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Sample records for pre-movement cortical potentials

  1. Continuous detection of the self-initiated walking pre-movement state from EEG correlates without session-to-session recalibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioana Sburlea, Andreea; Montesano, Luis; Minguez, Javier

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) as a rehabilitation tool have been used to restore functions in patients with motor impairments by actively involving the central nervous system and triggering prosthetic devices according to the detected pre-movement state. However, since EEG signals are highly variable between subjects and recording sessions, typically a BCI is calibrated at the beginning of each session. This process is inconvenient especially for patients suffering locomotor disabilities in maintaining a bipedal position for a longer time. This paper presents a continuous EEG decoder of a pre-movement state in self-initiated walking and the usage of this decoder from session to session without recalibrating. Approach. Ten healthy subjects performed a self-initiated walking task during three sessions, with an intersession interval of one week. The implementation of our continuous decoder is based on the combination of movement-related cortical potential (MRCP) and event-related desynchronization (ERD) features with sparse classification models. Main results. During intrasession our technique detects the pre-movement state with 70% accuracy. Moreover this decoder can be applied from session to session without recalibration, with a decrease in performance of about 4% on a one- or two-week intersession interval. Significance. Our detection model operates in a continuous manner, which makes it a straightforward asset for rehabilitation scenarios. By using both temporal and spectral information we attained higher detection rates than the ones obtained with the MRCP and ERD detection models, both during the intrasession and intersession conditions.

  2. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in Unsuccessful Cochlear Implant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munivrana, Boska; Mildner, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    In some cochlear implant users, success is not achieved in spite of optimal clinical factors (including age at implantation, duration of rehabilitation and post-implant hearing level), which may be attributed to disorders at higher levels of the auditory pathway. We used cortical auditory evoked potentials to investigate the ability to perceive…

  3. One Size Fits All? Slow Cortical Potentials Neurofeedback: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Kerstin; Wyckoff, Sarah N.; Strehl, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The intent of this manuscript was to review all published studies on slow cortical potentials (SCP) neurofeedback for the treatment of ADHD, with emphasis on neurophysiological rationale, study design, protocol, outcomes, and limitations. Method: For review, PubMed, MEDLINE, ERIC, and Google Scholar searches identified six studies and…

  4. [Evoked cortical somatosensory potentials in painful cervicobrachial radicular syndromes].

    PubMed

    Domzał, T; Marks, E; Miszczak, J

    1978-01-01

    The authors determined the subjective, objective and maximal pain threshold by means of electrical stimulation in two groups of subjects. Group I comprised healthy subjects, group II patients with right-sided radicular cervicobrachial pains. The method applied by the authors for objective determination of pain threshold with evoked cortical somatosensory potential differentiated both groups which suggests its practical usefulness in clinical practice and expertise. PMID:683429

  5. Mapping human brain networks with cortico-cortical evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Corey J.; Honey, Christopher J.; Mégevand, Pierre; Entz, Laszlo; Ulbert, Istvan; Mehta, Ashesh D.

    2014-01-01

    The cerebral cortex forms a sheet of neurons organized into a network of interconnected modules that is highly expanded in humans and presumably enables our most refined sensory and cognitive abilities. The links of this network form a fundamental aspect of its organization, and a great deal of research is focusing on understanding how information flows within and between different regions. However, an often-overlooked element of this connectivity regards a causal, hierarchical structure of regions, whereby certain nodes of the cortical network may exert greater influence over the others. While this is difficult to ascertain non-invasively, patients undergoing invasive electrode monitoring for epilepsy provide a unique window into this aspect of cortical organization. In this review, we highlight the potential for cortico-cortical evoked potential (CCEP) mapping to directly measure neuronal propagation across large-scale brain networks with spatio-temporal resolution that is superior to traditional neuroimaging methods. We first introduce effective connectivity and discuss the mechanisms underlying CCEP generation. Next, we highlight how CCEP mapping has begun to provide insight into the neural basis of non-invasive imaging signals. Finally, we present a novel approach to perturbing and measuring brain network function during cognitive processing. The direct measurement of CCEPs in response to electrical stimulation represents a potentially powerful clinical and basic science tool for probing the large-scale networks of the human cerebral cortex. PMID:25180306

  6. Mapping human brain networks with cortico-cortical evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Keller, Corey J; Honey, Christopher J; Mégevand, Pierre; Entz, Laszlo; Ulbert, Istvan; Mehta, Ashesh D

    2014-10-01

    The cerebral cortex forms a sheet of neurons organized into a network of interconnected modules that is highly expanded in humans and presumably enables our most refined sensory and cognitive abilities. The links of this network form a fundamental aspect of its organization, and a great deal of research is focusing on understanding how information flows within and between different regions. However, an often-overlooked element of this connectivity regards a causal, hierarchical structure of regions, whereby certain nodes of the cortical network may exert greater influence over the others. While this is difficult to ascertain non-invasively, patients undergoing invasive electrode monitoring for epilepsy provide a unique window into this aspect of cortical organization. In this review, we highlight the potential for cortico-cortical evoked potential (CCEP) mapping to directly measure neuronal propagation across large-scale brain networks with spatio-temporal resolution that is superior to traditional neuroimaging methods. We first introduce effective connectivity and discuss the mechanisms underlying CCEP generation. Next, we highlight how CCEP mapping has begun to provide insight into the neural basis of non-invasive imaging signals. Finally, we present a novel approach to perturbing and measuring brain network function during cognitive processing. The direct measurement of CCEPs in response to electrical stimulation represents a potentially powerful clinical and basic science tool for probing the large-scale networks of the human cerebral cortex. PMID:25180306

  7. Influence of spiking activity on cortical local field potentials

    PubMed Central

    Waldert, Stephan; Lemon, Roger N; Kraskov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The intra-cortical local field potential (LFP) reflects a variety of electrophysiological processes including synaptic inputs to neurons and their spiking activity. It is still a common assumption that removing high frequencies, often above 300 Hz, is sufficient to exclude spiking activity from LFP activity prior to analysis. Conclusions based on such supposedly spike-free LFPs can result in false interpretations of neurophysiological processes and erroneous correlations between LFPs and behaviour or spiking activity. Such findings might simply arise from spike contamination rather than from genuine changes in synaptic input activity. Although the subject of recent studies, the extent of LFP contamination by spikes is unclear, and the fundamental problem remains. Using spikes recorded in the motor cortex of the awake monkey, we investigated how different factors, including spike amplitude, duration and firing rate, together with the noise statistic, can determine the extent to which spikes contaminate intra-cortical LFPs. We demonstrate that such contamination is realistic for LFPs with a frequency down to ∼10 Hz. For LFP activity below ∼10 Hz, such as movement-related potential, contamination is theoretically possible but unlikely in real situations. Importantly, LFP frequencies up to the (high-) gamma band can remain unaffected. This study shows that spike–LFP crosstalk in intra-cortical recordings should be assessed for each individual dataset to ensure that conclusions based on LFP analysis are valid. To this end, we introduce a method to detect and to visualise spike contamination, and provide a systematic guide to assess spike contamination of intra-cortical LFPs. PMID:23981719

  8. Cortical somatosensory evoked potentials in spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Berić, A

    1992-01-01

    The amplitude and latency of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) in healthy subjects depend on intensity of stimulation. The effect of this parameter on SEPs in patients with neurologic disorders has not been systematically studied, although it could have a profound impact if SEPs are to be used for prognostication. We have compared the latency and amplitude of SEPs in healthy subjects and patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Stimulation intensity was standardized at two different biologically calibrated levels. Cortical SEPs in patients with SCI showed greater decrease in latency and increase in amplitude with increased intensity of stimulation in comparison to healthy subjects. These phenomena were observed in the majority of patients with incomplete SCI who subsequently showed improvement in cortical SEPs. We observed situations in which the SEP was absent with the usual intensity of stimulation and present only with the stronger stimulation intensity. Furthermore, SEP latencies often changed dramatically with different intensities of stimulation, potentially making any calculation of central conduction velocity meaningless without precise standardization of stimulation. These findings demonstrate a necessity for a biological calibration of stimulation intensity to improve the repeatability of SEPs. We suggest the use of two different standardized intensities of stimulation for SEP studies in SCI patients, one of which should be stronger than the intensity presently recommended. PMID:1578234

  9. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Amanda E.; Foust, Amanda J.; Bal, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca2+-activated K+ channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons

  10. The fMRI signal, slow cortical potential and consciousness

    PubMed Central

    He, Biyu J.; Raichle, Marcus E.

    2010-01-01

    As functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a driving force in cognitive neuroscience, it is crucial to understand the neural basis of the fMRI signal. Here, we discuss a novel neurophysiological correlate of the fMRI signal, the slow cortical potential (SCP), which also seems to modulate the power of higher-frequency activity, the more established neurophysiological correlate of the fMRI signal. We further propose a hypothesis for the involvement of the SCP in the emergence of consciousness, and review existing data that lend support to our proposal. This hypothesis, unlike several previous theories of consciousness, is firmly rooted in physiology and as such is entirely amenable to empirical testing. PMID:19535283

  11. [The cervical somatosensory evoked potential in lesions of the cortical efferents].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H

    1990-03-01

    Cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials to median nerve stimulation were analysed in 20 patients with unilateral central paresis of the arm. Neither the configuration nor the latency and amplitude measures of the neck potential did reveal any association with pathological alterations of cortical efferents or with abnormal cortically evoked responses. Thus, also in this population the evaluation of cervical potentials can be done according to the known criteria. PMID:2110891

  12. Pain Related Cortical Oscillations: Methodological Advances and Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weiwei; Tang, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    Alongside the time-locked event-related potentials (ERPs), nociceptive somatosensory inputs can induce modulations of ongoing oscillations, appeared as event-related synchronization or desynchronization (ERS/ERD) in different frequency bands. These ERD/ERS activities are suggested to reflect various aspects of pain perception, including the representation, encoding, assessment, and integration of the nociceptive sensory inputs, as well as behavioral responses to pain, even the precise details of their roles remain unclear. Previous studies investigating the functional relevance of ERD/ERS activities in pain perception were normally done by assessing their latencies, frequencies, magnitudes, and scalp distributions, which would be then correlated with subjective pain perception or stimulus intensity. Nevertheless, these temporal, spectral, and spatial profiles of stimulus induced ERD/ERS could only partly reveal the dynamics of brain oscillatory activities. Indeed, additional parameters, including but not limited to, phase, neural generator, and cross frequency couplings, should be paid attention to comprehensively and systemically evaluate the dynamics of oscillatory activities associated with pain perception and behavior. This would be crucial in exploring the psychophysiological mechanisms of neural oscillation, and in understanding the neural functions of cortical oscillations involved in pain perception and behavior. Notably, some chronic pain (e.g., neurogenic pain and complex regional pain syndrome) patients are often associated with the occurrence of abnormal synchronized oscillatory brain activities, and selectively modulating cortical oscillatory activities has been showed to be a potential therapy strategy to relieve pain with the application of neurostimulation techniques, e.g., repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS). Thus, the investigation of the oscillatory activities proceeding from

  13. Pain Related Cortical Oscillations: Methodological Advances and Potential Applications.

    PubMed

    Peng, Weiwei; Tang, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    Alongside the time-locked event-related potentials (ERPs), nociceptive somatosensory inputs can induce modulations of ongoing oscillations, appeared as event-related synchronization or desynchronization (ERS/ERD) in different frequency bands. These ERD/ERS activities are suggested to reflect various aspects of pain perception, including the representation, encoding, assessment, and integration of the nociceptive sensory inputs, as well as behavioral responses to pain, even the precise details of their roles remain unclear. Previous studies investigating the functional relevance of ERD/ERS activities in pain perception were normally done by assessing their latencies, frequencies, magnitudes, and scalp distributions, which would be then correlated with subjective pain perception or stimulus intensity. Nevertheless, these temporal, spectral, and spatial profiles of stimulus induced ERD/ERS could only partly reveal the dynamics of brain oscillatory activities. Indeed, additional parameters, including but not limited to, phase, neural generator, and cross frequency couplings, should be paid attention to comprehensively and systemically evaluate the dynamics of oscillatory activities associated with pain perception and behavior. This would be crucial in exploring the psychophysiological mechanisms of neural oscillation, and in understanding the neural functions of cortical oscillations involved in pain perception and behavior. Notably, some chronic pain (e.g., neurogenic pain and complex regional pain syndrome) patients are often associated with the occurrence of abnormal synchronized oscillatory brain activities, and selectively modulating cortical oscillatory activities has been showed to be a potential therapy strategy to relieve pain with the application of neurostimulation techniques, e.g., repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS). Thus, the investigation of the oscillatory activities proceeding from

  14. Evoked Potentials in Motor Cortical Local Field Potentials Reflect Task Timing and Behavioral Performance

    PubMed Central

    Confais, Joachim; Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Diesmann, Markus; Riehle, Alexa

    2010-01-01

    Evoked potentials (EPs) are observed in motor cortical local field potentials (LFPs) during movement execution (movement-related potentials [MRPs]) and in response to relevant visual cues (visual evoked potentials [VEPs]). Motor cortical EPs may be directionally selective, but little is known concerning their relation to other aspects of motor behavior, such as task timing and performance. We recorded LFPs in motor cortex of two monkeys during performance of a precued arm-reaching task. A time cue at the start of each trial signaled delay duration and thereby the pace of the task and the available time for movement preparation. VEPs and MRPs were strongly modulated by the delay duration, VEPs being systematically larger in short-delay trials and MRPs larger in long-delay trials. Despite these systematic modulations related to the task timing, directional selectivity was similar in short and long trials. The behavioral reaction time was positively correlated with MRP size and negatively correlated with VEP size, within sessions. In addition, the behavioral performance improved across sessions, in parallel with a slow decrease in the size of VEPs and MRPs. Our results clearly show the strong influence of the behavioral context and performance on motor cortical population activity during movement preparation and execution. PMID:20884766

  15. Cortical localization of cognitive function by regression of performance on event-related potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. W.; Montgomery, L. D.; Guisado, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a new method of mapping cortical localization of cognitive function, using electroencephalographic data. Cross-subject regression analyses are used to identify cortical sites and post-stimulus latencies where there is a high correlation between subjects' performance and their cognitive event-related potential amplitude. The procedure was tested using a mental arithmetic task and was found to identify essentially the same cortical regions that have been associated with such tasks on the basis of research with patients suffering localized cortical lesions. Thus, it appears to offer an inexpensive, noninvasive tool for exploring the dynamics of localization in neurologically normal subjects.

  16. Effect of galvanic vestibular stimulation on movement-related cortical potential.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Woo

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation on motion-related cortical potential. [Subjects and Methods] Fourty healthy female adult subjects each received galvanic vestibular stimulation or sham treatment. For galvanic vestibular stimulation, the anode and cathode were applied to the right and left mastoid processes, respectively, for 10 minutes. Motion-related cortical potential was tested pre- and post-treatment. To measure motion-related cortical potential, surface electromyography signals were generated by 50 thumb abductions with electrode application on the abductor pollicis brevis of the left (i.e., non-dominant) hand. [Results] The negative slope cortical potential on the C3 area (i.e., dominant hand) and cortical negative slope and motor potential on the C4 area (i.e., non-dominant hand) showed significant interaction effects. The galvanic vestibular stimulation group showed an increased negative slope amplitude in the C3 area, and increased negative slope and motor potential amplitudes in the C4 area compared to the sham group. [Conclusion] Galvanic vestibular stimulation increases the negative slope and motor potential amplitudes of the homonymous brain cortex area, which controls hand function and motion-related cortical potential, and the negative slope amplitude of the opposite cortical area, thus activating the brain areas for hand function. PMID:26180369

  17. Effect of galvanic vestibular stimulation on movement-related cortical potential

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation on motion-related cortical potential. [Subjects and Methods] Fourty healthy female adult subjects each received galvanic vestibular stimulation or sham treatment. For galvanic vestibular stimulation, the anode and cathode were applied to the right and left mastoid processes, respectively, for 10 minutes. Motion-related cortical potential was tested pre- and post-treatment. To measure motion-related cortical potential, surface electromyography signals were generated by 50 thumb abductions with electrode application on the abductor pollicis brevis of the left (i.e., non-dominant) hand. [Results] The negative slope cortical potential on the C3 area (i.e., dominant hand) and cortical negative slope and motor potential on the C4 area (i.e., non-dominant hand) showed significant interaction effects. The galvanic vestibular stimulation group showed an increased negative slope amplitude in the C3 area, and increased negative slope and motor potential amplitudes in the C4 area compared to the sham group. [Conclusion] Galvanic vestibular stimulation increases the negative slope and motor potential amplitudes of the homonymous brain cortex area, which controls hand function and motion-related cortical potential, and the negative slope amplitude of the opposite cortical area, thus activating the brain areas for hand function. PMID:26180369

  18. Cortical folding and the potential for prognostic neuroimaging in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuixia; Iwabuchi, Sarina; Balain, Vijender; Feng, Jianfeng; Liddle, Peter; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2015-01-01

    In 41 patients with schizophrenia, we used neuroanatomical information derived from structural imaging to identify patients with more severe illness, characterised by high symptom burden, low processing speed, high degree of illness persistence and lower social and occupational functional capacity. Cortical folding, but not thickness or volume, showed a high discriminatory ability in correctly identifying patients with more severe illness. PMID:26206860

  19. Cortical folding and the potential for prognostic neuroimaging in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuixia; Iwabuchi, Sarina; Balain, Vijender; Feng, Jianfeng; Liddle, Peter; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2015-11-01

    In 41 patients with schizophrenia, we used neuroanatomical information derived from structural imaging to identify patients with more severe illness, characterised by high symptom burden, low processing speed, high degree of illness persistence and lower social and occupational functional capacity. Cortical folding, but not thickness or volume, showed a high discriminatory ability in correctly identifying patients with more severe illness. PMID:26206860

  20. Gravity-induced changes in intracellular potentials in elongating cortical cells of mung bean roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishikawa, H.; Evans, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    Gravity-induced changes in intracellular potentials in primary roots of 2-day-old mung bean (Vigna mungo L. cv. black matpe) seedlings were investigated using glass microelectrodes held by 3-dimensional hydraulic micro-drives. The electrodes were inserted into outer cortical cells within the elongation zone. Intracellular potentials, angle of root orientation with respect to gravity, and position within the root of the impaled cortical cell were measured simultaneously. Gravistimulation caused intracellular potential changes in cortical cells of the elongation zone. When the roots were oriented vertically, the intracellular potentials of the outer cortical cells (2 mm behind the root apex) were approximately - 115 mV. When the roots were placed horizontally cortical cells on the upper side hyperpolarized to - 154 mV within 30 s while cortical cells on the lower side depolarized to about - 62 mV. This electrical asymmetry did not occur in cells of the maturation zone. Because attempts to insert the electrode into cells of the root cap were unsuccessful, these cells were not measured. The hyperpolarization of cortical cells on the upper side was greatly reduced upon application of N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), an inhibitor of respiratory energy coupling. When stimulated roots were returned to the vertical, the degree of hyperpolarization of cortical cells on the previous upper side decreased within 30 s and approached that of cortical cells in non-stimulated roots. This cycle of hyperpolarization/loss of hyperpolarization was repeatable at least ten times by alternately turning the root from the vertical to the horizontal and back again. The very short (<30 s) lag period of these electrical changes indicates that they may result from stimulus-perception and transduction within the elongation zone rather than from transmission of a signal from the root cap.

  1. Gravity-induced changes in intracellular potentials in elongating cortical cells of mung bean roots.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, H; Evans, M L

    1990-06-01

    Gravity-induced changes in intracellular potentials in primary roots of 2-day-old mung bean (Vigna mungo L. cv. black matpe) seedlings were investigated using glass microelectrodes held by 3-dimensional hydraulic micro-drives. The electrodes were inserted into outer cortical cells within the elongation zone. Intracellular potentials, angle of root orientation with respect to gravity, and position within the root of the impaled cortical cell were measured simultaneously. Gravistimulation caused intracellular potential changes in cortical cells of the elongation zone. When the roots were oriented vertically, the intracellular potentials of the outer cortical cells (2 mm behind the root apex) were approximately - 115 mV. When the roots were placed horizontally cortical cells on the upper side hyperpolarized to - 154 mV within 30 s while cortical cells on the lower side depolarized to about - 62 mV. This electrical asymmetry did not occur in cells of the maturation zone. Because attempts to insert the electrode into cells of the root cap were unsuccessful, these cells were not measured. The hyperpolarization of cortical cells on the upper side was greatly reduced upon application of N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), an inhibitor of respiratory energy coupling. When stimulated roots were returned to the vertical, the degree of hyperpolarization of cortical cells on the previous upper side decreased within 30 s and approached that of cortical cells in non-stimulated roots. This cycle of hyperpolarization/loss of hyperpolarization was repeatable at least ten times by alternately turning the root from the vertical to the horizontal and back again. The very short (<30 s) lag period of these electrical changes indicates that they may result from stimulus-perception and transduction within the elongation zone rather than from transmission of a signal from the root cap. PMID:11537168

  2. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and potential cortical and trigeminothalamic mechanisms in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Anna P.; Holland, Philip R.; Akerman, Simon; Summ, Oliver; Fredrick, Joe

    2016-01-01

    A single pulse of transcranial magnetic stimulation has been shown to be effective for the acute treatment of migraine with and without aura. Here we aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms of action of transcranial magnetic stimulation, using a transcortical approach, in preclinical migraine models. We tested the susceptibility of cortical spreading depression, the experimental correlate of migraine aura, and further evaluated the response of spontaneous and evoked trigeminovascular activity of second order trigemontothalamic and third order thalamocortical neurons in rats. Single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited both mechanical and chemically-induced cortical spreading depression when administered immediately post-induction in rats, but not when administered preinduction, and when controlled by a sham stimulation. Additionally transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited the spontaneous and evoked firing rate of third order thalamocortical projection neurons, but not second order neurons in the trigeminocervical complex, suggesting a potential modulatory effect that may underlie its utility in migraine. In gyrencephalic cat cortices, when administered post-cortical spreading depression, transcranial magnetic stimulation blocked the propagation of cortical spreading depression in two of eight animals. These results are the first to demonstrate that cortical spreading depression can be blocked in vivo using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and further highlight a novel thalamocortical modulatory capacity that may explain the efficacy of magnetic stimulation in the treatment of migraine with and without aura. PMID:27246325

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and potential cortical and trigeminothalamic mechanisms in migraine.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Anna P; Holland, Philip R; Akerman, Simon; Summ, Oliver; Fredrick, Joe; Goadsby, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    A single pulse of transcranial magnetic stimulation has been shown to be effective for the acute treatment of migraine with and without aura. Here we aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms of action of transcranial magnetic stimulation, using a transcortical approach, in preclinical migraine models. We tested the susceptibility of cortical spreading depression, the experimental correlate of migraine aura, and further evaluated the response of spontaneous and evoked trigeminovascular activity of second order trigemontothalamic and third order thalamocortical neurons in rats. Single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited both mechanical and chemically-induced cortical spreading depression when administered immediately post-induction in rats, but not when administered preinduction, and when controlled by a sham stimulation. Additionally transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited the spontaneous and evoked firing rate of third order thalamocortical projection neurons, but not second order neurons in the trigeminocervical complex, suggesting a potential modulatory effect that may underlie its utility in migraine. In gyrencephalic cat cortices, when administered post-cortical spreading depression, transcranial magnetic stimulation blocked the propagation of cortical spreading depression in two of eight animals. These results are the first to demonstrate that cortical spreading depression can be blocked in vivo using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and further highlight a novel thalamocortical modulatory capacity that may explain the efficacy of magnetic stimulation in the treatment of migraine with and without aura. PMID:27246325

  4. Effects of intrathecal baclofen on lumbosacral and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Kofler, M; Donovan, W H; Loubser, P G; Berić, A

    1992-04-01

    We analyzed lumbosacral and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials in three spinal cord injury patients undergoing evaluation of intrathecal baclofen infusion for management of spasticity. The cauda equina propagating root wave (R wave) and conus medullaris postsynaptic responses (S and P waves) were analyzed before and during baclofen infusion. Baclofen abolished the concomitantly recorded H-reflex and markedly suppressed the P wave amplitude and area. The S wave amplitude and area were suppressed to a lesser degree. In contrast, there were no significant changes in cortical somatosensory evoked potentials. PMID:1565243

  5. Effect of electrode density and measurement noise on the spatial resolution of cortical potential distribution.

    PubMed

    Ryynänen, Outi R M; Hyttinen, Jari A K; Laarne, Päivi H; Malmivuo, Jaakko A

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the spatial resolution of electroencephalography (EEG) by means of inverse cortical EEG solution. The main interest was to study how the number of measurement electrodes and the amount of measurement noise affects the spatial resolution. A three-layer spherical head model was used to obtain the source-field relationship of cortical potentials and scalp EEG field. Singular value decomposition was used to evaluate the spatial resolution with various measurement noise estimates. The results suggest that as the measurement noise increases the advantage of dense electrode systems is decreased. With low realistic measurement noise, a more accurate inverse cortical potential distribution can be obtained with an electrode system where the distance between two electrodes is as small as 16 mm, corresponding to as many as 256 measurement electrodes. In clinical measurement environments, it is always beneficial to have at least 64 measurement electrodes. PMID:15376503

  6. Evaluating long-latency auditory evoked potentials in the diagnosis of cortical hearing loss in children

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Soto, Teresa; Postigo-Madueno, Amparo; Nunez-Abades, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    In centrally related hearing loss, there is no apparent damage in the auditory system, but the patient is unable to hear sounds. In patients with cortical hearing loss (and in the absence of communication deficit, either total or partial, as in agnosia or aphasia), some attention-related or language-based disorders may lead to a wrong diagnosis of hearing impairment. The authors present two patients (8 and 11 years old) with no anatomical damage to the ear, the absence of neurological damage or trauma, but immature cortical auditory evoked potentials. Both patients presented a clinical history of multiple diagnoses over several years. Because the most visible symptom was moderate hearing loss, the patients were recurrently referred to audiological testing, with no improvement. This report describes the use of long-latency evoked potentials to determine cases of cortical hearing loss, where hearing impairment is a consequence of underdevelopment at the central nervous system. PMID:27006780

  7. Cortical brain states and corticospinal synchronization influence TMS-evoked motor potentials.

    PubMed

    Keil, Julian; Timm, Jana; Sanmiguel, Iria; Schulz, Hannah; Obleser, Jonas; Schönwiesner, Marc

    2014-02-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) influences cortical processes. Recent findings indicate, however, that, in turn, the efficacy of TMS depends on the state of ongoing cortical oscillations. Whereas power and phase of electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from the hand muscles as well as neural synchrony between cortex and hand muscles are known to influence the effect of TMS, to date, no study has shown an influence of the phase of cortical oscillations during wakefulness. We applied single-pulse TMS over the motor cortex and recorded motor-evoked potentials along with the electroencephalogram (EEG) and EMG. We correlated phase and power of ongoing EEG and EMG signals with the motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude. We also investigated the functional connectivity between cortical and hand muscle activity (corticomuscular coherence) with the MEP amplitude. EEG and EMG power and phase in a frequency band around 18 Hz correlated with the MEP amplitude. High beta-band (∼34 Hz) corticomuscular coherence exhibited a positive linear relationship with the MEP amplitude, indicating that strong synchrony between cortex and hand muscles at the moment when TMS is applied entails large MEPs. Improving upon previous studies, we demonstrate a clear dependence of TMS-induced motor effects on the state of ongoing EEG phase and power fluctuations. We conclude that not only the sampling of incoming information but also the susceptibility of cortical communication flow depends cyclically on neural phase. PMID:24198325

  8. Effects of training pre-movement sensorimotor rhythms on behavioral performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Dennis J.; Sarnacki, William A.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology might contribute to rehabilitation of motor function. This speculation is based on the premise that modifying the electroencephalographic (EEG) activity will modify behavior, a proposition for which there is limited empirical data. The present study asked whether learned modulation of pre-movement sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) activity can affect motor performance in normal human subjects. Approach. Eight individuals first performed a joystick-based cursor-movement task with variable warning periods. Targets appeared randomly on a video monitor and subjects moved the cursor to the target and pressed a select button within 2 s. SMR features in the pre-movement EEG that correlated with performance speed and accuracy were identified. The subjects then learned to increase or decrease these features to control a two-target BCI task. Following successful BCI training, they were asked to increase or decrease SMR amplitude in order to initiate the joystick task. Main results. After BCI training, pre-movement SMR amplitude was correlated with performance in subjects with initial poor performance: lower amplitude was associated with faster and more accurate movement. The beneficial effect on performance of lower SMR amplitude was greater in subjects with lower initial performance levels. Significance. These results indicate that BCI-based SMR training can affect a standard motor behavior. They provide a rationale for studies that integrate such training into rehabilitation protocols and examine its capacity to enhance restoration of useful motor function.

  9. Cortico-cortical evoked potentials for sites of early versus late seizure spread in stereoelectroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Lega, Bradley; Dionisio, Sasha; Flanigan, Patrick; Bingaman, William; Najm, Imad; Nair, Dileep; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Cortico-cortical evoked potentials offer the possibility of understanding connectivity within seizure networks to improve diagnosis and more accurately identify candidates for seizure surgery. We sought to determine if cortico-cortical evoked potentials and post-stimulation oscillatory changes differ for sites of EARLY versus LATE ictal spread. 37 patients undergoing stereoelectroencephalography were tested using a cortico-cortical evoked potential paradigm. All electrodes were classified according to the speed of ictal spread. EARLY spread sites were matched to a LATE spread site equidistant from the onset zone. Root-mean-square was used to quantify evoked responses and post-stimulation gamma band power and coherence were extracted and compared. Sites of EARLY spread exhibited significantly greater evoked responses after stimulation across all patients (t(36)=2.973, p=0.004). Stimulation elicited enhanced gamma band activity at EARLY spread sites (t(36)=2.61, p=0.03, FDR corrected); this gamma band oscillation was highly coherent with the onset zone. Cortico-cortical evoked potentials and post-stimulation changes in gamma band activity differ between sites of EARLY versus LATE ictal spread. The oscillatory changes can help visualize connectivity within the seizure network. PMID:26220373

  10. Slow Cortical Potential Neurofeedback in Chronic Tinnitus Therapy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Milner, Rafał; Lewandowska, Monika; Ganc, Małgorzata; Cieśla, Katarzyna; Niedziałek, Iwona; Skarżyński, Henryk

    2016-06-01

    This study is the first to demonstrate outcomes of slow cortical potential (SCP) Neurofeedback training in chronic tinnitus. A 50-year old male patient with tinnitus participated in three SCP training blocks, separated with 1-month breaks. After the training the patient reported decreased tinnitus loudness and pitch, as well as improved quality of daily life. A quantitative electroencephalography analysis revealed close to normal changes of resting state bioelectrical activity in cortical areas considered to be involved in tinnitus generation. The present case study indicates that SCP Neurofeedback training can be considered a promising method for tinnitus treatment. PMID:26459345

  11. Warm Body Temperature Facilitates Energy Efficient Cortical Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuguo; Hill, Adam P.; McCormick, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The energy efficiency of neural signal transmission is important not only as a limiting factor in brain architecture, but it also influences the interpretation of functional brain imaging signals. Action potential generation in mammalian, versus invertebrate, axons is remarkably energy efficient. Here we demonstrate that this increase in energy efficiency is due largely to a warmer body temperature. Increases in temperature result in an exponential increase in energy efficiency for single action potentials by increasing the rate of Na+ channel inactivation, resulting in a marked reduction in overlap of the inward Na+, and outward K+, currents and a shortening of action potential duration. This increase in single spike efficiency is, however, counterbalanced by a temperature-dependent decrease in the amplitude and duration of the spike afterhyperpolarization, resulting in a nonlinear increase in the spike firing rate, particularly at temperatures above approximately 35°C. Interestingly, the total energy cost, as measured by the multiplication of total Na+ entry per spike and average firing rate in response to a constant input, reaches a global minimum between 37–42°C. Our results indicate that increases in temperature result in an unexpected increase in energy efficiency, especially near normal body temperature, thus allowing the brain to utilize an energy efficient neural code. PMID:22511855

  12. Giant early components of somatosensory evoked potentials to tibial nerve stimulation in cortical myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Saracino, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Enlarged cortical components of somatosensory evoked potentials (giant SEPs) recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) and abnormal somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG) are observed in the majority of patients with cortical myoclonus (CM). Studies on simultaneous recordings of SEPs and SEFs showed that generator mechanism of giant SEPs involves both primary sensory and motor cortices. However the generator sources of giant SEPs have not been fully understood as only one report describes clearly giant SEPs following lower limb stimulation. In our study we performed a combined EEG-MEG recording on responses elicited by electric median and tibial nerve stimulation in a patient who developed consequently to methyl bromide intoxication CM with giant SEPs to median and tibial nerve stimuli. SEPs wave shapes were identified on the basis of polarity-latency components (e.g. P15-N20-P25) as defined by earlier studies and guidelines. At EEG recording, the SEP giant component did not appear in the latency range of the first cortical component for median nerve SEP (N20), but appeared instead in the range of the P37 tibial nerve SEP, which is currently identified as the first cortical component elicited by tibial nerve stimuli. Our MEG and EEG SEPs recordings also showed that components in the latency range of P37 were preceded by other cortical components. These findings suggest that lower limb P37 does not correspond to upper limb N20. MEG results confirmed that giant SEFs are the second component from both tibial (N43m-P43m) and median (N27m-P27m) nerve stimulation. MEG dipolar sources of these giant components were located in the primary sensory and motor area. PMID:27489768

  13. Axono-cortical evoked potentials: A proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Mandonnet, E; Dadoun, Y; Poisson, I; Madadaki, C; Froelich, S; Lozeron, P

    2016-04-01

    Awake surgery is currently considered the best method to tailor intraparenchymatous resections according to functional boundaries. However, the exact mechanisms by which electrical stimulation disturbs behavior remain largely unknown. In this case report, we describe a new method to explore the propagation toward cortical sites of a brief pulse applied to an eloquent white matter pathway. We present a patient, operated on in awake condition for removal of a cavernoma of the left ventral premotor cortex. At the end of the resection, the application of 60Hz stimulation in the white matter of the operculum induced anomia. Stimulating the same site at a frequency of 1Hz during 70seconds allowed to record responses on electrodes put over Broca's area and around the inferior part of central sulcus. Axono-cortical evoked potentials were then obtained by averaging unitary responses, time-locked to the stimulus. We then discuss the origin of these evoked axono-cortical potentials and the likely pathway connecting the stimulation site to the recorded cortical sites. PMID:26688046

  14. Valproic acid potentiates both typical and atypical antipsychotic-induced prefrontal cortical dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Junji; Chung, Young-Chul; Dai, Jin; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2005-08-01

    Antipsychotic drugs (APD)s and anticonvulsant mood-stabilizers are now frequently used in combination with one another in treating both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We have recently reported that the atypical APDs, e.g. clozapine and risperidone, as well as the anticonvulsant mood-stabilizers, valproic acid (VPA), zonisamide, and carbamazepine, but not the typical APD haloperidol, increase dopamine (DA) release in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The increased DA release was partially (atypical APDs) or completely (mood-stabilizers) blocked by the serotonin (5-HT)1A receptor antagonist WAY100635. Diminished prefrontal cortical DA activity may contribute to cognitive impairment in virtually all the patients with schizophrenia and, perhaps, bipolar disorder. Thus, the enhanced release of cortical DA by these agents may be beneficial in this regard. It is, therefore, of considerable interest to determine whether combined administration of these agents augments prefrontal cortical DA release, and if so, whether the increase is dependent upon 5-HT1A receptor activation. VPA (50 mg/kg), which was insufficient by itself to increase prefrontal cortical DA release, potentiated the ability of clozapine (20 mg/kg) and risperidone (1 mg/kg) to increase DA release in the mPFC, but not in the nucleus accumbens (NAC). VPA (50 mg/kg) also potentiated haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg)-induced DA release in the mPFC; this increase was completely abolished by WAY100635 (0.2 mg/kg). These results suggest that, in combination with VPA, both typical and atypical APDs produce greater increases in prefrontal cortical DA release than either type of drug alone via a mechanism dependent upon 5-HT(1A) receptor activation. Furthermore, they provide a strong rationale for testing for possible clinical synergism of an APD and anticonvulsant mood-stabilizer in improving the cognitive deficits present in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. PMID:16061211

  15. Cortical inhibition and habituation to evoked potentials: relevance for pathophysiology of migraine.

    PubMed

    Brighina, Filippo; Palermo, Antonio; Fierro, Brigida

    2009-04-01

    Dysfunction of neuronal cortical excitability has been supposed to play an important role in etiopathogenesis of migraine. Neurophysiological techniques like evoked potentials (EP) and in the last years non-invasive brain stimulation techniques like transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation gave important contribution to understanding of such issue highlighting possible mechanisms of cortical dysfunctions in migraine. EP studies showed impaired habituation to repeated sensorial stimulation and this abnormality was confirmed across all sensorial modalities, making defective habituation a neurophysiological hallmark of the disease. TMS was employed to test more directly cortical excitability in visual cortex and then also in motor cortex. Contradictory results have been reported pointing towards hyperexcitability or on the contrary to reduced preactivation of sensory cortex in migraine. Other experimental evidence speaks in favour of impairment of inhibitory circuits and analogies have been proposed between migraine and conditions of sensory deafferentation in which down-regulation of GABA circuits is considered the more relevant pathophysiological mechanism. Whatever the mechanism involved, it has been found that repeated sessions of high-frequency rTMS trains that have been shown to up-regulate inhibitory circuits could persistently normalize habituation in migraine. This could give interesting insight into pathophysiology establishing a link between cortical inhibition and habituation and opening also new treatment strategies in migraine. PMID:19209386

  16. Primary cortical representation of sounds by the coordination of action-potential timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decharms, R. Christopher; Merzenich, Michael M.

    1996-06-01

    CORTICAL population coding could in principle rely on either the mean rate of neuronal action potentials, or the relative timing of action potentials, or both. When a single sensory stimulus drives many neurons to fire at elevated rates, the spikes of these neurons become tightly synchronized1,2, which could be involved in 'binding' together individual firing-rate feature representations into a unified object percept3. Here we demonstrate that the relative timing of cortical action potentials can signal stimulus features themselves, a function even more basic than feature grouping. Populations of neurons in the primary auditory cortex can coordinate the relative timing of their action potentials such that spikes occur closer together in time during continuous stimuli. In this way cortical neurons can signal stimuli even when their firing rates do not change. Population coding based on relative spike timing can systematically signal stimulus features, it is topographically mapped, and it follows the stimulus time course even where mean firing rate does not.

  17. Cortical membrane potential signature of optimal states for sensory signal detection

    PubMed Central

    McGinley, Matthew J.; David, Stephen V.; McCormick, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The neural correlates of optimal states for signal detection task performance are largely unknown. One hypothesis holds that optimal states exhibit tonically depolarized cortical neurons with enhanced spiking activity, such as occur during movement. We recorded membrane potentials of auditory cortical neurons in mice trained on a challenging tone-in-noise detection task while assessing arousal with simultaneous pupillometry and hippocampal recordings. Arousal measures accurately predicted multiple modes of membrane potential activity, including: rhythmic slow oscillations at low arousal, stable hyperpolarization at intermediate arousal, and depolarization during phasic or tonic periods of hyper-arousal. Walking always occurred during hyper-arousal. Optimal signal detection behavior and sound-evoked responses, at both sub-threshold and spiking levels, occurred at intermediate arousal when pre-decision membrane potentials were stably hyperpolarized. These results reveal a cortical physiological signature of the classically-observed inverted-U relationship between task performance and arousal, and that optimal detection exhibits enhanced sensory-evoked responses and reduced background synaptic activity. PMID:26074005

  18. Decoding spoken words using local field potentials recorded from the cortical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellis, Spencer; Miller, Kai; Thomson, Kyle; Brown, Richard; House, Paul; Greger, Bradley

    2010-10-01

    Pathological conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or damage to the brainstem can leave patients severely paralyzed but fully aware, in a condition known as 'locked-in syndrome'. Communication in this state is often reduced to selecting individual letters or words by arduous residual movements. More intuitive and rapid communication may be restored by directly interfacing with language areas of the cerebral cortex. We used a grid of closely spaced, nonpenetrating micro-electrodes to record local field potentials (LFPs) from the surface of face motor cortex and Wernicke's area. From these LFPs we were successful in classifying a small set of words on a trial-by-trial basis at levels well above chance. We found that the pattern of electrodes with the highest accuracy changed for each word, which supports the idea that closely spaced micro-electrodes are capable of capturing neural signals from independent neural processing assemblies. These results further support using cortical surface potentials (electrocorticography) in brain-computer interfaces. These results also show that LFPs recorded from the cortical surface (micro-electrocorticography) of language areas can be used to classify speech-related cortical rhythms and potentially restore communication to locked-in patients.

  19. Mapping Sensorimotor Cortex Using Slow Cortical Potential Resting-State Networks While Awake and Under Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Breshears, Jonathan D.; Gaona, Charles M.; Roland, Jarod L.; Sharma, Mohit; Bundy, David T.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Rashid, Samiya; Eisenman, Lawrence N.; Hogan, R. Edward; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The emerging insight into resting-state cortical networks has been important in understanding the fundamental architecture of brain organization. These networks, which were originally identified with functional MRI, are also seen in the correlation topography of the infraslow rhythms of local field potentials. Because of the fundamental nature of these networks and their independence from task-related activations, we posit that in addition to their neuroscientific relevance, these slow cortical potential (SCP) networks could also play an important role in clinical brain mapping. Objective We hypothesized that these networks would be useful in identifying eloquent cortex, such as sensorimotor cortex, in patients both awake and under anesthesia. Methods This study included eight subjects undergoing surgical treatment for intractable epilepsy. SCPs were recorded from the cortical surface while awake and under propofol anesthesia. To test brain-mapping utility, slow cortical potential networks were identified using data-driven (seed-independent) and anatomy-driven (seed-based) approaches. Using electrocortical stimulation as the gold standard for comparison, the sensitivity and specificity of these networks for identifying sensorimotor cortex was calculated. Results Networks identified with a data-driven approach in patients under anesthesia and awake were 90% and 93% sensitive, and 58% and 55% specific for sensorimotor cortex, respectively. Networks identified with systematic seed selection in patients under anesthesia and awake were 78% and 83% sensitive, and 67% and 60% specific, respectively. Conclusion Resting-state networks may be useful for tailoring stimulation mapping and could provide a means of identifying eloquent regions in patients while under anesthesia. PMID:22517255

  20. Cortical Action Potential Backpropagation Explains Spike Threshold Variability and Rapid-Onset Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuguo; Shu, Yousheng; McCormick, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Neocortical action potential responses in vivo are characterized by considerable threshold variability, and thus timing and rate variability, even under seemingly identical conditions. This finding suggests that cortical ensembles are required for accurate sensorimotor integration and processing. Intracellularly, trial-to-trial variability results not only from variation in synaptic activities, but also in the transformation of these into patterns of action potentials. Through simultaneous axonal and somatic recordings and computational simulations, we demonstrate that the initiation of action potentials in the axon initial segment followed by backpropagation of these spikes throughout the neuron results in a distortion of the relationship between the timing of synaptic and action potential events. In addition, this backpropagation also results in an unusually high rate of rise of membrane potential at the foot of the action potential. The distortion of the relationship between the amplitude time course of synaptic inputs and action potential output caused by spike back-propagation results in the appearance of high spike threshold variability at the level of the soma. At the point of spike initiation, the axon initial segment, threshold variability is considerably less. Our results indicate that spike generation in cortical neurons is largely as expected by Hodgkin—Huxley theory and is more precise than previously thought. PMID:18632930

  1. Effects of pregnancy on slow cortical potentials in migraine patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Darabaneanu, S; Kropp, P; Niederberger, U; Strenge, H; Gerber, W-D

    2008-10-01

    Increased negative amplitudes and lack of habituation of contingent negative variation (CNV) in migraine are well established and are supposed to reflect an altered cortical excitability level. Migraine attacks occur less during pregnancy but often relapse after delivery. We investigated the effect of pregnancy on slow cortical potentials and reaction time in migraine patients and healthy controls. Four groups were examined: 14 pregnant migraine patients, 12 non-pregnant migraine patients, 15 pregnant healthy women and 16 non-pregnant healthy women aged 19-38 years. Two recordings were performed in the pregnant subjects: in the 36th week of gestation and 4 weeks after delivery. The non-pregnant subjects were recorded at the same time interval of 8 weeks. Pregnant migraine patients showed significantly fewer migraine days during the third trimester of pregnancy and returned to nearly the former level 4 weeks post delivery. Non-pregnant migraine patients demonstrated a significant reduction of migraine days at the second measurement. There was no effect of pregnancy on CNV amplitudes, but there was an effect of pregnancy on the habituation coefficient and reaction time of migraine patients. Faster habituation from a higher preactivation level was found. As an explanation for the changed habituation level we favour the model of correlation between preactivation level and habituation level, the so-called law of initial value. We found a correlation between preactivation level and habituation. Our study confirms a specific effect of pregnancy on slow cortical potentials in migraine patients. PMID:18624798

  2. [HOMOCYSTEINE-INDUCED MEMBRANE CURRENTS, CALCIUM RESPONSES AND CHANGES OF MITOCHONDRIAL POTENTIAL IN RAT CORTICAL NEURONS].

    PubMed

    Abushik, P A; Karelina, T V; Sibarov, D A; Stepanenko, J D; Giniatullin, R; Antonov, S M

    2015-01-01

    Homocysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, exhibits neurotoxic effects and is involved in the pathogenesis of several major neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to well studied excitoxicity of glutamate, the mechanism of homocysteine neurotoxicity is not clearly understood. By using whole-cell patch-clamp, calcium imaging (fluo-3) and measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (rhodamine 123) we studied transmembrane currents, calcium signals and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential induced by homocysteine versus responses induced by NMDA and glutamate in cultured rat cortical neurons. L-homocysteine (50 µM) induced inward currents that could be completely blocked by the selective antagonist of NMDA receptors - AP-5. In contrast to NMDA-induced currents, homocysteine-induced currents had a smaller steady-state amplitude. Comparison of calcium responses to homocysteine, NMDA or glutamate demonstrated that in all cortical neurons homocysteine elicited short, oscillatory-type calcium responses, whereas NMDA or glutamate induced sustained increase of intracellular calcium. Analysis of mitochondrial changes demonstrated that in contrast to NMDA homocysteine did not cause a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential at the early stages of action. However, after its long-term action, as in the case of NMDA and glutamate, the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were comparable with the full drop of respiratory chain induced by protonophore FCCP. Our data suggest that in cultured rat cortical neuron homocysteine at the first stages of action induces neurotoxic effects through activation of NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors with strong calcium influx through the channels of these receptors. The long-term action of homocysteine may lead to mitochondrial disfuction and appears as a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:26547950

  3. Longitudinal Evaluation of Residual Cortical and Subcortical Motor Evoked Potentials in Spinal Cord Injured Rats.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Castro, Elena; Navarro, Xavier; García-Alías, Guillermo

    2016-05-15

    We have applied transcranial electrical stimulation to rats with spinal cord injury and selectively tested the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) conveyed by descending motor pathways with cortical and subcortical origin. MEPs were elicited by electrical stimulation to the brain and recorded on the tibialis anterior muscles. Stimulation parameters were characterized and changes in MEP responses tested in uninjured rats, in rats with mild or moderate contusion, and in animals with complete transection of the spinal cord. All injuries were located at the T8 vertebral level. Two peaks, termed N1 and N2, were obtained when changing from single pulse stimulation to trains of 9 pulses at 9 Hz. Selective injuries to the brain or spinal cord funiculi evidenced the subcortical origin of N1 and the cortical origin of N2. Animals with mild contusion showed small behavioral deficits and abolished N1 but maintained small amplitude N2 MEPs. Substantial motor deficits developed in rats with moderate contusion, and these rats had completely eliminated N1 and N2 MEPs. Animals with complete cord transection had abolished N1 and N2 and showed severe impairment of locomotion. The results indicate the reliability of MEP testing to longitudinally evaluate over time the degree of impairment of cortical and subcortical spinal pathways after spinal cord injuries of different severity. PMID:26560177

  4. Decision-related cortical potentials during an auditory signal detection task with cued observation intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Squires, N. K.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1975-01-01

    Cortical-evoked potentials were recorded from human subjects performing an auditory detection task with confidence rating responses. Unlike earlier studies that used similar procedures, the observation interval during which the auditory signal could occur was clearly marked by a visual cue light. By precisely defining the observation interval and, hence, synchronizing all perceptual decisions to the evoked potential averaging epoch, it was possible to demonstrate that high-confidence false alarms are accompanied by late-positive P3 components equivalent to those for equally confident hits. Moreover the hit and false alarm evoked potentials were found to covary similarly with variations in confidence rating and to have similar amplitude distributions over the scalp. In a second experiment, it was demonstrated that correct rejections can be associated with a P3 component larger than that for hits. Thus it was possible to show, within the signal detection paradigm, how the two major factors of decision confidence and expectancy are reflected in the P3 component of the cortical-evoked potential.

  5. Signal type and signal-to-noise ratio interact to affect cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Billings, Curtis J; Grush, Leslie D

    2016-08-01

    Use of speech signals and background noise is emerging in cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) studies; however, the interaction between signal type and noise level remains unclear. Two experiments determined the interaction between signal type and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on CAEPs. Three signals (syllable /ba/, 1000-Hz tone, and the /ba/ envelope with 1000-Hz fine structure) with varying SNRs were used in two experiments, demonstrating signal-by-SNR interactions due to both envelope and spectral characteristics. When using real-world stimuli such as speech to evoke CAEPs, temporal and spectral complexity leads to differences with traditional tonal stimuli, especially when presented in background noise. PMID:27586784

  6. Cortical Neural Synchronization Underlies Primary Visual Consciousness of Qualia: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Babiloni, Claudio; Marzano, Nicola; Soricelli, Andrea; Cordone, Susanna; Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Del Percio, Claudio; Buján, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews three experiments on event-related potentials (ERPs) testing the hypothesis that primary visual consciousness (stimulus self-report) is related to enhanced cortical neural synchronization as a function of stimulus features. ERP peak latency and sources were compared between “seen” trials and “not seen” trials, respectively related and unrelated to the primary visual consciousness. Three salient features of visual stimuli were considered (visuospatial, emotional face expression, and written words). Results showed the typical visual ERP components in both “seen” and “not seen” trials. There was no statistical difference in the ERP peak latencies between the “seen” and “not seen” trials, suggesting a similar timing of the cortical neural synchronization regardless the primary visual consciousness. In contrast, ERP sources showed differences between “seen” and “not seen” trials. For the visuospatial stimuli, the primary consciousness was related to higher activity in dorsal occipital and parietal sources at about 400 ms post-stimulus. For the emotional face expressions, there was greater activity in parietal and frontal sources at about 180 ms post-stimulus. For the written letters, there was higher activity in occipital, parietal and temporal sources at about 230 ms post-stimulus. These results hint that primary visual consciousness is associated with an enhanced cortical neural synchronization having entirely different spatiotemporal characteristics as a function of the features of the visual stimuli and possibly, the relative qualia (i.e., visuospatial, face expression, and words). In this framework, the dorsal visual stream may be synchronized in association with the primary consciousness of visuospatial and emotional face contents. Analogously, both dorsal and ventral visual streams may be synchronized in association with the primary consciousness of linguistic contents. In this line of reasoning, the ensemble

  7. Cortical Neural Synchronization Underlies Primary Visual Consciousness of Qualia: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Marzano, Nicola; Soricelli, Andrea; Cordone, Susanna; Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Del Percio, Claudio; Buján, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews three experiments on event-related potentials (ERPs) testing the hypothesis that primary visual consciousness (stimulus self-report) is related to enhanced cortical neural synchronization as a function of stimulus features. ERP peak latency and sources were compared between "seen" trials and "not seen" trials, respectively related and unrelated to the primary visual consciousness. Three salient features of visual stimuli were considered (visuospatial, emotional face expression, and written words). Results showed the typical visual ERP components in both "seen" and "not seen" trials. There was no statistical difference in the ERP peak latencies between the "seen" and "not seen" trials, suggesting a similar timing of the cortical neural synchronization regardless the primary visual consciousness. In contrast, ERP sources showed differences between "seen" and "not seen" trials. For the visuospatial stimuli, the primary consciousness was related to higher activity in dorsal occipital and parietal sources at about 400 ms post-stimulus. For the emotional face expressions, there was greater activity in parietal and frontal sources at about 180 ms post-stimulus. For the written letters, there was higher activity in occipital, parietal and temporal sources at about 230 ms post-stimulus. These results hint that primary visual consciousness is associated with an enhanced cortical neural synchronization having entirely different spatiotemporal characteristics as a function of the features of the visual stimuli and possibly, the relative qualia (i.e., visuospatial, face expression, and words). In this framework, the dorsal visual stream may be synchronized in association with the primary consciousness of visuospatial and emotional face contents. Analogously, both dorsal and ventral visual streams may be synchronized in association with the primary consciousness of linguistic contents. In this line of reasoning, the ensemble of the cortical neural networks

  8. Depression and/or potentiation of cortical responses after status epilepticus in immature rats.

    PubMed

    Tsenov, G; Mares, P

    2007-01-01

    Lithium-pilocarpine status epilepticus (SE) resulted in delayed changes of single cortical interhemisperic (transcallosal) responses in immature rats. Low-frequency stimulation inducing depression and/or potentiation was studied to analyze possible dynamic changes in cortical responses. Status was elicited in 12-day-old (SE12) or 25-day-old (SE25) rats. Control siblings received saline instead of pilocarpine. Interhemispheric responses were elicited by stimulation of the sensorimotor region of the cerebral cortex 3, 6, 9, 13, or 26 days after status. A series of 5 biphasic pulses with intensity equal to twofold threshold were used for stimulation. The interval between pulses was 100, 125, 160, 200 or 300 ms, eight responses were always averaged. Peak amplitude of the first positive, first negative and second positive waves was measured and responses to the second, third, fourth and fifth pulse were compared with the first one. Animals after status epilepticus as well as lithium-paraldehyde controls exhibit a frequency depression at nearly all the intervals studied. An outlined increase of responses in SE rats in comparison with the controls three days after SE stayed just below the level of statistical significance. In addition, animals in the SE12 group exhibited potentiation of responses at this interval after SE. With longer intervals after SE, the relation between SE and control animals changed twice resulting in a tendency to lower amplitude of responses in SE than in control rats 26 days after SE. Rats in the SE25 group exhibited higher responses than controls 13 days after status, but this difference was not present at the longest interval after SE. Low-frequency stimulation did not reveal increased cortical excitability as a long-lasting consequence of status epilepticus induced in immature rats. In addition, the outlined differences between SE and control rats changed with the time after SE. PMID:16925471

  9. Grating visual evoked cortical potentials in the evaluation of laser bioeffects: instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, D.I.; Lund, D.J.; Van Sice, C.W.; Esgandarian, G.E.

    1982-12-01

    A system was designed to permit simultaneous viewing of the ocular fundus of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), the accurate placement of laser radiation on the retina, and the stimulation of the site to produce a grating visual evoked cortical potential (VECP). A fundus camera was modified to incorporate a grating whose image was projected onto the retina at specific locations. The evoked potential could thus be obtained for any rate of alternation before, during, and after the exposure of the fovea to any one of many laser sources. An example is shown of the use of this system to monitor the grating VECP before and after exposure of the animal's fundus to a 900 nm gallium arsenide laser source for 60 sec. In this case, changes were observed in the variability of the latency of components of the VECP when compared to the prelaser exposure potentials.

  10. A Review of Techniques for Detection of Movement Intention Using Movement-Related Cortical Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Aqsa; Navid, Muhammad Samran; Anwar, Muhammad Nabeel; Mazhar, Suleman; Jochumsen, Mads; Niazi, Imran Khan

    2015-01-01

    The movement-related cortical potential (MRCP) is a low-frequency negative shift in the electroencephalography (EEG) recording that takes place about 2 seconds prior to voluntary movement production. MRCP replicates the cortical processes employed in planning and preparation of movement. In this study, we recapitulate the features such as signal's acquisition, processing, and enhancement and different electrode montages used for EEG data recoding from different studies that used MRCPs to predict the upcoming real or imaginary movement. An authentic identification of human movement intention, accompanying the knowledge of the limb engaged in the performance and its direction of movement, has a potential implication in the control of external devices. This information could be helpful in development of a proficient patient-driven rehabilitation tool based on brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Such a BCI paradigm with shorter response time appears more natural to the amputees and can also induce plasticity in brain. Along with different training schedules, this can lead to restoration of motor control in stroke patients. PMID:26881008

  11. Movement-related cortical potentials during muscle fatigue induced by upper limb submaximal isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Wang, Ji-Ya; Sun, Yong-Jun; Yang, A-Li; Zhang, Ri-Hui

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the central neurophysiological mechanisms during fatigue induced by submaximal isometric contractions. A total of 23 individuals participated in the study and were assigned to fatigue and nonfatigue groups. Handgrip force, root mean square (RMS) of surface electromyography (sEMG) signal and movement-related cortical potentials during self-paced submaximal handgrip isometric contractions were assessed for each participant. The experimental data showed significant decreases in both maximal voluntary contraction [-24.3%; F(3, 42)=19.62, P<0.001, ηp=0.48] and RMS [-30.1%; F(3, 42)=19.01, P<0.001, ηp=0.57] during maximal voluntary contractions and a significant increase [F(3, 42)=14.27, P<0.001, ηp=0.50] in the average RMS of sEMG over four blocks in the fatigue group. There was no significant difference in the readiness potential between the fatigue and the nonfatigue groups at early stages, and at late stages, significant differences were observed only at the Fp1 and FC1 sites. Motor potential amplitudes were significantly higher in the fatigue group than in the nonfatigue group irrespective of block or electrode positions. Positive waveforms were observed in the prefrontal cortex in states without muscle fatigue, whereas a negative waveform pattern was observed with muscle fatigue. Significant within-subject correlations were observed between motor potential at the C1 site and RMS of sEMG (r=-0.439, P=0.02, ηp=0.11). Neurophysiological evidence indicates that cortical activity increases in the prefrontal cortex, primary motor cortex and supplementary motor cortex with muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue appears to have considerable effects on the components of movement-related cortical potentials during movement execution, whereas the readiness potential before movement is sensitive to cognitive demands during prolonged exercise. Our results provide additional evidence for a link between central motor command during movement

  12. Steady-state evoked potentials to tag specific components of nociceptive cortical processing.

    PubMed

    Colon, Elisabeth; Nozaradan, Sylvie; Legrain, Valery; Mouraux, André

    2012-03-01

    Studies have shown that the periodic repetition of a stimulus induces, at certain stimulation frequencies, a sustained electro-cortical response of corresponding frequency, referred to as steady-state evoked potential (SSEP). Using infrared laser stimulation, we recently showed that SSEPs can be used to explore nociceptive cortical processing. Here, we implemented a novel approach to elicit such responses, using a periodic intra-epidermal electrical stimulation of cutaneous Aδ-nociceptors (Aδ-SSEPs). Using a wide range of frequencies (3-43 Hz), we compared the scalp topographies and temporal dynamics of these Aδ-SSEPs to the Aβ-SSEPs elicited by non-nociceptive transcutaneous electrical stimulation, as well as to the transient ERPs elicited by the onsets of the 10-s stimulation trains, applied to the left and right hand. At 3 Hz, we found that the topographies of Aβ- and Aδ-SSEPs were both maximal at the scalp vertex, and resembled closely that of the late P2 wave of transient ERPs, suggesting activity originating from the same neuronal populations. The responses also showed marked habituation, suggesting that they were mainly related to unspecific, attention-related processes. In contrast, at frequencies >3 Hz, the topographies of Aβ- and Aδ-SSEPs were markedly different. Aβ-SSEPs were maximal over the contralateral parietal region, whereas Aδ-SSEPs were maximal over midline frontal regions, thus indicating an entrainment of distinct neuronal populations. Furthermore, the responses showed no habituation, suggesting more obligatory and specific stages of sensory processing. Taken together, our results indicate that Aβ- and Aδ-SSEPs offer a unique opportunity to study the cortical representation of nociception and touch. PMID:22197788

  13. The color-vision approach to emotional space: cortical evoked potential data.

    PubMed

    Boucsein, W; Schaefer, F; Sokolov, E N; Schröder, C; Furedy, J J

    2001-01-01

    A framework for accounting for emotional phenomena proposed by Sokolov and Boucsein (2000) employs conceptual dimensions that parallel those of hue, brightness, and saturation in color vision. The approach that employs the concepts of emotional quality. intensity, and saturation has been supported by psychophysical emotional scaling data gathered from a few trained observers. We report cortical evoked potential data obtained during the change between different emotions expressed in schematic faces. Twenty-five subjects (13 male, 12 female) were presented with a positive, a negative, and a neutral computer-generated face with random interstimulus intervals in a within-subjects design, together with four meaningful and four meaningless control stimuli made up from the same elements. Frontal, central, parietal, and temporal ERPs were recorded from each hemisphere. Statistically significant outcomes in the P300 and N200 range support the potential fruitfulness of the proposed color-vision-model-based approach to human emotional space. PMID:11666042

  14. Correlates of a single cortical action potential in the epidural EEG

    PubMed Central

    Teleńczuk, Bartosz; Baker, Stuart N; Kempter, Richard; Curio, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    To identify the correlates of a single cortical action potential in surface EEG, we recorded simultaneously epidural EEG and single-unit activity in the primary somatosensory cortex of awake macaque monkeys. By averaging over EEG segments coincident with more than hundred thousand single spikes, we found short-lived (≈ 0.5 ms) triphasic EEG deflections dominated by high-frequency components > 800 Hz. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the grand-averaged spike correlate was 80 nV, which matched theoretical predictions, while single-neuron amplitudes ranged from 12 to 966 nV. Combining these estimates with post-stimulus-time histograms of single-unit responses to median-nerve stimulation allowed us to predict the shape of the evoked epidural EEG response and to estimate the number of contributing neurons. These findings establish spiking activity of cortical neurons as a primary building block of high-frequency epidural EEG, which thus can serve as a quantitative macroscopic marker of neuronal spikes. PMID:25554430

  15. Cortical Potentials Evoked by Deep Brain Stimulation in the Subthalamic Area

    PubMed Central

    Devergnas, Annaelle; Wichmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been used since the mid-1990s as a treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease, and more recently also in other conditions, such as dystonia or obsessive compulsive disorder. Non-invasive studies of cortical evoked potentials (EPs) that follow individual STN–DBS stimuli has provided us with insights about the conduction of the DBS pulses to the cortex. Such EPs have multiple components of different latencies, making it possible to distinguish short-latency and long-latency responses (3–8 ms and 18–25 ms latency, respectively). The available evidence indicates that these short- and long-latency EPs correspond to conduction from the STN stimulation site to the cortical recording location via anti- and orthodromic pathways, respectively. In this review we survey the literature from recording studies in human patients treated with STN–DBS for Parkinson's disease and other conditions, as well as recent animal studies (including our own) that have begun to elucidate details of the pathways, frequency dependencies, and other features of EPs. In addition, we comment on the possible clinical utility of this knowledge. PMID:21625611

  16. Cortical auditory evoked potentials as an objective measure of behavioral thresholds in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Visram, Anisa S; Innes-Brown, Hamish; El-Deredy, Wael; McKay, Colette M

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of using cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) as an objective tool for predicting behavioral hearing thresholds in cochlear implant (CI) users. Nine experienced adult CI users of Cochlear(™) devices participated. Behavioral thresholds were measured in CI users across apical, mid and basal electrodes. CAEPs were measured for the same stimuli (50 ms pulse trains of 900-pps rate) at a range of input levels across the individual's psychophysical dynamic range (DR). Amplitude growth functions using global field power (GFP) were plotted, and from this the CAEP thresholds were extrapolated and compared to the behavioral thresholds. Increased amplitude and decreased latency of the N1-P2 response was seen with increasing input level. A strong correlation was found between CAEP and behavioral thresholds (r = 0.93), implying that the cortical response may be more useful as an objective programming tool for cochlear implants than the auditory nerve response. PMID:25959269

  17. Noninvasive scalp recording of cortical auditory evoked potentials in the alert macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kosuke; Nejime, Masafumi; Konoike, Naho; Nakada, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2015-09-01

    Scalp-recorded evoked potentials (EP) provide researchers and clinicians with irreplaceable means for recording stimulus-related neural activities in the human brain, due to its high temporal resolution, handiness, and, perhaps more importantly, non-invasiveness. This work recorded the scalp cortical auditory EP (CAEP) in unanesthetized monkeys by using methods that are essentially identical to those applied to humans. Young adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta, 5-7 years old) were seated in a monkey chair, and their head movements were partially restricted by polystyrene blocks and tension poles placed around their head. Individual electrodes were fixated on their scalp using collodion according to the 10-20 system. Pure tone stimuli were presented while electroencephalograms were recorded from up to nineteen channels, including an electrooculogram channel. In all monkeys (n = 3), the recorded CAEP comprised a series of positive and negative deflections, labeled here as macaque P1 (mP1), macaque N1 (mN1), macaque P2 (mP2), and macaque N2 (mN2), and these transient responses to sound onset were followed by a sustained potential that continued for the duration of the sound, labeled the macaque sustained potential (mSP). mP1, mN2 and mSP were the prominent responses, and they had maximal amplitudes over frontal/central midline electrode sites, consistent with generators in auditory cortices. The study represents the first noninvasive scalp recording of CAEP in alert rhesus monkeys, to our knowledge. PMID:26031378

  18. Data to support observation of late and ultra-late latency components of cortical laser evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Stancak, Andrej; Cook, Stephanie; Wright, Hazel; Fallon, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Data are provided to document the presence of late and ultra-late latency components of cortical laser evoked potentials (LEPs) following noxious laser stimulus in Stancak et al. (2015) [3]. The latency components, labeled provisionally as N4, N5, and N6, were observed in 16 healthy human participants who were asked to fully attend their painful and non-painful sensations occurring in association with noxious laser stimulus. Individual laser evoked potential waveforms are provided in support of this observation. Data provided demonstrate the cortical sources of the late and ultra-late laser evoked potentials. The cortical sources of LEPs were reconstructed using the standardized Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (sLORETA) method. PMID:26793747

  19. Cortical auditory evoked potentials in the assessment of auditory neuropathy: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Wendy; Golding, Maryanne; Dillon, Harvey

    2007-05-01

    Infants with auditory neuropathy and possible hearing impairment are being identified at very young ages through the implementation of hearing screening programs. The diagnosis is commonly based on evidence of normal cochlear function but abnormal brainstem function. This lack of normal brainstem function is highly problematic when prescribing amplification in young infants because prescriptive formulae require the input of hearing thresholds that are normally estimated from auditory brainstem responses to tonal stimuli. Without this information, there is great uncertainty surrounding the final fitting. Cortical auditory evoked potentials may, however, still be evident and reliably recorded to speech stimuli presented at conversational levels. The case studies of two infants are presented that demonstrate how these higher order electrophysiological responses may be utilized in the audiological management of some infants with auditory neuropathy. PMID:17715648

  20. Grey matter density and GABAA binding potential show a positive linear relationship across cortical regions.

    PubMed

    Duncan, N W; Gravel, P; Wiebking, C; Reader, A J; Northoff, G

    2013-04-01

    Voxel based morphometry (VBM) is a widely used technique for studying the structure of the brain. Direct comparisons between the results obtained using VBM and the underlying histology are limited, however. To circumvent the problems inherent in comparing VBM data in vivo with tissue samples that must generally be obtained post-mortem, we chose to consider GABAA receptors, measured using (18)F-flumazenil PET (18F-FMZ-PET), as non-invasive neural markers to be compared with VBM data. Consistent with previous cortical thickness findings, GABAA receptor binding potential (BPND) was found to correlate positively across regions with grey matter (GM) density. These findings confirm that there is a general positive relationship between MRI-based GM density measures and GABAA receptor BPND on a region-by-region basis (i.e., regions with more GM tend to also have higher BPND). PMID:23380503

  1. Cortical topography of event-related potentials to winning and losing in a video tennis game.

    PubMed

    Ivanitsky, A M; Kurnitskaya, I V; Sobotka, S

    1986-07-01

    The event-related potentials (ERP) in frontal and posterior associative cortex in right and left hemispheres were studied in two different outcomes of a television tennis game. These outcomes were 'win' and 'loss' of the ball, the first serving as a model of positive, the second as a model of negative emotional reactions. The ERPs consisted of 4 waves: P300, N600, P800, N1000. The most characteristic interhemispheric difference for 'win' was an increase of N600 in the left posterior associative cortex, and for 'loss', a decrease of P800 in the right frontal area. Thus, the positive and negative emotional reactions have specific spatio-temporal cortical organizations. The topography of ERP related to positive and negative emotions was disturbed in depressive patients. The patients revealed a larger negativity of the right posterior associative cortex and the left frontal cortex waves both at winning and losing the ball. PMID:3733492

  2. Serum MicroRNA-4521 is a Potential Biomarker for Focal Cortical Dysplasia with Refractory Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Sun, Yuqiang; Tan, Zeshi; Che, Ningwei; Ji, Anlong; Luo, Xiaodong; Sun, Xu; Li, Xinyu; Yang, Kang; Wang, Guanyu; Luan, Lan; Liu, Yaoling; Wei, Minghai; Yin, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Early biomarker-based diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) represents a major clinical challenge. The aim of this study was to identify novel brain microRNAs (miRNAs) in patients with refractory epilepsy and FCD as potential biomarkers. We evaluated serum hsa-miR-4521 as a promising novel biomarker in patients with FCD. Tissue for microarray was obtained from nine patients with temporal lobe refractory epilepsy who underwent surgery to remove epileptic foci identified by cortical video electroencephalogram monitoring. Control tissue was collected from eight patients with hypertension who required emergency surgery to remove an intracranial hematoma. The Affymetrix(®) GeneChip(®) Command Console(®) Software (Affymetrix miRNA 4.0) was used to compare miRNA expression in the cerebral cortex of experimental and control patients. Temporal cortex tissue and serum samples were taken from the same patients for verification of hsa-miR-4521 expression by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The experimental and control patients did not differ significantly in terms of age and gender. 19.4 % (148/764) of the total miRNAs were differentially expressed in experimental and control tissue, which is in agreement with the existing literature. We selected miRNA-4521 for further analysis; the fold-change in expression was 14.4707 and the q value was almost 0, which confirmed up-regulation. Significant up-regulation of hsa-miR-4521 was further validated by RT-qPCR. miRNA microarrays can efficiently and conveniently identify differentially expressed miRNAs in epilepsy brain tissue. This is the first study to identify differential expression of hsa-miR-4521 in brain tissue and serum of refractory epilepsy patients and suggests that serum hsa-miR-4521 may represent a potential diagnostic biomarker for FCD with refractory epilepsy. PMID:26645999

  3. Regulation of Action Potential Waveforms by Axonal GABAA Receptors in Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yang; Zhao, Yuan; Yang, Mingpo; Zeng, Shaoqun; Shu, Yousheng

    2014-01-01

    GABAA receptors distributed in somatodendritic compartments play critical roles in regulating neuronal activities, including spike timing and firing pattern; however, the properties and functions of GABAA receptors at the axon are still poorly understood. By recording from the cut end (bleb) of the main axon trunk of layer –5 pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical slices, we found that currents evoked by GABA iontophoresis could be blocked by picrotoxin, indicating the expression of GABAA receptors in axons. Stationary noise analysis revealed that single-channel properties of axonal GABAA receptors were similar to those of somatic receptors. Perforated patch recording with gramicidin revealed that the reversal potential of the GABA response was more negative than the resting membrane potential at the axon trunk, suggesting that GABA may hyperpolarize the axonal membrane potential. Further experiments demonstrated that the activation of axonal GABAA receptors regulated the amplitude and duration of action potentials (APs) and decreased the AP-induced Ca2+ transients at the axon. Together, our results indicate that the waveform of axonal APs and the downstream Ca2+ signals are modulated by axonal GABAA receptors. PMID:24971996

  4. Binocular interaction of visually evoked cortical potentials elicited by dichoptic binocular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Nakagomi, Ryota; Matsumoto, Harue; Minoda, Haruka; Shinoda, Kei; Iwata, Takeshi; Mizota, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the interaction of cortical potentials elicited by dichoptic stimulation of the dominant and fellow eyes at different frequencies, a pair of programmed power supply units were used to drive a light emitting diode (LED) mounted in the right and left eyes of light-proof goggles to elicit the visually evoked cortical responses (VECPs). The right eye was stimulated at 11.5 Hz and the left eye at 11.0 Hz. Then the stimulation was repeated with the frequency of stimulation switched to the other eyes. The stimulus duration was 5 ms. The sampling rate was 1.0 Hz, and the duration of collection was 200 ms. The VECP of each eye was extracted separately. Individual VECPs could be recorded separately after simultaneous dichoptic stimulation of each eye. The amplitudes of the VECPs were not significantly different after stimulating the dominant eye and the fellow eye separately. The implicit times of negative peak (N-2) and the second positive peak (P-2) were shorter after stimulation of the dominant eye than after stimulation of the fellow eye, but the difference was not significant. However, the implicit time of N-2 elicited by stimulating the dominant eye was significantly shorter when the stimulation rate was 11.5 Hz. The VECPs elicited by stimulating the two eyes can be recorded separately by simultaneous dichoptic stimulation. Dichoptic simultaneous stimulation required a shorter time and may be a more sensitive method of analyzing binocular interactions compared to the classic VECPs using monocular stimulation. PMID:25194016

  5. Evoked potentials in large-scale cortical networks elicited by TMS of the visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Emily D.; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    Single pulses of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) result in distal and long-lasting oscillations, a finding directly challenging the virtual lesion hypothesis. Previous research supporting this finding has primarily come from stimulation of the motor cortex. We have used single-pulse TMS with simultaneous EEG to target seven brain regions, six of which belong to the visual system [left and right primary visual area V1, motion-sensitive human middle temporal cortex, and a ventral temporal region], as determined with functional MRI-guided neuronavigation, and a vertex “control” site to measure the network effects of the TMS pulse. We found the TMS-evoked potential (TMS-EP) over visual cortex consists mostly of site-dependent theta- and alphaband oscillations. These site-dependent oscillations extended beyond the stimulation site to functionally connected cortical regions and correspond to time windows where the EEG responses maximally diverge (40, 200, and 385 ms). Correlations revealed two site-independent oscillations ∼350 ms after the TMS pulse: a theta-band oscillation carried by the frontal cortex, and an alpha-band oscillation over parietal and frontal cortical regions. A manipulation of stimulation intensity at one stimulation site (right hemisphere V1-V3) revealed sensitivity to the stimulation intensity at different regions of cortex, evidence of intensity tuning in regions distal to the site of stimulation. Together these results suggest that a TMS pulse applied to the visual cortex has a complex effect on brain function, engaging multiple brain networks functionally connected to the visual system with both invariant and site-specific spatiotemporal dynamics. With this characterization of TMS, we propose an alternative to the virtual lesion hypothesis. Rather than a technique that simulates lesions, we propose TMS generates natural brain signals and engages functional networks. PMID:21715670

  6. Subthalamic and Cortical Local Field Potentials Associated with Pilocarpine-Induced Oral Tremor in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Long, Lauren L.; Podurgiel, Samantha J.; Haque, Aileen F.; Errante, Emily L.; Chrobak, James J.; Salamone, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Tremulous jaw movements (TJMs) are rapid vertical deflections of the lower jaw that resemble chewing but are not directed at any particular stimulus. In rodents, TJMs are induced by neurochemical conditions that parallel those seen in human Parkinsonism, including neurotoxic or pharmacological depletion of striatal dopamine (DA), DA antagonism, and cholinomimetic administration. Moreover, TJMs in rodents can be attenuated by antiparkinsonian agents, including levodopa (L-DOPA), DA agonists, muscarinic antagonists, and adenosine A2A antagonists. In human Parkinsonian patients, exaggerated physiological synchrony is seen in the beta frequency band in various parts of the cortical/basal ganglia/thalamic circuitry, and activity in the tremor frequency range (3–7 Hz) also has been recorded. The present studies were undertaken to determine if tremor-related local field potential (LFP) activity could be recorded from motor cortex (M1) or subthalamic nucleus (STN) during the TJMs induced by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, which is a well-known tremorogenic agent. Pilocarpine induced a robust TJM response that was marked by rhythmic electromyographic (EMG) activity in the temporalis muscle. Compared to periods with no tremor activity, TJM epochs were characterized by increased LFP activity in the tremor frequency range in both neocortex and STN. Tremor activity was not associated with increased synchrony in the beta frequency band. These studies identified tremor-related LFP activity in parts of the cortical/basal ganglia circuitry that are involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism. This research may ultimately lead to identification of the oscillatory neural mechanisms involved in the generation of tremulous activity, and promote development of novel treatments for tremor disorders. PMID:27378874

  7. Fabrication and testing of polyimide-based microelectrode arrays for cortical mapping of evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Myllymaa, Sami; Myllymaa, Katja; Korhonen, Hannu; Töyräs, Juha; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Djupsund, Kaj; Tanila, Heikki; Lappalainen, Reijo

    2009-06-15

    Modern microfabrication techniques make it possible to develop microelectrode arrays that may be utilized not only in neurophysiological research but also in the clinic, e.g. in neurosurgery and as elements of neural prostheses. The aim of this study was to test whether a flexible microelectrode array is suitable for recording cortical surface field potentials in rats. Polyimide-based microelectrode arrays were fabricated by utilizing microfabrication techniques e.g. photolithography and magnetron sputter deposition. The present microelectrode array consists of eight platinum microelectrodes (round-shaped, Ø: 200 microm), transmission lines and connector pads sandwiched between two thin layers of biocompatible polyimide. The microelectrode arrays were electrochemically characterized by impedance spectroscopy in physiological saline solution and successfully tested in vivo by conducting acute and chronic measurements of evoked potentials on the surface of rat cortex. The arrays proved excellent flexibility and mechanical strength during handling and implantation onto the surface of cortex. The excellent electrochemical characteristics and stable in vivo recordings with high spatiotemporal resolution highlight the potential of these arrays. The fabrication protocol described here allows implementation of several other neural interfaces with different layouts, material selections or target areas either for recording or stimulation purposes. PMID:19380223

  8. CORTICAL EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS TO SPEECH SOUNDS IN 3- MONTH OLD BREAST AND FORMULA-FED INFANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies showing that infants can differentially process and discriminate speech stimuli have not considered the influence of diet as an experimental variable. To investigate this relationship, cortical auditory evoked potentials (ERPs) to syllables were recorded (128 electrodes) from 3 month old inf...

