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1

Pre-existing cardiovascular conditions and high altitude travel. Consensus statement of the Medical Commission of the Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme (UIAA MedCom) Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease.  

PubMed

The number of persons visiting high altitude regions for various purposes (recreation, business etc.), and the age of people who do so, increases. Therefore there are more and more patients who need specific and individual advice to prevent emergency situations at altitude and to deal with emergencies if the safety strategy should fail. Since literature concerning cardiocirculatory diseases at altitude is scarce and studies with a controlled setting and high evidence level are missing, UIAA MedCom has checked all available literature for specific information to enable physicians who are active in travel or high altitude medicine to advise the patients at the highest possible level of evidence. It must be pointed out that there are several other medical fields where such information is mandatory, e.g. in occupational medicine, when employees depart to high altitude destinations for business purposes. The recommendations are based on a detailed literature research (databases, handbooks and the respective references). For easier use the paper has been structured as follows: general information, cardiocirculatory system and ECG at altitude, several cardiocirculatory diseases and their specific recommendations. The commission concludes, that a general "don't go!" is no state-of-the-art advice for the patients. With the information presented here a safe trip to altitude should be possible for many patients. PMID:24675141

Donegani, Enrico; Hillebrandt, David; Windsor, Jeremy; Gieseler, Ulf; Rodway, George; Schöffl, Volker; Küpper, Thomas

2014-01-01

2

Roots of Mold Problems and Humidity Control Measures in Institutional Buildings with Pre-Existing Mold Condition  

E-print Network

Roots of Mold Problems and Humidity Control Measures in Institutional Buildings with Pre-Existing Mold Condition Hui Chen, P.E. Research Engineering Associate III, Energy Systems Lab Song Deng, P.E. Asst. Research Engineer... moved out of the lecture room because the humidity levels could have damaged them. Measurements in the room indicated temperatures near the comfortable range of 70-72?F but relative humidity near 80%. (Chen, etc. 2000). A single-zone air...

Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H.; Garcia, J.

2004-01-01

3

75 FR 45013 - Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Excluded services. Benefit plans offered by a PCIP shall not cover the following services: (1) Cosmetic surgery or other treatment for cosmetic purposes except to restore bodily function or correct deformity resulting from disease. (2)...

2010-07-30

4

78 FR 30218 - Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...generated pricing methodology...relative value scale which is generally based on the difficulty...relative value scale payment...similar to the pricing methodology...Part B drugs based on published...allowance will be based on the above...relative value scale pricing...

2013-05-22

5

The Origin of Allosteric Functional Modulation: Multiple Pre-existing Pathways  

PubMed Central

While allostery draws increasing attention, not much is known about allosteric mechanisms. Here we argue that in all proteins, allosteric signals transmit through multiple, pre-existing pathways; which pathways dominate depend on protein topologies, specific binding events, covalent modifications and cellular (environmental) conditions. Further, perturbation events at any site on the protein surface (or in the interior) will not create new pathways but only shift the pre-existing ensemble of pathways. Drugs binding at different sites or mutational events in disease shift the ensemble toward the same conformations; however, the relative populations of the different states will change. Consequently the observed functional, conformational, and dynamic effects will be different. This is the origin of allosteric functional modulation in dynamic proteins: allostery does not necessarily need to invoke conformational rearrangements to control protein activity and pre-existing pathways are always defaulted to during allostery regardless of the stimulant and perturbation site in the protein. PMID:19679084

del Sol, Antonio; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

2009-01-01

6

Medical conditions with neuropsychiatric manifestations.  

PubMed

Medical disease sometimes affects patients through neuropsychiatric manifestations. When neuropsychiatric symptoms are predominant, identifying medical disease early in the illness course is imperative because many of these conditions are reversible with appropriate treatment. A high index of suspicion is required on the part of clinicians, particularly when patients also present with physical signs or unexplained symptoms that might suggest a broader, systemic process. The processes that most commonly cause neuropsychiatric symptoms include infectious, autoimmune, endocrinologic, metabolic, and neoplastic diseases. This article focuses on the most common of these conditions, and conditions for which early diagnosis and treatment are particularly important. PMID:25134879

Isaac, Margaret L; Larson, Eric B

2014-09-01

7

PRESENCE OF PRE-EXISTING ANTIBODIES MEDIATE SURVIVAL IN SEPSIS  

PubMed Central

Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in hospitals worldwide. Even with optimal therapy, severe sepsis results in 50% mortality, indicating variability in the response of individuals towards treatment. We hypothesize that the presence of pre-existing antibodies present in the blood before the onset of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in mice, accounts for the differences in their survival. A Plasma Enhanced Killing (PEK) assay was performed to calculate the PEK capacity of plasma i.e. the ability of plasma to augment PMN killing of bacteria. PEK was calculated as PEK= (1/log (N)) × 100; where N= number of surviving bacteria; a higher PEK indicated better bacterial killing. A range of PEK in plasma collected from mice prior to CLP was observed, documenting individual differences in bacterial killing capacity. Mortality was predicted based on plasma IL-6 levels at 24 hr post CLP. Mice predicted to die (Die-P) had a lower PEK (<14) and higher peritoneal bacterial counts 24 hr post sepsis compared to those predicted to live (Live-P) with a PEK>16. Mice with PEK<14 were 3.1 times more likely to die compared to the PEK>16 group. To understand the mechanism of defense conferred by the pre-existing antibodies, binding of IgM or IgG to enteric bacteria was documented by flow cytometry. To determine the relative contribution of IgM or IgG, the immunoglobulins were specifically immuno-depleted from the naïve plasma samples and the PEK of the depleted plasma measured. Compared to naïve plasma, depletion of IgM had no effect on the PEK. However, depletion of IgG increased PEK suggesting that an inhibitory IgG binds to antigenic sites on bacteria preventing optimal opsonization of the bacteria. These data demonstrate that prior to CLP; circulating inhibitory IgG antibodies exist that prevent bacterial killing by PMNs in a CLP model of sepsis. PMID:21921828

Moitra, Rituparna; Beal, Dominic R.; Belikoff, Bryan G.; Remick, Daniel G.

2011-01-01

8

Do Transient Working Conditions Trigger Medical Errors?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Organizational factors affecting working conditions for health care workers have received significant attention as latent causes of medical errors. Little is known, however, about the risks associated with transient or changing working conditions. The purpose of this study was to identify specific transient, modifiable working conditions in the hospital environment that serve as triggers for medical errors. Methods: A

Deborah Grayson; Stuart Boxerman; Patricia Potter; Laurie Wolf; Clay Dunagan; Gary Sorock; Bradley Evanoff

9

[Metformin-associated lactic acidosis in a patient with pre-existing risk factors].  

PubMed

Lactic acidosis is a serious clinical situation associated with a high case fatality rate. Lactic acidosis is particularly found in conditions with an insufficient supply of oxigen in the tissue. Other causes for lactic acidosis can be hepatic or renal insufficiency. For the therapy of overweight patients with type 2 diabetes metformin is the first choice if diet and physical training have been ineffective. Metformin, however, has the potential to increase serumlactate. Therefore its ability to cause lactic acidosis is controversely discussed. We present a 64-year-old female patient with metformin-associated lactic acidosis. She had several pre-existing risk factors to develop a lactic acidosis. On her referral to the hospital she suffered from acute renal failure which is considered to be a contraindication for the use of metformin. PMID:16190374

Becker, C; Luginbühl, A; Pittl, U; Schlienger, R

2005-09-01

10

Pre-existing endothelial cell activation predicts vasoplegia after mitral valve surgery†  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES Post-cardiac surgery vasoplegia is a common complication of cardiac surgery, characterized by profound loss of systemic vascular resistance. This results in severe hypotension, high cardiac output and metabolic acidosis reflecting inadequate tissue perfusion. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this syndrome remain unknown. We hypothesized that this vasoplegia reflects endothelial dysfunction, either as pre-existing condition or as a consequence of the surgical procedure. METHODS To examine these mechanisms, six established and distinct markers of endothelial cell activation were measured pre- and perioperatively in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery. Arterial (radial artery) and myocardial venous blood samples (coronary sinus) were collected simultaneously over the reperfused heart at various time points during the first hour after reperfusion. Additional samples were collected at baseline (brachial vein) and 1 day post-reperfusion (radial artery). Post-cardiac surgery vasoplegia was defined as a mean arterial blood pressure of <60 mmHg, with a cardiac index of ?2.2 l/min/m2 treated with continuous intravenous administration of norepinephrine. RESULTS No myocardial release of endothelial cell activation markers was observed upon reperfusion in patients with vasoplegia (n = 15; mean age 71 years, 73% male). In contrast, in patients without vasoplegia (n = 24; mean age 64 years, 54% male), reperfusion was characterized by a myocardial release of three endothelial cell activation markers. Myocardial von Willebrand Factor propeptide, osteoprotegerin and interleukin-8 were increased 107% (P < 0.001), 106% (P = 0.02) and 116% (P = 0.009), respectively, compared with arterial levels upon reperfusion. Similar systemic levels of all markers were found upon reperfusion in both groups, except for 120% increased soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin) levels in vasoplegia patients (P = 0.03). Remarkably, postoperative vasoplegia was identified with baseline von Willebrand Factor propeptide levels with a cut-off value of 11.9 nM as well as with baseline sP-selectin levels with a cut-off value of 64.4 ng/ml. CONCLUSIONS Pre-existing endothelial cell activation, reflected by higher baseline von Willebrand Factor propeptide and sP-selectin levels, is a predisposing factor for post-cardiac surgery vasoplegia. The pre-existing endothelial cell activation may have resulted in desensibilization of endothelium in patients who develop vasoplegic syndrome, resulting in no myocardial release of endothelial cell activation markers upon reperfusion. PMID:23736659

Kortekaas, Kirsten A.; Lindeman, Jan H.N.; Reinders, Marlies E.J.; Palmen, Meindert; Klautz, Robert J.M.; de Groot, Philip G.; Roest, Mark

2013-01-01

11

Mining FDA drug labels for medical conditions  

PubMed Central

Background Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) has built the initial Natural Language Processing (NLP) component to extract medications with their corresponding medical conditions (Indications, Contraindications, Overdosage, and Adverse Reactions) as triples of medication-related information ([(1) drug name]-[(2) medical condition]-[(3) LOINC section header]) for an intelligent database system, in order to improve patient safety and the quality of health care. The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) drug labels are used to demonstrate the feasibility of building the triples as an intelligent database system task. Methods This paper discusses a hybrid NLP system, called AutoMCExtractor, to collect medical conditions (including disease/disorder and sign/symptom) from drug labels published by the FDA. Altogether, 6,611 medical conditions in a manually-annotated gold standard were used for the system evaluation. The pre-processing step extracted the plain text from XML file and detected eight related LOINC sections (e.g. Adverse Reactions, Warnings and Precautions) for medical condition extraction. Conditional Random Fields (CRF) classifiers, trained on token, linguistic, and semantic features, were then used for medical condition extraction. Lastly, dictionary-based post-processing corrected boundary-detection errors of the CRF step. We evaluated the AutoMCExtractor on manually-annotated FDA drug labels and report the results on both token and span levels. Results Precision, recall, and F-measure were 0.90, 0.81, and 0.85, respectively, for the span level exact match; for the token-level evaluation, precision, recall, and F-measure were 0.92, 0.73, and 0.82, respectively. Conclusions The results demonstrate that (1) medical conditions can be extracted from FDA drug labels with high performance; and (2) it is feasible to develop a framework for an intelligent database system. PMID:23617267

2013-01-01

12

Three-dimensional numerical analysis of magma transport through a pre-existing fracture in the crust  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magmas are transported through pre-existing fractures in many repeatedly erupting volcanoes. The study of this special process of magma transport is fundamentally important to understand the mechanisms and conditions of volcanic eruptions. In this paper, we numerically simulate the magma propagation process through a pre-existing vertical fracture in the crust by using the combined finite difference method (FDM), finite element method (FEM) and discontinuous deformation analysis (DDA) approach. FDM is used to analyze magma flow in the pre-existing fracture, FEM is used to calculate the opening of the fracture during magma intrusion, and DDA is used to deal with the contact of the closed fracture surfaces. Both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) examples are presented. Parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of various physical and geometric parameters on the magma transport in the pre-existing fracture. We have considered magma chamber depth ranging from 7 km to 10 km under the crust surface, magma viscosity ranging from 2 × 10-2 to 2 × 10-7 MPa s, and the density difference between the magma and host rock ranging from 300 to 700 kg/m3. The numerical results indicate that (1) the fluid pressure p varies gradually along the depth, (2) the shape of the magma body during propagation is like a torch bar and its width ranges from 2 m to 4 m approximately in the 3D case and 10 m to 50 m in the 2D case for the same physical parameters used, (3) the crust surface around the pre-existing fracture begins to increase on both sides of the fracture, forms a trough between them, then gradually uplifts during the transport of the magma, and finally takes the shape of a crater when the magma reaches the surface. We have also examined the influence of physical and geometric parameters on the minimum overpressure for magma transport in the 3D case. The numerical results show that our numerical technique presented in this paper is an effective tool for simulating magma transport process through pre-existing fractures in the crust.

Chen, Zuan; Cheng, Xu; Huang, Xiaoge; Bai, Wuming; Jin, Zhi-He

2014-05-01

13

Evolution and metamorphosis of pre-existent structures : lasting change, Lazarus' memory  

E-print Network

As society perpetually evolves, retention of selected pre-existent building fragments (structure and inhabitation, form and use) provides necessary continuity to affirm cultural and individual identity. Within this framework ...

Olson, Richard Keith

1994-01-01

14

Solid particle impingement erosion characteristics of cylindrical surfaces, pre-existing holes and slits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The erosion characteristics of aluminum cylinders sand-blasted with both spherical and angular erodent particles were studied and compared with results from previously studied flat surfaces. The cylindrical results are discussed with respect to impact conditions. The relationship between erosion rate and pit morphology (width, depth, and width to depth ratio) is established. The aspects of (1) erosion rate versus time curves on cylindrical surfaces; (2) long-term exposures; and (3) erosion rate versus time curves with spherical and angular particles are presented. The erosion morphology and characteristics of aluminum surfaces with pre-existing circular cylindrical and conical holes of different sizes were examined using weight loss measurements, scanning electron microscopy, a profilometer, and a depth gage. The morphological features (radial and concentric rings) are discussed with reference to flat surfaces, and the erosion features with spherical microglass beads. The similarities and differences of erosion and morphological features are highlighted. The erosion versus time curves of various shapes of holes are discussed and are compared with those of a flat surface. The erosion process at slits is considered.

Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

1983-01-01

15

The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA s Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the "Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember." This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this risk. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to define the set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur during exploration space flight missions. The list was derived from the International Space Station Medical Checklist, the Shuttle Medical Checklist, in-flight occurrence data from the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health, and NASA subject matter experts. The list of conditions was further prioritized for eight specific design reference missions with the assistance of the ExMC Advisory Group. The purpose of the SMEMCL is to serve as an evidence-based foundation for the conditions that could affect a crewmember during flight. This information is used to ensure that the appropriate medical capabilities are available for exploration missions.

Watkins, Sharmi; Barr, Yael; Kerstman, Eric

2011-01-01

16

Metabolic effects of milk protein intake strongly depend on pre-existing metabolic and exercise status  

PubMed Central

Milk protein intake has recently been suggested to improve metabolic health. This Perspective provides evidence that metabolic effects of milk protein intake have to be regarded in the context of the individual’s pre-existing metabolic and exercise status. Milk proteins provide abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and glutamine. Plasma BCAAs and glutamine are increased in obesity and insulin resistance, but decrease after gastric bypass surgery resulting in weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity. Milk protein consumption results in postprandial hyperinsulinemia in obese subjects, increases body weight of overweight adolescents and may thus deteriorate pre-existing metabolic disturbances of obese, insulin resistant individuals. PMID:24225036

2013-01-01

17

Using an Electronic Highlighter to Eliminate the Negative Effects of Pre-Existing, Inappropriate Highlighting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether using an active learning technique, electronic highlighting, can eliminate the negative effects of pre-existing, poor highlighting on reading comprehension. Participants read passages containing no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, or inappropriate highlighting. We hypothesized…

Gier, Vicki; Kreiner, David; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Herring, Daniel

2011-01-01

18

Mechanical and microstructural development of Carrara marble with pre-existing deformation history in torsion experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The deformation behaviour of Carrara marble has been studied mostly by performing deformation experiments on initially undeformed samples. In this study, torsion experiments on Carrara marble with a pre-existing deformation history have been conducted and analysed in terms of both mechanical and microstructural development. Torsion experiments have been conducted to deform initially deformed Carrara marble samples until a bulk shear

R. H. C. Bruijn; L. Burlini; K. Kunze

2009-01-01

19

Are There Pre-Existing Neural, Cognitive, or Motoric Markers for Musical Ability?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adult musician's brains show structural enlargements, but it is not known whether these are inborn or a consequence of long-term training. In addition, music training in childhood has been shown to have positive effects on visual-spatial and verbal outcomes. However, it is not known whether pre-existing advantages in these skills are found in…

Norton, Andrea; Winner, Ellen; Cronin, Karl; Overy, Katie; Lee, Dennis J.; Schlaug, Gottfried

2005-01-01

20

Influence of pre-existing salt structures in the 3D pattern of multilayer folding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Upward movement of the Precambrian Hormuz salt in the Fars region of the Zagros is supposed to have started as early as Late Cretaceous. The Late Cretaceous - Tertiary deformation events that lead to the folding of the sedimentary cover in this area would have therefore, enhance the upward salt movement by squeezing the pre-existing salt structures. How these salt diapirs evolve under such compressive events has already been previously addressed using analogue models (e.g. Callot et al. 2012). The same authors observed that pre-existing salt structures control the size and geometry of folds in sandbox models. Our previous work has shown that 3D folding instability gives rise to a wide variety of fold shapes (e.g. from dome shape structures to long en echelon or straight anticlines), resulting of the interactions between growing fold segments. The three dimensional growth of these folds, the wavelength and the lateral propagation, is itself controlled by physical parameters. However, the existence of initial weak zones such as pre-existing salt plugs within the sedimentary cover can affect the development of such folds by localizing part of the deformation. In this study we have used numerical modeling to investigate how the fold pattern in 3D multilayer folding is affected by pre-existing salt structures. High-resolution 3D folding simulations (with and without pre-existing salt structures) were performed with the parallel code LaMEM. Cylindrically shaped diapirs with different diameters and heights have been added to a multilayer folding setup. The use of a finite element based landscape evolution model (both erosion and sedimentation) allows for initially buried salt diapirs to be exposed at the surface during folding evolution. Acknowledgements Funding was provided by the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework program (FP7/2007-2013) ERC Grant agreement #258830. 3D simulations are performed in the IBM Blue Gene/Q JUQUEEN supercomputer of the Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany References Callot, J.P., Trocme, V., Letouzey, J., Albouy, E., Jahani, S. and Sherkati S., 2012, Pre-existing salt structures and the folding of the Zagros Mountains. Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 363, 545-561, doi: 10.1144/SP363.27

Fernandez, Naiara; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Collignon, Marine

2014-05-01

21

Pre-existing histological type and developmental mechanism of mucinous noncystic carcinoma of pancreas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eleven cases with mucinous noncystic carcinoma (MC) of the pancreas were studied by histology and mucin immunohistochemistry,\\u000a to elucidate the mechanism, or route of development, and pre-existing histological type of MC of the pancreas. These MCs were\\u000a observed in close approximation to, or surrounding, intraductal papillary-mucinous carcinomas (IPMCs), and were centrally\\u000a situated among ductal adenocarcinomas (DAs). Hence, the 11 cases

Koichi Suda; Bunsei Nobukawa; Shigetaka Yamasaki; Fujihiko Suzuki; Hideo Shimizu; Masaru Takase

2000-01-01

22

Importance of pre-existing co-morbidities for prognosis of septicemia in critically ill patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: ~Ib determine admission characteris- tics associated with the outcome of septicemia in critical- ly ill patients and more specifically assess the prognostic value of pre-existing co-morbidities. Design: 5 year-retrospective cohort study. Setting: Surgical Intensive Care Unit (ICU-20 beds) in a 1600 bed-tertiary care center. Patients: Among 5457 patients admitted to the ICU be- tween 1984 and 1988, 176 (3.2%)

D. Pittet; B. Thiévent; R. P. Wenzel; N. Li; G. Gurman; P. M. Suter

1993-01-01

23

Pre-existing Conditions Genetic Testing, Causation, and the Justice of  

E-print Network

public debate. Cloning or somatic cell nuclear transfer (even the terminol- ogy is controversial will require close collaboration of both scientists and ethicists. Progress on the controversy about human cloning, for instance, may be possible when scientists, ethicists, and phil- osophers of science use

Pennock, Robert T.

24

Pre-existing atrial fibrillation and risk of arterial thromboembolism and death following pneumonia: a population-based cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine the effect of pre-existing atrial fibrillation (AF) and associated therapy on the risk of arterial thromboembolism (ATE) and death following pneumonia. Design, setting and participants Population-based cohort study (1997–2012) of 88?315 patients with first-time hospitalisation with pneumonia in Northern Denmark. Results Of the included patients (median age 73.4?years), 8880 (10.1%) had pre-existing AF. The risk of ATE within 30?days of admission was 5.2% in patients with AF and 3.6% in patients without AF. After adjustment for higher age and comorbidity, the adjusted HR (aHR) with AF was 1.06 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.18). Among patients with AF, reduced risk of ATE was observed in vitamin-K antagonist users compared with non-users (aHR 0.74 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.91)). Thirty-day mortality was 20.1% in patients with AF and 13.9% in patients without AF. Corresponding 1-year mortalities were 43.7% and 30.3%. The aHRs for 30-day and 1-year mortality with AF were 1.00 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.05) and 1.01 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.05). In patients with AF, reduced mortality risk was observed in users of vitamin-K antagonists (aHR 0.70 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.77)) and ?-blockers (aHR 0.77 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.85). Increased mortality was found in digoxin users (aHR 1.16 (95% CI 1.06 to 1.28)). Conclusions Pre-existing AF is frequent in patients hospitalised with pneumonia and a marker of increased risk of ATE and death, explained by higher patient age and comorbidity. Prognosis is closely related to preadmission medical treatment for AF. PMID:25398678

Gamst, Jacob; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

2014-01-01

25

14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.213 Section 67.213...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.213 General...

2011-01-01

26

14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.313 Section 67.313...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.313 General...

2010-01-01

27

14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.213 Section 67.213...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.213 General...

2010-01-01

28

14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.113 Section 67.113...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.113 General...

2011-01-01

29

14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.313 Section 67.313...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.313 General...

2011-01-01

30

The effect of pre-existing vulnerability factors on a laboratory analogue trauma experience.  

PubMed

This study examined how pre-existing emotional and personality vulnerability factors affect responses to an analogue trauma experience. Sixty-eight undergraduate participants viewed a distressing film and completed measures of trait anxiety, intelligence, depression, trait dissociation, as well as changes in state anxiety, then recorded intrusions over the following week. Results revealed that trait anxiety, depression, trait dissociation, change in anxiety, and post-state anxiety were associated with intrusion frequency. Post-state anxiety mediated the relationship between trait anxiety, depression and trait dissociation, and intrusions. Implications for PTSD theories and laboratory trauma analogue research examining specific elements of cognitive models of PTSD are discussed. PMID:18294615

Laposa, Judith M; Alden, Lynn E

2008-12-01

31

Pre-existing sensory biases in the spectral domain in frogs: empirical results and methodological considerations.  

PubMed

In many species of anurans, advertisement calls excite only one of the two inner-ear organs. One prediction of the pre-existing bias hypothesis is that signal innovations that additionally excite the "untapped" organ will be more behaviorally effective than normal calls. However, recent studies have shown that females of three species with single-peaked calls that stimulate only the basilar papilla (BP) preferred single-peaked synthetic calls with a frequency typical of conspecific calls to two-peaked calls that also stimulated the amphibian papilla (AP). We report that in spring peepers (Pseudacris crucifer) that also produce single-peaked calls, females did not show a preference in choices between single-peaked and two-peaked synthetic calls. Thus, the addition of energy exciting the AP had a neutral effect on signal attractiveness. Together, these results are unsupportive of the pre-existing bias hypothesis. An alternative hypothesis is that positive fitness consequences of responding to sounds providing extraordinary spectral stimulation are required for a novel call to become established as a mate-attracting signal. Testing these ideas requires a taxonomically broader examination of responses to sounds with novel spectral complexity, and attention to some methodological details will improve the comparability of such studies. PMID:23160797

Gerhardt, H C; Humfeld, Sarah C

2013-02-01

32

Medical Conditions and Medication Use in Adults with Down Syndrome: A Descriptive Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: We examined the presence of medical conditions and medication use within a sample of adults with Down syndrome. Methods: Retrospective chart review using a sample of 141 adults with Down syndrome and age range of 30 to 65 years. Results: We identify 23 categories of commonly occurring medical conditions and 24 categories of medications

Kerins, Gerard; Petrovic, Kimberly; Bruder, Mary Beth; Gruman, Cynthia

2008-01-01

33

Effects of Pre-Existing Target Structure on the Formation of Large Craters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The shapes of large-scale craters and the mechanics responsible for melt generation are influenced by broad and small-scale structures present in a target prior to impact. For example, well-developed systems of fractures often create craters that appear square in outline, good examples being Meteor Crater, AZ and the square craters of 433 Eros. Pre-broken target material also affects melt generation. Kieffer has shown how the shock wave generated in Coconino sandstone at Meteor crater created reverberations which, in combination with the natural target heterogeneity present, created peaks and troughs in pressure and compressed density as individual grains collided to produce a range of shock mineralogies and melts within neighboring samples. In this study, we further explore how pre-existing target structure influences various aspects of the cratering process. We combine experimental and numerical techniques to explore the connection between the scales of the impact generated shock wave and the pre-existing target structure. We focus on the propagation of shock waves in coarse, granular media, emphasizing its consequences on excavation, crater growth, ejecta production, cratering efficiency, melt generation, and crater shape. As a baseline, we present a first series of results for idealized targets where the particles are all identical in size and possess the same shock impedance. We will also present a few results, whereby we increase the complexities of the target properties by varying the grain size, strength, impedance and frictional properties. In addition, we investigate the origin and implications of reverberations that are created by the presence of physical and chemical heterogeneity in a target.

Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Cintala, M. J.; Crawford, D. A.

2003-01-01

34

Numerical Study on Coalescence of Pre-Existing Flaw Pairs in Rock-Like Material  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present numerical study, which is an extension of our previous numerical analysis on cracking processes of a single pre-existing flaw, focuses on the coalescence of two pre-existing parallel open flaws in rock subjected to a uniaxial compressive loading. To facilitate a systematic investigation, the arrangements of the flaw pair are classified into 11 categories. Simulations engaging AUTODYN are conducted on each category. The numerical results are compared with some published physical experimental test results. Eleven typical coalescence patterns are obtained, which are in good agreement with the experimental results, which include two coalescence patterns obtained in flaw pair arrangements (II) and (VIII?) not being reported in previous studies. The information gathered in the simulations helps identify the type (tensile/shear) of each crack segment involved in the coalescence. Most of the coalescence cracks initiate at or around the flaw tips, except those in flaw pair arrangements (II) and (IX') with a very short ligament length, in which the coalescence cracks initiate on the flaw surfaces away from the flaw tip regions. Based on the numerical simulation results, the properties of the 11 coalescence patterns are obtained. Except those in flaw pair arrangements (II) and (IX'), the other coalescence patterns can be interpreted with respect to the basic crack types—tensile wing crack, horsetail crack and anti-wing crack. In addition, based on the type of crack segments involved in coalescence, namely tensile and shear, the coalescence can be classified into T mode (tensile mode), S mode (shear mode) and TS mode (mixed tensile-shear mode).

Li, Huan-Qiang; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen

2014-11-01

35

Pre-Existing Hypertension Dominates ??T Cell Reduction in Human Ischemic Stroke  

PubMed Central

T lymphocytes may play an important role in the evolution of ischemic stroke. Depletion of ??T cells has been found to abrogate ischemia reperfusion injury in murine stroke. However, the role of ??T cells in human ischemic stroke is unknown. We aimed to determine ??T cell counts and ??T cell interleukin 17A (IL-17A) production in the clinical setting of ischemic stroke. We also aimed to determine the associations of ??T cell counts with ischemic lesion volume, measures of clinical severity and with major stroke risk factors. Peripheral blood samples from 43 acute ischemic stroke patients and 26 control subjects matched on race and gender were used for flow cytometry and complete blood count analyses. Subsequently, cytokine levels and gene expression were measured in ??T cells. The number of circulating ??T cells was decreased by almost 50% (p?=?0.005) in the stroke patients. ??T cell counts did not correlate with lesion volume on magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging or with clinical severity in the stroke patients, but ??T cells showed elevated levels of IL-17A (p?=?0.048). Decreased ??T cell counts were also associated with older age (p?=?0.004), pre-existing hypertension (p?=?0.0005) and prevalent coronary artery disease (p?=?0.03), with pre-existing hypertension being the most significant predictor of ??T cell counts in a multivariable analysis. ??T cells in human ischemic stroke are reduced in number and show elevated levels of IL-17A. A major reduction in ??T lymphocytes also occurs in hypertension and may contribute to the development of hypertension-mediated stroke and vascular disease. PMID:24840735

Adamski, Mateusz G.; Li, Yan; Wagner, Erin; Yu, Hua; Seales-Bailey, Chloe; Durkin, Helen; Hao, Qing; Soper, Steven A.; Murphy, Michael; Baird, Alison E.

2014-01-01

36

Pre-existing hypertension dominates ??T cell reduction in human ischemic stroke.  

PubMed

T lymphocytes may play an important role in the evolution of ischemic stroke. Depletion of ??T cells has been found to abrogate ischemia reperfusion injury in murine stroke. However, the role of ??T cells in human ischemic stroke is unknown. We aimed to determine ??T cell counts and ??T cell interleukin 17A (IL-17A) production in the clinical setting of ischemic stroke. We also aimed to determine the associations of ??T cell counts with ischemic lesion volume, measures of clinical severity and with major stroke risk factors. Peripheral blood samples from 43 acute ischemic stroke patients and 26 control subjects matched on race and gender were used for flow cytometry and complete blood count analyses. Subsequently, cytokine levels and gene expression were measured in ??T cells. The number of circulating ??T cells was decreased by almost 50% (p?=?0.005) in the stroke patients. ??T cell counts did not correlate with lesion volume on magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging or with clinical severity in the stroke patients, but ??T cells showed elevated levels of IL-17A (p?=?0.048). Decreased ??T cell counts were also associated with older age (p?=?0.004), pre-existing hypertension (p?=?0.0005) and prevalent coronary artery disease (p?=?0.03), with pre-existing hypertension being the most significant predictor of ??T cell counts in a multivariable analysis. ??T cells in human ischemic stroke are reduced in number and show elevated levels of IL-17A. A major reduction in ??T lymphocytes also occurs in hypertension and may contribute to the development of hypertension-mediated stroke and vascular disease. PMID:24840735

Adamski, Mateusz G; Li, Yan; Wagner, Erin; Yu, Hua; Seales-Bailey, Chloe; Durkin, Helen; Hao, Qing; Soper, Steven A; Murphy, Michael; Baird, Alison E

2014-01-01

37

40 CFR Appendix B to Part 434 - Baseline Determination and Compliance Monitoring for Pre-existing Discharges at Remining Operations  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...pre-existing discharges at coal remining operations, in accordance...requirements set forth in Subpart G; Coal Remining. The requirements...whether discharge loadings during coal remining operations have exceeded...year. d. Accommodating Data Below the Maximum Daily...

2010-07-01

38

Medication errors in the homes of children with chronic conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundChildren with chronic conditions often have complex medication regimens, usually administered at home by their parents.ObjectiveTo describe the types of medication errors in the homes of children with chronic conditions.MethodsOur home visit methods include direct observation of administration, medication review and prescription dose checking. Parents of children with sickle cell disease and seizure disorders taking daily medications were recruited from

Kathleen E Walsh; Kathleen M Mazor; Christopher J Stille; Irma Torres; Joann L Wagner; Juliet Moretti; Kevin Chysna; Christy D Stine; G Naheed Usmani; Jerry H Gurwitz

2011-01-01

39

Plaque rupture with severe pre-existing stenosis precipitating coronary thrombosis. Characteristics of coronary atherosclerotic plaques underlying fatal occlusive thrombi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ruptured atheromatous plaques were identified by step-sectioning technique as responsible for 40 of 51 recent coronary artery thrombi and 63 larger intimal haemorrhages. The degree of pre-existing luminal narrowing at the site of rupture was decisive for whether plaque rupture caused occlusive thrombosis or just intimal haemorrhage. If the pre-existing stenosis was greater than 90% (histologically determined) then plaque rupture

E Falk

1983-01-01

40

Gene Therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI Is Effective in Cats Without Pre-Existing Immunity to AAV8  

PubMed Central

Abstract Liver gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) 2/8 vectors is being considered for therapy of systemic diseases like mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI), a lysosomal storage disease due to deficiency of arylsulfatase B (ARSB). We have previously reported that liver gene transfer with AAV2/8 results in sustained yet variable expression of ARSB. We hypothesized that the variability we observed could be due to pre-existing immunity to wild-type AAV8. To test this, we compared the levels of AAV2/8-mediated transduction in MPS VI cats with and without pre-existing immunity to AAV8. In addition, since levels of lysosomal enzymes as low as 5% of normal are expected to be therapeutic, we evaluated the impact of pre-existing immunity on MPS VI phenotypic rescue. AAV2/8 administration to MPS VI cats without pre-existing neutralizing antibodies to AAV8 resulted in consistent and dose-dependent expression of ARSB, urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) reduction, and femur length amelioration. Conversely, animals with pre-existing immunity to AAV8 showed low levels of ARSB expression and limited phenotypic improvement. Our data support the use of AAV2/8-mediated gene transfer for MPS VI and other systemic diseases, and highlight that pre-existing immunity to AAV8 should be considered in determining subject eligibility for therapy. PMID:23194248

Ferla, Rita; O'Malley, Thomas; Calcedo, Roberto; O'Donnell, Patricia; Wang, Ping; Cotugno, Gabriella; Claudiani, Pamela; Wilson, James M.; Haskins, Mark

2013-01-01

41

Evidence for Pre-existing Dust in the Bright Type IIn SN 2010jl  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SN 2010jl was an extremely bright, Type IIn supernova (SN) which showed a significant infrared (IR) excess no later than 90 days after explosion. We have obtained Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 ?m and JHK observations of SN 2010jl ~90 days post-explosion. Little to no reddening in the host galaxy indicated that the circumstellar material lost from the progenitor must lie in a torus inclined out of the plane of the sky. The likely cause of the high mid-IR flux is the reprocessing of the initial flash of the SN by pre-existing circumstellar dust. Using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative-transfer code, we have estimated that between 0.03 and 0.35 M sun of dust exists in a circumstellar torus around the SN located 6 × 1017 cm away from the SN and inclined between 60° and 80° to the plane of the sky. On day 90, we are only seeing the illumination of approximately 5% of this torus, and expect to see an elevated IR flux from this material up until day ~ 450. It is likely this dust was created in a luminous blue variable (LBV) like mass-loss event of more than 3 M sun, which is large but consistent with other LBV progenitors such as ? Carinae.

Andrews, J. E.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Wesson, R.; Sugerman, B. E. K.; Barlow, M. J.; Clem, J.; Ercolano, B.; Fabbri, J.; Gallagher, J. S.; Landolt, A.; Meixner, M.; Otsuka, M.; Riebel, D.; Welch, D. L.

2011-08-01

42

EVIDENCE FOR PRE-EXISTING DUST IN THE BRIGHT TYPE IIn SN 2010jl  

SciTech Connect

SN 2010jl was an extremely bright, Type IIn supernova (SN) which showed a significant infrared (IR) excess no later than 90 days after explosion. We have obtained Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m and JHK observations of SN 2010jl {approx}90 days post-explosion. Little to no reddening in the host galaxy indicated that the circumstellar material lost from the progenitor must lie in a torus inclined out of the plane of the sky. The likely cause of the high mid-IR flux is the reprocessing of the initial flash of the SN by pre-existing circumstellar dust. Using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative-transfer code, we have estimated that between 0.03 and 0.35 M{sub sun} of dust exists in a circumstellar torus around the SN located 6 x 10{sup 17} cm away from the SN and inclined between 60 deg. and 80 deg. to the plane of the sky. On day 90, we are only seeing the illumination of approximately 5% of this torus, and expect to see an elevated IR flux from this material up until day {approx} 450. It is likely this dust was created in a luminous blue variable (LBV) like mass-loss event of more than 3 M{sub sun}, which is large but consistent with other LBV progenitors such as {eta} Carinae.

Andrews, J. E.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Clem, J.; Landolt, A., E-mail: jandrews@phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: landolt@phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: gclayton@fenway.phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: jclem@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

2011-08-15

43

Discovery of a Pre-existing Molecular Filament Associated with Supernova Remnant G127.1+0.5  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We performed millimeter observations in CO lines toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G127.1+0.5. We found a molecular filament at 4-13 km s-1 consisting of two distinct parts: a straight part coming out of the remnant region and a curved part in the remnant region. The curved part is coincides well with the bright SNR shell detected in 1420 MHz radio continuum and mid-infrared observations in the northeastern region. In addition, redshifted line wing broadening is found only in the curved part of the molecular filament, which indicates a physical interaction. These provide strong evidences, for the first time, to confirm the association between an SNR and a pre-existing long molecular filament. Multi-band observations in the northeastern remnant shell could be explained by the interaction between the remnant shock and the dense molecular filament. RADEX radiative transfer modeling of the quiet and shocked components yield physical conditions consistent with the passage of a non-dissociative J-type shock. We argue that the curved part of the filament is fully engulfed by the remnant's forward shock. A spatial correlation between aggregated young stellar objects (YSOs) and the adjacent molecular filament close to the SNR is also found, which could be related to the progenitor's activity.

Zhou, Xin; Yang, Ji; Fang, Min; Su, Yang

2014-08-01

44

Pre-existing Statin Use is Associated with Greater Reperfusion in Hyper-Acute Ischemic Stroke  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose Statin pretreatment has been associated with improved outcomes in patients with ischemic stroke. Although several mechanisms have been examined in animal models, few have been examined in patients. We hypothesized that patients using statins before stroke onset may have greater reperfusion than patients not using statins. Methods Acute ischemic stroke patients underwent two MR scans: within 4.5 (tp1) and at 6 hours (tp2) after stroke onset. Regions of reperfusion were defined by prolonged MTT at tp1 which normalized at tp2. Four MTT thresholds were assessed to ensure that results were not spuriously based on an arbitrary threshold. Baseline characteristics, relative reperfusion, and change in NIH Stroke Scale between tp1 and 1-month follow-up (?NIHSS) were compared between patients who were taking statins at stroke onset and those who were not. Results Thirty-one stroke patients were prospectively enrolled; 12 were taking statins, while 19 were not. Baseline characteristics did not differ between the two groups except the statin group had greater coronary artery disease (p=0.03). Patients using statins showed significantly greater reperfusion compared to untreated patients across all MTT thresholds. For MTT=4 seconds, median relative reperfusion was 50% (IQR 30%,56%) in the pre-existing statin group vs. 13% (IQR=5%,36%) in the untreated group, p=0.014. The statin group had greater ?NIHSS (8.8±4.0 points) compared to the untreated group (4.4±5.7 points), p=0.028. Conclusion Statin use prior to ischemic stroke onset was associated with greater early reperfusion and NIHSS improvement. Further studies in larger populations are required to confirm our preliminary findings. PMID:21454815

Ford, Andria L.; An, Hongyu; D'Angelo, Gina; Ponisio, Rosana; Bushard, Patrick; Vo, Katie D.; Powers, William J.; Lin, Weili; Lee, Jin-Moo

2011-01-01

45

Evaluation of a pre-existing, 3-year household water treatment and handwashing intervention in rural Guatemala  

PubMed Central

Background The promotion of household water treatment and handwashing with soap has led to large reductions in child diarrhoea in randomized efficacy trials. Currently, we know little about the health effectiveness of behaviour-based water and hygiene interventions after the conclusion of intervention activities. Methods We present an extension of previously published design (propensity score matching) and analysis (targeted maximum likelihood estimation) methods to evaluate the behavioural and health impacts of a pre-existing but non-randomized intervention (a 3-year, combined household water treatment and handwashing campaign in rural Guatemala). Six months after the intervention, we conducted a cross-sectional cohort study in 30 villages (15 intervention and 15 control) that included 600 households, and 929 children <5 years of age. Results The study design created a sample of intervention and control villages that were comparable across more than 30 potentially confounding characteristics. The intervention led to modest gains in confirmed water treatment behaviour [risk difference = 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02–0.09]. We found, however, no difference between the intervention and control villages in self-reported handwashing behaviour, spot-check hygiene conditions, or the prevalence of child diarrhoea, clinical acute lower respiratory infections or child growth. Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first post-intervention follow-up study of a combined household water treatment and handwashing behaviour change intervention, and the first post-intervention follow-up of either intervention type to include child health measurement. The lack of child health impacts is consistent with unsustained behaviour adoption. Our findings highlight the difficulty of implementing behaviour-based household water treatment and handwashing outside of intensive efficacy trials. PMID:19574492

Arnold, Benjamin; Arana, Byron; Mausezahl, Daniel; Hubbard, Alan; Colford, John M

2009-01-01

46

Outcome of patients with pre-existing portal vein thrombosis undergoing arterialization of the portal vein during liver transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arterialization of the portal vein is being propagated as a technical possibility in liver transplant recipients with pre-existing portal vein thrombosis. In our own small series, portal vein arterialization (PVA) was carried out in four patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation. In three of these cases, the portal vein was anastomosed to the aorta via an interposed iliac artery, and in

Rudolf Ott; Cathrin Böhner; Susanna Müller; Thomas Aigner; Michaela Bussenius-Kammerer; Suleyman Yedibela; Hermann Kissler; Werner Hohenberger; Thomas Reck; Volker Müller

2003-01-01

47

Wheelchairs and Scooters: Travelers with Disabilities and Medical Conditions  

MedlinePLUS

... Print Travelers with Disabilities and Medical Conditions Most airlines provide accommodations to persons with disabilities who have ... a wheelchair and wheelchair attendant. Please contact your airline for more information about wheelchair assistance as TSA ...

48

Bayesian Hierarchical Rule Modeling for Predicting Medical Conditions  

E-print Network

We propose a statistical modeling technique, called the Hierarchical Association Rule Model (HARM), that predicts a patient’s possible future medical conditions given the patient’s current and past history of reported ...

McCormick, Tyler H.

2012-01-01

49

The experience of altered states of consciousness in shamanic ritual: the role of pre-existing beliefs and affective factors.  

