Science.gov

Sample records for pre-existing medical conditions

  1. Sport climbing with pre-existing cardio-pulmonary medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuepper, T; Morrison, A; Gieseler, U; Schoeffl, V

    2009-06-01

    Over the past 25 years sport climbing has developed from an elite extreme sport subculture pursued by few into a mainstream recreational sport enjoyed globally by climbers of all ages, climbing abilities, and with pre-existing health conditions. As the demands and grades of climbing difficulty have increased over this period, most scientific literature on sport climbing focused on acute injuries and overuse syndromes, or performance physiology in healthy adult males. The physiological response to sport climbing is more similar to that of resistance training (i.e., body building) rather than a predominantly aerobic sport (i.e., running, cycling), so that heart rate and blood pressure during a climb will be disproportionately high relative to the 'exercise' of climbing, and breathing may be irregular. Therefore this review sought evidence-based recommendations for recreational sport climbing participation by those individuals with pre-existing cardiopulmonary medical conditions including coronary heart disease, chronic heart failure, cardiac dysrhythmia, pulmonary diseases (i.e., asthma) or hypertension. This review defines the criteria that must be fulfilled for safe sport climbing by those with pre-existing cardiopulmonary conditions or those with hypertension. PMID:19199210

  2. The Affordable Care Act's pre-existing condition insurance plan: enrollment, costs, and lessons for reform.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jean P; Moore, Janice M

    2012-09-01

    The Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) is the temporary, federal high-risk pool created under the Affordable Care Act to provide coverage to uninsured individuals with preexisting conditions until 2014, when exchange coverage becomes available to them. Nearly 78,000 people have enrolled since the program was implemented two years ago. This issue brief compares the PCIP with state-based high-risk pools that existed prior to the Affordable Care Act and considers programmatic differences that may have resulted in lower-than-anticipated enrollment and higher-than-anticipated costs for the PCIP. PCIP coverage, like state high-risk pool coverage, likely remains unaffordable to most lower-income individuals with preexisting conditions, but provides much needed access to care for those able to afford it. Operational costs of these programs are also quite high, making them less than optimal as a means of broader coverage expansion. PMID:23012765

  3. Pre-existing cardiovascular conditions and high altitude travel. Consensus statement of the Medical Commission of the Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme (UIAA MedCom) Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease.

    PubMed

    Donegani, Enrico; Hillebrandt, David; Windsor, Jeremy; Gieseler, Ulf; Rodway, George; Schffl, Volker; Kpper, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The number of persons visiting high altitude regions for various purposes (recreation, business etc.), and the age of people who do so, increases. Therefore there are more and more patients who need specific and individual advice to prevent emergency situations at altitude and to deal with emergencies if the safety strategy should fail. Since literature concerning cardiocirculatory diseases at altitude is scarce and studies with a controlled setting and high evidence level are missing, UIAA MedCom has checked all available literature for specific information to enable physicians who are active in travel or high altitude medicine to advise the patients at the highest possible level of evidence. It must be pointed out that there are several other medical fields where such information is mandatory, e.g. in occupational medicine, when employees depart to high altitude destinations for business purposes. The recommendations are based on a detailed literature research (databases, handbooks and the respective references). For easier use the paper has been structured as follows: general information, cardiocirculatory system and ECG at altitude, several cardiocirculatory diseases and their specific recommendations. The commission concludes, that a general "don't go!" is no state-of-the-art advice for the patients. With the information presented here a safe trip to altitude should be possible for many patients. PMID:24675141

  4. Sports Dermatology: Part 1 of 2 Traumatic or Mechanical Injuries, Inflammatory Conditions, and Exacerbations of Pre-existing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Emer, Jason; Sivek, Rachel; Marciniak, Brian

    2015-04-01

    Competitive athletes endure extreme bodily stress when participating in sports-related activities. An athlete's skin is particularly susceptible to a wide array of repetitive physical and environmental stressors that challenge the skin's protective function. Many unique dermatoses are well-known to the serious athlete due to countless hours of intense physical training, but are frequently unrecognized by many healthcare professionals. Sports dermatology is a distinctive, budding field of dermatology that focuses on dermatoses frequently encountered in athletes. Athletic skin problems are notoriously infectious in nature due to the inherent environment of close-contact physical activity. Nonetheless, other skin conditions can manifest or worsen with recurring mechanical or traumatic injury or exposure to environmental hazards. Additionally, sports-related activities may exacerbate other pre-existing dermatological conditions that may possibly be unknown to the athlete or clinician. The objective of this two-part review is to arm the astute physician with the fundamental knowledge of the range of dermatological conditions distinct to the competitive athlete. Knowledge of these cutaneous conditions in the context of specific sporting events will permit the clinician to manage these unique patients most effectively. Part one will focus on traumatic or mechanical injuries, inflammatory conditions, and exacerbations of pre-existing conditions frequently seen in athletes. PMID:26060516

  5. Sports Dermatology: Part 1 of 2 Traumatic or Mechanical Injuries, Inflammatory Conditions, and Exacerbations of Pre-existing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sivek, Rachel; Marciniak, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Competitive athletes endure extreme bodily stress when participating in sports-related activities. An athlete’s skin is particularly susceptible to a wide array of repetitive physical and environmental stressors that challenge the skin’s protective function. Many unique dermatoses are well-known to the serious athlete due to countless hours of intense physical training, but are frequently unrecognized by many healthcare professionals. Sports dermatology is a distinctive, budding field of dermatology that focuses on dermatoses frequently encountered in athletes. Athletic skin problems are notoriously infectious in nature due to the inherent environment of close-contact physical activity. Nonetheless, other skin conditions can manifest or worsen with recurring mechanical or traumatic injury or exposure to environmental hazards. Additionally, sports-related activities may exacerbate other pre-existing dermatological conditions that may possibly be unknown to the athlete or clinician. The objective of this two-part review is to arm the astute physician with the fundamental knowledge of the range of dermatological conditions distinct to the competitive athlete. Knowledge of these cutaneous conditions in the context of specific sporting events will permit the clinician to manage these unique patients most effectively. Part one will focus on traumatic or mechanical injuries, inflammatory conditions, and exacerbations of pre-existing conditions frequently seen in athletes. PMID:26060516

  6. Comparison of maternal morbidity and medical costs during pregnancy and delivery between patients with gestational diabetes and patients with pre-existing diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Son, K H; Lim, N-K; Lee, J-W; Cho, M-C; Park, H-Y

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effects of gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes on maternal morbidity and medical costs, using data from the Korea National Health Insurance Claims Database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. Methods Delivery cases in 2010, 2011 and 2012 (459 842, 442 225 and 380 431 deliveries) were extracted from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. The complications and medical costs were compared among the following three pregnancy groups: normal, gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes. Results Although, the rates of pre-existing diabetes did not fluctuate (2.5, 2.4 and 2.7%) throughout the study, the rate of gestational diabetes steadily increased (4.6, 6.2 and 8.0%). Furthermore, the rates of pre-existing diabetes and gestational diabetes increased in conjunction with maternal age, pre-existing hypertension and cases of multiple pregnancy. The risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, urinary tract infections, premature delivery, liver disease and chronic renal disease were greater in the gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes groups than in the normal group. The risk of venous thromboembolism, antepartum haemorrhage, shoulder dystocia and placenta disorder were greater in the pre-existing diabetes group, but not the gestational diabetes group, compared with the normal group. The medical costs associated with delivery, the costs during pregnancy and the number of in-hospital days for the subjects in the pre-existing diabetes group were the highest among the three groups. Conclusions The study showed that the rates of pre-existing diabetes and gestational diabetes increased with maternal age at pregnancy and were associated with increases in medical costs and pregnancy-related complications. PMID:25472691

  7. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  8. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  9. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  10. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  11. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  12. Clinical prognosis, pre-existing conditions and the use of reperfusion therapy for patients with ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrea B; Naylor, C David; Chong, Alice; Alter, David A

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Some evidence-based therapies are underused in patients with a poor prognosis despite the fact that the survival gains would be highest among such patient subgroups. The extent to which this applies for acute, life-saving therapies is unknown. The impact of prognostic characteristics and pre-existing conditions on the use of reperfusion therapy among eligible patients with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction is examined. METHODS Of 2829 acute myocardial infarction patients prospectively identified in 53 acute care hospitals across Ontario, 987 presented with ST segment elevation within 12 h of symptom onset and without any absolute contraindications to reperfusion therapy. The baseline prognosis for each patient was derived from a validated risk-adjustment model of 30-day mortality. Multiple logistical regression was used to examine the relationships among reperfusion therapy, prognosis and the number of pre-existing chronic conditions after adjusting for factors such as age, sex, time since symptom onset and socioeconomic status. RESULTS Of the 987 appropriate candidates, 725 (73.5%) received reperfusion therapy (70.8% fibrinolysis, 2.6% primary angioplasty). The adjusted odds ratio of reperfusion therapy fell 4% with each 1% increase in baseline risk of death (adjusted OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.00, P=0.04) and fell 18% with each additional pre-existing condition (adjusted OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.90, P<0.001). The number rather than the type of pre-existing conditions inversely correlated with the use of reperfusion therapy. While the impact of baseline risk and pre-existing conditions was additive, pre-existing conditions exerted a greater impact on the nonuse of reperfusion therapy than did baseline risk. CONCLUSIONS A treatment-risk paradox is demonstrable even within a cohort of lower risk patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. These findings are consistent with the view that these clinical decisions are more likely to be attributable to concerns about patient frailty or side effects than to a misunderstanding of treatment benefits. PMID:16485048

  13. Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Patients With Pre-existing Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    DeBois, William; Liu, Junli; Lee, Leonard; Girardi, Leonard; Ko, Wilson; Tortolani, Anthony; Krieger, Karl; Isom, O. Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: Patients with pre-existing coagulopathies who undergo surgical interventions are at increased risk for bleeding complications. This risk is especially true in cardiac surgical procedures with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) because of the necessity for heparinization and the use of the extracorporeal circuits, which have destructive effects on most of the blood components. In this review, cases of cardiac surgeries in patients with certain pre-existing coagulopathies are summarized, which could shed a light on future managements of such patients undergoing cardiac procedures with CPB. Pre-existing coagulopathies include antithrombin III deficiency, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, cancer, factor XII deficiency, hemophilia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, protein S deficiency, and drug-induced platelet inhibition. In summary, pre-existing coagulopathy in patients undergoing open-heart surgeries, if not recognized and appropriately managed, can cause serious complications. Management of patients undergoing cardiac procedures should include a routine coagulation work-up and a thorough past medical history examination. If any of the foregoing is abnormal, further evaluation is warranted. Proper diagnosis and management of the pre-existing coagulopathy disorders is of crucial importance to the surgical outcome and long-term morbidity. PMID:15804152

  14. Pre-existing diabetes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Suja; Zen, Monica; Lee, Vincent; Cheung, Ngai W

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes amongst women of reproductive age is increasing worldwide. Despite recent advances in treatment options for diabetes outside of pregnancy, women still have a significantly increased risk of adverse obstetric outcomes including perinatal death and congenital malformation, compared to the non-diabetic population. An understanding of the physiological changes during pregnancy, management, early detection and prevention of complications and pre-pregnancy care, specific to women with pre-existing diabetes, is important in improving health outcomes in this growing group of women. This review particularly focuses on areas where there have been recent developments or controversy. PMID:26878562

  15. [HIGH ALTITUDE EXPOSURE IN TRAVELERS WITH PREEXISTING MEDICAL CONDITIONS].

    PubMed

    Mintzer, Dalya Navat; Leshem, Eyal; Chazan, Bibiana; Schwartz, Eli

    2015-11-01

    The number of travelers visiting high altitude regions is increasing. High altitude areas have become more accessible in recent years, and reaching areas at altitudes over 3000 meters above sea level has become more common than before. In many circumstances older travelers, who are more likely to have pre-existing chronic diseases and for whom altitude and hypoxic condition might be a risk, reach high altitudes in a fast and tight schedule, therefore having a shorter time for adaptation and acclimatization. Pre-travel consultation, including the discussion of chronic illnesses and medication use, is therefore crucial for the reduction of the risk of acute mountain sickness and preventing the deterioration of their pre-existing medical conditions. PMID:26821507

  16. 17 CFR 151.9 - Pre-existing positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pre-existing positions. 151.9 Section 151.9 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION (CONTINUED) POSITION LIMITS FOR FUTURES AND SWAPS 151.9 Pre-existing positions. (a) Non-spot-month position limits....

  17. 17 CFR 151.9 - Pre-existing positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pre-existing positions. 151.9 Section 151.9 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION POSITION LIMITS FOR FUTURES AND SWAPS 151.9 Pre-existing positions. (a) Non-spot-month position limits. The position...

  18. 17 CFR 151.9 - Pre-existing positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pre-existing positions. 151.9 Section 151.9 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION POSITION LIMITS FOR FUTURES AND SWAPS 151.9 Pre-existing positions. (a) Non-spot-month position limits. The position...

  19. The effect of pre-existing mental health comorbidities on the stage at diagnosis and timeliness of care of solid tumor malignances in a Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center

    PubMed Central

    Wadia, Roxanne J; Yao, Xiaopan; Deng, Yanhong; Li, Jia; Maron, Steven; Connery, Donna; Gunduz-Bruce, Handan; Rose, Michal G

    2015-01-01

    There are limited data on the impact of mental health comorbidities (MHC) on stage at diagnosis and timeliness of cancer care. Axis I MHC affect approximately 30% of Veterans receiving care within the Veterans Affairs (VA) system. The purpose of this study was to compare stage at diagnosis and timeliness of care of solid tumor malignancies among Veterans with and without MHC. We performed a retrospective analysis of 408 charts of Veterans with colorectal, urothelial, and head/neck cancer diagnosed and treated at VA Connecticut Health Care System (VACHS) between 2008 and 2011. We collected demographic data, stage at diagnosis, medical and mental health co-morbidities, treatments received, key time intervals, and number of appointments missed. The study was powered to assess for stage migration of 15–20% from Stage I/II to Stage III/IV. There was no significant change in stage distribution for patients with and without MHC in the entire study group (p = 0.9442) and in each individual tumor type. There were no significant differences in the time intervals from onset of symptoms to initiation of treatment between patients with and without MHC (p = 0.1135, 0.2042 and 0.2352, respectively). We conclude that at VACHS, stage at diagnosis for patients with colorectal, urothelial and head and neck cancers did not differ significantly between patients with and without MHC. Patients with MHC did not experience significant delays in care. Our study indicates that in a medical system in which mental health is integrated into routine care, patients with Axis I MHC do not experience delays in cancer care. PMID:26063243

  20. Pre-existing Antibody: Biotherapeutic Modality-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Gorovits, Boris; Clements-Egan, Adrienne; Birchler, Mary; Liang, Meina; Myler, Heather; Peng, Kun; Purushothama, Shobha; Rajadhyaksha, Manoj; Salazar-Fontana, Laura; Sung, Crystal; Xue, Li

    2016-03-01

    Pre-existing antibodies to biotherapeutic drugs have been detected in drug-naïve subjects for a variety of biotherapeutic modalities. Pre-existing antibodies are immunoglobulins that are either specific or cross-reacting with a protein or glycan epitopes on a biotherapeutic compound. Although the exact cause for pre-existing antibodies is often unknown, environmental exposures to non-human proteins, glycans, and structurally similar products are frequently proposed as factors. Clinical consequences of the pre-existing antibodies vary from an adverse effect on patient safety to no impact at all and remain highly dependent on the biotherapeutic drug modality and therapeutic indication. As such, pre-existing antibodies are viewed as an immunogenicity risk factor requiring a careful evaluation. Herein, the relationships between biotherapeutic modalities to the nature, prevalence, and clinical consequences of pre-existing antibodies are reviewed. Initial evidence for pre-existing antibody is often identified during anti-drug antibody (ADA) assay development. Other interfering factors known to cause false ADA positive signal, including circulating multimeric drug target, rheumatoid factors, and heterophilic antibodies, are discussed. PMID:26821802

  1. A Double Whammy: Health Promotion Among Cancer Survivors with Pre-Existing Functional Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Volker, Deborah L.; Becker, Heather; Kang, Sook Jung; Kullberg, Vicki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To explore the experience of living with a cancer diagnosis within the context of a pre-existing functional disability and to identify strategies to promote health in this growing population of cancer survivors. Research Approach Qualitative descriptive Setting Four sites in the United States Participants 19 female cancer survivors with pre-existing disabling conditions Methodologic Approach Four focus groups were conducted. The audiotapes were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis techniques. Main Research Variables cancer survivor, disability, health promotion Findings Analytic categories included living with a cancer diagnosis, health promotion strategies, and wellness program development for survivors with pre-existing functional limitations. Participants described many challenges associated with managing a cancer diagnosis on top of living with a chronic disabling functional limitation. They identified strategies they used to maintain their health and topics to be included in health promotion programs tailored for this unique group of cancer survivors. Conclusions The “double whammy” of a cancer diagnosis for persons with pre-existing functional limitations requires modification of health promotion strategies and programs to promote wellness in this group of cancer survivors. Interpretation Nurses and other health care providers must attend to patients’ pre-existing conditions as well as the challenges of the physical, emotional, social, and economic sequelae of a cancer diagnosis. PMID:23269771

  2. 75 FR 45013 - Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... 2719A (regarding patient protections), published in the Federal Register on June 28, 2010 (75 FR 37188... of rape or incest, or where the life of the woman would be endangered. Exec. Order No. 13,535, 75 FR... of Federal funding of abortion services with respect to the Affordable Care Act was addressed in...

  3. 78 FR 30218 - Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... significant and sustained growth, enrolling more than 135,000 otherwise uninsured individuals with pre... significant and sustained growth, providing affordable health care insurance to more than 135,000 of the... published July 10, 2010 (75 FR 45014) set forth and addressed key issues regarding administration of...

  4. 77 FR 52614 - Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... posted on the Internet exactly as received, and can be retrieved by most Internet search engines. No... 30, 2010 (75 FR 45014). For the reasons explained below, HHS is now issuing an amendment to this... Affordable Insurance Exchanges, 45 CFR 155.20 (77 FR 18310, March 27, 2012), and the premium tax credits,...

  5. The Origin of Allosteric Functional Modulation: Multiple Pre-existing Pathways

    PubMed Central

    del Sol, Antonio; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    While allostery draws increasing attention, not much is known about allosteric mechanisms. Here we argue that in all proteins, allosteric signals transmit through multiple, pre-existing pathways; which pathways dominate depend on protein topologies, specific binding events, covalent modifications and cellular (environmental) conditions. Further, perturbation events at any site on the protein surface (or in the interior) will not create new pathways but only shift the pre-existing ensemble of pathways. Drugs binding at different sites or mutational events in disease shift the ensemble toward the same conformations; however, the relative populations of the different states will change. Consequently the observed functional, conformational, and dynamic effects will be different. This is the origin of allosteric functional modulation in dynamic proteins: allostery does not necessarily need to invoke conformational rearrangements to control protein activity and pre-existing pathways are always defaulted to during allostery regardless of the stimulant and perturbation site in the protein. PMID:19679084

  6. Gate dielectric degradation: Pre-existing vs. generated defects

    SciTech Connect

    Veksler, Dmitry E-mail: gennadi.bersuker@sematech.org; Bersuker, Gennadi E-mail: gennadi.bersuker@sematech.org

    2014-01-21

    We consider the possibility that degradation of the electrical characteristics of high-k gate stacks under low voltage stresses of practical interest is caused primarily by activation of pre-existing defects rather than generation of new ones. In nFETs in inversion, in particular, defect activation is suggested to be associated with the capture of an injected electron: in this charged state, defects can participate in a fast exchange of charge carriers with the carrier reservoir (substrate or gate electrode) that constitutes the physical process underlying a variety of electrical measurements. The degradation caused by the activation of pre-existing defects, as opposed to that of new defect generation, is both reversible and exhibits a tendency to saturate through the duration of stress. By using the multi-phonon assisted charge transport description, it is demonstrated that the trap activation concept allows reproducing a variety of experimental results including stress time dependency of the threshold voltage, leakage current, charge pumping current, and low frequency noise. Continuous, long-term degradation described by the power law time dependency is shown to be determined by the activation of defects located in the interfacial SiO{sub 2} layer of the high-k gate stacks. The findings of this study can direct process optimization efforts towards reduction of as-grown precursors of the charge trapping defects as the major factor affecting reliability.

  7. Gate dielectric degradation: Pre-existing vs. generated defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Dmitry; Bersuker, Gennadi

    2014-01-01

    We consider the possibility that degradation of the electrical characteristics of high-k gate stacks under low voltage stresses of practical interest is caused primarily by activation of pre-existing defects rather than generation of new ones. In nFETs in inversion, in particular, defect activation is suggested to be associated with the capture of an injected electron: in this charged state, defects can participate in a fast exchange of charge carriers with the carrier reservoir (substrate or gate electrode) that constitutes the physical process underlying a variety of electrical measurements. The degradation caused by the activation of pre-existing defects, as opposed to that of new defect generation, is both reversible and exhibits a tendency to saturate through the duration of stress. By using the multi-phonon assisted charge transport description, it is demonstrated that the trap activation concept allows reproducing a variety of experimental results including stress time dependency of the threshold voltage, leakage current, charge pumping current, and low frequency noise. Continuous, long-term degradation described by the power law time dependency is shown to be determined by the activation of defects located in the interfacial SiO2 layer of the high-k gate stacks. The findings of this study can direct process optimization efforts towards reduction of as-grown precursors of the charge trapping defects as the major factor affecting reliability.

  8. PRESENCE OF PRE-EXISTING ANTIBODIES MEDIATE SURVIVAL IN SEPSIS

    PubMed Central

    Moitra, Rituparna; Beal, Dominic R.; Belikoff, Bryan G.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in hospitals worldwide. Even with optimal therapy, severe sepsis results in 50% mortality, indicating variability in the response of individuals towards treatment. We hypothesize that the presence of pre-existing antibodies present in the blood before the onset of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in mice, accounts for the differences in their survival. A Plasma Enhanced Killing (PEK) assay was performed to calculate the PEK capacity of plasma i.e. the ability of plasma to augment PMN killing of bacteria. PEK was calculated as PEK= (1/log (N)) × 100; where N= number of surviving bacteria; a higher PEK indicated better bacterial killing. A range of PEK in plasma collected from mice prior to CLP was observed, documenting individual differences in bacterial killing capacity. Mortality was predicted based on plasma IL-6 levels at 24 hr post CLP. Mice predicted to die (Die-P) had a lower PEK (<14) and higher peritoneal bacterial counts 24 hr post sepsis compared to those predicted to live (Live-P) with a PEK>16. Mice with PEK<14 were 3.1 times more likely to die compared to the PEK>16 group. To understand the mechanism of defense conferred by the pre-existing antibodies, binding of IgM or IgG to enteric bacteria was documented by flow cytometry. To determine the relative contribution of IgM or IgG, the immunoglobulins were specifically immuno-depleted from the naïve plasma samples and the PEK of the depleted plasma measured. Compared to naïve plasma, depletion of IgM had no effect on the PEK. However, depletion of IgG increased PEK suggesting that an inhibitory IgG binds to antigenic sites on bacteria preventing optimal opsonization of the bacteria. These data demonstrate that prior to CLP; circulating inhibitory IgG antibodies exist that prevent bacterial killing by PMNs in a CLP model of sepsis. PMID:21921828

  9. Ionospheric Current Closure of the Pre-existing Auroral Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, F.; Kivelson, M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Khurana, K. K.; Walker, R. J.; Weygand, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    An auroral substorm commences when a discrete auroral arc brightens and subsequently expands poleward and azimuthally. The arc that brightens is usually the most equatorward of several auroral arcs that remain quiescent for ~5 to ~60 minutes before the break-up commences. This arc is often referred to as the "pre-existing auroral arc (PAA)" or the "growth-phase arc". Till now, the ionospheric electrodynamics of the PAA has been studied extensively by ground radar, rockets and low-altitude spacecraft, and it is well established that the field-aligned currents (FAC) associated with the PAA in the ionosphere are current sheets that are narrow in latitude and elongated in longitude. However, it remains a question whether the ionospheric currents that connect the FAC pair of the PAA are meridional or azimuthal. In this study, we have identified ~180 PAA events from FAST measurements in 1998 and 1999 and used the statistics to investigate the ionospheric current closure of the PAA. We calculate the height-integrated Pedersen currents from the electric fields measured by FAST using an empirical ionospheric conductance model and infer the FAC density from the divergence of the Pedersen currents. We find that in the vicinity of the PAA, the FAC density inferred from the divergence of perpendicular currents mimics the trend of the FAC density inferred from magnetic perturbations seen on FAST, and that the boundaries between the upward and the downward FAC sheets inferred from two different approaches lie very close together. Additionally, the latitudinal gradient of the azimuthal component of the magnetic perturbation is much larger than the azimuthal gradient of the meridional component of the magnetic perturbation in the vicinity of the PAA, indicating that the density of a meridional current is much larger than that of an azimuthal current. Our observational analysis strongly suggests that the perpendicular current that closes the FAC pair of the PAA is a north-south Pedersen current in the ionosphere.

  10. Pre-existing diabetes mellitus and adverse pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pregnancies complicated by pre-existing diabetes mellitus (PDM) are associated with a high rate of adverse outcomes, including an increased miscarriage rate, preterm delivery, preeclampsia, perinatal mortality and congenital malformations; compared to the background population. The objectives of this study are to determine the prevalence of PDM and to investigate the maternal and the neonatal outcomes of women with PDM. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study for women who delivered in King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH) during the period of January 1st to the 31st of December 2008. The pregnancy outcomes of the women with PDM were compared to the outcomes of all non-diabetic women who delivered during the same study period. Results A total of 3157 deliveries met the inclusion criteria. Out of the study population 116 (3.7%) women had PDM. There were 66 (57%) women with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and 50 (43%) women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Compared to non-diabetic women those with PDM were significantly older, of higher parity, and they had more previous miscarriages. Women with PDM were more likely to be delivered by emergency cesarean section (C/S), OR 2.67, 95% confidence intervals (CI) (1.63-4.32), P < 0.001, or elective C/S, OR 6.73, 95% CI (3.99-11.31), P < 0.001. The neonates of the mothers with PDM were significantly heavier, P < 0.001; and more frequently macrosomic; OR 3.97, 95% CI (2.03-7.65), P = 0.002. They more frequently have APGAR scores <7 in 5 minutes, OR 2.61, 95% CI (0.89-7.05), P 0.057 and more likely to be delivered at <37 gestation weeks, OR 2.24, 95% CI (1.37- 3.67), P 0.003. The stillbirth rate was 2.6 times more among the women with PDM; however the difference did not reach statistical significance, P 0.084. Conclusion PDM is associated with increased risk for C/S delivery, macrosomia, stillbirth, preterm delivery and low APGAR scores at 5 min. PMID:22963905

  11. Is pre-existing dementia an independent predictor of outcome after stroke? A propensity score-matched analysis.

    PubMed

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Kapral, Moira K; Cote, Robert; Rochon, Paula A; Wang, Julie; Raptis, Stavroula; Mamdani, Muhammad; Black, Sandra E

    2012-11-01

    With an aging population, patients are increasingly likely to present with stroke and pre-existing dementia, which may lead to greater death and disability. The aim of this work was to assess the risk of all-cause mortality and poor functional outcomes after ischemic stroke in patients with and without pre-existing dementia. We conducted a multicenter cohort study of all patients presenting to 12 tertiary care institutions participating in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network (RCSN) with a first ischemic stroke between 2003 and 2008. Individuals with pre-existing dementia were matched using propensity-score methods with patients without dementia during their index hospitalization based on the following characteristics: age (within 3 years), sex, stroke severity, stroke subtype (lacunar vs. non-lacunar), level of consciousness, vascular risk factors, dysphagia, glucose and creatinine on admission, Charlson index, residence prior to hospitalization (home vs. other), pre-admission dependency, hospital arrival via ambulance, admission to stroke unit, thrombolysis, and palliative care. A propensity score for all-cause mortality and clinical outcomes was developed. Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network (RCSN) and Registered Persons Database (RPDB). The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at 30 days. Secondary outcomes included mortality at discharge and at 1 year, disability at discharge (modified Rankin scale ? 3), medical complications (pneumonia), and discharge disposition. A subgroup analysis assessing the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage among those receiving thrombolysis was also conducted. We matched 877 patients with an acute ischemic stroke and pre-existing dementia to 877 stroke patients without dementia. Patients were well matched. The mean age was 82 years and 58 % were women. Mortality at discharge, 30 days, and 1 year after stroke was similar in patients with and without dementia [for mortality at discharge RR 0.88 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.74-1.05]; mortality at 30-days: RR 0.88 (95 % CI 0.75-1.03) and mortality at 1 year: RR 1.01 (95 % CI 0.92-1.11). Patients with pre-existing dementia had similar disability at discharge and home disposition. In the subgroup of patients who received thrombolysis, there were no differences between those with and without dementia in the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (RR 1.27; 95 % CI 0.69-2.35) and no differences in mortality or disability at discharge. Pre-existing dementia is not independently associated with mortality, disability, or institutionalization after ischemic stroke. Pre-existing dementia may not necessarily preclude access to thrombolytic therapy and specialized stroke care. PMID:22532173

  12. Molecular dynamics study on the interactions between helium projectiles and helium bubbles pre-existing in tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yuan; Ma, Chaoqiong; Li, Min; Hou, Qing

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the interactions between low-energy (⩽100 eV) helium (He) projectiles and helium bubbles pre-existing near tungsten (W) surfaces. It is observed that with increasing bubble size, the reflection coefficient of the He projectiles was reduced, and the channelling effect that could be observed with no pre-existing He bubble was depressed. The He projectiles can be captured by pre-existing He bubbles and also knock He atoms out of the bubbles. The spatial distribution of the single He atoms, including both the slowed-down projectiles and the knocked-out He atoms, was extracted. The single He atoms were found distributed around the bubbles in a region with the width of 3-5.5 in lattice lengths of W. Although the results were obtained for the interaction of He projectiles with isolated He bubbles pre-existing in W, they suggest that the reflection and retention status of He projectiles would change during the irradiation of high flux/fluence He on W surfaces due to the change of He bubbles coverage near W surfaces. The results can be coupled with Monte Carlo modelling in conditions closer to that in experiments of high flux/fluence He bombardments on W surfaces.

  13. A framework for the merging of pre-existing and correspondenceless 3D statistical shape models.

    PubMed

    Pereaez, Marco; Lekadir, Karim; Butakoff, Constantine; Hoogendoorn, Corn; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2014-10-01

    The construction of statistical shape models (SSMs) that are rich, i.e., that represent well the natural and complex variability of anatomical structures, is an important research topic in medical imaging. To this end, existing works have addressed the limited availability of training data by decomposing the shape variability hierarchically or by combining statistical and synthetic models built using artificially created modes of variation. In this paper, we present instead a method that merges multiple statistical models of 3D shapes into a single integrated model, thus effectively encoding extra variability that is anatomically meaningful, without the need for the original or new real datasets. The proposed framework has great flexibility due to its ability to merge multiple statistical models with unknown point correspondences. The approach is beneficial in order to re-use and complement pre-existing SSMs when the original raw data cannot be exchanged due to ethical, legal, or practical reasons. To this end, this paper describes two main stages, i.e., (1) statistical model normalization and (2) statistical model integration. The normalization algorithm uses surface-based registration to bring the input models into a common shape parameterization with point correspondence established across eigenspaces. This allows the model fusion algorithm to be applied in a coherent manner across models, with the aim to obtain a single unified statistical model of shape with improved generalization ability. The framework is validated with statistical models of the left and right cardiac ventricles, the L1 vertebra, and the caudate nucleus, constructed at distinct research centers based on different imaging modalities (CT and MRI) and point correspondences. The results demonstrate that the model integration is statistically and anatomically meaningful, with potential value for merging pre-existing multi-modality statistical models of 3D shapes. PMID:24983233

  14. The Near Earth Asteroid Medical Conditions List

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael R.; Watkins, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element is one of six elements within NASA s Human Research Program (HRP) and is responsible for addressing the risk of "the inability to adequately recognize or treat an ill or injured crewmember" for exploration-class missions. The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Medical Conditions List, constructed by ExMC, is the first step in addressing the above-mentioned risk for the 13-month long NEA mission. The NEA mission is being designed by NASA's Human Space Flight Architecture Team (HAT). The purpose of the conditions list is to serve as an evidence-based foundation for determining which medical conditions could affect a crewmember during the NEA mission, which of those conditions would be of concern and require treatment, and for which conditions a gap in knowledge or technology development exists. This information is used to focus research efforts and technology development to ensure that the appropriate medical capabilities are available for exploration-class missions. Scope and Approach: The NEA Medical Conditions List is part of a broader Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), which incorporates various exploration-class design reference missions (DRMs). The conditions list contains 85 medical conditions which could occur during space flight and which are derived from several sources: Long-Term Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) in-flight occurrence data, The Space Shuttle (STS) Medical Checklist, The International Space Station (ISS) Medical Checklist, and subject matter expert opinion. Each medical condition listed has been assigned a clinical priority and a clinical priority rationale based on incidence, consequence, and mitigation capability. Implementation: The conditions list is a "living document" and as such, new conditions can be added to the list, and the priority of conditions on the list can be adjusted as the DRM changes, and as screening, diagnosis, or treatment capabilities change. The NEA medical conditions list was used recently as the basis for identifying gaps in in-flight medical evaluation (screening) capabilities. Learning Objectives: The audience will become familiar with the approach taken by NASA's Exploration Medical Capability element in addressing the risk of inability to recognize and treat medical conditions in the setting of a Near Earth Asteroid mission. Which one of the following statements is incorrect? a) The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) medical conditions list includes 85 medical conditions which could occur during space flight. b) Each condition on the NEA medical conditions list has been assigned a clinical priority and a clinical priority rationale. c) The NEA medical conditions list targets a mission to Mars. d) The NEA medical conditions list should be viewed as a "living document" where new conditions can be added and clinical priorities adjusted to address changes in the design reference mission or medical capabilities. The incorrect answer is c). The NEA medical conditions list targets a mission to a Near Earth Asteroid.

  15. Medical Conditions and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikeda, Robin M.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Simon, Thomas R.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Durant, Tonji M.; Swahn, Monica H.

    2002-01-01

    This population-based, case-control study examined physical illness as a risk factor for suicidal behavior. Case patients were more likely than controls to report having any serious medical conditions. Results suggest that young men with medical conditions are at increased risk for nearly lethal suicide attempts. (Contains 33 references and 3

  16. Mining FDA drug labels for medical conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) has built the initial Natural Language Processing (NLP) component to extract medications with their corresponding medical conditions (Indications, Contraindications, Overdosage, and Adverse Reactions) as triples of medication-related information ([(1) drug name]-[(2) medical condition]-[(3) LOINC section header]) for an intelligent database system, in order to improve patient safety and the quality of health care. The Food and Drug Administrations (FDA) drug labels are used to demonstrate the feasibility of building the triples as an intelligent database system task. Methods This paper discusses a hybrid NLP system, called AutoMCExtractor, to collect medical conditions (including disease/disorder and sign/symptom) from drug labels published by the FDA. Altogether, 6,611 medical conditions in a manually-annotated gold standard were used for the system evaluation. The pre-processing step extracted the plain text from XML file and detected eight related LOINC sections (e.g. Adverse Reactions, Warnings and Precautions) for medical condition extraction. Conditional Random Fields (CRF) classifiers, trained on token, linguistic, and semantic features, were then used for medical condition extraction. Lastly, dictionary-based post-processing corrected boundary-detection errors of the CRF step. We evaluated the AutoMCExtractor on manually-annotated FDA drug labels and report the results on both token and span levels. Results Precision, recall, and F-measure were 0.90, 0.81, and 0.85, respectively, for the span level exact match; for the token-level evaluation, precision, recall, and F-measure were 0.92, 0.73, and 0.82, respectively. Conclusions The results demonstrate that (1) medical conditions can be extracted from FDA drug labels with high performance; and (2) it is feasible to develop a framework for an intelligent database system. PMID:23617267

  17. The Post-Treatment Experience of Cancer Survivors with Pre-Existing Cardiopulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Heather; Rechis, Ruth; Kang, Sook Jung; Brown, Adama

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore the cancer experience of survivors with pre-existing diagnoses of heart and/or lung disease following active treatment. Method The Lance Armstrong Foundation recruited cancer survivors throughout the United States to complete a web-based survey to provide insight into post-treatment supportive care needs. Experts in survey methodology and oncology, as well as cancer survivors, provided input into the survey. Results The 137 individuals whose physicians told them they had heart or lung problems were 50 years old on average, and most were more than five years past active treatment. Two-thirds of these respondents reported pain for long periods, and 20% of them agreed that they now need help with everyday tasks that they did not need help with before their cancer. Among those who were tired, had no energy, or had trouble sleeping and/or resting, less than half (47%) agreed that they had received help with this problem. One third of these respondents indicated that they had decreased their physical activity since their cancer diagnosis because of fatigue and 26% decreased their activities because of pain. More respondents indicated that their needs were met during their cancer treatment than afterwards. Conclusions Researchers and health care providers are urged to consider the unmet supportive care needs of cancer survivors with co-morbid conditions following active treatment, particularly the need for careful monitoring of their complex health conditions. PMID:20658347

  18. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Sharmi; Barr, Yael; Kerstman, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA s Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the "Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember." This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this risk. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to define the set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur during exploration space flight missions. The list was derived from the International Space Station Medical Checklist, the Shuttle Medical Checklist, in-flight occurrence data from the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health, and NASA subject matter experts. The list of conditions was further prioritized for eight specific design reference missions with the assistance of the ExMC Advisory Group. The purpose of the SMEMCL is to serve as an evidence-based foundation for the conditions that could affect a crewmember during flight. This information is used to ensure that the appropriate medical capabilities are available for exploration missions.

  19. Solid particle impingement erosion characteristics of cylindrical surfaces, pre-existing holes and slits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The erosion characteristics of aluminum cylinders sand-blasted with both spherical and angular erodent particles were studied and compared with results from previously studied flat surfaces. The cylindrical results are discussed with respect to impact conditions. The relationship between erosion rate and pit morphology (width, depth, and width to depth ratio) is established. The aspects of (1) erosion rate versus time curves on cylindrical surfaces; (2) long-term exposures; and (3) erosion rate versus time curves with spherical and angular particles are presented. The erosion morphology and characteristics of aluminum surfaces with pre-existing circular cylindrical and conical holes of different sizes were examined using weight loss measurements, scanning electron microscopy, a profilometer, and a depth gage. The morphological features (radial and concentric rings) are discussed with reference to flat surfaces, and the erosion features with spherical microglass beads. The similarities and differences of erosion and morphological features are highlighted. The erosion versus time curves of various shapes of holes are discussed and are compared with those of a flat surface. The erosion process at slits is considered.

  20. Rapid selective sweep of pre-existing polymorphisms and slow fixation of new mutations in experimental evolution of Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aifen; Hillesland, Kristina L; He, Zhili; Schackwitz, Wendy; Tu, Qichao; Zane, Grant M; Ma, Qiao; Qu, Yuanyuan; Stahl, David A; Wall, Judy D; Hazen, Terry C; Fields, Matthew W; Arkin, Adam P; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the genetic basis of microbial evolutionary adaptation to salt (NaCl) stress, populations of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH), a sulfate-reducing bacterium important for the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur, carbon and nitrogen, and potentially the bioremediation of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides, were propagated under salt stress or non-stress conditions for 1200 generations. Whole-genome sequencing revealed 11 mutations in salt stress-evolved clone ES9-11 and 14 mutations in non-stress-evolved clone EC3-10. Whole-population sequencing data suggested the rapid selective sweep of the pre-existing polymorphisms under salt stress within the first 100 generations and the slow fixation of new mutations. Population genotyping data demonstrated that the rapid selective sweep of pre-existing polymorphisms was common in salt stress-evolved populations. In contrast, the selection of pre-existing polymorphisms was largely random in EC populations. Consistently, at 100 generations, stress-evolved population ES9 showed improved salt tolerance, namely increased growth rate (2.0-fold), higher biomass yield (1.8-fold) and shorter lag phase (0.7-fold) under higher salinity conditions. The beneficial nature of several mutations was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. All four tested mutations contributed to the shortened lag phases under higher salinity condition. In particular, compared with the salt tolerance improvement in ES9-11, a mutation in a histidine kinase protein gene lytS contributed 27% of the growth rate increase and 23% of the biomass yield increase while a mutation in hypothetical gene DVU2472 contributed 24% of the biomass yield increase. Our results suggested that a few beneficial mutations could lead to dramatic improvements in salt tolerance. PMID:25848870

  1. Asperger Syndrome: Associated Psychiatric and Medical Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2002-01-01

    This article explores the association of medical and psychiatric conditions with Asperger syndrome, based mainly on publications from the last two decades. It examines comorbidity of Asperger syndrome with mood disorders, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, tic disorders, violence and aggression,

  2. Metabolic effects of milk protein intake strongly depend on pre-existing metabolic and exercise status

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Milk protein intake has recently been suggested to improve metabolic health. This Perspective provides evidence that metabolic effects of milk protein intake have to be regarded in the context of the individual’s pre-existing metabolic and exercise status. Milk proteins provide abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and glutamine. Plasma BCAAs and glutamine are increased in obesity and insulin resistance, but decrease after gastric bypass surgery resulting in weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity. Milk protein consumption results in postprandial hyperinsulinemia in obese subjects, increases body weight of overweight adolescents and may thus deteriorate pre-existing metabolic disturbances of obese, insulin resistant individuals. PMID:24225036

  3. 14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.213 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.213 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  4. 14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.313 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.313 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  5. 14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.313 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.313 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  6. 14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.113 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.113 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  7. 14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.113 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.113 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  8. 14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.213 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.213 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  9. 14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.213 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.213 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  10. 14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.313 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.313 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  11. 14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.113 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.113 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  12. Using an Electronic Highlighter to Eliminate the Negative Effects of Pre-Existing, Inappropriate Highlighting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gier, Vicki; Kreiner, David; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Herring, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether using an active learning technique, electronic highlighting, can eliminate the negative effects of pre-existing, poor highlighting on reading comprehension. Participants read passages containing no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, or inappropriate highlighting. We hypothesized…

  13. 26 CFR 20.2045-1 - Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests. 20.2045-1 Section 20.2045-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  14. 26 CFR 20.2045-1 - Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests. 20.2045-1 Section 20.2045-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  15. 26 CFR 20.2045-1 - Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests. 20.2045-1 Section 20.2045-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  16. 26 CFR 20.2045-1 - Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests. 20.2045-1 Section 20.2045-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  17. Are There Pre-Existing Neural, Cognitive, or Motoric Markers for Musical Ability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Andrea; Winner, Ellen; Cronin, Karl; Overy, Katie; Lee, Dennis J.; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2005-01-01

    Adult musician's brains show structural enlargements, but it is not known whether these are inborn or a consequence of long-term training. In addition, music training in childhood has been shown to have positive effects on visual-spatial and verbal outcomes. However, it is not known whether pre-existing advantages in these skills are found in

  18. Are There Pre-Existing Neural, Cognitive, or Motoric Markers for Musical Ability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Andrea; Winner, Ellen; Cronin, Karl; Overy, Katie; Lee, Dennis J.; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2005-01-01

    Adult musician's brains show structural enlargements, but it is not known whether these are inborn or a consequence of long-term training. In addition, music training in childhood has been shown to have positive effects on visual-spatial and verbal outcomes. However, it is not known whether pre-existing advantages in these skills are found in…

  19. Influence of pre-existing salt diapirs on 3D folding patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Naiara; Kaus, Boris J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The 3D detachment folding instability gives rise to a wide variety of fold shapes (e.g. from dome shape structures to long en-echelon or straight anticlines) as a result of interactions between growing fold segments. The 3D growth of these folds, as well as the wavelength and lateral propagation of folds, is controlled by the physical parameters of a detachment layer and its overburden. However, the existence of initial heterogeneities, such as pre-existing salt plugs within the sedimentary cover, might affect fold development as well. We use numerical modeling to investigate how the fold pattern is affected by pre-existing salt structures. High-resolution 3D folding simulations (with and without pre-existing salt structures) were performed, in which we varied the shape, height and spacing of pre-existing diapirs. In a first geometric setup, we employed a multilayer setup and synthetic diapir distributions in order to study the influence of diapir spacing on fold spacing and patterns. In a second geometric setup, we use a diapir distribution that fits the observed exposed diapir distribution in the southeastern Zagros. Results show that the presence of diapirs does not considerably change the wavelength of the folds, which is in all cases close to the dominant folding wavelength that develops in the absence of diapirs. Yet, the presence of pre-existing structures speeds up the folding instability in those locations and also affects folding patterns as the diapirs localize the initial deformation by accommodating folding above them, which results in the diapirs being located in the core of the folds. If diapir spacing is much smaller than the dominant folding wavelength, diapirs are located in different structural positions such as fold synclines or flanks.

  20. Induction of mixed chimerism depletes pre-existing and de novo-developed autoreactive B cells in autoimmune NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Racine, Jeremy J; Wang, Miao; Zhang, Mingfeng; Zeng, Defu

    2014-06-01

    Destruction of pancreatic islet ?-cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D) is mainly mediated by autoimmune T and B lymphocytes. We reported that induction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched mixed chimerism reversed autoimmunity and reestablished thymic negative selection of autoreactive T cells in NOD mice, but it is still unclear how mixed chimerism tolerizes autoreactive B cells. The current studies were designed to reveal the mechanisms on how mixed chimerism tolerizes autoreactive B cells in T1D. Accordingly, mixed chimerism was induced in NOD mice through radiation-free nonmyeloablative anti-CD3/CD8 conditioning and infusion of donor CD4(+) T cell-depleted spleen and whole bone marrow (BM) cells or through myeloablative total body irradiation conditioning and reconstitution with T cell-depleted BM cells from donor and host. Kinetic analysis of percentage and yield of preplasma and plasma B cells, newly developed B-cell subsets, and their apoptosis was performed 30-60 days after transplantation. Induction of MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism results in depleting host-type pre-existing preplasma and plasma B cells as well as augmenting apoptosis of immature transitional T1 B cells, including insulin-specific B cells in a donor B cell-dependent manner. Therefore, induction of MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism depletes pre-existing and de novo-developed autoreactive B cells. PMID:24458357

  1. Experimental observations of the effect of crystals and pre-existing bubbles on the dynamics and fragmentation of vesiculating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourtada-Bonnefoi, C. C.; Mader, H. M.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of crystals and pre-existing gas phases on the dynamic degassing and fragmentation of magmas in a volcanic conduit have been simulated by analogue experiments. A series of decompression experiments of viscous solutions of gum rosin and acetone with and without the incorporation of particles (silicon carbide, glass beads, organic seeds) or pre-existing air bubbles have been performed in a transparent shock-tube. The addition of internal bubbles or solid particles in the starting solution shifts the fragmentation conditions towards lower acetone (volatile) contents and lower decompression ratios. The effect of solid particles depends on their number density and spatial distribution in the starting solution. A small number of sinking particles has little impact on the flow dynamics. However, a floating layer of particles provides a high concentration of surface bubbles that leads to an early fragmentation pulse. The observations also imply that the presence of crystals, if able to generate a high number density of bubbles, will lead to an earlier and deeper fragmentation of the magma in the volcanic conduit.

  2. Effects of pre-existing discontinuities on the residual strength of rock mass - Insight from a discrete element method simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F. Q.; Kang, H. P.

    2016-04-01

    When rock failure is unavoidable, the designer of engineering structures must know and account for the residual strength of the rock mass. This is particularly relevant in underground coal mine openings. Pre-existing discontinuities play an important role in the mechanical behavior of rock masses and thus it is important to understand the effects of such pre-existing discontinuities on the residual strength. For this purpose, the present study demonstrates a numerical analysis using a discrete element method simulation. The numerical results indicate that fracture intensity has no significant influence on the residual strength of jointed rock masses, independent of confining conditions. As confining pressures increase, both peak and residual strengths increase, with residual strength increasing at a faster rate. The finding was further demonstrated by analyzing documented laboratory compressive test data from a variety of rocks along with field data from coal pillars. A comprehensive interpretation of the finding was conducted using a cohesion-weakening-friction-strengthening (CWFS) model. The effect of rock bolts on rock mass strength was also evaluated by using a discrete element method model which suggested that rock bolts can significantly increases residual strength but have limited effect on increasing the peak strength of rock masses.

  3. Pre-existing immunity against vaccine vectors – friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Manvendra; Van, Thi Thu Hao; Baird, Fiona J.; Coloe, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last century, the successful attenuation of multiple bacterial and viral pathogens has led to an effective, robust and safe form of vaccination. Recently, these vaccines have been evaluated as delivery vectors for heterologous antigens, as a means of simultaneous vaccination against two pathogens. The general consensus from published studies is that these vaccine vectors have the potential to be both safe and efficacious. However, some of the commonly employed vectors, for example Salmonella and adenovirus, often have pre-existing immune responses in the host and this has the potential to modify the subsequent immune response to a vectored antigen. This review examines the literature on this topic, and concludes that for bacterial vectors there can in fact, in some cases, be an enhancement in immunogenicity, typically humoral, while for viral vectors pre-existing immunity is a hindrance for subsequent induction of cell-mediated responses. PMID:23175507

  4. Effect of pre-existing disorder on surface amorphization in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Titov, A. I.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2010-08-15

    Single crystal GaN epilayers with pre-existing surface disordered layers are bombarded at room temperature with 40 and 100 keV P ions. Stable lattice defects are studied by Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry. Results show that the rate of planar surface amorphization is independent of the concentration of pre-existing defects near the amorphous/crystalline (a/c) interface. In contrast, the formation of stable defects in the crystal bulk in the vicinity of an a/c interface is influenced by the presence of the interface. These experimental observations suggest that the a/c interface, as compared to stable bulk damage, is a more efficient sink for mobile point defects with respect to both processes of point defect recombination and trapping.

  5. U.S. Military Discharges and Pre-existing Personality Disorders: A Health Policy Review.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Todd C

    2015-11-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) is facing allegations service members were wrongfully discharged for pre-existing personality disorders. From 2001 to 2007, 26,000 enlisted service members were discharged for a pre-existing personality disorder (2.6 % of total discharges). With national media attention of the issue, personality disorder discharges were reduced by 31 % in 2008 with new discharge procedures issued by the DoD. Even with the reduction, a government review found the DoD did not adhere to its discharge protocols. The objective of this paper is to explore personality disorders in the military, analyze various costs to stakeholders, and identify potential policy alternatives. PMID:25378127

  6. Are there pre-existing neural, cognitive, or motoric markers for musical ability?

    PubMed

    Norton, Andrea; Winner, Ellen; Cronin, Karl; Overy, Katie; Lee, Dennis J; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2005-11-01

    Adult musician's brains show structural enlargements, but it is not known whether these are inborn or a consequence of long-term training. In addition, music training in childhood has been shown to have positive effects on visual-spatial and verbal outcomes. However, it is not known whether pre-existing advantages in these skills are found in children who choose to study a musical instrument nor is it known whether there are pre-existing associations between music and any of these outcome measures that could help explain the training effects. To answer these questions, we compared 5- to 7-year-olds beginning piano or string lessons (n=39) with 5- to 7-year-olds not beginning instrumental training (n=31). All children received a series of tests (visual-spatial, non-verbal reasoning, verbal, motor, and musical) and underwent magnetic resonance imaging. We found no pre-existing neural, cognitive, motor, or musical differences between groups and no correlations (after correction for multiple analyses) between music perceptual skills and any brain or visual-spatial measures. However, correlations were found between music perceptual skills and both non-verbal reasoning and phonemic awareness. Such pre-existing correlations suggest similarities in auditory and visual pattern recognition as well a sharing of the neural substrates for language and music processing, most likely due to innate abilities or implicit learning during early development. This baseline study lays the groundwork for an ongoing longitudinal study addressing the effects of intensive musical training on brain and cognitive development, and making it possible to look retroactively at the brain and cognitive development of those children who emerge showing exceptional musical talent. PMID:16054741

  7. Pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes: family support in managing the pregnancy process.

    PubMed

    Letherby, Gayle; Stephen, Nicole; Stenhouse, Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we report on findings from a Diabetes UK funded qualitative research project concerned to explore daughter/mother relationships during pregnancy and the transition to motherhood of women with pre-existing diabetes. In-depth qualitative interviews took place with 12 pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes and four of their mothers, three (male) partners and one father. The study was exploratory in nature and aimed to consider what support pregnant women felt they needed and what support they received from their mothers and other family members to discover policy and practice needs and identify further research concerns. Here, we focus on one theme from the data: management of the pregnancy process from planning for pregnancy and through pregnancy with specific reference to relationships with family members. Respondents reflect on the relationship between diabetes and pregnancy planning, on managing pregnancy and on their relationships with healthcare professionals. The data suggest overwhelmingly that pre-existing diabetes is a significant aspect of pregnancy planning and pregnancy for women and that managing the pregnancy process is a more positive experience if they have the support of family members. PMID:23268726

  8. Inheritance of pre-existing weakness in continental breakup: 3D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jie; Gerya, Taras

    2013-04-01

    The whole process of continental rifting to seafloor spreading is one of the most important plate tectonics on the earth. There are many questions remained related to this process, most of which are poorly understood, such as how continental rifting transformed into seafloor spreading? How the curved oceanic ridge developed from a single straight continental rift? How the pre-existing weakness in either crust or lithospheric mantle individually influences the continental rifting and oceanic spreading? By employing the state-of-the-art three-dimensional thermomechanical-coupled numerical code (using Eulerian-Lagrangian finite-difference method and marker-in-cell technic) (Gerya and Yuen, 2007), which can model long-term plate extension and large strains, we studied the whole process of continental rifting to seafloor spreading based on the following question: How the pre-existing lithospheric weak zone influences the continental breakup? Continental rifts do not occur randomly, but like to follow the pre-existing weakness (such as fault zones, suture zones, failed rifts, and other tectonic boundaries) in the lithosphere, for instance, the western branch of East African Rift formed in the relatively weak mobile belts along the curved western border of Tanzanian craton (Corti et al., 2007; Nyblade and Brazier, 2002), the Main Ethiopian Rift developed within the Proterozoic mobile belt which is believed to represent a continental collision zone (Keranen and Klemperer, 2008),the Baikal rift formed along the suture between Siberian craton and Sayan-Baikal folded belt (Chemenda et al., 2002). The early stage formed rift can be a template for the future rift development and continental breakup (Keranen and Klemperer, 2008). Lithospheric weakness can either reduce the crustal strength or mantle strength, and leads to the crustal or mantle necking (Dunbar and Sawyer, 1988), which plays an important role on controlling the continental breakup patterns, such as controlling the breakup order of crust and mantle (Huismans and Beaumont, 2011). However, the inheritance of pre-existing lithospheric weakness in the evolution of continental rifts and oceanic ridge is not well studied. We use 3D numerical modeling to study this problem, by changing the weak zone position and geometry, and the rheological structure of the model. In our study, we find that: 1).3D continental breakup and seafloor spreading patterns are controlled by (a) crust-mantle rheological coupling and (b) geometry and position of the pre-existing weak zones. 2).Three spreading patterns are obtained: (a) straight ridges, (b) curved ridges and (c) overlapping ridges. 3).When crust and mantle are decoupled, abandoned rift structures often form.

  9. 42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Conditions of participation: Organizational Environment § 418.102 Condition of participation: Medical director. The hospice must designate a physician to... responsibility for the medical component of the hospice's patient care program....

  10. 42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Conditions of participation: Organizational Environment § 418.102 Condition of participation: Medical director. The hospice must designate a physician to... responsibility for the medical component of the hospice's patient care program....

  11. A historical pyroclastic flow emplaced within a pre-existing Pleistocene lava tube: Silidong, Tianchi Volcano, Changbaishan, northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhengquan; Wei, Haiquan; Liu, Yongshun; Tilling, Robert I.; Xu, Jiandong; Wu, Chengzhi; Nie, Baofeng

    2015-06-01

    Pyroclastic flow deposits recently found within a pre-existing lava tube at Tianchi Volcano represent, to the best of our knowledge, the only such reported occurrence worldwide. In this case, pyroclastic flow of Tianchi's "Millennium eruption" (~1 ka) traveled about 18 km from the summit eruptive source and poured successively into the ~560-m-long accessible segment of Silidong lava tube. Mapping of tube morphology, combined with detailed characterization of the features associated with the pumice flow deposits (e.g., adhering of pyroclastic materials on tube walls, fumarole pipes, rootless vents, and flow fronts of the deposit surface) has enabled plausible inferences regarding the original within-tube conditions and dynamic flow regime during emplacement. We propose a model of an aggrading pyroclastic flow which locally varies its sedimentation rate. The pyroclastic deposit is thicker in locations of reduced flow mobility, and the resultant variations in deposit thickness appear to control the distribution of fumarole pipes and rootless vents.

