associated with obesity, chronic medical conditions, poor lifestyle choices, worse quality of life, and the use of costly forms of medical care. Pathological gamblers are less likely to receive regular dental care and are more likely to be unable to pay for medical care. The implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:22938650

  18. HIGHLIGHTING DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CONDITIONAL AND UNCONDITIONAL QUANTILE REGRESSION APPROACHES THROUGH AN APPLICATION TO ASSESS MEDICATION ADHERENCE

    PubMed Central

    BORAH, BIJAN J.; BASU, ANIRBAN

    2014-01-01

    The quantile regression (QR) framework provides a pragmatic approach in understanding the differential impacts of covariates along the distribution of an outcome. However, the QR framework that has pervaded the applied economics literature is based on the conditional quantile regression method. It is used to assess the impact of a covariate on a quantile of the outcome conditional on specific values of other covariates. In most cases, conditional quantile regression may generate results that are often not generalizable or interpretable in a policy or population context. In contrast, the unconditional quantile regression method provides more interpretable results as it marginalizes the effect over the distributions of other covariates in the model. In this paper, the differences between these two regression frameworks are highlighted, both conceptually and econometrically. Additionally, using real-world claims data from a large US health insurer, alternative QR frameworks are implemented to assess the differential impacts of covariates along the distribution of medication adherence among elderly patients with Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23616446

  19. Factors associated with geographic variation in cost per episode of care for three medical conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify associations between market factors, especially relative reimbursement rates, and the probability of surgery and cost per episode for three medical conditions (cataract, benign prostatic neoplasm, and knee degeneration) with multiple treatment options. Methods We use 2004–2006 Medicare claims data for elderly beneficiaries from sixty nationally representative communities to estimate multivariate models for the probability of surgery and cost per episode of care as a function local market factors, including Medicare physician reimbursement for surgical versus non-surgical treatment and the availability of primary care and specialty physicians. We used Symmetry’s Episode Treatment Groups (ETG) software to group claims into episodes for the three conditions (n?=?540,874 episodes). Results Higher Medicare reimbursement for surgical episodes and greater availability of the relevant specialists are significantly associated with more surgery and higher cost per episode for all three conditions, while greater availability of primary care physicians is significantly associated with less frequent surgery and lower cost per episode. Conclusion Relative Medicare reimbursement rates for surgical vs. non-surgical treatments and the availability of both primary care physicians and relevant specialists are associated with the likelihood of surgery and cost per episode. PMID:24949281

  20. Testing the influence of vertical, pre-existing joints on normal faulting using analogue and 3D discrete element models (DEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; von Hagke, Christoph; Virgo, Simon; Urai, Janos L.

    2015-04-01

    Brittle rocks are often affected by different generations of fractures that influence each other. We study pre-existing vertical joints followed by a faulting event. Understanding the effect of these interactions on fracture/fault geometries as well as the development of dilatancy and the formation of cavities as potential fluid pathways is crucial for reservoir quality prediction and production. Our approach combines scaled analogue and numerical modeling. Using cohesive hemihydrate powder allows us to create open fractures prior to faulting. The physical models are reproduced using the ESyS-Particle discrete element Modeling Software (DEM), and different parameters are investigated. Analogue models were carried out in a manually driven deformation box (30x28x20 cm) with a 60° dipping pre-defined basement fault and 4.5 cm of displacement. To produce open joints prior to faulting, sheets of paper were mounted in the box to a depth of 5 cm at a spacing of 2.5 cm. Powder was then sieved into the box, embedding the paper almost entirely (column height of 19 cm), and the paper was removed. We tested the influence of different angles between the strike of the basement fault and the joint set (0°, 4°, 8°, 12°, 16°, 20°, and 25°). During deformation we captured structural information by time-lapse photography that allows particle imaging velocimetry analyses (PIV) to detect localized deformation at every increment of displacement. Post-mortem photogrammetry preserves the final 3-dimensional structure of the fault zone. We observe that no faults or fractures occur parallel to basement-fault strike. Secondary fractures are mostly oriented normal to primary joints. At the final stage of the experiments we analyzed semi-quantitatively the number of connected joints, number of secondary fractures, degree of segmentation (i.e. number of joints accommodating strain), damage zone width, and the map-view area fraction of open gaps. Whereas the area fraction does not change distinctly, the number of secondary fractures and connected joints increases strongly with increasing angles between basement fault and joint strike. Integrating these models with a 3-dimensional DEM code using the ESyS-Particle software allows for retrieving 4D information from the models, as well as for testing other parameters such as joint spacing or joint depth. Our DEM models are capable of robustly reproducing all characteristic features observed in the analogue models, and will provide a quantitative measure of the influence of joint-fault angle on permeability of cohesive rocks that have experienced more than one brittle deformation phase.

  1. Mechanical ventilation using non-injurious ventilation settings causes lung injury in the absence of pre-existing lung injury in healthy mice

    PubMed Central

    Wolthuis, Esther K; Vlaar, Alexander PJ; Choi, Goda; Roelofs, Joris JTH; Juffermans, Nicole P; Schultz, Marcus J

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical ventilation (MV) may cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Present models of VILI use exceptionally large tidal volumes, causing gross lung injury and haemodynamic shock. In addition, animals are ventilated for a relative short period of time and only after a 'priming' pulmonary insult. Finally, it is uncertain whether metabolic acidosis, which frequently develops in models of VILI, should be prevented. To study VILI in healthy mice, the authors used a MV model with clinically relevant ventilator settings, avoiding massive damage of lung structures and shock, and preventing metabolic acidosis. Methods Healthy C57Bl/6 mice (n = 66) or BALB/c mice (n = 66) were ventilated (tidal volume = 7.5 ml/kg or 15 ml/kg; positive end-expiratory pressure = 2 cmH2O; fraction of inspired oxygen = 0.5) for five hours. Normal saline or sodium bicarbonate were used to correct for hypovolaemia. Lung histopathology, lung wet-to-dry ratio, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein content, neutrophil influx and levels of proinflammatory cytokines and coagulation factors were measured. Results Animals remained haemodynamically stable throughout the whole experiment. Lung histopathological changes were minor, although significantly more histopathological changes were found after five hours of MV with a larger tidal volume. Lung histopathological changes were no different between the strains. In both strains and with both ventilator settings, MV caused higher wet-to-dry ratios, higher bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein levels and more influx of neutrophils, and higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and coagulation factors. Also, with MV higher systemic levels of cytokines were measured. All parameters were higher with larger tidal volumes. Correcting for metabolic acidosis did not alter endpoints. Conclusions MV induces VILI, in the absence of a priming pulmonary insult and even with use of relevant (least injurious) ventilator settings. This model offers opportunities to study the pathophysiological mechanisms behind VILI and the contribution of MV to lung injury in the absence of pre-existing lung injury. PMID:19152704

  2. Symptoms and medical conditions in Australian veterans of the 1991 Gulf War: relation to immunisations and other Gulf War exposures

    PubMed Central

    Kelsall, H; Sim, M; Forbes, A; Glass, D; McKenzie, D; Ikin, J; Abramson, M; Blizzard, L; Ittak, P

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate whether Australian Gulf War veterans have a higher than expected prevalence of recent symptoms and medical conditions that were first diagnosed in the period following the 1991 Gulf War; and if so, whether these effects were associated with exposures and experiences that occurred in the Gulf War. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 1456 Australian Gulf War veterans and a comparison group who were in operational units at the time of the Gulf War, but were not deployed to that conflict (n = 1588). A postal questionnaire was administered and the likelihood of the diagnosis of self-reported medical conditions was assessed and rated by a medical practitioner. Results: Gulf War veterans had a higher prevalence of all self-reported health symptoms than the comparison group, and more of the Gulf War veterans had severe symptoms. Increased symptom reporting was associated with several exposures, including having more than 10 immunisations, pyridostigmine bromide tablets, anti-biological warfare tablets, pesticides, insect repellents, reportedly being in a chemical weapons area, and stressful military service experiences in a strong dose-response relation. Gulf War veterans reported psychological (particularly post-traumatic stress disorder), skin, eye, and sinus conditions first diagnosed in 1991 or later more commonly than the comparison group. Over 90% of medical conditions reported by both study groups were rated by a medical practitioner as having a high likelihood of diagnosis. Conclusion: More than 10 years after the 1991 Gulf War, Australian veterans self-report all symptoms and some medical conditions more commonly than the comparison group. Further analysis of the severity of symptoms and likelihood of the diagnosis of medical conditions suggested that these findings are not due to over-reporting or to participation bias. PMID:15550607

  3. 3-D numerical modelling of the influence of reactivated pre-existing faults on the distribution of deformation: example of North-Western Ghana around 2.15-2.00 Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FENG, Xiaojun; Gerbault, Muriel; Martin, Roland; Ganne, Jérôme; Jessell, Mark

    2015-04-01

    High strain zones appear to play a significant role in feeding the upper crust with fluids and partially molten material from lower crust sources. The Bole-Bulenga terrain (North-Western Ghana) is located in between two subvertical shear zones, and mainly consists of high-grade orthogneisses, paragneisses and metabasites intruded by partially molten lower crustal material with monzogranites and orthogneisses (Eburnean orogeny, around 2.1 Ga). In order to understand the location of these high grade rocks at the edges and in between these two shear zones, a three dimensional numerical model was built to test the influence of different orientations of a system of branched strike-slip faults on visco-plastic deformation, under compressional and simple shear boundary conditions. Our models indicate domains of tensile vs. compressional strain as well as shear zones, and show that not only internal fault zones but also the host rock in between the faults behave relatively softer than external regions. Under both applied compressive and simple shear boundary conditions, these softened domains constitute preferential zones of tensile strain accommodation (dilation) in the upper crust, which may favor infilling by deeper partially molten rocks. Our modeled pre-existing faults zones are assumed to have formed during an early D1 stage of deformation, and they are shown to passively migrate and rotate together with the solid matrix under applied external boundary conditions (corresponding to a post D1 - early D2 phase of deformation). We suggest that in the Bole-Bulenga terrain, fluids or partially molten material stored in deeper crustal domains, preferentially intruded the upper crust within these highly (shear and tensile) strained domains, thanks to this D2 shearing deformation phase. Building relief at the surface is primarily controlled by fault orientations, together with mechanical parameters and external boundary conditions. In particular, greatest magnitudes of relief are obtained when faults dip in parallel one with the other and when they are inclined at depth, as they thus facilitate stress rotation and material transfer from depth. The host rock density does not play a primary role in producing relief compared to variations in friction angle at the crustal scale (30km thick). Relief increases by 200 - 300 m when the host rock density is increased by 200 kg/m3 , whereas relief drops by about 1200 m when decreasing the host rock friction from ? = 20° to 10°.

  4. The Social and Ethical Implications of Changing Medical Technologies: The Views of People Living with Genetic Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth Chapman

    2002-01-01

    This article presents empirical data on subjective levels of health and quality of life for individuals with early- or late-onset genetic conditions. Twelve adults with an early-onset condition (cystic fibrosis) and 12 adults with a late-onset condition in the family (Huntington’s disease) participated in semi-structured interviews. Questions investigated perceptions of the body, quality of life and views on medical technology

  5. Do Race, Ethnicity, and Psychiatric Diagnoses Matter in the Prevalence of Multiple Chronic Medical Conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Humensky, Jennifer; Druss, Benjamin; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Gomes, Arminda P.; Wang, Shuai; Blanco, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Background The proportion of people in the United States with multiple chronic medical conditions (MCMC) is increasing. Yet, little is known about the relationship that race, ethnicity, and psychiatric disorders have on the prevalence of MCMCs in the general population. Methods This study used data from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (N= 33,107). Multinomial logistic regression models adjusting for socio-demographic variables, body mass index, and quality of life were used to examine differences in the 12-month prevalence of MCMC by race/ethnicity, psychiatric diagnosis, and the interactions between race/ethnicity and psychiatric diagnosis. Results Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, Hispanics reported lower odds of MCMC and African Americans reported higher odds of MCMC after adjusting for covariates. People with psychiatric disorders reported higher odds of MCMC compared to people without psychiatric disorders. There were significant interactions between race and psychiatric diagnosis associated with rates of MCMC. In the presence of certain psychiatric disorders, the odds of MCMC were higher among African Americans with psychiatric disorders compared to non-Hispanic Whites with similar psychiatric disorders. Conclusions Our study results indicate that race, ethnicity, and psychiatric disorders are associated with the prevalence of MCMC. As the rates of MCMC rise, it is critical to identify which populations are at increased risk and how to best direct services to address their health care needs. PMID:23552429

  6. 42 CFR 110.50 - Medical records necessary for the Secretary to determine whether a covered injury was sustained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...hospital records, including the admission history and physical examination, the discharge...consultation reports, all physician and nursing progress notes, and all test results...countermeasure recipient's pre-existing medical history. (b) A requester may...

  7. Improving textual medication extraction using combined conditional random fields and rule-based systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Domonkos Tikk; Illés Solt

    2010-01-01

    ObjectiveIn the i2b2 Medication Extraction Challenge, medication names together with details of their administration were to be extracted from medical discharge summaries.DesignThe task of the challenge was decomposed into three pipelined components: named entity identification, context-aware filtering and relation extraction. For named entity identification, first a rule-based (RB) method that was used in our overall fifth place-ranked solution at the

  8. International epidemiology of human pre-existing adenovirus (Ad) type-5, type-6, type-26 and type-36 neutralizing antibodies: Correlates of high Ad5 titers and implications for potential HIV vaccine trials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Christopher Mast; Lisa Kierstead; Swati B. Gupta; Alexander A. Nikas; Esper G. Kallas; Vladimir Novitsky; Bernard Mbewe; Punee Pitisuttithum; Mauro Schechter; Eftyhia Vardas; Nathan D. Wolfe; Miguel Aste-Amezaga; Danilo R. Casimiro; Paul Coplan; Walter L. Straus; John W. Shiver

    2010-01-01

    Replication-defective adenoviruses have been utilized as candidate HIV vaccine vectors. Few studies have described the international epidemiology of pre-existing immunity to adenoviruses. We enrolled 1904 participants in a cross-sectional serological survey at seven sites in Africa, Brazil, and Thailand to assess neutralizing antibodies (NA) for adenovirus types Ad5, Ad6, Ad26 and Ad36. Clinical trial samples were used to assess NA

  9. Efficacy of aqueous chlorine dioxide and fumaric acid for inactivating pre-existing microorganisms and Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes on broccoli sprouts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. J. Kim; M. H. Kim; K. B. Song

    2009-01-01

    The combined effect of aqueous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and fumaric acid as a chemical treatment to inactivate pre-existing microorganisms was evaluated using broccoli sprouts. Broccoli sprouts were treated with distilled water, 50ppm ClO2, 0.5% fumaric acid, and a combination of 0.5% fumaric acid and 50ppm ClO2. Treatment with 50ppm ClO2 and 0.5% fumaric acid reduced the initial populations of total

  10. Influence of pre-existing fabrics on fault kinematics and rift geometry of interacting segments: Analogue models based on the Albertine Rift (Uganda), Western Branch-East African Rift System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Aanyu; D. Koehn

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at showing how far pre-existing crustal weaknesses left behind by Proterozoic mobile belts, that pass around cratonic Archean shields (Tanzania Craton to the southeast and Congo Craton to the northwest), control the geometry of the Albertine Rift. Focus is laid on the development of the Lake Albert and Lake Edward\\/George sub-segments and between them the greatly uplifted

  11. Medical Conditions and Healthcare Utilization among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Group Homes in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Joel M.; Botuck, Shelly; Damiani, Marco R.; Levy, Philip H.; Dern, Thomas A.; Freeman, Stephen E.

    2006-01-01

    The shift in living situations for adults with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (IDDD) from family homes to group homes has raised questions about their healthcare needs and access to appropriate healthcare services. This study was undertaken to describe the disability characteristics and medical conditions in a sample of adults…

  12. Medication Treatments

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medications are used to treat certain symptoms of Fragile X syndrome, as shown in the chart below. The NICHD ... of these medications in treating the symptoms of Fragile X syndrome, or for other conditions for which the medications ...

  13. Nine children over the age of one year with full trisomy 13: a case series describing medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Deborah A; Campbell, Emily

    2014-12-01

    Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), identified by Patau and colleagues [1960; Lancet 1: 790-793] is the third most common autosomal condition. Population studies indicate less than one in 10 children reaches their first birthday. In the face of mixed findings and recommendations for treatment, additional research is needed to further determine what contributes to longevity and implications for treatment for presenting medical conditions. The purpose of the present study is to report on presenting medical conditions and the presence or absence of the specific conditions (age at survey completion). Data on nine survivors (seven female, two male) with trisomy 13 indicated mean gestational age of approximately 36?weeks, birth weight ranging from 1100 to 3290?g and mean length of 45.3?cm. Length of hospital stay after birth varied. The majority of infants presented with well-known physical characteristics. Medical conditions and their treatment varied at birth and at survey completion. Notably, several infants' cardiac anomalies resolved without surgical intervention. Surgeries were provided for a range of conditions including gastrostomy tube placement to address feeding issues and removal of intestinal blockage. There were no reports of holoprosencephaly. Implications and recommendations are provided. PMID:25323598

  14. Impaired driving from medical conditions: A 70-year-old man trying to decide if he should continue driving

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Some medical disorders can impair performance, increasing the risk of driving safety errors that can lead to vehicle crashes. The causal pathway often involves a concatenation of factors or events, some of which can be prevented or controlled. Effective interventions can operate before, during, or after a crash occurs at the levels of driver capacity, vehicle and road design, and public policy. A variety of systemic, neurological, psychiatric, and developmental disorders put drivers at potential increased risk of a car crash in the short or long term. Medical diagnosis and age alone are usually insufficient criteria for determining fitness to drive. Strategies are needed for determining what types and levels of reduced function provide a threshold for disqualification in drivers with medical disorders. Evidence of decreased mileage, self-restriction to driving in certain situations, collisions, moving violations, aggressive driving, sleepiness, alcohol abuse, metabolic disorders, and multiple medications may trigger considerations of driver safety. A general framework for evaluating driver fitness relies on a functional evaluation of multiple domains (cognitive, motor, perceptual, and psychiatric) that are important for safe driving and can be applied across many disorders, including conditions that have rarely been studied with respect to driving, and in patients with multiple conditions and medications. Neurocognitive tests, driving simulation, and road tests provide complementary sources of evidence to evaluate driver safety. No single test is sufficient to determine who should drive and who should not. PMID:21364126

  15. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. The medical history and...to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. (B) An updated examination...to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. (ii) Admitting...

  16. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant under the supervision of a qualified social worker, and in accordance with the plan of care. The...

  17. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant under the supervision of a qualified social worker, and in accordance with the plan of care. The...

  18. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant under the supervision of a qualified social worker, and in accordance with the plan of care. The...

  19. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant under the supervision of a qualified social worker, and in accordance with the plan of care. The...

  20. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant under the supervision of a qualified social worker, and in accordance with the plan of care. The...

  1. 20 CFR 30.611 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one medical condition, can the amount paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...medical condition, can the amount paid on a single EEOICPA claim be attributed to different...medical condition, can the amount paid on a single EEOICPA claim be attributed to different...accepted by OWCP in connection with a single claim are treated as the same...

  2. 20 CFR 30.611 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one medical condition, can the amount paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...medical condition, can the amount paid on a single EEOICPA claim be attributed to different...medical condition, can the amount paid on a single EEOICPA claim be attributed to different...accepted by OWCP in connection with a single claim are treated as the same...

  3. 20 CFR 30.611 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one medical condition, can the amount paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...medical condition, can the amount paid on a single EEOICPA claim be attributed to different...medical condition, can the amount paid on a single EEOICPA claim be attributed to different...accepted by OWCP in connection with a single claim are treated as the same...

  4. 20 CFR 30.611 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one medical condition, can the amount paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...medical condition, can the amount paid on a single EEOICPA claim be attributed to different...medical condition, can the amount paid on a single EEOICPA claim be attributed to different...accepted by OWCP in connection with a single claim are treated as the same...

  5. 20 CFR 30.611 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one medical condition, can the amount paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...medical condition, can the amount paid on a single EEOICPA claim be attributed to different...medical condition, can the amount paid on a single EEOICPA claim be attributed to different...accepted by OWCP in connection with a single claim are treated as the same...

  6. Diabetes mellitus, other medical conditions and familial history of cancer as risk factors for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, D T; Schiffman, M; Everhart, J; Goldstein, A; Lillemoe, K D; Swanson, G M; Schwartz, A G; Brown, L M; Greenberg, R S; Schoenberg, J B; Pottern, L M; Hoover, R N; Fraumeni, J F

    1999-01-01

    In a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer conducted in three areas of the USA, 484 cases and 2099 controls were interviewed to evaluate the aetiologic role of several medical conditions/interventions, including diabetes mellitus, cholecystectomy, ulcer/gastrectomy and allergic states. We also evaluated risk associated with family history of cancer. Our findings support previous studies indicating that diabetes is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, as well as a possible complication of the tumour. A significant positive trend in risk with increasing years prior to diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was apparent (P-value for test of trend = 0.016), with diabetics diagnosed at least 10 years prior to diagnosis having a significant 50% increased risk. Those treated with insulin had risks similar to those not treated with insulin (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6 and 1.5 respectively), and no trend in risk was associated with increasing duration of insulin treatment. Cholecystectomy also appeared to be a risk factor, as well as a consequence of the malignancy. Subjects with a cholecystectomy at least 20 years prior to the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer experienced a 70% increased risk, which was marginally significant. In contrast, subjects with a history of duodenal or gastric ulcer had little or no elevated risk (OR = 1.2; confidence interval = 0.9–1.6). Those treated by gastrectomy had the same risk as those not receiving surgery, providing little support for the hypothesis that gastrectomy is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A significant 40% reduced risk was associated with hay fever, a non-significant 50% decreased risk with allergies to animals, and a non-significant 40% reduced risk with allergies to dust/moulds. These associations, however, may be due to chance since no risk reductions were apparent for asthma or several other types of allergies. In addition, we observed significantly increased risks for subjects reporting a first-degree relative with cancers of the pancreas (OR = 3.2), colon (OR = 1.7) or ovary (OR = 5.3) and non-significantly increased risks for cancers of the endometrium (OR = 1.5) or breast (OR = 1.3). The pattern is consistent with the familial predisposition reported for pancreatic cancer and with the array of tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10468306

  7. Association between a Hospital’s Quality Performance for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Common Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lena M.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Spertus, John A.; Tang, Fengming; Chan, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Public reporting on hospital quality has been widely adopted for common medical conditions. Adding a measure of inpatient survival after cardiac arrest is being considered. It is unknown if this measure would be redundant, given evidence that hospital organization and culture can have hospital-wide effects on quality. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the correlation between inpatient survival after cardiac arrest and 30-day risk-standardized mortality rates for common medical conditions. Methods and Results Using data between 2007 and 2010 from a national in-hospital cardiac arrest registry, we calculated risk-standardized in-hospital survival rates for cardiac arrest at each hospital. We obtained risk-standardized 30-day mortality rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), and pneumonia from Hospital Compare for the same period. The relationship between a hospital’s performance on cardiac arrest and these other medical conditions was assessed using weighted Pearson correlation coefficients. Among 26,270 patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest at 130 hospitals, survival rates varied across hospitals, with a median risk-standardized hospital survival rate of 22.1% and an inter-quartile range (IQR) of 19.7% to 24.2%. There were no significant correlations between a hospital’s outcomes for its cardiac arrest patients and its patients admitted for AMI (correlation of ?0.12; P=0.16), HF (correlation of ?0.05; P=0.57), or pneumonia (correlation of ?0.15, P=0.10). Conclusions Hospitals that performed better on publicly reported outcomes for three common medical conditions did not necessarily have better cardiac arrest survival rates. Public reporting on cardiac arrest outcomes could provide new information about hospital quality. PMID:24221831

  8. Emergency Medical Services: The Frontier in Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Finnell, John T.; Overhage, J. Marc

    2010-01-01

    Emergency medical service (EMS) providers routinely lack even basic access to pre-existing patient information when delivering patient care in the field. Improving access to pre-existing patient information could improve the quality, safety and efficiency of care that they can deliver. EMS providers in Indianapolis use an electronic record to document their care. In order to provide access to pre-existing patient information, we integrated the EMS electronic record into the Indiana Network for Patient Care (INPC) --an operational statewide health information exchange (HIE). Over a six month study period, there were 28,986 911 calls to EMS, with 4,332 (16%) requests for patient data. Of the 58 medics surveyed, a substantial majority felt the information delivered was an important tool for delivering quality patient care. PMID:21346973

  9. The BPTI decamer observed in acidic pH crystal forms pre-exists as a stable species in solution 1 1 Edited by M. F. Moody

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cyril Hamiaux; Javier Pérez; Thierry Prangé; Stéphane Veesler; Madeleine Riès-Kautt; Patrice Vachette

    2000-01-01

    Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) crystallizes under acidic pH conditions in the presence of thiocyanate, chloride and sulfate ions, yielding three different polymorphs in P21, P6422 and P6322 space groups, respectively. In all three crystal forms, the same decamer is found in the packing (ten BPTI molecules organized through two perpendicular 2-fold and 5-fold axes as a well-defined and compact

  10. Spiritually Competent Practice with Individuals and Families Dealing with Medical Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Len

    2011-01-01

    Counselors and psychotherapists are increasingly expected to provide services that are spiritually competent. Those counseling individuals and families where medical concerns are a focus would do well to consider the implications of spiritual competence in their work. The article defines spiritual competence, describes spiritual competencies, and…

  11. Geriatric Conditions, Medication Use, and Risk of Adverse Drug Events in a Predominantly Male, Older Veteran Population

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Michael A.; Lund, Brian C.; Miao, Yinghui; Boscardin, W. John; Kaboli, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Background To determine whether geriatric conditions and functional impairment are independent risk factors for adverse drug events (ADEs). Design Prospective cohort study. Setting and Participants 377 veterans from a Veterans Affairs medical center age 65 years or older and taking 5 or more medications. Measurements Geriatric conditions and functional status were assessed using patient interviews and structured assessments at study baseline. ADEs were elicited during patient interviews at 3 and 12 months after study enrollment using validated methods. Results The strong majority (97%) of participants were male, mean age was 74 +/? 5 years, and 123 (33%) had one or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). Over the one-year study period, 126 patients (33%) developed 167 ADEs. On multivariable analysis, risk of ADEs was not associated with any of the geriatric conditions we had sufficient power to evaluate, including IADL function, cognitive impairment, depression, visual impairment, incontinence, constipation, and a summative measure of geriatric burden comprising the above and history of falls or gait instability. In exploratory analyses, the strongest factor associated with ADES was the number of drugs added to a patient’s medication regimen during the 1 year study period (incidence rate ratio 1.11 per each added drug, 95% CI 1.03–1.19). Conclusion Common geriatric conditions and IADL function were not associated with ADEs in a predominantly male, older veteran population. While it is important to consider the unique circumstances of each patient, excessive caution in prescribing to elders with these geriatric conditions may not be warranted. PMID:21410446

  12. Skin diseases and conditions among students of a medical college in southern India

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Nitin; Kumar, Ganesh S; Nelliyanil, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Skin diseases are a common problem among young adults. There is paucity of data about it among medical students. This study aimed to find out the pattern of skin disorders and to describe their association with various socio-demographic factors among medical students. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2011 in a medical college in Mangalore, Karnataka. Two-hundred and seventy eight medical students were chosen from the 4th, 6th and 8th semester through convenient sampling method. Data on hair and skin morbidities suffered over past 1 year and its associated factors were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Most of the participants 171 (61.5%) were of the age group 20-21 years and majority were females 148 (53.2%). The most common hair/skin morbidities suffered in the past one year were acne 185 (66.6%), hair loss 165 (59.3%), and sun tan 147 (52.9%). Fungal infection (P = 0.051) and severe type of acne (P = 0.041) were seen significantly more among males while hair morbidities like hair loss (P = 0.003), split ends of hairs (P < 0.0001) and dandruff (P =0.006) were seen significantly more among female students. Patterned baldness (P = 0.018) and sun tan (P < 0.0001) were significantly more among non-Mangalorean students than native Mangaloreans. Presence of dandruff was significantly associated with hair loss (P = 0.039) and usage of sunscreen was found to protect from developing sun tans (P = 0.049). Conclusion: Skin disorders, particularly the cosmetic problems are very common among medical students. Gender and place of origin were found to significantly influence the development of certain morbidities. PMID:24616849

  13. Spending And Service Use Among People With The Fifteen Most Costly Medical Conditions, 1997

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel W. Cohen; Nancy A. Krauss

    2003-01-01

    This study addresses the Institute of Medicine's recommendation that AHRQ use MEPS data to identify a set of priority conditions to inform efforts at improving quality of care. Using MEPS data we identify the fifteen most expensive conditions in the U.S. in 1997: chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, and acute conditions such as trauma, pneumonia, and

  14. Medication-induced oesophageal disorders.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karl-Uwe; Jaspersen, Daniel

    2003-09-01

    Medication-induced oesophageal distress and injury have become increasingly common conditions. First, smooth muscle relaxants may worsen or produce symptoms of pre-existing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease; notable examples include certain calcium antagonists (nifedipine), nitrates, sildenafil, nicotine, theophylline, and substances with antimuscarinic potential. Second, drugs with local toxicity may produce de novo damage including inflammation, strictures, ulcers, and bleeding. Notorious examples are alendronate, certain antibiotics including tetracyclines and clindamycin, all NSAIDs/aspirin, quinidine, potassium chloride, and ferrous sulfate. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors may be devoid of such toxicity, but may damage the mucosa by interfering with regenerative cell proliferation. The galenic formulation can modulate the risk of oesophageal injury. For this reason, medicines containing the same potentially toxic ingredient may be less exchangeable than commonly thought. Diagnostic gold standard is endoscopy. The best treatment is removal of the offending drug and supportive care. Prevention requires a re-appraisal of the drug's indication and adherence to guidelines of optimal drug intake including ingestion in an upright position and swallowing with enough fluid. The clinical relevance of drug-induced oesophageal injury and the feasibility of therapeutic alternatives are individually addressed. PMID:12946250

  15. International epidemiology of human pre-existing adenovirus (Ad) type-5, type-6, type-26 and type-36 neutralizing antibodies: correlates of high Ad5 titers and implications for potential HIV vaccine trials.