PubMed

Much attention has been paid recently to the role of anomalous experiences in the aetiology of certain types of psychopathology, e.g. in the formation of delusions. We examine, instead, the top-down influence of pre-existing beliefs and affective factors in shaping an individual's characterisation of anomalous sensory experiences. Specifically we investigated the effects of paranormal beliefs and alexithymia in determining the intensity and quality of an altered state of consciousness (ASC). Fifty five participants took part in a sweat lodge ceremony, a traditional shamanic ritual which was unfamiliar to them. Participants reported significant alterations in their state of consciousness, quantified using the 'APZ' questionnaire, a standardized measure of ASC experience. Participants endorsing paranormal beliefs compatible with shamanic mythology, and those showing difficulty identifying feelings scored higher on positive dimensions of ASC experience. Our findings demonstrate that variation in an individual's characterisation of anomalous experiences is nuanced by pre-existing beliefs and affective factors. PMID:20558090

Polito, Vince; Langdon, Robyn; Brown, Jac

2010-12-01

50

The influence of pre-existing thrust faults on normal fault geometry in nature and in experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relations between normal faults and pre-existing thrust faults are classically described in terms of three basic situations: normal faults can cross-cut thrust faults; they can branch out from thrust faults at depth on a de´collement level, or they can entirely reactivate thrust planes. The mechanical aspects of these types of interaction were studied by analogue modelling in which sand simulates

Vittorio Bosi; Thierry Nalpas; Jean-Pierre Brun; Philippe Davy

1995-01-01

51

Phenotypic T Cell Exhaustion in a Murine Model of Bacterial Infection in the Setting of Pre-Existing Malignancy  

PubMed Central

While much of cancer immunology research has focused on anti-tumor immunity both systemically and within the tumor microenvironment, little is known about the impact of pre-existing malignancy on pathogen-specific immune responses. Here, we sought to characterize the antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response following a bacterial infection in the setting of pre-existing pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Mice with established subcutaneous pancreatic adenocarcinomas were infected with Listeria monocytogenes, and antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses were compared to those in control mice without cancer. While the kinetics and magnitude of antigen-specific CD8+ T cell expansion and accumulation was comparable between the cancer and non-cancer groups, bacterial antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and total CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in cancer mice exhibited increased expression of the coinhibitory receptors BTLA, PD-1, and 2B4. Furthermore, increased inhibitory receptor expression was associated with reduced IFN-? and increased IL-2 production by bacterial antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in the cancer group. Taken together, these data suggest that cancer's immune suppressive effects are not limited to the tumor microenvironment, but that pre-existing malignancy induces phenotypic exhaustion in T cells by increasing expression of coinhibitory receptors and may impair pathogen-specific CD8+ T cell functionality and differentiation. PMID:24796533

Mittal, Rohit; Wagener, Maylene; Breed, Elise R.; Liang, Zhe; Yoseph, Benyam P.; Burd, Eileen M.; Farris, Alton B.

2014-01-01

52

Dementia and serious coexisting medical conditions: a double whammy.  

PubMed

Research-based information about the prevalence of other serious medical conditions in people with dementia has become available only recently, and the true prevalence is not known, primarily because many people with dementia do not have a diagnosis. The existing information is sufficient, however, to show that these other conditions are common in people with dementia. It is also clear that coexisting medical conditions increase the use and cost of health care services for people with dementia, and conversely, dementia increases the use and cost of health care services for people with other serious medical conditions. Nurses and other healthcare professionals should expect to see these relationships in their elderly patients. They should know how to recognize possible dementia and assess, or obtain an assessment of, the patient's cognitive status. They should expect the worsening of cognitive and related symptoms in acutely ill people with dementia and try to eliminate factors that cause this worsening, to the extent possible, while assuring the family that the symptoms are likely to improve once the acute phase of illness or treatment is over. Families, nurses, and other health care professionals are challenged by the complex issues involved in caring for a person with both dementia and other serious medical conditions. Greater attention to these issues by informed and thoughtful clinicians will improve outcomes for the people and their family and professional caregivers. PMID:15331302

Maslow, Katie

2004-09-01

53

Mechanical and microstructural development of Carrara marble with pre-existing strain variation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of two-stage torsion experiments on Carrara marble were conducted to constrain the influence of known prior deformation on rheological response and microstructural evolution. Comparison with previous experimental data on Carrara marble flow and fabric evolution during single-stage torsion deformation experiments provided direct insights into the significance of initial deformation at various conditions. Our experiments were conducted at 727°C

Rolf H. C. Bruijn; Karsten Kunze; David Mainprice; Luigi Burlini

2011-01-01

54

Relations among Chronic Medical Conditions, Medications, and Automobile Crashes in the Elderly: A Population-based Case-Control Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Older drivers have elevated crash rates and are more likely to be injured or die if they have a crash. Medical conditions and medications have been hypothesized as determinants of crash involvement. This population- based case-control study sought to identify medical conditions and medications associated with risk of at-fault crashes among older drivers. A total of 901 drivers aged 65

Gerald McGwin; Richard V. Sims; Jeffrey M. Roseman

55

Individual differences in reading comprehension gains from assisted reading practice: pre existing conditions, vocabulary acquisition, and amounts of practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted a study of the effects of assisted reading practice (Shany & Biemiller, 1995). In this paper we examined the original data to find factors affecting gains in reading comprehension. We contrasted 14\\u000a children who had below median gains in reading comprehension and 15 who had above median gains. There were no significant\\u000a correlations between pre-program language and reading

Michal Shany; Andrew Biemiller

2010-01-01

56

Indium-111-labeled white blood cells in the detection of osteomyelitis complicated by a pre-existing condition  

SciTech Connect

Forty-six patients (23M, 23F) ranging in age from 19 to 79 yr with a clinical history of a nonunion fracture, surgery, diabetes or a soft-tissue infection were studied with (/sup 111/In)oxine WBCs to detect osteomyelitis. There were 27 true-positive, nine true-negative, two false-positive and one false-negative. The false-positives and the false-negative occurred in patients with soft-tissue infections overlying the area of interest. All diagnoses were confirmed by intraoperative bone biopsies and cultures. Bone biopsy and scan were performed within 2 days of each other in 39 patients. The overall sensitivity was 97% (27/28), specificity, 82% (9/11) and the diagnostic accuracy, 92% (36/39). The remaining seven patients had negative (/sup 111/In)WBC scans several months after positive bone biopsies and definite antibiotic treatment. This suggests that (In)WBC scans become negative after appropriate therapy is undertaken. Interobserver data was obtained from four nuclear physicians of varying experience blinded to clinical information. A high degree of agreement was found in over 90% of the cases. This study demonstrates the utility of (/sup 111/In)WBC scans in the diagnosis and follow-up of complicated osteomyelitis and a high level of interobserver agreement in scan interpretation.

McCarthy, K.; Velchik, M.G.; Alavi, A.; Mandell, G.A.; Esterhai, J.L.; Goll, S.

1988-06-01

57

Effect of pre-existing crystallographic preferred orientation on the rheology of Carrara marble  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Localized deformation during high temperature plastic flow is frequently attributed to mechanical weakening caused by grain size reduction and, in some cases, by the development of a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). This study aims to investigate experimentally the contribution of CPO development to the strain weakening seen in Carrara marble samples during large strain torsion experiments at temperatures in the range 600-800 °C at constant strain rate and confining pressure. The starting material shows little or no CPO. Samples were treated in three steps. First, they were deformed to achieve a well-developed CPO and recrystallized to a finer grain size. Second, the samples were annealed at 727 °C for 5 h to grow the grains to approximately their original size and shape while maintaining a reasonably strong CPO. Finally, the samples were deformed again, under the same conditions as the first step. Re-deformed samples showed a strain weakening lower than during the first step. We infer that this strength difference is caused primarily by the CPO developed during the first deformation event. This implies that CPO development is an important process that contributes to strain weakening during flow of Carrara marble and likely of other rock types as well.

de Raadt, Wilhelmina S.; Burlini, Luigi; Kunze, Karsten; Spiers, Christopher J.

2014-11-01

58

Peroxisomes in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha do not necessarily derive from pre-existing organelles.  

PubMed Central

We have identified two temperature-sensitive peroxisome-deficient mutants of Hansenula polymorpha (ts6 and ts44) within a collection of ts mutants which are impaired for growth on methanol at 43 degrees C but grow well at 35 degrees C. In both strains peroxisomes were completely absent in cells grown at 43 degrees C; the major peroxisomal matrix enzymes alcohol oxidase, dihydroxyacetone synthase and catalase were synthesized normally but assembled into the active enzyme protein in the cytosol. As in wild-type cells, these enzymes were present in peroxisomes under permissive growth conditions (< or = 37 degrees C). However, at intermediate temperatures (38-42 degrees C) they were partly peroxisome-bound and partly resided in the cytosol. Genetic analysis revealed that both mutant phenotypes were due to monogenic recessive mutations mapped in the same gene, designated PER13. After a shift of per13-6ts cells from restrictive to permissive temperature, new peroxisomes were formed within 1 h. Initially one--or infrequently a few--small organelles developed which subsequently increased in size and multiplied by fission during prolonged permissive growth. Neither mature peroxisomal matrix nor membrane proteins, which were present in the cytosol prior to the temperature shift, were incorporated into the newly formed organelles. Instead, these proteins remained unaffected (and active) in the cytosol concomitant with further peroxisome development. Thus in H.polymorpha alternative mechanisms of peroxisome biogenesis may be possible in addition to multiplication by fission upon induction of the organelles by certain growth substrates. Images PMID:8223487

Waterham, H R; Titorenko, V I; Swaving, G J; Harder, W; Veenhuis, M

1993-01-01

59

Medical and Orthopaedic Conditions in Special Olympics Athletes  

PubMed Central

Objective: Many Special Olympics athletes experience hypokinetic diseases and comorbid conditions that may predispose them to serious injuries during physical activity. A clear understanding of these conditions and diseases may assist health care professionals in preventing further distress and managing the injuries sustained by these athletes. Such diseases and conditions include overweight and obesity, diabetes, vision problems, seizure disorders, and Down syndrome, which is often associated with atlantoaxial instability. Data Sources: MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, and Special Olympics information sources for the years 1990–2000 using the key terms Special Olympics, mental retardation, comorbidity, Down syndrome, hypokinetic diseases, and physical activity were searched. Data Synthesis: A basic review of hypokinetic diseases and comorbid conditions prepares health care professionals for working with people with mental retardation. Conclusions and Recommendations: Health care volunteers at Special Olympics events treat athletes with mental retardation who may also have some of the comorbid conditions and hypokinetic diseases observed commonly in this population. Moreover, many of these conditions and diseases are typical in athletes without mental retardation. Athletic trainers should be familiar with these conditions and diseases but should review the unique conditions and prescription medications commonly found in the Special Olympics population before providing medical services for these athletes. PMID:16404438

2001-01-01

60

[Psychological factors affecting medical conditions--a method of measurement].  

PubMed

Improving the way of diagnosing diseases is reflected in changes which are being introduced into the existing systems of classifications. Researchers aim to create such a system that will be free of assumptions that are controversial and difficult to approve on the medical basis. Currently completed works associated with the preparation and introduced the DSM-5, in which they prepared criteria for the assessment psychological factors affecting medical conditions and their method of measurement. An interview which is presented in this article has been created for the evaluation of those groups of syndromes and has been translated into the Polish language. PMID:25344974

Basi?ska, Malgorzata A; Wo?niewicz, Agnieszka

2014-01-01

61

Impact of Pre-Existing Immunity on Gene Transfer to Nonhuman Primate Liver with Adeno-Associated Virus 8 Vectors  

PubMed Central

Abstract Vectors based on the primate-derived adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) are being evaluated in preclinical and clinical models. Natural infections with related AAVs activate memory B cells that produce antibodies capable of modulating the efficacy and safety of the vector. We have evaluated the biology of AAV8 gene transfer in macaque liver, with a focus on assessing the impact of pre-existing humoral immunity. Twenty-one macaques with various levels of AAV neutralizing antibody (NAb) were injected intravenously with AAV8 vector expressing green fluorescent protein. Pre-existing antibody titers in excess of 1:10 substantially diminished hepatocyte transduction that, in the absence of NAbs, was highly efficient. Vector-specific NAb diminished liver deposition of genomes and unexpectedly increased genome distribution to the spleen. The majority of animals showed high-level and stable sequestration of vector capsid protein by follicular dendritic cells of splenic germinal centers. These studies illustrate how natural immunity to a virus that is related to a vector can impact the efficacy and potential safety of in vivo gene therapy. We propose to use the in vitro transduction inhibition assay to evaluate research subjects before gene therapy and to preclude from systemic AAV8 trials those that have titers in excess of 1:10. PMID:21476868

Wang, Lili; Calcedo, Roberto; Bell, Peter; Lin, Jianping; Grant, Rebecca L; Siegel, Don L

2011-01-01

62

Protective efficacy of a single immunization with capripoxvirus-vectored recombinant peste des petits ruminants vaccines in presence of pre-existing immunity.  

PubMed

Sheeppox, goatpox and peste des petits ruminants (PPR) are highly contagious ruminant diseases widely distributed in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Capripoxvirus (CPV)-vectored recombinant PPR vaccines (rCPV-PPR vaccines), which have been developed and shown to protect against both Capripox (CP) and PPR, would be critical tools in the control of these important diseases. In most parts of the world, these disease distributions overlap each other leaving concerns about the potential impact that pre-existing immunity against either disease may have on the protective efficacy of these bivalent rCPV-PPR vaccines. Currently, this question has not been indisputably addressed. Therefore, we undertook this study, under experimental conditions designed for the context of mass vaccination campaigns of small ruminants, using the two CPV recombinants (Kenya sheep-1 (KS-1) strain-based constructs) developed previously in our laboratory. Pre-existing immunity was first induced by immunization either with an attenuated CPV vaccine strain (KS-1) or the attenuated PPRV vaccine strain (Nigeria 75/1) and animals were thereafter inoculated once subcutaneously with a mixture of CPV recombinants expressing either the hemagglutinin (H) or the fusion (F) protein gene of PPRV (10(3) TCID50/animal of each). Finally, these animals were challenged with a virulent CPV strain followed by a virulent PPRV strain 3 weeks later. Our study demonstrated full protection against CP for vaccinated animals with prior exposure to PPRV and a partial protection against PPR for vaccinated animals with prior exposure to CPV. The latter animals exhibited a mild clinical form of PPR and did not show any post-challenge anamnestic neutralizing antibody response against PPRV. The implications of these results are discussed herein and suggestions made for future research regarding the development of CPV-vectored vaccines. PMID:24837763

Caufour, Philippe; Rufael, Tesfaye; Lamien, Charles Euloge; Lancelot, Renaud; Kidane, Menbere; Awel, Dino; Sertse, Tefera; Kwiatek, Olivier; Libeau, Geneviève; Sahle, Mesfin; Diallo, Adama; Albina, Emmanuel

2014-06-24

63

42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415...Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule...the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two...

2013-10-01

64

42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415...Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule...the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two...

2012-10-01

65

Sleep Problems in Children and Adolescents with Common Medical Conditions  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Sleep is critically important to children’s health and well-being. Untreated sleep disturbances and sleep disorders pose significant adverse daytime consequences and place children at considerable risk for poor health outcomes. Sleep disturbances occur at a greater frequency in children with acute and chronic medical conditions compared to otherwise healthy peers. Sleep disturbances in medically ill children can be associated with sleep disorders (e.g., sleep disordered breathing, restless leg syndrome), co-morbid with acute and chronic conditions (e.g., asthma, arthritis, cancer), or secondary to underlying disease-related mechanisms (e.g. airway restriction, inflammation) treatment regimens, or hospitalization. Clinical management should include a multidisciplinary approach with particular emphasis on routine, regular sleep assessments and prevention of daytime consequences and promotion of healthy sleep habits and health outcomes. PMID:21600350

Lewandowski, Amy S.; Ward, Teresa M.; Palermo, Tonya M.

2011-01-01

66

The Gibberellin perception system evolved to regulate a pre-existing GAMYB-mediated system during land plant evolution.  

PubMed

Gibberellin (GA) controls pollen development in flowering plants via the GAMYB transcription factor. Here we show that GAMYB is conserved in Selaginella moellendorffii (lycophyte) and Physcomitrella patens (moss), although the former contains the GA signalling pathway, the latter does not. In the lycophyte, GA treatment promotes the outer wall development on microspores, whereas treatment with GA biosynthesis inhibitors disturbs its development. Contrary, in the moss, GAMYB homologue knockouts also produce abnormal spores that resemble Selaginella microspores treated with GA biosynthesis inhibitors and pollen grains of rice gamyb mutant. Moreover, the knockouts fail to develop male organs, instead ectopically forming female organs. Thus, before the establishment of the GA signalling pathway, basal land plants, including mosses, contained a GAMYB-based system for spore and sexual organ development. Subsequently, during the evolution from mosses to basal vascular plants including lycophytes, GA signalling might have merged to regulate this pre-existing GAMYB-based system. PMID:22109518

Aya, Koichiro; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Matsuoka, Makoto

2011-01-01

67

Is the fault core-damage zone model representative of seismogenic faults? Pre-existing anisotropies and fault zone complexity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismogenic fault zones are often described in terms of a "fault core" surrounded by an intensely fractured "damage zone". This useful framework has found broad application in many fault zone studies (hydraulic potential, etc.). However, we found it difficult to apply this model in the case of several seismogenic faults zones hosted in the continental crust of the Italian Southern Alps. As an example, we present quantitative field data (e.g. roughness analysis, fracture density profiles) derived from various digital mapping methods (LiDAR, RTK-GPS, high resolution photogrammetry) to illustrate two case studies of seismogenic strike-slip faults: 1) The Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ) hosted in granitoids and exhumed from 8-10 km depth, and, 2) The Borcola Pass Fault Zone (BPFZ) hosted in dolostones and exhumed from 1.5-2 km depth. Ancient seismicity is corroborated by the occurrence of pseudotachylytes (GLFZ) and fluidized cataclasites (BPFZ). Both of the studied fault zones accommodated < 2 km of displacement. Despite the large differences in exhumation depth and host rock lithology, both fault zones: 1) are up to several hundreds of meters thick; 2) consist of tens to hundreds of sub-parallel fault strands, connected by a network of minor faults and fractures; 3) most significantly, lack a well-defined fault core that accommodated a majority of fault displacement. Instead, displacement was distributed amongst the networks of minor faults and fractures. The above similarities can be explained by the fact that both fault zones developed in rock volumes containing strong pre-existing anisotropies: magmatic cooling joints sets spaced 2-5 m apart for the GLFZ, regional joint sets spaced < 1 m apart for the BPFZ. During initial development of both fault zones, the pre-existing anisotropies were diffusely reactivated over wide volumes. This was associated in both cases with extensive fluid flow, and sealing/hardening of the pre-existing anisotropies by syn-deformation mineral precipitation. Pre-existing anisotropies are a common occurrence in the continental crust (e.g. joints, bedding surfaces, old fault zones, cleavage surfaces): fault zones developing in such areas will be highly segmented and discontinuous, particularly during the early stages of fault evolution (first few kilometers of displacement?). We speculate that the absence of a leading fault may result in long duration earthquake sequences with several main shocks, especially if accompanied by fluid migration. This is the case for the L'Aquila 2008-2009 seismic sequence (mainshock Mw 6.3) occurring within a fault zone with ~1.5 km total displacement cutting limestones and dolostones (Chiaraluce et al. 2011). High-resolution aftershock locations suggest the re-activation of both optimally and non-optimally oriented small fault segments over a total fault zone width of ~1 km. The magnitude of aftershocks is consistent with activation of fault strands tens to hundreds of meters in length for a period of several months following the mainshocks.

Di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A.; Fondriest, M.; Bistacchi, A.; Nielsen, S. B.; Mitchell, T. M.; Mittempergher, S.; Griffith, W. A.

2012-12-01

68

Aggravation of Pre-Existing Atrioventricular Block, Wenckebach Type, Provoked by Application of X-Ray Contrast Medium  

SciTech Connect

Background. Significant bradycardia followed by cardiac arrest related to single bolus administration of X-ray contrast medium into a peripheral artery has not, to our knowledge, been described in the literature. Methods and Results. While performing a percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of the left superficial femoral artery in a 68-year old patient with a pre-existing atrioventricular (AV) block, Wenckebach type, he developed an AV block III after a single bolus injection of intra-arterial X-ray contrast medium. Conclusion. We believe that application of contrast medium causes a transitory ischemia in the obstructed vessel and therefore elevation of endogenous adenosine. In the case of a previously damaged AV node this elevation of endogenous adenosine may be responsible for the development of a short period of third-degree AV block.

Brodmann, Marianne, E-mail: marianne.brodmann@meduni-graz.at; Seinost, Gerald [Medizinische Universitaet Graz, Division of Angiology, Department of Internal Medicine (Austria); Stark, Gerhard [LKH Deutschlandsberg, Department of Internal Medicine (Austria); Pilger, Ernst [Medizinische Universitaet Graz, Division of Angiology, Department of Internal Medicine (Austria)

2006-12-15

69

Limbal relaxing incision during cataract extraction versus photoastigmatic keratectomy after cataract extraction in controlling pre-existing corneal astigmatism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The techniques of limbal relaxing incision (LRI) and photoastigmatic keratectomy (PAK) are both effective methods for correcting\\u000a pre-existing astigmatism with cataract extraction, but no previous study has directly compared them.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Purpose  To compare the effects of limbal relaxing incision (LRI) and photoastigmatic keratectomy (PAK) on preoperative astigmatism\\u000a and higher-order aberrations (HOAs) in eyes undergoing cataract surgery.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Setting  Kitasato University Hospital, Japan.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients

Sameh Fouda; Kazutaka Kamiya; Daisuke Aizawa; Kimiya Shimizu

2010-01-01

70

Omentin-1 Is Decreased in Maternal Plasma, Placenta and Adipose Tissue of Women with Pre-Existing Obesity  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this study was to determine (i) the effect of maternal obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on (i) the circulating levels of omentin-1 in cord and maternal plasma, and (ii) gene expression and release of omentin-1 from human placenta and adipose tissue. The effect of pregnancy on circulating omentin-1 levels was also determined. Design Omentin-1 levels were measured in maternal and cord plasma from obese and non-obese normal glucose tolerant women (NGT; n?=?44) and women with GDM (n?=?39) at the time of term elective Caesarean section. Placenta and adipose tissue expression and release of omentin-1 was measured from 22 NGT and 22 GDM women collected at the time of term elective Caesarean section. Omentin-1 levels were also measured in maternal plasma from 13 NGT women at 11 and 28 weeks gestation and 7 weeks postpartum. Results Maternal obesity was associated with significantly lower omentin-1 levels in maternal plasma; however, there was no effect of maternal obesity on cord omentin levels. Omentin-1 gene expression was lower in placenta and adipose tissue obtained from women with pre-existing obesity. In addition to this, adipose tissue release of omentin-1 was significantly lower from obese pregnant women. Omentin-1 levels were significantly lower in non-obese GDM compared to non-obese NGT women. However, there was no difference in omentin-1 levels between obese NGT and obese GDM women. There was no effect of GDM on cord omentin levels, and placental and adipose tissue omentin-1 expression. Maternal omentin-1 levels were negatively correlated with fetal birthweight and fetal ponderal index. Conclusions The data presented in this study demonstrate that pre-existing maternal obesity is associated with lower omentin-1 expression in placenta, adipose tissue and maternal plasma. Alteration in omentin-1 in pregnancy may influence the development of metabolic disorders in offspring later in life. PMID:22952622

Barker, Gillian; Lim, Ratana; Georgiou, Harry M.; Lappas, Martha

2012-01-01

71

The dual PPAR?/? agonist tesaglitazar blocks progression of pre-existing atherosclerosis in APOE*3Leiden.CETP transgenic mice  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose: We have evaluated the effects of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)?/? agonist on the progression of pre-existing atherosclerotic lesions in APOE*3Leiden.cholesteryl ester transfer protein (E3L.CETP) transgenic mice. Experimental approach E3L.CETP mice were fed a high-cholesterol diet for 11 weeks to induce atherosclerosis, followed by a low-cholesterol diet for 4 weeks to obtain a lower plasma total cholesterol level of ?10 mmol·L?1. Mice were divided into three groups, which were either killed before (baseline) or after an 8 week treatment period with low-cholesterol diet without (control) or with the PPAR?/? agonist tesaglitazar (10 µg·kg?1·day?1). Atherosclerosis was assessed in the aortic root. Key results: Treatment with tesaglitazar significantly reduced plasma triglycerides, total cholesterol, CETP mass and CETP activity, and increased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. At baseline, substantial atherosclerosis had developed. During the 8 week low-cholesterol diet, atherosclerosis progressed in the control group with respect to lesion area and severity, whereas tesaglitazar inhibited lesion progression during this period. Tesaglitazar reduced vessel wall inflammation, as reflected by decreased monocyte adhesion and macrophage area, and modified lesions to a more stabilized phenotype, with increased smooth muscle cell content in the cap and collagen content. Conclusions and implications: Dual PPAR?/? agonism with tesaglitazar markedly improved the atherogenic triad by reducing triglycerides and very low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and increasing high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and additionally reduced cholesterol-induced vessel wall activation. These actions resulted in complete inhibition of progression and stabilization of pre-existing atherosclerotic lesions in E3L.CETP mice. PMID:19220285

van der Hoorn, JWA; Jukema, JW; Havekes, LM; Lundholm, E; Camejo, G; Rensen, PCN; Princen, HMG

2009-01-01

72

The prevalence of chronic conditions and medical expenditures of the elderly by chronic condition indicator (CCI)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to understand the prevalence of chronic conditions and medical expenditures of the elderly for health care planning development of chronic conditions. This research is based on the representative sample (N=114,873) of seniors over 65 years nationwide. The CCI by the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), and clinical classifications software (CCS) were

Mei-ju Chi; Cheng-yi Lee; Shwu-chong Wu

2011-01-01

73

The effects of aerobic- versus strength-training on body image among young women with pre-existing body image concerns.  

PubMed

This experiment compared the effects of aerobic-training (AT) versus strength-training (ST) on body image among young women with pre-existing body image concerns. Theory-based correlates of body image change were also examined. Participants were 46 women (M age=21.5 years), randomly assigned to an 8-week AT or ST intervention consisting of supervised exercise 3 days/week. Multidimensional measures of body image were administered pre- and post-intervention, along with measures of physical fitness, perceived fitness, and exercise self-efficacy. Women in the AT condition reported greater reductions in social physique anxiety (p=.001) and tended to report greater improvements in appearance evaluation (p=.06) than women in the ST condition. Changes in perceived fatness, perceived aerobic endurance and aerobic self-efficacy were significantly correlated with body image change (ps<.003). Results provide direction for prescribing exercise to improve body image and advancing theory to account for the effects of exercise. PMID:24958656

Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Strong, Heather A; Arent, Shawn M; Bray, Steven R; Bassett-Gunter, Rebecca L

2014-06-01

74

The role of pre-existing tectonic structures and magma chamber shape on the geometry of resurgent blocks: Analogue models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A set of analogue models has been carried out to understand the role of an asymmetric magma chamber on the resurgence-related deformation of a previously deformed crustal sector. The results are then compared with those of similar experiments, previously performed using a symmetric magma chamber. Two lines of experiments were performed to simulate resurgence in an area with a simple graben-like structure and resurgence in a caldera that collapsed within the previously generated graben-like structure. On the basis of commonly accepted scaling laws, we used dry-quartz sand to simulate the brittle behaviour of the crust and Newtonian silicone to simulate the ductile behaviour of the intruding magma. An asymmetric shape of the magma chamber was simulated by moulding the upper surface of the silicone. The resulting empty space was then filled with sand. The results of the asymmetric-resurgence experiments are similar to those obtained with symmetrically shaped silicone. In the sample with a simple graben-like structure, resurgence occurs through the formation of a discrete number of differentially displaced blocks. The most uplifted portion of the deformed depression floor is affected by newly formed, high-angle, inward-dipping reverse ring-faults. The least uplifted portion of the caldera is affected by normal faults with similar orientation, either newly formed or resulting from reactivation of the pre-existing graben faults. This asymmetric block resurgence is also observed in experiments performed with a previous caldera collapse. In this case, the caldera-collapse-related reverse ring-fault is completely erased along the shortened side, and enhances the effect of the extensional faults on the opposite side, so facilitating the intrusion of the silicone. The most uplifted sector, due to an asymmetrically shaped intrusion, is always in correspondence of the thickest overburden. These results suggest that the stress field induced by resurgence is likely dictated by the geometry of the intruding magma body, and the related deformation is partially controlled by pre-existing tectonic and/or volcano-tectonic structures.

Marotta, Enrica; de Vita, Sandro

2014-02-01

75

Influence of Pre-Existing Structure on Sill Geometry in the San Rafael Volcanic Field, Central Utah  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sills have been hypothesized to be formed at rigidity contrasts between layers or at the level of neutral buoyancy of the intruding magma body. Recent field observations of sills in the San Rafael Volcanic Field (SRVF) in central Utah conflict with both of these hypotheses, suggesting that something else may control the distribution of sills in the crust. This study examines the role pre-existing structure plays in determining the distribution and geometry of sills in the SRVF. Primarily, sills will be thickest in the hinge zone of synclines and thinnest towards the limbs. The SRVF consists of a series of dikes, conduits and sills intruded into the J-Kr strata of the western Colorado Plateau. The structure of the SRVF consists of a series of broad wavelength folds truncated by a major thrust fault as determined by a gravity profile across structure. There are several sill complexes in the area whose geometry and relationships with the host rock are unaccounted for by these hypotheses. At large scale, sills follow structural trends in the host rock. Sills are either oriented with regional dips, or follow the trends of folds in the area. One sill, in particular, intruded into a syncline and thins towards the limb of the fold. However, sills behave differently at smaller spatial scales. The smaller scale behavior is incongruent with sills forming at rigidity contrasts or at the level of neutral buoyancy. First, sills form tiered structures intruding at multiple stratigraphic levels within the field area, and in limited geographic extent. Geophysical surveys confirm tiered sill structures in the subsurface. Individual sills also change stratigraphic levels, sometimes, very abruptly, moving vertically up to 30 meters in short horizontal distances. Sills also form networks in anastomosing structures that cut across stratigraphy at varying angles. These observations suggest that neither the level of neutral buoyancy nor the rigidity contrasts between layers play a role in determining the distribution of sills in the crust. Broadly, sills follow pre-existing structure, but at smaller scales, sills behave drastically different, with little regard to bedding planes.

Ferwerda, B.; Wetmore, P. H.; Connor, C.; Kruse, S. E.; Kiyosugi, K.; Kiflu, H. G.

2011-12-01

76

Distribution of long-term Quaternary Deformation and Correlation with Pre-existing Tectonic Structures in the Central US  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The processes governing earthquakes in intraplate regions are still poorly understood, mostly because the very occurrence of such earthquakes violates plate tectonic theory, recurrence intervals are long, and seismicity occurs in quiescent areas where structures are buried/unexposed. In the central US, most of the seismicity is concentrated along the faults of the New Madrid seismic zone, located in the heart of the Mississippi embayment. However, the clash between the high level of present, historical and prehistorical seismicity, the geodetic vectors, and the puzzling lack of deformation at the surface and in the subsurface suggests that the New Madrid seismic zone might have not been the only fault system active in the region. Indeed, evidence is mounting that Quaternary deformation has been accommodated along structures that are presently aseismic. If seismicity has been migrating throughout the central US during the Quaternary, then what controls the location of seismicity? Here we present the results of ~950 km marine and land high-resolution seismic reflection data acquired along and near the Mississippi River in the Mississippi embayment between 2008 and 2011. The data clearly document Quaternary deformation within the New Madrid seismic zone and at 3 locations well beyond the seismically active region, with displacement of all the unconsolidated sedimentary units from the top of the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks to the base of the Quaternary river alluvium. Beside documenting Quaternary deformation in the region, perhaps one of the most important results of the ~950 km-long seismic survey is that deformation is not uniformly distributed throughout the profile, but is focused along distinct structures, which spatially coincide with the margin of the failed Paleozoic Reelfoot Rift and with the southern margin of the Proterozoic Laurentian continent, marked in this region by the Alabama-Oklahoma transform fault. This spatial correlation indicates a tectonic control, possibly imposed by pre-existing structures, which are capable of concentrating strain and stress and localizing intraplate deformation. Surprisingly, no Quaternary deformation is detected across the buried Paleozoic Ouachita orogenic belt, indicating that under the same stress field, not all the pre-existing structures appear to be capable of focusing deformation.

Magnani, M.; McIntosh, K. D.; Guo, L.; Hao, Y.

2012-12-01

77

Prior medical conditions and the risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.  

PubMed

Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is believed to be a complex disease in which multiple exogenous and genetic factors interact to cause motor neuron degeneration. Elucidating the association between medical conditions prior to the first symptoms of ALS could lend support to the theory that specific subpopulations are at risk of developing ALS and provide new insight into shared pathogenic mechanisms. We performed a population-based case-control study in the Netherlands, including 722 sporadic ALS patients and 2,268 age and gender matched controls. Data on medical conditions and use of medication were obtained through a structured questionnaire. Multivariate analyses showed that hypercholesterolemia (OR 0.76, 95 % CI 0.63-0.92, P = 0.006), the use of statins (OR 0.45, 95 % CI 0.35-0.59, P = 1.86 × 10(-9)) or immunosuppressive drugs (OR 0.26, 95 % CI 0.08-0.86, P = 0.03) were associated with a decreased risk of ALS. Head trauma was associated with an increased ALS susceptibility (OR 1.95, 95 % CI 1.11-3.43, P = 0.02). No association was found with autoimmune diseases, cancer, psychiatric disorders or cardiovascular diseases, or survival. The lower frequency of hypercholesterolemia and less use of statins in ALS patients indicate a favorable lipid profile prior to symptom onset in at least a subpopulation of ALS. Prior head trauma is a risk factor for ALS and the significantly lower use of immunosuppressive drugs in ALS patients could suggest a protective effect. The identification of specific subpopulations at risk for ALS may provide clues towards possible pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25059395

Seelen, Meinie; van Doormaal, Perry T C; Visser, Anne E; Huisman, Mark H B; Roozekrans, Margot H J; de Jong, Sonja W; van der Kooi, Anneke J; de Visser, Marianne; Voermans, Nicol C; Veldink, Jan H; van den Berg, Leonard H

2014-10-01

78

42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...medical director. The medical director must be a doctor of medicine or osteopathy who is an employee, or is under contract with the...services, the contract must specify the physician who assumes the medical director responsibilities...

2013-10-01

79

42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...medical director. The medical director must be a doctor of medicine or osteopathy who is an employee, or is under contract with the...services, the contract must specify the physician who assumes the medical director responsibilities...

2010-10-01

80

42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...medical director. The medical director must be a doctor of medicine or osteopathy who is an employee, or is under contract with the...services, the contract must specify the physician who assumes the medical director responsibilities...

2011-10-01

81

42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...medical director. The medical director must be a doctor of medicine or osteopathy who is an employee, or is under contract with the...services, the contract must specify the physician who assumes the medical director responsibilities...

2012-10-01

82

Office of the Vice-President, Finance and Finance Commission FINANCIAL SUBSIDY MEDICAL CONDITION FORM  

E-print Network

be completed by a physician in a relevant medical field to the medical condition listed. This document Office of the Vice-President, Finance and Finance Commission FINANCIAL SUBSIDY MEDICAL CONDITION FORM Use this form to indicate an applicant or someone in the care of the applicant has a medical

Pulfrey, David L.

83

The Role of Pre-Existing Disturbances in the Effect of Marine Reserves on Coastal Ecosystems: A Modelling Approach  

PubMed Central

We have used an end-to-end ecosystem model to explore responses over 30 years to coastal no-take reserves covering up to 6% of the fifty thousand square kilometres of continental shelf and slope off the coast of New South Wales (Australia). The model is based on the Atlantis framework, which includes a deterministic, spatially resolved three-dimensional biophysical model that tracks nutrient flows through key biological groups, as well as extraction by a range of fisheries. The model results support previous empirical studies in finding clear benefits of reserves to top predators such as sharks and rays throughout the region, while also showing how many of their major prey groups (including commercial species) experienced significant declines. It was found that the net impact of marine reserves was dependent on the pre-existing levels of disturbance (i.e. fishing pressure), and to a lesser extent on the size of the marine reserves. The high fishing scenario resulted in a strongly perturbed system, where the introduction of marine reserves had clear and mostly direct effects on biomass and functional biodiversity. However, under the lower fishing pressure scenario, the introduction of marine reserves caused both direct positive effects, mainly on shark groups, and indirect negative effects through trophic cascades. Our study illustrates the need to carefully align the design and implementation of marine reserves with policy and management objectives. Trade-offs may exist not only between fisheries and conservation objectives, but also among conservation objectives. PMID:23593432

Savina, Marie; Condie, Scott A.; Fulton, Elizabeth A.

2013-01-01

84

Region-Specific Integration of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neuronal Precursors into a Pre-Existing Neuronal Circuit  

PubMed Central

Enduring reorganization is accepted as a fundamental process of adult neural plasticity. The most dramatic example of this reorganization is the birth and continuously occurring incorporation of new neurons into the pre-existing network of the adult mammalian hippocampus. Based on this phenomenon we transplanted murine embryonic stem (ES)-cell derived neuronal precursors (ESNPs) into murine organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHC) and examined their integration. Using a precise quantitative morphological analysis combined with a detailed electrophysiology, we show a region-specific morphological integration of transplanted ESNPs into different subfields of the hippocampal tissue, resulting in pyramidal neuron-like embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs) in the Cornu Ammonis (CA1 and CA3) and granule neuron-like ESNs in the dentate gyrus (DG), respectively. Subregion specific structural maturation was accompanied by the development of dendritic spines and the generation of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). This cell type specific development does not depend upon NMDA-receptor-dependent synaptic transmission. The presented integration approach was further used to determine the cell-autonomous function of the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75 (P75NTR), as a possible negative regulator of ESN integration. By this means we used p75NTR-deficient ESNPs to study their integration into a WT organotypic environment. We show here that p75NTR is not necessary for integration per se but plays a suppressing role in dendritic development. PMID:23840491

Neuser, Franziska; Polack, Martin; Annaheim, Christine; Tucker, Kerry L.; Korte, Martin

2013-01-01

85

Characteristics of Memory B Cells Elicited by a Highly Efficacious HPV Vaccine in Subjects with No Pre-existing Immunity.  

PubMed

Licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines provide near complete protection against the types of HPV that most commonly cause anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers (HPV 16 and 18) when administered to individuals naive to these types. These vaccines, like most other prophylactic vaccines, appear to protect by generating antibodies. However, almost nothing is known about the immunological memory that forms following HPV vaccination, which is required for long-term immunity. Here, we have identified and isolated HPV 16-specific memory B cells from female adolescents and young women who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in the absence of pre-existing immunity, using fluorescently conjugated HPV 16 pseudoviruses to label antigen receptors on the surface of memory B cells. Antibodies cloned and expressed from these singly sorted HPV 16-pseudovirus labeled memory B cells were predominantly IgG (>IgA>IgM), utilized diverse variable genes, and potently neutralized HPV 16 pseudoviruses in vitro despite possessing only average levels of somatic mutation. These findings suggest that the quadrivalent HPV vaccine provides an excellent model for studying the development of B cell memory; and, in the context of what is known about memory B cells elicited by influenza vaccination/infection, HIV-1 infection, or tetanus toxoid vaccination, indicates that extensive somatic hypermutation is not required to achieve potent vaccine-specific neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:25330199

Scherer, Erin M; Smith, Robin A; Simonich, Cassandra A; Niyonzima, Nixon; Carter, Joseph J; Galloway, Denise A

2014-10-01

86

Characteristics of Memory B Cells Elicited by a Highly Efficacious HPV Vaccine in Subjects with No Pre-existing Immunity  

PubMed Central

Licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines provide near complete protection against the types of HPV that most commonly cause anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers (HPV 16 and 18) when administered to individuals naive to these types. These vaccines, like most other prophylactic vaccines, appear to protect by generating antibodies. However, almost nothing is known about the immunological memory that forms following HPV vaccination, which is required for long-term immunity. Here, we have identified and isolated HPV 16-specific memory B cells from female adolescents and young women who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in the absence of pre-existing immunity, using fluorescently conjugated HPV 16 pseudoviruses to label antigen receptors on the surface of memory B cells. Antibodies cloned and expressed from these singly sorted HPV 16-pseudovirus labeled memory B cells were predominantly IgG (>IgA>IgM), utilized diverse variable genes, and potently neutralized HPV 16 pseudoviruses in vitro despite possessing only average levels of somatic mutation. These findings suggest that the quadrivalent HPV vaccine provides an excellent model for studying the development of B cell memory; and, in the context of what is known about memory B cells elicited by influenza vaccination/infection, HIV-1 infection, or tetanus toxoid vaccination, indicates that extensive somatic hypermutation is not required to achieve potent vaccine-specific neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:25330199

Scherer, Erin M.; Smith, Robin A.; Simonich, Cassandra A.; Niyonzima, Nixon; Carter, Joseph J.; Galloway, Denise A.

2014-01-01

87

Nasal Delivery of an Adenovirus-Based Vaccine Bypasses Pre-Existing Immunity to the Vaccine Carrier and Improves the Immune Response in Mice  

PubMed Central

Pre-existing immunity to human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is common in the general population. Bypassing pre-existing immunity could maximize Ad5 vaccine efficacy. Vaccination by the intramuscular (I.M.), nasal (I.N.) or oral (P.O.) route with Ad5 expressing Ebola Zaire glycoprotein (Ad5-ZGP) fully protected naïve mice against lethal challenge with Ebola. In the presence of pre-existing immunity, only mice vaccinated I.N. survived. The frequency of IFN-?+ CD8+ T cells was reduced by 80% and by 15% in animals vaccinated by the I.M. and P.O. routes respectively. Neutralizing antibodies could not be detected in serum from either treatment group. Pre-existing immunity did not compromise the frequency of IFN-?+ CD8+ T cells (3.9±1% naïve vs. 3.6±1% pre-existing immunity, PEI) nor anti-Ebola neutralizing antibody (NAB, 40±10 reciprocal dilution, both groups). The number of INF-?+ CD8+ cells detected in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) after I.N. immunization was not compromised by pre-existing immunity to Ad5 (146±14, naïve vs. 120±16 SFC/million MNCs, PEI). However, pre-existing immunity reduced NAB levels in BAL by ?25% in this group. To improve the immune response after oral vaccination, the Ad5-based vaccine was PEGylated. Mice given the modified vaccine did not survive challenge and had reduced levels of IFN-?+ CD8+ T cells 10 days after administration (0.3±0.3% PEG vs. 1.7±0.5% unmodified). PEGylation did increase NAB levels 2-fold. These results provide some insight about the degree of T and B cell mediated immunity necessary for protection against Ebola virus and suggest that modification of the virus capsid can influence the type of immune response elicited by an Ad5-based vaccine. PMID:18958172

Croyle, Maria A.; Patel, Ami; Tran, Kaylie N.; Gray, Michael; Zhang, Yi; Strong, James E.; Feldmann, Heinz; Kobinger, Gary P.

2008-01-01

88

Nasal delivery of an adenovirus-based vaccine bypasses pre-existing immunity to the vaccine carrier and improves the immune response in mice.  