  12. Different intensities of glycaemic control for pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A; Simmonds, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Background The optimal glycaemic control target in pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes is unclear, although there is a clear link between high glucose concentrations and adverse birth outcomes. Objectives To assess the effects of different intensities of glycaemic control in pregnant women with pre-existing type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Groups Trials Register (30 April 2012). Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials comparing different glycaemic control targets in pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes. Data collection and analysis Two review authors assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias, and extracted data. Main results We included three trials all in women with type 1 diabetes (223 women and babies), and all with a high risk of bias. Two trials compared very tight (3.33 to 5.0 mmol/L fasting blood glucose (FBG)) with tight-moderate (4.45 to 6.38) glycaemic control targets, with one trial of 22 babies reporting no perinatal deaths or serious perinatal morbidity. In the same trial, there were two birth defects in the very tight and none in the tight-moderate group with no significant differences in caesarean section between groups (risk ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49 to 1.73). In these two trials glycaemic control was not significantly different between the very tight and tight-moderate groups by the third trimester, although one trial of 22 women found significantly less maternal hypoglycaemia in the tight-moderate group. In a trial of 60 women and babies comparing tight ( 5.6 mmol/L FBG); moderate (5.6 to 6.7); and loose (6.7 to 8.9) glycaemic control targets, there were two neonatal deaths in the loose and none in the tight or moderate groups. There were significantly fewer women with pre-eclampsia, fewer caesareans and fewer birthweights greater than 90th centile in the combined tight-moderate compared with the loose group. Authors conclusions In a very limited body of evidence, few differences in outcomes were seen between very tight and tight-moderate glycaemic control targets in pregnant women with pre-existing type 1 diabetes, including actual glycaemic control achieved. There is evidence of harm (increased pre-eclampsia, caesareans and birthweights greater than 90th centile) for loose control (FBG above 7 mmol/L). Future trials comparing interventions, rather than glycaemic control targets, may be more feasible particularly for pregnant women with type 2 diabetes. PMID:22895976

  13. 28 CFR 79.34 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of medical condition. 79.34 Section... COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Onsite Participants § 79.34 Proof of medical condition. Proof of medical condition under this subpart will be made in the same manner and according to the...

  14. 28 CFR 79.34 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of medical condition. 79.34 Section... COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Onsite Participants § 79.34 Proof of medical condition. Proof of medical condition under this subpart will be made in the same manner and according to the...

  15. Travelers with Disabilities and Medical Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and other external medical devices to test for explosives using explosives trace detection technology. Individuals with disabilities and medical ... includes a visual/physical inspection as well as explosives trace detection testing of the footwear. Please choose ...

  16. Effect of anesthesia in a patient with pre-existing anisocoria.

    PubMed

    Aceto, P; Perilli, V; Vitale, E; Sollazzi, L

    2011-02-01

    In this case report, we describe an accentuation of a pre-existing anisocoria shortly after tracheal intubation in a patient undergoing thyroidectomy. A 45-yr-old female patient with unequal pupillary diameter (right 2 mm > than left) and decreased light reflex in the right eye--due to a previous eye trauma--was scheduled for thyroidectomy because of multinodular goiter. Anesthesia was induced with propofol 2,5 mg/kg, fentanyl 3 mcg/kg and cisatracurium 0.15 mcg/kg. Immediately after tracheal intubation, examination of the right eye revealed a markedly dilated pupil (8 mm) which was nonreactive to direct and consensual light reflex. The left pupil was 2 mm, and normally reactive to light. An increase in heart rate was also registered (> 20% of baseline) with spontaneous return to baseline within 2 minutes. The right pupil returned to preoperative size within approximately one hour after awakening. From this case report, it emerges that a preexisting anisocoria may be exacerbated during anesthesia probably due to incomplete abolition of response to painful stimulus, such as tracheal intubation, provided by anesthetic drugs in the affected eye. The main contributing factor for accentuation of anisocoria could be sympathetic dominance in the pupil with pre-existing mechanical interruption in compensatory parasympathetic mechanisms. PMID:21434489

  17. Ionization-induced annealing of pre-existing defects in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanwen; Sachan, Ritesh; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Liu, Peng; Xue, Haizhou; Weber, William J.

    2015-08-01

    A long-standing objective in materials research is to effectively heal fabrication defects or to remove pre-existing or environmentally induced damage in materials. Silicon carbide (SiC) is a fascinating wide-band gap semiconductor for high-temperature, high-power and high-frequency applications. Its high corrosion and radiation resistance makes it a key refractory/structural material with great potential for extremely harsh radiation environments. Here we show that the energy transferred to the electron system of SiC by energetic ions via inelastic ionization can effectively anneal pre-existing defects and restore the structural order. The threshold determined for this recovery process reveals that it can be activated by 750 and 850 keV Si and C self-ions, respectively. The results conveyed here can contribute to SiC-based device fabrication by providing a room-temperature approach to repair atomic lattice structures, and to SiC performance prediction as either a functional material for device applications or a structural material for high-radiation environments.

  18. Bortezomib reduces pre-existing antibodies to recombinant immunotoxins in mice.

    PubMed

    Manning, Michael L; Mason-Osann, Emily; Onda, Masanori; Pastan, Ira

    2015-02-15

    Recombinant immunotoxin (RIT) therapy is limited in patients by neutralizing Ab responses. Ninety percent of patients with normal immune systems make neutralizing Abs after one cycle of RIT, preventing repeated dosing. Furthermore, some patients have pre-existing Abs from environmental exposure to Pseudomonas exotoxin, the component of the RIT that elicits the neutralizing Ab response. Bortezomib is an U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved proteasome inhibitor that selectively targets and kills plasma cells that are necessary for the neutralizing Ab response. We hypothesized that bortezomib may abrogate neutralizing Ab levels, making dosing of RIT possible in mice already immune to RIT. We immunized BALB/c mice with multiple doses of SS1P, a RIT whose Ab portion targets mesothelin. Mice with elevated Ab levels were separated into groups to receive saline, bortezomib, the pentostatin/cyclophosphamide (PC) regimen, or the bortezomib/PC (BPC) combination regimen. Four weeks after finishing therapy, plasma Ab levels were assayed, and bone marrow was harvested. The bortezomib and PC regimens significantly reduced Ab levels, and we observed fewer plasma cells in the bone marrow of bortezomib-treated mice but not in PC-treated mice. The BPC combination regimen almost completely eliminated Abs and further reduced plasma cells in the bone marrow. This regimen is more effective than individual regimens and may reduce Ab levels in patients with pre-existing neutralizing Abs to Pseudomonas exotoxin, allowing RIT treatment. PMID:25560410

  19. Ionization-induced annealing of pre-existing defects in silicon carbide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanwen; Sachan, Ritesh; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Liu, Peng; Xue, Haizhou; Weber, William J.

    2015-01-01

    A long-standing objective in materials research is to effectively heal fabrication defects or to remove pre-existing or environmentally induced damage in materials. Silicon carbide (SiC) is a fascinating wide-band gap semiconductor for high-temperature, high-power and high-frequency applications. Its high corrosion and radiation resistance makes it a key refractory/structural material with great potential for extremely harsh radiation environments. Here we show that the energy transferred to the electron system of SiC by energetic ions via inelastic ionization can effectively anneal pre-existing defects and restore the structural order. The threshold determined for this recovery process reveals that it can be activated by 750 and 850 keV Si and C self-ions, respectively. The results conveyed here can contribute to SiC-based device fabrication by providing a room-temperature approach to repair atomic lattice structures, and to SiC performance prediction as either a functional material for device applications or a structural material for high-radiation environments. PMID:26264864

  20. Numerical modeling of the seismic response of a large pre-existing landslide in the Marmara region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdeau, Céline; Lenti, Luca; Martino, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    Turkey is one of the geologically most active regions of Europe prone to natural hazards in particular earthquakes and landslides. Detailed seismological studies show that a catastrophic event is now expected in the Marmara region along the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). On the shores of the Marmara sea, about 30km East of Istanbul and 15km North from the NAFZ, urbanization is fastly growing despite the presence of pre-existing large landslides. Whether such landslides could be reactivated under seismic shaking is a key question. In the framework of the MARsite European project, we selected one of the most critical landslides namely the Büyükçekmece landslide in order to assess its local seismic response. Based on detailed geophysical and geotechnical field investigations, a high-resolution engineering-geological model of the landslide slope was reconstructed. A numerical modeling was carried out on a longitudinal cross section of this landslide with a 2D finite difference code FLAC in order to assess the local seismic response of the slope and to evaluate the consistency of conditions suitable for the earthquake-induced reactivation of the landslide. The obtained ground-motion amplification pattern along the slope surface is very complex and is strongly influenced by properties changes between the pre-existing landslide mass and the surrounding material. Further comparisons of 2D versus 1D ground-motion amplifications on the one hand and 2D versus topographic site effects on the other hand will shed light on the parameters controlling the spatial variations of ground-motion amplifications along the slope surface.

  1. Medical Conditions and Medication Use in Adults with Down Syndrome: A Descriptive Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerins, Gerard; Petrovic, Kimberly; Bruder, Mary Beth; Gruman, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Background: We examined the presence of medical conditions and medication use within a sample of adults with Down syndrome. Methods: Retrospective chart review using a sample of 141 adults with Down syndrome and age range of 30 to 65 years. Results: We identify 23 categories of commonly occurring medical conditions and 24 categories of medications

  2. 14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.113 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate 67.113...

  3. 14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.313 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate 67.313...

  4. 14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.213 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate 67.213...

  5. 42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Medical records. 494.170 Section 494.170... Administration 494.170 Condition: Medical records. The dialysis facility must maintain complete, accurate, and...: Completion of patient records and centralization of clinical information. (1) Current medical records...

  6. Initiation of breakdown in bubbles immersed in liquids: pre-existed charges versus bubble size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Tereshonok, Dmitry V.; Naidis, George V.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we report on results from a computational investigation of streamer evolution in bubbles immersed in liquids. We show that avalanche-to-streamer transition and streamer formation in the uniform electric field are determined by the applied external field, the parameter pR (pressure times bubble size), as well as by the location and amount of initial free charges inside the bubble. We found that streamers are not formed in bubbles with a rather small size, unless pre-existed or injected charges are large enough to initiate the breakdown. The present investigation relates the bubble size and the applied field to the minimal possible amount of charge in a bubble.

  7. Effects of Pre-Existing Target Structure on the Formation of Large Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Cintala, M. J.; Crawford, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    The shapes of large-scale craters and the mechanics responsible for melt generation are influenced by broad and small-scale structures present in a target prior to impact. For example, well-developed systems of fractures often create craters that appear square in outline, good examples being Meteor Crater, AZ and the square craters of 433 Eros. Pre-broken target material also affects melt generation. Kieffer has shown how the shock wave generated in Coconino sandstone at Meteor crater created reverberations which, in combination with the natural target heterogeneity present, created peaks and troughs in pressure and compressed density as individual grains collided to produce a range of shock mineralogies and melts within neighboring samples. In this study, we further explore how pre-existing target structure influences various aspects of the cratering process. We combine experimental and numerical techniques to explore the connection between the scales of the impact generated shock wave and the pre-existing target structure. We focus on the propagation of shock waves in coarse, granular media, emphasizing its consequences on excavation, crater growth, ejecta production, cratering efficiency, melt generation, and crater shape. As a baseline, we present a first series of results for idealized targets where the particles are all identical in size and possess the same shock impedance. We will also present a few results, whereby we increase the complexities of the target properties by varying the grain size, strength, impedance and frictional properties. In addition, we investigate the origin and implications of reverberations that are created by the presence of physical and chemical heterogeneity in a target.

  8. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 434 - Baseline Determination and Compliance Monitoring for Pre-existing Discharges at Remining Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS COAL MINING POINT... establishing effluent limitations for pre-existing discharges at coal remining operations, in accordance with the requirements set forth in subpart G; Coal Remining. The requirements specify that...

  9. Travelers with Disabilities and Medical Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rule Special Procedures Disabilities & Medical Military Children Seniors Law Enforcement TSA Pre✓® Apply Airports & Airlines FAQ Passenger Support Civil Rights Travel Redress Claims Travel Tips FAQ Disabilities ...

  10. Gene Therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI Is Effective in Cats Without Pre-Existing Immunity to AAV8

    PubMed Central

    Ferla, Rita; O'Malley, Thomas; Calcedo, Roberto; O'Donnell, Patricia; Wang, Ping; Cotugno, Gabriella; Claudiani, Pamela; Wilson, James M.; Haskins, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Liver gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) 2/8 vectors is being considered for therapy of systemic diseases like mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI), a lysosomal storage disease due to deficiency of arylsulfatase B (ARSB). We have previously reported that liver gene transfer with AAV2/8 results in sustained yet variable expression of ARSB. We hypothesized that the variability we observed could be due to pre-existing immunity to wild-type AAV8. To test this, we compared the levels of AAV2/8-mediated transduction in MPS VI cats with and without pre-existing immunity to AAV8. In addition, since levels of lysosomal enzymes as low as 5% of normal are expected to be therapeutic, we evaluated the impact of pre-existing immunity on MPS VI phenotypic rescue. AAV2/8 administration to MPS VI cats without pre-existing neutralizing antibodies to AAV8 resulted in consistent and dose-dependent expression of ARSB, urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) reduction, and femur length amelioration. Conversely, animals with pre-existing immunity to AAV8 showed low levels of ARSB expression and limited phenotypic improvement. Our data support the use of AAV2/8-mediated gene transfer for MPS VI and other systemic diseases, and highlight that pre-existing immunity to AAV8 should be considered in determining subject eligibility for therapy. PMID:23194248

  11. Gene therapy for mucopolysaccharidosis type VI is effective in cats without pre-existing immunity to AAV8.

    PubMed

    Ferla, Rita; O'Malley, Thomas; Calcedo, Roberto; O'Donnell, Patricia; Wang, Ping; Cotugno, Gabriella; Claudiani, Pamela; Wilson, James M; Haskins, Mark; Auricchio, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Liver gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) 2/8 vectors is being considered for therapy of systemic diseases like mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI), a lysosomal storage disease due to deficiency of arylsulfatase B (ARSB). We have previously reported that liver gene transfer with AAV2/8 results in sustained yet variable expression of ARSB. We hypothesized that the variability we observed could be due to pre-existing immunity to wild-type AAV8. To test this, we compared the levels of AAV2/8-mediated transduction in MPS VI cats with and without pre-existing immunity to AAV8. In addition, since levels of lysosomal enzymes as low as 5% of normal are expected to be therapeutic, we evaluated the impact of pre-existing immunity on MPS VI phenotypic rescue. AAV2/8 administration to MPS VI cats without pre-existing neutralizing antibodies to AAV8 resulted in consistent and dose-dependent expression of ARSB, urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) reduction, and femur length amelioration. Conversely, animals with pre-existing immunity to AAV8 showed low levels of ARSB expression and limited phenotypic improvement. Our data support the use of AAV2/8-mediated gene transfer for MPS VI and other systemic diseases, and highlight that pre-existing immunity to AAV8 should be considered in determining subject eligibility for therapy. PMID:23194248

  12. Treating child obesity and associated medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Caprio, Sonia

    2006-01-01

    With American children on course to grow into the most obese generation of adults in history, Sonia Caprio argues that it is critical to develop more effective strategies for preventing childhood obesity and treating serious obesity-related health complications. She notes that although pediatricians are concerned about the obesity problem, most are ineffective in addressing it. Treatment should begin, Caprio explains, with a thorough medical exam, an assessment of nutrition and physical activity, an appraisal of the degree of obesity and associated health complications, a family history, and full information about current medications. Caprio also summarizes the current use of medications and surgery in treating child obesity and argues, that for severe forms of obesity, the future lies in developing new and more effective drugs. Caprio explains that today's most effective obesity treatment programs have been carried out in academic centers through an approach that combines a dietary component, behavioral modification, physical activity, and parental involvement. Such programs, however, have yet to be translated to primary pediatric care centers. Successfully treating obesity, she argues, will require a major shift in pediatric care that builds on the findings of these academic centers regarding structured intervention programs. To ensure that pediatricians are well trained in implementing such programs, the American Medical Association is working with federal agencies, medical specialty societies, and public health organizations to teach doctors how to prevent and manage obesity in both children and adults. Such training should be a part of undergraduate and graduate medical education and of continuing medical education programs. Caprio also addresses the problem of reimbursement for obesity treatment. Despite the health risks of obesity, patients get little support from health insurers, thus putting long-term weight-management programs beyond the reach of most. Caprio argues that obesity should be recognized as a disease and receive coverage for its treatment just as other diseases do. PMID:16532665

  13. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth. PMID:26934465

  14. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth. PMID:26934465

  15. Medical Conditions and Medication Use in Adults with Down Syndrome: A Descriptive Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerins, Gerard; Petrovic, Kimberly; Bruder, Mary Beth; Gruman, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Background: We examined the presence of medical conditions and medication use within a sample of adults with Down syndrome. Methods: Retrospective chart review using a sample of 141 adults with Down syndrome and age range of 30 to 65 years. Results: We identify 23 categories of commonly occurring medical conditions and 24 categories of medications…

  16. Exact solutions for shells collapsing towards a pre-existing black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2009-08-01

    The gravitational collapse of a star is an important issue both for general relativity and astrophysics, which is related to the well-known frozen star paradox. This paradox has been discussed intensively and seems to have been solved in the comoving-like coordinates. However, to a real astrophysical observer within a finite time, this problem should be discussed in the point of view of the distant rest-observer, which is the main purpose of this Letter. Following the seminal work of Oppenheimer and Snyder (1939), we present the exact solution for one or two dust shells collapsing towards a pre-existing black hole. We find that the metric of the inner region of the shell is time-dependent and the clock inside the shell becomes slower as the shell collapses towards the pre-existing black hole. This means the inner region of the shell is influenced by the property of the shell, which is contrary to the result in Newtonian theory. It does not contradict the Birkhoff's theorem, since in our case we cannot arbitrarily select the clock inside the shell in order to ensure the continuity of the metric. This result in principle may be tested experimentally if a beam of light travels across the shell, which will take a longer time than without the shell. It can be considered as the generalized Shapiro effect, because this effect is due to the mass outside, but not inside as the case of the standard Shapiro effect. We also found that in real astrophysical settings matter can indeed cross a black hole's horizon according to the clock of an external observer and will not accumulate around the event horizon of a black hole, i.e., no frozen star is formed for an external observer as matter falls towards a black hole. Therefore, we predict that only gravitational wave radiation can be produced in the final stage of the merging process of two coalescing black holes. Our results also indicate that for the clock of an external observer, matter, after crossing the event horizon, will never arrive at the singularity (i.e. the exact center of the black hole), i.e., for all black holes with finite lifetimes their masses are distributed within their event horizons, rather than concentrated at their centers. We also present a worked-out example of the Hawking's area theorem.

  17. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept as proof of medical condition verification from the state cancer or tumor registry that it possesses medical records... Cancer Institute can make a diagnosis of leukemia to a reasonable degree of medical certainty: (i)...

  18. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept as proof of medical condition verification from the state cancer or tumor registry that it possesses medical records... Cancer Institute can make a diagnosis of leukemia to a reasonable degree of medical certainty: (i)...

  19. EVIDENCE FOR PRE-EXISTING DUST IN THE BRIGHT TYPE IIn SN 2010jl

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J. E.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Clem, J.; Landolt, A. E-mail: landolt@phys.lsu.edu E-mail: jclem@phys.lsu.edu

    2011-08-15

    SN 2010jl was an extremely bright, Type IIn supernova (SN) which showed a significant infrared (IR) excess no later than 90 days after explosion. We have obtained Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m and JHK observations of SN 2010jl {approx}90 days post-explosion. Little to no reddening in the host galaxy indicated that the circumstellar material lost from the progenitor must lie in a torus inclined out of the plane of the sky. The likely cause of the high mid-IR flux is the reprocessing of the initial flash of the SN by pre-existing circumstellar dust. Using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative-transfer code, we have estimated that between 0.03 and 0.35 M{sub sun} of dust exists in a circumstellar torus around the SN located 6 x 10{sup 17} cm away from the SN and inclined between 60 deg. and 80 deg. to the plane of the sky. On day 90, we are only seeing the illumination of approximately 5% of this torus, and expect to see an elevated IR flux from this material up until day {approx} 450. It is likely this dust was created in a luminous blue variable (LBV) like mass-loss event of more than 3 M{sub sun}, which is large but consistent with other LBV progenitors such as {eta} Carinae.

  20. Plasticity induced by pre-existing defects during high strain-rate loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringa, Eduardo

    2014-03-01

    High strain-rate deformation of metals has been typically studied for perfect monocrystals. Computational advances now allow more realistic simulations of materials including defects, which lower the Hugoniot Elastic Limit, and lead to microstructures differing from the ones from perfect monocrystals. As pre-existing defects one can consider vacancy clusters, dislocation loops, grain boundaries, etc. New analysis tools allow analysis of dislocation densities and twin fractions, for both f.c.c. and b.c.c. metals. Recent results for defective single crystal Ta [Tramontina et al.., High Energy Den. Phys. 10, 9 (2014), and Ruestes et al., Scripta Mat. 68, 818 (2013)], and for polycrystalline b.c.c metals [Tang et al., Mat. Sci. Eng. A 580, 414 (2013), and Gunkelmann et al., Phys. Rev. B 86, 144111 (2012)] will be highlighted, alongside new results for nanocrystalline Cu, Ta, Fe, and Zr [Ruestes et al., Scripta Mat. 71, 9 (2014)]. This work has been carried out in collaboration with D. Tramontina, C. Ruestes, E. Millan, J. Rodriguez-Nieva, M.A. Meyers, Y. Tang, H. Urbassek, N. Gunkelmann, A. Stukowski, M. Ruda, G. Bertolino, D. Farkas, A. Caro, J. Hawreliak, B. Remington, R. Rudd, P. Erhart, R. Ravelo, T. Germann, N. Park, M. Suggit, S. Michalik, A. Higginbotham and J. Wark. Funding by PICT2008-1325 and SeCTyP U.N. Cuyo.

  1. Flash-ionization of pre-existing circumstellar material around Nova Oph 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Walter, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    We have obtained daily high-resolution Echelle spectroscopy of Nova Oph 2015 during its initial evolution. It reveals the presence of pre-existing circumstellar material around the nova, which can be interpreted as the wind of an evolved companion. On earliest observations, the emission line profiles of Nova Oph 2015 displayed a very narrow emission component (full width at half-maximum [FWHM] ˜ 60 km s-1), recombining over a time-scale of 5 days and showing constant low velocity (RV⊙ = -4.5 km s-1), that we interpret as coming from the wind of the secondary recombining after the ionization from the initial UV-flash of the nova. The underlying broad component underwent a marked reduction in both FWHM and width at zero intensity (the latter declining from 4000 to 2000 km s-1 in 10 days) while increasing by six times in flux, that we believe is the result of the high-velocity ejecta of the nova being slowed down while trying to expand within the surrounding wind of the companion. Nova Oph 2015 is possibly unique among novae with evolved companions in having displayed a long rise to maximum brightness and a slow decline from it, an Fe II-type classification, and a probable sub-giant luminosity class for the secondary.

  2. Pre-existing brain function predicts subsequent practice of mindfulness and compassion meditation.

    PubMed

    Mascaro, Jennifer S; Rilling, James K; Negi, Lobsang Tenzin; Raison, Charles L

    2013-04-01

    While a variety of meditation techniques are increasingly employed as health interventions, the fact that meditation requires a significant commitment of time and effort may limit its potential widespread utility. In the current study, we ask whether baseline subjective reports or brain activity in response to a "Pain for Self and Others" paradigm predicts subsequent engagement in mindfulness and compassion meditation. The study also investigated whether compassion training would impact neural responses when compared to an active health education control group. Prior to training, activation of the left and right anterior insula, an area thought to be important for empathy, in response to the Other pain task was positively related to engagement with compassion meditation as measured by practice time (n=13). On the other hand, activity in the left amygdala during the Self pain task was negatively correlated with mindfulness practice time. Following the study intervention, there was no difference between the compassion group (n=13), and the control group (n=8), in brain responses to either the Self or Other task. These results are the first to indicate that baseline neural responses may predict engagement with meditation training and suggest that pre-existing neurobiological profiles differentially predispose individuals to engage with disparate meditation techniques. PMID:23266748

  3. Holistic approach of pre-existing flaws on the decay of two limestones.

    PubMed

    Dewanckele, J; Boone, M A; De Kock, T; De Boever, W; Brabant, L; Boone, M N; Fronteau, G; Dils, J; Van Hoorebeke, L; Jacobs, P; Cnudde, V

    2013-03-01

    This study aims to understand the influence of the microfacies and the determination of pre-existing flaws on the weathering behavior of two types of limestones. Therefore, both Lede and Noyant limestones were independently weathered by strong acid tests and freeze-thaw cycles. In order to characterize the weathering patterns inside the stones, a combination of high resolution X-ray CT, SEM-EDS and thin section microscopy was used. The advantage of high resolution X-ray CT is its non-destructive character and the obtained 3D structural information. By using this technique, a time-lapse sequence of the weathering patterns was obtained for both gypsum crust formation as well as crack formation due to freezing and thawing. This way, a clear link could be made with the initial non-weathered state. Thin section microscopy and SEM-EDS provided additional chemical information. The focus of this study lies in the processes that occur in the bioclast fragments in the stone and the influence of the surrounding cement or matrix. The results show that weathering patterns vary for both limestones although the causes of weathering were similar. In case of the Noyant stone, the weathering by crystallizing gypsum was mainly restricted to the microporous matrix of the stone, while in case of the Lede stone, several foraminifera and shell fragments were preferentially recrystallized. In general, the underlying microstructure determines the weathering pattern of the stone. PMID:23410862

  4. Pre-existent vertebral rotation in the human spine is influenced by body position

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Michiel M. A.; Vincken, Koen L.; Kemp, Bastiaan; Obradov, Marina; de Kleuver, Marinus; Viergever, Max A.; Bartels, Lambertus W.

    2010-01-01

    Both the humans as well as the quadrupedal spine have been shown to exhibit a pattern of pre-existent rotation that is similar in direction to what is found in the most common types of idiopathic scoliosis. It has been postulated that human bipedalism introduces forces to the spine that increase a tendency of the vertebrae to rotate. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of body position on vertebral rotation in vivo. Thirty asymptomatic volunteers underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning of the spine (T2L5) in three different body positions; upright, quadrupedal-like (on hands-and-knees) and supine. Vertebral rotation in the local transverse plane was measured according to a pre-established method and compared at different spinal levels between the three body positions. It was shown that in all three positions the mid- and lower thoracic vertebrae were predominantly rotated to the right. However, vertebral rotation was significantly less in the quadrupedal position than in both the standing upright and supine positions. PMID:20405300

  5. Psychological distress in an earthquake-devastated area with pre-existing high rate of suicide.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Akira; Kitamura, Hideaki; Shindo, Masanobu; Honma, Hiroko; Someya, Toshiyuki

    2014-10-30

    On 12 March 2011 an earthquake devastated the Matsunoyama and Matsudai districts of Tōkamachi City, Niigata, Japan. These areas had high pre-existing suicide rates, especially among the elderly. We investigated whether mental health status became worse among the sufferers 5 months after the earthquake, and what kind of factors were implicated in any changes. A 15-item questionnaire that tapped earthquake-related variables and the Kessler 10 Psychological Distress Scale to measure psychological distress were distributed to 1923 residents aged over 40 years. The mean age (S.D.) of the total 1731 respondents (male, 805; female, 926) was 68.2 (13.1) years. Of these, we assessed K10 scores from 1346 respondents. The mean scores (S.D.) for K10 and K6 (six selected items from the K10) were 5.8 (6.3) and 3.4 (3.9), respectively. Among the respondents, 9.1% and 3.2% obtained a score of K10 ≥15 and K6 ≥13, respectively. These scores showed slightly higher psychological distress, especially among the elderly, in comparison with existing community-based data. Categorical regression analysis revealed significant and relatively strong effects of initial psychological impact, decrease in sleep hours, advanced age, and decrease in interpersonal relationships within the community on the K10 score. The last item suggests the importance of socio-environmental factors in post-disaster mental health. PMID:24928758

  6. The Influence of Pre-existing Deformation on GMA Welding Distortion in Thin Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. M.; Ahn, J.; Tsunori, M.; Dye, D.; Nikbin, K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Weld distortion is particularly problematic for large thin structures that are used in the assembly of ships. The drive toward lighter ships and thinner plate is restricted by the significant increase in distortion as the plate thickness decreases. The influence of pre-existing deformation in the plates to be joined on the resultant distortion in gas metal arc welded structure has been studied. DH-36 steel plate surface profiles were measured before and after the butt welding of two plates 1000 × 500 × 4 mm in size. Three dimensional finite element models that incorporate the initial plate profile have been created to simulate the welding process and to examine the relationship between the final welded plate profiles and the initial deformation present in the plates. Both symmetric and asymmetric models were considered. A significant variation in the unwelded base plates' initial distortion was observed. Generally, it has been found that if an out-of-plane deformation exists in a plate prior to welding, the level of distortion further increases in the same direction following welding. The final distortions are strongly related to the initial plate profiles. The residual stress distributions in the plates are also to some extent affected by the level of distortion initially present.

  7. Interactions between X-ray induced transient defects and pre-existing damage precursors in DKDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, R A; Saw, C K; Demos, S G

    2008-10-24

    Large-aperture laser systems, currently designed to achieve high energy densities at the target location (exceeding {approx} 10{sup 11} J/m{sup 3}), will enable studies of the physics of matter and radiation under extreme conditions. As a result, their optical components, such as the frequency conversion crystals (KDP/DKDP), may be exposed to X-rays and other ionizing radiation. This in turn may lead to a change in the damage performance of these materials as they may be affected by radiation-induced effects by either forming new damage initiation centers or interacting with the pre-existing damage initiating defects (so-called damage precursors). We present an experimental study on the laser-induced bulk damage performance at 355-nm of DKDP crystals following X-ray irradiation at room temperature. Results indicate that the damage performance of the material is affected by exposure to X-rays. We attribute this behavior to a change in the physical properties of the precursors which, in turn, affect their individual damage threshold.

  8. Discovery of a pre-existing molecular filament associated with supernova remnant G127.1+0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin; Yang, Ji; Fang, Min; Su, Yang

    2014-08-20

    We performed millimeter observations in CO lines toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G127.1+0.5. We found a molecular filament at 4-13 km s{sup –1} consisting of two distinct parts: a straight part coming out of the remnant region and a curved part in the remnant region. The curved part is coincides well with the bright SNR shell detected in 1420 MHz radio continuum and mid-infrared observations in the northeastern region. In addition, redshifted line wing broadening is found only in the curved part of the molecular filament, which indicates a physical interaction. These provide strong evidences, for the first time, to confirm the association between an SNR and a pre-existing long molecular filament. Multi-band observations in the northeastern remnant shell could be explained by the interaction between the remnant shock and the dense molecular filament. RADEX radiative transfer modeling of the quiet and shocked components yield physical conditions consistent with the passage of a non-dissociative J-type shock. We argue that the curved part of the filament is fully engulfed by the remnant's forward shock. A spatial correlation between aggregated young stellar objects (YSOs) and the adjacent molecular filament close to the SNR is also found, which could be related to the progenitor's activity.

  9. 42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of participation: Organizational Environment § 418.102 Condition of participation: Medical director. The hospice must designate a... is an employee, or is under contract with the hospice. When the medical director is not available,...

  10. 42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of participation: Organizational Environment § 418.102 Condition of participation: Medical director. The hospice must designate a... is an employee, or is under contract with the hospice. When the medical director is not available,...

  11. 42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of participation: Organizational Environment § 418.102 Condition of participation: Medical director. The hospice must designate a... is an employee, or is under contract with the hospice. When the medical director is not available,...

  12. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Basic Hospital Functions § 482.22 Condition of participation: Medical staff. The hospital must have an organized medical staff that operates under bylaws approved by the governing body and is responsible for the quality...

  13. 42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Standard: Record retention and preservation. In accordance with 45 CFR 164.530(j)(2), all patient records... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Medical records. 494.170 Section 494.170... Administration 494.170 Condition: Medical records. The dialysis facility must maintain complete, accurate,...

  14. 42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Standard: Record retention and preservation. In accordance with 45 CFR § 164.530(j)(2), all patient records... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Medical records. 494.170 Section 494.170... Administration § 494.170 Condition: Medical records. The dialysis facility must maintain complete, accurate,...

  15. 42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Standard: Record retention and preservation. In accordance with 45 CFR § 164.530(j)(2), all patient records... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Medical records. 494.170 Section 494.170... Administration § 494.170 Condition: Medical records. The dialysis facility must maintain complete, accurate,...

  16. Asymptomatic carotid stenosis: mainly a medical condition.

    PubMed

    Spence, J David

    2010-01-01

    At present approximately 70% of carotid endarterectomy and stenting in the United States is being performed for asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS). This is based on historical risks of ACS that no longer pertain in the era of intensive medical therapy with statins and other therapies. In the past, the surgical risk of 3% in clinical trials was marginally better than medical therapy for male patients with ACS; however, this is no longer the case. Even in the past, women with ACS did not benefit from endarterectomy. Except for patients with microemboli on transcranial Doppler (who have a 2-year risk of stroke of approximately 14%), the 2-year risk of stroke in ACS is now 1% or less. Endarterectomy or stenting should be reserved for the < 5% of patients with microemboli on transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. In future, 3 dimensional ultrasound detection of ulceration, and magnetic resonance imaging of vulnerable plaque may provide additional approaches to identifying those patients with ACS who may benefit from endarterectomy or stenting. Routine endarterectomy or stenting for patients with ACS should now be regarded as inappropriate. PMID:20470680

  17. Differentiation of pre-existing trapped methane from thermogenic methane in an igneous-intruded coal by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dias, Robert F.; Lewan, Michael D.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Kotarba, Maciej J.

    2014-01-01

    So as to better understand how the gas generation potential of coal changes with increasing rank, same-seam samples of bituminous coal from the Illinois Basin that were naturally matured to varying degrees by the intrusion of an igneous dike were subjected to hydrous pyrolysis (HP) conditions of 360 °C for 72 h. The accumulated methane in the reactor headspace was analyzed for δ13C and δ2H, and mol percent composition. Maximum methane production (9.7 mg/g TOC) occurred in the most immature samples (0.5 %Ro), waning to minimal methane values at 2.44 %Ro (0.67 mg/g TOC), and rebounding to 3.6 mg/g TOC methane in the most mature sample (6.76 %Ro). Methane from coal with the highest initial thermal maturity (6.76 %Ro) shows no isotopic dependence on the reactor water and has a microbial δ13C value of −61‰. However, methane from coal of minimal initial thermal maturity (0.5 %Ro) shows hydrogen isotopic dependence on the reaction water and has a δ13C value of −37‰. The gas released from coals under hydrous pyrolysis conditions represents a quantifiable mixture of ancient (270 Ma) methane (likely microbial) that was generated in situ and trapped within the rock during the rapid heating by the dike, and modern (laboratory) thermogenic methane that was generated from the indigenous organic matter due to thermal maturation induced by hydrous pyrolysis conditions. These findings provide an analytical framework for better assessment of natural gas sources and for differentiating generated gas from pre-existing trapped gas in coals of various ranks.

  18. Caring for Kids With Medical Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... becomes dizzy, call the parents immediately. previous continue Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy (CP) is a long-term condition involving brain damage and muscle problems. CP can cause limitations in moving, learning, hearing, seeing, ...

  19. Medical physics personnel for medical imaging: requirements, conditions of involvement and staffing levels-French recommendations.

    PubMed

    Isambert, Aurlie; Le Du, Dominique; Valro, Marc; Guilhem, Marie-Thrse; Rousse, Carole; Dieudonn, Arnaud; Blanchard, Vincent; Pierrat, Nolle; Salvat, Ccile

    2015-04-01

    The French regulations concerning the involvement of medical physicists in medical imaging procedures are relatively vague. In May 2013, the ASN and the SFPM issued recommendations regarding Medical Physics Personnel for Medical Imaging: Requirements, Conditions of Involvement and Staffing Levels. In these recommendations, the various areas of activity of medical physicists in radiology and nuclear medicine have been identified and described, and the time required to perform each task has been evaluated. Criteria for defining medical physics staffing levels are thus proposed. These criteria are defined according to the technical platform, the procedures and techniques practised on it, the number of patients treated and the number of persons in the medical and paramedical teams requiring periodic training. The result of this work is an aid available to each medical establishment to determine their own needs in terms of medical physics. PMID:25323441

  20. Evolution of Pre-Existing versus Acquired Resistance to Platinum Drugs and PARP Inhibitors in BRCA-Associated Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N.; Hirota, Kouji; Takeda, Shunichi; Haeno, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Platinum drugs and PARP inhibitors (“PARPis”) are considered to be effective in BRCA-associated cancers with impaired DNA repair. These agents cause stalled and collapsed replication forks and create double-strand breaks effectively in the absence of repair mechanisms, resulting in arrest of the cell cycle and induction of cell death. However, recent studies have shown failure of these chemotherapeutic agents due to emerging drug resistance. In this study, we developed a stochastic model of BRCA-associated cancer progression in which there are four cancer populations: those with (i) functional BRCA, (ii) dysfunctional BRCA, (iii) functional BRCA and a growth advantage, and (iv) dysfunctional BRCA and a growth advantage. These four cancer populations expand from one cancer cell with normal repair function until the total cell number reaches a detectable amount. We derived formulas for the probability and expected numbers of each population at the time of detection. Furthermore, we extended the model to consider the tumor dynamics during treatment. Results from the model were validated and showed good agreement with clinical and experimental evidence in BRCA-associated cancers. Based on the model, we investigated conditions in which drug resistance during the treatment course originated from either a pre-existing drug-resistant population or a de novo population, due to secondary mutations. Finally, we found that platinum drugs and PARPis were effective if (i) BRCA inactivation is present, (ii) the cancer was diagnosed early, and (iii) tumor growth is rapid. Our results indicate that different types of cancers have a preferential way of acquiring resistance to platinum drugs and PARPis according to their growth and mutational characteristics. PMID:25158060

  1. Evaluation of a pre-existing, 3-year household water treatment and handwashing intervention in rural Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Benjamin; Arana, Byron; Musezahl, Daniel; Hubbard, Alan; Colford, John M

    2009-01-01

    Background The promotion of household water treatment and handwashing with soap has led to large reductions in child diarrhoea in randomized efficacy trials. Currently, we know little about the health effectiveness of behaviour-based water and hygiene interventions after the conclusion of intervention activities. Methods We present an extension of previously published design (propensity score matching) and analysis (targeted maximum likelihood estimation) methods to evaluate the behavioural and health impacts of a pre-existing but non-randomized intervention (a 3-year, combined household water treatment and handwashing campaign in rural Guatemala). Six months after the intervention, we conducted a cross-sectional cohort study in 30 villages (15 intervention and 15 control) that included 600 households, and 929 children <5 years of age. Results The study design created a sample of intervention and control villages that were comparable across more than 30 potentially confounding characteristics. The intervention led to modest gains in confirmed water treatment behaviour [risk difference = 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.020.09]. We found, however, no difference between the intervention and control villages in self-reported handwashing behaviour, spot-check hygiene conditions, or the prevalence of child diarrhoea, clinical acute lower respiratory infections or child growth. Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first post-intervention follow-up study of a combined household water treatment and handwashing behaviour change intervention, and the first post-intervention follow-up of either intervention type to include child health measurement. The lack of child health impacts is consistent with unsustained behaviour adoption. Our findings highlight the difficulty of implementing behaviour-based household water treatment and handwashing outside of intensive efficacy trials. PMID:19574492

  2. Proteasome Inhibition Is Partially Effective in Attenuating Pre-Existing Immunity against Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Karman, Jozsef; Gumlaw, Nathan K.; Zhang, Jinhua; Jiang, Ji-Lei; Cheng, Seng H.; Zhu, Yunxiang

    2012-01-01

    Pre-existing immunity against adeno-associated virus (AAV) remains a major challenge facing the clinical use of systemic administration of recombinant AAV vectors for the treatment of genetic and acquired diseases using gene therapy. In this study, we evaluated the potential of bortezomib (marketed under trade name Velcade) to abrogate a pre-existing immunity to AAV in mice, thereby allowing subsequent transduction by a recombinant AAV vector of the same serotype. We demonstrate that bortezomib efficiently reduces AAV-specific IgG titres and moderates the cytotoxic T cell response in mice that have a pre-existing immunity to AAV2/8. Significant depletion of AAV2/8-specific IgG-producing plasma cells in secondary lymphoid organs and bone marrow was observed. However, this inhibition of the immune response by bortezomib was insufficient to allow subsequent re-infection with a recombinant AAV vector of a similar serotype. We show that this shortcoming is probably due to the combination of residual antibody levels and the inability of bortezomib to completely deplete the memory B cells that are re-activated in response to a repeated infection with a recombinant AAV vector. Taken together, the results of this study argue for the use of immunosuppressive therapies that target both plasma and memory B cells for the efficient elimination of pre-existing immunity against AAV2/8 vectors. PMID:22514654

  3. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 434 - Baseline Determination and Compliance Monitoring for Pre-existing Discharges at Remining Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Monitoring for Pre-existing Discharges at Remining Operations B Appendix B to Part 434 Protection of... SOURCE CATEGORY BPT, BAT, BCT LIMITATIONS AND NEW SOURCE PERFORMANCE STANDARDS Pt. 434, App. B Appendix B...-observation) procedure and an annual procedure shall be applied, as described below. b. In order...

  4. Squaring the Circle: Impact Craters as a Diagnostic of Pre-Existing Sub-Surface Target Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C. S.

    2015-05-01

    Pre-existing inhomogeneities in target geology affect the geometry of impact craters. I explore the effects of target faulting on the evolution and final geometry of impact crater models and the use of craters as a probe of sub-surface morphology.

  5. Treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain by topical capsaicin: Impact of pre-existing pain in the QUEPP-study

    PubMed Central

    Maihfner, CG; Heskamp, M-LS

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluates the impact of the duration of pre-existing peripheral neuropathic pain on the therapeutic response to the capsaicin 8% cutaneous patch. Methods The non-interventional QUEPP (QUTENZA safety and effectiveness in peripheral neuropathic pain) study evaluated the effectiveness of Qutenza in 1044 non-diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathic pain, who received a single application. Follow-up visits were scheduled at weeks 12, 4, 8 and 12. A pre-defined co-analysis of changes in average pain intensity was performed based on the duration of pre-existing pain. Results In patients with pre-existing pain for <6 months, the mean relative change of the numeric pain rating scale score on days 714 to week 12 versus baseline was ?36.6% [4.6 standard error of the mean (SEM); n = 105], ?25.1% (1.9 SEM; n = 311) in patients with pain duration of 6 months to 2 years, ?22.3% (1.6 SEM; n = 391) in patients with pain for >210 years, and ?19.2% (2.6 SEM; n = 99) in patients with pain for >10 years. Thirty percent and 50% responder rates were 61.7% and 39.3% in patients with pre-existing pain for <6 months, 42.3% and 23.3% in patients with pain for 6 months to 2 years, 40.9% and 21.6% in patients with pain for >210 years, and 32.3% and 14.1% in patients with pain for >10 years. Conclusions The highest treatment response to the capsaicin 8% cutaneous patch was observed in patients with a history of pre-existing peripheral neuropathic pain of less than 6 months, suggesting that early initiation of topical treatment might be indicated. PMID:24259265

  6. Risk of endometrial cancer in relation to medical conditions and medication use

    PubMed Central

    Fortuny, Joan; Sima, Camelia; Bayuga, Sharon; Wilcox, Homer; Pulick, Katherine; Faulkner, Shameka; Zauber, Ann G.; Olson, Sara H.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the relation of medical conditions related to obesity and medications used for these conditions with endometrial cancer. We also investigated the association of other medical conditions and medications with risk. This US population-based case-control study included 469 endometrial cancer cases and 467 controls. Information on putative risk factors for endometrial cancer was collected through personal interviews. We asked women about their medical history and medications used for six months or longer and the number of years each medication was taken. Risk was strongly associated with increasing obesity (p for trend <0.001). Among conditions related to obesity, and after adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), and other risk factors and conditions, uterine fibroids were independently related to an increased cancer risk (adjusted OR= 1.8, 95%CI= 1.22.5). Although hypertension was not significantly related to endometrial cancer after adjustment for age and BMI, use of thiazide diuretics was independently associated with an increased risk (OR= 1.8, 95%CI= 1.13.0). Anemia was associated with decreased risk (OR= 0.6, 95%CI= 0.50.9). Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was related to a decreased risk (OR= 0.7, 95%CI= 0.50.97). To our knowledge, the observation about thiazide diuretics is novel and requires confirmation in other studies and populations. PMID:19383893

  7. The experience of altered states of consciousness in shamanic ritual: the role of pre-existing beliefs and affective factors.

    PubMed

    Polito, Vince; Langdon, Robyn; Brown, Jac

    2010-12-01

    Much attention has been paid recently to the role of anomalous experiences in the aetiology of certain types of psychopathology, e.g. in the formation of delusions. We examine, instead, the top-down influence of pre-existing beliefs and affective factors in shaping an individual's characterisation of anomalous sensory experiences. Specifically we investigated the effects of paranormal beliefs and alexithymia in determining the intensity and quality of an altered state of consciousness (ASC). Fifty five participants took part in a sweat lodge ceremony, a traditional shamanic ritual which was unfamiliar to them. Participants reported significant alterations in their state of consciousness, quantified using the 'APZ' questionnaire, a standardized measure of ASC experience. Participants endorsing paranormal beliefs compatible with shamanic mythology, and those showing difficulty identifying feelings scored higher on positive dimensions of ASC experience. Our findings demonstrate that variation in an individual's characterisation of anomalous experiences is nuanced by pre-existing beliefs and affective factors. PMID:20558090

  8. Avoiding the requirement for pre-existing optical contact during picosecond laser glass-to-glass welding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianyong; Carter, Richard M; Thomson, Robert R; Hand, Duncan P

    2015-07-13

    Previous reports of ultrafast laser welding of glass-to-glass have indicated that a pre-existing optical contact (or very close to) between the parts to be joined is essential. In this paper, the capability of picosecond laser welding to bridge micron-scale gaps is investigated, and successful welding, without cracking, of two glasses with a pre-existing gap of 3 µm is demonstrated. It is shown that the maximum gap that can be welded is not significantly affected by welding speeds, but is strongly dependent on the laser power and focal position relative to the interface between the materials. Five distinct types of material modification were observed over a range of different powers and surface separations, and a mechanism is proposed to explain the observations. PMID:26191923

  9. Sexual dysfunction among Ghanaian men presenting with various medical conditions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several medical conditions can affect and disrupt human sexuality. The alteration of sexuality in these medical conditions often hinder effective communication and empathy between the patients and their sexual partners because of cultural attitudes, social norms and negative feelings such as anxiety and guilt. Validated and standardized sexual inventories might therefore help resolve this problem. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to obtain data on the prevalence of male sexual dysfunction (SD) among Ghanaians with various medical conditions residing in Kumasi. Methods The Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS) was administered to 150 Ghanaian men with various medical conditions between 19 and 66 years old (mean ± standard deviation: 40.01 ± 12.32 years) domiciled in the Kumasi metropolis. Results Out of the total 150 questionnaires administered, 105 (70.0%) men returned the questionnaires. Questionnaires from 3 men were incomplete, leaving 102 complete and evaluable questionnaires, indicating a 68.0% response rate. Of the remaining 102 men, 88.2% were married, 70.6% had attained higher education, 88.2% were non-smokers. Whereas 54.9% were engaged in exercise, 61.8% indulged in alcoholic beverages. The prevalence of the various medical conditions include: diabetes (18%), hypertension (24.5%), migraine (11.8%), ulcer (7.8%), surgery (6.9%), STD (3.9) and others (26.5%). The prevalence of SD among the respondents in the study was 59.8%. The highest prevalence of SD was seen among ulcer patients (100%), followed by patients who have undergone surgery (75%), diabetes (70%), hypertension (50%), STD (50%) and the lowest was seen among migraine patients (41.7%). Conclusions SD rate is high among Ghanaian men with medical conditions (about 60%) and vary according to the condition and age. PMID:20942960

  10. National health spending by medical condition, 1996-2005.

    PubMed

    Roehrig, Charles; Miller, George; Lake, Craig; Bryant, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    This study responds to recent calls for information about how personal health expenditures from the National Health Expenditure Accounts are distributed across medical conditions. It provides annual estimates from 1996 through 2005 for thirty-two conditions mapped into thirteen all-inclusive diagnostic categories. Circulatory system spending was highest among the diagnostic categories, accounting for 17 percent of spending in 2005. The most costly conditions were mental disorders and heart conditions. Spending growth rates were lowest for lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, coronary heart disease, and stroke, perhaps reflecting benefits of preventive care. PMID:19240056

  11. 28 CFR 79.26 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of medical condition. 79.26 Section 79.26 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Certain Specified Diseases Contracted After Exposure in an Affected Area...

  12. 28 CFR 79.26 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of medical condition. 79.26 Section 79.26 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Certain Specified Diseases Contracted After Exposure in an Affected Area...

  13. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... quality of medical care provided to patients by the hospital. (a) Standard: Eligibility and process for... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Basic Hospital... individual distant-site physicians and practitioners providing such services, if the hospital's...

  14. Medical Care, Living Conditions, and Children's Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Catherine E.; Duff, Raymond S.

    1982-01-01

    The family's socioeconomic status and the social-psychological aspects of family functioning were found to influence children's physical well-being both directly as well as indirectly through access to good medical care. Quality of psychotherapeutic care had no effect on psychological well being, which was affected by family living conditions.…

  15. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.16 Proof of medical condition. (a... leukemia. Proof that the claimant contracted leukemia must be made either by using the procedure outlined... section. (b) If a claimant was diagnosed as having leukemia in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico,...

  16. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.16 Proof of medical condition. (a... leukemia. Proof that the claimant contracted leukemia must be made either by using the procedure outlined... section. (b) If a claimant was diagnosed as having leukemia in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico,...

  17. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.16 Proof of medical condition. (a... leukemia. Proof that the claimant contracted leukemia must be made either by using the procedure outlined... section. (b) If a claimant was diagnosed as having leukemia in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico,...

  18. 28 CFR 79.26 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... required in paragraph (c) of this section. (For claims relating to primary cancer of the liver, the... diagnosis, that authorizes the Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept as proof of medical condition verification from the state cancer or tumor...

  19. 28 CFR 79.26 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... required in paragraph (c) of this section. (For claims relating to primary cancer of the liver, the... diagnosis, that authorizes the Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept as proof of medical condition verification from the state cancer or tumor...

  20. Individual Differences in Reading Comprehension Gains from Assisted Reading Practice: Pre Existing Conditions, Vocabulary Acquisition, and Amounts of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shany, Michal; Biemiller, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a study of the effects of assisted reading practice (Shany & Biemiller, 1995). In this paper we examined the original data to find factors affecting gains in reading comprehension. We contrasted 14 children who had below median gains in reading comprehension and 15 who had above median gains. There were no significant correlations

  1. Pre-existing differences in motivation for food and sensitivity to cocaine-induced locomotion in obesity-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Vollbrecht, Peter J; Nobile, Cameron W; Chadderdon, Aaron M; Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is a significant problem in the United States, with roughly one third of adults having a body mass index (BMI) over thirty. Recent evidence from human studies suggests that pre-existing differences in the function of mesolimbic circuits that mediate motivational processes may promote obesity and hamper weight loss. However, few preclinical studies have examined pre-existing neurobehavioral differences related to the function of mesolimbic systems in models of individual susceptibility to obesity. Here, we used selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats to examine 1) the effect of a novel "junk-food" diet on the development of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, 2) over-consumption of "junk-food" in a free access procedure, 3) motivation for food using instrumental procedures, and 4) cocaine-induced locomotor activity as an index of general mesolimbic function. As expected, eating a sugary, fatty, "junk-food" diet exacerbated weight gain and increased fasted insulin levels only in obesity-prone rats. In addition, obesity-prone rats continued to over-consume junk-food during discrete access testing, even when this same food was freely available in the home cage. Furthermore, when asked to press a lever to obtain food in an instrumental task, rates of responding were enhanced in obesity-prone versus obesity-resistant rats. Finally, obesity-prone rats showed a stronger locomotor response to 15 mg/kg cocaine compared to obesity-resistant rats prior to any diet manipulation. This enhanced sensitivity to this dose of cocaine is indicative of basal differences in the function of mesolimbic circuits in obesity-prone rats. We speculate that pre-existing differences in motivational systems may contribute to over-consumption and enhanced motivation in susceptible individuals. PMID:26423787

  2. Lentivirus-mediated platelet gene therapy of murine hemophilia A with pre-existing anti-FVIII immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kuether, E. L.; Schroeder, J. A.; Fahs, S. A.; Cooley, B. C.; Chen, Y.; Montgomery, R. R.; Wilcox, D. A.; Shi, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The development of inhibitory antibodies, referred to as inhibitors, against exogenous FVIII in a significant subset of patients with hemophilia A remains a persistent challenge to the efficacy of protein replacement therapy. Our previous studies using the transgenic approach provided proof-of-principle that platelet-specific expression could be successful for treating hemophilia A in the presence of inhibitory antibodies. Objective To investigate a clinically translatable approach for platelet gene therapy of hemophilia A with pre-existing inhibitors. Methods Platelet-FVIII expression in pre-immunized FVIIInull mice was introduced by transplantation of lentivirus-transduced bone marrow or enriched hematopoietic stem cells. FVIII expression was determined by a chromogenic assay. The transgene copy number per cell was quantitated by real time PCR. Inhibitor titer was measured by Bethesda assay. Phenotypic correction was assessed by the tail clipping assay and an electrolytic-induced venous injury model. Integration sites were analyzed by LAM-PCR. Results Therapeutic levels of platelet-FVIII expression were sustained long-term without evoking an anti-FVIII memory response in the transduced pre-immunized recipients. The tail clip survival test and the electrolytic injury model confirmed that hemostasis was improved in the treated animals. Sequential bone marrow transplants showed sustained platelet-FVIII expression resulting in phenotypic correction in pre-immunized secondary and tertiary recipients. Conclusions Lentivirus-mediated platelet-specific gene transfer improves hemostasis in hemophilic A mice with pre-existing inhibitors, indicating that this approach may be a promising strategy for gene therapy of hemophilia A even in the high-risk setting of pre-existing inhibitory antibodies. PMID:22632092

  3. Multiple myeloma: Diagnosis and management issues in patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vadlamudi, Srilatha; Annapareddy, Siva Nagendra Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is one of the most common malignancies encountered in clinical practice. Renal involvement in myeloma is a well-recognized entity. Although rare, another special situation that a nephrologist can encounter is myeloma occurring in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to other etiologies. Anemia, bone pains and hypercalcemia, which commonly indicate the diagnosis of myeloma in the general population, are not useful in the presence of CKD. The sensitivity and specificity of serum free light chain assay is decreased in the presence of renal failure. Chemotherapy-related adverse effects are high compared with that in patients without CKD; this is attributed to the decreased clearance of drugs and the additive effect of chemotherapy-related adverse effects to the complications of CKD. Autologous and allogenic bone marrow transplantation can be attempted in this group of patients with non-myeloablative-conditioning regimens. Combined bone marrow and renal transplantation remains a viable option in this group of patients to increase life expectancy and quality of life. PMID:26787560

  4. Pre-Existing T- and B-Cell Defects in One Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sottini, Alessandra; Capra, Ruggero; Zanotti, Cinzia; Chiarini, Marco; Serana, Federico; Ricotta, Doris; Caimi, Luigi; Imberti, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) usually occurs in patients with severe immunosuppression, hematological malignancies, chronic inflammatory conditions or receiving organ transplant. Recently, PML has also been observed in patients treated with monoclonal antibodies. By taking advantage of the availability of samples from a multiple sclerosis (MS) patient treated with natalizumab, the antibody anti-?4 integrin, who developed PML and was monitored starting before therapy initiation, we investigated the fate of T and B lymphocytes in the onset of PML. Real-time PCR was used to measure new T- and B-cell production by means of T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) and K-deleting recombination excision circle (KREC) analysis and to quantify transcripts for CD34, terminal-deoxynucleotidyltransferase, and V pre-B lymphocyte gene 1. T- and B-cell subsets and T-cell heterogeneity were measured by flow cytometry and spectratyping. The data were compared to those of untreated and natalizumab-treated MS patients and healthy donors. Before therapy, a patient who developed PML had a low TREC and KREC number; TRECs remained low, while KRECs and pre-B lymphocyte gene 1 transcripts peaked at 6 months of therapy and then decreased at PML diagnosis. Flow cytometry confirmed the deficient number of newly produced T lymphocytes, counterbalanced by an increase in TEMRA cells. The percentage of naive B cells increased by approximately 70% after 6 months of therapy, but B lymphocyte number remained low for the entire treatment period. T-cell heterogeneity and immunoglobulins were reduced. Although performed in a single patient, all results showed that an immune deficit, together with an increase in newly produced B cells a few months after therapy initiation, may predispose the patient to PML. These findings indicate the TREC/KREC assay is a potential tool to identify patients at risk of developing PML and may provide insights into the immunological involvement of monoclonal antibody-associated therapies. PMID:22496817

  5. Using Pre-existing Microarray Datasets to Increase Experimental Power: Application to Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Bernie J.; Deng, Alicia; McLaughlin, Tracey; Cushman, Samuel W.; Cam, Margaret C.; Reaven, Gerald; Tsao, Philip S.; Altman, Russ B.

