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Sample records for pre-transplant serum ferritin

  1. Iron and ADHD: Time to Move beyond Serum Ferritin Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donfrancesco, Renato; Parisi, Pasquale; Vanacore, Nicola; Martines, Francesca; Sargentini, Vittorio; Cortese, Samuele

    2013-01-01

    Objective: (a) To compare serum ferritin levels in a sample of stimulant-naive children with ADHD and matched controls and (b) to assess the association of serum ferritin to ADHD symptoms severity, ADHD subtypes, and IQ. Method: The ADHD and the control groups included 101 and 93 children, respectively. Serum ferritin levels were determined with…

  2. Increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin and hemosiderin iron determined by serum ferritin kinetics.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hisao; Tomita, Akihiro; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Maeda, Hideaki; Naoe, Tomoki

    2013-08-01

    We attempted to clarify the mechanism of the storage iron metabolism. A new program of serum ferritin kinetics was applied for studying the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin and hemosiderin iron in iron addition and removal in patients with a normal level of iron stores or iron overload. The change of ferritin iron in response to iron addition and removal was rapid in the initial stage, but it was slow later. In contrast, the change of hemosiderin iron was slow in the initial stage, but it became rapid later. These changes of ferritin and hemosiderin iron suggest that the turnover of ferritin iron is preferential to that of hemosiderin iron, and that the initially existed ferritin iron is gradually replaced by the ferritin iron recovered by taking iron from hemosiderin in iron mobilization. The crossing of the increasing curves of ferritin and hemosiderin iron in iron addition indicates a switching of the principal storage iron from ferritin to hemosiderin. The crossing point shifted toward a higher storage iron level in the increase of iron deposition. Iron storing capacity can be increased not only by the transformation of ferritin into hemosiderin, but also by the expansion of cell space as seen by hepatomegaly in hereditary hemochromatosis. The amounts of hemosiderin iron exceeded ferritin iron in all 10 patients with chronic hepatitis C even though they had normal storage iron levels. This suggests it is difficult to store iron in the form of ferritin in chronic hepatitis C. PMID:24640177

  3. Association between Pre-Transplant Serum Malondialdehyde Levels and Survival One Year after Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Sergio T.; Sanz, Pablo; Abreu-González, Pedro; Díaz, Dácil; Moreno, Antonia M.; Borja, Elisa; Martín, María M.; Jiménez, Alejandro; Barrera, Manuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have found higher levels of serum malondialdehyde (MDA) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients compared to healthy controls and higher MDA concentrations in tumoral tissue of HCC patients than in non-tumoral tissue. However, the association between pre-transplant serum levels of MDA and survival in HCC patients after liver transplantation (LT) has not been described, and the aim of the present study was to determine whether such an association exists. In this observational study we measured serum MDA levels in 127 patients before LT. We found higher pre-LT serum MDA levels in 15 non-surviving than in 112 surviving patients one year after LT (p = 0.02). Exact binary logistic regression analysis revealed that pre-LT serum levels of MDA over 3.37 nmol/mL were associated with mortality after one year of LT (Odds ratio = 5.38; 95% confidence interval (CI) = from 1.580 to infinite; p = 0.007) adjusting for age of the deceased donor. The main finding of our study was that there is an association between serum MDA levels before LT for HCC and 1-year survival after LT. PMID:27058525

  4. The association between serum ferritin with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhe; Chen, Ji-Wei; Feng, Jian-Hua; Shen, Fei; Cai, Wen-Song; Cao, Jie; Xu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    There are conflicting reports on the correlation between serum levels of ferritin with colorectal cancer. The purpose of the present study is to clarify the association between serum ferritin with colorectal cancer using a meta-analysis approach. We searched articles indexed in Pubmed published as of July 2015 that met our predefined criteria. Six eligible articles involving 927 subjects were identified. Overall, pooled analysis indicated that subjects with colorectal cancer had lower serum level of ferritin than the healthy controls (SMD=-1.569, 95% CI=[-2.718, -0.420], P= 0.007). Further subgroup analysis found lower serum level of ferritin among patients with colorectal cancer in eastern country (SMD=-1.956, 95% CI=[-3.750, -0.162], P=0.033), but not in western country (SMD=-1.285, 95% CI=[-2.778, 0.207], P=0.091). In conclusion, this meta-analysis supports a significant association between serum ferritin with colorectal cancer. However, the subgroup analysis found that there was significant effect modification of ferritin level by ethnic. Thus this finding needs further confirmation by trans-regional multicenter, long-term observation in a cohort design to obtain better understanding of causal relationships between serum ferrintin levels and colorectal cancer, through measuring ferritin at baseline to investigate whether the highest ferritin category versus lowest is associated with colorectal cancer risk. PMID:26885206

  5. Erythropoiesis: Short Report: Translation of Analysis Results between Serum Ferritin Assays, Ferritin RIA AmershamTM and Abbott AxSYMTM Ferritin.

    PubMed

    Milman, NILS; Byg, KELD-ERIK; Juul-Jørgensen, BIRGIT; Weis Bentzon, MICHAEL

    1999-01-01

    The serum ferritin assays, Ferritin RIA Amersham(TM) and Abbott AxSYM(TM) Ferritin were compared in order to translate values from one assay to the other. Serum ferritin was analysed with both assays in 102 samples. Logarithmic transformation of the results was performed in order to stabilize the variance. The relationship between the untransformed values was most exactly expressed by a proportionality: AxSYM Ferritin = 0.873 * RIA Ferritin. Due to this proportionality, the numerical difference between the assays increases with the ferritin concentration, although the percentage difference between the assays remains constant. PMID:11399562

  6. Relationship between Serum Ferritin Levels and Dyslipidemia in Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Eun; Roh, Yong-Kyun; Ju, Sang-Yhun; Yoon, Yeo-Joon; Nam, Ga-Eun; Nam, Hyo-Yun; Choi, Jun-Seok; Lee, Jong-Eun; Sang, Jung-Eun; Han, Kyungdo

    2016-01-01

    Background Ferritin is associated with various cardiometabolic risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, and insulin resistance in adults. We aimed to study the association between serum ferritin levels and dyslipidemia in adolescents, because dyslipidemia is considered an important modifiable cardiovascular risk factor in the young. Methods We analyzed 1,879 subjects (1,026 boys and 853 girls) from the 2009–2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV. Subjects were categorized into quartiles according to their lipid parameters, which were classified according to age and gender. Those in the highest quartile groups for total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglyceride concentrations were diagnosed as having dyslipidemia. Those in the lowest quartile for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) values were diagnosed with abnormal levels. Results In boys, total cholesterol, LDL-C, and triglyceride concentrations were significantly correlated with serum ferritin levels. In both boys and girls, serum ferritin levels were negatively associated with HDL-C values, even after adjusting for all covariates. Furthermore, there was no significant correlation between serum ferritin levels and total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride concentrations in girls. Conclusion Serum ferritin levels were significantly associated with major dyslipidemia parameters, more prominently in boys than in girls, and this association represents a cardiometabolic risk factor. PMID:27070153

  7. [Approach to the Patient with Elevated Serum Ferritin].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Florentine; Krayenbühl, Pierre-Alexandre; Goede, Jeroen; Nowak, Albina

    2016-05-11

    An increase of the serum ferritin may appear as an incidental finding in asymptomatic patients in the routine laboratory examination. On the one hand, ferritin reflects the iron stores of the body and can therefore indicate an iron overload of various causes. On the other hand, it is an acute phase protein and thus increases in inflammatory and malignant diseases. We aim to describe an approach to the incidental finding hyperferritinemia with possible evaluation strategy and to explain the most important differential diagnoses. PMID:27167475

  8. Serum ferritin and paraoxonase-1 in canine leishmaniosis.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Subiela, S; Cerón, J J; Strauss-Ayali, D; Garcia-Martinez, J D; Tecles, F; Tvarijonaviciute, A; Caldin, M; Baneth, G

    2014-01-01

    Ferritin and paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) were measured in dogs experimentally infected by Leishmania infantum (during experimental infection and following treatment) and also in naturally-infected dogs which presented different degrees of proteinuria. Experimentally-infected dogs were monitored for 7 months post-infection, then treated for 3 months with allopurinol, and their response to therapy was followed for 11 additional months. Naturally-infected dogs were staged based on the urine protein/creatinine (UPC) ratio into three groups as follows: group 1 (non-proteinuric; UPC ratio: <0.2), group 2 (borderline proteinuric; UPC ratio: 0.2-0.5) and group 3 (proteinuric; UPC ratio>0.5). An increase in serum ferritin values and a decrease in PON-1 activity were observed 2 months after infection. Both analytes returned to preinfection values following treatment. Significantly higher concentrations of ferritin were observed in dogs classified as either borderline or proteinuric when compared with non-proteinuric dogs whereas serum PON-1 activity was decreased only in proteinuric dogs. PMID:24268430

  9. [Evaluation of Basic Performance of "Point Strip ferritin-3000" for Simple and Rapid Quantification of Serum Ferritin].

    PubMed

    Shibusa, Kotoe; Hatayama, Mayumi; Toki, Yasumichi; Yamamoto, Masayo; Ito, Satoshi; Shindo, Motohiro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Niizeki, Noriyasu; Tomoda, Yutaka; Kawai, Yuichi; Addo, Lynda; Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-12-01

    Serum ferritin is an excellent marker for total iron content in the body and is essential for the diagnosis of iron deficiency or iron overload. Recently, a simple and rapid method, which utilizes immunochromatography for the quantification of serum ferritin, was developed. However, the range of measurement in previous reagents was limited (10-500 ng/mL). This range is rather narrow and is not fully helpful for the diagnosis of iron overload which sometimes occurs as a result of prolonged transfusions, or for monitoring iron contents during iron chelation therapy against iron overload. In the present study we evaluated the basic performance of the newly developed "Point Strip ferritin-3000", which can measure serum ferritin in the range of 300-3,000 ng/mL. Coefficient of variation (CV) s of within and inter-day assays were in the ranges of 7.3-11.1% and 2.1-5.2%, respectively. Using 87 serum samples obtained from the patients with written informed consents, the correlation coefficient was calculated to be 0.93 compared to the control method. In addition, the quantification of serum ferritin by "Point Strip ferritin-3000" was not influenced by bilirubin, hemoglobin, chyle, rheumatoid factor, or ascorbic acid. From our data, "Point Strip ferritin-3000" is reliable reagent in the range of 300-3,000 ng/mL, and is therefore considered to be useful for the diagnosis of iron overload, as well as for monitoring iron contents during iron chelation therapy. In addition, this quantification method can be easily performed using a small desktop equipment without any special technique, making this system applicable for epidemiological surveys and clinical studies. PMID:27089653

  10. Transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin assayed by serum ferritin kinetics in patients with normal iron stores and iron overload.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hisao

    2015-11-01

    Ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron, total iron stores and transformation rate were determined by serum ferritin kinetics. The transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin is motivated by the potential difference between them. The transformer determines transformation rate according to the potential difference in iron mobilization and deposition. The correlations between transformation rate and iron stores were studied in 11 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), 1 patent with treated iron deficiency anemia (TIDA), 9 patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) and 4 patients with transfusion-dependent anemia (TD). The power regression curve of approximation showed an inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron in part and total iron stores in HH. Such an inverse correlation between transformation rate and iron stores implies that the larger the amount of iron stores, the smaller the transformation of iron stores. On the other hand, a minimal inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron and no correlation between transformation rate and hemosiderin iron or total iron stores in CHC indicate the derangement of storage iron metabolism in the cells with CHC. Radio-iron fixation on the iron storing tissue in iron overload was larger than that in normal subjects by ferrokinetics. This is consistent with the inverse correlation between transformation rate and total iron stores in HH. The characteristics of iron turnover between ferritin and hemosiderin were disclosed from the correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron or total iron stores. PMID:26663936

  11. Ferritin blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Serum ferritin level ... amount of ferritin in the blood (serum ferritin level) is directly related to the amount of iron ... to 150 ng/mL The lower the ferritin level, even within the "normal" range, the more likely ...

  12. Bilateral cataract and high serum ferritin: a new dominant genetic disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Dominique; Winter-Fuseau, Isabelle; Loiseau, Marie-Noëlle; Amati, Patrizia; Berthier, Michel; Oriot, Denis; Beaumont, Carole

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports the cosegregation in a three generation pedigree of dominantly inherited cataract with an abnormally high level of serum ferritin. In this family, circulating L ferritin was raised in all subjects affected by cataract independently of iron overload. We suggest that a disorder of ferritin metabolism could be a new genetic disorder leading to lens opacity. Cataract-hyperferritaemia syndrome could also be a new contiguous gene syndrome involving the L ferritin gene and the gene coding for the lens membrane protein (MP19), which both map to the same region of chromosome 19q. PMID:8558554

  13. Serum Ferritin as a Predictor of Host Response to Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustbader, Edward D.; Hann, Hie-Won L.; Blumberg, Baruch S.

    1983-04-01

    With hemodialysis patients, a high serum ferritin before there was serological evidence of hepatitis B virus infection increased the likelihood that the infection would be persistent. This finding suggested that hepatitis B virus is likely to infect and actively replicate in liver cells with the propensity for increased ferritin synthesis. The virus itself could stimulate the synthesis of ferritin in a cyclic positive feedback mechanism that increases intracellular ferritin concentration and, eventually, intracellular iron. Transformed liver cells have low iron content, do not replicate hepatitis B virus, and require iron for growth. Infected, nonmalignant liver cells could supply iron to the transformed cells and nourish their expansion.

  14. Quantitating Iron in Serum Ferritin by Use of ICP-MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Gillman, Patricia L.

    2003-01-01

    A laboratory method has been devised to enable measurement of the concentration of iron bound in ferritin from small samples of blood (serum). Derived partly from a prior method that depends on large samples of blood, this method involves the use of an inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Ferritin is a complex of iron with the protein apoferritin. Heretofore, measurements of the concentration of serum ferritin (as distinguished from direct measurements of the concentration of iron in serum ferritin) have been used to assess iron stores in humans. Low levels of serum ferritin could indicate the first stage of iron depletion. High levels of serum ferritin could indicate high levels of iron (for example, in connection with hereditary hemochromatosis an iron-overload illness that is characterized by progressive organ damage and can be fatal). However, the picture is complicated: A high level of serum ferritin could also indicate stress and/or inflammation instead of (or in addition to) iron overload, and low serum iron concentration could indicate inflammation rather than iron deficiency. Only when concentrations of both serum iron and serum ferritin increase and decrease together can the patient s iron status be assessed accurately. Hence, in enabling accurate measurement of the iron content of serum ferritin, the present method can improve the diagnosis of the patient s iron status. The prior method of measuring the concentration of iron involves the use of an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer with a graphite furnace. The present method incorporates a modified version of the sample- preparation process of the prior method. First, ferritin is isolated; more specifically, it is immobilized by immunoprecipitation with rabbit antihuman polyclonal antibody bound to agarose beads. The ferritin is then separated from other iron-containing proteins and free iron by a series of centrifugation and wash steps. Next, the ferritin is digested with nitric acid

  15. Serum ferritin levels are associated with arterial stiffness in healthy Korean adults.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ji Yoon; Kim, Min Kyung; Kang, Shinae; Nam, Ji Sun; Ahn, Chul Woo; Kim, Kyung Rae; Park, Jong Suk

    2016-08-01

    Although an association between serum ferritin and atherosclerosis has been suggested, limited epidemiologic data are available regarding the association between ferritin and arterial stiffness in healthy adults. A total of 2932 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. Anthropometric and biochemical profiles including ferritin were measured. The arterial stiffness was measured using brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Serum ferritin levels were classified into quartiles and baPWV values gradually increased with each ferritin quartile. Multiple regression analysis showed that ferritin levels were independently correlated with baPWV. After adjusting for multiple risk factors, as compared with the lowest quartile, the odds ratios for high baPWV (>75(th) percentile) were 1.15 (0.84-1.56), 1.37 (0.97-1.73), and 1.46 (1.29-2.17) among men (p for trend < 0.05) and 1.24 (0.87-1.79), 1.53 (1.09-2.16), and 1.80 (1.25-2.82) among women (p for trend < 0.05), for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of ferritin, respectively. In conclusion, serum ferritin levels are independently associated with arterial stiffness in healthy Korean adults. PMID:26926288

  16. Serum ferritin concentrations and body iron stores in a multicenter, multiethnic primary-care population

    PubMed Central

    Gordeuk, Victor R.; Reboussin, David M.; McLaren, Christine E.; Barton, James C.; Acton, Ronald T.; McLaren, Gordon D.; Harris, Emily L.; Reiss, Jacob A.; Adams, Paul C.; Speechley, Mark; Phatak, Pradyumna D.; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Eckfeldt, John H.; Chen, Wen-Pin; Passmore, Leah; Dawkins, Fitzroy W.