PubMed

Pre-existing immunity to human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is common in the general population. Bypassing pre-existing immunity could maximize Ad5 vaccine efficacy. Vaccination by the intramuscular (I.M.), nasal (I.N.) or oral (P.O.) route with Ad5 expressing Ebola Zaire glycoprotein (Ad5-ZGP) fully protected naïve mice against lethal challenge with Ebola. In the presence of pre-existing immunity, only mice vaccinated I.N. survived. The frequency of IFN-gamma+ CD8+ T cells was reduced by 80% and by 15% in animals vaccinated by the I.M. and P.O. routes respectively. Neutralizing antibodies could not be detected in serum from either treatment group. Pre-existing immunity did not compromise the frequency of IFN-gamma+ CD8+ T cells (3.9+/-1% naïve vs. 3.6+/-1% pre-existing immunity, PEI) nor anti-Ebola neutralizing antibody (NAB, 40+/-10 reciprocal dilution, both groups). The number of INF-gamma+ CD8+ cells detected in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) after I.N. immunization was not compromised by pre-existing immunity to Ad5 (146+/-14, naïve vs. 120+/-16 SFC/million MNCs, PEI). However, pre-existing immunity reduced NAB levels in BAL by approximately 25% in this group. To improve the immune response after oral vaccination, the Ad5-based vaccine was PEGylated. Mice given the modified vaccine did not survive challenge and had reduced levels of IFN-gamma+ CD8+ T cells 10 days after administration (0.3+/-0.3% PEG vs. 1.7+/-0.5% unmodified). PEGylation did increase NAB levels 2-fold. These results provide some insight about the degree of T and B cell mediated immunity necessary for protection against Ebola virus and suggest that modification of the virus capsid can influence the type of immune response elicited by an Ad5-based vaccine. PMID:18958172

Croyle, Maria A; Patel, Ami; Tran, Kaylie N; Gray, Michael; Zhang, Yi; Strong, James E; Feldmann, Heinz; Kobinger, Gary P

2008-01-01

89

Nasal Delivery of an Adenovirus-Based Vaccine Bypasses Pre-Existing Immunity to the Vaccine Carrier and Improves the Immune Response in Mice  

E-print Network

Pre-existing immunity to human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is common in the general population. Bypassing pre-existing immunity could maximize Ad5 vaccine efficacy. Vaccination by the intramuscular (I.M.), nasal (I.N.) or oral (P.O.) route with Ad5 expressing Ebola Zaire glycoprotein (Ad5-ZGP) fully protected naïve mice against lethal challenge with Ebola. In the presence of pre-existing immunity, only mice vaccinated I.N. survived. The frequency of IFN-c+ CD8+ T cells was reduced by 80 % and by 15 % in animals vaccinated by the I.M. and P.O. routes respectively. Neutralizing antibodies could not be detected in serum from either treatment group. Pre-existing immunity did not compromise the frequency of IFN-c+ CD8+ T cells (3.961 % naïve vs. 3.661 % pre-existing immunity, PEI) nor anti-Ebola neutralizing antibody (NAB, 40610 reciprocal dilution, both groups). The number of INF-c+ CD8+ cells detected in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) after I.N. immunization was not compromised by pre-existing immunity to Ad5 (146614, naïve vs. 120616 SFC/million MNCs, PEI). However, pre-existing immunity reduced NAB levels in BAL by,25 % in this group. To improve the immune response after oral vaccination, the Ad5-based vaccine was PEGylated. Mice given the modified vaccine did not survive challenge and had reduced levels of IFN-c+ CD8+ T cells 10 days after administration (0.360.3 % PEG vs. 1.760.5 % unmodified). PEGylation did

Maria A. Croyle; Ami Patel; Kaylie N. Tran; Michael Gray; Yi Zhang; James E. Strong

90

Evaluating Drivers Licensed with Medical Conditions in Utah, 1992-1996.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Utah License Division has implemented a program since 1979 that restricts drivers with medical conditions by functional ability category (medical condition) according to their functional ability level. This study compares the citation, all crash, and ...

E. Diller, L. Cook, D. Leonard, J. Reading, J. M. Dean, D. Vernon

1999-01-01

91

Pre-existing cirrhosis is associated with increased mortality of traumatic patients: Analysis of cases from a trauma center in East China  

PubMed Central

AIM: To determine the impact of cirrhosis on trauma patients and define the factors predicting death. METHODS: The data on patients admitted to the trauma center from January 2000-2005 were studied retrospectively. The clinical variables were recorded and compared to identify the factors differentiating cirrhotic trauma survivors from non survivors. Child's classification criteria were derived from the reviewed charts of cirrhotic trauma patients to evaluate their predictive value in cirrhotic trauma. Trauma registry was also used to generate a trauma control group by matching for age, sex, abbreviated injury score (AIS) over the same period of time. The outcome variables compared were mortality rate, time of ICU and hospital stay. Results were expressed as mean ± SD. These data were analyzed by SPSS.11.0 statistical software. Univariate analysis was performed to identify significant medical factors for survivor and non survivors subjected to chi-square test. Fisher's exact test and Student's t test were performed to determine the statistical difference between cirrhotic and control groups. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Poor prognosis of traum patients was associated with one or more of the following findings: ascitcs, hyperbilirubinemia (more than 2 mg/dL), hypoalbuminemia (less than 3.5 mg/dL), and prolonged prothrombin time (more than 12.5 seconds). Although Child's classification was used to predict the outcome in cirrhotic patients undergoing portacaval shunt procedures, no significant difference was found in mortality rate as a function of Child's classification. CONCLUSION: Cirrhosis is associated with a higher mortality, a longer time of ICU and hospital stay of trauma patients. It seems that treatment of trauma patients with pre-existing severe liver disease is a challenge to surgeons. PMID:17948942

Chen, Zuo-Bing; Ni, Lin-Mei; Gao, Yuan; Ding, Chen-Yan; Zhang, Yun; Zhao, Xue-Hong; Qiu, Yun-Qing

2007-01-01

92

Pre-existing Schistosoma japonicum infection alters the immune response to Plasmodium berghei infection in C57BL/6 mice  

PubMed Central

Background Since helminths and malaria parasites are often co-endemic, it is important to clarify the immunoregulatory mechanism that occurs during the process of co-infection. A previous study confirmed that dendritic cells (DCs) are involved in the establishment and regulation of the T-cell-mediated immune response to malaria infection. In the current study, distinct response profiles for splenic DCs and regulatory T cell (Treg) responses were assessed to evaluate the effects of a pre-existing Schistosoma japonicum infection on malaria infection. Methods Malaria parasitaemia, survival rate, brain histopathology and clinical experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) were assessed in both Plasmodium berghei ANKA-mono-infected and S. japonicum-P. berghei ANKA-co-infected mice. Cell surface/intracellular staining and flow cytometry were used to analyse the level of splenic DC subpopulations, toll-like receptors (TLRs), DC surface molecules, Tregs (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+), IFN-?/IL-10-secreting Tregs, and IFN-?+/IL-10+-Foxp3-CD4+ T cells. IFN-?, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 levels were determined in splenocyte supernatants using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The co-infected mice had significantly higher malaria parasitaemia, compared with the mono-infected mice, on days 2, 3, 7 and 8 after P. berghei ANKA infection. Mono-infected mice had a slightly lower survival rate, while clinical ECM symptoms, and brain pathology, were significantly more severe during the period of susceptibility to ECM. On days 5 and 8 post P. berghei ANKA infection, co-infected mice had significantly lower levels of CD11c+CD11b+, CD11c+CD45R/B220+, CD11c+TLR4+, CD11c+TLR9+, CD11c+MHCII+, CD11c+CD86+, IFN-?-secreting Tregs, and IFN-?+Foxp3-CD4+ T cells in single-cell suspensions of splenocytes when compared with P. berghei ANKA-mono-infected mice. Co-infected mice also had significantly lower levels of IFN-? and higher levels of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in splenocyte supernatants compared to mono-infected mice. There were no differences in the levels of IL-10-secreting Tregs or IL-10+Foxp3-CD4+ T cells between co-infected and mono-infected mice. Conclusions A Tregs-associated Th2 response plays an important role in protecting against ECM pathology. Pre-existing S. japonicum infection suppressed TLR ligand-induced DC maturation and had an anti-inflammatory effect during malaria infection not only by virtue of its ability to induce Th2 responses, but also by directly suppressing the ability of DC to produce pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:24034228

2013-01-01

93

14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

2010-01-01

94

14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

2012-01-01

95

14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...third-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or structural...

2012-01-01

96

14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...second-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or structural...

2013-01-01

97

14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...second-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or structural...

2012-01-01

98

14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

2013-01-01

99

14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

2013-01-01

100

14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.  

...standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

2014-01-01

101

14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.  

...standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

2014-01-01

102

14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.  

...standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control. (b) No other organic, functional, or...

2014-01-01

103

Swinburne University of Technology Disability / Medical Documentation Form Disability Services requires students to provide documentation of a disability or medical condition from a relevant professional, before  

E-print Network

requires students to provide documentation of a disability or medical condition from a relevant by Disability Services at Swinburne University to negotiate appropriate academic supports for students. Student impairment Physical Disability Mental Health Condition Learning Disability Neurological Condition Medical

Liley, David

104

Legal framework conditions for the reprocessing of medical devices.  

PubMed

The processing of single-use products is permissible pursuant to medical device law. This is apparent both from the wording of the German Law on Medical Devices and from the purpose and the objectives underpinning the legislative materials. The prerequisite for processing is, however, compliance with the the Joint Recommendation of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and the Prevention of Infection at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) and the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Products (BfArM).For medical devices in the category "critical C", the RKI/BfArM-recommendation provides that the processor's quality management system must be certified by a body accredited by the Central Authority of the Federal States for Health Protection with regard to Medicinal Products and Medical Devices (Zentralstelle der Länder für Gesundheitsschutz bei Arzneimitteln und Medizinprodukten, ZLG). The certification must be carried out in accordance with EN ISO 13485:2003+AC:2007.On April 4, 2008 the Federal Health Ministry (Bundesministerium für Gesundheit, BMG) presented a progress report on the processing of medical devices. The BMG concludes that the legal framework for the processing of medical devices is sufficient, and that a prohibition on the processing of single-use products is inappropriate. PMID:20204096

Großkopf, Volker; Jäkel, Christian

2008-01-01

105

Legal framework conditions for the reprocessing of medical devices  

PubMed Central

The processing of single-use products is permissible pursuant to medical device law. This is apparent both from the wording of the German Law on Medical Devices and from the purpose and the objectives underpinning the legislative materials. The prerequisite for processing is, however, compliance with the the Joint Recommendation of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and the Prevention of Infection at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) and the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Products (BfArM). For medical devices in the category “critical C”, the RKI/BfArM-recommendation provides that the processor’s quality management system must be certified by a body accredited by the Central Authority of the Federal States for Health Protection with regard to Medicinal Products and Medical Devices (Zentralstelle der Länder für Gesundheitsschutz bei Arzneimitteln und Medizinprodukten, ZLG). The certification must be carried out in accordance with EN ISO 13485:2003+AC:2007. On April 4, 2008 the Federal Health Ministry (Bundesministerium für Gesundheit, BMG) presented a progress report on the processing of medical devices. The BMG concludes that the legal framework for the processing of medical devices is sufficient, and that a prohibition on the processing of single-use products is inappropriate. PMID:20204096

Grosskopf, Volker; Jakel, Christian

2008-01-01

106

28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...National Cancer Institute can make a diagnosis of leukemia to a reasonable degree of medical certainty: (i) Bone marrow biopsy or aspirate report; (ii) Peripheral white blood cell differential count report; (iii) Autopsy report; (iv)...

2010-07-01

107

The role of friction and secondary flaws on deflection and re-initiation of hydraulic fractures at orthogonal pre-existing fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we explore the nature of plane-strain hydraulic fracture growth in the presence of pre-existing fractures such as joints without or with secondary flaws. The 2-D plane-strain fracture studied can be taken as a cross-section through the short dimensions of an elongated 3-D fracture or as an approximate representation of the leading edge of a 3-D fracture where

Xi Zhang; Robert G. Jeffrey

2006-01-01

108

The influence of pre-existing diabetes mellitus on the host immune response and outcome of pneumonia: analysis of two multicentre cohort studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAlthough diabetes mellitus is implicated in susceptibility to infection, the association of diabetes with the subsequent course and outcome is unclear.MethodsA retrospective analysis of two multicentre cohorts was carried out. The effect of pre-existing diabetes on the host immune response, acute organ function and mortality in patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the GenIMS study (n=1895) and on mortality

Sachin Yende; Tom van der Poll; Lee van der M; David T Huang; Anne B Newman; Lan Kong; John A Kellum; Tamara B Harris; Doug Bauer; Suzanne Satterfield; Derek C Angus

2010-01-01

109

Schoolchildren with Dysphagia Associated with Medically Complex Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This article reviews population trends and general characteristics of children with dysphagia in schools, provides an overview of dysphagia teams and the roles of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in school and hospital settings, and describes assessment and treatment of swallowing and feeding problems in children with complex medical

Lefton-Greif, Maureen A.; Arvedson, Joan C.

2008-01-01

110

28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Other Information, valid in the state of diagnosis, that authorizes the Program to contact...the claimant that contain a verified diagnosis of one type of leukemia. If the designated...medical records that contain a verified diagnosis of leukemia, the Radiation...

2013-07-01

111

28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Other Information, valid in the state of diagnosis, that authorizes the Program to contact...the claimant that contain a verified diagnosis of one type of leukemia. If the designated...medical records that contain a verified diagnosis of leukemia, the Radiation...

2012-07-01

112

28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Other Information, valid in the state of diagnosis, that authorizes the Program to contact...the claimant that contain a verified diagnosis of one type of leukemia. If the designated...medical records that contain a verified diagnosis of leukemia, the Radiation...

2011-07-01

113

42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health...CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals § 482.61 Condition of...

2011-10-01

114

42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health...CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals § 482.61 Condition of...

2013-10-01

115

42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health...CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals § 482.61 Condition of...

2012-10-01

116

Temperature-Dependent Structural Changes of Parkinson's Alpha-Synuclein Reveal the Role of Pre-Existing Oligomers in Alpha-Synuclein Fibrillization  

PubMed Central

Amyloid fibrils of ?-synuclein are the main constituent of Lewy bodies deposited in substantial nigra of Parkinson's disease brains. ?-Synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein lacking compact secondary and tertiary structures. To enhance the understanding of its structure and function relationship, we utilized temperature treatment to study ?-synuclein conformational changes and the subsequent effects. We found that after 1 hr of high temperature pretreatment, >80°C, ?-synuclein fibrillization was significantly inhibited. However, the temperature melting coupled with circular dichroism spectra showed that ?-synuclein was fully reversible and the NMR studies showed no observable structural changes of ?-synuclein after 95°C treatment. By using cross-linking and analytical ultracentrifugation, rare amount of pre-existing ?-synuclein oligomers were found to decrease after the high temperature treatment. In addition, a small portion of C-terminal truncation of ?-synuclein also occurred. The reduction of pre-existing oligomers of ?-synuclein may contribute to less seeding effect that retards the kinetics of amyloid fibrillization. Overall, our results showed that the pre-existing oligomeric species is a key factor contributing to ?-synuclein fibrillization. Our results facilitate the understanding of ?-synuclein fibrillization. PMID:23349712

Ariesandi, Winny; Chang, Chi-Fon; Chen, Tseng-Erh; Chen, Yun-Ru

2013-01-01

117

Numerical modeling of salt-based mountain belts with pre-existing basement faults: application to the Zagros fold and thrust belt, southwest Iran  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two-dimensional thermal-mechanical models of thick-skinned, salt-based fold- and thrust belts, such as the Zagros, SW Iran, are used to address: 1) the degree of deformation and decoupling between cover and basement rocks due to the presence of a weak salt detachment; 2) the reactivation potential of pre-existing basement normal faults due to brittle or ductile behavior of the lower crust (as related to cold or hot geothermal gradients); and 3) variations in deformation style and strain distribution. The geometry and kinematics of the orogenic wedge and the activity of pre-existing basement faults are strongly influenced by the geothermal gradient (defined by the Moho temperature, MT) and basement rheology. We infer that the MT plays a major role in how the lower and upper crust transfer deformation towards the foreland. In relatively hot geotherm models (MT = 600°C at 36 km depth), the lowermost basement deforms in a ductile fashion while the uppermost basement underlying the sedimentary cover deforms by folding, thrusting, and displacements along pre-existing basement faults. In these models cover units above the salt detachment are less deformed in the hinterland. In relatively cold geotherm models (MT = 400°C at 36 km depth), deformation is mainly restricted to the hinterland of the models where basement imbricates form. Detachment folding, thrusting and gravity gliding occur within cover sediments above uplifted basement blocks. Gravity gliding contributes to a larger amount of shortening in the cover compared to the basement.

Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Pysklywec, Russell; Cruden, Alexander; Koyi, Hemin

2013-04-01

118

Thermal-mechanical modeling of salt-based mountain belts with pre-existing basement faults: Application to the Zagros fold and thrust belt, southwest Iran  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two-dimensional thermal-mechanical models of thick-skinned, salt-based fold and thrust belts, such as the Zagros, SW Iran, are used to address: (1) the degree of deformation and decoupling between cover and basement rocks due to the presence of a weak salt detachment, (2) the reactivation potential of pre-existing basement normal faults due to brittle or ductile behavior of the lower crust (as related to cold or hot geothermal gradients), and (3) variations in deformation style and strain distribution. The geometry and kinematics of the orogenic wedge and the activity of pre-existing basement faults are strongly influenced by the geothermal gradient (defined by the Moho temperature, MT) and basement rheology. We infer that the MT plays a major role in how the lower and upper crust transfer deformation toward the foreland. In relatively hot geotherm models (MT = 600°C at 36 km depth), the lowermost basement deforms in a ductile fashion while the uppermost basement underlying the sedimentary cover deforms by folding, thrusting, and displacements along pre-existing basement faults. In these models, cover units above the salt detachment occur within a less deformed, wide plateau in the hinterland. In relatively cold geotherm models (MT = 400°C at 36 km depth), deformation is mainly restricted to basement imbricate thrusts that form within the orogenic hinterland. Detachment folding, thrusting, and gravity gliding occur within cover sediments above uplifted basement blocks. Gravity gliding contributes to a larger amount of shortening in the cover compared to the basement.

Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Pysklywec, Russell; Cruden, Alexander; Koyi, Hemin

2013-09-01

119

Modeling fault kinematics, segment interaction and transfer zone geometry as a function of pre-existing fabrics: the Albertine rift, East African Rift System.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study focuses on the development of the Rwenzori Mountains, an uplift horst block within the northern-most segment of the western branch of the East African Rift System (EARS). Attention is drawn to the role of pre-existing crustal weaknesses left behind by Proterozoic mobile belts that pass around cratonic Archean shields namely the Tanzanian Craton to the southeast and the Congo craton to the northwest. We study how the southward propagating sub-segment of the rift that contains Lake Albert to the north interacts with the northward propagating sub-segment that contains the lakes Edward and George and how this interaction produces the structural geometries observed within and around the Rwenzori horst block. Analogue experiments are used to simulate behavior of the upper crust with pre-cut rubber strips of varying overstep/overlap, placed oblique and/or orthogonal to the extension vector. The points of connection to the basal sheet present velocity discontinuities to localize deformation below the sand. Surface geometry of the developing rifts and section cuts are used to study the kinematics that result from the given boundary conditions. In general we try to model two parallel rifts that propagate towards each other and interact. Results show that greater overstep of rifts produces an oblique shear-dominated transfer zone with deep grabens (max.7.0km) in the adjoining segments. Smaller overlap ends in extension-dominated transfer, offset rift segments without oblique transfer faults to join two adjacent rift arms and produces moderately deep grabens (max.4.6km). When overlap doubles the overstep (SbR5), rifts propagate sub-orthogonal to the extension direction in a rotation-dominated transfer and form shallow valleys (max.2.9km). Whether a block like the Rwenzori Mountains is captured and rotates, depends on the overlap/overstep ratio where the rotation direction of a captured block is determined by the sense of overlap (right- or left-lateral). Fault orientation, fault kinematics and block rotation (once in play) re-enforce each other, and depending on the local kinematics different parts of a captured block can be rotated by different amounts but in the same general direction. The results are compared with the natural scenario. Keywords: Albertine rift; Analogue; Extension; Kinematics; Transfer zone

Aanyu, Kevin; Koehn, Daniel

2010-05-01

120

Systematic screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions: Still debatable  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Assessing people's ability to drive has become a public health concern in most industrialized countries. Although age itself is not a predictive factor of an increased risk for dangerous driving, the prevalence of medical conditions that may impair driving increases with age. Because the implementation of a screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions is a public health

Sandy Leproust; Emmanuel Lagarde; L Rachid Salmi

2008-01-01

121

Medical conditions and the severity of commercial motor vehicle drivers' road accidents  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this research we studied the association between commercial motor vehicle drivers' medical conditions and crash severity. Some aspects of medical condition were considered. To our knowledge, no study has everisolated this association. The severity of a crash was measured by the total number of victims (injured and dead). We estimated nonlinear regression models (specifically, Poisson and negative binomial) which

Claire Laberge-Nadeau; Georges Dionne; Urs Maag; Denise Desjardins; Charles Vanasse; Jean-Marie Ékoé

1996-01-01

122

Automatic Detection Of Vaccine Adverse Reactions By Incorporating Historical Medical Conditions  

E-print Network

Automatic Detection Of Vaccine Adverse Reactions By Incorporating Historical Medical Conditions This paper extends the state of art by bringing the historical medical conditions into the vaccine adverse with certain vaccines. We propose a novel measure called dual-lift for this task. It is shown that the dual

Karypis, George

123

Comparison of outcomes from sepsis between patients with and without pre-existing left ventricular dysfunction: a case-control analysis  

PubMed Central

Introduction The aim of this study was to determine if there are differences between patients with pre-existing left ventricular dysfunction and those with normal antecedent left ventricular function during a sepsis episode in terms of in-hospital mortality and mortality risk factors when treated in accordance with a sepsis treatment algorithm. Methods We performed a retrospective case-control analysis of patients selected from a quality improvement database of 1,717 patients hospitalized with sepsis between 1 January 2005 and 30 June 2010. In this study, 197 patients with pre-existing left ventricular systolic dysfunction and sepsis were compared to 197 case-matched patients with normal prior cardiac function and sepsis. Results In-hospital mortality rates (P?=?0.117) and intubation rates at 24 hours (P?=?0.687) were not significantly different between cases and controls. There was no correlation between the amount of intravenous fluid administered over the first 24 hours and the PaO2/FiO2 ratio at 24 hours in either cases or controls (r2?=?0.019 and r2?=?0.001, respectively). Mortality risk factors for cases included intubation status (P?=?0.016, OR?=?0.356 for no intubation), compliance with a sepsis bundle (P?=?0.008, OR?=?3.516 for failed compliance), a source of infection other than the lung (P?=?0.019, OR?=?2.782), and the initial mixed venous oxygen saturation (P?=?0.004, OR?=?0.997). Risk factors for controls were the initial platelet count (P?=?0.028, OR?=?0.997) and the serum lactate level (P?=?0.048, OR?=?1.104). Patients with pre-existing left ventricular dysfunction who died had a lower initial mean mixed venous oxygen saturation than those who survived (61?±?18% versus 70?±?16%, P?=?0.002). Conclusions Clinical outcomes were not different between septic patients with pre-existing left ventricular dysfunction and those with no cardiac disease. There was no correlation between fluid administration and oxygenation at 24 hours in either cohort. The mortality risk factor profile of patients with pre-existing left ventricular dysfunction was different when compared with control patients, and may be related to oxygen delivery determinants. PMID:24758343

2014-01-01

124

Adherence to Medication Regimens among Low-Income Patients with Multiple Comorbid Chronic Conditions  

PubMed Central

This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These factors included medication side effects, fear of harm from medication, fear of dependence on medication, complex instructions, suboptimal communications with doctor, suspicion about doctors’ and pharmaceutical companies’ motives in prescribing medication, and the high cost of medications. Participants also identified motivators, both internal (self-initiated) and external (initiated by family, doctor, support groups), to ensure adherence to multiple medications. These motivators included self-discipline, sense of personal responsibility, faith, support from family members and doctors, and focused health education and self-management support. Three themes emerged that enhanced understanding of the complexity of adherence to multiple medications: (1) reaching one’s own threshold for medication adherence, (2) lack of shared information and decision making, and (3) taking less than the prescribed medication. Further analysis of the data revealed that the patients perceived a lack of shared decision making in the management of their comorbid chronic conditions and their medication regimen. PMID:22308877

Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L.

2013-01-01

125

28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.  

...Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept...condition verification from the state cancer or tumor registry that it possesses...appropriate authorities at the National Cancer Institute can make a diagnosis of...

2014-07-01

126

A Comparison of Expedition Medical Condition List Treatment Directives with Integrated Medical Model Simulation Data Presentation and Briefing Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This aerospace medicine clerkship project is under the direction of Dr. Sharmila Watkins and is in cooperation with Dr. Eric Kerstman and Dr. Ronak Shah. The questions of the research project are: 1. What are the main drivers of evacuation and loss of crew life (LOCL) on three Design Reference Missions (DRMs): Near Earth Asteroid (NEA), Lunar Sortie and Lunar Outpost using an inexhaustible International Space Station medical kit 2. What are the treatment designations for these driving medical conditions as listed in Expedition Medical Condition List (EMCL) 3. Do the drivers make sense in the context of the given Design Reference Mission (DRM) 4. Do any EMCL treatment designations need re-assessing.

Lewis, Robert

2013-01-01

127

Pre-existing hyperlipidaemia increased the risk of new-onset anxiety disorders after traumatic brain injury: a 14-year population-based study  

PubMed Central

Objectives Anxiety disorders (ADs) are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the risk factors of new-onset ADs remain unclear. This study was aimed at evaluating the incidence and risk factors for new-onset ADs, including pre-existing hyperlipidaemia and three major comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cardiovascular disease), in patients with TBI. Setting A matched cohort study was conducted using the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database between January 1997 and December 2010. Participants A total of 3822 participants (1274 patients with TBI with hyperlipidaemia and 2548 age-matched and gender-matched patients with TBI without hyperlipidaemia). Outcome measures The incidence and HRs for the development of new-onset ADs after TBI were compared between the two groups. Results The overall incidence rate of new-onset ADs for patients with TBI with hyperlipidaemia is 142.03/10?000 person-years (PYs). Patients with TBI with hyperlipidaemia have a 1.60-fold incidence rate ratio (p<0.0001) and increased HR of ADs (1.58, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.02) compared with those without hyperlipidaemia. The incidence rates of ADs for males and females with hyperlipidaemia, respectively, were 142.12 and 292.32/10?000 PYs, which were higher than those without hyperlipidaemia (93.03 and 171.68/10?000 PYs, respectively). Stratified by age group, hyperlipidaemia is a risk factor of ADs for patients with TBI aged 65?years or younger. Conclusions Pre-existing hyperlipidaemia is an independent predictor of new-onset ADs in patients with TBI, even when controlling for other demographic and clinical variables. Female patients with pre-existing hyperlipidaemia had significantly higher risk of new-onset ADs than males, especially between the ages of 35 and 65?years. PMID:25034630

Ho, Chung-Han; Hsieh, Kuang-Yang; Liang, Fu-Wen; Li, Chia-Jung; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chio, Chung-Ching; Chang, Chin-Hung; Kuo, Jinn-Rung

2014-01-01

128

How much do elders with chronic conditions know about their medications?  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with chronic diseases often undertake multiple medication regimes to manage their condition, prevent complications and to maintain their quality of life. A patient’s medication knowledge has been defined as the awareness of drug name, purpose, administration schedule, adverse effects or side-effects and special administration instructions. Poor medication knowledge can have a negative impact on medication adherence and patient safety and, in increasing the use of medical resources. The objective of the study is to assess the medication knowledge of elderly patients with chronic disease conditions and the factors affecting this knowledge. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in patients aged ?60 with chronic disease conditions or their caregivers were recruited from two general outpatient clinics and two medical outpatient clinics in the public sector. Participants were approached by trained interviewers to complete a semi-structured questionnaire to assess their understanding of the instructions and information relating to their regular medications, which included medication name, regimen, purpose and common side-effects and precautions. Results A total of 412 patients were recruited with the mean age of 72.86?±?7.70. Of those, 221 (54.2%) were male and 226 (55.4%) were of primary school educational level or below. The mean number of medications taken per patient was 3.75?±?1.93. Overall, 52.7% of patients felt that healthcare staff or clinic pharmacists had very clearly explained the administration instruction of the prescribed medications whilst 47.9% had very clear explanations of drug purpose but only 11.4% felt they had very clear explanations of side-effects. 396 patients (96.1%) failed to recall any side effects or precautions of each of their prescribed medications, although 232 patients (58.4%) would consult a doctor if they encountered problems with their medications. Logistic regression analysis showed that for every additional medication prescribed, the likeliness of patients to recall side-effects of all the medications prescribed was significantly lowered by 35% (OR?=?0.65; 95% CI?=?0.44-0.94; P?=?0.023). In addition, those who finished secondary school or higher education were likely to possess more knowledge of side-effects (OR?=?9.88; 95% CI?=?2.11-46.25; P?=?0.004). Conclusions Patients who take medications for their chronic diseases generally lack knowledge on side-effects of their medications which could potentially affect medication compliance and medication safety. PMID:23758824

2013-01-01

129

Just Another Sign of Aging, or an Underlying Medical Condition?  

MedlinePLUS

... be deadly without early treatment. In the United States alone, one person dies from melanoma about every 68 minutes. Sign/Symptom Possible Underlying Condition Lesion on the skin that appears as a: Scaly, red spot or cluster of slow-growing, shiny or scaly lesions that ...

130

Tests and Medical Conditions Associated with Dementia Diagnosis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Diagnosis of dementia in adults with intellectual disabilities requires documentation of clinically significant declines in memory and other cognitive skills, as well as changes in everyday and emotional functioning. To improve diagnostic accuracy in adults with Down syndrome, the authors examined conditions often associated with dementia, as well…

Burt, Diana B.; Primeaux-Hart, Sharon; Loveland, Katherine A.; Cleveland, Lynne A.; Lewis, Kay R.; Lesser, Jary; Pearson, Pamela L.

2005-01-01

131

DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.  

PubMed

Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (<50% of control) to polystyrene. Treatment of established 72h biofilms with 100?g/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with <25% biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100?g/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25?g/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms. PMID:25043896

Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

2014-09-18

132

Phenological asynchrony between herbivorous insects and their hosts: signal of climate change or pre-existing adaptive strategy?  

PubMed Central

Climate change alters phenological relations between interacting species. We might expect the historical baseline, or starting-point, for such effects to be precise synchrony between the season at which a consumer most requires food and the time when its resources are most available. We synthesize evidence that synchrony was not the historical condition in two insect–plant interactions involving Edith's checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha), the winter moth (Operophtera brumata) and their host plants. Initial observations of phenological mismatch in both systems were made prior to the onset of anthropogenically driven climate change. Neither species can detect the phenology of its host plants with precision. In both species, evolution of life history has involved compromise between maximizing fecundity and minimizing mortality, with the outcome being superficially maladaptive strategies in which many, or even most, individuals die of starvation through poor synchrony with their host plants. Where phenological asynchrony or mismatch with resources forms the starting point for effects of anthropogenic global warming, consumers are particularly vulnerable to impacts that exacerbate the mismatch. This vulnerability likely contributed to extinction of a well-studied metapopulation of Edith's checkerspot, and to the skewed geographical pattern of population extinctions underlying a northward and upward range shift in this species. PMID:20819810

Singer, Michael C.; Parmesan, Camille

2010-01-01

133

Phenological asynchrony between herbivorous insects and their hosts: signal of climate change or pre-existing adaptive strategy?  

PubMed

Climate change alters phenological relations between interacting species. We might expect the historical baseline, or starting-point, for such effects to be precise synchrony between the season at which a consumer most requires food and the time when its resources are most available. We synthesize evidence that synchrony was not the historical condition in two insect-plant interactions involving Edith's checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha), the winter moth (Operophtera brumata) and their host plants. Initial observations of phenological mismatch in both systems were made prior to the onset of anthropogenically driven climate change. Neither species can detect the phenology of its host plants with precision. In both species, evolution of life history has involved compromise between maximizing fecundity and minimizing mortality, with the outcome being superficially maladaptive strategies in which many, or even most, individuals die of starvation through poor synchrony with their host plants. Where phenological asynchrony or mismatch with resources forms the starting point for effects of anthropogenic global warming, consumers are particularly vulnerable to impacts that exacerbate the mismatch. This vulnerability likely contributed to extinction of a well-studied metapopulation of Edith's checkerspot, and to the skewed geographical pattern of population extinctions underlying a northward and upward range shift in this species. PMID:20819810

Singer, Michael C; Parmesan, Camille

2010-10-12

134

Group invariant solution for a pre-existing fracture driven by a power-law fluid in impermeable rock  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of power-law rheology on hydraulic fracturing is investigated. The evolution of a two-dimensional fracture with non-zero initial length and driven by a power-law fluid is analyzed. Only fluid injection into the fracture is considered. The surrounding rock mass is impermeable. With the aid of lubrication theory and the PKN approximation a partial differential equation for the fracture half-width is derived. Using a linear combination of the Lie-point symmetry generators of the partial differential equation, the group invariant solution is obtained and the problem is reduced to a boundary value problem for an ordinary differential equation. Exact analytical solutions are derived for hydraulic fractures with constant volume and with constant propagation speed. The asymptotic solution near the fracture tip is found. The numerical solution for general working conditions is obtained by transforming the boundary value problem to a pair of initial value problems. Throughout the paper, hydraulic fracturing with shear thinning, Newtonian and shear thickening fluids are compared.

Fareo, A. G.; Mason, D. P.

2013-12-01

135

Adherence to Medication Regimens among Low-Income Patients with Multiple Comorbid Chronic Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These…

Mishra, Shiraz I.; Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L.

2011-01-01

136

Neutralization of myonecrosis, hemorrhage, and edema induced by Bothrops asper snake venom by homologous and heterologous pre-existing antibodies in mice.  

PubMed

The ability of pre-existing antibodies to neutralize locally-acting toxins of Bothrops asper snake venom was investigated. Hemorrhage, myonecrosis, and edema were markedly reduced in actively immunized mice, although none of these effects was completely abolished. In mice passively immunized with equine antivenom, hemorrhage was prevented completely, while myonecrosis and edema were partially reduced. Pre-existing antibodies did not modify the early stage (< 3 hr) of venom-induced edema, but significantly accelerated the normalization of this effect within 24 hr. Passive administration of antivenom either 5 or 120 min before venom injection gave similar results, suggesting that the presence of antibodies in the intravascular compartment may fully neutralize locally acting toxins, in this experimental animal model. Overall, the homologous or heterologous origin of antibodies was not a significant factor influencing their in vivo neutralizing efficiency against local venom effects. Antibody titrations by enzyme-immunoassay using purified toxins and whole venom indicated that serum from actively-immunized mice had a higher proportion of anti-myotoxin antibodies than equine antivenom. PMID:8783451

Rucavado, A; Lomonte, B

1996-05-01

137

Pre-existing oblique transfer zones and transfer/transform relationships in continental margins: New insights from the southeastern Gulf of Aden, Socotra Island, Yemen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transfer zones are ubiquitous features in continental rifts and margins, as are transform faults in oceanic lithosphere. Here, we present a structural study of the Hadibo Transfer Zone (HTZ), located in Socotra Island (Yemen) in the southeastern Gulf of Aden. There, we interpret this continental transfer fault zone to represent a reactivated pre-existing structure. Its trend is oblique to the direction of divergence and it has been active from the early up to the latest stages of rifting. One of the main oceanic fracture zones (FZ), the Hadibo-Sharbithat FZ, is aligned with and appears to be an extension of the HTZ and is probably genetically linked to it. Comparing this setting with observations from other Afro-Arabian rifts as well as with passive margins worldwide, it appears that many continental transfer zones are reactivated pre-existing structures, oblique to divergence. We therefore establish a classification system for oceanic FZ based upon their relationship with syn-rift structures. Type 1 FZ form at syn-rift structures and are late syn-rift to early syn-OCT. Type 2 FZ form during the OCT formation and Type 3 FZ form within the oceanic domain, after the oceanic spreading onset. The latter are controlled by far-field forces, magmatic processes, spreading rates, and oceanic crust rheology.

Bellahsen, N.; Leroy, S.; Autin, J.; Razin, P.; d'Acremont, E.; Sloan, H.; Pik, R.; Ahmed, A.; Khanbari, K.

2013-11-01

138

Oral anti-diabetic agents for women with pre-existing diabetes mellitus/impaired glucose tolerance or previous gestational diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Background While most guidelines recommend the use of insulin in women whose pregnancies are affected by pre-existing diabetes, oral agents have obvious benefits for patient acceptability and adherence. It is necessary, however, to assess the effects of these anti-diabetic agents on maternal and infant health outcomes. Additionally, women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus are increasingly found to be predisposed to impaired glucose tolerance and, despite the potential need for intervention for these women, there has been little evidence about the use of oral anti-diabetic agents by these women pre-conceptionally or during a subsequent pregnancy. Objectives To investigate the effect of oral anti-diabetic agents in women with pre-existing diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance or previous gestational diabetes planning a pregnancy or pregnant women with diabetes mellitus on maternal and infant health. The use of oral antidiabetic agents for management of gestational diabetes in a current pregnancy is evaluated in a separate Cochrane review. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (March 2010). Selection criteria We included randomised and quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility for inclusion. Main results We identified 13 trials published as 25 papers using the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth group literature search, and an additional ongoing trial. We have not included any trials in the review. One trial is awaiting assessment and we have excluded twelve trials because they evaluated treatment of women with gestational diabetes or women with polycystic ovary syndrome, were not randomised controlled trials or data were not available. Authors’ conclusions Little randomised evidence is available evaluating the use of oral anti-diabetic agents in women with diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, previous gestational diabetes mellitus planning a pregnancy or pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes mellitus. Large trials comparing any combination of oral anti-diabetic agent, insulin and dietary and lifestyle advice in these women, reporting on maternal and infant health outcomes, glycaemic control, women’s views on the intervention and long-term health outcomes for mother and child, are required to guide clinical practice. PMID:20927764

Tieu, Joanna; Coat, Suzette; Hague, William; Middleton, Philippa

2014-01-01

139

Management of co-morbidities and general medical conditions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rheumatologists, in addition to providing subspecialty care, are frequently called to treat general medical conditions in\\u000a their patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Co-morbid medical problems are common in the RA population and may require\\u000a a different approach from standard practice recommendations. In this paper, we review the evaluation and treatment of cardiovascular\\u000a disease, chronic kidney disease, gastrointestinal disease, depression, and

Molly D. Magnano; Mark C. Genovese

2005-01-01

140

Improving medication adherence in chronic pediatric health conditions: a focus on ADHD in youth.  

PubMed

Chronic pediatric health conditions pose a significant challenge for youth, their families and professionals who treat these conditions. Long-term adherence to interventions, including and often-times, pharmacological interventions, is necessary but often problematic. Understanding factors related to poor adherence and intervening to improve adherence is essential in order to maximize long-term outcomes. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one such chronic health condition requiring long-term adherence to treatment. The aims of this review are to 1) review the extant literature regarding rates of adherence to medication for youth with ADHD; 2) summarize what is known regarding factors that impede and support greater adherence to medication; 3) introduce the Unified Theory of Behavior Change as a conceptual model that may assist in developing adherence treatment packages to support medication adherence; and 4) describe several potential interventions based on the Unified Theory of Behavior Change that may improve adherence to medication for youth with ADHD. Although pharmacological interventions for youth with ADHD have been evaluated for decades, only more recently has adherence to medication been the subject of interest. However, this literature has exclusively focused on understanding factors related to adherence, with no empirical studies of interventions to improve adherence in youth with ADHD. This paper provides a rationale and research agenda for systematic study of interventions to support medication adherence in youth with ADHD. PMID:20513228

Chacko, Anil; Newcorn, Jeffrey H; Feirsen, Nicole; Uderman, Jodi Z

2010-01-01

141

Temporary Increases in Problem Behavior and Sleep Disruption Following Decreases in Medication: A Descriptive Analysis of Conditional Rates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conditional rates of problem behavior for weeks that followed medication decreases and no medication changes were compared for 12 individuals who exhibited severe problem behavior (e.g., self-injury, aggression). The results indicate that conditional rates of problem behavior were higher following medication decreases than following no changes in…

Rapp, John T.; Swanson, Greg; Dornbusch, Kaitlin

2007-01-01

142

Assessing health conditions and medication use among the homeless community in Long Beach, California  

PubMed Central

Objective: Persons experiencing homelessness are a vulnerable population and are at increased risk for morbidity and all-cause mortality compared to the general population. This study sought to evaluate medication use, regular physician visits, and identify health conditions among the homeless population of Long Beach, California. Methods: Two “brown bag” medication review events were held at homeless shelters in the Long Beach area. Demographic information, medication use, and comorbid disease states were obtained through surveys. Findings: Three-fourths of the cohort (95 participants) consisted of males, and the average age of participants was 48 years. Psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular disease were the most common disease states reported at 32% and 46%, respectively and so were medications used in treating these chronic diseases. Medication adherence was found to be a significant problem in this population, where more than 30% of patients were nonadherent to medications for chronic diseases. Furthermore, foot problems, hearing and vision difficulties constitute the most commonly overlooked health problems within the homeless population. Conclusion: Based on this and other similar finding, we must accept that the homeless represent a vulnerable population, and that because of this fact, more programs should be focused at improving availability and access to health care among the homeless. Regarding the high number of reported health problems in the study, more studies are needed and more studies should incorporate screening for foot, hearing, and vision issues, both to increase awareness and to provide an opportunity for devising possible solutions to these highly preventable conditions. PMID:25114938

Chong, Mok Thoong; Yamaki, Jason; Harwood, Megan; d'Assalenaux, Richard; Rosenberg, Ettie; Aruoma, Okezie; Bishayee, Anupam

2014-01-01

143

42 CFR 418.106 - Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...evaluation of a patient's response to medication therapy, identification of potential...own facility may only be administered medications by the following individuals: ...State-approved training program in medication administration; and (iii) The...

2010-10-01

144

Exploring Knowledge and Attitudes Related to Pregnancy and Preconception Health in Women with Chronic Medical Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Women with chronic medical conditions are at increased risk for pregnancy-related complications, yet little research has addressed\\u000a how women with diabetes, hypertension, and obesity perceive their pregnancy-associated risks or make reproductive health decisions.\\u000a Focus groups were conducted with 72 non-pregnant women stratified by chronic condition (diabetes, hypertension, obesity) and\\u000a by previous live birth. Participants discussed their intention for future pregnancy,

Cynthia H. Chuang; Diana L. Velott; Carol S. Weisman

2010-01-01

145

Medical conditions, risk exposure, and truck drivers' accidents: An analysis with count data regression models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies do not agree on the possible relationship between medical conditions and traffic safety; most of them do not control for exposure factors. This problem has become more pertinent for scientific studies because of litigation that showed that present regulations about access to driver permits might contravene human rights legislation. In our study, we estimate the effect of different

Georges Dionne; Denise Desjardins; Claire Laberge-Nadeau; Urs Maag

1995-01-01

146

Epidemiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Portugal: Prevalence, Clinical Characterization, and Medical Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and identify its clinical characterization, and medical conditions in a paediatric population in Portugal. A school survey was conducted in elementary schools, targeting 332 808 school-aged children in the mainland and 10 910 in the Azores islands.…

Oliveira, Guiomar; Ataide, Assuncao; Marques, Carla; Miguel, Teresa S.; Coutinho, Ana Margarida; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Goncalves, Esmeralda; Lopes, Nazare Mendes; Rodrigues, Vitor; Carmona da Mota, Henrique; Vicente, Astrid Moura

2007-01-01

147

Coping and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents with a Chronic Medical Condition: A Search for Intervention Targets  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the present study was to find relevant coping factors for the development of psychological intervention programs for adolescents with a chronic medical condition. A wide range of coping techniques were studied, including cognitive coping, behavioral coping and goal adjustment coping. A total of 176 adolescents participated. They were…

Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia

2012-01-01

148

Pattern of pre-existing IgG subclass responses to a panel of asexual stage malaria antigens reported during the lengthy dry season in Daraweesh, Sudan.  