    2010-01-01

    Although they have become a widely used experimental technique for identifying differentially expressed (DE) genes, DNA microarrays are notorious for generating noisy data. A common strategy for mitigating the effects of noise is to perform many experimental replicates. This approach is often costly and sometimes impossible given limited resources; thus, analytical methods are needed which increase accuracy at no additional cost. One inexpensive source of microarray replicates comes from prior work: to date, data from hundreds of thousands of microarray experiments are in the public domain. Although these data assay a wide range of conditions, they cannot be used directly to inform any particular experiment and are thus ignored by most DE gene methods. We present the SVD Augmented Gene expression Analysis Tool (SAGAT), a mathematically principled, data-driven approach for identifying DE genes. SAGAT increases the power of a microarray experiment by using observed coexpression relationships from publicly available microarray datasets to reduce uncertainty in individual genes' expression measurements. We tested the method on three well-replicated human microarray datasets and demonstrate that use of SAGAT increased effective sample sizes by as many as 2.72 arrays. We applied SAGAT to unpublished data from a microarray study investigating transcriptional responses to insulin resistance, resulting in a 50% increase in the number of significant genes detected. We evaluated 11 (58%) of these genes experimentally using qPCR, confirming the directions of expression change for all 11 and statistical significance for three. Use of SAGAT revealed coherent biological changes in three pathways: inflammation, differentiation, and fatty acid synthesis, furthering our molecular understanding of a type 2 diabetes risk factor. We envision SAGAT as a means to maximize the potential for biological discovery from subtle transcriptional responses, and we provide it as a freely available software package that is immediately applicable to any human microarray study. PMID:20361040

  6. Traffic AccidentsChronic Medical Conditions as a Cause

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Julian A.

    1966-01-01

    From comparatively scanty information, an increased traffic accident risk appears to be associated with several chronic medical conditions including alcoholism, cardiovascular disease, epilepsy, diabetes and mental illness. Further study probably will show that medical handicaps other than alcoholism are a factor in from 5 to 10 per cent of traffic accidents. However, in about half of the accidents caused by heart attacks, the individual has no previous knowledge of his illness, and prevention of the accident would not be possible. A selective program for identifying high risk drivers with medical conditions is feasible and warranted, but a program of mass medical examinations for all drivers is not. A very strong relationship has been shown between drunk driving and traffic accidents, and 50 to 75 per cent of all severe and fatal traffic accidents involve the use of alcohol. However, studies have shown that drivers with alcoholism rather than social drinkers represent the preponderance, but not the entirety, of those who get into trouble. A major reduction in the traffic accident toll may thus depend on the early identification and treatment of alcoholism. PMID:18730024

  7. Investigation on the Automatic Geo-Referencing of Archaeological UAV Photographs by Correlation with Pre-Existing Ortho-Photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karel, W.; Doneus, M.; Briese, C.; Verhoeven, G.; Pfeifer, N.

    2014-06-01

    We present a method for the automatic geo-referencing of archaeological photographs captured aboard unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), termed UPs. We do so by help of pre-existing ortho-photo maps (OPMs) and digital surface models (DSMs). Typically, these pre-existing data sets are based on data that were captured at a widely different point in time. This renders the detection (and hence the matching) of homologous feature points in the UPs and OPMs infeasible mainly due to temporal variations of vegetation and illumination. Facing this difficulty, we opt for the normalized cross correlation coefficient of perspectively transformed image patches as the measure of image similarity. Applying a threshold to this measure, we detect candidates for homologous image points, resulting in a distinctive, but computationally intensive method. In order to lower computation times, we reduce the dimensionality and extents of the search space by making use of a priori knowledge of the data sets. By assigning terrain heights interpolated in the DSM to the image points found in the OPM, we generate control points. We introduce respective observations into a bundle block, from which gross errors i.e. false matches are eliminated during its robust adjustment. A test of our approach on a UAV image data set demonstrates its potential and raises hope to successfully process large image archives.

  8. Report on a patient with pre-existing venous thrombosis and incidental malignancy undergoing urgent laparotomy: preoperative concerns.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sanjay; Garg, Rakesh

    2009-01-01

    The management of a patient with pre-existing deep venous thrombosis (DVT) who was subsequently found to have a malignancy planned for urgent laparotomy is reported.A 30-year-old woman presented to the emergency room and was diagnosed to have a DVT. During work-up, she was found to have a malignanacy and was scheduled for urgent laparotomy. The patient was put on enoxaprin (injection) and warfarin (tablets). The patient was started on heparin (injection) 1000 IU/h at 72 h prior to operation, stopped 6 h prior to surgery. Anaesthesia and surgery were uneventful.A number of issues related to pre-existing DVTs prior to gynaecological surgery require further clarification; the optimal duration of pharmacological treatment, and the optimal duration/modality of prophylaxis to prevent thromboembolism in high-risk patients with cancer.Patients presenting for DVT must be evaluated for its causative factor(s), and malignancy in particular, based on clinical findings and investigations. Before planning surgical procedures, adequate anticoagulation must be achieved to prevent further complications of DVT, thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism in particular. PMID:21686495

  9. Impact of Pre-Existing Immunity on Gene Transfer to Nonhuman Primate Liver with Adeno-Associated Virus 8 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Calcedo, Roberto; Bell, Peter; Lin, Jianping; Grant, Rebecca L; Siegel, Don L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vectors based on the primate-derived adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) are being evaluated in preclinical and clinical models. Natural infections with related AAVs activate memory B cells that produce antibodies capable of modulating the efficacy and safety of the vector. We have evaluated the biology of AAV8 gene transfer in macaque liver, with a focus on assessing the impact of pre-existing humoral immunity. Twenty-one macaques with various levels of AAV neutralizing antibody (NAb) were injected intravenously with AAV8 vector expressing green fluorescent protein. Pre-existing antibody titers in excess of 1:10 substantially diminished hepatocyte transduction that, in the absence of NAbs, was highly efficient. Vector-specific NAb diminished liver deposition of genomes and unexpectedly increased genome distribution to the spleen. The majority of animals showed high-level and stable sequestration of vector capsid protein by follicular dendritic cells of splenic germinal centers. These studies illustrate how natural immunity to a virus that is related to a vector can impact the efficacy and potential safety of in vivo gene therapy. We propose to use the in vitro transduction inhibition assay to evaluate research subjects before gene therapy and to preclude from systemic AAV8 trials those that have titers in excess of 1:10. PMID:21476868

  10. An in vivo neovascularization assay for screening regulators of angiogenesis and assessing their effects on pre-existing vessels.

    PubMed

    Kilarski, Witold W; Petersson, Ludvig; Fuchs, Peder Fredlund; Zielinski, Marcin S; Gerwins, Pr

    2012-12-01

    Therapeutic regulation of tissue vascularization has appeared as an attractive approach to treat a number of human diseases. In vivo neovascularization assays that reflect physiological and pathological formation of neovessels are important in this effort. In this report we present an assay where the effects of activators and inhibitors of angiogenesis can be quantitatively and qualitatively measured. A provisional matrix composed of collagen I and fibrin was formed in a plastic cylinder and implanted onto the chick chorioallantoic membrane. A nylon mesh separated the implanted matrix from the underlying tissue to distinguish new from pre-existing vessels. Vascularization of the matrix in response to fibroblast growth factor-2 or platelet-derived growth factor-BB was scored in a double-blinded manner, or vessel density was measured using a semi-automated image analysis procedure. Thalidomide, fumagillin, U0126 and TGF? inhibited neovessel growth while hydrocortisone exerted a negative and wortmannin a toxic effect on the pre-existing vasculature. This quantitative, inexpensive and rapid in vivo angiogenesis assay might be a valuable tool in screening and characterizing factors that influence wound or tumor induced vascularization and in assessing their effects on the normal vasculature. PMID:22918697

  11. Liver gene therapy by lentiviral vectors reverses anti-factor IX pre-existing immunity in haemophilic mice.

    PubMed

    Annoni, Andrea; Cantore, Alessio; Della Valle, Patrizia; Goudy, Kevin; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Russo, Fabio; Bartolaccini, Sara; D'Angelo, Armando; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Naldini, Luigi

    2013-11-01

    A major complication of factor replacement therapy for haemophilia is the development of anti-factor neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors). Here we show that liver gene therapy by lentiviral vectors (LVs) expressing factor IX (FIX) strongly reduces pre-existing anti-FIX antibodies and eradicates FIX inhibitors in haemophilia B mice. Concomitantly, plasma FIX levels and clotting activity rose to 50-100% of normal. The treatment was effective in 75% of treated mice. FIX-specific plasma cells (PCs) and memory B cells were reduced, likely because of memory B-cell depletion in response to constant exposure to high doses of FIX. Regulatory T cells displaying FIX-specific suppressive capacity were induced in gene therapy treated mice and controlled FIX-specific T helper cells. Gene therapy proved safer than a regimen mimicking immune tolerance induction (ITI) by repeated high-dose FIX protein administration, which induced severe anaphylactoid reactions in inhibitors-positive haemophilia B mice. Liver gene therapy can thus reverse pre-existing immunity, induce active tolerance to FIX and establish sustained FIX activity at therapeutic levels. These data position gene therapy as an attractive treatment option for inhibitors-positive haemophilic patients. PMID:24106222

  12. Sleep Problems in Children and Adolescents with Common Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Amy S.; Ward, Teresa M.; Palermo, Tonya M.

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis Sleep is critically important to childrens health and well-being. Untreated sleep disturbances and sleep disorders pose significant adverse daytime consequences and place children at considerable risk for poor health outcomes. Sleep disturbances occur at a greater frequency in children with acute and chronic medical conditions compared to otherwise healthy peers. Sleep disturbances in medically ill children can be associated with sleep disorders (e.g., sleep disordered breathing, restless leg syndrome), co-morbid with acute and chronic conditions (e.g., asthma, arthritis, cancer), or secondary to underlying disease-related mechanisms (e.g. airway restriction, inflammation) treatment regimens, or hospitalization. Clinical management should include a multidisciplinary approach with particular emphasis on routine, regular sleep assessments and prevention of daytime consequences and promotion of healthy sleep habits and health outcomes. PMID:21600350

  13. The Prescribed Pediatric Center: A Medical Day Treatment Program for Children with Complex Medical Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppert, Elizabeth S.; Karst, Thomas O.; Brogan, Mark G.

    1998-01-01

    The Prescribed Pediatric Center (Toledo, Ohio) is a community-based, multidisciplinary program for infants and children with chronic, complex medical conditions. This article describes program beginnings; the planning process; and the program's growth, development, and components. Initial program evaluation indicates positive effects on some…

  14. Rates of Pneumococcal Disease in Adults With Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Kimberly M.; Edelsberg, John; Weycker, Derek; Farkouh, Raymond A.; Strutton, David R.; Pelton, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Background. ?Although it is widely accepted that adults with immunocompromising conditions are at greatly increased risk of pneumococcal infection, the extent of risk among immunocompetent adults with chronic medical conditions is less certain, particularly in the current era of universal vaccination of children with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Methods. ?We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from 3 healthcare claims repositories (20062010) to compare rates of pneumococcal disease in immunocompetent adults with chronic medical conditions (at-risk) and immunocompromised adults (high-risk), with rates in adults without these conditions (healthy). Risk profiles and episodes of pneumococcal diseaseall-cause pneumonia, pneumococcal pneumonia, and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD)were ascertained from diagnosis, procedure, and drug codes. Results. ?Rates of all-cause pneumonia among at-risk persons aged 1849 years, 5064 years, and ?65 years were 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.13.2), 3.1 (95% CI, 3.13.1), and 3.0 (95% CI, 3.03.0) times the rates in age-matched healthy counterparts, respectively. We identified rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Crohn's disease, and neuromuscular or seizure disorders as additional at-risk conditions for pneumococcal disease. Among persons with at-risk conditions, the rate of all-cause pneumonia substantially increased with the accumulation of concurrent at-risk conditions (risk stacking): among persons 1849 years, rate ratios increased from 2.5 (95% CI, 2.52.5) in those with 1 at-risk condition to 6.2 (95% CI, 6.16.3) in those with 2 conditions, and to 15.6 (95% CI, 15.316.0) in those with ?3 conditions. Findings for pneumococcal pneumonia and IPD were similar. Conclusions. ?Despite widespread use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, rates of pneumonia and IPD remain disproportionately high in adults with at-risk conditions, including those with conditions not currently included in the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices guidelines for prevention and those with multiple at-risk conditions. PMID:25734097

  15. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical record services... Hospital Functions § 482.24 Condition of participation: Medical record services. The hospital must have a medical record service that has administrative responsibility for medical records. A medical record...

  16. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical record services... Hospital Functions § 482.24 Condition of participation: Medical record services. The hospital must have a medical record service that has administrative responsibility for medical records. A medical record...

  17. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical record services... Hospital Functions § 482.24 Condition of participation: Medical record services. The hospital must have a medical record service that has administrative responsibility for medical records. A medical record...

  18. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical record services... Hospital Functions § 482.24 Condition of participation: Medical record services. The hospital must have a medical record service that has administrative responsibility for medical records. A medical record...

  19. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical record services... Hospital Functions § 482.24 Condition of participation: Medical record services. The hospital must have a medical record service that has administrative responsibility for medical records. A medical record...

  20. Pre-existing Pulmonary Diseases and Survival in Patients With Stage-dependent Lung Adenocarcinoma: A STROBE-compliant Article.

    PubMed

    Jian, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Jing-Yang; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Jhang, Kai-Ming; Ku, Wen-Yuan; Ho, Chien-Chang; Lung, Chia-Chi; Pan, Hui-Hsien; Liang, Yu-Chiu; Wu, Ming-Fang; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2016-03-01

    Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are common lung diseases associated with lung cancer mortality. This study evaluated sex disparities in pre-existing pulmonary diseases and stage-dependent lung adenocarcinoma survival.Patients newly diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma between 2003 and 2008 were identified using the National Health Insurance Research Database and Cancer Registry. Cases with lung adenocarcinoma were followed until the end of 2010. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional-hazard regression was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of pre-existing asthma, COPD, and/or TB, and to estimate all-cause mortality risk in patients with different stages of lung adenocarcinoma.A total of 14,518 cases were identified with lung adenocarcinoma. Specifically, among men, the HRs for TB were 1.69 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-2.58), 1.48 (95% CI, 1.14-1.93), and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08-1.49) for individuals with stage I + II, III, and IV diseases, respectively. The HRs for asthma were 1.41 (95% CI, 1.00-1.99) in women with stage I + II and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04-1.26) in men with stage IV disease. For pulmonary disease combinations in men, the HRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.12-1.89) for asthma + COPD + TB, 1.35 (95% CI, 1.12-1.63) for COPD + TB, 1.28 (95% CI, 1.01-1.63) for TB, and 1.15 (95%CI, 1.04-1.27) for asthma + COPD, respectively. For women with stage I + II disease, the HR was 6.94 (95% CI, 2.72-17.71) for asthma + COPD + TB.Coexistence of pre-existing pulmonary diseases increased mortality risk in men with adenocarcinoma. TB is at elevated risk of mortality among men with different stages of adenocarcinoma. Asthmatic women with early-stage adenocarcinoma had increased risk of mortality. PMID:26962806

  1. Aggravation of Pre-Existing Atrioventricular Block, Wenckebach Type, Provoked by Application of X-Ray Contrast Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Brodmann, Marianne Seinost, Gerald; Stark, Gerhard; Pilger, Ernst

    2006-12-15

    Background. Significant bradycardia followed by cardiac arrest related to single bolus administration of X-ray contrast medium into a peripheral artery has not, to our knowledge, been described in the literature. Methods and Results. While performing a percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of the left superficial femoral artery in a 68-year old patient with a pre-existing atrioventricular (AV) block, Wenckebach type, he developed an AV block III after a single bolus injection of intra-arterial X-ray contrast medium. Conclusion. We believe that application of contrast medium causes a transitory ischemia in the obstructed vessel and therefore elevation of endogenous adenosine. In the case of a previously damaged AV node this elevation of endogenous adenosine may be responsible for the development of a short period of third-degree AV block.

  2. The Challenges and Future Considerations Regarding Pregnancy-related Outcomes in Women with Pre-Existing Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harsimran; Murphy, Helen R.; Hendrieckx, Christel; Ritterband, Lee; Speight, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Ineffective management of blood glucose levels during preconception and pregnancy hasbeen associated with severe maternal and fetal complications in women with pre-existing diabetes. Studies have demonstrated that preconception counseling and pre-pregnancy care can dramatically reduce these risks. However, pregnancy-related outcomes in women with diabetes continue to be less than ideal. This review highlights and discusses a variety of patient, provider, and organizational factors that can contribute to these suboptimal outcomes. Based on the findings of studies reviewed and authors' clinical and research experiences, recommendations have been proposed focusing on various aspects of care provided, including improved accessibility to effective preconception and pregnancy-related care and better organized clinic consultations that are sensitive to women's diabetes and pregnancy needs. PMID:24013963

  3. The Association between Pre-existing Diabetes Mellitus and Pressure Ulcers in Patients Following Surgery: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Zhou-Qing; Zhai, Xiao-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty exists about the role of diabetes in the development of surgery-related pressure ulcers. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to explore the association between pre-existing diabetes mellitus and pressure ulcers among patients after surgery. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random effects models. Thirteen eligible studies of 2367 patients in total and 12053 controls were included in the final analysis. Compared with patients without diabetes, the pooled odds ratio (OR) of the incidence of pressure ulcers in diabetic patients was 1.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.40–2.15, I2 = 51.1%]. Estimates by type of surgery suggested similar results in cardiac surgery [OR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.42–2.82, I2 = 0%], in general surgery [OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.42–2.15, I2 = 0%], and in major lower limb amputations [OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.01–2.68, I2 = 0%] for diabetic patients versus non-diabetic controls. We did not find an increased incidence of pressure ulcers in diabetic patients undergoing hip surgery compared with non-diabetic controls [OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 0.62–3.47, I2 = 93.1%]. The excess risk of pressure ulcers associated with pre-existing diabetes was significantly higher in patients undergoing surgery, specifically in patients receiving cardiac surgery. Further studies should be conducted to examine these associations in other types of surgery. PMID:26260124

  4. Pre-existing immunity against swine-origin H1N1 influenza viruses in the general human population.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Jason A; Kotturi, Maya F; Kim, Yohan; Oseroff, Carla; Vaughan, Kerrie; Salimi, Nima; Vita, Randi; Ponomarenko, Julia; Scheuermann, Richard H; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2009-12-01

    A major concern about the ongoing swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus (S-OIV) outbreak is that the virus may be so different from seasonal H1N1 that little immune protection exists in the human population. In this study, we examined the molecular basis for pre-existing immunity against S-OIV, namely the recognition of viral immune epitopes by T cells or B cells/antibodies that have been previously primed by circulating influenza strains. Using data from the Immune Epitope Database, we found that only 31% (8/26) of B-cell epitopes present in recently circulating H1N1 strains are conserved in the S-OIV, with only 17% (1/6) conserved in the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) surface proteins. In contrast, 69% (54/78) of the epitopes recognized by CD8(+) T cells are completely invariant. We further demonstrate experimentally that some memory T-cell immunity against S-OIV is present in the adult population and that such memory is of similar magnitude as the pre-existing memory against seasonal H1N1 influenza. Because protection from infection is antibody mediated, a new vaccine based on the specific S-OIV HA and NA proteins is likely to be required to prevent infection. However, T cells are known to blunt disease severity. Therefore, the conservation of a large fraction of T-cell epitopes suggests that the severity of an S-OIV infection, as far as it is determined by susceptibility of the virus to immune attack, would not differ much from that of seasonal flu. These results are consistent with reports about disease incidence, severity, and mortality rates associated with human S-OIV. PMID:19918065

  5. Evaluation of accelerated stability test conditions for medicated chewing gums.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Lauretta; Conte, Ubaldo; Nhamias, Alain; Grenier, Pascal; Vergnault, Guy

    2013-10-01

    The overall stability of medicated chewing gums is investigated under different storage conditions. Active substances with different chemical stabilities in solid state are chosen as model drugs. The dosage form is a three layer tablet obtained by direct compression. The gum core contains the active ingredient while the external layers are formulated to prevent gum adhesion to the punches of the tableting machine. Two accelerated test conditions (40°C/75% RH and 30°C/65% RH) are performed for 6 months. Furthermore, a long-term stability test at room conditions is conducted to verify the predictability of the results obtained from the stress tests. Some drugs are stable in all the conditions tested, but other drugs, generally considered stable in solid dosage forms, have shown relevant stability problems particularly when stress test conditions are applied to this particular semi-solid dosage forms. For less stable drugs, the stress conditions of 40°C/75% RH are not always predictable of chewing gum stability at room temperature and may produce false negative; intermediate conditions, 30°C/65% RH, are more predictive for this purpose, the results of drug content found after 6 months at intermediate stress conditions and 12 months at room conditions are generally comparable. But the results obtained show that only long-term conditions stability tests gave consistent results. During aging, the semi solid nature of the gum base itself, may also influence the drug delivery rate during chewing and great attention should be given also to the dissolution stability. PMID:22794248

  6. 43 CFR 404.53 - Does this rule provide authority for the transfer of pre-existing facilities from Federal to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404.53 Does...-existing facilities or pre-existing components of any water system from Federal to private ownership,...

  7. The effects of aerobic- versus strength-training on body image among young women with pre-existing body image concerns.

    PubMed

    Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Strong, Heather A; Arent, Shawn M; Bray, Steven R; Bassett-Gunter, Rebecca L

    2014-06-01

    This experiment compared the effects of aerobic-training (AT) versus strength-training (ST) on body image among young women with pre-existing body image concerns. Theory-based correlates of body image change were also examined. Participants were 46 women (M age=21.5 years), randomly assigned to an 8-week AT or ST intervention consisting of supervised exercise 3 days/week. Multidimensional measures of body image were administered pre- and post-intervention, along with measures of physical fitness, perceived fitness, and exercise self-efficacy. Women in the AT condition reported greater reductions in social physique anxiety (p=.001) and tended to report greater improvements in appearance evaluation (p=.06) than women in the ST condition. Changes in perceived fatness, perceived aerobic endurance and aerobic self-efficacy were significantly correlated with body image change (ps<.003). Results provide direction for prescribing exercise to improve body image and advancing theory to account for the effects of exercise. PMID:24958656

  8. 42 CFR 416.45 - Condition for coverage-Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition for coverage-Medical staff. 416.45....45 Condition for coverageMedical staff. The medical staff of the ASC must be accountable to the governing body. (a) Standard: Membership and clinical privileges. Members of the medical staff must...

  9. 42 CFR 416.45 - Condition for coverage-Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition for coverage-Medical staff. 416.45....45 Condition for coverageMedical staff. The medical staff of the ASC must be accountable to the governing body. (a) Standard: Membership and clinical privileges. Members of the medical staff must...

  10. Pre-existing AAV capsid-specific CD8+ T cells are unable to eliminate AAV-transduced hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Murphy, Samuel L; Giles-Davis, Wynetta; Edmonson, Shyrie; Xiang, Zhiquan; Li, Yan; Lasaro, Marcio O; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund Cj

    2007-04-01

    The goal of these studies was to test whether adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid-specific CD8(+) T cells cause loss of hepatic AAV-mediated gene expression in experimental animals. Mice immunized with adenoviral vectors expressing AAV capsid or with AAV vectors developed CD8(+) T cells in blood, lymphatic tissues, and liver to epitopes shared between AAV2 and AAV8, and serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies. At the height of the T cells' effector phase, mice were infused with a heterologous AAV vector expressing human factor IX under a hepatocyte-specific promoter. Despite the presence of lytic CD8(+) T cells in the liver, hepatic Factor IX expression was sustained and comparable in AAV-preimmune and nave animals. These results suggest that, in mice, pre-existing CD8(+) T cells to AAV capsid do not affect the longevity of AAV-mediated hepatic gene transfer. These results are in contrast to the outcome of a recent gene therapy trial of hemophilia B patients who were treated by hepatic gene transfer of AAV2 vectors expressing Factor IX. The loss of Factor IX expression, accompanied by a rise in liver enzymes and detectable frequencies of circulating AAV capsid-specific T cells, suggested T-cell-mediated destruction of transduced hepatocytes following reactivation of AAV-specific T cells upon AAV transfer. PMID:17245353

  11. Combinatorial RNA Interference Therapy Prevents Selection of Pre-existing HBV Variants in Human Liver Chimeric Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yao-Ming; Sun, Cheng-Pu; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Wu, Tzu-Hui; Chen, Chun-Chi; Wu, Ping-Yi; Enya Chen, Yu-Chen; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter; Tao, Mi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Selection of escape mutants with mutations within the target sequence could abolish the antiviral RNA interference activity. Here, we investigated the impact of a pre-existing shRNA-resistant HBV variant on the efficacy of shRNA therapy. We previously identified a highly potent shRNA, S1, which, when delivered by an adeno-associated viral vector, effectively inhibits HBV replication in HBV transgenic mice. We applied the “PICKY” software to systemically screen the HBV genome, then used hydrodynamic transfection and HBV transgenic mice to identify additional six highly potent shRNAs. Human liver chimeric mice were infected with a mixture of wild-type and T472C HBV, a S1-resistant HBV variant, and then treated with a single or combined shRNAs. The presence of T472C mutant compromised the therapeutic efficacy of S1 and resulted in replacement of serum wild-type HBV by T472C HBV. In contrast, combinatorial therapy using S1 and P28, one of six potent shRNAs, markedly reduced titers for both wild-type and T472C HBV. Interestingly, treatment with P28 alone led to the emergence of escape mutants with mutations in the P28 target region. Our results demonstrate that combinatorial RNAi therapy can minimize the escape of resistant viral mutants in chronic HBV patients. PMID:26482836

  12. Region-Specific Integration of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neuronal Precursors into a Pre-Existing Neuronal Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Neuser, Franziska; Polack, Martin; Annaheim, Christine; Tucker, Kerry L.; Korte, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Enduring reorganization is accepted as a fundamental process of adult neural plasticity. The most dramatic example of this reorganization is the birth and continuously occurring incorporation of new neurons into the pre-existing network of the adult mammalian hippocampus. Based on this phenomenon we transplanted murine embryonic stem (ES)-cell derived neuronal precursors (ESNPs) into murine organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHC) and examined their integration. Using a precise quantitative morphological analysis combined with a detailed electrophysiology, we show a region-specific morphological integration of transplanted ESNPs into different subfields of the hippocampal tissue, resulting in pyramidal neuron-like embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs) in the Cornu Ammonis (CA1 and CA3) and granule neuron-like ESNs in the dentate gyrus (DG), respectively. Subregion specific structural maturation was accompanied by the development of dendritic spines and the generation of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). This cell type specific development does not depend upon NMDA-receptor-dependent synaptic transmission. The presented integration approach was further used to determine the cell-autonomous function of the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75 (P75NTR), as a possible negative regulator of ESN integration. By this means we used p75NTR-deficient ESNPs to study their integration into a WT organotypic environment. We show here that p75NTR is not necessary for integration per se but plays a suppressing role in dendritic development. PMID:23840491

  13. The Role of Pre-Existing Disturbances in the Effect of Marine Reserves on Coastal Ecosystems: A Modelling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Savina, Marie; Condie, Scott A.; Fulton, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    We have used an end-to-end ecosystem model to explore responses over 30 years to coastal no-take reserves covering up to 6% of the fifty thousand square kilometres of continental shelf and slope off the coast of New South Wales (Australia). The model is based on the Atlantis framework, which includes a deterministic, spatially resolved three-dimensional biophysical model that tracks nutrient flows through key biological groups, as well as extraction by a range of fisheries. The model results support previous empirical studies in finding clear benefits of reserves to top predators such as sharks and rays throughout the region, while also showing how many of their major prey groups (including commercial species) experienced significant declines. It was found that the net impact of marine reserves was dependent on the pre-existing levels of disturbance (i.e. fishing pressure), and to a lesser extent on the size of the marine reserves. The high fishing scenario resulted in a strongly perturbed system, where the introduction of marine reserves had clear and mostly direct effects on biomass and functional biodiversity. However, under the lower fishing pressure scenario, the introduction of marine reserves caused both direct positive effects, mainly on shark groups, and indirect negative effects through trophic cascades. Our study illustrates the need to carefully align the design and implementation of marine reserves with policy and management objectives. Trade-offs may exist not only between fisheries and conservation objectives, but also among conservation objectives. PMID:23593432

  14. A critical shock mach number for particle acceleration in the absence of pre-existing cosmic rays: M=?5

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco

    2014-01-10

    It is shown that, under some generic assumptions, shocks cannot accelerate particles unless the overall shock Mach number exceeds a critical value M>?5. The reason is that for M??5 the work done to compress the flow in a particle precursor requires more enthalpy flux than the system can sustain. This lower limit applies to situations without significant magnetic field pressure. In case that the magnetic field pressure dominates the pressure in the unshocked medium, i.e., for low plasma beta, the resistivity of the magnetic field makes it even more difficult to fulfill the energetic requirements for the formation of shock with an accelerated particle precursor and associated compression of the upstream plasma. We illustrate the effects of magnetic fields for the extreme situation of a purely perpendicular magnetic field configuration with plasma beta ? = 0, which gives a minimum Mach number of M = 5/2. The situation becomes more complex, if we incorporate the effects of pre-existing cosmic rays, indicating that the additional degree of freedom allows for less strict Mach number limits on acceleration. We discuss the implications of this result for low Mach number shock acceleration as found in solar system shocks, and shocks in clusters of galaxies.

  15. Influence of pre-existing topography on downflow lava discharge rates estimated from thermal infrared airborne data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, V.

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing thermal data of active lava flows allow the evaluation of effusion rates. This is made possible by a simple formula relating the lava effusion rate to the heat flux radiated per unit time from the surface of the flow. Due to the assumptions of the model, this formula implies that heat flux, surface temperature and lava temperature vary as a function of the flow thickness. These relationships, never verified or validated before, have been used by several authors as a proof of the weakness of the model. Here, multispectral infrared and visible imaging spectrometer (MIVIS) high spatial resolution (5-10 m) thermal data acquired during Etna's 2001 eruption were used to investigate downflow heat flux variations in the lava flow emitted from a vent located at 2100 m a.s.l. A high correlation between the downflow heat flux and the lava flow thickness (measured from a pre-existing digital elevation model) was found. Topography beneath the flow appears to play an important role both in lava emplacement mechanisms and flow dynamics. MIVIS-derived downflow effusion rates are consistent with the law of conservation of mass assessing the reliability of remote sensing techniques.

  16. Characteristics of Memory B Cells Elicited by a Highly Efficacious HPV Vaccine in Subjects with No Pre-existing Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Erin M.; Smith, Robin A.; Simonich, Cassandra A.; Niyonzima, Nixon; Carter, Joseph J.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2014-01-01

    Licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines provide near complete protection against the types of HPV that most commonly cause anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers (HPV 16 and 18) when administered to individuals naive to these types. These vaccines, like most other prophylactic vaccines, appear to protect by generating antibodies. However, almost nothing is known about the immunological memory that forms following HPV vaccination, which is required for long-term immunity. Here, we have identified and isolated HPV 16-specific memory B cells from female adolescents and young women who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in the absence of pre-existing immunity, using fluorescently conjugated HPV 16 pseudoviruses to label antigen receptors on the surface of memory B cells. Antibodies cloned and expressed from these singly sorted HPV 16-pseudovirus labeled memory B cells were predominantly IgG (>IgA>IgM), utilized diverse variable genes, and potently neutralized HPV 16 pseudoviruses in vitro despite possessing only average levels of somatic mutation. These findings suggest that the quadrivalent HPV vaccine provides an excellent model for studying the development of B cell memory; and, in the context of what is known about memory B cells elicited by influenza vaccination/infection, HIV-1 infection, or tetanus toxoid vaccination, indicates that extensive somatic hypermutation is not required to achieve potent vaccine-specific neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:25330199

  17. Medical Signal-Conditioning and Data-Interface System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Jeffrey; Jacobus, charles; Booth, Scott; Suarez, Michael; Smith, Derek; Hartnagle, Jeffrey; LePrell, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    A general-purpose portable, wearable electronic signal-conditioning and data-interface system is being developed for medical applications. The system can acquire multiple physiological signals (e.g., electrocardiographic, electroencephalographic, and electromyographic signals) from sensors on the wearer s body, digitize those signals that are received in analog form, preprocess the resulting data, and transmit the data to one or more remote location(s) via a radiocommunication link and/or the Internet. The system includes a computer running data-object-oriented software that can be programmed to configure the system to accept almost any analog or digital input signals from medical devices. The computing hardware and software implement a general-purpose data-routing-and-encapsulation architecture that supports tagging of input data and routing the data in a standardized way through the Internet and other modern packet-switching networks to one or more computer(s) for review by physicians. The architecture supports multiple-site buffering of data for redundancy and reliability, and supports both real-time and slower-than-real-time collection, routing, and viewing of signal data. Routing and viewing stations support insertion of automated analysis routines to aid in encoding, analysis, viewing, and diagnosis.

  18. Dioxins from medical waste incineration: Normal operation and transient conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong; Zhan, Ming-xiu; Yan, Mi; Fu, Jian-ying; Lu, Sheng-yong; Li, Xiao-dong; Yan, Jian-hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2015-07-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are key pollutants in waste incineration. At present, incinerator managers and official supervisors focus only on emissions evolving during steady-state operation. Yet, these emissions may considerably be raised during periods of poor combustion, plant shutdown, and especially when starting-up from cold. Until now there were no data on transient emissions from medical (or hospital) waste incineration (MWI). However, MWI is reputed to engender higher emissions than those from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI). The emission levels in this study recorded for shutdown and start-up, however, were significantly higher: 483 184 ng Nm(-3) (1.47 0.17 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)) for shutdown and 735 ng Nm(-3) (7.73 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)) for start-up conditions, respectively. Thus, the average (I-TEQ) concentration during shutdown is 2.6 (3.8) times higher than the average concentration during normal operation, and the average (I-TEQ) concentration during start-up is 4.0 (almost 20) times higher. So monitoring should cover the entire incineration cycle, including start-up, operation and shutdown, rather than optimised operation only. This suggestion is important for medical waste incinerators, as these facilities frequently start up and shut down, because of their small size, or of lacking waste supply. Forthcoming operation should shift towards much longer operating cycles, i.e., a single weekly start-up and shutdown. PMID:26159561

  19. Medical Conditions Associated with Out-of-Hospital Endotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henry E.; Balasubramani, G. K.; Cook, Lawrence J.; Yealy, Donald M.; Lave, Judith R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE While prior studies describe the clinical presentation of patients requiring paramedic out-of-hospital endotracheal intubation (ETI), limited data characterize the underlying medical conditions or comorbidities. We sought to characterize the medical conditions and comorbidities of patients receiving successful paramedic out-of-hospital ETI. METHODS We used Pennsylvania statewide EMS clinical data, including all successful ETIs performed during 2003–2005. Using multiple imputation triple-match algorithms, we probabilistically linked EMS ETI to statewide death and hospital admission data. Each hospitalization record contained one primary and up to eight secondary diagnoses, classified according to the International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modification, ninth edition (ICD-9-CM). We determined the proportion of patients in each major ICD-9-CM diagnostic group and subgroup. We calculated the Charlson Comorbidity Index for each patient. Using binomial proportions with confidence intervals, we analyzed the data and combined imputed results using Rubin's method. RESULTS Across the imputed sets, we linked 25,733 (77.7% linkage) successful ETI to death or hospital records; 56.3% died before and 43.7% survived to hospital admission. Of the 14,479 deaths before hospital admission, most (92.7%, 95% CI: 92.5–93.3%) presented to EMS in cardiac arrest. Of the 11,255 hospitalized patents, the leading primary diagnoses were circulatory diseases (32.0%, 30.2–33.7%), respiratory diseases (22.8%, 21.9–23.7%), and injury or poisoning (25.2%; 22.7–27.8%). Prominent primary diagnosis subgroups included: asphyxia and respiratory failure (15.2%), traumatic brain injury and skull fractures (11.3%), acute myocardial infarction and ischemic heart disease (10.9%), poisoning, drug and alcohol disorders (6.7%), dysrhythmias (6.7%), hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic stroke (5.9%), acute heart failure and cardiomyopathies (5.6%), pneumonia and aspiration (4.9%), and sepsis, septicemia and septic shock (3.2%). Most of the admitted ETI patients had a secondary circulatory (70.8%), respiratory (61.4%), or endocrine, nutritional or metabolic secondary diagnosis (51.4%). The mean Charlson Index score was 1.6 (95% CI: 1.5–1.7). CONCLUSIONS The majority of successful paramedic ETI occur on patients with cardiac arrest, circulatory and respiratory conditions. Injury, poisoning and other conditions compromise smaller but important portions. ETI patients have multiple comorbidities. These findings may guide the systemic planning of paramedic airway management care and education. PMID:21612386

  20. Secondary organic aerosol formation from alpha-pinene and toluene: Laboratory studies examining the role of pre-existing particles, relative humidity and oxidant type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Tianqu

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is a major fraction of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), thus impacting air quality and climate. In the first section of this thesis, experiments were performed to investigate SOA formation from both ozonolysis and hydroxyl radical (OH)-initiated oxidation (so-called photooxidation) of alpha-pinene under conditions with varying relative humidity (RH) and seed aerosol acidity at the UNC dual outdoor smog chamber facility. Formation of dimer esters was observed only in SOA derived from alpha-pinene ozonolysis with increased concentrations at high RH, indicating these compounds could serve as tracers for SOA enhanced by anthropogenic pollution. In the second section of this thesis, toluene photooxidation experiments in presence of nitric oxide were conducted to examine the effect of the pre-existing titanium dioxide (TiO2) seed aerosol, as an instance of engineered metal oxide nanomaterials, considering their unique photocatalytic properties. Results indicate that TiO2 aerosol enhanced and accelerated SOA formation from toluene.

  1. The effect of pre-existing affect on the sexual responses of women with and without a history of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Rellini, Alessandra H; Elinson, Samantha; Janssen, Erick; Meston, Cindy M

    2012-04-01

    Women with a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) are at greater risk for experiencing sexual problems in their adult lives. Yet, little is known about the possible role of cognitive and affective mechanisms in the development of sexual arousal difficulties in this population. This study investigated the role of pre-existing affect (affect prior to exposure to sexual stimuli) on genital responses, subjective sexual arousal, and affect elicited during the presentation of erotic film excerpts in a community sample of 25 women with and 25 women without a history of CSA. The CSA group showed greater pre-existing negative affect and smaller genital responses to the erotic film stimuli compared to the NSA group. Findings support a moderating effect of CSA, in that pre-existing negative affect was associated with strength of genital responses in the NSA but not in the CSA group. The results did not support a mediation model of pre-existing negative affect as an explanation for smaller physiological sexual responses in the CSA group. Taken together, the findings suggest that pre-existing affect may be more relevant for women with no history of CSA and call for more research on factors implicated in impaired sexual responses in women with a history of CSA. PMID:21667233

  2. Towards ethical guidelines for dealing with unsolicited patient emails and giving teleadvice in the absence of a pre-existing patient-physician relationship systematic review and expert survey

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Background Many health information providers on the Internet and doctors with email accounts are confronted with the phenomenon of receiving unsolicited emails from patients asking for medical advice. Also, a growing number of websites offer "ask-the-doctor" services, where patients can ask questions to health professionals via email or other means of telecommunication. It is unclear whether these types of interactions constitute medical practice, and whether physicians have the ethical obligation to respond to unsolicited patient emails. Objective To improve the quality of online communication between patients and health professionals (physicians, experts) in the absence of a pre-existing patient-physician relationship or face-to-face communication, by preparing a set of guiding ethical principles applicable to this kind of interaction. Methods Systematic review of the literature, professional, and ethical codes; and consultation with experts. Results Two different types of patient-physician encounters have to be distinguished. "Traditional" clinical encounters or telemedicine applications are called "Type B" interactions here (Bona fide relationship). In comparison, online interactions lack many of the characteristics of bona fide interactions; most notably there is no pre-existing relationship and the information available to the physician is limited if, for example, a physician responds to the email of a patient who he has never seen before. I call these "Type A" consultations (Absence of pre-existing patient-physician relationship). While guidelines for Type B interactions on the Internet exist (Kane, 1998), this is not the case for Type A interactions. The following principles are suggested: Physicians responding to patients' requests on the Internet should act within the limitations of telecommunication services and keep the global nature of the Internet in mind; not every aspect of medicine requires face-to-face communication; requests for help, including unsolicited patient questions, should not be ignored, but dealt with in some appropriate manner; informed consent requires fair and honest labeling; health professionals and information providers must maintain confidentiality; health professionals should define internal procedures and perform quality control measures. Conclusions Different media are appropriate at each point on the continuum between dispensing general health information and handling patient problems that would require the practice of medicine to solve. For example, email is a sufficiently capable medium for giving out general health information, while diagnosis and treatment usually requires at least advanced telemedical technology. Patients have to be educated that it is unethical to diagnose and treat over the Internet in the absence of a pre-existing patient-physician relationship, and if the interaction is limited to a single email. More research is needed to establish more evidence regarding situations in which teleadvice is beneficial and efficient. PMID:11720920

  3. Pre-existing Schistosoma japonicum infection alters the immune response to Plasmodium berghei infection in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since helminths and malaria parasites are often co-endemic, it is important to clarify the immunoregulatory mechanism that occurs during the process of co-infection. A previous study confirmed that dendritic cells (DCs) are involved in the establishment and regulation of the T-cell-mediated immune response to malaria infection. In the current study, distinct response profiles for splenic DCs and regulatory T cell (Treg) responses were assessed to evaluate the effects of a pre-existing Schistosoma japonicum infection on malaria infection. Methods Malaria parasitaemia, survival rate, brain histopathology and clinical experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) were assessed in both Plasmodium berghei ANKA-mono-infected and S. japonicum-P. berghei ANKA-co-infected mice. Cell surface/intracellular staining and flow cytometry were used to analyse the level of splenic DC subpopulations, toll-like receptors (TLRs), DC surface molecules, Tregs (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+), IFN-?/IL-10-secreting Tregs, and IFN-?+/IL-10+-Foxp3-CD4+ T cells. IFN-?, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 levels were determined in splenocyte supernatants using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The co-infected mice had significantly higher malaria parasitaemia, compared with the mono-infected mice, on days 2, 3, 7 and 8 after P. berghei ANKA infection. Mono-infected mice had a slightly lower survival rate, while clinical ECM symptoms, and brain pathology, were significantly more severe during the period of susceptibility to ECM. On days 5 and 8 post P. berghei ANKA infection, co-infected mice had significantly lower levels of CD11c+CD11b+, CD11c+CD45R/B220+, CD11c+TLR4+, CD11c+TLR9+, CD11c+MHCII+, CD11c+CD86+, IFN-?-secreting Tregs, and IFN-?+Foxp3-CD4+ T cells in single-cell suspensions of splenocytes when compared with P. berghei ANKA-mono-infected mice. Co-infected mice also had significantly lower levels of IFN-? and higher levels of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in splenocyte supernatants compared to mono-infected mice. There were no differences in the levels of IL-10-secreting Tregs or IL-10+Foxp3-CD4+ T cells between co-infected and mono-infected mice. Conclusions A Tregs-associated Th2 response plays an important role in protecting against ECM pathology. Pre-existing S. japonicum infection suppressed TLR ligand-induced DC maturation and had an anti-inflammatory effect during malaria infection not only by virtue of its ability to induce Th2 responses, but also by directly suppressing the ability of DC to produce pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:24034228

  4. Pre-existing adversity, level of child protection involvement, and school attendance predict educational outcomes in a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Maclean, Miriam J; Taylor, Catherine L; O'Donnell, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Maltreatment largely occurs in a multiple-risk context. The few large studies adjusting for confounding factors have raised doubts about whether low educational achievement results from maltreatment or co-occurring risk factors. This study examined prevalence, risk and protective factors for low educational achievement among children involved with the child protection system compared to other children. We conducted a population-based record-linkage study of children born in Western Australia who sat national Year 3 reading achievement tests between 2008 and 2010 (N=46,838). The longitudinal study linked data from the Western Australian Department of Education, Department of Child Protection and Family Support, Department of Health, and the Disability Services Commission. Children with histories of child protection involvement (unsubstantiated maltreatment reports, substantiations or out-of-home care placement) were at three-fold increased risk of low reading scores. Adjusting for socio-demographic adversity partially attenuated the increased risk, however risk remained elevated overall and for substantiated (OR=1.68) and unsubstantiated maltreatment (OR=1.55). Risk of low reading scores in the out-of-home care group was fully attenuated after adjusting for socio-demographic adversity (OR=1.16). Attendance was significantly higher in the out-of-home care group and served a protective role. Neglect, sexual abuse, and physical abuse were associated with low reading scores. Pre-existing adversity was also significantly associated with achievement. Results support policies and practices to engage children and families in regular school attendance, and highlight a need for further strategies to prevent maltreatment and disadvantage from restricting children's opportunities for success. PMID:26626345

  5. Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) effectively boosts DNA-primed HIV-specific immune responses in humans despite pre-existing vaccinia immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Nilsson, Charlotta; Brave, Andreas; Hejdeman, Bo; Earl, Patricia; Moss, Bernard; Robb, Merlin; Cox, Josephine; Michael, Nelson; Marovich, Mary; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Sandström, Eric; Wahren, Britta

    2016-01-01

    The presence of vector-specific immune responses may hamper the induction of responses to a foreign antigen encoded by the vector. We evaluated the impact of pre-existing immunity to vaccinia virus on the induction of HIV-specific responses after immunization of healthy volunteers with a HIV-1 DNA prime-MVA boost vaccine. Following three priming immunizations with HIV-1 DNA plasmids, the volunteers were boosted with a single injection of recombinant MVA encoding HIV-1 proteins. Pre-existing immunity to vaccinia virus did not reduce the proportion of individuals who responded to HIV-1, but did lower the magnitude of responses. Our results suggest that vaccinia-based vectors can be used to efficiently induce immune responses to vectored HIV-1 antigens, even in individuals with pre-existing immunity to vaccinia virus. PMID:19450644

  6. 41 CFR 105-64.208 - What special conditions apply to release of medical records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... apply to release of medical records? 105-64.208 Section 105-64.208 Public Contracts and Property....208 What special conditions apply to release of medical records? Medical records containing... writing by you, or by your guardian or conservator. Medical records in an Official Personnel Folder...

  7. 41 CFR 105-64.208 - What special conditions apply to release of medical records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... apply to release of medical records? 105-64.208 Section 105-64.208 Public Contracts and Property....208 What special conditions apply to release of medical records? Medical records containing... writing by you, or by your guardian or conservator. Medical records in an Official Personnel Folder...

  8. 41 CFR 105-64.208 - What special conditions apply to release of medical records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... apply to release of medical records? 105-64.208 Section 105-64.208 Public Contracts and Property....208 What special conditions apply to release of medical records? Medical records containing... writing by you, or by your guardian or conservator. Medical records in an Official Personnel Folder...

  9. 41 CFR 105-64.208 - What special conditions apply to release of medical records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... apply to release of medical records? 105-64.208 Section 105-64.208 Public Contracts and Property....208 What special conditions apply to release of medical records? Medical records containing... writing by you, or by your guardian or conservator. Medical records in an Official Personnel Folder...

  10. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....34 Condition of participation: Medical social services. If the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical social...

  11. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....34 Condition of participation: Medical social services. If the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical social...

  12. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....34 Condition of participation: Medical social services. If the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical social...

  13. 42 CFR 416.47 - Condition for coverage-Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition for coverage-Medical records. 416.47... Coverage 416.47 Condition for coverageMedical records. The ASC must maintain complete, comprehensive, and accurate medical records to ensure adequate patient care. (a) Standard: Organization. The ASC...

  14. 42 CFR 416.47 - Condition for coverage-Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition for coverage-Medical records. 416.47... Coverage 416.47 Condition for coverageMedical records. The ASC must maintain complete, comprehensive, and accurate medical records to ensure adequate patient care. (a) Standard: Organization. The ASC...

  15. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical social services....34 Condition of participation: Medical social services. If the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work...

  16. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical social services....34 Condition of participation: Medical social services. If the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work...

  17. The role of pre-existing Precambrian structures in rift evolution: The Albertine and Rhino grabens, Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katumwehe, Andrew B.; Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Atekwana, Estella A.

    2015-04-01

    We integrated Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Digital Elevation Models (DEM), airborne magnetic, radiometric and three-dimensional Full Tensor Gravity Gradiometry (3D-FTG) data to investigate the role of Precambrian structures in the evolution of the largely amagmatic Miocene-Recent aged Albertine and Rhino grabens in Uganda. These grabens represent the northern segment of the Western Branch of the East African Rift System (EARS). The two NE-trending grabens are connected by a right-stepping transfer zone and they extend within the Archean-Paleoproterozoic Northeast Congo block which represents the northeastern extension of the Congo craton. Our results show the following and highlight the importance of pre-existing structures in the evolution of continental rift systems: (1) The NE-extent of the Albertine full-graben is controlled by NE-trending Precambrian fabric and the graben terminates at its northeastern end when it encounters a multiply folded Precambrian basement terrain with poorly-developed NW-trending structural grain. Additionally, the northeastern termination of the Albertine graben coincides with the presence of NW-trending right-stepping high-density bodies within the Precambrian terrain. (2) The transfer zone between the Albertine and Rhino grabens is controlled by NE-trending Precambrian structures which might have facilitated the development of relay ramp faults. (3) Strain localization within the better-developed southeastern border fault of the Rhino half-graben is facilitated by the presence of Precambrian structures better aligned in a NE-direction in the southeastern part of the basin compared to its northwestern part. (4) Further to the northeast, the Rhino graben is segmented and transitions into a narrower ENE-trending half-graben with a better-developed border fault on its northwestern side. This segmentation coincides with the presence of N-trending Precambrian structures. (5) The Rhino graben terminates farther northeast against the NW-trending Precambrian Aswa shear zone; a prominent structure with complex, but generally NW-trending fabric.

  18. Effects of Mining-Induced Stress Perturbations on Pre-Existing Faults Near a Deep South African Gold Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucier, A. M.; Heesakkers, V.; Zoback, M. D.; Reches, Z.

    2007-12-01

    For over a century, mining-induced earthquakes have been recorded in the deep underground mining region of Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa. The TauTona gold mine experiences an appreciable number of mining- induced earthquakes and is the site of the Natural Earthquake Laboratory in South African Mines (NELSAM) project. In this work, we constrain the virgin (i.e. unperturbed) state of stress near the TauTona gold mine using an iterative forward modeling approach that combines observations of drilling induced borehole failures in borehole images, boundary element modeling of the mining-induced stress perturbations, and forward modeling of borehole failures based on the results of the boundary element modeling. We find that the state of stress is a normal faulting regime with principal stress orientations that are slightly deviated from vertical and horizontal and therefore denoted with a (*). The maximum principal stress, Sv*, is deviated 0 to 20 from vertical towards the NNW and has a magnitude gradient of 27 0.3 MPa/km. The intermediate principal stress, SHmax*, is inclined 0 to 20 from horizontal with an azimuth of 145 to 168 and has a magnitude gradient of 21.5 to 26 MPa/km. The least principal stress, Shmin*, is inclined 0 to 10 from horizontal with an azimuth of 235 to 258 and has a magnitude gradient of 13 to 15.5 MPa/km. Using this constrained stress state, we investigate the likelihood of faulting to occur both on pre-existing fault planes that are optimally-oriented to the virgin stress state and on faults affected by the mining-perturbed stress field, the latter of which is calculated with boundary element modeling. The far-field stress state indicates that the crust is in a state of frictional faulting equilibrium, such that normal faulting is likely to occur on faults striking SSE and NNW and have a dip angle of approximately 45 to 80. The mining-induced stress perturbation affects faults relatively closer to the mining excavation. We analyze active faults observed in borehole image log data and mapped in the TauTona access tunnels. In the borehole image logs, we find evidence of recent slip on faults that have become critically stressed due to the mining-induced stress perturbation. In our investigation of the Pretorius Fault Zone (PFZ), an ancient (Pre-Cambrian) fault system, we find that stress perturbations due to recent mining advances may be responsible for reactivating segments of the PFZ that were observed to slip during a M2.2 event recorded in December 2004.

  19. Influence of pre-existing inflammation on the outcome of acute coronary syndrome: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Odeberg, Jacob; Freitag, Michael; Forssell, Henrik; Vaara, Ivar; Persson, Marie-Louise; Odeberg, Håkan; Halling, Anders; Råstam, Lennart; Lindblad, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Inflammation is a well-established risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, less is known about its influence on the outcome of ACS. The aim of this study was to determine if blood biomarkers of inflammation were associated specifically with acute myocardial infarction (MI) or unstable angina (UA) in patients with ACS. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Patients admitted to the coronary care unit, via the emergency room, at a central county hospital over a 4-year period (1992–1996). Participants In a substudy of Carlscrona Heart Attack Prognosis Study (CHAPS) of 5292 patients admitted to the coronary care unit, we identified 908 patients aged 30–74 years, who at discharge had received the diagnosis of either MI (527) or UA (381). Main outcome measures MI or UA, based on the diagnosis set at discharge from hospital. Results When adjusted for smoking, age, sex and duration of chest pain, concentrations of plasma biomarkers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C reactive protein>2 mg/L (OR=1.40 (1.00 to 1.96) and fibrinogen (p for trend=0.035)) analysed at admission were found to be associated with MI over UA, in an event of ACS. A strong significant association with MI over UA was found for blood cell markers of inflammation, that is, counts of neutrophils (p for trend<0.001), monocytes (p for trend<0.001) and thrombocytes (p for trend=0.021), while lymphocyte count showed no association. Interestingly, eosinophil count (p for trend=0.003) was found to be significantly lower in patients with MI compared to those with UA. Conclusions Our results show that, in patients with ACS, the blood cell profile and degree of inflammation at admission was associated with the outcome. Furthermore, our data suggest that a pre-existing low-grade inflammation may dispose towards MI over UA. PMID:26758266

  20. Influence of pre-existing invasive aspergillosis on allo-HSCT outcome: a retrospective EBMT analysis by the Infectious Diseases and Acute Leukemia Working Parties.

    PubMed

    Penack, O; Tridello, G; Hoek, J; Soci, G; Blaise, D; Passweg, J; Chevallier, P; Craddock, C; Milpied, N; Veelken, H; Maertens, J; Ljungman, P; Cornelissen, J; Thiebaut-Bertrand, A; Lioure, B; Michallet, M; Iacobelli, S; Nagler, A; Mohty, M; Cesaro, S

    2016-03-01

    Historically, invasive aspergillosis (IA) has been a major barrier for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The influence of invasive IA on long-term survival and on transplant-related complications has not been investigated in a larger patient cohort under current conditions. Our aim was to analyze the long-term outcome of patients undergoing allo-HSCT with a history of prior IA. We used European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation database data of first allo-HSCTs performed between 2005 and 2010 in patients with acute leukemia. One thousand one hundred and fifty patients with data on IA before allo-HSCT were included in the analysis. The median follow-up time was 52.1 months. We found no significant impact of IA on major transplant outcome variables such as overall survival, relapse-free survival, non-relapse mortality, cumulative incidence of acute GvHD grade II-IV, chronic GvHD, pulmonary complications and leukemia relapse. However, we found a trend toward lower overall survival (P=0.078, hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval (CI)): 1.16 (0.98, 1.36)) and higher non-relapse mortality (P=0.150, HR (95% CI): 1.19 (0.94, 1.50)) in allo-HSCT recipients with pre-existing IA. Our data suggest that a history of IA should not generally be a contraindication when considering the performance of allo-HSCT in patients with acute leukemia. PMID:26501769

  1. A dairy-based high calcium diet improves glucose homeostasis and reduces further weight gain in high fat fed mice in the context of pre-existing obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: High dietary calcium (Ca) in the context of a dairy food matrix has been shown to reduce obesity development and associated inflammation in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. However, the influence of Ca and dairy on these phenotypes in the context of pre-existing obesity is not known. Met...

  2. Effect of the pre-existing carbides on the grain boundary network during grain boundary engineering in a nickel based alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tingguang; Xia, Shuang; Li, Hui; Zhou, Bangxin; Bai, Qin

    2014-05-01

    Grain boundary engineering was carried out on an aging-treated nickel based Alloy 690, which has precipitated carbides at grain boundaries. Electron backscatter diffraction technique was used to investigate the grain boundary networks. Results show that, compared with the solution-annealed samples, the aging-treated samples with pre-existing carbides at grain boundaries need longer duration or higher temperature during annealing after low-strain tensile deformation for forming high proportion of low-Σ coincidence site lattice grain boundaries (more than 75%). The reason is that the primary recrystallization is inhibited or retarded owing to that the pre-existing carbides are barriers to grain boundaries migration. - Highlights: • Study of GBE as function of pre-existing GB carbides, tensile strain and annealing • Recrystallization of GBE is inhibited or retarded by the pre-existing carbides. • Retained carbides after annealing show the original GB positions. • More than 80% of special GBs were formed after the modification of GBE processing. • Multiple twinning during recrystallization is the key process of GBE.

  3. A dairy-based high calcium diet improves glucose homeostasis and reduces steatosis in the context of pre-existing obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High dietary calcium (Ca) in the context of a dairy food matrix has been shown to reduce obesity development and associated inflammation in diet-induced obese (DIO) rodents. The influence of Ca and dairy on these phenotypes in the context of pre-existing obesity is not known. Furthermore, interpre...