    2013-01-01

    How often elevated serum ferritin in primary-care patients reflects increased iron stores (normally 0.8 g in men, 0.4 g in women) is not known. The Hereditary Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) study screened 101,168 primary-care participants (44% Caucasians, 27% African-Americans, 14% Asians/Pacific Islanders, 13% Hispanics, 2% others). Follow-up clinical evaluation was performed in 302 of 333 HFE C282Y homozygotes regardless of iron measures and 1,375 of 1,920 nonhomozygotes with serum ferritin >300 μg/L (men), >200 μg/L (women) and transferrin saturation >50% (men), >45% (women). Quantitative phlebotomy was conducted in 122 of 175 C282Y homozygotes and 122 of 1,102 nonhomozygotes with non-transfusional serum ferritin elevation at evaluation. The estimated prevalence in the Caucasian population of C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 μg/L at evaluation was 20 per 10,000 men and 4 per 10,000 women; this constellation was predictive of iron stores >4 g in men and >2 g in women. The estimated prevalence per 10,000 of non-C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 μg/L at evaluation was 7 among Caucasians, 13 among Hispanics, 20 among African Americans, and 38 among Asians and Pacific Islanders, and this constellation was predictive of iron stores >2 g but <4 g. In conclusion, serum ferritin >900 μg/L after initial elevations of both serum ferritin and transferrin saturation is predictive of mildly increased iron stores in multiple ethnic populations regardless of HFE genotype. Serum ferritin >900 μg/L in male C282Y homozygotes is predictive of moderately increased iron stores. PMID:18429050

  17. Serum ferritin concentrations and body iron stores in a multicenter, multiethnic primary-care population.

    PubMed

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Reboussin, David M; McLaren, Christine E; Barton, James C; Acton, Ronald T; McLaren, Gordon D; Harris, Emily L; Reiss, Jacob A; Adams, Paul C; Speechley, Mark; Phatak, Pradyumna D; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Eckfeldt, John H; Chen, Wen-Pin; Passmore, Leah; Dawkins, Fitzroy W

    2008-08-01

    How often elevated serum ferritin in primary-care patients reflects increased iron stores (normally 0.8 g in men, 0.4 g in women) is not known. The Hereditary Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) study screened 101,168 primary-care participants (44% Caucasians, 27% African-Americans, 14% Asians/Pacific Islanders, 13% Hispanics, 2% others). Follow-up clinical evaluation was performed in 302 of 333 HFE C282Y homozygotes regardless of iron measures and 1,375 of 1,920 nonhomozygotes with serum ferritin >300 microg/L (men), >200 microg/L (women) and transferrin saturation >50% (men), >45% (women). Quantitative phlebotomy was conducted in 122 of 175 C282Y homozygotes and 122 of 1,102 nonhomozygotes with non-transfusional serum ferritin elevation at evaluation. The estimated prevalence in the Caucasian population of C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 microg/L at evaluation was 20 per 10,000 men and 4 per 10,000 women; this constellation was predictive of iron stores >4 g in men and >2 g in women. The estimated prevalence per 10,000 of non-C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 microg/L at evaluation was 7 among Caucasians, 13 among Hispanics, 20 among African Americans, and 38 among Asians and Pacific Islanders, and this constellation was predictive of iron stores >2 g but <4 g. In conclusion, serum ferritin >900 microg/L after initial elevations of both serum ferritin and transferrin saturation is predictive of mildly increased iron stores in multiple ethnic populations regardless of HFE genotype. Serum ferritin >900 microg/L in male C282Y homozygotes is predictive of moderately increased iron stores. PMID:18429050

  18. Is the serum ferritin level a considerable predictor for hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Mehrpour, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hemorrhagic Transformation (HT) of Ischemic Stroke (IS) is a detrimental complication. This study investigated the association between serum ferritin level and HT in patients with massive IS of middle cerebral artery. Methods: Thirty patients with massive IS of middle cerebral artery were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. They were divided into two groups based on the serum ferritin level, lower or greater than 164.1ng/ml at the first 24 hours after admission. To investigate the incidence of HT in the two groups, we observed them for two weeks. Results: During the two- week observation, the incidence of HT was two persons (13.3%) in the group with the serum ferritin level of lower than 164.1ng/ml, and eight persons (53.3%) in the other group. This difference was statistically significant between the two groups (p=0.02). The relative risk of HT was 4 (95% CI: 1.012- 15.8) in the patients with massive IS of middle cerebral artery and the serum ferritin level greater than 164.1ng/ml. Conclusion: This study revealed that the serum ferritin level greater than 164.1ng/ml in the first 24 hours after admission is a reasonably important predictor for HT of IS. Conducting studies on factors affecting the serum ferritin level are suggested. PMID:27493907

  19. Serum ferritin is an important inflammatory disease marker, as it is mainly a leakage product from damaged cells.

    PubMed

    Kell, Douglas B; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2014-04-01

    "Serum ferritin" presents a paradox, as the iron storage protein ferritin is not synthesised in serum yet is to be found there. Serum ferritin is also a well known inflammatory marker, but it is unclear whether serum ferritin reflects or causes inflammation, or whether it is involved in an inflammatory cycle. We argue here that serum ferritin arises from damaged cells, and is thus a marker of cellular damage. The protein in serum ferritin is considered benign, but it has lost (i.e. dumped) most of its normal complement of iron which when unliganded is highly toxic. The facts that serum ferritin levels can correlate with both disease and with body iron stores are thus expected on simple chemical kinetic grounds. Serum ferritin levels also correlate with other phenotypic readouts such as erythrocyte morphology. Overall, this systems approach serves to explain a number of apparent paradoxes of serum ferritin, including (i) why it correlates with biomarkers of cell damage, (ii) why it correlates with biomarkers of hydroxyl radical formation (and oxidative stress) and (iii) therefore why it correlates with the presence and/or severity of numerous diseases. This leads to suggestions for how one might exploit the corollaries of the recognition that serum ferritin levels mainly represent a consequence of cell stress and damage. PMID:24549403

  20. [Diagnosis of an increased serum level of ferritin].

    PubMed

    Lorcerie, B; Audia, S; Samson, M; Millière, A; Falvo, N; Leguy-Seguin, V; Berthier, S; Bonnotte, B

    2015-08-01

    The discovery of a hyperferritinemia is most of the time fortuitous. The diagnostic approach aims at looking for the responsible etiology and at verifying if an iron hepatic overload is present or not. Three diagnostic steps are proposed. The clinical elements and a few straightforward biological tests are sufficient at first to identify one of the four main causes: alcoholism, inflammatory syndrome, cytolysis, and metabolic syndrome. None of these causes is associated with a significant iron hepatic overload. If the transferring saturation coefficient is raised (>50%) a hereditary hemochromatosis should be discussed. Secondly, less common disorders will be discussed. Among these, only the chronic hematological disorders either acquired or congenital are at risk of iron hepatic overload. Thirdly, if a doubt persists in the etiologic research, and the serum ferritin level is very high or continues to rise, it is essential to verify that there is no iron hepatic overload. For that purpose, the MRI with study of the iron overload is the main test, which will guide the therapeutic attitude. Identification of more than a single etiology occurs in more than 40% of the cases. PMID:25640247

  1. A combination of serum iron, ferritin and transferrin predicts outcome in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Hu, Rong; Zhang, Chao; Qian, Christopher; Luo, Qian-Qian; Yung, Wing-Ho; Ke, Ya; Feng, Hua; Qian, Zhong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Association of a high-serum ferritin with poor outcome showed that iron might play a detrimental role in the brain after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Here, we investigated changes in serum iron, ferritin, transferrin (Tf) and ceruloplasmin (CP) in patients with ICH (n = 100) at day 1 (admission), 3, 7, 14 and 21 and those in control subjects (n = 75). The hematoma and edema volumes were also determined in ICH-patients on admission and at day 3. The Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) of 59 patients was ≥3 (poor outcome) and 41 < 3 (good outcome) at day 90. Serum ferritin was significantly higher and serum iron and Tf markedly lower in patients with poor-outcome than the corresponding values in patients with good-outcome at day 1 to 7 and those in the controls. There was a significant positive correlation between serum ferritin and relative edema volume or ratio at day 1 and 3 and hematoma volume at day 1 (n = 28), and a negative correlation between serum iron or Tf and hematoma volume at day 1 (n = 100). We concluded that not only increased serum ferritin but also reduced serum iron and Tf are associated with outcome as well as hematoma volume. PMID:26898550

  2. Postmenopausal vegetarians' low serum ferritin level may reduce the risk for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Hyun; Bae, Yun Jung

    2012-10-01

    The present study was conducted to compare the serum ferritin status between the postmenopausal vegetarians and non-vegetarians and to identify the relation of serum ferritin with metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors in postmenopausal women. The two study groups consisted of postmenopausal vegetarians (n=59) who maintained a vegetarian diet for over 20 years and age-matched non-vegetarian controls (n=48). Anthropometric measurements, dietary intakes, serum metabolic syndrome-related parameters, and serum ferritin level between the two groups were compared. The vegetarians exhibited significantly lower weight (p<0.01), body mass index (BMI) (p<0.001), percentage of body fat (p<0.001), waist circumference (p<0.01), SBP (p<0.001), DBP (p<0.001), and fasting glucose (p<0.05). According to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP)-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for MetS applying Korean guidelines for waist circumference, the prevalence of MetS was lower in vegetarians (33.9 %) than in non-vegetarians (47.9 %). Vegetarians had significantly lower serum level of ferritin (p<0.01) than non-vegetarians. In the correlation analysis, serum ferritin was positively related to fasting glucose (r=0.264, p<0.01), triglycerides (r=0.232, p<0.05), and the NCEP score (r=0.214, p<0.05) and negatively related to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (r=-0.225, p<0.05) after adjusting for BMI, lifestyle, and dietary factors (animal protein, animal fat, and dietary fiber intake). In conclusion, postmenopausal vegetarians had lower MetS presence and a lower serum ferritin level compared to non-vegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians' low serum ferritin level may reduce the risk of MetS in postmenopausal women. PMID:22528775

  3. Impact of the serum ferritin concentration in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wakiya, Taiichi; Sanada, Yukihiro; Urahashi, Taizen; Ihara, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Naoya; Okada, Noriki; Hirata, Yuta; Hakamada, Kenichi; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Mizuta, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    The serum ferritin (SF) concentration is a widely available and objective laboratory parameter. SF is also widely recognized as an acute-phase reactant. The purpose of the present study was to identify the chronological changes in the recipient's SF concentration during liver transplantation (LT) and to clarify factors having an effect on the recipient's intraoperative SF level. In addition, the study retrospectively evaluated the usefulness of measuring SF during LT. Ninety-eight pediatric recipients were retrospectively analyzed. The data were analyzed and compared according to the SF level in the recipient. Patients were classified into 2 groups based on the intraoperative peak SF levels of ≤ 1000 ng/mL (low-SF group) or >1000 ng/mL (high-SF group). The SF value increased dramatically after reperfusion and fell to normal levels within the early postoperative period. The warm ischemia time (WIT) was significantly longer in the high-SF group (47.0 versus 58.5 minutes; P = 0.003). In addition, a significant positive correlation was observed between the peak SF value and WIT (r = 0.35; P < 0.001). There were significant positive correlations between the peak SF value and the donors' preoperative laboratory data, including transaminases, cholinesterase, hemoglobin, transferrin saturation, and SF, of which SF showed the strongest positive correlation (r = 0.74; P < 0.001). The multivariate analysis revealed that WIT and donor's SF level were a significant risk factor for high SF level in the recipient (P = 0.007 and 0.02, respectively). In conclusion, the SF measurement can suggest the degree of ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). A high SF level in the donor is associated with the risk of further acute reactions, such as IRI, in the recipient. PMID:26224663

  4. Quantification of ferritin bound iron in human serum using species-specific isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yao; Walczyk, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Ferritin is a hollow sphere protein composed of 24 subunits that can store up to 4500 iron atoms in its inner cavity. It is mainly found in the liver and spleen but also in serum at trace levels. Serum ferritin is considered as the best single indicator in assessing body iron stores except liver or bone marrow biopsy. However, it is confounded by other disease conditions. Ferritin bound iron (FBI) and ferritin saturation have been suggested as more robust biomarkers. The current techniques for FBI determination are limited by low antibody specificity, low instrument sensitivity and possible analyte losses during sample preparation. The need for a highly sensitive and reliable method is widely recognized. Here we describe a novel technique to detect serum FBI using species-specific isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SS-IDMS). [(57)Fe]-ferritin was produced by biosynthesis and in vitro labeling with the (57)Fe spike in the form of [(57)Fe]-citrate after cell lysis and heat treatment. [(57)Fe]-ferritin for sample spiking was further purified by fast liquid protein chromatography. Serum ferritin and added [(57)Fe]-ferritin were separated from other iron species by ultrafiltration followed by isotopic analysis of FBI using negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Repeatability of our assay is 8% with an absolute detection limit of 18 ng FBI in the sample. As compared to other speciation techniques, SS-IDMS offers maximum control over sample losses and species conversion during analysis. The described technique may therefore serve as a reference technique for clinical applications of FBI as a new biomarker for assessing body iron status. PMID:25008269

  5. Evaluation of Iron Store by Serum Ferritin in Healthy Blood Donors of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M M; Adnan, S D; Karim, S; Mamun, M A; Nandy, S; Faruki, M A; Islam, K

    2016-07-01

    Iron stores in the body exist primarily in the form of ferritin. Small amounts of ferritin secreted into the plasma and plasma ferritin is positively correlated with the size of the total body iron stores. The present study conducted to determine the iron status using the serum ferritin level among healthy Bangladeshi blood donors. The present cross sectional study was conducted in the Department of Transfusion Medicine, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2011 to June 2012. Blood donor signed informed consent and has satisfactory pre-donation health assessment and satisfactory post-donation blood test results were included in the study. Full blood counts were performed within 4 hours of collection using an automated haematology analyzer. Serum ferritin was measured using a validated enzyme immunoassay. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 (SPPS Incorporation, Chicago, IL, USA). P value <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Total 100 blood donors were included in the study, among them 88 were male and 12 were female. Mean±SD of the age of the respondents was 26.8±5.9 years with a range of 19 to 45 years. Mean±SD of heamoglobin level (gm/dl) and total count of Red Blood Cell (million/cmm) were 14.1±1.4 and 5.1±0.4 respectively. Mean±SD of serum ferritin level (ng/ml) was 96.4±69.0ng/ml with a range of 4.1ng/ml to 298.7ng/ml. Among the respondents 9.0% had depleted iron store, 7.0 reduced iron store and 84.0% had normal iron store. Among the respondents 5.0% had iron deficiency anaemia in term of serum ferritin level. Statistically significant difference of serum ferritin level observed between male and female and donors with and without history of previous blood donation. Among the healthy blood donors of Bangladesh abnormal serum ferritin is highly prevalent among blood donors specially among female. Monitoring of iron stores by serum ferritin seems justified in order to identify those with depleted iron stores who will

  6. Serum Ferritin Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome and Red Meat Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Felipe, Avila; Guadalupe, Echeverría; Druso, Pérez; Carlos, Martinez; Pablo, Strobel; Oscar, Castillo; Luis, Villaroel; Diego, Mezzano; Jaime, Rozowski; Inés, Urquiaga; Federico, Leighton

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims. Hyperferritinemia has been related with a wide spectrum of pathologies, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, and metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hyperferritinemia and iron consumption. Methods and Results. Serum ferritin concentration was evaluated in 66 presumed healthy men, along with other clinical and biochemical markers of chronic diseases. A three-day food questionnaire was applied for nutrition information. Hyperferritinemia was a condition found in 13.4% of the volunteers analyzed. Significant correlations were found between serum ferritin concentration and metabolic syndrome parameters (HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose) as well as an increase of the serum ferritin mean value with the number of risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Also, oxidative stress markers (carbonyl groups, AOPP, and glycated hemoglobin), hepatic damage markers (GGT, SGOT), and parameters related to insulin resistance (HOMA, blood insulin, and blood glucose) correlate significantly with serum ferritin. Volunteers had an excessive iron intake, principally by bread consumption. Analyses of food intake showed that red meat consumption correlates significantly with serum ferritin. Conclusion. Red meat consumption, metabolic syndrome, and chronic disease markers are associated with hyperferritinemia in a population of Chilean men. PMID:26451235

  7. Rate and predictors of low serum ferritin levels among healthy parturient women in Enugu, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Emegoakor, Fausta Chioma J; Iyoke, Chukwuemeka Anthony; Ezegwui, Hyginus Uzo; Ezugwu, Frank Okechukwu; Umeora, Odidika Ugochukwu; Ibeagha, Izuchukwu Obumneme

    2015-01-01

    Background Low serum ferritin levels signify low iron stores and this could predispose to iron deficiency anemia. Objective To determine the rate and predictors of low serum ferritin levels during the puerperium in Enugu, Southeast Nigeria. Study design A hospital-based prospective longitudinal study involving parturient women who delivered singleton fetuses at term. Venous blood samples were collected to determine the serum ferritin concentration at 48 hours and 6 weeks postpartum. Data analysis involved descriptive and inferential statistics at 95% confidence interval (CI) using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) computer software version 20.0. Results Two-hundred and two women who carried singleton pregnancies to term were studied. The mean serum ferritin levels at 48 hours and 6 weeks were 27.82±18.41 µg/L and 36.12±21.53 µg/L, respectively. Forty-eight hours postdelivery, 29.2% had low ferritin levels and this decreased to 12.4% at 6 weeks postpartum. There was a significant positive correlation between the serum ferritin level at 48 hours postdelivery and the serum ferritin level at 6 weeks postpartum (r=0.89, P<0.001). Predictors of the low ferritin level at 6 weeks included age <20 years (odds ratio [OR] =0.70, 95% CI =0.53, 0.93), multiparity (OR =63.7, 95% CI =3.18, 127.5), anemia at 48 hours postpartum (OR =61.7, 95% CI =13.27, 116.6), a low ferritin level at 48 hours (OR =78.1, 95% CI =8.8, 108.3), and intake of antenatal hematinics for <3 months (OR =0.04, 95% CI =0.01, 0.20). Conclusion There was a significant occurrence of low ferritin levels during the puerperium in the study centers, and this was associated mainly with pregnancy and delivery factors. Efforts to improve the iron stores in parturient women could benefit from early booking and compliance with antenatal hematinics and optimizing hemoglobin and iron levels before delivery. PMID:26425110

  8. Serum ferritin levels are associated with carotid atherosclerosis in Chinese postmenopausal women: the Shanghai Changfeng Study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Lin, Huandong; Hu, Yu; Li, Xiaoming; He, Wanyuan; Jin, Xuejuan; Gao, Jian; Zhao, Naiqing; Song, Binbin; Pan, Boshen; Gao, Xin

    2015-10-14

    Postmenopausal women are at increased risk of CVD: the increased serum ferritin level may be involved in the pathogenesis. The aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship of ferritin and carotid atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. A total of 1178 postmenopausal women (mean age, 60·8 years) were enrolled from the Changfeng Study. A standard interview, anthropometric measurements and laboratory analyses were performed for each participant. Bilateral CIMT (carotid intima-media thickness) were measured using ultrasonography, and the presence of carotid plaques was assessed. Serum ferritin was measured using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. The results showed that serum ferritin was 181·9 (sd 65·8) ng/ml in the postmenopausal women. Multivariate, linear, stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that age (standardised β = 0·233, P< 0·001), alanine transaminase (standardised β = 0·194, P< 0·001), log homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance (standardised β = 0·181, P< 0·001), TAG (standardised β = 0·083, P= 0·003), Hb (standardised β = 0·080, P= 0·004) and PPG (2-h glucose levels following a 75-g oral glucose challenge) (standardised β = 0·079, P= 0·004) were independently associated with serum ferritin. Compared with the ferritin level of subjects in the first quartile, that in the fourth quartile had greater CIMT, and higher prevalence of carotid plaque. After adjusting for conventional CVD risk factors, Hb, leucocytes, log urine albumin:creatinine ratio and liver function, the ferritin level of postmenopausal women in the fourth quartile had a 1·587-fold increased risk of carotid plaques relative to those in the lowest quartile. In conclusion, these results suggest that serum ferritin is independently and positively associated with carotid atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women and that ferritin may be implicated in atherosclerosis. PMID:26395322

  9. The Relationship between Serum Ferritin Levels and Insulin Resistance in Pre- and Postmenopausal Korean Women: KNHANES 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Chon, Seung Joo; Jung, Yeon Soo; Kim, Bo Ok; Noe, Eun Bee; Yun, Bo Hyon; Cho, SiHyun; Choi, Young Sik; Lee, Byung Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background Serum ferritin levels increase in postmenopausal women, and they are reported to be linked to major health problems. Here, we investigated the association between serum ferritin levels and insulin resistance (IR) in postmenopausal women. Methods A total of 6632 healthy Korean women (4357 premenopausal and 2275 postmenopausal) who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) in 2007–2010 were enrolled in the study. Serum ferritin values were divided into six groups for the premenopausal and postmenopausal groups. IR and obesity indices were evaluated according to the six serum ferritin groups. Statistical analysis was carried out using SAS software, version 9.2 (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC, USA). Results The association between the IR indices and ferritin groups had a higher level of statistical significance in the postmenopausal group than in the premenopausal group. In addition, for the postmenopausal group, the estimates increased significantly in the sixth ferritin group compared to those in the first ferritin group. However, the association between the obesity indices and ferritin levels was not significantly different between the premenopausal and postmenopausal groups. Conclusion Elevated serum ferritin levels were associated with an increased risk of insulin resistance in postmenopausal women. PMID:27337113

  10. Association of Serum Ferritin and Kidney Function with Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Il Hwan; Choi, Eun Young; Park, Joon-Sung; Lee, Chang Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin is considered to be a marker of the body’s iron stores and has a potential relationship with the systemic manifestations of inflammatory reactions. Data on the association between increased levels of serum ferritin and ocular problems are limited, particularly in relation to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Serum ferritin levels, as a possible clinical parameter for predicting AMD, were analyzed in anthropometric, biochemical, and ophthalmologic data from a nation-wide, population-based, case-control study (KNHNES IV and V). All native Koreans aged ≥ 20 years and who had no medical illness were eligible to participate. Among them, 2.9% had AMD, and its prevalence was found to increase in the higher ferritin quintile groups (Ptrend < 0.0001). In multiple linear regression analysis, serum ferritin level was closely related to conventional risk factors for AMD. Comparison of early AMD with a control group showed that serum ferritin levels were closely associated with AMD (OR = 1.004, 95% CI = 1.002–1.006), and further adjustment for age, gender, serum iron, and kidney function did not reduce this association (OR = 1.003, 95% CI = 1.001–1.006). Furthermore, the relationship between ferritin quintile and early AMD was dose-dependent. Thus, an increased level of serum ferritin in a healthy person may be a useful indicator of neurodegenerative change in the macula. A large population-based prospective clinical study is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27096155

  11. Association of Serum Ferritin and Kidney Function with Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the General Population.