    PubMed

    Mast, T Christopher; Kierstead, Lisa; Gupta, Swati B; Nikas, Alexander A; Kallas, Esper G; Novitsky, Vladimir; Mbewe, Bernard; Pitisuttithum, Punee; Schechter, Mauro; Vardas, Eftyhia; Wolfe, Nathan D; Aste-Amezaga, Miguel; Casimiro, Danilo R; Coplan, Paul; Straus, Walter L; Shiver, John W

    2010-01-22

    Replication-defective adenoviruses have been utilized as candidate HIV vaccine vectors. Few studies have described the international epidemiology of pre-existing immunity to adenoviruses. We enrolled 1904 participants in a cross-sectional serological survey at seven sites in Africa, Brazil, and Thailand to assess neutralizing antibodies (NA) for adenovirus types Ad5, Ad6, Ad26 and Ad36. Clinical trial samples were used to assess NA titers from the US and Europe. The proportions of participants that were negative were 14.8% (Ad5), 31.5% (Ad6); 41.2% (Ad26) and 53.6% (Ad36). Adenovirus NA titers varied by geographic location and were higher in non-US and non-European settings, especially Thailand. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, geographic setting (non-US and non-European settings) was statistically significantly associated with having higher Ad5 titers; participants from Thailand had the highest odds of having high Ad5 titers (adjusted OR=3.53, 95% CI: 2.24, 5.57). Regardless of location, titers of Ad5NA were the highest and Ad36 NA were the lowest. Coincident Ad5/6 titers were lower than either Ad5 or Ad6 titers alone. Understanding pre-existing immunity to candidate vaccine vectors may contribute to the evaluation of vaccines in international populations. PMID:19925902

  16. therapeuticsAntibiotic prescribing for dental conditions: general medical practitioners and dentists compared

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Anderson; L Calder; D W Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Objective To compare the level of prescribing and types of antibiotics prescribed for dental problems by general medical practitioners and dentists.Design Secondary analysis of standard consultation data and prescription records from four different settings.Setting 30 participating general practices in the General Practice Morbidity Database for Wales in 1996.Subjects 1,185 attendances for tooth-related problems, at 30 participating practices in the General

  17. Apparatus for detecting at least one predetermined condition and providing an informational signal in response thereto in a medication infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischell, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A medication infusion system provides redundant safety and includes condition detecting and informational alarm signal generating apparatus for indicating if (1) a fluid leak occurs in different portions of the system; (2) a programmable input from a patient or physician would result in exceeding a safe dosage limit; (3) the reservoir containing medication has been filled; (4) the intended medication pumping does not correlate with the pumping actually effected; (5) battery voltage is low; (6) the medication reserve is low; and (7) the system has been switched off. The apparatus may provide subcutaneous electrical, thermal, or audible stimulation to the patient and also provides a signal which a physician may monitor. The stimulation may be coded to separately identify each above-listed deviation in nominal system performance. In addition, the number of medication requests are correlated with actual medication dispensing to assure proper operation. An identification scheme is provided which matches the patient with his or her corresponding medication.

  18. 42 CFR 416.45 - Condition for coverage-Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) AMBULATORY SURGICAL SERVICES Specific Conditions for Coverage § 416...Standard: Other practitioners. If the ASC assigns patient care responsibilities to practitioners other than physicians,...

  19. 42 CFR 416.45 - Condition for coverage-Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) AMBULATORY SURGICAL SERVICES Specific Conditions for Coverage § 416...Standard: Other practitioners. If the ASC assigns patient care responsibilities to practitioners other than physicians,...

  20. 42 CFR 416.45 - Condition for coverage-Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) AMBULATORY SURGICAL SERVICES Specific Conditions for Coverage § 416...Standard: Other practitioners. If the ASC assigns patient care responsibilities to practitioners other than physicians,...

  1. Psychological aspects of painful medical conditions in children. I. Developmental aspects and assessment.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, J V; Schulein, M J; Hahn, Y S

    1986-11-01

    The assessment and development of pain in children is reviewed in the first part of a two-part series. Assessment of pain in children has relied on self-report measures that have included visual analogue procedures using concrete stimuli for ratings. Behavioral assessment procedures are more sophisticated, but research on behavioral assessment of pediatric pain has begun to emergy only recently. There has been very little research on the developmental aspects of pain tolerance and pain threshold in children. There are preliminary indications that children's thoughts and attitudes about pain may change with age in a manner that contributes to more intense feelings of pain in adolescence than childhood. Children undergoing painful medical procedures show declining emotional outbursts with age and increasing signs of self-control and muscular rigidity. Possibilities for integrating the study of the developmental aspects of pain with social learning theory, cognitive developmental theory, and the psychology of physical symptom perception are discussed. PMID:3540810

  2. Are pre-existing markers of chronic kidney disease associated with short-term mortality following acute community-acquired pneumonia and sepsis? A cohort study among older people with diabetes using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Helen I.; Nitsch, Dorothea; Millett, Elizabeth R. C.; Sinclair, Alan; Thomas, Sara L.

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to examine whether pre-existing impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and proteinuria were associated with mortality following community-acquired pneumonia or sepsis among people aged ?65 years with diabetes mellitus, without end-stage renal disease. Methods Patients were followed up from onset of first community-acquired pneumonia or sepsis episode in a cohort study using large, linked electronic health databases. Follow-up was for up to 90 days, unlimited by hospital discharge. We used generalized linear models with log link, normal distribution and robust standard errors to calculate risk ratios (RRs) for all-cause 28- and 90-day mortality according to two markers of chronic kidney disease: eGFR and proteinuria. Results All-cause mortality among the 4743 patients with pneumonia was 29.6% after 28 days and 37.4% after 90 days. Among the 1058 patients with sepsis, all-cause 28- and 90-day mortality were 35.6 and 44.2%, respectively. eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m2 was a risk marker of higher 28-day mortality for pneumonia (RR 1.27: 95% CI 1.12–1.43) and sepsis (RR 1.32: 95% CI 1.07–1.64), adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, smoking status and co-morbidities. Neither moderately impaired eGFR nor proteinuria were associated with short-term mortality following either infection. Conclusions People with pre-existing low eGFR but not on dialysis are at higher risk of death following pneumonia and sepsis. This association was not explained by existing co-morbidities. These patients need to be carefully monitored to prevent modifiable causes of death. PMID:25605811

  3. Prevention or Reversal of Deep Venous Insufficiency and Treatment: Why Are Spider Veins of the Legs a Serious and A Dangerous Medical Condition?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Waheed Ahmad

    Spider veins (also known as spider hemangiomas) unlike varicose veins (dilated pre-existing veins) are acquired lesions caused by venous hypertension leading to proliferation of blood vessels in the skin and subcutaneous tissues due to the release of endothelial growth factors causing vascular neogenesis. More than 60% of the patients with spider veins of the legs have significant symptoms including pain,

  4. Special Medical Conditions Associated with Catatonia in the Internal Medicine Setting: Hyponatremia-Inducing Psychosis and Subsequent Catatonia

    PubMed Central

    Novac, Andrei A; Bota, Daniela; Witkowski, Joanne; Lipiz, Jorge; Bota, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of catatonia in the psychiatry consultation service is not infrequent. Usually, the patient either presents to the Emergency Department or develops catatonia on the medical floor. This condition manifests with significant behavioral changes (from mildly decreased speech output to complete mutism) that interfere with the ability to communicate. After structural brain disorders are excluded, one of the diagnoses that always should be considered is catatonia. However, the causes of catatonia are numerous, ranging from psychiatric causes to a plethora of medical illnesses. Therefore, it is not surprising that there are many proposed underlying mechanisms of catatonia and that controversy persists about the etiology of specific cases. There are only 6 reports of hyponatremia-induced catatonia and psychosis in the literature. Here, we present the case of a 30-year-old woman with catatonia and psychosis induced by hyponatremia, and we use this report to exemplify the multitude of biologic causes of catatonia and to propose a new way to look at the neuroanatomical basis of processing, particularly the vertical processing systems we believe are involved in catatonia. PMID:25102520

  5. Net Differences in Interview Data on Chronic Conditions and Information Derived from Medical Records. Vital and Health Statistics, Series 2, No. 57.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madow, William G.

    The California study, based on data from a national survey, compared accuracy and completeness of information on 7,182 chronic health conditions of persons, 17 years of age or older, given in household interviews with diagnostic information given by group medical plan physicians. Overreporting referred to conditions reported in the interview which…

  6. Mothers of Children Diagnosed With Attention-Deficit\\/Hyperactivity Disorder: Health Conditions and Medical Care Utilization in Periods Before and After Birth of the Child

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Thomas Ray; Lisa A. Croen; Laurel A. Habel

    2009-01-01

    Background: Analyzing health conditions and medical utilization of mothers of children with attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can shed light on biologic, environmental, and psychoso- cial factors relating to ADHD. Objective: To examine health conditions, health care utilization, and costs of mothers of children with ADHD in periods before the child was diagnosed. Methods: Using automated data from Northern California Kaiser Permanente

  7. [Experience of medical assistance in the hosital of Plesetsk Cosmodrome under conditions of large patient load after explosion of a launch vehicle].

    PubMed

    Plekhanov, V N; Mel'nikov, O N; Shut', A D

    2013-11-01

    Military hospital of Plesetsk Cosmodrome was founded on 20 December 1958. The aims of the hospital were always connected with medical support of the cosmodrome, including emergency situations. On 18 March 1980 a Vostok-2M rocket exploded on its launch pad during a fuelling operation. Experience of medical assistance under conditions of large patient load showed the necessity of constant readiness to medical assistance to patients with combined pathology (burn injury, orthopedic trauma and thermochemical injury of the upper respiratory tract), expediency of compact patient accommodation along with the modern anaesthetic machine and readiness to frequent suction bronchoscopy. PMID:24611312

  8. Apparatus for detecting a condition of a medication infusion system and providing an informational signal in response thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischell, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A medication infusion system having a means for providing an informational signal when (1) medication in the reservoir falls below a threshold level; (2) a fluid leak occurs in different portions of the system; and (3) the intended medication pumping does not correlate with the pumping actually affected.

  9. Concurrent Medical Conditions and Health Care Use and Needs among Children with Learning and Behavioral Developmental Disabilities, National Health Interview Survey, 2006-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schieve, Laura A.; Gonzalez, Vanessa; Boulet, Sheree L.; Visser, Susanna N.; Rice, Catherine E.; Braun, Kim Van Naarden; Boyle, Coleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies document various associated health risks for children with developmental disabilities (DDs). Further study is needed by disability type. Using the 2006-2010 National Health Interview Surveys, we assessed the prevalence of numerous medical conditions (e.g. asthma, frequent diarrhea/colitis, seizures), health care use measures (e.g. seeing a…

  10. Medical Assistants

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    For a concise summary of the medical assistant profession the Medical Assistants entry in the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook is must read. The site covers topics ranging from the nature of the profession, working conditions, earnings, and more. The section on training, qualifications and advancement will be of special interest to medical assistant faculty and students. The section on sources of addition information will also be a good launching point for anyone seeking additional online resources.

  11. 42 CFR 484.18 - Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Administration...patients, plan of care, and medical supervision...medicine. (a) Standard: Plan of care...diagnoses, including mental status,...

  12. Conditions?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Christy Wyckoff; Scott E. Henke; Kurt C. VerCauteren

    Research interests in feral hogs typically involve their negative impacts on ecosystems or their potential as a disease reservoir, especially with disease transmission to domestic swine. Authors within scientific literature state that feral hogs were captured as part of their research, but usually fail to mention specific conditions in which hogs were captured. Novice researchers of feral hogs must rely

  13. Medical Transcriptionists: Making Medical Histories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shniper, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Medical transcriptionists are experts in the language of medicine. Describes what they do and what their working conditions, earnings, employment prospects, and training requirements are. Includes sources of additional information. (Author)

  14. Medical Request for Special Housing or Meal Plan Consideration Medical accommodations may be requested by students with physical and/or nutritional conditions. All requests will be reviewed on a

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Medical Request for Special Housing or Meal Plan Consideration Medical accommodations may. Our policy requires that the following medical information be completed by you and your attending: ____________________________________________________________________________________________ Briefly explain your medical request for special housing or meal plan consideration

  15. The biostatistical theory versus the harmful dysfunction analysis, part 1: is part-dysfunction a sufficient condition for medical disorder?

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2014-12-01

    Christopher Boorse's biostatistical theory of medical disorder claims that biological part-dysfunction (i.e., failure of an internal mechanism to perform its biological function), a factual criterion, is both necessary and sufficient for disorder. Jerome Wakefield's harmful dysfunction analysis of medical disorder agrees that part-dysfunction is necessary but rejects the sufficiency claim, maintaining that disorder also requires that the part-dysfunction causes harm to the individual, a value criterion. In this paper, I present two considerations against the sufficiency claim. First, I analyze Boorse's central argument for the sufficiency claim, the "pathologist argument," which takes pathologists' intuitions about pathology as determinative of medical disorder and conclude that it begs the question and fails to support the sufficiency claim. Second, I present four counterexamples from the medical literature in which salient part-dysfunctions are considered nondisorders, including healthy disease carriers, HIV-positive status, benign mutations, and situs inversus totalis, thus falsifying the sufficiency claim and supporting the harm criterion. PMID:25336733

  16. Teachers' Drug Reference: A Guide to Medical Conditions and Drugs Commonly Used in School-Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agins, Alan P.

    This book provides a guide to approximately 175 drugs used with children. An introduction precedes the three major sections of the guide. Section 1 provides an overview of pharmacology and therapeutics in chapters on the basics of pharmacology, the language of pharmacology and therapeutics, compliance, side effects, and medications in school.…

  17. Parent & Educators' Drug Reference: A Guide to Common Medical Conditions & Drugs Used in School-Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agins, Alan P.

    This book provides a guide to more than 180 drugs used for children. An introduction precedes the four major sections of the guide. Section 1 provides an overview of pharmacology and therapeutics in chapters on the basics of pharmacology, the language of pharmacology and therapeutics, compliance, side effects, medications in school, and drug…

  18. Health Problems and Medical Utilization Associated With Gambling Disorders: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BENJAMIN J. MORASCO; ROBERT H. PIETRZAK; CARLOS BLANCO; BRIDGET F. GRANT; DEBORAH HASIN; NANCY M. PETRY

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Pathologic gambling is believed to be associated with adverse health consequences, but no prior studies have rigorously evaluated these relationships. We sought to examine medical disorders and health service utilization associated with problem and pathologic gambling. Method: A total of 43,093 adults aged 18 years and older were evaluated in the 2001 to 2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol

  19. Trends in health services utilization, medication use, and health conditions among older adults: a 2-year retrospective chart review in a primary care practice

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Population aging poses significant challenges to primary care providers and healthcare policy makers. Primary care reform can alleviate the pressures, but these initiatives require clinical benchmarks and evidence regarding utilization patterns. The objectives of this study is to measure older patients' use of health services, number of health conditions, and use of medications at the level of a primary care practice, and to investigate age- and gender-related utilization trends. Methods A cross-sectional chart audit over a 2-year study period was conducted in the academic family practice clinic of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. All patients 65 years and older (n = 2450) were included. Main outcome measures included the number of family physician visits, specialist visits, emergency room visits, surgical admissions, diagnostic test days, inpatient hospital admissions, health conditions, and medications. Results Older patients (80-84 and 85+ age-group) had significantly more family physician visits (average of 4.4 visits per person per year), emergency room visits (average of 0.22 ER visits per year per patient), diagnostic days (average of 5.1 test days per person per year), health conditions (average of 7.7 per patient), and medications average of 8.2 medications per person). Gender differences were also observed: females had significantly more family physician visits and number of medications, while men had more specialist visits, emergency room visits, and surgical admissions. There were no gender differences for inpatient hospital admissions and number of health conditions. With the exception of the 85+ age group, we found greater intra-group variability with advancing age. Conclusion The data present a map of greater interaction with and dependency on the health care system with advancing age. The magnitudes are substantial and indicate high demands on patients and families, on professional health care providers, and on the health care system itself. There is the need to create and evaluate innovative models of care of multiple chronic conditions in the late life course. PMID:19948033

  20. [Two cases of leprosy related conditions and relevant issues on medical services for ex-leprosy patients who live in communities in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yutaka; Inoue, Taro; Tsuchiya, Ichiro; Maeda, Mitsuyoshi; Hirano, Akira

    2010-02-01

    In Japan people affected by leprosy who were forced to admit to national leprosy sanatoria under leprosy prevention/segregation law (1953) have ever been promoted to return to live in community, after destruction of the law in 1996. In this paper two cases are shown with some comments who had already been discharged from leprosy sanatoria and came late to OPD of National Suruga Sanatorium for consultations of their leprosy related conditions. One case is a 60 year-old male who developed squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) from chronic planter ulcer. The other is a 69 year-old female who developed relapse after more than 20 years BI negativity. In these cases, periods until consultation to our clinic were one year and five months, and five years and five months respectively. One reason is that there is no follow-up system of leprosy related conditions for ex-patients in current medical service of Japan. Another reason may be that patients hesitated to consult local doctors for their leprosy related conditions. Since national leprosy sanatoria will come to be closed in near future, services should be available for leprosy related conditions, such as prevention of disability (POD), prevention of worsening disability (POWD), early detection of relapse and leprosy reaction, in general medical service of Japan. PMID:20169978

  1. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    MedlinePLUS

    Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects) By Barbara Cone, Patricia Dorn, Dawn Konrad-Martin, Jennifer Lister, Candice Ortiz, and ... in our Audiology Information Series [PDF]. What Is Ototoxicity? Certain medications can damage the ear, resulting in ...

  2. 76 FR 14600 - Dental Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ...nonservice-connected dental disability professionally...service-connected medical condition (Class...i.e., a dental condition is complicating a medical condition currently...care to eliminate dental infection prior...insure successful medical...

  3. Quality in health care. Medical or managerial?

    PubMed

    Hansson, J

    2000-01-01

    Explores the notion that the introduction of total quality management (TQM) in the public health-care sector indicates a conceptual break with a tradition in which the authority to define and interpret the meaning of medical practice has been located solely within the medical profession. It also serves to shift the focus of medical practice away from its contextual and interactional character towards numerical representations and codification in monetary terms. Further, it is argued that the realization of management ideals in everyday practice is dependent more on the availability of pre-existing technologies and standard procedures than on the ingenuity of particular organizational and institutional actors. These arguments are illustrated with the reutilization for TQM purposes of "local incident reports" in a Swedish hospital organization. PMID:11200301

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of cancer in medical textbooks of ancient Iran.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Mahmoud; Ali Tabatabaei, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that ancient Iranians were among the pioneers of medical science, and are therefore admired and praised by non-Iranian scholars for their efforts and accomplishments in this field. Investigations of medical and historical texts indicate that between the 10(th) and the 18(th) century A.D., ancient Iran experienced a golden age of medicine. Great physicians such as Rhazes, al-Ahwazi, Avicenna and others reviewed the medical textbooks of civilizations such as Greece and India, Theories were scientifically criticized, superstitious beliefs were discarded, valuable innovations were added to pre-existing knowledge and the ultimate achievements were compiled as precious textbooks. Alhawi by Rhazes, Cannon by Avicenna, and Kamil al-Sina'ah by al-Ahwazi are among the works that were treasured by domestic and foreign scientists alike, as well as future generations who continued to appreciate them for centuries. The above-mentioned textbooks discuss diseases and conditions related to neurosurgery, ophthalmology, ear, nose and throat, gastroenterology, urology, skeletomuscular system and other specialties, as well as cancer and similar subjects. One of the richest texts on the description, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and prognosis of cancer and therapeutic approaches is Alhawi by Mohammad ibn Zakarya al Razi (Rhazes). This article presents a brief summary of Rhazes' views about the definition of cancer, types, signs and symptoms, prevalence, complications, medical care, treatment and even surgical indications and contraindications. Moreover, his opinions are compared against the views of other physicians and theories of modern medicine. It is also recommended to review the medical heritage of Iran and evaluate the proposed treatments based on modern methodologies and scientific approaches. PMID:25512835

  5. Sociodemographic characteristics and chronic medical conditions as risk factors for herpes zoster: a population-based study from primary care in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Esteban-Vasallo, María D; Domínguez-Berjón, M Felicitas; Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Astray-Mochales, Jenaro; Gil de Miguel, Angel

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate incidence density rates (IDR) of herpes zoster (HZ) and to analyze the association with sociodemographic characteristics and selected chronic medical conditions. The study cohort consisted of the adult population included in the Public Health System of the Autonomous Community of Madrid, Spain on 1/10/2009 (5?244?402 persons). Data source were electronic medical records from primary care between 1/10/2009-31/12/2012. Individual socioeconomic status (SES) was inferred by geocoding. Poisson regression analyses were stratified by sex, to identify factors associated with HZ. We identified 81?541 incident cases of HZ (61.7% in women and 46.5% in the group aged 60 and over). IDR was 4.11 per 1000 person-years in men and 5.95 in women. IDR were higher with age, in autochthonous population, those with lower SES and in patients with immunodeficiencies. After adjustment, higher incidence rate ratios were found with age, autochthonous origin, lower SES, and in patients with HIV-infection/AIDS (3.20, CI95% 2.90-3.53 in men and 2.98, CI95% 2.58-3.45 in women), and other immunodeficiencies (1.57, CI95% 1.41-1.75 and 1.65, CI95% 1.50-1.80). COPD, asthma, DM, ischemic heart disease, other cardiovascular diseases, and cancer were also associated with an increased incidence of HZ. We conclude that older, autochthonous patients with lower SES and with certain underlying medical conditions had a higher probability of suffering HZ. Electronic databases are useful for estimating the incidence of HZ, and for finding associations with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Identifying unrecognized risk factors for HZ, such as asthma or cardiovascular diseases, is crucial to interpret the epidemiology of HZ, to target vaccination programs and to monitor their effect. PMID:24805130

  6. Medical Device Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    A medical device is any product used to diagnose, cure, or treat a condition, or to prevent disease. They ... may need one in a hospital. To use medical devices safely Know how your device works. Keep ...

  7. Impact of cardiovascular risk factors and medication use on the efficacy of remote ischaemic conditioning: post hoc subgroup analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sloth, Astrid Drivsholm; Schmidt, Michael Rahbek; Munk, Kim; Schmidt, Morten; Pedersen, Lars; Toft Sørensen, Henrik; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Bøttcher, M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Remote ischaemic conditioning (RIC) promotes cardioprotection in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The effect of RIC may be modified by cardiovascular risk factors and their medications. We examined whether cardiovascular risk factors, lipid and glucose levels, and medication use influenced the efficacy of RIC in patients with STEMI treated with pPCI. Design Post hoc subgroup analysis of a single-centre randomised controlled trial. Participants A total of 139 patients with STEMI, randomised during ambulance transport to hospital for pPCI with (n=71) or without (n=68) RIC, met the trial criteria and achieved data for a myocardial salvage index (MSI). Interventions RIC was administered through intermittent arm ischaemia with four cycles of 5?min inflation and 5?min deflation of a blood pressure cuff. Primary outcome measures MSI, estimated by single-photon emission CT. We evaluated the efficacy of RIC on the MSI in patient subgroups of cardiovascular risk factors, lipid and glucose levels, and medication use. Results We found no significant difference in the efficacy of RIC in subgroups of cardiovascular risk factors, lipid and glucose levels, and medication use. However, point estimates indicated a reduced effect of RIC among smokers (median difference in MSI between RIC and control groups: ?0.02 (95% CI ?0.32 to 0.28) in smokers vs 0.25 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.42) in non-smokers, p value for interaction=0.13) and an increased effect of RIC in statin users (median difference in MSI between RIC and control groups: 0.34 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.65) in statin users vs 0.09 (95% CI ?0.11 to 0.29) in non-statin users, p value for interaction=0.19). Conclusions RIC as an adjunct to pPCI seems to improve MSI in our trial population of patients with STEMI regardless of most cardiovascular risk factors and their medications. Our post hoc finding on a limited sample size calls for further investigation in large-scale multicentre trials. Trial registration number NCT00435266. PMID:25838505

  8. Weather conditions and visits to the medical wing of emergency rooms in a metropolitan area during the warm season in Israel: a predictive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Ilya; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra; Chetrit, Angela; Stav, Nir; Epstein, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    Global climate changes affect health and present new challenges to healthcare systems. The aim of the present study was to analyze the pattern of visits to the medical wing of emergency rooms (ERs) in public hospitals during warm seasons, and to develop a predictive model that will forecast the number of visits to ERs 2 days ahead. Data on daily visits to the ERs of the four largest medical centers in the Tel-Aviv metropolitan area during the warm months of the year (April-October, 2001-2004), the corresponding daily meteorological data, daily electrical power consumption (a surrogate marker for air-conditioning), air-pollution parameters, and calendar information were obtained and used in the analyses. The predictive model employed a time series analysis with transitional Poisson regression. The concise multivariable model was highly accurate ( r 2 = 0.819). The contribution of mean daily temperature was small but significant: an increase of 1°C in ambient temperature was associated with a 1.47% increase in the number of ER visits ( P < 0.001). An increase in electrical power consumption significantly attenuated the effect of weather conditions on ER visits by 4% per 1,000 MWh ( P < 0.001). Higher daily mean SO2 concentrations were associated with a greater number of ER visits (1% per 1 ppb increment; P = 0.017). Calendar data were the main predictors of ER visits ( r 2 = 0.794). The predictive model was highly accurate in forecasting the number of visits to ERs 2 days ahead. The marginal effect of temperature on the number of ER visits can be attributed to behavioral adaptations, including the use of air-conditioning.