  9. Expression and cellular distribution of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 in cortical tubers of the tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Yang, Meihua; Sun, Feiji; Liang, Chao; Wei, Yujia; Wang, Lukang; Yue, Jiong; Chen, Bing; Li, Song; Liu, Shiyong; Yang, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Cortical tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) are highly associated with intractable epilepsy. Recent evidence has shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) has direct effects on both neurons and glial cells. To understand the role of TRPV4 in pathogenesis of cortical tubers, we investigated the expression patterns of TRPV4 in cortical tubers of TSC compared with normal control cortex (CTX). We found that TRPV4 was clearly up-regulated in cortical tubers at the protein levels. Immunostaining indicated that TRPV4 was specially distributed in abnormal cells, including dysplastic neurons (DNs) and giant cells (GCs). In addition, double immunofluorescent staining revealed that TRPV4 was localized on neurofilament proteins (NF200) positive neurons and glial fibrillary acidic portein (GFAP) positive reactive astrocytes. Moreover, TRPV4 co-localized with both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Furthermore, protein levels of protein kinase C (PKC), but not protein kinase A (PKA), the important upstream factors of the TRPV4, were significantly increased in cortical tubers. Taken together, the overexpression and distribution patterns of TRPV4 may be linked with the intractable epilepsy caused by TSC. PMID:26874068

  10. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in (Un)aided Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Adults.

    PubMed

    Van Dun, Bram; Kania, Anna; Dillon, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) are influenced by the characteristics of the stimulus, including level and hearing aid gain. Previous studies have measured CAEPs aided and unaided in individuals with normal hearing. There is a significant difference between providing amplification to a person with normal hearing and a person with hearing loss. This study investigated this difference and the effects of stimulus signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and audibility on the CAEP amplitude in a population with hearing loss. Twelve normal-hearing participants and 12 participants with a hearing loss participated in this study. Three speech sounds-/m/, /g/, and /t/-were presented in the free field. Unaided stimuli were presented at 55, 65, and 75 dB sound pressure level (SPL) and aided stimuli at 55 dB SPL with three different gains in steps of 10 dB. CAEPs were recorded and their amplitudes analyzed. Stimulus SNRs and audibility were determined. No significant effect of stimulus level or hearing aid gain was found in normal hearers. Conversely, a significant effect was found in hearing-impaired individuals. Audibility of the signal, which in some cases is determined by the signal level relative to threshold and in other cases by the SNR, is the dominant factor explaining changes in CAEP amplitude. CAEPs can potentially be used to assess the effects of hearing aid gain in hearing-impaired users. PMID:27587919

  11. Visual and noxious electrical stimulus-evoked membrane-potential responses in anterior cingulate cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Qing; Ning, Li; Wang, Zhiru; Wang, Ying-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is known to participate in numerous brain functions, such as memory storage, emotion, attention, as well as perception of acute and chronic pain. ACC-dependent brain functions often rely on ACC processing of various forms of environmental information. To understand the neural basis of ACC functions, previous studies have investigated ACC responses to environmental stimulation, particularly complex sensory stimuli as well as award and aversive stimuli, but this issue remains to be further clarified. Here, by performing whole-cell recording in vivo in anaesthetized adult rats, we examined membrane-potential (MP) responses of layer II/III ACC neurons that were evoked by a brief flash of visual stimulation and pain-related electrical stimulation delivered to hind paws. We found that ~54 and ~81 % ACC neurons exhibited excitatory MP responses, subthreshold or suprathreshold, to the visual stimulus and the electrical stimulus, respectively, with no cell showing inhibitory MP responses. We further found that the visually evoked ACC response could be greatly diminished by local lidocaine infusion in the visual thalamus, and only their temporal patterns but not amplitudes could be changed by large-scale visual cortical lesions. Our in vivo whole-cell recording data characterized in ACC neurons a visually evoked response, which was largely dependent on the visual thalamus but not visual cortex, as well as a noxious electrical stimulus-evoked response. These findings may provide potential mechanisms that are used for ACC functions on the basis of sensory information processing. PMID:27585569

  12. Movement-related cortical potentials in paraplegic patients: abnormal patterns and considerations for BCI-rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren; Jiang, Ning; Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Hasan, Muhammad; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Allan, David; Fraser, Matthew; Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Conway, Bernie; Dremstrup, Kim; Farina, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive EEG-based Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) can be promising for the motor neuro-rehabilitation of paraplegic patients. However, this shall require detailed knowledge of the abnormalities in the EEG signatures of paraplegic patients. The association of abnormalities in different subgroups of patients and their relation to the sensorimotor integration are relevant for the design, implementation and use of BCI systems in patient populations. This study explores the patterns of abnormalities of movement related cortical potentials (MRCP) during motor imagery tasks of feet and right hand in patients with paraplegia (including the subgroups with/without central neuropathic pain (CNP) and complete/incomplete injury patients) and the level of distinctiveness of abnormalities in these groups using pattern classification. The most notable observed abnormalities were the amplified execution negativity and its slower rebound in the patient group. The potential underlying mechanisms behind these changes and other minor dissimilarities in patients’ subgroups, as well as the relevance to BCI applications, are discussed. The findings are of interest from a neurological perspective as well as for BCI-assisted neuro-rehabilitation and therapy. PMID:25221505

  13. Visual Evoked Potentials as a Readout of Cortical Function in Infants With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Varcin, Kandice J; Nelson, Charles A; Ko, Jordan; Sahin, Mustafa; Wu, Joyce Y; Jeste, Shafali Spurling

    2016-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder that confers a high risk for neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability. Studies have demonstrated specific delays in visual reception skills that may predict the development of autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability. Based on evidence for alterations in the retinogeniculate pathway in animal models of tuberous sclerosis complex, we asked whether children with tuberous sclerosis complex demonstrate alterations in early visual processing that may undermine the development of higher-level visual behaviors. Pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials were recorded in infants with tuberous sclerosis complex (n = 16) and typically developing infants (n = 18) at 12 months of age. Infants with tuberous sclerosis complex demonstrated remarkably intact visual evoked potentials even within the context of intellectual disability and epilepsy. Infants with tuberous sclerosis complex show intact visual cortical processing, suggesting that delays in visually mediated behaviors in tuberous sclerosis complex may not be rooted in early visual processing deficits. PMID:26018199

  14. The temporal relationship between the brainstem and primary cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Shaw, N A

    1995-10-01

    Many methods are employed in order to define more precisely the generators of an evoked potential (EP) waveform. One technique is to compare the timing of an EP whose origin is well established with that of one whose origin is less certain. In the present article, the latency of the primary cortical auditory evoked potential (PCAEP) was compared to each of the seven subcomponents which compose the brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP). The data for this comparison was derived from a retrospective analysis of previous recordings of the PCAEP and BAEP. Central auditory conduction time (CACT) was calculated by subtracting the latency of the cochlear nucleus BAEP component (wave III) from that of the PCAEP. It was found that CACT in humans is 12 msec which is more than double that of central somatosensory conduction time. The interpeak latencies between BAEP waves V, VI, and VII and the PCAEP were also calculated. It was deduced that all three waves must have an origin rather more caudally within the central auditory system than is commonly supposed. In addition, it is demonstrated that the early components of the middle latency AEP (No and Na) largely reside within the time domain between the termination of the BAEP components and the PCAEP which would be consistent with their being far field reflections of midbrain and subcortical auditory activity. It is concluded that as the afferent volley ascends the central auditory pathways, it generates not a sequence of high frequency BAEP responses but rather a succession of slower post-synaptic waves. The only means of reconciling the timing of the BAEP waves with that of the PCAEP is to assume that the generation of all the BAEP components must be largely restricted to a quite confined region within the auditory nerve and the lower half of the pons. PMID:8711132

  15. Detection of movement intention from single-trial movement-related cortical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niazi, Imran Khan; Jiang, Ning; Tiberghien, Olivier; Feldbæk Nielsen, Jørgen; Dremstrup, Kim; Farina, Dario

    2011-10-01

    Detection of movement intention from neural signals combined with assistive technologies may be used for effective neurofeedback in rehabilitation. In order to promote plasticity, a causal relation between intended actions (detected for example from the EEG) and the corresponding feedback should be established. This requires reliable detection of motor intentions. In this study, we propose a method to detect movements from EEG with limited latency. In a self-paced asynchronous BCI paradigm, the initial negative phase of the movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs), extracted from multi-channel scalp EEG was used to detect motor execution/imagination in healthy subjects and stroke patients. For MRCP detection, it was demonstrated that a new optimized spatial filtering technique led to better accuracy than a large Laplacian spatial filter and common spatial pattern. With the optimized spatial filter, the true positive rate (TPR) for detection of movement execution in healthy subjects (n = 15) was 82.5 ± 7.8%, with latency of -66.6 ± 121 ms. Although TPR decreased with motor imagination in healthy subject (n = 10, 64.5 ± 5.33%) and with attempted movements in stroke patients (n = 5, 55.01 ± 12.01%), the results are promising for the application of this approach to provide patient-driven real-time neurofeedback.

  16. Pharmacological Rescue of Cortical Synaptic and Network Potentiation in a Mouse Model for Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Lu, Jing-Shan; Song, Qian; Liu, Ming-Gang; Koga, Kohei; Descalzi, Giannina; Li, Yun-Qing; Zhuo, Min

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, caused by the mutation of the Fmr1 gene, is characterized by deficits of attention and learning ability. In the hippocampus of Fmr1 knockout mice (KO), long-term depression is enhanced whereas long-term potentiation (LTP) including late-phase LTP (L-LTP) is reduced or unaffected. Here we examined L-LTP in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in Fmr1 KO mice by using a 64-electrode array recording system. In wild-type mice, theta-burst stimulation induced L-LTP that does not occur in all active electrodes/channels within the cingulate circuit and is typically detected in ∼75% of active channels. Furthermore, L-LTP recruited new responses from previous inactive channels. Both L-LTP and the recruitment of inactive responses were blocked in the ACC slices of Fmr1 KO mice. Bath application of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) antagonist or glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) inhibitors rescued the L-LTP and network recruitment. Our results demonstrate that loss of FMRP will greatly impair L-LTP and recruitment of cortical network in the ACC that can be rescued by pharmacological inhibition of mGluR5 or GSK3. This study is the first report of the network properties of L-LTP in the ACC, and provides basic mechanisms for future treatment of cortex-related cognitive defects in fragile X patients. PMID:24553731

  17. Surface temperature change, cortical evoked potential and pain behavior elicited by CO2 lasers.

    PubMed

    Yen, C T; Huang, C H; Fu, S E

    1994-01-01

    The performance of a self-designed CO2 laser stimulator, TL#2, was evaluated against a commercial product, model DE20XL of the Direct Energy Inc. (Irvine). The major items evaluated were the temperature change of the irradiated surface and the electrophysiological and behavior changes in the rat elicited by single laser pulse irradiation. Single shots of TL#2 produced a profile of surface temperature change similar to those of the DE20XL, as quantified by their maximal temperature change, rate of rise (half time to maximum) and rate of temperature drop. TL#2 and DE20XL elicited the same pain behaviors and the same pattern of cortical evoked potential in awake, behaving rats. TL#2 differed from the DE20XL in its laser beam shape and focal depth. The cross sectional energy profile of the TL#2 was a Gaussian shape, i.e., most intense at its center point, whereas that of the DE20XL with the FL20XL attachment had a shape of an inverted Gaussian, i.e., most intense in the periphery. Consequently, the peak energy of the center of the TL#2 laser beam grows rapidly with an increase in the pulse intensity. Caution must be taken not to use this machine at high intensity or for long duration less permanent damage should be produced on tested animal or human subject. In summary, TL#2 when used properly, should be a useful tool in the study of pain mechanism. PMID:7796635

  18. Using human extra-cortical local field potentials to control a switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Philip; Andreasen, Dinal; Ehirim, Princewill; King, Brandon; Kirby, Todd; Mao, Hui; Moore, Melody

    2004-06-01

    Individuals with profound paralysis and mutism require a communication channel. Traditional assistive technology devices eventually fail, especially in the case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) subjects who gradually become totally locked-in. A direct brain-to-computer interface that provides switch functions can provide a direct communication channel to the external world. Electroencephalographic (EEG) signals recorded from scalp electrodes are significantly degraded due to skull and scalp attenuation and ambient noise. The present system using conductive skull screws allows more reliable access to cortical local field potentials (LFPs) without entering the brain itself. We describe an almost locked-in human subject with ALS who activated a switch using online time domain detection techniques. Frequency domain analysis of his LFP activity demonstrates this to be an alternative method of detecting switch activation intentions. With this brain communicator system it is reasonable to expect that locked-in, but cognitively intact, humans will always be able to communicate. Financial disclosure. Authors PK and DA may derive some financial gain from the sale of this device. A patent has been applied under US and international law: 10/675,703.

  19. Implications of movement-related cortical potential for understanding neural adaptations in muscle strength tasks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review aims to provide information about the implications of the movement-related cortical potential (MRCP) in acute and chronic responses to the counter resistance training. The structuring of the methods of this study followed the proposals of the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses). It was performed an electronically search in Pubmed/Medline and ISI Web of Knowledge data bases, from 1987 to 2013, besides the manual search in the selected references. The following terms were used: Bereitschaftspotential, MRCP, strength and force. The logical operator “AND” was used to combine descriptors and terms used to search publications. At the end, 11 studies attended all the eligibility criteria and the results demonstrated that the behavior of MRCP is altered because of different factors such as: force level, rate of force development, fatigue induced by exercise, and the specific phase of muscular action, leading to an increase in the amplitude in eccentric actions compared to concentric actions, in acute effects. The long-term adaptations demonstrated that the counter resistance training provokes an attenuation in the amplitude in areas related to the movement, which may be caused by neural adaptation occurred in the motor cortex. PMID:24602228

  20. Implications of movement-related cortical potential for understanding neural adaptations in muscle strength tasks.

    PubMed

    Lattari, Eduardo; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Monteiro-Junior, Renato Sobral; Mello Portugal, Eduardo Matta; Paes, Flávia; Menéndez-González, Manuel; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Machado, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review aims to provide information about the implications of the movement-related cortical potential (MRCP) in acute and chronic responses to the counter resistance training. The structuring of the methods of this study followed the proposals of the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses). It was performed an electronically search in Pubmed/Medline and ISI Web of Knowledge data bases, from 1987 to 2013, besides the manual search in the selected references. The following terms were used: Bereitschaftspotential, MRCP, strength and force. The logical operator "AND" was used to combine descriptors and terms used to search publications. At the end, 11 studies attended all the eligibility criteria and the results demonstrated that the behavior of MRCP is altered because of different factors such as: force level, rate of force development, fatigue induced by exercise, and the specific phase of muscular action, leading to an increase in the amplitude in eccentric actions compared to concentric actions, in acute effects. The long-term adaptations demonstrated that the counter resistance training provokes an attenuation in the amplitude in areas related to the movement, which may be caused by neural adaptation occurred in the motor cortex. PMID:24602228

  1. Auditory brainstem and cortical potentials following bone-anchored hearing aid stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rahne, Torsten; Ehelebe, Thomas; Rasinski, Christine; Götze, Gerrit

    2010-11-30

    Patients suffering from conductive or mixed hearing loss and Single-Sided Deafness may benefit from implantable hearing devices relying on bone conducted auditory stimulation. However, with only passively cooperative patients, objective methods are needed to estimate the aided and unaided pure-tone audiogram. This study focuses on the feasibility aspect of an electrophysiological determination of the hearing thresholds with bone-anchored hearing aid stimulation. Therefore, 10 normal-hearing subjects were provided with a Baha Intenso (Cochlear Ltd.) which was temporarily connected to the Baha Softband (Cochlear Ltd.). Auditory evoked potentials were measured by auditory stimulation paradigm used in clinical routine. The amplitudes, latencies, and thresholds of the resulting auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and the cortically evoked responses (CAEP) were correlated with the respective responses without the use of the Baha Intenso. The recording of ABR and CAEP by delivering the stimuli to the Baha results in response waveforms which are comparable to those evoked by earphone stimulation and appears appropriate to be measured using the Baha Intenso as stimulator. At the ABR recordings a stimulus artifact at higher stimulation levels and a constant latency shift caused by the Baha Intenso has to be considered. The CAEP recording appeared promising as a frequency specific objective method to approve the fitting of bone-anchored hearing aids. At all measurements, the ABR and CAEP thresholds seem to be consistent with the normal hearing of the investigated participants. Thus, a recording of auditory evoked potentials using a Baha is in general possible if specific limitations are considered. PMID:20875458

  2. Changes of slow cortical negative DC-potentials during the acquisition of a complex finger motor task.

    PubMed

    Niemann, J; Winker, T; Gerling, J; Landwehrmeyer, B; Jung, R

    1991-01-01

    To study whether electrophysiological correlates of increasing motor skill can be demonstrated in man, we recorded cortical negative DC-potentials during the acquisition of a complex finger movement in 21 subjects. The movement consisted in moving a matchstick to and fro between the index finger (II) and the little finger (V). Cortical negative DC-potentials were recorded at Fz, Cz, C1, C2 and Pz. As a control a simple finger movement was performed during the same session by 7 of the Ss. Both tasks were repeated 60-80 times and averages of the first and the last 15 artifact-free single runs were compared. Whereas only a slight, inconstant decrease in surface electronegativity during the simple motor task was observed, a significant reduction in potential size occurred during the complex task at Cz (maximum), C1, C2 and Pz but not at Fz. In addition, a significant difference in the decrease of surface electronegativity between various electrode positions was observed. We suggest that these changes in potential size during the process of motor learning may reflect an altered cortical organisation of movement control during the acquisition of a complex motor task. PMID:1893989

  3. Cortical inhibition of laser pain and laser-evoked potentials by non-nociceptive somatosensory input.

    PubMed

    Testani, Elisa; Le Pera, Domenica; Del Percio, Claudio; Miliucci, Roberto; Brancucci, Alfredo; Pazzaglia, Costanza; De Armas, Liala; Babiloni, Claudio; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2015-10-01

    Although the inhibitory action that tactile stimuli can have on pain is well documented, the precise timing of the interaction between the painful and non-painful stimuli in the central nervous system is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate this issue by measuring the timing of the amplitude modulation of laser evoked potentials (LEPs) due to conditioning non-painful stimuli. LEPs were recorded from 31 scalp electrodes in 10 healthy subjects after painful stimulation of the right arm (C6-C7 dermatomes). Non-painful electrical stimuli were applied by ring electrodes on the second and third finger of the right hand. Electrical stimuli were delivered at +50, +150, +200 and +250 ms interstimulus intervals (ISIs) after the laser pulses. LEPs obtained without any conditioning stimulation were used as a baseline. As compared to the baseline, non-painful electrical stimulation reduced the amplitude of the vertex N2/P2 LEP component and the laser pain rating when electrical stimuli followed the laser pulses only at +150 and +200 ms ISIs. As at these ISIs the collision between the non-painful and painful input is likely to take place at the cortical level, we can conclude that the late processing of painful (thermal) stimuli is partially inhibited by the processing of non-painful (cutaneous) stimuli within the cerebral cortex. Moreover, our results do not provide evidence that non-painful inputs can inhibit pain at a lower level, including the spinal cord. PMID:26227011

  4. Stimulation artifact correction method for estimation of early cortico-cortical evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Trebaul, Lena; Rudrauf, David; Job, Anne-Sophie; Mălîia, Mihai Dragos; Popa, Irina; Barborica, Andrei; Minotti, Lorella; Mîndruţă, Ioana; Kahane, Philippe; David, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background Effective connectivity can be explored using direct electrical stimulations in patients suffering from drug-resistant focal epilepsies and investigated with intracranial electrodes. Responses to brief electrical pulses mimic the physiological propagation of signals and manifest as cortico-cortical evoked potentials (CCEP). The first CCEP component is believed to reflect direct connectivity with the stimulated region but the stimulation artifact, a sharp deflection occurring during a few milliseconds, frequently contaminates it. New method In order to recover the characteristics of early CCEP responses, we developed an artifact correction method based on electrical modeling of the electrode–tissue interface. The biophysically motivated artifact templates are then regressed out of the recorded data as in any classical template-matching removal artifact methods. Results Our approach is able to make the distinction between the physiological responses time-locked to the stimulation pulses and the non-physiological component. We tested the correction on simulated CCEP data in order to quantify its efficiency for different stimulation and recording parameters. We demonstrated the efficiency of the new correction method on simulations of single trial recordings for early responses contaminated with the stimulation artifact. The results highlight the importance of sampling frequency for an accurate analysis of CCEP. We then applied the approach to experimental data. Comparison with existing method The model-based template removal was compared to a correction based on the subtraction of the averaged artifact. Conclusions This new correction method of stimulation artifact will enable investigators to better analyze early CCEP components and infer direct effective connectivity in future CCEP studies. PMID:26952846

  5. Electrophysiological Potentials Reveal Cortical Mechanisms for Mental Imagery, Mental Simulation, and Grounded (Embodied) Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Schendan, Haline E.; Ganis, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Grounded cognition theory proposes that cognition, including meaning, is grounded in sensorimotor processing. The mechanism for grounding cognition is mental simulation, which is a type of mental imagery that re-enacts modal processing. To reveal top-down, cortical mechanisms for mental simulation of shape, event-related potentials were recorded to face and object pictures preceded by mental imagery. Mental imagery of the identical face or object picture (congruous condition) facilitated not only categorical perception (VPP/N170) but also later visual knowledge [N3(00) complex] and linguistic knowledge (N400) for faces more than objects, and strategic semantic analysis (late positive complex) between 200 and 700 ms. The later effects resembled semantic congruity effects with pictures. Mental imagery also facilitated category decisions, as a P3 peaked earlier for congruous than incongruous (other category) pictures, resembling the case when identical pictures repeat immediately. Thus mental imagery mimics semantic congruity and immediate repetition priming processes with pictures. Perception control results showed the opposite for faces and were in the same direction for objects: Perceptual repetition adapts (and so impairs) processing of perceived faces from categorical perception onward, but primes processing of objects during categorical perception, visual knowledge processes, and strategic semantic analysis. For both imagery and perception, differences between faces and objects support domain-specificity and indicate that cognition is grounded in modal processing. Altogether, this direct neural evidence reveals that top-down processes of mental imagery sustain an imagistic representation that mimics perception well enough to prime subsequent perception and cognition. Findings also suggest that automatic mental simulation of the visual shape of faces and objects operates between 200 and 400 ms, and strategic mental simulation operates between 400 and 700

  6. Senescence of visual function as studied by visually evoked cortical potentials.

    PubMed

    Adachi-Usami, E

    1990-01-01

    Visual functions in senescence were assessed quantitatively by the pattern reversal visually evoked cortical potentials (VECP) in human subjects and animals. The results obtained in the elderly showed an elevation of contrast threshold, ie, lowered sensitivity, for higher spatial frequency, and a rise in the luminance thresholds. There was also an overall suppression in the temporal frequency curves, a sensitivity decrease for the upper half of the visual field, a blue-yellow defect and a decrease in the amplitude of accommodation. Studies of the pseudophakic eye with an intraocular lens verified that the lower transparency and yellowish changes of the crystalline lens and senile miosis do not entirely account for the depressed visual function in the elderly. The delay of P100 peak latency of the VECP in patients with juvenile Parkinson's disease after cessation of L-dopa indicated the deficiency of dopamine in these patients, which in turn was considered as a clinical model of senescence. Optic nerve fiber counts in mice showed a significant decrease in the aged group. It was considered that there is neuronal senescence other than in the eye itself. The results can be illustrated by the following daily life experience. In the evening, an elderly person would have difficulty in identifying a cat as a calico cat if the cat were atop a wall and running quickly through the visual field. It was surprising, however, that the senescence found in the visual function was not as great as that found in the other sensory organs. As further studies, investigation of the feedback mechanism from the brain to the retina and the compensatory mechanism should be made. PMID:2362377

  7. Cortical Auditory Event Related Potentials (P300) for Frequency Changing Dynamic Tones

    PubMed Central

    Kalaiah, Mohan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives P300 has been studied with a variety of stimuli. However, the nature of P300 has not been investigated for deviant stimuli which change its characteristics from standard stimuli after a period of time from onset. Subjects and Methods Nine young adults with normal hearing participated in the study. The P300 was elicited using an oddball paradigm, the probability of standard and deviant stimuli was 80% and 20% respectively. Six stimuli were used to elicit P300, it included two pure-tones (1,000 Hz and 2,000 Hz) and four tone-complexes (tones with frequency changes). Among these stimuli, 1,000 Hz tone served as standard while others served as deviant stimuli. The P300 was recorded in five separate blocks, with one of the deviant stimuli as target in each block. Electroencephalographic was recorded from electrode sites Fz, Cz, C3, C4, and Pz. Latency and amplitude of components of the cortical auditory evoked potentials were measured at Cz. Results Waveforms obtained in the present study shows that, all the deviant stimuli elicited obligatory P1-N1-P2 for stimulus onset. 2,000 Hz deviant tone elicited P300 at a latency of 300 ms. While, tone-complexes elicited acoustic change complex (ACC) for frequency changes and finally elicited P300 at a latency of 600 ms. In addition, the results showed shorter latency and larger amplitude ACC and P300 for rising tone-complexes compared to falling tone-complexes. Conclusions Tone-complexes elicited distinct waveforms compared to 2,000 Hz deviant tone. Rising tone-complexes which had an increase in frequency elicited shorter latency and larger amplitude responses, which could be attributed to perceptual bias for frequency changes. PMID:27144230

  8. Visual Evoked Cortical Potential (VECP) Elicited by Sinusoidal Gratings Controlled by Pseudo-Random Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Carolina S.; Souza, Givago S.; Gomes, Bruno D.; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L.

    2013-01-01

    The contributions of contrast detection mechanisms to the visual cortical evoked potential (VECP) have been investigated studying the contrast-response and spatial frequency-response functions. Previously, the use of m-sequences for stimulus control has been almost restricted to multifocal electrophysiology stimulation and, in some aspects, it substantially differs from conventional VECPs. Single stimulation with spatial contrast temporally controlled by m-sequences has not been extensively tested or compared to multifocal techniques. Our purpose was to evaluate the influence of spatial frequency and contrast of sinusoidal gratings on the VECP elicited by pseudo-random stimulation. Nine normal subjects were stimulated by achromatic sinusoidal gratings driven by pseudo random binary m-sequence at seven spatial frequencies (0.4–10 cpd) and three stimulus sizes (4°, 8°, and 16° of visual angle). At 8° subtence, six contrast levels were used (3.12–99%). The first order kernel (K1) did not provide a consistent measurable signal across spatial frequencies and contrasts that were tested–signal was very small or absent–while the second order kernel first (K2.1) and second (K2.2) slices exhibited reliable responses for the stimulus range. The main differences between results obtained with the K2.1 and K2.2 were in the contrast gain as measured in the amplitude versus contrast and amplitude versus spatial frequency functions. The results indicated that K2.1 was dominated by M-pathway, but for some stimulus condition some P-pathway contribution could be found, while the second slice reflected the P-pathway contribution. The present work extended previous findings of the visual pathways contribution to VECP elicited by pseudorandom stimulation for a wider range of spatial frequencies. PMID:23940546

  9. Differential potentiation of early and late components evoked in olfactory cortex by stimulation of cortical association fibers.

    PubMed

    Stripling, Jeffrey S; Galupo, M Paz

    2008-12-30

    The present study examined in detail the development and decay of potentiation induced in vivo by repeated high-frequency stimulation of cortical association fibers (AF) in piriform cortex (PC). Male Long-Evans rats with chronically-implanted stimulating and recording electrodes were administered potentiating AF stimulation (thirty 10-pulse 100-Hz trains) on 8 consecutive days, followed by a ninth administration after an 8-day layoff. The time course of potentiation was monitored by local field potentials evoked in the PC and olfactory bulb (OB) by 0.1 Hz single-pulse AF test stimulation before, during, and following each potentiating treatment. AF test stimulation evoked two distinct components in the PC, an early component (EC) and a late component (LC). High-frequency AF stimulation produced potentiation of each component, but with very different characteristics. EC potentiation consisted of a brief augmentation during each bout of potentiating stimulation that persisted <2 min after the last high-frequency train and showed no cumulative effects following repeated induction across days. In contrast, LC potentiation developed gradually, requiring several daily potentiation treatments to reach maximum amplitude, and decayed more slowly each time it was induced. Furthermore, LC potentiation persisted in latent form for at least 8 days following its apparent decay and could be reinstated by repeated test stimulation that was without effect at the beginning of the experiment. Potentiation in the OB resembled LC potentiation in its characteristics, but with less latent potentiation. These results indicate that the potentiation reported here is distinctly different from the long-term potentiation previously demonstrated in vitro in the PC, and suggest that this potentiation represents an increase in excitability within the cortical association fiber system that can be stored in latent form and retrieved at a later time. These characteristics make this potentiation a

  10. Functional abnormalities in the cortical processing of sound complexity and musical consonance in schizophrenia: evidence from an evoked potential study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated functional and structural temporal lobe abnormalities located close to the auditory cortical regions in schizophrenia. The goal of this study was to determine whether functional abnormalities exist in the cortical processing of musical sound in schizophrenia. Methods Twelve schizophrenic patients and twelve age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited, and participants listened to a random sequence of two kinds of sonic entities, intervals (tritones and perfect fifths) and chords (atonal chords, diminished chords, and major triads), of varying degrees of complexity and consonance. The perception of musical sound was investigated by the auditory evoked potentials technique. Results Our results showed that schizophrenic patients exhibited significant reductions in the amplitudes of the N1 and P2 components elicited by musical stimuli, to which consonant sounds contributed more significantly than dissonant sounds. Schizophrenic patients could not perceive the dissimilarity between interval and chord stimuli based on the evoked potentials responses as compared with the healthy controls. Conclusion This study provided electrophysiological evidence of functional abnormalities in the cortical processing of sound complexity and music consonance in schizophrenia. The preliminary findings warrant further investigations for the underlying mechanisms. PMID:23721126

  11. Dysfunctional cortical inhibition in adult ADHD: neural correlates in auditory event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Schubert, J K; Gonzalez-Trejo, E; Retz, W; Rösler, M; Corona-Strauss, F I; Steidl, G; Teuber, T; Strauss, D J

    2014-09-30

    In recent times, the relevance of an accurate diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults has been the focus of several studies. No longer considered a pathology exclusive to children and adolescents, and taking into account its social implications, developing enhanced support tools for the current diagnostic procedure becomes a priority. Here we present a method for the objective assessment of ADHD in adults using chirp-evoked, paired auditory late responses (ALRs) combined with a two-dimensional ALR denoising scheme to extract correlates of intracortical inhibition. Our method allows for an effective single-sweep denoising, thus requiring less trials to obtain recognizable physiological features, useful as pointers of cortical impairment. Results allow an optimized diagnosis, reduction of data loss and acquisition time; moreover, they do not account exclusively for critical elements within clinical evaluations, but also allow studying the pathophysiology of the condition by providing objective information regarding impaired cortical functions. PMID:25033725

  12. Cortical potentials in an auditory oddball task reflect individual differences in working memory capacity

    PubMed Central

    Yurgil, Kate A.; Golob, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    This study determined whether auditory cortical responses associated with mechanisms of attention vary with individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC) and perceptual load. The operation span test defined subjects with low vs. high WMC, who then discriminated target/nontarget tones while EEG was recorded. Infrequent white noise distracters were presented at midline or ±90° locations, and perceptual load was manipulated by varying nontarget frequency. Amplitude of the N100 to distracters was negatively correlated with WMC. Relative to targets, only high WMC subjects showed attenuated N100 amplitudes to nontargets. In the higher WMC group, increased perceptual load was associated with decreased P3a amplitudes to distracters and longer-lasting negative slow wave to nontargets. Results show that auditory cortical processing is associated with multiple facets of attention control related to WMC and possibly higher-level cognition. PMID:24016201

  13. Therapeutic potential of treatment with the flavonoid rutin after cortical focal ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Amélia Miranda Gomes; Marcilio, Fralini Dos Santos; Frazão Muzitano, Michelle; Giraldi-Guimarães, Arthur

    2013-03-29

    Flavonoids have known anti-inflammatory and antioxidative actions, and they have been described as neuroprotective and able to reduce damage in CNS diseases. We evaluated the action of the flavonoid rutin in an animal model of focal cortical ischemia induced by unilateral thermocoagulation of superficial blood vessels of motor (M1) and somatosensory (S1) primary cortices. Ischemic rats were submitted to daily injections (i.p.) for five days, starting immediately after induction of ischemia. We tested two doses: 50mg/kg or 100mg/kg of body weight. Sensorimotor tests were used to evaluate functional recovery. Bioavailability in plasma was done by chromatographic analysis. The effect of treatment in lesion volume and neurodegeneration was evaluated 48 h and 72 h after ischemia, respectively. We observed significant sensorimotor recovery induced by rutin, and the dose of 50mg/kg had more pronounced effect. Thus, this dose was used in further analyses. Plasma availability of rutin was detected from 2h to at least 8h after ischemia. The treatment did not result in reduction of lesion volume but reduced the number of degenerated neurons at the periphery of the lesion. The results suggest rutin as an efficient drug to treat brain ischemia since it was able to promote significant recovery of sensorimotor loss, which was correlated to the reduction of neurodegeneration in the periphery of cortical injury. Increasing studies with rutin and other flavonoids might give support for further clinical trials with these drugs. PMID:23370003

  14. Summary of the N1-P2 Cortical Auditory Evoked Potential to Estimate the Auditory Threshold in Adults.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, Guy

    2016-02-01

    This article introduces the cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) and describes the use of the N1-P2 response complex as an objective predictor of hearing threshold in adults and older children. The generators of the CAEP are discussed together with issues of maturation, subject factors, and stimuli and recording parameters for use in the clinic. The basic methods for response identification are outlined and suggestions are made for determining the CAEP threshold. Clinical applications are introduced and the accuracy of the CAEP as an estimator of hearing threshold is given. Finally, a case study provides an example of the technique in the context of medicolegal assessment. PMID:27587918

  15. Spaceflight-relevant types of ionizing radiation and cortical bone: Potential LET effect?

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Shane A J; Bandstra, Eric R; Travis, Neil D; Nelson, Gregory A; Bourland, J Daniel; Pecaut, Michael J; Gridley, Daila S; Willey, Jeffrey S; Bateman, Ted A

    2008-01-01

    Extended exposure to microgravity conditions results in significant bone loss. Coupled with radiation exposure, this phenomenon may place astronauts at a greater risk for mission-critical fractures. In a previous study, we identified a profound and prolonged loss of trabecular bone (29-39%) in mice following exposure to an acute, 2 Gy dose of radiation simulating both solar and cosmic sources. However, because skeletal strength depends on trabecular and cortical bone, accurate assessment of strength requires analysis of both bone compartments. The objective of the present study was to examine various properties of cortical bone in mice following exposure to multiple types of spaceflight-relevant radiation. Nine-week old, female C57BL/6 mice were sacrificed 110 days after exposure to a single, whole body, 2 Gy dose of gamma, proton, carbon, or iron radiation. Femora were evaluated with biomechanical testing, microcomputed tomography, quantitative histomorphometry, percent mineral content, and micro-hardness analysis. Compared to non-irradiated controls, there were significant differences compared to carbon or iron radiation for only fracture force, medullary area and mineral content. A greater differential effect based on linear energy transfer (LET) level may be present: high-LET (carbon or iron) particle irradiation was associated with a decline in structural properties (maximum force, fracture force, medullary area, and cortical porosity) and mineral composition compared to low-LET radiation (gamma and proton). Bone loss following irradiation appears to be largely specific to trabecular bone and may indicate unique biological microenvironments and microdosimetry conditions. However, the limited time points examined and non-haversian skeletal structure of the mice employed highlight the need for further investigation. PMID:19122806

  16. Spaceflight-relevant types of ionizing radiation and cortical bone: Potential LET effect?

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shane A.J.; Bandstra, Eric R.; Travis, Neil D.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Pecaut, Michael J.; Gridley, Daila S.; Willey, Jeffrey S.; Bateman, Ted A.

    2008-01-01

    Extended exposure to microgravity conditions results in significant bone loss. Coupled with radiation exposure, this phenomenon may place astronauts at a greater risk for mission-critical fractures. In a previous study, we identified a profound and prolonged loss of trabecular bone (29−39%) in mice following exposure to an acute, 2 Gy dose of radiation simulating both solar and cosmic sources. However, because skeletal strength depends on trabecular and cortical bone, accurate assessment of strength requires analysis of both bone compartments. The objective of the present study was to examine various properties of cortical bone in mice following exposure to multiple types of spaceflight-relevant radiation. Nine-week old, female C57BL/6 mice were sacrificed 110 days after exposure to a single, whole body, 2 Gy dose of gamma, proton, carbon, or iron radiation. Femora were evaluated with biomechanical testing, microcomputed tomography, quantitative histomorphometry, percent mineral content, and micro-hardness analysis. Compared to non-irradiated controls, there were significant differences compared to carbon or iron radiation for only fracture force, medullary area and mineral content. A greater differential effect based on linear energy transfer (LET) level may be present: high-LET (carbon or iron) particle irradiation was associated with a decline in structural properties (maximum force, fracture force, medullary area, and cortical porosity) and mineral composition compared to low-LET radiation (gamma and proton). Bone loss following irradiation appears to be largely specific to trabecular bone and may indicate unique biological microenvironments and microdosimetry conditions. However, the limited time points examined and non-haversian skeletal structure of the mice employed highlight the need for further investigation. PMID:19122806

  17. Spaceflight-relevant types of ionizing radiation and cortical bone: Potential LET effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Shane A. J.; Bandstra, Eric R.; Travis, Neil D.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Pecaut, Michael J.; Gridley, Daila S.; Willey, Jeffrey S.; Bateman, Ted A.

    2008-12-01

    Extended exposure to microgravity conditions results in significant bone loss. Coupled with radiation exposure, this phenomenon may place astronauts at a greater risk for mission-critical fractures. In a previous study, we identified a profound and prolonged loss of trabecular bone (29-39%) in mice following exposure to an acute, 2 Gy dose of radiation simulating both solar and cosmic sources. However, because skeletal strength depends on trabecular and cortical bone, accurate assessment of strength requires analysis of both bone compartments. The objective of the present study was to examine various properties of cortical bone in mice following exposure to multiple types of spaceflight-relevant radiation. Nine-week old, female C57BL/6 mice were sacrificed 110 days after exposure to a single, whole body, 2 Gy dose of gamma, proton, carbon, or iron radiation. Femora were evaluated with biomechanical testing, microcomputed tomography, quantitative histomorphometry, percent mineral content, and micro-hardness analysis. Compared to non-irradiated controls, there were significant differences compared to carbon or iron radiation for only fracture force, medullary area and mineral content. A greater differential effect based on linear energy transfer (LET) level may be present: high-LET (carbon or iron) particle irradiation was associated with a decline in structural properties (maximum force, fracture force, medullary area, and cortical porosity) and mineral composition compared to low-LET radiation (gamma and proton). Bone loss following irradiation appears to be largely specific to trabecular bone and may indicate unique biological microenvironments and microdosimetry conditions. However, the limited time points examined and non-haversian skeletal structure of the mice employed highlight the need for further investigation.

  18. Delayed Effects of Corticosterone on Slow After-Hyperpolarization Potentials in Mouse Hippocampal versus Prefrontal Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Anup G.; Henckens, Marloes J. A. G.; Fernández, Guillén; Joëls, Marian

    2014-01-01

    The rodent stress hormone corticosterone changes neuronal activity in a slow and persistent manner through transcriptional regulation. In the rat dorsal hippocampus, corticosterone enhances the amplitude of calcium-dependent potassium currents that cause a lingering slow after-hyperpolarization (sAHP) at the end of depolarizing events. In this study we compared the putative region-dependency of the delayed effects of corticosterone (approximately 5 hrs after treatment) on sAHP as well as other active and passive properties of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons from three prefrontal areas, i.e. the lateral orbitofrontal, prelimbic and infralimbic cortex, with the hippocampus of adult mice. In agreement with previous studies, corticosterone increased sAHP amplitude in the dorsal hippocampus with depolarizing steps of increasing amplitude. However, in the lateral orbitofrontal, prelimbic and infralimbic cortices we did not observe any modifications of sAHP amplitude after corticosterone treatment. Properties of single action potentials or % ratio of the last spike interval with respect to the first spike interval, an indicator of accommodation in an action potential train, were not significantly affected by corticosterone in all brain regions examined. Lastly, corticosterone treatment did not induce any lasting changes in passive membrane properties of hippocampal or cortical neurons. Overall, the data indicate that corticosterone slowly and very persistently increases the sAHP amplitude in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, while this is not the case in the cortical regions examined. This implies that changes in excitability across brain regions reached by corticosterone may vary over a prolonged period of time after stress. PMID:24901987

  19. Cross-correlation studies of movement-related cortical potentials during unilateral and bilateral muscle contractions in humans.

    PubMed

    Oda, S; Moritani, T

    1996-01-01

    A useful method of studying the degree of association between two signals of varying amplitude in the time domain is to use cross-correlation analysis. We applied this to the movement-related cortical potentials digitally filtered so as to eliminate the low frequency component before applying it during maximal unilateral left (UL L), unilateral right (UL R) and bilateral (BL) contractions in 11 right-handed subjects. The recording electrode sites were over the right and left motor cortex areas (C3 and C4). The BL condition revealed higher cross-correlation levels of cortical activities between the two hemispheres than in UL L or UL R contraction [UL L, r = 0.68 (SEM 0.05); UL R, r = 0.73 (SEM 0.03); BL, r = 0.76 (SEM 0.02)]. The UL R revealed a positive phase difference [5 (SEM 2) ms] when the maximal cross-correlation coefficient was shown and UL L showed a negative phase difference [5 (SEM 3) ms]. However, BL revealed a smaller phase difference [2 (SEM 1) ms] than that for UL. It was concluded that during maximal BL contraction cortical cellular activities in both hemispheres was more synchronized in amplitude and time course compared with maximal UL contractions. Our data suggested that central common drive existed between the right and left motor areas during the maximal BL handgrip contractions and the amplitude of potentials of both hemispheres was modified by the interhemispheric inhibition mechanism as reported in other studies. PMID:8891497

  20. Targeting Prefrontal Cortical Systems for Drug Development: Potential Therapies for Cognitive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Arnsten, Amy F T; Wang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Medications to treat cognitive disorders are increasingly needed, yet researchers have had few successes in this challenging arena. Cognitive abilities in primates arise from highly evolved N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor circuits in layer III of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These circuits have unique modulatory needs that can differ from the layer V neurons that predominate in rodents, but they offer multiple therapeutic targets. Cognitive improvement often requires low doses that enhance the pattern of information held in working memory, whereas higher doses can produce nonspecific changes that obscure information. Identifying appropriate doses for clinical trials may be helped by assessments in monkeys and by flexible, individualized dose designs. The use of guanfacine (Intuniv) for prefrontal cortical disorders was based on research in monkeys, supporting this approach. Coupling our knowledge of higher primate circuits with the powerful methods now available in drug design will help create effective treatments for cognitive disorders. PMID:26738476

  1. Targeting Prefrontal Cortical Systems for Drug Development: Potential Therapies for Cognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Arnsten, Amy F.T.; Wang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Medications to treat cognitive disorders are increasingly needed, yet researchers have had few successes in this challenging arena. Cognitive abilities in primates arise from highly evolved N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor circuits in layer III of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These circuits have unique modulatory needs that can differ from the layer V neurons that predominate in rodents, but they offer multiple therapeutic targets. Cognitive improvement often requires low doses that enhance the pattern of information held in working memory, whereas higher doses can produce nonspecific changes that obscure information. Identifying appropriate doses for clinical trials may be helped by assessments in monkeys and by flexible, individualized dose designs. The use of guanfacine (Intuniv) for prefrontal cortical disorders was based on research in monkeys, supporting this approach. Coupling our knowledge of higher primate circuits with the powerful methods now available in drug design will help create effective treatments for cognitive disorders. PMID:26738476

  2. Clinical Experience of Using Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in the Treatment of Infant Hearing Loss in Australia.

    PubMed

    Punch, Simone; Van Dun, Bram; King, Alison; Carter, Lyndal; Pearce, Wendy

    2016-02-01

    This article presents the clinical protocol that is currently being used within Australian Hearing for infant hearing aid evaluation using cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs). CAEP testing is performed in the free field at two stimulus levels (65 dB sound pressure level [SPL], followed by 55 or 75 dB SPL) using three brief frequency-distinct speech sounds /m/, /ɡ/, and /t/, within a standard audiological appointment of up to 90 minutes. CAEP results are used to check or guide modifications of hearing aid fittings or to confirm unaided hearing capability. A retrospective review of 83 client files evaluated whether clinical practice aligned with the clinical protocol. It showed that most children could be assessed as part of their initial fitting program when they were identified as a priority for CAEP testing. Aided CAEPs were most commonly assessed within 8 weeks of the fitting. A survey of 32 pediatric audiologists provided information about their perception of cortical testing at Australian Hearing. The results indicated that clinical CAEP testing influenced audiologists' approach to rehabilitation and was well received by parents and that they were satisfied with the technique. Three case studies were selected to illustrate how CAEP testing can be used in a clinical environment. Overall, CAEP testing has been effectively integrated into the infant fitting program. PMID:27587921

  3. Branch specific and spike-order specific action potential invasion in basal, oblique, and apical dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Short, Shaina M.; Rich, Matthew T.; Oikonomou, Katerina D.; Singh, Mandakini B.; Sterjanaj, Enas V.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. In neocortical pyramidal neurons, action potentials (APs) propagate from the axon into the dendritic tree to influence distal synapses. Traditionally, AP backpropagation was studied in the thick apical trunk. Here, we used the principles of optical imaging developed by Cohen to investigate AP invasion into thin dendritic branches (basal, oblique, and tuft) of prefrontal cortical L5 pyramidal neurons. Multisite optical recordings from neighboring dendrites revealed a clear dichotomy between two seemingly equal dendritic branches belonging to the same cell (“sister branches”). We documented the variable efficacy of AP invasion in basal and oblique branches by revealing their AP voltage waveforms. Using fast multisite calcium imaging, we found that trains of APs are filtered differently between two apical tuft branches. Although one dendritic branch passes all spikes in an AP train, another branch belonging to the same neuron, same cortical layer, and same path distance from the cell body, experiences only one spike. Our data indicate that the vast differences in dendritic voltage and calcium transients, detected in dendrites of pyramidal neurons, arise from a nonuniform distribution of A-type K+ conductance, an aggregate number of branch points in the path of the AP propagation and minute differences in dendritic diameter. PMID:26157997

  4. Acute stress exposure preceding transient global brain ischemia exacerbates the decrease in cortical remodeling potential in the rat retrosplenial cortex.

    PubMed

    Kutsuna, Nobuo; Yamashita, Akiko; Eriguchi, Takashi; Oshima, Hideki; Suma, Takeshi; Sakatani, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Takamitsu; Yoshino, Atsuo; Katayama, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Doublecortin (DCX)-immunoreactive (-ir) cells are candidates that play key roles in adult cortical remodeling. We have previously reported that DCX-ir cells decrease after stress exposure or global brain ischemia (GBI) in the cingulate cortex (Cg) of rats. Herein, we investigate whether the decrease in DCX-ir cells is exacerbated after GBI due to acute stress exposure preconditioning. Twenty rats were divided into 3 groups: acute stress exposure before GBI (Group P), non-stress exposure before GBI (Group G), and controls (Group C). Acute stress or GBI was induced by a forced swim paradigm or by transient bilateral common carotid artery occlusion, respectively. DCX-ir cells were investigated in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and retrosplenial cortex (RS). The number of DCX-ir cells per unit area (mm(2)) decreased after GBI with or without stress preconditioning in the ACC and in the RS (ANOVA followed by a Tukey-type test, P<0.001). Moreover, compared to Group G, the number in Group P decreased significantly in RS (P<0.05), though not significantly in ACC. Many of the DCX-ir cells were co-localized with the GABAergic neuronal marker parvalbumin. The present study indicates that cortical remodeling potential of GABAergic neurons of Cg decreases after GBI, and moreover, the ratio of the decrease is exacerbated by acute stress preconditioning in the RS. PMID:24257103

  5. Cortical responses elicited by photovoltaic subretinal prostheses exhibit similarities to visually evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Yossi; Goetz, Georges; Lavinsky, Daniel; Huie, Philip; Mathieson, Keith; Wang, Lele; Kamins, Theodore; Manivanh, Richard; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We have previously developed a wireless photovoltaic retinal prosthesis, in which camera-captured images are projected onto the retina using pulsed near-IR light. Each pixel in the subretinal implant directly converts pulsed light into local electric current to stimulate the nearby inner retinal neurons. Here we report that implants having pixel sizes of 280, 140 and 70μm implanted in the subretinal space in rats with normal and degenerate retina elicit robust cortical responses upon stimulation with pulsed near-IR light. Implant-induced eVEP has shorter latency than visible light-induced VEP, its amplitude increases with peak irradiance and pulse duration, and decreases with frequency in the range of 2-20Hz, similar to the visible light response. Modular design of the arrays allows scalability to a large number of pixels, and combined with the ease of implantation, offers a promising approach to restoration of sight in patients blinded by retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23778557

  6. Modeling a cortical auxin maximum for nodulation: different signatures of potential strategies.

    PubMed

    Deinum, Eva Elisabeth; Geurts, René; Bisseling, Ton; Mulder, Bela M

    2012-01-01

    Lateral organ formation from plant roots typically requires the de novo creation of a meristem, initiated at the location of a localized auxin maximum. Legume roots can form both root nodules and lateral roots. From the basic principles of auxin transport and metabolism only a few mechanisms can be inferred for increasing the local auxin concentration: increased influx, decreased efflux, and (increased) local production. Using computer simulations we investigate the different spatio-temporal patterns resulting from each of these mechanisms in the context of a root model of a generalized legume. We apply all mechanisms to the same group of preselected cells, dubbed the controlled area. We find that each mechanism leaves its own characteristic signature. Local production by itself can not create a strong auxin maximum. An increase of influx, as is observed in lateral root formation, can result in an auxin maximum that is spatially more confined than the controlled area. A decrease of efflux on the other hand leads to a broad maximum, which is more similar to what is observed for nodule primordia. With our prime interest in nodulation, we further investigate the dynamics following a decrease of efflux. We find that with a homogeneous change in the whole cortex, the first auxin accumulation is observed in the inner cortex. The steady state lateral location of this efflux reduced auxin maximum can be shifted by slight changes in the ratio of central to peripheral efflux carriers. We discuss the implications of this finding in the context of determinate and indeterminate nodules, which originate from different cortical positions. The patterns we have found are robust under disruption of the (artificial) tissue layout. The same patterns are therefore likely to occur in many other contexts. PMID:22654886

  7. Adaptation of the cortical somatosensory evoked potential following pulsed pneumatic stimulation of the lower face in adults.

    PubMed

    Custead, Rebecca; Oh, Hyuntaek; Rosner, Austin Oder; Barlow, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Cortical adaptation to sustained sensory input is a pervasive form of short-term plasticity in neurological systems. Its role in sensory perception in health and disease, or predicting long-term plastic changes resulting from sensory training offers insight into the mechanisms of somatosensory and sensorimotor processing. A 4-channel electroencephalography (EEG) recording montage was placed bilaterally (C3-P3, C4-P4, F7-P3, F8-P4) to characterize the short-term effects of pulsed pneumatic orofacial stimulation on the cortical somatosensory evoked potential (cSEP) in twenty neurotypical adults (mean age=21±2.88 years). A servo-controlled pneumatic amplifier was used to deliver a repetitive series of pneumatic pulse trains (six 50-ms pulses, 5-second intertrain interval) through a linked pair of custom acetal homopolymer probes (aka TAC-Cells) adhered to the nonglabrous skin of the lower face proximal to the right oral angle to synchronously activate mechanoreceptive afferents in the trigeminal nerve. Blocks of pulse trains were counterbalanced among participants and delivered at two rates, 2 and 4Hz. TAC-Cell stimulation of the lower face consistently evoked a series of cSEPs at P7, N20, P28, N38, P75, N85, and P115. The spatial organization and adaptation of the evoked cSEP was dependent on stimulus pulse index (1-6 within the pulse train, p=.012), frequency of stimulus presentation (2 vs 4Hz, p<.001), component (P7-P115, p<.001), and recording montage (channels 1-4, p<.001). Early component latencies (P7-N20) were highly stable in polarity (sign) and latency, and consistent with putative far-field generators (e.g., trigeminal brainstem, ventroposteromedial thalamus). PMID:26119917

  8. Cortical Reorganization in Dyslexic Children after Phonological Training: Evidence from Early Evoked Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spironelli, Chiara; Penolazzi, Barbara; Vio, Claudio; Angrilli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Brain plasticity was investigated in 14 Italian children affected by developmental dyslexia after 6 months of phonological training. The means used to measure language reorganization was the recognition potential, an early wave, also called N150, elicited by automatic word recognition. This component peaks over the left temporo-occipital cortex…

  9. Comparison of the somatosensory evoked potential and the direct cortical response following severe incomplete global ischemia: selective vulnerability of the white matter conduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Lesnick, J E; Coyer, P E; Michele, J J; Welsh, F A; Simeone, F A

    1986-01-01

    Eight cats were subjected to graded hemorrhagic hypotension following bilateral carotid ligation to produce incomplete global cerebral ischemia. Three additional cats served as controls. The somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and direct cortical response (DCR) were monitored in all animals and in each case, the cortical component of the SEP was abolished during progressive ischemia while the morphology of the DCR was well-preserved but with reduced amplitude. Determinations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine (PCr), and lactate levels in cerebral cortex and white matter were made in five experimental cats and the three controls. At the time of failure of the cortical SEP, PCr was dramatically reduced and lactate moderately elevated in the white matter while ATP remained unchanged. Cortical lactate was only mildly elevated and PCr and ATP were unchanged accounting for preservation of the DCR. In this model of global ischemia, abolition of the cortical SEP is due to a block of stimulus conduction in white matter projection pathways. A hypothesis to explain the observed metabolic changes is presented and correlation is made to clinical situations. PMID:3810728

  10. Reduced cortical motor potentials underlie reductions in memory-guided reaching performance.

    PubMed

    Krigolson, Olav; Bell, Jon; Kent, Courtney M; Heath, Matthew; Holroyd, Clay B

    2012-07-01

    We used the event-related potential (ERP) methodology to examine differences in neural processing between visually and memory-guided reaches. Consistent with previous findings (e.g., Westwood, Heath, & Roy, 2003), memory-guided reaches undershot veridical target location to a greater extent than their visually guided counterparts. Analysis of the ERP data revealed that memory-guided reaches were associated with reduced potentials over medial-frontal cortex at target presentation and following movement onset. Further, we found that the amplitudes of the potentials over medial-frontal cortex for visually and memory-guided reaches were significantly correlated with the peak accelerations and decelerations of the reaching movements. Our results suggest that memory-guided reaches are mediated by a motor plan that is generated while a target is visible, and then stored in memory until needed--a result counter to recent behavioral theories asserting that memory-guided reaches are planned just before movement onset via a stored, sensory-based target representation. PMID:22643098

  11. Cortical potentials evoked by confirming and disconfirming feedback following an auditory discrimination.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Hillyard, S. A.; Lindsay, P. H.

    1973-01-01

    Vertex potentials elicited by visual feedback signals following an auditory intensity discrimination have been studied with eight subjects. Feedback signals which confirmed the prior sensory decision elicited small P3s, while disconfirming feedback elicited P3s that were larger. On the average, the latency of P3 was also found to increase with increasing disparity between the judgment and the feedback information. These effects were part of an overall dichotomy in wave shape following confirming vs disconfirming feedback. These findings are incorporated in a general model of the role of P3 in perceptual decision making.

  12. Reduced habituation of auditory evoked potentials indicate cortical hyper-excitability in Fragile X Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ethridge, L E; White, S P; Mosconi, M W; Wang, J; Byerly, M J; Sweeney, J A

    2016-01-01

    Sensory hypersensitivities are common, clinically distressing features of Fragile X Syndrome (FXS). Preclinical evidence suggests this abnormality may result from synaptic hyper-excitability in sensory systems. This model predicts reduced sensory habituation to repeated stimulus presentation. Fourteen adolescents and adults with FXS and 15 age-matched controls participated in a modified auditory gating task using trains of 4 identical tones during dense array electroencephalography (EEG). Event-related potential and single trial time-frequency analyses revealed decreased habituation of the N1 event-related potential response in FXS, and increased gamma power coupled with decreases in gamma phase-locking during the early-stimulus registration period. EEG abnormalities in FXS were associated with parent reports of heightened sensory sensitivities and social communication deficits. Reduced habituation and altered gamma power and phase-locking to auditory cues demonstrated here in FXS patients parallels preclinical findings with Fmr1 KO mice. Thus, the EEG abnormalities seen in FXS patients support the model of neocortical hyper-excitability in FXS, and may provide useful translational biomarkers for evaluating novel treatment strategies targeting its neural substrate. PMID:27093069

  13. Reduced habituation of auditory evoked potentials indicate cortical hyper-excitability in Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ethridge, L E; White, S P; Mosconi, M W; Wang, J; Byerly, M J; Sweeney, J A

    2016-01-01

    Sensory hypersensitivities are common, clinically distressing features of Fragile X Syndrome (FXS). Preclinical evidence suggests this abnormality may result from synaptic hyper-excitability in sensory systems. This model predicts reduced sensory habituation to repeated stimulus presentation. Fourteen adolescents and adults with FXS and 15 age-matched controls participated in a modified auditory gating task using trains of 4 identical tones during dense array electroencephalography (EEG). Event-related potential and single trial time–frequency analyses revealed decreased habituation of the N1 event-related potential response in FXS, and increased gamma power coupled with decreases in gamma phase-locking during the early-stimulus registration period. EEG abnormalities in FXS were associated with parent reports of heightened sensory sensitivities and social communication deficits. Reduced habituation and altered gamma power and phase-locking to auditory cues demonstrated here in FXS patients parallels preclinical findings with Fmr1 KO mice. Thus, the EEG abnormalities seen in FXS patients support the model of neocortical hyper-excitability in FXS, and may provide useful translational biomarkers for evaluating novel treatment strategies targeting its neural substrate. PMID:27093069

  14. Clinical Use of Aided Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials as a Measure of Physiological Detection or Physiological Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Curtis J.; Papesh, Melissa A.; Penman, Tina M.; Baltzell, Lucas S.; Gallun, Frederick J.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of aided cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) remains unclear despite several decades of research. One major contributor to this ambiguity is the wide range of variability across published studies and across individuals within a given study; some results demonstrate expected amplification effects, while others demonstrate limited or no amplification effects. Recent evidence indicates that some of the variability in amplification effects may be explained by distinguishing between experiments that focused on physiological detection of a stimulus versus those that differentiate responses to two audible signals, or physiological discrimination. Herein, we ask if either of these approaches is clinically feasible given the inherent challenges with aided CAEPs. N1 and P2 waves were elicited from 12 noise-masked normal-hearing individuals using hearing-aid-processed 1000-Hz pure tones. Stimulus levels were varied to study the effect of hearing-aid-signal/hearing-aid-noise audibility relative to the noise-masked thresholds. Results demonstrate that clinical use of aided CAEPs may be justified when determining whether audible stimuli are physiologically detectable relative to inaudible signals. However, differentiating aided CAEPs elicited from two suprathreshold stimuli (i.e., physiological discrimination) is problematic and should not be used for clinical decision making until a better understanding of the interaction between hearing-aid-processed stimuli and CAEPs can be established. PMID:23093964

  15. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials Reveal Changes in Audibility with Nonlinear Frequency Compression in Hearing Aids for Children: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Ching, Teresa Y C; Zhang, Vicky W; Hou, Sanna; Van Buynder, Patricia

    2016-02-01

    Hearing loss in children is detected soon after birth via newborn hearing screening. Procedures for early hearing assessment and hearing aid fitting are well established, but methods for evaluating the effectiveness of amplification for young children are limited. One promising approach to validating hearing aid fittings is to measure cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs). This article provides first a brief overview of reports on the use of CAEPs for evaluation of hearing aids. Second, a study that measured CAEPs to evaluate nonlinear frequency compression (NLFC) in hearing aids for 27 children (between 6.1 and 16.8 years old) who have mild to severe hearing loss is reported. There was no significant difference in aided sensation level or the detection of CAEPs for /g/ between NLFC on and off conditions. The activation of NLFC was associated with a significant increase in aided sensation levels for /t/ and /s/. It also was associated with an increase in detection of CAEPs for /t/ and /s/. The findings support the use of CAEPs for checking audibility provided by hearing aids. Based on the current data, a clinical protocol for using CAEPs to validate audibility with amplification is presented. PMID:27587920

  16. Spatiotemporal cortical activation underlying dilemma decision-making: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peifeng; Qiu, Jiang; Li, Hong; Zhang, Qinglin

    2009-10-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were measured when 18 Chinese subjects performed a dilemma decision task. During this task, subjects were required to decide who to rescue when two relatives (FN-FN, e.g., father and mother) or two strangers (SN-SN: stranger A and stranger B) were buried in the debris after a great earthquake. All subjects had experienced the great Sichuan earthquake on May 12th, 2008 in Chengdu city, China. Scalp ERP analysis revealed that FN-FN elicited a much more positive deflection (P2) than did SN-SN, which might reflect stimulus evaluation and conflict detection in the initiation of decision-making. In addition, a greater positivity (P350-450) in FN-FN as compared to SN-SN was found between 350 and 450ms post-stimulus, after hearing aftershock information. Dipole source analysis of difference wave (FN-FN minus SN-SN) indicated that two generators of the P350-450, localized in the parahippocampal gyrus and the cuneus, might be involved in dilemma interference resolution processes. PMID:19576947

  17. Encoding of natural sounds by variance of the cortical local field potential.

    PubMed

    Ding, Nai; Simon, Jonathan Z; Shamma, Shihab A; David, Stephen V

    2016-06-01

    Neural encoding of sensory stimuli is typically studied by averaging neural signals across repetitions of the same stimulus. However, recent work has suggested that the variance of neural activity across repeated trials can also depend on sensory inputs. Here we characterize how intertrial variance of the local field potential (LFP) in primary auditory cortex of awake ferrets is affected by continuous natural sound stimuli. We find that natural sounds often suppress the intertrial variance of low-frequency LFP (<16 Hz). However, the amount of the variance reduction is not significantly correlated with the amplitude of the mean response at the same recording site. Moreover, the variance changes occur with longer latency than the mean response. Although the dynamics of the mean response and intertrial variance differ, spectro-temporal receptive field analysis reveals that changes in LFP variance have frequency tuning similar to multiunit activity at the same recording site, suggesting a local origin for changes in LFP variance. In summary, the spectral tuning of LFP intertrial variance and the absence of a correlation with the amplitude of the mean evoked LFP suggest substantial heterogeneity in the interaction between spontaneous and stimulus-driven activity across local neural populations in auditory cortex. PMID:26912594

  18. Prior probabilities modulate cortical surprise responses: A study of event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Seer, Caroline; Lange, Florian; Boos, Moritz; Dengler, Reinhard; Kopp, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    The human brain predicts events in its environment based on expectations, and unexpected events are surprising. When probabilistic contingencies in the environment are precisely instructed, the individual can form expectations based on quantitative probabilistic information ('inference-based learning'). In contrast, when probabilistic contingencies are imprecisely instructed, expectations are formed based on the individual's cumulative experience ('experience-based learning'). Here, we used the urn-ball paradigm to investigate how variations in prior probabilities and in the precision of information about these priors modulate choice behavior and event-related potential (ERP) correlates of surprise. In the urn-ball paradigm, participants are repeatedly forced to infer hidden states responsible for generating observable events, given small samples of factual observations. We manipulated prior probabilities of the states, and we rendered the priors calculable or incalculable, respectively. The analysis of choice behavior revealed that the tendency to consider prior probabilities when making decisions about hidden states was stronger when prior probabilities were calculable, at least in some of our participants. Surprise-related P3b amplitudes were observed in both the calculable and the incalculable prior probability condition. In contrast, calculability of prior probabilities modulated anteriorly distributed ERP amplitudes: when prior probabilities were calculable, surprising events elicited enhanced P3a amplitudes. However, when prior probabilities were incalculable, surprise was associated with enhanced N2 amplitudes. Furthermore, interindividual variability in reliance on prior probabilities was associated with attenuated P3b surprise responses under calculable in comparison to incalculable prior probabilities. Our results suggest two distinct neural systems for probabilistic learning that are recruited depending on contextual cues such as the precision of

  19. Spatiotemporal cortical activation underlies the Müller-Lyer illusion: an event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songyan; Du, Xue; Wu, Xin; Wei, Dongtao; Zhang, Meng; Qiu, Jiang

    2013-12-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were used to examine the electrophysiological correlates of the visual illusion effect in the Müller-Lyer illusion tasks. The participants were presented with the context of a horizontal line with two symmetric inward-pointing arrowheads or outward-pointing arrowheads, and then, they were asked to indicate whether they perceived an increase or a decrease in the line length. The behavioral results showed that there were significant differences among the four types of tasks, which meant that participants could understand different mean illusion magnitudes. The ERP results showed that both the illusion-45 and the illusion-135 elicited a more negative ERP deflection (N180-280) than did the illusion-225 and illusion-315 between 180 and 280 ms. In addition, the strong illusion stimuli elicited a more positive ERP deflection (P280-450) than did the weak illusion stimuli between 280 and 450 ms after the onset of the stimuli. Dipole source analysis of the difference wave (illusion-135-illusion-225) indicated that one generator localized in the left lateral occipital cortex and the difference wave (illusion-45-illusion-135) indicated that one generator localized in the left lingual gyrus. Our results led us to conclude that the ERP deflection in the different illusory strength might be related to the theory of attention resource distribution or because of the inverse optics problem. Then, the early visual areas lateral occipital cortex and the lingual gyrus near to the visual cortex could contribute to integrated processing in the illusory contours and top-down control processing because of the visual experiences. PMID:24064409

  20. Slow cortical potential and theta/beta neurofeedback training in adults: effects on attentional processes and motor system excitability.