    PubMed

    Oh, Il Hwan; Choi, Eun Young; Park, Joon-Sung; Lee, Chang Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin is considered to be a marker of the body's iron stores and has a potential relationship with the systemic manifestations of inflammatory reactions. Data on the association between increased levels of serum ferritin and ocular problems are limited, particularly in relation to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Serum ferritin levels, as a possible clinical parameter for predicting AMD, were analyzed in anthropometric, biochemical, and ophthalmologic data from a nation-wide, population-based, case-control study (KNHNES IV and V). All native Koreans aged ≥ 20 years and who had no medical illness were eligible to participate. Among them, 2.9% had AMD, and its prevalence was found to increase in the higher ferritin quintile groups (Ptrend < 0.0001). In multiple linear regression analysis, serum ferritin level was closely related to conventional risk factors for AMD. Comparison of early AMD with a control group showed that serum ferritin levels were closely associated with AMD (OR = 1.004, 95% CI = 1.002-1.006), and further adjustment for age, gender, serum iron, and kidney function did not reduce this association (OR = 1.003, 95% CI = 1.001-1.006). Furthermore, the relationship between ferritin quintile and early AMD was dose-dependent. Thus, an increased level of serum ferritin in a healthy person may be a useful indicator of neurodegenerative change in the macula. A large population-based prospective clinical study is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27096155

  12. Serum Ferritin Levels Are Positively Associated With Metabolically Obese Normal Weight: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Kim, Do Hoon; Roh, Yong Kyun; Ju, Sang Yhun; Nam, Hyo-Yun; Nam, Ga-Eun; Kim, Dong-Won; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Chung-Woo; Han, Kyungdo; Park, Yong-Gyu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between serum ferritin levels and metabolically obese normal weight (MONW) and to determine the appropriate cut-off value of serum ferritin for the prediction of clinical metabolic status in nonobese Korean adults. Data from 9411 participants in the fourth (2008) and fifth (2010) annual Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were used in this study. MONW was determined by combining National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, Wildman criteria, and homeostatic model assessment criteria for metabolic healthy obesity. The mean serum ferritin level was 103.5 ± 1.2 ng/mL in men and 45.5 ± 0.6 ng/mL in women. The estimated cutoff value of serum ferritin for the prediction of MONW was 127.03 ng/mL in men and 46.87 ng/mL in women. Both men and women who had higher serum ferritin levels than the cutoff value had a higher prevalence of MONW than those individuals who had lower serum ferritin levels than the cutoff value. In the final multivariable adjusted logistic regression model, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of MONW in the subjects who had higher serum ferritin levels than the cutoff value was 1.631 (1.312-2.028) in men and 1.298 (1-1.685) in women. In this study, serum ferritin levels were positively associated with MONW, and those subjects who had higher serum ferritin levels than the cutoff value had a higher prevalence and a higher adjusted odds ratio for MONW despite being nonobese. PMID:26717370

  13. The prognostic value of the serum ferritin in a southern Brazilian cohort of patients with Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Koppe, Tiago; Doneda, Divair; Siebert, Marina; Paskulin, Livia; Camargo, Matheus; Tirelli, Kristiane Michelin; Vairo, Filippo; Daudt, Liane; Schwartz, Ida Vanessa D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The clinical utility of serum ferritin as a biomarker of disease severity and prognosis in Gaucher disease (GD) is still debated. Here, we aimed to evaluate ferritin and its relation to clinicolaboratory parameters of GD patients seen at the Reference Center for Gaucher Disease of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, so as to gather evidence on the utility of ferritin as a biomarker of this condition. A retrospective chart review was performed collecting pre-and posttreatment data from GD patients. Eighteen patients with ferritin levels available before and after treatment were included in the study. Nine of these participants were males, and seventeen had type I GD. All patients were given either enzyme replacement (n = 16) or substrate reduction therapy (n = 2), and ferritin was found to decrease from 756 [318-1441] ng/mL at baseline to 521 [227-626] ng/mL (p=0.025) after 28.8 month soft treatment. Serum ferritin levels did not correlate with measures of disease severity, but showed an association with age at onset of treatment (ρ= 0.880; n = 18; p < 0.001). In conclusion, although serum ferritin did not correlate with disease severity, after a median 28.8 months of treatment, clinical outcomes had clearly improved, and ferritin levels had decreased. PMID:27007895

  14. Body iron and individual iron prophylaxis in pregnancy--should the iron dose be adjusted according to serum ferritin?

    PubMed

    Milman, Nils; Byg, Keld-Erik; Bergholt, Thomas; Eriksen, Lisbeth; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2006-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate iron prophylaxis in pregnant women from the individual aspect, i.e. according to serum ferritin levels at the beginning of pregnancy, and to assess which dose of iron would be adequate to prevent iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) during pregnancy and postpartum. A randomised, double-blind study comprising 301 healthy Danish pregnant women allocated into four groups taking ferrous iron (as fumarate) in doses of 20 mg (n=74), 40 mg (n=76), 60 mg (n=77) and 80 mg (n=75) from 18 weeks gestation (inclusion) to 8 weeks postpartum. Iron status markers [serum ferritin, serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), haemoglobin] were recorded at 18, 32 and 39 weeks gestation and 8 weeks postpartum. Body iron was calculated using the serum sTfR/serum ferritin ratio. ID was defined by serum ferritin <12 microg/l in pregnancy and <15 microg/l postpartum; IDA as serum ferritin <12 microg/l and haemoglobin <5th percentile in iron-replete pregnant women. Women in the iron supplement groups were stratified according to serum ferritin levels at inclusion; 50.7% had ferritin ferritin 30-70 microg/l and 11.6% ferritin >70 microg/l. At 32 weeks, women with ferritin ferritin >30 microg/l had an ID frequency of: 20-mg group 20.0%, 40 mg 13.9%, 60 mg 5.7%, 80 mg 5.1% (p<0.001). Women with ferritin >70 microg/l had no ID. Postpartum, ID was found in 4.7% in 20-mg group, 2.9% in group 40 mg and 0% in group 60 and 80 mg. IDA: At 32 weeks, women with ferritin ferritin >30 microg/l displayed IDA. Body iron at 18 weeks was 10.4 mg/kg, similar in the four iron groups. Later in pregnancy body iron declined significantly, being lower the 20 mg group, and similar in the 40, 60 and 80-mg groups. Postpartum

  15. The Association between the Levels of Serum Ferritin and Sex Hormones in a Large Scale of Chinese Male Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiying; Gao, Yong; Tan, Aihua; Zhang, Shijun; Xiao, Qiang; Zhang, Bing; Huang, Lulu; Ye, Bingbing; Qin, Xue; Wu, Chunlei; Lu, Zheng; Zhang, Youjie; Liao, Ming; Yang, Xiaobo; Mo, Zengnan

    2013-01-01

    Background The ferritin is an important participant of iron-storage but its regulation and related factors were not well defined. The present objective was to explore the potential association between serum ferritin levels and sex hormones. Methods 1999 Chinese men in the Fangchenggang Area Male Health and Examination Survey (FAMHES) were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Levels of serum ferritin, total testosterone (free testosterone was calculated from the total one), estradiol and sex hormone-binding protein were detected in venous blood samples. The effects of age, BMI, smoking as well as alcohol consumption were analyzed on ferritin levels, respectively, and then the Pearson’s correlation analysis was used to evaluate the association between ferritin levels and sex hormones adjusting for the above factors. Results The age, BMI and alcohol consumption significantly affected serum ferritin levels, but there was no significant difference between smokers and nonsmokers. Ferritin levels were significantly and negatively associated with total testosterone (R = −0.205, P< 0.001), sex hormone-binding protein (R = −0.161, P<0.001) and free testosterone (R = −0.097, P<0.001). After age and alcohol consumption were adjusted, the above associations were still significant (R = −0.200, −0.181 and −0.083, respectively, all P<0.001). However, there was only borderline negative association between ferritin levels and estradiol (adjusted R = −0.039, P = 0.083). Conclusion The large scale of epidemic results showed the significantly negative associations between serum ferritin levels and sex hormones, which may provide more clues to explore the potential regulation and biological mechanism of ferritin. PMID:24146788

  16. IV iron use in patients with higher serum ferritin: case study on anemia in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Larson, Kristin

    2008-01-01

    Anemia management practices in patients on hemodialysis that incorporate a balanced approach to erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) and intravenous (IV) iron therapy, use the lowest effective dose of ESA, and provide IV iron therapy in patients with higher serum ferritin levels have become important treatment considerations. This case study, followed by an indepth discussion, addresses these issues and helps to identify safe and effective treatment strategies to assist nurses in improving patient outcomes. PMID:18472686

  17. Serum Ferritin as a Prognostic Biomarker for Survival in Relapsed or Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sookyung; Song, Anna; Eo, Wankyu

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the prognostic impact of serum ferritin for survival in patients with relapsed or refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: This retrospective cohort study reviewed clinicopathological characteristics and laboratory biomarkers in 120 mCRC patients being treated with Korean Medicine (KM). The overall survival (OS) of patients was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and statistical significance was assessed using the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses of Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the prognostic impact for survival in relapsed or refractory mCRC patients. Results: Of the patients, 62.5% had liver metastases, 74.1% underwent greater than second-line chemotherapy, and 80.8% underwent surgery. Median OS was 7.6 months for all patients after the initiation of KM treatment, which was begun 13.7 months, on average, after mCRC diagnosis. Concerning prognostic factors such as the presence of liver metastasis (p = 0.024), high carcinoembryonic antigen level (CEA > 5 ng/mL, p = 0.044), elevated C-reactive protein (CRP ≥ 10.0 mg/L, p = 0.000), high absolute monocyte count (AMC > 413.3 cells/μL, p = 0.034), elevated serum ferritin (ferritin ≥ 150 ng/mL, p = 0.002), low hemoglobin level (Hb < 12 g/dL, p = 0.026) and low albumin (albumin < 3.5 g/dL, p = 0.003) were associated with increased hazard ratios and poor survival. According to the multivariate proportional hazards model with backward and forward manners, albumin (albumin < 3.5 g/dL; hazard ratio (HR) 2.218, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.135 - 3.990, p = 0.019), CRP (CRP ≥ 10.0 mg/L; HR 2.506, 95% CI 1.644 - 3.822, p = 0.000), CEA (CEA > 5 ng/mL; HR 2.040, 95% CI 1.203 - 3.460, p = 0.008), and serum ferritin (ferritin ≥ 150 ng/mL; HR 1.763, 95% CI 1.169 - 2.660, p = 0.007) were independent prognostic biomarkers of survival in mCRC patients. Conclusions: These results indicate that serum ferritin acts as an

  18. Impact of pretransplant serum ferritin level on risk of invasive mold infection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dadwal, Sanjeet S; Tegtmeier, Bernard; Liu, Xueli; Frankel, Paul; Ito, James; Forman, Stephen J; Pullarkat, Vinod

    2015-03-01

    Invasive mold infections (IMI) are life-threatening complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and are mostly caused by Aspergillus species and Mucorales. We examined whether elevated serum ferritin prior to HSCT was associated with increased risk of IMI after allogeneic HSCT. Elevated serum ferritin was defined as values ≥ 1000 ng/mL. Pretransplant ferritin levels were available for 477 transplants. Nine developed IMI at day 30 and 21 had IMI at day 100 for a cumulative incidence of 1.9% and 4.4%, respectively. Among the high ferritin group, eight of 220 transplant cases (3.6%) developed an IMI within 30 d after HSCT compared with one of 257 (0.4%) in the low ferritin group (P = 0.01). Fourteen of 220 (6.4%) and seven of 257 transplant cases (2.7%) in the high and low ferritin groups, respectively, had developed an IMI by day 100 after HSCT (P = 0.07). Nine of 53 (17%) patients with grades III and IV acute GVHD and iron overload experienced IMI, when compared to three of 37 (8.1%) with high-grade aGVHD, but no iron overload. Among patients without aGVHD, those with elevated ferritin had a 2.7% incidence of IMI compared with 0.9% for patients without elevated ferritin. There was a marginally significant difference in cumulative incidence function between high and low ferritin groups for IMI (P = 0.06). However, elevated serum ferritin (≥ 1000 ng/mL) was not a significant risk factor for IMI in a multivariate competing risk regression model after adjusting for aGVHD. PMID:25082161

  19. Serum ferritin in Danes: studies of iron status from infancy to old age, during blood donation and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Milman, N

    1996-02-01

    Iron status and body iron reserves were examined in a broad spectrum of the Danish population, and sex- and age-related changes determined. Serum ferritin concentration was employed as an indicator of mobilizable body iron stores. The relationship between serum ferritin and histochemical assessment of stainable bone marrow haemosiderin iron was examined in healthy individuals, defining threshold values for serum ferritin indicating exhausted, small, normal, ample, and increased iron stores. The populations examined comprised 7241 randomly selected normal individuals with an age distribution ranging from newborn to 85 years old. The influence of factors having a significant impact on iron balance, e.g., menstruation, pregnancy, parity, and blood donation, was analysed separately. Newborns had high cord serum ferritin levels, which were to a certain extent dependent on the mother's iron status. Newborns of mothers taking iron supplementation during pregnancy had higher cord serum ferritin than newborns of mothers taking a placebo. In children, the serum ferritin level was relatively constant from 3 years of age until adolescence, where the prevalence of exhausted iron stores was 13% in boys and 18% in girls. In postadolescent men, there was a gradual increase in serum ferritin levels until 30 years of age. Subsequently, serum ferritin remained relatively constant until old age. Among 30- to 70-year-old men, 9.4% had ample iron stores. The prevalence of depleted iron stores was 1.4%, and of iron deficiency anaemia 0.24%. In women, serum ferritin levels remained low from adolescence until the menopause. Among 30- to 50-year-old premenopausal women, the prevalence of ample iron stores was 0.49%, whereas 18% had exhausted iron reserves and 2.6% had iron deficiency anaemia. After menopause, serum ferritin gradually rose and approached male levels. Among 60- to 70-year-old postmenopausal women, 3.0% had ample iron stores, 2.3% had depleted stores and none had iron

  20. Effect of ascorbic acid deficiency on serum ferritin concentration in patients with beta-thalassaemia major and iron overload.

    PubMed

    Chapman, R W; Hussain, M A; Gorman, A; Laulicht, M; Politis, D; Flynn, D M; Sherlock, S; Hoffbrand, A V

    1982-05-01

    The incidence of ascorbic acid (AA) deficiency and its effect on serum ferritin concentration relative to body iron stores was studied in 61 unchelated patients with beta-thalassaemia major. Thirty-nine (64%) of patients had subnormal leucocyte ascorbate concentrations without clinical evidence of scurvy. The lowest leucocyte ascorbate concentrations tended to occur in the most transfused patients. No correlation was found between the units transfused and serum ferritin concentration in the AA-deficient patients but a close correlation (r = +0.82; p less than 0.005) existed for the AA-replete group. Similarly a close correlation (r = +0.77; p less than 0.005) was obtained between liver iron concentration and serum ferritin in AA-replete patients but only a weak correlation (r = +0.385; p less than 0.025) existed for the AA-deficient group. When AA-deficient patients were treated with ascorbic acid, serum iron and percentage saturation of iron binding capacity rose significantly; serum ferritin rose in 13 of 21 patients despite the simultaneous commencement of desferrioxamine therapy. In contrast all three measurements tended to fall in AA-replete patients with ascorbic acid and desferrioxamine therapy. Thus, AA deficiency is commonly present in beta-thalassaemia patients with iron overload and may give rise to inappropriate serum ferritin concentrations in relation to body iron stores. PMID:7085892

  1. Association of Serum Ferritin Level with Risk of Incident Abnormal Glucose Metabolism in Southwestern China: a Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fangli; Zhao, Zhuoxian; Tian, Li; Zheng, Tianpeng; Gao, Yun; Chen, Tao; Yan, Fangfang; Tian, Haoming

    2016-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aimed to analyze the association between serum ferritin levels and the risk of abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) in Southwestern Chinese population. The 383 subjects who are aged ≥20 years and free of AGM at baseline between in 2007 and in 2008 were included in Southwestern China, and their baseline serum ferritin levels were measured. Among these subjects, 140 subjects were developed into AGM during the follow-up (2008-2012). In logistic regression models, the relative risk in the top versus that in the lowest quartile of serum ferritin levels was 2.86 (p = 0.013) in females and 3.50 (p = 0.029) in males after adjusting the age, gender, family history of diabetes, current smoking, and alcohol; however, serum ferritin levels were not significantly associated with incident of AGM after controlling for metabolic factors (waist circumference, systolic pressure (SBP), triglyceride (TG), and homeostasis model assessment formula insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)). Elevated serum ferritin levels are associated with AGM but not an independent risk factor. PMID:26073512

  2. Dietary iron intake and serum ferritin concentration in 213 patients homozygous for the HFEC282Y hemochromatosis mutation

    PubMed Central

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Lovato, Laura; Barton, James C; Vitolins, Mara; McLaren, Gordon; Acton, Ronald T; McLaren, Christine; Harris, Emily L; Speechley, Mark; Eckfeldt, John H; Diaz, Sharmin; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Adams, Paul

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HFEC282Y homozygotes have an increased risk for developing increased iron stores and related disorders. It is controversial whether dietary iron restrictions should be recommended to such individuals. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether dietary iron content influences iron stores in HFEC282Y homozygotes as assessed by serum ferritin concentration. DESIGN: Serum ferritin concentration was measured and a dietary iron questionnaire was completed as part of the evaluation of 213 HFEC282Y homozygotes who were identified through screening of >100,000 primary care patients at five HEmochromatosis and IRon Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study Field Centers in the United States and Canada. RESULTS: No significant relationships between serum ferritin concentration and dietary heme iron content, dietary nonheme iron content or reports of supplemental iron use were found. CONCLUSION: These results do not support recommending dietary heme or nonheme iron restrictions for HFEC282Y homozygotes diagnosed through screening in North America. PMID:22720276

  3. Relationship Between Serum Hepcidin and Ferritin Levels in Patients With Thalassemia Major and Intermedia in Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Esmaeilzadeh, Masoomeh; Honar, Naser; Hassani, Fatemeh; Dehbozorgian, Javad; Rezaei, Narges; Abdollahi, Maryam; Bardestani, Marzieh; Safaei, Sanaz; Karimi, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepcidin is a key regulator of iron absorption in humans. It is mainly affected by hypoxia and iron stores. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the correlation between serum hepcidin and ferritin levels in patients with Thalassemia Major (TM) and Thalassemia Intermedia (TI). Patients and Methods: The current cross-sectional study investigated 88 randomly selected patients with Thalassemia, 48 TM and 40 TI, registered at the Thalassemia Clinic of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, a referral center for Thalassemia in Southern Iran in 2013. All patients with TI were receiving Hydroxyurea (HU) 10 - 15 mg/kg/day for at least 10 years. The serum hepcidin, ferritin levels, hemoglobin (Hb) and nucleated Red Blood Cell (RBC) of the two groups were measured. Results: No statistically significant correlation was observed between serum hepcidin and ferritin levels in any of the two groups of patients with TM (rs = 0.02, P = 0.892) or TI (rs = 0.055, P = 0.734). The median Interquartile Range (IQR) for serum hepcidin and ferritin levels were significantly higher in TM compared to TI group, (hepcidin: 87.6 (43.9) vs. 51.8 (23.4), P < 0.001; ferritin: 2208 (3761) vs. 465 (632), P < 0.001). Conclusions: There was insignificant correlation between serum hepcidin and ferritin levels in the two groups of patients with TM and TI. It seems that regulation of hepcidin in patients with Thalassemia is more affected by erythropoeitic activity than iron stores. Also, hepcidin levels were significantly higher in patients with TM than TI, possibly due to higher erythropoeitic activity in TI. In TI, it seems that low dose HU increases Hb levels and leads to transfusion-independence, but it is not high enough to suppress bone marrow activity and ineffective erythropoiesis. Consequently, serum hepcidin level decreases. PMID:26421179