PubMed

The anti-malarial IgG immune response during the lengthy and dry season in areas of low malaria transmission as in Eastern Sudan is largely unknown. In this study, ELISA was used for the measurement of pre-existing total IgG and IgG subclasses to a panel of malaria antigens, MSP2-3D7, MSP2-FC27, AMA-1 and Pf332-C231. The results showed that the antibody responses were predominantly age dependent, antigen specific, and their lifespan was at least 5-6 month long. Generally, the IgG3 was most abundant IgG subclass, and the most recognized antigen was Pf332-C231. Furthermore, the correlation between the levels of IgG subclasses was strongest between IgG1 and IgG3, which were more predictive to the total IgG levels. Finally, the response pattern of each of the IgG subclasses to the different test antigens that were spanning the dry season and the correlation between these responses were described in details for the first time. PMID:21645028

Nasr, A; Iriemenam, N C; Troye-Blomberg, M; Arnot, D; Theander, T G; Berzins, K; Giha, H A; Elghazali, G

2011-10-01

149

Lack of variant specific CD8+ T-cell response against mutant and pre-existing variants leads to outgrowth of particular clones in acute hepatitis C  

PubMed Central

Background CTL escape mutations have been described during acute hepatitis C in patients who developed chronic disease later on. Our aim was to investigate the mutual relationship between HCV specific CD8+ T cells and evolution of the viral sequence during early acute HCV infection. Results We sequenced multiple clones of NS3 1406 epitope in 4 HLA-A*02 patients with acute hepatitis C genotype 1b infection. Pentamers specific for the variants were used to monitor the corresponding CD8+ T cell response. We observed outgrowth of mutations, which induced only a weak and thus potentially insufficient CD8+ T cell response. In one patient we observed outgrowth of variant epitopes with similarities to a different genotype rather than de novo mutations most probably due to a lack of responsiveness to these likely pre-existing variants. We could show that in acute hepatitis C CTL escape mutations occur much earlier than demonstrated in previous studies. Conclusions The adaption of the virus to a new host is characterized by a high and rapid variability in epitopes under CD8+ T cell immune pressure. This adaption takes place during the very early phase of acute infection and strikingly some sequences were reduced below the limit of detection at some time points but were detected at high frequency again at later time points. Independent of the observed variability, HCV-specific CD8+ T cell responses decline and no adaption to different or new antigens during the course of infection could be detected. PMID:24073713

2013-01-01

150

Influenza M2 virus-like particles confer a broader range of cross protection to the strain-specific pre-existing immunity.  

PubMed

Immunity in humans with annual vaccination does not provide effective protection against antigenically distinct strains. As an approach to improve cross-protection in the presence of pre-existing strain-specific immunity, we investigated the efficacy of heterologous and heterosubtypic protection in previously vaccinated mice at earlier times after subsequent immunization with conserved-antigenic target influenza M2 ectodomain (M2e) virus-like particle vaccine (M2e5× VLP). Immunization of mice with H1N1 split vaccine induced virus specific antibodies to homologous influenza virus but did not provide heterosubtypic hemagglutination inhibiting antibody responses and cross-protection. However, subsequent M2e5× VLP immunization induced an M2e specific antibody response as well as interferon-? (IFN-?) producing cells in systemic and mucosal sites. Upon lethal challenge with H3N2 or H5N1 subtype influenza viruses, subsequently immunized mice with M2e5× VLP were well protected against heterosubtypic influenza viruses. These results provide evidence that non-seasonal immunization with M2e5× VLP, an experimental candidate for universal vaccine, is a promising approach for broadening the cross-protection even in the presence of strain-specific immunity. PMID:25171841

Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Yu-Na; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Ha, Suk-Hoon; Kang, Sang-Moo

2014-10-01

151

SIV replication in the infected rhesus macaque is limited by the size of the pre-existing Th17 cell compartment  

PubMed Central

The mechanisms by which some HIV-infected subjects resist disease progression, while others progress rapidly, are incompletely understood. Viral and host genetic factors, such as nef deletions and MHC alleles, explain a portion of the observed variability. However, it has been difficult to identify host immune functions that may be present before infection and that allow resistance to lentiviral disease progression. Here we show that SIV replication in the infected rhesus macaque is limited by the size of the pre-existing Th17 cell compartment: animals with a high representation of such cells in blood and intestinal tissue prior to infection experienced peak and set-point viral loads approximately one log unit lower than those with a lower representation of Th17 cells. Reciprocally, treatment of macaques with interleukin-2 (IL-2) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) before infection led to depletion of Th17 cells, reduction of the ratio between Th17 cells and CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127low regulatory T cells (Tregs), and higher viral loads for six months after infection. These results demonstrate that the composition of the host immune system before infection has an influence on the course of disease after infection. Furthermore, to the extent that this influence shapes and interacts with T-cell-mediated responses to virus, our findings provide a new framework for understanding inter-individual variation in responses to therapies and vaccines against HIV. PMID:22649090

Hartigan-O'Connor, Dennis J.; Abel, Kristina; Van Rompay, Koen K. A.; Kanwar, Bittoo; McCune, Joseph M.

2012-01-01

152

Optimization of vaccine responses with an E1, E2b, E3 deleted Ad5 vector circumvents pre-existing anti-vector immunity  

PubMed Central

Recombinant serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5) vectors lacking E1 expression induce robust immune responses against encoded transgenes in preclinical models, but have muted responses in human trials due to wide spread pre-existing anti-adenovirus immunity. Attempts to circumvent Ad5 specific immunity by using alternative serotypes or modifying capsid components have not yielded profound clinical improvement. To address this issue, we explored a novel alternative strategy, specifically reducing the expression of structural Ad5 genes by creating E1 and E2b deleted recombinant Ad5 vectors. Our data demonstrate that [E1?, E2b?]vectors retaining the Ad5 serotype are potent immunogens in pre-clinical models despite the presence of significant Ad5 specific immunity, in contrast to [E1?] vectors. These preclinical studies with E1 and E2b deleted recombinant Ad5 vectors suggest that anti-Ad immunity will no longer be a limiting factor and that clinical trials to evaluate their performance are warranted. PMID:19229288

Osada, Takuya; Yang, Xiao Yi; Hartman, Zachary C.; Glass, Oliver; Hodges, Bradley L.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Morse, Michael A.; Lyerly, H. Kim; Amalfitano, Andrea; Clay, Timothy M.

2013-01-01

153

An XML model of an enhanced data dictionary to facilitate the exchange of pre-existing clinical research data in international studies.  

PubMed

Pre-existing clinical research data sets exchanged in international epidemiology research often lack the elements needed to assess their suitability for use in multi-region meta-analyses or other clinical studies. While the missing information is generally known to local investigators, it is not contained in the files exchanged between sites. Instead, such content must be solicited by the study coordinating center though a series of lengthy phone and electronic communications: an informal process whose reproducibility and accuracy decays over time. This report describes a set of supplemental information needed to assess whether clinical research data from diverse research sites are truly comparable, and what metadata ("data about the data") should be preserved when a data set is archived for future use. We propose a structured Extensible Markup Language (XML) model that captures this information. The authors hope this model will be a first step towards preserving the metadata associated with clinical research data sets, thereby improving the quality of international data exchange, data archiving, and merged-data research using data collected in many different countries, languages and care settings. PMID:17911757

Duda, Stephany N; Cushman, Clint; Masys, Daniel R

2007-01-01

154

Novel application of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy using CyberKnife® for early-stage renal cell carcinoma in patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease: Initial clinical experiences  

PubMed Central

The treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in patients diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD) requires particular care in order to preserve the remaining renal function. The present study aimed to investigate the potential of a novel nephron-sparing treatment, which is capable of targeting tumors embedded deep within tissues. The present study analyzed three patients, with pre-existing CKD and multiple comorbidities, who were successfully treated for stage I RCC using the CyberKnife® stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) system. The total prescribed dose was 40 Gy in five fractions administered over five consecutive days. Treatment efficiency was determined using computed tomography scans of the tumors and periodic measurements of the glomerular filtration rate over a period of 12–40 months. Local control, defined as a radiologically stable condition, was achieved in all patients. Lung metastasis was observed in one patient nine months after SABR; however, the side-effects were generally mild and self-limiting. One patient developed renal failure 26 months after SABR, while the severity of CKD was only marginally altered in the other two patients and renal failure did not occur. In conclusion, in the present study, SABR with CyberKnife® was observed to be well tolerated in the patients, with an acceptable acute toxicity effect. Therefore, it may represent a potential therapeutic option for patients with early-stage RCC who have previously been diagnosed with CKD, but for whom other nephron-sparing treatments are contraindicated. PMID:24959276

LO, CHENG-HSIANG; HUANG, WEN-YEN; CHAO, HSING-LUNG; LIN, KUEN-TZE; JEN, YEE-MIN

2014-01-01

155

Rare medical conditions and suggestive past-life memories: a case report and literature review.  

PubMed

We aim to report the case of a 38-year-old male with suggestive past-life memories during a regression session and to show how these memories were related to unusual medical conditions: (1) isolated obstruction of the right coronary artery in a young patient, (2) omental infarction, and (3) right aortic arch with isolation of the left subclavian artery. These conditions were related to the following suggestive past-life memories: (1) a priest who committed suicide with a crucifix nailed to his chest and (2) a medieval weapon (skull flail) hitting his cervical and left back region. There was an intriguing relation between the patient's suggestive past-life memories and rare medical conditions. In this article, the authors highlight possible explanations, rarity of findings, and similarities/differences from previous cases and potential pitfalls in this area. PMID:24199777

Lucchetti, Giancarlo; dos Santos Camargo, Luizete; Lucchetti, Alessandra L G; Schwartz, Gary E; Nasri, Fabio

2013-01-01

156

Modeling Pre-Existing Immunity to Adenovirus in Rodents: Immunological Requirements for Successful Development of a Recombinant Adenovirus Serotype 5-based Ebola Vaccine  

PubMed Central

Pre-existing immunity (PEI) to human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) worldwide is the primary limitation to routine clinical use of Ad5-based vectors in immunization platforms. Using systemic and mucosal PEI induction models in rodents (mice and guinea pigs), we assessed the influence of PEI on the type of adaptive immune response elicited by an Ad5-based vaccine for Ebola with respect to immunization route. Splenocytes isolated from vaccinated animals revealed that immunization by the same route in which PEI was induced significantly compromised Ebola Zaire glycoprotein (ZGP)-specific IFN-?+ CD8+ T cells and ZGP-specific multifunctional CD8+ T cell populations. ZGP-specific IgG1 antibody levels were also significantly reduced and a sharp increase in serum anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibody (NAB) titers noted following immunization. These immune parameters correlated with poor survival after lethal challenge with rodent-adapted Ebola Zaire virus (ZEBOV). Although the number of IFN-?+ CD8+ T cells was reduced in animals given the vaccine by a different route from that used for PEI induction, the multifunctional CD8+ T cell response was not compromised. Survival rates in these groups were higher than when PEI was induced by the same route as immunization. These results suggest that antigen-specific multi-functional CD8+ T cell and Th2 type antibody responses compromised by PEI to Ad5 are required for protection from Ebola. They also illustrate that methods for induction of PEI used in pre-clinical studies must be carefully evaluated for successful development of novel Ad5-based vaccines. PMID:23915419

Choi, Jin Huk; Schafer, Stephen C.; Zhang, Lihong; Juelich, Terry; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Croyle, Maria A.

2013-01-01

157

Photosynthetic traits around budbreak in pre-existing needles of Sakhalin spruce (Picea glehnii) seedlings grown under elevated CO2 concentration assessed by chlorophyll fluorescence measurements.  

PubMed

To assess the effects of elevated CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) on the photosynthetic properties around spring budbreak, we monitored the total leaf sugar and starch content, and chlorophyll fluorescence in 1-year-old needles of Sakhalin spruce (Picea glehnii Masters) seedlings in relation to the timing of budbreak, grown in a phytotron under natural daylight at two [CO(2)] levels (ambient: 360??mol mol(-1) and elevated: 720??mol mol(-1)). Budbreak was accelerated by elevated [CO(2)] accompanied with earlier temporal declines in the quantum yield of PSII electron transport (?(PSII)) and photochemical quenching (q(L)). Plants grown under elevated [CO(2)] showed pre-budbreak leaf starch content twice as high with no significant difference in ?(PSII) from ambient-CO(2)-grown plants when compared at the same measurement [CO(2)], i.e., 360 or 720??mol mol(-1), suggesting that the enhanced pre-budbreak leaf starch accumulation might not cause down-regulation of photosynthesis in pre-existing needles under elevated [CO(2)]. Conversely, lower excitation pressure adjusted for the efficiency of PSII photochemistry ((1?-?q(P)) F(v)'/F(m)') was observed in plants grown under elevated [CO(2)] around budbreak when compared at their growth [CO(2)] (i.e., comparing (1?-?q(P)) F(v)'/F(m)' measured at 720??mol mol(-1) in elevated-CO(2)-grown plants with that at 360??mol mol(-1) in ambient-CO(2)-grown plants), which suggests lower rate of photoinactivation of PSII in the elevated-CO(2)-grown plants around spring budbreak. The degree of photoinhibition, as indicated by the overnight-dark-adapted F(v)/F(m), however, showed no difference between CO(2) treatments, thereby suggesting that photoprotection during the daytime or the repair of PSII at night was sufficient to alleviate differences in the rate of photoinactivation. PMID:22705862

Kitao, Mitsutoshi; Tobita, Hiroyuki; Utsugi, Hajime; Komatsu, Masabumi; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Maruyama, Yutaka; Koike, Takayoshi

2012-08-01

158

Medical conditions associated with driving cessation in community-dwelling, ambulatory elders.  

PubMed

The decision to stop driving leads to severe contraction of independence, and most localities do not curtail driving privileges in impaired elders. In a population of community-based, ambulatory individuals 70-96 years old, annual medical screening showed that 276 of 1,656 (16.7 +/- 1.8%) who reported driving regularly in the past do not currently drive. The cessation of driving behavior was examined in terms of specific medical conditions occurring within the past 5 years. Retired drivers were disproportionately female, and driving cessation risk rose with age. Age-sex-adjusted logistic regression found that six conditions explained about 50 percent of the decisions to stop driving: macular degeneration; retinal hemorrhage; any deficit in Activities of Daily Living; Parkinson's disease; stroke-related residual paralysis or weakness; and syncope. Strikingly, only 1.8 percent of those who stopped driving had ever had a license revoked; 58.7 percent reported voluntarily stopping; 31.9 percent gave health or medical reasons. Clearly, the decision to cede driving privileges is complex and not dependent solely on medical problems. PMID:8315247

Campbell, M K; Bush, T L; Hale, W E

1993-07-01

159

A Review of Therapeutic Uses of Mirtazapine in Psychiatric and Medical Conditions  

PubMed Central

Objective: To review the literature examining the use of mirtazapine with an emphasis on its therapeutic benefits for psychiatric patients with comorbid medical conditions. Data Sources: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Global Health, and AGRICOLA were searched using the terms mirtazapine OR Remeron. Limits were English language, human, year 1980–2012, treatment and prevention, and therapy. Study Selection: Two hundred ninety-three articles were identified. Data Extraction: Identified articles were reviewed with a focus on indications and therapeutic benefits in patients with medical comorbidities. Results: Mirtazapine is an effective antidepressant with unique mechanisms of action. It is characterized by a relatively rapid onset of action, high response and remission rates, a favorable side-effect profile, and several unique therapeutic benefits over other antidepressants. Mirtazapine has also shown promise in treating some medical disorders, including neurologic conditions, and ameliorating some of the associated debilitating symptoms of weight loss, insomnia, and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Conclusions: Mirtazapine offers clinicians multiple therapeutic advantages especially when treating patients with comorbid medical illness. PMID:24511451

Voronovich, Zoya; Carley, Joseph A.

2013-01-01

160

A prospective study of medical conditions, anthropometry, physical activity, and pancreatic cancer in male smokers (Finland)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the association between several medical conditions, anthropometric measurements, occupational and leisure physical activity, and pancreatic cancer in a cohort of male Finnish smokers. Methods: We performed a cohort analysis of the 172 subjects who developed pancreatic cancer between 1985 and 1997 (median 10.2 years follow-up) among the 29,048 male smokers, 50–69 years old, who had complete baseline

Rachael Z. Stolzenberg-Solomon; Pirjo Pietinen; Philip R. Taylor; Jarmo Virtamo; Demetrius Albanes

2002-01-01

161

Diabetes mellitus, other medical conditions and familial history of cancer as risk factors for pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer conducted in three areas of the USA, 484 cases and 2099 controls were interviewed to evaluate the aetiologic role of several medical conditions\\/interventions, including diabetes mellitus, cholecystectomy, ulcer\\/gastrectomy and allergic states. We also evaluated risk associated with family history of cancer. Our findings support previous studies indicating that diabetes is a risk

D T Silverman; M Schiffman; J Everhart; A Goldstein; K D Lillemoe; G M Swanson; A G Schwartz; L M Brown; R S Greenberg; J B Schoenberg; L M Pottern; R N Hoover; J F Fraumeni

1999-01-01

162

Nicotine as a Conditioned Stimulus: Impact of Attention-Deficit\\/Hyperactivity Disorder Medications  

Microsoft Academic Search

People diagnosed with attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at an increased risk to start smoking and have greater difficulty quitting. Nicotine, one of the principal addictive components of tobacco smoke, functioned as a conditioned stimulus (CS) for intermittent sucrose delivery in a Pavlovian drug discrimination task with rats. This study compared the ability of commonly prescribed ADHD medications (i.e., methylphenidate, atomoxetine,

Carmela M. Reichel; Jessica D. Linkugel; Rick A. Bevins

2007-01-01

163

Cytokines, “Depression Due to A General Medical Condition,” and Antidepressant Drugs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Activation of the immune system during various medical conditions produces neural, neuroendocrine, and behavioral effects.\\u000a The psychological and physiological effects of immune activation resemble many characteristics of depression. The essential\\u000a features of depression are depressed mood and loss of interest or pleasure in all, or almost all activities (anhedonia). Several\\u000a associated symptoms are also present, including, appetite disturbance, change in

Raz Yirmiya; Joseph Weidenfeld; Yehuda Pollak; Michal Morag; Avraham Morag; Ronit Avitsur; Ohr Barak; Edna Cohen; Yehuda Shavit; Haim Ovadia

164

Beliefs and Attitudes about Influenza Immunization among Parents of Children with Chronic Medical Conditions over a Two-Year Period  

Microsoft Academic Search

Influenza vaccination is recommended for children with chronic medical conditions yet is infrequently performed. The reasons for low influenza vaccination rates in this group have not been well studied. We assessed and compared parents of children with chronic medical conditions regarding their beliefs and attitudes about influenza vaccination in 2003 and 2004. Parents of 2- to 13-year-old children with chronic

Chyongchiou J. Lin; Mary Patricia Nowalk; Richard K. Zimmerman; Feng-Shou Ko; Lisa Zoffel; Alejandro Hoberman; Diana H. Kearney

2006-01-01

165

Medical costs and lost productivity from health conditions at volatile organic compound-contaminated Superfund sites  

SciTech Connect

This paper estimates the health costs at Superfund sites for conditions associated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water. Health conditions were identified from published literature and registry information as occurring at excess rates in VOC-exposed populations. These health conditions were: (1) some categories of birth defects, (2) urinary tract disorders, (3) diabetes, (4) eczema and skin conditions, (5) anemia, (6) speech and hearing impairments in children under 10 years of age, and (7) stroke. Excess rates were used to estimate the excess number of cases occurring among the total population living within one-half mile of 258 Superfund sites. These sites had evidence of completed human exposure pathways for VOCs in drinking water. For each type of medical condition, an individual`s expected medical costs, long-term care costs, and lost work time due to illness or premature mortality were estimated. Costs were calculated to be approximately $330 million per year, in the absence of any remediation or public health intervention programs. The results indicate the general magnitude of the economic burden associated with a limited number of contaminants at a portion of all Superfund sites, thus suggesting that the burden would be greater than that estimated in this study if all contaminants at all Superfund sites could be taken into account.

Lybarger, J.A.; Spengler, R.F.; Brown, D.R. [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (United States). Div. of Health Studies] [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (United States). Div. of Health Studies; Lee, R.; Vogt, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); [Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perhac, R.M. Jr. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); [Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-10-01

166

Discovering medical conditions associated with periodontitis using linked electronic health records  

PubMed Central

Aim To use linked electronic medical and dental records to discover associations between periodontitis and medical conditions independent of a priori hypotheses. Materials and Methods This case-control study included 2475 patients who underwent dental treatment at the College of Dental Medicine at Columbia University and medical treatment at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. Our cases are patients who received periodontal treatment and our controls are patients who received dental maintenance but no periodontal treatment. Chi-square analysis was performed for medical treatment codes and logistic regression was used to adjust for confounders. Results Our method replicated several important periodontitis associations in a largely Hispanic population, including diabetes mellitus type I (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.30–1.99, p < 0.001) and type II (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.22–1.67, p < 0.001), hypertension (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.10–1.37, p < 0.001), hypercholesterolaemia (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.07–1.38, p = 0.004), hyperlipidaemia (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.06–1.43, p = 0.008) and conditions pertaining to pregnancy and childbirth (OR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.32–7.21, p = 0.014). We also found a previously unreported association with benign prostatic hyperplasia (OR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.05–2.10, p = 0.026) after adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, lipid and circulatory system conditions, alcohol and tobacco abuse. Conclusions This study contributes a high-throughput method for associating periodontitis with systemic diseases using linked electronic records. PMID:23495669

Boland, Mary Regina; Hripcsak, George; Albers, David J.; Wei, Ying; Wilcox, Adam B.; Wei, Jin; Li, Jianhua; Lin, Steven; Breene, Michael; Myers, Ronnie; Zimmerman, John; Papapanou, Panos N.; Weng, Chunhua

2013-01-01

167

Use of an emergency medical pictorial communication book during simulated disaster conditions.  

PubMed

During disasters, the needs of victims outstrip available resources. Rapid assessment of patients must be performed; however, language barriers can be an impediment to efficient patient assessment, especially if interpreter resources are limited. Dependency on interpretive services requiring technology such a telephones, cell phones, and video conferencing may be inefficient, as they may be unavailable during disaster conditions. A low-tech, portable tool that aids in communication with non-English speakers would be beneficial. The medical emergency communication (MEC) book, developed at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has the potential to be a useful tool in this capacity. The goal of this pilot study was to compare the accuracy of a newly developed disaster-focused medical history obtained from Spanish-speaking patients or caregivers using the MEC book, compared to a control group with whom no book was used. Our hypothesis was that use of the MEC book improves accuracy of medical history taking between English-only speaking health care workers and Spanish-speaking patients better than a monolingual clinician trying to take a medical history without it. We anticipated a higher overall score in the group of subjects whose histories were taken using the MEC book than in the control group. Patient satisfaction with the MEC book also was measured. PMID:24274127

Behar, Solomon; Benson Ii, Richard; Kurzweil, Ami; Azen, Colleen; Nager, Alan L

2013-10-01

168

Gorlin-Goltz syndrome - a medical condition requiring a multidisciplinary approach  

PubMed Central

Summary Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare genetic condition showing a variable expressiveness. It is inherited in a dominant autosomal way. The strongest characteristic of the disease includes multiple basal cell carcinomas, jaw cysts, palmar and plantar pits, skeletal abnormalities and other developmental defects. Owing to the fact that the condition tends to be a multisystemic disorder, familiarity of various medical specialists with its manifestations may reduce the time necessary for providing a diagnosis. It will also enable them to apply adequate methods of treatment and secondary prevention. In this study, we present symptoms of the disease, its diagnostic methods and currently used treatments. We searched 2 scientific databases: Medline (EBSCO) and Science Direct, for the years 1996 to 2011. In our search of abstracts, key words included nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome and Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. We examined 287 studies from Medline and 80 from Science Direct, all published in English. Finally, we decided to use 60 papers, including clinical cases and literature reviews. Patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome need particular multidisciplinary medical care. Knowledge of multiple and difficult to diagnose symptoms of the syndrome among professionals of various medical specialties is crucial. The consequences of the disease pose a threat to the health and life of patients. Therefore, an early diagnosis creates an opportunity for effective prevention and treatment of the disorder. Prevention is better than cure. PMID:22936202

Kiwilsza, Malgorzata; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna

2012-01-01

169

Manchester Clinical Placement Index (MCPI). Conditions for medical students' learning in hospital and community placements.  

PubMed

The drive to quality-manage medical education has created a need for valid measurement instruments. Validity evidence includes the theoretical and contextual origin of items, choice of response processes, internal structure, and interrelationship of a measure's variables. This research set out to explore the validity and potential utility of an 11-item measurement instrument, whose theoretical and empirical origins were in an Experience Based Learning model of how medical students learn in communities of practice (COPs), and whose contextual origins were in a community-oriented, horizontally integrated, undergraduate medical programme. The objectives were to examine the psychometric properties of the scale in both hospital and community COPs and provide validity evidence to support using it to measure the quality of placements. The instrument was administered twice to students learning in both hospital and community placements and analysed using exploratory factor analysis and a generalizability analysis. 754 of a possible 902 questionnaires were returned (84% response rate), representing 168 placements. Eight items loaded onto two factors, which accounted for 78% of variance in the hospital data and 82% of variance in the community data. One factor was the placement learning environment, whose five constituent items were how learners were received at the start of the placement, people's supportiveness, and the quality of organisation, leadership, and facilities. The other factor represented the quality of training-instruction in skills, observing students performing skills, and providing students with feedback. Alpha coefficients ranged between 0.89 and 0.93 and there were no redundant or ambiguous items. Generalisability analysis showed that between 7 and 11 raters would be needed to achieve acceptable reliability. There is validity evidence to support using the simple 8-item, mixed methods Manchester Clinical Placement Index to measure key conditions for undergraduate medical students' experience based learning: the quality of the learning environment and the training provided within it. Its conceptual orientation is towards Communities of Practice, which is a dominant contemporary theory in undergraduate medical education. PMID:22234383

Dornan, Tim; Muijtjens, Arno; Graham, Jennifer; Scherpbier, Albert; Boshuizen, Henny

2012-12-01

170

Influence of pre-existing fabrics on fault kinematics and rift geometry of interacting segments: Analogue models based on the Albertine Rift (Uganda), Western Branch-East African Rift System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study aims at showing how far pre-existing crustal weaknesses left behind by Proterozoic mobile belts, that pass around cratonic Archean shields (Tanzania Craton to the southeast and Congo Craton to the northwest), control the geometry of the Albertine Rift. Focus is laid on the development of the Lake Albert and Lake Edward/George sub-segments and between them the greatly uplifted Rwenzori Mountains, a horst block located within the rift and whose highest peak rises to >5000 m above mean sea level. In particular we study how the southward propagating Lake Albert sub-segment to the north interacts with the northward propagating Lake Edward/George sub-segment south of it, and how this interaction produces the structures and geometry observed in this section of the western branch of the East African Rift, especially within and around the Rwenzori horst. We simulate behaviour of the upper crust by conducting sandbox analogue experiments in which pre-cut rubber strips of varying overstep/overlap connected to a basal sheet and oriented oblique and/or orthogonal to the extension vector, are placed below the sand-pack. The points of connection present velocity discontinuities to localise deformation, while the rubber strips represent ductile domain affected by older mobile belts. From fault geometry of developing rift segments in plan view and section cuts, we study kinematics resulting from a given set of boundary conditions, and results are compared with the natural scenario. Three different basal model-configurations are used to simulate two parallel rifts that propagate towards each other and interact. Wider overstep (model SbR3) produces an oblique transfer zone with deep grabens (max. 7.0 km) in the adjoining segments. Smaller overlap (model SbR4) ends in offset rift segments without oblique transfer faults to join the two, and produces moderately deep grabens (max. 4.6 km). When overlap doubles the overstep (model SbR5), rifts propagate sub-orthogonal to the extension direction and form shallow valleys (max. 2.9 km). Relative ratios of overlap/overstep between rift segments dictate the kind of transition zone that develops and whether or not a block (like the Rwenzoris) is captured and rotates; hence determining the end-member geometry. Rotation direction is controlled by pre-existing fabrics. Fault orientation, fault kinematics, and block rotation (once in play) reinforce each other; and depending on the local kinematics, different parts of a captured block may rotate with variable velocities but in the same general direction. Mechanical strength anisotropy of pre-structured crust only initially centres fault nucleation and propagation parallel to the grain of weakness of the basement, but at later stages of a protracted period of crustal extension, such boundaries are locally defied.

Aanyu, K.; Koehn, D.

2011-02-01

171

Prompt Reduction in Use of Medications for Comorbid Conditions After Bariatric Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Bariatric surgery leads to weight loss, but it is unclear whether surgery reduces conditions associated with obesity. We explored\\u000a this by assessing the change in use of medications to treat diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia in the year\\u000a following surgery.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  This is a cohort study using administrative data from 2002 to 2005 from seven Blue Cross\\/Blue Shield Plans. We compared

Jodi B. Segal; Jeanne M. Clark; Andrew D. Shore; Francesca Dominici; Thomas Magnuson; Thomas M. Richards; Jonathan P. Weiner; Eric B. Bass; Albert W. Wu; Martin A. Makary

2009-01-01

172

Assessment of health literacy as a part of a university medication therapy management program for patients with chronic conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of pharmacists in the U.S. continues to evolve. Pharmacists are now being trained to be drug information specialists and medication counselors. More than ever, pharmacists are helping patients with chronic conditions manage their diseases through the use of medication therapy management programs. As a part of these programs, it is important that pharmacists are aware of what affect

Jason T. Range

2011-01-01

173

[Health status and living conditions in medical district of Sandnes during the period 1866-1900].  

PubMed

The municipality of Sandnes became a separate medical district in 1866. The district physicians' reports give us an insight into health and living conditions in this district in the last half of the 19th century. This paper is based on a study of all statistical data and physicians' comments concerning the Sandnes district for the 1866-1900 period. The incidence of various diseases is estimated. Mental illness seems to have been more frequent in Sandness than in the rest of the county. In the physicians' reports, this was explained by the dominance of religious Puritanism in the district. The incidence of other disease, such as typhoid fever, tuberculosis and scarlet fever, did not differ essentially between Sandnes and the county as a whole. The living conditions in the district were rather good during the whole period, though the physicians' reports provide interesting insight in changes from one year to another. PMID:10827503

Helgaland, T; Rosvold, E O

1999-12-10

174

THE INFLUENCE OF DEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS AND MEDICAL CONDITIONS ON PATIENTS COMPLAINTS WITH COMPLETE DENTURES  

PubMed Central

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the most frequent complete denture complaints and to investigate the influence of age, gender and systemic disease conditions on the complaints. Methodology: This was a retrospective study in which information on the demographic data, medical and dental history of complete denture patients were obtained from their case records. Also the type of complaints and adjustment made to the denture at review appointments were recorded. All data generated were entered into IBM-Compatible micro-computer and analysed using the statistical packages of social sciences (SPSS) version 15. Chi-square test was used to test for statistical significance. Result: Eighty-two case records of complete denture patients were reviewed. Fourty-six of the patients were male while 36 were female. The age ranged between 40 and 90 years with mean age of 69.10 (SD=10.6) years. Fifty-one (62.2%) patients had complaints with their dentures during a week review appointment. Pain was the most common complaint 23 (28%), followed by lack of retention, 12 (14.6%). Eighteen (21.9%) patients had systemic medical conditions. Conclusion: There was no statistically significant relationship between patient age, gender, systemic health and denture complaints; but statistically significant relationship exist between types of denture, denture faults and complaints. PMID:25161408

Ogunrinde, T.J.; Dosumu, O.O.

2012-01-01

175

Veterinary homeopathy: systematic review of medical conditions studied by randomised placebo-controlled trials.  

PubMed

A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of veterinary homeopathy has not previously been undertaken. Using Cochrane methods, this review aims to assess risk of bias and to quantify the effect size of homeopathic intervention compared with placebo for each eligible peer-reviewed trial. Judgement in seven assessment domains enabled a trial's risk of bias to be designated as low, unclear or high. A trial was judged to comprise reliable evidence if its risk of bias was low or was unclear in specified domains. A trial was considered to be free of vested interest if it was not funded by a homeopathic pharmacy. The 18 eligible RCTs were disparate in nature, representing four species and 11 different medical conditions. Reliable evidence, free from vested interest, was identified in two trials: homeopathic Coli had a prophylactic effect on porcine diarrhoea (odds ratio 3.89, 95 per cent confidence interval [CI], 1.19 to 12.68, P=0.02); and individualised homeopathic treatment did not have a more beneficial effect on bovine mastitis than placebo intervention (standardised mean difference -0.31, 95 per cent CI, -0.97 to 0.34, P=0.35). Mixed findings from the only two placebo-controlled RCTs that had suitably reliable evidence precluded generalisable conclusions about the efficacy of any particular homeopathic medicine or the impact of individualised homeopathic intervention on any given medical condition in animals. PMID:25324413

Mathie, Robert T; Clausen, Jürgen

2014-10-18

176

Medical conditions among Iraqi refugees in Jordan: data from the United Nations Refugee Assistance Information System  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine the range and burden of health services utilization among Iraqi refugees receiving health assistance in Jordan, a country of first asylum. Methods Medical conditions, diagnosed in accordance with the tenth revision of the International classification of diseases, were actively monitored from 1January to 31December 2010 using a pilot centralized database in Jordan called the Refugee Assistance Information System. Findings There were 27?166 medical visits by 7642 Iraqi refugees (mean age: 37.4 years; 49% male; 70% from Baghdad; 6% disabled; 3% with a history of torture). Chronic diseases were common, including essential hypertension (22% of refugees), visual disturbances (12%), joint disorders (11%) and type II diabetes mellitus (11%). The most common reasons for seeking acute care were upper respiratory tract infection (11%), supervision of normal pregnancy (4%) and urinary disorders (3%). The conditions requiring the highest number of visits per refugee were cerebrovascular disease (1.46 visits), senile cataract (1.46) and glaucoma (1.44). Sponsored care included 31?747 referrals or consultations to a specialty service, 18?432 drug dispensations, 2307 laboratory studies and 1090 X-rays. The specialties most commonly required were ophthalmology, dentistry, gynaecology and orthopaedic surgery. Conclusion Iraqi refugees in countries of first asylum and resettlement require targeted health services, health education and sustainable prevention and control strategies for predominantly chronic diseases. PMID:22690034

Carone, Marco; Al-Saedy, Huda; Nyce, Sayre; Ghosn, Jad; Mutuerandu, Timothy; Black, Robert E

2012-01-01

177

42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...system of coding and indexing medical records. The system must allow...procedure, in order to support medical care evaluation studies. (3) The hospital must...alter patient records. Original medical records must be released...

2013-10-01

178

42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...system of coding and indexing medical records. The system must allow...procedure, in order to support medical care evaluation studies. (3) The hospital must...alter patient records. Original medical records must be released...

2011-10-01

179

42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...system of coding and indexing medical records. The system must allow...procedure, in order to support medical care evaluation studies. (3) The hospital must...alter patient records. Original medical records must be released...

2010-10-01

180

42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for the delivery of patient care and outcomes in the facility. The medical director is accountable to the governing body for the quality of medical care provided to patients. Medical...and approval of a “patient care policies and procedures...

2013-10-01

181

42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for the delivery of patient care and outcomes in the facility. The medical director is accountable to the governing body for the quality of medical care provided to patients. Medical...and approval of a “patient care policies and procedures...

2012-10-01

182

Hospital characteristics and racial disparities in hospital mortality from common medical conditions.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: Less is known about racial disparities in mortality from medical conditions than for procedures. We determined whether black-white disparities in risk-adjusted hospital mortality exist for five common conditions (myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, cerebral vascular accident, gastrointestinal hemorrhage and pneumonia), and to determine the role of hospital characteristics. METHODS: We used the 2003 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Where a mortality disadvantage for black patients was demonstrated, additional analyses assessed whether the degree of disparity varied by hospital characteristics. RESULTS: Mortality for black patients was equivalent to or lower than that for white patients for four of the five conditions. Black patients were more likely than white patients to die from gastrointestinal hemorrhage (1.5% vs. 1.1%, p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, hospital racial composition was the only characteristic associated with degree of disparity for gastrointestinal hemorrhage, with hospitals discharging fewer black patients demonstrating greater disparity. CONCLUSIONS: In a large, multistate sample, there was no evidence of disparities in mortality for four of five common conditions. Black-white racial disparities in mortality from gastrointestinal hemorrhage, however, may be associated with hospital racial composition. PMID:17913113

Pippins, Jennifer R.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Haas, Jennifer S.

2007-01-01

183

[Temporary cardiac pacing in patients with acute myocardial infarction in the conditions of air medical service].  

PubMed

Temporary electrical cardiac pacing in the conditions of air medical service was used in 183 patients with myocardial infarction complicated with life threatening disturbances of cardiac rhythm and conduction. Immediate results of treatment, complications, and causes of lethal outcomes are presented. Two groups of patients were distinguished: in which traditional and improved by authors methods of temporary electrical pacing were employed. It was established that the use in urgent situations of improved techniques of control of endocardial electrode position, transesophageal, cutaneous, and atrial dependent endocardial ventricular electrical pacing allowed to decrease number of complications 2.6 times, and to lower mortality in acute period of myocardial infarction by 12.8%. PMID:16883262

Cherkasov, V A; Protopopov, V V; Molodykh, S V

2006-01-01

184

Functional status and well-being of patients with chronic conditions. Results from the Medical Outcomes Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enhancing daily functioning and well-being is an increasingly advocated goal in the treatment of patients with chronic conditions. We evaluated the functioning and well-being of 9385 adults at the time of office visits to 362 physicians in three US cities, using brief surveys completed by both patients and physicians. For eight of nine common chronic medical conditions, patients with the

Anita L. Stewart; Sheldon Greenfield; Ron D. Hays; Kenneth Wells; William H. Rogers; Sandra D. Berry; Elizabeth A. McGlynn; Ware John E. Jr

1989-01-01

185

Which common clinical conditions should medical students be able to manage by graduation? A perspective from Australian interns  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY The objectives of the study were to report the devel- opment of a core curriculum that details the clinical conditions medical students should be able to manage upon graduation; and to canvass the opinion of interns (first-year postgraduate doctors) regarding their perceptions of the level of skill required to manage each condition. Literature relating to core curriculum development and

I. E. Rolfe; S.-A. Pearson; R. W. Sanson-Fisher; C. Ringland; S. Bayley; A. Hart; S. Kelly

2002-01-01

186

Comparative Effectiveness of Medications To Reduce Risk of Primary Breast Cancer in Women. Appendixes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of three medications--tamoxifen citrate, raloxifene, and tibolone--to reduce the risk of invasive breast cancer in women without pre-existing cancer. This therapy is sometimes referred to as chemopreve...

2009-01-01

187

Medical Request for Special Housing or Meal Plan Consideration Medical accommodations may be requested by students with physical and/or nutritional conditions. All requests will be reviewed on a  

E-print Network

assess this student's needs. Briefly describe the student's medical condition and resulting physicalMedical Request for Special Housing or Meal Plan Consideration Medical accommodations may be requested by students with physical and/or nutritional conditions. All requests will be reviewed on a case

Mather, Patrick T.

188

42 CFR 416.45 - Condition for coverage-Medical staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Medical staff. The medical staff of the ASC must be accountable to the governing body. (a) Standard: Membership and clinical...Standard: Other practitioners. If the ASC assigns patient care responsibilities to practitioners other than physicians,...

2011-10-01

189

42 CFR 416.45 - Condition for coverage-Medical staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Medical staff. The medical staff of the ASC must be accountable to the governing body. (a) Standard: Membership and clinical...Standard: Other practitioners. If the ASC assigns patient care responsibilities to practitioners other than physicians,...

2013-10-01

190

42 CFR 416.45 - Condition for coverage-Medical staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Medical staff. The medical staff of the ASC must be accountable to the governing body. (a) Standard: Membership and clinical...Standard: Other practitioners. If the ASC assigns patient care responsibilities to practitioners other than physicians,...

2010-10-01

191

42 CFR 416.45 - Condition for coverage-Medical staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Medical staff. The medical staff of the ASC must be accountable to the governing body. (a) Standard: Membership and clinical...Standard: Other practitioners. If the ASC assigns patient care responsibilities to practitioners other than physicians,...

2012-10-01

192

The Social and Ethical Implications of Changing Medical Technologies: The Views of People Living with Genetic Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents empirical data on subjective levels of health and quality of life for individuals with early- or late-onset genetic conditions. Twelve adults with an early-onset condition (cystic fibrosis) and 12 adults with a late-onset condition in the family (Huntington’s disease) participated in semi-structured interviews. Questions investigated perceptions of the body, quality of life and views on medical technology

Elizabeth Chapman

2002-01-01

193

The BPTI decamer observed in acidic pH crystal forms pre-exists as a stable species in solution 1 1 Edited by M. F. Moody  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) crystallizes under acidic pH conditions in the presence of thiocyanate, chloride and sulfate ions, yielding three different polymorphs in P21, P6422 and P6322 space groups, respectively. In all three crystal forms, the same decamer is found in the packing (ten BPTI molecules organized through two perpendicular 2-fold and 5-fold axes as a well-defined and compact

Cyril Hamiaux; Javier Pérez; Thierry Prangé; Stéphane Veesler; Madeleine Riès-Kautt; Patrice Vachette

2000-01-01

194

Trends, productivity losses, and associated medical conditions among toxoplasmosis deaths in the United States, 2000-2010.  

PubMed

Few studies have quantified toxoplasmosis mortality, associated medical conditions, and productivity losses in the United States. We examined national multiple cause of death data and estimated productivity losses caused by toxoplasmosis during 2000-2010. A matched case-control analysis examined associations between comorbid medical conditions and toxoplasmosis deaths. In total, 789 toxoplasmosis deaths were identified during the 11-year study period. Blacks and Hispanics had the highest toxoplasmosis mortality compared with whites. Several medical conditions were associated with toxoplasmosis deaths, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), lymphoma, leukemia, and connective tissue disorders. The number of toxoplasmosis deaths with an HIV codiagnosis declined from 2000 to 2010; the numbers without such a codiagnosis remained static. Cumulative disease-related productivity losses for the 11-year period were nearly $815 million. Although toxoplasmosis mortality has declined in the last decade, the infection remains costly and is an important cause of preventable death among non-HIV subgroups. PMID:25200264

Cummings, Patricia L; Kuo, Tony; Javanbakht, Marjan; Sorvillo, Frank

2014-11-01

195

The contribution of negative reproductive experiences and chronic medical conditions to depression and pain among Israeli women.  

PubMed

This study of 302 Israeli women sought to investigate the associations among stressful reproductive experiences (e.g. fertility problems, abortions, and traumatic births), chronic medical conditions, pain, and depression. The specific aims of the study were to examine (1) the effect of stressful reproductive experiences, chronic medical conditions, and pain on depressive symptoms and (2) the effect of stressful reproductive experiences, chronic medical conditions, and depressive symptoms on pain. Our findings corroborate with previous studies demonstrating that depression and pain are two interrelated, but different phenomena, which have both common and distinct risk factors. The findings are discussed in the light of stress and adaptation theories that point to the long-term effects of stressful life events on emotional and physiological aspects such as depression and pain. PMID:21745023

Sarid, Orly; Segal-Engelchin, Dorit; Cwikel, Julie

2012-01-01

196

What is expected of a medical director in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Conditions of Coverage?  