    PubMed

    Studer, Petra; Kratz, Oliver; Gevensleben, Holger; Rothenberger, Aribert; Moll, Gunther H; Hautzinger, Martin; Heinrich, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Neurofeedback (NF) is being successfully applied, among others, in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and as a peak performance training in healthy subjects. However, the neuronal mechanisms mediating a successful NF training have not yet been sufficiently uncovered for both theta/beta (T/B), and slow cortical potential (SCP) training, two protocols established in NF in ADHD. In the present, randomized, controlled investigation in adults without a clinical diagnosis (n = 59), the specificity of the effects of these two NF protocols on attentional processes and motor system excitability were to be examined, focusing on the underlying neuronal mechanisms. Neurofeedback training consisted of 10 double sessions, and self-regulation skills were analyzed. Pre- and post-training assessments encompassed performance and event-related potential measures during an attention task, and motor system excitability assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Some NF protocol-specific effects have been obtained. However, due to the limited sample size medium effects did not reach the level of significance. Self-regulation abilities during negativity trials of the SCP training were associated with increased contingent negative variation amplitudes, indicating improved resource allocation during cognitive preparation. Theta/beta training was associated with increased response speed and decreased target-P3 amplitudes after successful theta/beta regulation suggested reduced attentional resources necessary for stimulus evaluation. Motor system excitability effects after theta/beta training paralleled the effects of methylphenidate. Overall, our results are limited by the non-sufficiently acquired self-regulation skills, but some specific effects between good and poor learners could be described. Future studies with larger sample sizes and sufficient acquisition of self-regulation skills are needed to further evaluate the protocol-specific effects on

  1. Slow cortical potential and theta/beta neurofeedback training in adults: effects on attentional processes and motor system excitability

    PubMed Central

    Studer, Petra; Kratz, Oliver; Gevensleben, Holger; Rothenberger, Aribert; Moll, Gunther H.; Hautzinger, Martin; Heinrich, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Neurofeedback (NF) is being successfully applied, among others, in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and as a peak performance training in healthy subjects. However, the neuronal mechanisms mediating a successful NF training have not yet been sufficiently uncovered for both theta/beta (T/B), and slow cortical potential (SCP) training, two protocols established in NF in ADHD. In the present, randomized, controlled investigation in adults without a clinical diagnosis (n = 59), the specificity of the effects of these two NF protocols on attentional processes and motor system excitability were to be examined, focusing on the underlying neuronal mechanisms. Neurofeedback training consisted of 10 double sessions, and self-regulation skills were analyzed. Pre- and post-training assessments encompassed performance and event-related potential measures during an attention task, and motor system excitability assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Some NF protocol-specific effects have been obtained. However, due to the limited sample size medium effects did not reach the level of significance. Self-regulation abilities during negativity trials of the SCP training were associated with increased contingent negative variation amplitudes, indicating improved resource allocation during cognitive preparation. Theta/beta training was associated with increased response speed and decreased target-P3 amplitudes after successful theta/beta regulation suggested reduced attentional resources necessary for stimulus evaluation. Motor system excitability effects after theta/beta training paralleled the effects of methylphenidate. Overall, our results are limited by the non-sufficiently acquired self-regulation skills, but some specific effects between good and poor learners could be described. Future studies with larger sample sizes and sufficient acquisition of self-regulation skills are needed to further evaluate the protocol-specific effects on

  2. Spontaneous Decoding of the Timing and Content of Human Object Perception from Cortical Surface Recordings Reveals Complementary Information in the Event-Related Potential and Broadband Spectral Change

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kai J.; Schalk, Gerwin; Hermes, Dora; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Rao, Rajesh P. N.

    2016-01-01

    The link between object perception and neural activity in visual cortical areas is a problem of fundamental importance in neuroscience. Here we show that electrical potentials from the ventral temporal cortical surface in humans contain sufficient information for spontaneous and near-instantaneous identification of a subject’s perceptual state. Electrocorticographic (ECoG) arrays were placed on the subtemporal cortical surface of seven epilepsy patients. Grayscale images of faces and houses were displayed rapidly in random sequence. We developed a template projection approach to decode the continuous ECoG data stream spontaneously, predicting the occurrence, timing and type of visual stimulus. In this setting, we evaluated the independent and joint use of two well-studied features of brain signals, broadband changes in the frequency power spectrum of the potential and deflections in the raw potential trace (event-related potential; ERP). Our ability to predict both the timing of stimulus onset and the type of image was best when we used a combination of both the broadband response and ERP, suggesting that they capture different and complementary aspects of the subject’s perceptual state. Specifically, we were able to predict the timing and type of 96% of all stimuli, with less than 5% false positive rate and a ~20ms error in timing. PMID:26820899

  3. Spontaneous Decoding of the Timing and Content of Human Object Perception from Cortical Surface Recordings Reveals Complementary Information in the Event-Related Potential and Broadband Spectral Change.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kai J; Schalk, Gerwin; Hermes, Dora; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Rao, Rajesh P N

    2016-01-01

    The link between object perception and neural activity in visual cortical areas is a problem of fundamental importance in neuroscience. Here we show that electrical potentials from the ventral temporal cortical surface in humans contain sufficient information for spontaneous and near-instantaneous identification of a subject's perceptual state. Electrocorticographic (ECoG) arrays were placed on the subtemporal cortical surface of seven epilepsy patients. Grayscale images of faces and houses were displayed rapidly in random sequence. We developed a template projection approach to decode the continuous ECoG data stream spontaneously, predicting the occurrence, timing and type of visual stimulus. In this setting, we evaluated the independent and joint use of two well-studied features of brain signals, broadband changes in the frequency power spectrum of the potential and deflections in the raw potential trace (event-related potential; ERP). Our ability to predict both the timing of stimulus onset and the type of image was best when we used a combination of both the broadband response and ERP, suggesting that they capture different and complementary aspects of the subject's perceptual state. Specifically, we were able to predict the timing and type of 96% of all stimuli, with less than 5% false positive rate and a ~20ms error in timing. PMID:26820899

  4. Slow cortical potentials and "inner time consciousness" - A neuro-phenomenal hypothesis about the "width of present".

    PubMed

    Northoff, Georg

    2016-05-01

    William James postulated a "stream of consciousness" that presupposes temporal continuity. The neuronal mechanisms underlying the construction of such temporal continuity remain unclear, however, in my contribution, I propose a neuro-phenomenal hypothesis that is based on slow cortical potentials and their extension of the present moment as described in the phenomenal term of "width of present". More specifically, I focus on the way the brain's neural activity needs to be encoded in order to make possible the "stream of consciousness." This leads us again to the low-frequency fluctuations of the brain's neural activity and more specifically to slow cortical potentials (SCPs). Due to their long phase duration as low-frequency fluctuations, SCPs can integrate different stimuli and their associated neural activity from different regions in one converging region. Such integration may be central for consciousness to occur, as it was recently postulated by He and Raichle. They leave open, however, the question of the exact neuronal mechanisms, like the encoding strategy, that make possible the association of the otherwise purely neuronal SCP with consciousness and its phenomenal features. I hypothesize that SCPs allow for linking and connecting different discrete points in physical time by encoding their statistically based temporal differences rather than the single discrete time points by themselves. This presupposes difference-based coding rather than stimulus-based coding. The encoding of such statistically based temporal differences makes it possible to "go beyond" the merely physical features of the stimuli; that is, their single discrete time points and their conduction delays (as related to their neural processing in the brain). This, in turn, makes possible the constitution of "local temporal continuity" of neural activity in one particular region. The concept of "local temporal continuity" signifies the linkage and integration of different discrete time points

  5. Explaining the high voice superiority effect in polyphonic music: evidence from cortical evoked potentials and peripheral auditory models.

    PubMed

    Trainor, Laurel J; Marie, Céline; Bruce, Ian C; Bidelman, Gavin M

    2014-02-01

    Natural auditory environments contain multiple simultaneously-sounding objects and the auditory system must parse the incoming complex sound wave they collectively create into parts that represent each of these individual objects. Music often similarly requires processing of more than one voice or stream at the same time, and behavioral studies demonstrate that human listeners show a systematic perceptual bias in processing the highest voice in multi-voiced music. Here, we review studies utilizing event-related brain potentials (ERPs), which support the notions that (1) separate memory traces are formed for two simultaneous voices (even without conscious awareness) in auditory cortex and (2) adults show more robust encoding (i.e., larger ERP responses) to deviant pitches in the higher than in the lower voice, indicating better encoding of the former. Furthermore, infants also show this high-voice superiority effect, suggesting that the perceptual dominance observed across studies might result from neurophysiological characteristics of the peripheral auditory system. Although musically untrained adults show smaller responses in general than musically trained adults, both groups similarly show a more robust cortical representation of the higher than of the lower voice. Finally, years of experience playing a bass-range instrument reduces but does not reverse the high voice superiority effect, indicating that although it can be modified, it is not highly neuroplastic. Results of new modeling experiments examined the possibility that characteristics of middle-ear filtering and cochlear dynamics (e.g., suppression) reflected in auditory nerve firing patterns might account for the higher-voice superiority effect. Simulations show that both place and temporal AN coding schemes well-predict a high-voice superiority across a wide range of interval spacings and registers. Collectively, we infer an innate, peripheral origin for the higher-voice superiority observed in human

  6. Comparison of the reliability of multifocal visual evoked cortical potentials generated by pattern reversal and pattern pulse stimulation.

    PubMed

    Souza, G S; Schakelford, H B; Moura, A L A; Gomes, B D; Ventura, D F; Fitzgerald, M E C; Silveira, L C L

    2012-10-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of the multifocal visual evoked cortical potentials (mfVEP) elicited by pattern pulse stimulation with that of pattern reversal in producing reliable responses (signal-to-noise ratio >1.359). Participants were 14 healthy subjects. Visual stimulation was obtained using a 60-sector dartboard display consisting of 6 concentric rings presented in either pulse or reversal mode. Each sector, consisting of 16 checks at 99% Michelson contrast and 80 cd/m² mean luminance, was controlled by a binary m-sequence in the time domain. The signal-to-noise ratio was generally larger in the pattern reversal than in the pattern pulse mode. The number of reliable responses was similar in the central sectors for the two stimulation modes. At the periphery, pattern reversal showed a larger number of reliable responses. Pattern pulse stimuli performed similarly to pattern reversal stimuli to generate reliable waveforms in R1 and R2. The advantage of using both protocols to study mfVEP responses is their complementarity: in some patients, reliable waveforms in specific sectors may be obtained with only one of the two methods. The joint analysis of pattern reversal and pattern pulse stimuli increased the rate of reliability for central sectors by 7.14% in R1, 5.35% in R2, 4.76% in R3, 3.57% in R4, 2.97% in R5, and 1.78% in R6. From R1 to R4 the reliability to generate mfVEPs was above 70% when using both protocols. Thus, for a very high reliability and thorough examination of visual performance, it is recommended to use both stimulation protocols. PMID:22782556

  7. Movement-Related Cortical Potential Amplitude Reduction after Cycling Exercise Relates to the Extent of Neuromuscular Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Spring, Jérôme Nicolas; Place, Nicolas; Borrani, Fabio; Kayser, Bengt; Barral, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-induced fatigue affects the motor control and the ability to generate a given force or power. Surface electroencephalography allows researchers to investigate movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP), which reflect preparatory brain activity 1.5 s before movement onset. Although the MRCP amplitude appears to increase after repetitive single-joint contractions, the effects of large-muscle group dynamic exercise on such pre-motor potential remain to be described. Sixteen volunteers exercised 30 min at 60% of the maximal aerobic power on a cycle ergometer, followed by a 10-km all-out time trial. Before and after each of these tasks, knee extensor neuromuscular function was investigated using maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) combined with electrical stimulations of the femoral nerve. MRCP was recorded during 60 knee extensions after each neuromuscular sequence. The exercise resulted in a significant decrease in the knee extensor MVC force after the 30-min exercise (-10 ± 8%) and the time trial (-21 ± 9%). The voluntary activation level (VAL; -6 ± 8 and -12 ± 10%), peak twitch (Pt; -21 ± 16 and -32 ± 17%), and paired stimuli (P100 Hz; -7 ± 11 and -12 ± 13%) were also significantly reduced after the 30-min exercise and the time trial. The first exercise was followed by a decrease in the MRCP, mainly above the mean activity measured at electrodes FC1-FC2, whereas the reduction observed after the time trial was related to the FC1-FC2 and C2 electrodes. After both exercises, the reduction in the late MRCP component above FC1-FC2 was significantly correlated with the reduction in P100 Hz (r = 0.61), and the reduction in the same component above C2 was significantly correlated with the reduction in VAL (r = 0.64). In conclusion, large-muscle group exercise induced a reduction in pre-motor potential, which was related to muscle alterations and resulted in the inability to produce a maximal voluntary contraction. PMID:27313522

  8. Movement-Related Cortical Potential Amplitude Reduction after Cycling Exercise Relates to the Extent of Neuromuscular Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Jérôme Nicolas; Place, Nicolas; Borrani, Fabio; Kayser, Bengt; Barral, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-induced fatigue affects the motor control and the ability to generate a given force or power. Surface electroencephalography allows researchers to investigate movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP), which reflect preparatory brain activity 1.5 s before movement onset. Although the MRCP amplitude appears to increase after repetitive single-joint contractions, the effects of large-muscle group dynamic exercise on such pre-motor potential remain to be described. Sixteen volunteers exercised 30 min at 60% of the maximal aerobic power on a cycle ergometer, followed by a 10-km all-out time trial. Before and after each of these tasks, knee extensor neuromuscular function was investigated using maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) combined with electrical stimulations of the femoral nerve. MRCP was recorded during 60 knee extensions after each neuromuscular sequence. The exercise resulted in a significant decrease in the knee extensor MVC force after the 30-min exercise (−10 ± 8%) and the time trial (−21 ± 9%). The voluntary activation level (VAL; −6 ± 8 and −12 ± 10%), peak twitch (Pt; −21 ± 16 and −32 ± 17%), and paired stimuli (P100 Hz; −7 ± 11 and −12 ± 13%) were also significantly reduced after the 30-min exercise and the time trial. The first exercise was followed by a decrease in the MRCP, mainly above the mean activity measured at electrodes FC1-FC2, whereas the reduction observed after the time trial was related to the FC1-FC2 and C2 electrodes. After both exercises, the reduction in the late MRCP component above FC1-FC2 was significantly correlated with the reduction in P100 Hz (r = 0.61), and the reduction in the same component above C2 was significantly correlated with the reduction in VAL (r = 0.64). In conclusion, large-muscle group exercise induced a reduction in pre-motor potential, which was related to muscle alterations and resulted in the inability to produce a maximal voluntary contraction. PMID:27313522

  9. Stop-event-related potentials from intracranial electrodes reveal a key role of premotor and motor cortices in stopping ongoing movements

    PubMed Central

    Mattia, M.; Spadacenta, S.; Pavone, L.; Quarato, P.; Esposito, V.; Sparano, A.; Sebastiano, F.; Di Gennaro, G.; Morace, R.; Cantore, G.; Mirabella, G.

    2012-01-01

    In humans, the ability to withhold manual motor responses seems to rely on a right-lateralized frontal–basal ganglia–thalamic network, including the pre-supplementary motor area and the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). These areas should drive subthalamic nuclei to implement movement inhibition via the hyperdirect pathway. The output of this network is expected to influence those cortical areas underlying limb movement preparation and initiation, i.e., premotor (PMA) and primary motor (M1) cortices. Electroencephalographic (EEG) studies have shown an enhancement of the N200/P300 complex in the event-related potentials (ERPs) when a planned reaching movement is successfully stopped after the presentation of an infrequent stop-signal. PMA and M1 have been suggested as possible neural sources of this ERP complex but, due to the limited spatial resolution of scalp EEG, it is not yet clear which cortical areas contribute to its generation. To elucidate the role of motor cortices, we recorded epicortical ERPs from the lateral surface of the fronto-temporal lobes of five pharmacoresistant epileptic patients performing a reaching version of the countermanding task while undergoing presurgical monitoring. We consistently found a stereotyped ERP complex on a single-trial level when a movement was successfully cancelled. These ERPs were selectively expressed in M1, PMA, and Brodmann's area (BA) 9 and their onsets preceded the end of the stop process, suggesting a causal involvement in this executive function. Such ERPs also occurred in unsuccessful-stop (US) trials, that is, when subjects moved despite the occurrence of a stop-signal, mostly when they had long reaction times (RTs). These findings support the hypothesis that motor cortices are the final target of the inhibitory command elaborated by the frontal–basal ganglia–thalamic network. PMID:22754525

  10. Pain modulation in waking and hypnosis in women: event-related potentials and sources of cortical activity.

    PubMed

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Varriale, Vincenzo; Cacace, Immacolata

    2015-01-01

    Using a strict subject selection procedure, we tested in High and Low Hypnotizable subjects (HHs and LHs) whether treatments of hypoalgesia and hyperalgesia, as compared to a relaxation-control, differentially affected subjective pain ratings and somatosensory event-related potentials (SERPs) during painful electric stimulation. Treatments were administered in waking and hypnosis conditions. LHs showed little differentiation in pain and distress ratings between hypoalgesia and hyperalgesia treatments, whereas HHs showed a greater spread in the instructed direction. HHs had larger prefrontal N140 and P200 waves of the SERPs during hypnotic hyperalgesia as compared to relaxation-control treatment. Importantly, HHs showed significant smaller frontocentral N140 and frontotemporal P200 waves during hypnotic hypoalgesia. LHs did not show significant differences for these SERP waves among treatments in both waking and hypnosis conditions. Source localization (sLORETA) method revealed significant activations of the bilateral primary somatosensory (BA3), middle frontal gyrus (BA6) and anterior cingulate cortices (BA24). Activity of these contralateral regions significantly correlated with subjective numerical pain scores for control treatment in waking condition. Moreover, multivariate regression analyses distinguished the contralateral BA3 as the only region reflecting a stable pattern of pain coding changes across all treatments in waking and hypnosis conditions. More direct testing showed that hypnosis reduced the strength of the association of pain modulation and brain activity changes at BA3. sLORETA in HHs revealed, for the N140 wave, that during hypnotic hyperalgesia, there was an increased activity within medial, supramarginal and superior frontal gyri, and cingulated gyrus (BA32), while for the P200 wave, activity was increased in the superior (BA22), middle (BA37), inferior temporal (BA19) gyri and superior parietal lobule (BA7). Hypnotic hypoalgesia in HHs, for N

  11. Pain Modulation in Waking and Hypnosis in Women: Event-Related Potentials and Sources of Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Varriale, Vincenzo; Cacace, Immacolata

    2015-01-01

    Using a strict subject selection procedure, we tested in High and Low Hypnotizable subjects (HHs and LHs) whether treatments of hypoalgesia and hyperalgesia, as compared to a relaxation-control, differentially affected subjective pain ratings and somatosensory event-related potentials (SERPs) during painful electric stimulation. Treatments were administered in waking and hypnosis conditions. LHs showed little differentiation in pain and distress ratings between hypoalgesia and hyperalgesia treatments, whereas HHs showed a greater spread in the instructed direction. HHs had larger prefrontal N140 and P200 waves of the SERPs during hypnotic hyperalgesia as compared to relaxation-control treatment. Importantly, HHs showed significant smaller frontocentral N140 and frontotemporal P200 waves during hypnotic hypoalgesia. LHs did not show significant differences for these SERP waves among treatments in both waking and hypnosis conditions. Source localization (sLORETA) method revealed significant activations of the bilateral primary somatosensory (BA3), middle frontal gyrus (BA6) and anterior cingulate cortices (BA24). Activity of these contralateral regions significantly correlated with subjective numerical pain scores for control treatment in waking condition. Moreover, multivariate regression analyses distinguished the contralateral BA3 as the only region reflecting a stable pattern of pain coding changes across all treatments in waking and hypnosis conditions. More direct testing showed that hypnosis reduced the strength of the association of pain modulation and brain activity changes at BA3. sLORETA in HHs revealed, for the N140 wave, that during hypnotic hyperalgesia, there was an increased activity within medial, supramarginal and superior frontal gyri, and cingulated gyrus (BA32), while for the P200 wave, activity was increased in the superior (BA22), middle (BA37), inferior temporal (BA19) gyri and superior parietal lobule (BA7). Hypnotic hypoalgesia in HHs, for N

  12. Neurofeedback of slow cortical potentials: neural mechanisms and feasibility of a placebo-controlled design in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Gevensleben, Holger; Albrecht, Björn; Lütcke, Henry; Auer, Tibor; Dewiputri, Wan Ilma; Schweizer, Renate; Moll, Gunther; Heinrich, Hartmut; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate basic mechanisms underlying neurofeedback we investigated neural mechanisms of training of slow cortical potentials (SCPs) by considering EEG- and fMRI. Additionally, we analyzed the feasibility of a double-blind, placebo-controlled design in NF research based on regulation performance during treatment sessions and self-assessment of the participants. Twenty healthy adults participated in 16 sessions of SCPs training: 9 participants received regular SCP training, 11 participants received sham feedback. At three time points (pre, intermediate, post) fMRI and EEG/ERP-measurements were conducted during a continuous performance test (CPT). Performance-data during the sessions (regulation performance) in the treatment group and the placebo group were analyzed. Analysis of EEG-activity revealed in the SCP group a strong enhancement of the CNV (electrode Cz) at the intermediate assessment, followed by a decrease back to baseline at the post-treatment assessment. In contrast, in the placebo group a continuous but smaller increase of the CNV could be obtained from pre to post assessment. The increase of the CNV in the SCP group at intermediate testing was superior to the enhancement in the placebo group. The changes of the CNV were accompanied by a continuous improvement in the test performance of the CPT from pre to intermediate to post assessment comparable in both groups. The change of the CNV in the SCP group is interpreted as an indicator of neural plasticity and efficiency while an increase of the CNV in the placebo group might reflect learning and improved timing due to the frequent task repetition. In the fMRI analysis evidence was obtained for neuronal plasticity. After regular SCP neurofeedback activation in the posterior parietal cortex decreased from the pre- to the intermediate measurement and increased again in the post measurement, inversely following the U-shaped increase and decrease of the tCNV EEG amplitude in the SCP-trained group

  13. From evoked potentials to cortical currents: Resolving V1 and V2 components using retinotopy constrained source estimation without fMRI.

    PubMed

    Inverso, Samuel A; Goh, Xin-Lin; Henriksson, Linda; Vanni, Simo; James, Andrew C

    2016-05-01

    Despite evoked potentials' (EP) ubiquity in research and clinical medicine, insights are limited to gross brain dynamics as it remains challenging to map surface potentials to their sources in specific cortical regions. Multiple sources cancellation due to cortical folding and cross-talk obscures close sources, e.g. between visual areas V1 and V2. Recently retinotopic functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses were used to constrain source locations to assist separating close sources and to determine cortical current generators. However, an fMRI is largely infeasible for routine EP investigation. We developed a novel method that replaces the fMRI derived retinotopic layout (RL) by an approach where the retinotopy and current estimates are generated from EEG or MEG signals and a standard clinical T1-weighted anatomical MRI. Using the EEG-RL, sources were localized to within 2 mm of the fMRI-RL constrained localized sources. The EEG-RL also produced V1 and V2 current waveforms that closely matched the fMRI-RL's (n = 2) r(1,198)  = 0.99, P < 0.0001. Applying the method to subjects without fMRI (n = 4) demonstrates it generates waveforms that agree closely with the literature. Our advance allows investigators with their current EEG or MEG systems to create a library of brain models tuned to individual subjects' cortical folding in retinotopic maps, and should be applicable to auditory and somatosensory maps. The novel method developed expands EP's ability to study specific brain areas, revitalizing this well-worn technique. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1696-1709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26870938

  14. Dendrimer-mediated siRNA delivery knocks down Beclin 1 and potentiates NMDA-mediated toxicity in rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Carrión, María D; Pérez-Martínez, Francisco C; Merino, Sonia; Sánchez-Verdú, Prado; Martínez-Hernández, José; Luján, Rafael; Ceña, Valentín

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is an important process which plays a key role in cellular homeostasis by degrading cytoplasmic components in the lysosomes, which facilitates recycling. Alterations to normal autophagy have been linked to excitotoxicity, but the mechanisms governing its signal transduction remain unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the role of autophagy in neuronal excitotoxic death by delivering small interfering RNA (siRNA) to rat cortical neurons, using a dendrimer to silence the autophagy-related gene 6 (beclin 1) and to determine the role of autophagy in excitotoxicity. We have found that the dendrimer is very efficient to deliver siRNA to rat cortical neurons, leading to almost complete removal of the target protein Beclin 1. In addition, NMDA increases autophagy markers, such as the protein levels of Beclin 1, the microtubule-associated light chain 3 (LC3) B-II/LC3B-I ratio, and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) labeling in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NMDA also increases the formation of autophagosomes observed under a transmission electron microscope. Silencing beclin 1 expression blocked NMDA-induced autophagy. Moreover, Beclin 1 removal potentiated NMDA-induced neuronal death indicating that autophagy plays a protective role during excitotoxicity and suggesting that targeting autophagy might be a helpful therapeutic strategy in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22035151

  15. Dopaminergic neurotransmission dysfunction induced by amyloid-β transforms cortical long-term potentiation into long-term depression and produces memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Castilla, Perla; Rodriguez-Duran, Luis F; Guzman-Ramos, Kioko; Barcenas-Femat, Alejandro; Escobar, Martha L; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition manifested by synaptic dysfunction and memory loss, but the mechanisms underlying synaptic failure are not entirely understood. Although dopamine is a key modulator of synaptic plasticity, dopaminergic neurotransmission dysfunction in AD has mostly been associated to noncognitive symptoms. Thus, we aimed to study the relationship between dopaminergic neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity in AD models. We used a transgenic model of AD (triple-transgenic mouse model of AD) and the administration of exogenous amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers into wild type mice. We found that Aβ decreased cortical dopamine levels and converted in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP) into long-term depression (LTD) after high-frequency stimulation delivered at basolateral amygdaloid nucleus-insular cortex projection, which led to impaired recognition memory. Remarkably, increasing cortical dopamine and norepinephrine levels rescued both high-frequency stimulation -induced LTP and memory, whereas depletion of catecholaminergic levels mimicked the Aβ-induced shift from LTP to LTD. Our results suggest that Aβ-induced dopamine depletion is a core mechanism underlying the early synaptopathy and memory alterations observed in AD models and acts by modifying the threshold for the induction of cortical LTP and/or LTD. PMID:27103531

  16. Pharmacology of cortical inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Krnjević, K.; Randić, Mirjana; Straughan, D. W.

    1966-01-01

    1. We have studied the effects of various pharmacological agents on the cortical inhibitory process described in the previous two papers (Krnjević, Randić & Straughan, 1966a, b); the drugs were mostly administered directly by iontophoresis from micropipettes and by systemic injection (I.V.). 2. Strychnine given by iontophoresis or by the application of a strong solution to the cortical surface potentiated excitatory effects, but very large iontophoretic doses also depressed neuronal firing. Subconvulsive and even convulsive systemic doses had little or no effect at the cortical level. There was no evidence, with any method of application, that strychnine directly interferes with the inhibitory process. 3. Tetanus toxin, obtained from two different sources and injected into the cortex 12-48 hr previously, also failed to block cortical inhibition selectively. As with strychnine, there was some evidence of increased responses to excitatory inputs. 4. Other convulsant drugs which failed to block cortical inhibition included picrotoxin, pentamethylene tetrazole, thiosemicarbazide, longchain ω-amino acids and morphine. 5. The inhibition was not obviously affected by cholinomimetic agents or by antagonists of ACh. 6. α- and β-antagonists of adrenergic transmission were also ineffective. 7. Cortical inhibition was fully developed in the presence of several general anaesthetics, including ether, Dial, pentobarbitone, Mg and chloralose. A temporary reduction in inhibition which is sometimes observed after systemic doses of pentobarbitone, is probably secondary to a fall in blood pressure. 8. Several central excitants such as amphetamine, caffeine and lobeline also failed to show any specific antagonistic action on cortical inhibition. 9. In view of the possibility that GABA is the chemical agent mediating cortical inhibition, an attempt was made to find a selective antagonist of its depressant action on cortical neurones. None of the agents listed above, nor any other

  17. Cortical Responsiveness to Nociceptive Stimuli in Patients with Chronic Disorders of Consciousness: Do C-Fiber Laser Evoked Potentials Have a Role?

    PubMed Central

    Naro, Antonino; Russo, Margherita; Leo, Antonino; Rifici, Carmela; Pollicino, Patrizia; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that the presence of Aδ-fiber laser evoked potentials (Aδ-LEP) in patients suffering from chronic disorders of consciousness (DOC), such as vegetative state (VS) and minimally conscious state (MCS), may be the expression of a residual cortical pain arousal. Interestingly, the study of C-fiber LEP (C-LEP) could be useful in the assessment of cortical pain arousal in the DOC individuals who lack of Aδ-LEP. To this end, we enrolled 38 DOC patients following post-anoxic or post-traumatic brain injury, who met the international criteria for VS and MCS diagnosis. Each subject was clinically evaluated, through the coma recovery scale-revised (CRS-R) and the nociceptive coma scale-revised (NCS-R), and electrophysiologically tested by means of a solid-state laser for Aδ-LEP and C-LEP. VS individuals showed increased latencies and reduced amplitudes of both the Aδ-LEP and C-LEP components in comparison to MCS patients. Although nearly all of the patients had both the LEP components, some VS individuals showed only the C-LEP ones. Notably, such patients had a similar NCS-R score to those having both the LEP components. Hence, we could hypothesize that C-LEP generators may be rearranged or partially spared in order to still guarantee cortical pain arousal when Aδ-LEP generators are damaged. Therefore, the residual presence of C-LEP should be assessed when Aδ-LEP are missing, since a potential pain experience should be still present in some patients, so to properly initiate, or adapt, the most appropriate pain treatment. PMID:26674634

  18. Cortico-cortical communication dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Per E.; Hilgetag, Claus C.; Deco, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    In principle, cortico-cortical communication dynamics is simple: neurons in one cortical area communicate by sending action potentials that release glutamate and excite their target neurons in other cortical areas. In practice, knowledge about cortico-cortical communication dynamics is minute. One reason is that no current technique can capture the fast spatio-temporal cortico-cortical evolution of action potential transmission and membrane conductances with sufficient spatial resolution. A combination of optogenetics and monosynaptic tracing with virus can reveal the spatio-temporal cortico-cortical dynamics of specific neurons and their targets, but does not reveal how the dynamics evolves under natural conditions. Spontaneous ongoing action potentials also spread across cortical areas and are difficult to separate from structured evoked and intrinsic brain activity such as thinking. At a certain state of evolution, the dynamics may engage larger populations of neurons to drive the brain to decisions, percepts and behaviors. For example, successfully evolving dynamics to sensory transients can appear at the mesoscopic scale revealing how the transient is perceived. As a consequence of these methodological and conceptual difficulties, studies in this field comprise a wide range of computational models, large-scale measurements (e.g., by MEG, EEG), and a combination of invasive measurements in animal experiments. Further obstacles and challenges of studying cortico-cortical communication dynamics are outlined in this critical review. PMID:24847217

  19. Direct Exploration of the Role of the Ventral Anterior Temporal Lobe in Semantic Memory: Cortical Stimulation and Local Field Potential Evidence From Subdural Grid Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Shimotake, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Riki; Ueno, Taiji; Kunieda, Takeharu; Saito, Satoru; Hoffman, Paul; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2015-10-01

    Semantic memory is a crucial higher cortical function that codes the meaning of objects and words, and when impaired after neurological damage, patients are left with significant disability. Investigations of semantic dementia have implicated the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) region, in general, as crucial for multimodal semantic memory. The potentially crucial role of the ventral ATL subregion has been emphasized by recent functional neuroimaging studies, but the necessity of this precise area has not been selectively tested. The implantation of subdural electrode grids over this subregion, for the presurgical assessment of patients with partial epilepsy or brain tumor, offers the dual yet rare opportunities to record cortical local field potentials while participants complete semantic tasks and to stimulate the functionally identified regions in the same participants to evaluate the necessity of these areas in semantic processing. Across 6 patients, and utilizing a variety of semantic assessments, we evaluated and confirmed that the anterior fusiform/inferior temporal gyrus is crucial in multimodal, receptive, and expressive, semantic processing. PMID:25491206

  20. Direct Exploration of the Role of the Ventral Anterior Temporal Lobe in Semantic Memory: Cortical Stimulation and Local Field Potential Evidence From Subdural Grid Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Shimotake, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Riki; Ueno, Taiji; Kunieda, Takeharu; Saito, Satoru; Hoffman, Paul; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Semantic memory is a crucial higher cortical function that codes the meaning of objects and words, and when impaired after neurological damage, patients are left with significant disability. Investigations of semantic dementia have implicated the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) region, in general, as crucial for multimodal semantic memory. The potentially crucial role of the ventral ATL subregion has been emphasized by recent functional neuroimaging studies, but the necessity of this precise area has not been selectively tested. The implantation of subdural electrode grids over this subregion, for the presurgical assessment of patients with partial epilepsy or brain tumor, offers the dual yet rare opportunities to record cortical local field potentials while participants complete semantic tasks and to stimulate the functionally identified regions in the same participants to evaluate the necessity of these areas in semantic processing. Across 6 patients, and utilizing a variety of semantic assessments, we evaluated and confirmed that the anterior fusiform/inferior temporal gyrus is crucial in multimodal, receptive, and expressive, semantic processing. PMID:25491206

  1. Acute exposure to ethanol potentiates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat-induced Ca(2+) overload and neuronal death in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Brailoiu, Eugen; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Mameli, Giuseppe; Dolei, Antonina; Sawaya, Bassel E; Dun, Nae J

    2006-02-01

    A significant number of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients are alcoholics. Either alcohol or HIV alone induces morphological and functional damage to the nervous system. HIV-1 Tat is a potent transcriptional activator of the viral promoter, with the ability to modulate a number of cellular regulatory circuits including apoptosis and to cause neuronal injury. To further evaluate the involvement of alcohol in neuronal injury, the authors examined the effect of ethanol on Tat-induced calcium responses in rat cerebral cortical neurons, using microfluorimetric calcium determination. HIV Tat protein (10 or 500 nM) elicited two types of calcium responses in cortical neurons: a fast-onset, short-lasting response and a slow-onset, sustained response. The responses were concentration-dependent and diminished in calcium-free saline. A short exposure to ethanol (50 mM) potentiated both types of calcium response, which was markedly decreased when the cells were pretreated with BAPTA-AM (20 microM). In addition, an increase in the neurotoxic effect of Tat, which was assessed by trypan blue exclusion assay, was observed. The result led the authors to conclude that alcohol exposure significantly potentiates Tat-induced calcium overload and neuronal death. PMID:16595370

  2. Cortical motion deafness.

    PubMed

    Ducommun, Christine Y; Michel, Christoph M; Clarke, Stephanie; Adriani, Michela; Seeck, Margitta; Landis, Theodor; Blanke, Olaf

    2004-09-16

    The extent to which the auditory system, like the visual system, processes spatial stimulus characteristics such as location and motion in separate specialized neuronal modules or in one homogeneously distributed network is unresolved. Here we present a patient with a selective deficit for the perception and discrimination of auditory motion following resection of the right anterior temporal lobe and the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG). Analysis of stimulus identity and location within the auditory scene remained intact. In addition, intracranial auditory evoked potentials, recorded preoperatively, revealed motion-specific responses selectively over the resected right posterior STG, and electrical cortical stimulation of this region was experienced by the patient as incoming moving sounds. Collectively, these data present a patient with cortical motion deafness, providing evidence that cortical processing of auditory motion is performed in a specialized module within the posterior STG. PMID:15363389

  3. Modulation of high- and low-frequency components of the cortical local field potential via nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in anesthetized mice

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Release of acetylcholine (ACh) in neocortex is important for learning, memory and attention tasks. The primary source of ACh in neocortex is axons ascending from the basal forebrain. Release of ACh from these axons evokes changes in the cortical local field potential (LFP), including a decline in low-frequency spectral power that is often referred to as desynchronization of the LFP and is thought to result from the activation of muscarinic ACh receptors. Using channelrhodopsin-2, we selectively stimulated the axons of only cholinergic basal forebrain neurons in primary somatosensory cortex of the urethane-anesthetized mouse while monitoring the LFP. Cholinergic stimulation caused desynchronization and two brief increases in higher-frequency power at stimulus onset and offset. Desynchronization (1–6 Hz) was localized, extending ≤ 1 mm from the edge of stimulation, and consisted of both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor-mediated components that were inhibited by mecamylamine and atropine, respectively. Hence we have identified a nicotinic receptor-mediated component to desynchronization. The increase in higher-frequency power (>10 Hz) at stimulus onset was also mediated by activation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. However, the increase in higher-frequency power (10–20 Hz) at stimulus offset was evoked by activation of muscarinic receptors and inhibited by activation of nicotinic receptors. We conclude that the activation of nicotinic and muscarinic ACh receptors in neocortex exerts several effects that are reflected in distinct frequency bands of the cortical LFP in urethane-anesthetized mice. PMID:24155009

  4. Decoding stimulus identity from multi-unit activity and local field potentials along the ventral auditory stream in the awake primate: implications for cortical neural prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elliot; Kellis, Spencer; House, Paul; Greger, Bradley

    2013-02-01

    Objective. Hierarchical processing of auditory sensory information is believed to occur in two streams: a ventral stream responsible for stimulus identity and a dorsal stream responsible for processing spatial elements of a stimulus. The objective of the current study is to examine neural coding in this processing stream in the context of understanding the possibility for an auditory cortical neural prosthesis. Approach. We examined the selectivity for species-specific primate vocalizations in the ventral auditory processing stream by applying a statistical classifier to neural data recorded from microelectrode arrays. Multi-unit activity (MUA) and local field potential (LFP) data recorded simultaneously from primary auditory complex (AI) and rostral parabelt (PBr) were decoded on a trial-by-trial basis. Main results. While decode performance in AI was well above chance, mean performance in PBr did not deviate >15% from chance level. Mean performance levels were similar for MUA and LFP decodes. Increasing the spectral and temporal resolution improved decode performance; while inter-electrode spacing could be as large as 1.14 mm without degrading decode performance. Significance. These results serve as preliminary guidance for a human auditory cortical neural prosthesis; instructing interface implementation, microstimulation patterns and anatomical placement.

  5. Feasibility of event-related potential methodology to evaluate changes in cortical processing after rehabilitation in children with cerebral palsy: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Maitre, Nathalie L.; Henderson, Gena; Gogliotti, Shirley; Pearson, Jennifer; Simmons, Ashley; Wang, Lu; Slaughter, James C.; Key, Alexandra P.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using event-related potentials (ERPs) to measure changes in cortical processing following an established rehabilitative intervention (constraint-induced movement therapy, CIMT) for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Sixteen participants with a diagnosis of hemiparetic CP, with a median age of 6 years, were assessed pre and immediately post CIMT and at 6-month follow-up, using a picture–word match/mismatch discrimination task and standard neurobehavioral measures. Intervention effects were evident in improved performance on behavioral tests of sensory and motor function and the increased mean ERP amplitude of the N400 match/mismatch response on the side ipsilateral to the lesion. These effects were maintained 6 months after the intervention. No such changes were observed on the side contralateral to the lesion. This research suggests that ERPs can measure rehabilitation-induced changes in neural function in children with CP. PMID:24953907

  6. Least-squares (LS) deconvolution of a series of overlapping cortical auditory evoked potentials: a simulation and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardy, Fabrice; Van Dun, Bram; Dillon, Harvey; Cowan, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Objective. To evaluate the viability of disentangling a series of overlapping ‘cortical auditory evoked potentials’ (CAEPs) elicited by different stimuli using least-squares (LS) deconvolution, and to assess the adaptation of CAEPs for different stimulus onset-asynchronies (SOAs). Approach. Optimal aperiodic stimulus sequences were designed by controlling the condition number of matrices associated with the LS deconvolution technique. First, theoretical considerations of LS deconvolution were assessed in simulations in which multiple artificial overlapping responses were recovered. Second, biological CAEPs were recorded in response to continuously repeated stimulus trains containing six different tone-bursts with frequencies 8, 4, 2, 1, 0.5, 0.25 kHz separated by SOAs jittered around 150 (120-185), 250 (220-285) and 650 (620-685) ms. The control condition had a fixed SOA of 1175 ms. In a second condition, using the same SOAs, trains of six stimuli were separated by a silence gap of 1600 ms. Twenty-four adults with normal hearing (<20 dB HL) were assessed. Main results. Results showed disentangling of a series of overlapping responses using LS deconvolution on simulated waveforms as well as on real EEG data. The use of rapid presentation and LS deconvolution did not however, allow the recovered CAEPs to have a higher signal-to-noise ratio than for slowly presented stimuli. The LS deconvolution technique enables the analysis of a series of overlapping responses in EEG. Significance. LS deconvolution is a useful technique for the study of adaptation mechanisms of CAEPs for closely spaced stimuli whose characteristics change from stimulus to stimulus. High-rate presentation is necessary to develop an understanding of how the auditory system encodes natural speech or other intrinsically high-rate stimuli.

  7. Single-sweep spectral analysis of contact heat evoked potentials: a novel approach to identify altered cortical processing after morphine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Tine M; Graversen, Carina; Frøkjær, Jens B; Olesen, Anne E; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2015-01-01

    Aims The cortical response to nociceptive thermal stimuli recorded as contact heat evoked potentials (CHEPs) may be altered by morphine. However, previous studies have averaged CHEPs over multiple stimuli, which are confounded by jitter between sweeps. Thus, the aim was to assess single-sweep characteristics to identify alterations induced by morphine. Methods In a crossover study 15 single-sweep CHEPs were analyzed from 62 electroencephalography electrodes in 26 healthy volunteers before and after administration of morphine or placebo. Each sweep was decomposed by a continuous wavelet transform to obtain normalized spectral indices in the delta (0.5–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha (8–12 Hz), beta (12–32 Hz) and gamma (32–80 Hz) bands. The average distribution over all sweeps and channels was calculated for the four recordings for each volunteer, and the two recordings before treatments were assessed for reproducibility. Baseline corrected spectral indices after morphine and placebo treatments were compared to identify alterations induced by morphine. Results Reproducibility between baseline CHEPs was demonstrated. As compared with placebo, morphine decreased the spectral indices in the delta and theta bands by 13% (P = 0.04) and 9% (P = 0.007), while the beta and gamma bands were increased by 10% (P = 0.006) and 24% (P = 0.04). Conclusion The decreases in the delta and theta band are suggested to represent a decrease in the pain specific morphology of the CHEPs, which indicates a diminished pain response after morphine administration. Hence, assessment of spectral indices in single-sweep CHEPs can be used to study cortical mechanisms induced by morphine treatment. PMID:25556985

  8. Memory performance and area-specific self-regulation of slow cortical potentials: dual-task interference.

    PubMed

    Lutzenberger, W; Roberts, L E; Birbaumer, N

    1993-11-01

    We examined the effect of area-specific feedback for slow potentials on sensorimotor and memory performance under single and dual-task conditions. Subjects observed a memory set for 400 ms and then determined 5 s later whether a target letter had been contained in the original presentation (Sternberg task). After one session of Sternberg-only training, feedback training was added for production of negative and positive slow potentials area-specifically at Fz, Cz or Pz during the 5-s interval separating the memory set and target probes. Addition of the feedback task resulted in an increase in Sternberg response latency and errors which was followed by gradual recovery over five dual-task sessions (recovery not complete for the error measure). Subjects successfully regulated their slow potentials, but only in an area-nonspecific fashion, even though area-specific control was observed in an earlier study under a feedback-only condition. Sternberg performance did not depend on whether slow potential negativity or positivity was produced. These findings indicate that competition between tasks was a more important determinant of performance than was modulation of dendritic polarization by feedback-induced slow potentials. PMID:8119840

  9. Virtual Electrode Recording Tool for EXtracellular potentials (VERTEX): comparing multi-electrode recordings from simulated and biological mammalian cortical tissue.

    PubMed

    Tomsett, Richard J; Ainsworth, Matt; Thiele, Alexander; Sanayei, Mehdi; Chen, Xing; Gieselmann, Marc A; Whittington, Miles A; Cunningham, Mark O; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-07-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) sampled with extracellular electrodes are frequently used as a measure of population neuronal activity. However, relating such measurements to underlying neuronal behaviour and connectivity is non-trivial. To help study this link, we developed the Virtual Electrode Recording Tool for EXtracellular potentials (VERTEX). We first identified a reduced neuron model that retained the spatial and frequency filtering characteristics of extracellular potentials from neocortical neurons. We then developed VERTEX as an easy-to-use Matlab tool for simulating LFPs from large populations (>100,000 neurons). A VERTEX-based simulation successfully reproduced features of the LFPs from an in vitro multi-electrode array recording of macaque neocortical tissue. Our model, with virtual electrodes placed anywhere in 3D, allows direct comparisons with the in vitro recording setup. We envisage that VERTEX will stimulate experimentalists, clinicians, and computational neuroscientists to use models to understand the mechanisms underlying measured brain dynamics in health and disease. PMID:24863422

  10. Infant Attention and Visual Preferences: Converging Evidence from Behavior, Event-Related Potentials, and Cortical Source Localization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Greg D.; Courage, Mary L.; Richards, John E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we had 3 major goals. The 1st goal was to establish a link between behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures of infant attention and recognition memory. To assess the distribution of infant visual preferences throughout ERP testing, we designed a new experimental procedure that embeds a behavioral measure (paired…

  11. Auditory cortical and hippocampal local-field potentials to frequency deviant tones in urethane-anesthetized rats: An unexpected role of the sound frequencies themselves.

    PubMed

    Ruusuvirta, Timo; Lipponen, Arto; Pellinen, Eeva-Kaarina; Penttonen, Markku; Astikainen, Piia

    2015-06-01

    The human brain can automatically detect auditory changes, as indexed by the mismatch negativity of event-related potentials. The mechanisms that underlie this response are poorly understood. We recorded primary auditory cortical and hippocampal (dentate gyrus, CA1) local-field potentials to serial tones in urethane-anesthetized rats. In an oddball condition, a rare (deviant) tone (p=0.11) randomly replaced a repeated (standard) tone. The deviant tone was either lower (2200, 2700, 3200, 3700Hz) or higher (4300, 4800, 5300, 5800Hz) in frequency than the standard tone (4000Hz). In an equiprobability control condition, all nine tones were presented at random (p=0.11). Differential responses to deviant tones relative to the standard tone were found in the auditory cortex and the dentate gyrus but not in CA1. Only in the dentate gyrus, the responses were found to be standard- (i.e., oddball condition-) specific. In the auditory cortex, the sound frequencies themselves sufficed to explain their generation. These findings tentatively suggest dissociation among non-contextual afferent, contextual afferent and auditory change detection processes. Most importantly, they remind us about the importance of strict control of physical sound features in mismatch negativity studies in animals. PMID:25911953

  12. Hypergravity within a critical period impacts on the maturation of somatosensory cortical maps and their potential for use-dependent plasticity in the adult.

    PubMed

    Zennou-Azogui, Yoh'i; Catz, Nicolas; Xerri, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We investigated experience-dependent plasticity of somatosensory maps in rat S1 cortex during early development. We analyzed both short- and long-term effects of exposure to 2G hypergravity (HG) during the first 3 postnatal weeks on forepaw representations. We also examined the potential of adult somatosensory maps for experience-dependent plasticity after early HG rearing. At postnatal day 22, HG was found to induce an enlargement of cortical zones driven by nail displacements and a contraction of skin sectors of the forepaw map. In these remaining zones serving the skin, neurons displayed expanded glabrous skin receptive fields (RFs). HG also induced a bias in the directional sensitivity of neuronal responses to nail displacement. HG-induced map changes were still found after 16 wk of housing in normogravity (NG). However, the glabrous skin RFs recorded in HG rats decreased to values similar to that of NG rats, as early as the end of the first week of housing in NG. Moreover, the expansion of the glabrous skin area and decrease in RF size normally induced in adults by an enriched environment (EE) did not occur in the HG rats, even after 16 wk of EE housing in NG. Our findings reveal that early postnatal experience critically and durably shapes S1 forepaw maps and limits their potential to be modified by novel experience in adulthood. PMID:26888103

  13. Relationships among low-frequency local field potentials, spiking activity, and three-dimensional reach and grasp kinematics in primary motor and ventral premotor cortices

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Irwin, Carlos E.; Truccolo, Wilson; Donoghue, John P.

    2011-01-01

    A prominent feature of motor cortex field potentials during movement is a distinctive low-frequency local field potential (lf-LFP) (<4 Hz), referred to as the movement event-related potential (mEP). The lf-LFP appears to be a global signal related to regional synaptic input, but its relationship to nearby output signaled by single unit spiking activity (SUA) or to movement remains to be established. Previous studies comparing information in primary motor cortex (MI) lf-LFPs and SUA in the context of planar reaching tasks concluded that lf-LFPs have more information than spikes about movement. However, the relative performance of these signals was based on a small number of simultaneously recorded channels and units, or for data averaged across sessions, which could miss information of larger-scale spiking populations. Here, we simultaneously recorded LFPs and SUA from two 96-microelectrode arrays implanted in two major motor cortical areas, MI and ventral premotor (PMv), while monkeys freely reached for and grasped objects swinging in front of them. We compared arm end point and grip aperture kinematics′ decoding accuracy for lf-LFP and SUA ensembles. The results show that lf-LFPs provide enough information to reconstruct kinematics in both areas with little difference in decoding performance between MI and PMv. Individual lf-LFP channels often provided more accurate decoding of single kinematic variables than any one single unit. However, the decoding performance of the best single unit among the large population usually exceeded that of the best single lf-LFP channel. Furthermore, ensembles of SUA outperformed the pool of lf-LFP channels, in disagreement with the previously reported superiority of lf-LFP decoding. Decoding results suggest that information in lf-LFPs recorded from intracortical arrays may allow the reconstruction of reach and grasp for real-time neuroprosthetic applications, thus potentially supplementing the ability to decode these same

  14. A Primary Cortical Input to Hippocampus Expresses a Pathway-Specific and Endocannabinoid-Dependent Form of Long-Term Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weisheng; Jia, Yousheng; Pham, Danielle T.; Karsten, Carley A.; Merrill, Collin B.; Gall, Christine M.; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), a key modulator of synaptic transmission in mammalian brain, is produced in dendritic spines and then crosses the synaptic junction to depress neurotransmitter release. Here we report that 2-AG-dependent retrograde signaling also mediates an enduring enhancement of glutamate release, as assessed with independent tests, in the lateral perforant path (LPP), one of two cortical inputs to the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. Induction of this form of long-term potentiation (LTP) involved two types of glutamate receptors, changes in postsynaptic calcium, and the postsynaptic enzyme that synthesizes 2-AG. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy confirmed that CB1 cannabinoid receptors are localized presynaptically to LPP terminals, while the inhibition or knockout of the receptors eliminated LPP-LTP. Suppressing the enzyme that degrades 2-AG dramatically enhanced LPP potentiation, while overexpressing it produced the opposite effect. Priming with a CB1 agonist markedly reduced the threshold for LTP. Latrunculin A, which prevents actin polymerization, blocked LPP-LTP when applied extracellularly but had no effect when infused postsynaptically into granule cells, indicating that critical actin remodeling resides in the presynaptic compartment. Importantly, there was no evidence for the LPP form of potentiation in the Schaffer-commissural innervation of field CA1 or in the medial perforant path. Peripheral injections of compounds that block or enhance LPP-LTP had corresponding effects on the formation of long-term memory for cues conveyed to the dentate gyrus by the LPP. Together, these results indicate that the encoding of information carried by a principal hippocampal afferent involves an unusual, regionally differentiated form of plasticity. PMID:27517090

  15. A Primary Cortical Input to Hippocampus Expresses a Pathway-Specific and Endocannabinoid-Dependent Form of Long-Term Potentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weisheng; Trieu, Brian H; Palmer, Linda C; Jia, Yousheng; Pham, Danielle T; Jung, Kwang-Mook; Karsten, Carley A; Merrill, Collin B; Mackie, Ken; Gall, Christine M; Piomelli, Daniele; Lynch, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), a key modulator of synaptic transmission in mammalian brain, is produced in dendritic spines and then crosses the synaptic junction to depress neurotransmitter release. Here we report that 2-AG-dependent retrograde signaling also mediates an enduring enhancement of glutamate release, as assessed with independent tests, in the lateral perforant path (LPP), one of two cortical inputs to the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. Induction of this form of long-term potentiation (LTP) involved two types of glutamate receptors, changes in postsynaptic calcium, and the postsynaptic enzyme that synthesizes 2-AG. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy confirmed that CB1 cannabinoid receptors are localized presynaptically to LPP terminals, while the inhibition or knockout of the receptors eliminated LPP-LTP. Suppressing the enzyme that degrades 2-AG dramatically enhanced LPP potentiation, while overexpressing it produced the opposite effect. Priming with a CB1 agonist markedly reduced the threshold for LTP. Latrunculin A, which prevents actin polymerization, blocked LPP-LTP when applied extracellularly but had no effect when infused postsynaptically into granule cells, indicating that critical actin remodeling resides in the presynaptic compartment. Importantly, there was no evidence for the LPP form of potentiation in the Schaffer-commissural innervation of field CA1 or in the medial perforant path. Peripheral injections of compounds that block or enhance LPP-LTP had corresponding effects on the formation of long-term memory for cues conveyed to the dentate gyrus by the LPP. Together, these results indicate that the encoding of information carried by a principal hippocampal afferent involves an unusual, regionally differentiated form of plasticity. PMID:27517090

  16. Malformations of cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Trudy; Atefy, Ramin; Sheen, Volney

    2012-01-01

    Background Malformations of cortical development (MCD) are increasingly recognized as an important cause of epilepsy and developmental delay. MCD encompass a wide spectrum of disorders with various underlying genetic etiologies and clinical manifestations. High resolution imaging has dramatically improved our recognition of MCD. Review Summary This review will provide a brief overview of the stages of normal cortical development, including neuronal proliferation, neuroblast migration, and neuronal organization. Disruptions at various stages lead to characteristic MCD. Disorders of neurogenesis give rise to microcephaly (small brain) or macrocephaly (large brain). Disorders of early neuroblast migration give rise to periventricular heterotopia (neurons located along the ventricles), whereas abnormalities later in migration lead to lissencephaly (smooth brain) or subcortical band heterotopia (smooth brain with a band of heterotopic neurons under the cortex). Abnormal neuronal migration arrest give rise to over-migration of neurons in cobblestone lissencephaly. Lastly, disorders of neuronal organization cause polymicrogyria (abnormally small gyri and sulci). This review will also discuss the known genetic mutations and potential mechanisms that contribute to these syndromes. Conclusion Identification of various gene mutations has not only given us greater insight into some of the pathophysiologic basis of MCD, but also an understanding of the processes involved in normal cortical development. PMID:18469675

  17. Comparison of electrically evoked cortical potential thresholds generated with subretinal or suprachoroidal placement of a microelectrode array in the rabbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Yasuyuki; Franco, Luisa M.; Jackson, Douglas J.; Naber, John F.; Ofer Ziv, R.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Kaplan, Henry J.; Enzmann, Volker

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the study was to directly compare the threshold electrical charge density of the retina (retinal threshold) in rabbits for the generation of electrical evoked potentials (EEP) by delivering electrical stimulation with a custom-made microelectrode array (MEA) implanted into either the subretinal or suprachoroidal space. Nine eyes of seven Dutch-belted rabbits were studied. The electroretinogram (ERG), visual evoked potentials (VEP) and EEP were recorded. Electrodes for the VEP and EEP were placed on the dura mater overlying the visual cortex. The EEP was recorded following electrical stimulation of the MEA placed either subretinally beneath the visual streak of the retina or in the suprachoroidal space in the rabbit eye. An ab externo approach was used for placement of the MEA. Liquid perfluorodecaline (PFCL; 0.4 ml) was placed within the vitreous cavity to flatten the neurosensory retina on the MEA after subretinal implantation. The retinal threshold for generation of an EEP was determined for each MEA placement by three consecutive measurements consisting of 100 computer-averaged recordings. Animals were sacrificed at the conclusion of the experiment and the eyes were enucleated for histological examination. The retinal threshold to generate an EEP was 9 ± 7 nC (0.023 ± 0.016 mC cm-2) within the subretinal space and 150 ± 122 nC (0.375 ± 0.306 mC cm-2) within the suprachoroidal space. Histology showed disruption of the outer retina with subretinal but not suprachoroidal placement. The retinal threshold to elicit an EEP is significantly lower with subretinal placement of the MEA compared to suprachoroidal placement (P < 0.05). The retinal threshold charge density with a subretinal MEA is well below the published charge limit of 1 mC cm-2, which is the level below which chronic stimulation of the retina is considered necessary to avoid tissue damage (Shannon 1992 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 39 424-6). Supported in part by The Charles D Kelman, MD

  18. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease. PMID:27161368

  19. Single Dose of a Dopamine Agonist Impairs Reinforcement Learning in Humans: Evidence from Event-related Potentials and Computational Modeling of Striatal-Cortical Function

    PubMed Central

    Santesso, Diane L.; Evins, A. Eden; Frank, Michael J.; Cowman Schetter, Erika M.; Bogdan, Ryan; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2011-01-01

    Animal findings have highlighted the modulatory role of phasic dopamine (DA) signaling in incentive learning, particularly in the acquisition of reward-related behavior. In humans, these processes remain largely unknown. In a recent study we demonstrated that a single low dose of a D2/D3 agonist (pramipexole) – assumed to activate DA autoreceptors and thus reduce phasic DA bursts – impaired reward learning in healthy subjects performing a probabilistic reward task. The purpose of the present study was to extend these behavioral findings using event-related potentials and computational modeling. Compared to the placebo group, participants receiving pramipexole showed increased feedback-related negativity to probabilistic rewards and decreased activation in dorsal anterior cingulate regions previously implicated in integrating reinforcement history over time. Additionally, findings of blunted reward learning in participants receiving pramipexole were simulated by reduced presynaptic DA signaling in response to reward in a neural network model of striatal-cortical function. These preliminary findings offer important insights on the role of phasic DA signals on reinforcement learning in humans, and provide initial evidence regarding the spatio-temporal dynamics of brain mechanisms underlying these processes. PMID:18726908

  20. Detection Rates of Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials at Different Sensation Levels in Infants with Sensory/Neural Hearing Loss and Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Gardner-Berry, Kirsty; Chang, Hsiuwen; Ching, Teresa Y C; Hou, Sanna

    2016-02-01

    With the introduction of newborn hearing screening, infants are being diagnosed with hearing loss during the first few months of life. For infants with a sensory/neural hearing loss (SNHL), the audiogram can be estimated objectively using auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing and hearing aids prescribed accordingly. However, for infants with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) due to the abnormal/absent ABR waveforms, alternative measures of auditory function are needed to assess the need for amplification and evaluate whether aided benefit has been achieved. Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) are used to assess aided benefit in infants with hearing loss; however, there is insufficient information regarding the relationship between stimulus audibility and CAEP detection rates. It is also not clear whether CAEP detection rates differ between infants with SNHL and infants with ANSD. This study involved retrospective collection of CAEP, hearing threshold, and hearing aid gain data to investigate the relationship between stimulus audibility and CAEP detection rates. The results demonstrate that increases in stimulus audibility result in an increase in detection rate. For the same range of sensation levels, there was no difference in the detection rates between infants with SNHL and ANSD. PMID:27587922

  1. The Effect of Short-Term Auditory Training on Speech in Noise Perception and Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in Adults with Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Nathan; Purdy, Suzanne C; Sharma, Mridula; Giles, Ellen; Narne, Vijay

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated whether a short intensive psychophysical auditory training program is associated with speech perception benefits and changes in cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) in adult cochlear implant (CI) users. Ten adult implant recipients trained approximately 7 hours on psychophysical tasks (Gap-in-Noise Detection, Frequency Discrimination, Spectral Rippled Noise [SRN], Iterated Rippled Noise, Temporal Modulation). Speech performance was assessed before and after training using Lexical Neighborhood Test (LNT) words in quiet and in eight-speaker babble. CAEPs evoked by a natural speech stimulus /baba/ with varying syllable stress were assessed pre- and post-training, in quiet and in noise. SRN psychophysical thresholds showed a significant improvement (78% on average) over the training period, but performance on other psychophysical tasks did not change. LNT scores in noise improved significantly post-training by 11% on average compared with three pretraining baseline measures. N1P2 amplitude changed post-training for /baba/ in quiet (p = 0.005, visit 3 pretraining versus visit 4 post-training). CAEP changes did not correlate with behavioral measures. CI recipients' clinical records indicated a plateau in speech perception performance prior to participation in the study. A short period of intensive psychophysical training produced small but significant gains in speech perception in noise and spectral discrimination ability. There remain questions about the most appropriate type of training and the duration or dosage of training that provides the most robust outcomes for adults with CIs. PMID:27587925

  2. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Djordjevic, Jelena; Albensi, Benedict C.; Fernyhough, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30–35% in the presence of TMRM and safranin respectively. Maximal respiration was higher than coupled with Complex I- and II-linked substrates in the presence of both dyes. Safranin showed decreased maximal respiration at a higher concentration of carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) compared with TMRM. FCCP titration revealed that maximal respiration in the presence of glutamate and malate was not sustainable at higher FCCP concentrations as compared with pyruvate and malate. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and mtMP in response to mitochondrial substrates were higher in isolated mitochondria compared with tissue homogenates. Safranin exhibited higher sensitivity to changes in mtMP than TMRM. This multi-sensor system measured mitochondrial parameters in the brain of transgenic mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD), because mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to be a primary event in the pathogenesis of AD. The coupled and maximal respiration of electron transport chain were decreased in the cortex of AD mice along with the mtMP compared with age-matched controls. Overall, these data demonstrate that safranin and TMRM are suitable for the simultaneous evaluation of mtMP and respiratory chain activity using isolated mitochondria and tissue homogenate. However, certain care should be taken concerning the selection of appropriate substrates and dyes for specific experimental circumstances. PMID:26647379

  3. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Djordjevic, Jelena; Albensi, Benedict C; Fernyhough, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30-35% in the presence of TMRM and safranin respectively. Maximal respiration was higher than coupled with Complex I- and II-linked substrates in the presence of both dyes. Safranin showed decreased maximal respiration at a higher concentration of carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) compared with TMRM. FCCP titration revealed that maximal respiration in the presence of glutamate and malate was not sustainable at higher FCCP concentrations as compared with pyruvate and malate. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and mtMP in response to mitochondrial substrates were higher in isolated mitochondria compared with tissue homogenates. Safranin exhibited higher sensitivity to changes in mtMP than TMRM. This multi-sensor system measured mitochondrial parameters in the brain of transgenic mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD), because mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to be a primary event in the pathogenesis of AD. The coupled and maximal respiration of electron transport chain were decreased in the cortex of AD mice along with the mtMP compared with age-matched controls. Overall, these data demonstrate that safranin and TMRM are suitable for the simultaneous evaluation of mtMP and respiratory chain activity using isolated mitochondria and tissue homogenate. However, certain care should be taken concerning the selection of appropriate substrates and dyes for specific experimental circumstances. PMID:26647379

  4. Comparison of spatial filters and features for the detection and classification of movement-related cortical potentials in healthy individuals and stroke patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochumsen, Mads; Niazi, Imran Khan; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Jiang, Ning; Farina, Dario; Dremstrup, Kim

    2015-10-01

    Objective. The possibility of detecting movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) at the single trial level has been explored for closing the motor control loop with brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) for neurorehabilitation. A distinct feature of MRCPs is that the movement kinetic information is encoded in the brain potential prior to the onset of the movement, which makes it possible to timely drive external devices to provide sensory feedback according to the efferent activity from the brain. The aim of this study was to compare methods for the detection (different spatial filters) and classification (features extracted from various domains) of MRCPs from continuous electroencephalography recordings from executed and imagined movements from healthy subjects (n = 24) and attempted movements from stroke patients (n = 6) to optimize the performance of MRCP-based BCIs for neurorehabilitation. Approach. The MRCPs from four cue-based tasks were detected with a template matching approach and a set of spatial filters, and classified with a linear support vector machine using the combination of temporal, spectral, time-scale, or entropy-based features. Main results. The best spatial filter (large Laplacian spatial filter (LLSF)) resulted in a true positive rate of 82 ± 9%, 78 ± 12% and 72 ± 9% (with detections occurring ˜200 ms before the onset of the movement) for executed, imagined and attempted movements (stroke patients). The best feature combination (temporal and spectral) led to pairwise classification of 73 ± 9%, 64 ± 10% and 80 ± 12%. When the detection was combined with classification, 60 ± 10%, 49 ± 10% and 58 ± 10% of the movements were both correctly detected and classified for executed, imagined and attempted movements. A similar performance for detection and classification was obtained with optimized spatial filtering. Significance. A simple setup with an LLSF is useful for detecting cued movements while the combination of features from the time

  5. Maturation of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) to speech recorded from frontocentral and temporal sites: three months to eight years of age

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan H.; Wagner, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current analysis was to examine the maturation of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) from three months of age to eight years of age. The superior frontal positive-negative-positive sequence (P1, N2, P2) and the temporal site, negative-positive-negative sequence (possibly, Na, Ta, Tb of the T-complex) were examined. Event-related potentials were recorded from 63 scalp sites to a 250- ms vowel. Amplitude and latency of peaks were measured at left and right frontal sites (near Fz) and at left and right temporal sites (T7 and T8). In addition the largest peak (typically corresponding to P1) was selected from global field power (GFP). The results revealed a large positive peak (P1) easily identified at frontal sites across all ages. The N2 emerged after 6 months of age and the following P2 between 8 and 30 months of age. The latencies of these peaks decreased exponentially with the most rapid decrease observed for P1. For amplitude, only P1 showed a clear relationship with age, becoming more positive in a somewhat linear fashion. At the temporal sites only a negative peak, which might be Na, was clearly observed at both left and right sites in children older than 14 months and peaking between 100 and 200 ms. P1 measures at frontal sites and Na peak latencies were moderately correlated. The temporal negative peak latency showed a different maturational timecourse (linear in nature) than the P1 peak, suggesting at least partial independence. Distinct Ta (positive) and Tb (negative) peaks, following Na and peaking between 120 and 220 ms were not consistently found in most age groups of children, except Ta which was present in 7 year olds. Future research, which includes manipulation of stimulus factors, and use of modeling techniques will be needed to explain the apparent, protracted maturation of the temporal site measures in the current study. PMID:25219893

  6. Maturation of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) to speech recorded from frontocentral and temporal sites: three months to eight years of age.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Valerie L; Yu, Yan H; Wagner, Monica

    2015-02-01

    The goal of the current analysis was to examine the maturation of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) from three months of age to eight years of age. The superior frontal positive-negative-positive sequence (P1, N2, P2) and the temporal site, negative-positive-negative sequence (possibly, Na, Ta, Tb of the T-complex) were examined. Event-related potentials were recorded from 63 scalp sites to a 250-ms vowel. Amplitude and latency of peaks were measured at left and right frontal sites (near Fz) and at left and right temporal sites (T7 and T8). In addition, the largest peak (typically corresponding to P1) was selected from global field power (GFP). The results revealed a large positive peak (P1) easily identified at frontal sites across all ages. The N2 emerged after 6 months of age and the following P2 between 8 and 30 months of age. The latencies of these peaks decreased exponentially with the most rapid decrease observed for P1. For amplitude, only P1 showed a clear relationship with age, becoming more positive in a somewhat linear fashion. At the temporal sites only a negative peak, which might be Na, was clearly observed at both left and right sites in children older than 14 months and peaking between 100 and 200 ms. P1 measures at frontal sites and Na peak latencies were moderately correlated. The temporal negative peak latency showed a different maturational timecourse (linear in nature) than the P1 peak, suggesting at least partial independence. Distinct Ta (positive) and Tb (negative) peaks, following Na and peaking between 120 and 220 ms were not consistently found in most age groups of children, except Ta which was present in 7 year olds. Future research, which includes manipulation of stimulus factors, and use of modeling techniques will be needed to explain the apparent, protracted maturation of the temporal site measures in the current study. PMID:25219893

  7. The architecture of Norway spruce ectomycorrhizae: three-dimensional models of cortical cells, fungal biomass, and interface for potential nutrient exchange.