  4. The Different Association between Serum Ferritin and Mortality in Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Patients Using Japanese Nationwide Dialysis Registry

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Yukio; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Yokoo, Takashi; Shigematsu, Takashi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Monitoring of serum ferritin levels is widely recommended in the management of anemia among patients on dialysis. However, associations between serum ferritin and mortality are unclear and there have been no investigations among patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). Methods Baseline data of 191,902 patients on dialysis (age, 65 ± 13 years; male, 61.1%; median dialysis duration, 62 months) were extracted from a nationwide dialysis registry in Japan at the end of 2007. Outcomes, such as one-year mortality, were then evaluated using the registry at the end of 2008. Results Within one year, a total of 15,284 (8.0%) patients had died, including 6,210 (3.2%) cardiovascular and 2,707 (1.4%) infection-related causes. Higher baseline serum ferritin levels were associated with higher mortality rates among patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). In contrast, there were no clear associations between serum ferritin levels and mortality among PD patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis of HD patients showed that those in the highest serum ferritin decile group had higher rates of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality than those in the lowest decile group (hazard ratio [HR], 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31–1.81 and HR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.13–1.84, respectively), whereas associations with infection-related mortality became non-significant (HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.79–1.65). Conclusions Using Japanese nationwide dialysis registry, higher serum ferritin values were associated with mortality not in PD patients but in HD patients. PMID:26599216

  5. Association between Serum Ferritin and Osteocalcin as a Potential Mechanism Explaining the Iron-Induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Juanola-Falgarona, Martí; Cándido-Fernández, José; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Martínez-González, Miguel A.; Estruch, Ramón; Fiol, Miquel; Arija-Val, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased iron stores are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, however, the mechanisms underlying these associations are poorly understood. Because a reduction of circulating osteocalcin levels after iron overload have been demonstrated in cell cultures, and osteocalcin is related to glucose and insulin metabolism, the iron-induced osteocalcin reductions could contribute to explain the role of iron metabolism in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Objective To analyzed the associations between serum total and uncarboxylated osteocalcin and adiponectin concentrations with serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) in elderly subjects. Design We evaluated a total of 423 subjects from the PREDIMED cohort in a population-based cross-sectional analysis. Extensive clinical, nutritional and laboratory measurements, including total and uncarboxylated osteocalcin, adiponectin, ferritin and sTfR were recorded. Results Serum ferritin was positively correlated with increased glucose and insulin circulating levels but also with HOMA-IR, and was inversely associated with total osteocalcin and adiponectin. A regression analysis revealed that serum ferritin and transferrin receptor levels were significantly associated with a decrease in total and uncarboxylated osteocalcin. Serum sTfR levels were associated with lower uncarboxylated osteocalcin levels in the whole-study subjects and remained significant only in the IFG (impaired fasting glucose) individuals. Conclusions We described, for the first time, an inverse association between serum ferritin and sTfR with osteocalcin and extend previous results on adiponectin, thus supporting that factors related to iron metabolism could contribute to the insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN35739639 . PMID:24167545

  6. Dietary factors associated with high serum ferritin levels in postmenopausal women with the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V), 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Se Young

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Serum ferritin levels are significantly increased after menopause and greatly affect women's health. The aim of this study was to investigate the dietary and non-dietary factors associated with high ferritin levels in postmenopausal women. SUBJECTS/METHODS Among adult women in 2010-2012, qualified postmenopausal women (n = 3880) were separated into quartiles of serum ferritin. The variable differences among the quartiles of ferritin were determined using either procsurvey chi-square test (χ2-test) among categorical variables, or GLM (Generalized Linear Model) among continuous variables. The odds ratio for high ferritin in relation to dietary factors was also determined using procsurvery logistic analysis. RESULTS Age, obesity, drinking habit, and blood glucose levels were found to be significant indicators of high serum ferritin level after adjusting for all confounding factors. Among the food groups, grain, milk, vegetable, and seaweed intakes were significantly associated with high ferritin levels, but after adjusting for all confounding factors, only grains and vegetables remained significant factors. Among the nutrient groups, calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C intake were significant factors, but after adjustment, none of the nutrient groups analyzed were associated with a high risk of ferritin. CONCLUSION Age, obesity, drinking habit, and glucose levels, as well as inadequate intakes of grains and vegetables, were found to be significantly associated with high serum ferritin levels in postmenopausal Korean women. PMID:26865920

  7. Iron and Ferritin Levels in the Serum and Milk of Bovine Leukemia Virus-Infected Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Star A.; Ohtsuka, Hiromichi; Kakinuma, Seiichi; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Orino, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Iron metabolism was examined in 15 bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected dairy cows (2.6–7.8 years old). BLV infection was detected by measuring serum antibody titer against BLV virus antigen (gp51). The anti-BLV antibody titers of the BLV-infected cows were significantly higher in serum than in milk; a single serum-positive animal lacked detectable anti-BLV antibodies in its milk. Iron and ferritin concentrations also were significantly higher in serum than in milk. Although most of the BLV-infected dairy cows had past or present anamneses (such as inflammatory diseases, including intramammary infection), the milk ferritin concentrations of the infected cows were significantly lower than those of normal cows; serum ferritin concentrations did not differ significantly between these two groups. The anti-BLV antibody titers in milk samples showed significant correlation with serum iron concentrations. These results suggest that BLV infection affects iron homeostasis through iron metabolism in the dairy cow mammary gland. PMID:26664941

  8. Role of Serum Uric Acid and Ferritin in the Development and Progression of NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Rosa; Pisano, Giuseppina; Fargion, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), tightly linked to the metabolic syndrome (MS), has emerged as a leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Since it is potentially progressive towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatic fibrosis, up to cirrhosis and its associated complications, the need for predictive factors of NAFLD and of its advanced forms is mandatory. Despite the current "gold standard" for the assessment of liver damage in NAFLD being liver biopsy, in recent years, several non-invasive tools have been designed as alternatives to histology, of which fibroscan seems the most promising. Among the different serum markers considered, serum uric acid (SUA) and ferritin have emerged as possible predictors of severity of liver damage in NAFLD. In fact, as widely described in this review, they share common pathogenetic pathways and are both associated with hepatic steatosis and MS, thus suggesting a likely synergistic action. Nevertheless, the power of these serum markers seems to be too low if considered alone, suggesting that they should be included in a wider perspective together with other metabolic and biochemical parameters in order to predict liver damage. PMID:27077854

  9. Role of Serum Uric Acid and Ferritin in the Development and Progression of NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Rosa; Pisano, Giuseppina; Fargion, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), tightly linked to the metabolic syndrome (MS), has emerged as a leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Since it is potentially progressive towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatic fibrosis, up to cirrhosis and its associated complications, the need for predictive factors of NAFLD and of its advanced forms is mandatory. Despite the current “gold standard” for the assessment of liver damage in NAFLD being liver biopsy, in recent years, several non-invasive tools have been designed as alternatives to histology, of which fibroscan seems the most promising. Among the different serum markers considered, serum uric acid (SUA) and ferritin have emerged as possible predictors of severity of liver damage in NAFLD. In fact, as widely described in this review, they share common pathogenetic pathways and are both associated with hepatic steatosis and MS, thus suggesting a likely synergistic action. Nevertheless, the power of these serum markers seems to be too low if considered alone, suggesting that they should be included in a wider perspective together with other metabolic and biochemical parameters in order to predict liver damage. PMID:27077854

  10. Serum Ferritin Is Inversely Correlated with Testosterone in Boys and Young Male Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Kuo-Ching; Chang, Chun-Chao; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chang, Jung-Su

    2015-01-01

    Objective The transition from childhood to teenaged years is associated with increased testosterone and a decreased iron status. It is not clear whether higher testosterone levels cause the decreased iron status, and to what extent, obesity-related inflammation influences the iron-testosterone relationship. The aim of the present study was to examine relationships of testosterone, iron status, and anti-/proinflammatory cytokines in relation to nutritional status in boys and young adolescent Taiwanese males. Methods In total, 137 boys aged 7~13 yr were included. Parameters for obesity, the iron status, testosterone, and inflammatory markers were evaluated. Results Overweight and obese (ow/obese) boys had higher mean serum testosterone, interleukin (IL)-1β, and nitric oxide (NO) levels compared to their normal-weight counterparts (all p<0.05). Mean serum ferritin was slightly higher in ow/obese boys compared to normal-weight boys, but this did not reach statistical significance. A multiple linear regression showed that serum ferritin (β = -0.7470, p = 0.003) was inversely correlated with testosterone, while serum IL-10 (β = 0.3475, p = 0.009) was positively associated with testosterone after adjusting for covariates. When normal-weight boys were separately assessed from ow/obesity boys, the association between testosterone and serum ferritin became stronger (β = -0.9628, p<0.0001), but the association between testosterone and IL-10 became non-significant (β = 0.1140, p = 0.4065) after adjusting for covariates. In ow/obese boys, only IL-10 was weakly associated with serum testosterone (β = 0.6444, p = 0.051) after adjusting for age. Conclusions Testosterone and serum ferritin are intrinsically interrelated but this relationship is weaker in ow/obese boys after adjusting for age. PMID:26646112

  11. A longitudinal study of serum ferritin in 319 adolescent Danish boys and girls examined in 1986 and 1992.

    PubMed

    Milman, N; Byg, K E; Backer, V; Ulrik, C; Graudal, N

    1999-10-01

    This study examined trends in iron status in adolescents. Serum ferritin was measured in 1986 and 1992 in 319 Danes (161 males) stratified into 5 groups: I. median age 9 yr in 1986 vs. 15 yr in 1992; II. 11 vs. 17 yr; III. 13 vs. 19 yr; IV. 15 vs. 21 yr; V. 17 vs. 23 yr. Males in group I demonstrated no change in ferritin or estimated iron stores in mg/kg; groups II-V displayed an increase in iron status parameters. All groups showed an increase in estimated total iron stores. Changes in iron status parameters were inversely correlated with height velocity in group III, and positively correlated with height velocity in group V. Females in age groups I and II demonstrated a fall in ferritin and estimated iron stores in mg/kg in association with menarche; values were unchanged in groups III and IV, and increased in group V. All groups showed an increase in estimated total iron stores. Changes in iron status parameters were inversely correlated with height velocity in groups I and II. In conclusion, ferritin levels in adolescents display great variation during growth spurt and at menarche. Changes in ferritin showed no consistent association with growth velocity. In both genders, estimated total iron stores increased with age. PMID:10530411

  12. IgA mesangial deposits in C3H/HeJ mice after oral immunization with ferritin or bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Genin, C; Laurent, B; Sabatier, J C; Colon, S; Berthoux, F C

    1986-01-01

    In order to study an experimental model of IgA nephropathy, C3H/HeJ mice which are high IgA responders were strongly immunized orally with ferritin and compared to syngeneic C3H/eB. C3H/HeJ exhibited a significant increase of total IgA level in the serum and of IgA deposits in the mesangium. However the low level of IgA antibody to ferritin detected in the serum and the unsuccessful search for ferritin and antibody to ferritin in the glomeruli suggest that strong oral immunization of C3H/HeJ mice leads to high level of non specific IgA in the serum and deposition of IgA in the kidney. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3516467

  13. The relationship between the serum levels of ferritin and the radiological brain injury indices in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Aghaei, Iraj; Bakhshayesh, Babak; Ramezani, Hamed; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Shabani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Preclinical studies show that iron plays a key role in mediating neuronal injury. This study was performed in order to identify the relationship between the serum level of ferritin and severity of the brain injury which occur after an Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Materials and Methods: This was a cross sectional descriptive - analytic study, which was conducted on those patients who had suffered from an ICH and had attended Poursina Hospital. The Serum levels of ferritin were measured at admittance. A Cranial CT scan was performed at admission and also 72 hr afterward. Hematoma and edema surrounding the hematoma volumes were also measured at entrance and 72 hr afterward. Data analysis was carried out by a descriptive - analytic statistics approach and calculated later on by the Spss-20 software. Results: In this investigation, 63 patients were studied, from which 34 (54%) were male and 29 (46%) female. The average age of the patients was 69.7± 11.9 (Min 43 and Max 94 years old). A significant relationship was observed between the level of ferritin and the edema volume surrounding the hematoma at first and next 72 hr after the patients were admitted. Conclusion: These results delineated the effective role of iron on the edema volume elevation. More studies are essentially urged to ascertain the clinical evaluation of the curing effect of iron chelators in those patients who suffer from ICH. PMID:25729539

  14. Elevated serum ferritin is an independent predictor of histologic severity and advanced fibrosis among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kowdley, Kris V.; Belt, Patricia; Wilson, Laura A.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A.; Chalasani, Naga; Sanyal, Arun J.; Nelson, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Serum ferritin (SF) levels are commonly elevated in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), due to systemic inflammation, increased iron stores or both. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between elevated SF and NAFLD severity. Demographic, clinical, histologic, laboratory and anthropometric data were analyzed in 628 adult patients with NAFLD (age≥18 years) with biopsy-proven NAFLD and a serum ferritin measurement within six months of their liver biopsy. A threshold SF>1.5XULN (i.e. >300 ng/ml in women and >450 ng/ml in men) was significantly associated with male sex, elevated serum ALT, AST, iron, transferrin-iron saturation, iron stain grade and decreased platelets (p<0.01). Histologic features of NAFLD were more severe among patients with SF>1.5XULN including steatosis, fibrosis, hepatocellular ballooning and diagnosis of NASH (p<0.026). On multiple regression analysis, SF>1.5XULN was independently associated with advanced hepatic fibrosis (OR, 1.66, 95% CI, 1.05-2.62, p=0.028) and increased NAFLD Activity Score (NAS) (OR, 1.99, 95% CI, 1.06-3.75, p=0.033). Conclusions A SF >1.5XULN is associated with hepatic iron deposition, a diagnosis of NASH, and worsened histologic activity, and is an independent predictor of advanced hepatic fibrosis among patients with NAFLD. Furthermore, elevated SF is independently associated with higher NAS even among patients without hepatic iron deposition. We conclude that serum ferritin is useful to identify NAFLD patients at risk for NASH and advanced fibrosis. PMID:21953442

  15. Raised serum ferritin concentration in hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome is not a marker for iron overload.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dan; Kulhalli, Vasu; Walker, Ann P

    2014-03-01

    Hyperferritinemia and bilateral cataracts are features of the rare hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (HHCS; OMIM #600886). HHCS is an autosomal dominant condition caused by mutations which increase expression of the ferritin light polypeptide (FTL) gene. We report a patient with HHCS who was misdiagnosed and treated as having hemochromatosis, in whom a heterozygous c.-160A>G mutation was identified in the iron responsive element (IRE) of FTL, causing ferritin synthesis in the absence of iron overload. This report demonstrates the need for clinical awareness of HHCS as a cause of hyperferritinemia in the absence of iron overload and provides a possible diagnostic schema. PMID:24003015

  16. The hepcidin gene promoter nc.-1010C > T; -582A > G haplotype modulates serum ferritin in individuals carrying the common H63D mutation in HFE gene.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruno; Pita, Lina; Gomes, Susana; Gonçalves, João; Faustino, Paula

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe iron overload. It is usually associated with homozygosity for the HFE gene mutation c.845G > A; p.C282Y. However, in some cases, another HFE mutation (c.187C > G; p.H63D) seems to be associated with the disease. Its penetrance is very low, suggesting the possibility of other iron genetic modulators being involved. In this work, we have screened for HAMP promoter polymorphisms in 409 individuals presenting normal or increased serum ferritin levels together with normal or H63D-mutated HFE genotypes. Our results show that the hepcidin gene promoter TG haplotype, originated by linkage of the nc.-1010C > T and nc.-582A > G polymorphisms, is more frequent in the HFE_H63D individuals presenting serum ferritin levels higher than 300 μg/L than in those presenting the HFE_H63D mutation but with normal serum ferritin levels or in the normal control group.Moreover, it was observed that the TG haplotype was associated to increased serum ferritin levels in the overall pool of HFE_H63D individuals. Thus, our data suggest that screening for these polymorphisms could be of interest in order to explain the phenotype. However, this genetic condition seems to have no clinical significance. PMID:25015054

  17. Diagnostic values of serum tumor markers Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, CEA, CA19-9, and AFP in oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chuanshu; Yang, Kai; Tang, Hong; Chen, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Background At present, the research on serum tumor markers in the early diagnosis of malignant tumors has aroused widespread concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic values of serum tumor markers cytokeratin 19 fragment (Cyfra21-1), squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCAg), ferritin, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), and α-fetoprotein (AFP) for patients with oral/oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma (OSCC/OPSCC). Methods One hundred and sixty-nine cases of patients with OSCC/OPSCC as the experimental group, 86 cases of oral benign tumor patients as the control group, and 30 cases of healthy people as the normal control group were studied. The levels of serum Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, CEA, CA19-9, and AFP were measured using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Results The levels of serum Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, and CEA in patients with OSCC/OPSCC were significantly higher than those of benign tumor and healthy control group (P<0.05). The levels of CA19-9 and AFP showed no significant difference between patients with OSCC/OPSCC, benign tumor, and healthy group (P>0.05). The level of serum Cyfra21-1 in patients with early OSCC/OPSCC (stage I + II) was significantly higher than that of benign tumor and healthy control group (P<0.05). However, the levels of serum SCCAg, ferritin, CEA, CA19-9, and AFP showed no significant difference between patients with early OSCC/OPSCC, benign tumor, and healthy control group (P>0.05). The levels of serum Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, and CEA in the middle-late stage of patients with OSCC/OPSCC (stage III + IV) were significantly higher than those of patients with the early OSCC/OPSCC, benign tumor, and healthy control group (P<0.05). The diagnostic cutoff levels of Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, and CEA were 2.17, 0.72, 109.95, and 1.99 ng/mL, respectively. The sensitivities were 60.36%, 73.37%, 81.66%, and 66.27%, respectively. The specificities were 81.03%, 68.10%, 40

  18. Prognostic impact of pre-transplantation transfusion history and secondary iron overload in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a GITMO study