  9. Effect of Hot-Attribute Aged Ginger Tea on Chinese Medical Pulse Condition of Healthy Young Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Dan-Ping; Tyan, Chu-Chang; Chen, Jian-Jung; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Young individuals typically have a dry-heat (?? zào rè) constitution and feel overly stimulated. This study observes specialties on the right-bar (?? yòu gu?n) section of the radial-arterial pulse of healthy young subjects, and investigates pulse variations induced by different attribute foods. Chinese medical doctors grouped thirty subjects into heat and non-heat constitutions. Each subject took water, aged ginger tea, and coconut water, well recognized as neutral, hot, and cold drinks, on different visits. The current study observed physiological signals induced by the samples using novel noninvasive sphygmography and a blood pressure monitor. As the baseline bigger percussion wave, dicrotic wave, and area in the sphygmogram of the non-heat constitution subjects, this work suggests that blood vessels of these subjects may be more relaxed than that of the heat constitution ones. Stroke volume increased and pulse pressure decreased in the non-heat constitution subjects after taking aged ginger tea, which may elevate arterial compliance corresponding to maintaining an estimated radial-arterial diameter in our study. However, the percussion wave widened and the valley increased in the heat constitution subjects after taking aged ginger tea. This corresponds to the markedly reduced radial-arterial diameter, indicating tighter blood vessels than the baseline status. Accordingly, this study confirms that selecting foods with attributes opposite to personal constitutions is important for reestablishing a healthy cold-heat balance within the human body. Moreover, novel noninvasive sphygmography may be a useful instrument to classify scientifically the heat personal constitution and the responses to different attribute foods. PMID:24716108

  10. Socioeconomic inequalities in mortality from conditions amenable to medical interventions: do they reflect inequalities in access or quality of health care?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported large socioeconomic inequalities in mortality from conditions amenable to medical intervention, but it is unclear whether these can be attributed to inequalities in access or quality of health care, or to confounding influences such as inequalities in background risk of diseases. We therefore studied whether inequalities in mortality from conditions amenable to medical intervention vary between countries in patterns which differ from those observed for other (non-amenable) causes of death. More specifically, we hypothesized that, as compared to non-amenable causes, inequalities in mortality from amenable causes are more strongly associated with inequalities in health care use and less strongly with inequalities in common risk factors for disease such as smoking. Methods Cause-specific mortality data for people aged 30–74 years were obtained for 14 countries, and were analysed by calculating age-standardized mortality rates and relative risks comparing a lower with a higher educational group. Survey data on health care use and behavioural risk factors for people aged 30–74 years were obtained for 12 countries, and were analysed by calculating age-and sex-adjusted odds ratios comparing a low with a higher educational group. Patterns of association were explored by calculating correlation coefficients. Results In most countries and for most amenable causes of death substantial inequalities in mortality were observed, but inequalities in mortality from amenable causes did not vary between countries in patterns that are different from those seen for inequalities in non-amenable mortality. As compared to non-amenable causes, inequalities in mortality from amenable causes are not more strongly associated with inequalities in health care use. Inequalities in mortality from amenable causes are also not less strongly associated with common risk factors such as smoking. Conclusions We did not find evidence that inequalities in mortality from amenable conditions are related to inequalities in access or quality of health care. Further research is needed to find the causes of socio-economic inequalities in mortality from amenable conditions, and caution should be exercised in interpreting these inequalities as indicating health care deficiencies. PMID:22578154

  11. Diurnal and twenty-four hour patterning of human diseases: acute and chronic common and uncommon medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Smolensky, Michael H; Portaluppi, Francesco; Manfredini, Roberto; Hermida, Ramon C; Tiseo, Ruana; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda L; Haus, Erhard L

    2015-06-01

    The symptom intensity and mortality of human diseases, conditions, and syndromes exhibit diurnal or 24 h patterning, e.g., skin: atopic dermatitis, urticaria, psoriasis, and palmar hyperhidrosis; gastrointestinal: esophageal reflux, peptic ulcer (including perforation and hemorrhage), cyclic vomiting syndrome, biliary colic, hepatic variceal hemorrhage, and proctalgia fugax; infection: susceptibility, fever, and mortality; neural: frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe seizures, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, hereditary progressive dystonia, and pain (cancer, post-surgical, diabetic neuropathic and foot ulcer, tooth caries, burning mouth and temporomandibular syndromes, fibromyalgia, sciatica, intervertebral vacuum phenomenon, multiple sclerosis muscle spasm, and migraine, tension, cluster, hypnic, and paroxysmal hemicranial headache); renal: colic and nocturnal enuresis and polyuria; ocular: bulbar conjunctival redness, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, intraocular pressure and anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, and recurrent corneal erosion syndrome; psychiatric/behavioral: major and seasonal affective depressive disorders, bipolar disorder, parasuicide and suicide, dementia-associated agitation, and addictive alcohol, tobacco, and heroin cravings and withdrawal phenomena; plus autoimmune and musculoskeletal: rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, axial spondylarthritis, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Knowledge of these and other 24 h patterns of human pathophysiology informs research of their underlying circadian and other endogenous mechanisms, external temporal triggers, and more effective patient care entailing clinical chronopreventive and chronotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25129839

  12. The Effect of Different Storage Conditions on the Physical Properties of Pigmented Medical Grade I Silicone Maxillofacial Material

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dharrab, Ayman A.; Tayel, Seham B.; Abodaya, Mona H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different storage solutions that simulate acidic, alkaline, and sebum conditiions on the physical properties of pigmented (colorant elastomer) cosmesil M511 maxillofacial prosthetic material. Materials and Methods. Sixty specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions and were tested before and after immersion of different storage conditions for six months at 37?°C. The following tests were performed: color changes (group I), solution absorption (group II), surface roughness (group III), and scanning electron microscopy (group IV). Results. There were no significant changes observed in the color and solution absorption tests while surface roughness revealed significant difference between control group and other testing storage medium groups, and this result was supported by SEM analysis that revealed limited surface changes. Conclusions. Cosmaseil material is an acceptable cross-linked formulation that withstands storage in different solutions with variable pH. The addition of pigment cannot vary the physical properties of these materials. Surface roughness test as well as SEM microscopic study showed moderate changes indicating a limited effect on the surface of the material. PMID:23606978

  13. Preserved function of late-outgrowth endothelial cells in medically treated hypertensive patients under well-controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Herrmann, Sandra M S; Zhu, Xiangyang; Jordan, Kyra L; Gloviczki, Monika L; Lerman, Amir; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Lilach O

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) participate in renal repair, but their number and function may be impaired by exposure to cardiovascular risk factors. The number of circulating EPCs is decreased in essential and renovascular hypertensive patients, but the effects of hypertension on EPC function are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that EPC function was preserved under well-controlled conditions in treated hypertensive patients. Patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS; n=22) or essential hypertension (n=24) were studied during controlled sodium intake and antihypertensive regimen. Late-outgrowth EPCs were isolated from the inferior vena cava (IVC) and renal vein blood of ARAS and essential hypertension patients and a peripheral vein of matched normotensive controls (n=18). The angiogenic function of EPCs was assessed in vitro, and multidetector computed tomography was used to measure single-kidney hemodynamics and function in ARAS and essential hypertension patients. Inflammatory biomarkers and EPC homing signal levels and renal release were calculated. Inferior vena cava and renal vein-obtained EPC function were similar in ARAS and essential hypertension patients and comparable to that in normal controls (tube length, 171.86±16.846, 191.09±14.222, 174.925±19.774 ?m, respectively). Function of renal vein-obtained EPCs directly correlated with stenotic kidney glomerular filtration rate, EPC homing factors, and anti-inflammatory mediator levels in ARAS patients. Therefore, EPC function was relatively preserved in ARAS patients, although it directly correlated with renal function. Adequate EPC function supports the feasibility of using autologous EPCs as a therapeutic option in essential and renovascular hypertensive patients. Homing signals and inflammatory mediators may potentially regulate EPC angiogenic function. PMID:25047576

  14. [Forward medical air evacuation].

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Erik; Le Dorze, Patrick Causse; Hersan, Olivier; Pohl, Jean-Baptiste; Angot, Emmanuel

    2014-09-01

    The medical chain which assures the treatment of casualties from the theatre of operations back to France comprises several links connected by medical air transport. Whether it is tactical or strategic, it forms an integral part of the treatment pathway and offers casualties the best possible conditions for medical treatment with a high degree of safety, speed and traceability. PMID:25464630

  15. Increased IgG4 responses to multiple food and animal antigens indicate a polyclonal expansion and differentiation of pre-existing B cells in IgG4-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Emma L; Vermeulen, Ellen; Makuch, Mateusz; van Leeuwen, Astrid; Sadler, Ross; Cargill, Tamsin; Klenerman, Paul; Aalberse, Rob C; van Ham, S Marieke; Barnes, Eleanor; Rispens, Theo

    2015-01-01

    Background IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic fibroinflammatory condition, characterised by an elevated serum IgG4 concentration and abundant IgG4-positive plasma cells in the involved organs. An important question is whether the elevated IgG4 response is causal or a reflection of immune-regulatory mechanisms of the disease. Objectives To investigate if the IgG4 response in IgG4-RD represents a generalised polyclonal amplification by examining the response to common environmental antigens. Methods Serum from 24 patients with IgG4-RD (14 treatment-naive, 10 treatment-experienced), 9 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and an elevated serum IgG4 (PSC-high IgG4), and 18 healthy controls were tested against egg white and yolk, milk, banana, cat, peanut, rice and wheat antigens by radioimmunoassay. Results We demonstrated an elevated polyclonal IgG4 response to multiple antigens in patients with IgG4-RD and in PSC-high IgG4, compared with healthy controls. There was a strong correlation between serum IgG4 and antigen-specific responses. Responses to antigens were higher in treatment-naive compared with treatment-experienced patients with IgG4-RD. Serum electrophoresis and immunofixation demonstrated polyclonality. Conclusions This is the first study to show enhanced levels of polyclonal IgG4 to multiple antigens in IgG4-RD. This supports that elevated IgG4 levels reflect an aberrant immunological regulation of the overall IgG4 response, but does not exclude that causality of disease could be antigen-driven. PMID:25646372

  16. Medical marijuana.

    PubMed

    Marmor, J B

    1998-06-01

    Although many clinical studies suggest the medical utility of marijuana for some conditions, the scientific evidence is weak. Many patients in California are self-medicating with marijuana, and physicians need data to assess the risks and benefits. The only reasonable solution to this problem is to encourage research on the medical effects of marijuana. The current regulatory system should be modified to remove barriers to clinical research with marijuana. The NIH panel has identified several conditions for which there may be therapeutic benefit from marijuana use and that merit further research. Marijuana should be held to the same evaluation standards of safety and efficacy as other drugs (a major flaw in Proposition 215) but should not have to be proved better than current medications for its use to be adopted. The therapeutic window for marijuana and THC between desired effect and unpleasant side effects is narrow and is a major reason for discontinuing use. Although the inhaled route of administration has the benefit of allowing patients to self-titrate the dose, the smoking of crude plant material is problematic. The NIH panel recommended that a high priority be given to the development of a controlled inhaled form of THC. The presence of a naturally occurring cannabinoid-receptor system in the brain suggests that research on selective analogues of THC may be useful to enhance its therapeutic effects and minimize adverse effects. PMID:9656007

  17. Cyber-Physical Medical and Medication Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert M. K. Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Medical and medication devices are real-time systems with safety and timing requirements. They range from hard-real-time, embedded, and reactive systems such as pacemakers to soft-real-time, stand-alone medication dispensers. Many of these devices are already connected to computer networks, especially in hospital intensive-care units, so that patients' conditions detected by sensors can be monitored in real-time at remote computer stations nearby

  18. Diagnosis: medical and psychosocial conditions

    E-print Network

    Garfunkel, Eric

    manage- ment Counseling: family support, behavior modification and education planning Locations Northern Disorders (FASD) What you can do to help your child www.beinthekNOwnj.org How We Can Help Through a grant of a developmental pediatrician, nurse, psychologist, physical and occupational therapists, speech pathologist

  19. [Social conditions in which medical students from the faculty of medicine of the National University of Mexico (UNAM) perform their Social Service in rural areas].

    PubMed

    Hamui-Sutton, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the conditions in which medical students perform their Social Service, highlighting their experiences in areas such as: information before they move and the motivation to leave home; the perception of personal and environmental lack of safety; the institutional support that they receive during their work in the community and the financial support provided. The methodological design of the study included an exploratory phase, in which collective interviews were performed, using the focal group technique, with students who had been in rural areas. Three hundred sixty cases were considered, 72.8% corresponded to rural areas, and 27.7% to Mexico City. According to the findings, the following actions are proposed: give better information and improve the process of vacancy selection; increase the scholarship received by students in Social Service; establish legal, police, and community support mechanisms to guarantee the student's personal safety; pay attention to aspects such as the student's emotional and social situation, and design programs with gender perspective to enhance certainty and safety. PMID:22820362

  20. Environmental Taxes and Pre-Existing Distortions: The Normalization Trap

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronnie Schöb

    1997-01-01

    The double-dividend hypothesisclaims that green taxes will both improve the environment andreduce the distortions of existing taxes. According to the earlierliterature on the double dividend the tax rate for pollutinggoods should be higher than the Pigovian tax which fully internalizesthe marginal social damage from pollution, in order to obtaina ’second dividend‘. On the contrary, Bovenberg and de Mooij(1994) argue that

  1. Pre-existing brain states predict risky choices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Feng; Soon, Chun Siong; Mullette-Gillman, O'Dhaniel A; Hsieh, Po-Jang

    2014-11-01

    Rational decision-making models assume that people resolve an economic problem based on its properties and the underlying utility. Here we challenge this view by examining whether pre-stimulus endogenous neuronal fluctuations can bias economic decisions. We recorded subjects' pre-stimulus neural activation patterns with fMRI before presentation and choice between pairs of certain outcomes and risky gambles. Our results indicate that activities in the left nucleus accumbens and medial frontal gyrus can bias subsequent risky decision making, showing that neuronal activities in regions associated with uncertainty and reward processing are involved in biasing subsequent choice selection. This finding challenges theories which propose that choices merely reveal stable underlying distributions of hedonic utility. Endogenous brain states of this sort might originate from a systematic cause or a stochastic type of neural noise, which can be construed as contextual factors that shape people's decision making. PMID:25067816

  2. Treatment of pre-existing cardiomyopathy during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Sofie; De Pauw, Michel; Tromp, Fiona; Ascoop, An-Kristien; Roelens, Kristien; De Backer, Julie

    2014-04-01

    Heart failure is an established predictor of primary cardiac events during pregnancy. Adequate heart failure treatment in pregnant women is hampered by important foetotoxicity of several conventional drugs. Hydralazine with or without long-acting nitrates has been proposed as an alternative for ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. There are no published data, however, on the use of hydralazine to treat heart failure during pregnancy. We describe the course and outcome of pregnancy in two patients with heart failure. A 31-year-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy was not treated with hydralazine during pregnancy and developed worsening heart failure. A 36-year-old woman with ischaemic cardiomyopathy was treated with hydralazine early during pregnancy and remained stable throughout and after pregnancy. We assume that early initiation of hydralazine as an alternative for ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers during pregnancy in patients with cardiomyopathy could prevent further left ventricular dilatation and worsening heart failure. PMID:24783472

  3. Photogeneration of Gelatinous Networks from Pre-Existing Polymers

    E-print Network

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    , photoresists for micro- and nanofabrication,5,6 membranes,7,8 tissue engineering,9 and controlled drug release include polymers con- taining pendant cinnamate14 and anthracene15,16 groups. Irradiation of polymers

  4. Medication Guide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before starting any new medication. First-Line Medications: Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) These medications are called "first- ... they might try a "second-line" medication instead. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) helps smokers quit by reducing ...

  5. Nontraumatic dental condition-related visits to emergency departments on weekdays, weekends and night hours: findings from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care survey

    PubMed Central

    Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Fischer, Melissa Christine; Sadeghi, Saba Noori; Xiang, Qun; Szabo, Aniko

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the rates of nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC)-related emergency department (ED) visits are higher during the typical working hours of dental offices and lower during night hours, as well as the associated factors. Methods We analyzed data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 1997 through 2007 using multivariate binary and polytomous logistic regression adjusted for survey design to determine the effect of predictors on specified outcome variables. Results Overall, 4,726 observations representing 16.4 million NTDC-related ED visits were identified. Significant differences in rates of NTDC-related ED visits were observed with 40%–50% higher rates during nonworking hours and 20% higher rates on weekends than the overall average rate of 170 visits per hour. Compared with 19–33 year olds, subjects < 18 years old had significantly higher relative rates of NTDC-related ED visits during nonworking hours [relative rate ratio (RRR) = 1.6 to 1.8], whereas those aged 73 and older had lower relative rates during nonworking hours (RRR = 0.4; overall P = 0.0005). Compared with those having private insurance, Medicaid and self-pay patients had significantly lower relative rates of NTDC visits during nonworking and night hours (RRR = 0.6 to 0.7, overall P < 0.0003). Patients with a dental reason for visit were overrepresented during the night hours (RRR = 1.3; overall P = 0.04). Conclusion NTDC-related visits to ED occurred at a higher rate during nonworking hours and on weekends and were significantly associated with age, patient-stated reason for visit and payer type. PMID:24039453

  6. [The medical creed].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ya S

    2015-01-01

    In this review article the author discusses peculiarities of medical practice, requirements to medical profession, medicine as a vocation, and the role of these factors in the choice of health profession. Special attention is given to diagnostics and classifcation of internal diseases, problems of medical practice and science, significance of practical experience, medical intuition and judgment for diagnostics of pathological conditions. The role of medical deontology and ethics as a doctrine of commitment to speciality medicine is emphasized. The comprehensive examination of therapeutic problems include prescription of medication on an individual basis, the danger of polypragmasia and passivity in therapy. The critical attitude toward fashionable trends in medicine and the ability to think informally are encouraged. The article is concluded with the discussion of the relationship between medical science and practice. PMID:26031142

  7. [French physicians in independent practice: opinions on their conditions of work and the issue of over/under staffing of medical workforce in their areas].

    PubMed

    Doan, Bui Dang Ha; Lévy, Danièle

    2006-01-01

    In France, ambulatory care is provided to patients mostly by independent physicians, GPs and specialists, paid on a fee-for-service basis. A national agreement between the Sickness Insurance Fund and the medical associations sets the price of different medical services. Due to the numerus clausus imposed upon the medical schools since the 70's, the yearly number of new graduates has sharply decreased and a feeling of manpower shortage has spread throughout the health system, in the public hospitals and the ambulatory care sector as well. Moreover increased dissatisfaction has been perceived among independent practitioners (they were 56 % of all the medical profession in early 2004). In this context, an opinion survey was undertaken among a sample of 3000 independent doctors whose one thousand have answered to the postal questionnaire. PMID:16739775

  8. Abortion - medical

    MedlinePLUS

    Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion ... A medical, or nonsurgical, abortion can be done within 7 weeks from the first day of the woman's last ...

  9. Medical geography in Charaka Samhita

    PubMed Central

    Bhavana, K.R.; Shreevathsa

    2014-01-01

    Charaka Samhita is the oldest and the most authentic treatise on Ayurveda and is the ancient medical science of India. Apart from giving information on medical conditions and their treatment; it also gives valuable information on geographical, social, and economic conditions of India. This article is an attempt to explore geographical conditions of the ancient India, its geographical position in present India and its medical significance. PMID:26195898

  10. Medical applications of artificial olfactometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Severin, Erik J. (Inventor); Wong, Bernard (Inventor); Kelso, David M. (Inventor); Munoz, Beth C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides methods for detecting the presence of an analyte indicative of various medical conditions, including halitosis, periodontal disease and other diseases are also disclosed.

  11. Exploration Medical Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David; Wu, Jimmy; Barsten, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember. This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this goal and our current areas of interest. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to identify medical conditions of concern during exploration missions. The list was derived from space flight medical incidents, the shuttle medical checklist, the International Space Station medical checklist, and expert opinion. The conditions on the list were prioritized according to mission type by a panel comprised of flight surgeons, physician astronauts, engineers, and scientists. From the prioritized list, the ExMC element determined the capabilities needed to address the medical conditions of concern. Where such capabilities were not currently available, a gap was identified. The element s research plan outlines these gaps and the tasks identified to achieve the desired capabilities for exploration missions. This poster is being presented to inform the audience of the gaps and tasks being investigated by ExMC and to encourage discussions of shared interests and possible future collaborations.

  12. Comorbid depressive symptomatology: isolating the effects of chronic medical conditions on self-reported depressive symptoms among community-dwelling older adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Terry L. Mills

    2001-01-01

    Advances in medical technology and surgical knowledge have greatly extended the life expectancy of older individuals with chronic disabilities. Among the older adult population the prevalence of comorbid chronic illness and depressive symptoms has often been investigated. Yet there continues to be a lack of understanding about the consequences of specific chronic illnesses on depressive symptoms. Using cross-sectional data while

  13. "You teach us to listen,… but you don't teach us about suffering": self-care and resilience strategies in medical school curricula.

    PubMed

    Outram, Sue; Kelly, Brian

    2014-11-01

    This article examines the pre-vocational preparation of doctors to cope with the demands of clinical practice, drawing on literature from across a number of domains: mental health, psychological stress among medical students and medical practitioners; and self-care strategies in medicine curricula. High rates of psychological distress in medical students and medical practitioners were consistently reported. A number of questions remain pertinent to medical education: how does the experience of medical education impact on this level of distress, and possibly exacerbate pre-existing student vulnerabilities? What will help future doctors respond to, and cope with, suffering in their patients? Can the formal curriculum build resilience? Medical schools and educators have a responsibility to address these questions and to provide effective self-care curricula. In this review promising interventions such as mindfulness training are reported, frameworks to guide self-awareness in medical students are suggested, and recommendations for a self-care curriculum are made. PMID:25395229

  14. Medical Scenarios Relevant to Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacal, Kira; Hurs, Victor; Doerr, Harold

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Operational Support Team (MOST) was tasked by the JSC Space Medicine and Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) to incorporate medical simulation into 1) medical training for astronaut-crew medical officers (CMO) and medical flight control teams and 2) evaluations of procedures and resources required for medical care aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Development of evidence-based medical scenarios that mimic the physiology observed during spaceflight will be needed for the MOST to complete these two tasks. The MOST used a human patient simulator, the ISS-like resources in the Medical Simulation Laboratory (MSL), and evidence from space operations, military operations and medical literature to develop space relevant medical scenarios. These scenarios include conditions concerning airway management, Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and mitigating anaphylactic symptoms. The MOST has used these space relevant medical scenarios to develop a preliminary space medical training regimen for NASA flight surgeons, Biomedical Flight Controllers (Biomedical Engineers; BME) and CMO-analogs. This regimen is conducted by the MOST in the MSL. The MOST has the capability to develop evidence-based space-relevant medical scenarios that can help SLSD I) demonstrate the proficiency of medical flight control teams to mitigate space-relevant medical events and 2) validate nextgeneration medical equipment and procedures for space medicine applications.

  15. SPIE Medical Imaging Medical Imaging

    E-print Network

    Miga, Michael I.

    1 SPIE Medical Imaging 2006 1 Medical Imaging Fundamentals Kenneth H. Wong, Ph.D. Division of Computer Assisted Interventions and Medical Robotics (CAIMR) Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center Department of Radiology Georgetown University SPIE Medical Imaging 2006 2 Main Themes · Describe

  16. The Effects of Dysthymic Disorder on Health-Related Quality of Life and Disability Days in Persons with Comorbid Medical Conditions in the General Population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernhard T. Baune; Riccardo N. Caniato; Volker Arolt; Klaus Berger

    2009-01-01

    Background: We aimed to investigate in medical disorders the effects of comorbid dysthymic disorder as compared to major depressive disorder (MDD) on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) and disability days in the general population. Methods: In a population-based study 4,181 individuals were assessed for the presence of dysthymic disorder and depression, utilizing the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Each participant received

  17. Demonopolizing medical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sanjeev; Thornton, Karla; Komaromy, Miriam; Kalishman, Summers; Katzman, Joanna; Duhigg, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In the past 100 years, there has been an explosion of medical knowledge-and in the next 50 years, more medical knowledge will be available than ever before. Regrettably, current medical practice has been unable to keep pace with this explosion of medical knowledge. Specialized medical knowledge has been confined largely to academic medical centers (i.e., teaching hospitals) and to specialists in major cities; it has been disconnected from primary care clinicians on the front lines of patient care. To bridge this disconnect, medical knowledge must be demonopolized, and a platform for collaborative practice amongst all clinicians needs to be created. A new model of health care and education delivery called Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes), developed by the first author, does just this. Using videoconferencing technology and case-based learning, ECHO's medical specialists provide training and mentoring to primary care clinicians working in rural and urban underserved areas so that the latter can deliver the best evidence-based care to patients with complex health conditions in their own communities. The ECHO model increases access to care in rural and underserved areas, and it demonopolizes specialized medical knowledge and expertise. PMID:24280860

  18. Medical Management

    MedlinePLUS

    ... form Search Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Medical Management Although there’s no cure for CMT, there are ... individualized physical therapy program. For more on medical management of CMT, see Surgery Sometimes, Bracing Often, Caution ...

  19. Medication Errors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Risk Management (PDF - 1.1MB) Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff - Applying Human Factors and Usability Engineering to Optimize Medical Device Design Spotlight Guidance for Industry: Safety Considerations for Product Design to Minimize Medication ...