    PubMed

    Stögmann, Bernhard; Marth, Andreas; Pernfuß, Barbara; Pöder, Reinhold

    2013-08-01

    Gathering realistic data on actual fungal biomass in ectomycorrhized fine root systems is still a matter of concern. Thus far, observations on architecture of ectomycorrhizae (ECMs) have been limited to analyses of two-dimensional (2-D) images of tissue sections. This unavoidably causes stereometrical problems that lead to inadequate assumptions about actual size of cells and their arrangement within ECM's functional compartments. Based on extensive morphological investigations of field samples, we modeled the architectural components of an average-sized Norway spruce ECM. In addition to our comprehensive and detailed quantitative data on cell sizes, we studied actual shape and size, in vivo arrangement, and potential nutrient exchange area of plant cortical cells (CCs) using computer-aided three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions based on semithin serial sections. We extrapolated a factual fungal biomass in ECMs (Hartig net (HN) included) of 1.71 t ha(-1) FW (0.36 t ha(-1) DW) for the top 5 cm of soil for an autochthonous, montane, optimum Norway spruce stand in the Tyrolean Alps. The corresponding potential nutrient exchange area in ECMs including main axes of ECM systems, which is defined as the sum of interfaces between plant CCs and the HN, amounts to at least 3.2 × 10(5) m(2) ha(-1). This is the first study that determines the contribution of the HN to the total fungal biomass in ECMs as well as the quantification of its contact area. Our results may stimulate future research on fungal below-ground processes and their impact on the global carbon cycle. PMID:23435714

  8. Cortical activity prior to, and during, observation and execution of sequential finger movements.

    PubMed

    Calmels, Claire; Holmes, Paul; Jarry, Gilbert; Lévèque, Jean-Michel; Hars, Magaly; Stam, Cornelis J

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide further evidence for the existence of a mirror neuron system in humans using electroencephalography during the observation and execution of non-object-related movements. Event-related desynchronization and synchronization (ERD/ERS) were used to characterize brain activity prior to, and during, observation and execution of a finger movement in four frequency bands (7-10 Hz, 10-13 Hz, 13-20 Hz, and 20-30 Hz). Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded from 19 electrode sites in eight participants. In all the frequency bands and electrode sites, results revealed that there was no significant differences in EEG cortical activity between the observation condition and the execution conditions. Comparison of the two stages of the movement (i.e., pre-movement and movement) in the observation and execution conditions showed, in most cases, that pre-movement ERD values were less than movement ERD values. Whilst there was not an identical match of EEG cortical indices, this study provides further support for the existence of a mirror neuron system in humans. The incomplete congruence may be explained by the different behaviors, the nature of the task and factors in the observed action coded by the mirror system. PMID:17136468

  9. Temporal progression of evoked field potentials in neocortical slices after unilateral hypoxia-ischemia in perinatal rats: Correlation with cortical epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kadam, S D; Dudek, F E

    2016-03-01

    Infarcts of the neonatal cerebral cortex can lead to progressive epilepsy, which is characterized by time-dependent increases in seizure frequency after the infarct and by shifts in seizure-onset zones from focal to multi-focal. Using a rat model of unilateral perinatal hypoxia-ischemia (PHI), where long-term seizure monitoring had previously demonstrated progressive epilepsy, evoked field potentials (EFPs) were recorded in layers II/III of coronal neocortical slices to analyze the underlying time-dependent, network-level alterations ipsilateral vs. contralateral to the infarct. At 3weeks after PHI, EFPs ipsilateral to the infarct were normal in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF); however, after blocking GABAA receptors with bicuculline methiodide (BMI, 30μM), the slices with an infarct were more hyperexcitable than slices without an infarct. At 3weeks, contralateral PHI slices had responses indistinguishable from controls. Six months after PHI in normal ACSF, both ipsi- and contralateral slices from rats with cortical infarcts showed prolonged afterdischarges, which were only slightly augmented in BMI. These data suggest that the early changes after PHI are localized to the ipsilateral infarcted cortex and masked by GABA-mediated inhibition; however, after 6months, progressive epileptogenesis results in generation of robust bilateral hyperexcitability. Because these afterdischarges were only slightly prolonged by BMI, a time-dependent reduction of GABAergic transmission is hypothesized to contribute to the pronounced hyperexcitability at 6months. These changes in the EFPs coincide with the seizure semiology of the epilepsy and therefore offer an opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying this form of progressive pediatric epilepsy. PMID:26724579

  10. Differences in visuo-motor control in skilled vs. novice martial arts athletes during sustained and transient attention tasks: a motor-related cortical potential study.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Lopez, Javier; Fernandez, Thalia; Silva-Pereyra, Juan; Martinez Mesa, Juan A; Di Russo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive and motor processes are essential for optimal athletic performance. Individuals trained in different skills and sports may have specialized cognitive abilities and motor strategies related to the characteristics of the activity and the effects of training and expertise. Most studies have investigated differences in motor-related cortical potential (MRCP) during self-paced tasks in athletes but not in stimulus-related tasks. The aim of the present study was to identify the differences in performance and MRCP between skilled and novice martial arts athletes during two different types of tasks: a sustained attention task and a transient attention task. Behavioral and electrophysiological data from twenty-two martial arts athletes were obtained while they performed a continuous performance task (CPT) to measure sustained attention and a cued continuous performance task (c-CPT) to measure transient attention. MRCP components were analyzed and compared between groups. Electrophysiological data in the CPT task indicated larger prefrontal positive activity and greater posterior negativity distribution prior to a motor response in the skilled athletes, while novices showed a significantly larger response-related P3 after a motor response in centro-parietal areas. A different effect occurred in the c-CPT task in which the novice athletes showed strong prefrontal positive activity before a motor response and a large response-related P3, while in skilled athletes, the prefrontal activity was absent. We propose that during the CPT, skilled athletes were able to allocate two different but related processes simultaneously according to CPT demand, which requires controlled attention and controlled motor responses. On the other hand, in the c-CPT, skilled athletes showed better cue facilitation, which permitted a major economy of resources and "automatic" or less controlled responses to relevant stimuli. In conclusion, the present data suggest that motor expertise

  11. Differences in Visuo-Motor Control in Skilled vs. Novice Martial Arts Athletes during Sustained and Transient Attention Tasks: A Motor-Related Cortical Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Lopez, Javier; Fernandez, Thalia; Silva-Pereyra, Juan; Martinez Mesa, Juan A.; Di Russo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive and motor processes are essential for optimal athletic performance. Individuals trained in different skills and sports may have specialized cognitive abilities and motor strategies related to the characteristics of the activity and the effects of training and expertise. Most studies have investigated differences in motor-related cortical potential (MRCP) during self-paced tasks in athletes but not in stimulus-related tasks. The aim of the present study was to identify the differences in performance and MRCP between skilled and novice martial arts athletes during two different types of tasks: a sustained attention task and a transient attention task. Behavioral and electrophysiological data from twenty-two martial arts athletes were obtained while they performed a continuous performance task (CPT) to measure sustained attention and a cued continuous performance task (c-CPT) to measure transient attention. MRCP components were analyzed and compared between groups. Electrophysiological data in the CPT task indicated larger prefrontal positive activity and greater posterior negativity distribution prior to a motor response in the skilled athletes, while novices showed a significantly larger response-related P3 after a motor response in centro-parietal areas. A different effect occurred in the c-CPT task in which the novice athletes showed strong prefrontal positive activity before a motor response and a large response-related P3, while in skilled athletes, the prefrontal activity was absent. We propose that during the CPT, skilled athletes were able to allocate two different but related processes simultaneously according to CPT demand, which requires controlled attention and controlled motor responses. On the other hand, in the c-CPT, skilled athletes showed better cue facilitation, which permitted a major economy of resources and “automatic” or less controlled responses to relevant stimuli. In conclusion, the present data suggest that motor expertise

  12. Communication and wiring in the cortical connectome

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Julian M. L.; Kisvárday, Zoltán F.

    2012-01-01

    In cerebral cortex, the huge mass of axonal wiring that carries information between near and distant neurons is thought to provide the neural substrate for cognitive and perceptual function. The goal of mapping the connectivity of cortical axons at different spatial scales, the cortical connectome, is to trace the paths of information flow in cerebral cortex. To appreciate the relationship between the connectome and cortical function, we need to discover the nature and purpose of the wiring principles underlying cortical connectivity. A popular explanation has been that axonal length is strictly minimized both within and between cortical regions. In contrast, we have hypothesized the existence of a multi-scale principle of cortical wiring where to optimize communication there is a trade-off between spatial (construction) and temporal (routing) costs. Here, using recent evidence concerning cortical spatial networks we critically evaluate this hypothesis at neuron, local circuit, and pathway scales. We report three main conclusions. First, the axonal and dendritic arbor morphology of single neocortical neurons may be governed by a similar wiring principle, one that balances the conservation of cellular material and conduction delay. Second, the same principle may be observed for fiber tracts connecting cortical regions. Third, the absence of sufficient local circuit data currently prohibits any meaningful assessment of the hypothesis at this scale of cortical organization. To avoid neglecting neuron and microcircuit levels of cortical organization, the connectome framework should incorporate more morphological description. In addition, structural analyses of temporal cost for cortical circuits should take account of both axonal conduction and neuronal integration delays, which appear mostly of the same order of magnitude. We conclude the hypothesized trade-off between spatial and temporal costs may potentially offer a powerful explanation for cortical wiring patterns

  13. Slow cortical potential neurofeedback and self-management training in outpatient care for children with ADHD: study protocol and first preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Hanna; Reh, Verena; Schmidt, Martin H.; Rief, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment for children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) today is predominantly pharmacological. While it is the most common treatment, it might not always be the most appropriate one. Moreover, long term effects remain unclear. Behavior therapy (BT) and non-pharmacological treatments such as neurofeedback (NF) are promising alternatives, though there are no routine outpatient care/effectiveness studies yet that have included children with medication or changes in medication. Methods/design: This paper presents the protocol of a randomized controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of a Slow Cortical Potential (SCP) NF protocol with self-management (SM) in a high frequent outpatient care setting. Both groups (NF/SM) receive a total of 30 high frequent therapy sessions. Additionally, 6 sessions are reserved for comorbid problems. The primary outcome measure is the reduction of ADHD core symptoms according to parent and teacher ratings. Preliminary Results: Untill now 58 children were included in the study (48 males), with a mean age of 8.42 (1.34) years, and a mean IQ of 110 (13.37). Conners-3 parent and teacher ratings were used to estimate core symptom change. Since the study is still ongoing, and children are in different study stages, pre-post and follow-up results are not yet available for all children included. Preliminary results suggest overall good pre-post effects, though. For parent and teacher ratings an ANOVA with repeated measures yielded overall satisfying pre-post effects (η2 0.175–0.513). Differences between groups (NF vs. SM) could not yet be established (p = 0.81). Discussion: This is the first randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a NF protocol in a high frequent outpatient care setting that does not exclude children on or with changes in medication. First preliminary results show positive effects. The rationale for the trial, the design, and the strengths and limitations of the study are

  14. Communication Structure of Cortical Networks

    PubMed Central

    da Fontoura Costa, Luciano; Batista, João Luiz B.; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale cortical networks exhibit characteristic topological properties that shape communication between brain regions and global cortical dynamics. Analysis of complex networks allows the description of connectedness, distance, clustering, and centrality that reveal different aspects of how the network's nodes communicate. Here, we focus on a novel analysis of complex walks in a series of mammalian cortical networks that model potential dynamics of information flow between individual brain regions. We introduce two new measures called absorption and driftness. Absorption is the average length of random walks between any two nodes, and takes into account all paths that may diffuse activity throughout the network. Driftness is the ratio between absorption and the corresponding shortest path length. For a given node of the network, we also define four related measurements, namely in- and out-absorption as well as in- and out-driftness, as the averages of the corresponding measures from all nodes to that node, and from that node to all nodes, respectively. We find that the cat thalamo-cortical system incorporates features of two classic network topologies, Erdös–Rényi graphs with respect to in-absorption and in-driftness, and configuration models with respect to out-absorption and out-driftness. Moreover, taken together these four measures separate the network nodes based on broad functional roles (visual, auditory, somatomotor, and frontolimbic). PMID:21427794

  15. Effect of measurement noise and electrode density on the spatial resolution of cortical potential distribution with different resistivity values for the skull.

    PubMed

    Ryynänen, Outi R M; Hyttinen, Jari A K; Malmivuo, Jaakko A

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the present theoretical study was to examine the spatial resolution of electroencephalography (EEG) by means of the accuracy of the inverse cortical EEG solution. The study focused on effect of the amount of measurement noise and the number of electrodes on the spatial resolution with different resistivity ratios for the scalp, skull and brain. The results show that if the relative skull resistivity is lower than earlier believed, the spatial resolution of different electrode systems is less sensitive to the measurement noise. Furthermore, there is then also greater advantage to be obtained with high-resolution EEG at realistic noise levels. PMID:16941841

  16. Cortical State and Attention

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kenneth D.; Thiele, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Preface The brain continuously adapts its processing machinery to behavioural demands. To achieve this it rapidly modulates the operating mode of cortical circuits, controlling the way information is transformed and routed. This article will focus on two experimental approaches by which the control of cortical information processing has been investigated: the study of state-dependent cortical processing in rodents, and attention in the primate visual system. Both processes involve a modulation of low-frequency activity fluctuations and spiking correlation, and are mediated by common receptor systems. We suggest that selective attention involves processes similar to state change, operating at a local columnar level to enhance the representation of otherwise nonsalient features while suppressing internally generated activity patterns. PMID:21829219

  17. Cortical dynamics revisited.

    PubMed

    Singer, Wolf

    2013-12-01

    Recent discoveries on the organisation of the cortical connectome together with novel data on the dynamics of neuronal interactions require an extension of classical concepts on information processing in the cerebral cortex. These new insights justify considering the brain as a complex, self-organised system with nonlinear dynamics in which principles of distributed, parallel processing coexist with serial operations within highly interconnected networks. The observed dynamics suggest that cortical networks are capable of providing an extremely high-dimensional state space in which a large amount of evolutionary and ontogenetically acquired information can coexist and be accessible to rapid parallel search. PMID:24139950

  18. Cortical thinning in psychopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Martina; Motzkin, Julian C.; Philippi, Carissa L.; Kirk, Gregory R.; Newman, Joseph P.; Kiehl, Kent A.; Koenigs, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psychopathy is a personality disorder associated with severely antisocial behavior and a host of cognitive and affective deficits. The neuropathological basis of the disorder has not been clearly established. Cortical thickness is a sensitive measure of brain structure that has been used to identify neurobiological abnormalities in a number of psychiatric disorders. The purpose of this study is to evaluate cortical thickness and corresponding functional connectivity in criminal psychopaths. Method Using T1 MRI data, we computed cortical thickness maps in a sample of adult male prison inmates selected based on psychopathy diagnosis (n=21 psychopathic inmates, n=31 non-psychopathic inmates). Using rest-fMRI data from a subset of these inmates (n=20 psychopathic inmates, n=20 non-psychopathic inmates), we then computed functional connectivity within networks exhibiting significant thinning among psychopaths. Results Relative to non-psychopaths, psychopaths exhibited significantly thinner cortex in a number of regions, including left insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral precentral gyrus, bilateral anterior temporal cortex, and right inferior frontal gyrus. These neurostructural differences were not due to differences in age, IQ, or substance abuse. Psychopaths also exhibited a corresponding reduction in functional connectivity between left insula and left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Conclusions Psychopathy is associated with a distinct pattern of cortical thinning and reduced functional connectivity. PMID:22581200

  19. Optogenetic inhibition of cortical afferents in the nucleus accumbens simultaneously prevents cue-induced transient synaptic potentiation and cocaine-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Stefanik, Michael T; Kupchik, Yonatan M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Animal models of relapse reveal that the motivation to seek drug is regulated by enduring morphological and physiological changes in the nucleus accumbens, as well as transient synaptic potentiation in the accumbens core (NAcore) that parallels drug-seeking behavior. The current study sought to examine the link between the behavioral and synaptic consequences of cue-induced cocaine seeking by optically silencing glutamatergic afferents to the NAcore from the prelimbic cortex (PL). Adeno-associated virus coding for the inhibitory opsin archaerhodopsin was microinjected into PL, and optical fibers were targeted to NAcore. Animals were trained to self-administer cocaine followed by extinction training, and then underwent cue-induced reinstatement in the presence or absence of 15 min of optically induced inhibition of PL fibers in NAcore. Inhibiting the PL-to-NAcore projection blocked reinstated behavior and was paralleled by decreased dendritic spine head diameter and AMPA/NMDA ratio relative to sham-laser control rats. Interestingly, while spine density was elevated after extinction training, no further effects were observed by cued reinstatement or optical inhibition. These findings validate the critical role for PL afferents to the NAcore in simultaneously regulating both reinstated behavior and the associated transient synaptic potentiation. PMID:25663648

  20. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  1. Touch inhibits subcortical and cortical nociceptive responses

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Flavia; Beaumont, Anne-Lise; Hu, Li; Haggard, Patrick; Iannetti, Gian Domenico D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The neural mechanisms of the powerful analgesia induced by touching a painful body part are controversial. A long tradition of neurophysiologic studies in anaesthetized spinal animals indicate that touch can gate nociceptive input at spinal level. In contrast, recent studies in awake humans have suggested that supraspinal mechanisms can be sufficient to drive touch-induced analgesia. To investigate this issue, we evaluated the modulation exerted by touch on established electrophysiologic markers of nociceptive function at both subcortical and cortical levels in humans. Aδ and C skin nociceptors were selectively activated by high-power laser pulses. As markers of subcortical and cortical function, we recorded the laser blink reflex, which is generated by brainstem circuits before the arrival of nociceptive signals at the cortex, and laser-evoked potentials, which reflect neural activity of a wide array of cortical areas. If subcortical nociceptive responses are inhibited by concomitant touch, supraspinal mechanisms alone are unlikely to be sufficient to drive touch-induced analgesia. Touch induced a clear analgesic effect, suppressed the laser blink reflex, and inhibited both Aδ-fibre and C-fibre laser-evoked potentials. Thus, we conclude that touch-induced analgesia is likely to be mediated by a subcortical gating of the ascending nociceptive input, which in turn results in a modulation of cortical responses. Hence, supraspinal mechanisms alone are not sufficient to mediate touch-induced analgesia. PMID:26058037

  2. Touch inhibits subcortical and cortical nociceptive responses.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Flavia; Beaumont, Anne-Lise; Hu, Li; Haggard, Patrick; Iannetti, Giandomenico D; Iannetti, Gian Domenico D

    2015-10-01

    The neural mechanisms of the powerful analgesia induced by touching a painful body part are controversial. A long tradition of neurophysiologic studies in anaesthetized spinal animals indicate that touch can gate nociceptive input at spinal level. In contrast, recent studies in awake humans have suggested that supraspinal mechanisms can be sufficient to drive touch-induced analgesia. To investigate this issue, we evaluated the modulation exerted by touch on established electrophysiologic markers of nociceptive function at both subcortical and cortical levels in humans. Aδ and C skin nociceptors were selectively activated by high-power laser pulses. As markers of subcortical and cortical function, we recorded the laser blink reflex, which is generated by brainstem circuits before the arrival of nociceptive signals at the cortex, and laser-evoked potentials, which reflect neural activity of a wide array of cortical areas. If subcortical nociceptive responses are inhibited by concomitant touch, supraspinal mechanisms alone are unlikely to be sufficient to drive touch-induced analgesia. Touch induced a clear analgesic effect, suppressed the laser blink reflex, and inhibited both Aδ-fibre and C-fibre laser-evoked potentials. Thus, we conclude that touch-induced analgesia is likely to be mediated by a subcortical gating of the ascending nociceptive input, which in turn results in a modulation of cortical responses. Hence, supraspinal mechanisms alone are not sufficient to mediate touch-induced analgesia. PMID:26058037

  3. Is empathy necessary to comprehend the emotional faces? The empathic effect on attentional mechanisms (eye movements), cortical correlates (N200 event-related potentials) and facial behaviour (electromyography) in face processing.

    PubMed

    Balconi, Michela; Canavesio, Ylenia

    2016-01-01

    The present research explored the effect of social empathy on processing emotional facial expressions. Previous evidence suggested a close relationship between emotional empathy and both the ability to detect facial emotions and the attentional mechanisms involved. A multi-measure approach was adopted: we investigated the association between trait empathy (Balanced Emotional Empathy Scale) and individuals' performance (response times; RTs), attentional mechanisms (eye movements; number and duration of fixations), correlates of cortical activation (event-related potential (ERP) N200 component), and facial responsiveness (facial zygomatic and corrugator activity). Trait empathy was found to affect face detection performance (reduced RTs), attentional processes (more scanning eye movements in specific areas of interest), ERP salience effect (increased N200 amplitude), and electromyographic activity (more facial responses). A second important result was the demonstration of strong, direct correlations among these measures. We suggest that empathy may function as a social facilitator of the processes underlying the detection of facial emotion, and a general "facial response effect" is proposed to explain these results. We assumed that empathy influences cognitive and the facial responsiveness, such that empathic individuals are more skilful in processing facial emotion. PMID:25531027

  4. Decoding 3D reach and grasp from hybrid signals in motor and premotor cortices: spikes, multiunit activity, and local field potentials

    PubMed Central

    Truccolo, Wilson; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos E.; Donoghue, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Neural activity in motor cortex during reach and grasp movements shows modulations in a broad range of signals from single-neuron spiking activity (SA) to various frequency bands in broadband local field potentials (LFPs). In particular, spatiotemporal patterns in multiband LFPs are thought to reflect dendritic integration of local and interareal synaptic inputs, attentional and preparatory processes, and multiunit activity (MUA) related to movement representation in the local motor area. Nevertheless, the relationship between multiband LFPs and SA, and their relationship to movement parameters and their relative value as brain-computer interface (BCI) control signals, remain poorly understood. Also, although this broad range of signals may provide complementary information channels in primary (MI) and ventral premotor (PMv) areas, areal differences in information have not been systematically examined. Here, for the first time, the amount of information in SA and multiband LFPs was compared for MI and PMv by recording from dual 96-multielectrode arrays while monkeys made naturalistic reach and grasp actions. Information was assessed as decoding accuracy for 3D arm end point and grip aperture kinematics based on SA or LFPs in MI and PMv, or combinations of signal types across areas. In contrast with previous studies with ≤16 simultaneous electrodes, here ensembles of >16 units (on average) carried more information than multiband, multichannel LFPs. Furthermore, reach and grasp information added by various LFP frequency bands was not independent from that in SA ensembles but rather typically less than and primarily contained within the latter. Notably, MI and PMv did not show a particular bias toward reach or grasp for this task or for a broad range of signal types. For BCIs, our results indicate that neuronal ensemble spiking is the preferred signal for decoding, while LFPs and combined signals from PMv and MI can add robustness to BCI control. PMID:22157115

  5. Focal cortical damage parallels cognitive impairment in minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Montoliu, Carmina; Gonzalez-Escamilla, Gabriel; Atienza, Mercedes; Urios, Amparo; Gonzalez, Olga; Wassel, Abdallah; Aliaga, Roberto; Giner-Duran, Remedios; Serra, Miguel A; Rodrigo, Jose M; Belloch, Vicente; Felipo, Vicente; Cantero, Jose L

    2012-07-16

    Little attention has been paid to cortical integrity in patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), although cognitive functions affected in early stages of liver disease are mainly allocated in different neocortical structures. Here we used cortical surface-based analysis techniques to investigate if patterns of cortical thinning accompany the mildest form of HE. To aim this goal, cortical thickness obtained from high-resolution 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was measured in patients with no MHE (NMHE), MHE, and healthy controls. Further correlation analyses were performed to examine whether scores in the critical flicker frequency (CFF) test, and blood ammonia levels accounted for the loss of cortical integrity in different stages of liver disease. Finally, we assessed group differences in volume of different subcortical regions and their potential relationships with CFF scores/blood ammonia levels. Results showed a focal thinning of the superior temporal cortex and precuneus in MHE patients when compared with NMHE and controls. Relationships between blood ammonia levels and cortical thickness of the calcarine sulcus accounted for impaired visual judgment in patients with MHE when compared to NMHE. Regression analyses between cortical thickness and CFF predicted differences between controls and the two groups of HE patients, but failed to discriminate between patients with NMHE and MHE. Taking together, these findings provide the first report of cortical thinning in MHE patients, and they yield novel insights into the neurobiological basis of cognitive impairment associated with early stages of liver diseases. PMID:22465844

  6. Do unresponsive wakefulness syndrome patients feel pain? Role of laser-evoked potential-induced gamma-band oscillations in detecting cortical pain processing.

    PubMed

    Naro, A; Leo, A; Cannavò, A; Buda, A; Bramanti, P; Calabrò, R S

    2016-03-11

    It has been proposed that a neural signature of aware pain perception could be represented by the modulation of gamma-band oscillation (GBO) power induced by nociceptive repetitive laser stimulation (RLS). The aim of our study was to correlate the RLS-induced GBO modulation with the Nociception Coma Scale-Revised (NCS-R) scores (a validated scale assessing possible aware pain perception in patients with chronic disorders of consciousness), in an attempt to differentiate unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) patients from minimally conscious state (MCS) ones (both of them are awake but exhibit no or limited and fluctuant behavioral signs of awareness and mentation, and low and high NCS-R scores, respectively). In addition, we attempted to identify those among UWS patients who probably experienced pain at covert level (i.e. being aware but unable to show pain-related purposeful behaviors, which are those sustained, reproducible, and voluntary behavioral responses to nociceptive stimuli). Notably, the possibility of clearly differentiating UWS from MCS patients has outmost consequences concerning prognosis (worse in UWS) and adequate pain treatment. RLS consisted in 80 trains of three laser stimuli (delivered at 1Hz), at four different energies, able to evoke Aδ-fiber related laser evoked potentials. After each train, we assessed the NCS-R score. EEG was divided into epochs according to the laser trains, and the obtained epochs were classified in four categories according to the NCS-R score magnitude. We quantified the GBO absolute power for each category. RLS protocol induced a strongly correlated increase in GBO power and NCS-R score (the higher the laser stimulation intensity, the higher the NCS-R, independently of stimulus repetition) in all the MCS patients, thus confirming the presence of aware pain processing. Nonetheless, such findings were present even in five UWS individuals. This could suggest the presence of covert pain processing in such subjects

  7. Cortical Clefts and Cortical Bumps: A Continuous Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Furruqh, Farha; Thirunavukarasu, Suresh; Vivekandan, Ravichandran

    2016-01-01

    Cortical ‘clefts’ (schizencephaly) and cortical ‘bumps’ (polymicrogyria) are malformations arising due to defects in postmigrational development of neurons. They are frequently encountered together, with schizencephalic clefts being lined by polymicrogyria. We present the case of an eight-year-old boy who presented with seizures. Imaging revealed closed lip schizencephaly, polymicrogyria and a deep ‘incomplete’ cleft lined by polymicrogyria not communicating with the lateral ventricle. We speculate that hypoperfusion or ischaemic cortical injury during neuronal development may lead to a spectrum of malformations ranging from polymicrogyria to incomplete cortical clefts to schizencephaly.

  8. The Diversity of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Karube, Fuyuki; Nomura, Masaki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. However, it has become clear that synaptic inhibition in the cortex is much more diverse and complicated. Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. Each distinct non-pyramidal cell subtype has its own independent inhibitory function. Secondly, the inhibitory synapses innervate different neuronal domains, such as axons, spines, dendrites and soma, and their inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP) size is not uniform. Thus, cortical inhibition is highly complex, with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological modes. Moreover, the functional significance of the various inhibitory synapse innervation styles and their unique structural dynamic behaviors differ from those of excitatory synapses. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the inhibitory mechanisms of the cortical microcircuit. PMID:27199670

  9. Stroke rehabilitation using noninvasive cortical stimulation: aphasia.

    PubMed

    Mylius, Veit; Zouari, Hela G; Ayache, Samar S; Farhat, Wassim H; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2012-08-01

    Poststroke aphasia results from the lesion of cortical areas involved in the motor production of speech (Broca's aphasia) or in the semantic aspects of language comprehension (Wernicke's aphasia). Such lesions produce an important reorganization of speech/language-specific brain networks due to an imbalance between cortical facilitation and inhibition. In fact, functional recovery is associated with changes in the excitability of the damaged neural structures and their connections. Two main mechanisms are involved in poststroke aphasia recovery: the recruitment of perilesional regions of the left hemisphere in case of small lesion and the acquisition of language processing ability in homotopic areas of the nondominant right hemisphere when left hemispheric language abilities are permanently lost. There is some evidence that noninvasive cortical stimulation, especially when combined with language therapy or other therapeutic approaches, can promote aphasia recovery. Cortical stimulation was mainly used to either increase perilesional excitability or reduce contralesional activity based on the concept of reciprocal inhibition and maladaptive plasticity. However, recent studies also showed some positive effects of the reinforcement of neural activities in the contralateral right hemisphere, based on the potential compensatory role of the nondominant hemisphere in stroke recovery. PMID:23002940

  10. Cortical basal ganglionic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Scarmeas, N; Chin, S S; Marder, K

    2001-10-01

    In this case study, we describe the symptoms, neuropsychological testing, and brain pathology of a retired mason's assistant with cortical basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). CBGD is an extremely rare neurodegenerative disease that is categorized under both Parkinsonian syndromes and frontal lobe dementias. It affects men and women nearly equally, and the age of onset is usually in the sixth decade of life. CBGD is characterized by Parkinson's-like motor symptoms and by deficits of movement and cognition, indicating focal brain pathology. Neuronal cell loss is ultimately responsible for the neurological symptoms. PMID:14602941

  11. Synaptic strength modulation after cortical trauma: a role in epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Avramescu, Sinziana; Timofeev, Igor

    2008-07-01

    Traumatic brain injuries are often followed by abnormal hyperexcitability, leading to acute seizures and epilepsy. Previous studies documented the rewiring capacity of neocortical neurons in response to various cortical and subcortical lesions. However, little information is available on the functional consequences of these anatomical changes after cortical trauma and the adaptation of synaptic connectivity to a decreased input produced by chronic deafferentation. In this study, we recorded intracellular (IC) activities of cortical neurons simultaneously with extracellular (EC) unit activities and field potentials of neighboring cells in cat cortex, after a large transection of the white matter underneath the suprasylvian gyrus, in acute and chronic conditions (at 2, 4, and 6 weeks) in ketamine-xylazine-anesthetized cats. Using EC spikes to compute the spike-triggered averages of IC membrane potential, we found an increased connection probability and efficacy between cortical neurons weeks after cortical trauma. Inhibitory interactions showed no significant changes in the traumatized cortex compared with control. The increased synaptic efficacy was accompanied by enhanced input resistance and intrinsic excitability of cortical neurons, as well as by increased duration of silent network periods. Our electrophysiological data revealed functional consequences of previously reported anatomical changes in the injured cortex. We suggest that homeostatic synaptic plasticity compensating the decreased activity in the undercut cortex leads to an uncontrollable cortical hyperexcitability and seizure generation. PMID:18596152

  12. Electrophysiologic analysis of regional cortical maturation.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, H G

    1975-10-01

    Some issues in the study of human neurobehavioral development are briefly set forth. Attention is called to the limitations of strictly structural and behavioral approaches. The value of correlative morphophysiological and psychophysiological investigations is emphasized. By averaging brain activity with respect to stimuli and motor responses, event-related cortical potentials (ERP) can be reliably detected in the scalp EEG. Longitudinal topographic studies of ERP permit the definition of a sequence of regional cortical maturation during infancy and childhood. We have found that evoked potentials in the three major sensory modalities arise from both primary and secondary projection areas by 30 weeks of conceptional age. Frontocentral responses appear shortly thereafter. Thus, cortical mechanisms show a precocious development of electrogenesis which indicates the possibility for an early environmental impact on brain maturation. In contrast to the evoked potentials, association cortex potentials (ACP) do not seem to appear until early childhood. The behavioral significance of these neuroelectric phenomena is being sought in studies employing techniques which permit the concurrent recording of brain activity and behavioral responses in the waking infant and child. Some of the problems confronting the application of these methods to studies of infants are outlined. PMID:1203402

  13. Time in Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Shadlen, Michael N.; Jazayeri, Mehrdad; Nobre, Anna C.; Buonomano, Dean V.

    2015-01-01

    Time is central to cognition. However, the neural basis for time-dependent cognition remains poorly understood. We explore how the temporal features of neural activity in cortical circuits and their capacity for plasticity can contribute to time-dependent cognition over short time scales. This neural activity is linked to cognition that operates in the present or anticipates events or stimuli in the near future. We focus on deliberation and planning in the context of decision making as a cognitive process that integrates information across time. We progress to consider how temporal expectations of the future modulate perception. We propose that understanding the neural basis for how the brain tells time and operates in time will be necessary to develop general models of cognition. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Time is central to cognition. However, the neural basis for time-dependent cognition remains poorly understood. We explore how the temporal features of neural activity in cortical circuits and their capacity for plasticity can contribute to time-dependent cognition over short time scales. We propose that understanding the neural basis for how the brain tells time and operates in time will be necessary to develop general models of cognition. PMID:26468192

  14. Attention-dependent early cortical suppression contributes to crowding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; He, Yingchen; Zhu, Ziyun; Zhou, Tiangang; Peng, Yujia; Zhang, Xilin; Fang, Fang

    2014-08-01

    Crowding, the identification difficulty for a target in the presence of nearby flankers, is ubiquitous in spatial vision and is considered a bottleneck of object recognition and visual awareness. Despite its significance, the neural mechanisms of crowding are still unclear. Here, we performed event-related potential and fMRI experiments to measure the cortical interaction between the target and flankers in human subjects. We found that the magnitude of the crowding effect was closely associated with an early suppressive cortical interaction. The cortical suppression was reflected in the earliest event-related potential component (C1), which originated in V1, and in the BOLD signal in V1, but not other higher cortical areas. Intriguingly, spatial attention played a critical role in the manifestation of the suppression. These findings provide direct and converging evidence that attention-dependent V1 suppression contributes to crowding at a very early stage of visual processing. PMID:25100582

  15. Turning off cortical ensembles stops striatal Up states and elicits phase perturbations in cortical and striatal slow oscillations in rat in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kasanetz, Fernando; Riquelme, Luis A; O'Donnell, Patricio; Murer, M Gustavo

    2006-01-01

    In vivo, cortical neurons and striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN) display robust subthreshold depolarizations (Up states) during which they are enabled to fire action potentials. In the cortex, Up states are believed to occur simultaneously in a neuronal ensemble and to be sustained by local network interactions. It is known that MSN are impelled into the Up state by extra-striatal (primarily cortical) inputs, but the mechanisms that sustain and determine the end of striatal Up states are still debated. Furthermore, it has not been established if brisk perturbations of ongoing cortical oscillations alter rhythmic transitions between Up and Down states in striatal neurons. Here we report that MSN Up states terminate abruptly when persistent activity in cortical ensembles providing afferents to a given striatal region is turned off by local electrical stimulation or ends spontaneously. In addition, we found that phase perturbations in MSN membrane potential slow oscillations induced by cortical stimulation replicate the stimulus-induced dynamics of spiking activity in cortical ensembles. Overall, these results suggest that striatal Up states are single-cell subthreshold representations of episodes of persistent spiking in cortical ensembles. A precise spatial and temporal alignment between episodes of cortical persistent activity and striatal Up states would allow MSN to detect specific cortical inputs embedded within a more general cortical signal. PMID:16931555

  16. Dynamics of Ionic Shifts in Cortical Spreading Depression.

    PubMed

    Enger, Rune; Tang, Wannan; Vindedal, Gry Fluge; Jensen, Vidar; Johannes Helm, P; Sprengel, Rolf; Looger, Loren L; Nagelhus, Erlend A

    2015-11-01

    Cortical spreading depression is a slowly propagating wave of near-complete depolarization of brain cells followed by temporary suppression of neuronal activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that cortical spreading depression underlies the migraine aura and that similar waves promote tissue damage in stroke, trauma, and hemorrhage. Cortical spreading depression is characterized by neuronal swelling, profound elevation of extracellular potassium and glutamate, multiphasic blood flow changes, and drop in tissue oxygen tension. The slow speed of the cortical spreading depression wave implies that it is mediated by diffusion of a chemical substance, yet the identity of this substance and the pathway it follows are unknown. Intercellular spread between gap junction-coupled neurons or glial cells and interstitial diffusion of K(+) or glutamate have been proposed. Here we use extracellular direct current potential recordings, K(+)-sensitive microelectrodes, and 2-photon imaging with ultrasensitive Ca(2+) and glutamate fluorescent probes to elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of ionic shifts associated with the propagation of cortical spreading depression in the visual cortex of adult living mice. Our data argue against intercellular spread of Ca(2+) carrying the cortical spreading depression wavefront and are in favor of interstitial K(+) diffusion, rather than glutamate diffusion, as the leading event in cortical spreading depression. PMID:25840424

  17. Dynamics of Ionic Shifts in Cortical Spreading Depression

    PubMed Central

    Enger, Rune; Tang, Wannan; Vindedal, Gry Fluge; Jensen, Vidar; Johannes Helm, P.; Sprengel, Rolf; Looger, Loren L.; Nagelhus, Erlend A.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression is a slowly propagating wave of near-complete depolarization of brain cells followed by temporary suppression of neuronal activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that cortical spreading depression underlies the migraine aura and that similar waves promote tissue damage in stroke, trauma, and hemorrhage. Cortical spreading depression is characterized by neuronal swelling, profound elevation of extracellular potassium and glutamate, multiphasic blood flow changes, and drop in tissue oxygen tension. The slow speed of the cortical spreading depression wave implies that it is mediated by diffusion of a chemical substance, yet the identity of this substance and the pathway it follows are unknown. Intercellular spread between gap junction-coupled neurons or glial cells and interstitial diffusion of K+ or glutamate have been proposed. Here we use extracellular direct current potential recordings, K+-sensitive microelectrodes, and 2-photon imaging with ultrasensitive Ca2+ and glutamate fluorescent probes to elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of ionic shifts associated with the propagation of cortical spreading depression in the visual cortex of adult living mice. Our data argue against intercellular spread of Ca2+ carrying the cortical spreading depression wavefront and are in favor of interstitial K+ diffusion, rather than glutamate diffusion, as the leading event in cortical spreading depression. PMID:25840424

  18. Modeling cortical circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  19. Parcellating Cortical Functional Networks in Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danhong; Buckner, Randy L.; Fox, Michael D.; Holt, Daphne J.; Holmes, Avram J.; Stoecklein, Sophia; Langs, Georg; Pan, Ruiqi; Qian, Tianyi; Li, Kuncheng; Baker, Justin T.; Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Wang, Kai; Wang, Xiaomin; Hong, Bo; Liu, Hesheng

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to identify the unique functional architecture of an individual’s brain is a critical step towards personalized medicine and understanding the neural basis of variations in human cognition and behavior. Here, we developed a novel cortical parcellation approach to accurately map functional organization at the individual level using resting-state fMRI. A population-based functional atlas and a map of inter-individual variability were employed to guide the iterative search for functional networks in individual subjects. Functional networks mapped by this approach were highly reproducible within subjects and effectively captured the variability across subjects, including individual differences in brain lateralization. The algorithm performed well across different subject populations and data types including task fMRI data. The approach was then validated by invasive cortical stimulation mapping in surgical patients, suggesting great potential for use in clinical applications. PMID:26551545

  20. Cortical reorganization in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Gilley, Phillip M; Sharma, Anu; Dorman, Michael F

    2008-11-01

    Congenital deafness leads to atypical organization of the auditory nervous system. However, the extent to which auditory pathways reorganize during deafness is not well understood. We recorded cortical auditory evoked potentials in normal hearing children and in congenitally deaf children fitted with cochlear implants. High-density EEG and source modeling revealed principal activity from auditory cortex in normal hearing and early implanted children. However, children implanted after a critical period of seven years revealed activity from parietotemporal cortex in response to auditory stimulation, demonstrating reorganized cortical pathways. Reorganization of central auditory pathways is limited by the age at which implantation occurs, and may help explain the benefits and limitations of implantation in congenitally deaf children. PMID:18775684

  1. Do Cortical Circuits Need Protecting from Themselves?

    PubMed

    Trevelyan, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    All hippocampal and neocortical networks can be driven to seize quite easily. This can be done using drugs, by altering the ionic constituency of the bathing medium [cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)], or by electrical stimulation (both experimentally and clinically, as in electroconvulsive therapy). It is worth asking why this is so, because this will both tell us more about potentially devastating neurological disorders and extend our understanding of cortical function and architecture. Here I review work examining the features of cortical networks that bias activity towards and away from hyperexcitability. I suggest that several cellular- and circuit-level features of rapidly responsive interneuron networks tip the balance away from seizure in the healthy brain. PMID:27378547

  2. Visuomotor transformations: early cortical mechanisms of reaching.

    PubMed

    Caminiti, R; Ferraina, S; Mayer, A B

    1998-12-01

    Recent studies of visually guided reaching in monkeys support the hypothesis that the visuomotor transformations underlying arm movements to spatial targets involve a parallel mechanism that simultaneously engages functionally related frontal and parietal areas linked by reciprocal cortico-cortical connections. The neurons in these areas possess similar combinations of response properties. The multimodal combinatorial properties of these neurons and the gradient architecture of the parietofrontal network emerge as a potential substrate to link the different sensory and motor signals that arise during reaching behavior into common hybrid reference frames. This convergent combinatorial process is evident at early stages of visual information processing in the occipito-parietal cortex, suggesting the existence of re-entrant motor influences on cortical areas once believed to have only visual functions. PMID:9914239

  3. Impaired cortical mitochondrial function following TBI precedes behavioral changes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, William D.; Buonora, John E.; Yarnell, Angela M.; Lucky, Jessica J.; D’Acchille, Michaela I.; McMullen, David C.; Boston, Andrew G.; Kuczmarski, Andrew V.; Kean, William S.; Verma, Ajay; Grunberg, Neil E.; Cole, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) pathophysiology can be attributed to either the immediate, primary physical injury, or the delayed, secondary injury which begins minutes to hours after the initial injury and can persist for several months or longer. Because these secondary cascades are delayed and last for a significant time period post-TBI, they are primary research targets for new therapeutics. To investigate changes in mitochondrial function after a brain injury, both the cortical impact site and ipsilateral hippocampus of adult male rats 7 and 17 days after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury were examined. State 3, state 4, and uncoupler-stimulated rates of oxygen consumption, respiratory control ratios (RCRs) were measured and membrane potential quantified, and all were significantly decreased in 7 day post-TBI cortical mitochondria. By contrast, hippocampal mitochondria at 7 days showed only non-significant decreases in rates of oxygen consumption and membrane potential. NADH oxidase activities measured in disrupted mitochondria were normal in both injured cortex and hippocampus at 7 days post-CCI. Respiratory and phosphorylation capacities at 17 days post-CCI were comparable to naïve animals for both cortical and hippocampus mitochondria. However, unlike oxidative phosphorylation, membrane potential of mitochondria in the cortical lining of the impact site did not recover at 17 days, suggesting that while diminished cortical membrane potential at 17 days does not adversely affect mitochondrial capacity to synthesize ATP, it may negatively impact other membrane potential-sensitive mitochondrial functions. Memory status, as assessed by a passive avoidance paradigm, was not significantly impaired until 17 days after injury. These results indicate pronounced disturbances in cortical mitochondrial function 7 days after CCI which precede the behavioral impairment observed at 17 days. PMID:24550822

  4. Visual stimuli recruit intrinsically generated cortical ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jae-eun Kang; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The cortical microcircuit is built with recurrent excitatory connections, and it has long been suggested that the purpose of this design is to enable intrinsically driven reverberating activity. To understand the dynamics of neocortical intrinsic activity better, we performed two-photon calcium imaging of populations of neurons from the primary visual cortex of awake mice during visual stimulation and spontaneous activity. In both conditions, cortical activity is dominated by coactive groups of neurons, forming ensembles whose activation cannot be explained by the independent firing properties of their contributing neurons, considered in isolation. Moreover, individual neurons flexibly join multiple ensembles, vastly expanding the encoding potential of the circuit. Intriguingly, the same coactive ensembles can repeat spontaneously and in response to visual stimuli, indicating that stimulus-evoked responses arise from activating these intrinsic building blocks. Although the spatial properties of stimulus-driven and spontaneous ensembles are similar, spontaneous ensembles are active at random intervals, whereas visually evoked ensembles are time-locked to stimuli. We conclude that neuronal ensembles, built by the coactivation of flexible groups of neurons, are emergent functional units of cortical activity and propose that visual stimuli recruit intrinsically generated ensembles to represent visual attributes. PMID:25201983

  5. MECHANISMS UNDERLYING SOMATOSENSORY CORTICAL DYNAMICS: II. IN VITRO STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The response of the sensorimotor cortical slice to repetitive, single site afferent drive is mapped using both evoked potential and metabolic mapping (2DG) methods. ystematic changes (increases or decreases) in the evoked potential occur during repetitive 3-5 Hz stimulation. hese...

  6. [Cortical spreading depolarization: a new pathophysiological mechanism in neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Porras, Renán; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Santos, Edgar

    2014-05-20

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a wave of almost complete depolarization of the neuronal and glial cells that occurs in different neurological diseases such as migraine with aura, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, head trauma and stroke. These depolarization waves are characterized by a change in the negative potential with an amplitude between -10 and -30mV, duration of ∼1min and changes in the ion homeostasis between the intra- and extracellular space. This results in neuronal edema and dendritic distortion. Under pathologic states of hypoperfusion, cortical spreading depolarization can produce oxidative stress, worsen hypoxia and induce neuronal death. This is due to intense arterial vasoconstriction produced by an inverse response called spreading ischemia. Only in the last years there has been an electrophysiological confirmation of cortical spreading depolarization in human brains. Occurrence of cortical spreading depolarization has been associated with worse outcome in patients. Currently, increased knowledge regarding the pathophysiologic mechanisms supports the hypothetical correlation of cortical spreading depolarization with brain damage in humans. There are diverse therapeutic alternatives that promise inhibition of cortical spreading depolarization and subsequent better outcomes. PMID:23928069

  7. Subject-level measurement of local cortical coupling.

    PubMed

    Vandekar, Simon N; Shinohara, Russell T; Raznahan, Armin; Hopson, Ryan D; Roalf, David R; Ruparel, Kosha; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Satterthwaite, Theodore D

    2016-06-01

    The human cortex is highly folded to allow for a massive expansion of surface area. Notably, the thickness of the cortex strongly depends on cortical topology, with gyral cortex sometimes twice as thick as sulcal cortex. We recently demonstrated that global differences in thickness between gyral and sulcal cortex continue to evolve throughout adolescence. However, human cortical development is spatially heterogeneous, and global comparisons lack power to detect localized differences in development or psychopathology. Here we extend previous work by proposing a new measure - local cortical coupling - that is sensitive to differences in the localized topological relationship between cortical thickness and sulcal depth. After estimation, subject-level coupling maps can be analyzed using standard neuroimaging analysis tools. Capitalizing on a large cross-sectional sample (n=932) of youth imaged as part of the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort, we demonstrate that local coupling is spatially heterogeneous and exhibits nonlinear development-related trajectories. Moreover, we uncover sex differences in coupling that indicate divergent patterns of cortical topology. Developmental changes and sex differences in coupling support its potential as a neuroimaging phenotype for investigating neuropsychiatric disorders that are increasingly conceptualized as disorders of brain development. R code to estimate subject-level coupling maps from any two cortical surfaces generated by FreeSurfer is made publicly available along with this manuscript. PMID:26956908

  8. Sparse asynchronous cortical generators can produce measurable scalp EEG signals.

    PubMed

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Dan, Jonathan; Frauscher, Birgit; Gotman, Jean

    2016-09-01

    We investigate to what degree the synchronous activation of a smooth patch of cortex is necessary for observing EEG scalp activity. We perform extensive simulations to compare the activity generated on the scalp by different models of cortical activation, based on intracranial EEG findings reported in the literature. The spatial activation is modeled as a cortical patch of constant activation or as random sets of small generators (0.1 to 3cm(2) each) concentrated in a cortical region. Temporal activation models for the generation of oscillatory activity are either equal phase or random phase across the cortical patches. The results show that smooth or random spatial activation profiles produce scalp electric potential distributions with the same shape. Also, in the generation of oscillatory activity, multiple cortical generators with random phase produce scalp activity attenuated on average only 2 to 4 times compared to generators with equal phase. Sparse asynchronous cortical generators can produce measurable scalp EEG. This is a possible explanation for seemingly paradoxical observations of simultaneous disorganized intracranial activity and scalp EEG signals. Thus, the standard interpretation of scalp EEG might constitute an oversimplification of the underlying brain activity. PMID:27262240

  9. Tagging cortical networks in emotion: a topographical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Andreas; Costa, Vincent; Smith, J. Carson; Sabatinelli, Dean; McGinnis, E. Menton; Bradley, Margaret M.; Lang, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Viewing emotional pictures is associated with heightened perception and attention, indexed by a relative increase in visual cortical activity. Visual cortical modulation by emotion is hypothesized to reflect re-entrant connectivity originating in higher-order cortical and/or limbic structures. The present study used dense-array electroencephalography and individual brain anatomy to investigate functional coupling between the visual cortex and other cortical areas during affective picture viewing. Participants viewed pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant pictures that flickered at a rate of 10 Hz to evoke steady-state visual evoked potentials (ssVEPs) in the EEG. The spectral power of ssVEPs was quantified using Fourier transform, and cortical sources were estimated using beamformer spatial filters based on individual structural magnetic resonance images. In addition to lower-tier visual cortex, a network of occipito-temporal and parietal (bilateral precuneus, inferior parietal lobules) structures showed enhanced ssVEP power when participants viewed emotional (either pleasant or unpleasant), compared to neutral pictures. Functional coupling during emotional processing was enhanced between the bilateral occipital poles and a network of temporal (left middle/inferior temporal gyrus), parietal (bilateral parietal lobules), and frontal (left middle/inferior frontal gyrus) structures. These results converge with findings from hemodynamic analyses of emotional picture viewing and suggest that viewing emotionally engaging stimuli is associated with the formation of functional links between visual cortex and the cortical regions underlying attention modulation and preparation for action. PMID:21954087

  10. Cortical contributions to the flail leg syndrome: Pathophysiological insights.

    PubMed

    Menon, Parvathi; Geevasinga, Nimeshan; Yiannikas, Con; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Cortical hyperexcitability has been identified as an intrinsic feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Consequently, the aim of the present study was to determine whether cortical hyperexcitability formed the pathophysiological basis for the flail leg syndrome (FL), an atypical ALS variant. Cortical excitability studies were undertaken on 18 FL patients, using the threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technique, and results were compared to healthy controls, upper and lower limb-onset ALS as well as bulbar-onset and the flail arm variant ALS. Results showed that cortical hyperexcitability was a feature of FL and was heralded by a significant reduction of short-interval intracortical inhibition (FL 7.2 ± 1.8%; controls 13.2 ± 0.8%, p <0.01) and cortical silent period (CSP) duration (FL 181.7 ± 10.8ms; controls 209.8 ± 3.4ms; p <0.05) along with an increase in motor evoked potential amplitude (FL 29.2 ± 5.1%; controls 18.9 ± 1.2%, p <0.05). The degree of cortical hyperexcitability was comparable between FL and other ALS phenotypes, defined by site of disease onset. In addition, the CSP duration correlated with biomarkers of peripheral neurodegeneration in FL. In conclusion, cortical hyperexcitability is a feature of the flail leg syndrome, being comparable to other ALS phenotypes. Importantly, cortical hyperexcitability correlates with neurodegeneration, and as such may contribute to the underlying pathophysiology in FL. PMID:26888565

  11. [Cortical control of saccades].

    PubMed

    Pierrot-Deseilligny, C

    1989-01-01

    Among saccades triggered by the cerebral cortex, visually guided saccades are the best known and their cortical control is reviewed here. Only two immediately supra-reticular structures are able to trigger saccades (whatever their type): the frontal eye fields (FEF) and the superior colliculus (SC). These structures control two parallel excitatory pathways, which can replace each other in the event of lesion. Experimental findings have suggested that the colliculo-reticular pathway would, in the normal state, play the main role in the triggering of reflexive visually guided saccades. Furthermore experimental and clinical data suggest that the SC would receive an excitatory afference from the posterior part of the intraparietal sulcus, which could be involved in the triggering of these saccades. The parietal lobe could influence the SC by increasing the pre-excitation due to the onset of the visual target. There are also inhibitory pathways which prevent saccades, in particular during fixation. Two groups of tonic neurons inhibit the excitatory pathways. These are the omnipause neurons and the neurons of the substantia nigra (pars reticulata), which project upon the premotor reticular formations and the SC respectively. The pathways projecting upon these 2 types of neurons are multiple and still little known. Nevertheless, some arguments suggest that the frontal lobe partly controls inhibition. These arguments are based on a somewhat disinhibited triggering of reflexive visually guided saccades in focal or degenerative (progressive supranuclear palsy) frontal lesions. The prefrontal cortex could be involved in inhibition control, and it could act functionally above the FEF. PMID:2682934

  12. Malformations of cortical development and aberrant cortical networks: epileptogenesis and functional organization.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Renzo; Barba, Carmen

    2010-12-01

    Malformations of cortical development are a major cause of drug-resistant epilepsy. Focal cortical dysplasia, heterotopia, and polymicrogyria are often manifested as discrete areas of abnormal neuronal migration and improper development of the cerebral cortex. Some of the patients harboring these malformations have obvious neurologic impairment, but others show unexpected deficits that are detectable only by screening. The role of surgical treatment of epilepsy due to localized malformations of cortical development is now established. However, its technical application can be challenging in that localization of function based on anatomic landmarks may not be reliable. Intracranial recordings have shown a high propensity for complex epileptogenic networks that may include remote cortical and subcortical regions. The MRI visible area of cortical abnormality should therefore be regarded as just an indicator of the epileptogenic zone rather than its tangible substrate. Completeness of resection, after delineation of the ictal onset zone, a key factor for successful epilepsy surgery, may be particularly difficult, and invasive EEG monitoring is necessary in most patients. Neural plasticity issues are of primary importance to surgical planning as the possibility of removing eloquent cortex permits more complete procedures with potentially higher rates of success. However, the functional consequences of malformative lesions are still poorly understood; conservation of function in the dysplastic cortex, its atypical representation, and relocation outside the malformed area are all possible. Surgical planning for associated epilepsy should therefore be based on individual assessments of structural imaging and of the major functions relevant to the area in question in the individual patient. PMID:21076336

  13. Cortical blindness in acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Katafuchi, Y; Nishimi, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Matsuishi, T; Kimura, Y; Otaki, E; Yamashita, Y

    1985-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy had persistent cortical blindness following acute carbon monoxide poisoning. He was believed to have suffered anoxic brain damage due to incomplete combustion of the briquette-type solid fuel. Computed tomographic (CT) scan of the brain and visual evoked potentials (VEP) in the early stage were normal. However, on the 20th hospital day CT scan showed leukomalacia and VEP showed an absence of N1-, and P1-waves which was well correlated with the clinical feature at that time. PMID:4083389

  14. Toward more versatile and intuitive cortical brain machine interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Richard A.; Kellis, Spencer; Klaes, Christian; Aflalo, Tyson

    2015-01-01

    Brain machine interfaces have great potential in neuroprosthetic applications to assist patients with brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. One type of BMI is a cortical motor prosthetic which is used to assist paralyzed subjects. Motor prosthetics to date have typically used the motor cortex as a source of neural signals for controlling external devices. The review will focus on several new topics in the arena of cortical prosthetics. These include using 1) recordings from cortical areas outside motor cortex; 2) local field potentials (LFPs) as a source of recorded signals; 3) somatosensory feedback for more dexterous control of robotics; and 4) new decoding methods that work in concert to form an ecology of decode algorithms. These new advances hold promise in greatly accelerating the applicability and ease of operation of motor prosthetics. PMID:25247368

  15. Cortical thickness change in autism during early childhood.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elizabeth; Thurm, Audrey; Greenstein, Deanna; Farmer, Cristan; Swedo, Susan; Giedd, Jay; Raznahan, Armin

    2016-07-01

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans at high spatial resolution can detect potential foci of early brain dysmaturation in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In addition, comparison between MRI and behavior measures over time can identify patterns of brain change accompanying specific outcomes. We report structural MRI data from two time points for a total of 84 scans in children with ASD and 30 scans in typical controls (mean age time one = 4.1 years, mean age at time two = 6.6 years). Surface-based cortical morphometry and linear mixed effects models were used to link changes in cortical anatomy to both diagnostic status and individual differences in changes in language and autism severity. Compared with controls, children with ASD showed accelerated gray matter volume gain with age, which was driven by a lack of typical age-related cortical thickness (CT) decrease within 10 cortical regions involved in language, social cognition, and behavioral control. Greater expressive communication gains with age in children with ASD were associated with greater CT gains in a set of right hemisphere homologues to dominant language cortices, potentially identifying a compensatory system for closer translational study. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2616-2629, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061356

  16. Prefrontal cortical dopamine transmission is decreased in alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Narendran, Rajesh; Mason, Neale Scott; Paris, Jennifer; Himes, Michael L.; Douaihy, Antoine B.; Frankle, W. Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Objective Basic studies have demonstrated that optimal levels of prefrontal cortical dopamine are critical to various executive functions such working memory, attention, inhibitory control and risk/reward decisions--all of which are impaired in addictive disorders such as alcoholism. Based on this and imaging studies in alcoholics that have demonstrated less dopamine in the striatum, we hypothesized decreased dopamine transmission in the prefrontal cortex in alcoholism. To test this hypothesis, we used amphetamine and [11C]FLB 457 positron emission tomography (PET) to measure cortical dopamine transmission in a group of 21 recently abstinent alcoholics and matched healthy controls. Methods [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (BPND) was measured in subjects with kinetic analysis using the arterial input function both before and after 0.5 mg kg−1 of d-amphetamine. Results Amphetamine-induced displacement of [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (Δ BPND) was significantly smaller in the cortical regions in alcoholics compared to healthy controls. Cortical regions that demonstrated lower dopamine transmission in alcoholics included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Conclusions The results of this study for the first time unambiguously demonstrate decreased dopamine transmission in the cortex in alcoholism. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical relevance of decreased cortical dopamine as to whether it is related to impaired executive function, relapse, and outcome in alcoholism. PMID:24874293

  17. Cortical Hubs Form a Module for Multisensory Integration on Top of the Hierarchy of Cortical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zamora-López, Gorka; Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Sensory stimuli entering the nervous system follow particular paths of processing, typically separated (segregated) from the paths of other modal information. However, sensory perception, awareness and cognition emerge from the combination of information (integration). The corticocortical networks of cats and macaque monkeys display three prominent characteristics: (i) modular organisation (facilitating the segregation), (ii) abundant alternative processing paths and (iii) the presence of highly connected hubs. Here, we study in detail the organisation and potential function of the cortical hubs by graph analysis and information theoretical methods. We find that the cortical hubs form a spatially delocalised, but topologically central module with the capacity to integrate multisensory information in a collaborative manner. With this, we resolve the underlying anatomical substrate that supports the simultaneous capacity of the cortex to segregate and to integrate multisensory information. PMID:20428515

  18. Imprinting and recalling cortical ensembles.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yang, Weijian; Bando, Yuki; Peterka, Darcy S; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-08-12

    Neuronal ensembles are coactive groups of neurons that may represent building blocks of cortical circuits. These ensembles could be formed by Hebbian plasticity, whereby synapses between coactive neurons are strengthened. Here we report that repetitive activation with two-photon optogenetics of neuronal populations from ensembles in the visual cortex of awake mice builds neuronal ensembles that recur spontaneously after being imprinted and do not disrupt preexisting ones. Moreover, imprinted ensembles can be recalled by single- cell stimulation and remain coactive on consecutive days. Our results demonstrate the persistent reconfiguration of cortical circuits by two-photon optogenetics into neuronal ensembles that can perform pattern completion. PMID:27516599

  19. Vibrotactile aid and brain cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Suárez, H; Cibils, D; Caffa, C; Silveira, A; Basalo, S; Svirsky, M

    1997-03-01

    Six profoundly deaf patients were studied with mapping evoked potentials (MEP) using an acoustic signal passed through the vibrotactile prosthesis. This stimulus produced an activation of the central sulcus brain cortex. When the proSthesis was placed in the presenternal area it showed N1 P1 potentials with higher voltage and a more defined cortical dipole inversion than when the prosthesis was placed in the arm or abdomen: thus the presternal stimulation is considered an adequate place for the use of vibrotactile stimulation. The MEP were recorded in 2 patients after a period of audiological training and they showed new earlier potentials. These suggest plastic changes in the processing of an acoustic signal sent from the presternal skin by the somatosensory pathway after training and involving learning procedures. PMID:9105450

  20. A zonal model of cortical functions.

    PubMed

    Green, H S; Triffet, T

    1989-01-01

    A model of cortical functions is developed with the object of simulating the observed behavior of individual neurons organized in unit circuits and functional systems of the cerebellum, the cerebrum and the hippocampal formation. The neuronal model is capable of representing refractory and potentiated states, as well as the firing and lowest resting states. The unit circuits of each system consist of all common types of cells with known synaptic connections. In the cerebral system these unit circuits are interconnected to form columns as well as zones. A new discrete neural network equation, which takes account of interactions with the extracellular field, is proposed to simulate electrical activity in these circuits. A coherent theory of cortical activity and functions is derived that accounts for many of the observed phenomena, including those associated with the development of long-term potentiation and sequential memory. Three appendices are devoted to the theory of extracellular interactions, the derivation of non-linear network equations, and a computer program to simulate learning in the cortex. PMID:2779262

  1. Phase advancement and nucleus-specific timing of thalamocortical activity during slow cortical oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Slézia, Andrea; Hangya, Balázs; Ulbert, István; Acsády, László

    2011-01-01

    The exact timing of cortical afferent activity is instrumental for the correct coding and retrieval of internal and external stimuli. Thalamocortical inputs represent the most significant subcortical pathway to the cortex, but the precise timing and temporal variability of thalamocortical activity is not known. To examine this question, we studied the phase of thalamic action potentials relative to cortical oscillations and established correlations among phase, the nuclear location of the thalamocortical neurons and the frequency of cortical activity. The phase of thalamic action potentials depended on the exact frequency of the slow cortical oscillation both on long (minutes) and short (single wave) time scales. Faster waves were accompanied by phase advancement in both cases. Thalamocortical neurons located in different nuclei fired at significantly different phases of the slow waves but were active at similar phase of spindle oscillations. Different thalamic nuclei displayed distinct burst patterns. Bursts with higher number of action potentials displayed progressive phase advancement in a nucleus-specific manner. Thalamic neurons located along nuclear borders were characterized by mixed burst and phase properties. Our data demonstrate that the temporal relationship between cortical and thalamic activity is not fixed but displays dynamic changes during oscillatory activity. The timing depends on the precise location and exact activity of thalamocortical cells and the ongoing cortical network pattern. This variability of thalamic output and its coupling to cortical activity can enable thalamocortical neurons to actively participate in the coding and retrieval of complex cortical signals. PMID:21228169

  2. Asymmetrical Cortical Processing of Radial Expansioncontraction in Infants and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirai, Nobu; Birtles, Deirdre; Wattam-Bell, John; Yamaguchi, Masami K.; Kanazawa, So; Atkinson, Janette; Braddick, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    We report asymmetrical cortical responses (steady-state visual evoked potentials) to radial expansion and contraction in human infants and adults. Forty-four infants (22 3-month-olds and 22 4-month-olds) and nine adults viewed dynamic dot patterns which cyclically (2.1 Hz) alternate between radial expansion (or contraction) and random directional…

  3. Biomechanics of Single Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bernick, Kristin B.; Prevost, Thibault P.; Suresh, Subra; Socrate, Simona

    2011-01-01

    This study presents experimental results and computational analysis of the large strain dynamic behavior of single neurons in vitro with the objective of formulating a novel quantitative framework for the biomechanics of cortical neurons. Relying on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique, novel testing protocols are developed to enable the characterization of neural soma deformability over a range of indentation rates spanning three orders of magnitude – 10, 1, and 0.1 μm/s. Modified spherical AFM probes were utilized to compress the cell bodies of neonatal rat cortical neurons in load, unload, reload and relaxation conditions. The cell response showed marked hysteretic features, strong non-linearities, and substantial time/rate dependencies. The rheological data were complemented with geometrical measurements of cell body morphology, i.e. cross-diameter and height estimates. A constitutive model, validated by the present experiments, is proposed to quantify the mechanical behavior of cortical neurons. The model aimed to correlate empirical findings with measurable degrees of (hyper-) elastic resilience and viscosity at the cell level. The proposed formulation, predicated upon previous constitutive model developments undertaken at the cortical tissue level, was implemented into a three-dimensional finite element framework. The simulated cell response was calibrated to the experimental measurements under the selected test conditions, providing a novel single cell model that could form the basis for further refinements. PMID:20971217

  4. Anesthesia differentially modulates spontaneous network dynamics by cortical area and layer.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Kristin K; Bennett, Davis V; Hutt, Axel; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2013-12-01

    Anesthesia is widely used in medicine and research to achieve altered states of consciousness and cognition. Whereas changes to macroscopic cortical activity patterns by anesthesia measured at the spatial resolution of electroencephalography have been widely studied, modulation of mesoscopic and microscopic network dynamics by anesthesia remain poorly understood. To address this gap in knowledge, we recorded spontaneous mesoscopic (local field potential) and microscopic (multiunit activity) network dynamics in primary visual cortex (V1) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of awake and isoflurane anesthetized ferrets (Mustela putoris furo). This approach allowed for examination of activity as a function of cortical area, cortical layer, and anesthetic depth with much higher spatial and temporal resolution than in previous studies. We hypothesized that a primary sensory area and an association cortical area would exhibit different patterns of network modulation by anesthesia due to their different functional roles. Indeed, we found effects specific to cortical area and cortical layer. V1 exhibited minimal changes in rhythmic structure with anesthesia but differential modulation of input layer IV. In contrast, anesthesia profoundly altered spectral power in PFC, with more uniform modulation across cortical layers. Our results demonstrate that anesthesia modulates spontaneous cortical activity in an area- and layer-specific manner. These finding provide the basis for 1) refining anesthesia monitoring algorithms, 2) reevaluating the large number of systems neuroscience studies performed in anesthetized animals, and 3) increasing our understanding of differential dynamics across cortical layers and areas. PMID:24047911

  5. Decoding of Covert Vowel Articulation Using Electroencephalography Cortical Currents.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Natsue; Nishimoto, Atsushi; Belkacem, Abdelkader Nasreddine; Shin, Duk; Kambara, Hiroyuki; Hanakawa, Takashi; Koike, Yasuharu

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of providing assistive technology for the communication impaired, we proposed electroencephalography (EEG) cortical currents as a new approach for EEG-based brain-computer interface spellers. EEG cortical currents were estimated with a variational Bayesian method that uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data as a hierarchical prior. EEG and fMRI data were recorded from ten healthy participants during covert articulation of Japanese vowels /a/ and /i/, as well as during a no-imagery control task. Applying a sparse logistic regression (SLR) method to classify the three tasks, mean classification accuracy using EEG cortical currents was significantly higher than that using EEG sensor signals and was also comparable to accuracies in previous studies using electrocorticography. SLR weight analysis revealed vertices of EEG cortical currents that were highly contributive to classification for each participant, and the vertices showed discriminative time series signals according to the three tasks. Furthermore, functional connectivity analysis focusing on the highly contributive vertices revealed positive and negative correlations among areas related to speech processing. As the same findings were not observed using EEG sensor signals, our results demonstrate the potential utility of EEG cortical currents not only for engineering purposes such as brain-computer interfaces but also for neuroscientific purposes such as the identification of neural signaling related to language processing. PMID:27199638

  6. Decoding of Covert Vowel Articulation Using Electroencephalography Cortical Currents

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Natsue; Nishimoto, Atsushi; Belkacem, Abdelkader Nasreddine; Shin, Duk; Kambara, Hiroyuki; Hanakawa, Takashi; Koike, Yasuharu

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of providing assistive technology for the communication impaired, we proposed electroencephalography (EEG) cortical currents as a new approach for EEG-based brain-computer interface spellers. EEG cortical currents were estimated with a variational Bayesian method that uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data as a hierarchical prior. EEG and fMRI data were recorded from ten healthy participants during covert articulation of Japanese vowels /a/ and /i/, as well as during a no-imagery control task. Applying a sparse logistic regression (SLR) method to classify the three tasks, mean classification accuracy using EEG cortical currents was significantly higher than that using EEG sensor signals and was also comparable to accuracies in previous studies using electrocorticography. SLR weight analysis revealed vertices of EEG cortical currents that were highly contributive to classification for each participant, and the vertices showed discriminative time series signals according to the three tasks. Furthermore, functional connectivity analysis focusing on the highly contributive vertices revealed positive and negative correlations among areas related to speech processing. As the same findings were not observed using EEG sensor signals, our results demonstrate the potential utility of EEG cortical currents not only for engineering purposes such as brain-computer interfaces but also for neuroscientific purposes such as the identification of neural signaling related to language processing. PMID:27199638

  7. Cortical sensory plasticity in a model of migraine with aura

    PubMed Central

    Theriot, Jeremy J.; Toga, Arthur W.; Prakash, Neal; Ju, Y. Sungtaek; Brennan, K.C.