PubMed

The Medicare Conditions for Coverage for dialysis facilities, effective since 2008, make the medical director responsible for all levels of quality patient care in the facility. This includes issues such as water quality, infection control, staff education, policy/procedure development and implementation, dialyzer reuse, involuntary discharges, and patient safety. Most importantly, the medical director is the leader of the team responsible for quality assessment and performance improvement, which is central to the process of continuous quality improvement in the dialysis facility and the basis for much of Medicare's evaluation of facility performance. Through the measures assessment tool, the Conditions for Coverage specify the required domains for quality improvement activities in the dialysis facility, including dialysis adequacy, nutrition, bone disease, anemia management, vascular access, medical errors, patient satisfaction, and infection control. Under the leadership of the medical director, the quality assessment and performance improvement team identifies opportunities for improvement, tests and implements interventions, collects data, interprets results, and links system change with improved outcomes. These activities are rigorously documented and provide evidence to Medicare that the facility is acting responsibly to provide the best possible services for which it is being paid. The medical director is fairly compensated for his/her services by the facility, but must always act in the patients' best interest when evaluating policy changes directed at cost containment. The success of a medical director in shepherding positive change in a dialysis facility can be immensely satisfying as it impacts on patients other than his/her own. PMID:21228568

Wish, Jay B

2011-01-01

197

The Association of Pre-Existing Left Atrial Fibrosis with Clinical Variables in Patients Referred for Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence after ablation is associated with left atrial (LA) fibrosis on late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We sought to determine pre-ablation, clinical characteristics that associate with the extent of LA fibrosis in patients undergoing catheter ablation for AF. METHODS AND RESULTS Consecutive patients presenting for catheter ablation of AF were enrolled and underwent LGE-MRI prior to initial AF ablation. The extent of fibrosis as a percentage of total LA myocardium was calculated in all patients prior to ablation. The cohort was divided into quartiles based on the percentage of fibrosis. Of 60 patients enrolled in the cohort, 13 had <5% fibrosis (Group 1), 15 had 5–7% fibrosis (Group 2), 17 had 8–13% fibrosis (Group 3), and 15 had 14–36% fibrosis (Group 4). The extent of LA fibrosis was positively associated with time in continuous AF, and the presence of persistent or longstanding persistent AF. However, no statistically significant difference was observed in the presence of comorbid conditions, age, BMI, LA volume, or family history of AF among the four groups. After adjusting for diabetes and hypertension in a multivariable linear regression model, paroxysmal AF remained independently and negatively associated with the extent of fibrosis (?4.0 ± 1.8, P = 0.034). CONCLUSION The extent of LA fibrosis in patients undergoing AF ablation is associated with AF type and time in continuous AF. Our results suggest that the presence and duration of AF are primary determinants of increased atrial LGE. PMID:25368540

Dewire, Jane; Khurram, Irfan M; Pashakhanloo, Farhad; Spragg, David; Marine, Joseph E; Berger, Ronald D; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Rickard, John; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Calkins, Hugh; Nazarian, Saman

2014-01-01

198

Relations Of Income Inequality And Family Income To Chronic Medical Conditions And Mental Health Disorders: National Survey In USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To analyse the relation between geographical inequalities in income and the prevalence of common chronic medical conditions and mental health disorders, and to compare it with the relation between family income and these health problems. Design Nationally representative household telephone survey conducted in 1997-8. Setting 60 metropolitan areas or economic areas of the United States. Participants 9585 adults who

Roland Sturm; Carole Roan Gresenz

2002-01-01

199

Nine children over the age of one year with full trisomy 13: A case series describing medical conditions.  

PubMed

Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), identified by Patau and colleagues [1960; Lancet 1: 790-793] is the third most common autosomal condition. Population studies indicate less than one in 10 children reaches their first birthday. In the face of mixed findings and recommendations for treatment, additional research is needed to further determine what contributes to longevity and implications for treatment for presenting medical conditions. The purpose of the present study is to report on presenting medical conditions and the presence or absence of the specific conditions (age at survey completion). Data on nine survivors (seven female, two male) with trisomy 13 indicated mean gestational age of approximately 36?weeks, birth weight ranging from 1100 to 3290?g and mean length of 45.3?cm. Length of hospital stay after birth varied. The majority of infants presented with well-known physical characteristics. Medical conditions and their treatment varied at birth and at survey completion. Notably, several infants' cardiac anomalies resolved without surgical intervention. Surgeries were provided for a range of conditions including gastrostomy tube placement to address feeding issues and removal of intestinal blockage. There were no reports of holoprosencephaly. Implications and recommendations are provided. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25323598

Bruns, Deborah A; Campbell, Emily

2014-12-01

200

42 CFR 410.38 - Durable medical equipment: Scope and conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...requirements specified by CMS. (d) Medicare Part B pays for medically necessary equipment that is used for treatment of decubitus ulcers if— (1) The equipment is ordered in writing by the beneficiary's attending physician, or by a specialty physician...

2013-10-01

201

42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant under the supervision of a qualified social worker, and in accordance with the plan of care. The...

2010-10-01

202

42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant under the supervision of a qualified social worker, and in accordance with the plan of care. The...

2012-10-01

203

42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant under the supervision of a qualified social worker, and in accordance with the plan of care. The...

2013-10-01

204

42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant under the supervision of a qualified social worker, and in accordance with the plan of care. The...

2011-10-01

205

Disparities in the Reporting and Treatment of Health Conditions in Children: An Analysis of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine whether racial and ethnic disparities in health care use differ for physical and behavioral health conditions. Data Sources Secondary analysis of the 1996–1997 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of children aged 2–18 years old who were members of participating households. Children were categorized as Hispanic, black, or white. Differences in caregiver-reported behavioral and physical health conditions and services use were compared, and estimates were weighted to reflect the complex sampling scheme. Principal Findings Of eligible children weighted to represent over 44 million in each year, 13–15 percent were Hispanic, 14 percent black, and 68–70 percent white. After adjusting for potential confounding, Hispanic and black children were less likely to report externalizing behavioral conditions than white children. Black but not Hispanic children were more likely than white children to report asthma. In addition, Hispanic and black children were less likely to report ambulatory visits, and black children were less likely to report receiving a prescription medication than white children. There were no differences in reported emergency room visits or hospitalizations. Interactions between race and various health conditions, health status, insurance, and income were not significant. Conclusions In this nationally representative sample, we identified racial and ethnic disparities in the reporting of health conditions and the use of discretionary health services. Disparities differed between those with behavioral conditions and those with physical conditions. These disparities were not explained by traditional measures including the presence of health conditions, health status, insurance, and family income, and suggest that national surveys such as Medical Expenditure Panel Survey may benefit from the inclusion of additional explanatory measures. PMID:16584463

Guevara, James P; Mandell, David S; Rostain, Anthony L; Zhao, Huaqing; Hadley, Trevor R

2006-01-01

206

Prevalence of Chronic Medical Conditions in Adults with Mental Retardation: Comparison with the General Population.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study interviewed caregivers and reviewed medical records of 278 adults with mental retardation with and without Down syndrome. The adults with mental retardation had age-related disorders comparable to those in the general population, but there was an increased frequency of thyroid disorders, nonischemic heart disorders, and sensory impairment.…

Kapell, Deborah; Nightingale, Beryle; Rodriguez, Ana; Lee, Joseph H.; Zigman, Warren B.; Schupf, Nicole

1998-01-01

207

Manchester Clinical Placement Index (MCPI). Conditions for Medical Students' Learning in Hospital and Community Placements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The drive to quality-manage medical education has created a need for valid measurement instruments. Validity evidence includes the theoretical and contextual origin of items, choice of response processes, internal structure, and interrelationship of a measure's variables. This research set out to explore the validity and potential utility of an…

Dornan, Tim; Muijtjens, Arno; Graham, Jennifer; Scherpbier, Albert; Boshuizen, Henny

2012-01-01

208

Clinical effectiveness of influenza vaccination in persons younger than 65 years with high-risk medical conditions: the PRISMA Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Influenza vaccination has consistently been shown to prevent all-cause death and\\u000ahospitalizations during influenza epidemics among seniors. However, such benefits have not yet been demonstrated among younger individuals with high-risk medical conditions. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of influenza vaccine in persons recommended for vaccination of any age during an epidemic. METHODS: We conducted a case-control

E. Hak; E. Buskens; G. A. van Essen; D. H. de Bakker; D. E. Grobbee; M. A. J. B. Tacken; B. A. van Hout; Th. J. M. Verheij

2005-01-01

209

therapeuticsAntibiotic prescribing for dental conditions: general medical practitioners and dentists compared  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To compare the level of prescribing and types of antibiotics prescribed for dental problems by general medical practitioners and dentists.Design Secondary analysis of standard consultation data and prescription records from four different settings.Setting 30 participating general practices in the General Practice Morbidity Database for Wales in 1996.Subjects 1,185 attendances for tooth-related problems, at 30 participating practices in the General

R Anderson; L Calder; D W Thomas

2000-01-01

210

SCINTILLATION DETECTORS FOR MEDICAL AND BIOLOGY APPLICATIONS: MATERIALS, DESIGN AND LIGHT COLLECTION CONDITIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ways for the improvement of operation characteristics are considered for the following scintillators: long LSO(Ce) pixels\\u000a for positron emission tomographs; small prism-shaped CdWO4 crystals for X-ray computer tomography; large thin NaI(Tl) plates for medical gammacameras. The optimization process is based\\u000a on the simulation of light collection process, which involves the choice of the crystal shape, the way of the crystal,

Margaryta Globus; Borys Grinyov

211

[Investigation of actual condition of management and disposal of medical radioactive waste in Korea].  

PubMed

In order to realize the rational management and disposal of radioactive waste like DIS or its clearance as performed in Europe, North America, and Japan, we investigated the situation of medical radioactive waste in Korea and its enforcement. We visited three major Korean facilities in May 2008 and confirmed details of the procedure being used by administering a questionnaire after our visit. From the results, we were able to verify that the governmental agency had established regulations for the clearance of radioactive waste as self-disposal based on the clearance level of IAEA in Korea and that the medical facilities performed suitable management and disposal of radioactive waste based on the regulations and superintendence of a radiation safety officer. The type of nuclear medicine was almost the same as that in Japan, and the half-life of all radiopharmaceuticals was 60 days or less. While performing regulatory adjustment concerning the rational management and disposal of radioactive waste in Korea for reference also in this country, it is important to provide an enforcement procedure with quality assurance in the regulations. PMID:19661730

Watanabe, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Horiuchi, Shoji; Imoto, Atsushi

2009-07-20

212

Psychological aspects of painful medical conditions in children. I. Developmental aspects and assessment.  

PubMed

The assessment and development of pain in children is reviewed in the first part of a two-part series. Assessment of pain in children has relied on self-report measures that have included visual analogue procedures using concrete stimuli for ratings. Behavioral assessment procedures are more sophisticated, but research on behavioral assessment of pediatric pain has begun to emergy only recently. There has been very little research on the developmental aspects of pain tolerance and pain threshold in children. There are preliminary indications that children's thoughts and attitudes about pain may change with age in a manner that contributes to more intense feelings of pain in adolescence than childhood. Children undergoing painful medical procedures show declining emotional outbursts with age and increasing signs of self-control and muscular rigidity. Possibilities for integrating the study of the developmental aspects of pain with social learning theory, cognitive developmental theory, and the psychology of physical symptom perception are discussed. PMID:3540810

Lavigne, J V; Schulein, M J; Hahn, Y S

1986-11-01

213

[Miranda de Ebro: Medical condition of the concentration camp in the autumn of 1943].  

PubMed

Georges Morin's thesis (Algiers January 4 1944) allows to understand the sanitary conditions of the refugee camp at Miranda De Ebro (Spain) in the fall 1943. To avoid the Nazi occupation and the Obligatory Work Service in Germany 18,000 French got in Spain in 1943 and 10,000 including 39 physicians came through Miranda. The French were the majority and they created a Health Service separate from the official Spanish Health Service. The general dirtiness, the lack of water, the rudimentary conditions of lodging, the inadequacy and imbalance of food provoked two diseases among the young men: scabies and the so-called "mirandite" that is to say all the diarrheic diseases in the camp. Despite hard conditions of living the death rate in the camp remained smaller than crossing the Pyrenees from France where the danger threatened the escaped men. PMID:19230323

Héraut, Louis-Armand

2008-01-01

214

Apparatus for detecting at least one predetermined condition and providing an informational signal in response thereto in a medication infusion system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A medication infusion system provides redundant safety and includes condition detecting and informational alarm signal generating apparatus for indicating if (1) a fluid leak occurs in different portions of the system; (2) a programmable input from a patient or physician would result in exceeding a safe dosage limit; (3) the reservoir containing medication has been filled; (4) the intended medication pumping does not correlate with the pumping actually effected; (5) battery voltage is low; (6) the medication reserve is low; and (7) the system has been switched off. The apparatus may provide subcutaneous electrical, thermal, or audible stimulation to the patient and also provides a signal which a physician may monitor. The stimulation may be coded to separately identify each above-listed deviation in nominal system performance. In addition, the number of medication requests are correlated with actual medication dispensing to assure proper operation. An identification scheme is provided which matches the patient with his or her corresponding medication.

Fischell, Robert E. (Inventor)

1986-01-01

215

Certification of Health Care Provider for Family Member's Serious Health Condition Family and Medical Leave Act ("FMLA") & California Family Rights Act ("CFRA")  

E-print Network

and Medical Leave Act ("FMLA") & California Family Rights Act ("CFRA") PURPOSE of FORM: The below-named employee has requested a leave of absence to care for a family member with a health condition, which may qualify as a protected leave under the FMLA and/or CFRA. This medical certification form will provide

Leistikow, Bruce N.

216

Collaborative care: models for treatment of patients with complex medical-psychiatric conditions.  

PubMed

Patients with co-morbidity and multi-morbidity have worse outcomes and greater healthcare needs. Co-morbid depression and other long-term conditions present health services with challenges in delivering effective care for patients. We provide some recent evidence from the literature to support the need for collaborative care, illustrated by practical examples of how to deliver a collaborative/integrated care continuum by presenting data collected between 2011 and 2012 from a London Borough clinical improvement programme that compared co-morbid diagnosis of depression and other long-term conditions and Accident and Emergency use. We have provided some practical steps for developing collaborative care within primary care and suggest that primary care family practices should adopt closer collaboration with other services in order to improve clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness. PMID:25218604

Ivbijaro, Gabriel O; Enum, Yaccub; Khan, Anwar Ali; Lam, Simon Sai-Kei; Gabzdyl, Andrei

2014-11-01

217

Predictors of all-cause mortality in patients with stable COPD: medical co-morbid conditions or high depressive symptoms.  

PubMed

Co-morbid conditions are frequently found in patients with COPD. We evaluate the association of co-morbidities with mortality, in stable COPD. 224 patients, mean age 61.2 (± 10.00), 48.2% female, mean FEV1 1.1 (± 0.5) liters, median follow-up time 4.2 years, participated. Medical co-morbidities were scored according to the Charlson Co-morbidity Index (CCI). Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90). The Cox proportional hazard model was used for survival analyses. In our sample, 70% of all patients have a co-morbid medical condition or high depressive symptoms. During follow-up 51% of all patients died, and those with heart failure have the highest mortality rate (75%). Age, fat-free mass and exercise capacity were predictive factors, contrary to CCI-scores and high depressive symptoms. An unadjusted association between heart failure and survival was found. Although the presence of co-morbidities, using the CCI-score, is not related to survival, heart failure seems to have a detrimental effect on survival. Higher age and lower exercise capacity or fat-free mass predict mortality. PMID:24831411

Maters, Gemma A; de Voogd, Jacob N; Sanderman, Robbert; Wempe, Johan B

2014-08-01

218

Emergency Medical Services Outcomes Project I (EMSOP I): Prioritizing Conditions for Outcomes Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past several years, out-of-hospital EMS have come under increased scrutiny regarding the value of the range of EMS as currently provided. We used frequency data and expert opinion to rank-order EMS conditions for children and adults based on their potential value for the study of effectiveness of EMS care. Relief of discomfort was the outcome parameter EMS professionals

Ronald F Maio; Herbert G Garrison; Daniel W Spaite; Jeffrey S Desmond; Mary Ann Gregor; C. Gene Cayten; John L Chew; Elizabeth M Hill; Steven M Joyce; Ellen J MacKenzie; David R Miller; Patricia J O’Malley; Ian G Stiell

1999-01-01

219

Survey of medical ethnobotanicals for dental and oral medicine conditions and pathologies.  

PubMed

Ethnomedical questionnaires were distributed in Chicago, Costa Rica, and Colombia to identify the most common over-the-counter (OTC) plant or plant-based products advocated for treating oral pain, ulcerative conditions, and cancer within these locations. Over 100 plants or plant-based herbal preparations and commercial products, purchased from local botanical markets and pharmacies, were advocated for the treatment of oral medicine conditions. Locally familiar and common language names were attributed to the plant products at the time of purchase. Plant products or plant-based commercial products containing plant-based essential oils, anesthetic constituents, and or chemical compounds recommended as OTC oral medicine preparations were systematized, tabulated, and correlated with the published phytotherapeutic literature. Though pharmacognostic research is available for some of the species collected, further ethnographic research is needed to correlate common names with the accurate taxonomic identification for each plant species. Furthermore, epidemiological research is needed to verify the use and standardized dosage for OTC ethnomedicine preparations for oral medicine conditions. Pharmacognostic research and clinical trails which can verify taxonomy, dose, safety, active principles, and efficacy of these OTC oral medicine products must be enhanced in order to verify the claimed validity in contemporary, global, oral medicine practice. PMID:16735102

Colvard, Michael D; Cordell, Geoffrey A; Villalobos, Rodrigo; Sancho, Gina; Soejarto, Doel D; Pestle, William; Echeverri, Tatiana Lobo; Perkowitz, Kathleen M; Michel, Joanna

2006-08-11

220

Taking Medication  

MedlinePLUS

... Educator Questions, Comments, Concerns? 800 . 338 . 3633 Taking Medication Diabetes is a progressive condition. Depending on what ... healthcare team will be able to determine which medications they should be taking and help them understand ...

221

Pharmacological modulation of caspase-8 in thymus-related medical conditions.  

PubMed

The thymus is a lymphoid organ that governs the development of a diverse T-cell repertoire capable of defending against nonself-antigens and avoiding autoimmunity. However, the thymus can also succumb to different diseases. Hypertrophic diseases, such as thymomas, are typically associated with impairment of negative selection, which leads to autoimmune disease, or disruption of positive selection, which results in immunodeficiency. Hypotrophic diseases of the thymus can manifest during acute infections, cancer, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, or with aging. This condition leads to decreased immune function and can be treated by either replacing lost thymic tissue or by preventing thymic tissue death. Studies have demonstrated the critical role of caspase-8 in regulating apoptosis in the thymus. In this review, we discuss how pharmacological activation and inhibition of caspase-8 can be used to treat hypertrophic and hypotrophic diseases of the thymus, respectively, to improve its function. PMID:25060674

Pozzesi, Nicola; Fierabracci, Alessandra; Thuy, Trinh Thy; Martelli, Maria Paola; Liberati, Anna Marina; Ayroldi, Emira; Riccardi, Carlo; Delfino, Domenico V

2014-10-01

222

Special medical conditions associated with catatonia in the internal medicine setting: hyponatremia-inducing psychosis and subsequent catatonia.  

PubMed

Diagnosis and treatment of catatonia in the psychiatry consultation service is not infrequent. Usually, the patient either presents to the Emergency Department or develops catatonia on the medical floor. This condition manifests with significant behavioral changes (from mildly decreased speech output to complete mutism) that interfere with the ability to communicate. After structural brain disorders are excluded, one of the diagnoses that always should be considered is catatonia. However, the causes of catatonia are numerous, ranging from psychiatric causes to a plethora of medical illnesses. Therefore, it is not surprising that there are many proposed underlying mechanisms of catatonia and that controversy persists about the etiology of specific cases.There are only 6 reports of hyponatremia-induced catatonia and psychosis in the literature. Here, we present the case of a 30-year-old woman with catatonia and psychosis induced by hyponatremia, and we use this report to exemplify the multitude of biologic causes of catatonia and to propose a new way to look at the neuroanatomical basis of processing, particularly the vertical processing systems we believe are involved in catatonia. PMID:25102520

Novac, Andrei A; Bota, Daniela; Witkowski, Joanne; Lipiz, Jorge; Bota, Robert G

2014-01-01

223

Syndromes of Brain Dysfunction Presenting with Cognitive Impairment or Behavioral Disturbance: Delirium, Dementia, and Mental Disorders Caused by a General Medical Condition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The disorders under consideration are the result of identifiable conditions. Historically, an arbitrary distinction has been\\u000a made between “organic” conditions, associated with a presumably clear pathological basis, and “functional” conditions, or\\u000a psychiatric disorders that lacked obvious disease processes. Delirium, however, is a disorder of cognitive dysfunction that\\u000a lacks a well-understood pathophysiology despite unequivocal association with multiple and various medical conditions.

Keith E. Isenberg; Keith Garcia

224

Do(es) your child(ren) have any medical conditions, special needs or take any medication we need to be aware of? Street City State Zip  

E-print Network

/breast milk/infant cereal and baby food; IC3 provides apple juice and finger foods such as Cheerios.) Please _____________________ to ______________________ (date/time) (date/time) MEDICAL INFORMATION My child is completely immunized for his/her age: YES

225

Frontal White Matter Alterations in Short-Term Medicated Panic Disorder Patients without Comorbid Conditions: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study  

PubMed Central

The frontal cortex might play an important role in the fear network, and white matter (WM) integrity could be related to the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD). A few studies have investigated alterations of WM integrity in PD. The aim of this study was to determine frontal WM integrity differences between patients with PD without comorbid conditions and healthy control (HC) subjects by using diffusion tensor imaging. Thirty-six patients with PD who had used medication within 1 week and 27 age- and sex-matched HC subjects participated in this study. Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all participants. Panic Disorder Severity Scale and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) scores were assessed. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was used for image analysis. TBSS analysis showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in frontal WM and WM around the frontal lobe, including the corpus callosum of both hemispheres, in patients with PD compared to HC subjects. Moreover, voxel-wise correlation analysis revealed that the BAI scores for patients with PD were positively correlated with their FA values for regions showing group differences in the FA of frontal WM of both hemispheres. Altered integrity in frontal WM of patients with PD without comorbid conditions might represent the structural pathophysiology in these patients, and these changes could be related to clinical symptoms of PD. PMID:24788587

Kim, Borah; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Kang Soo; Kim, Youngki; Choi, Tai Kiu; Kim, Yun Tai; Lee, Sang-Hyuk

2014-01-01

226

Apparatus for detecting a condition of a medication infusion system and providing an informational signal in response thereto  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A medication infusion system having a means for providing an informational signal when (1) medication in the reservoir falls below a threshold level; (2) a fluid leak occurs in different portions of the system; and (3) the intended medication pumping does not correlate with the pumping actually affected.

Fischell, Robert E. (Inventor)

1988-01-01

227

In addition to a healthy lifestyle, preventive medications can help people avoid many illnesses and conditions. A consumer-directed health (CDH) plan that includes preventive medications can help support the goal of ongoing  

E-print Network

and conditions. A consumer-directed health (CDH) plan that includes preventive medications can help support be added to or removed from the list based on different factors, including the intended purpose for prevention and sometimes for treatment. ANEMIA IN CHILDREN FERROUS SULFATE LIQUID DROPS FOR INFANTS (SUCH

Jiang, Wen

228

Concurrent Medical Conditions and Health Care Use and Needs among Children with Learning and Behavioral Developmental Disabilities, National Health Interview Survey, 2006-2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies document various associated health risks for children with developmental disabilities (DDs). Further study is needed by disability type. Using the 2006-2010 National Health Interview Surveys, we assessed the prevalence of numerous medical conditions (e.g. asthma, frequent diarrhea/colitis, seizures), health care use measures (e.g. seeing a…

Schieve, Laura A.; Gonzalez, Vanessa; Boulet, Sheree L.; Visser, Susanna N.; Rice, Catherine E.; Braun, Kim Van Naarden; Boyle, Coleen A.

2012-01-01

229

Preventing Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Information for Older Adults and Their Caregivers  

MedlinePLUS

... CO poisoning due to their high frequency of pre-existing medical conditions. 1 While CO alarms can ... poisoned by carbon monoxide exposure. Older adults with pre-existing conditions, such as chronic heart disease, anemia, ...

230

Medical Assistants  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For a concise summary of the medical assistant profession the Medical Assistants entry in the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook is must read. The site covers topics ranging from the nature of the profession, working conditions, earnings, and more. The section on training, qualifications and advancement will be of special interest to medical assistant faculty and students. The section on sources of addition information will also be a good launching point for anyone seeking additional online resources.

2006-11-01

231

The impact of diabetes mellitus and other chronic medical conditions on health-related Quality of Life: Is the whole greater than the sum of its parts?  

PubMed Central

Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important public health concern, the impact of which is increased by the high prevalence of co-existing chronic medical conditions among subjects with DM. The aims of this study were therefore to (1) evaluate the impact of DM and co-existing chronic medical conditions on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) (which could be additive, synergistic or subtractive); (2) to determine the extent to which the SF-6D (a single-index preference measure) captures the multidimensional information provided by the SF-36 (a profile measure). Methods Using data from a cross-sectional, population-based survey of Chinese, Malay and Indians in Singapore, we developed 9 separate multiple linear regression models, with each SF-36 scale or SF-6D index score being the dependent variable for one model. The influence of DM and a second chronic medical condition (hypertension (HTN), heart disease (HD), musculoskeletal illnesses (MS)) and their interactions were studied after adjusting for the influence of potential confounding variables. Results Among 5,224 subjects, the prevalence of DM, HTN, HD and MS were 5.9%, 10.7%, 2.4% and 26.6% respectively. DM lowered SF-36 scores by more than 2 points on 3 SF-36 scales and lowered SF-6D scores by 0.03 points. Subjects with DM and HTN, DM and HD or DM and MS experienced further lowering of SF-36 scores exceeding 2 points on at least 6 scales and further lowering of SF-6D scores by 0.05, 0.08 and 0.10 points respectively. Generally, DM and co-existing medical conditions exerted additive effects on HRQoL, with the exception of DM and heart disease, where a subtractive effect was noted. SF-6D index scores generally reflected the patterns of influence of DM and chronic medical conditions on SF-36 scores. Conclusion DM and chronic medical conditions generally reduced HRQoL in this multiethnic general population in an additive, rather than synergistic or subtractive fashion. In this study, the SF-6D was a reasonably good summary measure for the SF-36. PMID:15644146

Wee, Hwee-Lin; Cheung, Yin-Bun; Li, Shu-Chuen; Fong, Kok-Yong; Thumboo, Julian

2005-01-01

232

The biostatistical theory versus the harmful dysfunction analysis, part 1: is part-dysfunction a sufficient condition for medical disorder?  

PubMed

Christopher Boorse's biostatistical theory of medical disorder claims that biological part-dysfunction (i.e., failure of an internal mechanism to perform its biological function), a factual criterion, is both necessary and sufficient for disorder. Jerome Wakefield's harmful dysfunction analysis of medical disorder agrees that part-dysfunction is necessary but rejects the sufficiency claim, maintaining that disorder also requires that the part-dysfunction causes harm to the individual, a value criterion. In this paper, I present two considerations against the sufficiency claim. First, I analyze Boorse's central argument for the sufficiency claim, the "pathologist argument," which takes pathologists' intuitions about pathology as determinative of medical disorder and conclude that it begs the question and fails to support the sufficiency claim. Second, I present four counterexamples from the medical literature in which salient part-dysfunctions are considered nondisorders, including healthy disease carriers, HIV-positive status, benign mutations, and situs inversus totalis, thus falsifying the sufficiency claim and supporting the harm criterion. PMID:25336733

Wakefield, Jerome C

2014-12-01

233

Levodopa medication does not influence motor inhibition or conflict resolution in a conditional stop-signal task in Parkinson’s disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence from animal, clinical, and imaging studies suggests that the basal ganglia and their frontal connections mediate\\u000a motor inhibition, but the role of dopamine remains unclear. The aim of our study was to investigate, for the first time, whether\\u000a levodopa medication influences motor inhibition and conflict resolution on the conditional stop-signal reaction time task\\u000a in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD)

Ignacio Obeso; Leonora Wilkinson; Marjan Jahanshahi

234

Medical Transcriptionists: Making Medical Histories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medical transcriptionists are experts in the language of medicine. Describes what they do and what their working conditions, earnings, employment prospects, and training requirements are. Includes sources of additional information. (Author)

Shniper, Lynn

2001-01-01

235

Familial and Personal Medical History of Cancer and Nervous System Conditions among Adults with Glioma and Controls  

Microsoft Academic Search

The causes of glioma, the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor, are poorly understood. This study compared the personal and first-degree familial medical histones of 462 adults newly diagnosed with glioma in the San Francisco Bay Area between August 1,1991, and March 31,1994, with those of 443 controls who were frequency-matched on age, sex, and ethnicity. Cases and

Margaret Wrensch; Marion Lee; Rei Mnke; Beth Newman; Geoffrey Barger; Richard Davis; John Wiencke; John Neuhaus

236

Integrating Care for People With Co-Occurring Alcohol and Other Drug, Medical, and Mental Health Conditions  

PubMed Central

Most people with alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders suffer from co-occurring disorders (CODs), including mental health and medical problems, which complicate treatment and may contribute to poorer outcomes. However, care for the patients’ AOD, mental health, and medical problems primarily is provided in separate treatment systems, and integrated care addressing all of a patient’s CODs in a coordinated fashion is the exception in most settings. A variety of barriers impede further integration of care for patients with CODs. These include differences in education and training of providers in the different fields, organizational factors, existing financing mechanisms, and the stigma still often associated with AOD use disorders and CODs. However, many programs are recognizing the disadvantages of separate treatment systems and are attempting to increase integrative approaches. Although few studies have been done in this field, findings suggest that patients receiving integrated treatment may have improved outcomes. However, the optimal degree of integration to ensure that patients with all types and degrees of severity of CODs receive appropriate care still remains to be determined, and barriers to the implementation of integrative models, such as one proposed by the Institute of Medicine, remain. PMID:23580018

Sterling, Stacy; Chi, Felicia; Hinman, Agatha

2011-01-01

237

Patient's condition--severe but stable. The press and the medical community: mutual expectations surrounding the health of national leaders.  

PubMed

A value system that espouses the right of an individual to guard his privacy has moral, theoretical and practical validity, while equal weight must be given, morally, conceptually and socially, to a concept that extols freedom of expression and the public's right to know. The built-in contradiction between these two schools of thought is expressed, inter alia, in the inter-relationship between the media and the medical community when the health of a national leader ceases to be his private affair and becomes the legitimate concern of the public. In Israel, no set rules exist regarding how such situations are reported. This article aims to suggest such a procedure. PMID:17180827

Benziman, Uzi

2006-11-01

238

Multiple Chronic Medical Conditions and Health-Related Quality of Life in Older Adults, 2004-2006  

PubMed Central

Introduction Understanding longitudinal relationships among multiple chronic conditions, limitations in activities of daily living, and health-related quality of life is important for identifying potential opportunities for health promotion and disease prevention among older adults. Methods This study assessed longitudinal associations between multiple chronic conditions and limitations in activities of daily living on health-related quality of life among older adults (?65 years) from 2004 through 2006, using data from the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (N = 27,334). Results Using a longitudinal path model, we found the numbers of chronic conditions at baseline and 2-year follow-up were independently associated with more limitations in activities of daily living at 2-year follow-up. In addition, more limitations in activities of daily living at 2-year follow-up were associated with worse health-related quality of life during the follow-up time period. The association between multiple chronic conditions and indices of health-related quality of life was mediated by changes in limitations in activities of daily living. Conclusion Both baseline and new multiple chronic conditions led to worse health in terms of activities of daily living and health-related quality of life and should be considered important outcomes to intervene on for improved long-term health. In addition, public health practitioners should consider addressing classes of multiple chronic conditions by using interventions designed to reduce the emergence of multiple chronic conditions, such as physical activity, reductions in smoking rates, and improved and coordinated access to health care services. PMID:24070034

Thompson, William W.; Zack, Matthew M.; Krahn, Gloria L.; Horner-Johnson, Willi; Bowen, Sonya E.

2013-01-01

239

42 CFR 484.18 - Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...adequately by the agency in the patient's place of residence...items. If a physician refers a patient under a plan of care that...therapy services include the specific procedures and modalities...often as the severity of the patient's condition...

2010-10-01

240

Sociodemographic characteristics and chronic medical conditions as risk factors for herpes zoster: A population-based study from primary care in Madrid (Spain).  

PubMed

The objectives of this study were to estimate incidence density rates (IDR) of herpes zoster (HZ) and to analyze the association with sociodemographic characteristics and selected chronic medical conditions. The study cohort consisted of the adult population included in the Public Health System of the Autonomous Community of Madrid, Spain on 1/10/2009 (5?244?402 persons). Data source were electronic medical records from primary care between 1/10/2009-31/12/2012. Individual socioeconomic status (SES) was inferred by geocoding. Poisson regression analyses were stratified by sex, to identify factors associated with HZ. We identified 81?541 incident cases of HZ (61.7% in women and 46.5% in the group aged 60 and over). IDR was 4.11 per 1000 person-years in men and 5.95 in women. IDR were higher with age, in autochthonous population, those with lower SES and in patients with immunodeficiencies. After adjustment, higher incidence rate ratios were found with age, autochthonous origin, lower SES, and in patients with HIV-infection/AIDS (3.20, CI95% 2.90-3.53 in men and 2.98, CI95% 2.58-3.45 in women), and other immunodeficiencies (1.57, CI95% 1.41-1.75 and 1.65, CI95% 1.50-1.80). COPD, asthma, DM, ischemic heart disease, other cardiovascular diseases, and cancer were also associated with an increased incidence of HZ. We conclude that older, autochthonous patients with lower SES and with certain underlying medical conditions had a higher probability of suffering HZ. Electronic databases are useful for estimating the incidence of HZ, and for finding associations with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Identifying unrecognized risk factors for HZ, such as asthma or cardiovascular diseases, is crucial to interpret the epidemiology of HZ, to target vaccination programs and to monitor their effect. PMID:24805130

Esteban-Vasallo, María D; Domínguez-Berjón, M Felicitas; Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Astray-Mochales, Jenaro; Gil de Miguel, Angel

2014-06-01

241

Imagining life with an ostomy: Does a video intervention improve quality-of-life predictions for a medical condition that may elicit disgust??  

PubMed Central

Objective To test a video intervention as a way to improve predictions of mood and quality-of-life with an emotionally evocative medical condition. Such predictions are typically inaccurate, which can be consequential for decision making. Method In Part 1, people presently or formerly living with ostomies predicted how watching a video depicting a person changing his ostomy pouch would affect mood and quality-of-life forecasts for life with an ostomy. In Part 2, participants from the general public read a description about life with an ostomy; half also watched a video depicting a person changing his ostomy pouch. Participants’ quality-of-life and mood forecasts for life with an ostomy were assessed. Results Contrary to our expectations, and the expectations of people presently or formerly living with ostomies, the video did not reduce mood or quality-of-life estimates, even among participants high in trait disgust sensitivity. Among low-disgust participants, watching the video increased quality-of-life predictions for ostomy. Conclusion Video interventions may improve mood and quality-of-life forecasts for medical conditions, including those that may elicit disgust, such as ostomy. Practice implications Video interventions focusing on patients’ experience of illness continue to show promise as components of decision aids, even for emotionally charged health states such as ostomy. PMID:23177398

Angott, Andrea M.; Comerford, David A.; Ubel, Peter A.

2014-01-01

242

Special conditions: modified Boeing Model 767-200 and -300 series airplanes; installation of a medical oxygen system utilizing liquid oxygen--Federal Aviation Administration. Final special conditions; request for comments.  

PubMed

These special conditions are issued to E-Systems for design of Civil Reserve Air Fleet aeromedical evacuation ship set kits used to modify Boeing Model 767-200 and -300 series airplanes. Removal of existing passenger seats and installation of the kit will result in these airplanes being equipped with an aeromedical evacuation interior that can accommodate up to 111 litter patients and their attendants. The aeromedical evacuation ship set kit includes an additional oxygen system, utilizing liquid oxygen for storage, that provides medical oxygen for the litter patients. The applicable regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for the design and installation of liquid oxygen systems. These special conditions contain the additional safety standards which the Administrator considers necessary to ensure that the design and installation of the liquid oxygen system is such that a level of safety equal to that intended by the applicable regulations is provided. PMID:10111149

1991-03-29

243

Action Rules Discovery without Pre-existing Classification Rules  

Microsoft Academic Search

Action rules describe possible transitions of objects from one state to another with respect to a distinguished attribute.\\u000a Previous research on action rule discovery usually requires the extraction of classification rules before constructing any\\u000a action rule. In this paper, we present a new algorithm that discovers action rules directly from a decision system. It is\\u000a a bottom-up strategy which has

Zbigniew W. Ras; Agnieszka Dardzinska

2008-01-01

244

Environmental Taxes and Pre-Existing Distortions: The Normalization Trap  

Microsoft Academic Search

The double-dividend hypothesisclaims that green taxes will both improve the environment andreduce the distortions of existing taxes. According to the earlierliterature on the double dividend the tax rate for pollutinggoods should be higher than the Pigovian tax which fully internalizesthe marginal social damage from pollution, in order to obtaina ’second dividend‘. On the contrary, Bovenberg and de Mooij(1994) argue that

Ronnie Schöb

1997-01-01

245

Health-related quality of life measurements in elderly Canadians with osteoporosis compared to other chronic medical conditions: a population-based study from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this research was to determine the relative decrement in health-related quality of life, as measured by the health utilities index mark 3 (HUI3), in osteoporosis compared to other chronic medical conditions. The impact of chronic medical conditions other than osteoporosis on HUI3 measurements had been previously established in the 1996\\/1997 Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS). The Canadian

A. M. Sawka; L. Thabane; A. Papaioannou; A. Gafni; G. Ioannidis; E. A. Papadimitropoulos; W. M. Hopman; A. Cranney; D. A. Hanley; L. Pickard; J. D. Adachi

2005-01-01

246

Weather conditions and visits to the medical wing of emergency rooms in a metropolitan area during the warm season in Israel: a predictive model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global climate changes affect health and present new challenges to healthcare systems. The aim of the present study was to analyze the pattern of visits to the medical wing of emergency rooms (ERs) in public hospitals during warm seasons, and to develop a predictive model that will forecast the number of visits to ERs 2 days ahead. Data on daily visits to the ERs of the four largest medical centers in the Tel-Aviv metropolitan area during the warm months of the year (April-October, 2001-2004), the corresponding daily meteorological data, daily electrical power consumption (a surrogate marker for air-conditioning), air-pollution parameters, and calendar information were obtained and used in the analyses. The predictive model employed a time series analysis with transitional Poisson regression. The concise multivariable model was highly accurate ( r 2 = 0.819). The contribution of mean daily temperature was small but significant: an increase of 1°C in ambient temperature was associated with a 1.47% increase in the number of ER visits ( P < 0.001). An increase in electrical power consumption significantly attenuated the effect of weather conditions on ER visits by 4% per 1,000 MWh ( P < 0.001). Higher daily mean SO2 concentrations were associated with a greater number of ER visits (1% per 1 ppb increment; P = 0.017). Calendar data were the main predictors of ER visits ( r 2 = 0.794). The predictive model was highly accurate in forecasting the number of visits to ERs 2 days ahead. The marginal effect of temperature on the number of ER visits can be attributed to behavioral adaptations, including the use of air-conditioning.

Novikov, Ilya; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra; Chetrit, Angela; Stav, Nir; Epstein, Yoram

2012-01-01

247

The effect of different storage conditions on the physical properties of pigmented medical grade I silicone maxillofacial material.  

PubMed

Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different storage solutions that simulate acidic, alkaline, and sebum conditiions on the physical properties of pigmented (colorant elastomer) cosmesil M511 maxillofacial prosthetic material. Materials and Methods. Sixty specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions and were tested before and after immersion of different storage conditions for six months at 37?°C. The following tests were performed: color changes (group I), solution absorption (group II), surface roughness (group III), and scanning electron microscopy (group IV). Results. There were no significant changes observed in the color and solution absorption tests while surface roughness revealed significant difference between control group and other testing storage medium groups, and this result was supported by SEM analysis that revealed limited surface changes. Conclusions. Cosmaseil material is an acceptable cross-linked formulation that withstands storage in different solutions with variable pH. The addition of pigment cannot vary the physical properties of these materials. Surface roughness test as well as SEM microscopic study showed moderate changes indicating a limited effect on the surface of the material. PMID:23606978

Al-Dharrab, Ayman A; Tayel, Seham B; Abodaya, Mona H

2013-01-01

248

The Effect of Different Storage Conditions on the Physical Properties of Pigmented Medical Grade I Silicone Maxillofacial Material  

PubMed Central

Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different storage solutions that simulate acidic, alkaline, and sebum conditiions on the physical properties of pigmented (colorant elastomer) cosmesil M511 maxillofacial prosthetic material. Materials and Methods. Sixty specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions and were tested before and after immersion of different storage conditions for six months at 37?°C. The following tests were performed: color changes (group I), solution absorption (group II), surface roughness (group III), and scanning electron microscopy (group IV). Results. There were no significant changes observed in the color and solution absorption tests while surface roughness revealed significant difference between control group and other testing storage medium groups, and this result was supported by SEM analysis that revealed limited surface changes. Conclusions. Cosmaseil material is an acceptable cross-linked formulation that withstands storage in different solutions with variable pH. The addition of pigment cannot vary the physical properties of these materials. Surface roughness test as well as SEM microscopic study showed moderate changes indicating a limited effect on the surface of the material. PMID:23606978

Al-Dharrab, Ayman A.; Tayel, Seham B.; Abodaya, Mona H.