  20. College students' use of widely advertised medications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lydia J. Burak; Amy Damico

    2000-01-01

    The authors describe college and university students' use of widely advertised pharmaceutical products. Four hundred seventy-one students from three institutions completed self-administered questionnaires that addressed the use of advertised medications, attention to magazine ads for medications, communications with physicians about medications, and the conditions the medications address. Results indicated that the majority of the students used at least one of

  1. MEDICAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCE Deselection of applicants

    E-print Network

    Dixon, Peter

    MEDICAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCE Deselection of applicants (for medics and vets) Competition arrangements. Criminal Record Check (for medics and vets) All offers of a place on this course will be subject. Those of you being offered a place (conditional or unconditional) for Medical or Veterinary Sciences

  2. Over-the-horizon, connected home/office (OCHO): situation management of environmental, medical, and security conditions at remote premises via broadband wireless access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2010-04-01

    Broadband wireless access standards, together with advances in the development of commercial sensing and actuator devices, enable the feasibility of a consumer service for a multi-sensor system that monitors the conditions within a residence or office: the environment/infrastructure, patient-occupant health, and physical security. The proposed service is a broadband reimplementation and combination of existing services to allow on-demand reports on and management of the conditions by remote subscribers. The flow of on-demand reports to subscribers and to specialists contracted to mitigate out-of-tolerance conditions is the foreground process. Service subscribers for an over-the-horizon connected home/office (OCHO) monitoring system are the occupant of the premises and agencies, contracted by the service provider, to mitigate or resolve any observed out-of-tolerance condition(s) at the premises. Collectively, these parties are the foreground users of the OCHO system; the implemented wireless standards allow the foreground users to be mobile as they request situation reports on demand from the subsystems on remote conditions that comprise OCHO via wireless devices. An OCHO subscriber, i.e., a foreground user, may select the level of detail found in on-demand reports, i.e., the amount of information displayed in the report of monitored conditions at the premises. This is one context of system operations. While foreground reports are sent only periodically to subscribers, the information generated by the monitored conditions at the premises is continuous and is transferred to a background configuration of servers on which databases reside. These databases are each used, generally, in non-real time, for the assessment and management of situations defined by attributes like those being monitored in the foreground by OCHO. This is the second context of system operations. Context awareness and management of conditions at the premises by a second group of analysts and decision makers who extract information from the OCHO data in the databases form the foundation of the situation management problem.

  3. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Medical consequences of doping with anabolic androgenic steroids: effects on reproductive functions.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Vorona, Elena

    2015-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) are appearance and performance-enhancing drugs (APEDs) used in competitive athletics, in recreational sports, and by body-builders. The global lifetime prevalence of AASs abuse is 6.4% for males and 1.6% for women. Many AASs, often obtained from the internet and dubious sources, have not undergone proper testing and are consumed at extremely high doses and in irrational combinations, also along with other drugs. Controlled clinical trials investigating undesired side effects are lacking because ethical restrictions prevent exposing volunteers to potentially toxic regimens, obscuring a causal relationship between AASs abuse and possible sequelae. Because of the negative feedback in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, in men AASs cause reversible suppression of spermatogenesis, testicular atrophy, infertility, and erectile dysfunction (anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism). Should spermatogenesis not recover after AASs abuse, a pre-existing fertility disorder may have resurfaced. AASs frequently cause gynecomastia and acne. In women, AASs may disrupt ovarian function. Chronic strenuous physical activity leads to menstrual irregularities and, in severe cases, to the female athlete triad (low energy intake, menstrual disorders and low bone mass), making it difficult to disentangle the effects of sports and AASs. Acne, hirsutism and (irreversible) deepening of the voice are further consequences of AASs misuse. There is no evidence that AASs cause breast carcinoma. Detecting AASs misuse through the control network of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) not only aims to guarantee fair conditions for athletes, but also to protect them from medical sequelae of AASs abuse. PMID:25805894

  4. 20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...person, other than the United States, to pay damages, OWCP or SOL will determine whether recoveries received from one or more...is both practicable and equitable, as determined by OWCP or SOL, in its discretion, the conditions will be treated as...

  5. 20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...person, other than the United States, to pay damages, OWCP or SOL will determine whether recoveries received from one or more...is both practicable and equitable, as determined by OWCP or SOL, in its discretion, the conditions will be treated as...

  6. Medical Dictionary of Popular Medical Terms

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created by MedicineNet.com, this free and constantly revised encylopedic dictionary of classic and contemporary medical terms contains over 9,000 entries. Written entirely by physicians for both professional and non-professional readers, the dictionary also includes "pertinent scientific items, abbreviations, acronyms, jargon, institutions, projects, symptoms, syndromes, eponyms, medical history -- all having to do with medicine and the biomedical sciences, particularly anything of value and of interest." Users can browse the dictionary by alphabetical entry or conduct a keyword search. The length of dictionary entries vary widely, and some are quite brief. Some, however (mostly conditions or diseases), include links to detailed articles and related forums at the MedicineNet main site. While new medical information sites seem to pop up every day, the depth of Medterms, the frequent updates, and its doctor-only editors mark it as a notable resource.

  7. Integrated Commissioning for a Large Medical Facility 

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Y.; Batten, T.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Giebler, T.; Liu, M.; Zhou, J.; Cameron, C.; Keeble, B.; Hirchak, R.

    2000-01-01

    The energy costs of heating, ventilating and air conditioning usually represents a large portion of the utility bills for a medical facility. One large, modem medical center located in the hot and humid region of southern Texas includes clinic areas...

  8. Medical Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer County Community Coll., Trenton, NJ.

    This document is one of a series of student workbooks developed for workplace skill development courses or workshops by Mercer County Community College (New Jersey) and its partners. Designed to help employees of medical establishments learn medical terminology, this course provides information on basic word structure, body parts, suffixes and…

  9. The Association of Cardioprotective Medications with Pneumonia-Related Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Albert; Good, Chester; Downs, John R.; Fine, Michael J.; Pugh, Mary Jo V.; Anzueto, Antonio; Mortensen, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Little research has examined whether cardiovascular medications, other than statins, are associated with improved outcomes after pneumonia. Our aim was to examine the association between the use of beta-blockers, statins, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) with pneumonia-related outcomes. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective population-based study on male patients ?65 years of age hospitalized with pneumonia and who did not have pre-existing cardiac disease. Our primary analyses were multilevel regression models that examined the association between cardiovascular medication classes and either mortality or cardiovascular events. Results Our cohort included 21,985 patients: 22% died within 90 days of admission, and 22% had a cardiac event within 90 days. The cardiovascular medications studied that were associated with decreased 90-day mortality included: statins (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.63–0.77), ACE inhibitors (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.74–0.91), and ARBs (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.44–0.77). However, none of the medications were significantly associated with decreased cardiovascular events. Discussion While statins, ACE inhibitors, and ARBs, were associated with decreased mortality, there was no significant association with decreased CV events. These results indicate that this decreased mortality is unlikely due to their potential cardioprotective effects. PMID:24489672

  10. Medications Older Adults Should Avoid

    MedlinePLUS

    Medications Older Adults Should Avoid Tools and Tips Printer-friendly PDF Click here to see our other tip sheets. Because older adults often experience chronic health conditions that require treatment ...

  11. Medication Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... behavior, such as to reduce self-injury or aggression. Once a symptom is no longer a problem, ... of repetitive behaviors; decrease anxiety, irritability, tantrums, and aggressive behavior; and improve eye contact. Tricyclics These medications ...

  12. Medical Scientists

    MedlinePLUS

    ... little supervision, forming their own hypotheses and developing experiments, accordingly. They often lead teams of technicians, and ... prospective medical scientists the opportunity to develop their experiments and, sometimes, to supervise undergraduates. Ph.D. programs ...

  13. Medical Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  14. Medical Assistants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... signs, such as heart rate and blood pressure. Training Medical assistants who do not have postsecondary education ... all workers was $34,750. On-the-job Training Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in ...

  15. BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY AUTHORIZATION FOR LIMITED RELEASE OF MEDICAL INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    medical information (including pertinent medical records), and to discuss my medical condition providers.) 1. 2. 3. I understand that the forgoing records and medical information are limited onlyBOISE STATE UNIVERSITY AUTHORIZATION FOR LIMITED RELEASE OF MEDICAL INFORMATION ("Release") I

  16. Medication Math

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Joey

    2008-10-16

    Medication calculation needs to be completed accurately for proper patient treatment. In this section you will need to review and improve your medication math. Understanding math: Math and Culture Refresher: Take the amount of fluid in the bottle and times that by the dose ordered. Then divide this number by the amount of drug in the bottle. This will give you the volume of the drug that you need to administer. Diagram of formulas Math Formulas Math ...

  17. Medical Products Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Ventrex Laboratories, Inc. develops, manufactures and markets a line of medical diagnostic assays based on biochemical techniques, in particular immunochemical techniques. Their products are sold worldwide to hospitals and medical laboratories for use in testing blood samples and other biological fluids. Analysis of a patient's body fluids, compared with normal values, aids a physician in confirming or otherwise diagnosing a suspected disease condition. NERAC's rapid information retrieval has provided Ventrex invaluable up-to-date information, and has permitted large scale savings. NERAC's service was particularly important in the development of a new product in the company's Ventre/Sep line, which is used in radioimmunoassays.

  18. Medical News Today

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website presents Medical News Today, an organization based in the United Kingdom, aimed at providing "the latest news headlines from the world of medicine and healthcare today and every day." The site offers 19 pages of recent news headline lists, with each headline hyperlinked to its article (or part of its article). Most article pages contain an original URL or some other contact or source information. In addition, the article pages allow site visitors to write an opinion piece about the article, as well as view other visitors' opinions. This website also provides search engines for medical abbreviations and terms, and links to information about healthcare, conditions, and patient resources.

  19. AIR CONDITIONER REQUEST EXTREME MEDICAL CIRCUMSTANCES

    E-print Network

    ? _____________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Type of allergy or significant medical condition: __________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Are allergy injections given No OR essential Yes No to the management of allergy? Is the use of an air conditioner

  20. MEDICAL EMERGENCIES What is a medical emergency?

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    911 for emergency assistance · Following the arrangement of emergency medical treatment of Injury form. · assists the employee in selecting the appropriate medical provider. · arrangesMEDICAL EMERGENCIES What is a medical emergency? Serious injury or illness. What do I do

  1. Usage of pioglitazone at Medanta, the Medicity.

    PubMed

    Mithal, Ambrish; Kaur, Parjeet; Bansal, Beena; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Wasir, Jasjeet S; Jevalikar, Ganesh; Mahendru, Shama

    2014-01-01

    Pioglitazone improves glycemic control by acting as an insulin sensitizer and is used in the management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pioglitazone has recently been at the center of a controversy with regards to its safety. There is no clear consensus on how, when and in what dose the drug should be used in the management of diabetes. We have summarized our strategy on pioglitazone use in Type 2 diabetes in a large private tertiary care center - Medanta, the Medicity- which may help in generating further thought about positioning of this anti-diabetic molecule. We use pioglitazone as the fourth in the pecking order of oral anti-diabetic agents. We typically use pioglitazone in a dose of 15 mg/day. We avoid using pioglitazone with insulin. We do not use pioglitazone under following situations: In the presence of significant or proven cardiac disease, in patients who are struggling with their weight or need to lose weight, in patients at high risk for osteoporotic fractures, in patients with macular edema, in patients with pre-existing bladder cancer and would discontinue in case hematuria or any other symptom of bladder cancer develops. We continue to use the drug in patients well controlled on it without any evident side-effects or contraindications. PMID:24701440

  2. [Future trend medical apps. From the apps store directly into medical practice?].

    PubMed

    Gehring, H; Pramann, O; Imhoff, M; Albrecht, U-V

    2014-12-01

    In day to day medical care, patients, nursing staff and doctors currently face a bewildering and rapidly growing number of health-related apps running on various "smart" devices and there are also uncountable possibilities for the use of such technology. Concerning regulation, a risk-based approach is applied for development and use (including safety and security considerations) of medical and health-related apps. Considering safety-related issues as well as organizational matters, this is a sensible approach but requires honest self-assessment as well as a high degree of responsibility, networking and good quality management by all those involved. This cannot be taken for granted. Apart from regulatory aspects it is important to not only consider what is reasonable, helpful or profitable. Quality aspects, safety matters, data protection and privacy as well as liability issues must also be considered but are often not adequately respected. If software quality is compromised, this endangers patient safety as well as data protection, privacy and data integrity. This can for example result in unwanted advertising or unauthorized access to the stored data by third parties; therefore, local, regional and international regulatory measures need to be applied in order to ensure safe use of medical apps in all possible areas, including the operating room (OR) with its highly specialized demands. Lawmakers need to include impulses from all stakeholders in their considerations and this should include input from existing private initiatives that already deal with the use and evaluation of apps in a medical context. Of course, this process needs to respect pre-existing national, European as well as international (harmonized) standards. PMID:25388438

  3. Antiviral medication use in a cohort of pregnant women during the 2009-2010 influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Yasseen, A S; Fell, D B; Sprague, A E; Xie, R; Smith, G; Walker, M C; Wen, S W

    2014-11-19

    Preventing influenza-like illness (ILI) during pregnancy with antiviral medication use (AVMU) can mitigate serious health risks to mother and foetus. We report on AVMU in pregnant women in Ontario, Canada, and describe characteristics of AVMU during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic. Rates and risk estimates of AVMU were compared across multiple categories and stratified across ILI infection status. Increased AVMU was observed in women with influenza infections, active smokers, those vaccinated against influenza, and those with pre-existing co-morbidities. Decreased AVMU was observed in women with multiple gestations, and those in neighbourhoods of high immigrant concentrations. Our stratified analysis indicated that the observed patterns differed by ILI infection status. We demonstrated that once infected, women across multiple groups were equally likely to use antiviral medications. In this report we also propose possible clinical explanations for the observed differences in AVMU, which will be useful in planning prevention initiatives for future pandemics. PMID:25409120

  4. Commercial Driver Medical Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Gary; Hanowski, Richard J.; Kales, Stefanos N.; Porter, Richard J.; Hegmann, Kurt T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess relationships between body mass index (BMI) and comorbid conditions within a large sample of truck drivers. Methods: Commercial driver medical examination data from 88,246 commercial drivers between 2005 and 2012 were analyzed for associations between BMI, medical disorders, and driver certification. Results: Most drivers were obese (53.3%, BMI >30.0 kg/m2) and morbidly obese (26.6%, BMI >35.0 kg/m2), higher than prior reports. Obese drivers were less likely to be certified for 2 years and more likely to report heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, nervous disorders, sleep disorders, and chronic low back pain (all P < 0.0001). There are relationships between multiple potentially disqualifying conditions and increasing obesity (P < 0.0001). Morbid obesity prevalence increased 8.9% and prevalence of three or more multiple conditions increased fourfold between 2005 and 2012. Conclusions: Obesity is related to multiple medical factors as well as increasing numbers of conditions that limit driving certification. PMID:25710607

  5. Human exposure to pet prescription medications.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Sean M; Mycyk, Mark B

    2002-08-01

    Veterinarians commonly prescribe medications to treat a variety of companion animal clinical conditions. Many pet medications are pharmacologically the same product prescribed for human use. We report 2 cases in which pet medications were used for self poisoning. Obtaining a pet history may provide critical information in the assessment of a patient with a suspected overdose. PMID:12136968

  6. Medical Monitoring Applications for Wearable Computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dejan Raskovic; Thomas L. Martin; Emil Jovanov

    2004-01-01

    Medical monitors have benefited from technological advances in the field of wireless communication, processing, and power sources. These advances have made possible miniaturization and prolonged operating times of medical monitors, as well as their global integration into telemedical systems. This allows patients to have real-time feedback about medical conditions while going about their normal daily activities. System designers are facing

  7. Effect of visual-spatial ability on medical students' performance in a gross anatomy course.

    PubMed

    Lufler, Rebecca S; Zumwalt, Ann C; Romney, Carla A; Hoagland, Todd M

    2012-01-01

    The ability to mentally manipulate objects in three dimensions is essential to the practice of many clinical medical specialties. The relationship between this type of visual-spatial ability and performance in preclinical courses such as medical gross anatomy is poorly understood. This study determined if visual-spatial ability is associated with performance on practical examinations, and if students' visual-spatial ability improves during medical gross anatomy. Three hundred and fifty-two first-year medical students completed the Mental Rotations Test (MRT) before the gross anatomy course and 255 at its completion in 2008 and 2009. Hypotheses were tested using logistic regression analysis and Student's t-test. Compared with students in the lowest quartile of the MRT, students who scored in the highest quartile of the MRT were 2.2 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2 and 3.8] and 2.1 (95% CI 1.2 and 3.5) times more likely to score greater than 90% on practical examinations and on both practical and written examinations, respectively. MRT scores for males and females increased significantly (P < 0.0001). Measurement of students' pre-existing visual-spatial ability is predictive of performance in medical gross anatomy, and early intervention may be useful for students with low visual-spatial ability on entry to medical school. Participation in medical gross anatomy increases students' visual-spatial ability, although the mechanism for this phenomenon is unknown. PMID:22127919

  8. Medical Device Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Medical Devices Print this page Share this page E- ... this page Home Medical Devices Medical Device Safety Medical Device Safety Search the Medical Device Safety Section ...

  9. Medical Instrumentation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students learn about the sorts of devices designed by biomedical engineers and the many other engineering specialties that are required in their design of medical diagnostics, therapeutic aids, surgical devices and procedures, and replacement parts. They discuss the special considerations that must be made when dealing with the human body, such as being minimally invasive, biocompatible, keeping sterile, lightweight, corrosion resistant, long lasting and electrically safe. They also explore how "form fits function." Students gain an appreciation for the amazing devices that improve our quality of life. This lesson serves as a starting point for students to begin to ponder how the medical devices in their everyday lives work.

  10. Medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    Medical Imaging: A Concise Textbook is written to assist a large group of medical personnel, including students and general practitioners, in reading radiographs. The book also attempts to give this group an introduction to radiology. The book begins by examining the physics and the positioning techniques of modern radiology. The following chapters then discuss the subspecialties, ranging from chest and musculoskeletal radiology to interventional radiology and nuclear medicine. The normal features of the subject are discussed first, followed by pathologic abnormalities. With the abnormal patterns, a differential diagnosis is arranged in tables.

  11. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  12. Integrated Medical Model Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, J.; Boley, L.; Foy, M.; Goodenow, D.; Griffin, D.; Keenan, A.; Kerstman, E.; Melton, S.; McGuire, K.; Saile, L.; Shah, R.; Garcia, Y.; Sirmons. B.; Walton, M.; Reyes, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) Project represents one aspect of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) to quantitatively assess medical risks to astronauts for existing operational missions as well as missions associated with future exploration and commercial space flight ventures. The IMM takes a probabilistic approach to assessing the likelihood and specific outcomes of one hundred medical conditions within the envelope of accepted space flight standards of care over a selectable range of mission capabilities. A specially developed Integrated Medical Evidence Database (iMED) maintains evidence-based, organizational knowledge across a variety of data sources. Since becoming operational in 2011, version 3.0 of the IMM, the supporting iMED, and the expertise of the IMM project team have contributed to a wide range of decision and informational processes for the space medical and human research community. This presentation provides an overview of the IMM conceptual architecture and range of application through examples of actual space flight community questions posed to the IMM project.

  13. Asian medical education.

    PubMed

    Ongley, P A

    1989-05-01

    In order to address issues relating to medical education in Asia, consideration must be given to the many differences among Asian countries, including variations in sizes, populations, social and cultural backgrounds, histories, political systems, and stages of economic development. In most Asian countries, poverty is pervasive, and it is usually national in scope. This is often coupled with lack of government commitment to provide health facilities and health care for the entire population. Systems of medical education differ widely and are based mainly on those of the country of colonial domination; hence, the systems may reflect predominantly British, American, Japanese, or Dutch influence, among others. Although most medical schools in Asia have academic disciplines and admission standards similar to those of Western schools, there are sharp differences among countries in faculty salaries, faculty competence, academic standards, adequacy of staffing, and number of medical schools. Underlying conditions and influences that have contributed to the current status of medical education systems in Asia are discussed. PMID:2713021

  14. Medical Tourism Abroad

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hinai, Saleh S.; Al-Busaidi, Ahmed S.; Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to understand why people seek medical advice abroad given the trouble and expense this entails. The types of medical problems for which treatment abroad was sought, preferred destinations and satisfaction with the treatment were explored. A secondary aim was to give feedback to stakeholders in the health care system on how to handle this issue and meet the needs of the community. Methods: 45 patients who had recently travelled abroad for treatment were asked to complete a questionnaire or were interviewed by telephone. Results: 40 questionnaires were received. 68% of the respondents were male. Orthopaedic diseases were the most common conditions leading patients to seek treatment abroad. Thailand was the most popular destination followed by India (50% and 30% respectively). 85% of respondents went abroad for treatment only, 10% for treatment and tourism and 2.5% were healthy, but travelled abroad for a checkup. Interestingly, 15% of the participants went abroad without first seeking medical care locally. Out of those initially treated in Oman, 38.2% had no specific diagnosis and 38.2% had received treatment, but it was not effective. 73% of respondents obtained information on treatment abroad from a friend. The Internet and medical tourism offices were the least used sources of information. 15% of the patients experienced complications after their treatment abroad. Conclusion: Various facts about medical treatment abroad need to be disseminated to the public. This will necessitate greater effort in public health promotion and education. PMID:22087396

  15. Treating Child Obesity and Associated Medical Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprio, Sonia

    2006-01-01

    With American children on course to grow into the most obese generation of adults in history, Sonia Caprio argues that it is critical to develop more effective strategies for preventing childhood obesity and treating serious obesity-related health complications. She notes that although pediatricians are concerned about the obesity problem, most…

  16. Treating Child Obesity and Associated Medical Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sonia Caprio

    2006-01-01

    Summary With American children on course to grow into the most obese generation of adults in history, Sonia Caprio argues that it is critical to develop more effective strategies for preventing child- hood obesity and treating serious obesity-related health complications. She notes that although pediatricians are concerned about the obesity problem, most are ineffective in addressing it. Treatment should begin,

  17. Travelers with Disabilities and Medical Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... opportunity to coordinate checkpoint support with a TSA Customer Service Manager located at the airport when necessary. ... to provide the highest level of security and customer service to all who pass through our screening ...

  18. Psychotic symptoms in patients with medical disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ashwin A. Patkar; Rajnish Mago; Prakash S. Masand

    2004-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms frequently occur in patients with comorbid medical disorders and present a diagnostic and treatment challenge.\\u000a They may be a part of an independent psychiatric illness associated with the underlying medical condition or induced by substance\\u000a use or medications. The presence of psychotic symptoms can contribute to misdiagnosis or complicate the management of the\\u000a comorbid medical illness. Psychiatrists must

  19. Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieck, Hans Paetz Gen.

    The recent progress in medical imaging techniques such as magnetic-resonance imaging (nmr or mri), computer tomography (CT with X-rays), and positron-emission tomography (PET scanning using short-lived radioactive nuclei) has been impressive. Two areas where diagnostic tools lacked behind have been tomography of the blood vessels of the brain and of the bronchi.

  20. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  1. 20 CFR 220.110 - Medically disabled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...are based on medically acceptable clinical and laboratory techniques. (c) Addiction to alcohol or drugs. If a claimant has a condition diagnosed as addiction to alcohol or drugs, this condition will not, by itself, be a basis for...

  2. 20 CFR 220.110 - Medically disabled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...are based on medically acceptable clinical and laboratory techniques. (c) Addiction to alcohol or drugs. If a claimant has a condition diagnosed as addiction to alcohol or drugs, this condition will not, by itself, be a basis for...

  3. 20 CFR 220.110 - Medically disabled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...are based on medically acceptable clinical and laboratory techniques. (c) Addiction to alcohol or drugs. If a claimant has a condition diagnosed as addiction to alcohol or drugs, this condition will not, by itself, be a basis for...

  4. 20 CFR 220.110 - Medically disabled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...are based on medically acceptable clinical and laboratory techniques. (c) Addiction to alcohol or drugs. If a claimant has a condition diagnosed as addiction to alcohol or drugs, this condition will not, by itself, be a basis for...

  5. 20 CFR 220.110 - Medically disabled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...are based on medically acceptable clinical and laboratory techniques. (c) Addiction to alcohol or drugs. If a claimant has a condition diagnosed as addiction to alcohol or drugs, this condition will not, by itself, be a basis for...

  6. Effectiveness of a quality improvement curriculum for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Kimberly M.; Walker, Curt

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As health systems find ways to improve quality of care, medical training programs are finding opportunities to prepare learners on principles of quality improvement (QI). The impact of QI curricula for medical students as measured by student learning is not well delineated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a QI curriculum for senior medical students as measured by student knowledge and skills. Methods This study was an observational study that involved a self-assessment and post-test Quality Improvement Knowledge Application Tool (QIKAT) for intervention and control students. A QI curriculum consisting of online modules, live discussions, independent readings and reflective writing, and participation in a mentored QI project was offered to fourth-year medical students completing an honor's elective (intervention group). Senior medical students who received the standard QI curriculum only were recruited as controls. Results A total of 22 intervention students and 12 control students completed the self-assessment and QIKAT. At baseline, there was no difference between groups in self-reported prior exposure to QI principles. Students in the intervention group reported more comfort with their skills in QI overall and in 9 of the 12 domains (p<0.05). Additionally, intervention students performed better in each of the three case scenarios (p<0.01). Discussion A brief QI curriculum for senior medical students results in improved comfort and knowledge with QI principles. The strengths of our curriculum include effective use of classroom time and faculty mentorship with reliance on pre-existing online modules and written resources. Additionally, the curriculum is easily expandable to larger groups of students and transferable to other institutions. PMID:25960052

  7. Medical imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Kreel, L.

    1991-01-01

    There is now a wide choice of medical imaging to show both focal and diffuse pathologies in various organs. Conventional radiology with plain films, fluoroscopy and contrast medium have many advantages, being readily available with low-cost apparatus and a familiarity that almost leads to contempt. The use of plain films in chest disease and in trauma does not need emphasizing, yet there are still too many occasions when the answer obtainable from a plain radiograph has not been available. The film may have been mislaid, or the examination was not requested, or the radiograph had been misinterpreted. The converse is also quite common. Examinations are performed that add nothing to patient management, such as skull films when CT will in any case be requested or views of the internal auditory meatus and heal pad thickness in acromegaly, to quote some examples. Other issues are more complicated. Should the patient who clinically has gall-bladder disease have more than a plain film that shows gall-stones? If the answer is yes, then why request a plain film if sonography will in any case be required to 'exclude' other pathologies especially of the liver or pancreas? But then should cholecystography, CT or scintigraphy be added for confirmation? Quite clearly there will be individual circumstances to indicate further imaging after sonography but in the vast majority of patients little or no extra information will be added. Statistics on accuracy and specificity will, in the case of gall-bladder pathology, vary widely if adenomyomatosis is considered by some to be a cause of symptoms or if sonographic examinations 'after fatty meals' are performed. The arguments for or against routine contrast urography rather than sonography are similar but the possibility of contrast reactions and the need to limit ionizing radiation must be borne in mind. These diagnostic strategies are also being influenced by their cost and availability; purely pragmatic considerations are not infrequently the overriding factor. Non-invasive methods will be preferred, particularly sonography as it is far more acceptable by not being claustrophobic and totally free of any known untoward effects. There is another quite different but unrelated aspect. The imaging methods, apart from limited exceptions, cannot characterize tissues as benign or malignant, granulomatous or neoplastic; cytology or histology usually provides the answer. Sonography is most commonly used to locate the needle tip correctly for percutaneous sampling of tissues. Frequently sonography with fine needle aspiration cytology or biopsy is the least expensive, safest and most direct route to a definitive diagnosis. Abscesses can be similarly diagnosed but with needles or catheters through which the pus can be drained. The versatility and mobility of sonography has spawned other uses, particularly for the very ill and immobile, for the intensive therapy units and for the operating theatre, as well in endosonography. The appointment of more skilled sonographers to the National Health Service could make a substantial contribution to cost-effective management of hospital services. Just when contrast agents and angiography have become safe and are performed rapidly, they are being supplanted by scanning methods. They are now mainly used for interventional procedures or of pre-operative 'road maps' and may be required even less in the future as MRI angiography and Doppler techniques progress. MRI will almost certainly extent its role beyond the central nervous system (CNS) should the equipment become more freely available, especially to orthopaedics. Until then plain films, sonography or CT will have to suffice. Even in the CNS there are conditions where CT is more diagnostic, as in showing calculations in cerebral cysticercosis. Then, too, in most cases CT produces results comparable to MRI apart from areas close to bone, structures at the base of the brain, in the posterior fossa and in the spinal cord. Scintigraphy for pulmonary infarcts and bone metastases and in renal disease in children plays

  8. The Integrated Medical Model: A Risk Assessment and Decision Support Tool for Space Flight Medical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerstman, Eric; Minard, Charles; Saile, Lynn; deCarvalho, Mary Freire; Myers, Jerry; Walton, Marlei; Butler, Douglas; Iyengar, Sriram; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Baumann, David

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a decision support tool that is useful to mission planners and medical system designers in assessing risks and designing medical systems for space flight missions. The IMM provides an evidence based approach for optimizing medical resources and minimizing risks within space flight operational constraints. The mathematical relationships among mission and crew profiles, medical condition incidence data, in-flight medical resources, potential crew functional impairments, and clinical end-states are established to determine probable mission outcomes. Stochastic computational methods are used to forecast probability distributions of crew health and medical resource utilization, as well as estimates of medical evacuation and loss of crew life. The IMM has been used in support of the International Space Station (ISS) medical kit redesign, the medical component of the ISS Probabilistic Risk Assessment, and the development of the Constellation Medical Conditions List. The IMM also will be used to refine medical requirements for the Constellation program. The IMM outputs for ISS and Constellation design reference missions will be presented to demonstrate the potential of the IMM in assessing risks, planning missions, and designing medical systems. The implementation of the IMM verification and validation plan will be reviewed. Additional planned capabilities of the IMM, including optimization techniques and the inclusion of a mission timeline, will be discussed. Given the space flight constraints of mass, volume, and crew medical training, the IMM is a valuable risk assessment and decision support tool for medical system design and mission planning.