    2012-01-01

    The migraine attack is characterized by alterations in sensory perception, such as photophobia or allodynia, which have in common an uncomfortable amplification of the percept. It is not known how these changes arise. We evaluated the ability of cortical spreading depression (CSD), the proposed mechanism of the migraine aura, to shape the cortical activity that underlies sensory perception. We measured forepaw- and hindpaw-evoked sensory responses in rat, before and after CSD, using multi-electrode array recordings and 2-dimensional optical spectroscopy. CSD significantly altered cortical sensory processing on a timescale compatible with the duration of the migraine attack. Both electrophysiological and hemodynamic maps had a reduced surface area (were sharpened) after CSD. Electrophysiological responses were potentiated at the receptive field center, but suppressed in surround regions. Finally, the normal adaptation of sensory evoked responses was attenuated at the receptive field center. In summary, we show that CSD induces changes in the evoked cortical response that are consistent with known mechanisms of cortical plasticity. These mechanisms provide a novel neurobiological substrate to explain the sensory alterations of the migraine attack. PMID:23115163

  8. Redefining the Role of Limbic Areas in Cortical Processing.

    PubMed

    Chanes, Lorena; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2016-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that the brain actively constructs action and perception using past experience. In this paper, we propose that the direction of information flow along gradients of laminar differentiation provides important insight on the role of limbic cortices in cortical processing. Cortical limbic areas, with a simple laminar structure (e.g., no or rudimentary layer IV), send 'feedback' projections to lower level better laminated areas. We propose that this 'feedback' functions as predictions that drive processing throughout the cerebral cortex. This hypothesis has the potential to provide a unifying framework for an increasing number of proposals that use predictive coding to explain a myriad of neural processes and disorders, and has important implications for hypotheses about consciousness. PMID:26704857

  9. Expression of TRPC6 and BDNF in Cortical Lesions From Patients With Focal Cortical Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Da-Hai; Guo, Wei; Sun, Fei-Ji; Xu, Guang-Zhen; Zang, Zhen-Le; Shu, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) likely results from abnormal migration of neural progenitor cells originating from the subventricular zone. To elucidate the roles in molecules that are involved in neural migration pathway abnormalities in FCDs, we investigated the expression patterns of transient receptor potential canonical channel 6 (TRPC6) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in cortical lesions from FCD patients and in samples of normal control cortex. TRPC6 and BDNF mRNA and protein levels were increased in FCD lesions. By immunohistochemistry, they were strongly expressed in microcolumns, heterotopic neurons, dysmorphic neurons, and balloon cells (BCs). Colocalization assays revealed that most of the misshapen TRPC6-positive or heterotopic cells had a neuronal lineage with the exception of TRPC6-positive FCDiib patient BCs, which had both neuronal and glial features. Most TRPC6-positive cells were glutamatergic neurons. There was also greater expression of calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV), the downstream factor of TRPC6, in FCD lesions, suggesting that TRPC6 expression promoted dendritic growth and the development of dendritic spines and excitatory synapses via the CaMKIV-CREB pathway in FCD. Thus, overexpression of BDNF and TRPC6 and activation of the TRPC6 signal transduction pathway in cortical lesions of FCD patients may contribute to FC pathogenesis and epileptogenesis. PMID:27288906

  10. Cable energy function of cortical axons

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L.; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na+-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na+-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20–70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship. PMID:27439954

  11. Cable energy function of cortical axons.

    PubMed

    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na(+)-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na(+)-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20-70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship. PMID:27439954

  12. Assessing similarity to primary tissue and cortical layer identity in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons through single-cell transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Handel, Adam E.; Chintawar, Satyan; Lalic, Tatjana; Whiteley, Emma; Vowles, Jane; Giustacchini, Alice; Argoud, Karene; Sopp, Paul; Nakanishi, Mahito; Bowden, Rory; Cowley, Sally; Newey, Sarah; Akerman, Colin; Ponting, Chris P.; Cader, M. Zameel

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cortical neurons potentially present a powerful new model to understand corticogenesis and neurological disease. Previous work has established that differentiation protocols can produce cortical neurons, but little has been done to characterize these at cellular resolution. In particular, it is unclear to what extent in vitro two-dimensional, relatively disordered culture conditions recapitulate the development of in vivo cortical layer identity. Single-cell multiplex reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to interrogate the expression of genes previously implicated in cortical layer or phenotypic identity in individual cells. Totally, 93.6% of single cells derived from iPSCs expressed genes indicative of neuronal identity. High proportions of single neurons derived from iPSCs expressed glutamatergic receptors and synaptic genes. And, 68.4% of iPSC-derived neurons expressing at least one layer marker could be assigned to a laminar identity using canonical cortical layer marker genes. We compared single-cell RNA-seq of our iPSC-derived neurons to available single-cell RNA-seq data from human fetal and adult brain and found that iPSC-derived cortical neurons closely resembled primary fetal brain cells. Unexpectedly, a subpopulation of iPSC-derived neurons co-expressed canonical fetal deep and upper cortical layer markers. However, this appeared to be concordant with data from primary cells. Our results therefore provide reassurance that iPSC-derived cortical neurons are highly similar to primary cortical neurons at the level of single cells but suggest that current layer markers, although effective, may not be able to disambiguate cortical layer identity in all cells. PMID:26740550

  13. Prognostic value of cortical magnetic stimulation in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Clarke, C E; Modarres-Sadeghi, H; Twomey, J A; Burt, A A

    1994-08-01

    Cortical magnetic stimulation was performed in a consecutive series of 10 patients presenting within 15 days of traumatic spinal cord injury. In those patients with complete paraplegia or quadriplegia, motor evoked potentials at presentation were absent below the level of the lesion. Six months after the injury, potentials had returned in the biceps brachii and abductor pollicis brevis muscles in some quadriplegic cases, but remained absent from the tibialis anterior in all of this group. None of those with a complete lesion made a significant functional recovery. Of the three patients with incomplete quadriplegia, two showed a significant recovery after 6 months. Motor evoked potentials were recordable below the level of the lesion at presentation in these cases, although the latencies were prolonged. In the remaining patient who failed to improve, potentials were unrecordable throughout the study. This small pilot study suggests that cortical magnetic stimulation may be useful in refining the prognosis in patients with an incomplete spinal cord injury. PMID:7970860

  14. Cortical Visual Impairment: New Directions

    PubMed Central

    Good, William V.

    2009-01-01

    Cortical visual impairment is the leading cause of bilateral low vision in children in the U.S., yet very little research is being done to find new diagnostic measures and treatments. Dr. Velma Dobson's pioneering work on visual assessments of developmentally delayed children stands out as highly significant in this field. Future research will assess new diagnostic measures, including advanced imaging techniques. In addition, research will evaluate methods to prevent, treat, and rehabilitate infants and children afflicted with this condition. PMID:19417710

  15. Cortical Control of Affective Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Black, Sherilynn J.; Hultman, Rainbo; Szabo, Steven T.; DeMaio, Kristine D.; Du, Jeanette; Katz, Brittany M.; Feng, Guoping; Covington, Herbert E.; Dzirasa, Kafui

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation and deep brain stimulation have emerged as therapeutic modalities for treatment refractory depression; however, little remains known regarding the circuitry that mediates the therapeutic effect of these approaches. Here we show that direct optogenetic stimulation of prefrontal cortex (PFC) descending projection neurons in mice engineered to express Chr2 in layer V pyramidal neurons (Thy1–Chr2 mice) models an antidepressant-like effect in mice subjected to a forced-swim test. Furthermore, we show that this PFC stimulation induces a long-lasting suppression of anxiety-like behavior (but not conditioned social avoidance) in socially stressed Thy1–Chr2 mice: an effect that is observed >10 d after the last stimulation. Finally, we use optogenetic stimulation and multicircuit recording techniques concurrently in Thy1–Chr2 mice to demonstrate that activation of cortical projection neurons entrains neural oscillatory activity and drives synchrony across limbic brain areas that regulate affect. Importantly, these neural oscillatory changes directly correlate with the temporally precise activation and suppression of limbic unit activity. Together, our findings show that the direct activation of cortical projection systems is sufficient to modulate activity across networks underlying affective regulation. They also suggest that optogenetic stimulation of cortical projection systems may serve as a viable therapeutic strategy for treating affective disorders. PMID:23325249

  16. Cortical inhibitory deficits in premanifest and early Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Philpott, April L; Cummins, Tarrant D R; Bailey, Neil W; Churchyard, Andrew; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie

    2016-01-01

    Although progress has been made towards understanding the gross cortical and subcortical pathology of Huntington's disease (HD), there remains little understanding of the progressive pathophysiological changes that occur in the brain circuits underlying the disease. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) enables investigation of the functional integrity of cortico-subcortical pathways, yet it has not been widely applied in HD research to date. This study sought to characterise profiles of cortical excitability, including inhibition and facilitation, in groups of premanifest and symptomatic HD participants via the use of TMS. We also investigated the clinical, neurocognitive and psychiatric correlates of cortical excitability to better understand the development of phenotypic heterogeneity. The sample comprised 16 premanifest HD, 12 early symptomatic HD and 17 healthy control participants. Single- and paired-pulse TMS protocols were administered to the left primary motor cortex, with surface electromyography recorded from the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. Short-interval cortical inhibition was significantly reduced in symptomatic HD, compared with premanifest HD and controls, and was significantly correlated with pathological burden and neurocognitive performance. There was also reduced long-interval cortical inhibition in both premanifest and symptomatic HD, compared with controls, which was associated with pathological burden and psychiatric disturbances. Motor thresholds, cortical silent periods and intracortical facilitation did not differ across groups. Our results provide important new insights into pathophysiological changes in cortico-subcortical circuits across disease stages in HD. We propose that neurophysiological measures obtained via TMS have potential utility as endophenotypic biomarkers in HD, given their association with both pathological burden and clinical phenotype. PMID:26416671

  17. Changes in motor cortical excitability during human muscle fatigue.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J L; Butler, J E; Allen, G M; Gandevia, S C

    1996-01-01

    1. The excitability of the motor cortex was investigated during fatiguing con of the elbow flexors in human subjects. During sustained contractions at 30 and 1 voluntary force (MVC), the short-latency electromyographic responses (EMG) evoke brachii and brachioradialis by transcranial magnetic stimulation increased in si EMG in the elbow flexors following the evoked muscle potential (silent period), duration during a sustained MVC but not during 30% MVCs nor during a sustained M muscle (adductor pollicis). 2. When the blood supply to brachioradialis was blocked with sphygmomanometer cuff sustained MVC, the changes in EMG responses to transcranial stimulation rapidly control values, This suggests that changes in these responses during fatigue wer small-diameter muscle afferents. 3. Tendon vibration during sustained MVCs indicated that the changes in the resp cortial stimulation were not mediated by reduced muscle spindle inputs. 4. Muscle action potentials evoked in brachioradialis by electrical stimulation cervicomedullary junction did not increase in size during sustained MVCs. Thus, cortically evoked responses during sustained MVCs reflects a change in cortical Although the silent period following cervicomedullary stimulation lengthened, it substantially shorter than the cortically evoked silent period. 5. The altered EMG responses to transcranial stimulation during fatigue suggest exitation and increased inhibition in the motor cortex. As these changes were un manipulation of afferent input they presumably result from intrinsic cortical pr altered voluntary drive to the motor cortex. Images Figure 1 PMID:8821148

  18. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Dependent Cortical Plasticity in Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Koga, Kohei; Li, Shermaine; Zhuo, Min

    2016-01-01

    Many cortical areas play crucial roles in higher order brain functions such as pain and emotion-processing, decision-making, and cognition. Among them, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insular cortex (IC) are two key areas. Glutamate mediates major excitatory transmission during long-term plasticity in both physiological and pathological conditions. Specifically related to nociceptive or pain behaviors, metabotropic glutamate subtype receptors (mGluRs) have been involved in different types of synaptic modulation and plasticity from periphery to the spinal cord. However, less is known about their functional roles in plasticity related to pain and its related behaviors within cortical regions. In this review, we first summarized previous studies of synaptic plasticity in both the ACC and IC, and discussed how mGluRs may be involved in both cortical long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD)-especially in LTD. The activation of mGluRs contributes to the induction of LTD in both ACC and IC areas. The loss of LTD caused by peripheral amputation or nerve injury can be rescued by priming ACC or IC with activations of mGluR1 receptors. We also discussed the potential functional roles of mGluRs for pain-related behaviors. We propose that targeting mGluRs in the cortical areas including the ACC and IC may provide a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of chronic pain, phantom pain or anxiety. PMID:27296638

  19. High frequency activation data used to validate localization of cortical electrodes during surgery for deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kondylis, Efstathios D.; Randazzo, Michael J.; Alhourani, Ahmad; Wozny, Thomas A.; Lipski, Witold J.; Crammond, Donald J.; Richardson, R. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Movement related synchronization of high frequency activity (HFA, 76–100 Hz) is a somatotopic process with spectral power changes occurring during movement in the sensorimotor cortex (Miller et al., 2007) [1]. These features allowed movement-related changes in HFA to be used to functionally validate the estimations of subdural electrode locations, which may be placed temporarily for research in deep brain stimulation surgery, using the novel tool described in Randazzo et al. (2015) [2]. We recorded electrocorticography (ECoG) signals and localized electrodes in the region of the sensorimotor cortex during an externally cued hand grip task in 8 subjects. Movement related HFA was determined for each trial by comparing HFA spectral power during movement epochs to pre-movement baseline epochs. Significant movement related HFA was found to be focal in time and space, occurring only during movement and only in a subset of electrodes localized to the pre- and post-central gyri near the hand knob. To further demonstrate the use of movement related HFA to aid electrode localization, we provide a sample of the electrode localization tool, with data loaded to allow readers to map movement related HFA onto the cortical surface of a sample patient. PMID:26862560

  20. Contralesional Cortical Structural Reorganization Contributes to Motor Recovery after Sub-Cortical Stroke: A Longitudinal Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jianxin; Ji, Qiling; Xin, Ruiqiang; Zhang, Dianping; Na, Xu; Peng, Ruchen; Li, Kuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Although changes in brain gray matter after stroke have been identified in some neuroimaging studies, lesion heterogeneity and individual variability make the detection of potential neuronal reorganization difficult. This study attempted to investigate the potential structural cortical reorganization after sub-cortical stroke using a longitudinal voxel-based gray matter volume (GMV) analysis. Eleven right-handed patients with first-onset, subcortical, ischemic infarctions involving the basal ganglia regions underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging in addition to National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and Motricity Index (MI) assessments in the acute (<5 days) and chronic stages (1 year later). The GMVs were calculated and compared between the two stages using nonparametric permutation paired t-tests. Moreover, the Spearman correlations between the GMV changes and clinical recoveries were analyzed. Compared with the acute stage, significant decreases in GMV were observed in the ipsilesional (IL) precentral gyrus (PreCG), paracentral gyrus (ParaCG), and contralesional (CL) cerebellar lobule VII in the chronic stage. Additionally, significant increases in GMV were found in the CL orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and middle (MFG) and inferior frontal gyri (IFG). Furthermore, severe GMV atrophy in the IL PreCG predicted poorer clinical recovery, and greater GMV increases in the CL OFG and MFG predicted better clinical recovery. Our findings suggest that structural reorganization of the CL “cognitive” cortices might contribute to motor recovery after sub-cortical stroke. PMID:27536229

  1. Perceived intensity of somatosensory cortical electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Hugh T.; Blaisdell, Aaron P.; Judy, Jack W.

    2010-01-01

    Artificial sensations can be produced by direct brain stimulation of sensory areas through implanted microelectrodes, but the perceptual psychophysics of such artificial sensations are not well understood. Based on prior work in cortical stimulation, we hypothesized that perceived intensity of electrical stimulation may be explained by the population response of the neurons affected by the stimulus train. To explore this hypothesis, we modeled perceived intensity of a stimulation pulse train with a leaky neural integrator. We then conducted a series of two-alternative forced choice behavioral experiments in which we systematically tested the ability of rats to discriminate frequency, amplitude, and duration of electrical pulse trains delivered to the whisker barrel somatosensory cortex. We found that the model was able to predict the performance of the animals, supporting the notion that perceived intensity can be largely accounted for by spatiotemporal integration of the action potentials evoked by the stimulus train. PMID:20440610

  2. [Posterior cortical atrophy with progressive visual agnosia].

    PubMed

    Zarranz, J J; Lasa, A; Fernández, M; Lezcano, E; Pérez Bas, M; Varona, L; Ruiz, J; Beristain, X

    1995-03-01

    Interest in progressive focal cerebral syndromes associated with classical degenerative diseases has increased in recent years. Descriptions of posterior cortical atrophy with progressive visual agnosia are relatively rare. We present 5 patients (2 women) ranging in age between 57 and 72 years old. In all cases symptoms began and progressed with no known etiology. All cases were sporadic. The main clinical signs are difficulty in recognizing objects, colors, persons or places; topographical disorientation and visual memory alterations; alexia, simultagnosia, loss of ocular fixing and optic ataxia. Some patients presented other disturbances of praxis or memory and 2 progressed to global dementia. Language function was preserved and behavioral disturbances did not develop. The amplitude of the P100 visual evoked potential was low but latency was normal in 4 patients and prolonged in 1. Brain images showed atrophy and hypoperfusion in the parieto-occipital area. The neuropathology status of these patients is unknown. PMID:7756009

  3. Cortical gating of oropharyngeal sensory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wheeler-Hegland, Karen; Pitts, Teresa; Davenport, Paul W

    2010-01-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials provide a measure of cortical neuronal activation in response to various types of sensory stimuli. In order to prevent flooding of the cortex with redundant information various sensory stimuli are gated cortically such that response to stimulus 2 (S2) is significantly reduced in amplitude compared to stimulus 1 (S1). Upper airway protective mechanisms, such as swallowing and cough, are dependent on sensory input for triggering and modifying their motor output. Thus, it was hypothesized that central neural gating would be absent for paired-air puff stimuli applied to the oropharynx. Twenty-three healthy adults (18-35 years) served as research participants. Pharyngeal sensory evoked potentials (PSEPs) were measured via 32-electrode cap (10-20 system) connected to SynAmps(2) Neuroscan EEG System. Paired-pulse air puffs were delivered with an inter-stimulus interval of 500 ms to the oropharynx using a thin polyethylene tube connected to a flexible laryngoscope. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a repeated measures analysis of variance. There were no significant differences found for the amplitudes S1 and S2 for any of the four component PSEP peaks. Mean gating ratios were above 0.90 for each peak. Results supports our hypothesis that sensory central neural gating would be absent for component PSEP peaks with paired-pulse stimuli delivered to the oropharynx. This may be related to the need for constant sensory monitoring necessary for adequate airway protection associated with swallowing and coughing. PMID:21423402

  4. Probing region-specific microstructure of human cortical areas using high angular and spatial resolution diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Manisha; Nauen, David W.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Mori, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Regional heterogeneity in cortical cyto- and myeloarchitecture forms the structural basis of mapping of cortical areas in the human brain. In this study, we investigate the potential of diffusion MRI to probe the microstructure of cortical gray matter and its region-specific heterogeneity across cortical areas in the fixed human brain. High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data at an isotropic resolution of 92-μm and 30 diffusion-encoding directions were acquired using a 3D diffusion-weighted gradient-and-spin-echo sequence, from the prefrontal (Brodmann area 9), primary motor (area 4), primary somatosensory (area 3b), and primary visual (area 17) cortical specimens (n = 3 each) from three human subjects. Further, the diffusion MR findings in these cortical areas were compared with histological silver impregnation of the same specimens, in order to investigate the underlying architectonic features that constitute the microstructural basis of diffusion-driven contrasts in cortical gray matter. Our data reveal distinct and region-specific diffusion MR contrasts across the studied areas, allowing delineation of intracortical bands of tangential fibers in specific layers layer I, layer VI, and the inner and outer bands of Baillarger. The findings of this work demonstrate unique sensitivity of diffusion MRI to differentiate region-specific cortical microstructure in the human brain, and will be useful for myeloarchitectonic mapping of cortical areas as well as to achieve an understanding of the basis of diffusion NMR contrasts in cortical gray matter. PMID:25449747

  5. Inhibitory Circuits in Cortical Layer 5

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Alexander; Adesnik, Hillel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons play a fundamental role in cortical computation and behavior. Recent technological advances, such as two photon imaging, targeted in vivo recording, and molecular profiling, have improved our understanding of the function and diversity of cortical interneurons, but for technical reasons most work has been directed towards inhibitory neurons in the superficial cortical layers. Here we review current knowledge specifically on layer 5 (L5) inhibitory microcircuits, which play a critical role in controlling cortical output. We focus on recent work from the well-studied rodent barrel cortex, but also draw on evidence from studies in primary visual cortex and other cortical areas. The diversity of both deep inhibitory neurons and their pyramidal cell targets make this a challenging but essential area of study in cortical computation and sensory processing. PMID:27199675

  6. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Ly, Julien Q M; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  7. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  8. Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton on cortical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Thompson, P M; Dinov, I; Toga, A W

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to construct graphical representations of cortical folding patterns by computing skeletons on triangulated cortical surfaces. In our approach, a cortical surface is first partitioned into sulcal and gyral regions via the solution of a variational problem using graph cuts, which can guarantee global optimality. After that, we extend the method of Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton [1] to subsets of triangulated surfaces, together with a geometrically intuitive pruning process that can trade off between skeleton complexity and the completeness of representing folding patterns. Compared with previous work that uses skeletons of 3-D volumes to represent sulcal patterns, the skeletons on cortical surfaces can be easily decomposed into branches and provide a simpler way to construct graphical representations of cortical morphometry. In our experiments, we demonstrate our method on two different cortical surface models, its ability of capturing major sulcal patterns and its application to compute skeletons of gyral regions. PMID:18450539

  9. Inhibitory Circuits in Cortical Layer 5.

    PubMed

    Naka, Alexander; Adesnik, Hillel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons play a fundamental role in cortical computation and behavior. Recent technological advances, such as two photon imaging, targeted in vivo recording, and molecular profiling, have improved our understanding of the function and diversity of cortical interneurons, but for technical reasons most work has been directed towards inhibitory neurons in the superficial cortical layers. Here we review current knowledge specifically on layer 5 (L5) inhibitory microcircuits, which play a critical role in controlling cortical output. We focus on recent work from the well-studied rodent barrel cortex, but also draw on evidence from studies in primary visual cortex and other cortical areas. The diversity of both deep inhibitory neurons and their pyramidal cell targets make this a challenging but essential area of study in cortical computation and sensory processing. PMID:27199675

  10. Cortical Tremor (CT) with coincident orthostatic movements.

    PubMed

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Frucht, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Cortical tremor (CT) is a form of cortical reflex myoclonus that can mimic essential tremor (ET). Clinical features that are helpful in distinguishing CT from ET are the irregular and jerky appearance of the movements. We report two patients with CT with coexisting orthostatic movements, either orthostatic tremor (OT) or myoclonus, who experienced functional improvement in both cortical myoclonus and orthostatic movements when treated with levetiracetam. PMID:26788343

  11. Automated assessment of renal cortical surface roughness from computerized tomography images and its association with age

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xinhui; Rule, Andrew D.; Elsherbiny, Hisham E.; Vrtiska, Terri J.; Avula, Ramesh T.; Alexander, Mariam P.; Lerman, Lilach O.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Nephrosclerosis occurs with aging and is characterized by increased kidney sub-capsular surface irregularities at autopsy. Assessments of cortical roughness in-vivo could provide an important measure of nephrosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an image-processing algorithm for quantifying renal cortical surface roughness in-vivo and determine its association with age. Materials and methods Renal cortical surface roughness was measured on contrast-enhanced abdominal CT images of potential living kidney donors. A roughness index was calculated based on geometric curvature of each kidney from 3D images, and compared with visual observation scores. Cortical roughness was compared between the oldest and youngest donors, and its interaction with cortical volume and age assessed. Results The developed quantitative roughness index identified significant differences in kidneys with visual surface roughness scores of 0 (minimal), 1 (mild), and 2 (moderate) (p<0.001) in a random sample of 200 potential kidney donors. Cortical roughness was significantly higher in the 94 oldest (64–75y) versus 91 youngest (18–25y) potential kidney donors (p<0.001). Lower cortical volume was associated with older age but not with roughness (r=−0.03, p=0.75). The association of oldest age group with roughness (OR=1.8 per SD of roughness index) remained significant after adjustment for total cortex volume (OR=2.0 per SD of roughness index). Conclusion A new algorithm to measure renal cortical surface roughness from CT scans detected rougher surface in older compared to younger kidneys, independent of cortical volume loss. This novel index may allow quantitative evaluation of nephrosclerosis in vivo using contrast-enhanced CT. PMID:25086950

  12. Environmental Enrichment Modulates Cortico-Cortical Interactions in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chillemi, Santi; Maffei, Lamberto; Caleo, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an experimental protocol based on a complex sensorimotor stimulation that dramatically affects brain development. While it is widely believed that the effects of EE result from the unique combination of different sensory and motor stimuli, it is not known whether and how cortico-cortical interactions are shaped by EE. Since the primary visual cortex (V1) is one of the best characterized targets of EE, we looked for direct cortico-cortical projections impinging on V1, and we identified a direct monosynaptic connection between motor cortex and V1 in the mouse brain. To measure the interactions between these areas under standard and EE rearing conditions, we used simultaneous recordings of local field potentials (LFPs) in awake, freely moving animals. LFP signals were analyzed by using different methods of linear and nonlinear analysis of time series (cross-correlation, mutual information, phase synchronization). We found that EE decreases the level of coupling between the electrical activities of the two cortical regions with respect to the control group. From a functional point of view, our results indicate, for the first time, that an enhanced sensorimotor experience impacts on the brain by affecting the functional crosstalk between different cortical areas. PMID:21966482

  13. Photophobia and cortical visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Jan, J E; Groenveld, M; Anderson, D P

    1993-06-01

    Photophobia, or intolerance of light, is not completely understood as a symptom. It has been divided into ocular and central types. This study shows that persistent, usually mild, photophobia occurs in about one-third of children with cortical visual impairment (CVI). When the CVI is congenital the photophobia is present from birth, and when it is acquired the sensitivity to light appears immediately after the brain insult. The intensity of photophobia tends to diminish with time and occasionally it may even disappear. The pathophysiology is unclear, as in all other neurological disorders associated with photophobia. PMID:8504889

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury Increases Cortical Glutamate Network Activity by Compromising GABAergic Control

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, David; Walker, Kendall; Andresen, Lauren; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Hampton, David; Tesco, Giuseppina; Dulla, Chris G.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor for developing pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Although disruptions in brain circuitry are associated with TBI, the precise mechanisms by which brain injury leads to epileptiform network activity is unknown. Using controlled cortical impact (CCI) as a model of TBI, we examined how cortical excitability and glutamatergic signaling was altered following injury. We optically mapped cortical glutamate signaling using FRET-based glutamate biosensors, while simultaneously recording cortical field potentials in acute brain slices 2–4 weeks following CCI. Cortical electrical stimulation evoked polyphasic, epileptiform field potentials and disrupted the input–output relationship in deep layers of CCI-injured cortex. High-speed glutamate biosensor imaging showed that glutamate signaling was significantly increased in the injured cortex. Elevated glutamate responses correlated with epileptiform activity, were highest directly adjacent to the injury, and spread via deep cortical layers. Immunoreactivity for markers of GABAergic interneurons were significantly decreased throughout CCI cortex. Lastly, spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency decreased and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current increased after CCI injury. Our results suggest that specific cortical neuronal microcircuits may initiate and facilitate the spread of epileptiform activity following TBI. Increased glutamatergic signaling due to loss of GABAergic control may provide a mechanism by which TBI can give rise to post-traumatic epilepsy. PMID:24610117

  15. Cortical auditory disorders: clinical and psychoacoustic features.

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, M F; Geehan, G R

    1988-01-01

    The symptoms of two patients with bilateral cortical auditory lesions evolved from cortical deafness to other auditory syndromes: generalised auditory agnosia, amusia and/or pure word deafness, and a residual impairment of temporal sequencing. On investigation, both had dysacusis, absent middle latency evoked responses, acoustic errors in sound recognition and matching, inconsistent auditory behaviours, and similarly disturbed psychoacoustic discrimination tasks. These findings indicate that the different clinical syndromes caused by cortical auditory lesions form a spectrum of related auditory processing disorders. Differences between syndromes may depend on the degree of involvement of a primary cortical processing system, the more diffuse accessory system, and possibly the efferent auditory system. Images PMID:2450968

  16. Functional Calcium Imaging in Developing Cortical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Hjorth, J.J. Johannes; Meredith, Rhiannon M.

    2011-01-01

    A hallmark pattern of activity in developing nervous systems is spontaneous, synchronized network activity. Synchronized activity has been observed in intact spinal cord, brainstem, retina, cortex and dissociated neuronal culture preparations. During periods of spontaneous activity, neurons depolarize to fire single or bursts of action potentials, activating many ion channels. Depolarization activates voltage-gated calcium channels on dendrites and spines that mediate calcium influx. Highly synchronized electrical activity has been measured from local neuronal networks using field electrodes. This technique enables high temporal sampling rates but lower spatial resolution due to integrated read-out of multiple neurons at one electrode. Single cell resolution of neuronal activity is possible using patch-clamp electrophysiology on single neurons to measure firing activity. However, the ability to measure from a network is limited to the number of neurons patched simultaneously, and typically is only one or two neurons. The use of calcium-dependent fluorescent indicator dyes has enabled the measurement of synchronized activity across a network of cells. This technique gives both high spatial resolution and sufficient temporal sampling to record spontaneous activity of the developing network. A key feature of newly-forming cortical and hippocampal networks during pre- and early postnatal development is spontaneous, synchronized neuronal activity (Katz & Shatz, 1996; Khaziphov & Luhmann, 2006). This correlated network activity is believed to be essential for the generation of functional circuits in the developing nervous system (Spitzer, 2006). In both primate and rodent brain, early electrical and calcium network waves are observed pre- and postnatally in vivo and in vitro (Adelsberger et al., 2005; Garaschuk et al., 2000; Lamblin et al., 1999). These early activity patterns, which are known to control several developmental processes including neuronal differentiation

  17. Progressive femoral cortical and cancellous bone density loss after uncemented tapered-design stem fixation

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Tobias E; Haeberle, Lothar; Mueller, Lars P; Kress, Alexander; Voelk, Michael; Pfander, David; Forst, Raimund; Schmidt, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Background Aseptic implant loosening and periprosthetic bone loss are major problems after total hip arthroplasty (THA). We present an in vivo method of computed tomography (CT) assisted osteodensitometry after THA that differentiates between cortical and cancellous bone density (BD) and area around the femoral component. Method Cortical and cancellous periprosthetic femoral BD (mg CaHA/mL), area (mm2) and contact area between the prothesis and cortical bone were determined prospectively in 31 patients 10 days, 1 year, and 6 years after uncemented THA (mean age at implantation: 55 years) using CT-osteodensitometry. Results 6 years postoperatively, cancellous BD had decreased by as much as 41% and cortical BD by up to 27% at the metaphyseal portion of the femur; this decrease was progressive between the 1-year and 6-year examinations. Mild cortical hypertrophy was observed along the entire length of the diaphysis. No statistically significant changes in cortical BD were observed along the diaphysis of the stem. Interpretation Periprosthetic CT-assisted osteodensitometry has the technical ability to discriminate between cortical and cancellous bone structures with respect to strain-adapted remodeling. Continuous loss of cortical and cancellous BD at the femoral metaphysis, a homeostatic cortical strain configuration, and mild cortical hypertrophy along the diaphysis suggest a diaphyseal fixation of the implanted stem. CT-assisted osteodensitometry has the potential to become an effective instrument for quality control in THA by means of in vivo determination of periprosthetic BD, which may be a causal factor in implant loosening after THA. PMID:20180716

  18. Cortical network models of impulse firing in the resting and active states predict cortical energetics.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Maxwell R; Farnell, Les; Gibson, William G; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2015-03-31

    Measurements of the cortical metabolic rate of glucose oxidation [CMR(glc(ox))] have provided a number of interesting and, in some cases, surprising observations. One is the decline in CMR(glc(ox)) during anesthesia and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and another, the inverse relationship between the resting-state CMR(glc(ox)) and the transient following input from the thalamus. The recent establishment of a quantitative relationship between synaptic and action potential activity on the one hand and CMR(glc(ox)) on the other allows neural network models of such activity to probe for possible mechanistic explanations of these phenomena. We have carried out such investigations using cortical models consisting of networks of modules with excitatory and inhibitory neurons, each receiving excitatory inputs from outside the network in addition to intermodular connections. Modules may be taken as regions of cortical interest, the inputs from outside the network as arising from the thalamus, and the intermodular connections as long associational fibers. The model shows that the impulse frequency of different modules can differ from each other by less than 10%, consistent with the relatively uniform CMR(glc(ox)) observed across different regions of cortex. The model also shows that, if correlations of the average impulse rate between different modules decreases, there is a concomitant decrease in the average impulse rate in the modules, consistent with the observed drop in CMR(glc(ox)) in NREM sleep and under anesthesia. The model also explains why a transient thalamic input to sensory cortex gives rise to responses with amplitudes inversely dependent on the resting-state frequency, and therefore resting-state CMR(glc(ox)). PMID:25775588

  19. Six Principles of Visual Cortical Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Per E.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental goal in vision science is to determine how many neurons in how many areas are required to compute a coherent interpretation of the visual scene. Here I propose six principles of cortical dynamics of visual processing in the first 150 ms following the appearance of a visual stimulus. Fast synaptic communication between neurons depends on the driving neurons and the biophysical history and driving forces of the target neurons. Under these constraints, the retina communicates changes in the field of view driving large populations of neurons in visual areas into a dynamic sequence of feed-forward communication and integration of the inward current of the change signal into the dendrites of higher order area neurons (30–70 ms). Simultaneously an even larger number of neurons within each area receiving feed-forward input are pre-excited to sub-threshold levels. The higher order area neurons communicate the results of their computations as feedback adding inward current to the excited and pre-excited neurons in lower areas. This feedback reconciles computational differences between higher and lower areas (75–120 ms). This brings the lower area neurons into a new dynamic regime characterized by reduced driving forces and sparse firing reflecting the visual areas interpretation of the current scene (140 ms). The population membrane potentials and net-inward/outward currents and firing are well behaved at the mesoscopic scale, such that the decoding in retinotopic cortical space shows the visual areas’ interpretation of the current scene. These dynamics have plausible biophysical explanations. The principles are theoretical, predictive, supported by recent experiments and easily lend themselves to experimental tests or computational modeling. PMID:20661451

  20. Cortical control of facial expression.

    PubMed

    Müri, René M

    2016-06-01

    The present Review deals with the motor control of facial expressions in humans. Facial expressions are a central part of human communication. Emotional face expressions have a crucial role in human nonverbal behavior, allowing a rapid transfer of information between individuals. Facial expressions can be either voluntarily or emotionally controlled. Recent studies in nonhuman primates and humans have revealed that the motor control of facial expressions has a distributed neural representation. At least five cortical regions on the medial and lateral aspects of each hemisphere are involved: the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area on the medial wall, and the rostral and caudal cingulate cortex. The results of studies in humans and nonhuman primates suggest that the innervation of the face is bilaterally controlled for the upper part and mainly contralaterally controlled for the lower part. Furthermore, the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, and the supplementary motor area are essential for the voluntary control of facial expressions. In contrast, the cingulate cortical areas are important for emotional expression, because they receive input from different structures of the limbic system. PMID:26418049

  1. Gyrification from constrained cortical expansion

    PubMed Central

    Tallinen, Tuomas; Chung, Jun Young; Biggins, John S.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    The exterior of the mammalian brain—the cerebral cortex—has a conserved layered structure whose thickness varies little across species. However, selection pressures over evolutionary time scales have led to cortices that have a large surface area to volume ratio in some organisms, with the result that the brain is strongly convoluted into sulci and gyri. Here we show that the gyrification can arise as a nonlinear consequence of a simple mechanical instability driven by tangential expansion of the gray matter constrained by the white matter. A physical mimic of the process using a layered swelling gel captures the essence of the mechanism, and numerical simulations of the brain treated as a soft solid lead to the formation of cusped sulci and smooth gyri similar to those in the brain. The resulting gyrification patterns are a function of relative cortical expansion and relative thickness (compared with brain size), and are consistent with observations of a wide range of brains, ranging from smooth to highly convoluted. Furthermore, this dependence on two simple geometric parameters that characterize the brain also allows us to qualitatively explain how variations in these parameters lead to anatomical anomalies in such situations as polymicrogyria, pachygyria, and lissencephalia. PMID:25136099

  2. Sleep and olfactory cortical plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Dylan C.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    In many systems, sleep plays a vital role in memory consolidation and synaptic homeostasis. These processes together help store information of biological significance and reset synaptic circuits to facilitate acquisition of information in the future. In this review, we describe recent evidence of sleep-dependent changes in olfactory system structure and function which contribute to odor memory and perception. During slow-wave sleep, the piriform cortex becomes hypo-responsive to odor stimulation and instead displays sharp-wave activity similar to that observed within the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the functional connectivity between the piriform cortex and other cortical and limbic regions is enhanced during slow-wave sleep compared to waking. This combination of conditions may allow odor memory consolidation to occur during a state of reduced external interference and facilitate association of odor memories with stored hedonic and contextual cues. Evidence consistent with sleep-dependent odor replay within olfactory cortical circuits is presented. These data suggest that both the strength and precision of odor memories is sleep-dependent. The work further emphasizes the critical role of synaptic plasticity and memory in not only odor memory but also basic odor perception. The work also suggests a possible link between sleep disturbances that are frequently co-morbid with a wide range of pathologies including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and depression and the known olfactory impairments associated with those disorders. PMID:24795585

  3. MarsAtlas: A cortical parcellation atlas for functional mapping.

    PubMed

    Auzias, Guillaume; Coulon, Olivier; Brovelli, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    An open question in neuroimaging is how to develop anatomical brain atlases for the analysis of functional data. Here, we present a cortical parcellation model based on macroanatomical information and test its validity on visuomotor-related cortical functional networks. The parcellation model is based on a recently developed cortical parameterization method (Auzias et al., [2013]: IEEE Trans Med Imaging 32:873-887), called HIP-HOP. This method exploits a set of primary and secondary sulci to create an orthogonal coordinate system on the cortical surface. A natural parcellation scheme arises from the axes of the HIP-HOP model running along the fundus of selected sulci. The resulting parcellation scheme, called MarsAtlas, complies with dorsoventral/rostrocaudal direction fields and allows inter-subject matching. To test it for functional mapping, we analyzed a MEG dataset collected from human participants performing an arbitrary visuomotor mapping task. Single-trial high-gamma activity, HGA (60-120 Hz), was estimated using spectral analysis and beamforming techniques at cortical areas arising from a Talairach atlas (i.e., Brodmann areas) and MarsAtlas. Using both atlases, we confirmed that visuomotor associations involve an increase in HGA over the sensorimotor and fronto-parietal network, in addition to medial prefrontal areas. However, MarsAtlas provided: (1) crucial functional information along both the dorsolateral and rostrocaudal direction; (2) an increase in statistical significance. To conclude, our results suggest that the MarsAtlas is a valid anatomical atlas for functional mapping, and represents a potential anatomical framework for integration of functional data arising from multiple techniques such as MEG, intracranial EEG and fMRI. PMID:26813563

  4. Brief anesthesia, but not voluntary locomotion, significantly alters cortical temperature

    PubMed Central

    Shirey, Michael J.; Kudlik, D'Anne E.; Huo, Bing-Xing; Greene, Stephanie E.; Drew, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in brain temperature can alter electrical properties of neurons and cause changes in behavior. However, it is not well understood how behaviors, like locomotion, or experimental manipulations, like anesthesia, alter brain temperature. We implanted thermocouples in sensorimotor cortex of mice to understand how cortical temperature was affected by locomotion, as well as by brief and prolonged anesthesia. Voluntary locomotion induced small (∼0.1°C) but reliable increases in cortical temperature that could be described using a linear convolution model. In contrast, brief (90-s) exposure to isoflurane anesthesia depressed cortical temperature by ∼2°C, which lasted for up to 30 min after the cessation of anesthesia. Cortical temperature decreases were not accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the γ-band local field potential power, multiunit firing rate, or locomotion behavior, which all returned to baseline within a few minutes after the cessation of anesthesia. In anesthetized animals where core body temperature was kept constant, cortical temperature was still >1°C lower than in the awake animal. Thermocouples implanted in the subcortex showed similar temperature changes under anesthesia, suggesting these responses occur throughout the brain. Two-photon microscopy of individual blood vessel dynamics following brief isoflurane exposure revealed a large increase in vessel diameter that ceased before the brain temperature significantly decreased, indicating cerebral heat loss was not due to increased cerebral blood vessel dilation. These data should be considered in experimental designs recording in anesthetized preparations, computational models relating temperature and neural activity, and awake-behaving methods that require brief anesthesia before experimental procedures. PMID:25972579

  5. Bicycling and Walking are Associated with Different Cortical Oscillatory Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Storzer, Lena; Butz, Markus; Hirschmann, Jan; Abbasi, Omid; Gratkowski, Maciej; Saupe, Dietmar; Schnitzler, Alfons; Dalal, Sarang S.

    2016-01-01

    Although bicycling and walking involve similar complex coordinated movements, surprisingly Parkinson’s patients with freezing of gait typically remain able to bicycle despite severe difficulties in walking. This observation suggests functional differences in the motor networks subserving bicycling and walking. However, a direct comparison of brain activity related to bicycling and walking has never been performed, neither in healthy participants nor in patients. Such a comparison could potentially help elucidating the cortical involvement in motor control and the mechanisms through which bicycling ability may be preserved in patients with freezing of gait. The aim of this study was to contrast the cortical oscillatory dynamics involved in bicycling and walking in healthy participants. To this end, EEG and EMG data of 14 healthy participants were analyzed, who cycled on a stationary bicycle at a slow cadence of 40 revolutions per minute (rpm) and walked at 40 strides per minute (spm), respectively. Relative to walking, bicycling was associated with a stronger power decrease in the high beta band (23–35 Hz) during movement initiation and execution, followed by a stronger beta power increase after movement termination. Walking, on the other hand, was characterized by a stronger and persisting alpha power (8–12 Hz) decrease. Both bicycling and walking exhibited movement cycle-dependent power modulation in the 24–40 Hz range that was correlated with EMG activity. This modulation was significantly stronger in walking. The present findings reveal differential cortical oscillatory dynamics in motor control for two types of complex coordinated motor behavior, i.e., bicycling and walking. Bicycling was associated with a stronger sustained cortical activation as indicated by the stronger high beta power decrease during movement execution and less cortical motor control within the movement cycle. We speculate this to be due to the more continuous nature of bicycling

  6. Cortical signature of patients with HBV-related cirrhosis without overt hepatic encephalopathy: a morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiu; Lv, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Ling; Wu, Hua-Wang; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Qiu, Ying-Wei; Zhang, Xue-Lin; Jiang, Gui-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients with hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis (HBV-RC) without overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) are associated with a varying degree of cognitive dysfunction. Several resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been conducted to explore the neural correlates of such cognitive deficits, whereas little effort has been made to investigate the cortical integrity in cirrhotic patients without OHE. Here, using cortical thickness, surface area and local gyrification index (lGI), this study performed a comprehensive analysis on the cortical morphometry of patients with HBV-RC without OHE (HBV-RC-NOHE) vs. matched healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, we found significantly increased cortical thickness in the bilateral lingual and parahippocampal gyrus, right posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, peri-calcarine sulcus and fusiform gyrus in patient with HBV-RC-NOHE, which may closely relate to be the low-grade brain edema. Cortical gyrification analysis showed significantly increased lGI in the left superior and inferior parietal cortex as well as lateral occipital cortex, which was speculated to be associated with disruptions in white matter connectivity and sub-optimal intra-cortical organization. In addition, the mean cortical thickness/lGI of the regions with structural abnormalities was shown to be negatively correlated with psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) of the patients with HBV-RC-NOHE. These morphological changes may serve as potential markers for the preclinical diagnosis and progression of HBV-RC-NOHE. PMID:26106307

  7. Assessing intracortical myelin in the living human brain using myelinated cortical thickness

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Christopher D.; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Tardif, Christine L.; Sehmbi, Manpreet; Hashim, Eyesha; Zaharieva, Nadejda; Minuzzi, Luciano; Frey, Benicio N.; Bock, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the myelination of the cerebral cortex may underlie abnormal cortical function in a variety of brain diseases. Here, we describe a technique for investigating changes in intracortical myelin in clinical populations on the basis of cortical thickness measurements with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 Tesla. For this, we separately compute the thickness of the shallower, lightly myelinated portion of the cortex and its deeper, heavily myelinated portion (referred to herein as unmyelinated and myelinated cortex, respectively). Our expectation is that the thickness of the myelinated cortex will be a specific biomarker for disruptions in myeloarchitecture. We show representative atlases of total cortical thickness, T, unmyelinated cortical thickness, G, and myelinated cortical thickness, M, for a healthy group of 20 female subjects. We further demonstrate myelinated cortical thickness measurements in a preliminary clinical study of 10 bipolar disorder type-I subjects and 10 healthy controls, and report significant decreases in the middle frontal gyrus in T, G, and M in the disorder, with the largest percentage change occurring in M. This study highlights the potential of myelinated cortical thickness measurements for investigating intracortical myelin involvement in brain disease at clinically relevant field strengths and resolutions. PMID:26557052

  8. Quantifying cortical surface harmonic deformation with stereovision during open cranial neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-02-01

    Cortical surface harmonic motion during open cranial neurosurgery is well observed in image-guided neurosurgery. Recently, we quantified cortical surface deformation noninvasively with synchronized blood pressure pulsation (BPP) from a sequence of stereo image pairs using optical flow motion tracking. With three subjects, we found the average cortical surface displacement can reach more than 1 mm and in-plane principal strains of up to 7% relative to the first image pair. In addition, the temporal changes in deformation and strain were in concert with BPP and patient respiration [1]. However, because deformation was essentially computed relative to an arbitrary reference, comparing cortical surface deformation at different times was not possible. In this study, we extend the technique developed earlier by establishing a more reliable reference profile of the cortical surface for each sequence of stereo image acquisitions. Specifically, fast Fourier transform (FFT) was applied to the dynamic cortical surface deformation, and the fundamental frequencies corresponding to patient respiration and BPP were identified, which were used to determine the number of image acquisitions for use in averaging cortical surface images. This technique is important because it potentially allows in vivo characterization of soft tissue biomechanical properties using intraoperative stereovision and motion tracking.

  9. Cortical superficial siderosis: detection and clinical significance in cerebral amyloid angiopathy and related conditions.

    PubMed

    Charidimou, Andreas; Linn, Jennifer; Vernooij, Meike W; Opherk, Christian; Akoudad, Saloua; Baron, Jean-Claude; Greenberg, Steven M; Jäger, Hans Rolf; Werring, David J

    2015-08-01

    Cortical superficial siderosis describes a distinct pattern of blood-breakdown product deposition limited to cortical sulci over the convexities of the cerebral hemispheres, sparing the brainstem, cerebellum and spinal cord. Although cortical superficial siderosis has many possible causes, it is emerging as a key feature of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, a common and important age-related cerebral small vessel disorder leading to intracerebral haemorrhage and dementia. In cerebral amyloid angiopathy cohorts, cortical superficial siderosis is associated with characteristic clinical symptoms, including transient focal neurological episodes; preliminary data also suggest an association with a high risk of future intracerebral haemorrhage, with potential implications for antithrombotic treatment decisions. Thus, cortical superficial siderosis is of relevance to neurologists working in neurovascular, memory and epilepsy clinics, and neurovascular emergency services, emphasizing the need for appropriate blood-sensitive magnetic resonance sequences to be routinely acquired in these clinical settings. In this review we focus on recent developments in neuroimaging and detection, aetiology, prevalence, pathophysiology and clinical significance of cortical superficial siderosis, with a particular emphasis on cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We also highlight important areas for future investigation and propose standards for evaluating cortical superficial siderosis in research studies. PMID:26115675

  10. Covariation of pupillary and auditory cortical activity in rats under isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Tokushige, H; Shiramatsu, T I; Noda, T; Kanzaki, R

    2015-08-01

    Very slow fluctuations of spontaneous activities significantly influence not only behavioral performance in a conscious state, but also neural activities in an unconscious state. Covariation of pupil and cortical activities may lend important insights into the state-dependent modulation of stimulus encoding, yet this phenomenon has received little attention, especially with regard to non-visual cortices. In the present study, we investigated co-fluctuation of pupil size and neural activity in the auditory cortex of rats under isoflurane anesthesia. Pupil fluctuation consisted of longitudinal irregular shifts, and 1-min cyclic modulations. Both spontaneous and auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) covaried with the longitudinal fluctuation of pupil size, but not with the 1-min cycle. Pupil size exhibited a positive correlation with spontaneous activity and negative correlation with AEP amplitude, particularly when the pupil size was beyond the normal range. Stimulus-specific adaptation characterized using an oddball paradigm was less dependent on pupil size than AEP. In contrast to the cortical activity, heart rate covaried with pupil size with the 1-min oscillatory component, but not the non-oscillatory component. Furthermore, light exposure induced the pupil reflex through the autonomic system, but did not modify cortical activity, indicating that autonomic activity was not causing the cortical modulation. These results together suggest that cortical activities spontaneously covary with pupillary activity through central cholinergic modulation that triggers sympathetic nerve activation. Such a state-dependent property may be a confounding factor in cortical electrophysiology studies. PMID:25967265

  11. Cortical signature of patients with HBV-related cirrhosis without overt hepatic encephalopathy: a morphometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiu; Lv, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Ling; Wu, Hua-Wang; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Qiu, Ying-Wei; Zhang, Xue-Lin; Jiang, Gui-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients with hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis (HBV-RC) without overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) are associated with a varying degree of cognitive dysfunction. Several resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been conducted to explore the neural correlates of such cognitive deficits, whereas little effort has been made to investigate the cortical integrity in cirrhotic patients without OHE. Here, using cortical thickness, surface area and local gyrification index (lGI), this study performed a comprehensive analysis on the cortical morphometry of patients with HBV-RC without OHE (HBV-RC-NOHE) vs. matched healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, we found significantly increased cortical thickness in the bilateral lingual and parahippocampal gyrus, right posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, peri-calcarine sulcus and fusiform gyrus in patient with HBV-RC-NOHE, which may closely relate to be the low-grade brain edema. Cortical gyrification analysis showed significantly increased lGI in the left superior and inferior parietal cortex as well as lateral occipital cortex, which was speculated to be associated with disruptions in white matter connectivity and sub-optimal intra-cortical organization. In addition, the mean cortical thickness/lGI of the regions with structural abnormalities was shown to be negatively correlated with psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) of the patients with HBV-RC-NOHE. These morphological changes may serve as potential markers for the preclinical diagnosis and progression of HBV-RC-NOHE. PMID:26106307

  12. A structure-dynamic approach to cortical organization: number of paths and accessibility.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Francisco A; da Fontoura Costa, Luciano

    2009-09-30

    A structure-dynamic approach to cortical systems is reported which is based on the number of paths and the accessibility of each node. The latter measurement is obtained by performing self-avoiding random walks in the respective networks, so as to simulate dynamics, and then calculating the entropies of the transition probabilities for walks starting from each node. Cortical networks of three species, namely cat, macaque and humans, are studied considering structural and dynamical aspects. It is verified that the human cortical network presents the highest accessibility and number of paths (in terms of z-scores). The correlation between the number of paths and accessibility is also investigated as a mean to quantify the level of independence between paths connecting pairs of nodes in cortical networks. By comparing the cortical networks of cat, macaque and humans, it is verified that the human cortical network tends to present the largest number of independent paths of length larger than four. These results suggest that the human cortical network is potentially the most resilient to brain injures. PMID:19591866

  13. Cortical cartography and Caret software.

    PubMed

    Van Essen, David C

    2012-08-15

    Caret software is widely used for analyzing and visualizing many types of fMRI data, often in conjunction with experimental data from other modalities. This article places Caret's development in a historical context that spans three decades of brain mapping--from the early days of manually generated flat maps to the nascent field of human connectomics. It also highlights some of Caret's distinctive capabilities. This includes the ease of visualizing data on surfaces and/or volumes and on atlases as well as individual subjects. Caret can display many types of experimental data using various combinations of overlays (e.g., fMRI activation maps, cortical parcellations, areal boundaries), and it has other features that facilitate the analysis and visualization of complex neuroimaging datasets. PMID:22062192

  14. Gyrification from constrained cortical expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallinen, Tuomas

    The convolutions of the human brain are a symbol of its functional complexity. But how does the outer surface of the brain, the layered cortex of neuronal gray matter get its folds? In this talk, we ask to which extent folding of the brain can be explained as a purely mechanical consequence of unpatterned growth of the cortical layer relative to the sublayers. Modeling the growing brain as a soft layered solid leads to elastic instabilities and the formation of cusped sulci and smooth gyri consistent with observations across species in both normal and pathological situations. Furthermore, we apply initial geometries obtained from fetal brain MRI to address the question of how the brain geometry and folding patterns may be coupled via mechanics.

  15. Cortical Cartography and Caret Software

    PubMed Central

    Van Essen, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Caret software is widely used for analyzing and visualizing many types of fMRI data, often in conjunction with experimental data from other modalities. This article places Caret’s development in a historical context that spans three decades of brain mapping – from the early days of manually generated flat maps to the nascent field of human connectomics. It also highlights some of Caret’s distinctive capabilities. This includes the ease of visualizing data on surfaces and/or volumes and on atlases as well as individual subjects. Caret can display many types of experimental data using various combinations of overlays (e.g., fMRI activation maps, cortical parcellations, areal boundaries), and it has other features that facilitate the analysis and visualization of complex neuroimaging datasets. PMID:22062192

  16. Cortical spreading depression: An enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, R. M.; Huang, H.; Wylie, J. J.

    2007-08-01

    The brain is a complex organ with active components composed largely of neurons, glial cells, and blood vessels. There exists an enormous experimental and theoretical literature on the mechanisms involved in the functioning of the brain, but we still do not have a good understanding of how it works on a gross mechanistic level. In general, the brain maintains a homeostatic state with relatively small ion concentration changes, the major ions being sodium, potassium, and chloride. Calcium ions are present in smaller quantities but still play an important role in many phenomena. Cortical spreading depression (CSD for short) was discovered over 60 years ago by A.A.P. Leão, a Brazilian physiologist doing his doctoral research on epilepsy at Harvard University, “Spreading depression of activity in the cerebral cortex," J. Neurophysiol., 7 (1944), pp. 359-390. Cortical spreading depression is characterized by massive changes in ionic concentrations and slow nonlinear chemical waves, with speeds on the order of mm/min, in the cortex of different brain structures in various experimental animals. In humans, CSD is associated with migraine with aura, where a light scintillation in the visual field propagates, then disappears, and is followed by a sustained headache. To date, CSD remains an enigma, and further detailed experimental and theoretical investigations are needed to develop a comprehensive picture of the diverse mechanisms involved in producing CSD. A number of mechanisms have been hypothesized to be important for CSD wave propagation. In this paper, we briefly describe several characteristics of CSD wave propagation, and examine some of the mechanisms that are believed to be important, including ion diffusion, membrane ionic currents, osmotic effects, spatial buffering, neurotransmitter substances, gap junctions, metabolic pumps, and synaptic connections. Continuum models of CSD, consisting of coupled nonlinear diffusion equations for the ion concentrations, and

  17. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features.

  18. Stress-induced sensitization of cortical adrenergic receptors following a history of cannabinoid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, B.A.S.; Szot, P.; Sikkema, C.; Cathel, A. M.; Kirby, L.G.; Van Bockstaele, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55,212-2, increases extracellular norepinephrine levels in the rat frontal cortex under basal conditions, likely via desensitization of inhibitory α2-adrenergic receptors located on norepinephrine terminals. Here, the effect of WIN 55,212-2 on stress-induced norepinephrine release was assessed in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats using in vivo microdialysis. Systemic administration of WIN 55,212-2 thirty minutes prior to stressor exposure prevented stress-induced cortical norepinephrine release induced by a single exposure to swim when compared to vehicle. To further probe cortical cannabinoid-adrenergic interactions, postsynaptic α2-adrenergic receptor (AR)-mediated responses were assessed in mPFC pyramidal neurons using electrophysiological analysis in an in vitro cortical slice preparation. We confirm prior studies showing that clonidine increases cortical pyramidal cell excitability and that this was unaffected by exposure to acute stress. WIN 55,212-2, via bath application, blocked postsynaptic α2-AR mediated responses in cortical neurons irrespective of exposure to stress. Interestingly, stress exposure prevented the desensitization of α2-AR mediated responses produced by a history of cannabinoid exposure. Together, these data indicate the stress-dependent nature of cannabinoid interactions via both pre- and postsynaptic ARs. In summary, microdialysis data indicate that cannabinoids restrain stress-induced cortical NE efflux. Electrophysiology data indicate that cannabinoids also restrain cortical cell excitability under basal conditions; however, stress interferes with these CB1-α2 AR interactions, potentially contributing to over-activation of pyramidal neurons in mPFC. Overall, cannabinoids are protective of the NE system and cortical excitability but stress can derail this protective effect, potentially contributing to stress-related psychopathology. These data add to the

  19. Dopamine D1/D5 receptor modulates state-dependent switching of soma-dendritic Ca2+ potentials via differential protein kinase A and C activation in rat prefrontal cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Young, Clint E; Yang, Charles R

    2004-01-01

    To determine the nature of dopamine modulation of dendritic Ca2+ signaling in layers V-VI prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons, whole-cell Ca2+ potentials were evoked after blockade of Na+ and K+ channels. Soma-dendritic Ca2+ spikes evoked by suprathreshold depolarizing pulses, which could be terminated by superimposed brief intrasomatic hyperpolarizing pulses, are blocked by the L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist nimodipine (1 microM). The D1/D5 receptor agonist dihydrexidine (DHX) (0.01-10 microM; 5 min) or R-(+)SKF81291 (10 microM) induced a prolonged (>30 min) dose-dependent peak suppression of these Ca2+ spikes. This effect was dependent on [Ca2+]i- and protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent mechanisms because [Ca2+]i chelation by BAPTA or inhibition of PKC by bisindolymaleimide (BiM1), but not inhibition of [Ca2+]i release with heparin or Xestospongin C, prevented the D1-mediated suppression of Ca2+ spikes. Depolarizing pulses subthreshold to activating a Ca2+ spike evoked a nimodipine-sensitive Ca2+ "hump" potential. D1/D5 stimulation induced an N-[2-((o-bromocinamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89)- or internal PKA inhibitory peptide[5-24]-sensitive (PKA-dependent) transient (approximately 7 min) potentiation of the hump potential to full Ca2+ spike firing. Furthermore, application of DHX in the presence of the PKC inhibitor BiM1 or internal PKC inhibitory peptide[19-36] resulted in persistent firing of full Ca2+ spike bursts, suggesting that a D1/D5-PKA mechanism switches subthreshold Ca2+ hump potential to fire full Ca2+ spikes, which are eventually turned off by a D1/D5-Ca2+-dependent PKC mechanism. This depolarizing state-dependent, D1/D5-activated, bi-directional switching of soma-dendritic L-type Ca2+ channels via PKA-dependent potentiation and PKC-dependent suppression may provide spatiotemporal regulation of synaptic integration and plasticity in PFC. PMID:14715933

  20. Delayed and Temporally Imprecise Neurotransmission in Reorganizing Cortical Microcircuits

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Samuel J.; Cheetham, Claire E.; Liu, Yan; Bennett, Sophie H.; Albieri, Giorgia; Jorstad, Anne A.; Knott, Graham W.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic neurotransmission is modified at cortical connections throughout life. Varying the amplitude of the postsynaptic response is one mechanism that generates flexible signaling in neural circuits. The timing of the synaptic response may also play a role. Here, we investigated whether weakening and loss of an entire connection between excitatory cortical neurons was foreshadowed in the timing of the postsynaptic response. We made electrophysiological recordings in rat primary somatosensory cortex that was undergoing experience-dependent loss of complete local excitatory connections. The synaptic latency of pyramid–pyramid connections, which typically comprise multiple synapses, was longer and more variable. Connection strength and latency were not correlated. Instead, prolonged latency was more closely related to progression of connection loss. The action potential waveform and axonal conduction velocity were unaffected, suggesting that the altered timing of neurotransmission was attributable to a synaptic mechanism. Modeling studies indicated that increasing the latency and jitter at a subset of synapses reduced the number of action potentials fired by a postsynaptic neuron. We propose that prolonged synaptic latency and diminished temporal precision of neurotransmission are hallmarks of impending loss of a cortical connection. PMID:26085628

  1. Amphetamine Dependence and Co-Morbid Alcohol Abuse: Associations to Brain Cortical Thickness

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Long-term amphetamine and methamphetamine dependence has been linked to cerebral blood perfusion, metabolic, and white matter abnormalities. Several studies have linked methamphetamine abuse to cortical grey matter reduction, though with divergent findings. Few publications investigate unmethylated amphetamine's potential effects on cortical grey matter. This work investigated if amphetamine dependent patients showed reduced cortical grey matter thickness. Subjects were 40 amphetamine dependent subjects and 40 healthy controls. While all subjects were recruited to be free of alcohol dependence, structured clinical interviews revealed significant patterns of alcohol use in the patients. Structural magnetic resonance brain images were obtained from the subjects using a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa machine. Brain cortical thickness was measured with submillimeter precision at multiple finely spaced cortical locations using semi-automated post-processing (FreeSurfer). Contrast analysis of a general linear model was used to test for differences between the two groups at each cortical location. In addition to contrasting patients with controls, a number of analyses sought to identify possible confounding effects from alcohol. Results No significant cortical thickness differences were observed between the full patient group and controls, nor between non-drinking patients and controls. Patients with a history of co-morbid heavy alcohol use (n = 29) showed reductions in the superior-frontal right hemisphere and pre-central left hemisphere when compared to healthy controls (n = 40). Conclusions Amphetamine usage was associated with reduced cortical thickness only in patients co-morbid for heavy alcohol use. Since cortical thickness is but one measure of brain structure and does not capture brain function, further studies of brain structure and function in amphetamine dependence are warranted. PMID:20487539

  2. Detecting a Cortical Fingerprint of Parkinson's Disease for Closed-Loop Neuromodulation

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Kevin; Naros, Georgios; Braun, Christoph; Weiss, Daniel; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's disease (PD) mediates its clinical effects by modulating cortical oscillatory activity, presumably via a direct cortico-subthalamic connection. This observation might pave the way for novel closed-loop approaches comprising a cortical sensor. Enhanced beta oscillations (13-35 Hz) have been linked to the pathophysiology of PD and may serve as such a candidate marker to localize a cortical area reliably modulated by DBS. However, beta-oscillations are widely distributed over the cortical surface, necessitating an additional signal source for spotting the cortical area linked to the pathologically synchronized cortico-subcortical motor network. In this context, both cortico-subthalamic coherence and cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) have been studied in PD patients. Whereas, the former requires invasive recordings, the latter allows for non-invasive detection, but displays a rather distributed cortical synchronization pattern in motor tasks. This distributed cortical representation may conflict with the goal of detecting a cortical localization with robust biomarker properties which is detectable on a single subject basis. We propose that this limitation could be overcome when recording CMC at rest. We hypothesized that—unlike healthy subjects—PD would show CMC at rest owing to the enhanced beta oscillations observed in PD. By performing source space analysis of beta CMC recorded during resting-state magnetoencephalography, we provide preliminary evidence in one patient for a cortical hot spot that is modulated most strongly by subthalamic DBS. Such a spot would provide a prominent target region either for direct neuromodulation or for placing a potential sensor in closed-loop DBS approaches, a proposal that requires investigation in a larger cohort of PD patients. PMID:27065781

  3. Detecting a Cortical Fingerprint of Parkinson's Disease for Closed-Loop Neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Kern, Kevin; Naros, Georgios; Braun, Christoph; Weiss, Daniel; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's disease (PD) mediates its clinical effects by modulating cortical oscillatory activity, presumably via a direct cortico-subthalamic connection. This observation might pave the way for novel closed-loop approaches comprising a cortical sensor. Enhanced beta oscillations (13-35 Hz) have been linked to the pathophysiology of PD and may serve as such a candidate marker to localize a cortical area reliably modulated by DBS. However, beta-oscillations are widely distributed over the cortical surface, necessitating an additional signal source for spotting the cortical area linked to the pathologically synchronized cortico-subcortical motor network. In this context, both cortico-subthalamic coherence and cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) have been studied in PD patients. Whereas, the former requires invasive recordings, the latter allows for non-invasive detection, but displays a rather distributed cortical synchronization pattern in motor tasks. This distributed cortical representation may conflict with the goal of detecting a cortical localization with robust biomarker properties which is detectable on a single subject basis. We propose that this limitation could be overcome when recording CMC at rest. We hypothesized that-unlike healthy subjects-PD would show CMC at rest owing to the enhanced beta oscillations observed in PD. By performing source space analysis of beta CMC recorded during resting-state magnetoencephalography, we provide preliminary evidence in one patient for a cortical hot spot that is modulated most strongly by subthalamic DBS. Such a spot would provide a prominent target region either for direct neuromodulation or for placing a potential sensor in closed-loop DBS approaches, a proposal that requires investigation in a larger cohort of PD patients. PMID:27065781

  4. Early cortical thickness changes predict β-amyloid deposition in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Grand'maison, Marilyn; Zehntner, Simone P; Ho, Ming-Kai; Hébert, François; Wood, Andrew; Carbonell, Felix; Zijdenbos, Alex P; Hamel, Edith; Bedell, Barry J

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have identified aberrant cortical structure in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The association between MRI-derived cortical morphometry measures and β-amyloid, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we explored the potential relationship between early alterations in cortical thickness and later stage β-amyloid deposition, using a novel approach, in a transgenic AD mouse model. We acquired longitudinal anatomical MRI scans from mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice and age-matched wild-type mice at 1 and 3.5months-of-age, and employed fully-automated image processing methods to derive objective, quantitative measures of cortical thickness on a region-of-interest basis. We also generated 3D quantitative immunohistochemistry (qIHC) volumes of deposited β-amyloid burden from 18month-old transgenic mice using an automated, production-level process. These studies revealed thinner cortex in most regions in the 1month-old transgenic mice relative to age-matched wild-types, with the exception of the frontal, perirhinal/entorhinal, posterior cingulate, and retrosplenial cortical regions. Between 1 and 3.5months-of-age, the transgenic mice demonstrated stable or increasing cortical thickness, while the wild-type mice showed cortical thinning. Based on data from co-registered 3D MRI and qIHC volumes, we identified an association between abnormal, early, regional cortical thickness change over 2.5months and later β-amyloid deposition. These observations suggest that the spatio-temporal pattern of early (pre-plaque) alterations in cerebral cortical structure is indicative of regional predisposition to later β-amyloid pathology in a transgenic AD mouse model. PMID:23454197

  5. Spatiotemporal SERT expression in cortical map development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoning; Petit, Emilie I; Dobrenis, Kostantin; Sze, Ji Ying

    2016-09-01

    The cerebral cortex is organized into morphologically distinct areas that provide biological frameworks underlying perception, cognition, and behavior. Profiling mouse and human cortical transcriptomes have revealed temporal-specific differential gene expression modules in distinct neocortical areas during cortical map establishment. However, the biological roles of spatiotemporal gene expression in cortical patterning and how cortical topographic gene expression is regulated are largely unknown. Here, we characterize temporal- and spatial-defined expression of serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) in glutamatergic neurons during sensory map development in mice. SERT is transiently expressed in glutamatergic thalamic neurons projecting to sensory cortices and in pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HPC) during the period that lays down the basic functional neural circuits. We previously identified that knockout of SERT in the thalamic neurons blocks 5-HT uptake by their thalamocortical axons, resulting in excessive 5-HT signaling that impairs sensory map architecture. In contrast, here we show that selective SERT knockout in the PFC and HPC neurons does not perturb sensory map patterning. These data suggest that transient SERT expression in specific glutamatergic neurons provides area-specific instructions for cortical map patterning. Hence, genetic and pharmacological manipulations of this SERT function could illuminate the fundamental genetic programming of cortex-specific maps and biological roles of temporal-specific cortical topographic gene expression in normal development and mental disorders. PMID:27282696

  6. Cortical feedback control of olfactory bulb circuits.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Alison M; Sturgill, James F; Poo, Cindy; Isaacson, Jeffry S

    2012-12-20

    Olfactory cortex pyramidal cells integrate sensory input from olfactory bulb mitral and tufted (M/T) cells and project axons back to the bulb. However, the impact of cortical feedback projections on olfactory bulb circuits is unclear. Here, we selectively express channelrhodopsin-2 in olfactory cortex pyramidal cells and show that cortical feedback projections excite diverse populations of bulb interneurons. Activation of cortical fibers directly excites GABAergic granule cells, which in turn inhibit M/T cells. However, we show that cortical inputs preferentially target short axon cells that drive feedforward inhibition of granule cells. In vivo, activation of olfactory cortex that only weakly affects spontaneous M/T cell firing strongly gates odor-evoked M/T cell responses: cortical activity suppresses odor-evoked excitation and enhances odor-evoked inhibition. Together, these results indicate that although cortical projections have diverse actions on olfactory bulb microcircuits, the net effect of cortical feedback on M/T cells is an amplification of odor-evoked inhibition. PMID:23259951

  7. Influence of contralateral homologous cortices on motor cortical reorganization after brachial plexus injuries in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Liang; Gu, Yu-dong

    2015-10-01

    Brachial plexus injuries induce corresponding cortical representations to be occupied by adjacent cortices. The purpose of this study was to clarify if contralateral homologous motor regions of adjacent cortices influence occupation of deafferented motor cortex. 36 rats were divided into 3 groups of 12 each. In group 1, total brachial plexus root avulsion (tBPRA) was made on the left side. In group 2, rats underwent left tBPRA combined with corpus callosum transection (CCX). In group 3, only CCX was performed. 6 rats in each group were used for intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) to map representations of motor cortex in the right hemisphere at 7 days and the other 6 rats, at 3 months. 18 more rats without any operation underwent ICMS, with 6 each taken to serve as normal control for motor cortical representations' changes caused by different surgery. Results showed that in groups 1 and 2, sites for motor cortical representations of vibrissae, of neck and of the hindlimb was statistically more than that of control, respectively, and statistically more sites were found at 3 months than at 7 days, respectively. At the two time points, sites for vibrissa cortices and that for the hindlimb were statistically more in group 2 than in group 1, respectively. CCX alone did not induce change of site number for motor cortical representations. We conclude that after tBPRA, contralateral homologous motor cortices may, to some extent, prevent neighboring cortices from encroachment on motor cortical representations of the brachial plexus. PMID:26314511

  8. Cerebral perfusion and cortical thickness indicate cortical involvement in mild Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Madhyastha, Tara M; Askren, Mary K; Boord, Peter; Zhang, Jing; Leverenz, James B; Grabowski, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    Cortical dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) may be caused by disruption to ascending systems or by intrinsic cortical neuropathology. We introduce and conduct a joint analysis of metabolism and atrophy capable of identifying whether metabolic disruption occurs in mild PD without cortical atrophy, to determine the extent and spatial pattern of cortical involvement in mild PD. The design was observational, studying 23 cognitively normal participants with mild PD (mean Hoehn & Yahr stage 2) and 21 healthy controls. Cortical thickness (obtained from analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] with FreeSurfer) and cerebral perfusion measures (obtained from arterial spin labeling [ASL]) analyzed independently and then together in a joint multiple factorial analysis to identify spatial patterns of perfusion and cortical thickness. We identify a pattern of changes in perfusion and cortical thickness characterized by symmetric parietal cortical thinning and reduced precuneus perfusion, with relative preservation of thickness and perfusion in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), right prefrontal gyrus, and medial frontal gyrus. The expression of this pattern is correlated with motor system symptoms and speed of processing. A spatial pattern of joint parietal cortical thinning and disproportionate reduction in perfusion occurs in our nondemented PD sample. We found no PD-related components of reduced perfusion without cortical thinning. This suggests that PD affects the cortex itself, even when symptoms are relatively mild. PMID:25759166

  9. A Turing Reaction-Diffusion Model for Human Cortical Folding Patterns and Cortical Pattern Malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurdal, Monica K.; Striegel, Deborah A.