  4. Lateral propagation of active normal faults throughout pre-existing fault zones: an example from the Southern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; Prosser, Giacomo; Ivo Giano, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    The main active structures in the Southern Apennines are represented by a set of NW-trending normal faults, which are mainly located in the axial sector of the chain. Evidences arising from neotectonics and seismology show activity of a composite seismic source, the Irpinia - Agri Valley, located across the Campania-Basilicata border. This seismic source is made up of two right-stepping, individual seismic sources forming a relay ramp. Each individual seismic source consists of a series of nearly parallel normal fault segments. The relay ramp area, located around the Vietri di Potenza town, is bounded by two seismic segments, the San Gregorio Magno Fault, to the NW, and the Pergola-Melandro Fault, to the SE. The possible interaction between the two right-stepping fault segments has not been proven yet, since the fault system of the area has never been analyzed in detail. This work is aimed at assessing the geometry of such fault system, inferring the relative age of the different fault sets by studying the crosscutting relationships, characterizing the micromechanics of fault rocks associated to the various fault sets, and understanding the modalities of lateral propagation of the two bounding fault segments. Crosscutting relationships are recognized by combining classical geological mapping with morphotectonic methods. This latter approach, which include the analysis of aerial photographs and field inspection of quaternary slope deposits, is used to identify the most recent structures among those cropping out in the field area. In the relay ramp area, normal faults crosscut different tectonic units of the Apennine chain piled up, essentially, during the Middle to Late Miocene. The topmost unit (only few tens of meter-thick) consists of a mélange containing blocks of different lithologies in a clayish matrix. The intermediate thrust sheet consists of 1-1.5 km-thick platform carbonates of late Triassic-Jurassic age, with dolomites at the base and limestones at the top, unconformably covered by Miocene clastic deposits. The lower thrust sheet is made up of deep-sea deposits of late Triassic to Eocene age, which include pelagic limestones, radiolarites, marls and turbiditic calcarenites. The relay ramp area is comprised of two main fault sets, which are NW-trending (N120-140E) and NE-trending (N60-70E). Minor E-trending (N90-100E) and NNW-trending (N160-170E) faults are also present. Maximum throws of the most developed faults, which are also characterized by the longest traces, are in the order of 300-400 m. Crosscutting relationships and morphotectonic analyses generally show that the NW-trending faults are the most recent, as also shown by the involvement of Quaternary breccias and near surface fault rocks. Our data indicate that propagation of NW-trending normal faults in the relay ramp area took place thanks to the breaking of a pre-existing structural grain made up, mainly, of NE-trending normal faults. This process determined the different multi-scale properties to the two fault sets, and somehow inhibited the lateral growth of the NW-trending normal faults.

  5. Estimating the Reactivation Potential of Pre-Existing Fractures in Subsurface Granitoids from Outcrop Analogues and in-Situ Stress Modeling: Implications for EGS Reservoir Stimulation with an Example from Thuringia (Central Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasch, N.; Ustaszewski, K. M.; Siegburg, M.; Navabpour, P.; Hesse, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Mid-German Crystalline Rise (MGCR) in Thuringia (central Germany) is part of the European Variscan orogen and hosts large extents of Visean granites (c. 350 Ma), locally overlain by up to 3 km of Early Permian to Mid-Triassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks. A geothermal gradient of 36°C km-1 suggests that such subsurface granites form an economically viable hot dry rock reservoir at > 4 km depth. In order to assess the likelihood of reactivating any pre-existing fractures during hydraulic reservoir stimulation, slip and dilation tendency analyses (Morris et al. 1996) were carried out. For this purpose, we determined orientations of pre-existing fractures in 14 granite exposures along the southern border fault of an MGCR basement high. Additionally, the strike of 192 Permian magmatic dikes affecting the granite was considered. This analysis revealed a prevalence of NW-SE-striking fractures (mainly joints, extension veins, dikes and subordinately brittle faults) with a maximum at 030/70 (dip azimuth/dip). Borehole data and earthquake focal mechanisms reveal a maximum horizontal stress SHmax trending N150°E and a strike-slip regime. Effective in-situ stress magnitudes at 4.5 km depth, assuming hydrostatic conditions and frictional equilibrium along pre-existing fractures with a friction coefficient of 0.85 yielded 230 and 110 MPa for SHmax and Shmin, respectively. In this stress field, fractures with the prevailing orientations show a high tendency of becoming reactivated as dextral strike-slip faults if stimulated hydraulically. To ensure that a stimulation well creates fluid connectivity on a reservoir volume as large as possible rather than dissipating fluids along existing fractures, it should follow a trajectory at the highest possible angle to the orientation of prevailing fractures, i.e. subhorizontal and NE-SW-oriented. References: Morris, A., D. A. Ferrill, and D. B. Henderson (1996), Slip-tendency analysis and fault reactivation, Geology, 24, 275-278.

  6. Medical errors in hospitalized pediatric trauma patients with chronic health conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaotong; Yin, Han; Shi, Junxin; Wheeler, Krista Kurz; Groner, Jonathan I; Xiang, Huiyun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study compares medical errors in pediatric trauma patients with and without chronic conditions. Methods: The 2009 Kids Inpatient Database, which included 123,303 trauma discharges, was analyzed. Medical errors were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes. The medical error rates per 100 discharges and per 1000 hospital days were calculated and compared between inpatients with and without chronic conditions. Results: Pediatric trauma patients with chronic conditions experienced a higher medical error rate compared with patients without chronic conditions: 4.04 (95% confidence interval: 3.754.33) versus 1.07 (95% confidence interval: 0.981.16) per 100 discharges. The rate of medical error differed by type of chronic condition. After controlling for confounding factors, the presence of a chronic condition increased the adjusted odds ratio of medical error by 37% if one chronic condition existed (adjusted odds ratio: 1.37, 95% confidence interval: 1.211.5), and 69% if more than one chronic condition existed (adjusted odds ratio: 1.69, 95% confidence interval: 1.481.53). In the adjusted model, length of stay had the strongest association with medical error, but the adjusted odds ratio for chronic conditions and medical error remained significantly elevated even when accounting for the length of stay, suggesting that medical complexity has a role in medical error. Higher adjusted odds ratios were seen in other subgroups. Conclusion: Chronic conditions are associated with significantly higher rate of medical errors in pediatric trauma patients. Future research should evaluate interventions or guidelines for reducing the risk of medical errors in pediatric trauma patients with chronic conditions.

  7. [Global aspects of medical ethics: conditions and possibilities].

    PubMed

    Neitzke, G

    2001-01-01

    A global or universal code of medical ethics seems paradoxical in the era of pluralism and postmodernism. A different conception of globalisation will be developed in terms of a "procedural universality". According to this philosophical concept, a code of medical ethics does not oblige physicians to accept certain specific, preset, universal values and rules. It rather obliges every culture and society to start a culture-sensitive, continuous, and active discourse on specific issues, mentioned in the codex. This procedure might result in regional, intra-cultural consensus, which should be presented to an inter-cultural dialogue. To exemplify this procedure, current topics of medical ethics (spiritual foundations of medicine, autonomy, definitions concerning life and death, physicians' duties, conduct within therapeutic teams) will be discussed from the point of view of western medicine. PMID:11475094

  8. 42 CFR 410.12 - Medical and other health services: Basic conditions and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical and other health services: Basic conditions and limitations. 410.12 Section 410.12 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services 410.12...

  9. 42 CFR 410.38 - Durable medical equipment: Scope and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Services 410.38 Durable medical equipment: Scope and conditions. (a) Medicare Part B pays for the rental or purchase of durable medical equipment, including iron lungs, oxygen tents, hospital beds, and... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Durable medical equipment: Scope and...

  10. 42 CFR 410.38 - Durable medical equipment: Scope and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Services 410.38 Durable medical equipment: Scope and conditions. (a) Medicare Part B pays for the rental or purchase of durable medical equipment, including iron lungs, oxygen tents, hospital beds, and... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Durable medical equipment: Scope and...

  11. 42 CFR 410.38 - Durable medical equipment: Scope and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Services 410.38 Durable medical equipment: Scope and conditions. (a) Medicare Part B pays for the rental or purchase of durable medical equipment, including iron lungs, oxygen tents, hospital beds, and... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Durable medical equipment: Scope and...

  12. The Role of Pre-Existing Diabetes Mellitus on Hepatocellular Carcinoma Occurrence and Prognosis: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Freddie; Gao, Shan; Gao, Jing; Li, Hong-Lan; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2011-01-01

    Background The impact of pre-existing diabetes mellitus (DM) on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) occurrence and prognosis is complex and unclear. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the association between pre-existing diabetes mellitus and hepatocellular carcinoma occurrence and prognosis. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library from their inception to January, 2011 for prospective epidemiological studies assessing the effect of pre-existing diabetes mellitus on hepatocellular carcinoma occurrence, mortality outcomes, cancer recurrence, and treatment-related complications. Study-specific risk estimates were combined by using fixed effect or random effect models. Results The database search generated a total of 28 prospective studies that met the inclusion criteria. Among these studies, 14 reported the risk of HCC incidence and 6 studies reported risk of HCC specific mortality. Six studies provided a total of 8 results for all-cause mortality in HCC patients. Four studies documented HCC recurrence risks and 2 studies reported risks for hepatic decomposition occurrence in HCC patients. Meta-analysis indicated that pre-existing diabetes mellitus (DM) was significantly associated with increased risk of HCC incidence [meta-relative risk (RR)?=?1.87, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.152.27] and HCC-specific mortality (meta-RR?=?1.88, 95%CI: 1.392.55) compared with their non-DM counterparts. HCC patients with pre-existing DM had a 38% increased (95% CI: 1.131.48) risk of death from all-causes and 91% increased (95%CI: 1.412.57) risk of hepatic decomposition occurrence compared to those without DM. In DM patients, the meta-RR for HCC recurrence-free survival was 1.93(95%CI: 1.123.33) compared with non-diabetic patients. Conclusion The findings from the current meta-analysis suggest that DM may be both associated with elevated risks of both HCC incidence and mortality. Furthermore, HCC patients with pre-existing diabetes have a poorer prognosis relative to their non-diabetic counterparts. PMID:22205924

  13. Schoolchildren with Dysphagia Associated with Medically Complex Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefton-Greif, Maureen A.; Arvedson, Joan C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews population trends and general characteristics of children with dysphagia in schools, provides an overview of dysphagia teams and the roles of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in school and hospital settings, and describes assessment and treatment of swallowing and feeding problems in children with complex medical

  14. Development of Mylonites and Pseudotachylites in Granitic Bodies: Brittle Deformation by Reactivation of Pre-existing Ductile Fabrics Defined by Mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.; Ross, C. H.; Lee, C. T.; Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    Pseudotachylites are common in brittle deformation zones and represent rapidly crystallized melts produced by friction-induced heating, possibly associated with dynamic rupture and slip during earthquakes. Thus, pseudotachylites may provide insight into how such localized deformation occurs. Here, we investigated the micron to cm scale structure and geochemistry of granitic plutons in the Eastern Peninsular Ranges shear zone (California), which is a large scale thrust rooted in the lower crust. Our U-Pb chronology and Zr thermometry of sphene porphyroblasts in the mylonite indicate that the plutons were deformed at near solidus conditions (780-750 ◦C) between 89 and 78 Ma, which coincides with the last pulse of magmatism. This ductile deformation resulted in a foliated fabric defined by biotite-rich layers. Subsequent brittle deformation is superimposed on this ductile fabric as exemplified by pseudotachylites and ultracataclasites cross-cutting or parallel to the foliation planes. The pseudotachylites are characterized by a glassy matrix with microlites, and the ultracataclasites are characterized by a fine-grained matrix of angular mineral and rock fragments. We measured major and trace compositions of these brittle deformation products using LA-ICPMS. The pseudotachylites are more mafic (lower Si, but higher Fe, Ti and K) than the host granitoid, while the ultracataclasites are intermediate between the pseudotachylites and the host. The mafic compositions of the pseudotachylites indicate that they form almost solely by melting of biotite. The compositions of the ultracastaclasites also suggest preferential involvement of biotite, but with a greater component of feldspar. The compositional discrepancy between the brittle deformation products and the host granitoid begs the question of why brittle deformation appears to preferentially involve biotite. One possibility is that brittle deformation occurred on weak zones inherited from the biotite-rich mylonitic foliation planes. Our observations indicate that such ductile deformation occurred at near-solidus conditions and may have been associated with the assembly of the Cretaceous magmatic arc. We suggest that brittle faulting inherits pre-existing ductile fabrics that, once formed, define long-lived weak shear zones in the crust.

  15. Oral vaccination with modified vaccinia virus Ankara attached covalently to TMPEG-modified cationic liposomes overcomes pre-existing poxvirus immunity from recombinant vaccinia immunization

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Toshio; Kaneko, Yutaro; Kozbor, Danuta

    2008-01-01

    Development of a safe and effective vaccine for induction of mucosal immunity to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein (Env, gp160) represents the best hope for containing the spread of an HIV epidemic worldwide. The highly attenuated modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is a laboratory virus well suited as a safe vaccine vector. However, the presence of pre-existing immunity to Vaccinia virus in the adult population represents a hindrance that limits the application of the MVA vector for inducing immunity to HIV antigens. Here, cationic liposomes were covalently attached to the surface of recombinant MVA expressing the HIV-1 strain IIIB Env glycoprotein and β-galactosidase (MVAIIIB/β-gal) using tresylmonomethoxypolyethylene glycol (TMPEG) grafted into a lipid membrane without compromising viral infectivity in vitro and in vivo. The orally administered MVAIIIB/β-gal–TMPEG/liposome complexes were capable of delivering the transgenes to mucosal tissues in mice with pre-existing poxvirus immunity based on β-galactosidase gene expression in intestinal tissues measured 18 h after infection. Importantly, the MVAIIIB/β-gal–TMPEG/liposome complexes enhanced Env-specific cellular and humoral immune responses in the mucosal and systemic tissues after repeated oral immunization of BALB/c mice. This approach may prove useful for induction of protective immunity against infectious diseases and cancer in populations with pre-existing immunity to vaccinia from smallpox vaccination. PMID:17170437

  16. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Basic Hospital... candidates. (3) When telemedicine services are furnished to the hospital's patients through an agreement with... practitioners providing such services, if the hospital's governing body ensures, through its written...

  17. A Comparison of Expedition Medical Condition List Treatment Directives with Integrated Medical Model Simulation Data Presentation and Briefing Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This aerospace medicine clerkship project is under the direction of Dr. Sharmila Watkins and is in cooperation with Dr. Eric Kerstman and Dr. Ronak Shah. The questions of the research project are: 1. What are the main drivers of evacuation and loss of crew life (LOCL) on three Design Reference Missions (DRMs): Near Earth Asteroid (NEA), Lunar Sortie and Lunar Outpost using an inexhaustible International Space Station medical kit 2. What are the treatment designations for these driving medical conditions as listed in Expedition Medical Condition List (EMCL) 3. Do the drivers make sense in the context of the given Design Reference Mission (DRM) 4. Do any EMCL treatment designations need re-assessing.

  18. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Basic Hospital... services are furnished to the hospital's patients through an agreement with a distant-site hospital, the governing body of the hospital whose patients are receiving the telemedicine services may choose, in lieu...

  19. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Basic Hospital... services are furnished to the hospital's patients through an agreement with a distant-site hospital, the governing body of the hospital whose patients are receiving the telemedicine services may choose, in lieu...

  20. Tests and Medical Conditions Associated with Dementia Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Diana B.; Primeaux-Hart, Sharon; Loveland, Katherine A.; Cleveland, Lynne A.; Lewis, Kay R.; Lesser, Jary; Pearson, Pamela L.

    2005-01-01

    Diagnosis of dementia in adults with intellectual disabilities requires documentation of clinically significant declines in memory and other cognitive skills, as well as changes in everyday and emotional functioning. To improve diagnostic accuracy in adults with Down syndrome, the authors examined conditions often associated with dementia, as well

  1. The Prevalence of Medical Conditions Among U.S. Chinese Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruijia; Simon, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The burden of medical conditions is increasing among U.S. older adults, yet we have very limited knowledge about medical conditions among Chinese older adults in the United States. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of medical conditions and its sociodemographic and health-related correlates within the context of a population-based cohort study of U.S. Chinese older adults. Method. Using a community-based participatory research approach, community-dwelling Chinese older adults aged 60 years and older in the Greater Chicago area were interviewed between 2011 and 2013. Results. Of the 3,159 participants interviewed, 58.9% were female and the mean age was 72.8 years. In total, 84.3% of older adults had one or more medical condition, 24.6% reported two conditions, 19.5% had three conditions, and 17.0% reported four or more conditions. A sizeable percentage of older adults had never been screened for dyslipidemia (24.4%) or had never been screened for diabetes mellitus (35.7%).For those who reported high cholesterol, 73.0% were taking medications when compared with 76.1% of those who reported having diabetes and 88.3% of those who reported having high blood pressure. Various sociodemographic and health-related characteristics were correlated with medical conditions. Conclusion. Medical conditions were common among U.S. Chinese older adults, yet screening and treatment rates were fairly low. Future longitudinal studies should be conducted to better understand the risk and protective factors associated with medical conditions. PMID:25378445

  2. Legal aspects of continence: disclosure of a medical condition.

    PubMed

    Dimond, Bridgit

    This article explores the issue of patient confidentiality and the exceptions to that duty. Even if a health professional considers that there would be a public interest in a patient's condition being made known, the patient is entitled to have his confidential information kept secret. There are recognized exceptions in law to the duty of confidentiality, and the guidance issued by the health professional registration bodies should be followed. PMID:16723956

  3. The Impact of Medical Conditions on the Support of Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zijlstra, H. P.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of medical conditions of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities on the professional support they receive in centres for special education. Method: The medical files, the daily records and daily communication records between parents and professionals were reviewed

  4. 42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... responsible for the delivery of patient care and outcomes in the facility. The medical director is accountable... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director. 494.150 Section 494.150 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  5. 42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... responsible for the delivery of patient care and outcomes in the facility. The medical director is accountable... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director. 494.150 Section 494.150 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  6. 42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... responsible for the delivery of patient care and outcomes in the facility. The medical director is accountable... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director. 494.150 Section 494.150 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  7. 42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... responsible for the delivery of patient care and outcomes in the facility. The medical director is accountable... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director. 494.150 Section 494.150 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  8. 42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... responsible for the delivery of patient care and outcomes in the facility. The medical director is accountable... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director. 494.150 Section 494.150 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  9. The Impact of Medical Conditions on the Support of Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zijlstra, H. P.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of medical conditions of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities on the professional support they receive in centres for special education. Method: The medical files, the daily records and daily communication records between parents and professionals were reviewed…

  10. Adherence to Medication Regimens among Low-Income Patients with Multiple Comorbid Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Shiraz I.; Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These

  11. Effects of pre-existing ice crystals on cirrus clouds and comparison between different ice nucleation parameterizations with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Liu, X.; Zhang, K.

    2015-02-01

    In order to improve the treatment of ice nucleation in a more realistic manner in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.3 (CAM5.3), the effects of pre-existing ice crystals on ice nucleation in cirrus clouds are considered. In addition, by considering the in-cloud variability in ice saturation ratio, homogeneous nucleation takes place spatially only in a portion of the cirrus cloud rather than in the whole area of the cirrus cloud. Compared to observations, the ice number concentrations and the probability distributions of ice number concentration are both improved with the updated treatment. The pre-existing ice crystals significantly reduce ice number concentrations in cirrus clouds, especially at mid- to high latitudes in the upper troposphere (by a factor of ~10). Furthermore, the contribution of heterogeneous ice nucleation to cirrus ice crystal number increases considerably. Besides the default ice nucleation parameterization of Liu and Penner (2005, hereafter LP) in CAM5.3, two other ice nucleation parameterizations of Barahona and Nenes (2009, hereafter BN) and Krcher et al. (2006, hereafter KL) are implemented in CAM5.3 for the comparison. In-cloud ice crystal number concentration, percentage contribution from heterogeneous ice nucleation to total ice crystal number, and pre-existing ice effects simulated by the three ice nucleation parameterizations have similar patterns in the simulations with present-day aerosol emissions. However, the change (present-day minus pre-industrial times) in global annual mean column ice number concentration from the KL parameterization (3.24 106 m-2) is less than that from the LP (8.46 106 m-2) and BN (5.62 106 m-2) parameterizations. As a result, the experiment using the KL parameterization predicts a much smaller anthropogenic aerosol long-wave indirect forcing (0.24 W m-2) than that using the LP (0.46 W m-2) and BN (0.39 W m-2) parameterizations.

  12. Failed PC-IOL implantation in one eye and successful AC-IOL implantation in the other eye in a patient with pre-existing bilateral uveitis.

    PubMed

    Wolter, J R; Anderson, C J

    1988-07-01

    An irregular proteinaceous film populated by sessile macrophages and large giant cells was found on the surface of a posterior chamber lens implant. This had to be removed from a position with its haptics in the capsular bag 8 months after surgery because of increased uveitis. The implant had been placed at the time of extracapsular cataract extraction in a patient with pre-existing active bilateral chronic iridocyclitis of a non-granulomatous type. An anterior chamber lens implant placed after intracapsular cataract extraction in the other eye of the same patient was tolerated, and the same type of implant was used to replace the removed posterior chamber lens implant. PMID:3412758

  13. 42 CFR 416.47 - Condition for coverage-Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition for coverage-Medical records. 416.47 Section 416.47 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) AMBULATORY SURGICAL SERVICES Specific Conditions for Coverage 416.47 Condition for...

  14. Guide to Geriatric Syndromes: Common and Often Related Medical Conditions in Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Urinary Incontinence Related Documents PDF A Guide to Geriatric Syndromes Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources A Guide to Geriatric Syndromes: Common and Often Related Medical Conditions in ...

  15. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (<50% of control) to polystyrene. Treatment of established 72h biofilms with 100?g/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with <25% biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100?g/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25?g/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms. PMID:25043896

  16. Phenological asynchrony between herbivorous insects and their hosts: signal of climate change or pre-existing adaptive strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Michael C.; Parmesan, Camille

    2010-01-01

    Climate change alters phenological relations between interacting species. We might expect the historical baseline, or starting-point, for such effects to be precise synchrony between the season at which a consumer most requires food and the time when its resources are most available. We synthesize evidence that synchrony was not the historical condition in two insectplant interactions involving Edith's checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha), the winter moth (Operophtera brumata) and their host plants. Initial observations of phenological mismatch in both systems were made prior to the onset of anthropogenically driven climate change. Neither species can detect the phenology of its host plants with precision. In both species, evolution of life history has involved compromise between maximizing fecundity and minimizing mortality, with the outcome being superficially maladaptive strategies in which many, or even most, individuals die of starvation through poor synchrony with their host plants. Where phenological asynchrony or mismatch with resources forms the starting point for effects of anthropogenic global warming, consumers are particularly vulnerable to impacts that exacerbate the mismatch. This vulnerability likely contributed to extinction of a well-studied metapopulation of Edith's checkerspot, and to the skewed geographical pattern of population extinctions underlying a northward and upward range shift in this species. PMID:20819810

  17. The role of pre-existing discontinuities in the development of extensional faults: An analog modeling perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Lorenzo; Basili, Roberto; Toscani, Giovanni; Burrato, Pierfrancesco; Seno, Silvio; Valensise, Gianluca

    2015-05-01

    Several mountainous regions are currently affected by syn- or post-orogenic active extension. We investigate how a newly-formed normal fault interacts with structures inherited from a previous contractional phase. To this end, we use analog models that adopt an innovative technique for performing a precut that mimics such inherited structures into a clay layer; this clay layer is laid on top of a master fault simulated by two rigid blocks sliding along an inclined plane. We carry out six experiments with variously oriented precuts and compare the results with those obtained in a reference isotropic experiment. All other conditions are identical for all seven realizations. Fault evolution is monitored by taking closely-spaced snapshots analyzed through the Digital Image Correlation method. We find that the upward propagation of the normal fault can be either accelerated or decelerated depending on the presence of a precut and its orientation. Such precuts can also promote or inhibit the formation of bending-moment faults. These interactions between master fault and precut also affect the shape of the fault-related syncline-anticline pair.

  18. Systematic screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions: Still debatable

    PubMed Central

    Leproust, Sandy; Lagarde, Emmanuel; Salmi, L Rachid

    2008-01-01

    Background Assessing people's ability to drive has become a public health concern in most industrialized countries. Although age itself is not a predictive factor of an increased risk for dangerous driving, the prevalence of medical conditions that may impair driving increases with age. Because the implementation of a screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions is a public health issue, its usefulness should be judged using standardised criteria already proposed for screening for chronic disease. The aim of this paper is to propose standardised criteria suitable to assess the scientific validity of screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions, and identify potential issues to be clarified before screening can be implemented and effective. Discussion Using criteria developed for screening for chronic diseases and published studies on driving with medical conditions, we specify six criteria to judge the opportunity of screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions. This adaptation was needed because of the complexity of the natural history of medical conditions and their potential consequences on driving and road safety. We then illustrate that published studies pleading for or against screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions fail to provide the needed documentation. Individual criteria were mentioned in 3 to 72% of 36 papers pleading for or against screening. Quantitative estimates of relevant indicators were provided in at most 42% of papers, and some data, such as the definition of an appropriate unsafe driving period were never provided. Summary The standardised framework described in this paper provides a template for assessing the effectiveness (or lack of effectiveness) of proposed measures for screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions. Even if most criteria were mentioned in the published literature pleading for or against such a screening, the failure to find quantitative and evidence-based estimates of relevant indicators provides useful insight for further research. PMID:18215269

  19. Localized gastric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of high-grade malignancy in patients with pre-existing chronic lymphocytic leukemia or immunocytoma.

    PubMed

    Ott, M M; Ott, G; Roblick, U; Linke, B; Kneba, M; de Leon, F; Mller-Hermelink, H K

    1995-04-01

    Analyses for clonality in cases of Richter's syndrome have provided evidence for a clonal evolution of high-grade lymphoma in most patients, while in others an independent cellular clone seems to exist in the secondary neoplasm. Richter's syndrome with an isolated high-grade lymphoma of the stomach has been rarely reported in patients with pre-existing B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We investigated four cases of CLL or lymphoplasmacytoid immunocytoma (LPIC) with development of a localized high-grade B cell lymphoma in the stomach. Southern blotting showed different rearrangements of the immunoglobulin light and heavy chain genes in the tumor cells of the low-grade lymphoma and the gastric tumor in two cases. Comparison of the DNA sequences of the CDR3 region of the immunoglobulin genes revealed different clones in another case. By means of chromosomal in situ hybridization, trisomy 3 was detected in two cases of high-grade lymphoma of the stomach, but not in the cells of the associated low-grade tumor. Our findings indicate that high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphomas arising localized in the stomach of patients with CLL or immunocytoma are not clonally related to the pre-existing low-grade lymphoma and, therefore indeed, present true secondary neoplasms. PMID:7723393

  20. C/EBPα Activates Pre-existing and De Novo Macrophage Enhancers during Induced Pre-B Cell Transdifferentiation and Myelopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    van Oevelen, Chris; Collombet, Samuel; Vicent, Guillermo; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Lepoivre, Cyrille; Badeaux, Aimee; Bussmann, Lars; Sardina, Jose Luis; Thieffry, Denis; Beato, Miguel; Shi, Yang; Bonifer, Constanze; Graf, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Transcription-factor-induced somatic cell conversions are highly relevant for both basic and clinical research yet their mechanism is not fully understood and it is unclear whether they reflect normal differentiation processes. Here we show that during pre-B-cell-to-macrophage transdifferentiation, C/EBPα binds to two types of myeloid enhancers in B cells: pre-existing enhancers that are bound by PU.1, providing a platform for incoming C/EBPα; and de novo enhancers that are targeted by C/EBPα, acting as a pioneer factor for subsequent binding by PU.1. The order of factor binding dictates the upregulation kinetics of nearby genes. Pre-existing enhancers are broadly active throughout the hematopoietic lineage tree, including B cells. In contrast, de novo enhancers are silent in most cell types except in myeloid cells where they become activated by C/EBP factors. Our data suggest that C/EBPα recapitulates physiological developmental processes by short-circuiting two macrophage enhancer pathways in pre-B cells. PMID:26235892

  1. Pre-existing oblique transfer zones and transfer/transform relationships in continental margins: New insights from the southeastern Gulf of Aden, Socotra Island, Yemen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellahsen, N.; Leroy, S.; Autin, J.; Razin, P.; d'Acremont, E.; Sloan, H.; Pik, R.; Ahmed, A.; Khanbari, K.

    2013-11-01

    Transfer zones are ubiquitous features in continental rifts and margins, as are transform faults in oceanic lithosphere. Here, we present a structural study of the Hadibo Transfer Zone (HTZ), located in Socotra Island (Yemen) in the southeastern Gulf of Aden. There, we interpret this continental transfer fault zone to represent a reactivated pre-existing structure. Its trend is oblique to the direction of divergence and it has been active from the early up to the latest stages of rifting. One of the main oceanic fracture zones (FZ), the Hadibo-Sharbithat FZ, is aligned with and appears to be an extension of the HTZ and is probably genetically linked to it. Comparing this setting with observations from other Afro-Arabian rifts as well as with passive margins worldwide, it appears that many continental transfer zones are reactivated pre-existing structures, oblique to divergence. We therefore establish a classification system for oceanic FZ based upon their relationship with syn-rift structures. Type 1 FZ form at syn-rift structures and are late syn-rift to early syn-OCT. Type 2 FZ form during the OCT formation and Type 3 FZ form within the oceanic domain, after the oceanic spreading onset. The latter are controlled by far-field forces, magmatic processes, spreading rates, and oceanic crust rheology.

  2. First-trimester abortion in women with medical conditions: release date October 2012 SFP guideline #20122.

    PubMed

    Guiahi, M; Davis, A

    2012-12-01

    Most women undergoing first-trimester abortion are healthy. However, abortion providers also encounter women with a wide variety of medical conditions, some of which are serious and complex. When such a condition exists, consultation with the woman's physician or a specialist can facilitate decision making regarding hospital referral and additional preparations that may be required. Medical conditions may determine the approach to abortion. Surgical abortion is preferred when mifepristone or methotrexate is contraindicated. Medication abortion may be preferred when lithotomy position is not possible or in patients with extreme obesity. Limited data suggest that women treated with anticoagulation therapy bleed more than other women during surgical abortion, although this additional bleeding may be clinically unimportant. The decision to temporarily discontinue anticoagulation therapy will depend on the agent used and the underlying risk of thrombosis. According to the American Heart Association, additional antibiotics are not recommended to prevent endocarditis in women with cardiac lesions during surgical abortion. We review specific recommendations for women with common medical conditions. In some women, highly effective postabortion contraception is essential to prevent pregnancy-related morbidity. The U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, 2010, provides guidance for method selection for women with medical problems. PMID:23039921

  3. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR...

  4. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR...

  5. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR...

  6. Self-Medication of Somatic and Psychiatric Conditions Using Botanical Marijuana.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Lawrence A; Lauritsen, Kirstin J; Cross, Nicole; Davis, Alan K; Rosenberg, Harold; Bonadio, Francis; Lang, Brent

    2015-01-01

    As a complement to research evaluating botanical marijuana as a medical therapy for various somatic and psychiatric conditions, there is a growing body of research assessing marijuana users' self-reports of the symptoms and conditions for which they use marijuana without a physician's recommendation. As part of two larger web-based surveys and one in-situ survey at an outdoor marijuana festival, we asked regular marijuana users if they consumed the drug without a physician's recommendation and, if so, to describe (or select from a checklist) the conditions for which they used marijuana as a medication. Participants reported using marijuana to self-medicate a wide variety of both somatic conditions (such as pain, diabetes, and irritable bowel syndrome) and psychiatric conditions (such as depression, anxiety, and insomnia). Because fewer than half of the American states, and only a few countries, allow physicians to recommend medicinal marijuana, these findings may be of interest to clinicians as they treat patients, to lawmakers and policymakers as they consider legislation allowing physicians to recommend botanical marijuana for somatic and psychiatric conditions, and to researchers evaluating conditions that individuals elect to self-medicate using botanical marijuana. PMID:26595140

  7. [The main ways of improvement of medical support of the Air Forces in modern conditions].

    PubMed

    Blaginin, A A; Grebeniuk, A N; Lizogub, I N

    2014-02-01

    Blaginin A.A., Grebenyuk A.N., Lizogub LN. - The main ways of improvement of medical support of the Air Forces in modern conditions. Aircrew conducting active hostilities suffers from the whole spectrum of factors and conditions of the combat situation. The main task for the medical service of the Air Force is to carry out preventive and curative action for aviation specialists who are responsible for the combat capability of aircraft formations. The medical service of the Air Force must have forces and facilities for planning, organization and implementation of the treatment of lightly wounded and sick aviation professionals with short periods of recovery, medical rehabilitation of aircrew qfter suffering injuries, diseases, sanatorium therapy of aircrew with partial failure of health, outpatient and inpatient medical examination aircrew - flight commissions, preventive rest of aviation specialists with symptoms of chronic fatigue. Should be trained aviation physicians, including both basic military medical education and in-depth study of the medical aspects of various fields of personnel of the Air Force. PMID:25046924

  8. Effects of pre-existing hearing loss and gender on proposed ANSI S12.13 outcomes for characterizing hearing conservation program effectiveness: preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Amos, N E; Simpson, T H

    1995-11-01

    Draft American National Standard "Evaluating the Effectiveness of Hearing Conservation Programs" identifies potentially important links between audiometric threshold variability outcomes and occupational hearing conservation program (HCP) practices. Unacceptable threshold variability in annual audiograms may identify poor testing practices and temporary threshold shifts. This preliminary investigation reveals pre-existing hearing loss to be a potentially important confounding viable to interpreting ANSI S12.13 outcomes. Poor hearing groups in this study consistently yielded greater threshold variability (i.e., "poorer" HCP performance) than better hearing groups. Gender may also be a confounding variable, however, to a far lesser degree. HCP managers should exercise caution when interpreting relative ANSI S12.13 outcomes among HCPs differing in baseline hearing sensitivity. Potential causes for these findings are discussed, and implications for future research are identified. PMID:8580500

  9. Early Colonoscopy Confers Survival Benefits on Colon Cancer Patients with Pre-Existing Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chieh-Lin Jerry; Yu, Jui-Ting; Chen, Yi-Huei; Lin, Ching-Heng; Hwang, Wen-Li

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the prognostic significance of pre-existing iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and the benefits of early colonoscopy in patients with colon cancer, since these have not been clearly established to date. Using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database, we retrieved and retrospectively reviewed the records of patients aged ?55 years who were diagnosed with colon cancer between 2000 and 2005. The patient cohort was divided into two groups: patients with (n?=?1,260) or without (n?=?15,912) an IDA diagnosis during ?18 months preceding the date of colon cancer diagnosis. We found that diabetes (27.9% vs. 20.3%, p<0.0001), cardiovascular disease (61.6% vs. 54.7%, p<0.001), and chronic kidney disease (4.6% vs. 2.2%, p<0.0001) were more common among patients with IDA than among those without IDA. The median overall survival times for patients with IDA and those without IDA were 4.6 and 5.7 years, respectively (p?=?0.002). Patients who underwent colonoscopy ?30 days, 3190, and ?91 days after IDA diagnosis showed median overall survival times of 5.79, 4.43, and 4.04 years, respectively (p?=?0.003). Delayed colonoscopy was an independent factor associated with poor overall survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.071.53; p?=?0.01). In conclusion, colon cancer patients with IDA were more likely to experience comorbidities than were those without IDA. Pre-existing IDA was a poor prognostic factor in adult men and postmenopausal women who had colon cancer. Early colonoscopy could improve overall survival possibly by facilitating early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24466209

  10. Vaccines expressing the innate immune modulator EAT-2 elicit potent effector memory T lymphocyte responses despite pre-existing vaccine immunity.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Yasser Ali; Seregin, Sergey S; Schuldt, Nathaniel J; Rastall, David P W; Liu, Chyong-Jy J; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    The mixed results from recent vaccine clinical trials targeting HIV-1 justify the need to enhance the potency of HIV-1 vaccine platforms in general. Use of first-generation recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) platforms failed to protect vaccinees from HIV-1 infection. One hypothesis is that the rAd5-based vaccine failed due to the presence of pre-existing Ad5 immunity in many vaccines. We recently confirmed that EAT-2-expressing rAd5 vectors uniquely activate the innate immune system and improve cellular immune responses against rAd5-expressed Ags, inclusive of HIV/Gag. In this study, we report that use of the rAd5-EAT-2 vaccine can also induce potent cellular immune responses to HIV-1 Ags despite the presence of Ad5-specific immunity. Compared to controls expressing a mutant SH2 domain form of EAT-2, Ad5 immune mice vaccinated with an rAd5-wild-type EAT-2 HIV/Gag-specific vaccine formulation significantly facilitated the induction of several arms of the innate immune system. These responses positively correlated with an improved ability of the vaccine to induce stronger effector memory T cell-biased, cellular immune responses to a coexpressed Ag despite pre-existing anti-Ad5 immunity. Moreover, inclusion of EAT-2 in the vaccine mixture improves the generation of polyfunctional cytolytic CD8(+) T cell responses as characterized by enhanced production of IFN-?, TNF-?, cytotoxic degranulation, and increased in vivo cytolytic activity. These data suggest a new approach whereby inclusion of EAT-2 expression in stringent human vaccination applications can provide a more effective vaccine against HIV-1 specifically in Ad5 immune subjects. PMID:22745373

  11. Manganese [III] Tetrakis [5,10,15,20]-Benzoic Acid Porphyrin Reduces Adiposity and Improves Insulin Action in Mice with Pre-Existing Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Brestoff, Jonathan R.; Brodsky, Tim; Sosinsky, Alexandra Z.; McLoughlin, Ryan; Stansky, Elena; Fussell, Leila; Sheppard, Aaron; DiSanto-Rose, Maria; Kershaw, Erin E.; Reynolds, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The superoxide dismutase mimetic manganese [III] tetrakis [5,10,15,20]-benzoic acid porphyrin (MnTBAP) is a potent antioxidant compound that has been shown to limit weight gain during short-term high fat feeding without preventing insulin resistance. However, whether MnTBAP has therapeutic potential to treat pre-existing obesity and insulin resistance remains unknown. To investigate this, mice were treated with MnTBAP or vehicle during the last five weeks of a 24-week high fat diet (HFD) regimen. MnTBAP treatment significantly decreased body weight and reduced white adipose tissue (WAT) mass in mice fed a HFD and a low fat diet (LFD). The reduction in adiposity was associated with decreased caloric intake without significantly altering energy expenditure, indicating that MnTBAP decreases adiposity in part by modulating energy balance. MnTBAP treatment also improved insulin action in HFD-fed mice, a physiologic response that was associated with increased protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation and expression in muscle and WAT. Since MnTBAP is a metalloporphyrin molecule, we hypothesized that its ability to promote weight loss and improve insulin sensitivity was regulated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in a similar fashion as cobalt protoporphyrins. Despite MnTBAP treatment increasing HO-1 expression, administration of the potent HO-1 inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) did not block the ability of MnTBAP to alter caloric intake, adiposity, or insulin action, suggesting that MnTBAP influences these metabolic processes independent of HO-1. These data demonstrate that MnTBAP can ameliorate pre-existing obesity and improve insulin action by reducing caloric intake and increasing PKB phosphorylation and expression. PMID:26397111

  12. Early colonoscopy confers survival benefits on colon cancer patients with pre-existing iron deficiency anemia: a nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Teng, Chieh-Lin Jerry; Yu, Jui-Ting; Chen, Yi-Huei; Lin, Ching-Heng; Hwang, Wen-Li

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the prognostic significance of pre-existing iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and the benefits of early colonoscopy in patients with colon cancer, since these have not been clearly established to date. Using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database, we retrieved and retrospectively reviewed the records of patients aged ? 55 years who were diagnosed with colon cancer between 2000 and 2005. The patient cohort was divided into two groups: patients with (n = 1,260) or without (n = 15,912) an IDA diagnosis during ? 18 months preceding the date of colon cancer diagnosis. We found that diabetes (27.9% vs. 20.3%, p<0.0001), cardiovascular disease (61.6% vs. 54.7%, p<0.001), and chronic kidney disease (4.6% vs. 2.2%, p<0.0001) were more common among patients with IDA than among those without IDA. The median overall survival times for patients with IDA and those without IDA were 4.6 and 5.7 years, respectively (p = 0.002). Patients who underwent colonoscopy ? 30 days, 31-90, and ? 91 days after IDA diagnosis showed median overall survival times of 5.79, 4.43, and 4.04 years, respectively (p = 0.003). Delayed colonoscopy was an independent factor associated with poor overall survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.53; p = 0.01). In conclusion, colon cancer patients with IDA were more likely to experience comorbidities than were those without IDA. Pre-existing IDA was a poor prognostic factor in adult men and postmenopausal women who had colon cancer. Early colonoscopy could improve overall survival possibly by facilitating early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24466209

  13. Enhancing the performance of multi-crystalline silicon photovoltaic module by encapsulating high efficient Eu3+ complex into its pre-existing EVA layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongxin; Yu, Bo; Hu, Zhijia; Wang, Xin; Zou, Gang; Zhang, Qijin

    2013-03-01

    Luminescent down shifting (LDS) technique is one effective way to improve the poor response of multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules at short wavelength less than 400 nm. Eu3+ complexes are effective LDS species for PV modules due to their large stokes' shift and high luminescent quantum efficiency (LQE). Although Eu3+ complexes have been utilized in PV modules as LDS species widely, they have not been encapsulated into the pre-existing poly-ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) layer of modules between glass and solar cell by now. The aim of our work is to enhance the performance of mc-Si PV modules by encapsulating high efficient Eu3+ complexes into their pre-existing EVA layers which would not modify the well-established manufacturing process for PV modules. In this work, two Eu3+ complexes with different absorption spectrum were encapsulated into the commercial EVA layer by soaking method for the first time and used in the encapsulation of mc-Si PV modules. Hereinto, Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 (TTA = 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, TPPO = triphenylphosphine oxide) (EuTT) with absorption spectrum less than 400 nm and high LQE (0.73) improves the external quantum efficiency of mc-Si PV module from 0.05 to 0.20, which produces a 0.42% increases in its power conversion efficiency. In addition, it is found that the enhancement brought by Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 can reduce cost of power generated by mc-Si devices from US1/Wp to US0.98/Wp according to the calculation. Therefore, Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 as LDS species with high LQE and low cost is promising for enhancing the performance of mc-Si PV modules in practical application.

  14. Temporary Increases in Problem Behavior and Sleep Disruption Following Decreases in Medication: A Descriptive Analysis of Conditional Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, John T.; Swanson, Greg; Dornbusch, Kaitlin

    2007-01-01

    Conditional rates of problem behavior for weeks that followed medication decreases and no medication changes were compared for 12 individuals who exhibited severe problem behavior (e.g., self-injury, aggression). The results indicate that conditional rates of problem behavior were higher following medication decreases than following no changes in

  15. Assessing health conditions and medication use among the homeless community in Long Beach, California

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Mok Thoong; Yamaki, Jason; Harwood, Megan; d'Assalenaux, Richard; Rosenberg, Ettie; Aruoma, Okezie; Bishayee, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Persons experiencing homelessness are a vulnerable population and are at increased risk for morbidity and all-cause mortality compared to the general population. This study sought to evaluate medication use, regular physician visits, and identify health conditions among the homeless population of Long Beach, California. Methods: Two brown bag medication review events were held at homeless shelters in the Long Beach area. Demographic information, medication use, and comorbid disease states were obtained through surveys. Findings: Three-fourths of the cohort (95 participants) consisted of males, and the average age of participants was 48 years. Psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular disease were the most common disease states reported at 32% and 46%, respectively and so were medications used in treating these chronic diseases. Medication adherence was found to be a significant problem in this population, where more than 30% of patients were nonadherent to medications for chronic diseases. Furthermore, foot problems, hearing and vision difficulties constitute the most commonly overlooked health problems within the homeless population. Conclusion: Based on this and other similar finding, we must accept that the homeless represent a vulnerable population, and that because of this fact, more programs should be focused at improving availability and access to health care among the homeless. Regarding the high number of reported health problems in the study, more studies are needed and more studies should incorporate screening for foot, hearing, and vision issues, both to increase awareness and to provide an opportunity for devising possible solutions to these highly preventable conditions. PMID:25114938

  16. Medical Conditions and Symptoms Associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Low-Income Urban Women

    PubMed Central

    Szanton, S.; Taylor, T.J.; Page, G.G; Campbell, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Epidemiological studies have consistently reported rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in women that are twice that of men. In men and women, PTSD has been associated with comorbid medical conditions, medical symptoms and lower self-rating of health. In low-income urban women, rates of PTSD are even more elevated than in suburban women and may be related to observed health disparities. Methods In this study, 250 women seeking healthcare at an urban clinic were interviewed for a PTSD diagnosis, major depressive disorder (MDD), the experience of traumatic events, the experience of current and past common medical conditions and symptoms, and subjective rating of health. A chart review was used to assess healthcare use in the past year. Results More current (5.2 vs. 3.8, p?medical conditions (4.6 vs. 3.3, p?medical care to women. PMID:19183098

  17. Epidemiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Portugal: Prevalence, Clinical Characterization, and Medical Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Guiomar; Ataide, Assuncao; Marques, Carla; Miguel, Teresa S.; Coutinho, Ana Margarida; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Goncalves, Esmeralda; Lopes, Nazare Mendes; Rodrigues, Vitor; Carmona da Mota, Henrique; Vicente, Astrid Moura

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and identify its clinical characterization, and medical conditions in a paediatric population in Portugal. A school survey was conducted in elementary schools, targeting 332 808 school-aged children in the mainland and 10 910 in the Azores islands.

  18. Academic and Family Conditions Associated with Intrinsic Academic Motivation in Japanese Medical Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabea, Yasuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Intrinsic academic motivation is one of the most important psychological concepts in education, and it is related to academic outcomes in medical students. This study examined the relationships between academic and family conditions and intrinsic academic motivation. Design: Cross-sectional design. Setting: The study group consisted of

  19. Evaluation of treatment effects in obese children with co-morbid medical or psychiatric conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for effective treatments for pediatric overweight is well known. We evaluated the applicability of an evidence-based treatment in an applied clinic setting that includes children with severe obesity and comorbid medical or psychiatric conditions. Forty-eight overweight children and their fa...

  20. Academic and Family Conditions Associated with Intrinsic Academic Motivation in Japanese Medical Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabea, Yasuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Intrinsic academic motivation is one of the most important psychological concepts in education, and it is related to academic outcomes in medical students. This study examined the relationships between academic and family conditions and intrinsic academic motivation. Design: Cross-sectional design. Setting: The study group consisted of…

  1. Coping and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents with a Chronic Medical Condition: A Search for Intervention Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to find relevant coping factors for the development of psychological intervention programs for adolescents with a chronic medical condition. A wide range of coping techniques were studied, including cognitive coping, behavioral coping and goal adjustment coping. A total of 176 adolescents participated. They were

  2. Epidemiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Portugal: Prevalence, Clinical Characterization, and Medical Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Guiomar; Ataide, Assuncao; Marques, Carla; Miguel, Teresa S.; Coutinho, Ana Margarida; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Goncalves, Esmeralda; Lopes, Nazare Mendes; Rodrigues, Vitor; Carmona da Mota, Henrique; Vicente, Astrid Moura

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and identify its clinical characterization, and medical conditions in a paediatric population in Portugal. A school survey was conducted in elementary schools, targeting 332 808 school-aged children in the mainland and 10 910 in the Azores islands.…

  3. Coping and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents with a Chronic Medical Condition: A Search for Intervention Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to find relevant coping factors for the development of psychological intervention programs for adolescents with a chronic medical condition. A wide range of coping techniques were studied, including cognitive coping, behavioral coping and goal adjustment coping. A total of 176 adolescents participated. They were…

  4. The control of pre-existing extensional structures on the evolution of the southern sector of the Aconcagua fold and thrust belt, southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giambiagi, Laura B.; Alvarez, P. Pamela; Godoy, Estanislao; Ramos, Victor A.

    2003-07-01

    The Aconcagua fold and thrust belt, located in the Andean mountains at 3230' to 34S, has been described as a classic model of a thin-skinned thrust belt. However, new structural data from its southern sector have shown that it has a complex structural framework reflected in multiple Mesozoic extensional phases, overprinted by structural inversion, as well as thin- and thick-skinned tectonics. Two major superimposed extensional structural styles have been identified for the Mesozoic characterized by distinctly oriented stress fields. A key role in the evolution of this part of the fold and thrust belt was played by a Late Triassic to Early Jurassic depocentre and by Late Jurassic block faulting. Shortening was accommodated by a combination of inversion of pre-existing normal faults, development of footwall short cuts and both thin and thick-skinned thrusting. Synrift and postrift sedimentary rocks were uplifted by reactivation of normal faults, with further shortening along newly formed thin-skinned thrust faults. The geometry of thin-skinned fault systems is controlled by the architecture of the rift basin, competent footwalls forming barriers to the lateral propagation of detachments.

  5. Genome-wide reinforcement of cohesin binding at pre-existing cohesin sites in response to ionizing radiation in human cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom-Jun; Li, Yehua; Zhang, Jinglan; Xi, Yuanxin; Li, Yumei; Yang, Tao; Jung, Sung Yun; Pan, Xuewen; Chen, Rui; Li, Wei; Wang, Yi; Qin, Jun

    2010-07-23

    The cohesin complex plays a central role in genome maintenance by regulation of chromosome segregation in mitosis and DNA damage response (DDR) in other phases of the cell cycle. The ATM/ATR phosphorylates SMC1 and SMC3, two core components of the cohesin complex to regulate checkpoint signaling and DNA repair. In this report, we show that the genome-wide binding of SMC1 and SMC3 after ionizing radiation (IR) is enhanced by reinforcing pre-existing cohesin binding sites in human cancer cells. We demonstrate that ATM and SMC3 phosphorylation at Ser(1083) regulate this process. We also demonstrate that acetylation of SMC3 at Lys(105) and Lys(106) is induced by IR and this induction depends on the acetyltransferase ESCO1 as well as the ATM/ATR kinases. Consistently, both ESCO1 and SMC3 acetylation are required for intra-S phase checkpoint and cellular survival after IR. Although both IR-induced acetylation and phosphorylation of SMC3 are under the control of ATM/ATR, the two forms of modification are independent of each other and both are required to promote reinforcement of SMC3 binding to cohesin sites. Thus, SMC3 modifications is a mechanism for genome-wide reinforcement of cohesin binding in response to DNA damage response in human cells and enhanced cohesion is a downstream event of DDR. PMID:20501661

  6. Pre-existing anti-Salmonella vector immunity prevents the development of protective antigen-specific CD8 T-cell frequencies against murine listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Sevil Domènech, Victòria E; Panthel, Klaus; Meinel, Katrin M; Winter, Sebastian E; Rüssmann, Holger

    2007-10-01

    Our laboratory has focused its research on the use of the type III secretion system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to translocate heterologous antigens directly into the cytosol of antigen-presenting cells. We have previously reported that the single oral immunization of mice with a recombinant Salmonella aroA/sptP mutant strain expressing the translocated Yersinia outer protein E fused to the immunodominant antigen p60 from Listeria monocytogenes in a type III-mediated fashion results in the efficient induction of p60-specific CD8 T cells and confers protection against a lethal Listeria challenge infection. In the present study, we determined whether pre-existing anti-Salmonella vector immunity influences the induction of p60-specific CD8 T cells and modulates protective immunity against listeriosis after oral vaccination with recombinant Salmonella. After single oral immunization, the Salmonella aroA/sptP double mutant strain was found to colonize spleens of mice for 21days. In contrast, the period of colonization was significantly shortened to 6days due to anti-Salmonella vector immunity after second oral immunization. The latter scenario led to the induction of low-level frequencies of antigen-specific CD8 T cells. Compared to the significantly higher numbers of p60-specific T lymphocytes elicited after single oral immunization, the low amount of Listeria-specific CD8 T cells did not confer protection against listeriosis. PMID:17913544

  7. Pattern of pre-existing IgG subclass responses to a panel of asexual stage malaria antigens reported during the lengthy dry season in Daraweesh, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Nasr, A; Iriemenam, N C; Troye-Blomberg, M; Arnot, D; Theander, T G; Berzins, K; Giha, H A; Elghazali, G

    2011-10-01

    The anti-malarial IgG immune response during the lengthy and dry season in areas of low malaria transmission as in Eastern Sudan is largely unknown. In this study, ELISA was used for the measurement of pre-existing total IgG and IgG subclasses to a panel of malaria antigens, MSP2-3D7, MSP2-FC27, AMA-1 and Pf332-C231. The results showed that the antibody responses were predominantly age dependent, antigen specific, and their lifespan was at least 5-6 month long. Generally, the IgG3 was most abundant IgG subclass, and the most recognized antigen was Pf332-C231. Furthermore, the correlation between the levels of IgG subclasses was strongest between IgG1 and IgG3, which were more predictive to the total IgG levels. Finally, the response pattern of each of the IgG subclasses to the different test antigens that were spanning the dry season and the correlation between these responses were described in details for the first time. PMID:21645028

  8. [Efficient and durable gene delivery of self complementary adeno-associated virus 6 vector and impact of pre-existing immunity].

    PubMed

    Tu, Lingli; Sun, Lan; Xue, Jianxin; Zhang, Yu; Lu, You

    2012-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors are promising vectors for human gene therapy. However, AAV-mediated gene transduction can be hampered because of the pre-existing neutralized natural antibodies (NAbs) in primates. We evaluated transduction efficiency of rAAV6 expressing human alpha-1-anti-trypsin (hAAT) vectors in murine models, and found that these vectors showed stable and high levels of transgene expression. Fluorescence imaging showed that AAV6 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) by intravenous administration predominantly targeted the liver, but led to self-limited hepatitis. Besides, our study evaluated epidemiology of anti-AAV6 NAb in non-human primates (NHPs) by NAb assay in vitro. The result indicated that 52.17% of NHPs had detectable NAb at 1:5 dilution rate. In vivo passive transfer experiment showed that AAV6 specific neutralizing antibody, even though with low NAb titer, could significantly inhibit rAAV6 transduction. PMID:23469547

  9. Effects of pre-existing hearing loss on proposed ANSI S12.13 outcomes for characterizing hearing conservation program effectiveness: follow-up investigation.