  9. Medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Alex

    2005-07-01

    Diagnostic medical imaging is a fundamental part of the practice of modern medicine and is responsible for the expenditure of considerable amounts of capital and revenue monies in healthcare systems around the world. Much research and development work is carried out, both by commercial companies and the academic community. This paper reviews briefly each of the major diagnostic medical imaging techniques—X-ray (planar and CT), ultrasound, nuclear medicine (planar, SPECT and PET) and magnetic resonance. The technical challenges facing each are highlighted, with some of the most recent developments. In terms of the future, interventional/peri-operative imaging, the advancement of molecular medicine and gene therapy are identified as potential areas of expansion.

  10. Medical Dictionary

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    For nurses and other health care professionals who seek to distinguish the habitus from the humerus, this online medical dictionary provided by MedicineNet will be a place to bookmark for repeat visits. The dictionary contains well-written explanations for over 16,000 medical terms, and users can go ahead and browse around, or enter keywords or phrases into the search engine that resides on the page. The site also features a â??Word of the Dayâ?, and visitors can also look through recent news items that address different health issues and also look over the latest entries to the dictionary. The site is rounded out by a list of the â??Top 10 Medtermsâ?, which is also a good way to start exploring the materials here.

  11. Medication Considerations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colleen E. Carney; Jack D. Edinger

    \\u000a Despite the general efficacy of CBT for insomnia, this form of therapy is generally not the first intervention chosen for\\u000a the majority of treatment seeking insomnia sufferers. Most are seen in primary care settings where they usually are treated\\u000a with some form of hypnotic medication. Many of those who eventually present for a trial of CBT do so while continuing

  12. Medical Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Telemetry is the process whereby physiological or other data is acquired by instruments, translated into radio signals and j sent to a receiving station where the signals are decoded and recorded. Extensively used in I space operations, it is finding new Earth applications, among them transmission of medical data between emergency vehicles and hospitals. For example, transmission of an electrocardiogram from an ambulance to a hospital enables a physician to read the telemetered EKG and advise ambulance attendants on emergency procedures. Central Medical Emergency Dispatch (CMED) operates as a regional emergency medical communications center for Cleveland, Ohio and Cuyahoga County. The CMED system includes radio and telephone communications from hospital-to-hospital and from ambulance-to-hospital, but for improved emergency life support CMED sought to add a county-wide telemetry capability. The problem was that there were only eight radio frequencies available for telemetry and there were more than 30 potential users in Cleveland alone. NASA's Lewis Research Center volunteered its expert assistance. The Center's engineers studied the systems of other telemetry using cities, surveyed area hospitals to assure compatibility of telemetry equipment, and advised what types of equipment would be needed in emergency vehicles and at the various hospitals. The Lewis plan suggested that CMED be designated the central coordinating agency for the Cuyahoga County system, monitoring all telemetry frequencies and, when requested, assigning one not in use or one to be used at a sufficient distance that it would create no interference problem.

  13. Medication-induced peripheral neuropathy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis H. Weimer

    2003-01-01

    Although not very common, medication-induced neuropathy is a treatable condition and, therefore, is important to identify.\\u000a Medications continue to grow in number and expand in usage; consequently, toxic neuropathy continues to be relevant to neurologists.\\u000a Many agents have toxicities that are tolerated because the treatments are necessary, such as therapies for HIV and malignancy.\\u000a Additional agents to prevent or ameliorate

  14. Video surveillance of medication intake.

    PubMed

    Valin, Myriam; Meunier, Jean; St-Arnaud, Alain; Rousseau, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    In the context of the growing proportion of seniors in the western world population and the efforts provided in home care services, we have developed a computer vision system for monitoring medication intake. The system detects automatically medication intake using a single low-cost webcam. Person detection and tracking over the video sequence is done using color-based techniques while the recognition of the medication intake activity is performed using our main contribution, a three-level scenario model. Experimental results in controlled conditions are shown and we discuss improvements to our system. PMID:17945965

  15. Preparing Children for Medical Examinations: The Importance of Previous Medical Experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynnda M. Dahlquist; Karen M. Gil; F. Daniel Armstrong; David D. DeLawyer; Paul Greene; Donald Wuori

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between past medical experience and children’s response to preparation for medical examinations was investigated in 79 pediatric outpatients aged 3 to 12 years. Children were randomly assigned to one of five preparation conditions prior to receiving a medical examination and a throat culture: sensory information about the exam, training in coping skills (deep breathing and positive self-talk), combined

  16. FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA) CERTIFICATION FORM Employee's Section

    E-print Network

    Swaddle, John

    FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA) CERTIFICATION FORM Employee's Section Employee's Name): ______________________________________________________________ Medical Release-My signature authorizes the release of any medical information needed by the College __________________ (if patient is not employee): Reason for FMLA Leave: a. Employee's (your) own medical condition. b

  17. Graduate Medical Education Committee (GMEC) Policy on Accommodations for Disabilities

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Graduate Medical Education Committee (GMEC) Policy on Accommodations for Disabilities will be required to provide medical verification of a medical condition that he or she believes is a disability Institutional Requirements Approved by GMEC 1/12/07 II.D.4.n Office of Graduate Medical Education West Virginia

  18. Medical alert bracelet (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ... People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ...

  19. Implantable Medical Devices

    MedlinePLUS

    Implantable Medical Devices Updated:Oct 23,2014 Implantable Medical Devices - 2 types 1. Rhythm control ICD -- Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator ( ... medical treatment. 2. Support of the Circulation Implantable Medical Devices Left Ventricular Assist Device (Also known as ...

  20. Recent Medical Device Recalls

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Medical Devices Print this page Share this page E-mail this page Home Medical Devices Medical Device Safety Medical Device Recalls List ...

  1. Services Bldg. Veterinary Medical

    E-print Network

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Student Services Bldg. Oak Veterinary Medical College Veterinary Medical Research Institute Stadium Continuing Education--H7 Veterinary Medical College--I13 Veterinary Medical Research Institute-- H13

  2. Medical Mysteries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rice University presents Medical Mysteries (or MedMyst for short) "an Internet-based adventure...in which you are on a mission to discover the causes of diseases." Designed for middle and high school students, MedMyst offers an engaging, multimedia approach to learning about infectious diseases and the immune system, as well as pharmacology, chemistry, public health policy, and more. MedMyst also includes three downloadable mini-labs that expand on concepts covered in the multimedia adventure. The Web site also includes loads of useful links.

  3. Medical Mystery

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-01-28

    This activity (on pages 15-23) combines interactive role-playing and graphing to introduce learners to the health affects of pollen. In the first part, learners role-play a detective on a medical case and the main character in the case. Learners formulate a hypothesis about a patient's illness. In the second part, learners graph evidence based on pollen counts and create a "final report" about what caused the patient's health problem. This activity smoothly combines health education, environmental science, and math.

  4. How do we Define a Medical School?

    PubMed Central

    Karle, Hans

    2010-01-01

    A century after the Flexner Report on medical education in North America, which revolutionised the training of medical doctors all over the world, it is time to revisit this famous document and analyse symptoms and signs of a return to pre-Flexnerian conditions. With the ongoing mushroom growth over the last decades of small, proprietary educational institutions of low quality and driven by for-profit purposes, medical education is in a threatened position. This trend is of general international interest because of the increasing migration of medical doctors. There is a need for discussion of what should be the rational criteria and basic requirements for establishing new medical schools. PMID:21509225

  5. Thinking About Medical School?

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Thinking About Medical School? Explore the DO Difference! Osteopathic Medical Education Training's Osteopathic Medical Schools · Meet with Medical School Admission Officers · Learn about osteopathic medicine and medical schools · Discover the best ways to prepare for medical school When Where Pre-Health Advisor

  6. Disability & Medical Leave Resources A Guide for Employees

    E-print Network

    Saffman, Mark

    Disability & Medical Leave Resources A Guide for Employees This guide is a resource for you if you are experiencing difficulties at work related to a disability or chronic medical condition. For example, you may: have a serious health condition and need medical leave be returning to work with restrictions

  7. Medical Use of Recreational Drugs by AIDS Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel A. Dansak

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 72 patients at an AIDS clinic regarding self-medication with recreational drugs for medical or psychological conditions related to their illness disclosed that marijuana was the primary drug used. The perceived benefit was for gastrointestinal conditions such as nausea, vomiting, indigestion and appetite improvement. Use of other “recreational” drugs as self-medication was reported to usually be ineffective or

  8. Medical Marketing Semi MedicalMarketingSemi

    E-print Network

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    U.S. ARMY Medical Marketing Semi WELCOME U.S.ARMY MedicalMarketingSemi Virginia Tech DATE: 23 October 2014 TIME: 8:00 am - 8:00 pm LOCATION: On Campus The Medical Marketing Semi is an operationally flexible, mobile medical exhibit. The MMS has various peripheral multi-media systems and displays

  9. MEDICAL EMERGENCIES What is a medical emergency?

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    assistance Following the arrangement of emergency medical treatment for the injured employee, supervisor mustMEDICAL EMERGENCIES What is a medical emergency? Serious injury or illness. What do I do if there is a medical emergency occurring or one has occurred? CALL 911. Paramedics and ambulance service

  10. MEDICAL EMERGENCIES What is a medical emergency?

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    assistance Following the arrangement of emergency medical treatment for the injured employee, supervisorMEDICAL EMERGENCIES What is a medical emergency? Serious injury or illness. What do I do if there is a medical emergency occurring or one has occurred? CALL 911. Paramedics and ambulance service

  11. Business ethics, medical ethics and economic medicalization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geoffrey Poitras

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the ethical implications of economic medicalization: where non-medical problems are transformed into medical problems in order to achieve the objective of shareholder wealth maximization. After considering differences between business ethics and medical ethics, economic medicalization arising from corporate marketing strategies is detailed. Both direct-to-consumer and more traditional physician centred marketing methods are considered. In addition, the economic

  12. International Space Station Medical Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA is currently the leader, in conjunction with our Russian counterpart co-leads, of the Multilateral Medical Policy Board (MMPB), the Multilateral Medical Operations Panel (MMOP), which coordinates medical system support for International Space Station (ISS) crews, and the Multilateral Space Medicine Board (MSMB), which medically certifies all crewmembers for space flight on-board the ISS. These three organizations have representatives from NASA, RSA-IMBP (Russian Space Agency- Institute for Biomedical Problems), GCTC (Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center), ESA (European Space Agency), JAXA (Japanese Space Agency), and CSA (Canadian Space Agency). The policy and strategic coordination of ISS medical operations occurs at this level, and includes interactions with MMOP working groups in Radiation Health, Countermeasures, Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA), Informatics, Environmental Health, Behavioral Health and Performance, Nutrition, Clinical Medicine, Standards, Post-flight Activities and Rehabilitation, and Training. Each ISS Expedition has a lead Crew Surgeon from NASA and a Russian Crew Surgeon from GCTC assigned to the mission. Day-to-day issues are worked real-time by the flight surgeons and biomedical engineers (also called the Integrated Medical Group) on consoles at the MCC (Mission Control Center) in Houston and the TsUP (Center for Flight Control) in Moscow/Korolev. In the future, this may also include mission control centers in Europe and Japan, when their modules are added onto the ISS. Private medical conferences (PMCs) are conducted regularly and upon crew request with the ISS crew via private audio and video communication links from the biomedical MPSR (multipurpose support room) at MCC Houston. When issues arise in the day-to-day medical support of ISS crews, they are discussed and resolved at the SMOT (space medical operations team) meetings, which occur weekly among the International Partners. Any medical or life science issue that is not resolved at the SMOT can be taken to the Mission Management Team meeting, which occurs biweekly from MCC-Houston. This meeting includes the other International Partners and all flight support and console position representatives via teleconference. ISS Crew Surgeons have handled many medical conditions on orbit; including skin rashes, dental abscesses, lacerations, and STT segment EKG changes. Fortunately to date, there have not been any forced medical evacuations from the ISS. This speaks well for the implementation of the primary, secondary and even tertiary prevention strategies invoked by the Integrated Medical Group, as there were several medical evacuations during the previous Russian space stations.

  13. A medication extraction framework for electronic health records

    E-print Network

    Bodnari, Andreea

    2012-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of concept and relation extraction in medical documents. We present a medical concept and relation extraction system (medNERR) that incorporates hand-built rules and constrained conditional ...

  14. Space Station medical sciences concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. A.; Johnson, P. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Current life sciences concepts relating to Space Station are presented including the following: research, extravehicular activity, biobehavioral considerations, medical care, maintenance of dental health, maintaining health through physical conditioning and countermeasures, protection from radiation, atmospheric contamination control, atmospheric composition, noise pollution, food supply and service, clothing and furnishings, and educational program possibilities. Information on the current status of Soviet Space Stations is contained.

  15. Developmental Dyscalculia and Medical Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shalev, Ruth S.; Gross-Tsur, Varda

    1993-01-01

    Medical evaluation of seven third-grade children with developmental dyscalculia in a mainstream setting identified neurological conditions (including petit mal seizures, Gerstmann syndrome, and attention deficit disorder without hyperactivity) in all the children. Findings suggest that children who are not improving academically should undergo…

  16. Security and Privacy for Implantable Medical Devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Halperin; Thomas S. Heydt-benjamin; Kevin Fu; Tadayoshi Kohno; William H. Maisel

    2008-01-01

    Protecting implantable medical devices against attack without compromising patient health requires balancing security and privacy goals with traditional goals such as safety and utility. Implantable medical devices monitor and treat physiological conditions within the body. These devices - including pacemakers, implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs), drug delivery systems, and neurostimulators - can help manage a broad range of ailments, such as

  17. Medical marketplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Michael

    1991-08-01

    Solid state lasers are the real highlight of my talk today, and were really the star of the year. In every application area I can think of, people have tried with some success to introduce corturiercial solid state products. I'll go into more detail, but aside from solid state, a very significant event happened in Deceniber when one of the laser angioplasty companies (Advanced Interventional Systens) received FDA clearance to begin marketing the excimer for coronary applications (Figure 1) . This is the first time to my knowledge that an excimer has ever been cleared for a medical application in the United States. It's an event that we didn't really expect to happen so soon. It's extremely significant and we'll see where it goes from here. The system needs to be road-tested a bit but to get past the FDA is the major obstacle. Looking back to solid state laser the importance of solid state lasers is as researchers become more involved with the excimer and conduct more clinical studies in ophthalmology, they realize that it's not going to be a panacea for all refractive surgery or other ophthalmolic applications. In many cases it looks like the solid state laser may be the laser of choice in certain types of surgery; most notably perhaps in refractive surgery. We've all read about the success of the excimer at least in capturing the press's attention for corneal sculpting and vision correction. Well, it could be that actually the next generation will be a solid state laser, so let's keep an open mind here.

  18. The Medical Home

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Keeping Kids Safe Concussions: What to Know The Medical Home KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Doctor & Hospital Visits > ... home" for your child. What Does the Term "Medical Home" Mean? A medical home isn't a ...

  19. Your Medical Records

    MedlinePLUS

    What Are Medical Records? Each time you climb up on a doctor's exam table or roll up your sleeve for a ... place to keep them private. What's in My Medical Records? You might picture your medical records as ...

  20. Medication/Drug Allergy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Allergy & Clinical Immunology View full profile Medication/Drug Allergy Allergies to medications/drugs are complicated because ... allergy symptoms. Learn more. Doctors Who Treat Medication/Drug Allergy Rohit K. Katial Harold S. Nelson Richard W. ...

  1. Medical narratives in electronic medical records

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huibert J Tange; Arie Hasman; Pieter F de Vries Robbé; Harry C Schouten

    1997-01-01

    In this article, we describe the state of the art and directions of current development and research with respect to the inclusion of medical narratives in electronic medical-record systems. We used information about 20 electronic medical-record systems as presented in the literature. We divided these systems into `classical' systems that matured before 1990 and are now used in a broad

  2. Advances in Medical Devices and Medical Electronics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael R. Neuman; Gail D. Baura; Stuart Meldrum; Orhan Soykan; Max E. Valentinuzzi; Ron S. Leder; Silvestro Micera; Yuan-Ting Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Medical devices and medical electronics are areas that had little to offer 100 years ago. However, there were three important existing technologies that led to many further developments over the following 100 years. These are the stethoscope, electrocardiography, and X-ray medical imaging. Although these technologies had been described and were available to some extent when the Proceedings of the IEEE

  3. Avoiding Medical and Alternative Health Scams

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to prey on people with health conditions, including Tourette syndrome. How can you avoid being their next ... placebo) without the patients knowing which they received. Tourette Association Medical & Treatment pages . The Tourette Association keeps ...

  4. Diagnostic Medical Sonographers: Seeing with Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Alan

    2001-01-01

    Explains how diagnostic medical sonographers use special equipment to direct high frequency sound waves into areas of a patient's body. Describes specialties within the occupation, working conditions, employment and outlook, earnings, and necessary training and qualifications. (JOW)

  5. Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jimmy; Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David

    2010-01-01

    During missions to the Moon or Mars, the crew will need medical capabilities to diagnose and treat disease as well as for maintaining their health. The Exploration Medical Capability Element develops medical technologies, medical informatics, and clinical capabilities for different levels of care during space missions. The work done by team members in this Element is leading edge technology, procedure, and pharmacological development. They develop data systems that protect patient's private medical information, aid in the diagnosis of medical conditions, and act as a repository of relevant NASA life sciences experimental studies. To minimize the medical risks to crew health the physicians and scientists in this Element develop models to quantify the probability of medical events occurring during a mission. They define procedures to treat an ill or injured crew member who does not have access to an emergency room and who must be cared for in a microgravity environment where both liquids and solids behave differently than on Earth. To support the development of these medical capabilities, the Element manages the development of medical technologies that prevent, monitor, diagnose, and treat an ill or injured crewmember. The Exploration Medical Capability Element collaborates with the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), the Department of Defense, other Government-funded agencies, academic institutions, and industry.

  6. Psychosocial predictors of attitudes toward physician empathy in clinical encounters among 4732 1st year medical students: A report from the CHANGES study?

    PubMed Central

    van Ryn, Michelle; Hardeman, Rachel R.; Phelan, Sean M.; Burke, Sara E.; Przedworski, Julia; Allen, Michele L.; Burgess, Diana J.; Ridgeway, Jennifer; White, Richard O.; Dovidio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Medical school curricula intended to promote empathy varies widely. Even the most effective curricula leave a significant group of students untouched. Pre-existing student factors influence their response to learning experiences. We examined the individual predictors of first semester medical students’ attitudes toward the value of physician empathy in clinical encounters. Methods First year students (n = 4732) attending a stratified random sample of 49 US medical schools completed an online questionnaire that included measures of dispositional characteristics, attitudes and beliefs, self-concept and well-being. Results Discomfort with uncertainty, close-mindedness, dispositional empathy, elitism, medical authoritarianism, egalitarianism, self-concept and well-being all independently predicted first year medical students’ attitudes toward the benefit of physician empathy in clinical encounters. Conclusion Students vary on their attitude toward the value of physician empathy when they start medical school. The individual factors that predict their attitudes toward empathy may also influence their response to curricula promoting empathic care. Practice implications Curricula in medical school promoting empathic care may be more universally effective if students’ preexisting attitudes are taken into account. Messages about the importance of physician empathy may need to be framed in ways that are consistent with the beliefs and prior world-views of medical students. PMID:25065328

  7. A Medical Resident in Ponape

    PubMed Central

    Nelsen, Alan C.

    1978-01-01

    The University of Hawaii has an elective two-month primary care rotation in Ponape, in the Eastern Caroline Islands, for senior medical residents. Many diagnostic and therapeutic situations provide unusual challenges because of the tropical environment and the paucity of medical facilities. Parasitoses, tuberculosis and trauma are common, and certain diseases, such as cholelithiasis and coronary artery disease, have a low incidence, reflecting the socio-economic conditions. The local intoxicant, sakau, seems to be responsible for dermatologic, pulmonary, and possibly hepatic and neurologic disorders. The rotation has proved to be a worthwhile educational experience for residents and a benefit to the people of Ponape. PMID:664646

  8. Community acquired Roseomonas infection in a pre-existing Tubercular lung lesion

    PubMed Central

    Kaore, Navinchandra M.; Khan, Zoyev; Aher, Atul R.; Ramnani, V. K.

    2014-01-01

    Roseomonas are nonfermenting opportunistic Gram-negative bacilli belonging to the newly established genus of Roseomonas. The clinical experience with the species is limited and is difficult to diagnose because of limited expertise and lack of commercially available identification kits with any of the automated systems. This is a first ever reported case of secondary bacterial infection due to Roseomonas genomospecies 6 in a patient of pulmonary tuberculosis from the Indian subcontinent. PMID:25125823

  9. The effect of pre-existing corrosion on the fatigue cracking behavior of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hagerdorn, E.L.; Koch, G.H. [CC Technologies Labs., Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

    1996-10-01

    In order to assess the effect of preexisting corrosion on the fatigue crack behavior of aluminum alloys 2024-T3 and 7074-T6 crack initiation and growth data were obtained using fracture mechanics specimens. These specimens incorporated mechanically thinned areas and areas that had been preexposed to environments which produced various degrees of pitting or exfoliation corrosion. The data obtained from these laboratory experiments indicate that specific corrosive was most pronounced in the fatigue cracking behavior of aluminum alloys. The effect of preexisting corrosion was most pronounced in the fatigue crack initiation stage. Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that the effect of preexisting corrosion on the fatigue cracking behavior of both aluminum alloys 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 is a combination of stress concentrations as a result of material loss, and altered material properties, possible as a result of hydrogen entry into the lattice.

  10. Pre-Existing Background Knowledge Influences Socioeconomic Differences in Preschoolers' Word Learning and Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaefer, Tanya; Neuman, Susan B.; Pinkham, Ashley M.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the current study is to explore the influence of knowledge on socioeconomic discrepancies in word learning and comprehension. After establishing socioeconomic differences in background knowledge (Study 1), the authors presented children with a storybook that incorporates this knowledge (Study 2). Results indicated that middle-income…

  11. Hypermagnesemia Induced by Massive Cathartic Ingestion in an Elderly Woman without Pre-existing Renal Dysfunction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Makoto KONTANI; Akinori HARA; Shinji OHTA; Takayuki IKEDA

    2005-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for unresponsiveness and hypotension. She had developed constipation that had led to ileus and had received 34 g of magnesium citrate (Magcolol P ® ) orally the day before. She was lethargic, her blood pressure was less than 50 mmHg, and electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed sinus ar- rest with junctional escape rhythm. Her

  12. Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever in a Japanese Traveler with Pre-existing Japanese Encephalitis Virus Antibody.

    PubMed

    Sato, Rumi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kashiwagi, Takahito; Imamura, Yoshihiro; Hara, Koyu; Nishimura, Munetsugu; Kamimura, Tomoko; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Koga, Takeharu

    2015-06-01

    An adult Japanese man who had just returned from Thailand developed dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). A primary infection of dengue virus (DENV) was confirmed, specifically DENV serotype 2 (DENV-2), on the basis of the detection of the virus genome, a significant increase in the neutralizing antibody and the isolation of DENV-2. DHF is often observed following a secondary infection from another serotype of dengue virus, particularly in children, but this case was a primary infection of DENV. Japan is a non-endemic country for dengue disease. In fact, only Japanese encephalitis (JE) is known to be a member of the endemic flavivirus family. In this study, IgG antibody against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was detected. JEV belongs to the family of dengue virus and prevails in Japan, particularly Kyushu. Among many risk factors for the occurrence of DHF, a plausible candidate could be a cross-reactive antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) mechanism caused by JEV antibody. This indicates that most Japanese travelers who living in dengue non-endemic areas, particularly Kyushu, should be aware of the occurrence of DHF. PMID:26060418

  13. Multiple diverse ligands binding at a single protein site: A matter of pre-existing populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BUYONG MA; MAXIM SHATSKY; HAIM J. WOLFSON; RUTH NUSSINOV

    2002-01-01

    Here, we comment on the steadily increasing body of data showing that proteins with specificity actually bind ligands of diverse shapes, sizes, and composition. Such a phenomenon is not surprising when one considers that binding is a dynamic process with populations in equilibrium and that the shape of the binding site is strongly influenced by the molecular partner. It derives

  14. Interaction between Hydraulic Fracturing Process and Pre-existing Natural Fractures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Meng

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is employed as a stimulation treatment by the oil and gas industry to enhance the hydro-carbon recoveries. The rationale is that by creating fractures from the wellbore into the surrounding formations, the conductivity between the well and reservoir is significantly increased and the hydro-carbon flow is therefore stimulated. The hydraulic fracture is initiated and driven by pressurizing a

  15. Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever in a Japanese Traveler with Pre-existing Japanese Encephalitis Virus Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Rumi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kashiwagi, Takahito; Imamura, Yoshihiro; Hara, Koyu; Nishimura, Munetsugu; Kamimura, Tomoko; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Koga, Takeharu

    2015-01-01

    An adult Japanese man who had just returned from Thailand developed dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). A primary infection of dengue virus (DENV) was confirmed, specifically DENV serotype 2 (DENV-2), on the basis of the detection of the virus genome, a significant increase in the neutralizing antibody and the isolation of DENV-2. DHF is often observed following a secondary infection from another serotype of dengue virus, particularly in children, but this case was a primary infection of DENV. Japan is a non-endemic country for dengue disease. In fact, only Japanese encephalitis (JE) is known to be a member of the endemic flavivirus family. In this study, IgG antibody against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was detected. JEV belongs to the family of dengue virus and prevails in Japan, particularly Kyushu. Among many risk factors for the occurrence of DHF, a plausible candidate could be a cross-reactive antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) mechanism caused by JEV antibody. This indicates that most Japanese travelers who living in dengue non-endemic areas, particularly Kyushu, should be aware of the occurrence of DHF. PMID:26060418

  16. Impact of Pre-Existing Donor Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus on Cadaveric Renal Transplant Outcomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akinlolu O. Ojo; Alan B. Leichtman; Jeffrey D. Punch; Julie A. Hanson; David M. Dickinson; Robert A. Wolfe; Friedrich K. Port; Lawrence Y. Agodoa

    2000-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus (DM) predispose to systemic atherosclerosis with renal involvement. The prevalence of HTN and DM in cadaveric renal donors (affected donors) and the results of transplantation are unknown. We investigated these issues with national data from the US Renal Data System. A total of 4,035 transplants from affected donors were matched 1:1 with unaffected controls according

  17. Pre-existent Asymmetry in the Human Cyclooxygenase-2 Sequence Homodimer*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Liang; Sharma, Narayan P.; Jurban, Brice J.; Smith, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthase-2 (PGHS-2), also known as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is a sequence homodimer. However, the enzyme exhibits half-site heme and inhibitor binding and functions as a conformational heterodimer having a catalytic subunit (Ecat) with heme bound and an allosteric subunit (Eallo) lacking heme. Some recombinant heterodimers composed of a COX-deficient mutant subunit and a native subunit (i.e. Mutant/Native PGHS-2) have COX activities similar to native PGHS-2. This suggests that the presence of heme plus substrate leads to the subunits becoming lodged in a semi-stable Eallo-mutant/Ecat-Native?heme form during catalysis. We examined this concept using human PGHS-2 dimers composed of combinations of Y385F, R120Q, R120A, and S530A mutant or native subunits. With some heterodimers (e.g. Y385F/Native PGHS-2), heme binds with significantly higher affinity to the native subunit. This correlates with near native COX activity for the heterodimer. With other heterodimers (e.g. S530A/Native PGHS-2), heme binds with similar affinities to both subunits, and the COX activity approximates that expected for an enzyme in which each monomer contributes equally to the net COX activity. With or without heme, aspirin acetylates one-half of the subunits of the native PGHS-2 dimer, the Ecat subunits. Subunits having an S530A mutation are refractory to acetylation. Curiously, aspirin acetylates only one-quarter of the monomers of S530A/Native PGHS-2 with or without heme. This implies that there are comparable amounts of two noninterchangeable species of apoenzymes, Eallo-S530A/Ecat-Native and Eallo-Native/Ecat-S530A. These results suggest that native PGHS-2 assumes a reasonably stable, asymmetric Eallo/Ecat form during its folding and processing. PMID:23955344

  18. Maximizing the Use of Pre-Existing Assessment Results for Improvement in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Darlene A.; Tolbert, Rebecca P.