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Porta, Matteo Giovanni Della; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Angelucci, Emanuele; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Falda, Michele; Onida, Francesco; Bernardi, Massimo; Guidi, Stefano; Lucarelli, Barbarella; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Cerretti, Raffaella; Marenco, Paola; Pioltelli, Pietro; Pascutto, Cristiana; Oneto, Rosi; Pirolini, Laura; Fanin, Renato; Bosi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Background Transfusion-dependency affects the natural history of myelodysplastic syndromes. Secondary iron overload may concur to this effect. The relative impact of these factors on the outcome of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome receiving allogeneic stem-cell transplantation remains to be clarified. Design and Methods We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic effect of transfusion history and iron overload on the post-transplantation outcome of 357 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome reported to the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo (GITMO) registry between 1997 and 2007. Results Transfusion-dependency was independently associated with reduced overall survival (hazard ratio=1.48, P=0.017) and increased non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio=1.68, P=0.024). The impact of transfusion-dependency was noted only in patients receiving myeloablative conditioning (overall survival: hazard ratio=1.76, P=0.003; non-relapse mortality: hazard ratio=1.70, P=0.02). There was an inverse relationship between transfusion burden and overall survival after transplantation (P=0.022); the outcome was significantly worse in subjects receiving more than 20 red cell units. In multivariate analysis, transfusion-dependency was found to be a risk factor for acute graft-versus-host disease (P=0.04). Among transfusion-dependent patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation, pre-transplantation serum ferritin level had a significant effect on overall survival (P=0.01) and non-relapse mortality (P=0.03). This effect was maintained after adjusting for transfusion burden and duration, suggesting that the negative effect of transfusion history on outcome might be determined at least in part by iron overload. Conclusions Pre-transplantation transfusion history and serum ferritin have significant prognostic value in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation, inducing a significant increase of non

  19. Tailoring iron chelation by iron intake and serum ferritin: the prospective EPIC study of deferasirox in 1744 patients with transfusion-dependent anemias

    PubMed Central

    Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Porter, John; El-Beshlawy, Amal; Li, Chi-Kong; Seymour, John F.; Elalfy, Mohsen; Gattermann, Norbert; Giraudier, Stéphane; Lee, Jong-Wook; Chan, Lee Lee; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Rose, Christian; Taher, Ali; Thein, Swee Lay; Viprakasit, Vip; Habr, Dany; Domokos, Gabor; Roubert, Bernard; Kattamis, Antonis

    2010-01-01

    Background Following a clinical evaluation of deferasirox (Exjade®) it was concluded that, in addition to baseline body iron burden, ongoing transfusional iron intake should be considered when selecting doses. The 1-year EPIC study, the largest ever investigation conducted for an iron chelator, is the first to evaluate whether fixed starting doses of deferasirox, based on transfusional iron intake, with dose titration guided by serum ferritin trends and safety markers, provides clinically acceptable chelation in patients (aged ≥2 years) with transfusional hemosiderosis from various types of anemia. Design and Methods The recommended initial dose was 20 mg/kg/day for patients receiving 2–4 packed red blood cell units/month and 10 or 30 mg/kg/day was recommended for patients receiving less or more frequent transfusions, respectively. Dose adjustments were based on 3-month serum ferritin trends and continuous assessment of safety markers. The primary efficacy end-point was change in serum ferritin after 52 weeks compared with baseline. Results The 1744 patients enrolled had the following conditions; thalassemia (n=1115), myelodysplastic syndromes (n=341), aplastic anemia (n=116), sickle cell disease (n=80), rare anemias (n=43) and other transfused anemias (n=49). Overall, there was a significant reduction in serum ferritin from baseline (−264 ng/mL; P<0.0001), reflecting dosage adjustments and ongoing iron intake. The most common (>5%) adverse events were gastrointestinal disturbances (28%) and skin rash (10%). Conclusions Analysis of this large, prospectively collected data set confirms the response to chelation therapy across various anemias, supporting initial deferasirox doses based on transfusional iron intake, with subsequent dose titration guided by trends in serum ferritin and safety markers (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00171821). PMID:19951979

  20. Serum Ferritin is a Reliable, Non-invasive Test for Iron Status in Pregnancy: Comparison of Ferritin with Other Iron Status Markers in a Longitudinal Study on Healthy Pregnant Women; Erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Byg, Keld-Erik; Milman, Nils; Hansen, Stig; Agger, Anders O.

    2000-01-01

    Background and Aims: To assess the true positive and false positive rates of the iron status markers (serum iron, serum transferrin, transferrin saturation, haemoglobin, haematocrit, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean cell haemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), erythrocyte count) in the diagnosis of depleted iron stores (iron depletion) during normal pregnancy and postpartum. Methods: Among 120 pregnant women, 58 were randomised to placebo-treatment and 62 to iron-treatment (66 mg ferrous iron daily from 14 weeks of gestation). Iron status markers were measured every 4th week during pregnancy and 8 weeks postpartum. Iron depletion was defined by a serum ferritin concentration < 16 &mgr;g/L. The 5th percentiles for the other iron status markers in the group of iron-treated women were used as cut-off values. Calculations were made in the 2nd and 3rd trimester, praepartum and postpartum. Results: In general, the true positive rates of other iron status markers in the diagnosis of iron depletion (serum ferritin < 16 &mgr;g/L) were low ranging from 0% to 52% during pregnancy and from 9% to 64% postpartum. Transferrin saturation and MCH displayed the highest true positive rates. The false positive rates ranged from 0% to 13% during pregnancy and from 4% to 17% postpartum. Haemoglobin and MCH displayed the highest false positive rates. Conclusions: The sensitivities of the other iron status markers were too low and the false positive rates too high to be of clinical value in the diagnosis of iron depletion. Despite physiologic variations due to haemodilution, the serum ferritin concentration is currently the most reliable non-invasive marker of iron status in pregnancy and postpartum. PMID:11399631

  1. Serum ferritin levels are positively associated with bone mineral density in elderly Korean men: the 2008-2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Shik; Jang, Ji Su; Lee, Dong Ryul; Kim, Yang Hyun; Nam, Ga Eun; Han, Byoung-Duck; Do Han, Kyung; Cho, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Seon Mee; Choi, Youn Seon; Kim, Do Hoon

    2014-11-01

    A possible negative effect of iron overload on bone metabolism has been suggested by the fact that patients with hemochromatosis, thalassemia, and sickle cell anemia have lower bone mineral density than the general population. However, the influence of iron overload on bone health in the general population is uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between serum ferritin levels and bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly Koreans. A total of 2,943 subjects aged 65 years and over who participated in the 2008-2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were included in this study. Age, physical activity, current smoking status, alcohol consumption, education level, household income, and dietary assessment were surveyed by a face-to-face interview. BMD was measured at the lumbar spine and femur by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and other biochemical markers, including serum ferritin, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, serum alkaline phosphatase, and parathyroid hormone, were assayed. After adjusting for age and body mass index, we found an association between BMD of the total lumbar spine, total femur, and femur neck and levels of alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, vitamin D3, and daily intake of calcium and protein. Serum ferritin levels were positively associated with BMD of the total lumbar spine, total femur, and femur neck after adjusting for all covariates in men, but not in women. This study suggests a positive association between serum ferritin levels and BMD in elderly South Korean men without hematologic disorders. Further study is warranted to verify the effects of iron on bone metabolism. PMID:24337956

  2. The Association between Serum Ferritin Level, Tissue Doppler Echocardiography, Cardiac T2* MRI, and Heart Rate Recovery in Patients with Beta Thalassemia Major

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Isa Oner; Koklu, Erkan; Kurtoglu, Erdal; Arslan, Sakir; Cagirci, Goksel; Karakus, Volkan; Kus, Gorkem; Cay, Serkan; Kucukseymen, Selcuk

    2016-01-01

    Background It is generally well-understood that iron-mediated cardiomyopathy is the major complication that can arise from beta thalassemia major (TM). Therefore, early diagnosis, risk stratification, and the effective treatment of beta TM patients are clinically important to optimize long-term positive outcomes. Methods This study included 57 beta TM patients with a mean age of 25 ± 7 years. We determined the serum ferritin level, echocardiography, heart rate recovery (HRR), and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) T2* in all patients. CMR T2* findings were categorized as normal myocardium (T2* > 20 ms), and myocardial involvement (T2* ≤ 20 ms). HRR values at 1-5 min (HRR1-5) were recorded; Subsequently. HRR was calculated by subtracting the heart rate at each time point from the heart rate at peak exercise. Results There was a significant negative correlation between the serum ferritin level and the cardiac T2* MRI findings (r = -0.34, p = 0.009). A similar result was found in the negative correlation between serum ferritin and all heart rate recovery values. There was a significant positive correlation between HRR1, HRR2, and HRR3 values, and CMR T2* (T2* heart rate recovery (HRR)1: r = 0.51, p < 0.001; T2* HRR2: r = 0.48, p < 0.001; T2* HRR3: r = 0.47, p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions The serum ferritin level and echocardiography can be used to predict the presence of myocardial iron load in beta TM patients. Therefore, HRR can be used to screen beta TM patients, and the clinical use of HRR can be a predictive marker for autonomic dysfunction in beta TM patients. PMID:27122954

  3. Response of iron overload to deferasirox in rare transfusion-dependent anaemias: equivalent effects on serum ferritin and labile plasma iron for haemolytic or production anaemias

    PubMed Central

    Porter, John B; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Beris, Photis; Forni, Gian Luca; Taher, Ali; Habr, Dany; Domokos, Gabor; Roubert, Bernard; Thein, Swee Lay

    2011-01-01

    Objectives It is widely assumed that, at matched transfusional iron-loading rates, responses to chelation therapy are similar, irrespective of the underlying condition. However, data are limited for rare transfusion-dependent anaemias, and it remains to be elucidated if response differs, depending on whether the anaemia has a primary haemolytic or production mechanism. Methods The efficacy and safety of deferasirox (Exjade®) in rare transfusion-dependent anaemias were evaluated over 1 yr, with change in serum ferritin as the primary efficacy endpoint. Initial deferasirox doses were 10–30 mg/kg/d, depending on transfusion requirements; 34 patients had production anaemias, and 23 had haemolytic anaemias. Results Patients with production anaemias or haemolytic anaemias had comparable transfusional iron-loading rates (0.31 vs. 0.30 mL red blood cells/kg/d), mean deferasirox dosing (19.3 vs. 19.0 mg/kg/d) and baseline median serum ferritin (2926 vs. 2682 ng/mL). Baseline labile plasma iron (LPI) levels correlated significantly with the transfusional iron-loading rates and with serum ferritin levels in both cohorts. Reductions in median serum ferritin levels were initially faster in the production than the haemolytic anaemias, but at 1 yr, similar significant reductions of 940 and 617 ng/mL were attained, respectively (−26.0% overall). Mean LPI decreased significantly in patients with production (P < 0.0001) and haemolytic (P = 0.037) anaemias after the first dose and was maintained at normal mean levels (<0.4 μm) subsequently. The most common drug-related, investigator-assessed adverse events were diarrhoea (n = 16) and nausea (n = 12). Conclusions At matched transfusional iron-loading rates, the responses of rare transfusion-dependent anaemias to deferasirox are similar at 1 yr, irrespective of the underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:21649735

  4. Association between Serum Ferritin and Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Boqian; Hou, Jiantong; Gong, Yaoyao; Yan, Gaoliang; Wang, Qingjie; Wang, Dong; Qiao, Yong; Chen, Yifei

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. CIN is a major and serious complication following PCI in patients with ACS. It is unclear whether a higher serum ferritin level is associated with an increased risk of CIN in high-risk patients. Thus, we conducted this study to assess the predictive value of SF for the risk of CIN after PCI. Methods. We prospectively examined SF levels in 548 patients with ACS before undergoing PCI. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the independent risk factors for CIN. The ROC analysis was performed to evaluate the predictive value of SF for CIN. Results. CIN occurred in 96 patients. Baseline SF was higher in patients who developed CIN compared to those who did not (257.05 ± 93.98 versus 211.67 ± 106.65; P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that SF was an independent predictor of CIN (OR, 1.008; 95% CI, 1.003–1.013; P = 0.002). The area under ROC curve for SF was 0.629, and SF > 180.9 μg/L predicted CIN with sensitivity of 80.2% and specificity of 41.4%. Conclusion. Our data show that a higher SF level was significantly associated with an increased risk of CIN after PCI. PMID:27547760

  5. Relationship of Baseline Hemoglobin Level with Serum Ferritin, Postphlebotomy Hemoglobin Changes, and Phlebotomy Requirements among HFE C282Y Homozygotes.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Ali; Mahmood, Faiza; Aandahl, Astrid; Knutsen, Teresa Risopatron; Llohn, Abid Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We aimed to examine whether baseline hemoglobin levels in C282Y-homozygous patients are related to the degree of serum ferritin (SF) elevation and whether patients with different baseline hemoglobin have different phlebotomy requirements. Methods. A total of 196 patients (124 males and 72 females) who had undergone therapeutic phlebotomy and had SF and both pre- and posttreatment hemoglobin values were included in the study. Results. Bivariate correlation analysis suggested that baseline SF explains approximately 6 to 7% of the variation in baseline hemoglobin. The results also showed that males who had higher (≥150 g/L) baseline hemoglobin levels had a significantly greater reduction in their posttreatment hemoglobin despite requiring fewer phlebotomies to achieve iron depletion than those who had lower (<150 g/L) baseline hemoglobin, regardless of whether baseline SF was below or above 1000 µg/L. There were no significant differences between hemoglobin subgroups regarding baseline and treatment characteristics, except for transferrin saturation between male subgroups with SF above 1000 µg/L. Similar differences were observed when females with higher (≥138 g/L) baseline hemoglobin were compared with those with lower (<138 g/L) baseline hemoglobin. Conclusion. Dividing C282Y-homozygous patients into just two subgroups according to the degree of baseline SF elevation may obscure important subgroup variations. PMID:26380265

  6. Association between Serum Ferritin Concentrations and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Adults: A Population Study from the Tianjin Chronic Low-Grade Systemic Inflammation and Health (TCLSIHealth) Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Su, Qian; Gu, Yeqing; Yu, Bin; Yu, Fei; He, Haiyan; Zhang, Qing; Meng, Ge; Wu, Hongmei; Du, Huanmin; Liu, Li; Shi, Hongbin; Xia, Yang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xing; Li, Chunlei; Bao, Xue; Liu, Fangfang; Fang, Liyun; Yang, Huijun; Sun, Shaomei; Wang, Xing; Zhou, Ming; Jia, Qiyu; Zhao, Honglin; Song, Kun; Niu, Kaijun

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms have become the most important global public health issue. Iron plays an important role in brain function, cognition, and behavior, and its impacts on depressive symptoms may be multifactorial with both positive and negative effects. Previous observational studies focusing on the association between iron status and depressive symptoms showed inconsistent results. Ferritin is a ubiquitous intracellular protein that can store and release iron and is widely used as a clinical biomarker to evaluate iron status. We performed a cross-sectional study to examine the relationship between serum ferritin and depressive symptoms among 3,839 subjects who were from the Tianjin Chronic Low-grade Systemic Inflammation and Health (TCLSIHealth) cohort. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Chinese version of 20-item self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) with 4 cutoffs (40, 45, 48 and 50) to indicate elevated depressive symptoms (40 was the primary cut-off). The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 36.5%, 17.6%, 11.0% and 7.0% for SDS ≥40, ≥45, ≥48 and ≥50, respectively. With the primary cut-off point of 40, multiple potential confounding factors were adjusted and the odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of having elevated depressive symptoms by quartiles of serum ferritin concentrations were 1.00 (reference), 1.10 (0.91, 1.34), 0.81 (0.66, 1.01) and 1.02 (0.81, 1.28) for the first, second, third and fourth quartile, respectively (P for trend = 0.76). Similar relations were observed with the use of other cut-offs as a definition of depressive symptoms. In conclusion, there is no significant relationship between serum ferritin concentrations and depressive symptoms among Chinese adults. PMID:27611581

  7. Higher Serum Ferritin Levels Correlate with an Increased Risk of Cutaneous Morbidity in Adult Patients with β-Thalassemia: A Single-Center Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Skandalis, Konstantinos; Vlachos, Christoforos; Pliakou, Xanthi; Gaitanis, Georgios; Kapsali, Eleni; Bassukas, Ioannis D

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed iron homeostasis characterizes β-thalassemia and increases its morbidity. Our aim was to retrospectively associate β-thalassemia disease characteristics with treatment-requiring skin conditions. The files of adult β-thalassemia (including sickle β-thalassemia) patients were screened over a 10-year period for treatment-requiring skin disease episodes and their correlation with hematologic diagnoses and epidemiological and serological characteristics. Seventy-eight patients were identified, and 7 (9%) developed at least one relevant episode including cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis (CSVV), urticaria, and leg ulcers. Average ferritin serum level correlated significantly with development of a dermatosis (2,034 ± 799 μg/l in cases vs. 920 ± 907 μg/l in the overall population; p = 0.001, ANOVA). This difference relied exclusively on the high ferritin levels observed in patients with 'generalized' dermatoses (urticaria and CSVV: 3,860 ± 1,220 μg/l) as opposed to values within the normal range in the case of 'localized' ones (leg ulcers: 662 ± 167 μg/l). The employed iron chelation treatment influenced ferritin levels (p = 0.002, Kruskal-Wallis test) since chelation with a single agent seems to increase the risk of a skin disease (p = 0.013, likelihood ratio method). Conclusively, serum ferritin can be evaluated as risk factor for generalized dermatoses, but not for leg ulcers, in patients with the β-thalassemia genotype. This risk can be efficiently controlled with adequate chelation. PMID:26509267

  8. Blood Metal Concentrations of Manganese, Lead, and Cadmium in Relation to Serum Ferritin Levels in Ohio Residents

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to assess fcrritin-specific profiles of blood metal concentrations such as manganese, lead, and cadmium and to evaluate whether ferritin may affect the behavior of the blood metals in relation to menstruation, menopause, or sex in Ohio residents....

  9. Ferritin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... presence and severity of iron deficiency or iron overload. ^ Back to top When is it ordered? The ... ferritin level may also be ordered when iron overload is suspected. Symptoms of iron overload will vary ...