    2011-11-01

    Modeling and understanding cortical folding pattern formation is important for quantifying cortical development. We present a biomathematical model for cortical folding pattern formation in the human brain and apply this model to study diseases involving cortical pattern malformations associated with neural migration disorders. Polymicrogyria is a cortical malformation disease resulting in an excessive number of small gyri. Our mathematical model uses a Turing reaction-diffusion system to model cortical folding. The lateral ventricle (LV) and ventricular zone (VZ) of the brain are critical components in the formation of cortical patterning. In early cortical development the shape of the LV can be modeled with a prolate spheroid and the VZ with a prolate spheroid surface. We use our model to study how global cortex characteristics, such as size and shape of the LV, affect cortical pattern formation. We demonstrate increasing domain scale can increase the number of gyri and sulci formed. Changes in LV shape can account for sulcus directionality. By incorporating LV size and shape, our model is able to elucidate which parameters can lead to excessive cortical folding.

  10. Measuring and comparing brain cortical surface area and other areal quantities

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Anderson M.; Sabuncu, Mert R.; Yeo, B.T. Thomas; Fischl, Bruce; Greve, Douglas N.; Kochunov, Peter; Nichols, Thomas E.; Blangero, John; Glahn, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Structural analysis of MRI data on the cortical surface usually focuses on cortical thickness. Cortical surface area, when considered, has been measured only over gross regions or approached indirectly via comparisons with a standard brain. Here we demonstrate that direct measurement and comparison of the surface area of the cerebral cortex at a fine scale is possible using mass conservative interpolation methods. We present a framework for analyses of the cortical surface area, as well as for any other measurement distributed across the cortex that is areal by nature. The method consists of the construction of a mesh representation of the ortex, registration to a common coordinate system and, crucially, interpolation using a pycnophylactic method. Statistical analysis of surface area is done with power-transformed data to address lognormality, and inference is done with permutation methods. We introduce the concept of facewise analysis, discuss its interpretation and potential applications. PMID:22446492

  11. Dendritic nonlinearities are tuned for efficient spike-based computations in cortical circuits.

    PubMed

    Ujfalussy, Balázs B; Makara, Judit K; Branco, Tiago; Lengyel, Máté

    2015-01-01

    Cortical neurons integrate thousands of synaptic inputs in their dendrites in highly nonlinear ways. It is unknown how these dendritic nonlinearities in individual cells contribute to computations at the level of neural circuits. Here, we show that dendritic nonlinearities are critical for the efficient integration of synaptic inputs in circuits performing analog computations with spiking neurons. We developed a theory that formalizes how a neuron's dendritic nonlinearity that is optimal for integrating synaptic inputs depends on the statistics of its presynaptic activity patterns. Based on their in vivo preynaptic population statistics (firing rates, membrane potential fluctuations, and correlations due to ensemble dynamics), our theory accurately predicted the responses of two different types of cortical pyramidal cells to patterned stimulation by two-photon glutamate uncaging. These results reveal a new computational principle underlying dendritic integration in cortical neurons by suggesting a functional link between cellular and systems--level properties of cortical circuits. PMID:26705334

  12. Encoding Cortical Dynamics in Sparse Features

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sheraz; Lefèvre, Julien; Baillet, Sylvain; Michmizos, Konstantinos P.; Ganesan, Santosh; Kitzbichler, Manfred G.; Zetino, Manuel; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Papadelis, Christos; Kenet, Tal

    2014-01-01

    Distributed cortical solutions of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) exhibit complex spatial and temporal dynamics. The extraction of patterns of interest and dynamic features from these cortical signals has so far relied on the expertise of investigators. There is a definite need in both clinical and neuroscience research for a method that will extract critical features from high-dimensional neuroimaging data in an automatic fashion. We have previously demonstrated the use of optical flow techniques for evaluating the kinematic properties of motion field projected on non-flat manifolds like in a cortical surface. We have further extended this framework to automatically detect features in the optical flow vector field by using the modified and extended 2-Riemannian Helmholtz–Hodge decomposition (HHD). Here, we applied these mathematical models on simulation and MEG data recorded from a healthy individual during a somatosensory experiment and an epilepsy pediatric patient during sleep. We tested whether our technique can automatically extract salient dynamical features of cortical activity. Simulation results indicated that we can precisely reproduce the simulated cortical dynamics with HHD; encode them in sparse features and represent the propagation of brain activity between distinct cortical areas. Using HHD, we decoded the somatosensory N20 component into two HHD features and represented the dynamics of brain activity as a traveling source between two primary somatosensory regions. In the epilepsy patient, we displayed the propagation of the epileptic activity around the margins of a brain lesion. Our findings indicate that HHD measures computed from cortical dynamics can: (i) quantitatively access the cortical dynamics in both healthy and disease brain in terms of sparse features and dynamic brain activity propagation between distinct cortical areas, and (ii) facilitate a reproducible, automated analysis of experimental and clinical

  13. Encoding cortical dynamics in sparse features.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sheraz; Lefèvre, Julien; Baillet, Sylvain; Michmizos, Konstantinos P; Ganesan, Santosh; Kitzbichler, Manfred G; Zetino, Manuel; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Papadelis, Christos; Kenet, Tal

    2014-01-01

    Distributed cortical solutions of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) exhibit complex spatial and temporal dynamics. The extraction of patterns of interest and dynamic features from these cortical signals has so far relied on the expertise of investigators. There is a definite need in both clinical and neuroscience research for a method that will extract critical features from high-dimensional neuroimaging data in an automatic fashion. We have previously demonstrated the use of optical flow techniques for evaluating the kinematic properties of motion field projected on non-flat manifolds like in a cortical surface. We have further extended this framework to automatically detect features in the optical flow vector field by using the modified and extended 2-Riemannian Helmholtz-Hodge decomposition (HHD). Here, we applied these mathematical models on simulation and MEG data recorded from a healthy individual during a somatosensory experiment and an epilepsy pediatric patient during sleep. We tested whether our technique can automatically extract salient dynamical features of cortical activity. Simulation results indicated that we can precisely reproduce the simulated cortical dynamics with HHD; encode them in sparse features and represent the propagation of brain activity between distinct cortical areas. Using HHD, we decoded the somatosensory N20 component into two HHD features and represented the dynamics of brain activity as a traveling source between two primary somatosensory regions. In the epilepsy patient, we displayed the propagation of the epileptic activity around the margins of a brain lesion. Our findings indicate that HHD measures computed from cortical dynamics can: (i) quantitatively access the cortical dynamics in both healthy and disease brain in terms of sparse features and dynamic brain activity propagation between distinct cortical areas, and (ii) facilitate a reproducible, automated analysis of experimental and clinical

  14. Cortical astrocytes rewire somatosensory cortical circuits for peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Shibata, Keisuke; Inada, Hiroyuki; Roh, Seung Eon; Kim, Sang Jeong; Moorhouse, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term treatments to ameliorate peripheral neuropathic pain that includes mechanical allodynia are limited. While glial activation and altered nociceptive transmission within the spinal cord are associated with the pathogenesis of mechanical allodynia, changes in cortical circuits also accompany peripheral nerve injury and may represent additional therapeutic targets. Dendritic spine plasticity in the S1 cortex appears within days following nerve injury; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms of this plasticity and whether it has a causal relationship to allodynia remain unsolved. Furthermore, it is not known whether glial activation occurs within the S1 cortex following injury or whether it contributes to this S1 synaptic plasticity. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging with genetic and pharmacological manipulations of murine models, we have shown that sciatic nerve ligation induces a re-emergence of immature metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) signaling in S1 astroglia, which elicits spontaneous somatic Ca2+ transients, synaptogenic thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) release, and synapse formation. This S1 astrocyte reactivation was evident only during the first week after injury and correlated with the temporal changes in S1 extracellular glutamate levels and dendritic spine turnover. Blocking the astrocytic mGluR5-signaling pathway suppressed mechanical allodynia, while activating this pathway in the absence of any peripheral injury induced long-lasting (>1 month) allodynia. We conclude that reawakened astrocytes are a key trigger for S1 circuit rewiring and that this contributes to neuropathic mechanical allodynia. PMID:27064281

  15. Cortical astrocytes rewire somatosensory cortical circuits for peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kwang; Hayashi, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Shibata, Keisuke; Shigetomi, Eiji; Shinozaki, Youichi; Inada, Hiroyuki; Roh, Seung Eon; Kim, Sang Jeong; Lee, Gihyun; Bae, Hyunsu; Moorhouse, Andrew J; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Fukazawa, Yugo; Koizumi, Schuichi; Nabekura, Junichi

    2016-05-01

    Long-term treatments to ameliorate peripheral neuropathic pain that includes mechanical allodynia are limited. While glial activation and altered nociceptive transmission within the spinal cord are associated with the pathogenesis of mechanical allodynia, changes in cortical circuits also accompany peripheral nerve injury and may represent additional therapeutic targets. Dendritic spine plasticity in the S1 cortex appears within days following nerve injury; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms of this plasticity and whether it has a causal relationship to allodynia remain unsolved. Furthermore, it is not known whether glial activation occurs within the S1 cortex following injury or whether it contributes to this S1 synaptic plasticity. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging with genetic and pharmacological manipulations of murine models, we have shown that sciatic nerve ligation induces a re-emergence of immature metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) signaling in S1 astroglia, which elicits spontaneous somatic Ca2+ transients, synaptogenic thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) release, and synapse formation. This S1 astrocyte reactivation was evident only during the first week after injury and correlated with the temporal changes in S1 extracellular glutamate levels and dendritic spine turnover. Blocking the astrocytic mGluR5-signaling pathway suppressed mechanical allodynia, while activating this pathway in the absence of any peripheral injury induced long-lasting (>1 month) allodynia. We conclude that reawakened astrocytes are a key trigger for S1 circuit rewiring and that this contributes to neuropathic mechanical allodynia. PMID:27064281

  16. LRP12 silencing during brain development results in cortical dyslamination and seizure sensitization.

    PubMed

    Grote, Alexander; Robens, Barbara K; Blümcke, Ingmar; Becker, Albert J; Schoch, Susanne; Gembé, Eva

    2016-02-01

    Correct positioning and differentiation of neurons during brain development is a key precondition for proper function. Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) are increasingly recognized as causes of therapy refractory epilepsies. Neuropathological analyses of respective surgical specimens from neurosurgery for seizure control often reveal aberrant cortical architecture and/or aberrantly shaped neurons in FCDs. However, the molecular pathogenesis particularly of FCDs with aberrant lamination (so-called FCD type I) is largely unresolved. Lipoproteins and particularly low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 12 (LRP12) are involved in brain development. Here, we have examined a potential role of LRP12 in the pathogenesis of FCDs. In vitro knockdown of LRP12 in primary neurons results in impaired neuronal arborization. In vivo ablation of LRP12 by intraventricularly in utero electroporated shRNAs elicits cortical maldevelopment, i.e. aberrant lamination by malpositioning of upper cortical layer neurons. Subsequent epilepsy phenotyping revealed pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures to be aggravated in cortical LRP12-silenced mice. Our data demonstrates IUE mediated cortical gene silencing as an excellent approach to study the role of distinct molecules for epilepsy associated focal brain lesions and suggests LRP12 and lipoprotein homeostasis as potential molecular target structures for the emergence of epilepsy-associated FCDs. PMID:26639854

  17. Linking cortical network synchrony and excitability

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Theoretical approaches based on dynamical systems theory can provide useful frameworks to guide experiments and analysis techniques when investigating cortical network activity. The notion of phase transitions between qualitatively different kinds of network dynamics has been such a framework inspiring novel approaches to neurophysiological data analysis over the recent years. One particular intriguing hypothesis has been that cortical networks reside in the vicinity of a phase transition. Although the final verdict on this hypothesis is still out, trying to understand cortex dynamics from this viewpoint has recently led to interesting insights on cortical network function with relevance for clinical practice. PMID:27065159

  18. Synaptic variability in a cortical neuromorphic circuit.

    PubMed

    Mahvash, Mohammad; Parker, Alice C

    2013-03-01

    Variable behavior has been observed in several mechanisms found in biological neurons, resulting in changes in neural behavior that might be useful to capture in neuromorphic circuits. This paper presents a neuromorphic cortical neuron with synaptic neurotransmitter-release variability, which is designed to be used in neural networks as part of the Biomimetic Real-Time Cortex project. This neuron has been designed and simulated using carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors, which is one of several nanotechnologies under consideration to meet the challenges of scale presented by the cortex. Some research results suggest that some instances of variability are stochastic, while others indicate that some instances of variability are chaotic. In this paper, both possible sources of variability are considered by embedding either Gaussian noise or a chaotic signal into the neuromorphic or synaptic circuit and observing the simulation results. In order to embed chaotic behavior into the neuromorphic circuit, a chaotic signal generator circuit is presented, implemented with CNT transistors that could be embedded in the electronic neural circuit, and simulated using CNT SPICE models. The circuit uses a chaotic piecewise linear 1-D map implemented by switched-current circuits. The simulation results presented in this paper illustrate that neurotransmitter-release variability plays a beneficial role in the reliability of spike generation. In an examination of this reliability, the precision of spike timing in the CNT circuit simulations is found to be dependent on stimulus (postsynaptic potential) transients. Postsynaptic potentials with low neurotransmitter release variability or without neurotransmitter release variability produce imprecise spike trains, whereas postsynaptic potentials with high neurotransmitter-release variability produce spike trains with reproducible timing. PMID:24808313

  19. PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS OF FOCAL CORTICAL DYSPLASIA

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Guerrini, Renzo; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) constitute a prevalent cause of intractable epilepsy in children, and one of the leading conditions requiring epilepsy surgery. Despite the recent advances on the cellular and molecular biology of these conditions, the pathogenetic mechanisms of FCDs remain largely unknown. The purpose if this work is to review the molecular underpinnings of FCDs and to highlight potential therapeutic targets. Methods A systematic review of the literature regarding the histological, molecular, and electrophysiological aspects of FCDs was conducted. Results Disruption of the mTOR signaling comprises a common pathway underlying the structural and electrical disturbances of some FCDs. Other mechanisms such as viral infections, prematurity, head trauma, and brain tumors are also posited. mTOR inhibitors (i.e., rapamycin) have shown positive results on seizure management in animal models and in a small cohort of patients with FCD. Significance Encouraging progresses have been achieved on the molecular and electrophysiological basis of constitutive cells in the dysplastic tissue. Despite the promising results of mTOR inhibitors, large-scale randomized trials are in need to evaluate their efficacy and side effects, along with additional mechanistic studies for the development of novel, molecular-based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:24861491

  20. Spatiotemporal dynamics of early cortical gesture processing.

    PubMed

    Möhring, Nicole; Shen, Christina; Neuhaus, Andres H

    2014-10-01

    Gesture processing has been consistently shown to be associated with activation of the inferior parietal lobe (IPL); however, little is known about the integration of IPL activation into the temporal dynamics of early sensory areas. Using a temporally graded repetition suppression paradigm, we examined the activation and time course of brain areas involved in hand gesture processing. We recorded event-related potentials in response to stimulus pairs of static hand images forming gestures of the popular rock-paper-scissors game and estimated their neuronal generators. We identified two main components associated with adaptive patterns related to stimulus repetition. The N190 component elicited at temporo-parietal sites adapted to repetitions of the same gesture and was associated with right-hemispheric extrastriate body area activation. A later component at parieto-occipital sites demonstrated temporally graded adaptation effects for all gestures with a left-hemispheric dominance. Source localization revealed concurrent activations of the right extrastriate body area, fusiform gyri bilaterally, and the left IPL at about 250 ms. The adaptation pattern derived from the graded repetition suppression paradigm demonstrates the functional sensitivity of these sources to gesture processing. Given the literature on IPL contribution to imitation, action recognition, and action execution, IPL activation at about 250 ms may represent the access into specific cognitive routes for gesture processing and may thus be involved in integrating sensory information from cortical body areas into subsequent visuo-motor transformation processes. PMID:24875144

  1. Altered Cortical Communication in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Blain-Moraes, Stefanie; Mashour, George A.; Lee, Heonsoo; Huggins, Jane E.; Lee, UnCheol

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disorder associated primarily with the degeneration of the motor system. More recently, functional connectivity studies have demonstrated potentially adaptive changes in ALS brain organization, but disease-related changes in cortical communication remain unknown. We recruited individuals with ALS and age-matched controls to operate a brain-computer interface while electroencephalography was recorded over three sessions. Using normalized symbolic transfer entropy, we measured directed functional connectivity from frontal to parietal (feedback connectivity) and parietal to frontal (feedforward connectivity) regions. Feedback connectivity was not significantly different between groups, but feedforward connectivity was significantly higher in individuals with ALS. This result was consistent across a broad electroencephalographic spectrum (4 – 35 Hz), and in theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. Feedback connectivity has been associated with conscious state and was found to be independent of ALS symptom severity in this study, which may have significant implications for the detection of consciousness in individuals with advanced ALS. We suggest that increases in feedforward connectivity represent a compensatory response to the ALS-related loss of input such that sensory stimuli have sufficient strength to cross the threshold necessary for conscious processing in the global neuronal workspace. PMID:23567743

  2. Altered cortical communication in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Blain-Moraes, Stefanie; Mashour, George A; Lee, Heonsoo; Huggins, Jane E; Lee, Uncheol

    2013-05-24

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disorder associated primarily with the degeneration of the motor system. More recently, functional connectivity studies have demonstrated potentially adaptive changes in ALS brain organization, but disease-related changes in cortical communication remain unknown. We recruited individuals with ALS and age-matched controls to operate a brain-computer interface while electroencephalography was recorded over three sessions. Using normalized symbolic transfer entropy, we measured directed functional connectivity from frontal to parietal (feedback connectivity) and parietal to frontal (feedforward connectivity) regions. Feedback connectivity was not significantly different between groups, but feedforward connectivity was significantly higher in individuals with ALS. This result was consistent across a broad electroencephalographic spectrum (4-35 Hz), and in theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. Feedback connectivity has been associated with conscious state and was found to be independent of ALS symptom severity in this study, which may have significant implications for the detection of consciousness in individuals with advanced ALS. We suggest that increases in feedforward connectivity represent a compensatory response to the ALS-related loss of input such that sensory stimuli have sufficient strength to cross the threshold necessary for conscious processing in the global neuronal workspace. PMID:23567743

  3. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  4. Cortical mechanisms of pretense observation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Eric D; Englander, Zoë A; Lillard, Angeline S; Morris, James P

    2013-01-01

    Pretend play emerges in children the world over around 18 months and continues into adolescence and even adulthood. Observing and engaging in pretense are thought to rely on similar neural mechanisms, but little is known about them. Here we examined neural activation patterns associated with observing pretense acts, including high-likelihood, low-likelihood, and imaginary substitute objects, as compared with activation patterns when observing parallel real acts. The association between fantasy predisposition and cortical representations of pretense was also explored. Supporting prior research that used more limited types of pretense, observed pretense acts, when contrasted with real acts, elicited activity in regions associated with mentalizing. A novel contribution here is that substitute object pretense (high- and low-likelihood) elicited significantly more activity than imaginary (pantomime) acts not only in theory of mind regions but also in the superior parietal lobule, a region thought to aid in the prediction and error-monitoring of motor actions. Finally, when high-likelihood pretense acts were contrasted with real acts, participants with elevated fantasy predispositions evidenced significantly different activation patterns than their more reality-prone peers. Future research will explore the intersection of fantasy predisposition and experience with the neural representation of pretense. PMID:23802124

  5. Cortical high-density counterstream architectures.

    PubMed

    Markov, Nikola T; Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Van Essen, David C; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Kennedy, Henry

    2013-11-01

    Small-world networks provide an appealing description of cortical architecture owing to their capacity for integration and segregation combined with an economy of connectivity. Previous reports of low-density interareal graphs and apparent small-world properties are challenged by data that reveal high-density cortical graphs in which economy of connections is achieved by weight heterogeneity and distance-weight correlations. These properties define a model that predicts many binary and weighted features of the cortical network including a core-periphery, a typical feature of self-organizing information processing systems. Feedback and feedforward pathways between areas exhibit a dual counterstream organization, and their integration into local circuits constrains cortical computation. Here, we propose a bow-tie representation of interareal architecture derived from the hierarchical laminar weights of pathways between the high-efficiency dense core and periphery. PMID:24179228

  6. Similar Age-Related Decline in Cortical Activity Over Frontotemporal Regions in Schizophrenia: A Multichannel Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Po-Han; Koike, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Yukika; Satomura, Yoshihiro; Kinoshita, Akihide; Takizawa, Ryu; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Although recent studies have demonstrated that patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls did not differ in the speed of age-related decline in cortical thickness and performances on cognitive tests, hemodynamic changes assessed by functional neuroimaging remain unclear. This study investigated age effects on regional brain cortical activity to determine whether there is similar age-related decline in cortical activity as those observed in cortical thickness and cognitive test performance. Method: A total of 109 patients with schizophrenia (age range: 16–59 y) and 106 healthy controls (age range: 16–59 y) underwent near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while performing a verbal fluency test (VFT). Group comparison of cortical activity was examined using 2-tailed t tests, adopting the false discovery rate method. The relationship between age and cortical activity was investigated using correlational and multiple regression analyses, adjusting for potential confounding variables. A 2-way ANOVA was conducted to investigate differences in the age effects between diagnostic groups. Results: The patient group exhibited significantly decreased cortical activity in several regions of the frontotemporal cortices. However, slopes of age-dependent decreases in cortical activity were similar between patients and healthy individuals at the bilateral frontotemporal regions. Conclusions: Our study showed no significant between-group differences in the age-related decline in cortical activity, as measured by NIRS, over the frontotemporal regions during a VFT. The results of our study may indicate a decrease in cortical activity in a relatively limited period around illness onset rather than continuously progressing over the course of the illness. PMID:24948388

  7. Direct control of paralysed muscles by cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Chet T; Perlmutter, Steve I; Fetz, Eberhard E

    2008-12-01

    A potential treatment for paralysis resulting from spinal cord injury is to route control signals from the brain around the injury by artificial connections. Such signals could then control electrical stimulation of muscles, thereby restoring volitional movement to paralysed limbs. In previously separate experiments, activity of motor cortex neurons related to actual or imagined movements has been used to control computer cursors and robotic arms, and paralysed muscles have been activated by functional electrical stimulation. Here we show that Macaca nemestrina monkeys can directly control stimulation of muscles using the activity of neurons in the motor cortex, thereby restoring goal-directed movements to a transiently paralysed arm. Moreover, neurons could control functional stimulation equally well regardless of any previous association to movement, a finding that considerably expands the source of control signals for brain-machine interfaces. Monkeys learned to use these artificial connections from cortical cells to muscles to generate bidirectional wrist torques, and controlled multiple neuron-muscle pairs simultaneously. Such direct transforms from cortical activity to muscle stimulation could be implemented by autonomous electronic circuitry, creating a relatively natural neuroprosthesis. These results are the first demonstration that direct artificial connections between cortical cells and muscles can compensate for interrupted physiological pathways and restore volitional control of movement to paralysed limbs. PMID:18923392

  8. A simulated actuator driven by motor cortical signals.

    PubMed

    Lukashin, A V; Amirikian, B R; Georgopoulos, A P

    1996-11-01

    One problem in motor control concerns the mechanism whereby the central nervous system translates the motor cortical command encoded in cell activity into a coordinated contraction of limb muscles to generate a desired motor output. This problem is closely related to the design of adaptive systems that transform neuronal signals chronically recorded from the motor cortex into the physiologically appropriate motor output of multijoint prosthetic limbs. In this study we demonstrated how this transformation can be carried out by an artificial neural network using as command signals the actual impulse activity obtained from recordings in the motor cortex of monkeys during the performance of a task that required the exertion of force in different directions. The network receives experimentally measured brain signals and recodes them into motor actions of a simulated actuator that mimics the primate arm. The actuator responds to the motor cortical commands with surprising fidelity, generating forces in close quantitative agreement with those exerted by trained monkeys, in both the temporal and spatial domains. Moreover, we show that the time-varying motor output may be controlled by the impulse activity of as few as 15 motor cortical cells. These results outline a potentially implementable computation scheme that utilizes raw neuronal signals to drive artificial mechanical systems. PMID:8981430

  9. Anatomic variations of anterior cerebral artery cortical branches.

    PubMed

    Stefani, M A; Schneider, F L; Marrone, A C; Severino, A G; Jackowski, A P; Wallace, M C

    2000-01-01

    The anterior cerebral artery (ACA) is a major vessel responsible for the blood supply to the interhemispheric region. The ACA segment after the anterior communicating artery (AComA) origin is called the distal ACA and has central and cortical branches. The cortical branches are distributed in the different regions of the orbital and medial part of the brain. The objects of this study are the anatomical variations found in the distal ACA. In 76 hemispheres the ACA distal branches were injected with latex and dissected under microscope magnification. Vessel diameters and distances between vessel origins and anterior communicating artery were recorded and analyzed. Microsurgical dissection was carried out to demonstrate anatomic variations of these vessels. Average diameter of ACA at origin was 2.61 +/- 0.34 mm and average diameter of cortical branches diameter ranged from 0.79 +/- 0.27 mm to 1.84 +/- 0.3 mm. Distances between vessel origin and AComA ranged from 7.68 +/- 3.91 mm (orbitofrontal) to 112.6 +/- 11.63 mm (inferior internal parietal). This study found anatomical variations: a single (azygos) ACA was present in one case and three in three cases. Crossing branches of the distal ACA to the contralateral hemisphere were present in 26% of the cases. In some cases a single ACA may supply the posterior hemispheric region through crossing branches. This calls attention to potential bilateral brain infarcts due to a single unilateral ACA occlusion. PMID:10873213

  10. Morphological and functional aspects of progenitors perturbed in cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    Bizzotto, Sara; Francis, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss molecular and cellular mechanisms important for the function of neuronal progenitors during development, revealed by their perturbation in different cortical malformations. We focus on a class of neuronal progenitors, radial glial cells (RGCs), which are renowned for their unique morphological and behavioral characteristics, constituting a key element during the development of the mammalian cerebral cortex. We describe how the particular morphology of these cells is related to their roles in the orchestration of cortical development and their influence on other progenitor types and post-mitotic neurons. Important for disease mechanisms, we overview what is currently known about RGC cellular components, cytoskeletal mechanisms, signaling pathways and cell cycle characteristics, focusing on how defects lead to abnormal development and cortical malformation phenotypes. The multiple recent entry points from human genetics and animal models are contributing to our understanding of this important cell type. Combining data from phenotypes in the mouse reveals molecules which potentially act in common pathways. Going beyond this, we discuss future directions that may provide new data in this expanding area. PMID:25729350

  11. Dynamic photophysical processes in laser irradiated human cortical skull bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, Andreas; Kwan, Chi-Hang; Matvienko, Anna

    2009-02-01

    Modulated luminescence (LUM) technique was applied to analyze photophysical processes in the cortical layer of human skull bones. The theoretical interpretation of the results was based on the optical excitation and decay rate equations of the fluorophore and on the molecular interaction parameter with the photon field density in the matrix of the bone. Using comparisons of the theory with the frequency response of dental LUM it was concluded that the optically active molecular species (fluorophore) in the bones is hydroxyapatite. An effective relaxation lifetime of skull cortical bone was derived theoretically and was found to depend on the intrinsic fluorophore decay lifetime, on the photon field density, and on the thickness of the bone. The experimentally measured dependencies were in excellent agreement with the theoretical model. The theory was able to yield measurements of the optical scattering coefficient, optical absorption coefficient, and mean coupling coefficient. These results show that the quantitative LUM can be used as a sensitive method to measure optical properties of the active fluorophore in cortical skull bones and the optical-field-induced molecular interaction parameter. When calibrated vs. laser intensity, the modulated luminescence can also be used to measure human skull thickness. These traits can be applied to monitor the bone mineral density (BMD) and, ultimately can be used as potential markers of bone health or disease, such as osteoporosis or bone cancer.

  12. The up and down states of cortical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, Maryam; Levine, Alex J.; Mehta, Mayank; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2011-03-01

    The cortical networks show a collective activity of alternating active and silent states known as up and down states during slow wave sleep or anesthesia. The mechanism of this spontaneous activity as well as the anesthesia or sleep are still not clear. Here, using a mean field approach, we present a simple model to study the spontaneous activity of a homogenous cortical network of excitatory and inhibitory neurons that are recurrently connected. A key new ingredient in this model is that the activity-dependant synaptic depression is considered only for the excitatory neurons. We find depending on the strength of the synaptic depression and synaptic efficacies, the phase space contains strange attractors or stable fixed points at active or quiescent regimes. At the strange attractor phase, we can have oscillations similar to up and down states with flat and noisy up states. Moreover, we show that by increasing the synaptic efficacy corresponding to the connections between the excitatory neurons, the characteristics of the up and down states change in agreement with the changes that we observe in the intracellular recordings of the membrane potential from the entorhinal cortex by varying the depth of anesthesia. Thus, we propose that by measuring the value of this synaptic efficacy, one can quantify the depth of anesthesia which is clinically very important. These findings provide a simple, analytical understanding of the spontaneous cortical dynamics.

  13. Identifying True Cortical Interactions in MEG using the Nulling Beamformer

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Hua Brian; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Bressler, Steven L.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Modeling functional brain interaction networks using non-invasive EEG and MEG data is more challenging than using intracranial recording data. This is because most interaction measures are not robust to the cross-talk (interference) between cortical regions, which may arise due to the limited spatial resolution of EEG/MEG inverse procedures. In this paper we describe a modified beam-forming approach to accurately measure cortical interactions from EEG/MEG data, designed to suppress cross-talk between cortical regions. We estimate interaction measures from the output of the modified beamformer and test for statistical significance using permutation tests. Since the underlying neuronal sources and their interactions are unknown in real MEG data, we demonstrate the performance of the proposed beamforming method in a novel simulation scheme, where intracranial recordings from a macaque monkey are used as neural sources to simulate realistic MEG signals. The advantage of this approach is that local field potentials are more realistic representations of true neuronal sources than simulation models and therefore are more suitable to indicate the performance of our nulling beamforming method. PMID:19896541

  14. Cortical swallowing processing in early subacute stroke

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dysphagia is a major complication in hemispheric as well as brainstem stroke patients causing aspiration pneumonia and increased mortality. Little is known about the recovery from dysphagia after stroke. The aim of the present study was to determine the different patterns of cortical swallowing processing in patients with hemispheric and brainstem stroke with and without dysphagia in the early subacute phase. Methods We measured brain activity by mean of whole-head MEG in 37 patients with different stroke localisation 8.2 +/- 4.8 days after stroke to study changes in cortical activation during self-paced swallowing. An age matched group of healthy subjects served as controls. Data were analyzed by means of synthetic aperture magnetometry and group analyses were performed using a permutation test. Results Our results demonstrate strong bilateral reduction of cortical swallowing activation in dysphagic patients with hemispheric stroke. In hemispheric stroke without dysphagia, bilateral activation was found. In the small group of patients with brainstem stroke we observed a reduction of cortical activation and a right hemispheric lateralization. Conclusion Bulbar central pattern generators coordinate the pharyngeal swallowing phase. The observed right hemispheric lateralization in brainstem stroke can therefore be interpreted as acute cortical compensation of subcortically caused dysphagia. The reduction of activation in brainstem stroke patients and dysphagic patients with cortical stroke could be explained in terms of diaschisis. PMID:21392404

  15. Cortical thinning in former professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Koerte, Inga K; Mayinger, Michael; Muehlmann, Marc; Kaufmann, David; Lin, Alexander P; Steffinger, Denise; Fisch, Barbara; Rauchmann, Boris-Stephan; Immler, Stefanie; Karch, Susanne; Heinen, Florian R; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Reiser, Maximilian; Stern, Robert A; Zafonte, Ross; Shenton, Martha E

    2016-09-01

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world. Soccer players are at high risk for repetitive subconcussive head impact when heading the ball. Whether this leads to long-term alterations of the brain's structure associated with cognitive decline remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate cortical thickness in former professional soccer players using high-resolution structural MR imaging. Fifteen former male professional soccer players (mean age 49.3 [SD 5.1] years) underwent high-resolution structural 3 T MR imaging, as well as cognitive testing. Fifteen male, age-matched former professional non-contact sport athletes (mean age 49.6 [SD 6.4] years) served as controls. Group analyses of cortical thickness were performed using voxel-based statistics. Soccer players demonstrated greater cortical thinning with increasing age compared to controls in the right inferolateral-parietal, temporal, and occipital cortex. Cortical thinning was associated with lower cognitive performance as well as with estimated exposure to repetitive subconcussive head impact. Neurocognitive evaluation revealed decreased memory performance in the soccer players compared to controls. The association of cortical thinning and decreased cognitive performance, as well as exposure to repetitive subconcussive head impact, further supports the hypothesis that repetitive subconcussive head impact may play a role in early cognitive decline in soccer players. Future studies are needed to elucidate the time course of changes in cortical thickness as well as their association with impaired cognitive function and possible underlying neurodegenerative process. PMID:26286826

  16. Brain Plasticity in Blind Subjects Centralizes Beyond the Modal Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Terán, Laura; Ortiz, Tomás; Perez, David L.; Aragón, Jose Ignacio; Diez, Ibai; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Sepulcre, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the human brain reorganizes following sensory deprivations. In blind individuals, visual processing regions including the lateral occipital cortex (LOC) are activated by auditory and tactile stimuli as demonstrated by neurophysiological and neuroimaging investigations. The mechanisms for such plasticity remain unclear, but shifts in connectivity across existing neural networks appear to play a critical role. The majority of research efforts to date have focused on neuroplastic changes within visual unimodal regions, however we hypothesized that neuroplastic alterations may also occur in brain networks beyond the visual cortices including involvement of multimodal integration regions and heteromodal cortices. In this study, two recently developed graph-theory based functional connectivity analyses, interconnector analyses and local and distant connectivity, were applied to investigate functional reorganization in regional and distributed neural-systems in late-onset blind (LB) and congenitally blind (CB) cohorts each compared to their own group of sighted controls. While functional network alterations as measured by the degree of differential links (DDL) occurred in sensory cortices, neuroplastic changes were most prominent within multimodal and association cortices. Subjects with LB showed enhanced multimodal integration connections in the parieto-opercular, temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and ventral premotor (vPM) regions, while CB individuals exhibited increased superior parietal cortex (SPC) connections. This study reveals the critical role of recipient multi-sensory integration areas in network reorganization and cross-modal plasticity in blind individuals. These findings suggest that aspects of cross-modal neuroplasticity and adaptive sensory-motor and auditory functions may potentially occur through reorganization in multimodal integration regions. PMID:27458350

  17. Brain Plasticity in Blind Subjects Centralizes Beyond the Modal Cortices.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Terán, Laura; Ortiz, Tomás; Perez, David L; Aragón, Jose Ignacio; Diez, Ibai; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Sepulcre, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the human brain reorganizes following sensory deprivations. In blind individuals, visual processing regions including the lateral occipital cortex (LOC) are activated by auditory and tactile stimuli as demonstrated by neurophysiological and neuroimaging investigations. The mechanisms for such plasticity remain unclear, but shifts in connectivity across existing neural networks appear to play a critical role. The majority of research efforts to date have focused on neuroplastic changes within visual unimodal regions, however we hypothesized that neuroplastic alterations may also occur in brain networks beyond the visual cortices including involvement of multimodal integration regions and heteromodal cortices. In this study, two recently developed graph-theory based functional connectivity analyses, interconnector analyses and local and distant connectivity, were applied to investigate functional reorganization in regional and distributed neural-systems in late-onset blind (LB) and congenitally blind (CB) cohorts each compared to their own group of sighted controls. While functional network alterations as measured by the degree of differential links (DDL) occurred in sensory cortices, neuroplastic changes were most prominent within multimodal and association cortices. Subjects with LB showed enhanced multimodal integration connections in the parieto-opercular, temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and ventral premotor (vPM) regions, while CB individuals exhibited increased superior parietal cortex (SPC) connections. This study reveals the critical role of recipient multi-sensory integration areas in network reorganization and cross-modal plasticity in blind individuals. These findings suggest that aspects of cross-modal neuroplasticity and adaptive sensory-motor and auditory functions may potentially occur through reorganization in multimodal integration regions. PMID:27458350

  18. Cognitive Correlates of Basal Forebrain Atrophy and Associated Cortical Hypometabolism in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Grothe, Michel J; Heinsen, Helmut; Amaro, Edson; Grinberg, Lea T; Teipel, Stefan J

    2016-06-01

    Degeneration of basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic nuclei is associated with cognitive decline, and this effect is believed to be mediated by neuronal dysfunction in the denervated cortical areas. MRI-based measurements of BF atrophy are increasingly being used as in vivo surrogate markers for cholinergic degeneration, but the functional implications of reductions in BF volume are not well understood. We used high-resolution MRI, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET), and neuropsychological test data of 132 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 177 cognitively normal controls to determine associations between BF atrophy, cortical hypometabolism, and cognitive deficits. BF atrophy in MCI correlated with both impaired memory function and attentional control deficits, whereas hippocampus volume was more specifically associated with memory deficits. BF atrophy was also associated with widespread cortical hypometabolism, and path analytic models indicated that hypometabolism in domain-specific cortical networks mediated the association between BF volume and cognitive dysfunction. The presence of cortical amyloid pathology, as assessed using AV45-PET, did not significantly interact with the observed associations. These data underline the potential of multimodal imaging markers to study structure-function-cognition relationships in the living human brain and provide important in vivo evidence for an involvement of the human BF in cortical activity and cognitive function. PMID:25840425

  19. Reassessing cortical reorganization in the primary sensorimotor cortex following arm amputation.

    PubMed

    Makin, Tamar R; Scholz, Jan; Henderson Slater, David; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Tracey, Irene

    2015-08-01

    The role of cortical activity in generating and abolishing chronic pain is increasingly emphasized in the clinical community. Perhaps the most striking example of this is the maladaptive plasticity theory, according to which phantom pain arises from remapping of cortically neighbouring representations (lower face) into the territory of the missing hand following amputation. This theory has been extended to a wide range of chronic pain conditions, such as complex regional pain syndrome. Yet, despite its growing popularity, the evidence to support the maladaptive plasticity theory is largely based on correlations between pain ratings and oftentimes crude measurements of cortical reorganization, with little consideration of potential contributions of other clinical factors, such as adaptive behaviour, in driving the identified brain plasticity. Here, we used a physiologically meaningful measurement of cortical reorganization to reassess its relationship to phantom pain in upper limb amputees. We identified small yet consistent shifts in lip representation contralateral to the missing hand towards, but not invading, the hand area. However, we were unable to identify any statistical relationship between cortical reorganization and phantom sensations or pain either with this measurement or with the traditional Euclidian distance measurement. Instead, we demonstrate that other factors may contribute to the observed remapping. Further research that reassesses more broadly the relationship between cortical reorganization and chronic pain is warranted. PMID:26072517

  20. Reassessing cortical reorganization in the primary sensorimotor cortex following arm amputation

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Jan; Henderson Slater, David; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Tracey, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The role of cortical activity in generating and abolishing chronic pain is increasingly emphasized in the clinical community. Perhaps the most striking example of this is the maladaptive plasticity theory, according to which phantom pain arises from remapping of cortically neighbouring representations (lower face) into the territory of the missing hand following amputation. This theory has been extended to a wide range of chronic pain conditions, such as complex regional pain syndrome. Yet, despite its growing popularity, the evidence to support the maladaptive plasticity theory is largely based on correlations between pain ratings and oftentimes crude measurements of cortical reorganization, with little consideration of potential contributions of other clinical factors, such as adaptive behaviour, in driving the identified brain plasticity. Here, we used a physiologically meaningful measurement of cortical reorganization to reassess its relationship to phantom pain in upper limb amputees. We identified small yet consistent shifts in lip representation contralateral to the missing hand towards, but not invading, the hand area. However, we were unable to identify any statistical relationship between cortical reorganization and phantom sensations or pain either with this measurement or with the traditional Euclidian distance measurement. Instead, we demonstrate that other factors may contribute to the observed remapping. Further research that reassesses more broadly the relationship between cortical reorganization and chronic pain is warranted. PMID:26072517

  1. Diffuse malformations of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Guerrini, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) represent a major cause of developmental disabilities and severe epilepsy. Advances in imaging and genetics have improved the diagnosis and classification of these conditions. Up to now, eight genes have been involved in different types of MCD. Lissencephaly-pachygyria and subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) represent a malformative spectrum resulting from mutations of either LIS1 or DCX genes. LIS1 mutations cause a more severe malformation in the posterior brain regions. DCX mutations usually cause anteriorly predominant lissencephaly in males and SBH in female patients. Additional forms are X-linked lissencephaly with corpus callosum agenesis and ambiguous genitalia associated with mutations of the ARX gene. Lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH) encompass heterogeneous disorders named LCH types a to d. LCHa is related to mutation in LIS1 or DCX, LCHb with mutation of the RELN gene, and LCHd could be related to the TUBA1A gene. Polymicrogyria encompasses a wide range of clinical, etiological, and histological findings. Among several syndromes, recessive bilateral fronto-parietal polymicrogyria has been associated with mutations of the GPR56 gene. Bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria has been associated with mutations in the SRPX2 gene in a few individuals and with linkage to chromosome Xq28 in a some other families. X-linked bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) consists of PNH with focal epilepsy in females and prenatal lethality in males. Filamin A (FLNA) mutations have been reported in some families and in sporadic patients. It is possible to infer the most likely causative gene by brain imaging studies and other clinical findings. PMID:23622213

  2. Cortical mechanisms of cocaine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Steketee, Jeffery D

    2005-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization is the augmented motor-stimulant response that occurs with repeated, intermittent exposure to most drugs of abuse, including cocaine. Sensitization, which is a long-lasting phenomenon, is thought to underlie drug craving and relapse to drug use. Much research has been conducted to determine the neural mechanisms of sensitization. The bulk of this effort has focused on the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area (VTA) that comprise a portion of the mesolimbic dopamine system. Recently, studies have begun to also explore the role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in sensitization, in part because this region provides glutamatergic innervation to the VTA and nucleus accumbens. The present review will coalesce these studies into a working hypothesis that states that cocaine sensitization results from a decrease in inhibitory modulation of excitatory transmission from the mPFC to the VTA and nucleus accumbens. The discussion will revolve around how repeated cocaine exposure alters dopamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutamate regulation of pyramidal cell activity. It will be proposed that cocaine-induced alterations in cortical transmission occur in two phases. During early withdrawal from repeated cocaine exposure, changes in neurotransmitter release are thought to underlie the decreased inhibitory modulation of pyramidal projection neurons. Following more prolonged withdrawal, the attenuation in inhibitory transmission appears to occur at the receptor level. A model will be presented that may serve to direct future studies on the involvement of the mPFC in the development of cocaine sensitization, which ultimately could lead to development of pharmacotherapies for cocaine addiction. PMID:16808728

  3. Epidural cortical stimulation and aphasia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cherney, Leora R.; Harvey, Richard L.; Babbitt, Edna M.; Hurwitz, Rosalind; Kaye, Rosalind C.; Lee, Jaime B.; Small, Steven. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several methods of delivering cortical brain stimulation to modulate cortical excitability and interest in their application as an adjuvant strategy in aphasia rehabilitation after stroke is growing. Epidural cortical stimulation, although more invasive than other methods, permits high frequency stimulation of high spatial specificity to targeted neuronal populations. Aims First, we review evidence supporting the use of epidural cortical stimulation for upper limb recovery after focal cortical injury in both animal models and human stroke survivors. These data provide the empirical and theoretical platform underlying the use of epidural cortical stimulation in aphasia. Second, we summarize evidence for the application of epidural cortical stimulation in aphasia. We describe the procedures and primary outcomes of a safety and feasibility study (Cherney, Erickson & Small, 2010), and provide previously unpublished data regarding secondary behavioral outcomes from that study. Main Contribution In a controlled study comparing epidural cortical stimulation plus language treatment (CS/LT) to language treatment alone (LT), eight stroke survivors with nonfluent aphasia received intensive language therapy for 6 weeks. Four of these participants also underwent surgical implantation of an epidural stimulation device which was activated only during therapy sessions. Behavioral data were collected before treatment, immediately after treatment, and at 6 and 12 weeks following the end of treatment. The effect size for the primary outcome measure, the Western Aphasia Battery Aphasia Quotient, was benchmarked as moderate from baseline to immediately post-treatment, and large from baseline to the 12-week follow-up. Similarly, effect sizes obtained at the 12-week follow-up for the Boston Naming Test, the Communicative Effectiveness Index, and for correct information units on a picture description task were greater than those obtained immediately post treatment

  4. Risk Factors and Consequences of Cortical Thickness in an Asian Population.

    PubMed

    Hilal, Saima; Xin, Xu; Ang, Seow Li; Tan, Chuen Seng; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Niessen, Wiro J; Vrooman, Henri; Wong, Tien Yin; Chen, Christopher; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran

    2015-06-01

    Cortical thickness has been suggested to be one of the most important markers of cortical atrophy. In this study, we examined potential risk factors of cortical thickness and its association with cognition in an elderly Asian population from Singapore. This is a cross-sectional study among 572 Chinese and Malay patients from the ongoing Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore (EDIS) Study, who underwent comprehensive examinations including neuropsychological testing and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cortical thickness (in micrometers) was measured using a model-based automated procedure. Cognitive function was expressed as composite and domain-specific Z-scores. Cognitive impairment was categorized into cognitive impairment no dementia (CIND)-mild, CIND-moderate, and dementia in accordance with accepted criteria. Linear regression models were used to examine the association between various risk factors and cortical thickness. With respect to cognition as outcome, both linear (for Z-scores) and logistic (for CIND/dementia) regression models were constructed. Initial adjustments were made for age, sex, and education, and subsequently for other cardiovascular risk factors and MRI markers. Out of 572 included patients, 171 (29.9%) were diagnosed with CIND-mild, 197 (34.4%) with CIND-moderate, and 28 (4.9%) with dementia. Risk factors related to a smaller cortical thickness were increased age, male sex, Malay ethnicity, higher blood glucose, and body mass index levels and presence of lacunar infarcts on MRI. Smaller cortical thickness was associated with CIND moderate/dementia [odds ratio (OR) per standard deviation (SD) decrease: 1.70; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19-2.44, P = 0.004] and with composite Z-score reflecting global cognitive functioning [mean difference per SD decrease: -0.094; 95% CI: -0.159; -0.030, P = 0.004]. In particular, smaller cortical thicknesses in the occipital and temporal lobes were related to cognitive impairment. Finally

  5. Simulating Cortical Feedback Modulation as Changes in Excitation and Inhibition in a Cortical Circuit Model

    PubMed Central

    Murray, John D.; McCormick, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical feedback pathways are hypothesized to distribute context-dependent signals during flexible behavior. Recent experimental work has attempted to understand the mechanisms by which cortical feedback inputs modulate their target regions. Within the mouse whisker sensorimotor system, cortical feedback stimulation modulates spontaneous activity and sensory responsiveness, leading to enhanced sensory representations. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unknown. In this study we use a simplified neural circuit model, which includes two recurrent excitatory populations and global inhibition, to simulate cortical modulation. First, we demonstrate how changes in the strengths of excitation and inhibition alter the input–output processing responses of our model. Second, we compare these responses with experimental findings from cortical feedback stimulation. Our analyses predict that enhanced inhibition underlies the changes in spontaneous and sensory evoked activity observed experimentally. More generally, these analyses provide a framework for relating cellular and synaptic properties to emergent circuit function and dynamic modulation. PMID:27595137

  6. Simulating Cortical Feedback Modulation as Changes in Excitation and Inhibition in a Cortical Circuit Model.

    PubMed

    Zagha, Edward; Murray, John D; McCormick, David A

    2016-01-01

    Cortical feedback pathways are hypothesized to distribute context-dependent signals during flexible behavior. Recent experimental work has attempted to understand the mechanisms by which cortical feedback inputs modulate their target regions. Within the mouse whisker sensorimotor system, cortical feedback stimulation modulates spontaneous activity and sensory responsiveness, leading to enhanced sensory representations. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unknown. In this study we use a simplified neural circuit model, which includes two recurrent excitatory populations and global inhibition, to simulate cortical modulation. First, we demonstrate how changes in the strengths of excitation and inhibition alter the input-output processing responses of our model. Second, we compare these responses with experimental findings from cortical feedback stimulation. Our analyses predict that enhanced inhibition underlies the changes in spontaneous and sensory evoked activity observed experimentally. More generally, these analyses provide a framework for relating cellular and synaptic properties to emergent circuit function and dynamic modulation. PMID:27595137

  7. Symmetry breaking in reconstituted actin cortices.

    PubMed

    Abu Shah, Enas; Keren, Kinneret

    2014-01-01

    The actin cortex plays a pivotal role in cell division, in generating and maintaining cell polarity and in motility. In all these contexts, the cortical network has to break symmetry to generate polar cytoskeletal dynamics. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms responsible for regulating cortical dynamics in vivo and inducing symmetry breaking are still unclear. Here we introduce a reconstituted system that self-organizes into dynamic actin cortices at the inner interface of water-in-oil emulsions. This artificial system undergoes spontaneous symmetry breaking, driven by myosin-induced cortical actin flows, which appears remarkably similar to the initial polarization of the embryo in many species. Our in vitro model system recapitulates the rich dynamics of actin cortices in vivo, revealing the basic biophysical and biochemical requirements for cortex formation and symmetry breaking. Moreover, this synthetic system paves the way for further exploration of artificial cells towards the realization of minimal model systems that can move and divide.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01433.001. PMID:24843007

  8. Automatic parcellation of longitudinal cortical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alassaf, Manal H.; Hahn, James K.

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel automatic method to parcellate the cortical surfaces of the neonatal brain longitudinal atlas at different stages of development. A labeled brain atlas of newborn at 41 weeks gestational age (GA) is used to propagate labels of anatomical regions of interest to an unlabeled spatio-temporal atlas, which provides a dynamic model of brain development at each week between 28-44 GA weeks. First, labels from the cortical volume of the labeled newborn brain are propagated to an age-matched cortical surface from the spatio-temporal atlas. Then, labels are propagated across the cortical surfaces of each week of the spatio-temporal atlas by registering successive cortical surfaces using a novel approach and an energy optimization function. This procedure incorporates local and global, spatial and temporal information when assigning the labels to each surface. The result is a complete parcellation of 17 neonatal brain surfaces of the spatio-temporal atlas with similar points per labels distributions across weeks.

  9. Human Cortical Excitability Increases with Time Awake

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Reto; Mäki, Hanna; Rosanova, Mario; Casarotto, Silvia; Canali, Paola; Casali, Adenauer G.; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness is associated not only with obvious changes in the way we feel and perform but also with well-known clinical effects, such as increased susceptibility to seizures, to hallucinations, and relief of depressive symptoms. These clinical effects suggest that prolonged wakefulness may be associated with significant changes in the state of cortical circuits. While recent animal experiments have reported a progressive increase of cortical excitability with time awake, no conclusive evidence could be gathered in humans. In this study, we combine transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to monitor cortical excitability in healthy individuals as a function of time awake. We observed that the excitability of the human frontal cortex, measured as the immediate (0–20 ms) EEG reaction to TMS, progressively increases with time awake, from morning to evening and after one night of total sleep deprivation, and that it decreases after recovery sleep. By continuously monitoring vigilance, we also found that this modulation in cortical responsiveness is tonic and not attributable to transient fluctuations of the level of arousal. The present results provide noninvasive electrophysiological evidence that wakefulness is associated with a steady increase in the excitability of human cortical circuits that is rebalanced during sleep. PMID:22314045

  10. Accelerated longitudinal cortical thinning in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dongming; Lebel, Catherine; Treit, Sarah; Evans, Alan; Beaulieu, Christian

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear if changes of the cerebral cortex occur gradually from childhood to adulthood, or if adolescence marks a differential period of cortical development. In the current study of 90 healthy volunteers aged 5-32years (48 females, 85 right handed) with 180 scans (2 scans for each participant with ~4year gaps), thinning of overall mean thickness and across the four major cortical lobes bilaterally was observed across this full age span. However, the thinning rate, calculated as Δcortical thickness/Δage (mm/year) between scans of each participant, revealed an accelerated cortical thinning during adolescence, which was preceded by less thinning in childhood and followed by decelerated thinning in young adulthood. Males and females showed similarly faster thinning rates during adolescence relative to young adults. The underlying basis and role of accelerated cortical thinning during adolescence for cognition, behaviour and disorders that appear at such a stage of development remains to be determined in future work. PMID:25312772

  11. Symmetry breaking in reconstituted actin cortices

    PubMed Central

    Abu Shah, Enas; Keren, Kinneret

    2014-01-01

    The actin cortex plays a pivotal role in cell division, in generating and maintaining cell polarity and in motility. In all these contexts, the cortical network has to break symmetry to generate polar cytoskeletal dynamics. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms responsible for regulating cortical dynamics in vivo and inducing symmetry breaking are still unclear. Here we introduce a reconstituted system that self-organizes into dynamic actin cortices at the inner interface of water-in-oil emulsions. This artificial system undergoes spontaneous symmetry breaking, driven by myosin-induced cortical actin flows, which appears remarkably similar to the initial polarization of the embryo in many species. Our in vitro model system recapitulates the rich dynamics of actin cortices in vivo, revealing the basic biophysical and biochemical requirements for cortex formation and symmetry breaking. Moreover, this synthetic system paves the way for further exploration of artificial cells towards the realization of minimal model systems that can move and divide. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01433.001 PMID:24843007

  12. Malformations of cortical development and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Leventer, Richard J; Guerrini, Renzo; Dobyns, William B

    2008-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) are macroscopic or microscopic abnormalities of the cerebral cortex that arise as a consequence of an interruption to the normal steps of formation of the cortical plate. The human cortex develops its basic structure during the first two trimesters of pregnancy as a series of overlapping steps, beginning with proliferation and differentiation of neurons, which then migrate before finally organizing themselves in the developing cortex. Abnormalities at any of these stages, be they environmental or genetic in origin, may cause disruption of neuronal circuitry and predispose to a variety of clinical consequences, the most common of which is epileptic seizures. A large number of MCDs have now been described, each with characteristic pathological, clinical, and imaging features. The causes of many of these MCDs have been determined through the study of affected individuals, with many MCDs now established as being secondary to mutations in cortical development genes. This review will highlight the best-known of the human cortical malformations associated with epilepsy. The pathological, clinical, imaging, and etiologic features of each MCD will be summarized, with representative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images shown for each MCD. The malformations tuberous sclerosis, focal cortical dysplasia, hemimegalencephaly, classical lissencephaly, subcortical band heterotopia, periventricular nodular heterotopia, polymicrogyria, and schizencephaly will be presented. PMID:18472484

  13. Fearful faces heighten the cortical representation of contextual threat

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Matthias J.; Keil, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Perception of facial expressions is typically investigated by presenting isolated face stimuli. In everyday life, however, faces are rarely seen without a surrounding visual context that affects perception and interpretation of the facial expression. Conversely, fearful faces may act as a cue, heightening the sensitivity of the visual system to effectively detect potential threat in the environment. In the present study, we used steady-state visually evoked potentials (ssVEPs) to examine the mutual effects of facial expressions (fearful, neutral, happy) and affective visual context (pleasant, neutral, threat). By assigning two different flicker frequencies (12 vs. 15 Hz) to the face and the visual context scene, cortical activity to the concurrent stimuli was separated, which represents a novel approach to independently tracking the cortical processes associated with the face and the context. Twenty healthy students viewed flickering faces overlaid on flickering visual scenes, while performing a simple change-detection task at fixation, and high-density EEG was recorded. Arousing background scenes generally drove larger ssVEP amplitudes than neutral scenes. Importantly, background and expression interacted: When viewing fearful facial expressions, the ssVEP in response to threat context was amplified compared to other backgrounds. Together, these findings suggest that fearful faces elicit vigilance for potential threat in the visual periphery. PMID:24125792

  14. Potentials of endogenous neural stem cells in cortical repair

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Bhaskar; Jaber, Mohamed; Gaillard, Afsaneh

    2012-01-01

    In the last few decades great thrust has been put in the area of regenerative neurobiology research to combat brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. The recent discovery of neurogenic niches in the adult brain has led researchers to study how to mobilize these cells to orchestrate an endogenous repair mechanism. The brain can minimize injury-induced damage by means of an immediate glial response and by initiating repair mechanisms that involve the generation and mobilization of new neurons to the site of injury where they can integrate into the existing circuit. This review highlights the current status of research in this field. Here, we discuss the changes that take place in the neurogenic milieu following injury. We will focus, in particular, on the cellular and molecular controls that lead to increased proliferation in the Sub ventricular Zone (SVZ) as well as neurogenesis. We will also concentrate on how these cellular and molecular mechanisms influence the migration of new cells to the affected area and their differentiation into neuronal/glial lineage that initiate the repair mechanism. Next, we will discuss some of the different factors that limit/retard the repair process and highlight future lines of research that can help to overcome these limitations. A clear understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms and physiological changes following brain damage and the subsequent endogenous repair should help us develop better strategies to repair damaged brains. PMID:22509153

  15. Behavioral Dependence of Auditory Cortical Responses

    PubMed Central

    Osmanski, Michael S.; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Neural responses in the auditory cortex have historically been measured from either anesthetized or awake but non-behaving animals. A growing body of work has begun to focus instead on recording from auditory cortex of animals actively engaged in behavior tasks. These studies have shown that auditory cortical responses are dependent upon the behavioral state of the animal. The longer ascending subcortical pathway of the auditory system and unique characteristics of auditory processing suggest that such dependencies may have a more profound influence on cortical processing in auditory system compared to other sensory systems. It is important to understand the nature of these dependencies and their functional implications. In this article, we review the literature on this topic pertaining to cortical processing of sounds. PMID:25690831

  16. Phase reversal technique decreases cortical stimulation time during motor mapping.

    PubMed

    Simon, Mirela V; Sheth, Sameer A; Eckhardt, Christine A; Kilbride, Ronan D; Braver, Diana; Williams, Ziv; Curry, William; Cahill, Dan; Eskandar, Emad N

    2014-06-01

    Neurophysiologic mapping of the primary motor cortex (PMC) is commonly used in supratentorial surgery. Electrical cortical stimulation is guided by anatomic landmarks towards the precentral gyrus, with recording of the triggered primary motor responses (TPMR) in the contralateral hemibody. Thus, factors such as distortion of the pericentral anatomy, small surgical fields, brain shifts and miscalibrated neuronavigational systems may lengthen the process and result in unnecessary stimulations, increasing the probability of triggering seizures. We hypothesized that central sulcus localization via the median somatosensory evoked potentials phase reversal technique (MSSEP PRT) accurately guides the surgeon, resulting in prompt identification of the PMC with minimal electrical stimulation. Multivariate Cox regression was used to study the impact of MSSEP PRT on time spent performing electrical cortical stimulation to TPMR. The analysis was adjusted for presence of increased cortical excitability, high motor thresholds, lesions close to PMC and fMRI data, in 100 consecutive standardized motor mapping procedures for brain tumor resection and epilepsy surgery. Phase reversal and change morphology of the recorded somatosensory evoked potentials quadrupled (hazard ratio [HR] 4.13, p<0.0001) and doubled (HR 2.14, p=0.02) the rate of obtaining TPMR, respectively. A 1mA increase in motor threshold decreased the rate by 9% (HR 0.91, p=0.0002). Afterdischarges triggered before TPMR and lesions in close proximity to PMC decreased the rate of TPMR by 76% (HR 0.23, p<0.0001) and 48% (HR 0.52, p=0.04), respectively. Informative PRT decreases stimulation time. Afterdischarges triggered before TPMR, high motor thresholds and lesions close to the PMC increase it. PMID:24679940

  17. Focal cortical dysplasias in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous reports indicate the presence of histological abnormalities in the brains of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggestive of a dysplastic process. In this study we identified areas of abnormal cortical thinning within the cerebral cortex of ASD individuals and examined the same for neuronal morphometric abnormalities by using computerized image analysis. Results The study analyzed celloidin-embedded and Nissl-stained serial full coronal brain sections of 7 autistic (ADI-R diagnosed) and 7 age/sex-matched neurotypicals. Sections were scanned and manually segmented before implementing an algorithm using Laplace’s equation to measure cortical width. Identified areas were then subjected to analysis for neuronal morphometry. Results of our study indicate the presence within our ASD population of circumscribed foci of diminished cortical width that varied among affected individuals both in terms of location and overall size with the frontal lobes being particularly involved. Spatial statistic indicated a reduction in size of neurons within affected areas. Granulometry confirmed the presence of smaller pyramidal cells and suggested a concomitant reduction in the total number of interneurons. Conclusions The neuropathology is consistent with a diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Results from the medical literature (e.g., heterotopias) and our own study suggest that the genesis of this cortical malformation seemingly resides in the heterochronic divisions of periventricular germinal cells. The end result is that during corticogenesis radially migrating neuroblasts (future pyramidal cells) are desynchronized in their development from those that follow a tangential route (interneurons). The possible presence of a pathological mechanism in common among different conditions expressing an autism-like phenotype argue in favor of considering ASD a “sequence” rather than a syndrome. Focal cortical dysplasias in ASD may serve to

  18. Remote changes in cortical excitability after stroke.

    PubMed

    Bütefisch, Cathrin M; Netz, Johannes; Wessling, Marion; Seitz, Rüdiger J; Hömberg, Volker

    2003-02-01

    Changes in the cerebral metabolism and the excitability of brain areas remote from an ischaemic brain lesion have been reported in animals and humans and implicated as a mechanism relevant to functional recovery. The aim of the present study was to determine whether changes in the inhibitory and excitatory activity in motor cortex of the non-affected hemisphere are present in stroke patients, and whether these changes are related to the extent of the patients' recovery of function. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to study the first dorsal interosseus muscle (FDI) of the non-affected hand in 13 patients with good recovery of hand function after stroke, and was compared with left hemispheric stimulation in 13 healthy age-matched volunteers. In the first experiment, paired-pulse TMS with the conditioning stimulus (CS) set at 80% of the subject's motor threshold (MT) and interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 2, 3, 10 and 15 ms was used. In the second experiment, different intensities of CS were used to study its inhibitory effect on a succeeding suprathreshold test stimulus at an ISI that was kept constant at 2 ms. In a third experiment, the rise in motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes with increasing stimulus intensities was measured. In two additional control experiments, the effect of left versus right hemispheric stimulation in normal volunteers and good versus poor recovery of hand function in patients after stroke on the excitability of inhibitory and excitatory activity was studied. MT, mean test MEP and recruitment curves were similar in patients and healthy volunteers. In those patients with good recovery, paired-pulse excitability was increased at ISIs of 2 and 3 ms, similar to healthy volunteers at ISIs of 10 and 15 ms. When tested with different CS intensities at an ISI of 2 ms, inhibitory activity was similar in patients and healthy subjects at small CS intensities, but faded rapidly at higher CS intensities in patients. In contrast, in

  19. Is an absolute level of cortical beta suppression required for proper movement? Magnetoencephalographic evidence from healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Wilson, Tony W

    2016-07-01

    Previous research has connected a specific pattern of beta oscillatory activity to proper motor execution, but no study to date has directly examined how resting beta levels affect motor-related beta oscillatory activity in the motor cortex. Understanding this relationship is imperative to determining the basic mechanisms of motor control, as well as the impact of pathological beta oscillations on movement execution. In the current study, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) and a complex movement paradigm to quantify resting beta activity and movement-related beta oscillations in the context of healthy aging. We chose healthy aging as a model because preliminary evidence suggests that beta activity is elevated in older adults, and thus by examining older and younger adults we were able to naturally vary resting beta levels. To this end, healthy younger and older participants were recorded during motor performance and at rest. Using beamforming, we imaged the peri-movement beta event-related desynchronization (ERD) and extracted virtual sensors from the peak voxels, which enabled absolute and relative beta power to be assessed. Interestingly, absolute beta power during the pre-movement baseline was much stronger in older relative to younger adults, and older adults also exhibited proportionally large beta desynchronization (ERD) responses during motor planning and execution compared to younger adults. Crucially, we found a significant relationship between spontaneous (resting) beta power and beta ERD magnitude in both primary motor cortices, above and beyond the effects of age. A similar link was found between beta ERD magnitude and movement duration. These findings suggest a direct linkage between beta reduction during movement and spontaneous activity in the motor cortex, such that as spontaneous beta power increases, a greater reduction in beta activity is required to execute movement. We propose that, on an individual level, the primary motor cortices have an

  20. Huntingtin Is Required for Normal Excitatory Synapse Development in Cortical and Striatal Circuits

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, Spencer U.; Karadeniz, Yonca B.; Worthington, Atesh K.; Hayrapetyan, Volodya Y.; Ozlu, M. Ilcim; Serafin-Molina, Karol; Risher, W. Christopher; Ustunkaya, Tuna; Dragatsis, Ioannis; Zeitlin, Scott; Yin, Henry H.

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a poly-glutamine (poly-Q) stretch in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. Gain-of-function effects of mutant Htt have been extensively investigated as the major driver of neurodegeneration in HD. However, loss-of-function effects of poly-Q mutations recently emerged as potential drivers of disease pathophysiology. Early synaptic problems in the excitatory cortical and striatal connections have been reported in HD, but the role of Htt protein in synaptic connectivity was unknown. Therefore, we investigated the role of Htt in synaptic connectivity in vivo by conditionally silencing Htt in the developing mouse cortex. When cortical Htt function was silenced, cortical and striatal excitatory synapses formed and matured at an accelerated pace through postnatal day 21 (P21). This exuberant synaptic connectivity was lost over time in the cortex, resulting in the deterioration of synapses by 5 weeks. Synaptic decline in the cortex was accompanied with layer- and region-specific reactive gliosis without cell loss. To determine whether the disease-causing poly-Q mutation in Htt affects synapse development, we next investigated the synaptic connectivity in a full-length knock-in mouse model of HD, the zQ175 mouse. Similar to the cortical conditional knock-outs, we found excessive excitatory synapse formation and maturation in the cortices of P21 zQ175, which was lost by 5 weeks. Together, our findings reveal that cortical Htt is required for the correct establishment of cortical and striatal excitatory circuits, and this function of Htt is lost when the mutant Htt is present. PMID:25009276

  1. Cortical Amyloid β Deposition and Current Depressive Symptoms in Alzheimer Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jun Ku; Plitman, Eric; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Caravaggio, Fernando; Gerretsen, Philip; Iwata, Yusuke; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-05-01

    Depressive symptoms are frequently seen in patients with dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Evidence suggests that there may be a link between current depressive symptoms and Alzheimer disease (AD)-associated pathological changes, such as an increase in cortical amyloid-β (Aβ). However, limited in vivo studies have explored the relationship between current depressive symptoms and cortical Aβ in patients with MCI and AD. Our study, using a large sample of 455 patients with MCI and 153 patients with AD from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiatives, investigated whether current depressive symptoms are related to cortical Aβ deposition. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale and Neuropsychiatric Inventory-depression/dysphoria. Cortical Aβ was quantified using positron emission tomography with the Aβ probe(18)F-florbetapir (AV-45).(18)F-florbetapir standardized uptake value ratio (AV-45 SUVR) from the frontal, cingulate, parietal, and temporal regions was estimated. A global AV-45 SUVR, defined as the average of frontal, cingulate, precuneus, and parietal cortex, was also used. We observed that current depressive symptoms were not related to cortical Aβ, after controlling for potential confounds, including history of major depression. We also observed that there was no difference in cortical Aβ between matched participants with high and low depressive symptoms, as well as no difference between matched participants with the presence and absence of depressive symptoms. The association between depression and cortical Aβ deposition does not exist, but the relationship is highly influenced by stressful events in the past, such as previous depressive episodes, and complex interactions of different pathways underlying both depression and dementia. PMID:26400248

  2. Cortical morphometry in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: Contribution of thickness and surface area to volume.