    PubMed

    Simpson, T H; Amos, N; Rintelmann, W F

    1998-04-01

    Draft ANSI S12.13 1991 Standard Evaluating the Effectiveness of Hearing Conservation Programs presents statistical protocols purportedly sensitive to temporary threshold shift (TTS) in occupational hearing conservation program (HCP) audiometric databases. Because it is well established that less TTS is found in humans with hearing loss than in those with essentially normal hearing, one might predict baseline hearing level to be a confounding variable in interpreting ANSI S12.13 outcomes, with better-hearing industrial populations tending to demonstrate greater year-to-year audiometric variability than poorer-hearing groups. However, in a large industrial sample from the public domain audiometric database, poorer-hearing groups systematically demonstrated greater audiometric threshold variability than better-hearing groups, and ANSI S12.13 outcome magnitudes were highly positively correlated to baseline hearing levels. These findings generally do not support notions that ANSI S12.13 outcomes clearly provide indirect measures of TTS. HCP managers should exercise extreme caution in interpreting ANSI S12.13 outcomes to rate overall program performance. In particular, HCP managers should not rely upon these outcomes for decisions regarding hearing protection policies without careful consideration of pre-existing hearing loss in the populations involved. PMID:9564673

  10. Twenty-five additional cases of trisomy 9 mosaic: Birth information, medical conditions, and developmental status.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Deborah A; Campbell, Emily

    2015-05-01

    Limited literature exists on children and adults diagnosed with the mosaic form of trisomy 9. Data from the Tracking Rare Incidence Syndromes (TRIS) project has provided physical characteristics and medical conditions for 14 individuals. This article provides TRIS Survey results of 25 additional cases at two data points (birth and survey completion) as well as developmental status. Results confirmed a number of phenotypic features and medical conditions. In addition, a number of cardiac anomalies were reported along with feeding and respiratory difficulties in the immediate postnatal period. In addition, developmental status data indicated a range in functioning level up to skills in the 36 and 48-month range. Strengths were also noted across the sample in language and communication, fine motor and social-emotional development. Implications for professionals caring for children with this genetic condition are offered. PMID:25755087

  11. Rare medical conditions and suggestive past-life memories: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; dos Santos Camargo, Luizete; Lucchetti, Alessandra L G; Schwartz, Gary E; Nasri, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    We aim to report the case of a 38-year-old male with suggestive past-life memories during a regression session and to show how these memories were related to unusual medical conditions: (1) isolated obstruction of the right coronary artery in a young patient, (2) omental infarction, and (3) right aortic arch with isolation of the left subclavian artery. These conditions were related to the following suggestive past-life memories: (1) a priest who committed suicide with a crucifix nailed to his chest and (2) a medieval weapon (skull flail) hitting his cervical and left back region. There was an intriguing relation between the patient's suggestive past-life memories and rare medical conditions. In this article, the authors highlight possible explanations, rarity of findings, and similarities/differences from previous cases and potential pitfalls in this area. PMID:24199777

  12. College Health Service Capacity to Support Youth With Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Katherine; Scherer, Emily A.; Kelemen, Skyler; Weitzman, Elissa R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Twenty percent of US youth have a chronic medical condition and many attend college. Guidelines for transition from pediatric to adult care do not address college health services, and little is known about their capacity to identify, support, and provide care for these youth. The objective of this study was to describe college health center policies, practices, and resources for youth with chronic medical conditions (YCMC). METHODS: Survey of medical directors from health centers of a representative sample of 200 4-year US colleges with ?400 enrolled undergraduate students. Patterns of identification, management, and support for youth with a general chronic medical condition and with asthma, diabetes, and depression, were investigated; ?2 and Fisher exact tests were used to ascertain differences by institutional demographics. RESULTS: Directors at 153 institutions completed the survey (76.5% response rate). Overall, 42% of schools had no system to identify YCMC. However, almost a third (31%) did identify and add to a registry of incoming YCMC on review of medical history, more likely in private (P < .001) and small (<5000 students, P = .002) colleges; 24% of health centers contacted YCMC to check-in/make initial appointments. Most institutions could manage asthma and depression (83% and 69%, respectively); 51% could manage diabetes on campus. CONCLUSIONS: Relatively few US colleges have health systems to identify and contact YCMC, although many centers have capacity to provide primary care and management of some conditions. Guidelines for transition should address policy and practices for pediatricians and colleges to enhance comanagement of affected youth. PMID:25349315

  13. A Review of Therapeutic Uses of Mirtazapine in Psychiatric and Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Voronovich, Zoya; Carley, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature examining the use of mirtazapine with an emphasis on its therapeutic benefits for psychiatric patients with comorbid medical conditions. Data Sources: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Global Health, and AGRICOLA were searched using the terms mirtazapine OR Remeron. Limits were English language, human, year 1980–2012, treatment and prevention, and therapy. Study Selection: Two hundred ninety-three articles were identified. Data Extraction: Identified articles were reviewed with a focus on indications and therapeutic benefits in patients with medical comorbidities. Results: Mirtazapine is an effective antidepressant with unique mechanisms of action. It is characterized by a relatively rapid onset of action, high response and remission rates, a favorable side-effect profile, and several unique therapeutic benefits over other antidepressants. Mirtazapine has also shown promise in treating some medical disorders, including neurologic conditions, and ameliorating some of the associated debilitating symptoms of weight loss, insomnia, and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Conclusions: Mirtazapine offers clinicians multiple therapeutic advantages especially when treating patients with comorbid medical illness. PMID:24511451

  14. Medical conditions associated with driving cessation in community-dwelling, ambulatory elders.

    PubMed

    Campbell, M K; Bush, T L; Hale, W E

    1993-07-01

    The decision to stop driving leads to severe contraction of independence, and most localities do not curtail driving privileges in impaired elders. In a population of community-based, ambulatory individuals 70-96 years old, annual medical screening showed that 276 of 1,656 (16.7 +/- 1.8%) who reported driving regularly in the past do not currently drive. The cessation of driving behavior was examined in terms of specific medical conditions occurring within the past 5 years. Retired drivers were disproportionately female, and driving cessation risk rose with age. Age-sex-adjusted logistic regression found that six conditions explained about 50 percent of the decisions to stop driving: macular degeneration; retinal hemorrhage; any deficit in Activities of Daily Living; Parkinson's disease; stroke-related residual paralysis or weakness; and syncope. Strikingly, only 1.8 percent of those who stopped driving had ever had a license revoked; 58.7 percent reported voluntarily stopping; 31.9 percent gave health or medical reasons. Clearly, the decision to cede driving privileges is complex and not dependent solely on medical problems. PMID:8315247

  15. Receipt of Prescription Contraception by Commercially Insured Women With Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    DeNoble, Anna E.; Hall, Kelli S.; Xu, Xiao; Zochowski, Melissa K.; Piehl, Kenneth; Dalton, Vanessa K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess differences in receipt of prescription contraception among women with and without chronic medical conditions. Methods This observational study used 3 years of administrative claims records for insured women aged 2145 years who were enrolled in a commercial insurance company in Michigan between 2004 and 2009. Women were considered to have a chronic medical condition if they had at least two claims for one of the following conditions, in order of prevalence in our study population: hypertension, asthma, hypothyroidism, diabetes, obesity, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, or systemic lupus erythematosus. Our primary outcome was receipt of prescription contraception, defined by a pharmacy claim or diagnostic or procedural code. We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate the association of chronic condition status with the odds of receiving prescription contraception within 3 years, adjusting for age, community-level socioeconomic status, total outpatient visits, and cervical cancer screening. Results Of 11,649 women studied, 16.0% (n=1,862) had at least one of the chronic conditions we considered. Of those with a chronic condition, 33.5% (n=623) received prescription contraception during the 3-year study period compared to 41.1% (n=4,018) of those without a chronic condition (p<0.001). After adjusting for covariates, women with a chronic condition remained less likely than women without a chronic condition to have received prescription contraception (adjusted odds ratio=0.85; 95% CI 0.76, 0.96; p=0.010). Conclusion Despite a greater risk for adverse outcomes with an unplanned pregnancy, women with these chronic conditions were less likely to receive prescription contraception. PMID:24807345

  16. 42 CFR 418.106 - Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Hospices may only contract for durable medical equipment services with a durable medical equipment supplier that meets the Medicare DMEPOS Supplier Quality and Accreditation Standards at 42 CFR 424.57....

  17. 42 CFR 418.106 - Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Hospices may only contract for durable medical equipment services with a durable medical equipment supplier that meets the Medicare DMEPOS Supplier Quality and Accreditation Standards at 42 CFR 424.57....

  18. The efficacy of sodium bicarbonate in preventing contrast-induced nephropathy in patients with pre-existing renal insufficiency: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Liang, Long; Chen, Wenbo; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore the efficacy of sodium bicarbonate in preventing contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). Methods We searched PubMed, Medline and the Cochrane Library from 1 January 2004 to 1 August 2014. The effect estimate was expressed as a pooled OR with 95% CI, using the fixed-effects or random-effects model. Results 20 randomised controlled trials (n=4280) were identified. Hydration with sodium bicarbonate was associated with a significant decrease in CIN among patients with pre-existing renal insufficiency (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.96; p=0.027). However, moderate heterogeneity was noted across trials (I2=48%; p=0.008). Subgroup analyses indicated a better effect of sodium bicarbonate in studies using low-osmolar (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.93; p=0.024) compared with iso-osmolar contrast agents (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.34; p=0.351). The odds of CIN with sodium bicarbonate were lower in studies including only patients undergoing emergency (OR 0.16, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.51; p=0.002) compared with elective procedures (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.06; p=0.105). Sodium bicarbonate was more beneficial in patients given a bolus injection before procedures (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.54; p=0.004) compared with continuous infusion (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.05; p=0.091). Sodium bicarbonate plus N-acetylcysteine (OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.79; p=0.024) was better than sodium bicarbonate alone (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.03; p=0.071). The effect of sodium bicarbonate was considered greater in papers published before (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.41; p=0.000) compared with after 2008 (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.16; p=0.302). However, no significant differences were found in mortality (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.32; p=0.263) or requirement for dialysis (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.52 to 2.25; p=0.841). Conclusions Sodium bicarbonate is effective in preventing CIN among patients with pre-existing renal insufficiency. However, it fails to lower the risks of dialysis and mortality and therefore cannot improve the clinical prognosis of patients with CIN. PMID:25783425

  19. The elephant in the room: ethical issues associated with rare and expensive medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Constantine D; Mavroudis, Constantine; Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    The treatment of rare and expensive medical conditions is one of the defining qualities of paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery. Increasing concerns over healthcare resource allocation are challenging the merits of treating more expensive forms of congenital heart disease, and this trend will almost certainly continue. In this manuscript, the problems of resource allocation for rare and expensive medical conditions are described from philosophical and economic perspectives. The argument is made that current economic models are limited in the ability to assess the value of treating expensive and rare forms of congenital heart disease. Further, multi-disciplinary approaches are necessary to best determine the merits of treating a patient population such as those with significant congenital heart disease that sometimes requires enormous healthcare resources. PMID:26675614

  20. Mechanical Behavior of Brittle Rock-Like Specimens with Pre-existing Fissures Under Uniaxial Loading: Experimental Studies and Particle Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ri-hong; Cao, Ping; Lin, Hang; Pu, Cheng-zhi; Ou, Ke

    2016-03-01

    Joints and fissures with similar orientation or characteristics are common in natural rocks; the inclination and density of the fissures affect the mechanical properties and failure mechanism of the rock mass. However, the strength, crack coalescence pattern, and failure mode of rock specimens containing multi-fissures have not been studied comprehensively. In this paper, combining similar material testing and discrete element numerical method (PFC2D), the peak strength and failure characteristics of rock-like materials with multi-fissures are explored. Rock-like specimens were made of cement and sand and pre-existing fissures created by inserting steel shims into cement mortar paste and removing them during curing. The peak strength of multi-fissure specimens depends on the fissure angle α (which is measured counterclockwise from horizontal) and fissure number ( N f). Under uniaxial compressional loading, the peak strength increased with increasing α. The material strength was lowest for α = 25°, and highest for α = 90°. The influence of N f on the peak strength depended on α. For α = 25° and 45°, N f had a strong effect on the peak strength, while for higher α values, especially for the 90° sample, there were no obvious changes in peak strength with different N f. Under uniaxial compression, the coalescence modes between the fissures can be classified into three categories: S-mode, T-mode, and M-mode. Moreover, the failure mode can be classified into four categories: mixed failure, shear failure, stepped path failure, and intact failure. The failure mode of the specimen depends on α and N f. The peak strength and failure modes in the numerically simulated and experimental results are in good agreement.

  1. Influence of pre-existing basement faults on the structural evolution of the Zagros Simply Folded belt: 3D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, Jonas B.; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    The Simply Folded Belt of the Zagros orogen is characterized by elongated fold trains symptomatically defining the geomorphology along this mountain range. The Zagros orogen results from the collision of the Arabian and the Eurasian plates. The Simply Folded Belt is located southwest of the Zagros suture zone. An up to 2 km thick salt horizon below the sedimentary sequence enables mechanical and structural detachment from the underlying Arabian basement. Nevertheless, deformation within the basement influences the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt. It has been shown that thrusts in form of reactivated normal faults can trigger out-of-sequence deformation within the sedimentary stratigraphy. Furthermore, deeply rooted strike-slip faults, such as the Kazerun faults between the Fars zone in the southeast and the Dezful embayment and the Izeh zone, are largely dispersing into the overlying stratigraphy, strongly influencing the tectonic evolution and mechanical behaviour. The aim of this study is to reveal the influence of basement thrusts and strike-slip faults on the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt depending on the occurrence of intercrustal weak horizons (Hormuz salt) and the rheology and thermal structure of the basement. Therefore, we present high-resolution 3D thermo-mechnical models with pre-existing, inversively reactivated normal faults or strike-slip faults within the basement. Numerical models are based on finite difference, marker-in-cell technique with (power-law) visco-plastic rheology accounting for brittle deformation. Preliminary results show that deep tectonic structures present in the basement may have crucial effects on the morphology and evolution of a fold-and-thrust belt above a major detachment horizon.

  2. Online 2D-LC-MS/MS assay to quantify therapeutic protein in human serum in the presence of pre-existing antidrug antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yinghua; Zhang, Guodong; Yang, Jinsong; Qiu, Yongchang; McCauley, Thomas; Pan, Luying; Wu, Jiang

    2015-08-18

    The formation of antidrug antibodies (ADA) can interfere with the accurate quantitation of therapeutic proteins, leading to significantly underestimated drug concentrations and confounded pharmacokinetic (PK) data interpretation. Although highly desirable, development of ADA-tolerant bioanalytical methods enabling unbiased measurement of both free and ADA-bound drug presents a considerable challenge. We report herein the development and validation of a robust LC-MS assay capable of quantifying therapeutic protein immunoglobulin A1 protease (IgAP) in human serum in the presence of pre-existing anti-IgAP antibodies. The procedure included sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) denaturation and chemical reduction of serum proteins to dissociate ADA-drug bindings, followed by tryptic digestion of protein pellets and subsequent LC-MS analysis of the surrogate IgAP peptide using stable isotope labeled peptide internal standard. Substantial enhancements in the sensitivity and selectivity were achieved by the combination of online two-dimensional reversed-phase LC (2D-LC) operated in high and low pH buffers, respectively, for efficient enrichment and quantitation of the surrogate peptide by multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry. Unlike ligand-binding assay, our method is not prone to interferences from ADA, allowing accurate and precise measurement of the IgAP in the range of 0.05 to 10 ?g/mL in 25 ?L of human serum with a wide range of anti-IgAP antibody levels. The intra- and inter-run precision (coefficient of variation (CV%)) was within 11.5% and 10.5%, respectively, and the bias was within 7.1% for all quality control (QC) concentrations. With little modification, the described method can readily be applicable to the quantitation of other biotherapeutic proteins in the ADA-positive clinical matrices. PMID:26237058

  3. Estimating the Impact of Workplace Bullying: Humanistic and Economic Burden among Workers with Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fattori, A.; Neri, L.; Aguglia, E.; Bellomo, A.; Bisogno, A.; Camerino, D.; Carpiniello, B.; Cassin, A.; Costa, G.; De Fazio, P.; Di Sciascio, G.; Favaretto, G.; Fraticelli, C.; Giannelli, R.; Leone, S.; Maniscalco, T.; Marchesi, C.; Mauri, M.; Mencacci, C.; Polselli, G.; Quartesan, R.; Risso, F.; Sciaretta, A.; Vaggi, M.; Vender, S.; Viora, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although the prevalence of work-limiting diseases is increasing, the interplay between occupational exposures and chronic medical conditions remains largely uncharacterized. Research has shown the detrimental effects of workplace bullying but very little is known about the humanistic and productivity cost in victims with chronic illnesses. We sought to assess work productivity losses and health disutility associated with bullying among subjects with chronic medical conditions. Methods. Participants (N = 1717) with chronic diseases answered a self-administered survey including sociodemographic and clinical data, workplace bullying experience, the SF-12 questionnaire, and the Work Productivity Activity Impairment questionnaire. Results. The prevalence of significant impairment was higher among victims of workplace bullying as compared to nonvictims (SF-12 PCS: 55.5% versus 67.9%, p < 0.01; SF-12 MCS: 59.4% versus 74.3%, p < 0.01). The adjusted marginal overall productivity cost of workplace bullying ranged from 13.9% to 17.4%, corresponding to Italian Purchase Power Parity (PPP) 2010 US$ 4182–5236 yearly. Association estimates were independent and not moderated by concurrent medical conditions. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that the burden on workers' quality of life and productivity associated with workplace bullying is substantial. This study provides key data to inform policy-making and prioritize occupational health interventions. PMID:26557692

  4. Estimating the Impact of Workplace Bullying: Humanistic and Economic Burden among Workers with Chronic Medical Conditions.

    PubMed

    Fattori, A; Neri, L; Aguglia, E; Bellomo, A; Bisogno, A; Camerino, D; Carpiniello, B; Cassin, A; Costa, G; De Fazio, P; Di Sciascio, G; Favaretto, G; Fraticelli, C; Giannelli, R; Leone, S; Maniscalco, T; Marchesi, C; Mauri, M; Mencacci, C; Polselli, G; Quartesan, R; Risso, F; Sciaretta, A; Vaggi, M; Vender, S; Viora, U

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although the prevalence of work-limiting diseases is increasing, the interplay between occupational exposures and chronic medical conditions remains largely uncharacterized. Research has shown the detrimental effects of workplace bullying but very little is known about the humanistic and productivity cost in victims with chronic illnesses. We sought to assess work productivity losses and health disutility associated with bullying among subjects with chronic medical conditions. Methods. Participants (N = 1717) with chronic diseases answered a self-administered survey including sociodemographic and clinical data, workplace bullying experience, the SF-12 questionnaire, and the Work Productivity Activity Impairment questionnaire. Results. The prevalence of significant impairment was higher among victims of workplace bullying as compared to nonvictims (SF-12 PCS: 55.5% versus 67.9%, p < 0.01; SF-12 MCS: 59.4% versus 74.3%, p < 0.01). The adjusted marginal overall productivity cost of workplace bullying ranged from 13.9% to 17.4%, corresponding to Italian Purchase Power Parity (PPP) 2010 US$ 4182-5236 yearly. Association estimates were independent and not moderated by concurrent medical conditions. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that the burden on workers' quality of life and productivity associated with workplace bullying is substantial. This study provides key data to inform policy-making and prioritize occupational health interventions. PMID:26557692

  5. Depression and Social Functioning Among Preschool Children with Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Carmen E.; Luby, Joan L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relations between depressive symptoms, social behavior, and chronic medical illness in preschool children. Study design Caregivers of 273 preschool children (3.0 to 5.2 years of age) completed questionnaires regarding preschoolers physical health, depressive symptoms, and social behavior. Interviewers determined ratings for preschoolers impairment in social and behavioral functioning. Analyses examined the relationships between chronic medical conditions, depressive symptoms, peer acceptance/rejection, and social behavior. Results Chronic illness was significantly associated with early-onset depressive symptoms and impairment in several social functioning domains, even after accounting for socioeconomic status. Regression analyses demonstrated that the number of health conditions predicted higher depression scores, frequency of asocial behaviors, and impairment in daycare role cooperation and behavior towards others. Preschoolers with at least one medical condition experienced a greater frequency of peer rejection and bullying compared with healthy peers. Depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between illness and asocial behavior. Conclusions There is a need for greater attention to depression and difficulties in social functioning in preschool children with chronic illness. Given the potential impact on later developmental and mental health outcomes, primary care physicians should now be attentive to depressive symptoms in chronically ill preschoolers. PMID:18534206

  6. Concomitant dietary supplement and prescription medication use is prevalent among US adults with doctor-informed medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Farina, Emily K; Austin, Krista G; Lieberman, Harris R

    2014-11-01

    Information on patterns of concomitant dietary supplement (DS) and prescription medication (PM) use among US adults is limited. Thus, the prevalence of concomitant DS and PM use as a function of doctor-informed medical conditions (DIMC) was determined in a cross-sectional, observational study of a nationally representative sample of noninstitutionalized, civilian adults aged ?20 years in the United States (N=9,950) from the 2005-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Data were weighted for the complex, multistage, probability sampling design. Approximately one third (34.3%) of all US adults reported concomitant DS and PM use (approximately one in three adults). The prevalence of use was significantly higher among those with vs without a DIMC (47.3% vs 17.3%). Adults with a DIMC were more than two and a half times more likely to concomitantly use DS and PM than adults without a DIMC, after adjustment for sex, age, education, and household income. Multivitamin plus other ingredient(s), followed by antacids and multivitamin plus botanical ingredient(s), were the most prevalent DS categories used with a PM among those with and without a DIMC. The most prevalent PM categories used with a DS were cardiovascular agents (among those with a DIMC) and hormones (among those without a DIMC). These findings demonstrate that presence of a DIMC may be a risk factor for concomitant DS and PM use among US adults. Multivitamins containing nonvitamin or mineral ingredients are more commonly used than standard multivitamins with PM by US adults. This may be an emerging trend that warrants further consideration. PMID:24703929

  7. Influence of Dopaminergic Medication on Conditioned Pain Modulation in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Buhmann, Carsten; Forkmann, Katarina; Diedrich, Sabrina; Wesemann, Katharina; Bingel, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain is highly prevalent in patients with Parkinsons disease (PD), but little is known about the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. The susceptibility to pain is known to depend on ascending and descending pathways. Because parts of the descending pain inhibitory system involve dopaminergic pathways, dysregulations in dopaminergic transmission might contribute to altered pain processing in PD. Deficits in endogenous pain inhibition can be assessed using conditioned pain modulation (CPM) paradigms. Methods Applying such a paradigm, we investigated i) whether CPM responses differ between PD patients and healthy controls, ii) whether they are influenced by dopaminergic medication and iii) whether there are effects of disease-specific factors. 25 patients with idiopathic PD and 30 healthy age- and gender-matched controls underwent an established CPM paradigm combining heat pain test stimuli at the forearm and the cold pressor task on the contralateral foot as the conditioning stimulus. PD patients were tested under dopaminergic medication and after at least 12 hours of medication withdrawal. Results No significant differences between CPM responses of PD patients and healthy controls or between PD patients on and off medication were found. These findings suggest (i) that CPM is insensitive to dopaminergic modulations and (ii) that PD is not related to general deficits in descending pain inhibition beyond the known age-related decline. However, at a trend level, we found differences between PD subtypes (akinetic-rigid, tremor-dominant, mixed) with the strongest impairment of pain inhibition in the akinetic-rigid subtype. Conclusions There were no significant differences between CPM responses of patients compared to healthy controls or between patients on and off medication. Differences between PD subtypes at a trend level point towards different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the three PD subtypes which warrant further investigation and potentially differential therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26270817

  8. Medical costs and lost productivity from health conditions at volatile organic compound-contaminated Superfund sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lybarger, J.A.; Spengler, R.F.; Brown, D.R.; Lee, R.; Vogt, D.P.; Perhac, R.M. Jr.

    1998-10-01

    This paper estimates the health costs at Superfund sites for conditions associated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water. Health conditions were identified from published literature and registry information as occurring at excess rates in VOC-exposed populations. These health conditions were: (1) some categories of birth defects, (2) urinary tract disorders, (3) diabetes, (4) eczema and skin conditions, (5) anemia, (6) speech and hearing impairments in children under 10 years of age, and (7) stroke. Excess rates were used to estimate the excess number of cases occurring among the total population living within one-half mile of 258 Superfund sites. These sites had evidence of completed human exposure pathways for VOCs in drinking water. For each type of medical condition, an individual`s expected medical costs, long-term care costs, and lost work time due to illness or premature mortality were estimated. Costs were calculated to be approximately $330 million per year, in the absence of any remediation or public health intervention programs. The results indicate the general magnitude of the economic burden associated with a limited number of contaminants at a portion of all Superfund sites, thus suggesting that the burden would be greater than that estimated in this study if all contaminants at all Superfund sites could be taken into account.

  9. Discovering medical conditions associated with periodontitis using linked electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Mary Regina; Hripcsak, George; Albers, David J.; Wei, Ying; Wilcox, Adam B.; Wei, Jin; Li, Jianhua; Lin, Steven; Breene, Michael; Myers, Ronnie; Zimmerman, John; Papapanou, Panos N.; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    Aim To use linked electronic medical and dental records to discover associations between periodontitis and medical conditions independent of a priori hypotheses. Materials and Methods This case-control study included 2475 patients who underwent dental treatment at the College of Dental Medicine at Columbia University and medical treatment at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. Our cases are patients who received periodontal treatment and our controls are patients who received dental maintenance but no periodontal treatment. Chi-square analysis was performed for medical treatment codes and logistic regression was used to adjust for confounders. Results Our method replicated several important periodontitis associations in a largely Hispanic population, including diabetes mellitus type I (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.30–1.99, p < 0.001) and type II (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.22–1.67, p < 0.001), hypertension (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.10–1.37, p < 0.001), hypercholesterolaemia (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.07–1.38, p = 0.004), hyperlipidaemia (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.06–1.43, p = 0.008) and conditions pertaining to pregnancy and childbirth (OR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.32–7.21, p = 0.014). We also found a previously unreported association with benign prostatic hyperplasia (OR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.05–2.10, p = 0.026) after adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, lipid and circulatory system conditions, alcohol and tobacco abuse. Conclusions This study contributes a high-throughput method for associating periodontitis with systemic diseases using linked electronic records. PMID:23495669

  10. Use of an emergency medical pictorial communication book during simulated disaster conditions.

    PubMed

    Behar, Solomon; Benson Ii, Richard; Kurzweil, Ami; Azen, Colleen; Nager, Alan L

    2013-10-01

    During disasters, the needs of victims outstrip available resources. Rapid assessment of patients must be performed; however, language barriers can be an impediment to efficient patient assessment, especially if interpreter resources are limited. Dependency on interpretive services requiring technology such a telephones, cell phones, and video conferencing may be inefficient, as they may be unavailable during disaster conditions. A low-tech, portable tool that aids in communication with non-English speakers would be beneficial. The medical emergency communication (MEC) book, developed at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has the potential to be a useful tool in this capacity. The goal of this pilot study was to compare the accuracy of a newly developed disaster-focused medical history obtained from Spanish-speaking patients or caregivers using the MEC book, compared to a control group with whom no book was used. Our hypothesis was that use of the MEC book improves accuracy of medical history taking between English-only speaking health care workers and Spanish-speaking patients better than a monolingual clinician trying to take a medical history without it. We anticipated a higher overall score in the group of subjects whose histories were taken using the MEC book than in the control group. Patient satisfaction with the MEC book also was measured. PMID:24274127

  11. Medical Treatment of Aortic Aneurysms in Marfan Syndrome and other Heritable Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Christine H. Attenhofer; Greutmann, Matthias; Connolly, Heidi M.; Weber, Roland; Rohrbach, Marianne; Oxenius, Angela; Kretschmar, Oliver; Luscher, Thomas F.; Matyas, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms can be triggered by genetic disorders such as Marfan syndrome (MFS) and related aortic diseases as well as by inflammatory disorders such as giant cell arteritis or atherosclerosis. In all these conditions, cardiovascular risk factors, such as systemic arterial hypertension, may contribute to faster rate of aneurysm progression. Optimal medical management to prevent progressive aortic dilatation and aortic dissection is unknown. β-blockers have been the mainstay of medical treatment for many years despite limited evidence of beneficial effects. Recently, losartan, an angiotensin II type I receptor antagonist (ARB), has shown promising results in a mouse model of MFS and subsequently in humans with MFS and hence is increasingly used. Several ongoing trials comparing losartan to β-blockers and/or placebo will better define the role of ARBs in the near future. In addition, other medications, such as statins and tetracyclines have demonstrated potential benefit in experimental aortic aneurysm studies. Given the advances in our understanding of molecular mechanisms triggering aortic dilatation and dissection, individualized management tailored to the underlying genetic defect may be on the horizon of individualized medicine. We anticipate that ongoing research will address the question whether such genotype/pathogenesis-driven treatments can replace current phenotype/syndrome-driven strategies and whether other forms of aortopathies should be treated similarly. In this work, we review currently used and promising medical treatment options for patients with heritable aortic aneurysmal disorders. PMID:24527681

  12. Leisure Engagement: Medical Conditions, Mobility Difficulties, and Activity LimitationsA Later Life Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ingeborg; Nyqvist, Fredrica; Gustafson, Yngve; Nygrd, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aims to investigate the impact of medical conditions, mobility difficulties, and activity limitations on older people's engagement in leisure activities. Methods. The analyses are based on a cross regional survey carried out in 2010 in the Bothnia region (Northern Sweden and Western Finland). A posted questionnaire, which included questions on different aspects of leisure engagement, medical history, and health, was sent out to older persons in the region. The final sample consisted of 5435 persons aged 65, 70, 75, and 80 years. The data was analyzed by using ordinary least squares (OLS) multivariate regression. Results. The most important predictor of leisure engagement abstention among older people is the prevalence of activity limitations, whereas mobility difficulties and medical conditions play less important roles. The strong negative association between activity limitations and leisure engagement remains significant even after we control for individual, sociodemographic characteristics, and country. Discussion. This study provides a window into leisure engagement in later life and factors influencing the magnitude of engagement in leisure activities. PMID:26346706

  13. Leisure Engagement: Medical Conditions, Mobility Difficulties, and Activity Limitations-A Later Life Perspective.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Ingeborg; Nyqvist, Fredrica; Gustafson, Yngve; Nygrd, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aims to investigate the impact of medical conditions, mobility difficulties, and activity limitations on older people's engagement in leisure activities. Methods. The analyses are based on a cross regional survey carried out in 2010 in the Bothnia region (Northern Sweden and Western Finland). A posted questionnaire, which included questions on different aspects of leisure engagement, medical history, and health, was sent out to older persons in the region. The final sample consisted of 5435 persons aged 65, 70, 75, and 80 years. The data was analyzed by using ordinary least squares (OLS) multivariate regression. Results. The most important predictor of leisure engagement abstention among older people is the prevalence of activity limitations, whereas mobility difficulties and medical conditions play less important roles. The strong negative association between activity limitations and leisure engagement remains significant even after we control for individual, sociodemographic characteristics, and country. Discussion. This study provides a window into leisure engagement in later life and factors influencing the magnitude of engagement in leisure activities. PMID:26346706

  14. I-type granitoids associated with the early Paleozoic intracontinental orogenic collapse along pre-existing block boundary in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Huang, Xiao-Long; He, Peng-Li; Li, Jie

    2016-04-01

    The early Paleozoic Wuyi-Yunkai orogeny resulted in extensive magmatism in the Cathaysia and eastern Yangtze blocks, South China. Identifying the nature of related magmatism is essential for understanding the orogeny that remains enigmatic with regard to its tectonic setting and geodynamic driving force. The Zhangjiafang pluton (438 ± 3 Ma) in western Jiangxi province is composed of predominant granodiorite with abundant coeval mafic-intermediate microgranular enclaves (MMEs) (~ 433 ± 5 Ma). The granodiorite samples are weakly peraluminous (A/CNK = 1.05-1.09) and have low SiO2 (61.9-64.9 wt.%) and high Fe2O3 (4.6-5.6 wt.%), MgO (2.2-2.8 wt.%) and CaO (4.3-4.8 wt.%), belonging to I-type suite due to abundant amphibole in the rocks. They exhibit strongly negative whole-rock εNd(t) values (- 11 to - 9) and zircon εHf(t) values (- 14 to - 4), similar to the basement of the Cathaysia Block, but distinguishable from simultaneous I-type granites of the Banshanpu and Hongxiaqiao plutons in eastern Yangtze Block in much lower Sr, Ba, Th and U. The MME samples show pronounced negative Nb-Ta-Ti anomalies and have overall less negative whole-rock εNd(t) (- 9 to - 7) and zircon εHf(t) values (- 9 to - 4) than the host granodiorite, which are best interpreted as products of mantle-derived melts that mixed insufficiently with crust-derived magma. The block boundary between the eastern Yangtze and Cathaysia blocks should pass through the nearby west area (i.e., Pingxiang City) of the Zhangjiafang pluton. The Early Paleozoic I-type granitic rocks near the block boundary have all negative εNd(t) and εHf(t) values, demonstrating an overall ancient basement of the two blocks prior to the Wuyi-Yunkai orogeny, preferring an intracontinental orogeny model. However, the early Paleozoic mafic rocks and I-type granites with coeval MMEs were frequently present along the Jiangshan-Shaoxing-Pingxiang Fault zone, illustrating widespread modification of the ancient basement adjacent to the block boundary by mantle-derived melt during the orogenic collapse. The pre-existing block boundary might have promoted asthenosphere upwelling and basaltic underplating during the intracontinental orogenic collapse.

  15. Testing the influence of vertical, pre-existing joints on normal faulting using analogue and 3D discrete element models (DEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; von Hagke, Christoph; Virgo, Simon; Urai, Janos L.

    2015-04-01

    Brittle rocks are often affected by different generations of fractures that influence each other. We study pre-existing vertical joints followed by a faulting event. Understanding the effect of these interactions on fracture/fault geometries as well as the development of dilatancy and the formation of cavities as potential fluid pathways is crucial for reservoir quality prediction and production. Our approach combines scaled analogue and numerical modeling. Using cohesive hemihydrate powder allows us to create open fractures prior to faulting. The physical models are reproduced using the ESyS-Particle discrete element Modeling Software (DEM), and different parameters are investigated. Analogue models were carried out in a manually driven deformation box (30x28x20 cm) with a 60° dipping pre-defined basement fault and 4.5 cm of displacement. To produce open joints prior to faulting, sheets of paper were mounted in the box to a depth of 5 cm at a spacing of 2.5 cm. Powder was then sieved into the box, embedding the paper almost entirely (column height of 19 cm), and the paper was removed. We tested the influence of different angles between the strike of the basement fault and the joint set (0°, 4°, 8°, 12°, 16°, 20°, and 25°). During deformation we captured structural information by time-lapse photography that allows particle imaging velocimetry analyses (PIV) to detect localized deformation at every increment of displacement. Post-mortem photogrammetry preserves the final 3-dimensional structure of the fault zone. We observe that no faults or fractures occur parallel to basement-fault strike. Secondary fractures are mostly oriented normal to primary joints. At the final stage of the experiments we analyzed semi-quantitatively the number of connected joints, number of secondary fractures, degree of segmentation (i.e. number of joints accommodating strain), damage zone width, and the map-view area fraction of open gaps. Whereas the area fraction does not change distinctly, the number of secondary fractures and connected joints increases strongly with increasing angles between basement fault and joint strike. Integrating these models with a 3-dimensional DEM code using the ESyS-Particle software allows for retrieving 4D information from the models, as well as for testing other parameters such as joint spacing or joint depth. Our DEM models are capable of robustly reproducing all characteristic features observed in the analogue models, and will provide a quantitative measure of the influence of joint-fault angle on permeability of cohesive rocks that have experienced more than one brittle deformation phase.

  16. Prevalence of chronic medical conditions in adults with mental retardation: comparison with the general population.

    PubMed

    Kapell, D; Nightingale, B; Rodriguez, A; Lee, J H; Zigman, W B; Schupf, N

    1998-08-01

    We interviewed caregivers and reviewed medical records of 278 adults with mental retardation with and without Down syndrome, 45 to 74 years of age. Standardized morbidity ratios were used to compare frequency of medical disorders in these adults to frequency in the general population. In adults with mental retardation, the frequency of common age-related disorders was comparable to that in the general population, but there was an increased frequency of thyroid disorders, nonischemic heart disorders, and sensory impairment. Surveillance of health status and increased access to health care for screening and treatment of age-related disorders that are more frequent in adults with mental retardation would be important to prevent the development or delay the impact of these conditions and to promote healthy aging. PMID:9713183

  17. Patterns of Risk for Multiple Co-Occurring Medical Conditions Replicate Across Distinct Cohorts of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Aldinger, Kimberly A; Lane, Christianne J; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Levitt, Pat

    2015-12-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may present with multiple medical conditions in addition to ASD symptoms. This study investigated whether there are predictive patterns of medical conditions that co-occur with ASD, which could inform medical evaluation and treatment in ASD, as well as potentially identify etiologically meaningful subgroups. Medical history data were queried in the multiplex family Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE). Fourteen medical conditions were analyzed. Replication in the Simons Simplex Collection (SSC) was attempted using available medical condition data on gastrointestinal disturbances (GID), sleep problems, allergy and epilepsy. In the AGRE cohort, no discrete clusters emerged among 14 medical conditions. GID and seizures were enriched in unaffected family members, and together with sleep problems, were represented in both AGRE and SSC. Further analysis of these medical conditions identified predictive co-occurring patterns in both samples. For a child with ASD, the presence of GID predicts sleep problems and vice versa, with an approximately 2-fold odds ratio in each direction. These risk patterns were replicated in the SSC sample, and in addition, there was increased risk for seizures and sleep problems to co-occur with GID. In these cohorts, seizure alone was not predictive of the other conditions co-occurring, but behavioral impairments were more severe as the number of co-occurring medical symptoms increased. These findings indicate that interdisciplinary clinical care for children with ASD will benefit from evaluation for specific patterns of medical conditions in the affected child and their family members. Autism Res 2015, 8: 771-781. 015 The Authors Autism Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Autism Research. PMID:26011086

  18. Waivers for disqualifying medical conditions in U.S. Naval aviation personnel.

    PubMed

    Bailey, D A; Gilleran, L G; Merchant, P G

    1995-05-01

    In the United States Navy, many diagnoses are considered disqualifying for aviation duty, but aircrew may be "waived" to return to flight duties after resolution of the disease or appropriate treatment of the condition. Personnel with waivers are usually subject to more frequent physical examinations and/or special diagnostic procedures. Although the Naval Aerospace and Operational Medical Institute promulgates written aeromedical guidelines as to which diseases may be waived and which may not, waivers are granted on a case-by-case basis considering not only the diagnosis, but the age, experience, and type of aviation duty of the individual in question. This study was undertaken to determine which conditions were most and least likely to be waived. We reviewed all records of aviators entered into the Naval Aviation Medical Data Retrieval System who had been diagnosed with a condition considered disqualifying for aviation duty, totaling over 39,000 records. Cases were stratified by diagnosis and aviation duty, and the percentage waived was calculated for major diagnostic groups. Among designated aviation personnel, approximately 68% of all aviators with a disqualifying diagnosis were recommended for a waiver. Otolaryngologic, musculoskeletal, and cardiovascular disorders accounted for nearly 50% of diagnoses in personnel recommended for a waiver. Fear of flying, personality disorders, and adjustment disorders were the three diagnoses least likely to be granted a waiver. The most frequently occurring disqualifying diagnoses were allergic rhinitis, obesity, disorders of refraction and accommodation, urolithiasis, and alcohol dependence. PMID:7619031

  19. Effects of common chronic medical conditions on psychometric tests used to diagnose minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lauridsen, M M; Poulsen, L; Rasmussen, C K; Høgild, M; Nielsen, M K; de Muckadell, O B Schaffalitzky; Vilstrup, H

    2016-04-01

    Many chronic medical conditions are accompanied by cognitive disturbances but these have only to a very limited extent been psychometrically quantified. An exception is liver cirrhosis where hepatic encephalopathy is an inherent risk and mild forms are diagnosed by psychometric tests. The preferred diagnostic test battery in cirrhosis is often the Continuous Reaction Time (CRT) and the Portosystemic Encephalopathy (PSE) tests but the effect on these of other medical conditions is not known. We aimed to examine the effects of common chronic (non-cirrhosis) medical conditions on the CRT and PSE tests. We studied 15 patients with heart failure (HF), 15 with end stage renal failure (ESRF), 15 with dysregulated type II diabetes (DMII), 15 with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 15 healthy persons. We applied the CRT test, which is a 10-min computerized test measuring sustained attention and reaction time stability and the PSE test, which is a paper-pencil test battery consisting of 5 subtests. We found that a high fraction of the patients with HF (8/15, 0.002) or COPD (7/15, p = 0.006) had pathological CRT test results; and COPD patients also frequently had an abnormal PSE test result (6/15, p < 0.0001). Both tests were unaffected by ESRF and DMII. Half of the patients with HF or COPD had psychometrically measurable cognitive deficits, whereas those with ESRF or DMII had not. This adds to the understanding of the clinical consequences of chronic heart- and lung disease, and implies that the psychometric tests should be interpreted with great caution in cirrhosis patients with heart- or lung comorbidity. PMID:26435407

  20. Race and Ethnic Group Differences in Comorbid Major Depressive Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Chronic Medical Conditions.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Daphne C; Assari, Shervin; Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki

    2015-09-01

    This study tested whether race and ethnic group differences exist for lifetime major depressive disorder and/or general anxiety disorder with one or more chronic medical conditions. Data from the National Survey of American Life, which included 3570 African American, 1438 Caribbean Black, and 891 non-Hispanic White adults were analyzed. Outcomes included at least one and multiple chronic medical conditions, from a list of 14 medical conditions (e.g., arthritis, cancer, diabetes, kidney disease, stroke, heart disease, etc.). Logistic regressions were fitted to data to determine how the association between major depressive disorder, general anxiety disorder, and one or more chronic medical conditions vary across race and ethnicity. Lifetime major depressive disorder (but not lifetime general anxiety disorder) was associated with at least one chronic medical condition among African Americans and Caribbean Blacks, but not non-Hispanic Whites. Lifetime major depressive disorder was similarly associated with multiple chronic medical conditions among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks, and non-Hispanic Whites. For Caribbean Blacks, stronger associations were found between major depressive disorder and general anxiety disorder with one or more chronic medical conditions compared to African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites. Findings suggest that race and ethnicity may shape the links between comorbid psychiatric disorders and chronic medical conditions. Mental health screening of individuals with chronic medical conditions in primary health-care settings may benefit from tailoring based on race and ethnicity. More research is needed to understand why associations between physical and mental health vary among race and ethnic groups. PMID:26863467

  1. Influence of pre-existing fabrics on fault kinematics and rift geometry of interacting segments: Analogue models based on the Albertine Rift (Uganda), Western Branch-East African Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aanyu, K.; Koehn, D.

    2011-02-01

    This study aims at showing how far pre-existing crustal weaknesses left behind by Proterozoic mobile belts, that pass around cratonic Archean shields (Tanzania Craton to the southeast and Congo Craton to the northwest), control the geometry of the Albertine Rift. Focus is laid on the development of the Lake Albert and Lake Edward/George sub-segments and between them the greatly uplifted Rwenzori Mountains, a horst block located within the rift and whose highest peak rises to >5000 m above mean sea level. In particular we study how the southward propagating Lake Albert sub-segment to the north interacts with the northward propagating Lake Edward/George sub-segment south of it, and how this interaction produces the structures and geometry observed in this section of the western branch of the East African Rift, especially within and around the Rwenzori horst. We simulate behaviour of the upper crust by conducting sandbox analogue experiments in which pre-cut rubber strips of varying overstep/overlap connected to a basal sheet and oriented oblique and/or orthogonal to the extension vector, are placed below the sand-pack. The points of connection present velocity discontinuities to localise deformation, while the rubber strips represent ductile domain affected by older mobile belts. From fault geometry of developing rift segments in plan view and section cuts, we study kinematics resulting from a given set of boundary conditions, and results are compared with the natural scenario. Three different basal model-configurations are used to simulate two parallel rifts that propagate towards each other and interact. Wider overstep (model SbR3) produces an oblique transfer zone with deep grabens (max. 7.0 km) in the adjoining segments. Smaller overlap (model SbR4) ends in offset rift segments without oblique transfer faults to join the two, and produces moderately deep grabens (max. 4.6 km). When overlap doubles the overstep (model SbR5), rifts propagate sub-orthogonal to the extension direction and form shallow valleys (max. 2.9 km). Relative ratios of overlap/overstep between rift segments dictate the kind of transition zone that develops and whether or not a block (like the Rwenzoris) is captured and rotates; hence determining the end-member geometry. Rotation direction is controlled by pre-existing fabrics. Fault orientation, fault kinematics, and block rotation (once in play) reinforce each other; and depending on the local kinematics, different parts of a captured block may rotate with variable velocities but in the same general direction. Mechanical strength anisotropy of pre-structured crust only initially centres fault nucleation and propagation parallel to the grain of weakness of the basement, but at later stages of a protracted period of crustal extension, such boundaries are locally defied.

  2. The State of Health in Older Adults in Japan: Trends in Disability, Chronic Medical Conditions and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Shinya; Ogawa, Sumito; Akishita, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Both life expectancy and healthy life expectancy in Japan have been increasing and are among the highest in the world, but the gap between them has also been widening. To examine the recent trends in old age disability, chronic medical conditions and mortality in Japan, we retrospectively analyzed three nationally representative datasets: Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions (20012013), Patient Survey (19962011) and Vital Statistics (19952010). We obtained the sex- and age-stratified trends in disability rate, treatment rates of nine selected chronic medical conditions (cerebrovascular diseases, joint disorders, fractures, osteoporosis, ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pneumonia and malignant neoplasms), total mortality rate and mortality rates from specific causes (cerebrovascular diseases, heart diseases, pneumonia and malignant neoplasms) in both sexes in four age strata (6569, 7074, 7579, 8084 years). Disability rates declined significantly in both sexes. Treatment rates of all selected medical conditions also decreased significantly, except for fractures in women and pneumonia. Both total mortality rate and cause-specific mortality rates decreased in both sexes. We concluded that the recent decline in disability rates, treatment rates of chronic medical conditions and mortality rates points toward overall improvement in health conditions in adults over the age of 65 years in Japan. Nonetheless, considering the increase in the number of older adults, the absolute number of older adults with disability or chronic medical conditions will continue to increase and challenge medical and long-term care systems. PMID:26431468

  3. Symptoms and quality of life indicators among children with chronic medical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyewon; Amtmann, Dagmar; Salem, Rana; Park, Ryoungsun; Askew, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Children with chronic conditions often experience numerous symptoms, but few research studies examine patterns of symptoms and quality of life (QoL) indicators. Objective To examine if reliable latent classes of children with chronic medical conditions can be identified based on the clustering of symptoms and QoL indicators. Methods Structured interviews were conducted with children ages 9 to 21 living with chronic medical conditions (N = 90). Multiple symptoms (e.g., pain, sleep, fatigue, and depression) and QoL indicators (e.g., life satisfaction and social support) were measured. Physical health and emotional, social, and school functioning were measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL). Latent class analysis was used to classify each child into a latent class whose members report similar patterns of responses. Results A three-class solution had the best model fit. Class 1 (high-symptom group; n = 15, 16.7%) reported the most problems with symptoms and the lowest scores on the QoL indicators. Class 2 (moderate-symptom group; n = 39, 43.3%) reported moderate levels of both symptoms and QoL indicators. Class 3 (low-symptom group; n = 36, 40.0%) reported the lowest levels of symptoms and the highest scores on the QoL indicators. Conclusions The three latent classes identified in this study were distributed along the severity continuum. All symptoms and QoL indicators appeared to move in the same direction (e.g. worse symptoms with lower QoL). The PedsQL psychosocial health summary score (combining emotional, social, and school functioning scores) discriminated well between children with different levels of disease burden. PMID:24411513

  4. Assessment of medical students proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    PubMed Central

    Ulman, Catherine A.; Binder, Stephen Bruce; Borges, Nicole J.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%). Many students (87.6%) felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training. PMID:25989840

  5. Maternal Recall Versus Medical Records of Metabolic Conditions from the Prenatal Period: A Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Krakowiak, Paula; Walker, Cheryl K; Tancredi, Daniel J; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2015-09-01

    To assess validity of maternally-reported diabetes and hypertensive disorders, and reliability of BMI measurements during periconception and pregnancy compared with medical records when mothers are interviewed 2-5 years after delivery. To investigate whether reporting accuracy differed by child's case status (autism, delays, typical development). Participants were mothers of 2-5 year old children with and without neurodevelopmental disorders from the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment) Study who had both prenatal/delivery records and telephone interviews. Sensitivity and specificity of self-report in telephone interview was assessed by comparison with medical records; agreement was evaluated by kappa statistics. Deviations in reported BMI were evaluated with Bland-Altman plots and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). Mothers of children with neurodevelopmental disorders (autism or developmental delay) reported metabolic conditions slightly more accurately than control mothers. For diabetes, sensitivity ranged from 73 to 87% and specificity was ≥98% across groups. For hypertensive disorders, sensitivity ranged from 57 to 77% and specificity from 93 to 98%. Reliability of BMI was high (CCC = 0.930); when grouped into BMI categories, a higher proportion of mothers of delayed children were correctly classified (κ(wt) = 0.93) compared with the autism group and controls (κ(wt) = 0.85 and κ(wt) = 0.84, respectively; P = 0.05). Multiparity was associated with higher discrepancies in BMI and misreporting of hypertensive disorders. For purposes of etiologic studies, self-reported diabetes and hypertensive disorders during periconception and pregnancy show high validity among mothers irrespective of child's case status. Recall of pre-pregnancy BMI is reliable compared with self-reported values in medical records. PMID:25656730

  6. Improving textual medication extraction using combined conditional random fields and rule-based systems

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective In the i2b2 Medication Extraction Challenge, medication names together with details of their administration were to be extracted from medical discharge summaries. Design The task of the challenge was decomposed into three pipelined components: named entity identification, context-aware filtering and relation extraction. For named entity identification, first a rule-based (RB) method that was used in our overall fifth place-ranked solution at the challenge was investigated. Second, a conditional random fields (CRF) approach is presented for named entity identification (NEI) developed after the completion of the challenge. The CRF models are trained on the 17 ground truth documents, the output of the rule-based NEI component on all documents, a larger but potentially inaccurate training dataset. For both NEI approaches their effect on relation extraction performance was investigated. The filtering and relation extraction components are both rule-based. Measurements In addition to the official entry level evaluation of the challenge, entity level analysis is also provided. Results On the test data an entry level F1-score of 80% was achieved for exact matching and 81% for inexact matching with the RB-NEI component. The CRF produces a significantly weaker result, but CRF outperforms the rule-based model with 81% exact and 82% inexact F1-score (p<0.02). Conclusion This study shows that a simple rule-based method is on a par with more complicated machine learners; CRF models can benefit from the addition of the potentially inaccurate training data, when only very few training documents are available. Such training data could be generated using the outputs of rule-based methods. PMID:20819860

  7. The Integrated Medical Model: A Probabilistic Simulation Model Predicting In-Flight Medical Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, Alexandra; Young, Millennia; Saile, Lynn; Boley, Lynn; Walton, Marlei; Kerstman, Eric; Shah, Ronak; Goodenow, Debra A.; Myers, Jerry G., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a probabilistic model that uses simulation to predict mission medical risk. Given a specific mission and crew scenario, medical events are simulated using Monte Carlo methodology to provide estimates of resource utilization, probability of evacuation, probability of loss of crew, and the amount of mission time lost due to illness. Mission and crew scenarios are defined by mission length, extravehicular activity (EVA) schedule, and crew characteristics including: sex, coronary artery calcium score, contacts, dental crowns, history of abdominal surgery, and EVA eligibility. The Integrated Medical Evidence Database (iMED) houses the model inputs for one hundred medical conditions using in-flight, analog, and terrestrial medical data. Inputs include incidence, event durations, resource utilization, and crew functional impairment. Severity of conditions is addressed by defining statistical distributions on the dichotomized best and worst-case scenarios for each condition. The outcome distributions for conditions are bounded by the treatment extremes of the fully treated scenario in which all required resources are available and the untreated scenario in which no required resources are available. Upon occurrence of a simulated medical event, treatment availability is assessed, and outcomes are generated depending on the status of the affected crewmember at the time of onset, including any pre-existing functional impairments or ongoing treatment of concurrent conditions. The main IMM outcomes, including probability of evacuation and loss of crew life, time lost due to medical events, and resource utilization, are useful in informing mission planning decisions. To date, the IMM has been used to assess mission-specific risks with and without certain crewmember characteristics, to determine the impact of eliminating certain resources from the mission medical kit, and to design medical kits that maximally benefit crew health while meeting mass and volume constraints.

  8. The Integrated Medical Model: A Probabilistic Simulation Model for Predicting In-Flight Medical Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, Alexandra; Young, Millennia; Saile, Lynn; Boley, Lynn; Walton, Marlei; Kerstman, Eric; Shah, Ronak; Goodenow, Debra A.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a probabilistic model that uses simulation to predict mission medical risk. Given a specific mission and crew scenario, medical events are simulated using Monte Carlo methodology to provide estimates of resource utilization, probability of evacuation, probability of loss of crew, and the amount of mission time lost due to illness. Mission and crew scenarios are defined by mission length, extravehicular activity (EVA) schedule, and crew characteristics including: sex, coronary artery calcium score, contacts, dental crowns, history of abdominal surgery, and EVA eligibility. The Integrated Medical Evidence Database (iMED) houses the model inputs for one hundred medical conditions using in-flight, analog, and terrestrial medical data. Inputs include incidence, event durations, resource utilization, and crew functional impairment. Severity of conditions is addressed by defining statistical distributions on the dichotomized best and worst-case scenarios for each condition. The outcome distributions for conditions are bounded by the treatment extremes of the fully treated scenario in which all required resources are available and the untreated scenario in which no required resources are available. Upon occurrence of a simulated medical event, treatment availability is assessed, and outcomes are generated depending on the status of the affected crewmember at the time of onset, including any pre-existing functional impairments or ongoing treatment of concurrent conditions. The main IMM outcomes, including probability of evacuation and loss of crew life, time lost due to medical events, and resource utilization, are useful in informing mission planning decisions. To date, the IMM has been used to assess mission-specific risks with and without certain crewmember characteristics, to determine the impact of eliminating certain resources from the mission medical kit, and to design medical kits that maximally benefit crew health while meeting mass and volume constraints.

  9. Dental Erosion and Medical Conditions An Overview of Aetiology, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Paryag, A; Rafeek, R

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tooth wear or tooth surface loss is a normal physiological process and occurs throughout life but is considered pathological when the degree of destruction is excessive or the rate of loss is rapid, causing functional, aesthetic or sensitivity problems. The importance of tooth wear as a dental problem has been increasingly recognized. The findings of a study in Trinidad indicate that the prevalence of tooth wear in a Trinidadian population is comparable to the United Kingdom (UK) and, indeed, that the level of moderate and severe wear is nearly twice as high. The aetiology of tooth wear is attributed to four causes: erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is generally considered to be the most prevalent cause of tooth wear in the UK and Europe. Acids that cause dental erosion originate mainly from the diet or the stomach and, to a lesser extent, the environment. Underlying medical problems can contribute to influence the progress of tooth wear due to erosion and the patient may not be aware of these conditions. Moderate to severe tooth wear poses a significant clinical challenge to dental practitioners and may result in treatment that is more complex and costly to the patient, both in terms of finances and time spent in the dental chair. This paper provides an overview of aetiology and diagnosis of tooth wear, in particular tooth wear due to erosion, so that medical and dental practitioners may recognize tooth wear early, institute preventive measures and manage patients appropriately. PMID:25781289

  10. Comorbid Medical Conditions in Vascular Dementia: A Matched Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Habeych, Miguel E; Castilla-Puentes, Ruby

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the presence of comorbid medical conditions between patients with a vascular dementia (VaD) and a control group, from the Integrated Healthcare Information Services (IHCIS) database. VaD was defined by the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes 290.40, 290.4, 290.41, 290.42, and, 290.43. An individual matching method was used to select the controls, which were matched to cases on a 15:1 ratio by age, gender, type of health plan, and pharmacy benefits. Alzheimer's disease, any other dementia or cognitive deficits associated were considered exclusion criteria. Among the IHCIS patients 60 years of age or older and full year of eligibility during 2010, there were 898 VaD patients, from which 63.6% were women. Concurrent presence of cerebrovascular disease, atherosclerosis, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation were found at 12.6, 4.6, 2.8, and 1.7 times higher in VaD patients, respectively. Compared to controls, VaD patients had more septicemia, injuries, lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and urinary diseases (all with df = 897,1; p < 0.0001). The present study confirms that these four medical comorbidities are frequent complications of VaD and physicians should be alert to the presence of them in patients with VaD. PMID:26230648

  11. HIGHLIGHTING DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CONDITIONAL AND UNCONDITIONAL QUANTILE REGRESSION APPROACHES THROUGH AN APPLICATION TO ASSESS MEDICATION ADHERENCE

    PubMed Central

    BORAH, BIJAN J.; BASU, ANIRBAN

    2014-01-01

    The quantile regression (QR) framework provides a pragmatic approach in understanding the differential impacts of covariates along the distribution of an outcome. However, the QR framework that has pervaded the applied economics literature is based on the conditional quantile regression method. It is used to assess the impact of a covariate on a quantile of the outcome conditional on specific values of other covariates. In most cases, conditional quantile regression may generate results that are often not generalizable or interpretable in a policy or population context. In contrast, the unconditional quantile regression method provides more interpretable results as it marginalizes the effect over the distributions of other covariates in the model. In this paper, the differences between these two regression frameworks are highlighted, both conceptually and econometrically. Additionally, using real-world claims data from a large US health insurer, alternative QR frameworks are implemented to assess the differential impacts of covariates along the distribution of medication adherence among elderly patients with Alzheimers disease. PMID:23616446

  12. Pneumococcal and influenza vaccination rates and their determinants in children with chronic medical conditions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To investigate the rates of pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations and their determinants in children with chronic medical conditions. Patients and Methods Children with HIV infection, cystic fibrosis, liver transplantation and diabetes mellitus were enrolled. Physicians of regional Reference Centres for each condition, primary care paediatricians and caregivers of children provided information through specific questionnaires. For diabetes, 3 Reference Centres were included. Results Less than 25% of children in each group received pneumococcal vaccination. Vaccination rates against influenza were 73% in patients with HIV-infection, 90% in patients with cystic fibrosis, 76% in patients with liver transplantation, and ranged from 21% to 61% in patients with diabetes mellitus. Reference Centres rather than primary care paediatricians had a major role in promoting vaccinations. Lack of information was the main reason for missing vaccination. Awareness of the severity of pneumococcus infection by key informants of at-risk children was associated with higher vaccination rate. Conclusions Vaccination rates in children with chronic conditions were poor for pneumococcus and slightly better for influenza. Barriers to vaccination include lack of awareness, health care and organization problems. PMID:20346141

  13. Factors associated with geographic variation in cost per episode of care for three medical conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify associations between market factors, especially relative reimbursement rates, and the probability of surgery and cost per episode for three medical conditions (cataract, benign prostatic neoplasm, and knee degeneration) with multiple treatment options. Methods We use 20042006 Medicare claims data for elderly beneficiaries from sixty nationally representative communities to estimate multivariate models for the probability of surgery and cost per episode of care as a function local market factors, including Medicare physician reimbursement for surgical versus non-surgical treatment and the availability of primary care and specialty physicians. We used Symmetrys Episode Treatment Groups (ETG) software to group claims into episodes for the three conditions (n?=?540,874 episodes). Results Higher Medicare reimbursement for surgical episodes and greater availability of the relevant specialists are significantly associated with more surgery and higher cost per episode for all three conditions, while greater availability of primary care physicians is significantly associated with less frequent surgery and lower cost per episode. Conclusion Relative Medicare reimbursement rates for surgical vs. non-surgical treatments and the availability of both primary care physicians and relevant specialists are associated with the likelihood of surgery and cost per episode. PMID:24949281

  14. Vaccination of adolescents with chronic medical conditions: Special considerations and strategies for enhancing uptake.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Annika M; LaRussa, Philip; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2015-11-01

    Adolescents with chronic medical conditions (CMCs), a growing population worldwide, possess a wide array of preventive health care needs. Vaccination is strongly recommended for the vast majority of these adolescents given their increased risk of vaccine preventable infection and associated complications. Not only should they receive routine vaccines, but some also require additional vaccines. Despite these guidelines, evidence suggests that adolescents with CMCs often fail to receive needed vaccines. Many factors contribute to this under-immunization, including lack of knowledge among parents and providers and suboptimal coordination of primary and subspecialty care. This review describes current vaccination recommendations for these adolescents as well as recent data related to infection risk, vaccine efficacy and safety, vaccination coverage, and the unique multilevel factors impacting uptake in this population. It also discusses strategies for improving coverage levels and reducing missed vaccination opportunities, with a particular focus on technology-based interventions. PMID:26212313

  15. Feasibility of Remote Ischemic Peri-conditioning during Air Medical Transport of STEMI Patients.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gill, Christian; Wayne, Max; Guyette, Francis X; Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Toma, Catalin

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic peri-conditioning (RIPC) has gained interest as a means of reducing ischemic injury in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who are undergoing emergent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). We aimed to evaluate the feasibility, process, and patient-related factors related to the delivery of RIPC during air medical transport of STEMI patients to tertiary pPCI centers. We performed a retrospective review of procedural outcomes of a cohort of STEMI patients who received RIPC as part of a clinical protocol in a multi-state air medical service over 16 months (March 2013 to June 2014). Eligible patients were transported to two tertiary PCI centers and received up to four cycles of RIPC by inflating a blood pressure cuff on an upper arm to 200 mmHg for 5 minutes and subsequently deflating the cuff for 5 minutes. Data regarding feasibility, process variables, patient comfort, and occurrence of hypotension were obtained from prehospital records and prospectively completed quality improvement surveys. The primary outcome was whether at least 3 cycles of RIPC were completed by air medical transport crews prior to pPCI. Secondary outcomes included the number of cycles completed prior to pPCI, time spent with the patient prior to transport (bedside time), patient discomfort level, and incidence of hypotension (systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg) during the procedure. RIPC was initiated in 99 patients (91 interfacility, 8 scene transports) and 83 (83.3%) received 3 or 4 cycles of RIPC, delivered over 25-35 minutes. Median bedside time for interfacility transfers was 8 minutes (IQR 7, 10). More than half of patients reported no pain related to the procedure (N = 53, 53.3%), whereas 5 (5.1%) patients reported discomfort greater than 5 out of 10. Two patients developed hypotension while receiving RIPC and both had experienced hypotension prior to initiation of RIPC. RIPC is feasible and safe to implement for STEMI patients undergoing air medical transport for pPCI, without occurrence of prolonged bedside times. The incidence of excessive RIPC-related discomfort or hemodynamic instability is rare. STEMI patients requiring on average >30 minutes transport for pPCI may be the ideal group for RIPC utilization. PMID:26270795

  16. Hurricane Katrinas Impact on the Care of Survivors with Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hurricane Katrina affected a population with significant levels of chronic disease. OBJECTIVE The extent to which Hurricane Katrina disrupted treatments is not known but would be useful information for future disaster planning. PARTICIPANTS 1,043 displaced and nondisplaced English-speaking Katrina survivors ages 18 and older who resided in affected areas before the hurricane. DESIGN AND SETTING A geographically representative telephone survey conducted between January 19 and March 31, 2006. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS The proportions of survivors with chronic illnesses in the 12months before the hurricane and the extent to which those with chronic illnesses cut back or terminated treatments because of the disaster. Correlates and reasons given by survivors for disrupted treatment were identified. Most (73.9%) Katrina survivors had 1 or more chronic conditions in the year before the hurricane; of these, 20.6% cut back or terminated their treatment because of the disaster. Disruptions in treatment were significantly more common among the non-elderly, uninsured, socially isolated, those with housing needs, or for conditions remaining relatively asymptomatic but still dangerous if untreated. Frequent reasons for disrupted care included problems accessing physicians (41.1%), medications (32.5%), insurance/financial means (29.3%), transportation (23.2%), or competing demands on time (10.9%). CONCLUSIONS Many Katrina survivors burdened by chronic disease had their treatments disrupted by the disaster. Future disaster management plans should anticipate and address such chronic care needs, with timely reestablishment of primary care services, access to medications, and means to address financial and structural barriers to treatment. PMID:17657545

  17. Invasive pneumococcal infections among persons with and without underlying medical conditions: Implications for prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) is recommended for persons aged < 65 years with chronic medical conditions. We evaluated the risk and mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among persons with and without the underlying medical conditions which are considered PPV23 indications. Methods Population-based data on all episodes of IPD (positive blood or cerebrospinal fluid culture) reported by Finnish clinical microbiology laboratories during 19952002 were linked to data in national health care registries and vital statistics to obtain information on the patient's preceding hospitalisations, co-morbidities, and outcome of illness. Results Overall, 4357 first episodes of IPD were identified in all age groups (average annual incidence, 10.6/100,000). Patients aged 1849 and 5064 years accounted for 1282 (29%) and 934 (21%) of IPD cases, of which 372 (29%) and 427 (46%) had a current PPV23 indication, respectively. Overall, 536 (12%) IPD patients died within one month of first positive culture. Persons aged 1864 years accounted for 254 (47%) of all deaths (case-fatality proportion, 12%). Of those who died 117 (46%) did not have a vaccine indication. In a survival model, patients with alcohol-related diseases, non-haematological malignancies, and those aged 5064 years were most likely to die. Conclusion In the general population of non-elderly adults, almost two-thirds of IPD and half of fatal cases occurred in persons without a recognised PPV23 indication. Policymakers should consider additional prevention strategies such as lowering the age of universal PPV23 vaccination and introducing routine childhood pneumococcal conjugate immunisation which could provide substantial health benefits to this population through indirect vaccine effects. PMID:18647385

  18. 42 CFR 418.106 - Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of participation: Organizational Environment § 418.106 Condition of... illness and related conditions, as identified in the hospice plan of care, must be provided by the hospice while the patient is under hospice care. (a) Standard: Managing drugs and biologicals. (1) The...