  10. Low body weight gain, low white blood cell count and high serum ferritin as markers of poor nutrition and increased risk for preterm delivery.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Yin; Wu, Cheng-Hsuan; Hsieh, Charles Tsung-Che; Lo, Hui-Chen; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Kao, Mei-Ding

    2013-01-01

    This study determined factors of preterm delivery in Taiwan. Healthy women (n=520, age 29.1±4.2 y) at 8-12 weeks of pregnancy were recruited from prenatal clinics. Background information, anthropometrics, biochemical parameters, and dietary intake, collected by 24 h-recall were obtained from the first, second, and third trimesters to delivery. Clinical outcomes of neonates were also collected. The results show that 53.7% of women were primiparous and that the incidence of preterm delivery was 6.2%. Body weight gains in the first trimester and throughout pregnancy were significantly lower in mothers with preterm delivery (preterm group) than in mothers with term delivery (term group, p<0.05). Maternal cholesterol intake, circulating white blood cell counts (WBC) and serum albumin were significantly lower and that serum magnesium and ferritin were significantly higher in the preterm group than in the term group. Maternal weight gain was positively correlated with caloric and nutrient intake (p<0.05). Neonatal birth weight was positively correlated with maternal weight gain and intakes of protein and phosphate during pregnancy; with intakes of calories, vitamin B-1 and B-2 in the first trimester; and with intakes of calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc, as well as circulating WBC in the third trimester. However, neonatal birth weight was negatively correlated with serum iron in the third trimester and with serum iron and ferritin at the time of delivery. In conclusion, maternal weight gain in early pregnancy and WBC, mineral intake and iron status in late pregnancy seem to be major factors affecting delivery and neonatal outcomes. PMID:23353616

  11. Genome-wide admixture and association study of serum iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation and total iron binding capacity in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Lange, Leslie A.; Duan, Qing; Lu, Yurong; Singleton, Andrew B.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.; Li, Yun; Taylor, Herman A.; Willis, Monte S.; Nalls, Mike; Wilson, James G.; Lange, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential component of many important proteins and enzymes, including hemoglobin, which is responsible for carrying oxygen to the cells. African Americans (AAs) have a greater prevalence of iron deficiency compared with European Americans. We conducted genome-wide admixture-mapping and association studies for serum iron, serum ferritin, transferrin saturation (SAT) and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) in 2347 AAs participating in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). Follow-up replication analyses for JHS iron-trait associated SNPs were conducted in 329 AA participants in the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study (HANDLS). Higher estimated proportions of global African ancestry were significantly associated with lower levels of iron (P = 2.4 × 10−5), SAT (P = 0.0019) and TIBC (P = 0.042). We observed significant associations (P < 5 × 10−8) between serum TIBC levels and two independent SNPs around TF on chromosome 3, the first report of a genome-wide significant second independent signal in this region, and SNPs near two novel genes: HDGFL1 on chromosome 6 and MAF on chromosome 16. We also observed significant associations between ferritin levels and SNPs near GAB3 on chromosome X. We replicated our two independent associations at TF and our association at GAB3 in HANDLS. Our study provides evidence for both shared and unique genetic risk factors that are associated with iron-related measures in AAs. The top two variants in TF explain 11.2% of the total variation in TIBC levels in AAs after accounting for age, gender, body mass index and background ancestry. PMID:25224454

  12. Accuracy of erythrogram and serum ferritin for the maternal anemia diagnosis (AMA): a phase 3 diagnostic study on prediction of the therapeutic responsiveness to oral iron in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pregnancy anemia remains as a public health problem, since the official reports in the 70’s. To guide the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in pregnancy, the haemoglobin concentration is the most used test in spite of its low accuracy, and serum ferritin is the most reliable test, although its cutoff point remains an issue. Methods/design The aim of this protocol is to verify the accuracy of erythrocyte indices and serum ferritin (studied tests) for the diagnosis of functional iron-deficiency in pregnancy using the iron-therapy responsiveness as the gold-standard. This is an ongoing phase III accuracy study initiated in August 2011 and to be concluded in April 2013. The subjects are anemic pregnant women (haemoglobin concentration < 11.0 g/dL) attended at a low-risk prenatal care center in the Northeast of Brazil. The sample size (n 278) was calculated to estimate sensitivity of 90% and 80% of specificity with relative error of 10% and power of 95%. This study has a prospective design with a before-after intervention of 80 mg of daily oral iron during 90 days and will be analyzed as a delayed-type cross-sectional study. Women at the second trimester of pregnancy are being evaluated with clinical and laboratorial examinations at the enrollment and monthly. The ‘responsiveness to therapeutic test with oral iron’ (gold-standard) was defined to an increase of at least 0.55 Z-score in haemoglobin after 4 weeks of treatment and a total dose of 1200 mg of iron. At the study conclusion, sensitivities, specificities, predictive values, likelihood ratios and areas under the ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) curves of serum ferritin and erythrocyte indices (red blood cell count, haematocrit, haemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, red blood cell distribution width, reticulocyte count) will be tested. The compliance and adverse effects are considered

  13. Pre-transplant angiotensin receptor II type 1 antibodies and risk of post-transplant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis recurrence.

    PubMed

    Mujtaba, Muhammad A; Sharfuddin, Asif A; Book, Benita L; Goggins, William C; Khalil, Ali A; Mishler, Dennis P; Fridell, Johnathan A; Yaqub, Muhammad S; Taber, Tim E

    2015-07-01

    Post-kidney transplant recurrence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a major problem. AT1R is expressed on podocyte; its expression is elevated in the proteinuric state. Using an ELISA, we tested pre-transplant sera of 28 patients with history of idiopathic FSGS for anti-AT1R levels and serum soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) as a biomarker for risk of recurrence of FSGS. Sera from 11 patients with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) were used as controls. Twelve patients had biopsy proven post-transplant FSGS recurrence at 1.5 months. No difference was found in the pre-transplant suPAR levels of FSGS patients (5993 ± 2292 pg/mL) vs. PKD (7334 ± 4538 pg/mL) (p = 0.23). Serum suPAR levels in patients with FSGS recurrence (5786 ± 1899 pg/mL) vs. no FSGS recurrence (6149 ± 2598 pg/mL) (p = 0.69) were not different. Anti-AT1R levels in patients with FSGS were 12.66 ± 11.85 U/mL vs. 8.69 ± 6.52 U/mL in PKD (p = 0.32); however, a difference was found in patients with and without FSGS recurrence 20.41 ± 14.36 U/mL 6.84 ± 4.181 U/mL, respectively (p < 0.01). Area under curve for suPAR and anti-AT1R to predict post-transplant FSGS recurrence was 0.51 and 0.84, respectively. Pre-transplant anti-AT1R levels appear to be a helpful biomarker in identifying patients at high risk of post-transplant FSGS recurrence. PMID:25973696

  14. Association of ferroportin Q248H polymorphism with elevated levels of serum ferritin in African-Americans in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Rivers, Charles A.; Barton, James C.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Acton, Ronald T.; Speechley, Mark R.; Snively, Beverly M.; Leiendecker-Foster, Catherine; Press, Richard D.; Adams, Paul C.; McLaren, Gordon D.; Dawkins, Fitzroy W.; McLaren, Christine E.; Reboussin, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The ferroportin (FPN1) Q248H polymorphism has been associated with increased serum ferritin (SF) levels in sub-Saharan Africans and in African Americans (AA). AA participants of the HEIRS Study who did not have HFE C282Y or H63D who had elevated initial screening SF (≥300 μg/L in men and ≥200 μg/L in women) (defined as cases) were frequency-matched to AA participants with normal SF (defined as controls) to investigate the association of the Q248H with elevated SF. 10.4% of cases and 6.7% of controls were Q248H heterozygotes (P = 0.257). Q248H homozygosity was observed in 0.5% of the cases and none of the controls. The frequency of Q248H was higher among men with elevated SF than among control men (P = 0.047); corresponding differences were not observed among women. This appeared to be unrelated to self-reports of a previous diagnosis of liver disease. Men with elevated SF were three times more likely than women with elevated SF to have Q248H (P = 0.012). There were no significant differences in Q248H frequencies in men and women control participants. We conclude that the frequency of the FPN1 Q248H polymorphism is greater in AA men with elevated SF than in those with normal SF. PMID:17276706

  15. Association of ferroportin Q248H polymorphism with elevated levels of serum ferritin in African Americans in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Charles A; Barton, James C; Gordeuk, Victor R; Acton, Ronald T; Speechley, Mark R; Snively, Beverly M; Leiendecker-Foster, Catherine; Press, Richard D; Adams, Paul C; McLaren, Gordon D; Dawkins, Fitzroy W; McLaren, Christine E; Reboussin, David M

    2007-01-01

    The ferroportin (FPN1) Q248H polymorphism has been associated with increased serum ferritin (SF) levels in sub-Saharan Africans and in African Americans (AA). AA participants of the HEIRS Study who did not have HFE C282Y or H63D who had elevated initial screening SF (> or =300 microg/L in men and >= or =200 microg/L in women) (defined as cases) were frequency-matched to AA participants with normal SF (defined as controls) to investigate the association of the Q248H with elevated SF. 10.4% of cases and 6.7% of controls were Q248H heterozygotes (P=0.257). Q248H homozygosity was observed in 0.5% of the cases and none of the controls. The frequency of Q248H was higher among men with elevated SF than among control men (P=0.047); corresponding differences were not observed among women. This appeared to be unrelated to self-reports of a previous diagnosis of liver disease. Men with elevated SF were three times more likely than women with elevated SF to have Q248H (P=0.012). There were no significant differences in Q248H frequencies in men and women control participants. We conclude that the frequency of the FPN1 Q248H polymorphism is greater in AA men with elevated SF than in those with normal SF. PMID:17276706

  16. The pre-transplant anemic condition is independent of long-term outcome in living-related kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Song, Turun; Wang, Li; He, Shaofeng; Fu, Lei; Huang, Zhongli; Wei, Qiang; Lin, Tao

    2014-06-01

    The relationship between pre-transplant Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and long-term outcome of living-related kidney transplantation is far from well addressed. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by reviewing the medical profile of the patients who received living-related kidney transplantations at our center from January 2006 to January 2013. Patients were divided into two groups: high Hb group (≥10 g/dL) and low Hb group (<10 g/dL). Cox regression model was utilized to analyze the effect of pre-transplant hemoglobin concentration on the patient and graft survival. About 422 patients were of Hb level <10 g/dL (78.30 ± 14.18 g/dL), 280 were >10 g/dL (116.2 ± 14.43 g/dL) (p < 0.001). In a follow-up of 35.34 ± 18.12 months, we did not find any difference in serum creatinine between the two groups. Low Hb concentration is not associated with increased risk of developing DGF (HR = 1.186, 95% CI: 0.53-2.654), acute rejection (HR = 1.338, 95% CI: 0.919-1.947), overall infection (HR = 1.263, 95% CI: 0.847-1.885) nor perioperational infection (HR = 1.019, 95% CI: 0.513-2.026). Though we detected a trend that low Hb level group were of higher incidence of patient death and graft failure, the two groups did not differ significantly (2.38% vs. 0.71%, p = 0.096; and 4.04% vs. 2.14%, p = 0.165, respectively). Cox regression model revealed that pre-transplant Hb level <10 g/dL was independent of increased overall mortality (HR = 3.379; 95% CI: 0.706-17.172) and increased death censored allograft failure risk (HR = 1.556; 95% CI: 0.595-4.069). Pre-transplant Hb concentration <10 g/dL is independent of poor long-term outcome of living-related kidney transplantation. PMID:24512314

  17. Serum ferritin level changes in children with sickle cell disease on chronic blood transfusion are nonlinear and are associated with iron load and liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Miguel R.; Paley, Carole; Olivieri, Nancy; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Vichinsky, Elliott; Casella, James F.; Alvarez, Ofelia A.; Barredo, Julio C.; Lee, Margaret T.; Iyer, Rathi V.; Kutlar, Abdullah; McKie, Kathleen M.; McKie, Virgil; Odo, Nadine; Gee, Beatrice; Kwiatkowski, Janet L.; Woods, Gerald M.; Coates, Thomas; Wang, Winfred; Adams, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic blood transfusion is increasingly indicated in patients with sickle cell disease. Measuring resulting iron overload remains a challenge. Children without viral hepatitis enrolled in 2 trials for stroke prevention were examined for iron overload (STOP and STOP2; n = 271). Most received desferrioxamine chelation. Serum ferritin (SF) changes appeared nonlinear compared with prechelation estimated transfusion iron load (TIL) or with liver iron concentrations (LICs). Averaged correlation coefficient between SF and TIL (patients/observations, 26 of 164) was r = 0.70; between SF and LIC (patients/observations, 33 of 47) was r = 0.55. In mixed models, SF was associated with LIC (P = .006), alanine transaminase (P = .025), and weight (P = .026). Most patients with SF between 750 and 1500 ng/mL had a TIL between 25 and 100 mg/kg (72.8% ± 5.9%; patients/observations, 24 of 50) or an LIC between 2.5 and 10 mg/g dry liver weight (75% ± 0%; patients/observations, 8 of 9). Most patients with SF of 3000 ng/mL or greater had a TIL of 100 mg/kg or greater (95.3% ± 6.7%; patients/observations, 7 of 16) or an LIC of 10 mg/g dry liver weight or greater (87.7% ± 4.3%; patients/observations, 11 of 18). Although SF changes are nonlinear, levels less than 1500 ng/mL indicated mostly acceptable iron overload; levels of 3000 ng/mL or greater were specific for significant iron overload and were associated with liver injury. However, to determine accurately iron overload in patients with intermediately elevated SF levels, other methods are required. These trials are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00000592 and #NCT00006182. PMID:19721013

  18. Should HFE p.C282Y homozygotes with moderately elevated serum ferritin be treated? A randomised controlled trial comparing iron reduction with sham treatment (Mi-iron)

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Sim Yee; Dolling, Lara; Dixon, Jeannette L; Nicoll, Amanda J; Gurrin, Lyle C; Wolthuizen, Michelle; Wood, Erica M; Anderson, Greg J; Ramm, Grant A; Allen, Katrina J; Olynyk, John K; Crawford, Darrell; Kava, Jennifer; Ramm, Louise E; Gow, Paul; Durrant, Simon; Powell, Lawrie W; Delatycki, Martin B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HFE p.C282Y homozygosity is the most common cause of hereditary haemochromatosis. There is currently insufficient evidence to assess whether non-specific symptoms or hepatic injury in homozygotes with moderately elevated iron defined as a serum ferritin (SF) of 300–1000 µg/L are related to iron overload. As such the evidence for intervention in this group is lacking. We present here methods for a study that aims to evaluate whether non-specific symptoms and hepatic fibrosis markers improve with short-term normalisation of SF in p.C282Y homozygotes with moderate elevation of SF. Methods and analysis Mi-iron is a prospective, multicentre, randomised patient-blinded trial conducted in three centres in Victoria and Queensland, Australia. Participants who are HFE p.C282Y homozygotes with SF levels between 300 and 1000 μg/L are recruited and randomised to either the treatment group or to the sham treatment group. Those in the treatment group have normalisation of SF by 3-weekly erythrocytapheresis while those in the sham treatment group have 3-weekly plasmapheresis and thus do not have normalisation of SF. Patients are blinded to all procedures. All outcome measures are administered prior to and following the course of treatment/sham treatment. Patient reported outcome measures are the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS-primary outcome), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form V.2 (SF36v2) and Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale 2 short form (AIMS2-SF). Liver injury and hepatic fibrosis are assessed with transient elastography (TE), Fibrometer and Hepascore, while oxidative stress is assessed by measurement of urine and serum F2-isoprostanes. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committees of Austin Health, Royal Melbourne Hospital and Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital. Study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference

  19. A novel immunoradiometric assay for human liver ferritin.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shawi, A; Dawnay, A; Landon, J

    1983-01-01

    Rivanol, the cationic salt of an acridine base, has been used as a novel separation procedure in an immunoradiometric assay for human liver ferritin. The separation step is based on the differences in charge and molecular weight between the labelled antibody-ferritin complex and free labelled immunoglobulins. The resultant assay is simple, reproducible and sufficiently sensitive to determine serum concentrations of ferritin. PMID:6403597

  20. Bivariate mixture modeling of transferrin saturation and serum ferritin concentration in Asians, African Americans, Hispanics, and whites in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Mclaren, Christine E.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Chen, Wen-Pin; Barton, James C.; Acton, Ronald T.; Speechley, Mark; Castro, Oswaldo; Adams, Paul C.; Snively, Beverly M.; Harris, Emily L.; Reboussin, David M.; Mclachlan, Geoffrey J.; Bean, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Bivariate mixture modeling was used to analyze joint population distributions of transferrin saturation (TS) and serum ferritin concentration (SF) measured in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study. Four components (C1, C2, C3, and C4) with successively age-adjusted increasing means for TS and SF were identified in data from 26,832 African Americans, 12,620 Asians, 12,264 Hispanics, and 43,254 whites. The largest component, C2, had normal mean TS (21% to 26% for women, 29% to 30% for men) and SF (43–82 μg/L for women, 165–242 μg/L for men), which consisted of component proportions greater than 0.59 for women and greater than 0.68 for men. C3 and C4 had progressively greater mean values for TS and SF with progressively lesser component proportions. C1 had mean TS values less than 16% for women (<20% for men) and SF values less than 28 μg/L for women (<47 μg/L for men). Compared with C2, adjusted odds of iron deficiency were significantly greater in C1 (14.9–47.5 for women, 60.6–3530 for men), adjusted odds of liver disease were significantly greater in C3 and C4 for African-American women and all men, and adjusted odds of any HFE mutation were increased in C3 (1.4–1.8 for women, 1.2–1.9 for men) and in C4 for Hispanic and white women (1.5 and 5.2, respectively) and men (2.8 and 4.7, respectively). Joint mixture modeling identifies a component with lesser SF and TS at risk for iron deficiency and 2 components with greater SF and TS at risk for liver disease or HFE mutations. This approach can identify populations in which hereditary or acquired factors influence metabolism measurement. PMID:18201677

  1. Change of antibody levels to ferritin in the sera of foals after birth: possible passive transfer of maternal anti-ferritin autoantibody via colostrum and age-related anti-ferritin autoantibody production.

    PubMed

    Numata, Masami; Kondo, Takashi; Nambo, Yasuo; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Orino, Koichi

    2013-12-01

    Antibody (immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM or IgA) levels relative to ferritin in six foal sera (three male and three female) after birth (day 0 and 2, 6, 10, 20, 28, 36, 40, 52 and 56 weeks of age) were semi-quantitatively measured with normalization with antibody activity to ferritin in one adult horse serum. After addition of horse spleen ferritin to the serum sample, the complex formed between antibodies to ferritin in the serum and ferritin was co-immunoprecipitated using antibody to horse spleen ferritin. Antibody classes of the co-immnoprecipitate were detected with antibodies specific for horse IgG, IgM or IgA heavy chain. Six adult horse serum samples were found to have ferritin-binding activities in all immunoglobulin classes examined. Although ferritin antibody activities (IgG, IgM and IgA) were scant in the foal sera before sucking colostrum (day 0), their activities increased at 2 weeks of age. IgG antibodies showed a biphasic response and IgM antibody activity increased up to 40 weeks of age. Antibody (IgG, IgM and IgA) activities to ferritin in three colostrum samples were significantly higher than in adult horse serum samples. These results demonstrate that antibody to ferritin in foal serum is derived from colostrum after birth and is produced thereafter. PMID:23607654

  2. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340 Section 866.5340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-storing protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurements of ferritin aid in the diagnosis of...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340 Section 866.5340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-storing protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurements of ferritin aid in the diagnosis of...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340 Section 866.5340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-storing protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurements of ferritin aid in the diagnosis of...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340 Section 866.5340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-storing protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurements of ferritin aid in the diagnosis of...

  6. Ferritin Diversity: Mechanistic Studies, Disease Implications, and Materials Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Robert J.