    1995-01-01

    To predict and improve licensure examination results, Tennessee Technological University's nursing school has investigated the use of existing student outcomes information (licensing exam scores and grades) as a basis for curricular and individual student improvement. The strategy has helped to identify specific areas for enhancement. (MSE)

  19. Pelvic Arterial Embolisation in a Trauma Patient with a Pre-Existing Aortobifemoral Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Abulaban, Osama; Hopkins, Jonathan; Willis, Andrew P.; Jones, Robert G., E-mail: robert.jones@uhb.nhs.uk [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Pelvic fractures secondary to blunt trauma are associated with a significant mortality rate due to uncontrolled bleeding. Interventional radiology (IR) can play an important and central role in the management of such patients, offering definitive minimally invasive therapy and avoiding the need for high-risk surgery. Rapid access to whole-body computed tomography has been shown to improve survival in polytrauma patients and allows rapid diagnosis of vascular injury and assessment of suitability for endovascular therapy. IR can then target and treat the specific area of bleeding. Embolisation of bleeding pelvic arteries has been shown to be highly effective and should be the treatment of choice in this situation. The branches of the internal iliac artery (IIA) are usually involved, and these arteries are accessed by way of IIA catheterisation after abdominal aortography. Occasionally these arteries cannot be accessed by way of this conventional route because of recent IIA ligation carried out surgically in an attempt to stop the bleeding or because (in the rare situation we describe here) these vessels are excluded secondary to previous aortoiliac repair. In this situation, knowledge of pelvic arterial collateral artery pathways is important because these will continue to supply pelvic structures whilst making access to deep pelvic branches challenging. We describe a rare case, which has not been previously reported in the literature, in which successful embolisation of a bleeding pelvic artery was carried out by way of the collateral artery pathways.

  20. Using Pre-existing Microarray Datasets to Increase Experimental Power: Application to Insulin Resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernie J. Daigle; Alicia Deng; Tracey McLaughlin; Samuel W. Cushman; Margaret C. Cam; Gerald Reaven; Philip S. Tsao; Russ B. Altman

    2010-01-01

    Although they have become a widely used experimental technique for identifying differentially expressed (DE) genes, DNA microarrays are notorious for generating noisy data. A common strategy for mitigating the effects of noise is to perform many experimental replicates. This approach is often costly and sometimes impossible given limited resources; thus, analytical methods are needed which increase accuracy at no additional

  1. The Effects of Pre-Existing Inappropriate Highlighting on Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvers, Vicki L.; Kreiner, David S.

    1997-01-01

    Addresses concerns that, if a student uses a second-hand textbook already highlighted throughout the text, it may interfere with reading comprehension. Investigates highlighting: in the first experiment preexisting inappropriate highlighting interfered with performance on a reading test; in the second experiment, advance warning on the negative…

  2. Space Shuttle Program: STS-1 Medical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The necessity for developing medical standards addressing individual classes of Shuttle crew positions is discussed. For the U.S. manned program the conclusion of the Apollo era heralded the end of water recovery operations and the introduction of land-based medical operations. This procedural change marked a significant departure from the accepted postflight medical recovery and evaluation techniques. All phases of the missions required careful re-evaluation, identification of potential impact on preexisting medical operational techniques, and development of new methodologies which were carefully evaluated and tested under simulated conditions. Significant coordination was required between the different teams involved in medical operations. Additional dimensions were added to the concepts of medical operations, by the introduction of different toxic substances utilized by the Space Transportation Systems especially during ground operations.

  3. The Medical Passport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ineson, Sue; Seeling, Stephen S.

    2005-01-01

    A Working Group on Medical Passports was established in 2002 by the International Association of Medical Regulatory Authorities. The goal of this group was to develop a fast-track registration process for highly qualified medical practitioners wishing to move from one jurisdiction to another. A "medical passport" would be available only to…

  4. Medicine and Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) #12;400 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Graduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Officers Vice President for Medical Affairs and the Raja N. Khuri Dean of the Faculty of Medicine Ziyad Ghazzal

  5. Medicine and Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) #12;370 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Graduate Catalogue 2013­14 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Officers Vice President for Medical Affairs and the Raja N. Khuri Dean of the Faculty of Medicine Ziyad Ghazzal

  6. GOOD MEDICAL PRACTICE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kerry J Breen; MB BS; Stephen M Cordner; Dip Crim

    Good Medical Practice: Professionalism, Ethics and Law brings together the infor- mation central to the professional, ethical and legal requirements of being a doctor. It covers a core curriculum for medical students, doctors in training and international medical graduates preparing for the Australian Medical Council examinations. It will also be useful for busy doctors looking for answers to issues that

  7. Medical device market in china.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Philip; Morshed, Bashir I; Mussivand, Tofy

    2015-06-01

    With China's growing old-age population and economic presence on the international stage, it has become important to evaluate its domestic and foreign market contribution to medical devices. Medical devices are instruments or apparatuses used in the prevention, rehabilitation, treatment, or knowledge generation with respect to disease or other abnormal conditions. This article provides information drawn from recent publications to describe the current state of the Chinese domestic market for medical devices and to define opportunities for foreign investment potential therein. Recent healthcare reforms implemented to meet rising demand due to an aging and migrating population are having a positive effect on market growth-a global market with a projected growth of 15% per year over the next decade. PMID:25735659

  8. Medical practice and related insurance.

    PubMed

    Chormunge, Vijay; Pawar, Vasantrao; Patil, Ajay

    2012-03-01

    The liability of a doctor as regards medical negligence is now a well accepted eventuality. However still many doctors and hospitals are unaware of their liability on account of negligence on the part of their junior doctors and hospital staff. Indemnity insurance specifically protects you against your liability to pay compensation including legal costs, fees or expenses. If court orders to pay compensation for negligence of patient and you have a valid insurance cover, the insurance company is supposed to pay the money. In the present text we are highlighting the medical practice related insurance such as personal indemnity insurance, error and omission policy for hospital and nursing homes and insurance policy related to damage to hospital building, damage to electrical and electronics appliances and also insurance for doctor's kit, signboard, burglary, fidelity guarantee and loss of money in transit. All this medical practice related insurance is explained with its present charges, terms and conditions and its importance in today's practice. PMID:23029950

  9. STS-3 medical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, S. L. (editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (editor); Mason, J. A. (editor)

    1982-01-01

    The medical operations report for STS-3, which includes a review of the health of the crew before, during, and immediately after the third Shuttle orbital flight is presented. Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical 'kit' carried in flight, tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results, hematology and immunology analyses, medical microbiology, food and nutrition, potable water, shuttle toxicology, radiological health, and cabin acoustic noise. Environmental effects of shuttle launch and landing medical information management, and management, planning, and implementation of the medical program are also dicussed.

  10. Secure scalable disaster electronic medical record and tracking system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerard DeMers; Christopher Kahn; Colleen Buono; Theodore Chan; Paul Blair; William Griswold; Per Johansson; Octav Chipara; Anders Nilsson Plymoth

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic medical records (EMR) are considered superior in documentation of care for medical practice. Current disaster medical response involves paper tracking systems and radio communication for mass casualty incidents (MCIs). These systems are prone to errors, may be compromised by local conditions, and are labor intensive. Communication infrastructure may be impacted, overwhelmed by call volume, or destroyed by the

  11. Comparative levels of excessive daytime sleepiness in common medical disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alice F. Stroe; Thomas Roth; Catherine Jefferson; David W. Hudgel; Timothy Roehrs; Kenneth Moss; Christopher L. Drake

    2010-01-01

    IntroductionSleep restriction and sleep disorders are common causes of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Medical disorders (MD) can also cause EDS, but previous studies have used non-standardized measures, selected samples, or have examined EDS in singular disorders. This study describes the relative degree of EDS associated with medical disorders to provide comparative data across a range of common medical conditions in

  12. POLICY ON INVOLUNTARY LEAVE OF ABSENCE FOR MEDICAL REASONS

    E-print Network

    Carter, John

    for possible Involuntary Medical Leave if the Assistant Vice President for Student Development or a designee- 1 - POLICY ON INVOLUNTARY LEAVE OF ABSENCE FOR MEDICAL REASONS POLICY STATEMENT The University a student's behaviors associated with a psychiatric, psychological, or other medical condition interferes

  13. Wireless Medical Interface Using ZigBee and Bluetooth Technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Indra H. Mulyadi; Eko Supriyanto; Norlaili Mat Safri; Muhammad H. Satria

    2009-01-01

    Since years, the using of telemedicine has increased although there are some technical issues related to standard and quality. In order to improve the telemedicine quality of service, a robust wireless connection between medical devices and telecommunication network is required. Unfortunately, many medical devices were developed without possibility to connect with telecommunication infrastructure. Due to this condition, a wireless medical

  14. Factors related to medication adherence in memory disorder clinic patients

    PubMed Central

    OWNBY, R. L.; HERTZOG, C.; CROCCO, E.; DUARA, R.

    2012-01-01

    Medication adherence is a substantial problem in the elderly. It may be even more important among elderly persons with memory problems, since other factors that lead to non-adherence may be compounded with the memory problems themselves. The objective was to determine whether a model that integrates research on medication adherence from several research domains is useful in understanding adherence in elderly patients. The methodology involved a cross-sectional observational study using a convenience sample of 63 patients drawn from a university-affiliated outpatient memory disorders clinic. The primary measure of medication adherence was caregivers’ reports of patients’ medication adherence. Patients and their caregivers were asked questions assessing their beliefs about the seriousness of each condition for which a medication was prescribed and the likely outcome of that condition without treatment. Additional data collected included presence of side effects, total number of medications taken, and patients’ mood and cognitive status. Multilevel path analysis confirmed several model-based predictions. Caregivers’ reports of adherence were predicted by estimates of disease outcome, the presence of side effects, and patients’ relying on themselves to remember to take medications. Results partially confirm the integrative model in understanding medication adherence in these patients. Patients’ beliefs about the likely effect of medication treatment for their condition and the presence of side effects influence reported medication adherence. Results thus suggest that efforts to educate patients about the likely response of their medical condition to treatment and to assess and deal with medication side effects might improve patient adherence. PMID:16798630

  15. [Medical ethics in residency training].

    PubMed

    Civaner, Murat; Sarikaya, Ozlem; Balcio?lu, Harun

    2009-04-01

    Medical ethics education in residency training is one of the hot topics of continuous medical education debates. Its importance and necessity is constantly stressed in declarations and statements on national and international level. Parallel to the major structural changes in the organization and the finance model of health care system, patient-physician relationship, identity of physicianship, social perception and status of profession are changing. Besides, scientific developments and technological advancements create possibilities that never exists before, and bring new ethical dilemmas along with. To be able to transplant human organs has created two major problems for instance; procurement of organs in sufficient numbers, and allocating them to the patients in need by using some prioritizing criteria. All those new and challenging questions force the health care workers to find authentic and justifiable solutions while keeping the basic professional values. In that sense, proper medical ethics education in undergraduate and postgraduate term that would make physician-to-be's and student-physicians acquire the core professional values and skill to notice, analyze and develop justifiable solutions to ethical problems is paramount. This article aims to express the importance of medical ethics education in residency training, and to propose major topics and educational methods to be implemented into. To this aim, first, undergraduate medical education, physician's working conditions, the exam of selection for residency training, and educational environment were revised, and then, some topics and educational methods, which are oriented to educate physicians regarding the professional values that they should have, were proposed. PMID:19357056

  16. Physics design for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor epithermal neutron source.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, F J; Parsons, D K; Nigg, D W; Wessol, D E; Miller, L G; Fairchild, R G

    1990-01-01

    A collaborative effort by researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Brookhaven National Laboratory has resulted in the design and implementation of an epithermal-neutron source at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Large aluminum containers, filled with aluminum oxide tiles and aluminum spacers, were tailored to pre-existing compartments on the animal side of the reactor facility. A layer of cadmium was used to minimize the thermal-neutron component. Additional bismuth was added to the pre-existing bismuth shield to minimize the gamma component of the beam. Lead was also added to reduce gamma streaming around the bismuth. The physics design methods are outlined in this paper. Information available to date shows close agreement between calculated and measured beam parameters. The neutron spectrum is predominantly in the intermediate energy range (0.5 eV - 10 keV). The peak flux intensity is 6.4E + 12 n/(m2.s.MW) at the center of the beam on the outer surface of the final gamma shield. The corresponding neutron current is 3.8E + 12 n/(m2.s.MW). Presently, the core operates at a maximum of 3 MW. The fast-neutron KERMA is 3.6E-15 cGy/(n/m2) and the gamma KERMA is 5.0E-16 cGY/(n/m2) for the unperturbed beam. The neutron intensity falls off rapidly with distance from the outer shield and the thermal flux realized in phantom or tissue is strongly dependent on the beam-delimiter and target geometry. PMID:2268249

  17. Classical Conditioning

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Palacios, Miss Miller, Mr. Rowser

    2008-04-01

    !!Classical Conditioning!! Classical conditioning is the use of Pavlovian conditioning procedures where a neutral stimulus becomes capable of evoking a response through pairing with an unconditioned stimulus. Click the link below to get an introduction into classical conditioning. Introduction to Classical Conditioning Now that you\\'ve been introduced to classical conditioning, view the clip at the link below, ...

  18. Medical Physics Panel Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guèye, Paul; Avery, Steven; Baird, Richard; Soares, Christopher; Amols, Howard; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Drew

    2006-03-01

    The panel discussion will explore opportunities and vistas in medical physics research and practice, medical imaging, teaching medical physics to undergraduates, and medical physics curricula as a recruiting tool for physics departments. Panel members consist of representatives from NSBP (Paul Guèye and Steven Avery), NIH/NIBIB (Richard Baird), NIST (Christopher Soares), AAPM (Howard Amols), ASTRO (Prabhakar Tripuraneni), and Jefferson Lab (Stan Majewski and Drew Weisenberger). Medical Physicists are part of Departments of Radiation Oncology at hospitals and medical centers. The field of medical physics includes radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. It also ranges from basic researcher (at college institutions, industries, and laboratories) to applications in clinical environments.

  19. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, MICHIO; USAMI, EISEKI; IWAI, MINA; NAKAO, TOSHIYA; YOSHIMURA, TOMOAKI; MORI, HIROMI; SUGIYAMA, TADASHI; TERAMACHI, HITOMI

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21–85 years) and 73 years (range, 30–90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3–3,585 days) and 219 days (24–3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4–5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

  20. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Nakao, Toshiya; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Mori, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21-85 years) and 73 years (range, 30-90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3-3,585 days) and 219 days (24-3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4-5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

  1. Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs' Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS) staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs' decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. The data analysis revealed the following theme: “degree of perceived risk in EMS staffs and their patients.” This theme consisted of two main categories: (1) patient's condition' and (2) the context of the EMS mission'. The patent's condition category emerged from “physical health statuses,” “socioeconomic statuses,” and “cultural background” subcategories. The context of the EMS mission also emerged from two subcategories of “characteristics of the mission” and EMS staffs characteristics'. EMS system managers can consider adequate technical, informational, financial, educational, and emotional supports to facilitate the decision making of their staffs. Also, development of an effective and user-friendly checklist and scoring system was recommended for quick and easy recognition of patients' needs for transportation in a prehospital situation. PMID:24891953

  2. Training medical assistants for surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fernando Vaz; Staffan Bergstrom; Maria da Luz Vaz; Antonio Bugalho

    A successful programme is reported from Mozambique for training middle-level health workers to perform fairly advanced surgical procedures in remote areas where the services of consultants are virtually unobtainable. Manpower and financial constraints obliged Mozambique to train medical assistants to perform surgical work in rural areas, where three broad priorities were identified: pregnancy-related complications, trauma-related complications, and emergency inflammatory conditions.

  3. 77 FR 4469 - Dental Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ...38 U.S.C. chapter 17 if dental care is reasonably necessary...types of surgery for which dental care may be necessary to minimize...complications due to infection from dental conditions. The examples provided...but rather merely examples of medical conditions commonly...

  4. Rethinking medical humanities.

    PubMed

    Chiapperino, Luca; Boniolo, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    This paper questions different conceptions of Medical Humanities in order to provide a clearer understanding of what they are and why they matter. Building upon former attempts, we defend a conception of Medical Humanities as a humanistic problem-based approach to medicine aiming at influencing its nature and practice. In particular, we discuss three main conceptual issues regarding the overall nature of this discipline: (i) a problem-driven approach to Medical Humanities; (ii) the need for an integration of Medical Humanities into medicine; (iii) the methodological requirements that could render Medical Humanities an effective framework for medical decision-making. PMID:24477428

  5. STS-1 medical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, S. L. (editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (editor); Mason, J. A. (editor)

    1981-01-01

    The report includes a review of the health of the crew before, during and immediately after the first Shuttle orbital flight (April 12-14, 1981). Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical kit carried inflight; tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results; hematology and immunology analyses; medical microbiology; food and nutrition; potable water; shuttle toxicology; radiological health; cabin acoustical noise. Also included is information on: environmental effects of Shuttle launch and landing, medical information management; and management, planning and implementation of the medical program.

  6. MEDIC: Medical embedded device for individualized care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Winston H. Wu; Alex A. T. Bui; Maxim A. Batalin; Lawrence K. Au; Jonathan D. Binney; William J. Kaiser

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective: Presented work highlights the development and initial validation of a medical embedded device for individualized care (MEDIC), which is based on a novel software architecture, enabling sensor management and disease prediction capabil- ities, and commercially available microelectronic components, sensors and conven- tional personal digital assistant (PDA) (or a cell phone). Methods and materials: In this paper, we present

  7. [Use of functional packages of medical stuff by military level of medical service of the Armed Forces].

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, Iu V; Kononov, V N; Miliaev, A V; Stupnikov, A V; Slobodeniuk, A V

    2013-11-01

    Authors submitted results of recent developments made by The Kirov Military-Medical Academy and OOO "Special medical equipment" in accordance with State defence order in the area of modernization of the system of organizational equipment of military level of medical service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. Along with other samples of organizational equipment, new functional equipment of medical stuff was developed and approved as supply. New equipment of medical stuff meets modern requirements and is highly valuated by medical services of foreign countries. Authors came to conclusion that functional equipment which is approved as supply and included into the Supply rate provides operational flexibility of set-up/tear-down stages of medical evacuation under the conditions of battlefield, allows to deliver medical aid on the basis of innovative medical technologies. PMID:24611304

  8. Medically Unexplained Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about which medication may be appropriate, but be smart about your medicines. Make sure you know the ... antidiarrheal, and anti-depressant drugs as well as fiber supplements. There are also some medications approved by ...

  9. Avoiding Medical Identity Theft

    MedlinePLUS

    Tips for Preventing and Detecting Medical Identity Theft Tips for Preventing and Detecting Medical Identity Theft Monitor your health records closely and address any errors quickly Share personal and ...

  10. Medications and Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Membership About the AAAAI Share | Medications and Older Adults This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, ... effects can be. This is especially true for older adults with allergies or asthma. Asthma Medications There are ...

  11. Emergency Medical Services

    MedlinePLUS

    ... need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people and ... emergencies, you need help where you are. Emergency medical technicians, or EMTs, do specific rescue jobs. They ...

  12. Understanding Medical Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you hear about the results of a new medical research study. Sometimes the results of one study ... when reading or listening to reports of new medical findings. Some questions that can help you evaluate ...

  13. State Veterinary Medical Associations

    MedlinePLUS

    ... alvma.com Alaska State Veterinary Medical Association Vicki Smith, Executive Director 1841 West Secluded Court Kuna, ID, ... www.hawaiivetmed.org Idaho Veterinary Medical Association Vicki Smith, Executive Director 1841 West Secluded Court Kuna, ID, ...

  14. Veterinary Medical Center - 1 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    As medical educators strive to produce qualified physicians who are able to meet societal needs, the medical education system must continually reform itself to meet the demands of that changing society. Understanding the interactions between...

  15. Marijuana: modern medical chimaera.

    PubMed

    Lamarine, Roland J

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana has been used medically since antiquity. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in medical applications of various cannabis preparations. These drugs have been cited in the medical literature as potential secondary treatment agents for severe pain, muscle spasticity, anorexia, nausea, sleep disturbances, and numerous other uses. This article reviews the research literature related to medical applications of various forms of cannabis. Benefits related to medical use of cannabinoids are examined and a number of potential risks associated with cannabis use, both medical and recreational, are considered. There is a clearly identified need for further research to isolate significant benefits from the medical application of cannabinoids and to establish dosage levels, appropriate delivery mechanisms and formulations, and to determine what role, if any, cannabinoids might play in legitimate medical applications. It is also imperative to determine if reported dangers pose a significant health risks to users. PMID:22873011

  16. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Director, Health Initiatives View full profile Asthma and Pregnancy: Asthma Medications We would like to avoid all ... mother and child. Making Decisions about Medication During Pregnancy It is important that your asthma be controlled ...

  17. Medication Use during Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Medication Use During Pregnancy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Information About the Effects of Medication Use During Pregnancy? The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates ...

  18. Mental Health Medications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... more about child and adolescent mental health research . Older adults Because older people often have more medical problems ... people who take medications for mental disorders. An older adult may forget his or her regular dose and ...

  19. Optimizing Medical Kits for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minard, Charles G.; FreiredeCarvalho, Mary H.; Iyengar, M. Sriram

    2010-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) uses Monte Carlo methodologies to predict the occurrence of medical events, their mitigation, and the resources required during space flight. The model includes two modules that utilize output from a single model simulation to identify an optimized medical kit for a specified mission scenario. This poster describes two flexible optimization routines built into SAS 9.1. The first routine utilizes a systematic process of elimination to maximize (or minimize) outcomes subject to attribute constraints. The second routine uses a search and mutate approach to minimize medical kit attributes given a set of outcome constraints. There are currently 273 unique resources identified that are used to treat at least one of 83 medical conditions currently in the model.

  20. Medical device development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dorin Panescu

    2009-01-01

    The development of a successful medical product requires not only engineering design efforts, but also clinical, regulatory, marketing and business expertise. This paper reviews items related to the process of designing medical devices. It discusses the steps required to take a medical product idea from concept, through development, verification and validation, regulatory approvals and market release.

  1. Emergency Medical Treatment Required

    E-print Network

    Sura, Philip

    or Chemical Exposure Occurs * Laboratory Employee Faculty, Post Doc, Technician, Graduate Student (whenEmergency Medical Treatment Required Non-Emergency Medical Treatment Required If possible, get help present if possible AmeriSys will complete the "First Report of Injury or Illness" and authorize medical

  2. Intelligent medical information filtering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuri Quintana

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an intelligent information filtering system to assist users to be notified of updates to new and relevant medical information. Among the major problems users face is the large volume of medical information that is generated each day, and the need to filter and retrieve relevant information. The Internet has dramatically increased the amount of electronically accessible medical

  3. The Medical University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piel, Gerard

    1981-01-01

    Success, it is suggested, has brought the medical school into critical new responsibility for the welfare of the university as a whole. An urgent topic for inquiry in the university is seen as the expansion of the medical economy and the attendant growth of medical schools. (MLW)

  4. Health Professions Medical Assisting

    E-print Network

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    Health Professions Medical Assisting Practical Nurse Registered Nurse Pharmacy Technology.B.A., RT(R) Phone: 406.243.7809 Email: Anne.Delaney@UMontana.edu Medical Assisting Students entering the Medical Assisting program must have earned a "C" or better in all prerequisite courses listed below

  5. Medical Assisting Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a medical assisting program. The program guide is designed to relate primarily to the development of those skills needed by individuals in the medical assisting field, such as medical law and ethics, typing,…

  6. Medical Student Procedure Guide

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    20132014 O.H.S.U. Medical Student Procedure Guide #12;2013-2014 Medical Student Procedure Guide 1 Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine - Medical Student Procedure Guide Welcome This is an exciting time to be in medicine. Advances in the sciences basic to the study and practice of medicine

  7. HELPING YOU MEDICAL DECISIONS

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    HELPING YOU MEDICAL DECISIONS MAKE THE When you're facing a critical medical decision, getting, the right treatment and the right care. How? By providing access to the best medical minds in the world all your records. Your images. Your test samples. You don't have to travel or deal with the healthcare

  8. Medics in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Some time ago a flyer on "Medics in Primary School" came the author's way. It described a programme for making placements in primary schools available to medical students. The benefits of the program to medical students and participating schools were highlighted, including opportunities to develop communication skills and demystify medicine. It…

  9. Reducing Medical Waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie Conrardy; Mary Hillanbrand; Sandra Myers; George F. Nussbaum

    2010-01-01

    Medical waste is a necessary by-product of any hospital environment; however, the majority of regulated medical waste is produced in the OR from the use of disposable surgical supplies (eg, drapes, gowns, basins, gloves, sponges). We conducted a concept comparison project in the ORs of two large medical centers in Bethesda, Maryland, and Washington, DC, to evaluate the effects of

  10. History of Medical Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, John S.

    1983-01-01

    Traces the development of basic radiation physics that underlies much of today's medical physics and looks separately at the historical development of two major subfields of medical physics: radiation therapy and nuclear medicine. Indicates that radiation physics has made important contributions to solving biomedical problems in medical…

  11. Normalized medical information visualization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-de-Madariaga, Ricardo; Muñoz, Adolfo; Somolinos, Roberto; Castro, Antonio; Velázquez, Iker; Moreno, Oscar; García-Pacheco, José L; Pascual, Mario; Salvador, Carlos H

    2015-01-01

    A new mark-up programming language is introduced in order to facilitate and improve the visualization of ISO/EN 13606 dual model-based normalized medical information. This is the first time that visualization of normalized medical information is addressed and the programming language is intended to be used by medical non-IT professionals. PMID:25991133

  12. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  13. Medical management of acute severe anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Norrington, Amy; Stanley, Ruth; Tremlett, Michael; Birrell, Ginny

    2012-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a common condition affecting young people. The medical management of AN on a general paediatric ward is challenging. It is important to identify young people who are at risk of medical complications, so early intervention can be instigated. This article aims to review the clinical practice and evidence supporting the current medical management of young people with AN. It provides a system-based approach to potential complications of the disease, guidance on feeding and the management of re-feeding syndrome. Approaches to legal and ethical challenges are also considered. While the importance of psychiatric treatment is recognised, the same is not discussed within this article. PMID:21764823

  14. Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Duane

    2012-01-01

    The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) is a project under the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element managed by the Human Research Program (HRP). The vision for the EMSD is to utilize ISS as a test bed to show that several medical technologies needed for an exploration mission and medical informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making can be integrated into a single system and used by the on-orbit crew in an efficient and meaningful manner. Objectives: a) Reduce and even possibly eliminate the time required for on-orbit crew and ground personnel (which include Surgeon, Biomedical Engineer (BME) Flight Controller, and Medical Operations Data Specialist) to access and move medical data from one application to another. b) Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information using an intuitive and crew-friendly software solution to assist/aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c) Develop a common data management framework and architecture that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all crew health and life sciences activities.