  19. 42 CFR 418.106 - Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of participation: Organizational Environment § 418.106 Condition of... illness and related conditions, as identified in the hospice plan of care, must be provided by the hospice while the patient is under hospice care. (a) Standard: Managing drugs and biologicals. (1) The...

  20. 42 CFR 418.106 - Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of participation: Organizational Environment § 418.106 Condition of... illness and related conditions, as identified in the hospice plan of care, must be provided by the hospice while the patient is under hospice care. (a) Standard: Managing drugs and biologicals. (1) The...

  1. 20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single FECA claim... received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single... to the United States? (a) All wounds, diseases or other medical conditions accepted by OWCP...

  2. 20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single FECA claim... received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single... to the United States? (a) All wounds, diseases or other medical conditions accepted by OWCP...

  3. 20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single FECA claim... received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single... to the United States? (a) All wounds, diseases or other medical conditions accepted by OWCP...

  4. 20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single FECA claim... received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single... to the United States? (a) All wounds, diseases or other medical conditions accepted by OWCP...

  5. 20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single FECA claim... received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single... to the United States? (a) All wounds, diseases or other medical conditions accepted by OWCP...

  6. [About development of medical maintenance of military air forces in modern conditions].

    PubMed

    Radchenko, S N; Arsen'ev, Iu G

    2010-10-01

    The authors prove the necessity of transformation of medical service of Air Force of all levels within the framework of the realization of program "Development of medical supply of Armed Forces of Russian Federation 2008-2012". Goals, functions of different elements of medical service, responsibilities of performers are developed. These goals have fundamental differences from previous one. New organizational structure of medical service of Air Forces and criteria of the estimation of its effectiveness are suggested. Offers of further optimization of organizational medical structure and improvement of medical supply of Air Forces are developed. PMID:21254586

  7. The Relation Between Smoking Status and Medical Conditions Among Incarcerated Adults

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Donna R.; Fallone, Diandra; Martin, Rosemarie A.; Stein, L. A. R.; Bock, Beth; Martin, Stephen A.; Roberts, Mary B.; Lopes, Cheryl E.; Clarke, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The rate of smoking among incarcerated adults is over three times that of the general population. Negative health consequences of smoking have prompted many correctional facilities to become tobacco-free. This presents a unique opportunity to examine health conditions associated with motivation to remain tobacco-free following release from prison. We examined this association among individuals who participated in the WISE randomized clinical trial. Methods 247 participants completed a baseline questionnaire asking about illnesses (both smoking-related and non-smoking related), family history of smoking-related illnesses, demographics and smoking history. Smoking status was assessed 3 weeks post release. Results 38.1% of participants reported having an illness caused by or worsened by smoking and 53.0% reported having moderate to a lot of concern about their health due to smoking. 22.9% reported having asthma and 26.8% reported hypertension. The adjusted odds of remaining tobacco-free at 3 weeks post-release from a tobacco-free prison was significant only for individuals with a family history of smoking-related illnesses (OR=0.28;95% CI: 0.120.68). For individuals with smoking-related conditions, the adjusted odds of remaining tobacco-free was non-significant (OR=1.91;95% CI: 0.854.27). Similarly, the adjusted odds of remaining tobacco-free for participants with non-smoking related medical conditions was non-significant (OR=0.27;95% CI: 0.061.22) Conclusions These results offer a first look at understanding health conditions as a motivator to remain tobacco-free following release from prison. While these findings require additional investigation, these results suggest that providing treatment to prisoners with chronic disease and specifically targeting smoking related illnesses might be beneficial with regard to smoking cessation success. PMID:24503925

  8. Critical Illness in Pregnancy: Part II: Common Medical Conditions Complicating Pregnancy and Puerperium.

    PubMed

    Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K; Karnad, Dilip R; Bandi, Venkata; Hall, Nicole; Belfort, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The first of this two-part series on critical illness in pregnancy dealt with obstetric disorders. In Part II, medical conditions that commonly affect pregnant women or worsen during pregnancy are discussed. ARDS occurs more frequently in pregnancy. Strategies commonly used in nonpregnant patients, including permissive hypercapnia, limits for plateau pressure, and prone positioning, may not be acceptable, especially in late pregnancy. Genital tract infections unique to pregnancy include chorioamnionitis, group A streptococcal infection causing toxic shock syndrome, and polymicrobial infection with streptococci, staphylococci, and Clostridium perfringens causing necrotizing vulvitis or fasciitis. Pregnancy predisposes to VTE; D-dimer levels have low specificity in pregnancy. A ventilation-perfusion scan is preferred over CT pulmonary angiography in some situations to reduce radiation to the mother's breasts. Low-molecular-weight or unfractionated heparins form the mainstay of treatment; vitamin K antagonists, oral factor Xa inhibitors, and direct thrombin inhibitors are not recommended in pregnancy. The physiologic hyperdynamic circulation in pregnancy worsens many cardiovascular disorders. It increases risk of pulmonary edema or arrhythmias in mitral stenosis, heart failure in pulmonary hypertension or aortic stenosis, aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome, or valve thrombosis in mechanical heart valves. Common neurologic problems in pregnancy include seizures, altered mental status, visual symptoms, and strokes. Other common conditions discussed are aspiration of gastric contents, OSA, thyroid disorders, diabetic ketoacidosis, and cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy. Studies confined to pregnant women are available for only a few of these conditions. We have, therefore, reviewed pregnancy-specific adjustments in the management of these disorders. PMID:26020727

  9. Trends, Productivity Losses, and Associated Medical Conditions Among Toxoplasmosis Deaths in the United States, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Patricia L.; Kuo, Tony; Javanbakht, Marjan; Sorvillo, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have quantified toxoplasmosis mortality, associated medical conditions, and productivity losses in the United States. We examined national multiple cause of death data and estimated productivity losses caused by toxoplasmosis during 2000–2010. A matched case–control analysis examined associations between comorbid medical conditions and toxoplasmosis deaths. In total, 789 toxoplasmosis deaths were identified during the 11-year study period. Blacks and Hispanics had the highest toxoplasmosis mortality compared with whites. Several medical conditions were associated with toxoplasmosis deaths, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), lymphoma, leukemia, and connective tissue disorders. The number of toxoplasmosis deaths with an HIV codiagnosis declined from 2000 to 2010; the numbers without such a codiagnosis remained static. Cumulative disease-related productivity losses for the 11-year period were nearly $815 million. Although toxoplasmosis mortality has declined in the last decade, the infection remains costly and is an important cause of preventable death among non-HIV subgroups. PMID:25200264

  10. Ethnic Differences in Diabetes Management in Patients With and Without Comorbid Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Alshamsan, Riyadh; Majeed, Azeem; Vamos, Eszter Panna; Khunti, Kamlesh; Curcin, Vasa; Rawaf, Salman; Millett, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine ethnic disparities in diabetes management among patients with and without comorbid medical conditions after a period of sustained investment in quality improvement in the U.K. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This cross-sectional study examined associations between ethnicity, comorbidity, and intermediate outcomes for mean A1C, total cholesterol, and blood pressure levels in 6,690 diabetes patients in South West London. RESULTS The presence of ≥2 cardiovascular comorbidities was associated with similar blood pressure control among white and South Asian patients when compared with whites without comorbidity but with worse blood pressure control among black patients, with a mean difference in systolic blood pressure of +1.5, +1.4, and +6.2 mmHg, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Despite major reforms to improve quality, disparities in blood pressure management have persisted in the U.K., particularly among patients with cardiovascular comorbidities. Policy makers should consider the potential impacts of quality initiatives on high-risk groups. PMID:21282346

  11. Adipositas athletica: a group of neglected conditions associated with medical risks.

    PubMed

    Berglund, L; Sundgot-Borgen, J; Berglund, B

    2011-10-01

    At the 2008 Olympics, the body weight of the athletes varied from 28 to 181 kg and many Olympic athletes therefore today have a stature far from the ancient Greek athletic ideals. Athletes and sports associated with leanness and their medical problems have been researched extensively. However, there has been less focus on those athletes, who may gain a competitive advantage by having excess body fat, being large or oversized. The present review introduces for the first time the concept of Adipositas athletica and gives a description and classification of these athletes. Adipositas athletica is defined as having a higher than "athletic normal" (Greek Olympic ideals) fat mass and being an elite athlete. The condition is divided into subgroups based on the intent or non-intent to increase body fat per se. Another factor is the intent to increase body mass as well as increasing physiological factors such as strength or endurance. It is concluded that most of the sports-medicine community-physicians, researchers and nutritionists - has neglected these oversized and obese athletes, their long- and short-term morbidity and mortality, their eating problems and the use of performance-enhancing drugs. Although some data on overweight and obese athletes exist, the most remarkable finding when reviewing the literature is the paucity of data. Many unanswered questions remain and great strides remain to be made. PMID:21545536

  12. Clinical deterioration in the condition of patients with acute medical illness in Australian hospitals: improving detection and response.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Paul F; Thompson, Campbell H; Barton, Lorna L

    2011-06-01

    Medical Assessment Units (MAUs) provide an opportunity for multidisciplinary staff to manage recently admitted acutely unwell patients with complex medical illnesses. We propose concerted development of robust mechanisms for identifying and managing patients whose condition is unstable as they move through hospital departments. Track, trigger and response (TTR) systems (eg, medical emergency team calls and early warning scores) have been introduced to hospital practice, but evidence for their effectiveness is, so far, incomplete. The current variation in TTR systems within and between hospitals impairs intersite comparisons. A range of outcome measures, including risk of physiological deterioration, mortality and projected hospital length of stay, could be usefully investigated by future intersite collaborative research. More deliberate, systematic, evidence-based design of "response" in TTR systems may help in identifying patients who need early attention from skilled medical staff. We need more uniform TTR systems, more research on TTR systems and more multisite research; MAUs are ideally situated to address this important area. PMID:21644875

  13. Multiple Chronic Conditions Among US Adults Who Visited Physician Offices: Data From the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Beresovsky, Vladislav

    2013-01-01

    Most research on adults with chronic conditions focuses on a single disease or condition, such as hypertension or diabetes, rather than on multiple chronic conditions (MCC). Our studys objective was to compare physician office visits by adults with MCC with visits by adults without MCC, by selected patient demographic characteristics. We also identified the most prevalent dyads and triads of chronic conditions among these patients. We used the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a nationally representative survey of office visits to nonfederal physicians and used 13 of the 20 conditions defined by the National Strategic Framework on Multiple Chronic Conditions. Descriptive estimates were generated and significant differences were tested. In 2009, an estimated 326 million physician office visits, were made by adults aged 18 years or older with MCC representing 37.6% of all medical office visits by adults. Hypertension was the most prevalent chronic condition that appeared in the top 5 MCC dyads and triads, by sex and age groups. The number of visits by patients with MCC increased with age and was greater for men than for women and for adults with public rather than private insurance. Physicians were more likely to prescribe medications at office visits made by patients with MCC. Physician office visits by adults with MCC were not evenly distributed by demographic characteristics. PMID:23618544

  14. Oral Assessment and Postgraduate Medical Examinations: Establishing Conditions for Validity, Reliability and Fairness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memon, Muhammed Ashraf; Joughin, Gordon Rowland; Memon, Breda

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the practice of oral assessment in postgraduate medical education in the context of the core assessment constructs of validity, reliability and fairness. Although oral assessment has a long history in the certification process of medical specialists and is a well-established part of such proceedings for a…

  15. 42 CFR 410.38 - Durable medical equipment: Scope and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... or purchase of durable medical equipment, including iron lungs, oxygen tents, hospital beds, and.... (2) Rollabout chair. (3) Oxygen and respiratory equipment. (4) Hospital beds and accessories. (5... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Durable medical equipment: Scope and...

  16. 42 CFR 410.38 - Durable medical equipment: Scope and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... or purchase of durable medical equipment, including iron lungs, oxygen tents, hospital beds, and.... (2) Rollabout chair. (3) Oxygen and respiratory equipment. (4) Hospital beds and accessories. (5... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Durable medical equipment: Scope and...

  17. Oral Assessment and Postgraduate Medical Examinations: Establishing Conditions for Validity, Reliability and Fairness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memon, Muhammed Ashraf; Joughin, Gordon Rowland; Memon, Breda

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the practice of oral assessment in postgraduate medical education in the context of the core assessment constructs of validity, reliability and fairness. Although oral assessment has a long history in the certification process of medical specialists and is a well-established part of such proceedings for a

  18. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule. Medicare pays for the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two through four concurrent...

  19. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule. Medicare pays for the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two through four concurrent...

  20. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule. Medicare pays for the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two through four concurrent...

  1. The prevalence of the pre-existing hepatitis C viral variants and the evolution of drug resistance in patients treated with the NS3-4a serine protease inhibitor telaprevir

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Libin; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Perelson, Alan S

    2008-01-01

    Telaprevir (VX-950), a novel hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3-4A serine protease inhibitor, has demonstrated substantial antiviral activity in patients infected with HCV genotype 1. Some patients experience viral breakthrough, which has been shown to be associated with emergence of telaprevir-resistant HCV variants during treatment. The exact mechanisms underlying the rapid selection of drug resistant viral variants during dosing are not fully understood. In this paper, we develop a two-strain model to study the pre-treatment prevalence of the mutant virus and derive an analytical solution of the mutant frequency after administration of the protease inhibitor. Our analysis suggests that the rapid increase of the mutant frequency during therapy is not due to mutant growth but rather due to the rapid and profound loss of wild-type virus, which uncovers the pre-existing mutant variants. We examine the effects of backward mutation and hepatocyte proliferation on the pre-existence of the mutant virus and the competition between wild-type and drug resistant virus during therapy. We then extend the simple model to a general model with multiple viral strains. Mutations during therapy do not play a significant role in the dynamics of various viral strains, although they are capable of generating low levels of HCV variants that would otherwise be completely suppressed because of fitness disadvantages. Hepatocyte proliferation may not affect the pretreatment frequency of mutant variants, but is able to influence the quasispecies dynamics during therapy. It is the relative fitness of each mutant strain compared with wild-type that determines which strain(s) will dominate the virus population. The study provides a theoretical framework for exploring the prevalence of pre-existing mutant variants and the evolution of drug resistance during treatment with other protease inhibitors or HCV polymerase inhibitors.

  2. Out-of-hours and weekend admissions to Danish medical departments: admission rates and 30-day mortality for 20 common medical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Srensen, Henrik Toft; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Knowledge on timing of admissions and mortality for acute medical patients is limited. The aim of the study was to examine hospital admission rates and mortality rates for patients with common medical conditions according to time of admission. Design Nationwide population-based cohort study. Setting Population of Denmark. Participants Using the Danish National Registry of Patients covering all Danish hospitals, we identified all adults with the first acute admission to a medical department in Denmark during 2010. Primary and secondary outcome measures Hourly admission rates and age-standardised and sex-standardised 30-day mortality rates comparing weekday office hours, weekday out of hours, weekend daytime hours and weekend night-time hours. Results In total, 174?192 acute medical patients were included in the study. The admission rates (patients per hour) were 38.7 (95% CI 38.4 to 38.9) during weekday office hours, 13.3 (95% CI 13.2 to 13.5) during weekday out of hours, 19.8 (95% CI 19.6 to 20.1) during weekend daytime hours and 7.9 (95% CI 7.8 to 8.0) during weekend night-time hours. Admission rates varied between medical conditions. The proportion of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) increased outside of office hours. The age-standardised and sex-standardised 30-day mortality rate was 5.1% (95% CI 5.0% to 5.3%) after admission during weekday office hours, 5.7% (95% CI 5.5% to 6.0%) after admission during weekday out of hours, 6.4% (95% CI 6.1% to 6.7%) after admission during weekend daytime hours and 6.3% (95% CI 5.9% to 6.8%) after admission during weekend night-time hours. For the majority of the medical conditions examined, weekend admission was associated with highest mortality. Conclusions While admission rates decreased from office hours to weekend hours there was an observed increase in mortality. This may reflect differences in severity of illness as the proportion admitted to an ICU increased during the weekend. PMID:25762233

  3. Men in extreme conditions: some medical and psychological aspects of the Auschwitz concentration camp.

    PubMed

    Radil-Weiss, T

    1983-08-01

    The second world war ended many years ago. Most of those who survived the stay at the German concentration camp at Auschwitz have already died of the consequences of their imprisonment; those still alive are already in the last third of their life. Is there any point in returning to the experiences of those days? Consideration of the mental hygiene of former prisoners cautions us that perhaps we should not do it. But consideration of the general interest holds that we are not entitled to ignore any knowledge that can contribute to social development--including medicine and psychology--even if acquired under unspeakably awful conditions. In addition, since the war new generations have grown up that play an increasingly significant role in various spheres of life but have little concrete information about those events; they can neither rationally nor emotionally understand how the horrors connected with fascism and the war could have happened. In a sense it is encouraging that they cannot grasp such inhuman behavior; nevertheless, we must adhere to the following motto: "Nothing must be forgotten, nobody will be forgotten." We owe it to those millions who did not survive--both the victims of the Holocaust and those who fought against it. These are arguments in favor of returning to the facts that are ineffaceably recorded somewhere in our memories. In doing so, however, we must remember that at times we are revisiting experiences of a boy of 14 as recalled by a 50-year-old man. The material below, examining the medical as well as psychological aspects of imprisonment at Auschwitz, is based on my own memories, as an adolescent imprisoned at Auschwitz. I have tried to move from this individual account to more general statements, although the methodological apparatus on which scientific analysis is usually based is absent. PMID:6622601

  4. Chronic kidney disease is associated with a higher 90-day mortality than other chronic medical conditions in patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Ashham; Mulwande, Evelyn; Steinau, Maximilian; Bergmann, Ingo; Popov, Aron Frederik; Ghadimi, Michael; Beissbarth, Tim; Bauer, Martin; Hinz, Jos

    2015-01-01

    According to previous studies, the clinical course of sepsis could be affected by preexisting medical conditions, which are very common among patients with sepsis. This observational study aimed at investigating whether common chronic medical conditions affect the 90-day mortality risk in adult Caucasian patients with sepsis. A total of 482 patients with sepsis were enrolled in this study. The ninety-day mortality was the primary outcome; organ failure was the secondary outcome. Sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores and the requirements for organ support were evaluated to assess organ failure. A multivariate Cox regression model for the association between the 90-day mortality risk and chronic preexisting medical conditions adjusted for all relevant confounders and mortality predictors revealed the highest hazard ratio for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) (hazard ratio, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.46-3.46; p = 0.0002). Patients with CKD had higher SOFA scores than patients without CKD (8.9 4.0 and 6.5 3.4, respectively; p < 0.0001). Additionally, an analysis of organ-specific SOFA scores revealed higher scores in three organ systems (kidney, cardiovascular and coagulation). Patients with CKD have the highest 90-day mortality risk compared with patients without CKD or with other chronic medical conditions. PMID:25995131

  5. Medical Conditions and Healthcare Utilization among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Group Homes in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Joel M.; Botuck, Shelly; Damiani, Marco R.; Levy, Philip H.; Dern, Thomas A.; Freeman, Stephen E.

    2006-01-01

    The shift in living situations for adults with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (IDDD) from family homes to group homes has raised questions about their healthcare needs and access to appropriate healthcare services. This study was undertaken to describe the disability characteristics and medical conditions in a sample of adults

  6. Chronic kidney disease is associated with a higher 90-day mortality than other chronic medical conditions in patients with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mansur, Ashham; Mulwande, Evelyn; Steinau, Maximilian; Bergmann, Ingo; Frederik Popov, Aron; Ghadimi, Michael; Beissbarth, Tim; Bauer, Martin; Hinz, José

    2015-01-01

    According to previous studies, the clinical course of sepsis could be affected by preexisting medical conditions, which are very common among patients with sepsis. This observational study aimed at investigating whether common chronic medical conditions affect the 90-day mortality risk in adult Caucasian patients with sepsis. A total of 482 patients with sepsis were enrolled in this study. The ninety-day mortality was the primary outcome; organ failure was the secondary outcome. Sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores and the requirements for organ support were evaluated to assess organ failure. A multivariate Cox regression model for the association between the 90-day mortality risk and chronic preexisting medical conditions adjusted for all relevant confounders and mortality predictors revealed the highest hazard ratio for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) (hazard ratio, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.46-3.46; p = 0.0002). Patients with CKD had higher SOFA scores than patients without CKD (8.9 ± 4.0 and 6.5 ± 3.4, respectively; p < 0.0001). Additionally, an analysis of organ-specific SOFA scores revealed higher scores in three organ systems (kidney, cardiovascular and coagulation). Patients with CKD have the highest 90-day mortality risk compared with patients without CKD or with other chronic medical conditions. PMID:25995131

  7. 42 CFR 484.18 - Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision. 484.18 Section 484.18 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Administration §...

  8. 42 CFR 484.18 - Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision. 484.18 Section 484.18 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Administration §...

  9. Nine children over the age of one year with full trisomy 13: a case series describing medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Deborah A; Campbell, Emily

    2014-12-01

    Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), identified by Patau and colleagues [1960; Lancet 1: 790-793] is the third most common autosomal condition. Population studies indicate less than one in 10 children reaches their first birthday. In the face of mixed findings and recommendations for treatment, additional research is needed to further determine what contributes to longevity and implications for treatment for presenting medical conditions. The purpose of the present study is to report on presenting medical conditions and the presence or absence of the specific conditions (age at survey completion). Data on nine survivors (seven female, two male) with trisomy 13 indicated mean gestational age of approximately 36 weeks, birth weight ranging from 1100 to 3290 g and mean length of 45.3 cm. Length of hospital stay after birth varied. The majority of infants presented with well-known physical characteristics. Medical conditions and their treatment varied at birth and at survey completion. Notably, several infants' cardiac anomalies resolved without surgical intervention. Surgeries were provided for a range of conditions including gastrostomy tube placement to address feeding issues and removal of intestinal blockage. There were no reports of holoprosencephaly. Implications and recommendations are provided. PMID:25323598

  10. The Association of Pre-Existing Left Atrial Fibrosis with Clinical Variables in Patients Referred for Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Dewire, Jane; Khurram, Irfan M; Pashakhanloo, Farhad; Spragg, David; Marine, Joseph E; Berger, Ronald D; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Rickard, John; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Calkins, Hugh; Nazarian, Saman

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence after ablation is associated with left atrial (LA) fibrosis on late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We sought to determine pre-ablation, clinical characteristics that associate with the extent of LA fibrosis in patients undergoing catheter ablation for AF. METHODS AND RESULTS Consecutive patients presenting for catheter ablation of AF were enrolled and underwent LGE-MRI prior to initial AF ablation. The extent of fibrosis as a percentage of total LA myocardium was calculated in all patients prior to ablation. The cohort was divided into quartiles based on the percentage of fibrosis. Of 60 patients enrolled in the cohort, 13 had <5% fibrosis (Group 1), 15 had 57% fibrosis (Group 2), 17 had 813% fibrosis (Group 3), and 15 had 1436% fibrosis (Group 4). The extent of LA fibrosis was positively associated with time in continuous AF, and the presence of persistent or longstanding persistent AF. However, no statistically significant difference was observed in the presence of comorbid conditions, age, BMI, LA volume, or family history of AF among the four groups. After adjusting for diabetes and hypertension in a multivariable linear regression model, paroxysmal AF remained independently and negatively associated with the extent of fibrosis (?4.0 1.8, P = 0.034). CONCLUSION The extent of LA fibrosis in patients undergoing AF ablation is associated with AF type and time in continuous AF. Our results suggest that the presence and duration of AF are primary determinants of increased atrial LGE. PMID:25368540

  11. Medical repatriations from Operation Resolute (Bosnia).

    PubMed

    Croft, A M; Hopkins, J P

    1997-02-01

    Operation Resolute is a peace enforcement mission in Bosnia-Herzegovina, which commenced on 20 December 1995. During Weeks 1-26 of the operation a total of 405 British personnel were repatriated on medical grounds, out of a mean force size of 9,299. We analysed these repatriations by clinical category and according to final destination. In addition we carried out a focused analysis of the 87 medical repatriations which occurred during May 1996. 77.5% of all the repatriations in the first 6 months of Operation Resolute were for surgical conditions, and 22.5% were medical. Eighty two per cent of British soldiers were repatriated to UK, and 18% to Germany. The mean weekly repatriation rate during this 6-month period was 1.7 per 1,000 force strength. Orthopaedic conditions were by far the greatest single cause of repatriation. During the month of May there was a total of 87 repatriations, of which 12 were due to disease. These showed no consistent pattern. Seventy five of the May repatriations were due to injury and of these 29% were caused by sport, 5% by road traffic accidents, 4% were eye injuries and one was due to burns; other occupational injuries accounted for a further 27% of the total. Twenty out of the 87 personnel repatriated in May had pre-existing medical conditions, but only 35% of these had been reviewed by their medical officer prior to deployment. Medical officers should be more diligent in carrying out pre-deployment fitness screening. The routine medical surveillance of deployed troops should be targeted towards occupational causes of injury, since these are preventable and account for terminal manpower losses. PMID:9089551

  12. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... medicine or osteopathy responsible for the care of the patient as specified in § 482.12(c), nurse,...

  13. Effect of Providing Conditional Economic Compensation on Uptake of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Thirumurthy, Harsha; Masters, Samuel H.; Rao, Samwel; Bronson, Megan A.; Lanham, Michele; Omanga, Eunice; Evens, Emily; Agot, Kawango

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Novel strategies are needed to increase the uptake of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) in sub-Saharan Africa and enhance the effectiveness of male circumcision as an HIV prevention strategy. OBJECTIVE To determine whether small economic incentives could increase circumcision prevalence by addressing reported economic barriers to VMMC and behavioral factors such as present-biased decision making. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized clinical trial conducted between June 22, 2013, and February 4, 2014, among 1504 uncircumcised men aged 25 to 49 years in Nyanza region, Kenya. VMMC services were provided free of charge and participants were randomized to 1 of 3 intervention groups or a control group. INTERVENTIONS Participants in the 3 intervention groups received varying amounts of compensation conditional on undergoing circumcision at 1 of 9 study clinics within 2 months of enrollment. Compensation took the form of food vouchers worth 200 Kenya shillings (≈US $2.50), 700 Kenya shillings (≈US $8.75), or 1200 Kenya shillings (≈US $15.00), which reflected a portion of transportation costs and lost wages associated with getting circumcised. The control group received no compensation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES VMMC uptake within 2 months. RESULTS Analysis of data for 1502 participants with complete data showed that VMMC uptake within 2 months was higher in the US $8.75 group (6.6%; 95% CI, 4.3%–9.5% [25 of 381]) and the US $15.00 group (9.0%; 95% CI, 6.3%–12.4% [34 of 377]) than in the US $2.50 group (1.9%; 95% CI, 0.8%–3.8% [7 of 374]) and the control group (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.6%–3.5% [6 of 370]). In logistic regression analysis, the US $8.75 group had significantly higher VMMC uptake than the control group (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.3; 95% CI, 1.7–10.7), as did the US $15.00 group (AOR 6.2; 95% CI, 2.6–15.0). Effect sizes for the US $8.75 and US $15.00 groups did not differ significantly (P = .20). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among uncircumcised men in Kenya, compensation in the form of food vouchers worth approximately US $8.75 or US $15.00, compared with lesser or no compensation, resulted in a modest increase in the prevalence of circumcision after 2 months. The effects of more intense promotion or longer implementation require further investigation. PMID:25042290

  14. Access to Health Insurance: Experiences and Attitudes of Those With Genetic Versus Non-Genetic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Nancy E.; Medley, Amy M.; Natowicz, Marvin R.; Hull, Sara Chandros; Faden, Ruth R.; Plantinga, Laura; Gostin, Lawrence O.

    2016-01-01

    While studies reveal that individuals with both genetic and other chronic medical conditions have difficulty obtaining health insurance, no large-scale studies have compared the health insurance experiences of these groups. The goal of this study was to document and compare the health insurance experiences, attitudes, and beliefs of persons with genetic conditions to those of persons with or at risk for other serious medical conditions. We interviewed approximately 100 adults or parents of children with one of each of the following medical conditions: sickle cell disease (SCD), cystic fibrosis (CF), diabetes, and HIV, and 200 adults with or at risk for breast (BC) or colon cancer (CC). The interview included items related to respondents’ experiences and attitudes regarding health insurance. Twenty-seven percent of 597 total respondents self-reported having been denied health insurance or offered insurance at a prohibitive rate. Respondents with single-gene disorders (CF and SCD) were twice as likely to report this as those with non-genetic conditions. Legislation that exists to limit genetic discrimination in insurance addresses genetic risks or traits only, however, rather than protecting those with actual disease. Thus, current legislation may not address the challenges faced by individuals like those in this study, who try to maintain access to health insurance when they or their children are symptomatic with a genetic or other serious health condition. More than one-third of all respondents thought there was a high chance they would be denied health insurance in the future or their insurance would become unaffordable. That individuals with all six health conditions expressed concern regarding their ability to obtain future health insurance suggests policy proposals should be broad-based, addressing the needs and concerns of individuals with diverse health conditions. PMID:17290434

  15. [Condition and perspectives of development of vehicle-park of medical evacuation in the Armed Forces].

    PubMed

    Petrovski?, G V; Gamali?, V N; Varfolomeev, V A; Pozdniakov, A V; Stremedlovski?, N V; Tushnova, L K; Kiselev, N V

    2010-04-01

    The article presents an observe of vehicles of medical evacuation (VME), existing in medical service of the Armed Forces of RF, intended for transporting of ill and wounded persons with delivery of emergency care in passing. Were presented perspective examples of CMV "Aybolit" and VME of middle and grand evacocapacity, pertained to elaboration. There was made a conclusion that the new generation of VME on chassis of the army all-wheel-drive vehicles, having an armor defense (complex of local defense), system of smooth transporting and loading-unloading system, permits solve questions of evacuation of ill and wounded persons from battle field more effectively. PMID:20564950

  16. Emotional Impact of the Medical Examination for Child Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the importance of research on the emotional impact of the medical examination for child sexual abuse. Summarizes current research; identifies unanswered questions; and proposes a research agenda to investigate effects of pre-existing factors, medical setting and emotional response, targeting positive and negative outcomes, and emotional

  17. Manchester Clinical Placement Index (MCPI). Conditions for Medical Students' Learning in Hospital and Community Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dornan, Tim; Muijtjens, Arno; Graham, Jennifer; Scherpbier, Albert; Boshuizen, Henny

    2012-01-01

    The drive to quality-manage medical education has created a need for valid measurement instruments. Validity evidence includes the theoretical and contextual origin of items, choice of response processes, internal structure, and interrelationship of a measure's variables. This research set out to explore the validity and potential utility of an…

  18. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule. Medicare pays for the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two through four concurrent anesthesia services...

  19. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule. Medicare pays for the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two through four concurrent anesthesia services...

  20. Prevalence of Chronic Medical Conditions in Adults with Mental Retardation: Comparison with the General Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapell, Deborah; Nightingale, Beryle; Rodriguez, Ana; Lee, Joseph H.; Zigman, Warren B.; Schupf, Nicole

    1998-01-01

    A study interviewed caregivers and reviewed medical records of 278 adults with mental retardation with and without Down syndrome. The adults with mental retardation had age-related disorders comparable to those in the general population, but there was an increased frequency of thyroid disorders, nonischemic heart disorders, and sensory impairment.

  1. Spiritually Competent Practice with Individuals and Families Dealing with Medical Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Len

    2011-01-01

    Counselors and psychotherapists are increasingly expected to provide services that are spiritually competent. Those counseling individuals and families where medical concerns are a focus would do well to consider the implications of spiritual competence in their work. The article defines spiritual competence, describes spiritual competencies, and

  2. Potential Therapeutic Competition in Community-Living Older Adults in the U.S.: Use of Medications That May Adversely Affect a Coexisting Condition

    PubMed Central

    Lorgunpai, Songprod Jonathan; Grammas, Marianthe; Lee, David S. H.; McAvay, Gail; Charpentier, Peter; Tinetti, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The 75% of older adults with multiple chronic conditions are at risk of therapeutic competition (i.e. treatment for one condition may adversely affect a coexisting condition). The objective was to determine the prevalence of potential therapeutic competition in community-living older adults. Methods Cross-sectional descriptive study of a representative sample of 5,815 community-living adults 65 and older in the U.S, enrolled 20072009. The 14 most common chronic conditions treated with at least one medication were ascertained from Medicare claims. Medication classes recommended in national disease guidelines for these conditions and used by ?2% of participants were identified from in-person interviews conducted 20082010. Criteria for potential therapeutic competition included: 1), well-acknowledged adverse medication effect; 2) mention in disease guidelines; or 3) report in a systematic review or two studies published since 2000. Outcomes included prevalence of situations of potential therapeutic competition and frequency of use of the medication in individuals with and without the competing condition. Results Of 27 medication classes, 15 (55.5%) recommended for one study condition may adversely affect other study conditions. Among 91 possible pairs of study chronic conditions, 25 (27.5%) have at least one potential therapeutic competition. Among participants, 1,313 (22.6%) received at least one medication that may worsen a coexisting condition; 753 (13%) had multiple pairs of such competing conditions. For example, among 846 participants with hypertension and COPD, 16.2% used a nonselective beta-blocker. In only 6 of 37 cases (16.2%) of potential therapeutic competition were those with the competing condition less likely to receive the medication than those without the competing condition. Conclusions One fifth of older Americans receive medications that may adversely affect coexisting conditions. Determining clinical outcomes in these situations is a research and clinical priority. Effects on coexisting conditions should be considered when prescribing medications. PMID:24586786

  3. Neutralizing Antibody Response after Intramuscular Purified Vero Cell Rabies Vaccination (PVRV) in Iranian Patients with Specific Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Pooneh; Vahabpour, RouhAllah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Sadat, Syed Mehdi; Howaizi, Nader; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Eslamifar, Ali; Fallahian, Vida

    2015-01-01

    Objective Post exposure prophylaxis using one of the WHO-approved vaccines is the method of choice for preventing rabies. Abnormal immune function in patients with some specific medical conditions, such as pregnancy, chronic hepatitis B virus infection, different types of cancers like lymphoma, diabetes I and II, corticosteroid consumption by patients with rheumatoid arthritis and lupus erythematosus, could impair the immunologic response to various vaccines. The immune response to rabies vaccination has never been examined in patients with any of these described medical conditions. This study purposed to evaluate the neutralyzing antibody response after vaccination with purified Vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV) according to the WHO-recommended PostExposure Prophylaxis (PEP) "ESSEN" regimen. Methods Thirty healthy volunteers and 50 volunteers with different medical conditions who were exposed to a suspected rabid animal in the 2nd or 3rd category of exposure received 5 doses of PVRV under the ESSEN protocol. Three blood samples were collected on days 0 (before the first dose), 14, and 35. The anti-rabies antibody titer was measured using the Rapid Fluorescent Foci Inhibition Test (RFFIT) and an ELISA Bio-Rad, Platelia, Rabies II kit. Results All subjects reached NAb titers above 0.5 IU/ml by day 14 after vaccination. On day 35 (1 week after receiving the last rabies vaccine), anti-rabies antibodies were in the protective level (>0.5 IU/ml) in both groups. There was no statistically significant difference in anti-rabies antibody response due to the type of exposure (category 2 or 3), and successful seroconversion was confirmed in both groups. Conclusion In conclusion, the ESSEN protocol using the PVRV vaccine is sufficient for rabies prophylaxis in patients with specific medical conditions. PMID:26440665

  4. MedMinify: An Advice-giving System for Simplifying the Schedules of Daily Home Medication Regimens Used to Treat Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Allen J.; Klasnja, Predrag; Friedman, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    For those with high blood pressure, diabetes, or high cholesterol, adherence to a home medication regimen is important for health. Reductions in the number of daily medication-taking events or daily pill burden improve adherence. A novel advice-giving computer application was developed using the SMART platform to generate advice on how to potentially simplify home medication regimens. MedMinify generated advice for 41.3% of 1,500 home medication regimens for adults age 60 years and older with chronic medical conditions. If the advice given by MedMinify were implemented, 320 regimen changes would have reduced daily medication-taking events while an additional 295 changes would have decreased the daily pill burden. The application identified four serious drug-drug interactions and so advised against taking two pairs of medications simultaneously. MedMinify can give advice to change home medication regimens that could result in simpler home medication-taking schedules. PMID:25954445

  5. Are pre-existing markers of chronic kidney disease associated with short-term mortality following acute community-acquired pneumonia and sepsis? A cohort study among older people with diabetes using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Helen I.; Nitsch, Dorothea; Millett, Elizabeth R. C.; Sinclair, Alan; Thomas, Sara L.

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to examine whether pre-existing impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and proteinuria were associated with mortality following community-acquired pneumonia or sepsis among people aged ?65 years with diabetes mellitus, without end-stage renal disease. Methods Patients were followed up from onset of first community-acquired pneumonia or sepsis episode in a cohort study using large, linked electronic health databases. Follow-up was for up to 90 days, unlimited by hospital discharge. We used generalized linear models with log link, normal distribution and robust standard errors to calculate risk ratios (RRs) for all-cause 28- and 90-day mortality according to two markers of chronic kidney disease: eGFR and proteinuria. Results All-cause mortality among the 4743 patients with pneumonia was 29.6% after 28 days and 37.4% after 90 days. Among the 1058 patients with sepsis, all-cause 28- and 90-day mortality were 35.6 and 44.2%, respectively. eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m2 was a risk marker of higher 28-day mortality for pneumonia (RR 1.27: 95% CI 1.121.43) and sepsis (RR 1.32: 95% CI 1.071.64), adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, smoking status and co-morbidities. Neither moderately impaired eGFR nor proteinuria were associated with short-term mortality following either infection. Conclusions People with pre-existing low eGFR but not on dialysis are at higher risk of death following pneumonia and sepsis. This association was not explained by existing co-morbidities. These patients need to be carefully monitored to prevent modifiable causes of death. PMID:25605811

  6. Living conditions, ability to seek medical treatment, and awareness of health conditions and healthcare options among homeless persons in Tokyo, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohtsu, Tadahiro; Toda, Ryouhei; Shiraishi, Tomonobu; Toyoda, Hirokuni; Toyozawa, Hideyasu; Kamioka, Yasuaki; Ochiai, Hirotaka; Shimada, Naoki; Shirasawa, Takako; Hoshino, Hiromi; Kokaze, Akatsuki

    2011-12-01

    Empirical data indicative of the health conditions and medical needs of homeless persons are scarce in Japan. In this study, with the aim of contributing to the formulation of future healthcare strategies for the homeless, we conducted a self-administered questionnaire survey and interviews at a park in Shinjuku Ward, Tokyo, to clarify the living conditions of homeless persons and their health conditions and awareness about the availability of medical treatment. Responses from 55 homeless men were recorded (response rate: 36.7%). With the exception of one person, none of them possessed a health insurance certificate. Half of the respondents reported having a current income source, although their modal monthly income was 30,000 yen($1 was approximately 90 yen). The number of individuals who responded "yes" to the questions regarding "Consulting a doctor on the basis of someone's recommendation" and "Being aware of the location of the nearest hospital or clinic" was significantly higher among those who had someone to consult when they were ill than among those who did not (the odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] were 15.00 [3.05-93.57] and 11.45 [1.42-510.68], respectively). This showed that whether or not a homeless person had a person to consult might influence his healthcare-seeking behavior. When queried about the entity they consulted (multiple responses acceptable), respondents mentioned "life support organizations" (61.1%) and "public offices" (33.3%). Overall, 94.5% of the respondents were aware of swine flu (novel influenza A (H1N1)). Their main sources of information were newspapers and magazines. On the basis of these findings, with regard to the aim of formulating healthcare strategies for homeless persons, while life support organizations and public offices play significant roles as conduits to medical institutions, print media should be considered useful for communicating messages to homeless persons. PMID:22189479

  7. A Survey of Injuries and Medical Conditions Affecting Competitive Adult Outrigger Canoe Paddlers on O`ahu

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Amanda; Nichols, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Outrigger canoe paddling is a very popular competitive sport in the Hawaiian Islands and Polynesia. The sport is growing rapidly in Australia and the mainland US. Purpose To assess the types and severity of musculoskeletal injuries and medical conditions that affect adult outrigger canoe paddlers on (O`ahu, Hawai`i. Methods and Study Design A survey was designed to assess outrigger canoe paddling injuries and medical conditions based upon a literature review of medical conditions that affect other paddling sport athletes (e.g., rowers, kayakers, and canoeists). The data were compiled and analyzed using statistical software. Results Surveys were completed by 278 (142 women, 145 men) (9.5%) of the 3,068 registered (O`ahu adult paddlers during the summer of 2006. The subjects mean age was 39 years (range=1872 years). Sixty-two percent of respondents had experienced paddling-related musculoskeletal injuries. The most common sites of involvement were shoulder (40%), and back (26%), followed by wrist/hand (10%), elbow (9%), and neck (9%). Forty-nine percent of participants experienced skin lacerations, 33% developed heat illness, 32% sustained injuries from exposure to coral or sea creatures, and 24% developed skin infections. Ten percent of subjects reported prior histories of skin cancer or precancerous lesions. There was no statistically significant increase in injuries when comparing age groups, sex, or boat position. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of injuries in those that paddled in the long and short distance seasons over those that paddled only short distance. Short distance races are sprints less than 2000 meters and long distance races are endurance events usually 20 to 30 kilometers with some more than 40 kilometers. There were also more injuries reported in the first season compared with the second season and in the third or later season as compared with the second, although this may be due to limitations of the survey design. Conclusions Outrigger canoe paddlers report a high prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries and illnesses related to their sport. The shoulder and back were the most common sites of injury. The rib was the most commonly fractured bone. Paddling may also predispose to such environmentally related conditions as heat illness, injury from sea creatures, and perhaps skin cancers. Significance of Findings To the authors knowledge, this is the first study to identify the medical conditions that affect adult competitive outrigger canoe paddlers on (O`ahu. The findings will help paddlers, coaches, and medical practitioners to better identify and understand paddling-related injuries and illnesses. PMID:19653418

  8. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF...) Describe attitudes and behavior; (6) Estimate intellectual functioning, memory functioning, and...

  9. [Differential Diagnosis of Schizophrenia: Psychotic Symptoms in Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Psychotic Disorders due to other Medical Conditions].

    PubMed

    Kokurcan, Ahmet; Atba?o?lu, E?ref Cem

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the differentiation of schizophrenia in the setting of adult psychiatry from neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD's) and psychosis due to other medical conditions (PDMC). Psychotic disorders in early adulthood are most frequently diagnosed with the schizophrenia spectrum or mood disorders. However, they may be the manifestation of neurologic, endocrine or immunologic disease. Individuals with NDD's such as the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or intellectual developmental disorder (IDD) may also present initially in adulthood. Therefore it is not uncommon that the psychiatrist is the first physician to assess a psychotic patient with underlying medical illness or a NDD. Failure to identify the underlying cause will delay appropriate management. Overdiagnosis of primary psychiatric disorders may be misleading in planning the treatment, as evidence-based treatment algorithms relevant to psychosis are intended for primary psychotic disorders like schizophrenia, and symptomatic treatment may result in unnecessary exposure to antipsychotic drugs. Exclusion of other medical conditions and NDD's is essential before establishing a diagnosis of schizophrenia. PMID:26731025

  10. Associations between Medical Conditions and Breast Cancer Risk in Asians: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Shu-Chun; Wu, Guo-Jie; Lu, Yen-Shen; Lin, Ching-Hung; Hsiung, Chao Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Background The breast cancer incidence in Asia is rising. To explore whether the etiology of breast cancer is different from the known risk factors from studies in Western countries, we conducted a nested case-control study using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Methods All medical conditions based on the first three digits of the ICD-9 and a list of medical conditions based on literature review were retrieved for each case and control. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the associations between medical conditions and breast cancer risks were estimated using conditional logistic regression and adjusted for occupation, number of breast cancer screening, and the average number of outpatient visits prior the diagnosis. The associations were also estimated for younger (<50 years old) and older subjects separately. Results The analyses included 4,884 breast cancer cases and 19,536 age-matched controls. Prior breast diseases (OR, 95% CI: 2.47, 2.26–2.71), obesity (1.43, 1.04–1.96), endometriosis (1.44, 1.15–1.80), uterine leiomyoma (1.20, 1.03–1.40), hypertensive diseases (1.14, 1.05–1.25), and disorders in lipid metabolism (1.13, 1.04–1.24) were associated with increased breast cancer risk. No heterogeneity was observed between age groups (<50 and ≥50 years old). Conclusions In addition to benign breast diseases, obesity, endometriosis, uterine leiomyoma, hypertensive diseases, and disorders of lipid metabolism were associated with a subsequent breast cancer risk. Impacts Our results suggest that estrogen related factors may play an important role in breast cancer risks in the Taiwanese female population. PMID:26605792

  11. [Investigation of actual condition of management and disposal of medical radioactive waste in Korea].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Horiuchi, Shoji; Imoto, Atsushi

    2009-07-20

    In order to realize the rational management and disposal of radioactive waste like DIS or its clearance as performed in Europe, North America, and Japan, we investigated the situation of medical radioactive waste in Korea and its enforcement. We visited three major Korean facilities in May 2008 and confirmed details of the procedure being used by administering a questionnaire after our visit. From the results, we were able to verify that the governmental agency had established regulations for the clearance of radioactive waste as self-disposal based on the clearance level of IAEA in Korea and that the medical facilities performed suitable management and disposal of radioactive waste based on the regulations and superintendence of a radiation safety officer. The type of nuclear medicine was almost the same as that in Japan, and the half-life of all radiopharmaceuticals was 60 days or less. While performing regulatory adjustment concerning the rational management and disposal of radioactive waste in Korea for reference also in this country, it is important to provide an enforcement procedure with quality assurance in the regulations. PMID:19661730

  12. Introduction: Chronic Medical Conditions and Depression: the View from Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kravitz, Richard L.; Ford, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Martin Hickman maneuvered his way into the office and pulled up his sleeve as the medical assistant put the brake on his wheelchair and attached the blood pressure cuff around his oversized upper arm. A bulky 56-year-old man with a heavy shock of gray hair teetering on the edge of his forehead, his problem list included type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. For the past 15 years he has used a wheelchair due to T4 paraplegia from a gunshot wound. He has also suffers from bouts of major depression that respond to sertraline but never fully remit. As the medical assistant inflated the cuff, Mr. Hickman smiled weakly and maintained a cheerful faade even after she informed him that his blood pressure was 164/88 mm Hg and his glucose was 267 mg/dl (both well above goal). Later, on more careful questioning by his primary care physician, Hickman admitted that he was feeling more down than usual and that he sometimes neglected to take his diabetes medicine and blood pressure pills. Thinking back over the years he had cared for this patient, the physician recalled that December tended to be a particularly bad month. Social isolation, tolerable for most of the year, became painful around the holidays. December also happened to mark the anniversary of Hickman's spinal cord injury. The clock was running, the waiting room was full, and the physician realized he was already falling behind. PMID:18954587

  13. A geriatric and gerontologic perspective on the effects of medical conditions on older drivers: discussion of Waller.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R B; Retchin, S M

    1992-02-01

    In discussing Waller's paper, we build on his review of medical conditions and the risk of motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) using principles derived from geriatrics, gerontology, and health services research. Three approaches are suggested. The medical model uses discrete diseases as risk factors, but despite its utility and appeal, this model does not sufficiently characterize health and functional status to be the sole approach, and future investigative efforts should at least consider severity of illness concepts. The functional status model emphasizes a functional and physiological approach to health status, but despite its successful application in geriatric assessment and its investigative promise, functional status can be difficult to measure and has not been validated in relation to MVA risk. Finally we consider a behavioral model and within that framework discuss the relation of depressive and other emotional illnesses as well as social vitality to driving patterns and MVA occurrence. PMID:1577499

  14. An Index of Multiple Psychosocial, Syndemic Conditions Is Associated with Antiretroviral Medication Adherence Among HIV-Positive Youth.

    PubMed

    Kuhns, Lisa M; Hotton, Anna L; Garofalo, Rob; Muldoon, Abigail L; Jaffe, Kaitlyn; Bouris, Alida; Voisin, Dexter; Schneider, John

    2016-04-01

    Medication adherence among HIV-infected individuals is critical to limit disease progression and onward transmission. Evidence indicates that among youth living with HIV (YLH), adherence is suboptimal and related to co-morbid psychosocial conditions. Cross-sectional data from 212 YLH, ages 16-29, collected between 2011-2014 in Chicago were analyzed to assess the relationship of multiple psychosocial conditions (e.g., depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, moderate/heavy marijuana use, moderate/heavy alcohol use, HIV-related stigma) to ART adherence (i.e., a "syndemic.") Adherence was regressed on an index of increasing numbers of psychosocial conditions, controlling for demographic and treatment factors as well as enrollment site. The mean age of participants was 24, 89% were male, 87% black, and 91% behaviorally infected. Psychosocial conditions were prevalent, including 38% and 34% with high depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively, 54% and 25% with a moderate/high level of marijuana and alcohol use, respectively, and 46% reporting high HIV-related stigma. In regression analysis, the likelihood of ART adherence decreased with the number of syndemic conditions (linear dose response, p = 0.02) as did the odds of viral load suppression (p = 0.008). Interventions to address these conditions in concert with biomedical treatment as prevention for YLH are needed. PMID:27028184

  15. Personal attitudes, perceived social norms, and health-risk behavior among female adolescents with chronic medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Jennifer H; Greenley, Rachel N; Mussatto, Kathleen A; Roth-Wojcicki, Betsy; Miller, Tami; Freeman, Mary E; Lerand, Sarah

    2014-07-01

    To examine whether perceived peer/parent norms or personal beliefs about adolescent substance use influence substance use among female adolescents with chronic medical conditions. Sixty-eight females reported on substance use, personal beliefs, and perceived peer/parent norms. Personal beliefs and perceived peer/parent norms were associated with adolescent's current and future substance use. Although perceived peer norms accounted for variance in current substance use, only personal beliefs accounted for variance in future alcohol use. Targeting perceived peer norms may be effective for intervention efforts among adolescents endorsing current substance use, whereas alcohol use prevention efforts should target personal beliefs. PMID:23524992

  16. Apparatus for detecting at least one predetermined condition and providing an informational signal in response thereto in a medication infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischell, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A medication infusion system provides redundant safety and includes condition detecting and informational alarm signal generating apparatus for indicating if (1) a fluid leak occurs in different portions of the system; (2) a programmable input from a patient or physician would result in exceeding a safe dosage limit; (3) the reservoir containing medication has been filled; (4) the intended medication pumping does not correlate with the pumping actually effected; (5) battery voltage is low; (6) the medication reserve is low; and (7) the system has been switched off. The apparatus may provide subcutaneous electrical, thermal, or audible stimulation to the patient and also provides a signal which a physician may monitor. The stimulation may be coded to separately identify each above-listed deviation in nominal system performance. In addition, the number of medication requests are correlated with actual medication dispensing to assure proper operation. An identification scheme is provided which matches the patient with his or her corresponding medication.

  17. Service-conditional medical student aid programs: The experience of the states.

    PubMed

    Strosberg, M A; Mullan, F; Winsberg, G R

    1982-08-01

    Medical student aid programs tied to a service commitment are in operation in 31 states. The programs provide various options for students to pay back the financial support given by the state, the most popular form being cancellation of the financial obligation to the the state if a service commitment is fulfilled. Although the statutory language and program literature claim a major objective of the programs to be the provision of manpower to underserved areas, lenient "buy-out" provisions and small awards relative to the total tuition have caused these programs to be used as sources of low-interest loans. Moreover, states do not provide subsidies to promote service in unattractive areas; thus, there is little reason for physician graduates to locate in low-income areas. State cooperation with the federal National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program, which does provide subsidies to physicians practicing in underserved areas, may provide the states a strategy for meeting their legislative objectives of providing physicians for the underserved. PMID:7097731

  18. Collaborative care: models for treatment of patients with complex medical-psychiatric conditions.

    PubMed

    Ivbijaro, Gabriel O; Enum, Yaccub; Khan, Anwar Ali; Lam, Simon Sai-Kei; Gabzdyl, Andrei

    2014-11-01

    Patients with co-morbidity and multi-morbidity have worse outcomes and greater healthcare needs. Co-morbid depression and other long-term conditions present health services with challenges in delivering effective care for patients. We provide some recent evidence from the literature to support the need for collaborative care, illustrated by practical examples of how to deliver a collaborative/integrated care continuum by presenting data collected between 2011 and 2012 from a London Borough clinical improvement programme that compared co-morbid diagnosis of depression and other long-term conditions and Accident and Emergency use. We have provided some practical steps for developing collaborative care within primary care and suggest that primary care family practices should adopt closer collaboration with other services in order to improve clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness. PMID:25218604

  19. [Vaccination of cats against infection with feline leukemia virus (FeLV): first recombinant vaccine and the effect of a pre-existing infection with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)].