    PubMed

    Silk, Timothy J; Beare, Richard; Malpas, Charles; Adamson, Chris; Vilgis, Veronika; Vance, Alasdair; Bellgrove, Mark A

    2016-09-01

    Although lower brain volume is a consistent neuroimaging finding in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), we lack an understanding of whether this effect is driven by changes in cortical thickness or surface area, which are governed by distinct neurodevelopmental processes. This study examined ADHD-control differences in cortical thickness, surface area and volume, and tests whether thickness and surface area mediates any observed volume differences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data was collected from 35 males with ADHD-combined type and 35 typically developing control participants aged 9-17 years. Morphometric measures were examined for between group differences and the specific contribution of surface area and thickness to group differences in volume tested using mediation analysis. Individuals with ADHD had smaller total cortical volume (7.3%), surface area (4.3%), and mean cortical thickness (2.8%) compared to controls. Differences were pronounced in frontal and parietal lobes. Variance in volume as a function of ADHD diagnosis was accounted for at least in part by the relationship between diagnosis and each of cortical thickness and surface area, with regional variation in the relative contributions of these measures. The surface area of the precuneus was a major driver of volume differences, attesting to the potential relevance of this region for neurodevelopment in ADHD. Both surface area and cortical thickness play a significant mediating role in determining diagnostic differences in volume, with regional variation in the contribution of thickness and surface area to those volume differences, highlighting the importance of examining both cortical thickness and surface area in examining ADHD. PMID:27268101

  3. Cortical thickness, volume and surface area in patients with bipolar disorder types I and II

    PubMed Central

    Abé, Christoph; Ekman, Carl-Johan; Sellgren, Carl; Petrovic, Predrag; Ingvar, Martin; Landén, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Background Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common chronic psychiatric disorder mainly characterized by episodes of mania, hypomania and depression. The disorder is associated with cognitive impairments and structural brain abnormalities, such as lower cortical volumes in primarily frontal brain regions than healthy controls. Although bipolar disorder types I (BDI) and II (BDII) exhibit different symptoms and severity, previous studies have focused on BDI. Furthermore, the most frequently investigated measure in this population is cortical volume. The aim of our study was to investigate abnormalities in patients with BDI and BDII by simultaneously analyzing cortical volume, thickness and surface area, which yields more information about disease- and symptom-related neurobiology. Methods We used MRI to measure cortical volume, thickness and area in patients with BDI and BDII as well as in healthy controls. The large study cohort enabled us to adjust for important confounding factors. Results We included 81 patients with BDI, 59 with BDII and 85 controls in our analyses. Cortical volume, thickness and surface area abnormalities were present in frontal, temporal and medial occipital regions in patients with BD. Lithium and antiepileptic drug use had an effect on the observed differences in medial occipital regions. Patients with the subtypes BDI and BDII displayed common cortical abnormalities, such as lower volume, thickness and surface area than healthy controls in frontal brain regions but differed in temporal and medial prefrontal regions, where only those with BDI had abnormally low cortical volume and thickness. Limitations The group differences can be explained by progressive changes, but also by premorbid conditions. They could also have been influenced by unknown factors, such as social, environmental or genetic factors. Conclusion Our findings suggest diagnosis-related neurobiological differences between the BD subtypes, which could explain distinct symptoms and

  4. Cortical dysfunction underlies the development of the split-hand in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Menon, Parvathi; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The split-hand phenomenon, a specific feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), refers to preferential wasting of abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) with relative preservation of abductor digiti minimi (ADM). The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the split-hand phenomenon remain elusive and resolution of this issue would provide unique insights into ALS pathophysiology. Consequently, the present study dissected out the relative contribution of cortical and peripheral processes in development of the split-hand phenomenon in ALS. Cortical and axonal excitability studies were undertaken on 26 ALS patients, with motor responses recorded over the APB, FDI and ADM muscles. Results were compared to 21 controls. Short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), a biomarker of cortical excitability, was significantly reduced across the range of intrinsic hand muscles (APB(SICI ALS) 0.3±2.0%, APB(SICI controls) 16.0±1.9%, P<0.0001; FDI(SICI ALS) 2.7±1.7%, FDI(SICI controls) 14.8±1.9%, P<0.0001; ADM(SICI ALS) 2.6±1.5%, ADM(SICI controls) 9.7±2.2%, P<0.001), although the reduction was most prominent when recorded over APB/FDI. Changes in SICI were accompanied by a significant increase in motor evoked potential amplitude and reduction of cortical silent period duration, all indicative of cortical hyperexcitability, and these were most prominent from the APB/FDI. At a peripheral level, a significant increase in strength-duration time constant and reduction in depolarising threshold electrotonus were evident in ALS, although these changes did not follow a split-hand distribution. Cortical dysfunction contributed to development of the split-hand in ALS, thereby implying an importance of cortical hyperexcitability in ALS pathogenesis. PMID:24475241

  5. Diaphragmatic activity induced by cortical stimulation: surface versus esophageal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Gea, J; Espadaler, J M; Guiu, R; Aran, X; Seoane, L; Broquetas, J M

    1993-02-01

    Evoked responses of the diaphragm can be induced by magnetic cortical stimulation and recorded by either surface or esophageal electrodes. The former recording system is tolerated better by the patient but has potential problems with the specificity of the diaphragmatic signal. This study compares the responses of the diaphragm to cortical stimulation that were recorded simultaneously with surface and esophageal electrodes on seven patients (61 +/- 4 yr) with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Stimuli were delivered in three ventilatory conditions: at baseline, during deep breathing, and during voluntary panting. No differences were observed between results recorded by surface and esophageal electrodes [amplitude of the compound motor of the action potential (CMAP), 0.8 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.8 +/- 0.1 mV, NS; latency, 13.1 +/- 0.4 vs. 12.6 +/- 0.5 ms, NS]. In addition, significant correlations were found (CMAP, r = 0.77, P < 0.001; latency, r = 0.71, P = 0.002). The concordance analysis, however, indicated some dissimilarity between the recordings of the electrodes (CMAP, R1 = 0.31; latency, R1 = 0.26). These differences may be due to the area of the muscle mainly recorded by each electrode and/or to the additional activity from other muscles recorded by surface electrodes. On the other hand, the diaphragmatic responses observed in these patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases were similar to those previously reported in healthy subjects. PMID:8458780

  6. Frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related β-amyloid accumulation by chronic sleep restriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyi; Wu, Huijuan; He, Jialin; Zhuang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhenyu; Yang, Yang; Huang, Liuqing; Zhao, Zhongxin

    2016-08-17

    Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by mitochondria-related β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation is increasingly being considered a novel risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology. The close relationship between chronic sleep restriction (CSR) and cortical Aβ elevation was confirmed recently. By assessing frontal cortical mitochondrial function (electron microscopy manifestation, cytochrome C oxidase concentration, ATP level, and mitochondrial membrane potential) and the levels of mitochondria-related Aβ in 9-month-old adult male C57BL/6J mice subjected to CSR and as an environmental control (CO) group, we aimed to evaluate the association of CSR with mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related Aβ accumulation. In this study, frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction was significantly more severe in CSR mice compared with CO animals. Furthermore, CSR mice showed higher mitochondria-associated Aβ, total Aβ, and mitochondria-related β-amyloid protein precursor (AβPP) levels compared with CO mice. In the CSR model, mouse frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction was correlated with mitochondria-associated Aβ and mitochondria-related AβPP levels. However, frontal cortical mitochondria-associated Aβ levels showed no significant association with cortical total Aβ and mitochondrial AβPP concentrations. These findings indicated that CSR-induced frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related Aβ accumulation, which was closely related to mitochondrial dysfunction under CSR. PMID:27341212

  7. Frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related β-amyloid accumulation by chronic sleep restriction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyi; He, Jialin; Zhuang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhenyu; Yang, Yang; Huang, Liuqing; Zhao, Zhongxin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by mitochondria-related β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation is increasingly being considered a novel risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer’s disease pathophysiology. The close relationship between chronic sleep restriction (CSR) and cortical Aβ elevation was confirmed recently. By assessing frontal cortical mitochondrial function (electron microscopy manifestation, cytochrome C oxidase concentration, ATP level, and mitochondrial membrane potential) and the levels of mitochondria-related Aβ in 9-month-old adult male C57BL/6J mice subjected to CSR and as an environmental control (CO) group, we aimed to evaluate the association of CSR with mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related Aβ accumulation. In this study, frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction was significantly more severe in CSR mice compared with CO animals. Furthermore, CSR mice showed higher mitochondria-associated Aβ, total Aβ, and mitochondria-related β-amyloid protein precursor (AβPP) levels compared with CO mice. In the CSR model, mouse frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction was correlated with mitochondria-associated Aβ and mitochondria-related AβPP levels. However, frontal cortical mitochondria-associated Aβ levels showed no significant association with cortical total Aβ and mitochondrial AβPP concentrations. These findings indicated that CSR-induced frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related Aβ accumulation, which was closely related to mitochondrial dysfunction under CSR. PMID:27341212

  8. Cortical thickness correlates of psychotic experiences: examining the effect of season of birth using a genetically informative design.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Palomera, A; Alemany, S; Falcón, C; Bargalló, N; Goldberg, X; Crespo-Facorro, B; Nenadic, I; Fañanás, L

    2014-09-01

    Season of birth has been shown to influence risk for several neuropsychiatric diseases. Furthermore, it has been suggested that season of birth modifies a number of brain morphological traits. Since cortical thickness alterations have been reported across some levels of the psychosis-spectrum, this study was aimed at i) assessing the scarcely explored relationship between cortical thickness and severity of subclinical psychotic experiences (PEs) in healthy subjects, and ii) evaluating the potential impact of season of birth in the preceding thickness-PEs relationship. As both PEs and brain cortical features are heritable, the current work used monozygotic twins to separately evaluate familial and unique environmental factors. High-resolution structural MRI scans of 48 twins (24 monozygotic pairs) were analyzed to estimate cortical thickness using FreeSurfer. They were then examined in relation to PEs, accounting for the effects of birth season; putative differential relationships between PEs and cortical thickness depending on season of birth were also tested. Current results support previous findings indicative of cortical thickening in healthy individuals with high psychometrically assessed psychosis scores, probably in line with theories of compensatory aspects of brain features in non-clinical populations. Additionally, they suggest distinct patterns of cortical thickness-PEs relationships depending on birth seasonality. Familial factors underlying the presence of PEs may drive these effects. PMID:24923523

  9. A Role for Diminished GABA Transporter Activity in the Cortical Discharge Phenotype of MeCP2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Wither, Robert G; Lang, Min; Wu, Chiping; Sidorova-Darmos, Elena; Netchev, Hristo; Matolcsy, Catherine B; Snead, Orlando Carter; Eubanks, James H

    2016-05-01

    Cortical network hyper-excitability is a common phenotype in mouse models lacking the transcriptional regulator methyl-CPG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Here, we implicate enhanced GABAB receptor activity stemming from diminished cortical expression of the GABA transporter GAT-1 in the genesis of this network hyper-excitability. We found that administering the activity-dependent GABAB receptor allosteric modulator GS-39783 to female Mecp2(+/-) mice at doses producing no effect in wild-type mice strongly potentiated their basal rates of spontaneous cortical discharge activity. Consistently, administering the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP-35348 significantly decreased basal discharge activity in these mice. Expression analysis revealed that while GABAB or extra-synaptic GABAA receptor prevalence is preserved in the MeCP2-deficient cortex, the expression of GAT-1 is significantly reduced from wild-type levels. This decrease in GAT-1 expression is consequential, as low doses of the GAT-1 inhibitor NO-711 that had no effects in wild-type mice strongly exacerbated cortical discharge activity in female Mecp2(+/-) mice. Taken together, these data indicate that the absence of MeCP2 leads to decreased cortical levels of the GAT-1 GABA transporter, which facilitates cortical network hyper-excitability in MeCP2-deficient mice by increasing the activity of cortical GABAB receptors. PMID:26499511

  10. Mapping gray matter volume and cortical thickness in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Li, Ziyi; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wang, Zhiqun; Li, Kuncheng

    2010-03-01

    Gray matter volume and cortical thickness are two important indices widely used to detect neuropathological changes in brain structural magnetic resonance imaging. Using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM) protocol and surface-based cortical thickness measure, this study comprehensively investigated the regional changes in cortical gray matter volume and cortical thickness in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thirteen patients with AD and fourteen age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Results showed that voxel-based gray matter volume and cortical thickness reductions were highly correlated in the temporal lobe and its medial structure in AD. Moreover significant reduced cortical regions of gray matter volume were obviously more than that of cortical thickness. These findings suggest that gray matter volume and cortical thickness, as two important imaging markers, are effective indices for detecting the neuroanatomical alterations and help us understand the neuropathology from different views in AD.

  11. Cortical Hemisphere Registration Via Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Curve Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Anqi; Miller, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    We present large deformation diffeomorphic metric curve mapping (LDDMM-Curve) for registering cortical hemispheres. We showed global cortical hemisphere matching and evaluated the mapping accuracy in five subregions of the cortex in fourteen MRI scans. PMID:18051058

  12. Cortical Serotonin Type-2 Receptor Density in Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Jeremy; Anderson, George M.; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Hall, Geoffrey B. C.; Nahmias, Claude; Thompson, Ann; Szatmari, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Parents (N = 19) of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and adult controls (N = 17) underwent positron emission tomography (PET) using [[superscript 18]F]setoperone to image cortical serotonin type-2 (5-HT2) receptors. The 5-HT2 binding potentials (BPs) were calculated by ratioing [[superscript 18]F]setoperone intensity in regions of…

  13. Cortical Response Variability as a Developmental Index of Selective Auditory Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strait, Dana L.; Slater, Jessica; Abecassis, Victor; Kraus, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Attention induces synchronicity in neuronal firing for the encoding of a given stimulus at the exclusion of others. Recently, we reported decreased variability in scalp-recorded cortical evoked potentials to attended compared with ignored speech in adults. Here we aimed to determine the developmental time course for this neural index of auditory…

  14. Neuroprotective Activities of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Following Controlled Cortical Impact

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Matthew L.; Elliott, Bret R.; Haverland, Nicole A.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is facilitated by innate and adaptive immunity and can be harnessed to effect brain repair. In mice subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) we show that treatment with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) affects regulatory T cell numbers coincident with decreased lesion volumes and increased cortical tissue sparing. This paralleled increases in neurofilament and diminished reactive microglial staining. Transcriptomic analysis showed that GM-CSF induces robust immune neuroprotective responses seven days following CCI. Together, these results support the therapeutic potential of GM-CSF for TBI. PMID:25468272

  15. Extraction and analysis of neuron firing signals from deep cortical video microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kerekes, Ryan A; Blundon, Jay

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a method for extracting and analyzing neuronal activity time signals from video of the cortex of a live animal. The signals correspond to the firing activity of individual cortical neurons. Activity signals are based on the changing fluorescence of calcium indicators in the cells over time. We propose a cell segmentation method that relies on a user-specified center point, from which the signal extraction method proceeds. A stabilization approach is used to reduce tissue motion in the video. The extracted signal is then processed to flatten the baseline and detect action potentials. We show results from applying the method to a cortical video of a live mouse.

  16. Comparative aspects of cerebral cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Zoltán; Métin, Christine; Stoykova, Anastassia; Tarabykin, Victor; Price, David J.; Francis, Fiona; Meyer, Gundela; Dehay, Colette; Kennedy, Henry

    2006-01-01

    This review intends to provide examples how comparative and genetic analyses both contribute to our understanding of the rules for cortical development and evolution. Genetic studies helped to understand evolutionary rules of telencephalic organization in vertebrates. The control of the establishment of conserved telencephalic subdivisions and the formation of boundaries between these subdivisions has been examined and revealed the very specific alterations at the striatocortical junction. Comparative studies and genetic analyses both demonstrated the differential origin and migratory pattern of the two basic neuron types of the cerebral cortex. GABAergic interneurons are mostly generated in the subpallium and a common mechanisms govern their migration to the dorsal cortex in both mammals and sauropsids. The pyramidal neurons are generated within the cortical germinal zone and migrate radially. The earliest generated cell layers comprising preplate cells. Reelin positive Cajal-Retzius cells are a general feature of all vertebrates studied so far, however, there is a considerable amplification of the reelin signaling, which might have contributed to the establishment of the basic mammalian pattern of cortical development. Based on numerous recent observations we shall present an argument that specialization of the mitotic compartments might constitute a major drive behind the evolution of the mammalian cortex. Comparative developmental studies revealed distinct features in the early compartments of the developing macaque brain drawing our attention to the limitations of some of the current model systems for understanding human developmental abnormalities of the cortex. Comparative and genetic aspects of cortical development both reveal the workings of evolution. PMID:16519657

  17. Cortical Memory Mechanisms and Language Origins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboitiz, Francisco; Garcia, Ricardo R.; Bosman, Conrado; Brunetti, Enzo

    2006-01-01

    We have previously proposed that cortical auditory-vocal networks of the monkey brain can be partly homologized with language networks that participate in the phonological loop. In this paper, we suggest that other linguistic phenomena like semantic and syntactic processing also rely on the activation of transient memory networks, which can be…

  18. Junk DNA Used in Cerebral Cortical Evolution.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Thomas; Price, David J

    2016-06-15

    In this issue of Neuron, Rani et al. (2016) address important questions about the mechanisms of cerebral cortical evolution. They describe how a primate-specific long non-coding RNA titrates the levels of a microRNA that regulates an ancient signaling pathway controlling neuronal numbers. PMID:27311076

  19. Cortical correlates of acquired deafness to dissonance.

    PubMed

    Brattico, Elvira; Tervaniemi, Mari; Valimaki, Vesa; Van Zuijen, Titia; Peretz, Isabelle

    2003-11-01

    Patient I.R., who had bilateral lesions in the auditory cortex but intact hearing, did not distinguish dissonant from consonant musical excerpts in behavioral testing. We additionally found that the electrical brain responses did not differentiate musical intervals in terms of their dissonance/consonance, consistent with the idea that this phenomenon depends on the integrity of cortical functions. PMID:14681131

  20. Development of Cortical Circuitry and Cognitive Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman-Rakic, Patricia S.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies on the biological development of the prefrontal cortex in rhesus monkeys are reviewed. These studies have elucidated the basic neural circuitry underlying the delayed-response function in adult nonhuman primates and suggest that a critical mass of cortical synapses is important for the emergence of this cognitive function. (BN)

  1. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  2. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  3. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  4. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  5. 21 CFR 882.1310 - Cortical electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Identification. A cortical electrode is an electrode which is temporarily placed on the surface of the brain for stimulating the brain or recording the brain's electrical activity. (b) Classification. Class II...

  6. Localization of metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma with Ga-67

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, F.T.; Anderson, J.H.; Jelinek, J.; Anderson, D.W. )

    1991-02-01

    Data are limited on the localization of Ga-67 in primary or metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma. We report the localization of Ga-67 to pathologically confirmed adrenal cortical carcinoma metastatic to the lung. A review of the literature revealed four patients have previously been reported to have metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma detected on Ga-67 scan. Gallium imaging may be useful in the evaluation of patients with adrenal cortical carcinoma. SPECT imaging should further improve lesion resolution and localization.

  7. Trajectories of cortical surface area and cortical volume maturation in normal brain development

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Simon; Albaugh, Matthew D.; Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Hudziak, James J.; Mateos-Pérez, J.M.; Labbe, Aurelie; Evans, Alan C.; Karama, Sherif

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of developmental trajectories of cortical surface area and cortical volume in the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development. The quality-controlled sample included 384 individual typically-developing subjects with repeated scanning (1–3 per subject, total scans n=753) from 4.9 to 22.3 years of age. The best-fit model (cubic, quadratic, or first-order linear) was identified at each vertex using mixed-effects models, with statistical correction for multiple comparisons using random field theory. Analyses were performed with and without controlling for total brain volume. These data are provided for reference and comparison with other databases. Further discussion and interpretation on cortical developmental trajectories can be found in the associated Ducharme et al.׳s article “Trajectories of cortical thickness maturation in normal brain development – the importance of quality control procedures” (Ducharme et al., 2015) [1]. PMID:26702424

  8. Familial Cortical Myoclonus with a Mutation in NOL3

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Jonathan F.; Steckley, Jamie L.; Coppola, Giovanni; Hahn, Angelika F.G.; Howard, MacKenzie A.; Kornberg, Zachary; Huang, Alden; Mirsattari, Seyed M.; Merriman, Barry; Klein, Eric; Choi, Murim; Lee, Hsien-Yang; Kirk, Andrew; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Gibson, Gillian; Baraban, Scott C.; Lifton, Richard P.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Fu, Ying-Hui; Ptáček, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Myoclonus is characterized by sudden, brief involuntary movements and its presence is debilitating. We identified a family suffering from adult-onset, cortical myoclonus without associated seizures. We performed clinical, electrophysiological, and genetic studies to define this phenotype. Methods A large, four-generation family with history of myoclonus underwent careful questioning, examination, and electrophysiological testing. Thirty-five family members donated blood samples for genetic analysis, which included SNP mapping, microsatellite linkage, targeted massively parallel sequencing, and Sanger sequencing. In silico and in vitro experiments were performed to investigate functional significance of the mutation. Results We identified 11 members of a Canadian Mennonite family suffering from adult-onset, slowly progressive, disabling, multifocal myoclonus. Somatosensory evoked potentials indicated a cortical origin of the myoclonus. There were no associated seizures. Some severely affected individuals developed signs of progressive cerebellar ataxia of variable severity late in the course of their illness. The phenotype was inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. We demonstrated linkage to chromosome 16q21-22.1. We then sequenced all coding sequence in the critical region, identifying only a single co-segregating, novel, nonsynonymous mutation, which resides in the gene NOL3. Furthermore, this mutation was found to alter post-translational modification of NOL3 protein in vitro. Interpretation We propose that Familial Cortical Myoclonus (FCM) is a novel movement disorder that may be caused by mutation in NOL3. Further investigation of the role of NOL3 in neuronal physiology may shed light on neuronal membrane hyperexcitability and pathophysiology of myoclonus and related disorders. PMID:22926851

  9. Pain Catastrophising Affects Cortical Responses to Viewing Pain in Others

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Pain catastrophising is an exaggerated cognitive attitude implemented during pain or when thinking about pain. Catastrophising was previously associated with increased pain severity, emotional distress and disability in chronic pain patients, and is also a contributing factor in the development of neuropathic pain. To investigate the neural basis of how pain catastrophising affects pain observed in others, we acquired EEG data in groups of participants with high (High-Cat) or low (Low-Cat) pain catastrophising scores during viewing of pain scenes and graphically matched pictures not depicting imminent pain. The High-Cat group attributed greater pain to both pain and non-pain pictures. Source dipole analysis of event-related potentials during picture viewing revealed activations in the left (PHGL) and right (PHGR) paraphippocampal gyri, rostral anterior (rACC) and posterior cingulate (PCC) cortices. The late source activity (600–1100 ms) in PHGL and PCC was augmented in High-Cat, relative to Low-Cat, participants. Conversely, greater source activity was observed in the Low-Cat group during the mid-latency window (280–450 ms) in the rACC and PCC. Low-Cat subjects demonstrated a significantly stronger correlation between source activity in PCC and pain and arousal ratings in the long latency window, relative to high pain catastrophisers. Results suggest augmented activation of limbic cortex and higher order pain processing cortical regions during the late processing period in high pain catastrophisers viewing both types of pictures. This pattern of cortical activations is consistent with the distorted and magnified cognitive appraisal of pain threats in high pain catastrophisers. In contrast, high pain catastrophising individuals exhibit a diminished response during the mid-latency period when attentional and top-down resources are ascribed to observed pain. PMID:26186545

  10. Initiation of sleep-dependent cortical-hippocampal correlations at wakefulness-sleep transition.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Daniel C; Ji, Daoyun

    2014-10-01

    Sleep is involved in memory consolidation. Current theories propose that sleep-dependent memory consolidation requires active communication between the hippocampus and neocortex. Indeed, it is known that neuronal activities in the hippocampus and various neocortical areas are correlated during slow-wave sleep. However, transitioning from wakefulness to slow-wave sleep is a gradual process. How the hippocampal-cortical correlation is established during the wakefulness-sleep transition is unknown. By examining local field potentials and multiunit activities in the rat hippocampus and visual cortex, we show that the wakefulness-sleep transition is characterized by sharp-wave ripple events in the hippocampus and high-voltage spike-wave events in the cortex, both of which are accompanied by highly synchronized multiunit activities in the corresponding area. Hippocampal ripple events occur earlier than the cortical high-voltage spike-wave events, and hippocampal ripple incidence is attenuated by the onset of cortical high-voltage spike waves. This attenuation leads to a temporary weak correlation in the hippocampal-cortical multiunit activities, which eventually evolves to a strong correlation as the brain enters slow-wave sleep. The results suggest that the hippocampal-cortical correlation is established through a concerted, two-step state change that first synchronizes the neuronal firing within each brain area and then couples the synchronized activities between the two regions. PMID:25008411

  11. Longitudinal data on cortical thickness before and after working memory training

    PubMed Central

    Metzler-Baddeley, Claudia; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Foley, Sonya; Jones, Derek K.

    2016-01-01

    The data and supplementary information provided in this article relate to our research article “Task complexity and location specific changes of cortical thickness in executive and salience networks after working memory training” (Metzler-Baddeley et al., 2016) [1]. We provide cortical thickness and subcortical volume data derived from parieto-frontal cortical regions and the basal ganglia with the FreeSurfer longitudinal analyses stream (http://surfer.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu [2]) before and after Cogmed working memory training (Cogmed and Cogmed Working Memory Training, 2012) [3]. This article also provides supplementary information to the research article, i.e., within-group comparisons between baseline and outcome cortical thickness and subcortical volume measures, between-group tests of performance changes in cognitive benchmark tests (www.cambridgebrainsciences.com [4]), correlation analyses between performance changes in benchmark tests and training-related structural changes, correlation analyses between the time spent training and structural changes, a scatterplot of the relationship between cortical thickness measures derived from the occipital lobe as control region and the chronological order of the MRI sessions to assess potential scanner drift effects and a post-hoc vertex-wise whole brain analysis with FreeSurfer Qdec (https://surfer.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/fswiki/Qdec [5]). PMID:27115029

  12. Cortico-Cortical Interactions during Acquisition and Use of a Neuroprosthetic Skill.

    PubMed

    Wander, Jeremiah D; Sarma, Devapratim; Johnson, Lise A; Fetz, Eberhard E; Rao, Rajesh P N; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Darvas, Felix

    2016-08-01

    A motor cortex-based brain-computer interface (BCI) creates a novel real world output directly from cortical activity. Use of a BCI has been demonstrated to be a learned skill that involves recruitment of neural populations that are directly linked to BCI control as well as those that are not. The nature of interactions between these populations, however, remains largely unknown. Here, we employed a data-driven approach to assess the interaction between both local and remote cortical areas during the use of an electrocorticographic BCI, a method which allows direct sampling of cortical surface potentials. Comparing the area controlling the BCI with remote areas, we evaluated relationships between the amplitude envelopes of band limited powers as well as non-linear phase-phase interactions. We found amplitude-amplitude interactions in the high gamma (HG, 70-150 Hz) range that were primarily located in the posterior portion of the frontal lobe, near the controlling site, and non-linear phase-phase interactions involving multiple frequencies (cross-frequency coupling between 8-11 Hz and 70-90 Hz) taking place over larger cortical distances. Further, strength of the amplitude-amplitude interactions decreased with time, whereas the phase-phase interactions did not. These findings suggest multiple modes of cortical communication taking place during BCI use that are specialized for function and depend on interaction distance. PMID:27541829

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphism in the neuroplastin locus associates with cortical thickness and intellectual ability in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Desrivières, S; Lourdusamy, A; Tao, C; Toro, R; Jia, T; Loth, E; Medina, L M; Kepa, A; Fernandes, A; Ruggeri, B; Carvalho, F M; Cocks, G; Banaschewski, T; Barker, G J; Bokde, A L W; Büchel, C; Conrod, P J; Flor, H; Heinz, A; Gallinat, J; Garavan, H; Gowland, P; Brühl, R; Lawrence, C; Mann, K; Martinot, M L P; Nees, F; Lathrop, M; Poline, J-B; Rietschel, M; Thompson, P; Fauth-Bühler, M; Smolka, M N; Pausova, Z; Paus, T; Feng, J; Schumann, G

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recognition that cortical thickness is heritable and correlates with intellectual ability in children and adolescents, the genes contributing to individual differences in these traits remain unknown. We conducted a large-scale association study in 1583 adolescents to identify genes affecting cortical thickness. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; n=54 837) within genes whose expression changed between stages of growth and differentiation of a human neural stem cell line were selected for association analyses with average cortical thickness. We identified a variant, rs7171755, associating with thinner cortex in the left hemisphere (P=1.12 × 10−7), particularly in the frontal and temporal lobes. Localized effects of this SNP on cortical thickness differently affected verbal and nonverbal intellectual abilities. The rs7171755 polymorphism acted in cis to affect expression in the human brain of the synaptic cell adhesion glycoprotein-encoding gene NPTN. We also found that cortical thickness and NPTN expression were on average higher in the right hemisphere, suggesting that asymmetric NPTN expression may render the left hemisphere more sensitive to the effects of NPTN mutations, accounting for the lateralized effect of rs7171755 found in our study. Altogether, our findings support a potential role for regional synaptic dysfunctions in forms of intellectual deficits. PMID:24514566

  14. Cortical representation of the human hand assessed by two levels of high-resolution EEG recordings.

    PubMed

    Houzé, Bérengère; Perchet, Caroline; Magnin, Michel; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2011-11-01

    Increasing interest in cortical plasticity has prompted the growing use of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) to estimate changes in the cortical representation of body regions. Here, we tested the effect of different sites of hand stimulation and of the density of spatial sampling in the quality of estimation of somatosensory sources. Sources of two SEP components from the primary somatosensory cortex (N20/P20 and P45) were estimated using two levels of spatial sampling (64- vs. 128-channel) and stimulation of four distal sites in the upper limbs, including single digits (first vs. fifth) and distal nerves with comparable cortical projection (superficial branch of the radial nerve and distal ulnar nerve). The most robust separation of somatosensory sources was achieved by comparing the cortical representations of the first digit and the distal ulnar nerve territories on the N20/P20 component of SEPs. Although both the 64- and the 128-electrode montages correctly discriminated these two areas, only the 128-electrode montage was able to significantly separate sources in the other cases, notably when using first versus fifth digit stimulation. Trustworthy distinction of cortical representations was not obtainable when using the P45 component, probably because of greater activation volume, radial orientation of sources in areas 1-2 and increased variability with attention and vigilance. Assessment of tangential SEP components to stimulation of first digit versus ulnar nerve appears the best option to assess plastic somatosensory changes, especially when using relatively low-electrode sampling. PMID:21246666

  15. Initiation of sleep-dependent cortical-hippocampal correlations at wakefulness-sleep transition

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is involved in memory consolidation. Current theories propose that sleep-dependent memory consolidation requires active communication between the hippocampus and neocortex. Indeed, it is known that neuronal activities in the hippocampus and various neocortical areas are correlated during slow-wave sleep. However, transitioning from wakefulness to slow-wave sleep is a gradual process. How the hippocampal-cortical correlation is established during the wakefulness-sleep transition is unknown. By examining local field potentials and multiunit activities in the rat hippocampus and visual cortex, we show that the wakefulness-sleep transition is characterized by sharp-wave ripple events in the hippocampus and high-voltage spike-wave events in the cortex, both of which are accompanied by highly synchronized multiunit activities in the corresponding area. Hippocampal ripple events occur earlier than the cortical high-voltage spike-wave events, and hippocampal ripple incidence is attenuated by the onset of cortical high-voltage spike waves. This attenuation leads to a temporary weak correlation in the hippocampal-cortical multiunit activities, which eventually evolves to a strong correlation as the brain enters slow-wave sleep. The results suggest that the hippocampal-cortical correlation is established through a concerted, two-step state change that first synchronizes the neuronal firing within each brain area and then couples the synchronized activities between the two regions. PMID:25008411

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphism in the neuroplastin locus associates with cortical thickness and intellectual ability in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Desrivières, S; Lourdusamy, A; Tao, C; Toro, R; Jia, T; Loth, E; Medina, L M; Kepa, A; Fernandes, A; Ruggeri, B; Carvalho, F M; Cocks, G; Banaschewski, T; Barker, G J; Bokde, A L W; Büchel, C; Conrod, P J; Flor, H; Heinz, A; Gallinat, J; Garavan, H; Gowland, P; Brühl, R; Lawrence, C; Mann, K; Martinot, M L P; Nees, F; Lathrop, M; Poline, J-B; Rietschel, M; Thompson, P; Fauth-Bühler, M; Smolka, M N; Pausova, Z; Paus, T; Feng, J; Schumann, G

    2015-02-01

    Despite the recognition that cortical thickness is heritable and correlates with intellectual ability in children and adolescents, the genes contributing to individual differences in these traits remain unknown. We conducted a large-scale association study in 1583 adolescents to identify genes affecting cortical thickness. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; n=54,837) within genes whose expression changed between stages of growth and differentiation of a human neural stem cell line were selected for association analyses with average cortical thickness. We identified a variant, rs7171755, associating with thinner cortex in the left hemisphere (P=1.12 × 10(-)(7)), particularly in the frontal and temporal lobes. Localized effects of this SNP on cortical thickness differently affected verbal and nonverbal intellectual abilities. The rs7171755 polymorphism acted in cis to affect expression in the human brain of the synaptic cell adhesion glycoprotein-encoding gene NPTN. We also found that cortical thickness and NPTN expression were on average higher in the right hemisphere, suggesting that asymmetric NPTN expression may render the left hemisphere more sensitive to the effects of NPTN mutations, accounting for the lateralized effect of rs7171755 found in our study. Altogether, our findings support a potential role for regional synaptic dysfunctions in forms of intellectual deficits. PMID:24514566

  17. Low level laser therapy reduces oxidative stress in cortical neurons in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tedford, Clark E.; McCarthy, Thomas; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    It is accepted that the mechanisms of low level laser therapy (LLLT) involves photons that are absorbed in the mitochondria of cells and lead to increase of mitochondrial metabolism resulting in more electron transport, increase of mitochondrial membrane potential, and more ATP production. Intracellular calcium changes are seen that correlate with mitochondrial stimulation. The situation with two other intermediates is more complex however: reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Evidence exists that low levels of ROS are produced by LLLT in normal cells that can be beneficial by (for instance) activating NF-kB. However high fluences of light can produce large amounts of ROS that can damage the cells. In oxidatively stressed cells the situation may be different. We exposed primary cultured cortical neurons to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or cobalt chloride (CoCl2) oxidative insults in the presence or absence of LLLT (810-nm laser at 0.3 or 3 J/cm2). Cell viability of cortical neurons was determined by lactate dehydrogenase assay. ROS in neurons was detected using an ROS probe, MitoRox with confocal microscopy. Results showed that LLLT dose-dependently reversed ROS production and protected cortical neurons against H2O2 or CoCl2 induced oxidative injury in cultured cortical neurons. Conclusion: LLLT can protect cortical neurons against oxidative stress by reversing the levels of ROS.

  18. Longitudinal data on cortical thickness before and after working memory training.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Baddeley, Claudia; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Foley, Sonya; Jones, Derek K

    2016-06-01

    The data and supplementary information provided in this article relate to our research article "Task complexity and location specific changes of cortical thickness in executive and salience networks after working memory training" (Metzler-Baddeley et al., 2016) [1]. We provide cortical thickness and subcortical volume data derived from parieto-frontal cortical regions and the basal ganglia with the FreeSurfer longitudinal analyses stream (http://surfer.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu [2]) before and after Cogmed working memory training (Cogmed and Cogmed Working Memory Training, 2012) [3]. This article also provides supplementary information to the research article, i.e., within-group comparisons between baseline and outcome cortical thickness and subcortical volume measures, between-group tests of performance changes in cognitive benchmark tests (www.cambridgebrainsciences.com [4]), correlation analyses between performance changes in benchmark tests and training-related structural changes, correlation analyses between the time spent training and structural changes, a scatterplot of the relationship between cortical thickness measures derived from the occipital lobe as control region and the chronological order of the MRI sessions to assess potential scanner drift effects and a post-hoc vertex-wise whole brain analysis with FreeSurfer Qdec (https://surfer.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/fswiki/Qdec [5]). PMID:27115029

  19. Cortico-Cortical Interactions during Acquisition and Use of a Neuroprosthetic Skill

    PubMed Central

    Wander, Jeremiah D.; Sarma, Devapratim; Johnson, Lise A.; Fetz, Eberhard E.; Rao, Rajesh P. N.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Darvas, Felix

    2016-01-01

    A motor cortex-based brain-computer interface (BCI) creates a novel real world output directly from cortical activity. Use of a BCI has been demonstrated to be a learned skill that involves recruitment of neural populations that are directly linked to BCI control as well as those that are not. The nature of interactions between these populations, however, remains largely unknown. Here, we employed a data-driven approach to assess the interaction between both local and remote cortical areas during the use of an electrocorticographic BCI, a method which allows direct sampling of cortical surface potentials. Comparing the area controlling the BCI with remote areas, we evaluated relationships between the amplitude envelopes of band limited powers as well as non-linear phase-phase interactions. We found amplitude-amplitude interactions in the high gamma (HG, 70–150 Hz) range that were primarily located in the posterior portion of the frontal lobe, near the controlling site, and non-linear phase-phase interactions involving multiple frequencies (cross-frequency coupling between 8–11 Hz and 70–90 Hz) taking place over larger cortical distances. Further, strength of the amplitude-amplitude interactions decreased with time, whereas the phase-phase interactions did not. These findings suggest multiple modes of cortical communication taking place during BCI use that are specialized for function and depend on interaction distance. PMID:27541829

  20. Reduced variability of ongoing and evoked cortical activity leads to improved behavioral performance.

    PubMed

    Ledberg, Anders; Montagnini, Anna; Coppola, Richard; Bressler, Steven L

    2012-01-01

    Sensory responses of the brain are known to be highly variable, but the origin and functional relevance of this variability have long remained enigmatic. Using the variable foreperiod of a visual discrimination task to assess variability in the primate cerebral cortex, we report that visual evoked response variability is not only tied to variability in ongoing cortical activity, but also predicts mean response time. We used cortical local field potentials, simultaneously recorded from widespread cortical areas, to gauge both ongoing and visually evoked activity. Trial-to-trial variability of sensory evoked responses was strongly modulated by foreperiod duration and correlated both with the cortical variability before stimulus onset as well as with response times. In a separate set of experiments we probed the relation between small saccadic eye movements, foreperiod duration and manual response times. The rate of eye movements was modulated by foreperiod duration and eye position variability was positively correlated with response times. Our results indicate that when the time of a sensory stimulus is predictable, reduction in cortical variability before the stimulus can improve normal behavioral function that depends on the stimulus. PMID:22937021

  1. Cortical interneurons from human pluripotent stem cells: prospects for neurological and psychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Arber, Charles; Li, Meng

    2012-01-01

    Cortical interneurons represent 20% of the cells in the cortex. These cells are local inhibitory neurons whose function is to modulate the firing activities of the excitatory projection neurons. Cortical interneuron dysfunction is believed to lead to runaway excitation underlying (or implicated in) seizure-based diseases, such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia. The complex development of this cell type and the intricacies involved in defining the relative subtypes are being increasingly well defined. This has led to exciting experimental cell therapy in model organisms, whereby fetal-derived interneuron precursors can reverse seizure severity and reduce mortality in adult epileptic rodents. These proof-of-principle studies raise hope for potential interneuron-based transplantation therapies for treating epilepsy. On the other hand, cortical neurons generated from patient iPSCs serve as a valuable tool to explore genetic influences of interneuron development and function. This is a fundamental step in enhancing our understanding of the molecular basis of neuropsychiatric illnesses and the development of targeted treatments. Protocols are currently being developed for inducing cortical interneuron subtypes from mouse and human pluripotent stem cells. This review sets out to summarize the progress made in cortical interneuron development, fetal tissue transplantation and the recent advance in stem cell differentiation toward interneurons. PMID:23493959

  2. Effect of GABA(B) receptor agonist SKF97541 on cortical and hippocampal epileptic afterdischarges.

    PubMed

    Fábera, P; Mareš, P

    2014-01-01

    Activation of GABA(B) receptors leads to longer inhibitory postsynaptic potentials than activation of GABA(A) receptors. Therefore GABA(B) receptors may be a target for anticonvulsant therapy. The present study examined possible effects of GABA(B) receptor agonist SKF97541 on cortical and hippocampal epileptic afterdischarges (ADs). Epileptic ADs elicited by electrical stimulation of sensorimotor cortex or dorsal hippocampus were studied in adult male Wistar rats. Stimulation series were applied 6 times with 10- or 20-min interval. Either interval was efficient for reliable elicitation of cortical ADs but stimulation at 10-min intervals did not reliably elicit hippocampal ADs, many stimulations were without effect. SKF97541 in dose 1 mg/kg significantly prolonged cortical ADs. Duration of hippocampal ADs was not significantly changed by either dose of SKF97541 in spite of a marked myorelaxant effect of the higher dose. Our present data demonstrated that neither cortical nor hippocampal ADs in adult rats were suppressed by GABA(B) receptor agonist SKF97541. Proconvulsant effect on cortical ADs indicates a different role in these two brain structures. In addition, duration of refractory period for electrically-induced ADs in these two structures in adult rats is different. PMID:24702499

  3. Natural stimuli from three coherent modalities enhance behavioral responses and electrophysiological cortical activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Sella, Irit; Reiner, Miriam; Pratt, Hillel

    2014-07-01

    Cues that involve a number of sensory modalities are processed in the brain in an interactive multimodal manner rather than independently for each modality. We studied multimodal integration in a natural, yet fully controlled scene, implemented as an interactive game in an auditory-haptic-visual virtual environment. In this imitation of a natural scene, the targets of perception were ecologically valid uni-, bi- and tri-modal manifestations of a simple event-a ball hitting a wall. Subjects were engaged in the game while their behavioral and early cortical electrophysiological responses were measured. Behavioral results confirmed that tri-modal cues were detected faster and more accurately than bi-modal cues, which, likewise, showed advantages over unimodal responses. Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded, and the first 200 ms following stimulus onset was analyzed to reveal the latencies of cortical multimodal interactions as estimated by sLORETA. These electrophysiological findings indicated bi-modal as well as tri-modal interactions beginning very early (~30 ms), uniquely for each multimodal combination. The results suggest that early cortical multimodal integration accelerates cortical activity and, in turn, enhances performance measures. This acceleration registers on the scalp as sub-additive cortical activation. PMID:24315926

  4. Altered Theta Oscillations and Aberrant Cortical Excitatory Activity in the 5XFAD Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siwek, Magdalena Elisabeth; Müller, Ralf; Henseler, Christina; Trog, Astrid; Lundt, Andreas; Wormuth, Carola; Broich, Karl; Weiergräber, Marco; Papazoglou, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impairment of memory function. The 5XFAD mouse model was analyzed and compared with wild-type (WT) controls for aberrant cortical excitability and hippocampal theta oscillations by using simultaneous video-electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. Seizure staging revealed that 5XFAD mice exhibited cortical hyperexcitability whereas controls did not. In addition, 5XFAD mice displayed a significant increase in hippocampal theta activity from the light to dark phase during nonmotor activity. We also observed a reduction in mean theta frequency in 5XFAD mice compared to controls that was again most prominent during nonmotor activity. Transcriptome analysis of hippocampal probes and subsequent qPCR validation revealed an upregulation of Plcd4 that might be indicative of enhanced muscarinic signalling. Our results suggest that 5XFAD mice exhibit altered cortical excitability, hippocampal dysrhythmicity, and potential changes in muscarinic signaling. PMID:25922768

  5. A synergy-based hand control is encoded in human motor cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Leo, Andrea; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bianchi, Matteo; Marino, Hamal; Gabiccini, Marco; Guidi, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Pietrini, Pietro; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    How the human brain controls hand movements to carry out different tasks is still debated. The concept of synergy has been proposed to indicate functional modules that may simplify the control of hand postures by simultaneously recruiting sets of muscles and joints. However, whether and to what extent synergic hand postures are encoded as such at a cortical level remains unknown. Here, we combined kinematic, electromyography, and brain activity measures obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects performed a variety of movements towards virtual objects. Hand postural information, encoded through kinematic synergies, were represented in cortical areas devoted to hand motor control and successfully discriminated individual grasping movements, significantly outperforming alternative somatotopic or muscle-based models. Importantly, hand postural synergies were predicted by neural activation patterns within primary motor cortex. These findings support a novel cortical organization for hand movement control and open potential applications for brain-computer interfaces and neuroprostheses. PMID:26880543

  6. Myosin VI small insert isoform maintains exocytosis by tethering secretory granules to the cortical actin

    PubMed Central

    Tomatis, Vanesa M.; Papadopulos, Andreas; Malintan, Nancy T.; Martin, Sally; Wallis, Tristan; Gormal, Rachel S.; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2013-01-01

    Before undergoing neuroexocytosis, secretory granules (SGs) are mobilized and tethered to the cortical actin network by an unknown mechanism. Using an SG pull-down assay and mass spectrometry, we found that myosin VI was recruited to SGs in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Interfering with myosin VI function in PC12 cells reduced the density of SGs near the plasma membrane without affecting their biogenesis. Myosin VI knockdown selectively impaired a late phase of exocytosis, consistent with a replenishment defect. This exocytic defect was selectively rescued by expression of the myosin VI small insert (SI) isoform, which efficiently tethered SGs to the cortical actin network. These myosin VI SI–specific effects were prevented by deletion of a c-Src kinase phosphorylation DYD motif, identified in silico. Myosin VI SI thus recruits SGs to the cortical actin network, potentially via c-Src phosphorylation, thereby maintaining an active pool of SGs near the plasma membrane. PMID:23382463

  7. Mandibular Inferior Cortical Bone Thickness on Panoramic Radiographs in Patients using Bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Sandra R.; Chen, Curtis S. K.; Leroux, Brian G.; Lee, Peggy P.; Hollender, Lars G.; Lloid, Michelle; Drew, Shane Patrick; Schubert, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To detect dimensional changes in the mandibular cortical bone associated with bisphosphonate (BP) use and to correlate the measurements of the cortical bone with the cumulative dose of BP therapy. Methods Mandibular inferior cortical bone thickness (MICBT) was measured under the mental foramen from panoramic radiographs of subjects using BP with and without bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) and controls. Results The highest mean MICBT was observed in BRONJ subjects 6.81 (± 1.35 mm), when compared to subjects using BP 5.44 (± 1.09 mm) and controls 4.79 (± 0.85 mm; p<0.01). The mean MICBT of BRONJ subjects was significantly higher than that of subjects using BP without BRONJ. There was a correlation between MICBT and cumulative dose of zolendronate. Conclusion The MICBT on panoramic radiograph is a potentially useful tool for the detection of dimensional changes associated with BP therapy. PMID:25864820

  8. Evolutionarily Dynamic Alternative Splicing of GPR56 Regulates Regional Cerebral Cortical Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Byoung-Il; Tietjen, Ian; Atabay, Kutay D.; Evrony, Gilad D.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Asare, Ebenezer; Wang, Peter P.; Murayama, Ayako Y.; Im, Kiho; Lisgo, Steven N.; Overman, Lynne; Šestan, Nenad; Chang, Bernard S.; Barkovich, A. James; Grant, P. Ellen; Topçu, Meral; Politsky, Jeffrey; Okano, Hideyuki; Piao, Xianhua; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    The human neocortex has numerous specialized functional areas whose formation is poorly understood. Here, we describe a 15–base pair deletion mutation in a regulatory element of GPR56 that selectively disrupts human cortex surrounding the Sylvian fissure bilaterally including “Broca’s area,” the primary language area, by disrupting regional GPR56 expression and blocking RFX transcription factor binding. GPR56 encodes a heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein (G protein)–coupled receptor required for normal cortical development and is expressed in cortical progenitor cells. GPR56 expression levels regulate progenitor proliferation. GPR56 splice forms are highly variable between mice and humans, and the regulatory element of gyrencephalic mammals directs restricted lateral cortical expression. Our data reveal a mechanism by which control of GPR56 expression pattern by multiple alternative promoters can influence stem cell proliferation, gyral patterning, and, potentially, neocortex evolution. PMID:24531968

  9. Revisiting enigmatic cortical calretinin-expressing interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Cauli, Bruno; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Tricoire, Ludovic; Toussay, Xavier; Staiger, Jochen F.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical calretinin (CR)-expressing interneurons represent a heterogeneous subpopulation of about 10–30% of GABAergic interneurons, which altogether total ca. 12–20% of all cortical neurons. In the rodent neocortex, CR cells display different somatodendritic morphologies ranging from bipolar to multipolar but the bipolar cells and their variations dominate. They are also diverse at the molecular level as they were shown to express numerous neuropeptides in different combinations including vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), cholecystokinin (CCK), neurokinin B (NKB) corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF), enkephalin (Enk) but also neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SOM) to a lesser extent. CR-expressing interneurons exhibit different firing behaviors such as adapting, bursting or irregular. They mainly originate from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) but a subpopulation also derives from the dorsal part of the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE). Cortical GABAergic CR-expressing interneurons can be divided in two main populations: VIP-bipolar interneurons deriving from the CGE and SOM-Martinotti-like interneurons originating in the dorsal MGE. Although bipolar cells account for the majority of CR-expressing interneurons, the roles they play in cortical neuronal circuits and in the more general metabolic physiology of the brain remained elusive and enigmatic. The aim of this review is, firstly, to provide a comprehensive view of the morphological, molecular and electrophysiological features defining this cell type. We will, secondly, also summarize what is known about their place in the cortical circuit, their modulation by subcortical afferents and the functional roles they might play in neuronal processing and energy metabolism. PMID:25009470

  10. CORTICAL INVOLVEMENT IN THE STARTREACT EFFECT

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Andrew J. T.; Chiu, Chenhao; Maslovat, Dana; Chua, Romeo; Gick, Bryan; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Franks, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid release of prepared movements by a loud acoustic stimulus capable of eliciting a startle response has been termed the StartReact effect (Valls-Solé et al., 1999), and premotor reaction times (PMTs) of <70 ms are often observed. Two explanations have been given for these short latency responses. The subcortical storage and triggering hypothesis suggests movements that can be prepared in advance of a “go” signal are stored and triggered from subcortical areas by a startling acoustic stimulus (SAS) without cortical involvement. Alternatively, it has been hypothesized that the SAS can trigger movements from cortical areas through a faster pathway ascending from subcortical structures. Two experiments were designed to examine the possible role of primary motor cortex in the StartReact effect. In Experiment 1, we used suprathreshold transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during the reaction time (RT) interval to induce a cortical silent period in the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1). Thirteen participants performed 20° wrist extension movements as fast as possible in response to either a control stimulus (82dB) or SAS (124 dB). PMTs for startle trials were faster than control trials, while TMS significantly delayed movement onset compared to No TMS or Sham TMS conditions. In Experiment 2, we examined the StartReact effect in a highly cortically represented action involving speech of a consonant-vowel (CV) syllable. Similar to previous work examining limb movements, a robust StartReact effect was found. Collectively, these experiments provide evidence for cortical (M1) involvement in the StartReact effect. PMID:24680855

  11. Variability in Cortical Representations of Speech Sound Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boatman, Dana F.

    2007-01-01

    Recent brain mapping studies have provided new insights into the cortical systems that mediate human speech perception. Electrocortical stimulation mapping (ESM) is a brain mapping method that is used clinically to localize cortical functions in neurosurgical patients. Recent ESM studies have yielded new insights into the cortical systems that…

  12. Mean cortical curvature reflects cytoarchitecture restructuring in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    King, Jace B; Lopez-Larson, Melissa P; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A

    2016-01-01

    In the United States alone, the number of persons living with the enduring consequences of traumatic brain injuries is estimated to be between 3.2 and 5 million. This number does not include individuals serving in the United States military or seeking care at Veterans Affairs hospitals. The importance of understanding the neurobiological consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has increased with the return of veterans from conflicts overseas, many of who have suffered this type of brain injury. However, identifying the neuroanatomical regions most affected by mTBI continues to prove challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the use of mean cortical curvature as a potential indicator of progressive tissue loss in a cross-sectional sample of 54 veterans with mTBI compared to 31 controls evaluated with MRI. It was hypothesized that mean cortical curvature would be increased in veterans with mTBI, relative to controls, due in part to cortical restructuring related to tissue volume loss. Mean cortical curvature was assessed in 60 bilateral regions (31 sulcal, 29 gyral). Of the 120 regions investigated, nearly 50% demonstrated significantly increased mean cortical curvature in mTBI relative to controls with 25% remaining significant following multiple comparison correction (all, pFDR < .05). These differences were most prominent in deep gray matter regions of the cortex. Additionally, significant relationships were found between mean cortical curvature and gray and white matter volumes (all, p < .05). These findings suggest potentially unique patterns of atrophy by region and indicate that changes in brain microstructure due to mTBI are sensitive to measures of mean curvature. PMID:26909332

  13. Mean cortical curvature reflects cytoarchitecture restructuring in mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    King, Jace B.; Lopez-Larson, Melissa P.; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States alone, the number of persons living with the enduring consequences of traumatic brain injuries is estimated to be between 3.2 and 5 million. This number does not include individuals serving in the United States military or seeking care at Veterans Affairs hospitals. The importance of understanding the neurobiological consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has increased with the return of veterans from conflicts overseas, many of who have suffered this type of brain injury. However, identifying the neuroanatomical regions most affected by mTBI continues to prove challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the use of mean cortical curvature as a potential indicator of progressive tissue loss in a cross-sectional sample of 54 veterans with mTBI compared to 31 controls evaluated with MRI. It was hypothesized that mean cortical curvature would be increased in veterans with mTBI, relative to controls, due in part to cortical restructuring related to tissue volume loss. Mean cortical curvature was assessed in 60 bilateral regions (31 sulcal, 29 gyral). Of the 120 regions investigated, nearly 50% demonstrated significantly increased mean cortical curvature in mTBI relative to controls with 25% remaining significant following multiple comparison correction (all, pFDR < .05). These differences were most prominent in deep gray matter regions of the cortex. Additionally, significant relationships were found between mean cortical curvature and gray and white matter volumes (all, p < .05). These findings suggest potentially unique patterns of atrophy by region and indicate that changes in brain microstructure due to mTBI are sensitive to measures of mean curvature. PMID:26909332

  14. Molecular identity of human outer radial glia during cortical development.

    PubMed

    Pollen, Alex A; Nowakowski, Tomasz J; Chen, Jiadong; Retallack, Hanna; Sandoval-Espinosa, Carmen; Nicholas, Cory R; Shuga, Joe; Liu, Siyuan John; Oldham, Michael C; Diaz, Aaron; Lim, Daniel A; Leyrat, Anne A; West, Jay A; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2015-09-24

    Radial glia, the neural stem cells of the neocortex, are located in two niches: the ventricular zone and outer subventricular zone. Although outer subventricular zone radial glia may generate the majority of human cortical neurons, their molecular features remain elusive. By analyzing gene expression across single cells, we find that outer radial glia preferentially express genes related to extracellular matrix formation, migration, and stemness, including TNC, PTPRZ1, FAM107A, HOPX, and LIFR. Using dynamic imaging, immunostaining, and clonal analysis, we relate these molecular features to distinctive behaviors of outer radial glia, demonstrate the necessity of STAT3 signaling for their cell cycle progression, and establish their extensive proliferative potential. These results suggest that outer radial glia directly support the subventricular niche through local production of growth factors, potentiation of growth factor signals by extracellular matrix proteins, and activation of self-renewal pathways, thereby enabling the developmental and evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex. PMID:26406371

  15. Minor and Unsystematic Cortical Topographic Changes of Attention Correlates between Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Luis F. H.; Lozano, Mirna D.; Alvarenga, Milkes Y.; Pereira, José F.; Machado, Sérgio; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Piedade, Roberto; Anghinah, Renato; Knyazev, Gennady; Ramos, Renato T.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the topography of induced cortical oscillations in 20 healthy individuals performing simple attention tasks. We were interested in qualitatively replicating our recent findings on the localization of attention-induced beta bands during a visual task [1], and verifying whether significant topographic changes would follow the change of attention to the auditory modality. We computed corrected latency averaging of each induced frequency bands, and modeled their generators by current density reconstruction with Lp-norm minimization. We quantified topographic similarity between conditions by an analysis of correlations, whereas the inter-modality significant differences in attention correlates were illustrated in each individual case. We replicated the qualitative result of highly idiosyncratic topography of attention-related activity to individuals, manifested both in the beta bands, and previously studied slow potential distributions [2]. Visual inspection of both scalp potentials and distribution of cortical currents showed minor changes in attention-related bands with respect to modality, as compared to the theta and delta bands, known to be major contributors to the sensory-related potentials. Quantitative results agreed with visual inspection, supporting to the conclusion that attention-related activity does not change much between modalities, and whatever individual changes do occur, they are not systematic in cortical localization across subjects. We discuss our results, combined with results from other studies that present individual data, with respect to the function of cortical association areas. PMID:21179421

  16. Minor and unsystematic cortical topographic changes of attention correlates between modalities.

    PubMed

    Basile, Luis F H; Lozano, Mirna D; Alvarenga, Milkes Y; Pereira, José F; Machado, Sérgio; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Piedade, Roberto; Anghinah, Renato; Knyazev, Gennady; Ramos, Renato T

    2010-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the topography of induced cortical oscillations in 20 healthy individuals performing simple attention tasks. We were interested in qualitatively replicating our recent findings on the localization of attention-induced beta bands during a visual task [1], and verifying whether significant topographic changes would follow the change of attention to the auditory modality. We computed corrected latency averaging of each induced frequency bands, and modeled their generators by current density reconstruction with Lp-norm minimization. We quantified topographic similarity between conditions by an analysis of correlations, whereas the inter-modality significant differences in attention correlates were illustrated in each individual case. We replicated the qualitative result of highly idiosyncratic topography of attention-related activity to individuals, manifested both in the beta bands, and previously studied slow potential distributions [2]. Visual inspection of both scalp potentials and distribution of cortical currents showed minor changes in attention-related bands with respect to modality, as compared to the theta and delta bands, known to be major contributors to the sensory-related potentials. Quantitative results agreed with visual inspection, supporting to the conclusion that attention-related activity does not change much between modalities, and whatever individual changes do occur, they are not systematic in cortical localization across subjects. We discuss our results, combined with results from other studies that present individual data, with respect to the function of cortical association areas. PMID:21179421

  17. Cortical actin regulation modulates vascular contractility and compliance in veins

    PubMed Central

    Saphirstein, Robert J; Gao, Yuan Z; Lin, Qian Qian; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The literature on arterial mechanics is extensive, but far less is known about mechanisms controlling mechanical properties of veins. We use here a multi-scale approach to identify subcellular sources of venous stiffness. Portal vein tissue displays a severalfold decrease in passive stiffness compared to aortic tissues. The α-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PE) increased tissue stress and stiffness, both attenuated by cytochalasin D (CytoD) and PP2, inhibitors of actin polymerization and Src activity, respectively. We quantify, for the first time, cortical cellular stiffness in freshly isolated contractile vascular smooth muscle cells using magnetic microneedle technology. Cortical stiffness is significantly increased by PE and CytoD inhibits this increase but, surprisingly, PP2 does not. No detectable change in focal adhesion size, measured by immunofluorescence of FAK and zyxin, accompanies the PE-induced changes in cortical stiffness. Probing with phospho-specific antibodies confirmed activation of FAK/Src and ERK pathways and caldesmon phosphorylation. Thus, venous tissue stiffness is regulated both at the level of the smooth muscle cell cortex, via cortical actin polymerization, and by downstream smooth muscle effectors of Src/ERK signalling pathways. These findings identify novel potential molecular targets for the modulation of venous capacitance and venous return in health and disease. Key points Most cardiovascular research focuses on arterial mechanisms of disease, largely ignoring venous mechanisms. Here we examine ex vivo venous stiffness, spanning tissue to molecular levels, using biomechanics and magnetic microneedle technology, and show for the first time that venous stiffness is regulated by a molecular actin switch within the vascular smooth muscle cell in the wall of the vein. This switch connects the contractile apparatus within the cell to adhesion structures and facilitates stiffening of the vessel wall, regulating blood flow return

  18. Awake vs. anesthetized: layer-specific sensory processing in visual cortex and functional connectivity between cortical areas

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Kristin K.; Bennett, Davis V.; Hutt, Axel; Williams, James H.

    2015-01-01

    During general anesthesia, global brain activity and behavioral state are profoundly altered. Yet it remains mostly unknown how anesthetics alter sensory processing across cortical layers and modulate functional cortico-cortical connectivity. To address this gap in knowledge of the micro- and mesoscale effects of anesthetics on sensory processing in the cortical microcircuit, we recorded multiunit activity and local field potential in awake and anesthetized ferrets (Mustela putoris furo) during sensory stimulation. To understand how anesthetics alter sensory processing in a primary sensory area and the representation of sensory input in higher-order association areas, we studied the local sensory responses and long-range functional connectivity of primary visual cortex (V1) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Isoflurane combined with xylazine provided general anesthesia for all anesthetized recordings. We found that anesthetics altered the duration of sensory-evoked responses, disrupted the response dynamics across cortical layers, suppressed both multimodal interactions in V1 and sensory responses in PFC, and reduced functional cortico-cortical connectivity between V1 and PFC. Together, the present findings demonstrate altered sensory responses and impaired functional network connectivity during anesthesia at the level of multiunit activity and local field potential across cortical layers. PMID:25833839

  19. Awake vs. anesthetized: layer-specific sensory processing in visual cortex and functional connectivity between cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Kristin K; Bennett, Davis V; Hutt, Axel; Williams, James H; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-06-01

    During general anesthesia, global brain activity and behavioral state are profoundly altered. Yet it remains mostly unknown how anesthetics alter sensory processing across cortical layers and modulate functional cortico-cortical connectivity. To address this gap in knowledge of the micro- and mesoscale effects of anesthetics on sensory processing in the cortical microcircuit, we recorded multiunit activity and local field potential in awake and anesthetized ferrets (Mustela putoris furo) during sensory stimulation. To understand how anesthetics alter sensory processing in a primary sensory area and the representation of sensory input in higher-order association areas, we studied the local sensory responses and long-range functional connectivity of primary visual cortex (V1) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Isoflurane combined with xylazine provided general anesthesia for all anesthetized recordings. We found that anesthetics altered the duration of sensory-evoked responses, disrupted the response dynamics across cortical layers, suppressed both multimodal interactions in V1 and sensory responses in PFC, and reduced functional cortico-cortical connectivity between V1 and PFC. Together, the present findings demonstrate altered sensory responses and impaired functional network connectivity during anesthesia at the level of multiunit activity and local field potential across cortical layers. PMID:25833839

  20. Stochastic Amplification of Fluctuations in Cortical Up-States

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Seoane, Luís F.; Cortés, Jesús M.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Cortical neurons are bistable; as a consequence their local field potentials can fluctuate between quiescent and active states, generating slow Hz oscillations which are widely known as transitions between Up and Down States. Despite a large number of studies on Up-Down transitions, deciphering its nature, mechanisms and function are still today challenging tasks. In this paper we focus on recent experimental evidence, showing that a class of spontaneous oscillations can emerge within the Up states. In particular, a non-trivial peak around Hz appears in their associated power-spectra, what produces an enhancement of the activity power for higher frequencies (in the Hz band). Moreover, this rhythm within Ups seems to be an emergent or collective phenomenon given that individual neurons do not lock to it as they remain mostly unsynchronized. Remarkably, similar oscillations (and the concomitant peak in the spectrum) do not appear in the Down states. Here we shed light on these findings by using different computational models for the dynamics of cortical networks in presence of different levels of physiological complexity. Our conclusion, supported by both theory and simulations, is that the collective phenomenon of “stochastic amplification of fluctuations” – previously described in other contexts such as Ecology and Epidemiology – explains in an elegant and parsimonious manner, beyond model-dependent details, this extra-rhythm emerging only in the Up states but not in the Downs. PMID:22879879

  1. Brain somatic mutations in MTOR leading to focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Seok; Lee, Jeong Ho

    2016-02-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia type II (FCDII) is a focal malformation of the developing cerebral cortex and the major cause of intractable epilepsy. However, since the molecular genetic etiology of FCD has remained enigmatic, the effective therapeutic target for this condition has remained poorly understood. Our recent study on FCD utilizing various deep sequencing platforms identified somatic mutations in MTOR (existing as low as 1% allelic frequency) only in the affected brain tissues. We observed that these mutations induced hyperactivation of the mTOR kinase. In addition, focal cortical expression of mutant MTOR using in utero electroporation in mice, recapitulated the neuropathological features of FCDII, such as migration defect, cytomegalic neuron and spontaneous seizures. Furthermore, seizures and dysmorphic neurons were rescued by the administration of mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin. This study provides the first evidence that brain somatic activating mutations in MTOR cause FCD, and suggests the potential drug target for intractable epilepsy in FCD patients. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 71-72]. PMID:26779999

  2. Parvalbumin neurons and gamma rhythms enhance cortical circuit performance

    PubMed Central

    Sohal, Vikaas S.; Zhang, Feng; Yizhar, Ofer; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized oscillations and inhibitory interneurons have important and interconnected roles within cortical microcircuits. In particular, interneurons defined by the fast-spiking phenotype and expression of the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin1,2 have been suggested to be involved in gamma (30–80 Hz) oscillations3–7, which are hypothesized to enhance information processing8,9. However, because parvalbumin interneurons cannot be selectively controlled, definitive tests of their functional significance in gamma oscillations, and quantitative assessment of the impact of parvalbumin interneurons and gamma oscillations on cortical circuits, have been lacking despite potentially enormous significance (for example, abnormalities in parvalbumin interneurons may underlie altered gamma-frequency synchronization and cognition in schizophrenia10 and autism11). Here we use a panel of optogenetic technologies12–14 in mice to selectively modulate multiple distinct circuit elements in neocortex, alone or in combination. We find that inhibiting parvalbumin interneurons suppresses gamma oscillations in vivo, whereas driving these interneurons (even by means of non-rhythmic principal cell activity) is sufficient to generate emergent gamma-frequency rhythmicity. Moreover, gamma-frequency modulation of excitatory input in turn was found to enhance signal transmission in neocortex by reducing circuit noise and amplifying circuit signals, including inputs to parvalbumin interneurons. As demonstrated here, optogenetics opens the door to a new kind of informational analysis of brain function, permitting quantitative delineation of the functional significance of individual elements in the emergent operation and function of intact neural circuitry. PMID:19396159

  3. Early visual cortical responses produced by checkerboard pattern stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shigihara, Yoshihito; Hoshi, Hideyuki; Zeki, Semir

    2016-07-01

    Visual evoked potentials have been traditionally triggered with flash or reversing checkerboard stimuli and recorded with electroencephalographic techniques, largely but not exclusively in clinical or clinically related settings. They have been crucial in determining the healthy functioning or otherwise of the visual pathways up to and including the cerebral cortex. They have typically given early response latencies of 100ms, the source of which has been attributed to V1, with the prestriate cortex being secondarily activated somewhat later. On the other hand, magnetoencephalographic studies using stimuli better tailored to the physiology of individual, specialized, visual areas have given early latencies of <50ms with the sources localized in both striate (V1) and prestriate cortex. In this study, we used the reversing checkerboard pattern as a stimulus and recorded cortical visual evoked magnetic fields with magnetoencephalography, to establish whether very early responses can be traced to (estimated) in both striate and prestriate cortex, since such a demonstration would enhance considerably the power of this classical approach in clinical investigations. Our results show that cortical responses evoked by checkerboard patterns can be detected before 50ms post-stimulus onset and that their sources can be estimated in both striate and prestriate cortex, suggesting a strong parallel input from the sub-cortex to both striate and prestriate divisions of the visual cortex. PMID:27083528

  4. Radiation therapy for adjunctive treatment of adrenal cortical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Markoe, A.M.; Serber, W.; Micaily, B.; Brady, L.W. )

    1991-04-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare disease which is primarily approached surgically. There have been few reports of the efficacy of radiation therapy and, for the most part, these have been anecdotal. This paper reports on the potential adjuvant role of radiation therapy after surgical excision of primary adrenal cortical carcinoma and also comments about the efficacy of palliative radiation therapy for metastases. We have identified eight patients treated for adrenal cortical carcinomas at Hahnemann University Hospital (HUH) from 1962 until the present and have also identified five patients with the same diagnosis at Philadelphia General Hospital (PGH) from 1962 until its close in 1975. These two groups are examined separately. In the PGH group, in which two patients were diagnosed at autopsy and only one patient was treated by radiation therapy, the median survival was between 0 and 1 month for Stage IV disease with the only patient surviving to 6 months being that patient receiving radiation therapy. In the HUH group, five of eight patients were treated adjunctively after diagnosis, one was not and two received palliative therapy. The median survival for treated Stage III patients was between 34 months and 7 years. The suggestion, based on a limited patient series, is that patients treated postoperatively to the tumor bed and nodal areas in Stage III disease may have improved survival over historic series and improved local control.