    2011-07-01

    The study of ferritin includes a rich history of discoveries and scientific progress. Initially, the composition of ferritin was determined. Soon, it was shown that ferritin is a spherical, hollow protein. Eventually, over several decades of research, the structure and some function of this interesting protein was elucidated. However, the ferritin field was not completely satisfied. Today, for example, researchers are interested in refining the details of ferritin function, in discovering the role of ferritin in a variety of diseases, and in using ferritin for materials chemistry applications. The work presented in this dissertation highlights the progress that we have made in each of these three areas: (1) Mechanistic studies: The buffer used during horse spleen ferritin iron loading significantly influences the mineralization process and the quantity of iron deposited in ferritin. The ferrihydrite core of ferritin is crystalline and ordered when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of imidazole buffer. On the other hand, when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of MOPS buffer, the ferrihydrite core is less crystalline and less ordered, and a smaller amount of total iron is loaded in ferritin. We also show that iron can be released from the ferritin core in a non-reductive manner. The rate of Fe3+ release from horse spleen ferritin was measured using the Fe3+-specific chelator desferoxamine. We show that iron release occurs by three kinetic events. (2) Disease studies: In order to better understand iron disruption during disease states, we performed in vitro assays that mimicked chronic kidney disease. We tested the hypothesis that elevated levels of serum phosphate interrupted normal iron binding by transferrin and ferritin. Results show that phosphate competes for iron, forming an iron(III)-phosphate complex that is inaccessible to either transferrin or ferritin. Ferritin samples separated from the iron(III)-phosphate complex shows that as the

  7. Neuroferritinopathy: From ferritin structure modification to pathogenetic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Sonia; Rovida, Ermanna

    2015-01-01

    Neuroferritinopathy is a rare, late-onset, dominantly inherited movement disorder caused by mutations in L-ferritin gene. It is characterized by iron and ferritin aggregate accumulation in brain, normal or low serum ferritin levels and high variable clinical feature. To date, nine causative mutations have been identified and eight of them are frameshift mutations determined by nucleotide(s) insertion in the exon 4 of L-ferritin gene altering the structural conformation of the C-terminus of the L-ferritin subunit. Acting in a dominant negative manner, mutations are responsible for an impairment of the iron storage efficiency of ferritin molecule. Here, we review the main characteristics of neuroferritinopathy and present a computational analysis of some representative recently defined mutations with the purpose to gain new information about the pathogenetic mechanism of the disorder. This is particularly important as neuroferritinopathy can be considered an interesting model to study the relationship between iron, oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. PMID:25772441

  8. Pre-Transplant Cardiovascular Risk Factors Affect Kidney Allograft Survival: A Multi-Center Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Pyo; Bae, Eunjin; Kang, Eunjeong; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Yong-Jin; Oh, Yun Kyu; Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Young Hoon; Lim, Chun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-transplant cardiovascular (CV) risk factors affect the development of CV events even after successful kidney transplantation (KT). However, the impact of pre-transplant CV risk factors on allograft failure (GF) has not been reported. Methods and Findings We analyzed the graft outcomes of 2,902 KT recipients who were enrolled in a multi-center cohort from 1997 to 2012. We calculated the pre-transplant CV risk scores based on the Framingham risk model using age, gender, total cholesterol level, smoking status, and history of hypertension. Vascular disease (a composite of ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease) was noted in 6.5% of the patients. During the median follow-up of 6.4 years, 286 (9.9%) patients had developed GF. In the multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model, pre-transplant vascular disease was associated with an increased risk of GF (HR 2.51; 95% CI 1.66–3.80). The HR for GF (comparing the highest with the lowest tertile regarding the pre-transplant CV risk scores) was 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.23). In the competing risk model, both pre-transplant vascular disease and CV risk score were independent risk factors for GF. Moreover, the addition of the CV risk score, the pre-transplant vascular disease, or both had a better predictability for GF compared to the traditional GF risk factors. Conclusions In conclusion, both vascular disease and pre-transplant CV risk score were independently associated with GF in this multi-center study. Pre-transplant CV risk assessments could be useful in predicting GF in KT recipients. PMID:27501048

  9. Biocompatibility of ferritin-based nanoparticles as targeted MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Jennifer R; Pearl, Valeria M; Denotti, Anna R; Lee, Jonathan B; Swaminathan, Sundararaman; Scindia, Yogesh M; Charlton, Nathan P; Baldelomar, Edwin J; Beeman, Scott C; Bennett, Kevin M

    2016-08-01

    Ferritin is a naturally occurring iron storage protein, proposed as a clinically relevant nanoparticle with applications as a diagnostic and therapeutic agent. Cationic ferritin is a targeted, injectable contrast agent to measure kidney microstructure with MRI. Here, the toxicity of horse spleen ferritin is assessed as a step to clinical translation. Adult male mice received cationic, native and high dose cationic ferritin (CF, NF, or HDCF) or saline and were monitored for 3weeks. Transient weight loss occurred in the ferritin groups with no difference in renal function parameters. Ferritin-injected mice demonstrated a lower serum iron 3weeks after administration. In ferritin-injected animals pre-treated with hydrocortisone, there were no structural or weight differences in the kidneys, liver, lung, heart, or spleen. This study demonstrates a lack of significant detrimental effects of horse-derived ferritin-based nanoparticles at MRI-detectable doses, allowing further exploration of these agents in basic research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:27071333

  10. Relationship between dietary iron intake, corrected for diet reporting error, and serum ferritin in Danish women aged 35-65 years.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, B L; Milman, N; Hansen, G L

    1996-06-01

    Several studies have failed to demonstrate an association between Fe status and intake of dietary Fe. However, in the long term, it seems logical to presume that body Fe reserves are, fundamentally, dependent on the intake of bioavailable dietary Fe. This discrepancy may depend on several factors: (1) interindividual variation in biological availability of dietary Fe (differences in intestinal absorption), (2) interactions between dietary Fe and absorption enhancers and inhibitors, (3) variations in physiological (menstruation, childbirth) or unphysiological (blood donation) Fe losses, (4) the failure to adjust dietary intake data for Fe supplements, (5) uncertain food composition data (discrepancies between calculated and chemically measured Fe content in the diet), and (6) diet reporting error (reported intake of dietary Fe may deviate considerably from the true intake). The present study examined associations between dietary intake of Fe (assessed by diet history interview) and Fe status (assessed by ferritin status) among 167 Danish women aged 35-65 years, who were not blood donors, by taking into account diet reporting error (assessed from p-amino benzoic acid-validated urinary N), physiological blood losses (menstruation, childbirth, abortions), and Fe supplementation. Our results indicate that the lack of a general association between Fe status and dietary Fe intake may, in part, be caused by selective diet reporting error. PMID:8774235

  11. The clinical and molecular epidemiology of pre-transplant vancomycin-resistant enterococci colonization among liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Banach, David B; Peaper, David R; Fortune, Brett E; Emre, Sukru; Dembry, Louise M

    2016-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infections cause significant morbidity in liver transplant recipients. The epidemiology and impact of pre-transplant colonization with VRE among patients who undergo liver transplantation are poorly understood. We conducted an observational cohort study to identify risk factors and outcomes associated with pre-transplant VRE colonization and described the molecular diversity among VRE strains colonizing patients who undergo liver transplantation. Perirectal VRE surveillance cultures were performed prior to transplantation. Repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) testing was used to identify clonality among VRE isolates. Of 61 patients who underwent pre-transplant VRE surveillance and subsequent liver transplantation, 27 (44%) were colonized with VRE. In multivariate analysis, pre-transplant VRE colonization was associated with central venous catheterization (OR 9.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]= 1.3-70.2, p = 0.03) and rifaximin use (OR 15.4, 95% CI 1.5-159.7, p = 0.02). Pre-transplant VRE colonization was associated with more hospital days post-transplant (26.6 vs. 16.1 d, p = 0.04). Of VRE-colonized patients analyzed with rep-PCR, 68% were colonized with the same strain as another patient in the cohort. Active surveillance identifies VRE-colonized patients who may benefit from targeted antimicrobial prophylaxis and enhanced infection prevention measures to prevent VRE spread. The relationship between rifaximin receipt and VRE colonization warrants further study. The identification of similar VRE isolates may suggest linked transmission during pre-transplant hospitalizations, which should be further investigated in prospective studies. PMID:26780305

  12. Pre-transplant weight loss predicts inferior outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Becker, Natalia; Benner, Axel; Penack, Olaf; Platzbecker, Uwe; Stölzel, Friedrich; Bornhäuser, Martin; Hegenbart, Ute; Ho, Anthony D.; Dreger, Peter; Luft, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) represents a curative therapeutic option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM) limit treatment efficacy. Based on our previous observation in acute myeloid leukemia we investigated the impact of pre-transplant weight loss on post-transplant outcome in MDS patients. A total of 111 patients diagnosed with MDS according to WHO criteria transplanted between 2000 and 2012 in three different transplant centers were included into the analysis. Data on weight loss were collected from medical records prior to conditioning therapy and 3–6 months earlier. Patient, disease and transplant characteristics did not differ between patients with weight loss (2–5%, n = 17; > 5%, n = 17) and those without (n = 77). In a mixed effect model, weight loss was associated with higher risk MDS (p = 0.046). In multivariable analyses, pre-transplant weight loss exceeding 5% was associated with a higher incidence of relapse (p < 0.001) and NRM (p = 0.007). Pre-transplant weight loss of 2–5% and > 5% were independent predictors of worse disease-free (p = 0.023 and p < 0.001, respectively) and overall survival (p = 0.043 and p < 0.001, respectively). Our retrospective study suggests that MDS patients losing weight prior to alloSCT have an inferior outcome after transplantation. Prospective studies addressing pre-transplant nutritional interventions are highly warranted. PMID:26360778

  13. Biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in idiopathic hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hultcrantz, R.; Angelin, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.E.; Ewerth, S.; Einarsson, K.

    1989-06-01

    The role of biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in iron overload was studied and evaluated. Ten patients with idiopathic hemochromatosis and two groups of controls (14 gallstone patients and 16 healthy subjects) were included. Liver tissue (obtained by percutaneous or operative biopsy) was investigated with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy in combination with x-ray microanalysis. Fasting bile samples were obtained through duodenal aspiration or at cholecystectomy. Iron was determined in liver tissue and bile using atomic absorption spectroscopy, and ferritin was determined in serum and bile with a radioimmunoassay technique. All patients with hemochromatosis had iron-positive staining as seen in light microscopy. Electron microscopy showed iron-containing proteins in the lysosomes and cytosol of liver parenchymal cells, and this observation was supported by x-ray microanalysis. Hepatic iron concentration was increased about eightfold in the patients with hemochromatosis (p less than 0.001). Biliary iron concentration, expressed per millimole of bile acid, was increased about twofold (p less than 0.05) and biliary ferritin concentration about fivefold (p less than 0.001) in hemochromatosis. Four of the patients with hemochromatosis were reexamined after completed treatment with venesection; this resulted in normalized biliary concentrations of iron and ferritin. We conclude that biliary secretion of ferritin occurs in humans and that both iron and ferritin excretion are enhanced in hepatic iron overload. The apparently limited capacity of biliary iron excretion may be of importance for the hepatic iron accumulation in hemochromatosis.

  14. [Red cell zinc protoporphyrin and its ratio to serum ferritin (ZPP/logSF index) in the detection of iron deficiency in patients with end-stage renal failure on hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Matuszkiewicz-Rowińska, Joanna; Ostrowski, Grzegorz; Niemczyk, Stanisław; Przedlacki, Jerzy; Wardyn, Kazimierz; Puka, Janusz; Włodarczyk, Dariusz; Switalski, Marek; Zakrzewska, Teresa; Ostrowski, Kazimierz

    2003-07-01

    Monitoring of iron metabolism has become a major clinical issue in end-stage renal patients undergoing hemodialysis. It can be done at three levels: storage, transport and marrow availability. The objective of that study was to evaluate if a combination of an iron storage marker, serum ferritin (SF) with red cell zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), a marker of iron availability for erythron, will improve diagnostic value of both tests. In a baseline survey in the population of 186 haemodialysis patients (75% treated with rHuEpo), the following parameters were determined: complete blood count, serum transferrin saturation (TSAT), transferrin, SF, hypochromic red cells % (HRC) and ZPP; the ZPP/logSF ratio was calculated. Iron deficiency was defined as a fernitin saturation--TSAT < 20%. In the second part of the study, 24 pts with SF < 50 ng/ml were given 50 mg of i.v. iron weekly for three months, then the same tests were repeated. During that time the doses of rhuEpo were stable. An increase in hemoglobin of > 1.0 g/dl was considered as a positive response. In 186 studied patients mean SF was 274 +/- 335 ng/ml, and mean ZPP was 68 +/- 44 mumol/mol heme. A ZPP/logSF ratio > or = 40 had the best combination of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in detecting iron deficiency (76% and 83% vs: 56% and 89% for ZPP > 90 mumol/mol heme, 84% and 34% for HRC > 5%, 68% and 58% for HRC > 10%) and the strong correlations with all other examined parameters were found. The index showed also the highest correlation with the response to the i.v. iron (r = 59; p < 0.01) of the tests evaluated. After three months the values of ZPP/logSF ratio decreased from 80 +/- 105 to 39 +/- 19 (p < 0.01). A significant difference between responders and nonresponders was found for basal ZPP/logSF (p < 0.05) but not for ZPP. Our data suggest that the ZPP/logSF index provides a new valuable parameter for the identification of hemodialysis patients with iron deficiency and the prediction an erythropoietic

  15. Multilayer Ferritin Array for Bionanobattery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R., Jr. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A thin-film electrode for a bio-nanobattery is produced by consecutively depositing arrays of a ferritin protein on a substrate, employing a spin self-assembly procedure. By this procedure, a first ferritin layer is first formed on the substrate, followed by building a second, oppositely-charged ferritin layer on the top of the first ferritin layer to form a bilayer structure. Oppositely-charged ferritin layers are subsequently deposited on top of each other until a desired number of bilayer structures is produced. An ordered, uniform, stable and robust, thin-film electrode material of enhanced packing density is presented, which provides optimal charge density for the bio-nanobattery.

  16. Associations of Pre-transplant Prescription Narcotic Use with Clinical Complications after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lentine, Krista L.; Lam, Ngan N.; Xiao, Huiling; Tuttle-Newhall, Janet E.; Axelrod, David; Brennan, Daniel C.; Dharnidharka, Vikas R.; Yuan, Hui; Nazzal, Mustafa; Zheng, Jie; Schnitzler, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Associations of narcotic use before kidney transplantation with post-transplant clinical outcomes are not well described. Methods We examined integrated national transplant registry, pharmacy records, and Medicare billing claims to follow 16,322 kidney transplant recipients, of whom 28.3% filled a narcotic prescription in the year before transplantation. Opioid analgesic fills were normalized to morphine equivalents (ME) and expressed as mg/kg exposures (approximate quartiles: 0.1– 1.7, 1.8–5.4, 5.5–23.7, and ≥23.8 mg/kg, respectively). Post-transplant cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, accidents, substance abuse, and non-compliance events were identified using diagnosis codes on Medicare billing claims. Adjusted associations of ME level with post-transplant complications were quantified by multivariate Cox regression. Results The incidence of complications at 3 years post-transplant among those with the highest pre-transplant ME exposure compared to no use included: ventricular arrhythmias, 1.1% vs. 0.2% (p<0.001); cardiac arrest, 4.7% vs. 2.7% (p<0.05); hypotension, 14% vs. 8% (p<0.0001); hypercapnia, 1.6% vs. 0.9% (p<0.05); mental status changes, 5.3% vs. 2.7% (p<0.001); drug abuse/dependence, 7.0% vs. 1.7% (p<0.0001); alcohol abuse, 1.8% vs. 0.6% (p=0.0001); accidents, 0.9% vs. 0.3% (p<0.05); and non-compliance, 3.5% vs. 2.3% (p<0.05). In multivariate analyses, transplant recipients with the highest level of pre-transplant narcotic use had approximately 2-to-4-times the risks of post-transplant ventricular arrhythmias, mental status changes, drug abuse, alcohol abuse, and accidents compared with non-users, and 35% to 45% higher risks of cardiac arrest and hypotension. Conclusion Although associations may reflect underlying conditions or behaviors, high-level prescription narcotic use before kidney transplantation predicts increased risk of clinical complications after transplantation. PMID:25832723

  17. Pre-Transplant Screening for Latent Adenovirus in Donors and Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Piatti, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are frequent cause of slight self-limiting infections in immune competent subjects, while causing life-threatening and disseminated diseases in immunocompromised patients, particularly in the subjects affected by acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and in bone marrow and organ transplant recipients. Here, infections interest lungs, liver, encephalon, heart, kidney and gastro enteric tract. To date, human adenoviruses comprise 51 serotypes grouped into seven species, among which species C especially possesses the capability to persist in infected tissues. From numerous works, it emerges that in the recipient, because of loss of immune-competence, both primary infection, via the graft or from the environment, and reactivated endogenous viruses can be responsible for transplantation related adenovirus disease. The transplants management should include the evaluation of anti-adenovirus pre-transplant screening similar to that concerning cytomegalovirus. The serological screening on cytomegalovirus immunity is currently performed to prevent viral reactivation from grafts and recipient, the viral spread and dissemination to different organs and apparatus, and potentially lethal outcome. PMID:27006724

  18. Insect Ferritins: typical or atypical?

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Daphne Q. D.; Winzerling, Joy J.

    2010-01-01

    Insects transmit millions of cases of disease each year, and cost millions of dollars in agricultural losses. The control of insect-borne diseases is vital for numerous developing countries, and the management of agricultural insect pests is a very serious business for developed countries. Control methods should target insect-specific traits in order to avoid non-target effects, especially in mammals. Since insect cells have had a billion years of evolutionary divergence from those of vertebrates, they differ in many ways that might be promising for the insect control field—especially, in iron metabolism because current studies have indicated that significant differences exist between insect and mammalian systems. Insect iron metabolism differs from that of vertebrates in the following respects. Insect ferritins have a heavier mass than mammalian ferritins. Unlike their mammalian counterparts, the insect ferritin subunits are often glycosylated and are synthesized with a signal peptide. The crystal structure of insect ferritin also shows a tetrahedral symmetry consisting of 12 heavy chain and 12 light chain subunits in contrast to that of mammalian ferritin that exhibits an octahedral symmetry made of 24 heavy chain and 24 light chain subunits. Insect ferritins associate primarily with the vacuolar system and serve as iron transporters—quite the opposite of the mammalian ferritins, which are mainly cytoplasmic and serve as iron storage proteins. This review will discuss these differences. PMID:20230873

  19. Impact of Pre-transplant Therapy and Depth of Disease Response prior to Autologous Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Vij, Ravi; Kumar, Shaji; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Zhong, Xiaobo; Huang, Jiaxing; Dispenzieri, Angela; Abidi, Muneer H.; Bird, Jennifer M.; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila L.; Kyle, Robert A.; Landsburg, Daniel J.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Munker, Reinhold; Roy, Vivek; Sharma, Manish; Vogl, Dan T.; Wirk, Baldeep; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with multiple myeloma (MM), who are eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT), typically receive a finite period of initial therapy prior to ASCT. It is not clear if patients with suboptimal (less than a partial) response to initial therapy benefit from additional alternative therapy with intent to maximize pre-transplant response. We identified 539 patients with MM who had an ASCT after having achieved less than a partial response (PR) to first line induction chemotherapy between 1995 and 2010. These patients were then divided into two groups: those who received additional salvage chemotherapy prior to ASCT (n=324) and those who had no additional salvage chemotherapy immediately prior to ASCT (n=215). Additional pre-transplant chemotherapy resulted in deepening responses in 68% (complete response in 8% and PR in 60%). On multivariate analysis there was no impact of pre-transplant salvage chemotherapy on treatment related mortality (TRM), risk for relapse, progression free or overall survival. In conclusion, for patients achieving a less than PR to initial induction therapy including with novel agent combinations, additional pre-ASCT salvage chemotherapy improved the depth of response and pre-ASCT disease status but was not associated with survival benefit. PMID:25445028

  20. Magneto-Optics of Ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobek, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Ferritins are the metalloproteides present in plant and animal cells. Their micelleous tertiary structure allows iron accumulation in the form of hydratated oxides and phosphates. Thus, ferritin is a large spherical macromolecular protein with iron compounds in the cavity created by a peptide shell. Because of the spherical shape, ferritin macromolecule should not manifest magnetic anisotropy; however, in solution it shows the induced magnetic birefringence (Cotton-Mouton effect) and changes in intensity of the scattered light components. Therefore, the Cotton-Mouton effect, Rayleigh light scattering and nonlinear light scattering in dc magnetic field, were measured at room temperature for 100 mM NaCl solutions of apoferritin/ferritin loaded with different contents of Fe atoms/molecule. Analysis of the results has shown that the deformation of linear optical polarizability induced in the ferritin by a magnetic field and the orientation of the induced and permanent magnetic dipole moment by this field are the main sources of the magneto-optical phenomena observed. The results suggest the simultaneous diamagnetic and superparamagnetic behavior of the ferritin biomacromolecule.