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Aubert, A; Wolfensberger, C; Cronier, J; Lutz, H

    1994-01-01

    A new recombinant FeLV vaccine was evaluated in 30 specified pathogen-free cats 10 months of age cats. The vaccine consisted of the non-glycosylated FeLV envelope protein p45, aluminium hydroxide and a saponin adjuvant. The cats (n = 18) were vaccinated twice intramuscularly, 3 weeks apart. All animals were challenged intraperitoneally with FeLV subgroup A, 18 weeks later. While 94% of the vaccinated cats showed no viraemia or were only transiently viraemic, 80% of the non-vaccinated animals became persistently viraemic within 2 to 3 weeks. In our hands the preventable fraction of the vaccine was 93%. In order to determine the effect of a pre-existing infection with feline immunodeficiency virus on the efficacy of vaccination, 50% of the cats were previously infected with FIV. The infected cats were protected to the same degree as the non-infected animals. With prolonged duration of FIV infection the probability increases, that the immune system of the cat will fail and clinical signs will appear. In order to observe a state of possible immunodeficiency, an accurate clinical examination of every cat prior to vaccination seems of major importance. PMID:7801087

  20. Predictors of all-cause mortality in patients with stable COPD: medical co-morbid conditions or high depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Maters, Gemma A; de Voogd, Jacob N; Sanderman, Robbert; Wempe, Johan B

    2014-08-01

    Co-morbid conditions are frequently found in patients with COPD. We evaluate the association of co-morbidities with mortality, in stable COPD. 224 patients, mean age 61.2 ( 10.00), 48.2% female, mean FEV1 1.1 ( 0.5) liters, median follow-up time 4.2 years, participated. Medical co-morbidities were scored according to the Charlson Co-morbidity Index (CCI). Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90). The Cox proportional hazard model was used for survival analyses. In our sample, 70% of all patients have a co-morbid medical condition or high depressive symptoms. During follow-up 51% of all patients died, and those with heart failure have the highest mortality rate (75%). Age, fat-free mass and exercise capacity were predictive factors, contrary to CCI-scores and high depressive symptoms. An unadjusted association between heart failure and survival was found. Although the presence of co-morbidities, using the CCI-score, is not related to survival, heart failure seems to have a detrimental effect on survival. Higher age and lower exercise capacity or fat-free mass predict mortality. PMID:24831411

  1. 20 CFR 30.114 - What kind of evidence is needed to establish a compensable medical condition and how will that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... other imaging reports, lymphocyte proliferation testings, beryllium patch tests, pulmonary function or... medical condition. (1) For covered beryllium illnesses, additional medical evidence, as set forth in § 30.207, is required to establish a beryllium illness. (2) For chronic silicosis, additional...

  2. 20 CFR 30.114 - What kind of evidence is needed to establish a compensable medical condition and how will that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... other imaging reports, lymphocyte proliferation testings, beryllium patch tests, pulmonary function or... medical condition. (1) For covered beryllium illnesses, additional medical evidence, as set forth in § 30.207, is required to establish a beryllium illness. (2) For chronic silicosis, additional...

  3. 20 CFR 30.114 - What kind of evidence is needed to establish a compensable medical condition and how will that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... other imaging reports, lymphocyte proliferation testings, beryllium patch tests, pulmonary function or... medical condition. (1) For covered beryllium illnesses, additional medical evidence, as set forth in § 30.207, is required to establish a beryllium illness. (2) For chronic silicosis, additional...

  4. Pharmacological modulation of caspase-8 in thymus-related medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzesi, Nicola; Fierabracci, Alessandra; Thuy, Trinh Thy; Martelli, Maria Paola; Liberati, Anna Marina; Ayroldi, Emira; Riccardi, Carlo; Delfino, Domenico V

    2014-10-01

    The thymus is a lymphoid organ that governs the development of a diverse T-cell repertoire capable of defending against nonself-antigens and avoiding autoimmunity. However, the thymus can also succumb to different diseases. Hypertrophic diseases, such as thymomas, are typically associated with impairment of negative selection, which leads to autoimmune disease, or disruption of positive selection, which results in immunodeficiency. Hypotrophic diseases of the thymus can manifest during acute infections, cancer, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, or with aging. This condition leads to decreased immune function and can be treated by either replacing lost thymic tissue or by preventing thymic tissue death. Studies have demonstrated the critical role of caspase-8 in regulating apoptosis in the thymus. In this review, we discuss how pharmacological activation and inhibition of caspase-8 can be used to treat hypertrophic and hypotrophic diseases of the thymus, respectively, to improve its function. PMID:25060674

  5. Interventions to Address Medical Conditions and Health-Risk Behaviors Among Persons With Serious Mental Illness: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    McGinty, Emma E; Baller, Julia; Azrin, Susan T; Juliano-Bult, Denise; Daumit, Gail L

    2016-01-01

    People with serious mental illness (SMI) have mortality rates 2 to 3 times higher than the overall US population, largely due to cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity and diabetes mellitus and other conditions, such as HIV/AIDS, is heightened in this group. Based on the recommendations of a National Institute of Mental Health stakeholder meeting, we conducted a comprehensive review examining the strength of the evidence surrounding interventions to address major medical conditions and health-risk behaviors among persons with SMI. Peer-reviewed studies were identified using 4 major research databases. Randomized controlled trials and observational studies testing interventions to address medical conditions and risk behaviors among persons with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder between January 2000 and June 2014 were included. Information was abstracted from each study by 2 trained reviewers, who also rated study quality using a standard tool. Following individual study review, the quality of the evidence (high, medium, low) and the effectiveness of various interventions were synthesized. 108 studies were included. The majority of studies examined interventions to address overweight/obesity (n = 80). The strength of the evidence was high for 4 interventions: metformin and behavioral interventions had beneficial effects on weight loss; and bupropion and varenicline reduced tobacco smoking. The strength of the evidence was low for most other interventions reviewed. Future studies should test long-term interventions to cardiovascular risk factors and health-risk behaviors. In addition, future research should study implementation strategies to effectively translate efficacious interventions into real-world settings. PMID:26221050

  6. The quality of life in acne: a comparison with general medical conditions using generic questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Mallon, E; Newton, J N; Klassen, A; Stewart-Brown, S L; Ryan, T J; Finlay, A Y

    1999-04-01

    Skin diseases such as acne are sometimes thought of as unimportant, even trivial, when compared with diseases of other organ systems. To address this point directly, validated generic questionnaires were used to assess morbidity in acne patients and compare it with morbidity in patients with other chronic diseases. For 111 acne patients referred to a dermatologist, quality of life was measured using the Dermatology Life Quality Index, Rosenberg's measure of self-esteem, a version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) and the Short Form 36 (SF-36). Clinical severity was measured using the Leeds Acne Grade. Population quality of life data for the SF-36 instrument were available from a random sample of adult local residents (n = 9334) some of whom reported a variety of long-standing disabling diseases. All quality of life instruments showed substantial deficits for acne patients that correlated with each other but not with clinically assessed acne severity. The acne patients (a relatively severely affected group) reported levels of social, psychological and emotional problems that were as great as those reported by patients with chronic disabling asthma, epilepsy, diabetes, back pain or arthritis. Acne is not a trivial disease in comparison with other chronic conditions. This should be recognized in the allocation of health care resources. PMID:10233319

  7. Predicting chronic symptoms after an acute "stressor"--lessons learned from 3 medical conditions.

    PubMed

    McLean, Samuel A; Clauw, Daniel J

    2004-01-01

    Stressful events occur in the lives of millions of individuals each year. Such events, or "stressors", are experiences that threaten personal well-being, and include traumatic events such as motor vehicle collision, infectious illness, and situations such as military deployment. While most individuals recover from such events, others develop persistent somatic symptoms, such as chronic pain and fatigue, and/or psychological disturbances, such as posttraumatic stress disorder. Recent findings from the study of risk factors for the development of chronic somatic symptoms after a traumatic, infectious, or situational stressor suggest that similar pre-event, event-related, and post-event risk factors influence the development of chronic symptoms in each condition. Females, and those with pre-event distress or psychological factors, may be at higher risk of developing chronic symptoms after such events. Regarding the event, or "stressor", it appears as though the intensity or specific characteristics of exposure may be a relatively unimportant predictor of patient outcome. Instead, other factors such as the worry, or expectation, of chronicity may increase the risk of chronic symptom development. After the event, inactivity and time off work appear to increase the risk of chronic symptoms. Health care providers have an important role in emphasizing the benefits of resuming usual activities, and downplaying potential benefits of continuing in the sick role (e.g., time off work, increased family attention). While many aspects of the complex interaction of biological, psychological, and social factors that influence patient outcome after a stressful event remain to be elucidated, it appears that for the present, one of the most important interventions is to continue to emphasize to patients the old saying, "rest makes rust". PMID:15325010

  8. Special Medical Conditions Associated with Catatonia in the Internal Medicine Setting: Hyponatremia-Inducing Psychosis and Subsequent Catatonia

    PubMed Central

    Novac, Andrei A; Bota, Daniela; Witkowski, Joanne; Lipiz, Jorge; Bota, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of catatonia in the psychiatry consultation service is not infrequent. Usually, the patient either presents to the Emergency Department or develops catatonia on the medical floor. This condition manifests with significant behavioral changes (from mildly decreased speech output to complete mutism) that interfere with the ability to communicate. After structural brain disorders are excluded, one of the diagnoses that always should be considered is catatonia. However, the causes of catatonia are numerous, ranging from psychiatric causes to a plethora of medical illnesses. Therefore, it is not surprising that there are many proposed underlying mechanisms of catatonia and that controversy persists about the etiology of specific cases. There are only 6 reports of hyponatremia-induced catatonia and psychosis in the literature. Here, we present the case of a 30-year-old woman with catatonia and psychosis induced by hyponatremia, and we use this report to exemplify the multitude of biologic causes of catatonia and to propose a new way to look at the neuroanatomical basis of processing, particularly the vertical processing systems we believe are involved in catatonia. PMID:25102520

  9. The choice dilemma in chronic hematological conditions: Why choosing is not only a medical issue? A psycho-cognitive perspective.

    PubMed

    Renzi, Chiara; Riva, Silvia; Masiero, Marianna; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    Research in cognitive psychology focused on risk perception and decision making was shown to facilitate treatment choice and patient's satisfaction with decision in a number of medical conditions, increasing perceived alliance between patient and physician, and adherence to treatment. However, this aspect has been mostly neglected in the literature investigating choice of treatment for chronic hematological conditions. In this paper, a patient centered model and a shared decision making (SDM) approach to treatment switch in chronic hematological conditions, in particular chronic myeloid leukemia, atrial fibrillation, and β-thalassemia is proposed. These pathologies have a series of implications requiring important decisions about new available treatments. Although new generation treatmentsmay provide a significant improvement in patient's health and health-related quality of life (HrQoL), a significant percentage of them is uncertain about or refuse treatment switch, even when strongly suggested by healthcare guidelines. Possible cognitive and emotional factors which may influence decision making in this field and may prevent appropriate risk-and-benefits evaluation of new treatment approaches are reviewed. Possible adaptive strategies to improve quality of care, patient participation, adherence to treatment and final satisfaction are proposed, and implications relatively to new treatment options available are discussed. PMID:26762858

  10. Assessing the Representativeness of Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Inpatient Utilization Data for Individuals With Psychiatric and Nonpsychiatric Conditions.

    PubMed

    Slade, Eric P; Goldman, Howard H; Dixon, Lisa B; Gibbons, Brent; Stuart, Elizabeth A

    2015-12-01

    Sampling and reporting biases in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) survey could render data on inpatient utilization that are not representative for individuals with severe psychiatric conditions. The authors assessed the representativeness of MEPS data on psychiatric inpatient utilization, by comparing MEPS estimates of total annual psychiatric and nonpsychiatric inpatient admissions and bed days, and mean length of stay, for nonelderly U.S. adults in calendar years 2005 to 2010 (N = 9,288) to estimates from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), a nationally representative inpatient care database derived from hospitals' administrative records (N = 21,934,378). Compared with the NIS, the MEPS indicated 34% as many psychiatric admissions and 86% as many nonpsychiatric admissions, while mean psychiatric length of stay was greater in MEPS than in NIS. In MEPS data, underrepresentation of psychiatric inpatient utilization at community hospitals may result in measurement distortions for commonly used statistics on psychiatric inpatient utilization and costs. PMID:26149973

  11. Net Differences in Interview Data on Chronic Conditions and Information Derived from Medical Records. Vital and Health Statistics, Series 2, No. 57.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madow, William G.

    The California study, based on data from a national survey, compared accuracy and completeness of information on 7,182 chronic health conditions of persons, 17 years of age or older, given in household interviews with diagnostic information given by group medical plan physicians. Overreporting referred to conditions reported in the interview which

  12. Frontal White Matter Alterations in Short-Term Medicated Panic Disorder Patients without Comorbid Conditions: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Borah; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Kang Soo; Kim, Youngki; Choi, Tai Kiu; Kim, Yun Tai; Lee, Sang-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    The frontal cortex might play an important role in the fear network, and white matter (WM) integrity could be related to the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD). A few studies have investigated alterations of WM integrity in PD. The aim of this study was to determine frontal WM integrity differences between patients with PD without comorbid conditions and healthy control (HC) subjects by using diffusion tensor imaging. Thirty-six patients with PD who had used medication within 1 week and 27 age- and sex-matched HC subjects participated in this study. Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all participants. Panic Disorder Severity Scale and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) scores were assessed. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was used for image analysis. TBSS analysis showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in frontal WM and WM around the frontal lobe, including the corpus callosum of both hemispheres, in patients with PD compared to HC subjects. Moreover, voxel-wise correlation analysis revealed that the BAI scores for patients with PD were positively correlated with their FA values for regions showing group differences in the FA of frontal WM of both hemispheres. Altered integrity in frontal WM of patients with PD without comorbid conditions might represent the structural pathophysiology in these patients, and these changes could be related to clinical symptoms of PD. PMID:24788587

  13. Apparatus for detecting a condition of a medication infusion system and providing an informational signal in response thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischell, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A medication infusion system having a means for providing an informational signal when (1) medication in the reservoir falls below a threshold level; (2) a fluid leak occurs in different portions of the system; and (3) the intended medication pumping does not correlate with the pumping actually affected.

  14. Medication/Drug Allergy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information > Condition Information > Allergens > Medication/Drug Allergy Medication/Drug Allergy Allergies to medications/drugs are complicated because ... allergy symptoms. Learn more. Doctors Who Treat Medication/Drug Allergy Rohit K. Katial Harold S. Nelson Richard W. ...

  15. Automatic de-identification of electronic medical records using token-level and character-level conditional random fields.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengjian; Chen, Yangxin; Tang, Buzhou; Wang, Xiaolong; Chen, Qingcai; Li, Haodi; Wang, Jingfeng; Deng, Qiwen; Zhu, Suisong

    2015-12-01

    De-identification, identifying and removing all protected health information (PHI) present in clinical data including electronic medical records (EMRs), is a critical step in making clinical data publicly available. The 2014 i2b2 (Center of Informatics for Integrating Biology and Bedside) clinical natural language processing (NLP) challenge sets up a track for de-identification (track 1). In this study, we propose a hybrid system based on both machine learning and rule approaches for the de-identification track. In our system, PHI instances are first identified by two (token-level and character-level) conditional random fields (CRFs) and a rule-based classifier, and then are merged by some rules. Experiments conducted on the i2b2 corpus show that our system submitted for the challenge achieves the highest micro F-scores of 94.64%, 91.24% and 91.63% under the "token", "strict" and "relaxed" criteria respectively, which is among top-ranked systems of the 2014 i2b2 challenge. After integrating some refined localization dictionaries, our system is further improved with F-scores of 94.83%, 91.57% and 91.95% under the "token", "strict" and "relaxed" criteria respectively. PMID:26122526

  16. Targeting and retrofitting pre-existing libraries of transposon insertions with FRT and oriV elements for in-vivo generation of large quantities of any genomic fragment.

    PubMed

    Wild, J; Sektas, M; Hradecn, Z; Szybalski, W

    1998-11-26

    A procedure is described that converts the pre-existing transposon insertion libraries to a collection of 'pop-out' strains, each allowing generation of 20- to 100-kb genomic fragments directly from the genome. The procedure consists of two steps: (1) single transposon insertions are targeted and retrofitted with excision and amplification elements (FRT and oriV), by homologous recombination with an FRT-oriV-carrying plasmid; and (2) two retrofitted neighbouring transposons are brought together by P1 transduction. From each strain, a 20- to 100-kb genomic fragment, bound by a pair of retrofitted transposons, could be excised and amplified upon supplying in trans the excision (Flp) and replication (TrfA) functions. To enhance the efficiency of crossing-in the FRT-oriV cassette, we transiently increased the copy number of our retrofitting plasmids using a temperature-sensitive TrfA-supplying helper plasmid. Using FRT-oriV and helper plasmids, we retrofitted four Tn10KmR and three Tn10CmR insertions. Subsequently, the FRT-oriV retrofitted insertions were crossed with each other in pairs (KmRxCmR), using P1 phage transductions. The resulting CmRFRT-[28-65-kb]-KmRFRT strains were transformed with a plasmid expressing FLP and trfA genes from the tightly controlled Ptet promoter. Induction of this tightly repressed promoter by autoclaved chlortetracycline (cTc) resulted in the efficient excision and amplification of genomic fragments located between FRT sites, but only in productive strains, i.e. having two parallel FRTs. We have shown that genomic fragments of 28-, 40-, 50- and 65-kb were efficiently excised and amplified. Furthermore, we could convert non-productive strains (having FRTs in non-parallel orientation), to productive combination of parallel FRTs, because one of the FRT elements was flanked by two convergent loxP sites, and thus could be inverted by the Cre function delivered either by the P1 phage or by a specially constructed temperature-sensitive Plac-cre plasmid. Although several microbial genomes were recently sequenced, the described method will help in supplying large quantities of any genomic fragment (prepared without the conventional cloning and its artifacts) for refined sequence comparison among strains and species, and for further analysis of uncharacterized ORFs, various mutations, and regulatory elements or functions. The excised and circularized DNA fragments (plasmids) could be propagated like any other large plasmids but only in hosts that could supply the appropriate Rep function. Our original 'pop-out' method [Psfai et al. (1994) Nucleic Acids Res. 22, 2392-2398] was already employed for sequencing of the E. coli genome [Blattner et al. (1997) Science 277, 1453-1462]. Moreover, the Flp-mediated recombination between two FRT elements resulted in bacterial strains with large deletions (for parallel FRT orientations) or with large inversions (for inverted FRT orientations). PMID:9858684

  17. Concurrent Medical Conditions and Health Care Use and Needs among Children with Learning and Behavioral Developmental Disabilities, National Health Interview Survey, 2006-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schieve, Laura A.; Gonzalez, Vanessa; Boulet, Sheree L.; Visser, Susanna N.; Rice, Catherine E.; Braun, Kim Van Naarden; Boyle, Coleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies document various associated health risks for children with developmental disabilities (DDs). Further study is needed by disability type. Using the 2006-2010 National Health Interview Surveys, we assessed the prevalence of numerous medical conditions (e.g. asthma, frequent diarrhea/colitis, seizures), health care use measures (e.g. seeing a…

  18. Concurrent Medical Conditions and Health Care Use and Needs among Children with Learning and Behavioral Developmental Disabilities, National Health Interview Survey, 2006-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schieve, Laura A.; Gonzalez, Vanessa; Boulet, Sheree L.; Visser, Susanna N.; Rice, Catherine E.; Braun, Kim Van Naarden; Boyle, Coleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies document various associated health risks for children with developmental disabilities (DDs). Further study is needed by disability type. Using the 2006-2010 National Health Interview Surveys, we assessed the prevalence of numerous medical conditions (e.g. asthma, frequent diarrhea/colitis, seizures), health care use measures (e.g. seeing a

  19. Human Factors/Usability Barriers to Home Medical Devices Among Individuals with Disabling Conditions: In-depth Interviews with Positive Airway Pressure Device Users

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Constance H.; Igodan, Uyi; Alessi, Cathy; Martin, Jennifer L.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Josephson, Karen; Kramer, B. Josea

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that medical equipment often fails to accommodate the needs of individuals with disabling conditions. Few studies have focused on the accessibility of home medical devices such as positive airway pressure (PAP), which is a type of home medical equipment prescribed for long-term therapy. Objective The purpose of this study was to explore in detail the types of difficulties experienced by patients with physical/sensory impairments who use PAP devices, as an initial step in designing a questionnaire to survey users about this topic. Methods In this descriptive study, in-depth interviews were conducted with 19 participants (9 patients with physical/sensory impairment and 10 healthcare providers). Interviews were coded and analyzed for major topics. Results Participants detailed the numerous ways in which current PAP devices fail to meet the needs of individuals with physical/sensory impairments (e.g., tremor, poor depth perception, paresis), by requiring patients to perform manually difficult tasks, such as inserting PAP parts through small apertures, attaching parts using a twisting motion, and lifting arms overhead to apply PAP headgear. These demands contributed to patients' frustration with and reduced usage of the home medical device. Conclusions Our findings suggest that home medical devices such as PAP may not be currently designed to meet the needs of some users with physical/sensory impairments. Additional studies are needed to measure the prevalence and impact of impairment-related barriers on PAP adherence for this common medical equipment. PMID:25126995

  20. Trends in self-medication for dental conditions among patients attending oral health outreach programs in coastal Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Arun K.; Rao, Ashwini; Rajesh, Gururaghavendran; Shenoy, Ramya; Pai, Mithun B. H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence, pattern, and awareness of self-medication practices among patients presenting at oral health outreach programs in coastal Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional study, based on an interview conducted in randomly selected 400 study subjects from the patients presenting at these oral health outreach programs. Data were collected regarding demographic information and the interview schedule consisting of 14 questions was administered. Results: Prevalence of self-medication was 30%. Respondents’ gender (χ2 = 5.095, P < 0.05), occupation (χ2 = 10.215, P < 0.05), the time from the last dental visit (χ2 = 8.108, P < 0.05), recommendation of drug(s) to family members or friends (χ2 = 75.565, P < 0.001), and the likelihood of self-medication in the next 6 months (χ2 = 80.999, P < 0.001) were significantly associated with self-medication. Male respondents were less likely to have undertaken self-medication (odds ratio = 0.581 [0.361, 0.933]). The frequently self-medicated drug was analgesics (42.5%) for toothache (69.2%). The regression model explained 39.4% (Nagelkerke R2) of the variance in self-medication practices. Conclusions: Prevalence of self-medication was 30% with demographic influence. Hence, this study highlights the policy implications for drug control by government agencies and stresses on the need for dental health education to discourage irrational drug use. PMID:26600642

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacemakers: era of "MR Conditional" designs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiac device technology have led to the first generation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conditional devices, providing more diagnostic imaging options for patients with these devices, but also new controversies. Prior studies of pacemakers in patients undergoing MRI procedures have provided groundwork for design improvements. Factors related to magnetic field interactions and transfer of electromagnetic energy led to specific design changes. Ferromagnetic content was minimized. Reed switches were modified. Leads were redesigned to reduce induced currents/heating. Circuitry filters and shielding were implemented to impede or limit the transfer of certain unwanted electromagnetic effects. Prospective multicenter clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of the first generation of MR conditional cardiac pacemakers demonstrated no significant alterations in pacing parameters compared to controls. There were no reported complications through the one month visit including no arrhythmias, electrical reset, inhibition of generator output, or adverse sensations. The safe implementation of these new technologies requires an understanding of the well-defined patient and MR system conditions. Although scanning a patient with an MR conditional device following the strictly defined patient and MR system conditions appears straightforward, issues related to patients with pre-existing devices remain complex. Until MR conditional devices are the routine platform for all of these devices, there will still be challenging decisions regarding imaging patients with pre-existing devices where MRI is required to diagnose and manage a potentially life threatening or serious scenario. A range of other devices including ICDs, biventricular devices, and implantable physiologic monitors as well as guidance of medical procedures using MRI technology will require further biomedical device design changes and testing. The development and implementation of cardiac MR conditional devices will continue to require the expertise and collaboration of multiple disciplines and will need to prove safety, effectiveness, and cost effectiveness in patient care. PMID:22032338

  2. Adaptive multi-level conditional random fields for detection and segmentation of small enhanced pathology in medical images.

    PubMed

    Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Arnold, Douglas L; Arbel, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Detection and segmentation of large structures in an image or within a region of interest have received great attention in the medical image processing domains. However, the problem of small pathology detection and segmentation still remains an unresolved challenge due to the small size of these pathologies, their low contrast and variable position, shape and texture. In many contexts, early detection of these pathologies is critical in diagnosis and assessing the outcome of treatment. In this paper, we propose a probabilistic Adaptive Multi-level Conditional Random Fields (AMCRF) with the incorporation of higher order cliques for detecting and segmenting such pathologies. In the first level of our graphical model, a voxel-based CRF is used to identify candidate lesions. In the second level, in order to further remove falsely detected regions, a new CRF is developed that incorporates higher order textural features, which are invariant to rotation and local intensity distortions. At this level, higher order textures are considered together with the voxel-wise cliques to refine boundaries and is therefore adaptive. The proposed algorithm is tested in the context of detecting enhancing Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions in brain MRI, where the problem is further complicated as many of the enhancing voxels are associated with normal structures (i.e. blood vessels) or noise in the MRI. The algorithm is trained and tested on large multi-center clinical trials from Relapsing-Remitting MS patients. The effect of several different parameter learning and inference techniques is further investigated. When tested on 120 cases, the proposed method reaches a lesion detection rate of 90%, with very few false positive lesion counts on average, ranging from 0.17 for very small (3-5 voxels) to 0 for very large (50+ voxels) regions. The proposed model is further tested on a very large clinical trial containing 2770 scans where a high sensitivity of 91% with an average false positive count of 0.5 is achieved. Incorporation of contextual information at different scales is also explored. Finally, superior performance is shown upon comparing with Support Vector Machine (SVM), Random Forest and variant of an MRF. PMID:26211811

  3. Parent & Educators' Drug Reference: A Guide to Common Medical Conditions & Drugs Used in School-Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agins, Alan P.

    This book provides a guide to more than 180 drugs used for children. An introduction precedes the four major sections of the guide. Section 1 provides an overview of pharmacology and therapeutics in chapters on the basics of pharmacology, the language of pharmacology and therapeutics, compliance, side effects, medications in school, and drug

  4. Parent & Educators' Drug Reference: A Guide to Common Medical Conditions & Drugs Used in School-Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agins, Alan P.

    This book provides a guide to more than 180 drugs used for children. An introduction precedes the four major sections of the guide. Section 1 provides an overview of pharmacology and therapeutics in chapters on the basics of pharmacology, the language of pharmacology and therapeutics, compliance, side effects, medications in school, and drug…

  5. Teachers' Drug Reference: A Guide to Medical Conditions and Drugs Commonly Used in School-Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agins, Alan P.

    This book provides a guide to approximately 175 drugs used with children. An introduction precedes the three major sections of the guide. Section 1 provides an overview of pharmacology and therapeutics in chapters on the basics of pharmacology, the language of pharmacology and therapeutics, compliance, side effects, and medications in school.…

  6. Teachers' Drug Reference: A Guide to Medical Conditions and Drugs Commonly Used in School-Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agins, Alan P.

    This book provides a guide to approximately 175 drugs used with children. An introduction precedes the three major sections of the guide. Section 1 provides an overview of pharmacology and therapeutics in chapters on the basics of pharmacology, the language of pharmacology and therapeutics, compliance, side effects, and medications in school.

  7. Medication/Drug Allergy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Condition Information > Allergens > Medication/Drug Allergy Medication/Drug Allergy Allergies to medications/drugs are complicated because they ... Calendar Read the News View Daily Pollen Count Allergy Treatment Programs, Adult At National Jewish Health, some ...

  8. Association of maternal medical conditions and unfavorable birth outcomes: findings from the 1996-2003 Mississippi linked birth and death data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Cox, Reagan G; Graham, Juanita; Johnson, Dick

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to identify factors contributing to high rates of preterm birth (PTB), low birth weight (LBW) and infant mortality in Mississippi while considering both traditional risk factors and maternal medical conditions. The retrospective cohort study used 1996-2003 Mississippi linked birth and infant death files. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate association between maternal medical conditions and unfavorable birth outcomes. Along with traditional risk factors, hypertension was significantly associated with PTB and LBW. Women with hypertension were about 2.2 and 3.2 times as likely to have PTB and LBW, respectively. Hydramnios/oligohydramnios increased 1.8-4.4 folds of risk for PTB, LBW and infant death and was significantly associated with the unfavorable birth outcomes. Non-Hispanic black women were about 1.5-2.0 times as likely to have an unfavorable birth outcome compared to non-Hispanic white women. Maternal education and prenatal care effect appeared to be modified by maternal race. Certain maternal medical conditions may be contributing to PTB, LBW and infant mortality rates identifying preconception and prenatal healthcare as possible strategies for reducing unfavorable outcomes. Results suggest that different risk profiles for unfavorable outcomes may exist according to maternal race highlighting the need to consider racial groups separately when further exploring the sociodemographic and/or health-related factors that contribute to unfavorable birth outcomes. PMID:19760166

  9. Medical Transcriptionists: Making Medical Histories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shniper, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Medical transcriptionists are experts in the language of medicine. Describes what they do and what their working conditions, earnings, employment prospects, and training requirements are. Includes sources of additional information. (Author)

  10. Astronomy for Special Needs Children (Low-income and/or Serious Medical Conditions) and Their Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, Donald

    2015-08-01

    I present the results of two NASA-IDEAS/STScI* sponsored and one IAU OAD grant for astronomy outreach programs for seriously ill or traumatically injured children and their families staying at the Ronald McDonald Houses of Long Island (New Hyde Park, NY) and Chicago or for children hospitalized at the Winthrop University Hospital Children’s Medical Center, (Mineola, NY). An astronomy program was also created for the five Fresh Air Fund Charity summer camps (low-income and special needs) and for a Hofstra summer camp for developmentally challenged youths.These programs are designed for children of all ages include” STSCi’s “Tonight’s Sky” (monthly guide to the sky); telescope observations of the Moon, Sun, planets, nebulae, and stars; and hands-on activities. During cloudy weather remote/robotic telescope observations are shown to the children.The staff and volunteers at the Ronald McDonald House and Children’s Medical Center are trained to use the telescope and to do astronony demonstrations. I created an Activity Book for the staff with demonstrations, participatory hands-on activities, and edible demonstrations using chocolate, marshmallows, and popcorn are to stimulate interest.These educational activities help children and their families learn about astronomy while providing a diversion to take their minds off their illness during a stressful time. The RMHs provide free or low-cost housing in a comfortable, supportive alternative atmosphere where family members sleep, eat, relax and find support from other families in similar situations. Families are kept united when mutual support is as critical as the medical treatment itself. The ill children and their families may stay for a few days or months because of chemotherapy, dialysis, or rehabilitative therapy. Children from 50 states and 50 countries stay the Chicago RMHs and there are 260 RMHs in the US and 65 worldwide.

  11. Performance and microbial community variations in thermophilic anaerobic digesters treating OTC medicated cow manure under different operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Çağrı; Turker, Gokhan; Ince, Orhan; Ertekin, Emine; Üstüner, Oya; Ince, Bahar

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the fate and effect of oxytetracycline (OTC) and its metabolites during thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cow manure. OTC-medicated and non-medicated digesters were operated at 55°C with different volatile solids (VS) concentrations (4% and 6%) and mixing rates (90 and 120rpm). OTC and its metabolites were measured by HPLC and LC/MS/MS, respectively. Microbial community dynamics were monitored by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time PCR (qPCR). Approximately 2mg/L initial OTC concentration caused 10-30% inhibition on biogas production and higher inhibition was observed as mixing rate increased. DGGE results indicated that OTC caused a shift in bacterial community structure and several species became dominant with time. Archaeal community decreased throughout the digestion period. RNA based qPCR analyses showed that gene copy numbers of bacteria and Methanomicrobiales declined in all digesters whereas gene copy numbers of Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales increased in high mixing rate digesters. PMID:26826959

  12. Integrating Care for People With Co-Occurring Alcohol and Other Drug, Medical, and Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Stacy; Chi, Felicia; Hinman, Agatha

    2011-01-01

    Most people with alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders suffer from co-occurring disorders (CODs), including mental health and medical problems, which complicate treatment and may contribute to poorer outcomes. However, care for the patients’ AOD, mental health, and medical problems primarily is provided in separate treatment systems, and integrated care addressing all of a patient’s CODs in a coordinated fashion is the exception in most settings. A variety of barriers impede further integration of care for patients with CODs. These include differences in education and training of providers in the different fields, organizational factors, existing financing mechanisms, and the stigma still often associated with AOD use disorders and CODs. However, many programs are recognizing the disadvantages of separate treatment systems and are attempting to increase integrative approaches. Although few studies have been done in this field, findings suggest that patients receiving integrated treatment may have improved outcomes. However, the optimal degree of integration to ensure that patients with all types and degrees of severity of CODs receive appropriate care still remains to be determined, and barriers to the implementation of integrative models, such as one proposed by the Institute of Medicine, remain. PMID:23580018

  13. What You Need to Know in an Emergency (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the medication last and how much was taken. Pre-Existing Illnesses It is also very important for ... have diabetes , a bleeding disorder, or asthma ? These pre-existing conditions can have a huge effect on ...

  14. Development of novel fluorescent probes for the analysis of protein interactions under physiological conditions with medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mafina, Marc-Krystelle; Hing, Karin A; Sullivan, Alice C

    2013-02-01

    In this article, a method to analyze protein adsorption on porous, clinically relevant samples under physiologically relevant conditions is described. The use of fluorescent probes was identified as a methodology that would facilitate analysis under a range of conditions including fully competitive conditions where a protein of interest may be labeled in isolation and then allowed to compete with unlabeled proteins on samples that require no specialized surface pretreatment. As a first step, this article describes the covalent labeling of isolated bovine serum albumin (BSA) with fluorescent fluoresceinthioureidoaminocaproic acid, FTCA, giving FTCA-BSA. The fluorescence intensity of FTCA-BSA was then used to monitor the adsorption and desorption of the protein under noncompetitive conditions with two forms of hydroxyapatite discs (silicate-substituted, SA and stoichiometric, HA) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and minimum essential Eagles' medium (MEM). Noncompetitive conditions were used to facilitate the validation of the technique in which data obtained from these experiments were corroborated against data obtained using an established total protein assay method (Quant-IT kit, Invitrogen). These experiments demonstrated that the FTCA-BSA probe had several advantages including a greater sensitivity at lower concentrations and a considerably longer lifetime. The results also demonstrated that the interaction of BSA with SA and HA was also highly temperature- and media-dependent. Under the most physiologically relevant conditions of MEM at 37 C, BSA was more readily adsorbed to SA with significant differences between biomaterials, but no differences were observed during the desorption process. The use of this method to analyze adsorption under competitive conditions will be the subject of further investigations. PMID:23259749

  15. Increased IgG4 responses to multiple food and animal antigens indicate a polyclonal expansion and differentiation of pre-existing B cells in IgG4-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Emma L; Vermeulen, Ellen; Makuch, Mateusz; van Leeuwen, Astrid; Sadler, Ross; Cargill, Tamsin; Klenerman, Paul; Aalberse, Rob C; van Ham, S Marieke; Barnes, Eleanor; Rispens, Theo

    2015-01-01

    Background IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic fibroinflammatory condition, characterised by an elevated serum IgG4 concentration and abundant IgG4-positive plasma cells in the involved organs. An important question is whether the elevated IgG4 response is causal or a reflection of immune-regulatory mechanisms of the disease. Objectives To investigate if the IgG4 response in IgG4-RD represents a generalised polyclonal amplification by examining the response to common environmental antigens. Methods Serum from 24 patients with IgG4-RD (14 treatment-naive, 10 treatment-experienced), 9 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and an elevated serum IgG4 (PSC-high IgG4), and 18 healthy controls were tested against egg white and yolk, milk, banana, cat, peanut, rice and wheat antigens by radioimmunoassay. Results We demonstrated an elevated polyclonal IgG4 response to multiple antigens in patients with IgG4-RD and in PSC-high IgG4, compared with healthy controls. There was a strong correlation between serum IgG4 and antigen-specific responses. Responses to antigens were higher in treatment-naive compared with treatment-experienced patients with IgG4-RD. Serum electrophoresis and immunofixation demonstrated polyclonality. Conclusions This is the first study to show enhanced levels of polyclonal IgG4 to multiple antigens in IgG4-RD. This supports that elevated IgG4 levels reflect an aberrant immunological regulation of the overall IgG4 response, but does not exclude that causality of disease could be antigen-driven. PMID:25646372

  16. Medical Marijuana.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri

    2016-01-01

    The use of medicinal marijuana is increasing. Marijuana has been shown to have therapeutic effects in certain patients, but further research is needed regarding the safety and efficacy of marijuana as a medical treatment for various conditions. A growing body of research validates the use of marijuana for a variety of healthcare problems, but there are many issues surrounding the use of this substance. This article discusses the use of medical marijuana and provides implications for home care clinicians. PMID:26645838

  17. Mothers of Children Diagnosed with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Health Conditions and Medical Care Utilization in Periods Before and After Birth of the Child

    PubMed Central

    Ray, G. Thomas; Croen, Lisa A.; Habel, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Analyzing health conditions and medical utilization of mothers of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can shed light on biological, environmental, and psychosocial factors relating to ADHD. Objective To examine health conditions, health care utilization, and costs of mothers of children with ADHD in periods before the child was diagnosed. Methods Using automated data from Northern California Kaiser Permanente we identified mothers of children with ADHD, mothers of children without ADHD, and mothers of children with asthma. Mothers’ diagnostic clusters, health care utilization, and costs were compared. Mothers of children with ADHD were compared to mothers of children without ADHD and, separately, to mothers of children with asthma. Results Compared to mothers of children without ADHD, mothers of children with ADHD were more likely to be diagnosed with numerous medical and mental health problems in the two years after birth of their child, including depression (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.88), anxiety neuroses (OR: 1.64), obesity (OR: 1.70), and musculoskeletal symptoms (OR: 1.51). Results were similar for the year before delivery. Mothers of children with ADHD also had higher total health care costs per person in the year before ($1003) and the two years after ($953) the birth of their child. Mothers of children with ADHD also were diagnosed with more health conditions and had higher health care costs than mothers of children with asthma. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the likelihood of being diagnosed with ADHD is related to maternal conditions and use of health services that precede the child’s diagnosis. Future studies are needed to clarify whether this is due to biologic, psychosocial, or environmental factors, or a combination. PMID:19106738

  18. Imagining life with an ostomy: Does a video intervention improve quality-of-life predictions for a medical condition that may elicit disgust??

    PubMed Central

    Angott, Andrea M.; Comerford, David A.; Ubel, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test a video intervention as a way to improve predictions of mood and quality-of-life with an emotionally evocative medical condition. Such predictions are typically inaccurate, which can be consequential for decision making. Method In Part 1, people presently or formerly living with ostomies predicted how watching a video depicting a person changing his ostomy pouch would affect mood and quality-of-life forecasts for life with an ostomy. In Part 2, participants from the general public read a description about life with an ostomy; half also watched a video depicting a person changing his ostomy pouch. Participants quality-of-life and mood forecasts for life with an ostomy were assessed. Results Contrary to our expectations, and the expectations of people presently or formerly living with ostomies, the video did not reduce mood or quality-of-life estimates, even among participants high in trait disgust sensitivity. Among low-disgust participants, watching the video increased quality-of-life predictions for ostomy. Conclusion Video interventions may improve mood and quality-of-life forecasts for medical conditions, including those that may elicit disgust, such as ostomy. Practice implications Video interventions focusing on patients experience of illness continue to show promise as components of decision aids, even for emotionally charged health states such as ostomy. PMID:23177398

  19. Nonequilibrium structural condition in the medical TiNi-based alloy surface layer treated by electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Neiman, Aleksei A. Lotkov, Aleksandr I.; Meisner, Ludmila L. Semin, Viktor O.; Koval, Nikolai N.; Teresov, Anton D.

    2014-11-14

    The research is devoted to study the structural condition and their evolution from the surface to the depth of TiNi specimens treated by low-energy high-current electron beams with surface melting at a beam energy density E = 10 J/cm{sup 2}, number of pulses N = 10, and pulse duration ? = 50 ?s. Determined thickness of the remelted layer, found that it has a layered structure in which each layer differs in phase composition and structural phase state. Refinement B2 phase lattice parameters in local areas showed the presence of strong inhomogeneous lattice strain.

  20. A cross-sectional assessment of the prevalence of multiple chronic conditions and medication use in a sample of community-dwelling adults with fibromyalgia in Olmsted County, Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O; McAllister, Samantha J; Aleman, Katherine M; St Sauver, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the problem of multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy in patients with fibromyalgia. Design Retrospective medical record review. Setting Olmsted County, Minnesota. Participants 1111 adults with fibromyalgia. Primary and secondary outcome measures Number and type of chronic medical and psychiatric conditions, medication use. Results Medical record review demonstrated that greater than 50% of the sample had seven or more chronic conditions. Chronic joint pain/degenerative arthritis was the most frequent comorbidity (88.7%), followed by depression (75.1%), migraines/chronic headaches (62.4%) and anxiety (56.5%). Approximately, 40% of patients were taking three or more medications for symptoms of fibromyalgia. Sleep aids were the most commonly prescribed medications in our sample (33.3%) followed by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (28.7%), opioids (22.4%) and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (21.0%). Conclusions The results of our study highlight the problem of multiple chronic conditions and high prevalence of polypharmacy in fibromyalgia. Clinicians who care for patients with fibromyalgia should take into consideration the presence of multiple chronic conditions when recommending medications. PMID:25735301

  1. Surveillance of Medication Use During Pregnancy in the Mini-Sentinel Program.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Susan E; Toh, Sengwee; Houstoun, Monika; Mott, Katrina; Pitts, Marilyn; Kieswetter, Caren; Ceresa, Carrie; Haffenreffer, Katherine; Reichman, Marsha E

    2016-04-01

    Objectives Mini-Sentinel is a pilot project sponsored by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to create an active surveillance system to monitor the safety of FDA-regulated medical products. We assessed the capability of the Mini-Sentinel pilot to provide prevalence rates of medication use among pregnant women delivering a liveborn infant. Methods An algorithm was developed to identify pregnancies for a reusable analytic tool to be executed against the Mini-Sentinel Distributed Database. Diagnosis and procedure codes were used to identify women ages 10-54 years delivering a liveborn infant between April 2001 and December 2012. A comparison group of age- and date-matched nonpregnant women was identified. The analytic code was distributed to all 18 Mini-Sentinel data partners. The use of specific medications, selected because of concerns about their safe use during pregnancy, was identified from outpatient dispensing data. We determined the frequency of pregnancy episodes and nonpregnant episodes exposed to medications of interest, any time during the pregnant/matched nonpregnant period, and during each trimester. Results The analytic tool successfully identified 1,678,410 live birth deliveries meeting the eligibility criteria. The prevalence of use at any time during pregnancy was 0.38 % for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and 0.22 % for statins. For ≤0.05 % of pregnancy episodes, the woman was dispensed warfarin, methotrexate, ribavirin, or mycophenolate. Conclusions The analytic tool developed for this study can be used to assess the use of medications during pregnancy as safety issues arise, and is adaptable to include different medications, observation periods, pre-existing conditions, and enrollment criteria. PMID:26645616

  2. Pay for perfomance and the quality of diabetes management in individuals with and without co-morbid medical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Millett, Christopher; Bottle, Alex; Ng, Anthea; Curcin, Vasa; Molokhia, Mariam; Saxena, Sonia; Majeed, Azeem

    2009-01-01

    Summary Objective To examine the impact of the Quality and Outcomes Framework, a major pay-for-performance incentive introduced in the UK during 2004, on diabetes management in patients with and without co-morbidity. Design Cohort study comparing actual achievement of treatment targets in 2004 and 2005 with that predicted by the underlying (pre-intervention) trend in diabetes patients with and without co-morbid conditions. Setting A total of 422 general practices participating in the General Practice Research Database. Main outcomes measures Achievement of diabetes treatment targets for blood pressure (< 140/80 mm Hg), HbA1c (≤ 7.0%) and cholesterol (≤ 5 mmol/L). Results The percentage of diabetes patients with co-morbidity reaching blood pressure and cholesterol targets exceeded that predicted by the underlying trend during the first two years of pay for perfomance (by 3.1% [95% CI 1.1–5.1] for BP and 4.1% [95% CI 2.2–6.0] for cholesterol among patients with ≥ 5 co-morbidities in 2005). Similar improvements were evident in patients without co-morbidity, except for cholesterol control in 2004 (−0.2% [95% CI −1.7–1.4]). The percentage of patients meeting the HbA1c target in the first two years of this program was significantly lower than predicted by the underlying trend in all patients, with the greatest shortfall in patients without co-morbidity (3.8% [95% CI 2.6–5.0] lower in 2005). Patients with co-morbidity remained significantly more likely to meet treatment targets for cholesterol and HbA1c than those without after the introduction of pay for perfomance. Conclusions Diabetes patients with co-morbid conditions appear to have benefited more from this pay-for-performance program than those without co-morbidity. PMID:19734534

  3. Weather conditions and visits to the medical wing of emergency rooms in a metropolitan area during the warm season in Israel: a predictive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Ilya; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra; Chetrit, Angela; Stav, Nir; Epstein, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    Global climate changes affect health and present new challenges to healthcare systems. The aim of the present study was to analyze the pattern of visits to the medical wing of emergency rooms (ERs) in public hospitals during warm seasons, and to develop a predictive model that will forecast the number of visits to ERs 2 days ahead. Data on daily visits to the ERs of the four largest medical centers in the Tel-Aviv metropolitan area during the warm months of the year (April-October, 2001-2004), the corresponding daily meteorological data, daily electrical power consumption (a surrogate marker for air-conditioning), air-pollution parameters, and calendar information were obtained and used in the analyses. The predictive model employed a time series analysis with transitional Poisson regression. The concise multivariable model was highly accurate ( r 2 = 0.819). The contribution of mean daily temperature was small but significant: an increase of 1C in ambient temperature was associated with a 1.47% increase in the number of ER visits ( P < 0.001). An increase in electrical power consumption significantly attenuated the effect of weather conditions on ER visits by 4% per 1,000 MWh ( P < 0.001). Higher daily mean SO2 concentrations were associated with a greater number of ER visits (1% per 1 ppb increment; P = 0.017). Calendar data were the main predictors of ER visits ( r 2 = 0.794). The predictive model was highly accurate in forecasting the number of visits to ERs 2 days ahead. The marginal effect of temperature on the number of ER visits can be attributed to behavioral adaptations, including the use of air-conditioning.

  4. Pre-existing brain states predict aesthetic judgments.

    PubMed

    Colas, Jaron T; Hsieh, Po-Jang

    2014-07-01

    Intuition and an assumption of basic rationality would suggest that people evaluate a stimulus on the basis of its properties and their underlying utility. However, various findings suggest that evaluations often depend not only on what is being evaluated, but also on contextual factors. Here we demonstrate a further departure from normative decision making: Aesthetic evaluations of abstract fractal art by human subjects were predicted from pre-stimulus patterns of BOLD fMRI signals across a distributed network of frontal regions before the stimuli were presented. This predictive power was dissociated from motor biases in favor of pressing a particular button to indicate one's choice. Our findings suggest that endogenous neural signals present before stimulation can bias decisions at multiple levels of representation when evaluating stimuli. PMID:24038968

  5. Diurnal and twenty-four hour patterning of human diseases: acute and chronic common and uncommon medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Smolensky, Michael H; Portaluppi, Francesco; Manfredini, Roberto; Hermida, Ramon C; Tiseo, Ruana; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda L; Haus, Erhard L

    2015-06-01

    The symptom intensity and mortality of human diseases, conditions, and syndromes exhibit diurnal or 24h patterning, e.g., skin: atopic dermatitis, urticaria, psoriasis, and palmar hyperhidrosis; gastrointestinal: esophageal reflux, peptic ulcer (including perforation and hemorrhage), cyclic vomiting syndrome, biliary colic, hepatic variceal hemorrhage, and proctalgia fugax; infection: susceptibility, fever, and mortality; neural: frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe seizures, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, hereditary progressive dystonia, and pain (cancer, post-surgical, diabetic neuropathic and foot ulcer, tooth caries, burning mouth and temporomandibular syndromes, fibromyalgia, sciatica, intervertebral vacuum phenomenon, multiple sclerosis muscle spasm, and migraine, tension, cluster, hypnic, and paroxysmal hemicranial headache); renal: colic and nocturnal enuresis and polyuria; ocular: bulbar conjunctival redness, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, intraocular pressure and anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, and recurrent corneal erosion syndrome; psychiatric/behavioral: major and seasonal affective depressive disorders, bipolar disorder, parasuicide and suicide, dementia-associated agitation, and addictive alcohol, tobacco, and heroin cravings and withdrawal phenomena; plus autoimmune and musculoskeletal: rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, axial spondylarthritis, gout, Sjgren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Knowledge of these and other 24 hpatterns of human pathophysiology informs research of their underlying circadian and other endogenous mechanisms, external temporal triggers, and more effective patient care entailing clinical chronopreventive and chronotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25129839

  6. The Effect of Different Storage Conditions on the Physical Properties of Pigmented Medical Grade I Silicone Maxillofacial Material

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dharrab, Ayman A.; Tayel, Seham B.; Abodaya, Mona H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different storage solutions that simulate acidic, alkaline, and sebum conditiions on the physical properties of pigmented (colorant elastomer) cosmesil M511 maxillofacial prosthetic material. Materials and Methods. Sixty specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions and were tested before and after immersion of different storage conditions for six months at 37 °C. The following tests were performed: color changes (group I), solution absorption (group II), surface roughness (group III), and scanning electron microscopy (group IV). Results. There were no significant changes observed in the color and solution absorption tests while surface roughness revealed significant difference between control group and other testing storage medium groups, and this result was supported by SEM analysis that revealed limited surface changes. Conclusions. Cosmaseil material is an acceptable cross-linked formulation that withstands storage in different solutions with variable pH. The addition of pigment cannot vary the physical properties of these materials. Surface roughness test as well as SEM microscopic study showed moderate changes indicating a limited effect on the surface of the material. PMID:23606978

  7. Managing work–family conflict in the medical profession: working conditions and individual resources as related factors

    PubMed Central

    Mache, Stefanie; Bernburg, Monika; Vitzthum, Karin; Groneberg, David A; Klapp, Burghard F; Danzer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study developed and tested a research model that examined the effects of working conditions and individual resources on work–family conflict (WFC) using data collected from physicians working at German clinics. Material and methods This is a cross-sectional study of 727 physicians working in German hospitals. The work environment, WFC and individual resources were measured by the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, the WFC Scale, the Brief Resilient Coping Scale and the Questionnaire for Self-efficacy, Optimism and Pessimism. Descriptive, correlation and linear regression analyses were applied. Results Clinical doctors working in German hospitals perceived high levels of WFC (mean=76). Sociodemographic differences were found for age, marital status and presence of children with regard to WFC. No significant gender differences were found. WFCs were positively related to high workloads and quantitative job demands. Job resources (eg, influence at work, social support) and personal resources (eg, resilient coping behaviour and self-efficacy) were negatively associated with physicians’ WFCs. Interaction terms suggest that job and personal resources buffer the effects of job demands on WFC. Conclusions In this study, WFC was prevalent among German clinicians. Factors of work organisation as well as factors of interpersonal relations at work were identified as significant predictors for WFC. Our results give a strong indication that both individual and organisational factors are related to WFC. Results may play an important role in optimising clinical care. Practical implications for physicians’ career planning and recommendations for future research are discussed. PMID:25941177

  8. Clinical implications and validity of nursing assessments: a longitudinal measure of patient condition from analysis of the Electronic Medical Record

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Michael J; Solinger, Alan B; Rothman, Steven I; Finlay, G Duncan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates risk of mortality associated with nurses assessments of patients by physiological system. We hypothesise that nursing assessments of in-patients performed at entry correlate with in-hospital mortality, and those performed just before discharge correlate with postdischarge mortality. Design Cohort study of in-hospital and postdischarge mortality of patients over two 1-year periods. Setting An 805-bed community hospital in Sarasota, Florida, USA. Subjects 42?302 inpatients admitted for any reason, excluding obstetrics, paediatric and psychiatric patients. Outcome measures All-cause mortalities and mortality OR. Results Patients whose entry nursing assessments, other than pain, did not meet minimum standards had significantly higher in-hospital mortality than patients meeting minimums; and final nursing assessments before discharge had large OR for postdischarge mortality. In-hospital mortality OR were found to be: food, 7.0; neurological, 9.4; musculoskeletal, 6.9; safety, 5.6; psychosocial, 6.7; respiratory, 8.1; skin, 5.2; genitourinary, 3.0; gastrointestinal, 2.3; peripheral-vascular, 3.9; cardiac, 2.8; and pain, 1.1. CI at 95% are within 20% of these values, with p<0.001 (except for pain). Similar results applied to postdischarge mortality. All results were comparable across the two 1-year periods, with 0.85 intraclass correlation coefficient. Conclusions Nursing assessments are strongly correlated with in-hospital and postdischarge mortality. No multivariate analysis has yet been performed, and will be the subject of a future study, thus there may be confounding factors. Nonetheless, we conclude that these assessments are clinically meaningful and valid. Nursing assessment data, which are currently unused, may allow physicians to improve patient care. The mortality OR and the dynamic nature of nursing assessments suggest that nursing assessments are sensitive indicators of a patient's condition. While these conclusions must remain qualified, pending future multivariate analyses, nursing assessment data ought to be incorporated in risk-related health research, and changes in record-keeping software are needed to make this information more accessible. PMID:22874626

  9. Medical Device Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    A medical device is any product used to diagnose, cure, or treat a condition, or to prevent disease. They ... may need one in a hospital. To use medical devices safely Know how your device works. Keep ...

  10. Socioeconomic inequalities in mortality from conditions amenable to medical interventions: do they reflect inequalities in access or quality of health care?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported large socioeconomic inequalities in mortality from conditions amenable to medical intervention, but it is unclear whether these can be attributed to inequalities in access or quality of health care, or to confounding influences such as inequalities in background risk of diseases. We therefore studied whether inequalities in mortality from conditions amenable to medical intervention vary between countries in patterns which differ from those observed for other (non-amenable) causes of death. More specifically, we hypothesized that, as compared to non-amenable causes, inequalities in mortality from amenable causes are more strongly associated with inequalities in health care use and less strongly with inequalities in common risk factors for disease such as smoking. Methods Cause-specific mortality data for people aged 30–74 years were obtained for 14 countries, and were analysed by calculating age-standardized mortality rates and relative risks comparing a lower with a higher educational group. Survey data on health care use and behavioural risk factors for people aged 30–74 years were obtained for 12 countries, and were analysed by calculating age-and sex-adjusted odds ratios comparing a low with a higher educational group. Patterns of association were explored by calculating correlation coefficients. Results In most countries and for most amenable causes of death substantial inequalities in mortality were observed, but inequalities in mortality from amenable causes did not vary between countries in patterns that are different from those seen for inequalities in non-amenable mortality. As compared to non-amenable causes, inequalities in mortality from amenable causes are not more strongly associated with inequalities in health care use. Inequalities in mortality from amenable causes are also not less strongly associated with common risk factors such as smoking. Conclusions We did not find evidence that inequalities in mortality from amenable conditions are related to inequalities in access or quality of health care. Further research is needed to find the causes of socio-economic inequalities in mortality from amenable conditions, and caution should be exercised in interpreting these inequalities as indicating health care deficiencies. PMID:22578154

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of cancer in medical textbooks of ancient Iran.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Mahmoud; Ali Tabatabaei, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that ancient Iranians were among the pioneers of medical science, and are therefore admired and praised by non-Iranian scholars for their efforts and accomplishments in this field. Investigations of medical and historical texts indicate that between the 10(th) and the 18(th) century A.D., ancient Iran experienced a golden age of medicine. Great physicians such as Rhazes, al-Ahwazi, Avicenna and others reviewed the medical textbooks of civilizations such as Greece and India, Theories were scientifically criticized, superstitious beliefs were discarded, valuable innovations were added to pre-existing knowledge and the ultimate achievements were compiled as precious textbooks. Alhawi by Rhazes, Cannon by Avicenna, and Kamil al-Sina'ah by al-Ahwazi are among the works that were treasured by domestic and foreign scientists alike, as well as future generations who continued to appreciate them for centuries. The above-mentioned textbooks discuss diseases and conditions related to neurosurgery, ophthalmology, ear, nose and throat, gastroenterology, urology, skeletomuscular system and other specialties, as well as cancer and similar subjects. One of the richest texts on the description, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and prognosis of cancer and therapeutic approaches is Alhawi by Mohammad ibn Zakarya al Razi (Rhazes). This article presents a brief summary of Rhazes' views about the definition of cancer, types, signs and symptoms, prevalence, complications, medical care, treatment and even surgical indications and contraindications. Moreover, his opinions are compared against the views of other physicians and theories of modern medicine. It is also recommended to review the medical heritage of Iran and evaluate the proposed treatments based on modern methodologies and scientific approaches. PMID:25512835

  12. Something is amiss in Denmark: A comparison of preventable hospitalisations and readmissions for chronic medical conditions in the Danish Healthcare system and Kaiser Permanente

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As many other European healthcare systems the Danish healthcare system (DHS) has targeted chronic condition care in its reform efforts. Benchmarking is a valuable tool to identify areas for improvement. Prior work indicates that chronic care coordination is poor in the DHS, especially in comparison with care in Kaiser Permanente (KP), an integrated delivery system based in the United States. We investigated population rates of hospitalisation and readmission rates for ambulatory care sensitive, chronic medical conditions in the two systems. Methods Using a historical cohort study design, age and gender adjusted population rates of hospitalisations for angina, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and hypertension, plus rates of 30-day readmission and mortality were investigated for all individuals aged 65+ in the DHS and KP. Results DHS had substantially higher rates of hospitalisations, readmissions, and mean lengths of stay per hospitalisation, than KP had. For example, the adjusted angina hospitalisation rates in 2007 for the DHS and KP respectively were 1.01/100 persons (95%CI: 0.98-1.03) vs. 0.11/100 persons (95%CI: 0.10-0.13/100 persons); 21.6% vs. 9.9% readmission within 30 days (OR = 2.53; 95% CI: 1.84-3.47); and mean length of stay was 2.52 vs. 1.80 hospital days. Mortality up through 30 days post-discharge was not consistently different in the two systems. Conclusions There are substantial differences between the DHS and KP in the rates of preventable hospitalisations and subsequent readmissions associated with chronic conditions, which suggest much opportunity for improvement within the Danish healthcare system. Reductions in hospitalisations also could improve patient welfare and free considerable resources for use towards preventing disease exacerbations. These conclusions may also apply for similar public systems such as the US Medicare system, the NHS and other systems striving to improve the integration of care for persons with chronic conditions. PMID:22192270

  13. Acute behavioral crises in psychiatric inpatients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD): recognition of concomitant medical or non-ASD psychiatric conditions predicts enhanced improvement.