2013-01-01

249

Treatment non-adherence in pediatric long-term medical conditions: systematic review and synthesis of qualitative studies of caregivers' views  

PubMed Central

Background Non-adherence to prescribed treatments is the primary cause of treatment failure in pediatric long-term conditions. Greater understanding of parents and caregivers’ reasons for non-adherence can help to address this problem and improve outcomes for children with long-term conditions. Methods We carried out a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative studies. Medline, Embase, Cinahl and PsycInfo were searched for relevant studies published in English and German between 1996 and 2011. Papers were included if they contained qualitative data, for example from interviews or focus groups, reporting the views of parents and caregivers of children with a range of long-term conditions on their treatment adherence. Papers were quality assessed and analysed using thematic synthesis. Results Nineteen papers were included reporting 17 studies with caregivers from 423 households in five countries. Long-term conditions included; asthma, cystic fibrosis, HIV, diabetes and juvenile arthritis. Across all conditions caregivers were making on-going attempts to balance competing concerns about the treatment (such as perceived effectiveness or fear of side effects) with the condition itself (for instance perceived long-term threat to child). Although the barriers to implementing treatment regimens varied across the different conditions (including complexity and time-consuming nature of treatments, un-palatability and side-effects of medications), it was clear that caregivers worked hard to overcome these day-to-day challenges and to deal with child resistance to treatments. Yet, carers reported that strict treatment adherence, which is expected by health professionals, could threaten their priorities around preserving family relationships and providing a ‘normal life’ for their child and any siblings. Conclusions Treatment adherence in long-term pediatric conditions is a complex issue which needs to be seen in the context of caregivers balancing the everyday needs of the child within everyday family life. Health professionals may be able to help caregivers respond positively to the challenge of treatment adherence for long-term conditions by simplifying treatment regimens to minimise impact on family life and being aware of difficulties around child resistance and supportive of strategies to attempt to overcome this. Caregivers would also welcome help with communicating with children about treatment goals. PMID:24593304

2014-01-01

250

Clinical implications and validity of nursing assessments: a longitudinal measure of patient condition from analysis of the Electronic Medical Record  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study investigates risk of mortality associated with nurses’ assessments of patients by physiological system. We hypothesise that nursing assessments of in-patients performed at entry correlate with in-hospital mortality, and those performed just before discharge correlate with postdischarge mortality. Design Cohort study of in-hospital and postdischarge mortality of patients over two 1-year periods. Setting An 805-bed community hospital in Sarasota, Florida, USA. Subjects 42?302 inpatients admitted for any reason, excluding obstetrics, paediatric and psychiatric patients. Outcome measures All-cause mortalities and mortality OR. Results Patients whose entry nursing assessments, other than pain, did not meet minimum standards had significantly higher in-hospital mortality than patients meeting minimums; and final nursing assessments before discharge had large OR for postdischarge mortality. In-hospital mortality OR were found to be: food, 7.0; neurological, 9.4; musculoskeletal, 6.9; safety, 5.6; psychosocial, 6.7; respiratory, 8.1; skin, 5.2; genitourinary, 3.0; gastrointestinal, 2.3; peripheral-vascular, 3.9; cardiac, 2.8; and pain, 1.1. CI at 95% are within ±20% of these values, with p<0.001 (except for pain). Similar results applied to postdischarge mortality. All results were comparable across the two 1-year periods, with 0.85 intraclass correlation coefficient. Conclusions Nursing assessments are strongly correlated with in-hospital and postdischarge mortality. No multivariate analysis has yet been performed, and will be the subject of a future study, thus there may be confounding factors. Nonetheless, we conclude that these assessments are clinically meaningful and valid. Nursing assessment data, which are currently unused, may allow physicians to improve patient care. The mortality OR and the dynamic nature of nursing assessments suggest that nursing assessments are sensitive indicators of a patient's condition. While these conclusions must remain qualified, pending future multivariate analyses, nursing assessment data ought to be incorporated in risk-related health research, and changes in record-keeping software are needed to make this information more accessible. PMID:22874626

Rothman, Michael J; Solinger, Alan B; Rothman, Steven I; Finlay, G Duncan

2012-01-01

251

Diagnosis: medical and psychosocial conditions  

E-print Network

and make recommendations. Your child's physical growth and intellectual and emotional development, NJ 07753 (732) 776-4178 Children's Specialized Hospital Ambulatory Care Center Uday C. Mehta, MD, MPH, Director 150 New Providence Road Mountainside, NJ 07092 (908) 301-5511; (908) 301-5500 Children's Hospital

Garfunkel, Eric

252

Medical marijuana.  

PubMed

Although many clinical studies suggest the medical utility of marijuana for some conditions, the scientific evidence is weak. Many patients in California are self-medicating with marijuana, and physicians need data to assess the risks and benefits. The only reasonable solution to this problem is to encourage research on the medical effects of marijuana. The current regulatory system should be modified to remove barriers to clinical research with marijuana. The NIH panel has identified several conditions for which there may be therapeutic benefit from marijuana use and that merit further research. Marijuana should be held to the same evaluation standards of safety and efficacy as other drugs (a major flaw in Proposition 215) but should not have to be proved better than current medications for its use to be adopted. The therapeutic window for marijuana and THC between desired effect and unpleasant side effects is narrow and is a major reason for discontinuing use. Although the inhaled route of administration has the benefit of allowing patients to self-titrate the dose, the smoking of crude plant material is problematic. The NIH panel recommended that a high priority be given to the development of a controlled inhaled form of THC. The presence of a naturally occurring cannabinoid-receptor system in the brain suggests that research on selective analogues of THC may be useful to enhance its therapeutic effects and minimize adverse effects. PMID:9656007

Marmor, J B

1998-06-01

253

Towards a clinically useful diagnosis for mild-to-moderate conditions of medically unexplained symptoms in general practice: a mixed methods study  

PubMed Central

Background Symptoms that cannot be attributed to any known conventionally defined disease are highly prevalent in general practice. Yet, only severe cases are captured by the current diagnostic classifications of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS). This study explores the clinical usefulness of a proposed new diagnostic category for mild-to-moderate conditions of MUS labelled ‘multiple symptoms’. Methods A mixed methods approach was used. For two weeks, 20 general practitioners (GPs) classified symptoms presented in consecutive consultations according to the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC) supplemented with the new diagnostic category ‘multiple symptoms’. The GPs’ experiences were subsequently explored by focus group interviews. Interview data were analysed according to ethnographic principles. Results In 33% of patients, GPs classified symptoms as medically unexplained, but applied the category of ‘multiple symptoms’ only in 2.8%. The category was described as a useful tool for promoting communication and creating better awareness of patients with MUS; as such, the category was perceived to reduce the risk of unnecessary tests and referrals of these patients. Three main themes were found to affect the clinical usefulness of the diagnostic category of ‘multiple symptoms’: 1) lack of consensus on categorisation practices, 2) high complexity of patient cases and 3) relational continuity (i.e. continuity in the doctor-patient relationship over time). The first two were seen as barriers to usefulness, the latter as a prerequisite for application. The GPs’ diagnostic classifications were found to be informed by the GPs’ subjective pre-formed concepts of patients with MUS, which reflected more severe conditions than actually intended by the new category of ‘multiple symptoms’. Conclusions The study demonstrated possible clinical benefits of the category of ‘multiple symptoms’, such as GPs’ increased awareness and informational continuity in partnership practices. The use of the category was challenged by the GPs’ conceptual understanding of MUS and was applied only to a minority of patients. The study demonstrates a need for addressing these issues if sub-threshold categories for MUS are to be applied in routine care. The category of ‘multiple symptoms’ may profitably be used in the future as a risk indicator rather than a diagnostic category. PMID:24924564

2014-01-01

254

[Social conditions in which medical students from the faculty of medicine of the National University of Mexico (UNAM) perform their Social Service in rural areas].  

PubMed

The aim of this work is to describe the conditions in which medical students perform their Social Service, highlighting their experiences in areas such as: information before they move and the motivation to leave home; the perception of personal and environmental lack of safety; the institutional support that they receive during their work in the community and the financial support provided. The methodological design of the study included an exploratory phase, in which collective interviews were performed, using the focal group technique, with students who had been in rural areas. Three hundred sixty cases were considered, 72.8% corresponded to rural areas, and 27.7% to Mexico City. According to the findings, the following actions are proposed: give better information and improve the process of vacancy selection; increase the scholarship received by students in Social Service; establish legal, police, and community support mechanisms to guarantee the student's personal safety; pay attention to aspects such as the student's emotional and social situation, and design programs with gender perspective to enhance certainty and safety. PMID:22820362

Hamui-Sutton, Alicia

2012-01-01

255

Influence of the presence of pre-existing thermal [var epsilon]-martensite on the formation of stress-induced [var epsilon]-martensite and on the shape memory effect of a Fe-Mn-Cr-Si-Ni shape memory alloy  

SciTech Connect

At present, many investigations are done on Fe-Mn-based shape memory alloys because of their particularly good one-way type shape memory effect and their low cost. With addition of Cr and Ni, it is possible to reach a good corrosion resistance, which confers to this type of alloys a commercial significance. The shape memory effect is associated with the formation of stress-induced [var epsilon]-martensite by deformation of an austenitic ([gamma]) sample. The reversion by heating of the [var epsilon]-martensite provides the shape memory effect. It is generally admitted that the presence of thermal [var epsilon]-martensite before deformation has a negative influence on the formation of the stress-induced martensite and on the shape memory effect. The authors' purpose is to evaluate the real influence of the pre-existing thermal [var epsilon]-martensite on the formation of the stress-induced [var epsilon]-martensite, its recovery and on the shape memory effect.

Federzoni, L.; Guenin, G. (G.E.M.P.P.M., Villeurbanne (France))

1994-07-01

256

Dangerous fatigue conditions: a study of police work and law enforcement administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sleep deprivation data from various nations have shown a lack of sleep contributing to a number of severe and destructive workplace accidents. Here, a triangulated research strategy focusing on pre?existing data, survey administration, and personal interviews from multiple law enforcement agencies (police, sheriff, and highway patrol) was implemented to study conditions which induce dangerous levels of fatigue in law enforcement

Scott R. Senjo

2011-01-01

257

Medication Errors  

MedlinePLUS

... Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention Medication Errors Within the Center for Drug Evaluation and ... broader product safety issues. Drug Products Associated with Medication Errors FDA Drug Safety Communication: Serious medication errors ...

258

Myasthenia Gravis Medication Information Card (Drugs to be Avoided or Used with Caution in Myasthenia Gravis)  

MedlinePLUS

... Emergency: Name __________________________________________________ Phone ( _______ ) ____________ or ( _______ ) _____________ Other Medical Conditions: ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ Current Medications: ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ MYASTHENIA GRAVIS MEDICATION INFORMATION CARD Drugs to be ...

259

Artificial oxygen carrier with pharmacologic actions of adenosine-5'-triphosphate, adenosine, and reduced glutathione formulated to treat an array of medical conditions.  

PubMed

Effective artificial oxygen carriers may offer a solution to tackling current transfusion medicine challenges such as blood shortages, red blood cell storage lesions, and transmission of emerging pathogens. These products, could provide additional therapeutic benefits besides oxygen delivery for an array of medical conditions. To meet these needs, we developed a hemoglobin (Hb)-based oxygen carrier, HemoTech, which utilizes the concept of pharmacologic cross-linking. It consists of purified bovine Hb cross-linked intramolecularly with open ring adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) and intermolecularly with open ring adenosine, and conjugated with reduced glutathione (GSH). In this composition, ATP prevents Hb dimerization, and adenosine promotes formation of Hb polymers as well as counteracts the vasoconstrictive and pro-inflammatory properties of Hb via stimulation of adenosine receptors. ATP also serves as a regulator of vascular tone through activation of purinergic receptors. GSH blocks Hb's extravasation and glomerular filtration by lowering the isoelectric point, as well as shields heme from nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species. HemoTech and its manufacturing technology have been broadly tested, including viral and prion clearance validation studies and various nonclinical pharmacology, toxicology, genotoxicity, and efficacy tests. The clinical proof-of-concept was carried out in sickle cell anemia subjects. The preclinical and clinical studies indicate that HemoTech works as a physiologic oxygen carrier and has efficacy in treating: (i) acute blood loss anemia by providing a temporary oxygen bridge while stimulating an endogenous erythropoietic response; (ii) sickle cell disease by counteracting vaso-occlusive/inflammatory episodes and anemia; and (iii) ischemic vascular diseases particularly thrombotic and restenotic events. The pharmacologic cross-linking of Hb with ATP, adenosine, and GSH showed usefulness in designing an artificial oxygen carrier for multiple therapeutic indications. PMID:24980041

Simoni, Jan; Simoni, Grace; Moeller, John F; Feola, Mario; Wesson, Donald E

2014-08-01

260

20 CFR 30.114 - What kind of evidence is needed to establish a compensable medical condition and how will that...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...proliferation testings, beryllium patch tests, pulmonary function or exercise testing results, pathology reports including biopsy results and other medical records. A claimant is not required to submit all of the evidence listed in this paragraph....

2010-04-01

261

[French physicians in independent practice: opinions on their conditions of work and the issue of over/under staffing of medical workforce in their areas].  

PubMed

In France, ambulatory care is provided to patients mostly by independent physicians, GPs and specialists, paid on a fee-for-service basis. A national agreement between the Sickness Insurance Fund and the medical associations sets the price of different medical services. Due to the numerus clausus imposed upon the medical schools since the 70's, the yearly number of new graduates has sharply decreased and a feeling of manpower shortage has spread throughout the health system, in the public hospitals and the ambulatory care sector as well. Moreover increased dissatisfaction has been perceived among independent practitioners (they were 56 % of all the medical profession in early 2004). In this context, an opinion survey was undertaken among a sample of 3000 independent doctors whose one thousand have answered to the postal questionnaire. PMID:16739775

Doan, Bui Dang Ha; Lévy, Danièle

2006-01-01

262

Pharmaceutical care model to assess the medication-related risks of travel.  

PubMed

Background People are at greater risk of health problems when travelling and a significant number of travel-related health problems are associated with the effects of travel on pre-existing chronic diseases. Medications play a key role in the management of these conditions. However, there is a notable lack of research evaluating the potential medication-related risks associated with travel. Objective To apply a systematic pharmaceutical care model developed to evaluate potential pharmaceutical risks (PPRs) and pharmaceutical care issues (PCIs) in travellers. Setting Adult travellers leaving Cairns International Airport, Australia, for an international destination. Method A cross-sectional survey using semi-structured interviews, including a systematic medication history, followed by the application of a pharmaceutical care model to evaluate each participant for PPRs and PCIs. Main outcome measure Evaluation of standard clinical and travel-related PPRs and PCIs. Results Medications for chronic diseases were being taken by 47.7 % of the 218 travellers interviewed. Although 75.2 % of participants presented with no PPRs, a total of 274 PCIs were identified across 61.5 % of the participants, with an average of 2.04 PCIs per participant. The most prevalent PCIs related to the inadequate precautions taken by some travellers visiting malaria-endemic regions. Although 91 participants recognised that they were travelling to malaria-endemic regions, 65.9 % of these participants were not using malarial chemoprophylaxis, and only 16.5 % were using chemoprophylaxis that fully complied with standard recommendations. The second most prevalent PCI was the need for 18.8 % of participants to be educated about their medications. Other PCIs identified have the potential to increase the risk of acute, travel-related conditions, and complicate the care of travellers, if they inadvertently became unwell while overseas. Conclusion PPRs and PCIs were not identified in all participants. However, the impact of many of the identified medication-related issues could be substantial to the traveller. This study represents the novel application of a pharmaceutical care model to identify potential PPRs and PCIs in travellers that may not be identified by other pre-travel risk assessment methods. PMID:25266664

Heslop, Ian M; Bellingan, Michelle; Speare, Richard; Glass, Beverley D

2014-12-01

263

Medical Scientists  

MedlinePLUS

... Those who go to medical school spend most of the first 2 years in labs and classrooms, taking courses such as anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology, psychology, microbiology, pathology, medical ethics, and medical law. They ...

264

Botox (Medical)  

MedlinePLUS

... the Eye Glossary Current News How to Help Botox (Medical) Share with a friend Botox (Medical) A link to this article will be ... any list. Close without sharing. Give Us Feedback Botox (Medical) Your name First Name MI Laast Name ...

265

Oral Medication  

MedlinePLUS

... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

266

The relation between health-related quality of life, past medical history, and American Society of Anesthesiologists’ ASA grade in patients having primary operations for oral and oropharyngeal cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pre-existing medical problems have the potential to affect postoperative survival, complications, and health-related quality of life (QoL). Our aim was to explore the relation between past medical history, American Society of Anesthesiologists’ (ASA) score, health-related QoL, and survival. We collected data from 278 consecutive patients with previously untreated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma operated on primarily from 1995 to

Simon Rogers; Peter Kenyon; Derek Lowe; Chris Grant; Ged Dempsey

2005-01-01

267

Physical Functioning in Female Caregivers of Children With Physical Disabilities Compared With Female Caregivers of Children With a Chronic Medical Condition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To evaluate if physical functioning is dif- ferent in female caregivers of children with physical dis- abilities compared with female caregivers of children with nondisabling medical illnesses, and to investigate the fac- tors associated with functioning level. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: University-based clinics. Patients: Ninety consecutive female caregivers of chil- dren presenting to a pediatric physical medicine and rehabilitation

J. Dennis Fortenberry; Edward J. Brizendine; Barry P. Katz; Donald P. Orr; Henry C. Tong; Geeta Kandala; Andrew J. Haig; Virginia S. Nelson; Karen S. J. Yamakawa; Ki Y. Shin; Mascha Kamphuis; Ton Vogels; Jaap Ottenkamp; Ernst E. van der Wall; S. Pauline Verloove-Vanhorick; Hubert W. Vliegen; Susan M. Sweeney; Karen Wiss; Susan Bayliss Mallory; Dennis M. Gorman; J. David Hawkins; Heather S. Lonczak; Robert D. Abbott; Rick Kosterman; Richard F. Catalano

2002-01-01

268

Medical Comorbidity in Schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The extent and consequences of medical comorbidity in patients with schizophrenia are generally underrecognized. Patients with comorbid conditions are usually excluded from research studies, although they probably represent the majority of individuals with schizophrenia. Elderly patients are especially likely to have comorbid disorders. In this article, we review selected literature on medical comorbidity in schizophrenia, including physical illnesses, substance use,

Dilip V. Jeste; Julie Akiko Gladsjo; Laurie A. Lindamer; Jonathan P. Lacro

1996-01-01

269

Medical Matrix  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Medical Matrix is a Web resource that offers a database of Internet clinical medicine resources. Medical Matrix categorizes resources by disease, specialty, and other interest areas. It is designed as a "home page" for a physician's or healthworker's computer. Medical Matrix is a project of the Internet Working Group of the American Medical Informatics Association.

270

The Effects of Dysthymic Disorder on Health-Related Quality of Life and Disability Days in Persons with Comorbid Medical Conditions in the General Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: We aimed to investigate in medical disorders the effects of comorbid dysthymic disorder as compared to major depressive disorder (MDD) on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) and disability days in the general population. Methods: In a population-based study 4,181 individuals were assessed for the presence of dysthymic disorder and depression, utilizing the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Each participant received

Bernhard T. Baune; Riccardo N. Caniato; Volker Arolt; Klaus Berger

2009-01-01

271

Impact of some environmental conditions on the tensile, creep-recovery, relaxation, melting and crystallinity behaviour of UHMWPE-GUR 410-medical grade  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work was undertaken to examine the effect of some environmental media (sodium hydroxide NaOH solution, water, ice, UV irradiation dose and pre-heat treatment) on the mechanical (quasi-static tensile creep-recovery and relaxation) and physical\\/thermal (melting and crystallinity) behaviour of the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE-GUR 410-medical grade), that has several biomedical and engineering applications. The results show changes

A.-H. I. Mourad; H. Fouad; Rabeh Elleithy

2009-01-01

272

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON STUDENT CONSENT, MEDICAL AUTHORIZATION, AND RELEASE AGREEMENT  

E-print Network

, and conveyances; local medical and weather conditions; local road conditions, dietary and food differences1 ADDENDUM COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON STUDENT CONSENT, MEDICAL AUTHORIZATION, AND RELEASE AGREEMENT

Young, Paul Thomas

273

Medical applications of artificial olfactometry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present invention provides methods for detecting the presence of an analyte indicative of various medical conditions, including halitosis, periodontal disease and other diseases are also disclosed.

Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Severin, Erik J. (Inventor); Wong, Bernard (Inventor); Kelso, David M. (Inventor); Munoz, Beth C. (Inventor)

2005-01-01

274

PHP95 MEDICAL FOODS AND FOODS FOR SPECIAL MEDICAL PURPOSES  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: A medical food is formulated to be consumed or administered enterally under the supervision of a physician, and is intended for the specific dietary management of a disease or condition for which distinctive nutritional requirements are established by medical evaluation. In the US, medical foods are a special product category regulated by the FDA. In Europe, a similar category

Les L. Noe; N Neil; K Ogden; M Turini

2009-01-01

275

Surgery under extreme conditions in the aftermath of the 2010 Haiti earthquake: the importance of regional anesthesia.  

PubMed

The 12 January 2010 earthquake that struck Port-au-Prince, Haiti caused >200,000 deaths, thousands of injuries requiring immediate surgical interventions, and 1.5 million internally displaced survivors. The earthquake destroyed or disabled most medical facilities in the city, seriously hampering the ability to deliver immediate life- and limb-saving surgical care. A Project Medishare/University of Miami Miller School of Medicine trauma team deployed to Haiti from Miami within 24 hours of the earthquake. The team began work at a pre-existing tent facility in the United Nations (UN) compound based at the airport, where they encountered 225 critically injured patients. However, non-sterile conditions, no means to administer oxygen, the lack of surgical equipment and supplies, and no anesthetics precluded the immediate delivery of general anesthesia. Despite these limitations, resuscitative care was administered, and during the first 72 hours following the event, some amputations were performed with local anesthesia. Because of these austere conditions, an anesthesiologist, experienced and equipped to administer regional block anesthesia, was dispatched three days later to perform anesthesia for limb amputations, debridements, and wound care using single shot block anesthesia until a better equipped tent facility was established. After four weeks, the relief effort evolved into a 250-bed, multi-specialty trauma/intensive care center staffed with >200 medical, nursing, and administrative staff. Within that timeframe, the facility and its staff completed 1,000 surgeries, including spine and pediatric neurological procedures, without major complications. This experience suggests that when local emergency medical resources are completely destroyed or seriously disabled, a surgical team staffed and equipped to provide regional nerve block anesthesia and acute pain management can be dispatched rapidly to serve as a bridge to more advanced field surgical and intensive care, which takes longer to deploy and set up. PMID:21181680

Missair, Andres; Gebhard, Ralf; Pierre, Edgar; Cooper, Lebron; Lubarsky, David; Frohock, Jeffery; Pretto, Ernesto A

2010-01-01

276

"You teach us to listen,… but you don't teach us about suffering": self-care and resilience strategies in medical school curricula.  

PubMed

This article examines the pre-vocational preparation of doctors to cope with the demands of clinical practice, drawing on literature from across a number of domains: mental health, psychological stress among medical students and medical practitioners; and self-care strategies in medicine curricula. High rates of psychological distress in medical students and medical practitioners were consistently reported. A number of questions remain pertinent to medical education: how does the experience of medical education impact on this level of distress, and possibly exacerbate pre-existing student vulnerabilities? What will help future doctors respond to, and cope with, suffering in their patients? Can the formal curriculum build resilience? Medical schools and educators have a responsibility to address these questions and to provide effective self-care curricula. In this review promising interventions such as mindfulness training are reported, frameworks to guide self-awareness in medical students are suggested, and recommendations for a self-care curriculum are made. PMID:25395229

Outram, Sue; Kelly, Brian

2014-11-01

277

Medical neglect.  

PubMed

Medical neglect occurs when children are harmed or placed at significant risk of harm by gaps in their medical care. This is most likely to occur and to be recognized when families lack resources, commonly due to poverty, and when medical demands are high, such as with complex, severe, and chronic illness. A systematic evaluation of the probabilities for harm from gaps in care versus benefits from improved care will define medical neglect. A broad consideration of child, family, community, and medical system contributions to identified gaps will guide management. Special circumstances, such as lapsed immunizations, unremitting obesity, and medically motivated alterations in care, are often challenging for medical providers. Guidance for these specific situations is available from the American Academy of Pediatrics, and from the medical literature. [Pediatr Ann. 2014;43(11):e253-e259.]. PMID:25369577

Boos, Stephen C; Fortin, Kristine

2014-11-01

278

COPD Medications  

MedlinePLUS

... Lung Disease > COPD > Treating COPD Managing Your COPD Medications There are a variety of medicines available to ... if it is time for your pneumonia vaccine. Medication Management Tips COPD medicines do not cure COPD ...

279

Medication Guide  

MedlinePLUS

... of medications are currently in use to treat glaucoma. Your doctor may prescribe a combination of medications ... the optic nerve. Eye drops used in managing glaucoma decrease eye pressure by helping the eye’s fluid ...

280

Immune-Related Conditions and Immune-Modulating Medications as Risk Factors for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Case-Control Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

In immunosuppressed or autoimmune disease states, disordered immune responses may lead to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). In a US population-based case-control study of NHL (1998-2000), the authors collected per- sonal histories of immune-related conditions and use of immune-modulating therapies as well as family histories of autoimmune conditions. The study included 1,321 NHL cases and 1,057 controls; only half received some ques-

Eric A. Engels; James R. Cerhan; Martha S. Linet; Wendy Cozen; Joanne S. Colt; Scott Davis; Gloria Gridley; Richard K. Severson; Patricia Hartge

2005-01-01

281

Variants near FOXE1 are associated with hypothyroidism and other thyroid conditions: using electronic medical records for genome- and phenome-wide studies.  

PubMed

We repurposed existing genotypes in DNA biobanks across the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics network to perform a genome-wide association study for primary hypothyroidism, the most common thyroid disease. Electronic selection algorithms incorporating billing codes, laboratory values, text queries, and medication records identified 1317 cases and 5053 controls of European ancestry within five electronic medical records (EMRs); the algorithms' positive predictive values were 92.4% and 98.5% for cases and controls, respectively. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium at 9q22 near FOXE1 were associated with hypothyroidism at genome-wide significance, the strongest being rs7850258 (odds ratio [OR] 0.74, p = 3.96 × 10(-9)). This association was replicated in a set of 263 cases and 1616 controls (OR = 0.60, p = 5.7 × 10(-6)). A phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) that was performed on this locus with 13,617 individuals and more than 200,000 patient-years of billing data identified associations with additional phenotypes: thyroiditis (OR = 0.58, p = 1.4 × 10(-5)), nodular (OR = 0.76, p = 3.1 × 10(-5)) and multinodular (OR = 0.69, p = 3.9 × 10(-5)) goiters, and thyrotoxicosis (OR = 0.76, p = 1.5 × 10(-3)), but not Graves disease (OR = 1.03, p = 0.82). Thyroid cancer, previously associated with this locus, was not significantly associated in the PheWAS (OR = 1.29, p = 0.09). The strongest association in the PheWAS was hypothyroidism (OR = 0.76, p = 2.7 × 10(-13)), which had an odds ratio that was nearly identical to that of the curated case-control population in the primary analysis, providing further validation of the PheWAS method. Our findings indicate that EMR-linked genomic data could allow discovery of genes associated with many diseases without additional genotyping cost. PMID:21981779

Denny, Joshua C; Crawford, Dana C; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Bielinski, Suzette J; Basford, Melissa A; Bradford, Yuki; Chai, High Seng; Bastarache, Lisa; Zuvich, Rebecca; Peissig, Peggy; Carrell, David; Ramirez, Andrea H; Pathak, Jyotishman; Wilke, Russell A; Rasmussen, Luke; Wang, Xiaoming; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Kho, Abel N; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Weston, Noah; Matsumoto, Martha; Kopp, Peter A; Newton, Katherine M; Jarvik, Gail P; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Chute, Christopher G; Chisholm, Rex L; Larson, Eric B; McCarty, Catherine A; Masys, Daniel R; Roden, Dan M; de Andrade, Mariza

2011-10-01

282

Variants Near FOXE1 Are Associated with Hypothyroidism and Other Thyroid Conditions: Using Electronic Medical Records for Genome- and Phenome-wide Studies  

PubMed Central

We repurposed existing genotypes in DNA biobanks across the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics network to perform a genome-wide association study for primary hypothyroidism, the most common thyroid disease. Electronic selection algorithms incorporating billing codes, laboratory values, text queries, and medication records identified 1317 cases and 5053 controls of European ancestry within five electronic medical records (EMRs); the algorithms' positive predictive values were 92.4% and 98.5% for cases and controls, respectively. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium at 9q22 near FOXE1 were associated with hypothyroidism at genome-wide significance, the strongest being rs7850258 (odds ratio [OR] 0.74, p = 3.96 × 10?9). This association was replicated in a set of 263 cases and 1616 controls (OR = 0.60, p = 5.7 × 10?6). A phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) that was performed on this locus with 13,617 individuals and more than 200,000 patient-years of billing data identified associations with additional phenotypes: thyroiditis (OR = 0.58, p = 1.4 × 10?5), nodular (OR = 0.76, p = 3.1 × 10?5) and multinodular (OR = 0.69, p = 3.9 × 10?5) goiters, and thyrotoxicosis (OR = 0.76, p = 1.5 × 10?3), but not Graves disease (OR = 1.03, p = 0.82). Thyroid cancer, previously associated with this locus, was not significantly associated in the PheWAS (OR = 1.29, p = 0.09). The strongest association in the PheWAS was hypothyroidism (OR = 0.76, p = 2.7 × 10?13), which had an odds ratio that was nearly identical to that of the curated case-control population in the primary analysis, providing further validation of the PheWAS method. Our findings indicate that EMR-linked genomic data could allow discovery of genes associated with many diseases without additional genotyping cost. PMID:21981779

Denny, Joshua C.; Crawford, Dana C.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Basford, Melissa A.; Bradford, Yuki; Chai, High Seng; Bastarache, Lisa; Zuvich, Rebecca; Peissig, Peggy; Carrell, David; Ramirez, Andrea H.; Pathak, Jyotishman; Wilke, Russell A.; Rasmussen, Luke; Wang, Xiaoming; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Kho, Abel N.; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Weston, Noah; Matsumoto, Martha; Kopp, Peter A.; Newton, Katherine M.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Chute, Christopher G.; Chisholm, Rex L.; Larson, Eric B.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Masys, Daniel R.; Roden, Dan M.; de Andrade, Mariza

2011-01-01

283

Medical Marijuana  

MedlinePLUS

... the lower right-hand corner of the player. Medical Marijuana HealthDay August 26, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Chronic ... the American Medical Association found that states with medical marijuana laws had an average 25% lower opiate overdose ...

284

Psychiatric Medication  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory, descriptive study assessed psychiatric medication use in two samples. Students in three social work courses and practicing social workers in a midwestern city were surveyed by mail. Respondents were asked to identify symptoms, psychiatric medication use, effectiveness of drug therapy, side effects, stigma, and to rate the impact of psychiatric medication use on their current or future social

Jennifer Davis-Berman; H. Frances Pestello

2002-01-01

285

Over-the-horizon, connected home/office (OCHO): situation management of environmental, medical, and security conditions at remote premises via broadband wireless access  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Broadband wireless access standards, together with advances in the development of commercial sensing and actuator devices, enable the feasibility of a consumer service for a multi-sensor system that monitors the conditions within a residence or office: the environment/infrastructure, patient-occupant health, and physical security. The proposed service is a broadband reimplementation and combination of existing services to allow on-demand reports on and management of the conditions by remote subscribers. The flow of on-demand reports to subscribers and to specialists contracted to mitigate out-of-tolerance conditions is the foreground process. Service subscribers for an over-the-horizon connected home/office (OCHO) monitoring system are the occupant of the premises and agencies, contracted by the service provider, to mitigate or resolve any observed out-of-tolerance condition(s) at the premises. Collectively, these parties are the foreground users of the OCHO system; the implemented wireless standards allow the foreground users to be mobile as they request situation reports on demand from the subsystems on remote conditions that comprise OCHO via wireless devices. An OCHO subscriber, i.e., a foreground user, may select the level of detail found in on-demand reports, i.e., the amount of information displayed in the report of monitored conditions at the premises. This is one context of system operations. While foreground reports are sent only periodically to subscribers, the information generated by the monitored conditions at the premises is continuous and is transferred to a background configuration of servers on which databases reside. These databases are each used, generally, in non-real time, for the assessment and management of situations defined by attributes like those being monitored in the foreground by OCHO. This is the second context of system operations. Context awareness and management of conditions at the premises by a second group of analysts and decision makers who extract information from the OCHO data in the databases form the foundation of the situation management problem.

Hortos, William S.

2010-04-01

286

Supporting Medical Decision Making with Argumentation Tools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the collaborative decision-making and communicative discourse of groups of learners engaged in a simulated medical emergency in two conditions. In one condition subgroups used a traditional whiteboard (TW group) to document medical arguments on how to solve a medical emergency. In the other condition subgroups used…

Lu, Jingyan; Lajoie, Susanne P.

2008-01-01

287

SPIE Medical Imaging Medical Imaging  

E-print Network

) Center Department of Radiology Georgetown University SPIE Medical Imaging 2006 2 Main Themes · Describe the major modalities in radiology (medical imaging) · Essential Physics and Engineering · Strengths Medical Imaging 2006 14 Skeletal MRI Scan of Head and Neck Region cpmcnet.columbia.edu/dept/radiology

Miga, Michael I.

288

Certification of Health Care Provider for Employee's Serious Health Condition Family and Medical Leave Act ("FMLA") & California Family Rights Act ("CFRA")  

E-print Network

Leave Act ("FMLA") & California Family Rights Act ("CFRA") PURPOSE of FORM: The below-named employee has requested a leave of absence for his/her health condition that may qualify as a protected leave under to determine if the employee's requested leave is for a qualifying reason under the FMLA and/or CFRA. Section

Leistikow, Bruce N.

289

20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...person, other than the United States, to pay damages, OWCP or SOL will determine whether recoveries received from one or more...is both practicable and equitable, as determined by OWCP or SOL, in its discretion, the conditions will be treated as...

2011-04-01

290

20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...person, other than the United States, to pay damages, OWCP or SOL will determine whether recoveries received from one or more...is both practicable and equitable, as determined by OWCP or SOL, in its discretion, the conditions will be treated as...

2010-04-01

291

LOOK AT POSSIBLE MEDICAL CAUSES FOR ENURESIS AND KNOW ABOUT INVESTIGATIONS AND POSSIBLE ORTHODOX TREATMENT INVOLVED. LOOK AT 6-8 REMEDIES WITH PARTICULAR ASSOCIATION WITH THIS CONDITION  

Microsoft Academic Search

'Enuresis is a term which is reserved for incontinence in children. It is the involuntary passing of urine at night when asleep. The existence of incontinence during the day suggests a kidney or bladder condition. It is mainly a disorder found in boys and affects 10% of boys aged 4-11 years. There are estimated to be 500,000 cases in Britain

Wendy Howard

292

Healthcare services for those with musculoskeletal conditions: a rheumatology service. Recommendations of the European Union of Medical Specialists Section of Rheumatology/European Board of Rheumatology 2006  

PubMed Central

Musculoskeletal conditions are very common across Europe. They affect all age groups, and the associated physical disability is an enormous burden on individuals and society. They can be effectively prevented and controlled in many situations, but this is not at present fully achieved. This report outlines what is required to achieve this and the role of rheumatology in providing these healthcare services. Strategies are given for the prevention and management of musculoskeletal conditions. The needs of people with these conditions are expressed in the PARE Manifesto and the clinical needs have been identified. The healthcare services required to implement these strategies and meet these needs are considered focusing on what services a rheumatology centre should provide. A key principle is that management of musculoskeletal conditions requires a coordinated, integrated, multidisciplinary and multiprofessional approach providing access to a combination of expertise and competencies. Guidance is given of what a rheumatology service should be expected to offer. For a rheumatology centre to provide these services, the need for appropriate facilities and resources is identified, which considers physical resources as well as personnel, training and management needs. Maintaining high standards of care and achieving the best outcomes at all times needs the monitoring of quality indicators as well as ongoing education and research. In conclusion, improving musculoskeletal health is dependent on access to effective treatments and this document shows how the services provided by a rheumatology centre is central to this. PMID:17158137

Rheumatology, Anthony D Woolf and The European Union of Medical Specialists Section of

2007-01-01

293

Over-the-horizon, connected home\\/office (OCHO): situation management of environmental, medical, and security conditions at remote premises via broadband wireless access  

Microsoft Academic Search

Broadband wireless access standards, together with advances in the development of commercial sensing and actuator devices, enable the feasibility of a consumer service for a multi-sensor system that monitors the conditions within a residence or office: the environment\\/infrastructure, patient-occupant health, and physical security. The proposed service is a broadband reimplementation and combination of existing services to allow on-demand reports on

William S. Hortos

2010-01-01

294

Medical confidence.  

PubMed Central

If medical confidentiality is not observed patients may well be reluctant to disclose information to their doctors or even to seek medical advice. Therefore, argues the author, it is of the utmost importance that doctors strive to protect medical confidentiality, particularly now when it is under threat not only in this country but also overseas. The profession must cease to regard ethical issues to do with confidentiality, and indeed to do with all areas of medical practice, as abstract phenomena requiring no justification. If it does not then it will come under increasing and justified criticism from the community it serves. PMID:3981576

Havard, J

1985-01-01

295

Your First Chiropractic Visit  

MedlinePLUS

... be asked to provide family medical history, any pre-existing medical conditions or prior injuries, and previous ... including therapeutic ultrasound, electrical muscle stimulation, ice and heat, traction, soft-tissue massage, and rehabilitative exercises, may ...

296

The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act 2006  

E-print Network

The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act 2006 [ 42 USC 1395dd ] [ 42 CFR 489.24 ] The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act 2006 [ 42 USC 1395dd ] [ 42 CFR 489.24 ] Jorge A. Martinez medical screening examination No Emergency Medical Condition Emergency Medical Condition exists

297

Medication reviews  

PubMed Central

Recent years have seen a formalization of medication review by pharmacists in all settings of care. This article describes the different types of medication review provided in primary care in the UK National Health Service (NHS), summarizes the evidence of effectiveness and considers how such reviews might develop in the future. Medication review is, at heart, a diagnostic intervention which aims to identify problems for action by the prescriber, the clinican conducting the review, the patient or all three but can also be regarded as an educational intervention to support patient knowledge and adherence. There is good evidence that medication review improves process outcomes of prescribing including reduced polypharmacy, use of more appropriate medicines formulation and more appropriate choice of medicine. When ‘harder’ outcome measures have been included, such as hospitalizations or mortality in elderly patients, available evidence indicates that whilst interventions could improve knowledge and adherence they did not reduce mortality or hospital admissions with one study showing an increase in hospital admissions. Robust health economic studies of medication reviews remain rare. However a review of cost-effectiveness analyses of medication reviews found no studies in which the cost of the intervention was greater than the benefit. The value of medication reviews is now generally accepted despite lack of robust research evidence consistently demonstrating cost or clinical effectiveness compared with traditional care. Medication reviews can be more effectively deployed in the future by targeting, multi-professional involvement and paying greater attention to medicines which could be safely stopped. PMID:22607195

Blenkinsopp, Alison; Bond, Christine; Raynor, David K

2012-01-01

298

Why pharmacists belong in the medical home.  

PubMed

Pharmacists can affect the delivery of primary care by addressing the challenges of medication therapy management. Most office visits involve medications for chronic conditions and require assessment of medication effectiveness, the cost of therapies, and patients' adherence with medication regimens. Pharmacists are often underused in conducting these activities. They perform comprehensive therapy reviews of prescribed and self-care medications, resolve medication-related problems, optimize complex regimens, design adherence programs, and recommend cost-effective therapies. Pharmacists should play key roles as team members in medical homes, and their potential to serve effectively in this role should be evaluated as part of medical home demonstration projects. PMID:20439879

Smith, Marie; Bates, David W; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Cleary, Paul D

2010-05-01

299

Medical Care Costs Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury over the Full Spectrum of Disease: A Controlled Population-Based Study  

PubMed Central

Abstract Data on traumatic brain injury (TBI) economic outcomes are limited. We used Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) resources to estimate long-term medical costs for clinically-confirmed incident TBI across the full range of severity after controlling for pre-existing conditions and co-occurring injuries. All Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents with diagnoses indicative of potential TBI from 1985–2000 (n=46,114) were identified, and a random sample (n=7175) was selected for medical record review to confirm case status, and to characterize as definite (moderate/severe), probable (mild), or possible (symptomatic) TBI. For each case, we identified one age- and sex-matched non-TBI control registered in REP in the same year (±1 year) as case's TBI. Cases with co-occurring non-head injuries were assessed for non-head-injury severity and assigned similar non-head-injury-severity controls. The 1145 case/control pairs for 1988–2000 were followed until earliest death/emigration of either member for medical costs 12 months before and up to 6 years after baseline (i.e., injury date for cases and comparable dates for controls). Differences between case and control costs were stratified by TBI severity, as defined by evidence of brain injury; comparisons used Wilcoxon signed-rank plus multivariate modeling (adjusted for pre-baseline characteristics). From baseline until 6 years, each TBI category exhibited significant incremental costs. For definite and probable TBI, most incremental costs occurred within the first 6 months; significant long-term incremental medical costs were not apparent among 1-year survivors. By contrast, cost differences between possible TBI cases and controls were not as great within the first 6 months, but were substantial among 1-year survivors. Although mean incremental costs were highest for definite cases, probable and possible cases accounted for>90% of all TBI events and 66% of total incremental costs. Preventing probable and possible events might facilitate substantial reductions in TBI-associated medical care costs. PMID:22414023

Brown, Allen W.; Hall Long, Kirsten; Ransom, Jeanine E.; Mandrekar, Jay; Osler, Turner M.; Malec, James F.

2012-01-01

300

Exploration Medical System Demonstration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that allows for scalability, extensibility, and interoperability of data sources and data users. f. Lower total cost of ownership for development and sustainment of peripheral hardware and software that use EMSD for data management. g. Provide a better standard of healthcare for crew members through reductions in the time required by crew and ground personnel to provide medical treatment and the number of crew errors experienced during treatment.

Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

2014-01-01

301

[The mandatory medical insurance through eyes of medical personnel].  

PubMed

The article considers the results of sociological survey carries out among medical personnel of the Moscowskaya oblast in August-September 2013. The purpose of the study was to examine opinions of medical personnel about system of mandatory insurance in conditions of implementation of the new law regulating system of mandatory medical insurance during last three years. The sampling included 932 respondents that corresponds approximately 1% of all medical personnel in the oblast. It is established that even 20 years later after the moment of organization of the system of mandatory medical insurance not all medical personnel is oriented in it. More than 70% of respondents consider this system too convoluted and over bureaucratized and only 22.2% of respondents assume that medical insurance organizations defense interests of patient and 25.8% feel no impact of mandatory medical insurance funds on functioning of medical organizations. Most of respondents consider functions of mandatory medical insurance organizations and mandatory medical insurance funds as controlling only. Only 31% of respondents support the actual system of mandatory medical insurance. PMID:24772652

Semenov, V Yu; Lakunin, K Yu; Livshits, S A

2014-01-01

302

Abortion - medical  

MedlinePLUS

... pregnancy resulted after a traumatic event such as rape or incest The woman may not wish to ... American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Clinical management guidelines of obstetrician-gynecologists. Medical management of abortion. Obstet Gynecol . 2005 ...

303

Cardiac Medications  

MedlinePLUS

... fluid in the body. Vasodilators (Also known as Nitrates. Nitroglycerin tablets are a form of vasodilator.) Commonly ... include: Isosorbide dinitrate (Isordil) Nesiritide (Natrecor) Hydralazine (Apresoline) Nitrates Minoxidil What the Medication Does Relaxes blood vessels ...

304

Medication Math  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Medication calculation needs to be completed accurately for proper patient treatment. In this section you will need to review and improve your medication math. Understanding math: Math and Culture Refresher: Take the amount of fluid in the bottle and times that by the dose ordered. Then divide this number by the amount of drug in the bottle. This will give you the volume of the drug that you need to administer. Diagram of formulas Math Formulas Math ...

Joey

2008-10-16

305

Medical Acoustics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

Beach, Kirk; Dunmire, Barbrina

306

[Modern medical science and Military Medical Academy].  

PubMed

The article presents the information about the main directions of scientific investigations of Military Medical Academy and their results during the period of 1999-2000. The scientific work was conducted in conformity with demands of orders and directives of RF Ministry of Defense. 12 integrated scientific problems were formed in the annual plans of the Academy's research work. Together with traditional directions the new ones connected with the experience of troops medical support during the armed conflicts, liquidation of consequences of extreme situations, participation of military contingents in peace-making operations were developed. The complex clinical investigations of specific features of combat pathology due to firearms used by the enemy during the military operations in Afghanistan and in the Northern Caucasus are going on. In the most of clinical departments the problems of etiology, pathogenesis and treatment of servicemen' diseases under peacetime conditions are the main directions of scientific investigations. Every year the Academy's rationalizers and inventors produce 60-70 inventions and more than 500 rationalization proposals. Since 1995 the Academy publishes the journal "Clinical medicine and pathophysiology" and since 1999--"Bulletin of Russian Military Medical Academy". The Academy's scientific potential comprises 194 professors, 295 associate professors, 349 Doctors and 894 Candidates of Science, 20 Honoured Scientists of RF, 57 members and corresponding members of academies (Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Russian Academy of Natural Sciences and other social academies). PMID:16259295

Ga?dar, B V; Lobzin, Iu V; Chursin, I G; Tsygan, V N

2005-08-01

307

[A medical-pharmaceutical partnership model as a contributor to the success in conditioning regimen for allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adults: a cross-reflection on our organizations].  