  15. 76 FR 9283 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ...Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care-Acquired Conditions AGENCY...providing medical assistance for health care-acquired conditions. It would...Hospital-acquired condition HCAC Health care-acquired condition ICR...

  16. Lancaster Medical School Admissions Policy

    E-print Network

    Diggle, Peter J.

    Lancaster Medical School Admissions Policy Introduction: About our medical degree programme The medical degree programme at Lancaster University aims to equip graduates with the requisite knowledge placement is encouraged through frequent, timely feedback and the annual appraisal scheme. Lancaster Medical

  17. THE MEDICAL PROFESSIONS Anthropology Professors

    E-print Network

    Holliday, Vance T.

    THE MEDICAL PROFESSIONS Anthropology Professors Linda Green Mark Nichter Mimi Nichter Ivy Pike, and Household Economics ANTH 438A Women's Health in Global Perspective ANTH 444 Introduction to Medical medical and alternative medical professions Forensics Disaster Help #12;

  18. Medical Surveillance for Former Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Takaro

    2009-05-29

    The Former Hanford Worker Medical Monitoring Program, directed by the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program at the University of Washington, served former production and other non-construction workers who were potentially exposed to workplace hazards while working for the USDOE or its contractors at Hanford. The USDOE Former Workers Program arose from Congressional action in the Defense Authorization of 1993 (Public Law 102). Section 3162 stated that, “The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and ongoing medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such employment.” (This also covers former employees of USDOE contractors and subcontractors.) The key objective has been to provide these former workers with medical evaluations in order to determine whether workers have experienced significant risk due to workplace exposure to hazards. Exposures to asbestos, beryllium, and noise can produce specific medical conditions: asbestosis, berylliosis, and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Each of these conditions can be identified by specific, non-invasive screening tests, which are widely available. Treatments are also available for individuals affected by these conditions. This project involved two phases. Phase I involved a needs and risk assessment, characterizing the nature and extent of workplace health hazards which may have increased the risk for long-term health effects. We categorized jobs and tasks by likelihood of exposures to specific workplace health hazards; and located and established contact with former Hanford workers. Phase II involved implementation of medical monitoring programs for former workers whose individual work history indicated significant risk for adverse health effects. We identified 118,000 former workers, employed from 1943 to 1997. After excluding current workers, construction workers, and deceased workers, the total estimated number of former workers eligible for screening was 72,611. By September, 2006, 53,010 workers had been contacted, 20,298 responded, 2,835 were eligible and authorized, and 2,773 workers were ultimately screened. The cohort was 80% male, 85% white, and had a mean age of 63 years (range 24-96 years) at the time of first exam. Participants completed an occupational health history survey prior to the medical exam. Former Hanford workers were considered eligible for an exam if they reported exposure to asbestos, beryllium, or noise, or if a review of their Hanford work history indicated possible or probable exposure to one of these three hazards. We also invited any former Hanford worker who requested an exam to participate, regardless of documentation of exposure. The screening exam included a problem-focused physical exam, along with screening tests for one or more of three specific medical conditions: asbestosis (chest X-ray and spirometry), berylliosis (chest X-ray, spirometry, and beryllium-induced lymphocyte proliferation test), and NIHL (audiometry). We assisted ill workers in filing appropriate workers’ compensation claims, and facilitated appropriate follow-up medical care. This program has made an important contribution to the health of former DOE contractor workers at the Hanford defense nuclear site.

  19. continued next page... Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    in the healthcare scene. With the explosion of medical information and advances in medical technology, medical In this digital era of information explosion and rapid advances in medical sciences and medical technologyinside continued next page... Medical Education: Enhancing Learning in the Affective (Feeling

  20. Medical School AdmissionsMedical School AdmissionsMedical School AdmissionsMedical School Admissions Monday, April 23rd

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Medical School AdmissionsMedical School AdmissionsMedical School AdmissionsMedical School Part 1: Admissions Presentations and Upcoming Changes in Medical Education, 6:30 ­ 8:00 pm · Greg. of Admissions: The Medical College of Wisconsin · Kurt Hansen Asst. Dean of Admissions: UW School of Medicine

  1. Inflight medical emergencies.

    PubMed

    Lyznicki, J M; Williams, M A; Deitchman, S D; Howe, J P

    2000-08-01

    This report responds to resolutions asking the American Medical Association (AMA) to develop recommendations for the use of medical equipment and technology onboard commercial airlines. Information for the report was derived from a search of the MEDLINE database and references listed in pertinent articles, as well as through communications with experts in aerospace and emergency medicine. Based on this information, the AMA Council on Scientific Affairs determined that, while inflight morbidity and mortality are uncommon, serious events do occur, which require immediate emergency care. Management of serious problems requires an integrated emergency response system that ensures rapid notification of medical personnel on the ground, assistance from appropriately trained flight crews and passenger volunteers (if available), and adequate medical supplies and equipment to stabilize the victim. Physicians have an important role in the preflight evaluation and counseling of potential passengers who are at risk of inflight medical complications, and in providing inflight medical assistance. Some U.S. and foreign air carriers are upgrading inflight emergency medical kits and placing automated external defibrillators aboard aircraft. Few data are available regarding the effectiveness of such improvements in improving health or survival outcomes. Recent federal legislation requires assessment of the extent of inflight medical emergencies, including the adequacy of emergency medical supplies and equipment carried onboard commercial airliners. This legislation also should alleviate liability concerns by providing immunity for physicians and others who render inflight medical assistance. PMID:10954361

  2. Hysterical again: the gastrointestinal woman in medical discourse.

    PubMed

    Vidali, Amy

    2013-03-01

    This article suggests increased attention to how medical discourses of gastrointestinal (GI) disorder and distress are fraught with social assumptions and consequences by examining nineteenth-century and contemporary medical texts focused on chronic constipation and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). I suggest that these medical discourses present what I call the "gastrointestinal woman," who is characterized as having unjustified anxiety and is to blame for her condition. My approach to understanding, and ultimately revising, the representation of the gastrointestinal woman is shaped by disability studies scholarship, which encourages intervention in problematic medical discourses and more active shaping of discourses of chronic pain and illness by those who have these conditions. PMID:23179643

  3. Adherence to Long-Term Therapies and Beliefs about Medications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To assess adherence to long-term medications among patients in family medicine clinics and to evaluate relationship between adherence, beliefs about medications, medication information adequacy, and other factors. Methods. Interviewer assisted survey was conducted to assess adherence using the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8), beliefs about medications using beliefs about medicine questionnaire (BMQ), and the patients' perception of medication information adequacy. Results. Of the 408 participants, 56.9% reported low adherence. Pearson's bivariate correlation showed positive association between MMAS-8 score and BMQ-specific necessity (r = 0.526??P < 0.001) and the perceived information adequacy (r = 0.568??P < 0.001), and there was negative association between adherence score and BMQ specific concerns, general overuse, and harm (r = ?0.647, ?0.466, and ?0.663, resp.) (P < 0.001). Multivariable analysis revealed that age, number of medications, number of medical conditions, specific necessity and concerns beliefs, general harm beliefs, and perceived adequacy of medication information were independent predictor of adherence. Furthermore, specific beliefs explain 27.7% of the variance in adherence, while medication information adequacy explains 32.3% of the variance in adherence. Conclusion. The prevalence of low adherence among patients on long-term medications is high and it is related to negative beliefs about medications and to inadequate information given to patients about their medications. PMID:24688792

  4. High Altitude Medical Problems

    PubMed Central

    Hultgren, Herbert N.

    1979-01-01

    Increased travel to high altitude areas by mountaineers and nonclimbing tourists has emphasized the clinical problems associated with rapid ascent. Acute mountain sickness affects most sojourners at elevations above 10,000 feet. Symptoms are usually worse on the second or third day after arrival. Gradual ascent, spending one to three days at an intermediate altitude, and the use of acetazolamide (Diamox) will prevent or ameliorate symptoms in most instances. Serious and potentially fatal problems, such as high altitude pulmonary edema or cerebral edema, occur in approximately 0.5 percent to 1.0 percent of visitors to elevations above 10,000 feet—especially with heavy physical exertion on arrival, such as climbing or skiing. Early recognition, high flow oxygen therapy and prompt descent are crucially important in management. Our knowledge of the causes of these and other high altitude problems, such as retinal hemorrhage, systemic edema and pulmonary hypertension, is still incomplete. Even less is known of the effect of high altitudes on medical conditions common at sea level or on the action of commonly used drugs. ImagesFigure 2. PMID:483805

  5. An integrated model of multiple-condition ChIP-Seq data reveals predeterminants of Cdx2 binding.

    PubMed

    Mahony, Shaun; Edwards, Matthew D; Mazzoni, Esteban O; Sherwood, Richard I; Kakumanu, Akshay; Morrison, Carolyn A; Wichterle, Hynek; Gifford, David K

    2014-03-01

    Regulatory proteins can bind to different sets of genomic targets in various cell types or conditions. To reliably characterize such condition-specific regulatory binding we introduce MultiGPS, an integrated machine learning approach for the analysis of multiple related ChIP-seq experiments. MultiGPS is based on a generalized Expectation Maximization framework that shares information across multiple experiments for binding event discovery. We demonstrate that our framework enables the simultaneous modeling of sparse condition-specific binding changes, sequence dependence, and replicate-specific noise sources. MultiGPS encourages consistency in reported binding event locations across multiple-condition ChIP-seq datasets and provides accurate estimation of ChIP enrichment levels at each event. MultiGPS's multi-experiment modeling approach thus provides a reliable platform for detecting differential binding enrichment across experimental conditions. We demonstrate the advantages of MultiGPS with an analysis of Cdx2 binding in three distinct developmental contexts. By accurately characterizing condition-specific Cdx2 binding, MultiGPS enables novel insight into the mechanistic basis of Cdx2 site selectivity. Specifically, the condition-specific Cdx2 sites characterized by MultiGPS are highly associated with pre-existing genomic context, suggesting that such sites are pre-determined by cell-specific regulatory architecture. However, MultiGPS-defined condition-independent sites are not predicted by pre-existing regulatory signals, suggesting that Cdx2 can bind to a subset of locations regardless of genomic environment. A summary of this paper appears in the proceedings of the RECOMB 2014 conference, April 2-5. PMID:24675637

  6. Medication errors in anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Amit; Malapero, Raymond J; Gabriel, Rodney A; Kaye, Alan David; Elhassan, Amir O; Nelson, Ehren R; Bates, David W; Urman, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Medication errors represent one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Anesthesia has specific medication-related risks; providers must administer many potent intravenous medications quickly, often with minimal to no supervision. Well-described reasons for medication administration errors in anesthesia include medication ampoules with similar appearance and packaging, clinician inattention, ineffective communication, fatigue, and haste. Technologies that are used widely in other parts of the hospital, such as barcoding, are a challenge to implement in anesthesia, and systemic approaches, including color-coding of syringe labels and barcoding technology of syringes, have been evaluated with mixed results. Emphasis should be placed on implementing forcing functions when possible, utilizing technology, standardization, and education about the need for awareness in specific situations. More studies need to be done to define the epidemiology of medication errors in anesthesia, and more importantly, to assess interventions for preventing them. PMID:26062316

  7. Medical services at ultra-endurance foot races in remote environments: medical issues and consensus guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Martin D; Pasternak, Andy; Rogers, Ian R; Khodaee, Morteza; Hill, John C; Townes, David A; Scheer, Bernd Volker; Krabak, Brian J; Basset, Patrick; Lipman, Grant S

    2014-08-01

    An increasing participation in ultra-endurance foot races is cause for greater need to ensure the presence of appropriate medical care at these events. Unique medical challenges result from the extreme physical demands these events place on participants, the often remote settings spanning broad geographical areas, and the potential for extremes in weather conditions and various environmental hazards. Medical issues in these events can adversely affect race performance, and there is the potential for the presentation of life-threatening issues such as exercise-associated hyponatremia, severe altitude illnesses, and major trauma from falls or animal attacks. Organization of a medical support system for ultra-endurance foot races starts with a determination of the level of medical support that is appropriate and feasible for the event. Once that is defined, various legal considerations and organizational issues must be addressed, and medical guidelines and protocols should be developed. While there is no specific or universal standard of medical care for ultra-endurance foot races since a variety of factors determine the level and type of medical services that are appropriate and feasible, the minimum level of services that each event should have in place is a plan for emergency transport of injured or ill participants, pacers, spectators and event personnel to local medical facilities. PMID:24748459

  8. Acromegaly: Medical Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pamela U. Freda

    In recent years, significant advances in the pharmacological options for therapy of acromegaly have been made and thus medical\\u000a management has a major role in the care of patients with this disease. Disease-specific medical therapies are directed at\\u000a controlling the excessive hormone secretion i.e. normalizing serum levels of GH and IGF-I. These medical therapies are used\\u000a predominantly after surgical therapy

  9. Medical Image Processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raj Shekhar; Vivek Walimbe; William Plishker

    \\u000a Of many types of images around us, medical images are a ubiquitous type since xrays were first discovered in 1985. The recent\\u000a years, especially after the introduction of computed tomography (CT) in 1972, have witnessed an explosion in the use of medical\\u000a imaging and, consequently, the volume of medical image data being produced. It is estimated that 40,000 terabytes of

  10. Career Investigation: Medical Illustration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Dobyns

    2011-12-11

    Believe it or not, artists can actually have careers in their passion area. Dig deeper into Medical Illustration, a field requiring a mind for science and a talent for drawing. Aspects covered include an overview, work environment, high school preparation, college requirements and career outlook (including salary). Medical Illustration Medical Illustrators are those rare individuals who have both a demonstrated artistic ability and a detailed knowledge of human and animal anatomy, as well as ...

  11. Medical waste management plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.

    2004-12-01

    This plan describes the process for managing research generated medical waste at Sandia National Laboratories/California. It applies to operations at the Chemical and Radiation Detection Laboratory (CRDL), Building 968, and other biosafety level 1 or 2 activities at the site. It addresses the accumulation, storage, treatment and disposal of medical waste and sharps waste. It also describes the procedures to comply with regulatory requirements and SNL policies applicable to medical waste.

  12. PHARMACOLOGY MEDICAL SCHOOL

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY MEDICAL SCHOOL 2011 ANNUAL AND HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY #12; MISSION The mission of the Department of Pharmacology is to provide quality educational programs related

  13. [Collapse of the nasal alae and instruments for treating this condition, especially with the Feldbausch nasal dilator. Pictures from the history of otorhinolaryngology, presented by instruments from the collection of the German Museum of Medical History in Ingolstadt].

    PubMed

    Feldmann, H

    1995-03-01

    Although the anatomy of the nasal muscles and the active movement of the nasal alae brought about by them, were already known in ancient times (Galenos), it was only at the end of the 19th century that the collapse of the nasal alae was recognized as a passive mechanism obstructing the inspiratory air passages. Since surgical methods for treating this condition were not available at that time, various small gadgets to be introduced into the nasal vestibulum were invented for stabilising the alae. Among these, Feldbausch's nasal dilator was the best known. It was in use up to the middle of this century, but then became completely obsolete. The history of this chapter of rhinology is related primarily by means of literal quotations of the phrases with which the authors presented their devices and praised their virtues. PMID:7755859

  14. The Integrated Medical Model - Optimizing In-flight Space Medical Systems to Reduce Crew Health Risk and Mission Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerstman, Eric; Walton, Marlei; Minard, Charles; Saile, Lynn; Myers, Jerry; Butler, Doug; Lyengar, Sriram; Fitts, Mary; Johnson-Throop, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a decision support tool used by medical system planners and designers as they prepare for exploration planning activities of the Constellation program (CxP). IMM provides an evidence-based approach to help optimize the allocation of in-flight medical resources for a specified level of risk within spacecraft operational constraints. Eighty medical conditions and associated resources are represented in IMM. Nine conditions are due to Space Adaptation Syndrome. The IMM helps answer fundamental medical mission planning questions such as What medical conditions can be expected? What type and quantity of medical resources are most likely to be used?", and "What is the probability of crew death or evacuation due to medical events?" For a specified mission and crew profile, the IMM effectively characterizes the sequence of events that could potentially occur should a medical condition happen. The mathematical relationships among mission and crew attributes, medical conditions and incidence data, in-flight medical resources, potential clinical and crew health end states are established to generate end state probabilities. A Monte Carlo computational method is used to determine the probable outcomes and requires up to 25,000 mission trials to reach convergence. For each mission trial, the pharmaceuticals and supplies required to diagnose and treat prevalent medical conditions are tracked and decremented. The uncertainty of patient response to treatment is bounded via a best-case, worst-case, untreated case algorithm. A Crew Health Index (CHI) metric, developed to account for functional impairment due to a medical condition, provides a quantified measure of risk and enables risk comparisons across mission scenarios. The use of historical in-flight medical data, terrestrial surrogate data as appropriate, and space medicine subject matter expertise has enabled the development of a probabilistic, stochastic decision support tool capable of optimizing in-flight medical systems based on crew and mission parameters. This presentation will illustrate how to apply quantitative risk assessment methods to optimize the mass and volume of space-based medical systems for a space flight mission given the level of crew health and mission risk.

  15. Content updated November 2011 Yeshiva University provides you and your family with comprehensive medical coverage through

    E-print Network

    Jenny, Andreas

    , brand name formulary drugs and brand name non formulary drugs. In addition, we have designated a special list of generic and formulary, brand name preventive medications for certain medical conditions

  16. 75 FR 41986 - Medical Devices; Pediatric Uses of Devices; Requirements for Submission of Information on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ...Rules and Regulations] [Page 41986...RIN 0910-AG29 Medical Devices; Pediatric Uses...Condition That a Device Is Intended to...amendments to existing regulations which would require...available pediatric medical device information...

  17. Role of State Medical Boards in Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David A.; Austin, Dale L.; Thompson, James N.

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of physician competency prior to issuing an initial medical license has been a fundamental responsibility of medical boards. Growing public expectation holds that medical boards will ensure competency throughout a physician's career. The Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) strongly supports the right of state medical boards to…

  18. Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Medical Medical Department Dental Services

    E-print Network

    Polz, Martin

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Medical Medical Department Dental Services 77 being treated by a physician now? For what? Date of last medical exam Date of last Dental exam 5. Yes History English #12;Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Medical Medical Department Dental Services

  19. Designated Medical Directors for Emergency Medical Services: Recruitment and Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Freeman, Victoria A.; Patterson, P. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Context: Emergency medical services (EMS) agencies rely on medical oversight to support Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) in the provision of prehospital care. Most states require EMS agencies to have a designated medical director (DMD), who typically is responsible for the many activities of medical oversight. Purpose: To assess rural-urban…

  20. MEDICAL SCIENCES DIVISION SENIOR CLERICAL OFFICER (OXFORD MEDICAL ALUMNI)

    E-print Network

    Oxford, University of

    1 MEDICAL SCIENCES DIVISION SENIOR CLERICAL OFFICER (OXFORD MEDICAL ALUMNI) Grade 4 , Salary. Oxford Medical Alumni exists to advance the cause of medical education by promoting the interests to establish a mutually beneficial relationship between the Medical Sciences and its alumni and to promote

  1. 42 CFR 124.10 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Additional conditions. 124.10 Section 124.10 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT MEDICAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION AND MODERNIZATION Project Grants...

  2. Training medical assistants for surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, F.; Bergström, S.; Vaz, M. da l.; Langa, J.; Bugalho, A.

    1999-01-01

    A successful programme is reported from Mozambique for training middle-level health workers to perform fairly advanced surgical procedures in remote areas where the services of consultants are virtually unobtainable. Manpower and financial constraints obliged Mozambique to train medical assistants to perform surgical work in rural areas, where three broad priorities were identified: pregnancy-related complications, trauma-related complications, and emergency inflammatory conditions. Since 1984, 20 health workers have emerged from three-year courses to become técnicos de cirurgía (assistant medical officers), and it is expected that there will be 46 by 1999. The training comprises two years of lectures and practical sessions in the Maputo Central Hospital, and a practical internship lasting a year at a provincial hospital. Three workshops organized since 1989 suggest that the upgraded personnel are performing well. More detailed evaluation and follow-up are in progress. Throughout 1995 a follow-up was conducted on 14 assistant medical officers. They performed 10,258 surgical operations, some 70% of which were emergency interventions. Low rates of complication occurred and postoperative mortality amounted to 0.4% and 0.1% in emergency and elective interventions respectively. PMID:10516791

  3. Exploration Medical Capability - Technology Watch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, Michael; Watkins, Sharmila; Barr, Yael; Barsten, Kristina; Fung, Paul; Baumann, David

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the Technology Watch process are to identify emerging, high-impact technologies that augment current ExMC development efforts, and to work with academia, industry, and other government agencies to accelerate the development of medical care and research capabilities for the mitigation of potential health issues that could occur during space exploration missions. The establishment of collaborations with these entities is beneficial to technology development, assessment and/or insertion. Such collaborations also further NASA s goal to provide a safe and healthy environment for human exploration. The Tech Watch project addresses requirements and capabilities identified by knowledge and technology gaps that are derived from a discrete set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur on exploration missions. These gaps are addressed through technology readiness level assessments, market surveys, collaborations and distributed innovation opportunities. Ultimately, these gaps need to be closed with respect to exploration missions, and may be achieved through technology development projects. Information management is a key aspect to this process where Tech Watch related meetings, research articles, collaborations and partnerships are tracked by the HRP s Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element. In 2011, ExMC will be introducing the Tech Watch external website and evidence wiki that will provide access to ExMC technology and knowledge gaps, technology needs and requirements documents.

  4. Developing medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Coles, C.

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews the current state of undergraduate and postgraduate medical education, and suggests changing the educational methods used rather than rearranging the content of courses. A learner centred approach is described, and its applications to postgraduate medical education discussed. Some research and development implications are considered. PMID:8446554

  5. MEDICAL SCIENCE SYLLABUS 2014

    E-print Network

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    Series of Medical Oncology 11 Special Series of Radiation Oncology 12 Special Series of Palliative Neurology 63 Medical Oncology/Hematology 64 Hematology 65 Internal Related Radiology 66 Radiation Oncology;Pediatrics 71 General Pediatrics 72 Dermatology 73 Phychiatry 74 Laboratory Medicine 75 Metabolomics Research

  6. Medicalization and epistemic injustice.

    PubMed

    Wardrope, Alistair

    2015-08-01

    Many critics of medicalization (the process by which phenomena become candidates for medical definition, explanation and treatment) express concern that the process privileges individualised, biologically grounded interpretations of medicalized phenomena, inhibiting understanding and communication of aspects of those phenomena that are less relevant to their biomedical modelling. I suggest that this line of critique views medicalization as a hermeneutical injustice-a form of epistemic injustice that prevents people having the hermeneutical resources available to interpret and communicate significant areas of their experience. Interpreting the critiques in this fashion shows they frequently fail because they: neglect the ways in which medicalization may not obscure, but rather illuminate, individuals' experiences; and neglect the testimony of those experiencing first-hand medicalized problems, thus may be guilty of perpetrating testimonial injustice. However, I suggest that such arguments are valuable insofar as they highlight the unwarranted epistemic privilege frequently afforded to medical institutions and medicalized models of phenomena, and a consequent need for greater epistemic humility on the part of health workers and researchers. PMID:25374423

  7. Avoiding medical emergencies.

    PubMed

    Omar, Y

    2013-03-01

    Medical emergencies can occur at any time in any location. This article and associated presentation at the forthcoming British Dental Conference Exhibition provide key advice on avoiding medical emergencies in dental practice; including advice on risk assessing all patients, understanding the importance of a checklist, and using a National Early Warning Score (NEWS). PMID:23470404

  8. Emergency Medical Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of emergency medical technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 4 units specific to the occupation of emergency medical technician. The following…

  9. Access to Medical Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Nancy

    Although confidentiality with regard to medical records is supposedly protected by the American Medical Associaton's principles of Ethics and the physician-patient privilege, there are a number of laws that require a physician to release patient information to public authorities without the patient's consent. These exceptions include birth and…

  10. Microwave medical devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Sterzer

    2002-01-01

    This article describes several new microwave medical devices that either were or are being developed at MMTC, Inc. in cooperation with the following institutions: Celsion Corporation, Columbia, Maryland (microwave balloon catheters); Montefiore Medical Center (MMC), Bronx, New York (microwave balloon catheters, dual microwave antennas, and microwave poration); and the University of California at San Francisco (conformal array antennas). The individuals

  11. Medical ultrasound imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jørgen Arendt Jensen

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy are shown. Systems using both linear and non-linear propagation of ultrasound are described. The blood velocity

  12. Philosophy and Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopelman, Loretta M.

    1995-01-01

    It is argued that study of philosophy in medical school develops better physicians by teaching salient views of ethical, social, and conceptual problems arising in medical practice. Students learn to examine assumptions, broaden perspectives and gain self-knowledge, develop critical thinking skills, generate tolerance and skepticism about dogma,…

  13. Medication and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Laurie L.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical syndrome which relates most frequently to the reading-disabled child is the attention deficity disorder. The child psychiatrist will generally resort to medication only when behavioral management techniques have failed. The two most frequently used medications are Ritalin and Dexedrine, central nervous system stimulants. (JN)

  14. Medical Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kent A.

    1986-01-01

    Description of information services from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) highlights a new system for retrieving information from NLM's databases (GRATEFUL MED); a formal Regional Medical Library Network; DOCLINE; the Unified Medical Language System; and Integrated Academic Information Management Systems. Research and development and the…

  15. Medical Practice Makes Perfect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Cedaron Medical Inc., was founded in 1990 as a result of a NASA SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) grant from Johnson Space Center to develop a Hand Testing and Exercise Unit for use in space. From that research came Dexter, a comprehensive workstation that creates a paperless environment for medical data management.