    PubMed

    Guinchat, Vincent; Cravero, Cora; Diaz, Lautaro; Périsse, Didier; Xavier, Jean; Amiet, Claire; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Bodeau, Nicolas; Wachtel, Lee; Cohen, David; Consoli, Angèle

    2015-03-01

    During adolescence, some individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) engage in severe challenging behaviors, such as aggression, self-injury, disruption, agitation and tantrums. We aimed to assess risk factors associated with very acute behavioral crises in adolescents with ASD admitted to a dedicated neurobehavioral unit. We included retrospectively in 2008 and 2009 29 adolescents and young adults with ASD hospitalized for severe challenging behaviors and proposed a guideline (Perisse et al., 2010) that we applied prospectively for 29 patients recruited for the same indications between 2010 and 2012. In total, 58 patients were admitted (n=70 hospitalizations, mean age=15.66 (±4.07) years, 76% male). We systematically collected data describing socio-demographic characteristics, clinical variables (severity, presence of language, cognitive level), comorbid organic conditions, etiologic diagnosis of the episode, and treatments. We explored predictors of Global Assessment Functioning Scale (GAFS) score and duration of hospitalization at discharge. All but 2 patients exhibited severe autistic symptoms and intellectual disability (ID), and two-thirds had no functional verbal language. During the inpatient stay (mean=84.3 (±94.9) days), patients doubled on average their GAFS scores (mean=17.66 (±9.05) at admission vs. mean=31.4 (±9.48) at discharge). Most common etiologies for acute behavioral crises were organic causes [n=20 (28%), including epilepsy: n=10 (14%) and painful medical conditions: n=10 (14%)], environmental causes [n=17 (25%) including lack of treatment: n=11 (16%) and adjustment disorder: n=6 (9%)], and non-ASD psychiatric condition [n=33 (48%) including catatonia: n=5 (7%), major depressive episode: n=6 (9%), bipolar disorder: n=4 (6%), schizophrenia: n=6 (9%), other/unknown diagnosis: n=12 (17%)]. We found no influence of age, gender, socio-economic status, migration, level of ID, or history of seizure on improvement of GAFS score at discharge. Severity of autism at admission was the only negative predictor (p<.001). Painful medical conditions (p=.04), non-ASD psychiatric diagnoses (p=.001), prior usage of specialized ASD care programs (p=.004), functional language (p=.007), as well as a higher number of challenging behaviors upon admission (p=.001) were associated with higher GAFS scores at discharge. Clinical severity at admission, based on the number of challenging behaviors (r=.35, p=.003) and GAFS score (r=-.32, p=.008) was correlated with a longer inpatient stay. Longer hospitalization was however correlated (r=.27, p=.03) with higher GAFS score at discharge even after adjustment for confounding factors. Challenging behaviors among adolescents with ASD may stem from diverse risk factors, including environmental problems, comorbid acute psychiatric conditions, or somatic illness such as epilepsy or acute pain. The management of these behavioral challenges requires a unified, multidisciplinary approach. PMID:25575287

  14. Medical marijuana.

    PubMed

    Marmor, J B

    1998-06-01

    Although many clinical studies suggest the medical utility of marijuana for some conditions, the scientific evidence is weak. Many patients in California are self-medicating with marijuana, and physicians need data to assess the risks and benefits. The only reasonable solution to this problem is to encourage research on the medical effects of marijuana. The current regulatory system should be modified to remove barriers to clinical research with marijuana. The NIH panel has identified several conditions for which there may be therapeutic benefit from marijuana use and that merit further research. Marijuana should be held to the same evaluation standards of safety and efficacy as other drugs (a major flaw in Proposition 215) but should not have to be proved better than current medications for its use to be adopted. The therapeutic window for marijuana and THC between desired effect and unpleasant side effects is narrow and is a major reason for discontinuing use. Although the inhaled route of administration has the benefit of allowing patients to self-titrate the dose, the smoking of crude plant material is problematic. The NIH panel recommended that a high priority be given to the development of a controlled inhaled form of THC. The presence of a naturally occurring cannabinoid-receptor system in the brain suggests that research on selective analogues of THC may be useful to enhance its therapeutic effects and minimize adverse effects. PMID:9656007

  15. [Social conditions in which medical students from the faculty of medicine of the National University of Mexico (UNAM) perform their Social Service in rural areas].

    PubMed

    Hamui-Sutton, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the conditions in which medical students perform their Social Service, highlighting their experiences in areas such as: information before they move and the motivation to leave home; the perception of personal and environmental lack of safety; the institutional support that they receive during their work in the community and the financial support provided. The methodological design of the study included an exploratory phase, in which collective interviews were performed, using the focal group technique, with students who had been in rural areas. Three hundred sixty cases were considered, 72.8% corresponded to rural areas, and 27.7% to Mexico City. According to the findings, the following actions are proposed: give better information and improve the process of vacancy selection; increase the scholarship received by students in Social Service; establish legal, police, and community support mechanisms to guarantee the student's personal safety; pay attention to aspects such as the student's emotional and social situation, and design programs with gender perspective to enhance certainty and safety. PMID:22820362

  16. Conditional probability analysis of multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacilli isolated from tertiary medical institutions in South Korea during 1999-2009.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hak

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance of Gram-negative bacilli is a major problem globally. However, little is known about the combined probability of resistance to various antibiotics. In this study, minimum inhibitory concentrations of widely used antibiotics were determined using clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Acinetobacter baumannii, randomly chosen from strain collections created during 1999-2009 in tertiary medical institutions in Seoul, South Korea. To analyze combined efficacy of antibiotics against a subgroup of isolates, conditional probabilities were determined based on arbitrary, non-independent patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance. Multidrug resistance, defined as resistance to three or more classes of antibiotics, was observed in the following order: A. baumannii (96%), P. aeruginosa (65%), E. coli (52%), and K. pneumoniae (7%). A. baumannii strains resistant to gentamicin were found to be resistant to a number of antibiotics, except for colistin and polymyxin B. Resistance to gentamicin following exposure to this antibiotic was highly likely to lead to multidrug resistance in all four microbes. This study shows a causal relationship between gentamicin resistance and the prevalence of multidrug resistance in clinical isolates of Gramnegative bacilli in South Korea during 1999-2009 and suggests the importance of prudent use of gentamicin in hospitals. PMID:26727902

  17. 20 CFR 30.114 - What kind of evidence is needed to establish a compensable medical condition and how will that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., lymphocyte proliferation testings, beryllium patch tests, pulmonary function or exercise testing results.... (1) For covered beryllium illnesses, additional medical evidence, as set forth in § 30.207, is required to establish a beryllium illness. (2) For chronic silicosis, additional medical evidence, as...

  18. 20 CFR 30.114 - What kind of evidence is needed to establish a compensable medical condition and how will that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., lymphocyte proliferation testings, beryllium patch tests, pulmonary function or exercise testing results.... (1) For covered beryllium illnesses, additional medical evidence, as set forth in § 30.207, is required to establish a beryllium illness. (2) For chronic silicosis, additional medical evidence, as...

  19. Potential interactions of prescription and over-the-counter medications having antioxidant capabilities with radiation and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lemmo, Walter

    2015-12-01

    Oncology patients undergoing radiation treatment and chemotherapy routinely use prescription and/or over-the counter medications either as part of pre-existing comorbid conditions or in the context of conventional treatment management. A growing amount of data suggest that commonly used pharmaceuticals possess antioxidant properties, which may also partially explain some of their therapeutic efficacy. Clinical research is continuing on how such agents interact during chemotherapy and radiation when oxidative mechanisms of action are involved. Historically, such discussions centered on the category of dietary supplements, natural health products, fruits and vegetables, along with established protectant medications. Evidence confirms that some pharmaceutical agents exhibit antioxidant properties similar to dietary supplements, protectants, and may hence hinder the efficacy of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Awareness by both healthcare providers and patients in this area is often lacking. After reviewing some of the more common and well-established pharmaceuticals, which include those prescribed during cancer treatment, caution needs to be advised especially in regards to the use of corticosteroids, as long-term randomized outcome studies ensuring safety in this area are still outstanding. PMID:25220632

  20. Beyond accreditation: excellence in medical education.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eusang; Ahn, Ducksun

    2014-01-01

    Medical school accreditation is a relatively new phenomenon in Korea. The development of an accreditation body and standards for a two-tiered "Must" and "Should" system in 1997 eventually led to the implementation of a third "Excellence" level of attainment. These standards were conceived out of a desire to be able to first recognize and promote outstanding performance of medical schools, second to provide role models in medical education, and furthermore to preview the third level as potential components of the pre-existing second level for the next accreditation cycle. It is a quality-assurance mechanism that, while not required for accreditation itself, pushes medical schools to go beyond the traditional requirements of mere pass-or-fail accreditation adequacy, and encourages schools to deliver an unprecedented level of medical education. The Association for Medical Education in Europe developed its own third-tier system of evaluation under the ASPIRE project, with many similar goals. Due to its advanced nature and global scope, the Korean accreditation body has decided to implement the ASPIRE system in Korea as well. PMID:24050749

  1. [French physicians in independent practice: opinions on their conditions of work and the issue of over/under staffing of medical workforce in their areas].

    PubMed

    Doan, Bui Dang Ha; Lvy, Danile

    2006-01-01

    In France, ambulatory care is provided to patients mostly by independent physicians, GPs and specialists, paid on a fee-for-service basis. A national agreement between the Sickness Insurance Fund and the medical associations sets the price of different medical services. Due to the numerus clausus imposed upon the medical schools since the 70's, the yearly number of new graduates has sharply decreased and a feeling of manpower shortage has spread throughout the health system, in the public hospitals and the ambulatory care sector as well. Moreover increased dissatisfaction has been perceived among independent practitioners (they were 56 % of all the medical profession in early 2004). In this context, an opinion survey was undertaken among a sample of 3000 independent doctors whose one thousand have answered to the postal questionnaire. PMID:16739775

  2. Diagnostic recognition of facial changes associated with chronic conditions: use of an e-learning tool to enhance medical student education.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Danielle; Wilkinson, Caroline; Ker, Jean

    2010-06-16

    Facial characteristics serve as reliable indicators of numerous diseases, and their recognition can assist junior medical students in making an accurate diagnosis. At present, however, there is little data to support the incorporation of physiognomy in medical education. This pilot study involved the design, implementation and evaluation of e-learning tutorials as a means of teaching students to appreciate how careful observation of facial characteristics can enhance diagnosis. PMID:20557153

  3. [Social-hygienic features of health, life conditions and medical-social assistance to the veterans and disabled veterans of the Great patriotic war in Russia].

    PubMed

    Shchepin, O P; Maksimova, T M; Kakorina, E P; Ismailova, D I; Korol'kova, T A

    1995-01-01

    Disease incidence in participants and subjects disabled in the Great Patriotic War is analyzed as reflected by the records of consultation rate and medical check-ups of this population. Sociologic study provided information about the subjective assessment of the health status and some sociohygienic and biological characteristics of the cohort. The scope of medical care rendered and requirements in corrective devices and specific types of social care were studied. PMID:9273163

  4. A situated-Information Motivation Behavioral Skills Model of Care Initiation and Maintenance (sIMB-CIM): an IMB model based approach to understanding and intervening in engagement in care for chronic medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Rivet Amico, K

    2011-10-01

    A sizable portion of adults living with chronic medical conditions (CMCs) delay initiation of care or maintain it inconsistently, which has tremendous personal and public costs. However, few explanatory models with high yield for intervention development and implementation have been proposed to date that would help to characterize and support care use for CMCs. A situated Information, Motivation, Behavioral Skills model of Care Initiation and Maintenance (sIMB-CIM) is presented here as an application of the IMB model to medical care use for CMCs. An example of a sIMB model for characterizing and intervening to support maintenance in HIV-care is provided. PMID:21459919

  5. Medical marijuana

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Possession of marijuana is illegal under federal law. Medical marijuana refers to using marijuana to treat certain medical ... Medical marijuana may be: Smoked Vaporized Eaten Taken as a liquid extract Marijuana leaves and buds contain substances ...

  6. Predictors of Age of Diagnosis for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of a Consistent Source of Medical Care, Race, and Condition Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Natacha D.; Morrell, Holly E. R.; Neece, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    Having a consistent source of medical care may facilitate diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This study examined predictors of age of ASD diagnosis using data from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health. Using multiple linear regression analysis, age of diagnosis was predicted by race, ASD severity, having a consistent…

  7. Predictors of Age of Diagnosis for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of a Consistent Source of Medical Care, Race, and Condition Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Natacha D.; Morrell, Holly E. R.; Neece, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    Having a consistent source of medical care may facilitate diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This study examined predictors of age of ASD diagnosis using data from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health. Using multiple linear regression analysis, age of diagnosis was predicted by race, ASD severity, having a consistent

  8. [The medical creed].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ya S

    2015-01-01

    In this review article the author discusses peculiarities of medical practice, requirements to medical profession, medicine as a vocation, and the role of these factors in the choice of health profession. Special attention is given to diagnostics and classifcation of internal diseases, problems of medical practice and science, significance of practical experience, medical intuition and judgment for diagnostics of pathological conditions. The role of medical deontology and ethics as a doctrine of commitment to speciality medicine is emphasized. The comprehensive examination of therapeutic problems include prescription of medication on an individual basis, the danger of polypragmasia and passivity in therapy. The critical attitude toward fashionable trends in medicine and the ability to think informally are encouraged. The article is concluded with the discussion of the relationship between medical science and practice. PMID:26031142

  9. MEDICAL "DEPRIVATION."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUCHMAN, EDWARD A.

    THE SOCIAL AND MEDICAL PROBLEM TODAY HAS SHIFTED FROM PROVIDING FOR THE EMERGENCY MEDICAL NEEDS OF THE INDIGENT SICK TO RAISING THE LEVEL OF LOWER CLASS PARTICIPATION IN THE BENEFITS OF MODERN MEDICINE. GREATER ATTENTION IS BEING FOCUSED ON MEDICAL DEPRIVATION SUFFERED BY LARGE SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION WHO DO NOT SHARE EQUALLY IN MEDICAL

  10. Travel Medical Kit.

    PubMed

    Terry, Anne C; Haulman, N Jean

    2016-03-01

    "The traveler's medical kit is an essential tool for both the novice and expert traveler. It is designed to treat travel-related illness and injury and to ensure preexisting medical conditions are managed appropriately. Travelers are at increased risk for common gastrointestinal issues during travel. Respiratory illnesses make up approximately 8% of the ailments present in returned international travelers. Approximately 12% of travelers experience a travel-related skin condition. First aid treatment for minor injuries is essential to all travel medical kits. The complexity ranges from a small, simple case for the urban traveler to a larger, extensive case for wilderness travel." PMID:26900112

  11. Medical geography in Charaka Samhita

    PubMed Central

    Bhavana, K.R.; Shreevathsa

    2014-01-01

    Charaka Samhita is the oldest and the most authentic treatise on Ayurveda and is the ancient medical science of India. Apart from giving information on medical conditions and their treatment; it also gives valuable information on geographical, social, and economic conditions of India. This article is an attempt to explore geographical conditions of the ancient India, its geographical position in present India and its medical significance. PMID:26195898

  12. Medical geography in Charaka Samhita.

    PubMed

    Bhavana, K R; Shreevathsa

    2014-01-01

    Charaka Samhita is the oldest and the most authentic treatise on Ayurveda and is the ancient medical science of India. Apart from giving information on medical conditions and their treatment; it also gives valuable information on geographical, social, and economic conditions of India. This article is an attempt to explore geographical conditions of the ancient India, its geographical position in present India and its medical significance. PMID:26195898

  13. Exploration Medical Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David; Wu, Jimmy; Barsten, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember. This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this goal and our current areas of interest. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to identify medical conditions of concern during exploration missions. The list was derived from space flight medical incidents, the shuttle medical checklist, the International Space Station medical checklist, and expert opinion. The conditions on the list were prioritized according to mission type by a panel comprised of flight surgeons, physician astronauts, engineers, and scientists. From the prioritized list, the ExMC element determined the capabilities needed to address the medical conditions of concern. Where such capabilities were not currently available, a gap was identified. The element s research plan outlines these gaps and the tasks identified to achieve the desired capabilities for exploration missions. This poster is being presented to inform the audience of the gaps and tasks being investigated by ExMC and to encourage discussions of shared interests and possible future collaborations.

  14. Medical applications of artificial olfactometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Severin, Erik J. (Inventor); Wong, Bernard (Inventor); Kelso, David M. (Inventor); Munoz, Beth C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides methods for detecting the presence of an analyte indicative of various medical conditions, including halitosis, periodontal disease and other diseases are also disclosed.

  15. Medical marijuana: legal considerations.

    PubMed

    Schouten, J T

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, Washington State passed a law, Initiative 692 (I-692), that gives individuals who are charged with possession of marijuana for medical purposes a possible affirmative defense. The law lets these individuals provide a note from their doctor or a copy of their medical records stating they have a condition that may benefit from the use of marijuana. I-692 does not legalize the medical use of marijuana and does not affect Federal law, which makes obtaining, possessing, and growing marijuana illegal. The Washington law limits the amount of marijuana a patient can possess to a 60-day supply and defines the conditions for which medical marijuana may be used. These conditions include HIV, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and epilepsy. PMID:11366751

  16. Predictors of Age of Diagnosis for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of a Consistent Source of Medical Care, Race, and Condition Severity.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Natacha D; Morrell, Holly E R; Neece, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    Having a consistent source of medical care may facilitate diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This study examined predictors of age of ASD diagnosis using data from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health. Using multiple linear regression analysis, age of diagnosis was predicted by race, ASD severity, having a consistent source of care (CSC), and the interaction between these variables after controlling for birth cohort, birth order, poverty level, parental education, and health insurance. While African American children were diagnosed earlier than Caucasians, this effect was moderated by ASD severity and CSC. Having a CSC predicted earlier diagnosis for Caucasian but not African American children. Both physician and parent behaviors may contribute to diagnostic delays in minority children. PMID:26280401

  17. Medical Management

    MedlinePLUS

    ... form Search Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Medical Management Although theres no cure for CMT, there are ... individualized physical therapy program. For more on medical management of CMT, see Surgery Sometimes, Bracing Often, Caution ...

  18. Over-the-horizon, connected home/office (OCHO): situation management of environmental, medical, and security conditions at remote premises via broadband wireless access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2010-04-01

    Broadband wireless access standards, together with advances in the development of commercial sensing and actuator devices, enable the feasibility of a consumer service for a multi-sensor system that monitors the conditions within a residence or office: the environment/infrastructure, patient-occupant health, and physical security. The proposed service is a broadband reimplementation and combination of existing services to allow on-demand reports on and management of the conditions by remote subscribers. The flow of on-demand reports to subscribers and to specialists contracted to mitigate out-of-tolerance conditions is the foreground process. Service subscribers for an over-the-horizon connected home/office (OCHO) monitoring system are the occupant of the premises and agencies, contracted by the service provider, to mitigate or resolve any observed out-of-tolerance condition(s) at the premises. Collectively, these parties are the foreground users of the OCHO system; the implemented wireless standards allow the foreground users to be mobile as they request situation reports on demand from the subsystems on remote conditions that comprise OCHO via wireless devices. An OCHO subscriber, i.e., a foreground user, may select the level of detail found in on-demand reports, i.e., the amount of information displayed in the report of monitored conditions at the premises. This is one context of system operations. While foreground reports are sent only periodically to subscribers, the information generated by the monitored conditions at the premises is continuous and is transferred to a background configuration of servers on which databases reside. These databases are each used, generally, in non-real time, for the assessment and management of situations defined by attributes like those being monitored in the foreground by OCHO. This is the second context of system operations. Context awareness and management of conditions at the premises by a second group of analysts and decision makers who extract information from the OCHO data in the databases form the foundation of the situation management problem.

  19. Medical Scenarios Relevant to Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacal, Kira; Hurs, Victor; Doerr, Harold

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Operational Support Team (MOST) was tasked by the JSC Space Medicine and Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) to incorporate medical simulation into 1) medical training for astronaut-crew medical officers (CMO) and medical flight control teams and 2) evaluations of procedures and resources required for medical care aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Development of evidence-based medical scenarios that mimic the physiology observed during spaceflight will be needed for the MOST to complete these two tasks. The MOST used a human patient simulator, the ISS-like resources in the Medical Simulation Laboratory (MSL), and evidence from space operations, military operations and medical literature to develop space relevant medical scenarios. These scenarios include conditions concerning airway management, Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and mitigating anaphylactic symptoms. The MOST has used these space relevant medical scenarios to develop a preliminary space medical training regimen for NASA flight surgeons, Biomedical Flight Controllers (Biomedical Engineers; BME) and CMO-analogs. This regimen is conducted by the MOST in the MSL. The MOST has the capability to develop evidence-based space-relevant medical scenarios that can help SLSD I) demonstrate the proficiency of medical flight control teams to mitigate space-relevant medical events and 2) validate nextgeneration medical equipment and procedures for space medicine applications.

  20. Medical devices; pediatric uses of devices; requirement for submission of information on pediatric subpopulations that suffer from a disease or condition that a device is intended to treat, diagnose, or cure; direct final rule. Direct final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the regulations on premarket approval of medical devices to include requirements relating to the submission of information on pediatric subpopulations that suffer from the disease or condition that a device is intended to treat, diagnose, or cure. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, we are publishing a companion proposed rule under FDA's usual procedure for notice and comment to provide a procedural framework to finalize the rule in the event we receive significant adverse comment and withdraw this direct final rule. PMID:20383921

  1. Trouble with ataxia: A longitudinal qualitative study of the diagnosis and medical management of a group of rare, progressive neurological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ealing, John; Greenfield, Julie; Kingston, Helen; Sanders, Caroline; Payne, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: An exploratory investigation of diagnosis and management in progressive ataxias: rare neurological conditions usually affecting balance, mobility and speech. Methods: A longitudinal qualitative study into the experiences of people with ataxia and neurologists. Thematic analysis and follow-up interviews were used to determine diagnosis and management issues over time. Results: People with ataxia recruited via two hospital departments and Ataxia UK were interviewed at baseline (n = 38) and 12-month follow-up (n = 31). Eight consultant neurologists were interviewed once. Patient accounts were diverse, but many expressed frustration at having an incurable condition and dissatisfaction with service outcomes. At follow-up, there was variation in their contact and satisfaction with helping agencies. Service issues regarding continuity of care and the primary/secondary care interface were evident. Neurologists accounts also varied. One-half reported that there is nothing that can be done, and one-half favoured specialist referral to increase the likelihood of finding an underlying aetiology within budget constraints. Conclusions: Diagnostic uncertainties existing at baseline remained for patients at follow-up interviews, although some had learned to deal with the uncertainties brought by the diagnosis of a largely untreatable condition. Care pathways only seemed to operate in the case of defined conditions, such as Friedreichs Ataxia, the most commonly inherited cause. The findings point to a need to develop the evidence base to inform the relative utility of diagnostic procedures in the context of finite resources for patient care and support. PMID:26770684

  2. Demonopolizing medical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sanjeev; Thornton, Karla; Komaromy, Miriam; Kalishman, Summers; Katzman, Joanna; Duhigg, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In the past 100 years, there has been an explosion of medical knowledge-and in the next 50 years, more medical knowledge will be available than ever before. Regrettably, current medical practice has been unable to keep pace with this explosion of medical knowledge. Specialized medical knowledge has been confined largely to academic medical centers (i.e., teaching hospitals) and to specialists in major cities; it has been disconnected from primary care clinicians on the front lines of patient care. To bridge this disconnect, medical knowledge must be demonopolized, and a platform for collaborative practice amongst all clinicians needs to be created. A new model of health care and education delivery called Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes), developed by the first author, does just this. Using videoconferencing technology and case-based learning, ECHO's medical specialists provide training and mentoring to primary care clinicians working in rural and urban underserved areas so that the latter can deliver the best evidence-based care to patients with complex health conditions in their own communities. The ECHO model increases access to care in rural and underserved areas, and it demonopolizes specialized medical knowledge and expertise. PMID:24280860

  3. Impact of medicated feed along with clay mineral supplementation on Escherichia coli resistance to antimicrobial agents in pigs after weaning in field conditions.

    PubMed

    Jahanbakhsh, Seyedehameneh; Kabore, Kiswendsida Paul; Fravalo, Philippe; Letellier, Ann; Fairbrother, John Morris

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) phenotype and virulence and AMR gene profiles in Escherichia coli from pigs receiving in-feed antimicrobial medication following weaning and the effect of feed supplementation with a clay mineral, clinoptilolite, on this dynamic. Eighty E. coli strains isolated from fecal samples of pigs receiving a diet containing chlortetracycline and penicillin, with or without 2% clinoptilolite, were examined for antimicrobial resistance to 15 antimicrobial agents. Overall, an increased resistance to 10 antimicrobials was observed with time. Supplementation with clinoptilolite was associated with an early increase but later decrease in blaCMY-2, in isolates, as shown by DNA probe. Concurrently, a later increase in the frequency of blaCMY-2 and the virulence genes iucD and tsh was observed in the control pig isolates, being significantly greater than in the supplemented pigs at day 28. Our results suggest that, in the long term, supplementation with clinoptilolite could decrease the prevalence of E. coli carrying certain antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. PMID:26412523

  4. Supporting Medical Decision Making with Argumentation Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Jingyan; Lajoie, Susanne P.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the collaborative decision-making and communicative discourse of groups of learners engaged in a simulated medical emergency in two conditions. In one condition subgroups used a traditional whiteboard (TW group) to document medical arguments on how to solve a medical emergency. In the other condition subgroups used

  5. Medical marijuana and children.

    PubMed

    Stubblefield, Sam

    2014-11-01

    Medical marijuana is legal for use by minors in many states, but not Delaware. Anecdotes have accumulated suggesting efficacy in managing seizures in children and several other conditions in adults. Currently well-designed studies in children are lacking. Challenges to effective pediatric medical marijuana use remain at the level of biochemistry, the individual patient, and society. Appropriate and effective use of medical marijuana in children will require significant legislative changes at the state and federal level, as well as high-quality research and standardization of marijuana strains. PMID:25647865

  6. Medical tourism in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vijay; Das, Poonam

    2012-06-01

    The term 'medical tourism' is under debate because health care is a serious business and rarely do patients combine the two. India is uniquely placed by virtue of its skilled manpower, common language, diverse medical conditions that doctors deal with, the volume of patients, and a large nonresident Indian population overseas. Medical tourism requires dedicated services to alleviate the anxiety of foreign patients. These include translation, currency conversion, travel, visa, posttreatment care system,and accommodation of patient relatives during and after treatment. PMID:22727009

  7. Medical criminalistics.

    PubMed

    Pollak, S

    2007-01-17

    Medical criminalistics is an essential part of legal/forensic medicine. It includes the clinical examination of surviving victims and suspects, the inspection of the scene in suspicious deaths with subsequent performance of medico-legal autopsies, the assessment of (biological) traces and the reconstruction of criminal events under medical aspects. Just as the circumstances of life and the manifestations of crime are changing with time, there is a permanent alteration regarding the issues of medical criminalistics. Legal/forensic medicine is a university subject in most countries and therefore, research work is one of the main tasks also in medical criminalistics. In contrast to clinical medicine and basic research, some common study designs are not suitable for the special needs of medical criminalistics, whereas other types are more appropriate like epidemiological evaluations, cross-sectional studies and (retrospective) observation studies. Moreover, experimental model tests and case reports also rate high in medical criminalistics. PMID:16822631

  8. Medical Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer County Community Coll., Trenton, NJ.

    This document is one of a series of student workbooks developed for workplace skill development courses or workshops by Mercer County Community College (New Jersey) and its partners. Designed to help employees of medical establishments learn medical terminology, this course provides information on basic word structure, body parts, suffixes and

  9. [The death of Yasser Arafat: molecular-genetic authentication of the remains as an indispensable condition for the evaluation of the medical hypotheses of the cause of his death].

    PubMed

    Zemskova, E Yu; Kvacheva, Yu E; Kovalev, A V; Ivanov, P L

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was the molecular-genetic authentication of the remains as an indispensable condition for the evaluation of the medical hypotheses of the cause of death in 2004 of Yasser Arafat, the former Palestinian leader and the first president of the Palestinian National Administration, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate. We carried out molecular-genetic investigations aimed at establishing the circumstances and cause of the death of Yasser Arafat including the analysis of the relevant medical documentation, the examination of the burial place at Ramallah, remains, and personal belongings stored in his Al Muqata'ah residence at Ramallah. The objective of the present molecular- genetic investigations was to confirm the authenticity of the fragments of Yasser Arafat's remains available for radio-toxicological, chemical toxicological, and other laboratory studies. The reference objects were the contact traces left on the personal belongings by their owner. The aggregate probabilistic estimate of the coincidence of genotype traits of autosomal DNA, Y-chromosomal DNA, and mtDNA was at least 99,(9)29 4% which gives evidence of the genetic identity of the objects of study. It is this value (99.999999 <...> 9999999(29) 4%) that characterizes the probability that the bone fragments provided for the laboratory studies are actually authentic remains of Yasser Arafat. PMID:26856052

  10. Mycobacterial bone marrow infections at a medical centre in Taiwan, 2001-2009.

    PubMed

    Lin, S-H; Lai, C-C; Huang, S-H; Hung, C-C; Hsueh, P-R

    2014-07-01

    Mycobacterial bone marrow (BM) infection is the most common diagnosis established by BM examinations for fever of unknown origin. In this study, clinical features and outcomes of patients who fulfilled the criteria for BM infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) at a medical centre in Taiwan from 2001 to 2009 were investigated. The BM histopathological findings were also analysed. A total of 24 patients (16 men, eight women) with mycobacterial BM infections were found. Of these, nine (38%) were positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and six (25%) had no pre-existing immunocompromised conditions. MTB isolates were obtained from 11 (46%) patients and NTM species were isolated from 10 (42%) patients, including M. avium complex (MAC, n = 7) and M. kansasii (n = 3). Patients with MTB infections were significantly older than those with NTM infections (605 vs. 477 years, P = 0043) and were less likely to have a positive BM culture (45% vs. 100%, P = 0012). The 90-day survival rates for MTB and NTM BM infections were 68% and 60%, respectively (P = 061). In addition, the presence of BM granulomas was significantly more common in patients with MTB BM infections than in those with NTM infections (82% vs. 30%, P = 0030). In Taiwan, the importance of NTM was not inferior to MTB and besides MAC, M. kansasii might be an important pathogen in non-HIV-infected patients. The presence of BM granulomas and caseation provides valuable information regarding early treatment pending culture results. PMID:24168831

  11. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Medical consequences of doping with anabolic androgenic steroids: effects on reproductive functions.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Vorona, Elena

    2015-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) are appearance and performance-enhancing drugs (APEDs) used in competitive athletics, in recreational sports, and by body-builders. The global lifetime prevalence of AASs abuse is 6.4% for males and 1.6% for women. Many AASs, often obtained from the internet and dubious sources, have not undergone proper testing and are consumed at extremely high doses and in irrational combinations, also along with other drugs. Controlled clinical trials investigating undesired side effects are lacking because ethical restrictions prevent exposing volunteers to potentially toxic regimens, obscuring a causal relationship between AASs abuse and possible sequelae. Because of the negative feedback in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, in men AASs cause reversible suppression of spermatogenesis, testicular atrophy, infertility, and erectile dysfunction (anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism). Should spermatogenesis not recover after AASs abuse, a pre-existing fertility disorder may have resurfaced. AASs frequently cause gynecomastia and acne. In women, AASs may disrupt ovarian function. Chronic strenuous physical activity leads to menstrual irregularities and, in severe cases, to the female athlete triad (low energy intake, menstrual disorders and low bone mass), making it difficult to disentangle the effects of sports and AASs. Acne, hirsutism and (irreversible) deepening of the voice are further consequences of AASs misuse. There is no evidence that AASs cause breast carcinoma. Detecting AASs misuse through the control network of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) not only aims to guarantee fair conditions for athletes, but also to protect them from medical sequelae of AASs abuse. PMID:25805894

  12. Medical applications of tattooing.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, Snejina; Hristakieva, Evgeniya

    2007-01-01

    Tattooing is an ancient procedure, practiced by humans from all parts of the world for a variety of reasons. However, relatively little is known by the medical audience of the numerous medical conditions where tattooing is employed as a therapeutic modality or a diagnostic method. Tattooing for cosmetic and medicinal purposes, referred to as either micropigmentation, dermatography, or medical tattooing, may ensure permanent camouflage in a wide range of dermatological diseases. It can be a valuable finishing step in several surgical procedures in the fields of craniofacial surgery, plastic and reconstructive operations, cosmetic surgery procedures, and breast reconstruction. Other fields of application of medical tattooing include radiation therapy, endoscopic surgery, and ophthalmology. PMID:17697919

  13. [Medical Equipment Maintenance Methods].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    Due to the high technology and the complexity of medical equipment, as well as to the safety and effectiveness, it determines the high requirements of the medical equipment maintenance work. This paper introduces some basic methods of medical instrument maintenance, including fault tree analysis, node method and exclusive method which are the three important methods in the medical equipment maintenance, through using these three methods for the instruments that have circuit drawings, hardware breakdown maintenance can be done easily. And this paper introduces the processing methods of some special fault conditions, in order to reduce little detours in meeting the same problems. Learning is very important for stuff just engaged in this area. PMID:26904890

  14. Exploration Medical System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that allows for scalability, extensibility, and interoperability of data sources and data users. f. Lower total cost of ownership for development and sustainment of peripheral hardware and software that use EMSD for data management. g. Provide a better standard of healthcare for crew members through reductions in the time required by crew and ground personnel to provide medical treatment and the number of crew errors experienced during treatment.

  15. Exploration Medical System Demonstration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, D. A.; McGrath, T. L.; Reyna, B.; Watkins, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    A near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) mission will present significant new challenges including hazards to crew health created by exploring a beyond low earth orbit destination, traversing the terrain of asteroid surfaces, and the effects of variable gravity environments. Limited communications with ground-based personnel for diagnosis and consultation of medical events require increased crew autonomy when diagnosing conditions, creating treatment plans, and executing procedures. Scope: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will be a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to show an end-to-end medical system assisting the Crew Medical Officers (CMO) in optimizing medical care delivery and medical data management during a mission. NEA medical care challenges include resource and resupply constraints limiting the extent to which medical conditions can be treated, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and rendering of medical care by a non-clinician. The system demonstrates the integration of medical technologies and medical informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making. Project Objectives: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a) Reduce and possibly eliminate the time required for a crewmember and ground personnel to manage medical data from one application to another. b) Demonstrate crewmember's ability to access medical data/information via a software solution to assist/aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c) Develop a common data management architecture that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all crew health and life sciences activities. d) Develop a common data management architecture that allows for scalability, extensibility, and interoperability of data sources and data users. e) Lower total cost of ownership for development and sustainment of peripheral hardware and software that use EMSD for data management f) Provide better crew health via the reduction in crew errors, crew time, and ground time.

  16. Medical syncretism with reference to malaria in a Tanzanian community.

    PubMed

    Muela, Susanna Hausmann; Ribera, Joan Muela; Mushi, Adiel K; Tanner, Marcel

    2002-08-01

    What happens when new health information is introduced into a community? We have explored this question in a semi-rural community of Southeastern Tanzania whose population has been in contact with biomedicine for many decades. With the example of malaria, we illustrate how biomedical knowledge transmitted in health messages coexists, interacts and merges with local pre-existing ideas and logics. The results are syncretic models, which may deviate considerably from what health promoters intended to transmit. Some of those may have implications for treatment of malaria, which may include delay in seeking treatment and non-compliance with therapy. Analysing this medical syncretism clearly demonstrates that even if comprehension of health messages is accurate, the way in which people interpret these messages may not be. Disentangling syncretic processes permits us to understand the dynamics of how information is processed by the recipients, and provides orientations for health promoters for adapting messages to the local context. PMID:12144148

  17. Medical Scientists

    MedlinePLUS

    ... scientists typically have a Ph.D., usually in biology or a related life science. Some medical scientists ... specialize in this field seek to understand the biology of aging and investigate ways to improve the ...

  18. Medication Guide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to the disease. Read more » Alternative Medicine Eye Drop Tips Financial Assistance Find a Doctor Glaucoma Surgery Living With Glaucoma Low Vision Resources Medication Guide Resources on the Web » See All Articles Help the Cause Glaucoma affects ...

  19. Taking Medication

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Tracker App Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication ... Legislative Action Center Federal Legislation State Legislation Affordable Care Act Information Advocacy Tools and Resources Cart Search ...

  20. Medication Errors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... regulators to address broader product safety issues. Relevant FDA Drug Safety Communications for Drug Products Associated with ... OTC) Dosage Delivery Devices Avoiding Medication Mistakes Contact FDA Toll Free (855) 543-3784, or (301) 796- ...

  1. Stability Analysis of ISS Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that medications degrade over time, and that extreme storage conditions will hasten their degradation. The temperature and humidity conditions of the ISS have been shown to be within the ideal ranges for medication storage, but the effects of other environmental factors, like elevated exposure to radiation, have not yet been evaluated. Current operational procedures ensure that ISS medications are re-stocked before expiration, but this may not be possible on long duration exploration missions. For this reason, medications that have experienced long duration storage on the ISS were returned to JSC for analysis to determine any unusual effects of aging in the low- Earth orbit environment. METHODS Medications were obtained by the JSC Pharmacy from commercial distributors and were re-packaged by JSC pharmacists to conserve up mass and volume. All medication doses were part of the ISS crew medical kit and were transported to the International Space Station (ISS) via NASA's Shuttle Transportation System (Space Shuttle). After 568 days of storage, the medications were removed from the supply chain and returned to Earth on a Dragon (SpaceX) capsule. Upon return to Earth, medications were transferred to temperature and humidity controlled environmental chambers until analysis. Nine medications were chosen on the basis of their availability for study. The medications included several of the most heavily used by US crewmembers: 2 sleep aids, 2 antihistamines/decongestants, 3 pain relievers, an antidiarrheal and an alertness medication. Each medication was available at a single time point; analysis of the same medication at multiple time points was not possible. Because the samples examined in this study were obtained opportunistically from medical supplies, there were no control samples available (i.e. samples aged for a similar period of time on the ground); a significant limitation of this study. Medications were analyzed using the HPLC/MS methods described in the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) to measure the amount of intact active ingredient, identify degradation products and measure their amounts. Some analyses were conducted by an independent analytical laboratory, but certain (Schedule) medications could not be shipped to their facility and were analyzed at JSC. RESULTS Nine medications were analyzed with respect to active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and degradant amounts. Results were compared to the USP requirements for API and degradants/impurities content for every FDA-approved medication. One medication met USP requirements at 5 months after its expiration date. Four of the nine (44% of those tested) medications tested met USP requirements up to 8 months post-expiration. Another 3 medications (33% of those tested) met USP guidelines 2-3 months before expiration. One medication, a compound classed by the FDA as a dietary supplement and sometimes used as a sleep aid, failed to meet USP requirements at 11 months post-expiration. CONCLUSION Analysis of each medication at a single time point provides limited information on the stability of a medication stored in particular conditions; it is not possible to predict how long a medication may be safe and effective from these data. Notwithstanding, five of the nine medications tested (56%) met USP requirements for API and degradants/impurities at least 5 months past expiration dates. The single compound that failed to meet USP requirements is not regulated as strictly as prescription medications are during manufacture; it is unknown if this medication would have met the requirements prior to flight. Notably, it was the furthest beyond its expiration date. Only more comprehensive analysis of flight-aged samples compared to appropriate ground controls will permit determination of spaceflight effects on medication stability.

  2. [A medical-pharmaceutical partnership model as a contributor to the success in conditioning regimen for allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adults: a cross-reflection on our organizations].

    PubMed

    Bourget, Philippe; Falaschi, Ludivine; Suarez, Felipe; Galland, Valrie; Blot, Dominique; Trompette, Caroline; Sibon, David; Fontbrune, Flore Sicre de; Merlette, Christophe; Vidal, Fabrice; Corriol, Odile; Giraud, Brnice; Broissand, Christine; Clement, Rozenn; Hermine, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplant (allo-SCT) remains the only cure for many hematological malignancies and some benign and congenital diseases. Busulfan, proposed in its injectable form, has quickly become a mainstay of pharmacological and myeloablative (or non-myeloablative) conditioning. This is following the outbreak in 2010 of a multicenter international clinical phase II trial, we tested the robustness and reliability of our organization in a complex model of organization and multifactorial partnership. In this type "BuCy2" protocol based on a classical treatment duration of 4 consecutive days, the administration of IV busulfan is given in one single daily infusion instead of the conventional 16 infusions, while keeping the same total dose. Under these conditions, the treatment is totally secured using a therapeutic drug monitoring of busulfan, applied in real-time. The process is technically complex and requires the very close cooperation of the teams involved. A strength, weakness, opportunity and threat (SWOT) analysis has been constructed; it fully supports continuous quality improvement to the triple benefit of the nursing chain, the patients and their environment. Several critical points were identified and corrected. The experiment strongly contributes to the safety and security of the medication circuit at the hospital and, improves the performance of allo-SCT. It also contributes to the protection of all actors in the health field and their working environment via a well-functioning quality management system. PMID:22645281

  3. Medical Uses of the Birth Control Pill

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Clinicians About Us Donate General Health Sexual Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Medical Uses ... and Young Adult Medicine and the Division of Gynecology at Boston Children’s Hospital. The Center is an ...

  4. Treating Child Obesity and Associated Medical Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprio, Sonia

    2006-01-01

    With American children on course to grow into the most obese generation of adults in history, Sonia Caprio argues that it is critical to develop more effective strategies for preventing childhood obesity and treating serious obesity-related health complications. She notes that although pediatricians are concerned about the obesity problem, most…

  5. Caring for Kids With Medical Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... consult your doctor. 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  6. Medical Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2015-06-01

    The Medical Renaissance started as the regular Renaissance did in the early 1400s and ended in the late 1600s. During this time great medical personalities and scholar humanists made unique advances to medicine and surgery. Linacre, Erasmus, Leonicello and Sylvius will be considered first, because they fit the early classic Renaissance period. Andreas Vesalius and Ambroise Paré followed thereafter, making outstanding anatomical contributions with the publication of the "Human Factory" (1543) by Vesalius, and describing unique surgical developments with the publication of the "The Apologie and Treatise of Ambroise Paré." At the end of the Renaissance and beginning of the New Science, William Harvey, noted British medical doctor and cardiovascular researcher, discovered the general circulation. He published his findings in "The Motu Cordis" in 1628 (Figure 1). The Medical Renaissance, in summary, included a great number of accomplished physicians and surgeons who made especial contributions to human anatomy; Vesalius assembled detailed anatomical information; Paré advanced surgical techniques; and Harvey, a medical genius, detailed the circulatory anatomy and physiology. PMID:26065591

  7. Medical Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    For more than two decades, Biotechnology and Bioengineering has documented research focused on natural and engineered microbial biofilms within aquatic and subterranean ecosystems, wastewater and waste-gas treatment systems, marine vessels and structures, and industrial bioprocesses. Compared to suspended culture systems, intentionally engineered biofilms are heterogeneous reaction systems that can increase reactor productivity, system stability, and provide inherent cell: product separation. Unwanted biofilms can create enormous increases in fluid frictional resistances, unacceptable reductions in heat transfer efficiency, product contamination, enhanced material deterioration, and accelerated corrosion. Missing from B&B has been an equivalent research dialogue regarding the basic molecular microbiology, immunology, and biotechnological aspects of medical biofilms. Presented here are the current problems related to medical biofilms; current concepts of biofilm formation, persistence, and interactions with the host immune system; and emerging technologies for controlling medical biofilms. PMID:18366134

  8. Medical Products Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Ventrex Laboratories, Inc. develops, manufactures and markets a line of medical diagnostic assays based on biochemical techniques, in particular immunochemical techniques. Their products are sold worldwide to hospitals and medical laboratories for use in testing blood samples and other biological fluids. Analysis of a patient's body fluids, compared with normal values, aids a physician in confirming or otherwise diagnosing a suspected disease condition. NERAC's rapid information retrieval has provided Ventrex invaluable up-to-date information, and has permitted large scale savings. NERAC's service was particularly important in the development of a new product in the company's Ventre/Sep line, which is used in radioimmunoassays.

  9. Medical leasing.

    PubMed

    Holden, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Leases for medical space can have far-reaching (and sometimes unintentional) consequences for the future of the practice and the costs of the business. In order to prevent hardship and expense down the line, it is especially important to review the lease to make sure that it reflects the practice's goals, needs, and structure. This article provides a number of provisions that are especially crucial to review and negotiate when leasing medical space, including use restrictions, assignment and subleasing clauses, build-out terms, and legal compliance requirements. PMID:22594070

  10. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  11. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    PubMed

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-05-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects. Key messages The medical disorders with the current best evidence that supports a benefit for cannabinoid use are the following: multiple sclerosis patient-reported symptoms of spasticity (nabiximols, nabilone, dronabinol, and oral cannabis extract), multiple sclerosis central pain or painful spasms (nabiximols, nabilone, dronabinol, and oral cannabis extract), multiple sclerosis bladder frequency (nabiximols), and chronic cancer pain/neuropathic pain (nabiximols and smoked THC). Herbal cannabis has not met rigorous US FDA standards for medical approval, while specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards, and more are being studied. However, herbal cannabis is legal for medical use in certain US states/countries, and patients must usually see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Participating physicians should be knowledgeable about cannabinoids, closely look at the risk/benefit ratio, and consider certain important criteria in selecting a patient, such as: age, severity, and nature of the medical disorder, prior or current serious psychiatric or substance use disorder, failure of standard medical therapy as well as failure of an approved cannabinoid, serious underlying cardiac/pulmonary disease, agreement to follow-up visits, and acceptance of the detailed explanation of potential adverse risks. The limitations of use of medical cannabis include the following potential adverse effects that are discussed with potential patients: acute central nervous system effects such as deficits in memory, judgment, attention, coordination, and perception (such as time and color), anxiety, dysphoria, and psychosis; chronic central nervous system effects such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive and memory deficits, and increased risk of psychosis; pulmonary effects such as chronic bronchitis; social dysfunction, such as work/school; increased risk of accidents, such as motor vehicle accidents; and preliminary data suggest possible risk for acute cardiovascular event, especially with underlying heart disease. The normal human endocannabinoid system is important in the understanding of such issues as normal physiology, cannabis use disorder, and the development of medications that may act as agonists or antagonists to CB1 and CB2. By understanding the endocannabinoid system, it may be possible to enhance the beneficial effects of cannabinoid-related medication, while reducing the harmful effects. PMID:26912385

  12. Why Is It Important to Know My Family Medical History?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Conditions > Why is it important to know my family medical history? A family medical history is a ... a healthcare professional regularly. For more information about family medical history: NIHSeniorHealth, a service of the National ...

  13. Usage of pioglitazone at Medanta, the Medicity

    PubMed Central

    Mithal, Ambrish; Kaur, Parjeet; Bansal, Beena; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Wasir, Jasjeet S.; Jevalikar, Ganesh; Mahendru, Shama

    2014-01-01

    Pioglitazone improves glycemic control by acting as an insulin sensitizer and is used in the management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pioglitazone has recently been at the center of a controversy with regards to its safety. There is no clear consensus on how, when and in what dose the drug should be used in the management of diabetes. We have summarized our strategy on pioglitazone use in Type 2 diabetes in a large private tertiary care center - Medanta, the Medicity- which may help in generating further thought about positioning of this anti-diabetic molecule. We use pioglitazone as the fourth in the pecking order of oral anti-diabetic agents. We typically use pioglitazone in a dose of 15 mg/day. We avoid using pioglitazone with insulin. We do not use pioglitazone under following situations: In the presence of significant or proven cardiac disease, in patients who are struggling with their weight or need to lose weight, in patients at high risk for osteoporotic fractures, in patients with macular edema, in patients with pre-existing bladder cancer and would discontinue in case hematuria or any other symptom of bladder cancer develops. We continue to use the drug in patients well controlled on it without any evident side-effects or contraindications. PMID:24701440

  14. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  15. Cardiac Medications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... heart. Reason for Medication For the treatment of heart failure Beta Blockers (Also known as Beta-Adrenergic Blocking Agents) Commonly ... use if the patient is at risk for heart failure. Generic name - carvedilol, ... of combined alpha and beta-blockers: May cause a drop in blood pressure when ...

  16. Medical exceptionalism.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Michael

    2012-01-01

    How should we assess the historical development of health care? Many historians are deeply reluctant to endorse ideas involving progress in human affairs, including the evolution of modern medicine. We tend to think either that our present situation is little better than in the past, or that most kinds of value judgments about history are subjective and inappropriate. A laudatory approach to medical history commonly adopted by "amateur" medical historians in the tradition of Sir William Osler has often been eschewed by "professionals" as faulty, feel-good history. But Osler was right in his belief that, on balance, the progress of medicine has been spectacular, that modern health care offers one of the finest examples of the possibility of "man's redemption of man." Written objectively, medical history is about progress and achievement, and can properly seen as inspiring. If we mordantly or relativistically dismiss the unprecedentedly high quality of modern health care, we lose the ability to understand why citizens value it so highly, and this distorts our understanding of current issues. We also lose our sense of the wonders of human and medical achievement. PMID:23179032

  17. [Future trend medical apps. From the apps store directly into medical practice?].

    PubMed

    Gehring, H; Pramann, O; Imhoff, M; Albrecht, U-V

    2014-12-01

    In day to day medical care, patients, nursing staff and doctors currently face a bewildering and rapidly growing number of health-related apps running on various "smart" devices and there are also uncountable possibilities for the use of such technology. Concerning regulation, a risk-based approach is applied for development and use (including safety and security considerations) of medical and health-related apps. Considering safety-related issues as well as organizational matters, this is a sensible approach but requires honest self-assessment as well as a high degree of responsibility, networking and good quality management by all those involved. This cannot be taken for granted. Apart from regulatory aspects it is important to not only consider what is reasonable, helpful or profitable. Quality aspects, safety matters, data protection and privacy as well as liability issues must also be considered but are often not adequately respected. If software quality is compromised, this endangers patient safety as well as data protection, privacy and data integrity. This can for example result in unwanted advertising or unauthorized access to the stored data by third parties; therefore, local, regional and international regulatory measures need to be applied in order to ensure safe use of medical apps in all possible areas, including the operating room (OR) with its highly specialized demands. Lawmakers need to include impulses from all stakeholders in their considerations and this should include input from existing private initiatives that already deal with the use and evaluation of apps in a medical context. Of course, this process needs to respect pre-existing national, European as well as international (harmonized) standards. PMID:25388438

  18. Medical imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Kreel, L.

    1991-01-01

    There is now a wide choice of medical imaging to show both focal and diffuse pathologies in various organs. Conventional radiology with plain films, fluoroscopy and contrast medium have many advantages, being readily available with low-cost apparatus and a familiarity that almost leads to contempt. The use of plain films in chest disease and in trauma does not need emphasizing, yet there are still too many occasions when the answer obtainable from a plain radiograph has not been available. The film may have been mislaid, or the examination was not requested, or the radiograph had been misinterpreted. The converse is also quite common. Examinations are performed that add nothing to patient management, such as skull films when CT will in any case be requested or views of the internal auditory meatus and heal pad thickness in acromegaly, to quote some examples. Other issues are more complicated. Should the patient who clinically has gall-bladder disease have more than a plain film that shows gall-stones? If the answer is yes, then why request a plain film if sonography will in any case be required to 'exclude' other pathologies especially of the liver or pancreas? But then should cholecystography, CT or scintigraphy be added for confirmation? Quite clearly there will be individual circumstances to indicate further imaging after sonography but in the vast majority of patients little or no extra information will be added. Statistics on accuracy and specificity will, in the case of gall-bladder pathology, vary widely if adenomyomatosis is considered by some to be a cause of symptoms or if sonographic examinations 'after fatty meals' are performed. The arguments for or against routine contrast urography rather than sonography are similar but the possibility of contrast reactions and the need to limit ionizing radiation must be borne in mind. These diagnostic strategies are also being influenced by their cost and availability; purely pragmatic considerations are not infrequently the overriding factor. Non-invasive methods will be preferred, particularly sonography as it is far more acceptable by not being claustrophobic and totally free of any known untoward effects. There is another quite different but unrelated aspect. The imaging methods, apart from limited exceptions, cannot characterize tissues as benign or malignant, granulomatous or neoplastic; cytology or histology usually provides the answer. Sonography is most commonly used to locate the needle tip correctly for percutaneous sampling of tissues. Frequently sonography with fine needle aspiration cytology or biopsy is the least expensive, safest and most direct route to a definitive diagnosis. Abscesses can be similarly diagnosed but with needles or catheters through which the pus can be drained. The versatility and mobility of sonography has spawned other uses, particularly for the very ill and immobile, for the intensive therapy units and for the operating theatre, as well in endosonography. The appointment of more skilled sonographers to the National Health Service could make a substantial contribution to cost-effective management of hospital services. Just when contrast agents and angiography have become safe and are performed rapidly, they are being supplanted by scanning methods. They are now mainly used for interventional procedures or of pre-operative 'road maps' and may be required even less in the future as MRI angiography and Doppler techniques progress. MRI will almost certainly extent its role beyond the central nervous system (CNS) should the equipment become more freely available, especially to orthopaedics. Until then plain films, sonography or CT will have to suffice. Even in the CNS there are conditions where CT is more diagnostic, as in showing calculations in cerebral cysticercosis. Then, too, in most cases CT produces results comparable to MRI apart from areas close to bone, structures at the base of the brain, in the posterior fossa and in the spinal cord. Scintigraphy for pulmonary infarcts and bone metastases and in renal disease in children plays

  19. Commercial Driver Medical Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Gary; Hanowski, Richard J.; Kales, Stefanos N.; Porter, Richard J.; Hegmann, Kurt T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess relationships between body mass index (BMI) and comorbid conditions within a large sample of truck drivers. Methods: Commercial driver medical examination data from 88,246 commercial drivers between 2005 and 2012 were analyzed for associations between BMI, medical disorders, and driver certification. Results: Most drivers were obese (53.3%, BMI >30.0 kg/m2) and morbidly obese (26.6%, BMI >35.0 kg/m2), higher than prior reports. Obese drivers were less likely to be certified for 2 years and more likely to report heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, nervous disorders, sleep disorders, and chronic low back pain (all P < 0.0001). There are relationships between multiple potentially disqualifying conditions and increasing obesity (P < 0.0001). Morbid obesity prevalence increased 8.9% and prevalence of three or more multiple conditions increased fourfold between 2005 and 2012. Conclusions: Obesity is related to multiple medical factors as well as increasing numbers of conditions that limit driving certification. PMID:25710607

  20. Integrated Medical Model Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, J.; Boley, L.; Foy, M.; Goodenow, D.; Griffin, D.; Keenan, A.; Kerstman, E.; Melton, S.; McGuire, K.; Saile, L.; Shah, R.; Garcia, Y.; Sirmons. B.; Walton, M.; Reyes, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) Project represents one aspect of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) to quantitatively assess medical risks to astronauts for existing operational missions as well as missions associated with future exploration and commercial space flight ventures. The IMM takes a probabilistic approach to assessing the likelihood and specific outcomes of one hundred medical conditions within the envelope of accepted space flight standards of care over a selectable range of mission capabilities. A specially developed Integrated Medical Evidence Database (iMED) maintains evidence-based, organizational knowledge across a variety of data sources. Since becoming operational in 2011, version 3.0 of the IMM, the supporting iMED, and the expertise of the IMM project team have contributed to a wide range of decision and informational processes for the space medical and human research community. This presentation provides an overview of the IMM conceptual architecture and range of application through examples of actual space flight community questions posed to the IMM project.