  5. Genetic associations with brain cortical thickness in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, T.; Madireddy, L.; Sprenger, T.; Khankhanian, P.; Magon, S.; Naegelin, Y.; Caverzasi, E.; Lindberg, R. L. P.; Kappos, L.; Hauser, S. L.; Oksenberg, J. R.; Henry, R.; Pelletier, D.; Baranzini, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by temporal and spatial dissemination of demyelinating lesions in the central nervous system. Associated neurodegenerative changes contributing to disability have been recognized even at early disease stages. Recent studies show the importance of gray matter damage for the accrual of clinical disability rather than white matter where demyelination is easily visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The susceptibility to MS is influenced by genetic risk, but genetic factors associated with the disability are not known. We used MRI data to determine cortical thickness in 557 MS cases and 75 controls and in another cohort of 219 cases. We identified nine areas showing different thickness between cases and controls (regions of interest, ROI) (eight of them were negatively correlated with Kurtzke’s expanded disability status scale, EDSS) and conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 464 and 211 cases available from the two data sets. No marker exceeded genome-wide significance in the discovery cohort. We next combined nominal statistical evidence of association with physical evidence of interaction from a curated human protein interaction network, and searched for subnetworks enriched with nominally associated genes and for commonalities between the two data sets. This network-based pathway analysis of GWAS detected gene sets involved in glutamate signaling, neural development and an adjustment of intracellular calcium concentration. We report here for the first time gene sets associated with cortical thinning of MS. These genes are potentially correlated with disability of MS. PMID:25684059

  6. Mitochondrial activity and brain functions during cortical depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayevsky, Avraham; Sonn, Judith

    2008-12-01

    Cortical depolarization (CD) of the cerebral cortex could be developed under various pathophysiological conditions. In animal models, CD was recorded under partial or complete ischemia as well as when cortical spreading depression (SD) was induced externally or by internal stimulus. The development of CD in patients and the changes in various metabolic parameters, during CD, was rarely reported. Brain metabolic, hemodynamic, ionic and electrical responses to the CD event are dependent upon the O2 balance in the tissue. When the O2 balance is negative (i.e. ischemia), the CD process will be developed due to mitochondrial dysfunction, lack of energy and the inhibition of Na+-K+-ATPase. In contradiction, when oxygen is available (i.e. normoxia) the development of CD after induction of SD will accelerate mitochondrial respiration for retaining ionic homeostasis and normal brain functions. We used the multiparametric monitoring approach that enable real time monitoring of mitochondrial NADH redox state, microcirculatory blood flow and oxygenation, extracellular K+, Ca2+, H+ levels, DC steady potential and electrocorticogram (ECoG). This monitoring approach, provide a unique tool that has a significant value in analyzing the pathophysiology of the brain when SD developed under normoxia, ischemia, or hypoxia. We applied the same monitoring approach to patients suffered from severe head injury or exposed to neurosurgical procedures.

  7. Effects of Controlled Cortical Impact on the Mouse Brain Vasculome.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuzhen; Lok, Josephine; Zhao, Song; Leung, Wendy; Som, Angel T; Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Wang, Qingzhi; Xing, Changhong; Wang, Xiaoying; Ji, Xunming; Zhou, Yiming; Lo, Eng H

    2016-07-15

    Perturbations in blood vessels play a critical role in the pathophysiology of brain injury and neurodegeneration. Here, we use a systematic genome-wide transcriptome screening approach to investigate the vasculome after brain trauma in mice. Mice were subjected to controlled cortical impact and brains were extracted for analysis at 24 h post-injury. The core of the traumatic lesion was removed and then cortical microvesels were isolated from nondirectly damaged ipsilateral cortex. Compared to contralateral cortex and normal cortex from sham-operated mice, we identified a wide spectrum of responses in the vasculome after trauma. Up-regulated pathways included those involved in regulation of inflammation and extracellular matrix processes. Decreased pathways included those involved in regulation of metabolism, mitochondrial function, and transport systems. These findings suggest that microvascular perturbations can be widespread and not necessarily localized to core areas of direct injury per se and may further provide a broader gene network context for existing knowledge regarding inflammation, metabolism, and blood-brain barrier alterations after brain trauma. Further efforts are warranted to map the vasculome with higher spatial and temporal resolution from acute to delayed phase post-trauma. Investigating the widespread network responses in the vasculome may reveal potential mechanisms, therapeutic targets, and biomarkers for traumatic brain injury. PMID:26528928

  8. Stochastic amplification of fluctuations in cortical up-states.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Seoane, Luís F; Cortés, Jesús M; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    Cortical neurons are bistable; as a consequence their local field potentials can fluctuate between quiescent and active states, generating slow 0.5 2 Hz oscillations which are widely known as transitions between Up and Down States. Despite a large number of studies on Up-Down transitions, deciphering its nature, mechanisms and function are still today challenging tasks. In this paper we focus on recent experimental evidence, showing that a class of spontaneous oscillations can emerge within the Up states. In particular, a non-trivial peak around 20 Hz appears in their associated power-spectra, what produces an enhancement of the activity power for higher frequencies (in the 30-90 Hz band). Moreover, this rhythm within Ups seems to be an emergent or collective phenomenon given that individual neurons do not lock to it as they remain mostly unsynchronized. Remarkably, similar oscillations (and the concomitant peak in the spectrum) do not appear in the Down states. Here we shed light on these findings by using different computational models for the dynamics of cortical networks in presence of different levels of physiological complexity. Our conclusion, supported by both theory and simulations, is that the collective phenomenon of "stochastic amplification of fluctuations"--previously described in other contexts such as Ecology and Epidemiology--explains in an elegant and parsimonious manner, beyond model-dependent details, this extra-rhythm emerging only in the Up states but not in the Downs. PMID:22879879

  9. SLEEP/WAKE DEPENDENT CHANGES IN CORTICAL GLUCOSE CONCENTRATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Michael B; Bellesi, Michele; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Most of the energy in the brain comes from glucose and supports glutamatergic activity. The firing rate of cortical glutamatergic neurons, as well as cortical extracellular glutamate levels, increase with time spent awake and decline throughout non rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, raising the question whether glucose levels reflect behavioral state and sleep/wake history. Here chronic (2–3 days) electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings in the rat cerebral cortex were coupled with fixed-potential amperometry to monitor the extracellular concentration of glucose ([gluc]) on a second-by-second basis across the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and in response to 3 hours of sleep deprivation. [Gluc] progressively increased during NREM sleep and declined during REM sleep, while during wake an early decline in [gluc] was followed by an increase 8–15 minutes after awakening. There was a significant time of day effect during the dark phase, when rats are mostly awake, with [gluc] being significantly lower during the last 3–4 hours of the night relative to the first 3–4 hours. Moreover, the duration of the early phase of [gluc] decline during wake was longer after prolonged wake than after consolidated sleep. Thus, the sleep/wake history may affect the levels of glucose available to the brain upon awakening. PMID:23106535

  10. Late cortical disinhibition in relaxed versus active hand muscles.

    PubMed

    Caux-Dedeystère, A; Derambure, P; Devanne, H

    2015-07-01

    Recent research suggests that long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI) is followed by a transitory period of late cortical disinhibition (LCD) that can even lead to a net increase in cortical excitability. The relationship between LICI/LCD and voluntary drive remains poorly understood. Our study aims at investigating the influence of index abduction on LICI and LCD in an actively engaged muscle and a neighboring muscle, while varying the intensity of the conditioning stimulus (CS). Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles in 13 subjects. Paired-pulses were delivered with 10 different interstimulus intervals (ranging from 60 to 290 ms). Whatever the condition (relaxed or active FDI), the test stimulus was set to evoke an MEP of 1mV. The time course of conditioned MEP amplitude was compared for relaxed and active conditions when the CS intensity was set to (i) 130% of the rest motor threshold (RMT) or (ii) to evoke the same size of MEP under both conditions. LICI lasted longer (i.e. disinhibition occurred later) at rest than during abduction when evoked either by similar or matched conditioning stimuli. No post-LICI facilitation was observed at rest - even when the CS intensity was set to 160% RMT. In contrast, long-interval intracortical facilitation (LICF) was observed in the quiescent ADM when FDI was active. LICF may then be associated with voluntary activity albeit with lack of topographic specificity. PMID:25888934

  11. Automatic Sulcal Curve Extraction on the Human Cortical Surface

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Ilwoo; Kim, Sun Hyung; Styner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of sulcal regions on the cortical surface is an important task to shape analysis and landmark detection. However, it is challenging especially in a complex, rough human cortex. In this paper, we focus on the extraction of sulcal curves from the human cortical surface. The previous sulcal extraction methods are time-consuming in practice and often have a difficulty to delineate curves correctly along the sulcal regions in the presence of significant noise. Our pipeline is summarized in two main steps: 1) We extract candidate sulcal points spread over the sulcal regions. We further reduce the size of the candidate points by applying a line simplification method. 2) Since the candidate points are potentially located away from the exact valley regions, we propose a novel approach to connect candidate sulcal points so as to obtain a set of complete curves (line segments). We have shown in experiment that our method achieves high computational efficiency, improved robustness to noise, and high reliability in a test-retest situation as compared to a well-known existing method. PMID:26028801

  12. Effect of electrode cap on measured cortical motor threshold.

    PubMed

    Julkunen, Petro; Säisänen, Laura; Sarasti, Maria; Könönen, Mervi

    2009-01-30

    We investigated the role of electrode cap use in the determination of the cortical motor threshold (MT), and the resulting changes in the recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs). We also tested whether the induced changes in determined MT could be corrected via previously introduced correction method. Sixteen healthy subjects were studied. Navigated TMS was used for mapping the optimal representation area of the thenar musculature in the primary motor cortex and individual MTs were determined with and without the use of the electrode cap. A mathematical correction was utilized to compensate for the effect of electrode cap in the MTs. Individual MEPs were also measured. We observed a significant (p<0.05) increase in the determined MTs attributable to the use of the electrode cap. At the group level this difference was reduced significantly (p<0.01) by the use of the correction method. However, at the individual level the efficiency of the correction was poor. The MEP-amplitudes were not affected whether measured with or without the electrode cap. The electrode cap affects significantly the cortical MT measured as stimulation intensity making the comparison of MTs difficult with other studies not having used an electrode cap. PMID:18801386

  13. The Computational Properties of a Simplified Cortical Column Model.

    PubMed

    Cain, Nicholas; Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Koch, Christof; Mihalas, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    The mammalian neocortex has a repetitious, laminar structure and performs functions integral to higher cognitive processes, including sensory perception, memory, and coordinated motor output. What computations does this circuitry subserve that link these unique structural elements to their function? Potjans and Diesmann (2014) parameterized a four-layer, two cell type (i.e. excitatory and inhibitory) model of a cortical column with homogeneous populations and cell type dependent connection probabilities. We implement a version of their model using a displacement integro-partial differential equation (DiPDE) population density model. This approach, exact in the limit of large homogeneous populations, provides a fast numerical method to solve equations describing the full probability density distribution of neuronal membrane potentials. It lends itself to quickly analyzing the mean response properties of population-scale firing rate dynamics. We use this strategy to examine the input-output relationship of the Potjans and Diesmann cortical column model to understand its computational properties. When inputs are constrained to jointly and equally target excitatory and inhibitory neurons, we find a large linear regime where the effect of a multi-layer input signal can be reduced to a linear combination of component signals. One of these, a simple subtractive operation, can act as an error signal passed between hierarchical processing stages. PMID:27617444

  14. Optimizing working memory with heterogeneity of recurrent cortical excitation.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P; Ermentrout, Bard; Doiron, Brent

    2013-11-27

    A neural correlate of parametric working memory is a stimulus-specific rise in neuron firing rate that persists long after the stimulus is removed. Network models with local excitation and broad inhibition support persistent neural activity, linking network architecture and parametric working memory. Cortical neurons receive noisy input fluctuations that cause persistent activity to diffusively wander about the network, degrading memory over time. We explore how cortical architecture that supports parametric working memory affects the diffusion of persistent neural activity. Studying both a spiking network and a simplified potential well model, we show that spatially heterogeneous excitatory coupling stabilizes a discrete number of persistent states, reducing the diffusion of persistent activity over the network. However, heterogeneous coupling also coarse-grains the stimulus representation space, limiting the storage capacity of parametric working memory. The storage errors due to coarse-graining and diffusion trade off so that information transfer between the initial and recalled stimulus is optimized at a fixed network heterogeneity. For sufficiently long delay times, the optimal number of attractors is less than the number of possible stimuli, suggesting that memory networks can under-represent stimulus space to optimize performance. Our results clearly demonstrate the combined effects of network architecture and stochastic fluctuations on parametric memory storage. PMID:24285904

  15. Highly Nonrandom Features of Synaptic Connectivity in Local Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    How different is local cortical circuitry from a random network? To answer this question, we probed synaptic connections with several hundred simultaneous quadruple whole-cell recordings from layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the rat visual cortex. Analysis of this dataset revealed several nonrandom features in synaptic connectivity. We confirmed previous reports that bidirectional connections are more common than expected in a random network. We found that several highly clustered three-neuron connectivity patterns are overrepresented, suggesting that connections tend to cluster together. We also analyzed synaptic connection strength as defined by the peak excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude. We found that the distribution of synaptic connection strength differs significantly from the Poisson distribution and can be fitted by a lognormal distribution. Such a distribution has a heavier tail and implies that synaptic weight is concentrated among few synaptic connections. In addition, the strengths of synaptic connections sharing pre- or postsynaptic neurons are correlated, implying that strong connections are even more clustered than the weak ones. Therefore, the local cortical network structure can be viewed as a skeleton of stronger connections in a sea of weaker ones. Such a skeleton is likely to play an important role in network dynamics and should be investigated further. PMID:15737062

  16. Cortical Resonance Frequencies Emerge from Network Size and Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lea-Carnall, Caroline A.; Montemurro, Marcelo A.; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson J.; Parkes, Laura M.; El-Deredy, Wael

    2016-01-01

    Neural oscillations occur within a wide frequency range with different brain regions exhibiting resonance-like characteristics at specific points in the spectrum. At the microscopic scale, single neurons possess intrinsic oscillatory properties, such that is not yet known whether cortical resonance is consequential to neural oscillations or an emergent property of the networks that interconnect them. Using a network model of loosely-coupled Wilson-Cowan oscillators to simulate a patch of cortical sheet, we demonstrate that the size of the activated network is inversely related to its resonance frequency. Further analysis of the parameter space indicated that the number of excitatory and inhibitory connections, as well as the average transmission delay between units, determined the resonance frequency. The model predicted that if an activated network within the visual cortex increased in size, the resonance frequency of the network would decrease. We tested this prediction experimentally using the steady-state visual evoked potential where we stimulated the visual cortex with different size stimuli at a range of driving frequencies. We demonstrate that the frequency corresponding to peak steady-state response inversely correlated with the size of the network. We conclude that although individual neurons possess resonance properties, oscillatory activity at the macroscopic level is strongly influenced by network interactions, and that the steady-state response can be used to investigate functional networks. PMID:26914905

  17. Viewing a forelimb induces widespread cortical activations.

    PubMed

    Raos, Vassilis; Kilintari, Marina; Savaki, Helen E

    2014-04-01

    Given that prerequisite of activating the mirror neuron system is the preshaping of the hand and its interaction with the object during observation of a reaching-to-grasp-an-object action, the effects of viewing the object, the reaching forelimb and the static hand may obscure the effects of observing the grasping action per se. To disentangle these effects, we employed the (14)C-deoxyglucose quantitative autoradiographic method to map the functional activity in the entire cortex of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) which observed the experimenter performing non-goal-directed (purposeless) forelimb movements towards an object that was previously presented but no longer visible. Thus, our monkeys were exposed to the view of an object, a moving arm and a static hand with extended wrist and fingers. The distribution of metabolic activity was analyzed in 20μm thick brain sections, and two dimensional maps were reconstructed in the occipital operculum, the temporal, the lateral and medial parietal, the lateral and medial frontal, the lateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices, including the cortex within the lunate, superior temporal, lateral, parietoccipital, intraparietal, central, arcuate and principal sulci. Increased metabolic activity, as compared to fixation-control monkeys, was measured in the forelimb representation of the primary motor and somatosensory cortices, the premotor cortices F2 and F5, cingulate motor areas, the secondary somatosensory cortex SII, the posterior intraparietal area 5 and areas TPOc and FST, in the hemisphere contralateral to the moving arm. Moreover, bilateral activations were elicited in areas pre-SMA, 8m, SSA and the somatorecipient area VS, the retroinsula, the auditory belt area CM, motion areas MT, MST, LOP/CIP, area 31, visual areas TEO, V6, V6Av and the parafoveal and peripheral visual representations of areas V1 and V2, respectively. Few parietal, auditory and visual areas were bilaterally depressed. In brief, a surprisingly wide

  18. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

    PubMed Central

    Celada, Pau; Puig, M. Victoria; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively) are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT), acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by (1) modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and (2) varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3) and inhibitory (5-HT1A) receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the frontal lobe

  19. Ultrasound strain zero-crossing elasticity measurement in assessment of renal allograft cortical hardness: a preliminary observation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Rubin, Jonathan M

    2014-09-01

    group 2 (p ≪ 0.001), and were positive in 18 of 20 cases in group 3 and negative in 17 of 18 cases in group 4 (p ≪ 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.992 ± 0.010 for fibrosis and 0.988 ± 0.021 for inflammation. ZC had 100% sensitivity and 95% specificity when zero strain was used as the cutoff value to determine moderate cortical fibrosis and 94% sensitivity and 90% specificity for inflammation. ZC is a new strain marker that could be straightforward to interpret and perform, making it a potentially practical approach for monitoring progression of cortical fibrosis or inflammation in renal allografts. PMID:25109692

  20. Genetic animal models of malformations of cortical development and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael; Roper, Steven N

    2016-02-15

    Malformations of cortical development constitute a variety of pathological brain abnormalities that commonly cause severe, medically-refractory epilepsy, including focal lesions, such as focal cortical dysplasia, heterotopias, and tubers of tuberous sclerosis complex, and diffuse malformations, such as lissencephaly. Although some cortical malformations result from environmental insults during cortical development in utero, genetic factors are increasingly recognized as primary pathogenic factors across the entire spectrum of malformations. Genes implicated in causing different cortical malformations are involved in a variety of physiological functions, but many are focused on regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and neuronal migration. Advances in molecular genetic methods have allowed the engineering of increasingly sophisticated animal models of cortical malformations and associated epilepsy. These animal models have identified some common mechanistic themes shared by a number of different cortical malformations, but also revealed the diversity and complexity of cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of the pathological lesions and resulting epileptogenesis. PMID:25911067

  1. Inhibitory interneurons in visual cortical plasticity.

    PubMed

    van Versendaal, Daniëlle; Levelt, Christiaan N

    2016-10-01

    For proper maturation of the neocortex and acquisition of specific functions and skills, exposure to sensory stimuli is vital during critical periods of development when synaptic connectivity is highly malleable. To preserve reliable cortical processing, it is essential that these critical periods end after which learning becomes more conditional and active interaction with the environment becomes more important. How these age-dependent forms of plasticity are regulated has been studied extensively in the primary visual cortex. This has revealed that inhibitory innervation plays a crucial role and that a temporary decrease in inhibition is essential for plasticity to take place. Here, we discuss how different interneuron subsets regulate plasticity during different stages of cortical maturation. We propose a theory in which different interneuron subsets select the sources of neuronal input that undergo plasticity. PMID:27193323

  2. Permanent Cortical Blindness After Bronchial Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Doorn, Colette S. van De Boo, Diederick W.; Weersink, Els J. M.; Delden, Otto M. van Reekers, Jim A. Lienden, Krijn P. van

    2013-12-15

    A 35-year-old female with a known medical history of cystic fibrosis was admitted to our institution for massive hemoptysis. CTA depicted a hypertrophied bronchial artery to the right upper lobe and showed signs of recent bleeding at that location. Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) was performed with gelfoam slurry, because pronounced shunting to the pulmonary artery was present. Immediately after BAE, the patient developed bilateral cortical blindness. Control angiography showed an initially not opacified anastomosis between the embolized bronchial artery and the right subclavian artery, near to the origin of the right vertebral artery. Cessation of outflow in the bronchial circulation reversed the flow through the anastomosis and allowed for spill of embolization material into the posterior circulation. Unfortunately the cortical blindness presented was permanent.

  3. Relearning to See in Cortical Blindness.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Michael D; Tadin, Duje; Huxlin, Krystel R

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of cortically induced blindness is increasing as our population ages. The major cause of cortically induced blindness is stroke affecting the primary visual cortex. While the impact of this form of vision loss is devastating to quality of life, the development of principled, effective rehabilitation strategies for this condition lags far behind those used to treat motor stroke victims. Here we summarize recent developments in the still emerging field of visual restitution therapy, and compare the relative effectiveness of different approaches. We also draw insights into the properties of recovered vision, its limitations and likely neural substrates. We hope that these insights will guide future research and bring us closer to the goal of providing much-needed rehabilitation solutions for this patient population. PMID:26659828

  4. Unified statistical approach to cortical thickness analysis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moo K; Robbins, Steve; Evans, Alan C

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a unified image processing and analysis framework for cortical thickness in characterizing a clinical population. The emphasis is placed on the development of data smoothing and analysis framework. The human brain cortex is a highly convoluted surface. Due to the convoluted non-Euclidean surface geometry, data smoothing and analysis on the cortex are inherently difficult. When measurements lie on a curved surface, it is natural to assign kernel smoothing weights based on the geodesic distance along the surface rather than the Euclidean distance. We present a new data smoothing framework that address this problem implicitly without actually computing the geodesic distance and present its statistical properties. Afterwards, the statistical inference is based on the random field theory based multiple comparison correction. As an illustration, we have applied the method in detecting the regions of abnormal cortical thickness in 16 high functioning autistic children. PMID:17354731

  5. Cortical laminar necrosis following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Simona; Silvestrini, Mauro; Provinciali, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    The cortical laminar necrosis (CLN) is a permanent injury characterized by the selective delayed necrosis of the cerebral cortex, mainly of the third layer, and usually greater in the depths and sides of the sulci than over the crest of the gyri. The damage involves all cellular components - either neurons, glia cells and blood vessels - and results in a focal cortical band of pan-necrosis detectable in late sub-acute or chronic stages of reduced energy supply to the brain. The CLN has been described in different conditions as hypoxia, hypoglycemia and status epilepticus. At brain CT or MR scans it appears with pathognomonic highly hyperdense or T1-hyperintense lesions following the gyral anatomy of the cerebral cortex. We reported a case of CLN associated to myocardial infarct and discussed the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27375142

  6. Phonological Processing in Human Auditory Cortical Fields

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Herron, Timothy J.; Cate, Anthony D.; Kang, Xiaojian; Yund, E. W.

    2011-01-01

    We used population-based cortical-surface analysis of functional magnetic imaging data to characterize the processing of consonant–vowel–consonant syllables (CVCs) and spectrally matched amplitude-modulated noise bursts (AMNBs) in human auditory cortex as subjects attended to auditory or visual stimuli in an intermodal selective attention paradigm. Average auditory cortical field (ACF) locations were defined using tonotopic mapping in a previous study. Activations in auditory cortex were defined by two stimulus-preference gradients: (1) Medial belt ACFs preferred AMNBs and lateral belt and parabelt fields preferred CVCs. This preference extended into core ACFs with medial regions of primary auditory cortex (A1) and the rostral field preferring AMNBs and lateral regions preferring CVCs. (2) Anterior ACFs showed smaller activations but more clearly defined stimulus preferences than did posterior ACFs. Stimulus preference gradients were unaffected by auditory attention suggesting that ACF preferences reflect the automatic processing of different spectrotemporal sound features. PMID:21541252

  7. The ontogeny of the cortical language network.

    PubMed

    Skeide, Michael A; Friederici, Angela D

    2016-05-01

    Language-processing functions follow heterogeneous developmental trajectories. The human embryo can already distinguish vowels in utero, but grammatical complexity is usually not fully mastered until at least 7 years of age. Examining the current literature, we propose that the ontogeny of the cortical language network can be roughly subdivided into two main developmental stages. In the first stage extending over the first 3 years of life, the infant rapidly acquires bottom-up processing capacities, which are primarily implemented bilaterally in the temporal cortices. In the second stage continuing into adolescence, top-down processes emerge gradually with the increasing functional selectivity and structural connectivity of the left inferior frontal cortex. PMID:27040907

  8. Plasticity of Cortical Excitatory-Inhibitory Balance

    PubMed Central

    Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses are highly plastic and are modified by changes in patterns of neural activity or sensory experience. Plasticity of cortical excitatory synapses is thought to be important for learning and memory, leading to alterations in sensory representations and cognitive maps. However, these changes must be coordinated across other synapses within local circuits to preserve neural coding schemes and the organization of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, i.e., excitatory-inhibitory balance. Recent studies indicate that inhibitory synapses are also plastic and are controlled directly by a large number of neuromodulators, particularly during episodes of learning. Many modulators transiently alter excitatory-inhibitory balance by decreasing inhibition, and thus disinhibition has emerged as a major mechanism by which neuromodulation might enable long-term synaptic modifications naturally. This review examines the relationships between neuromodulation and synaptic plasticity, focusing on the induction of long-term changes that collectively enhance cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance for improving perception and behavior. PMID:25897875

  9. Optimizing sound features for cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    deCharms, R C; Blake, D T; Merzenich, M M

    1998-05-29

    The brain's cerebral cortex decomposes visual images into information about oriented edges, direction and velocity information, and color. How does the cortex decompose perceived sounds? A reverse correlation technique demonstrates that neurons in the primary auditory cortex of the awake primate have complex patterns of sound-feature selectivity that indicate sensitivity to stimulus edges in frequency or in time, stimulus transitions in frequency or intensity, and feature conjunctions. This allows the creation of classes of stimuli matched to the processing characteristics of auditory cortical neurons. Stimuli designed for a particular neuron's preferred feature pattern can drive that neuron with higher sustained firing rates than have typically been recorded with simple stimuli. These data suggest that the cortex decomposes an auditory scene into component parts using a feature-processing system reminiscent of that used for the cortical decomposition of visual images. PMID:9603734

  10. Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers.

    PubMed

    Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Bola, Łukasz; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Śliwińska, Magdalena W; Amedi, Amir; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Subjects showed enhanced activity for tactile reading in the visual cortex, including the visual word form area (VWFA) that was modulated by their Braille reading speed and strengthened resting-state connectivity between visual and somatosensory cortices. Moreover, TMS disruption of VWFA activity decreased their tactile reading accuracy. Our results indicate that large-scale reorganization is a viable mechanism recruited when learning complex skills. PMID:26976813

  11. Focal Cortical Lesions Induce Bidirectional Changes in the Excitability of Fast Spiking and Non Fast Spiking Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Mittmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A physiological brain function requires neuronal networks to operate within a well-defined range of activity. Indeed, alterations in neuronal excitability have been associated with several pathological conditions, ranging from epilepsy to neuropsychiatric disorders. Changes in inhibitory transmission are known to play a key role in the development of hyperexcitability. However it is largely unknown whether specific interneuronal subpopulations contribute differentially to such pathological condition. In the present study we investigated functional alterations of inhibitory interneurons embedded in a hyperexcitable cortical circuit at the border of chronically induced focal lesions in mouse visual cortex. Interestingly, we found opposite alterations in the excitability of non fast-spiking (Non Fs) and fast-spiking (Fs) interneurons in acute cortical slices from injured animals. Non Fs interneurons displayed a depolarized membrane potential and a higher frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). In contrast, Fs interneurons showed a reduced sEPSCs amplitude. The observed downscaling of excitatory synapses targeting Fs interneurons may prevent the recruitment of this specific population of interneurons to the hyperexcitable network. This mechanism is likely to seriously affect neuronal network function and to exacerbate hyperexcitability but it may be important to protect this particular vulnerable population of GABAegic neurons from excitotoxicity. PMID:25347396

  12. Vestibular receptors contribute to cortical auditory evoked potentials☆

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Neil P.M.; Paillard, Aurore C.; Kluk, Karolina; Whittle, Elizabeth; Colebatch, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic sensitivity of the vestibular apparatus is well-established, but the contribution of vestibular receptors to the late auditory evoked potentials of cortical origin is unknown. Evoked potentials from 500 Hz tone pips were recorded using 70 channel EEG at several intensities below and above the vestibular acoustic threshold, as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In healthy subjects both auditory mid- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), consisting of Na, Pa, N1 and P2 waves, were observed in the sub-threshold conditions. However, in passing through the vestibular threshold, systematic changes were observed in the morphology of the potentials and in the intensity dependence of their amplitude and latency. These changes were absent in a patient without functioning vestibular receptors. In particular, for the healthy subjects there was a fronto-central negativity, which appeared at about 42 ms, referred to as an N42, prior to the AEP N1. Source analysis of both the N42 and N1 indicated involvement of cingulate cortex, as well as bilateral superior temporal cortex. Our findings are best explained by vestibular receptors contributing to what were hitherto considered as purely auditory evoked potentials and in addition tentatively identify a new component that appears to be primarily of vestibular origin. PMID:24321822

  13. Cortical necrosis in a renal transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhardt, R.; Growcock, G.; Lasher, J.C.

    1983-07-01

    The /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA renogram is a well extabished noninvasive method for evaluating and following transplanted kidneys. The examination is useful in distinguishing rejection from acute tubular necrosis as well as demonstrating several less common complications such as vascular occlusion, urinary extravasation, obstruction, and lymphocele. A previously unreported condition involving a transplant kidney (i.e., renal cortical necrosis) is described which was diagnosed with renal scintigraphy in combination with sonography.

  14. Cortical subnetwork dynamics during human language tasks.

    PubMed

    Collard, Maxwell J; Fifer, Matthew S; Benz, Heather L; McMullen, David P; Wang, Yujing; Milsap, Griffin W; Korzeniewska, Anna; Crone, Nathan E

    2016-07-15

    Language tasks require the coordinated activation of multiple subnetworks-groups of related cortical interactions involved in specific components of task processing. Although electrocorticography (ECoG) has sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to capture the dynamics of event-related interactions between cortical sites, it is difficult to decompose these complex spatiotemporal patterns into functionally discrete subnetworks without explicit knowledge of each subnetwork's timing. We hypothesized that subnetworks corresponding to distinct components of task-related processing could be identified as groups of interactions with co-varying strengths. In this study, five subjects implanted with ECoG grids over language areas performed word repetition and picture naming. We estimated the interaction strength between each pair of electrodes during each task using a time-varying dynamic Bayesian network (tvDBN) model constructed from the power of high gamma (70-110Hz) activity, a surrogate for population firing rates. We then reduced the dimensionality of this model using principal component analysis (PCA) to identify groups of interactions with co-varying strengths, which we term functional network components (FNCs). This data-driven technique estimates both the weight of each interaction's contribution to a particular subnetwork, and the temporal profile of each subnetwork's activation during the task. We found FNCs with temporal and anatomical features consistent with articulatory preparation in both tasks, and with auditory and visual processing in the word repetition and picture naming tasks, respectively. These FNCs were highly consistent between subjects with similar electrode placement, and were robust enough to be characterized in single trials. Furthermore, the interaction patterns uncovered by FNC analysis correlated well with recent literature suggesting important functional-anatomical distinctions between processing external and self-produced speech. Our

  15. Familial Precocious Fetal Abnormal Cortical Sulcation.

    PubMed

    Frassoni, Carolina; Avagliano, Laura; Inverardi, Francesca; Spaccini, Luigina; Parazzini, Cecilia; Rustico, Maria Angela; Bulfamante, Gaetano; Righini, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The development of the human cerebral cortex is a complex and precisely programmed process by which alterations may lead to morphological and functional neurological abnormalities. We report familial cases of prenatally diagnosed abnormal brain, characterized by aberrant symmetrical mesial oversulcation of the parietooccipital lobes, in fetuses affected by abnormal skeletal features. Fetal brain anomalies were characterized by prenatal magnetic resonance imaging at 21 weeks of gestation and histologically evaluated at 22 weeks. Histological examination added relevant information showing some focal cortical areas of micropoligyria and heterotopic extension of the cortical plate into the marginal zone beneath the cortical surface. Genetic analysis of the fetuses excluded FGFR3 mutations known to be related to skeletal dysplasia and aberrant symmetrical oversulcation in other brain areas (temporal lobes). Hence, the present report suggests the existence of a class of rare syndromes of skeleton and brain development abnormality unrelated to FGFR3 mutations or related to other not described FGFR3 gene defects. Using magnetic resonance imaging, histopathology and molecular characterization we provide an example of a translational study of a rare and unreported brain congenital malformation. PMID:27177044

  16. Coverage, continuity, and visual cortical architecture

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The primary visual cortex of many mammals contains a continuous representation of visual space, with a roughly repetitive aperiodic map of orientation preferences superimposed. It was recently found that orientation preference maps (OPMs) obey statistical laws which are apparently invariant among species widely separated in eutherian evolution. Here, we examine whether one of the most prominent models for the optimization of cortical maps, the elastic net (EN) model, can reproduce this common design. The EN model generates representations which optimally trade of stimulus space coverage and map continuity. While this model has been used in numerous studies, no analytical results about the precise layout of the predicted OPMs have been obtained so far. Results We present a mathematical approach to analytically calculate the cortical representations predicted by the EN model for the joint mapping of stimulus position and orientation. We find that in all the previously studied regimes, predicted OPM layouts are perfectly periodic. An unbiased search through the EN parameter space identifies a novel regime of aperiodic OPMs with pinwheel densities lower than found in experiments. In an extreme limit, aperiodic OPMs quantitatively resembling experimental observations emerge. Stabilization of these layouts results from strong nonlocal interactions rather than from a coverage-continuity-compromise. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that optimization models for stimulus representations dominated by nonlocal suppressive interactions are in principle capable of correctly predicting the common OPM design. They question that visual cortical feature representations can be explained by a coverage-continuity-compromise. PMID:22329968

  17. Computational modeling of epidural cortical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-12-01

    Epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) is a developing therapy to treat neurological disorders. However, it is not clear how the cortical anatomy or the polarity and position of the electrode affects current flow and neural activation in the cortex. We developed a 3D computational model simulating ECS over the precentral gyrus. With the electrode placed directly above the gyrus, about half of the stimulus current flowed through the crown of the gyrus while current density was low along the banks deep in the sulci. Beneath the electrode, neurons oriented perpendicular to the cortical surface were depolarized by anodic stimulation, and neurons oriented parallel to the boundary were depolarized by cathodic stimulation. Activation was localized to the crown of the gyrus, and neurons on the banks deep in the sulci were not polarized. During regulated voltage stimulation, the magnitude of the activating function was inversely proportional to the thickness of the CSF and dura. During regulated current stimulation, the activating function was not sensitive to the thickness of the dura but was slightly more sensitive than during regulated voltage stimulation to the thickness of the CSF. Varying the width of the gyrus and the position of the electrode altered the distribution of the activating function due to changes in the orientation of the neurons beneath the electrode. Bipolar stimulation, although often used in clinical practice, reduced spatial selectivity as well as selectivity for neuron orientation.

  18. Changing interpretations of the human cortical pattern.

    PubMed

    Maudgil, D D

    1997-06-01

    There has been a long historical succession of scientific description of the cerebral cortex, usually accompanied by conflicting speculations on its function. It was noted by Thomas S. Kuhn that scientific descriptions are phrased in terms of the prevailing scientific paradigm and that disagreement about the interpretation of observed phenomena is what drives scientists to formulate new theories. The objectives of this study were to examine how the observation of Kuhn can help to gain insight into historical concepts of brain functioning from contemporary descriptions of the cortical gyrations, to examine how these historical concepts are relevant to neurology today, and to demonstrate how subjective these concepts are because they are based on interpretations that may be wrong. The method used here is examination of historical sources that give descriptions and illustrations of the cerebral cortex and contemporary theories of brain function. I have found that the emphases on cortical description have varied according to the prevailing contemporary paradigm. Debates about and between different paradigms mirror some themes in current neuroscience. In conclusion, the observations of Kuhn help to interpret descriptions to shed light on theories of cerebral cortical functioning, and they demonstrate that a scientific description is necessarily highly subjective (since it is phrased in terms of the current paradigm). The insights that can be gained are relevant to modern neurology and neuroscience research. PMID:9193213

  19. Cortical Reorganization following Injury Early in Life

    PubMed Central

    Artzi, Moran; Shiran, Shelly Irene; Weinstein, Maya; Myers, Vicki; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Schertz, Mitchell; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Miller, Elka; Gordon, Andrew M.; Green, Dido; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2016-01-01

    The brain has a remarkable capacity for reorganization following injury, especially during the first years of life. Knowledge of structural reorganization and its consequences following perinatal injury is sparse. Here we studied changes in brain tissue volume, morphology, perfusion, and integrity in children with hemiplegia compared to typically developing children, using MRI. Children with hemiplegia demonstrated reduced total cerebral volume, with increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and reduced total white matter volumes, with no differences in total gray matter volume, compared to typically developing children. An increase in cortical thickness at the hemisphere contralateral to the lesion (CLH) was detected in motor and language areas, which may reflect compensation for the gray matter loss in the lesion area or retention of ipsilateral pathways. In addition, reduced cortical thickness, perfusion, and surface area were detected in limbic areas. Increased CSF volume and precentral cortical thickness and reduced white matter volume were correlated with worse motor performance. Brain reorganization of the gray matter within the CLH, while not necessarily indicating better outcome, is suggested as a response to neuronal deficits following injury early in life. PMID:27298741

  20. Astrocytes refine cortical connectivity at dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Risher, W Christopher; Patel, Sagar; Kim, Il Hwan; Uezu, Akiyoshi; Bhagat, Srishti; Wilton, Daniel K; Pilaz, Louis-Jan; Singh Alvarado, Jonnathan; Calhan, Osman Y; Silver, Debra L; Stevens, Beth; Calakos, Nicole; Soderling, Scott H; Eroglu, Cagla

    2014-01-01

    During cortical synaptic development, thalamic axons must establish synaptic connections despite the presence of the more abundant intracortical projections. How thalamocortical synapses are formed and maintained in this competitive environment is unknown. Here, we show that astrocyte-secreted protein hevin is required for normal thalamocortical synaptic connectivity in the mouse cortex. Absence of hevin results in a profound, long-lasting reduction in thalamocortical synapses accompanied by a transient increase in intracortical excitatory connections. Three-dimensional reconstructions of cortical neurons from serial section electron microscopy (ssEM) revealed that, during early postnatal development, dendritic spines often receive multiple excitatory inputs. Immuno-EM and confocal analyses revealed that majority of the spines with multiple excitatory contacts (SMECs) receive simultaneous thalamic and cortical inputs. Proportion of SMECs diminishes as the brain develops, but SMECs remain abundant in Hevin-null mice. These findings reveal that, through secretion of hevin, astrocytes control an important developmental synaptic refinement process at dendritic spines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04047.001 PMID:25517933

  1. Partial volume correction using cortical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaasvær, Kamille R.; Haubro, Camilla D.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Borghammer, Per; Otzen, Daniel; Ostergaard, Lasse R.

    2010-03-01

    Partial volume effect (PVE) in positron emission tomography (PET) leads to inaccurate estimation of regional metabolic activities among neighbouring tissues with different tracer concentration. This may be one of the main limiting factors in the utilization of PET in clinical practice. Partial volume correction (PVC) methods have been widely studied to address this issue. MRI based PVC methods are well-established.1 Their performance depend on the quality of the co-registration of the MR and PET dataset, on the correctness of the estimated point-spread function (PSF) of the PET scanner and largely on the performance of the segmentation method that divide the brain into brain tissue compartments.1, 2 In the present study a method for PVC is suggested, that utilizes cortical surfaces, to obtain detailed anatomical information. The objectives are to improve the performance of PVC, facilitate a study of the relationship between metabolic activity in the cerebral cortex and cortical thicknesses, and to obtain an improved visualization of PET data. The gray matter metabolic activity after performing PVC was recovered by 99.7 - 99.8 % , in relation to the true activity when testing on simple simulated data with different PSFs and by 97.9 - 100 % when testing on simulated brain PET data at different cortical thicknesses. When studying the relationship between metabolic activities and anatomical structures it was shown on simulated brain PET data, that it is important to correct for PVE in order to get the true relationship.

  2. Differential Cortical Neurotrophin and Cytogenetic Adaptation after Voluntary Exercise in Normal and Amnestic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Joseph M.; Vetreno, Ryan P.; Savage, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary exercise (VEx) has profound effects on neural and behavioral plasticity, including recovery of CNS trauma and disease. However, the unique regional cortical adaption to VEx has not been elucidated. In a series of experiments, we first examined whether VEx would restore and retain neurotrophin levels in several cortical regions (frontal cortex [FC], retrosplenial cortex [RSC], occipital cortex [OC]) in an animal model (pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency [PTD]) of the amnestic disorder Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. In addition, we assessed the time-dependent effect of VEx to rescue performance on a spontaneous alternation task. Following 2-weeks of VEx or stationary housing conditions (Stat), rats were behaviorally tested and brains were harvested either the day after VEx (24-h) or after an additional two-week period (2-wk). In both control pair-fed (PF) rats and PTD rats, all neurotrophin levels (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], nerve growth factor [NGF], and vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) increased at the 24-h period after VEx in the FC and RSC, but not OC. Two-weeks following VEx, BDNF remained elevated in both FC and RSC, whereas NGF remained elevated in only the FC. Interestingly, VEx only recovered cognitive performance in amnestic rats when there was an additional 2-wk adaptation period after VEx. Given this unique temporal profile, Experiment 2 examined the cortical cytogenetic responses in all three cortical regions following a 2-wk adaptation period after VEx. In healthy (PF) rats, VEx increased the survival of progenitor cells in both the FC and RSC, but only increased oligodendrocyte precursor cells in the FC. Furthermore, VEx had a selective effect of only recovering oligodendrocyte precursor cells in the FC in PTD rats. These data reveal the therapeutic potential of exercise to restore cortical plasticity in the amnestic brain, and that the FC is one of the most responsive cortical regions to VEx. PMID:24215977

  3. Association of Optic Radiation Integrity with Cortical Thickness in Children with Anisometropic Amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shun; Mu, Yun-Feng; Cui, Long-Biao; Li, Rong; Shi, Mei; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jun-Qing; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Jian; Yin, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have indicated regional abnormalities of both gray and white matter in amblyopia. However, alterations of cortical thickness associated with changes in white matter integrity have rarely been reported. In this study, structural magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data were obtained from 15 children with anisometropic amblyopia and 15 age- and gender-matched children with normal sight. Combining DTI and surface-based morphometry, we examined a potential linkage between disrupted white matter integrity and altered cortical thickness. The fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the optic radiations (ORs) of children with anisometropic amblyopia were lower than in controls (P < 0.05). The cortical thickness in amblyopic children was lower than controls in the following subregions: lingual cortex, lateral occipitotemporal gyrus, cuneus, occipital lobe, inferior parietal lobe, and temporal lobe (P < 0.05, corrected), but was higher in the calcarine gyrus (P < 0.05, corrected). Node-by-node correlation analysis of changes in cortical thickness revealed a significant association between a lower FA value in the OR and diminished cortical thickness in the following subregions: medial lingual cortex, lateral occipitotemporal gyrus, lateral, superior, and medial occipital cortex, and lunate cortex. We also found a relationship between changes of cortical thickness and white matter OR integrity in amblyopia. These findings indicate that developmental changes occur simultaneously in the OR and visual cortex in amblyopia, and provide key information on complex damage of brain networks in anisometropic amblyopia. Our results also support the hypothesis that the pathogenesis of anisometropic amblyopia is neurodevelopmental. PMID:26769488

  4. Cortical reorganization after experimental traumatic brain injury: a functional autoradiography study.

    PubMed

    Harris, Neil G; Chen, Szu-Fu; Pickard, John D

    2013-07-01

    Cortical sensorimotor (SM) maps are a useful readout for providing a global view of the underlying status of evoked brain function, as well as a gross overview of ongoing mechanisms of plasticity. Recent evidence in the rat controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury model shows that the ipsilesional (injured) hemisphere is temporarily permissive for axon sprouting. This would predict that size and spatial alterations in cortical maps may occur much earlier than previously tested and that they might be useful as potential markers of the postinjury plasticity period as well as indicators of outcome. We investigated the evolution of changes in brain activation evoked by affected hindlimb electrical stimulation at 4, 7, and 30 days following CCI or sham injury over the hindlimb cortical region of adult rats. [(14)C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiography was used to quantitatively examine the local cerebral blood flow changes in response to hindlimb stimulation as a marker for neuronal activity. The results show that although ipsilesional hindlimb SM activity was persistently depressed from 4 days, additional novel regions of ipsilesional activity appeared concurrently within SM barrel and S2 regions as well as posterior auditory cortex. Simultaneously with this was the appearance of evoked activity within the intact, contralesional cortex that was maximal at 4 and 7 days, compared to stimulated sham-injured rats, where activation was solely unilateral. By 30 days, however, contralesional activation had greatly subsided and existing ipsilesional activity was enhanced within the same novel cortical regions that were identified acutely. These data indicate that significant reorganization of the cortical SM maps occurs after injury that evolves with a particular postinjury time course. We discuss these data in terms of the known mechanisms of plasticity that are likely to underlie these map changes, with particular reference to the differences and similarities that exist between

  5. Age-related changes in the thickness of cortical zones in humans.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, Scott M; Brickhouse, Michael; Pascual, Belen; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2011-10-01

    Structural neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that all regions of the cortex are not affected equally by aging, with frontal regions appearing especially susceptible to atrophy. The "last in, first out" hypothesis posits that aging is, in a sense, the inverse of development: late-maturing regions of the brain are preferentially vulnerable to age-related loss of structural integrity. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing age-related changes in regional cortical thickness via three methods: (1) an exploratory linear regression of cortical thickness and age across the entire cortical mantle (2) an analysis of age-related differences in the thickness of zones of cortex defined by functional/cytoarchitectural affiliation (including primary sensory/motor, unimodal association, heteromodal association, and paralimbic zones), and (3) an analysis of age-related differences in the thickness of regions of cortex defined by surface area expansion in the period between birth and early adulthood. Subjects were grouped as young (aged 18-29, n = 138), middle-aged (aged 30-59, n = 80), young-old (aged 60-79, n = 60), and old-old (aged 80+, n = 38). Thinning of the cortex between young and middle-aged adults was greatest in heteromodal association cortex and regions of high postnatal surface area expansion. In contrast, thinning in old-old age was greatest in primary sensory/motor cortices and regions of low postnatal surface area expansion. In sum, these results lead us to propose a sequential "developmental-sensory" model of aging, in which developmental factors influence cortical vulnerability relatively early in the aging process, whereas later-in more advanced stages of aging-factors specific to primary sensory and motor cortices confer vulnerability. This model offers explicitly testable hypotheses and suggests the possibility that normal aging may potentially allow for multiple opportunities for intervention to promote the structural integrity of the cerebral

  6. Regional increases of cortical thickness in untreated, first-episode major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Qiu, L; Lui, S; Kuang, W; Huang, X; Li, J; Li, J; Zhang, J; Chen, H; Sweeney, J A; Gong, Q

    2014-01-01

    The large majority of structural MRI studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) investigated volumetric changes in chronic medicated patients in whom course of illness and treatment effects may impact anatomic measurements. Further, in few studies, separate measurements of cortical thickness and surface area have been performed that reflect different neurobiological processes regulated by different genetic mechanisms. In the present study, we investigated both cortical thickness and surface area in first-episode, treatment-naïve, mid-life MDD to elucidate the core pathophysiology of this disease and its early impact on the brain. We observed increased cortical thickness in the right hemisphere, including medial orbitofrontal gyrus, pars opercularis, rostral middle frontal gyrus and supramarginal gyrus. Increased thickness of rostral middle frontal gyrus was negatively related with depression severity on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Furthermore, MDD patients showed significantly increased associations in cortical thickness measurements among areas where increased cortical thickness was observed. Analysis of pial area revealed a trend toward increased surface area in the left parahippocampal gyrus in MDD. To permit comparison of our data with those of previous gray matter volume studies, voxel-based morphometry was performed. That analysis revealed significantly increased gray matter volume in left paracentral lobule, left superior frontal gyrus, bilateral cuneus and thalamus which form limbic-cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic loops. These changes in first-episode, treatment-naïve, mid-life MDD patients may reflect an active illness-related cortical change close to illness onset, and thus potentially provide important new insight into the early neurobiology of the disorder. PMID:24713859

  7. Differential cortical neurotrophin and cytogenetic adaptation after voluntary exercise in normal and amnestic rats.

    PubMed

    Hall, J M; Vetreno, R P; Savage, L M

    2014-01-31

    Voluntary exercise (VEx) has profound effects on neural and behavioral plasticity, including recovery of CNS trauma and disease. However, the unique regional cortical adaption to VEx has not been elucidated. In a series of experiments, we first examined whether VEx would restore and retain neurotrophin levels in several cortical regions (frontal cortex [FC], retrosplenial cortex [RSC], occipital cortex [OC]) in an animal model (pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency [PTD]) of the amnestic disorder Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. In addition, we assessed the time-dependent effect of VEx to rescue performance on a spontaneous alternation task. Following 2-weeks of VEx or stationary housing conditions (Stat), rats were behaviorally tested and brains were harvested either the day after VEx (24-h) or after an additional 2-week period (2-wk). In both control pair-fed (PF) rats and PTD rats, all neurotrophin levels (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], nerve growth factor [NGF], and vascular endothelial growth factor) increased at the 24-h period after VEx in the FC and RSC, but not OC. Two-weeks following VEx, BDNF remained elevated in both FC and RSC, whereas NGF remained elevated in only the FC. Interestingly, VEx only recovered cognitive performance in amnestic rats when there was an additional 2-wk adaptation period after VEx. Given this unique temporal profile, Experiment 2 examined the cortical cytogenetic responses in all three cortical regions following a 2-wk adaptation period after VEx. In healthy (PF) rats, VEx increased the survival of progenitor cells in both the FC and RSC, but only increased oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OLPs) in the FC. Furthermore, VEx had a selective effect of only recovering OLPs in the FC in PTD rats. These data reveal the therapeutic potential of exercise to restore cortical plasticity in the amnestic brain, and that the FC is one of the most responsive cortical regions to VEx. PMID:24215977

  8. Cortical reorganization after macroreplantation at the upper extremity: a magnetoencephalographic study.

    PubMed

    Blume, Kathrin R; Dietrich, Caroline; Huonker, Ralph; Götz, Theresa; Sens, Elisabeth; Friedel, Reinhard; Hofmann, Gunther O; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    With the development of microsurgical techniques, replantation has become a feasible alternative to stump treatment after the amputation of an extremity. It is known that amputation often induces phantom limb pain and cortical reorganization within the corresponding somatosensory areas. However, whether replantation reduces the risk of comparable persisting pain phenomena as well as reorganization of the primary somatosensory cortex is still widely unknown. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the potential development of persistent pain and cortical reorganization of the hand and lip areas within the sensory cortex by means of magnetoencephalographic dipole analyses after replantation of a traumatically amputated upper limb proximal to the radiocarpal joint. Cortical reorganization was investigated in 13 patients with limb replantation using air puff stimulation of the phalanges of both thumbs and both corners of the lower lip. Displacement of the centre of gravity of lip and thumb representations and increased cortical activity were found in the limb and face areas of the primary somatosensory cortex contralateral to the replanted arm when compared to the ipsilateral hemisphere. Thus, cortical reorganization in the primary somatosensory cortex also occurs after replantation of the upper extremity. Patients' reports of pain in the replanted body part were negatively correlated with the amount of cortical reorganization, i.e. the more pain the patients reported, the less reorganization of the subjects' hand representation within the primary somatosensory cortex was observed. Longitudinal studies in patients after macroreplantation are necessary to assess whether the observed reorganization in the primary somatosensory cortex is a result of changes within the representation of the replanted arm and/or neighbouring representations and to assess the relationship between the development of persistent pain and reorganization. PMID:24480484

  9. Experiments and models of cortical oscillations as a target for noninvasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation is attracting substantial attention due to its potential for safe and effective modulation of brain network dynamics. Promising applications include cognitive enhancement and treatment of disorders of the central nervous system. Recently, targeting of cortical oscillations by brain stimulation with periodic electromagnetic waveforms has emerged as a particularly appealing approach for understanding the causal role of cortical oscillations in human cognition and behavior. Two main approaches exist: repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS); rTMS is more widely used as a research and clinical tool but only recently has it been suggested to selectively engage frequency-matched cortical oscillations. In contrast, tACS is an offspring of transcranial direct current stimulation and has been introduced with the specific aim of engaging cortical oscillations. One of the main lessons that the field of noninvasive brain stimulation has learned over the last few years is that without a mechanistic understanding of how stimulation engages neuronal circuits, little progress can be made toward the rational design of individualized, adaptive stimulation treatments. Computer simulations of cellular and network models from the field of computational neuroscience are a key tool to gain such a mechanistic understanding. However, the insights gained from such modeling strategies can only be fully leveraged when used in tight conjunction with experimental approaches in both human and animal model studies. Here, I provide an in-depth review of the pioneering experimental and computational studies that together provide the basis for understanding how periodic noninvasive brain stimulation targets cortical oscillations to enable the rational design of brain stimulation treatments for disorders associated with specific deficits in cortical oscillations. PMID:26541376

  10. Motor cortical hyperexcitability in idiopathic scoliosis: could focal dystonia be a subclinical etiological factor?

    PubMed Central

    Tormos, José María; Barrios, Carlos; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) remains unknown; however, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that the spine deformity could be the expression of a subclinical nervous system disorder. A defective sensory input or an anomalous sensorimotor integration may lead to an abnormal postural tone and therefore the development of a spine deformity. Inhibition of the motor cortico-cortical excitability is abnormal in dystonia. Therefore, the study of cortico-cortical inhibition may shed some insight into the dystonia hypothesis regarding the pathophysiology of IS. Paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to study cortico-cortical inhibition and facilitation in nine adolescents with IS, five teenagers with congenital scoliosis (CS) and eight healthy age-matched controls. The effect of a previous conditioning stimulus (80% intensity of resting motor threshold) on the amplitude of the motor-evoked potential induced by the test stimulus (120% of resting motor threshold) was examined at various interstimulus intervals (ISIs) in both abductor pollicis brevis muscles. The results of healthy adolescents and those with CS showed a marked inhibitory effect of the conditioning stimulus on the response to the test stimulus at interstimulus intervals shorter than 6 ms. These findings do not differ from those reported for normal adults. However, children with IS revealed an abnormally reduced cortico-cortical inhibition at the short ISIs. Cortico-cortical inhibition was practically normal on the side of the scoliotic convexity while it was significantly reduced on the side of the scoliotic concavity. In conclusion, these findings support the hypothesis that a dystonic dysfunction underlies in IS. Asymmetrical cortical hyperexcitability may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IS and represents an objective neurophysiological finding that could be used clinically. PMID:20033462

  11. Cortical hot spots and labyrinths: why cortical neuromodulation for episodic migraine with aura should be personalized

    PubMed Central

    Dahlem, Markus A.; Schmidt, Bernd; Bojak, Ingo; Boie, Sebastian; Kneer, Frederike; Hadjikhani, Nouchine; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation protocols for medical devices should be rationally designed. For episodic migraine with aura we outline model-based design strategies toward preventive and acute therapies using stereotactic cortical neuromodulation. To this end, we regard a localized spreading depression (SD) wave segment as a central element in migraine pathophysiology. To describe nucleation and propagation features of the SD wave segment, we define the new concepts of cortical hot spots and labyrinths, respectively. In particular, we firstly focus exclusively on curvature-induced dynamical properties by studying a generic reaction-diffusion model of SD on the folded cortical surface. This surface is described with increasing level of details, including finally personalized simulations using patient's magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner readings. At this stage, the only relevant factor that can modulate nucleation and propagation paths is the Gaussian curvature, which has the advantage of being rather readily accessible by MRI. We conclude with discussing further anatomical factors, such as areal, laminar, and cellular heterogeneity, that in addition to and in relation to Gaussian curvature determine the generalized concept of cortical hot spots and labyrinths as target structures for neuromodulation. Our numerical simulations suggest that these target structures are like fingerprints, they are individual features of each migraine sufferer. The goal in the future will be to provide individualized neural tissue simulations. These simulations should predict the clinical data and therefore can also serve as a test bed for exploring stereotactic cortical neuromodulation. PMID:25798103

  12. Effect of age at onset on cortical thickness and cognition in posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Suárez-González, Aida; Lehmann, Manja; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Yong, Keir X X; Paterson, Ross W; Slattery, Catherine F; Foulkes, Alexander J M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Gil-Néciga, Eulogio; Roldán-Lora, Florinda; Schott, Jonathan M; Fox, Nick C; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2016-08-01

    Age at onset (AAO) has been shown to influence the phenotype of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but how it affects atypical presentations of AD remains unknown. Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is the most common form of atypical AD. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of AAO on cortical thickness and cognitive function in 98 PCA patients. We used Freesurfer (v5.3.0) to compare cortical thickness with AAO both as a continuous variable, and by dichotomizing the groups based on median age (58 years). In both the continuous and dichotomized analyses, we found a pattern suggestive of thinner cortex in precuneus and parietal areas in earlier-onset PCA, and lower cortical thickness in anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex in later-onset PCA. These cortical thickness differences between PCA subgroups were consistent with earlier-onset PCA patients performing worse on cognitive tests involving parietal functions. Our results provide a suggestion that AAO may not only affect the clinico-anatomical characteristics in AD but may also affect atrophy patterns and cognition within atypical AD phenotypes. PMID:27318138

  13. Modulation of Cortical Oscillations by Low-Frequency Direct Cortical Stimulation Is State-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Alagapan, Sankaraleengam; Schmidt, Stephen L.; Lefebvre, Jérémie; Hadar, Eldad; Shin, Hae Won; Frӧhlich, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Cortical oscillations play a fundamental role in organizing large-scale functional brain networks. Noninvasive brain stimulation with temporally patterned waveforms such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) have been proposed to modulate these oscillations. Thus, these stimulation modalities represent promising new approaches for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses in which these oscillations are impaired. However, the mechanism by which periodic brain stimulation alters endogenous oscillation dynamics is debated and appears to depend on brain state. Here, we demonstrate with a static model and a neural oscillator model that recurrent excitation in the thalamo-cortical circuit, together with recruitment of cortico-cortical connections, can explain the enhancement of oscillations by brain stimulation as a function of brain state. We then performed concurrent invasive recording and stimulation of the human cortical surface to elucidate the response of cortical oscillations to periodic stimulation and support the findings from the computational models. We found that (1) stimulation enhanced the targeted oscillation power, (2) this enhancement outlasted stimulation, and (3) the effect of stimulation depended on behavioral state. Together, our results show successful target engagement of oscillations by periodic brain stimulation and highlight the role of nonlinear interaction between endogenous network oscillations and stimulation. These mechanistic insights will contribute to the design of adaptive, more targeted stimulation paradigms. PMID:27023427

  14. Modulation of Cortical Oscillations by Low-Frequency Direct Cortical Stimulation Is State-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Alagapan, Sankaraleengam; Schmidt, Stephen L; Lefebvre, Jérémie; Hadar, Eldad; Shin, Hae Won; Frӧhlich, Flavio

    2016-03-01

    Cortical oscillations play a fundamental role in organizing large-scale functional brain networks. Noninvasive brain stimulation with temporally patterned waveforms such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) have been proposed to modulate these oscillations. Thus, these stimulation modalities represent promising new approaches for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses in which these oscillations are impaired. However, the mechanism by which periodic brain stimulation alters endogenous oscillation dynamics is debated and appears to depend on brain state. Here, we demonstrate with a static model and a neural oscillator model that recurrent excitation in the thalamo-cortical circuit, together with recruitment of cortico-cortical connections, can explain the enhancement of oscillations by brain stimulation as a function of brain state. We then performed concurrent invasive recording and stimulation of the human cortical surface to elucidate the response of cortical oscillations to periodic stimulation and support the findings from the computational models. We found that (1) stimulation enhanced the targeted oscillation power, (2) this enhancement outlasted stimulation, and (3) the effect of stimulation depended on behavioral state. Together, our results show successful target engagement of oscillations by periodic brain stimulation and highlight the role of nonlinear interaction between endogenous network oscillations and stimulation. These mechanistic insights will contribute to the design of adaptive, more targeted stimulation paradigms. PMID:27023427

  15. [Age changes in early somatosensory evoked potentials].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H

    1986-06-01

    There are characteristic age-related changes in the cervical and early cortical somatosensory potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of the median nerve. At an age of 40 to 50 years the latencies of the potential components and the transit times start increasing progressively. Moreover, there is an attenuation of the cervical and an enhancement of the cortical components with age. Considering the presumed neuronal basis of the bioelectric phenomena the changes are discussed in connection with aging processes of the spinal ganglion cells, cortical pyramidal cells and the locus coeruleus. PMID:3017682

  16. Cortical Thickness Abnormalities in Late Adolescence with Online Gaming Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kai; Cheng, Ping; Dong, Tao; Bi, Yanzhi; Xing, Lihong; Yu, Dahua; Zhao, Limei; Dong, Minghao; von Deneen, Karen M.; Liu, Yijun; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Online gaming addiction, as the most popular subtype of Internet addiction, had gained more and more attention from the whole world. However, the structural differences in cortical thickness of the brain between adolescents with online gaming addiction and healthy controls are not well unknown; neither was its association with the impaired cognitive control ability. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans from late adolescence with online gaming addiction (n = 18) and age-, education- and gender-matched controls (n = 18) were acquired. The cortical thickness measurement method was employed to investigate alterations of cortical thickness in individuals with online gaming addiction. The color-word Stroop task was employed to investigate the functional implications of the cortical thickness abnormalities. Imaging data revealed increased cortical thickness in the left precentral cortex, precuneus, middle frontal cortex, inferior temporal and middle temporal cortices in late adolescence with online gaming addiction; meanwhile, the cortical thicknesses of the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), insula, lingual gyrus, the right postcentral gyrus, entorhinal cortex and inferior parietal cortex were decreased. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the cortical thicknesses of the left precentral cortex, precuneus and lingual gyrus correlated with duration of online gaming addiction and the cortical thickness of the OFC correlated with the impaired task performance during the color-word Stroop task in adolescents with online gaming addiction. The findings in the current study suggested that the cortical thickness abnormalities of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of online gaming addiction. PMID:23326379

  17. Cortical thickness abnormalities in late adolescence with online gaming addiction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai; Cheng, Ping; Dong, Tao; Bi, Yanzhi; Xing, Lihong; Yu, Dahua; Zhao, Limei; Dong, Minghao; von Deneen, Karen M; Liu, Yijun; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Online gaming addiction, as the most popular subtype of Internet addiction, had gained more and more attention from the whole world. However, the structural differences in cortical thickness of the brain between adolescents with online gaming addiction and healthy controls are not well unknown; neither was its association with the impaired cognitive control ability. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans from late adolescence with online gaming addiction (n = 18) and age-, education- and gender-matched controls (n = 18) were acquired. The cortical thickness measurement method was employed to investigate alterations of cortical thickness in individuals with online gaming addiction. The color-word Stroop task was employed to investigate the functional implications of the cortical thickness abnormalities. Imaging data revealed increased cortical thickness in the left precentral cortex, precuneus, middle frontal cortex, inferior temporal and middle temporal cortices in late adolescence with online gaming addiction; meanwhile, the cortical thicknesses of the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), insula, lingual gyrus, the right postcentral gyrus, entorhinal cortex and inferior parietal cortex were decreased. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the cortical thicknesses of the left precentral cortex, precuneus and lingual gyrus correlated with duration of online gaming addiction and the cortical thickness of the OFC correlated with the impaired task performance during the color-word Stroop task in adolescents with online gaming addiction. The findings in the current study suggested that the cortical thickness abnormalities of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of online gaming addiction. PMID:23326379

  18. Postmortem validation of MRI cortical volume measurements in MS.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Veronica; Klaver, Roel; Versteeg, Adriaan; Voorn, Pieter; Twisk, Jos W R; Barkhof, Frederik; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Vrenken, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Grey matter (GM) atrophy is a prominent aspect of multiple sclerosis pathology and an important outcome in studies. GM atrophy measurement requires accurate GM segmentation. Several methods are used in vivo for measuring GM volumes in MS, but assessing their validity in vivo remains challenging. In this postmortem study, we evaluated the correlation between postmortem MRI cortical volume or thickness and the cortical thickness measured on histological sections. Sixteen MS brains were scanned in situ using 3DT1-weighted MRI and these images were used to measure regional cortical volume using FSL-SIENAX, FreeSurfer, and SPM, and regional cortical thickness using FreeSurfer. Subsequently, cortical thickness was measured histologically in 5 systematically sampled cortical areas. Linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the relation between MRI regional cortical volume or thickness and histological cortical thickness to determine which postprocessing technique was most valid. After correction for multiple comparisons, we observed a significant correlation with the histological cortical thickness for FSL-SIENAX cortical volume with manual editing (std. β = 0.345, adjusted R(2)  = 0.105, P = 0.005), and FreeSurfer cortical volume with manual editing (std. β = 0.379, adjusted R(2)  = 0.129, P = 0.003). In addition, there was a significant correlation between FreeSurfer cortical thickness with manual editing and histological cortical thickness (std. β = 0.381, adjusted R(2)  = 0.130, P = 0.003). The results support the use of FSL-SIENAX and FreeSurfer in cases of severe MS pathology. Interestingly none of the methods were significant in automated mode, which supports the use of manual editing to improve the automated segmentation. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2223-2233, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26945922

  19. Unimodal primary sensory cortices are directly connected by long-range horizontal projections in the rat sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Stehberg, Jimmy; Dang, Phat T.; Frostig, Ron D.

    2014-01-01

    Research based on functional imaging and neuronal recordings in the barrel cortex subdivision of primary somatosensory cortex (SI) of the adult rat has revealed novel aspects of structure-function relationships in this cortex. Specifically, it has demonstrated that single whisker stimulation evokes subthreshold neuronal activity that spreads symmetrically within gray matter from the appropriate barrel area, crosses cytoarchitectural borders of SI and reaches deeply into other unimodal primary cortices such as primary auditory (AI) and primary visual (VI). It was further demonstrated that this spread is supported by a spatially matching underlying diffuse network of border-crossing, long-range projections that could also reach deeply into AI and VI. Here we seek to determine whether such a network of border-crossing, long-range projections is unique to barrel cortex or characterizes also other primary, unimodal sensory cortices and therefore could directly connect them. Using anterograde (BDA) and retrograde (CTb) tract-tracing techniques, we demonstrate that such diffuse horizontal networks directly and mutually connect VI, AI and SI. These findings suggest that diffuse, border-crossing axonal projections connecting directly primary cortices are an important organizational motif common to all major primary sensory cortices in the rat. Potential implications of these findings for topics including cortical structure-function relationships, multisensory integration, functional imaging, and cortical parcellation are discussed. PMID:25309339

  20. Perceiving invisible light through a somatosensory cortical prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Eric E; Carra, Rafael; Nicolelis, Miguel A L

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neuroprostheses show great potential for alleviating major sensory deficits. It is not known, however, whether such devices can augment the subject's normal perceptual range. Here we show that adult rats can learn to perceive otherwise invisible infrared light through a neuroprosthesis that couples the output of a head-mounted infrared sensor to their somatosensory cortex (S1) via intracortical microstimulation. Rats readily learn to use this new information source, and generate active exploratory strategies to discriminate among infrared signals in their environment. S1 neurons in these infrared-perceiving rats respond to both whisker deflection and intracortical microstimulation, suggesting that the infrared representation does not displace the original tactile representation. Hence, sensory cortical prostheses, in addition to restoring normal neurological functions, may serve to expand natural perceptual capabilities in mammals. PMID:23403583

  1. Subarachnoid haemorrhage as the initial manifestation of cortical venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Sahu, Ritesh; Lalla, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal rupture is the commonest cause of non-traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). SAH can rarely be the manifestation of cortical venous thrombosis (CVT). CVT is potentially lethal but treatable disorder with positive outcome if timely treatment is instituted. The site of bleeding is mainly on convexities and sulcus with sparing of basal cisterns in SAH related to CVT. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of treatment, in spite of SAH complicated by CVT. In this submission, the author highlighted a case of SAH presented as initial manifestation of CVT in an elderly woman. Early therapy with anticoagulation led to complete clinical and radiological recovery in a short duration of 2 weeks. Thus, diagnosis of CVT should be kept in mind in unusual presentation of SAH. PMID:22914236

  2. Perceiving Invisible Light through a Somatosensory Cortical Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Eric E.; Carra, Rafael; Nicolelis, Miguel A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neuroprostheses show great potential for alleviating major sensory deficits. It is not known, however, whether such devices can augment the subject’s normal perceptual range. Here we show that adult rats can learn to perceive otherwise invisible infrared (IR) light through a neuroprosthesis that couples the output of a head-mounted IR sensor to their somatosensory cortex (S1) via intracortical microstimulation (ICMS). Rats readily learn to use this new information source, and generate active exploratory strategies to discriminate among IR sources in their environment. S1 neurons in these IR-perceiving rats respond to both whisker deflection and ICMS, suggesting that the IR representation does not displace the original tactile representation. Hence, sensory cortical prostheses, in addition to restoring normal neurological functions, may serve to expand natural perceptual capabilities in mammals. PMID:23403583

  3. Dual Roles for Spike Signaling in Cortical Neural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Dana H.; Jehee, Janneke F. M.

    2011-01-01

    A prominent feature of signaling in cortical neurons is that of randomness in the action potential. The output of a typical pyramidal cell can be well fit with a Poisson model, and variations in the Poisson rate repeatedly have been shown to be correlated with stimuli. However while the rate provides a very useful characterization of neural spike data, it may not be the most fundamental description of the signaling code. Recent data showing γ frequency range multi-cell action potential correlations, together with spike timing dependent plasticity, are spurring a re-examination of the classical model, since precise timing codes imply that the generation of spikes is essentially deterministic. Could the observed Poisson randomness and timing determinism reflect two separate modes of communication, or do they somehow derive from a single process? We investigate in a timing-based model whether the apparent incompatibility between these probabilistic and deterministic observations may be resolved by examining how spikes could be used in the underlying neural circuits. The crucial component of this model draws on dual roles for spike signaling. In learning receptive fields from ensembles of inputs, spikes need to behave probabilistically, whereas for fast signaling of individual stimuli, the spikes need to behave deterministically. Our simulations show that this combination is possible if deterministic signals using γ latency coding are probabilistically routed through different members of a cortical cell population at different times. This model exhibits standard features characteristic of Poisson models such as orientation tuning and exponential interval histograms. In addition, it makes testable predictions that follow from the γ latency coding. PMID:21687798

  4. Movement-related parameters modulate cortical activity during imaginary isometric plantar-flexions.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Omar Feix; Nielsen, Kim Dremstrup; Voigt, Michael

    2006-05-01

    A multitude of studies have demonstrated a clear activation of the motor cortex during imagination of various motor tasks; however, it is still unclear if movement-related parameters (movement direction, range of motion, speed, force level and rate of force development) specifically modulate cortical activation as they do during the execution of actual motor tasks. Accordingly, this study examined whether the rate of torque development (RTD) and/or the torque amplitude modulates cortical potentials generated during imaginary motor tasks. Fifteen subjects imagined four different left-sided isometric plantar-flexion tasks, while EEG and EMG recordings were being performed. The averaged EEG activity was analyzed in terms of movement-related potentials (MRPs), consisting of readiness potential (RP), motor potential (MP) and movement-monitoring potential (MMP). It was demonstrated that RTD and torque amplitude indeed modulate cortica