  16. Medical Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

  17. Continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Todd, D

    1987-04-01

    With the rapid advances in medical science and increasing complexities of patient care, the need for continuing medical education (CME) is widely accepted by the profession. CME follows general and higher professional training, and should be a life long process. Teaching hospitals and postgraduate professional institutions play vital roles in organising, promoting, and monitoring this activity. CME directorates should be established. University authorities must recognise the important role of medical teachers in postgraduate and continuing medical education, and the staff establishment and terms of service should be held regularly. Medical libraries should have easy borrowing facilities. Self-assessment and audio-visual material are particularly helpful to the busy practitioner and inexpensive local or regional journals of quality can provide pertinent and up-to-date information. All charges for attending scientific meetings and educational material should be tax deductible or subsidized. The effectiveness of CME is difficult to assess and participation is almost impossible to enforce. Much depends on the standard of medical practice wanted by society. Recertification of general practitioners or specialists poses many problems. On the other hand, completion of self-assessment programmes, active participation at medical meetings, contributions to scientific literature, and membership of medical societies with built-in peer review could be monitored and regularly used to evaluate professional status. PMID:3688816

  18. Medical evaluation and management of urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Semins, Michelle Jo; Matlaga, Brian R

    2010-02-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a highly prevalent condition with a high recurrence rate that has a large impact on the quality of life of those affected. It also poses a great financial burden on society. There have been great advancements in the surgical treatment of stone disease over the past several decades. The evolution of surgical technique appears to have overshadowed the importance of prevention of stone disease despite evidence showing medical therapies significantly decreasing stone recurrence rates. Herein we review the metabolic evaluation of stone formers with the use of specific blood and urine tests. We complete our discussion with a review of the medical management of stone formers providing both general recommendations as well as reviewing focused therapies for specific metabolic abnormalities and medical conditions. PMID:21789078

  19. A Study on Agent-Based Secure Scheme for Electronic Medical Record System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tzer-Long Chen; Yu-Fang Chung; Frank Y. S. Lin

    Patient records, including doctors’ diagnoses of diseases, trace of treatments and patients’ conditions, nursing actions,\\u000a and examination results from allied health profession departments, are the most important medical records of patients in medical\\u000a systems. With patient records, medical staff can instantly understand the entire medical information of a patient so that,\\u000a according to the patient’s conditions, more accurate diagnoses and

  20. Medical relief for the 2011 Japan earthquake: a nursing account.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Satoko; Kako, Mayumi; Mayner, Lidia

    2014-03-01

    In 2011 the east coast of Japan experienced a massive earthquake which triggered a devastating tsunami destroying many towns and killing over 15?000 people. The work presented in this paper is a personal account that outlines the relief efforts of the Humanitarian Medical Assistance team and describes the efforts to provide medical assistance to evacuees. The towns most affected had a large proportion of older people who were more likely to have chronic conditions and required medication to sustain their health. Since personal property was destroyed in the tsunami many older people were left without medication and also did not remember which type of medication they were taking. Some evacuees had brought a list of their medication with them, this assisted relief teams in obtaining the required medication for these people. The more successful evacuation centers had small numbers of evacuees who were given tasks to administer the center that kept them occupied and active. PMID:24305171

  1. Can older people remember medication reminders presented using synthetic speech?

    PubMed

    Wolters, Maria K; Johnson, Christine; Campbell, Pauline E; DePlacido, Christine G; McKinstry, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Reminders are often part of interventions to help older people adhere to complicated medication regimes. Computer-generated (synthetic) speech is ideal for tailoring reminders to different medication regimes. Since synthetic speech may be less intelligible than human speech, in particular under difficult listening conditions, we assessed how well older people can recall synthetic speech reminders for medications. 44 participants aged 50-80 with no cognitive impairment recalled reminders for one or four medications after a short distraction. We varied background noise, speech quality, and message design. Reminders were presented using a human voice and two synthetic voices. Data were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models. Reminder recall was satisfactory if reminders were restricted to one familiar medication, regardless of the voice used. Repeating medication names supported recall of lists of medications. We conclude that spoken reminders should build on familiar information and be integrated with other adherence support measures. PMID:25080534

  2. Skylab medical operational support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primeaux, G. R.; Spross, F. R.

    1974-01-01

    To support the medical research and the maintenance of crew health during the three Skylab missions, a medical operational support team was organized. The functions of this team ranged from medical data management to medical systems engineering monitoring during the flights. The capability to expand preflight and postflight medical research and analysis was supplied through the use of the Skylab mobile laboratories. These mobile laboratories were not only capable of being transported to the recovery ship for postflight use, but also served as a preflight test area for gathering crewman baseline data. The laboratories contained experiment hardware identical to that of the flight orbital workshop and a laboratory diagnostic facility that duplicated many of the capabilities of ground-based clinical laboratories.

  3. Medical negligence: Criminal prosecution of medical professionals, importance of medical evidence: Some guidelines for medical practitioners.

    PubMed

    Pandit, M S; Pandit, Shobha

    2009-07-01

    The changing doctor-patient relationship and commercialization of modern medical practice has affected the practice of medicine. On the one hand, there can be unfavorable results of treatment and on the other hand the patient suspects negligence as a cause of their suffering. There is an increasing trend of medical litigation by unsatisfied patients. The Supreme Court has laid down guidelines for the criminal prosecution of a doctor. This has decreased the unnecessary harassment of doctors. As the medical profession has been brought under the provisions of the Consumer Protection Act, 1986, the patients have an easy method of litigation. There should be legal awareness among the doctors that will help them in the proper recording of medical management details. This will help them in defending their case during any allegation of medical negligence. PMID:19881135

  4. At the borders of medical reasoning: aetiological and ontological challenges of medically unexplained symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) remain recalcitrant to the medical profession, proving less suitable for homogenic treatment with respect to their aetiology, taxonomy and diagnosis. While the majority of existing medical research methods are designed for large scale population data and sufficiently homogenous groups, MUS are characterised by their heterogenic and complex nature. As a result, MUS seem to resist medical scrutiny in a way that other conditions do not. This paper approaches the problem of MUS from a philosophical point of view. The aim is to first consider the epistemological problem of MUS in a wider ontological and phenomenological context, particularly in relation to causation. Second, the paper links current medical practice to certain ontological assumptions. Finally, the outlines of an alternative ontology of causation are offered which place characteristic features of MUS, such as genuine complexity, context-sensitivity, holism and medical uniqueness at the centre of any causal set-up, and not only for MUS. This alternative ontology provides a framework in which to better understand complex medical conditions in relation to both their nature and their associated research activity. PMID:24006875

  5. Consent for emergency medical services for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    2011-08-01

    Parental consent generally is required for the medical evaluation and treatment of minor children. However, children and adolescents might require evaluation of and treatment for emergency medical conditions in situations in which a parent or legal guardian is not available to provide consent or conditions under which an adolescent patient might possess the legal authority to provide consent. In general, a medical screening examination and any medical care necessary and likely to prevent imminent and significant harm to the pediatric patient with an emergency medical condition should not be withheld or delayed because of problems obtaining consent. The purpose of this policy statement is to provide guidance in those situations in which parental consent is not readily available, in which parental consent is not necessary, or in which parental refusal of consent places a child at risk of significant harm. PMID:21788221

  6. Tackling medication non-adherence in severe mental illness: where are we going wrong?

    PubMed

    Brown, E; Gray, R

    2015-04-01

    Although people with schizophrenia require medication to manage symptoms such as hearing voices, most do not take it as prescribed (they are non-adherent). We talked to psychiatrists, nurses and pharmacists about how they work with patients to help them be better at sticking with their medication. Although the professionals that we talked to recognized that treatment adherence was a major issue in their clinical work, they did not make best use of evidence-based interventions to address the problem. Often their practice was based on what they believed would work (e.g. patient education) even when the research shows that way of working to be ineffective. As far as we can determine, this is the first study to examine what interventions different mental health professionals report that they use in clinical practice to address patient's medication non-adherence. Non-adherence with medication is common in patients with schizophrenia. Addressing adherence to treatment may enhance clinical outcomes. Our aim was to explore mental health professionals experience and practise managing medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia. In this qualitative study, we interviewed mental health professionals from three key groups involved in promoting adherence: pharmacists, psychiatrists and nurses. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using a thematic approach. Thirty-five health professionals participated. From these interviews, we identified five main themes: my beliefs inform my practice; withholding information; adherence is important; who is responsible for promoting adherence?; and is it ok to pay people to take medication? Our overarching meta-theme was that practice with regard to promoting adherence was informed by beliefs and not by evidence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to explore different mental health professionals' approaches to working with patients who do not want to take medication. The significance of participants' personal beliefs is an important observation. Our findings suggest that to support clinicians to more effectively help patients manage their medication, it may be first necessary to challenge pre-existing beliefs about adherence. PMID:25655400

  7. The Emergency Medical Services Safety Attitudes Questionnaire

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Daniel Patterson; David T. Huang; Rollin J. Fairbanks; Henry E. Wang

    2010-01-01

    To characterize safety culture in emergency medical services (EMS), the authors modified a validated safety culture instrument, the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). The pilot instrument was administered to 3 EMS agencies in a large metropolitan area. The authors characterized safety culture across 6 domains: safety climate, teamwork climate, perceptions of management, job satisfaction, working conditions, and stress recognition. The feasibility

  8. Automating Accreditation of Medical Web Content

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vangelis Karkaletsis; Pythagoras Karampiperis; Konstantinos Stamatakis; Martin Labský; Marek Ruzicka; Vojtech Svátek; Enrique Amigó; Matti Pöllä; Miquel Angel Mayer; Angela Leis; Dagmar Villarroel Gonzales

    2008-01-01

    The increasing amount of freely available health- related web content generates, on one hand, excellent conditions for self-education of patients as well as physicians, but on the other hand entails substantial risks if such information is trusted irrespective of low competence or even bad intentions of its authors. This is why medical web resources accreditation by renowned authorities is of

  9. MEDICAL CENTRE Welfare W tch

    E-print Network

    Banaji,. Murad

    UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTRE Welfare W tch Medical Centre Health Check Patient Participation THE RESPONSE. #12;INTRODUCTION The University Medical Centre is a GP Practice on the campus of the University Medical Centre and our practice population is made up of approximately 75% 16-24 year olds. The Medical

  10. Pre-Medical Studies Certificate

    E-print Network

    Saldin, Dilano

    Pre-Medical Studies Certificate What are Pre-Medical Studies? Pre-medical studies follow the course of study you take to prepare for admission to medical school. This includes not just the necessary science has been long-standing at UWM and prepares students for the upcoming changes to the Medical College

  11. MEDICAL COLLEGE OF WISCONSIN Introduction

    E-print Network

    1 MEDICAL COLLEGE OF WISCONSIN OVERVIEW Introduction The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW and the communities we serve. The Medical College of Wisconsin had unrestricted revenues of $851 million for fiscal and Schools (NCA) and by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME). MEDICAL COLLEGE OF WISCONSIN

  12. Medical Writers: Who Are We?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susanna J Dodgson

    The aim of this study was to determine how medical writers define themselves and are defined by others. Functional definitions differed in the three professional societies to which medical writers belong: the American Medical Writers Association (AMWA), the European Medical Writers Association (EMWA) and the Drug Information Association (DIA). A fourth professional association, the International Committee for Medical Journal Editors

  13. Southwestern Ontario Medical Education Network Southwestern Ontario Medical Education Network

    E-print Network

    Lennard, William N.

    Southwestern Ontario Medical Education Network SWOMEN Southwestern Ontario Medical Education Network SWOMEN Contact: Charlotte Sikatori, Southwestern Ontario Medical Education Network (SWOMEN, Pathology, Respirology, Plastic Surgery, Oncology, and ENT. There are many more ­ please feel free

  14. Genetically and medically susceptible workers.

    PubMed

    Mohr, S; Gochfeld, M; Pransky, G

    1999-01-01

    The likelihood of an individual becoming ill from a hazardous material or condition is strongly influenced by both their genetic makeup and their underlying state of health. Although the past decade has seen great advances in understanding human variation in health and genetic polymorphisms and in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, much less progress has been made in effectively using this information to protect worker health. Scientific evidence for increased susceptibility often is weak and rarely satisfies legal thresholds for sufficient risk to warrant exclusion from a particular job. When public safety is a major concern, many legally mandated exclusions are not well justified. Medical opinions about fitness to work should be based upon a systematic and credible analysis of the condition, its relationship to ability and risk for a particular job, and knowledge of possible accommodations. Conclusions should reflect the limitations of scientific knowledge and guidance from antidiscrimination legislation. PMID:10378978

  15. Robust Medical Data Delivery for Wireless Pervasive Healthcare

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shanshan Jiang; Yuan Xue; Annarita Giani; Ruzena Bajcsy

    2009-01-01

    The use of wireless sensor networks as a means for providing remote healthcare provides a unique opportunity to reduce the healthcare cost through more efficient use of clinical resources and earlier detection of medical conditions. Despite the initial promising results, there remain significant obstacles to apply this technology to the practical medical care context. In this paper, we investigate one

  16. UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY REQUEST FOR EXCESS MEDICAL/ACCIDENT INSURANCE

    E-print Network

    Hayes, Jane E.

    UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY REQUEST FOR EXCESS MEDICAL/ACCIDENT INSURANCE (CAMPS, FIELD TRIPS, AND ACTIVITIES) Before submitting, please read the Conditions for Excess Medical/Accident Insurance. Your for billing purposes, and will be kept on file in Risk Management. If you have any questions regarding

  17. Impact of Medication Adherence on Hospitalization Risk and Healthcare Cost

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael C. Sokol; Kimberly A. McGuigan; Robert R. Verbrugge; Robert S. Epstein

    2005-01-01

    Objective:The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of medication adherence on healthcare utilization and cost for 4 chronic conditions that are major drivers of drug spending: diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and congestive heart failure. Research Design:The authors conducted a retrospective cohort observation of patients who were continuously enrolled in medical and prescription benefit plans from June 1997 through

  18. Student Perceptions of the First Year of Veterinary Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    A brief survey was conducted of nearly 900 first-year students in 14 U.S. veterinary medical schools in order to gather impressions of the first year of veterinary medical education. Although some students reported that conditions were stressful, the majority did not feel that they were inordinately so. Overall, most students were quite positive…

  19. Language Proficiency Testing and the Expatriate Medical Practitioner in Malawi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamwendo, Gregory H.

    2008-01-01

    According to the Medical Council of Malawi, one of the conditions for a licence to be granted to an individual who wants to practise medicine in Malawi is the practitioner's ability to speak and write English fluently. This means that the expatriate medical practitioner is not required by law to demonstrate fluency in Chichewa (the national…

  20. Flexible Spending Account Summary Partial list of qualified medical expenses

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Flexible Spending Account Summary Partial list of qualified medical expenses: Deductibles Copays and not used to treat a medical condition Warranties What is a Flexible Spending Account? A Flexible Spending Chiropractic services $240 $168 $72 and many others... #12;Flexible Spending Account Summary Dependent Care FSA

  1. Design of a context-aware model to enhance medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Lim, Myungeun; Choi, Jae-Hun; Bang, Sun-Lee; Kim, Dae-Hee; Park, Soo-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Medication adherence is important to patients who suffer from chronic disease. Regular medication activity reduces the cost of caring disease and prohibits the worsening of disease condition. To support patients taking medicine correctly, we developed a medication assistance system which alarms medication situation through multimedia messages and help patients to take a medicine. To enable the system copes with various situations related to a medication service, we designed a medication context model and implemented a state based context aware application. We also applied our system to patients and saw a little improvement in medication adherence. PMID:19964115

  2. Medical termination of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Christin-Maitre, S; Bouchard, P; Spitz, I M

    2000-03-30

    This review focuses on advances in the medical termination of pregnancy during the early period of the first trimester, when most abortions are performed. The drugs are used to terminate pregnancy act by inhibiting the synthesis of progesterone, inducing myometrial contractions, antagonizing the action of progesterone, or inhibiting trophoblast development. Among the drugs used in medical abortion are epostane, prostaglandins (including misoprostol and gameprost), combined methotrexate and misoprostol, tamoxifen-misoprostol regimen, mifepristone and prostaglandin, and antiprogestin and prostaglandins. The efficacy, side effects, and contraindications of these drugs in the medical termination of pregnancy are discussed. In general, medical abortion is associated with higher rates of prolonged bleeding, nausea, vomiting, and pain as compared to surgical abortion. However, medical termination of pregnancy has a high rate of efficacy in women with early pregnancies. In addition, medical abortion is safe and acceptable to women, and it does not require anesthesia. Lastly, women who choose medical abortion must have access to a center where suction curettage is available, should heavy bleeding occur and blood transfusion is required. PMID:10738054

  3. MayoClinic.com: Diseases & Conditions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hosted by MayoClinic.com, this helpful website offers information about a wide range of diseases and other medical conditions from scientists and physicians at the noted Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The website offers overviews of a plethora of diseases and conditions including Diarrhea, Alcohol Addiction, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, and Whooping Cough, to name just a few. The overviews contain concise sections addressing Signs and Symptoms, Causes, Prevention, Treatment, When to Seek Medical Advice, and more. Site visitors can find additional information by linking to one of 16 Disease & Condition Centers. These Centers address such conditions as High Blood Pressure, Cancer, Arthritis, Pain Management, Cholesterol, Allergy, and Diabetes.

  4. MEDLINEplus: Medical Dictionary

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    MEDLINEplus, the consumer health Web site from the National Library of Medicine, had recently added an online version of Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary. Added in response to feedback from MEDLINEplus users, the medical dictionary provides definitions, correct spelling, and pronunciation help for 60,000 words and phrases used by healthcare professionals. The dictionary also offers "biographies of individuals who have given their names to the language of medicine." With the addition of this medical dictionary, MEDLINEplus becomes an even more valuable resource for staying informed about one's health.

  5. MEDICAL AND EMERGENCY INFORMATION FORM

    E-print Network

    Rothman, Daniel

    MEDICAL AND EMERGENCY INFORMATION FORM Field Trip Name: __________________________ Trip Dates from information about your medical coverage that might be useful. Emergency Contact Information Emergency Personal;___________________________________________________________________________________ Please return completed form to the trip coordinator two weeks prior to departure. Known Medical

  6. Quick-release medical tape

    E-print Network

    Laulicht, Bryan E.

    Medical tape that provides secure fixation of life-sustaining and -monitoring devices with quick, easy, damage-free removal represents a longstanding unmet medical need in neonatal care. During removal of current medical ...

  7. ABOUTTHEMEDICALCOLLEGE A Premier Medical School

    E-print Network

    ......................................................7 The Campus .....................................................7 The Medical College of Wisconsin Facilities ............8 Milwaukee Regional Medical Center .....................10 Off-Campus Affiliations Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities............56 Residencies and Clinical Fellowships

  8. Conditional association.

    PubMed

    Seth, Sohan; Príncipe, José C

    2012-07-01

    Estimating conditional dependence between two random variables given the knowledge of a third random variable is essential in neuroscientific applications to understand the causal architecture of a distributed network. However, existing methods of assessing conditional dependence, such as the conditional mutual information, are computationally expensive, involve free parameters, and are difficult to understand in the context of realizations. In this letter, we discuss a novel approach to this problem and develop a computationally simple and parameter-free estimator. The difference between the proposed approach and the existing ones is that the former expresses conditional dependence in terms of a finite set of realizations, whereas the latter use random variables, which are not available in practice. We call this approach conditional association, since it is based on a generalization of the concept of association to arbitrary metric spaces. We also discuss a novel and computationally efficient approach of generating surrogate data for evaluating the significance of the acquired association value. PMID:22428596

  9. Medication alliance: development and implementation of a mental health staff training program for the enhancement of patient medication adherence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mitchell K Byrne

    2008-01-01

    Patient nonadherence to prescribed medications remains a major hurdle in the effective delivery of health care services for people experiencing chronic illnesses. Nonadherence rates are particularly high among those with major mental health problems and account for a significant proportion of hospitalisations due to relapse in conditions previously well-managed by medications. Therefore, interventions to enhance the adherence of patients with

  10. Medication deserts: survey of neighborhood disparities in availability of prescription medications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Only a small amount of research has focused on the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and geographic access to prescription medications at community pharmacies in North America and Europe. To examine the relationship between a community’s socio-economic context and its residents’ geographic access to common medications in pharmacies, we hypothesized that differences are present in access to pharmacies across communities with different socio-economic environments, and in availability of commonly prescribed medications within pharmacies located in communities with different socio-economic status. Methods We visited 408 pharmacies located in 168 socio-economically diverse communities to assess the availability of commonly prescribed medications. We collected the following information at each pharmacy visited: hours of operation, pharmacy type, in-store medication availability, and the cash price of the 13 most commonly prescribed medications. We calculated descriptive statistics for the sample and fitted a series of hierarchical linear models to test our hypothesis that the in-stock availability of medications differs by the socio-economic conditions of the community. This was accomplished by modeling medication availability in pharmacies on the socio-economic factors operating at the community level in a socio-economically devise urban area. Results Pharmacies in poor communities had significantly higher odds of medications being out of stock, OR=1.24, 95% CI [1.02, 1.52]. There was also a significant difference in density of smaller, independent pharmacies with very limited stock and hours of operation, and larger, chain pharmacies in poor communities as compared to the middle and low-poverty communities. Conclusions The findings suggest that geographic access to a neighborhood pharmacy, the type of pharmacy, and availability of commonly prescribed medications varies significantly across communities. In extreme cases, entire communities could be deemed “medication deserts” because geographic access to pharmacies and the availability of the most prescribed medications within them were very poor. To our knowledge, this study is first to report on the relationship between SES and geographic access to medications using small area econometric analysis techniques. Our findings should be reasonably generalizable to other urban areas in North America and Europe and suggest that more research is required to better understand the relationship of socio-economic environments and access to medications to develop strategies to achieve equitable medication access. PMID:23137192

  11. Medical devices: US medical device regulation.

    PubMed

    Jarow, Jonathan P; Baxley, John H

    2015-03-01

    Medical devices are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) within the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Center for Devices and Radiological Health is responsible for protecting and promoting the public health by ensuring the safety, effectiveness, and quality of medical devices, ensuring the safety of radiation-emitting products, fostering innovation, and providing the public with accurate, science-based information about the products we oversee, throughout the total product life cycle. The FDA was granted the authority to regulate the manufacturing and marketing of medical devices in 1976. It does not regulate the practice of medicine. Devices are classified based on complexity and level of risk, and "pre-1976" devices were allowed to remain on the market after being classified without FDA review. Post-1976 devices of lower complexity and risk that are substantially equivalent to a marketed "predicate" device may be cleared through the 510(k) premarket notification process. Clinical data are typically not needed for 510(k) clearance. In contrast, higher-risk devices typically require premarket approval. Premarket approval applications must contain data demonstrating reasonable assurance of safety and efficacy, and this information typically includes clinical data. For novel devices that are not high risk, the de novo process allows FDA to simultaneously review and classify new devices. Devices that are not legally marketed are permitted to be used for clinical investigation purposes in the United States under the Investigational Device Exemptions regulation. PMID:25458071

  12. Medical marijuana: medical necessity versus political agenda.

    PubMed

    Clark, Peter A; Capuzzi, Kevin; Fick, Cameron

    2011-12-01

    Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as an illegal Schedule I drug which has no accepted medical use. However, recent studies have shown that medical marijuana is effective in controlling chronic non-cancer pain, alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, treating wasting syndrome associated with AIDS, and controlling muscle spasms due to multiple sclerosis. These studies state that the alleviating benefits of marijuana outweigh the negative effects of the drug, and recommend that marijuana be administered to patients who have failed to respond to other therapies. Despite supporting evidence, the DEA refuses to reclassify marijuana as a Schedule II drug, which would allow physicians to prescribe marijuana to suffering patients. The use of medical marijuana has continued to gain support among states, and is currently legal in 16 states and the District of Columbia. This is in stark contrast to the federal government's stance of zero-tolerance, which has led to a heated legal debate in the United States. After reviewing relevant scientific data and grounding the issue in ethical principles like beneficence and nonmaleficence, there is a strong argument for allowing physicians to prescribe marijuana. Patients have a right to all beneficial treatments and to deny them this right violates their basic human rights. PMID:22129912

  13. Medical marijuana: Medical necessity versus political agenda

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter A.; Capuzzi, Kevin; Fick, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Summary Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as an illegal Schedule I drug which has no accepted medical use. However, recent studies have shown that medical marijuana is effective in controlling chronic non-cancer pain, alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, treating wasting syndrome associated with AIDS, and controlling muscle spasms due to multiple sclerosis. These studies state that the alleviating benefits of marijuana outweigh the negative effects of the drug, and recommend that marijuana be administered to patients who have failed to respond to other therapies. Despite supporting evidence, the DEA refuses to reclassify marijuana as a Schedule II drug, which would allow physicians to prescribe marijuana to suffering patients. The use of medical marijuana has continued to gain support among states, and is currently legal in 16 states and the District of Columbia. This is in stark contrast to the federal government’s stance of zero-tolerance, which has led to a heated legal debate in the United States. After reviewing relevant scientific data and grounding the issue in ethical principles like beneficence and nonmaleficence, there is a strong argument for allowing physicians to prescribe marijuana. Patients have a right to all beneficial treatments and to deny them this right violates their basic human rights. PMID:22129912

  14. 10 CFR 26.183 - Medical review officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...resulted from responsible use of legally prescribed medication, a documented condition or disease state, or the demonstrated physiology of the donor. (2) The MRO may only consider the results of tests of specimens that are collected and processed...

  15. 10 CFR 26.183 - Medical review officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...resulted from responsible use of legally prescribed medication, a documented condition or disease state, or the demonstrated physiology of the donor. (2) The MRO may only consider the results of tests of specimens that are collected and processed...

  16. Medications that Weaken Your Immune System and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fungal Diseases Share Compartir Medications that Weaken Your Immune System and Fungal Infections Overall, most serious fungal infections ... They are most common among people with weak immune systems. People with certain health conditions may need to ...

  17. Then & Now: Medical Research Pays Off for All Americans

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issues Then & Now Medical Research Pays Off for All Americans Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents ... which afflict tens of millions of Americans of all ages. William Howard Taft—Then & Now Taft's Condition ...

  18. Medical marijuana use for chronic pain: risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Garth T

    2012-01-01

    Questions from patients about medical marijuana use for chronic pain are becoming more common. The information in this report will help patients understand the potential risks and benefits of using this substance for painful conditions. PMID:22448949

  19. 10 CFR 26.183 - Medical review officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...resulted from responsible use of legally prescribed medication, a documented condition or disease state, or the demonstrated physiology of the donor. (2) The MRO may only consider the results of tests of specimens that are collected and processed...

  20. 10 CFR 26.183 - Medical review officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...resulted from responsible use of legally prescribed medication, a documented condition or disease state, or the demonstrated physiology of the donor. (2) The MRO may only consider the results of tests of specimens that are collected and processed...