PubMed

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplant (allo-SCT) remains the only cure for many hematological malignancies and some benign and congenital diseases. Busulfan, proposed in its injectable form, has quickly become a mainstay of pharmacological and myeloablative (or non-myeloablative) conditioning. This is following the outbreak in 2010 of a multicenter international clinical phase II trial, we tested the robustness and reliability of our organization in a complex model of organization and multifactorial partnership. In this type "BuCy2" protocol based on a classical treatment duration of 4 consecutive days, the administration of IV busulfan is given in one single daily infusion instead of the conventional 16 infusions, while keeping the same total dose. Under these conditions, the treatment is totally secured using a therapeutic drug monitoring of busulfan, applied in real-time. The process is technically complex and requires the very close cooperation of the teams involved. A strength, weakness, opportunity and threat (SWOT) analysis has been constructed; it fully supports continuous quality improvement to the triple benefit of the nursing chain, the patients and their environment. Several critical points were identified and corrected. The experiment strongly contributes to the safety and security of the medication circuit at the hospital and, improves the performance of allo-SCT. It also contributes to the protection of all actors in the health field and their working environment via a well-functioning quality management system. PMID:22645281

Bourget, Philippe; Falaschi, Ludivine; Suarez, Felipe; Galland, Valérie; Blot, Dominique; Trompette, Caroline; Sibon, David; Fontbrune, Flore Sicre de; Merlette, Christophe; Vidal, Fabrice; Corriol, Odile; Giraud, Bérénice; Broissand, Christine; Clement, Rozenn; Hermine, Olivier

2012-06-01

308

Gastro-intestinal problems and concomitant medication in NSAID users: additional findings from a questionnaire-based survey in Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  In a previous questionnaire-based survey, we found extensive use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in subjects\\u000a with risk factors for serious gastrointestinal complications.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Aim  This study focused on the use of NSAIDs in subjects who reported either (a) pre-existing disorders which would have required\\u000a caution in using NSAIDs (e.g. dyspepsia\\/heartburn or peptic ulcer) or (b) co-medication with drugs having a high

Maria Chiara Silvani; Domenico Motola; Elisabetta Poluzzi; Ambrogio Bottoni; Fabrizio De Ponti; Alberto Vaccheri; Nicola Montanaro

2006-01-01

309

Medically Induced Coma vs. Sedation  

MedlinePLUS

... patient before, during and after surgery. LEARN MORE Anesthesia Topics Quick Links Choose a topic: Featured Video: ... to patient inquiries regarding specific medical conditions or anesthesia administration. Please direct any questions related to anesthetics, ...

310

Supporting medical students with mental  

E-print Network

-to-moderate mental health conditions 23­24 15 Severe mental illnesses 25 16 Eating disorders 26­27 17 Substance. Medical schools must not treat students themselves or manage the treatment that students receive

Heinke, Dietmar

311

Treating Child Obesity and Associated Medical Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With American children on course to grow into the most obese generation of adults in history, Sonia Caprio argues that it is critical to develop more effective strategies for preventing childhood obesity and treating serious obesity-related health complications. She notes that although pediatricians are concerned about the obesity problem, most…

Caprio, Sonia

2006-01-01

312

Psoriasis Increases Risk for Some Medical Conditions  

MedlinePLUS

... when they get it checked. If you have high blood pressure, you can lower it. Eating healthy foods, exercising, and taking medicine are a few ways to lower blood pressure. Cancer Risk: More research is needed. Some studies suggest that psoriasis increases your risk of getting ...

313

Medical Instrumentation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn about the sorts of devices designed by biomedical engineers and the many other engineering specialties that are required in their design of medical diagnostics, therapeutic aids, surgical devices and procedures, and replacement parts. They discuss the special considerations that must be made when dealing with the human body, such as being minimally invasive, biocompatible, keeping sterile, lightweight, corrosion resistant, long lasting and electrically safe. They also explore how "form fits function." Students gain an appreciation for the amazing devices that improve our quality of life. This lesson serves as a starting point for students to begin to ponder how the medical devices in their everyday lives work.

Techtronics Program

314

Medical marijuana.  

PubMed

The Florida Supreme Court heard oral arguments in April regarding a glaucoma patient's request for a medical exception to the State prohibition on use of marijuana. [Name removed] was convicted on possession and cultivation charges, and a trial judge refused to allow a medical necessity defense. A State appeals court subsequently overturned [name removed]'s conviction. The case focuses on whether the legislature intended to prohibit such a defense when it declared in 1993 that the substance had no medicinal benefits. PMID:11366533

1999-04-30

315

[Future trend medical apps : From the apps store directly into medical practice?].  

PubMed

In day to day medical care, patients, nursing staff and doctors currently face a bewildering and rapidly growing number of health-related apps running on various "smart" devices and there are also uncountable possibilities for the use of such technology. Concerning regulation, a risk-based approach is applied for development and use (including safety and security considerations) of medical and health-related apps. Considering safety-related issues as well as organizational matters, this is a sensible approach but requires honest self-assessment as well as a high degree of responsibility, networking and good quality management by all those involved. This cannot be taken for granted. Apart from regulatory aspects it is important to not only consider what is reasonable, helpful or profitable. Quality aspects, safety matters, data protection and privacy as well as liability issues must also be considered but are often not adequately respected. If software quality is compromised, this endangers patient safety as well as data protection, privacy and data integrity. This can for example result in unwanted advertising or unauthorized access to the stored data by third parties; therefore, local, regional and international regulatory measures need to be applied in order to ensure safe use of medical apps in all possible areas, including the operating room (OR) with its highly specialized demands. Lawmakers need to include impulses from all stakeholders in their considerations and this should include input from existing private initiatives that already deal with the use and evaluation of apps in a medical context. Of course, this process needs to respect pre-existing national, European as well as international (harmonized) standards. PMID:25388438

Gehring, Hartmut; Pramann, O; Imhoff, M; Albrecht, U-V

2014-12-01

316

"Without handicap": issues of medical schools and physically disabled students.  

PubMed

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 requires that access to education not be denied simply on the basis of disability. The law requires definition of "basic qualifications" required of all applicants, "essential elements" of the curriculum, and whether accommodation would alter the "fundamental nature" of the learning experience or impose "undue burden." Medical schools have a very low proportion of physically disabled students, which the author argues is largely a result of schools' conception of the "undifferentiated graduate" as being capable of performing the history, physical examination, and any medical procedure without an intermediary. But the author maintains that medical students need not be unblemished physically; medical educators' obligation is to educate those students who are qualified to become physicians by virtue of intelligence, professional attitude, and ability to effectively interact and communicate. With respect to clinical training, it is important to consider whether personal, hands-on experience is required for adequate learning to occur. Because most physicians limit the scopes of their practices and do not perform all procedures, because those physicians who develop physical disabilities are not precluded from continuing in some forms of medical practice, and because technologic advances allow for the substitution of imaging and diagnostic testing for the more conventional approach to the physical examination, the requirement for hands-on capability becomes less compelling. Yet not every physically disabled applicant should be admitted to medical school, and those admitted require coaching, guidance, and career advice in order to succeed with their physical limitations. The author suggests that one of the seminal concepts of medical education, "without handicap," should be seen not as referring to the pre-existing physical status of students but instead as the obligation of educators to provide all their students with the broadest possible learning experiences so that they will be without the handicap of inadequate education when they proceed to their chosen fields. PMID:9158339

Reichgott, M J

1996-07-01

317

AIR CONDITIONER REQUEST EXTREME MEDICAL CIRCUMSTANCES  

E-print Network

? _____________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Type of allergy or significant medical condition: __________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Are allergy injections given No OR essential Yes No to the management of allergy? Is the use of an air conditioner

318

Medical Tourism Abroad  

PubMed Central

Objectives: This study aimed to understand why people seek medical advice abroad given the trouble and expense this entails. The types of medical problems for which treatment abroad was sought, preferred destinations and satisfaction with the treatment were explored. A secondary aim was to give feedback to stakeholders in the health care system on how to handle this issue and meet the needs of the community. Methods: 45 patients who had recently travelled abroad for treatment were asked to complete a questionnaire or were interviewed by telephone. Results: 40 questionnaires were received. 68% of the respondents were male. Orthopaedic diseases were the most common conditions leading patients to seek treatment abroad. Thailand was the most popular destination followed by India (50% and 30% respectively). 85% of respondents went abroad for treatment only, 10% for treatment and tourism and 2.5% were healthy, but travelled abroad for a checkup. Interestingly, 15% of the participants went abroad without first seeking medical care locally. Out of those initially treated in Oman, 38.2% had no specific diagnosis and 38.2% had received treatment, but it was not effective. 73% of respondents obtained information on treatment abroad from a friend. The Internet and medical tourism offices were the least used sources of information. 15% of the patients experienced complications after their treatment abroad. Conclusion: Various facts about medical treatment abroad need to be disseminated to the public. This will necessitate greater effort in public health promotion and education. PMID:22087396

Al-Hinai, Saleh S.; Al-Busaidi, Ahmed S.; Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim H.

2011-01-01

319

Medical Efficacy and Medical Ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pro-life movement has a problem, an undiagnosed illness, as it were, which may cause the movement to self-destruct. It is a problem commonly found among those ardently involved in saving the lives of the unborn, the crippled, the senile and others unable to fend for themselves. The problem is an overvaluation of medical care often taking the form of

Hilton P. Terrell

320

Medication or Lifestyle for Pre-Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

Medication or Lifestyle for Pre-diabetes Updated:Mar 8,2014 What’s best? Medication or lifestyle changes? Most people at the pre- ... diet, physical activity and maintaining a healthy weight. Medications may be prescribed to manage related conditions and ...

321

Medication errors.  

PubMed

Medication errors cause substantial harm to patients. We need good methods for counting errors, and we need to know how errors defined in different ways and ascertained by different methods are related to the harm that patients suffer. As errors arise within the complex and poorly designed systems of hospital and primary care, analysis of the factors that lead to error, for example by failure mode and effects analysis, may encourage better designs and reduce harms. There is almost no information on the best ways to train prescribers to be safe or to design effective computerized decision support to help them, although both are important in reducing medication errors and should be investigated. We also need to know how best to provide patients with the data they need to be part of initiatives for safer prescribing. PMID:22360355

Ferner, Robin E

2012-06-01

322

Acute Kidney Injury and Increasing Nephrotoxic-Medication Exposure in Noncritically-Ill Children  

PubMed Central

Summary Background and objectives Acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized children results in increased patient morbidity and mortality. Nephrotoxic-medication exposure is a common cause of AKI. Currently, no data exist to quantify the risks of developing AKI for various nephrotoxic medications in children. The primary aim of the current study is to assess for a potential association between nephrotoxic medications and the risk of developing AKI in hospitalized noncritically ill children with no pre-existing renal insufficiency. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We performed a retrospective case-control study in pediatric hospitalized noncritically ill patients aged 1 day to 18 years. The cases were patients who developed AKI, as defined by the pediatric modified RIFLE (pRIFLE) criteria; patients without AKI served as controls and were matched by age category, gender, and disease state. Results 561/1660 (33.8%) patients identified for inclusion had AKI (441 category “R,” 117 category “I,” three category “F”); 357 cases were matched with 357 controls. Patients with AKI had longer length of hospital stay and increased hospital costs. Patients with AKI had exposure to more nephrotoxic medications for a longer period of time compared with controls. Odds of exposure for at least one nephrotoxic medication was significant for development of AKI. Exposure to more nephrotoxic medications was associated with an increased risk of AKI. Conclusions Increasing exposure to three or more nephrotoxic medications places pediatric patients at greater risk of acute kidney injury with resultant increased hospital costs and patient morbidity. PMID:21212419

Goldstein, Stuart L.

2011-01-01

323

Medical Thoracoscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

As opposed to ‘video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery’ which requires general anesthesia, double-lumen tracheal intubation and single lung ventilation, medical thoracoscopy (or ‘pleuroscopy’) is frequently performed in the respiratory endoscopy suite using local anesthesia. It can be done by well-trained physicians, either pulmonologists or thoracic surgeons, and its main indication is related to diagnosis and treatment of pleural effusions. Also, pneumothorax can

Francisco Rodríguez-Panadero

2008-01-01

324

Medical Myth Prevention - Understanding Medical News  

MedlinePLUS

... H. Shmerling, M.D. is associate physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and associate professor at Harvard Medical ... a practicing rheumatologist for over 20 years at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He is an active teacher in ...

325

Smoking cessation medications  

MedlinePLUS

Smoking cessation - medications; Smokeless tobacco - medications; Medications for stopping tobacco ... Creating a plan to help you deal with smoking urges. Getting support from a doctor, counselor, or ...

326

Medical foods for Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition associated with cognitive loss, behavioural changes, functional ability decline and caregiver burden. Given the worldwide public health impact of AD, novel interventions to reduce suffering experienced by AD patients need to be developed. Foods may offer a mechanism for intervention complementary to drugs, devices, biologicals and vaccines. Apart from foods with health claims (including dietary supplements), medical foods are also being explored as an intervention option. The purpose of this article is to describe how medical foods may complement other interventions for AD patients by: (i) defining what a medical food is; (ii) discussing whether AD is a condition amenable to medical food intervention; (iii) reviewing current clinical trial data on medical foods used in participants with AD; and (iv) highlighting steps needed to establish a more comprehensive framework for developing medical foods for AD. While medical foods may be defined differently in other countries, the US Orphan Drug Act of 1998 defined a medical food as a food formulated for enteral intake, taken under physician supervision, and intended to meet the distinctive nutritional requirements identified for a disease or condition. For AD to be amenable to medical food intervention, it must: (i) result in limited or impaired capacity to ingest, digest, absorb or metabolize ordinary foodstuff or certain nutrients; or (ii) have unique, medically determined nutrient requirements; and (iii) require dietary management that cannot be achieved by modification of the normal diet alone. While these criteria are most likely met in advanced AD, identifying unique nutritional requirements in early AD that cannot be met by normal diet modification requires a better understanding of AD pathophysiology. A PubMed search using the terms 'medical food' and 'Alzheimer', limited to clinical trials published in English with human participants with AD aged >65 years and supplemented by other articles known to meet the inclusion criteria, revealed that only two medical foods, AC-1202 and Souvenaid® with Fortasyn Connect™, have clinical trial results available for discussion. As medical food development for AD is a relatively new endeavour, a window of opportunity exists for all stakeholders to develop a comprehensive framework for assuring that medical food interventions for AD achieve the highest possible scientific and ethical standards to warrant commercialization. PMID:21534638

Shah, Raj C

2011-06-01

327

Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions  

E-print Network

, developed complex life histories through time that responded to the subbasin's considerable variation in this habitat. Loss of grassland habitat greatly reduced such populations. Today subbasin habitat conditions/optimal) conditions in the year 2050, and examines what future conditions might be expected if no additional future

328

Medical clip  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An X-ray transparent and biological inert medical clip for treating aneurisms and the like is described. A graphite reinforced composite film is molded into a unitary structure having a pair of hourglass-like cavities hinged together with a pair of jaws for grasping the aneurism extending from the wall of one cavity. A silicone rubber pellet is disposed in the other cavity to exert a spring force through the hinge area to normally bias the jaws into contact with each other.

Baucom, R. M. (inventor)

1983-01-01

329

Medical Mystery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity (on pages 15-23) combines interactive role-playing and graphing to introduce learners to the health affects of pollen. In the first part, learners role-play a detective on a medical case and the main character in the case. Learners formulate a hypothesis about a patient's illness. In the second part, learners graph evidence based on pollen counts and create a "final report" about what caused the patient's health problem. This activity smoothly combines health education, environmental science, and math.

Museum, University O.; Nebraska Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth Development

2001-01-01

330

Repair of fractured abutment teeth under pre-existing crowns: an alternative approach.  

PubMed

This article describes a technique for repair of abutment tooth which fractured during removal of a provisional restoration before bisque trial. The technique uses plastic templates to fabricate new composite core foundation for the existing crowns. This technique helps the dentist to rebuild the core in a single appointment. PMID:23852248

Mascarenhas, Kennedy; Aras, Meena A; Fernandes, Aquaviva S

2013-01-01

331

Surrogate-based optimization of hydraulic fracturing in pre-existing fracture networks  

E-print Network

, and geothermal energy in formations with low natural permeability. Numerical optimization of fracture stimulation the simulated fracturing network as the objective for maximizing energy recovery sweep efficiency. The surrogate Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Hydraulic communication is a key factor for determining

Lu, Zhiming

332

Seeing orange: prawns tap into a pre-existing sensory bias of the Trinidadian guppy  

PubMed Central

Sensory bias, a predisposition towards certain signals, has been implicated in the origin of mate preferences in some species. A risk associated with these biases is that they can be co-opted by predators as sensory lures. Here we propose that the orange spots on the brown pincers of a diurnal, predatory species of prawn function as lures for Trinidadian guppies, which have a sensory bias for orange. We exposed female guppies to (i) a life-like model of this Trinidadian prawn with orange, green or no spots on the pincers or (ii) a live, novel (non-Trinidadian) crustacean (crayfish), also with spotted pincers. First, we provide evidence that guppies sympatric with the prawn recognized our model as a potential predator. Next, we found that guppies spent more time in the dangerous head region of the model prawn with orange-spotted pincers compared with unspotted pincers. Finally, we show that allopatric, but not sympatric, guppies spent more time in the vicinity of the head of a live crayfish when orange spots were added to its pincers than when brown spots were added. Our results suggest that the orange spots on prawn pincers can act as a sensory lure. PMID:22593111

De Serrano, Alexandra R.; Weadick, Cameron J.; Price, Anna C.; Rodd, F. Helen

2012-01-01

333

Time dependence of magnetization reversal when beginning with pre-existing nucleation sites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use measurements of time and field dependent magnetization reversal in Co/Pd multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy to detect the presence of dilute enclaves of opposite magnetization within a magnetized ferromagnet. Such enclaves are stable due to dipolar fields generated by the surrounding material, and their presence at the onset of reversal can speed the process by orders of magnitude. The field required to suppress these nuclei and reach true magnetic saturation is found to be an order of magnitude higher than the observable macroscopic saturation field. Fatuzzo-Labrune model is extended to describe magnetization reversal starting with ready nucleation domains.

Windsor, Y. W.; Gerber, A.; Korenblit, I. Ya.; Karpovski, M.

2013-06-01

334

ORIGINAL PAPER The Effect of Pre-Existing Affect on the SexualResponses of Women  

E-print Network

sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with an increased risk for a variety of sexual problems in the adult, the abuse (for a review, see Rellini, 2008). Such models suggest that a child exposed to a traumatizing a History of Childhood Sexual Abuse Alessandra H. Rellini · Samantha Elinson · Erick Janssen · Cindy M

335

Pre-existent Asymmetry in the Human Cyclooxygenase-2 Sequence Homodimer*  

PubMed Central

Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthase-2 (PGHS-2), also known as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is a sequence homodimer. However, the enzyme exhibits half-site heme and inhibitor binding and functions as a conformational heterodimer having a catalytic subunit (Ecat) with heme bound and an allosteric subunit (Eallo) lacking heme. Some recombinant heterodimers composed of a COX-deficient mutant subunit and a native subunit (i.e. Mutant/Native PGHS-2) have COX activities similar to native PGHS-2. This suggests that the presence of heme plus substrate leads to the subunits becoming lodged in a semi-stable Eallo-mutant/Ecat-Native?heme form during catalysis. We examined this concept using human PGHS-2 dimers composed of combinations of Y385F, R120Q, R120A, and S530A mutant or native subunits. With some heterodimers (e.g. Y385F/Native PGHS-2), heme binds with significantly higher affinity to the native subunit. This correlates with near native COX activity for the heterodimer. With other heterodimers (e.g. S530A/Native PGHS-2), heme binds with similar affinities to both subunits, and the COX activity approximates that expected for an enzyme in which each monomer contributes equally to the net COX activity. With or without heme, aspirin acetylates one-half of the subunits of the native PGHS-2 dimer, the Ecat subunits. Subunits having an S530A mutation are refractory to acetylation. Curiously, aspirin acetylates only one-quarter of the monomers of S530A/Native PGHS-2 with or without heme. This implies that there are comparable amounts of two noninterchangeable species of apoenzymes, Eallo-S530A/Ecat-Native and Eallo-Native/Ecat-S530A. These results suggest that native PGHS-2 assumes a reasonably stable, asymmetric Eallo/Ecat form during its folding and processing. PMID:23955344

Dong, Liang; Sharma, Narayan P.; Jurban, Brice J.; Smith, William L.

2013-01-01

336

Atomistic simulation of the influence of pre-existing stress on the interpretation of nanoindentation data  

E-print Network

of nanoindentation data J. David Schall and Donald W. Brenner Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North to 100 nm2 . I. INTRODUCTION In the past 20 years, nanoindentation has developed into a reliable means of nanoindentation exist in the literature. For example, nanoindentation has been found to be useful in determin- ing

Brenner, Donald W.

337

Pre-existence and clonal selection of MET amplification in EGFR mutant NSCLC  

PubMed Central

Summary MET amplification activates ERBB3/PI3K/AKT signaling in EGFR mutant lung cancers, and causes resistance to EGFR kinase inhibitors. We demonstrate that MET activation by its ligand, HGF, also induces drug resistance, but through GAB1 signaling. Using high-throughput FISH analyses in both cell lines and in lung cancer patients, we identify subpopulations of cells with MET amplification prior to drug exposure. Surprisingly, HGF accelerates the development of MET amplification both in vitro and in vivo. EGFR kinase inhibitor resistance, due to either MET amplification or autocrine HGF production, was cured in vivo by combined EGFR and MET inhibition. These findings highlight the potential to prospectively identify treatment naïve EGFR mutant lung cancer patients who will benefit from initial combination therapy. PMID:20129249

Turke, Alexa B.; Zejnullahu, Kreshnik; Wu, Yi-Long; Song, Youngchul; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Lifshits, Eugene; Toschi, Luca; Rogers, Andrew; Mok, Tony; Sequist, Lecia; Lindeman, Neal I.; Murphy, Carly; Akhavanfard, Sara; Yeap, Beow Y.; Xiao, Yun; Capelletti, Marzia; Iafrate, A. John; Lee, Charles; Christensen, James G.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Janne, Pasi A.

2010-01-01

338

Character displacement: in situ evolution of novel phenotypes or sorting of pre-existing variation?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Character displacement - the divergence of traits between species in response to competition for resources or mates - has long been viewed as a major cause of adaptive diversification and species coexistence. Yet, we lack answers to basic questions concerning the causes and consequences of character displacement, not the least of which is why some species are more prone than

A. M. RICE; D. W. PFENNIG

2007-01-01

339

Crater formation in pre-existing target structures: Implications for small bodies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study compares and constrast the results from impact experiments in a coarse grained target with those in a fine grained one, where the target porosity and Coulomb friction properties are kept constant by using spherical glass beads of differing size. Measurements of crater growth and ejecta speeds are analyzed using non-intrusive laser-based techniques, and compared to preliminary 2 and 3D numerical calculations using CTH [3].

Barnouin, O. S.; Ernst, C. M.; Crawford, D. A.; Cintala, M. J.; Sugita, S.

2011-10-01

340

Pelvic Arterial Embolisation in a Trauma Patient with a Pre-Existing Aortobifemoral Graft  

SciTech Connect

Pelvic fractures secondary to blunt trauma are associated with a significant mortality rate due to uncontrolled bleeding. Interventional radiology (IR) can play an important and central role in the management of such patients, offering definitive minimally invasive therapy and avoiding the need for high-risk surgery. Rapid access to whole-body computed tomography has been shown to improve survival in polytrauma patients and allows rapid diagnosis of vascular injury and assessment of suitability for endovascular therapy. IR can then target and treat the specific area of bleeding. Embolisation of bleeding pelvic arteries has been shown to be highly effective and should be the treatment of choice in this situation. The branches of the internal iliac artery (IIA) are usually involved, and these arteries are accessed by way of IIA catheterisation after abdominal aortography. Occasionally these arteries cannot be accessed by way of this conventional route because of recent IIA ligation carried out surgically in an attempt to stop the bleeding or because (in the rare situation we describe here) these vessels are excluded secondary to previous aortoiliac repair. In this situation, knowledge of pelvic arterial collateral artery pathways is important because these will continue to supply pelvic structures whilst making access to deep pelvic branches challenging. We describe a rare case, which has not been previously reported in the literature, in which successful embolisation of a bleeding pelvic artery was carried out by way of the collateral artery pathways.

Abulaban, Osama; Hopkins, Jonathan; Willis, Andrew P.; Jones, Robert G., E-mail: robert.jones@uhb.nhs.uk [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom)

2011-02-15

341

1Extend your health care coverage When you switch jobs, you cannot be denied  

E-print Network

new employer's health benefits plan due to a pre-existing medical condition. That's the law under, the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. COBRA lets you purchase continued health care coverage

342

Emergency Medical Questionnaire & College Medical Registration Form This information is retained at your Residence for use by Residence staff in the event of a medical emergency  

E-print Network

Emergency Medical Questionnaire & College Medical Registration Form This information is retained at your Residence for use by Residence staff in the event of a medical emergency and will be treated's details in case of an emergency and is also aware of any existing medical conditions. Residents

Applebaum, David

343

The Employment Medical Advisory Service.  

PubMed Central

The historical development of the Employment Medical Advisory Service is described, and the Service's present organization is related to its range of activities, including its role as a source of information and advice on occupational health. The Employment Medical Advisory Service's influence on the development of occupational health practice, the collection of new knowledge and its adaptability in changing social and employment conditions is described, and examples of its work are given. PMID:2145554

Henderson, R. T.; Carter, J. T.

1990-01-01

344

Medication Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... is no longer a problem, the person with autism can focus on other things, including learning and ... approved by the FDA for treating symptoms of autism or other conditions. In 2006, the U.S. Food ...

345

The Integrated Medical Model: A Risk Assessment and Decision Support Tool for Space Flight Medical Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a decision support tool that is useful to mission planners and medical system designers in assessing risks and designing medical systems for space flight missions. The IMM provides an evidence based approach for optimizing medical resources and minimizing risks within space flight operational constraints. The mathematical relationships among mission and crew profiles, medical condition incidence data, in-flight medical resources, potential crew functional impairments, and clinical end-states are established to determine probable mission outcomes. Stochastic computational methods are used to forecast probability distributions of crew health and medical resource utilization, as well as estimates of medical evacuation and loss of crew life. The IMM has been used in support of the International Space Station (ISS) medical kit redesign, the medical component of the ISS Probabilistic Risk Assessment, and the development of the Constellation Medical Conditions List. The IMM also will be used to refine medical requirements for the Constellation program. The IMM outputs for ISS and Constellation design reference missions will be presented to demonstrate the potential of the IMM in assessing risks, planning missions, and designing medical systems. The implementation of the IMM verification and validation plan will be reviewed. Additional planned capabilities of the IMM, including optimization techniques and the inclusion of a mission timeline, will be discussed. Given the space flight constraints of mass, volume, and crew medical training, the IMM is a valuable risk assessment and decision support tool for medical system design and mission planning.

Kerstman, Eric; Minard, Charles; Saile, Lynn; deCarvalho, Mary Freire; Myers, Jerry; Walton, Marlei; Butler, Douglas; Iyengar, Sriram; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Baumann, David

2009-01-01

346

Medical Misuse of Controlled Medications Among Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine the past-year medical misuse prevalence for 4 controlled medication classes (pain, stimulant, sleeping, and antianxiety) among adolescents, and to assess substance use outcomes among adolescents who report medical misuse. Design A Web-based survey was self-administered by 2744 secondary school students in 2009-2010. Setting Two southeastern Michigan school districts. Participants The sample had a mean age of 14.8 years and was 51.1% female. The racial/ethnic distribution was 65.0% white, 29.5% African American, 3.7% Asian, 1.3% Hispanic, and 0.5% other. Main Outcome Measures Past-year medical use and misuse of 4 controlled medication classes. Results Eighteen percent of the sample reported past-year medical use of at least 1 prescribed controlled medication. Among past-year medical users, 22.0% reported misuse of their controlled medications, including taking too much, intentionally getting high, or using to increase alcohol or other drug effects. Medical misusers were more likely than nonmisusers to divert their controlled medications and to abuse other substances. The odds of a positive screening result for drug abuse were substantially higher among medical misusers (adjusted odds ratio, 7.8; 95% confidence interval, 4.3-14.2) compared with medical users who used their controlled medications appropriately. The odds of drug abuse did not differ between medical users who used their controlled medications appropriately and nonusers. Conclusions Most adolescents who used controlled medications took their medications appropriately. Substance use and diversion of controlled medications were more prevalent among adolescents who misused their controlled medications. Careful therapeutic monitoring could reduce medical misuse and diversion of controlled medications among adolescents. PMID:21810634

McCabe, Sean Esteban; West, Brady T.; Cranford, James A.; Ross-Durow, Paula; Young, Amy; Teter, Christian J.; Boyd, Carol J.

2011-01-01

347

Implantable medical devices MRI safe.  

PubMed

Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

2013-01-01

348

In-flight Medical Emergencies  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Research and data regarding in-flight medical emergencies during commercial air travel are lacking. Although volunteer medical professionals are often called upon to assist, there are no guidelines or best practices to guide their actions. This paper reviews the literature quantifying and categorizing in-flight medical incidents, discusses the unique challenges posed by the in-flight environment, evaluates the legal aspects of volunteering to provide care, and suggests an approach to managing specific conditions at 30,000 feet. Methods: We conducted a MEDLINE search using search terms relevant to aviation medical emergencies and flight physiology. The reference lists of selected articles were reviewed to identify additional studies. Results: While incidence studies were limited by data availability, syncope, gastrointestinal upset, and respiratory complaints were among the most common medical events reported. Chest pain and cardiovascular events were commonly associated with flight diversion. Conclusion: When in-flight medical emergencies occur, volunteer physicians should have knowledge about the most common in-flight medical incidents, know what is available in on-board emergency medical kits, coordinate their therapy with the flight crew and remote resources, and provide care within their scope of practice. PMID:24106549

Chandra, Amit; Conry, Shauna

2013-01-01

349

Medical responsibility.  

PubMed

These comments seek to take issue with the contention that society has a responsibility to provide its members with any needed health care. In order to deal with this claim we must first make clear exactly what it meant by the proposition. I take it that those who embrace this view mean considerably more than that each of us has a moral obligation to contribute to those in need of medical attention who are unable, for one reason or another, to afford the necessary care. This is a moral proposition and is traditionally dealt with under the heading of charity. But the contention, as here used, means considerably more since its main implications are not moral but primarily political. PMID:23061581

Hamowy, Ronald

2012-01-01

350

Medical marijuana.  

PubMed

Grassroots AIDS activist groups denounce the Clinton Administration's stance on banning medicinal use of marijuana due to the lack of clinical evidence supporting its benefits. The 1997 meeting of the San Francisco Medical Society and the New England Journal of Medicine both agreed, following a review of 75 scientific studies of the medicinal benefits of marijuana, that the benefits of smoked marijuana include relief from pain and the reduction of nausea caused by anti-cancer drugs. The Federal government is attempting to punish physicians for prescribing marijuana to their patients, a situation being opposed by the Bay Area Physicians for Human Rights who have initiated a suit against the government. A hearing to stop this prosecution was scheduled for March 21. PMID:11364533

Baker, R; Bowers, M

1997-03-01

351

Medical telesensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Medical telesensors are self-contained integrated circuits for measuring and transmitting vital signs over a distance of approximately 1-2 meters. The circuits are unhoused and contain a sensor, signal processing and modulation electronics, a spread-spectrum transmitter, an antenna and a thin-film battery. We report on a body-temperature telesensor, which is sufficiently small to be placed on a tympanic membrane in a child's ear. We also report on a pulse-oximeter telesensor and a micropack receiver/long- range transmitter unit, which receives form a telesensor array and analyzes and re-transmits the vital signs over a longer range. Signal analytics are presented for the pulse oximeter, which is currently in the form of a finger ring. A multichip module is presented as the basic signal-analysis component. The module contains a microprocessor, a field=programmable gate array, memory elements and other components necessary for determining trauma and reporting signals.

Ferrell, Trinidad L.; Crilly, P. B.; Smith, S. F.; Wintenberg, Alan L.; Britton, Charles L., Jr.; Morrison, Gilbert W.; Ericson, M. N.; Hedden, D.; Bouldin, Donald W.; Passian, A.; Downey, Todd R.; Wig, A. G.; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

1998-05-01

352

MEDICAL EMERGENCIES What is a medical emergency?  

E-print Network

MEDICAL EMERGENCIES What is a medical emergency? Serious injury or illness. What do I do if there is a medical emergency occurring or one has occurred? CALL 911. Paramedics and ambulance service or visitor. What information do I need to have readily available when reporting a medical emergency

Fernandez, Eduardo

353

MEDICAL EMERGENCIES What is a medical emergency?  

E-print Network

MEDICAL EMERGENCIES What is a medical emergency? Serious injury or illness. What do I do if there is a medical emergency occurring or one has occurred? NOTIFY 911 or University Police. Paramedics and ambulance, the employee to the nearest medical facility or CALL 911 for emergency assistance CALL OptaComp at 877

Fernandez, Eduardo

354

MEDICAL EMERGENCIES What is a medical emergency?  

E-print Network

MEDICAL EMERGENCIES What is a medical emergency? Serious injury or illness. What do I do if there is a medical emergency occurring or one has occurred? CALL 911. Paramedics and ambulance service or visitor. What information do I need to have readily available when reporting a medical emergency? Building

Fernandez, Eduardo

355

Medical Technology 1 Running Head: USE OF TECHNOLGY IN A MEDICAL SETTING  

E-print Network

depending on the technology condition. These findings have implications for healthcare providers such as howMedical Technology 1 Running Head: USE OF TECHNOLGY IN A MEDICAL SETTING The Use of Different Technologies During a Medical Interview: Effects on Perceived Quality of Care Julia M. DeBlasio, Britt Caldwell

356

FOR FAMILY MEDICAL LEAVE AND SHORT TERM DISABILITY PLAN DARTMOUTH COLLEGE MEDICAL CERTIFICATION FORM  

E-print Network

FOR FAMILY MEDICAL LEAVE AND SHORT TERM DISABILITY PLAN DARTMOUTH COLLEGE MEDICAL CERTIFICATION FORM Certification of Health Care Provider for Employee's Serious Health Condition Family and Medical to other health care provider(s) for evaluation or treatment (e.g., physical therapist)? ____No ____Yes

Myers, Lawrence C.

357

Using Home Visits to Understand Medication Errors in Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current research methods are not well designed to detect medication errors that occur at home. We developed home visit methods to investigate home medication errors in children with chronic conditions. These methods include observation of parent administration of medication to the child by a trained nurse observer who takes detailed ethnographic notes; review of all prescription and over-the-counter medications for

Kathleen E. Walsh; Christopher J. Stille; Kathleen M. Mazor; Jerry H. Gurwitz

358

REVIEW Open Access Overview of medical errors and adverse events  

E-print Network

REVIEW Open Access Overview of medical errors and adverse events Maité Garrouste-Orgeas1 hospitalized patients to experience medical errors, due to the complexity of their conditions, need for urgent interventions, and considerable workload fluctuation. Medication errors are the most common medical errors

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

359

How do we Define a Medical School?  

PubMed Central

A century after the Flexner Report on medical education in North America, which revolutionised the training of medical doctors all over the world, it is time to revisit this famous document and analyse symptoms and signs of a return to pre-Flexnerian conditions. With the ongoing mushroom growth over the last decades of small, proprietary educational institutions of low quality and driven by for-profit purposes, medical education is in a threatened position. This trend is of general international interest because of the increasing migration of medical doctors. There is a need for discussion of what should be the rational criteria and basic requirements for establishing new medical schools. PMID:21509225

Karle, Hans

2010-01-01

360

Assessment of a safety enhancement to the hospital medication reconciliation process for elderly patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Medication history taking is important because clinicians rely on the information that is collected; however, medication histories are often inaccurate and incomplete. The use of a medication at home without a corresponding disease or condition in the patient's records (ie, “unspecified” medication) warrants investigation of the need for that medication. The process of reconciling medications with current diseases or

Lucy A. Gizzi; Douglas Slain; Justin T. Hare; Renee Sager; Frank Briggs III; Carl H. Palmer

2010-01-01

361

Medically unexplained physical symptoms in medical practice: a psychiatric perspective.  

PubMed Central

Clusters of medically unexplained physical symptoms have been referred to in the literature by many different labels, including somatization, symptom-based conditions, and functional somatic syndromes, among many others. The traditional medical perspective has been to classify and study these symptoms and functional syndromes separately. In psychiatry, current taxonomies (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder, 4th edition, and The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision) classify these syndromes together under the rubric of somatoform disorders. In this article we approach medically unexplained physical symptoms from a psychiatric perspective and discuss the common features that unite multiple unexplained symptoms or functional somatic syndromes as a class. Included in this article is a discussion of nosological issues, clinical assessment, how these syndromes are viewed within the various medical specialties, and clinical management and treatment. PMID:12194898

Escobar, Javier I; Hoyos-Nervi, Constanza; Gara, Michael

2002-01-01

362

Medical muddle.  

PubMed

Nanette Gartrell, MD, is a psychiatrist and researcher whose investigations have documented the mental health and psychological well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people over the past four decades. Nanette is the principal investigator of an ongoing longitudinal study of lesbian families in which the children were conceived by donor insemination. Now in its 27th year, this project has been cited internationally in the debates over equality in marriage, foster care, and adoption. Previously on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and the University of California, San Francisco, Nanette is currently a Visiting Distinguished Scholar at the Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law. In 2013, Nanette received the Association of Women Psychiatrists Presidential Commendation Award for "selfless and enduring vision, leadership, wisdom, and mentorship in the fields of women's mental health, ethics, and gender research." At the age of 63, Nanette experienced a 3 ½ month period of intractable, incapacitating dizziness for which there was never a clear diagnosis. PMID:24400630

Gartrell, Nanette

2014-01-01

363

[The medical technologist as a key professional in medical care in the 21st century].  

PubMed

The dynamic healthcare environment of Japan, including the rapidly aging population and the requirement of highly sophisticated and diverse medical care, induces strict financial conditions and increases the number of those seeking medical care. Therefore, medical professionals are now required to provide safe and effective medical care with limited medical resources. Recently, Japanese medical institutions have introduced the total quality management system, which was developed for better business management, to promote safe and effective management. However, there are two major drawbacks with the introduction of this system in the sector of medical care in Japan. First, the standardization of medical skills of medical professionals is greatly affected due to the presence of different education systems for the same medical profession except for medical doctors and pharmacologists. The education system for major medical professionals, such as nurses and medical and radiological technologists, must be standardized based on the university norms. Second, the knowledge-creating process among the medical professionals has been associated with many problems. The specialized fields are quite different among medical professionals. Therefore, common specialized fields must be established among major medical professions based on the specialization of medical doctors to promote their communication and better understanding. Considering the roles of medical professionals in medical care, medical doctors and nurses are the most responsible for monitoring, assessing, and guaranteeing the safety of medical care, and medical and radiological technologists are the most responsible for effective medical care. The current medical technologists are not only required to carry out clinical laboratory tests, but also be proactive and positive as well as have marked problem-solving abilities. They are expected to improve the diagnostic test systems in medical institutes for medical doctors and patients, resulting in the highest level of management efficiency. For the development of such medical technologists, university education, specialist capabilities in medical technology and clinical laboratory diagnostics, and a research capability are essential. Thus, it is crucial for clinical laboratory physicians and the Japanese medical care system of the 21st century to urgently develop such an education system. PMID:19068789

Iwatani, Yoshinori

2008-10-01

364

The effect of nucleation conditions on the topology and geometry of two-dimensional grain structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The geometry and topology of two-dimensional grain structures have been analyzed for different conditions of nucleation and growth to impingement. These conditions include simultaneous nucleation at a fixed number of sites, and continuous nucleation at a constant rate per unit of untransformed area. Intermediate between these cases are conditions in which the nucleation rate declines with time. Another set of conditions are those in which nucleation is excluded in a zone surrounding each pre-existing grain. A constant growth rate is assumed for all conditions. All the conditions modeled result in markedly different structures. The modeling is intended for applications to the study of the nucleation and growth conditions for thin films of metals or semiconductors.

Frost, H. J.; Thompson, C. V.

1987-02-01

365

Medical Use of Recreational Drugs by AIDS Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of 72 patients at an AIDS clinic regarding self-medication with recreational drugs for medical or psychological conditions related to their illness disclosed that marijuana was the primary drug used. The perceived benefit was for gastrointestinal conditions such as nausea, vomiting, indigestion and appetite improvement. Use of other “recreational” drugs as self-medication was reported to usually be ineffective or

Daniel A. Dansak

1997-01-01

366

Patterns of post-operative pain medication prescribing after invasive dental procedures  

PubMed Central

We investigated disparities in the prescription of analgesics following dental procedures that were expected to cause acute post-operative pain. Patients over the age of 19 years who had been treated by surgical and/or endodontic dental procedures were included in this study. We reviewed 900 consecutive charts and abstracted data on procedures, patients, and providers. We used chi-square and logistic regression models for analyses. There were 485 White subjects 357 African-American subjects included in this review; 81% of the African-American and 78% of White patients received a post-operative narcotic prescription (p=0.56). In multivariate regression models, patients over age 45 (p=0.003), those with insurance that covered medication and those with pre-existing pain (p=0.004) were more likely to receive narcotic analgesics. Students prescribed more narcotics than residents (p=0.001). No differences were found by race in prescribing analgesics. PMID:21371065

Barasch, Andrei; Safford, Monika M.; McNeal, Sandre F.; Robinson, Michelle; Grant, Vivian S.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

2011-01-01

367

[Medically unexplained symptoms].  

PubMed

Patients with physical symptoms for which no medical explanation can be found are relatively common in general practice. Patients with medically unexplained symptoms are frequently frustrating to physicians both in primary and secondary care and utilize health sources disproportionately. They frequently attend both primary care units and hospitals and are usually not satisfied with the care they receive. Medically unexplained symptoms in patient populations are strongly associated with psychiatric pathology and with anxiety and depression in particular. They are also linked to personality pathology, childhood adversity, adult trauma or medically unexplained symptoms in childhood. The predictive value of alexithymia in determining these symptoms is controversial. Patients who have high negative affectivity or neuroticism tend to score high on measures of physical symptoms. These symptoms have a high degree of co-occurrence. The same person may meet the diagnostic criteria for several functional somatic syndromes simultaneously. The clinician should be aware of the cultural and social shaping of the bodily experience of these patients and hence acknowledge the somatic nature and reality of the symptoms. The clinician should make the person feel understood and establish a positive collaborative relationship. This would enable him/her to correct misconceptions about the disease and give a positive explanation of symptoms. Antidepressant therapy and cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy have been proved to be moderately effective in this group of patients. Because of the high disability that might be caused by these symptoms, psychiatrists and primary and secondary care physicians should pay careful attention to this clinical condition. These symptoms may also aid us in challenging the long-held idea of mind-body dualism which is inherent in Western biomedicine. PMID:12794657

Sayar, Kemal

2002-01-01

368

Space Station medical sciences concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current life sciences concepts relating to Space Station are presented including the following: research, extravehicular activity, biobehavioral considerations, medical care, maintenance of dental health, maintaining health through physical conditioning and countermeasures, protection from radiation, atmospheric contamination control, atmospheric composition, noise pollution, food supply and service, clothing and furnishings, and educational program possibilities. Information on the current status of Soviet Space Stations is contained.

Mason, J. A. (editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (editor)

1984-01-01

369

Physical Activity Readiness Medical Examination  

E-print Network

Physical Activity Readiness Medical Examination (revised 2002) 1 Physical Exam: Ht Wt BP i) / BP ii) / Conditions limiting physical activity: Cardiovascular Respiratory Other Musculoskeletal Abdominal Tests required: ECG Exercise Test X-Ray Blood Urinalysis Other What physical activity do you intend to do

Waterloo, University of

370

Your Medical Records  

MedlinePLUS

... Own Medical Records? It's a great idea. Many health care experts recommend that patients keep their own medical summaries or Personal Medical Records (PMRs). That way, they can bring them along ...

371

Reading Your Medical Record  

MedlinePLUS

... H. Shmerling, M.D. is associate physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and associate professor at Harvard Medical ... a practicing rheumatologist for over 20 years at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He is an active teacher in ...

372

When Medication Is Prescribed  

MedlinePLUS

... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression When Medication Is Prescribed Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... you have about the medicine. —NIMH Types of Medications There are several types of medications used to ...

373

Committee opinion No. 531: improving medication safety.  

PubMed

Despite significant national attention, medical errors continue to pervade the U.S. health care system. Medication-related errors consistently rank at the top of all medical errors, which account for thousands of preventable deaths annually in the United States. There are a variety of methods—ranging from broad-based error reduction strategies to the adoption of sophisticated health information technologies—that can assist obstetrician–gynecologists in minimizing the risk of medication errors. Practicing obstetrician–gynecologists should be familiar with these various approaches that, along with efforts directed at assisting the patient in understanding the medical condition for which a medication is prescribed, can improve the safety and efficacy of medication use. PMID:22825108

2012-08-01

374

Medical confidentiality and patient safety: reporting procedures.  

PubMed

Medical confidentiality is of individual and of general interest. Medical confidentiality is not absolute. European countries differ in their legislative approaches of consent for data-sharing and lawful breaches of medical confidentiality. An increase of interference by the legislator with medical confidentiality is noticeable. In The Netherlands for instance this takes the form of new mandatory duties to report resp. of legislation providing for a release of medical confidentiality in specific situations, often under the condition that reporting takes place on the basis of a professional code that includes elements imposed by the legislator (e.g. (suspicion of) child abuse, domestic violence). Legislative interference must not result in the patient loosing trust in healthcare. To avoid erosion of medical confidentiality, (comparative) effectiveness studies and privacy impact assessments are necessary (European and national level). Medical confidentiality should be a subject of permanent education of health personnel. PMID:25065032

Abbing, Henriette Roscam

2014-06-01

375

Narcolepsy and Other Comorbid Medical Illnesses  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Patients with narcolepsy may suffer from a host of other comorbid medical and psychiatric conditions. These include eating\\u000a disorders and obesity, diabetes, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine headaches, cognitive dysfunction and psychosocial\\u000a impairment. The associations between narcolepsy and many of these comorbid medical problems have not been clearly defined,\\u000a and there are often conflicting data in the medical literature. Nevertheless, it

Lori A. Panossian; Alon Y. Avidan

376

A medication extraction framework for electronic health records  

E-print Network

This thesis addresses the problem of concept and relation extraction in medical documents. We present a medical concept and relation extraction system (medNERR) that incorporates hand-built rules and constrained conditional ...

Bodnari, Andreea

2012-01-01

377

76 FR 71571 - Medicare Program; Town Hall Meeting on FY 2013 Applications for New Medical Services and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a patient population where that medical condition is currently undetectable...offers the ability to diagnose a medical condition earlier in a patient...that are frequently evaluated in studies of medical devices are the...

2011-11-18

378

78 FR 71555 - Medicare Program; Town Hall Meeting on FY 2015 Applications for New Medical Services and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a patient population where that medical condition is currently undetectable...offers the ability to diagnose a medical condition earlier in a patient...that are frequently evaluated in studies of medical devices are the...

2013-11-29

379

77 FR 70163 - Medicare Program; Town Hall Meeting on FY 2014 Applications for New Medical Services and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a patient population where that medical condition is currently undetectable...offers the ability to diagnose a medical condition earlier in a patient...that are frequently evaluated in studies of medical devices are the...

2012-11-23

380

Incontinence Treatment: Medication  

MedlinePLUS

... Who We Are Contact Us Donate Incontinence Treatment: Medication Jump to Topic Lifestyle changes Dietary changes Medication Bowel management/retraining program Biofeedback therapy Surgical treatments ...

381

Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Projects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During missions to the Moon or Mars, the crew will need medical capabilities to diagnose and treat disease as well as for maintaining their health. The Exploration Medical Capability Element develops medical technologies, medical informatics, and clinical capabilities for different levels of care during space missions. The work done by team members in this Element is leading edge technology, procedure, and pharmacological development. They develop data systems that protect patient's private medical information, aid in the diagnosis of medical conditions, and act as a repository of relevant NASA life sciences experimental studies. To minimize the medical risks to crew health the physicians and scientists in this Element develop models to quantify the probability of medical events occurring during a mission. They define procedures to treat an ill or injured crew member who does not have access to an emergency room and who must be cared for in a microgravity environment where both liquids and solids behave differently than on Earth. To support the development of these medical capabilities, the Element manages the development of medical technologies that prevent, monitor, diagnose, and treat an ill or injured crewmember. The Exploration Medical Capability Element collaborates with the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), the Department of Defense, other Government-funded agencies, academic institutions, and industry.

Wu, Jimmy; Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David

2010-01-01

382

Medication adherence behaviors of Medicare beneficiaries  

PubMed Central

Background Medication adherence is crucial for positive outcomes in the management of chronic conditions. Comprehensive medication consultation can improve medication adherence by addressing intentional and unintentional nonadherence. The Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit has eliminated some cost barriers. We sought to examine variables that impact self-reported medication adherence behaviors in an ambulatory Medicare-beneficiary population and to identify the factors that influence what information is provided during a pharmacist consultation. Methods Medicare beneficiaries who attended health fairs in northern California were offered medication therapy management (MTM) services during which demographic, social, and health information, and responses to survey questions regarding adherence were collected. Beneficiaries were also asked which critical elements of a consultation were typically provided by their community pharmacist. Survey responses were examined as a function of demographic, socioeconomic, and health-related factors. Results Of the 586 beneficiaries who were provided MTM services, 575 (98%) completed the adherence questions. Of responders, 406 (70%) reported taking medications “all of the time”. Of the remaining 169 (30%), the following reasons for nonadherence were provided: 123 (73%) forgetfulness; 18 (11%) side effects; and 17 (10%) the medication was not needed. Lower adherence rates were associated with difficulty paying for medication, presence of a medication-related problem, and certain symptomatic chronic conditions. Of the 532 who completed survey questions regarding the content of a typical pharmacist consultation, the topics included: 378 (71%) medication name and indication; 361 (68%) administration instructions; 307 (58%) side effects; 257 (48%) missed-dose instructions; and 245 (46%) interactions. Subsidy recipients and non-English speakers were significantly less likely to be counseled on drug name, indication, and side effects. The presence of certain health conditions was also associated with missing consultation elements. Conclusion While Medicare beneficiaries are generally adherent to medication therapy, adherence barriers must be identified and addressed during comprehensive medication consultation.

Carr-Lopez, Sian M; Shek, Allen; Lastimosa, Janine; Patel, Rajul A; Woelfel, Joseph A; Galal, Suzanne M; Gundersen, Berit

2014-01-01

383

Medical Implications of Women On Submarines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The review highlights traditionally important medical conditions for submariners along with the unique consequence of women's health care on the submarine. The information covered includes a review of the history of women in the military followed by a dis...

J. L. Kane, W. G. Horn

2001-01-01

384

Continuous Commissioning of a Medical Research Facility  

E-print Network

This paper presents a case study for Continuous Commissioning® (CC®)of a 520,000 square foot medical research facility. All of the primary energy using systems in the building were investigated to determine their existing condition and operation...

Turner, W. D.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Zeig, G.; Wei, G.

2007-01-01

385

Prescription Medications for the Treatment of Obesity  

MedlinePLUS

Prescription Medications for the Treatment of Obesity WIN Weight-control Information Network U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Introduction Obesity is a chronic condition that affects many people. ...

386

32 CFR 732.21 - Medical board.  

...guidance. (a) Chronic conditions requiring a medical board include (but are not limited to): (1) Arthritis, (2) Asthma, (3) Diabetes, (4) Gout, (5) Heart disease, (6) Hypertension, (7) Peptic ulcer disease, (8)...

2014-07-01

387

Probiotics and Medical Nutrition Therapy  

PubMed Central

Probiotics have been defined by The Food Agricultural Organization/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) as “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit to the host.” They have been used for centuries in the form of dairy-based fermented products, but the potential use of probiotics as a form of medical nutrition therapy has not received formal recognition. A detailed literature review (from 1950 through February 2004) of English-language articles was undertaken to find articles showing a relationship between probiotic use and medical conditions. Medical conditions that have been reportedly treated or have the potential to be treated with probiotics include diarrhea, gastroenteritis, irritable bowel syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis), cancer, depressed immune function, inadequate lactase digestion, infant allergies, failure-to-thrive, hyperlipidemia, hepatic diseases, Helicobacter pylori infections, genitourinary tract infections, and others. The use of probiotics should be further investigated for possible benefits and side-effects in patients affected by these medical conditions. PMID:15481739

Brown, Amy C.; Valiere, Ana

2006-01-01

388

Medical science and social values.  

PubMed

Social Values, no less than medical science, have shaped the medical management of the pain of childbirth. Nineteenth century feminists fought for greater use of anesthesia in obstetrics at a time when physicians held back for fear of its effects on labor, hemorrhage, rates of infection and the condition of the child. A century later, after physicians became comfortable with the use of anesthesia, a new generation of feminists challenged the use of such drugs, once again citing social considerations. The personalities of colorful and charismatic obstetricians such as James Young Simpson and Grantley Dick-Read played a strong part in the outcome of each confrontation. PMID:15321396

Caton, D

2004-07-01

389

Medical Student Resource Guide  

E-print Network

. With this in mind, interprofessional education is another important aspect of medical education. We strive20132014 O.H.S.U. Medical Student Resource Guide #12;2013-2014 Medical Student Resource Guide 1 Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine - Medical Student Resource Guide Welcome

Chapman, Michael S.

390

Medical Student Procedure Guide  

E-print Network

. With this in mind, interprofessional education is another important aspect of medical education. We strive20132014 O.H.S.U. Medical Student Procedure Guide #12;2013-2014 Medical Student Procedure Guide 1 Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine - Medical Student Procedure Guide Welcome

Chapman, Michael S.

391

Medication error prevalence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Healthcare risk epidemiology identifies medication error as the commonest cause of adverse effects on patients. Medication error can occur at any phase of the complex medication process so prevalence rates need to be estimated at each drug treatment phase: prescription, transcription and administration along with their clinical repercussions. This paper aims to investigate this issue. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Medication

Ana Belén Jiménez Muñoz; Antonio Muiño Miguez; María Paz Rodriguez Pérez; María Dolores Vigil Escribano; María Esther Durán Garcia; María Sanjurjo Saez

2010-01-01

392

Medical marijuana: more questions than answers.  

PubMed

With 23 states and the District of Columbia having enacted medical marijuana laws as of August 2014, it is important that psychiatrists be able to address questions about medical marijuana from patients, families, and other health care professionals. The author discusses the medical literature on synthetic cannabinoids and medical marijuana. The synthetic cannabinoids dronabinol and nabilone are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy and appetite stimulation in patients with wasting diseases such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Results of clinical trials of these agents for other conditions have varied widely thus far. In addition, few data are available on the use of the marijuana plant as a medical treatment. The author concludes that there is a clear need for additional research on possible medical uses of cannabinoids. He notes that discussions with prospective medical marijuana patients should emphasize the importance of communication among all parties due to the possible side effects of treatment with marijuana and its potential to interact with other medications the patient may be taking. Facilitating a thorough substance abuse consultation is one of most positive ways that psychiatrists, especially addiction psychiatrists, can make an impact as medical marijuana becomes increasingly common. A careful review of the prospective medical marijuana user's substance use history, co-occurring medical and psychiatric conditions, family history, and psychosocial stressors is essential in evaluating the potential risks of medical marijuana for these patients. The author concludes that psychiatrists can have a significant impact by increasing the likelihood that medical marijuana will be used in a safe and responsible way. PMID:25226202

Hill, Kevin P

2014-09-01

393

Projecting long term medical spending growth.  

PubMed

We present a dynamic general equilibrium model of the U.S. economy and the medical sector in which the adoption of new medical treatments is endogenous and the demand for medical services is conditional on the state of technology. We use this model to prepare 75-year medical spending forecasts and a projection of the Medicare actuarial balance, and we compare our results to those obtained from a method that has been used by government actuaries. Our baseline forecast predicts slower health spending growth in the long run and a lower Medicare actuarial deficit relative to the previous projection methodology. PMID:17459502

Borger, Christine; Rutherford, Thomas F; Won, Gregory Y

2008-01-01

394

Sex differences in fear conditioning in posttraumatic stress disorder  

PubMed Central

Background Women are twice as likely as men to develop Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Abnormal acquisition of conditioned fear has been suggested as a mechanism for the development of PTSD. While some studies of healthy humans suggest that women are either no different or express less conditioned fear responses during conditioning relative to men, differences in the acquisition of conditioned fear between men and women diagnosed with PTSD has not been examined. Methods Thirty-one participants (18 men; 13 women) with full or subsyndromal PTSD completed a fear conditioning task. Participants were shown computer-generated colored circles that were paired (CS+) or unpaired (CS?) with an aversive electrical stimulus and skin conductance levels were assessed throughout the task. Results Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significant sex by stimulus interaction during acquisition. Women had greater differential conditioned skin conductance responses (CS + trials compared to CS? trials) than did men, suggesting greater acquisition of conditioned fear in women with PTSD. Conclusions In contrast to studies of healthy individuals, we found enhanced acquisition of conditioned fear in women with PTSD. Greater fear conditioning in women may either be a pre-existing vulnerability trait or an acquired phenomenon that emerges in a sex-dependent manner after the development of PTSD. Characterizing the underlying mechanisms of these differences is needed to clarify sex-related differences in the pathophysiology of PTSD. PMID:23107307

Inslicht, Sabra S.; Metzler, Thomas J.; Garcia, Natalia M.; Pineles, Suzanne L.; Milad, Mohammed R.; Orr, Scott P.; Marmar, Charles R.; Neylan, Thomas C.

2013-01-01

395

Psychosocial predictors of attitudes toward physician empathy in clinical encounters among 4732 1st year medical students: A report from the CHANGES study?  

PubMed Central

Objective Medical school curricula intended to promote empathy varies widely. Even the most effective curricula leave a significant group of students untouched. Pre-existing student factors influence their response to learning experiences. We examined the individual predictors of first semester medical students’ attitudes toward the value of physician empathy in clinical encounters. Methods First year students (n = 4732) attending a stratified random sample of 49 US medical schools completed an online questionnaire that included measures of dispositional characteristics, attitudes and beliefs, self-concept and well-being. Results Discomfort with uncertainty, close-mindedness, dispositional empathy, elitism, medical authoritarianism, egalitarianism, self-concept and well-being all independently predicted first year medical students’ attitudes toward the benefit of physician empathy in clinical encounters. Conclusion Students vary on their attitude toward the value of physician empathy when they start medical school. The individual factors that predict their attitudes toward empathy may also influence their response to curricula promoting empathic care. Practice implications Curricula in medical school promoting empathic care may be more universally effective if students’ preexisting attitudes are taken into account. Messages about the importance of physician empathy may need to be framed in ways that are consistent with the beliefs and prior world-views of medical students. PMID:25065328

van Ryn, Michelle; Hardeman, Rachel R.; Phelan, Sean M.; Burke, Sara E.; Przedworski, Julia; Allen, Michele L.; Burgess, Diana J.; Ridgeway, Jennifer; White, Richard O.; Dovidio, John F.

2014-01-01

396

Chapter III: Management of cardiovascular risk factors and medical therapy.  

PubMed

Critical limb ischaemia (CLI) is a particularly severe manifestation of lower limb atherosclerosis posing a major threat to both limb and life of affected patients. Besides arterial revascularisation, risk-factor modification and administration of antiplatelet therapy is a major goal in the treatment of CLI patients. Key elements of cardiovascular risk management are smoking cessation and treatment of hyperlipidaemia with dietary modification or statins. Moreover, arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus should be adequately treated. In CLI patients not suitable for arterial revascularisation or subsequent to unsuccessful revascularisation, parenteral prostanoids may be considered. CLI patients undergoing surgical revascularisation should be treated with beta blockers. At present, neither gene nor stem-cell therapy can be recommended outside clinical trials. Of note, walking exercise is contraindicated in CLI patients due to the risk of worsening pre-existing or causing new ischaemic wounds. CLI patients are oftentimes medically frail and exhibit significant comorbidities. Co-existing coronary heart and carotid as well as renal artery disease should be managed according to current guidelines. Considering the above-mentioned treatment goals, interdisciplinary treatment approaches for CLI patients are warranted. Aim of the present manuscript is to discuss currently existing evidence for both the management of cardiovascular risk factors and treatment of co-existing disease and to deduct specific treatment recommendations. PMID:22172471

Diehm, N; Schmidli, J; Setacci, C; Ricco, J-B; de Donato, G; Becker, F; Robert-Ebadi, H; Cao, P; Eckstein, H H; De Rango, P; Teraa, M; Moll, F L; Dick, F; Davies, A H; Lepäntalo, M; Apelqvist, J

2011-12-01

397

Medical virology in Malaysia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Virology is a branch of biological science dealing with the study of viruses, and medical virology focuses on the study and\\u000a control of diseases due to viruses that is of medical importance. The development of medical virology in Malaysia has its\\u000a beginning in the Institute for Medical Research (IMR), following the establishment of the Division of Medical Zoology and\\u000a Virus

Kaw Bing Chua

2009-01-01

398

Intrasubject Medication Adherence Patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this prospective descriptive study was to explore the patterns of intrasubject (between medication) adherence of two similarly timed, twice-daily medications using the Medication Event Management System® electronic monitoring cap. Medication adherence was measured for 6 months using electronic monitoring in 25 adult renal-transplant recipients. Data were available from 7,119 electronic medication events. Results indicated that two twice-daily

Cynthia L. Russell; Vicki S. Conn; Catherine Ashbaugh; Richard Madsen; Karen Hayes; Gilbert Ross

2007-01-01

399

Digital halftoning of medical images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work considers the use of digital halftones in the display of medical images. One might assume that the use of halftone rendering (as opposed to continuous tone image rendering) will degrade the information in medical images, therefore, it is interesting to study what degree of degradation is unacceptable in medical images. We analyze various halftoning techniques quantitatively by first generating low-contrast detail diagrams (CDD) made to represent computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), and ultrasound (US) modality images. These are then halftoned and printed using error diffusion, Bayer's method, blue noise mask, and centered weighted dots. The contrast areas in the diagram are randomly placed on a 5 X 5 grid. A single observer is used to determine the minimum contrast `lesion' that could be observed. The results for minimum detectable contrast depend on resolution (dots per inch), modality, and halftoning technique. It is shown that acceptable halftone rendering, with small degradation, can be achieved under certain conditions.

Silkman, Ronald W.; Parker, Kevin J.

1995-04-01

400

Space Shuttle Program: STS-1 Medical Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The necessity for developing medical standards addressing individual classes of Shuttle crew positions is discussed. For the U.S. manned program the conclusion of the Apollo era heralded the end of water recovery operations and the introduction of land-based medical operations. This procedural change marked a significant departure from the accepted postflight medical recovery and evaluation techniques. All phases of the missions required careful re-evaluation, identification of potential impact on preexisting medical operational techniques, and development of new methodologies which were carefully evaluated and tested under simulated conditions. Significant coordination was required between the different teams involved in medical operations. Additional dimensions were added to the concepts of medical operations, by the introduction of different toxic substances utilized by the Space Transportation Systems especially during ground operations.

1981-01-01

401

MEDIC: Medical embedded device for individualized care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Objective: Presented work highlights the development and initial validation of a medical embedded device for individualized care (MEDIC), which is based on a novel software architecture, enabling sensor management and disease prediction capabil- ities, and commercially available microelectronic components, sensors and conven- tional personal digital assistant (PDA) (or a cell phone). Methods and materials: In this paper, we present

Winston H. Wu; Alex A. T. Bui; Maxim A. Batalin; Lawrence K. Au; Jonathan D. Binney; William J. Kaiser

2008-01-01

402

Medical spa marketing.  

PubMed

Medical spas are different. We are not just selling medical and dermatology services; we are offering clients viable new solutions to their skin care, body care, and hair care challenges. Traditional medical marketing becomes blurred today, as the expansion and acceptance of medical spas helps you to effectively compete with traditional skin care clinics, salons, and spas, while offering more therapeutic treatments from professionally licensed doctors, nurses, aestheticians, massage therapists, spa professionals, and medical practitioners. We recommend that you make the choice to successfully and competitively become a market-driven medical spa with an annual strategic plan, rather than an operationally driven business. PMID:18555955

Sadick, Neil S; Dinkes, Adam; Oskin, Larry

2008-07-01

403

Computerized medical training system  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

A method of medical training includes presenting a user with a medical scenario within a medical simulation in which the user plays a physician. The medical scenario includes an interaction between the user and a patient. Performance data corresponding to the user is identified. The identified performance data is based at least in part on an action of the user during the interaction between the user and the patient. The user is evaluated based at least in part on the identified performance data to determine whether the user has achieved a training goal within the medical simulation. The training goal is intended to improve a medical skill of the user.

2013-06-25

404

Physics design for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor epithermal neutron source.  

PubMed

A collaborative effort by researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Brookhaven National Laboratory has resulted in the design and implementation of an epithermal-neutron source at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Large aluminum containers, filled with aluminum oxide tiles and aluminum spacers, were tailored to pre-existing compartments on the animal side of the reactor facility. A layer of cadmium was used to minimize the thermal-neutron component. Additional bismuth was added to the pre-existing bismuth shield to minimize the gamma component of the beam. Lead was also added to reduce gamma streaming around the bismuth. The physics design methods are outlined in this paper. Information available to date shows close agreement between calculated and measured beam parameters. The neutron spectrum is predominantly in the intermediate energy range (0.5 eV - 10 keV). The peak flux intensity is 6.4E + 12 n/(m2.s.MW) at the center of the beam on the outer surface of the final gamma shield. The corresponding neutron current is 3.8E + 12 n/(m2.s.MW). Presently, the core operates at a maximum of 3 MW. The fast-neutron KERMA is 3.6E-15 cGy/(n/m2) and the gamma KERMA is 5.0E-16 cGY/(n/m2) for the unperturbed beam. The neutron intensity falls off rapidly with distance from the outer shield and the thermal flux realized in phantom or tissue is strongly dependent on the beam-delimiter and target geometry. PMID:2268249

Wheeler, F J; Parsons, D K; Nigg, D W; Wessol, D E; Miller, L G; Fairchild, R G

1990-01-01

405

Predictors of Medication Errors Among Elderly Hospitalized Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medication errors are a serious safety concern and most errors are preventable. A retrospective study design was employed to describe medication errors experienced during 10187 hospitalizations of elderly patients admitted to a Midwest teaching hospital between July 1, 1998 and December 31, 2001 and to determine the factors predictive of medication errors. The model considered patient characteristics, clinical conditions, interventions,

Debra Matsen Picone; Marita G. Titler; Joanne Dochterman; Leah Shever; Taikyoung Kim; Paul Abramowitz; Mary Kanak; Rui Qin

2008-01-01

406

Medical Interventions for Cognitive Impairment  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a We have proposed that the Flynn effect – the progressive rise in IQ that is well documented over the past several decades\\u000a – may have arisen because of successful intervention into medical conditions that depressed intelligence in the past. In the\\u000a United States alone, more than 10 million children are at risk from the effects of poverty, and the average

R. Grant Steen

407

Chromosomal Conditions  

MedlinePLUS

... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

408

General Medical Surveillance Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Background on the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is presented. The purpose of the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the program are discussed.

1993-01-01

409

Medical Physics Publishing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Medical Physics Publishing is a nonprofit, membership organization founded in 1985 to provide affordable books in medical physics and related fields. The books are written by and for technologists, physicists, residents, and radiologists

2003-10-10

410

Liquid medication administration  

MedlinePLUS

... easily. Oral syringes have some advantages for giving liquid medications. They are accurate. They are easy to ... cups are also a handy way to give liquid medications. However, dosing errors have occurred with them. ...

411

Recent Medical Device Recalls  

MedlinePLUS

... is a Medical Device Recall? Recalls Database Safety Communications MedWatch: The FDA Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program FDA 101: Product Recalls - From First Alert to Effectiveness Checks [ARCHIVED] Older Recalls 2011 Medical Device Recalls [ ...

412

A cyber medical center.  

PubMed

This paper describes the design and implementation of a Cyber Medical Center (CMC) using web technology. The intention is to overcome the inefficiency of the traditional filing system for patients' medical records, which are considered to be time and space consuming. Another objective is to enhance the interaction between the user - the patient in this case - and the medical center personnel - the doctors and staff. This task is achieved by developing a cyber medical center interfaced with the Internet to provide direct public access. The traditional filing system is replaced by a database system for maintaining the electronic medical records of all patients in the medical center. The doctors or staff can either view the medical records or update them through the Intranet/Internet. This system has been successfully developed, implemented and tested on the Intranet platform. It will be available in a university medical center for practical use. PMID:16520147

Al-Ali, A R; Abdul Salam, A O; Al-Zohlof, L; Manna, M; Zakaria, R

2005-12-01

413

Medications for Memory Loss  

MedlinePLUS

Medications for Memory Loss Tweet Although current medications cannot cure Alzheimer’s or stop it from progressing, they may help lessen symptoms, such as memory loss and confusion, for a limited time. Types ...

414

American Medical Association  

MedlinePLUS

... Have a hand in shaping updated Code of Medical Ethics A vision for a healthier nation From advocating ... language to describe healthcare services. AMA Code of Medical Ethics Since 1847, the AMA has provided guidance on ...

415

Medication/Drug Allergy  

MedlinePLUS

... Allergy & Clinical Immunology View full profile Medication/Drug Allergy Allergies to medications/drugs are complicated because they ... Calendar Read the News View Daily Pollen Count Allergy Treatment Programs At National Jewish Health, some of ...

416

Marijuana: modern medical chimaera.  

PubMed

Marijuana has been used medically since antiquity. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in medical applications of various cannabis preparations. These drugs have been cited in the medical literature as potential secondary treatment agents for severe pain, muscle spasticity, anorexia, nausea, sleep disturbances, and numerous other uses. This article reviews the research literature related to medical applications of various forms of cannabis. Benefits related to medical use of cannabinoids are examined and a number of potential risks associated with cannabis use, both medical and recreational, are considered. There is a clearly identified need for further research to isolate significant benefits from the medical application of cannabinoids and to establish dosage levels, appropriate delivery mechanisms and formulations, and to determine what role, if any, cannabinoids might play in legitimate medical applications. It is also imperative to determine if reported dangers pose a significant health risks to users. PMID:22873011

Lamarine, Roland J

2012-01-01

417

Avoiding Medical Identity Theft  

MedlinePLUS

Tips for Preventing and Detecting Medical Identity Theft Tips for Preventing and Detecting Medical Identity Theft Monitor your health records closely and address any errors quickly Share personal and ...

418

Asthma Medications and Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

... Director, Health Initiatives View full profile Asthma and Pregnancy: Asthma Medications We would like to avoid all ... mother and child. Making Decisions about Medication During Pregnancy It is important that your asthma be controlled ...

419

Medication Use during Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

... this? Submit Button CDC Features Medication Use During Pregnancy Language: English Español (Spanish) Share Compartir The safety ... Information About the Effects of Medication Use During Pregnancy? The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates ...

420

Medications: Using Them Safely  

MedlinePLUS

Medication Safety Giving kids medicine safely can be complicated. It may be frightening to give a young ... isn't kept clean and dry. Continue Administering Medication To ensure the safe use of prescription or ...

421

After the Transplant: Medications  

MedlinePLUS

... Risks Cancer Types Risk Factors Prevention & Early Detection Medications After transplants, the focus for patients transitions from ... a donor organ to learning how to manage medications and their side effects as part of daily ...

422

Understand Your Medication  

MedlinePLUS

... Asthma A A A Share Print Understand Your Medication There are a variety of medicines available to ... should not be used for quick relief. These medications are only recommended for use when combined with ...

423

HIV Medication Adherence  

MedlinePLUS

... Before and After Starting HIV Medicines . What is medication adherence? Adherence means “to stick firmly.” So for ... future HIV regimen. What is the connection between medication adherence and drug resistance? Taking HIV medicines every ...

424

Giving Medication to Children  

MedlinePLUS

... the Right Medicine and the Right Amount Giving Medication to Children Search the Consumer Updates Section Printer- ... the upper limit. back to top Q: Are medications that are intended for children clinically tested on ...

425

Medications After the NICU  

MedlinePLUS

... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Medications after the NICU Many babies go home from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) on medication for apnea, reflux or respiratory problems. Apnea is ...

426

Glaucoma Medical Updates  

MedlinePLUS

... for Change Get Involved Research Grants Special Events Glaucoma Medical Updates Latest Medical News Updates DoD Funds ... with Discovery of New Gene Variations Associated with Glaucoma September 3, 2014 Hot Topics in Glaucoma Research ...

427

Using Medications Safely  

MedlinePLUS

... health systems play an important role in preventing medication errors. To make sure you use medicines safely and effectively, ASHP recommends that you: Keep a list of all medications that you take (prescribed drugs, nonprescription medicines, herbal ...

428

Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients  

PubMed Central

In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21–85 years) and 73 years (range, 30–90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3–3,585 days) and 219 days (24–3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4–5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

KIMURA, MICHIO; USAMI, EISEKI; IWAI, MINA; NAKAO, TOSHIYA; YOSHIMURA, TOMOAKI; MORI, HIROMI; SUGIYAMA, TADASHI; TERAMACHI, HITOMI

2014-01-01

429

Global Services Medical Advisory Services  

E-print Network

): Allergies ­ Medications/food/other: Current Medical Problems: Current Medications: Medical HistoryGlobal Services Medical Advisory Services Medical Profile - Domestic Doc. No./Rev. No OPS 07-33 R0: Company Contact Person: MEDICAL INFORMATION: Blood Type (A/B/AB/O) Rh (positive or negative

Russell, Lynn

430

Medication in the Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Administering medication exposes school boards and employees to liability for civil damages should the medication cause harm. Points out some of the risks associated with a school undertaking to administer medicine to students and offers suggestions on the contents of a written medication policy to help control those risks. (MLF)

Koeze, Jeffrey S.

1988-01-01

431

Mission Medical Information System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Mission Medical Information System (MMIS). The topics include: 1) What is MMIS?; 2) MMIS Goals; 3) Terrestrial Health Information Technology Vision; 4) NASA Health Information Technology Needs; 5) Mission Medical Information System Components; 6) Electronic Medical Record; 7) Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH); 8) Methods; and 9) Data Submission Agreement (example).

Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Joe, John C.; Follansbee, Nicole M.

2008-01-01

432

Medical Treatments for Fibroids  

MedlinePLUS

... may be used to help the surgery succeed. Common medical treatments for fibroids include: 1 Pain medication. Over-the-counter or prescription medication is often used for mild or occasional pain from fibroids. Birth control pills or other types of hormonal birth control. ...

433

Marijuana: Modern Medical Chimaera  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Marijuana has been used medically since antiquity. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in medical applications of various cannabis preparations. These drugs have been cited in the medical literature as potential secondary treatment agents for severe pain, muscle spasticity, anorexia, nausea, sleep disturbances, and numerous…

Lamarine, Roland J.

2012-01-01

434

Children's Hospital Medical Center  

E-print Network

WherryHall Veterans Affairs Medical Center VAMC VAMC VAMC VAMC VAMC Holmes CHMC CHMC Children's HospitalUNIVERSITY COMMONS Children's Hospital Medical Center Children's Hospital Medical Research Center Hoxworth Blood Center ShrinersHospital forChildren Shriners Garage Cincinnati Dept of Health Logan

Papautsky, Ian

435

Children's Hospital Medical Center  

E-print Network

Affairs Medical Center VAMC VAMC VAMC VAMC VAMC Holmes CHMC CHMC Children's Hospital Garage CHMC KingsgateUNIVERSITY COMMONS Children's Hospital Medical Center Children's Hospital Medical Research Center Co. Coroner Kettering Lab Complex Radiation Safety HealthProfessions Building WherryHall Veterans

Papautsky, Ian

436

Children's Hospital Medical Center  

E-print Network

Complex Radiation Safety HealthProfessions Building WherryHall Veterans Affairs Medical Center VAMC VAMCUNIVERSITY COMMONS Children's Hospital Medical Center Children's Hospital Medical Research Center VAMC VAMC VAMC Holmes CHMC CHMC Children's Hospital Garage CHMC Kingsgate Conference Center French East

Papautsky, Ian

437

Emergency Medical Treatment Required  

E-print Network

or Chemical Exposure Occurs * Laboratory Employee Faculty, Post Doc, Technician, Graduate Student (whenEmergency Medical Treatment Required Non-Emergency Medical Treatment Required If possible, get help present if possible AmeriSys will complete the "First Report of Injury or Illness" and authorize medical

Sura, Philip

438

Scottish Canadian Medical Programme  

E-print Network

Scottish ­ Canadian Medical Programme Bachelors of Medicine and Surgery #12;Overview The Scottish ­ Canadian Medical Programme (Bachelors of Medicine and Surgery) provides a unique experience both marks. Edinburgh The MB ChB medical degree programme at Edinburgh recognises the talents, skills

Brierley, Andrew

439

Intelligent medical information filtering  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an intelligent information filtering system to assist users to be notified of updates to new and relevant medical information. Among the major problems users face is the large volume of medical information that is generated each day, and the need to filter and retrieve relevant information. The Internet has dramatically increased the amount of electronically accessible medical

Yuri Quintana

1998-01-01

440

Considering a Medical Career  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains resources for those interested in pursuing a medical career. There is information on applying to medical school and making financial arrangements to pay for schooling, possible careers options within the medical field, and a listing of accredited degree programs.

Colleges, The A.

2009-03-16

441

History of Medical Physics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traces the development of basic radiation physics that underlies much of today's medical physics and looks separately at the historical development of two major subfields of medical physics: radiation therapy and nuclear medicine. Indicates that radiation physics has made important contributions to solving biomedical problems in medical

Laughlin, John S.

1983-01-01

442

Medical Veteran Utilization Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual is intended to encourage policy makers, administrators, and personnel officers in hospitals and other health facilities to recruit and hire the thousands of well-trained, experienced men and women who leave the military medical services each year. The document lists the advantages to the medical institution when employing medically

Nathan (Robert R.) Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

443

Medical History Record Health Services Medical  

E-print Network

the Medical History Record and the Student Immunization Record. A tuberculin test (Note: tine or monovac Hearing loss left or right ear Knee problem Severe or frequent headaches Severe head injury Concussion

Nelson, Tim

444

Issued by the International Mobility Office -August 2014 -All Information is subject to change UK HEALTHCARE INFORMATION FOR EXCHANGE & VISITING STUDENTS  

E-print Network

, there will be a charge for registration and medical treatment. Details are in the flow chart below. Bear in mind that pre-existing health issues or are undergoing medical treatment, we advise you to bring your current condition, all treatment and medication you require, plus any assistance you will need while you study

Burton, Geoffrey R.

445

IN THE EVENT OF HOSPITALIZATION, YOU MUST CALL GLOBAL EXCEL MANAGEMENT INC. (HErEINAFTEr CALLEd GLOBAL EXCEL) From Canada and U.S., call toll free 1-800-715-8833 From Mexico, call toll free 001-800-514-7798 From anywhere, call collect +1-819-566-8839  

E-print Network

treatment that is not medically necessary. "Emergency" means that you require immediate medical treatment or alcohol abusers. "Immediate Family Member" means your mother, father, sibling, child, spouse, grandparent be subject to certain limitations and exclusions. 3. A pre-existing medical condition exclusion applies

446

The Nurse's Medication Day  

PubMed Central

The medication administration stage of the medication-use process is especially vulnerable to error because errors are least likely to be caught before reaching the patient. Medication administration, however, remains poorly understood. In this article we describe medication administration as observed in an ethnographic study conducted on one medical and one surgical unit. A central finding was that medication administration entailed a complex mixture of varied and often competing demands that temporally structured the nurses' entire workday. Articulation work was evident in time management strategies nurses used to handle demands from institutional policies, technical devices, patients, the physical environment, and the medications themselves. The average number of doses of medication per patient was more than double the number policy groups have indicated. Medication administration is neither simply the giving of drugs nor does it have clearly defined temporal boundaries. Because of its inseparability from other nurses' work, medication administration inherently entails interruption, thereby calling into question the current emphasis on reducing interruptions as a tactic to decrease medication errors. PMID:21693688

Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski; Sandelowski, Margarete; Mark, Barbara

2014-01-01

447

The medical passport.  

PubMed

A Working Group on Medical Passports was established in 2002 by the International Association of Medical Regulatory Authorities. The goal of this group was to develop a fast-track registration process for highly qualified medical practitioners wishing to move from one jurisdiction to another. A "medical passport" would be available only to practitioners who meet or exceed certain well-defined gold-standard educational, examination, and practice requirements. These standards are the core elements of the international medical passport. Each physician would need to satisfy a series of comprehensive requirements to be eligible for this fast-track, expedited treatment. A medical passport system would ease the movement of highly qualified physicians between countries while contributing to the broader dissemination of scientific knowledge and education. Significant progress has been made, but many issues need further study before the medical passport is ready for piloting. PMID:16078800

Ineson, Sue; Seeling, Stephen S

2005-01-01

448

Online Medical Terminology Course  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For those entering the medical field, developing a working knowledge of medical terminology can be a daunting task. Des Moines University provides this short introductory course, which allows the user to develop a basic understanding of the origin and composition of medical terms. The course is divided into thirteen sections based on the different systems of the body (circulatory, nervous, digestive, respiratory, urinary, reproductive and musculoskeletal) and also defines words pertaining to cancer and medication. The site supplies not only the definitions of three hundred terms, but the skills to evaluate and understand new terms as well. This is an excellent resource for medical administrative staff, assistants, transcriptionists and anyone else entering the medical field with little or no previous experience in medical terminology.

2007-02-25

449

The Texas Children's Medication Algorithm Project: Report of the Texas Consensus Conference Panel on Medication Treatment of Childhood Attention-Deficit\\/Hyperactivity Disorder. Part II: Tactics  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesExpert consensus methodology was used to develop a medication treatment algorithm for attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The algorithm broadly outlined the choice of medication for ADHD and some of its most common comorbid conditions. Specific tactical recommendations were developed with regard to medication dosage, assessment of drug response, management of side effects, and long-term medication management.

STEVEN R. PLISZKA; LAWRENCE L. GREENHILL; M. LYNN CRISMON; ANDREW SEDILLO; CARYN CARLSON; C. KEITH CONNERS; JAMES T. McCRACKEN; JAMES M. SWANSON; CARROLL W. HUGHES; MARIA E. LLANA; MOLLY LOPEZ; MARCIA G. TOPRAC

2000-01-01

450

Optimizing Medical Kits for Space Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) uses Monte Carlo methodologies to predict the occurrence of medical events, their mitigation, and the resources required during space flight. The model includes two modules that utilize output from a single model simulation to identify an optimized medical kit for a specified mission scenario. This poster describes two flexible optimization routines built into SAS 9.1. The first routine utilizes a systematic process of elimination to maximize (or minimize) outcomes subject to attribute constraints. The second routine uses a search and mutate approach to minimize medical kit attributes given a set of outcome constraints. There are currently 273 unique resources identified that are used to treat at least one of 83 medical conditions currently in the model.

Minard, Charles G.; FreiredeCarvalho, Mary H.; Iyengar, M. Sriram

2010-01-01

451

Comorbidity Between Psychiatric and General Medical Disorders in Homeless Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homeless veterans have numerous co-occurring medical and behavioral health problems. Identification of common patterns of\\u000a comorbid conditions may help providers to determine severity of medical conditions and triage health care more effectively.\\u000a In this study we identify such patterns of comorbid medical and psychiatric disorders using cluster analysis and we evaluate\\u000a relationships between these patterns and sociodemographic factors. We used

Gerald Goldstein; James F. Luther; Gretchen L. Haas; Adam J. Gordon; Cathleen Appelt

2009-01-01

452

The medical-legal responsibilities of a dialysis unit medical director.  

PubMed

The specialty of Nephrology, by virtue of its relationship with the dialysis procedure, is highly vulnerable to litigation. As is the case with all nephrologists, a dialysis unit medical director is not immune to medical malpractice suits, and can be held liable for any act of perceived or potential harm to any dialysis patient, regardless of the director's level of involvement. The medical director, per the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Conditions of Participation, accepts the responsibilities, accountability, and consequent legal liabilities of the quality of the medical care provided to every dialysis patient in the unit. This review is a synopsis of lawsuits filed against medical directors of dialysis units in the past forty years. Six categories of legal actions were noted; medical malpractice, fraudulent claims, self-referral and Stark Law, discrimination, negligence, and violation of patient autonomy and dignity. PMID:24329720

Vaqar, Sarosh; Murray, Brian; Panesar, Mandip

2014-09-01

453

Medical management of acute severe anorexia nervosa.  

PubMed

Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a common condition affecting young people. The medical management of AN on a general paediatric ward is challenging. It is important to identify young people who are at risk of medical complications, so early intervention can be instigated. This article aims to review the clinical practice and evidence supporting the current medical management of young people with AN. It provides a system-based approach to potential complications of the disease, guidance on feeding and the management of re-feeding syndrome. Approaches to legal and ethical challenges are also considered. While the importance of psychiatric treatment is recognised, the same is not discussed within this article. PMID:21764823

Norrington, Amy; Stanley, Ruth; Tremlett, Michael; Birrell, Ginny

2012-04-01

454

Over-the-Counter Medications in Pregnancy.  

PubMed

Many pregnant women take over-the-counter (OTC) medications despite the absence of randomized controlled trials to guide their use during pregnancy. Most data come from case-control and cohort studies. In 1979, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began reviewing all prescription and OTC medications to develop risk categories for use in pregnancy. Most OTC medications taken during pregnancy are for allergy, respiratory, gastrointestinal, or skin conditions, as well as for general analgesia. Acetaminophen, which is used by about 65% of pregnant women, is generally considered safe during any trimester. Cold medications are also commonly used and are considered safe for short-term use outside of the first trimester. Many gastrointestinal medications are now available OTC. Histamine H2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors have not demonstrated significant fetal effects. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are generally not recommended in pregnancy, especially during organogenesis and in the third trimester. There are even fewer data regarding use of individual herbal supplements. Ginger is considered safe and effective for treating nausea in pregnancy. Topical creams are considered safe based on small studies and previous practice. All OTC medication use should be discussed with patients, and the effects of the symptoms should be balanced with the risks and benefits of each medication. Because of the expanding OTC market, formalized studies are warranted for patients to make a safe and informed decision about OTC medication use during pregnancy. PMID:25369643

Servey, Jessica; Chang, Jennifer

2014-10-15