  1. H-Ferritin Is Preferentially Incorporated by Human Erythroid Cells through Transferrin Receptor 1 in a Threshold-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Soichiro; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Mizumoto, Chisaki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is an iron-storage protein composed of different ratios of 24 light (L) and heavy (H) subunits. The serum level of ferritin is a clinical marker of the body’s iron level. Transferrin receptor (TFR)1 is the receptor not only for transferrin but also for H-ferritin, but how it binds two different ligands and the blood cell types that preferentially incorporate H-ferritin remain unknown. To address these questions, we investigated hematopoietic cell-specific ferritin uptake by flow cytometry. Alexa Fluor 488-labeled H-ferritin was preferentially incorporated by erythroid cells among various hematopoietic cell lines examined, and was almost exclusively incorporated by bone marrow erythroblasts among human primary hematopoietic cells of various lineages. H-ferritin uptake by erythroid cells was strongly inhibited by unlabeled H-ferritin but was only partially inhibited by a large excess of holo-transferrin. On the other hand, internalization of labeled holo-transferrin by these cells was not inhibited by H-ferritin. Chinese hamster ovary cells lacking functional endogenous TFR1 but expressing human TFR1 with a mutated RGD sequence, which is required for transferrin binding, efficiently incorporated H-ferritin, indicating that TFR1 has distinct binding sites for H-ferritin and holo-transferrin. H-ferritin uptake by these cells required a threshold level of cell surface TFR1 expression, whereas there was no threshold for holo-transferrin uptake. The requirement for a threshold level of TFR1 expression can explain why among primary human hematopoietic cells, only erythroblasts efficiently take up H-ferritin. PMID:26441243

  2. H-Ferritin Is Preferentially Incorporated by Human Erythroid Cells through Transferrin Receptor 1 in a Threshold-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Soichiro; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Mizumoto, Chisaki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H Phillip; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is an iron-storage protein composed of different ratios of 24 light (L) and heavy (H) subunits. The serum level of ferritin is a clinical marker of the body's iron level. Transferrin receptor (TFR)1 is the receptor not only for transferrin but also for H-ferritin, but how it binds two different ligands and the blood cell types that preferentially incorporate H-ferritin remain unknown. To address these questions, we investigated hematopoietic cell-specific ferritin uptake by flow cytometry. Alexa Fluor 488-labeled H-ferritin was preferentially incorporated by erythroid cells among various hematopoietic cell lines examined, and was almost exclusively incorporated by bone marrow erythroblasts among human primary hematopoietic cells of various lineages. H-ferritin uptake by erythroid cells was strongly inhibited by unlabeled H-ferritin but was only partially inhibited by a large excess of holo-transferrin. On the other hand, internalization of labeled holo-transferrin by these cells was not inhibited by H-ferritin. Chinese hamster ovary cells lacking functional endogenous TFR1 but expressing human TFR1 with a mutated RGD sequence, which is required for transferrin binding, efficiently incorporated H-ferritin, indicating that TFR1 has distinct binding sites for H-ferritin and holo-transferrin. H-ferritin uptake by these cells required a threshold level of cell surface TFR1 expression, whereas there was no threshold for holo-transferrin uptake. The requirement for a threshold level of TFR1 expression can explain why among primary human hematopoietic cells, only erythroblasts efficiently take up H-ferritin. PMID:26441243

  3. Concerns regarding the financial aspects of kidney transplantation: perspectives of pre-transplant patients and their family members

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Sumitha; Ephraim, Patti L.; Ameling, Jessica M.; Purnell, Tanjala S.; Lewis-Boyer, LaPricia L.; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2015-01-01

    Background African American and non-African American pre-transplant patients’ and their families’ concerns about the financial costs of kidney transplantation have not been well studied. Methods We conducted structured group interviews among pre-transplant patients (seven African American, five non-African American) and their family members (six African American, five non-African American) to identify their concerns about transplant health insurance coverage, out-of-pocket expenses, and living donor expenses. We reviewed transcribed group audio recordings and identified common discussion themes. Results African American and non-African American patients and family members expressed uncertainty about which transplant-related costs were covered by health insurance and wanted information about how to choose insurance policies accordingly. Patients were particularly concerned about the impact of pre-existing illness on securing optimal health insurance, while family members wanted information about non-insurance-based financial resources. Both patients and family members expressed concern about paying for immunosuppressant medications and about gradual loss of insurance benefits after transplantation. Both patients and family members also expressed concern about potential financial hardships for living donors. Conclusion African American and non-African American pre-transplant patients and families expressed a broad range of concerns about transplant health insurance policies, out-of-pocket expenses, non-insurance-based financial resources, and resources to address donors’ financial burden. Efforts to improve education and develop more comprehensive transplant insurance policies are needed to facilitate informed decision-making for potential transplant recipients and donors. PMID:25066730

  4. Pre-transplant assessment of CMV-specific immune response by Elispot assay in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Rittà, Massimo; Costa, Cristina; Sidoti, Francesca; Ballocco, Cinzia; Ranghino, Andrea; Messina, Maria; Biancone, Luigi; Cavallo, Rossana

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) primary infection or re-activation in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, with patients with IgG-CMV D+/R- sero-matching at greater risk. The impact of pre-transplant CMV-specific host cellular immunity on the long-term risk of CMV replication in kidney transplants (KT) was prospectively evaluated in eighty patients by CMV-EliSpot assay. The study population included 54 male and 26 female recipients, with CMV-IgG distribution: 60 D+/R+, 11 D-/R+, 7 D+/R-, 2 D-/R-. At pre-transplantation, 49 KT (61.3%) were CMV-responders by EliSpot. At 3-month follow up, 16 (32.7%) out of 49 CMV-responders showed CMV blood infection, compared to 8 (25.8%) out of 31 non-responders. No further episode of CMV viraemia was reported in the responder group, in comparison to 15 out 31 non-responders (48.4%) showing at least one episode of CMV-DNAemia at 12-month follow-up. Baseline CMV-IgG serology showed a strong correlation with EliSpot determinations; KT recipients exhibiting at least one episode of CMV viraemia at 12-month follow-up showed lower baseline CMV-EliSpot values than those without signs of CMV replication. The study suggests that monitoring CMV-specific T-cell responses at pre-transplantation by EliSpot assay may be useful for predicting the post-transplantation risk of CMV infection and reactivation. PMID:26147141

  5. Ferritin and the response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Orino, K; Lehman, L; Tsuji, Y; Ayaki, H; Torti, S V; Torti, F M

    2001-01-01

    Iron is required for normal cell growth and proliferation. However, excess iron is potentially harmful, as it can catalyse the formation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) via Fenton chemistry. For this reason, cells have evolved highly regulated mechanisms for controlling intracellular iron levels. Chief among these is the sequestration of iron in ferritin. Ferritin is a 24 subunit protein composed of two subunit types, termed H and L. The ferritin H subunit has a potent ferroxidase activity that catalyses the oxidation of ferrous iron, whereas ferritin L plays a role in iron nucleation and protein stability. In the present study we report that increased synthesis of both subunits of ferritin occurs in HeLa cells exposed to oxidative stress. An increase in the activity of iron responsive element binding proteins in response to oxidative stress was also observed. However, this activation was transient, allowing ferritin protein induction to subsequently proceed. To assess whether ferritin induction reduced the accumulation of ROS, and to test the relative contribution of ferritin H and L subunits in this process, we prepared stable transfectants that overexpressed either ferritin H or ferritin L cDNA under control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter. We observed that overexpression of either ferritin H or ferritin L reduced the accumulation of ROS in response to oxidant challenge. PMID:11415455

  6. The relation between body iron store and ferritin, and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Pourmoghaddas, Ali; Sanei, Hamid; Garakyaraghi, Mohammad; Esteki-Ghashghaei, Fatemeh; Gharaati, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Iron is essential for many physiological processes; whereas, iron overload has been known as a risk factor in progression of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of serum ferritin levels, which are known as an indicator of body iron stored in the incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS In a case-control study, we evaluated 432 eligible men who underwent coronary angiography at Chamran Cardiology Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. They were separated into two groups of case (with CAD) and control (without CAD). All subjects had given written informed consents. Then, the blood samples were taken after 12-14 hours of fast by a biologist for measuring cardiovascular risk factors and body iron stores, including serum ferritin, serum iron, and total iron binding capacity (TIBC). For statistical analyses, chi-square test, Student’s t-test, one-way ANOVA, and the logistic regression were used. RESULTS In the present study, 212 participants with CAD in the case group and 220 participants free of CAD in the control group were included in the analysis. At baseline, there were significant differences in serum ferritin (P < 0.001) and other cardiovascular risk factors between the two groups. Moreover, when other risk factors of CVD were included in the model, serum ferritin [Odd Ratio (OR) = 1.006, 95% confidence interval of 95% (95% CI) 1.00-1.01, P = 0.045] and serum ferritin ≥ 200 (OR = 4.49, 95% CI 1.72-11.70, P < 0.001) were associated with CAD. CONCLUSION High iron store, as assessed by serum ferritin, was associated with the increased risk of CAD. Furthermore, it was a strong and independent risk factor in the incident of atherosclerosis in the Iranian male population. PMID:24963311

  7. Ferritin Assembly in Enterocytes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Arellano, Abraham; Vásquez-Procopio, Johana; Gambis, Alexis; Blowes, Liisa M; Steller, Hermann; Mollereau, Bertrand; Missirlis, Fanis

    2016-01-01

    Ferritins are protein nanocages that accumulate inside their cavity thousands of oxidized iron atoms bound to oxygen and phosphates. Both characteristic types of eukaryotic ferritin subunits are present in secreted ferritins from insects, but here dimers between Ferritin 1 Heavy Chain Homolog (Fer1HCH) and Ferritin 2 Light Chain Homolog (Fer2LCH) are further stabilized by disulfide-bridge in the 24-subunit complex. We addressed ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo using novel transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster. We concentrated on the intestine, where the ferritin induction process can be controlled experimentally by dietary iron manipulation. We showed that the expression pattern of Fer2LCH-Gal4 lines recapitulated iron-dependent endogenous expression of the ferritin subunits and used these lines to drive expression from UAS-mCherry-Fer2LCH transgenes. We found that the Gal4-mediated induction of mCherry-Fer2LCH subunits was too slow to effectively introduce them into newly formed ferritin complexes. Endogenous Fer2LCH and Fer1HCH assembled and stored excess dietary iron, instead. In contrast, when flies were genetically manipulated to co-express Fer2LCH and mCherry-Fer2LCH simultaneously, both subunits were incorporated with Fer1HCH in iron-loaded ferritin complexes. Our study provides fresh evidence that, in insects, ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo are tightly regulated. PMID:26861293

  8. Ferritin Assembly in Enterocytes of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Arellano, Abraham; Vásquez-Procopio, Johana; Gambis, Alexis; Blowes, Liisa M.; Steller, Hermann; Mollereau, Bertrand; Missirlis, Fanis

    2016-01-01

    Ferritins are protein nanocages that accumulate inside their cavity thousands of oxidized iron atoms bound to oxygen and phosphates. Both characteristic types of eukaryotic ferritin subunits are present in secreted ferritins from insects, but here dimers between Ferritin 1 Heavy Chain Homolog (Fer1HCH) and Ferritin 2 Light Chain Homolog (Fer2LCH) are further stabilized by disulfide-bridge in the 24-subunit complex. We addressed ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo using novel transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster. We concentrated on the intestine, where the ferritin induction process can be controlled experimentally by dietary iron manipulation. We showed that the expression pattern of Fer2LCH-Gal4 lines recapitulated iron-dependent endogenous expression of the ferritin subunits and used these lines to drive expression from UAS-mCherry-Fer2LCH transgenes. We found that the Gal4-mediated induction of mCherry-Fer2LCH subunits was too slow to effectively introduce them into newly formed ferritin complexes. Endogenous Fer2LCH and Fer1HCH assembled and stored excess dietary iron, instead. In contrast, when flies were genetically manipulated to co-express Fer2LCH and mCherry-Fer2LCH simultaneously, both subunits were incorporated with Fer1HCH in iron-loaded ferritin complexes. Our study provides fresh evidence that, in insects, ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo are tightly regulated. PMID:26861293

  9. Ferritin associates with marginal band microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Infante, Anthony A.; Infante, Dzintra; Chan, M.-C.; How, P.-C.; Kutschera, Waltraud; Linhartova, Irena; Muellner, Ernst W.; Wiche, Gerhard; Propst, Friedrich . E-mail: friedrich.propst@univie.ac.at

    2007-05-01

    We characterized chicken erythrocyte and human platelet ferritin by biochemical studies and immunofluorescence. Erythrocyte ferritin was found to be a homopolymer of H-ferritin subunits, resistant to proteinase K digestion, heat stable, and contained iron. In mature chicken erythrocytes and human platelets, ferritin was localized at the marginal band, a ring-shaped peripheral microtubule bundle, and displayed properties of bona fide microtubule-associated proteins such as tau. Red blood cell ferritin association with the marginal band was confirmed by temperature-induced disassembly-reassembly of microtubules. During erythrocyte differentiation, ferritin co-localized with coalescing microtubules during marginal band formation. In addition, ferritin was found in the nuclei of mature erythrocytes, but was not detectable in those of bone marrow erythrocyte precursors. These results suggest that ferritin has a function in marginal band formation and possibly in protection of the marginal band from damaging effects of reactive oxygen species by sequestering iron in the mature erythrocyte. Moreover, our data suggest that ferritin and syncolin, a previously identified erythrocyte microtubule-associated protein, are identical. Nuclear ferritin might contribute to transcriptional silencing or, alternatively, constitute a ferritin reservoir.

  10. Impact of pre-transplant pulmonary infection developed in horizontal laminar flow unit on the outcome of subsequent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    He, Gan-Lin; Chang, Ying-Jun; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yu; Liu, Kai-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background So far, there is very little literature on how pre-transplant pulmonary infection developed in horizontal laminar flow unit (HLFU) affects outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on allo-HSCT recipients who were diagnosed with pre-transplant pulmonary infection developed in HLFU between January 2012 and December 2012. Various tests were analyzed to evaluate the overall survival (OS) and pulmonary infection rate after allo-HSCT. Results Among 317 patients who received allo-HSCT from related donors, 7 cases of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical transplantation reported a fever, cough, and other symptoms before transplantation. Chest radiography findings showed pulmonary infection, and the C-reactive protein (CRP) level was higher than normal, which confirmed pulmonary infection (incidence rate 2.21%). The Breslow test suggested that the early survival rate was lower in the group with pre-transplant pulmonary infection than in the group without pre-transplant pulmonary infection (OS: 28.4 vs. 42.4 months; P=0.023); the early survival rate was lower in patients with a pulmonary infection accompanied by bilateral pleural effusion than in patients without pleural effusion (OS: 1.5 vs. 36.3 months; P=0.010). In the first month after transplantation, the difference in the CD4CD45RO+CD45RA- and CD4CD45RO-CD45RA+ between the groups with and without pre-transplant pulmonary infection was statistically significant (P<0.05). Patients with pre-transplant pulmonary infection who survived >3 years had a higher rate of pulmonary infection in the first 2 months after allo-HSCT than those without pre-transplant pulmonary infection [100% (5/5 patients) vs. 38.1% (118/310); χ2=5.542, P=0.019]. Conclusions Development of pre-transplant pulmonary infection in the HLFU in patients with hematological malignancies who receive HLA-haploidentical HSCT is associated with an increased risk

  11. Haemoglobin and ferritin concentrations of pregnant women at term

    PubMed Central

    Adediran, A; Gbadegesin, A; Adeyemo, T A; Akinbami, A A; Akanmu, A S; Osunkalu, V; Ogbenna, A A; Oremosu, A

    2011-01-01

    Background Anaemia in pregnancy is defined as haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations of less than 11 g/dL while low ferritin is defined as serum ferritin (SR) levels of less than 10 µg/L. Hb and ferritin concentrations of pregnant women at term were determined to establish their mean values and to determine the prevalence of anaemia in our locality. Methods Haemoglobin and ferritin levels of 170 non-smoking and HIV-negative pregnant women were determined at term. The majority 143 of 170 (84.1%) of the pregnant women recruited for the study, booked at the beginning of the second trimester and received 200 mg elemental iron in three divided doses and 5 mg folic acid daily which were commenced at booking. Five millilitres of blood were collected from each patient at term into EDTA bottles for full blood count analysis and another 5 mL into plain bottles for SR assay. Results The mean Hb and ferritin values were 10.9 ± 1.9 and 47.84 ± 98.39 µg/L, respectively. The prevalence of anaemia at term was 46.4%. Only 11.2% (19 of 170) of pregnant women at term had low SR (iron stores). A statistically significant relationship was found between women's education and SR (P = 0.032). Booking status also correlated directly with SR and haemoglobin concentrations, while increasing age and parity did not. Conclusion About half of the patients were anaemic. Iron deficiency is not the major cause of anaemia in pregnancy in this study because the majority of the pregnant women had normal iron stores. Education and booking status are possible factors that contribute to anaemia.

  12. Iron in Parkinson disease, blood diseases, malaria and ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauminger, E. R.; Nowik, I.

    1998-12-01

    The concentration of iron in Substantia nigra, the part of the brain which is involved in Parkinson disease, has been found by Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) to be ~ 160 μg/g wet tissue and ~ 670 μg/g dry weight, both in control and Parkinson samples. All the iron observed by MS in these samples is ferritin-like iron. In several blood diseases, large amounts of ferritin-like iron have been observed in red blood cells. Desferral removed iron from serum, but not from red blood cells. The iron compound in the malarial pigment of human blood infected by P. falciparum was found to be hemin-like, whereas the pigment iron in rats infected by P. berghei was different from any known iron porphyrin.

  13. FERRITIN H INDUCTION BY HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Di, Xiumin; Torti, Suzy V.; Torti, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    Because both iron deficiency and iron excess are deleterious to normal cell function, the intracellular level of iron must be tightly controlled. Ferritin, an iron binding protein, regulates iron balance by storing iron in a bioavailable but non-toxic form. Ferritin protein comprises two subunits: ferritin H, which contains ferroxidase activity, and ferritin L. Here we demonstrate that ferritin H mRNA and protein are induced by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC inhibitors), a promising class of anti-cancer drugs, in cultured human cancer cells. Deletion analysis and EMSA assays reveal that the induction of ferritin H occurs at a transcriptional level via Sp1 and NF-Y binding sites near the transcriptional start site of the human ferritin H promoter. Classically, HDAC inhibitors modulate gene expression by increasing histone acetylation. However, ChIP assays demonstrate that HDAC inhibitors induce ferritin H transcription by increasing NF-Y binding to the ferritin H promoter without changes in histone acetylation. These results identify ferritin H as a new target of HDAC inhibitors, and recruitment of NF-Y as a novel mechanism of action of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:20385107

  14. Ferritin-stimulated lipid peroxidation, lysosomal leak, and macroautophagy promote lysosomal "metastability" in primary hepatocytes determining in vitro cell survival.

    PubMed

    Krenn, Margit A; Schürz, Melanie; Teufl, Bernhard; Uchida, Koji; Eckl, Peter M; Bresgen, Nikolaus

    2015-03-01

    Several pathologies are associated with elevated levels of serum ferritin, for which growth inhibitory properties have been reported; however, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly defined. Previously we have described cytotoxic properties of isoferritins released from primary hepatocytes in vitro, which induce apoptosis in an iron and oxidative stress-dependent mode. Here we show that this ferritin species stimulates endosome clustering and giant endosome formation in primary hepatocytes accompanied by enhanced lysosomal membrane permeability (LMP). In parallel, protein modification by lipid peroxidation-derived 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) is strongly promoted by ferritin, the HNE-modified proteins (HNE-P) showing remarkable aggregation. Emphasizing the prooxidant context, GSH is rapidly depleted and the GSH/GSSG ratio is substantially declining in ferritin-treated cells. Furthermore, ferritin triggers a transient upregulation of macroautophagy which is abolished by iron chelation and apparently supports HNE-P clearance. Macroautophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine strongly amplifies ferritin cytotoxicity in a time- and concentration-dependent mode, suggesting an important role of macroautophagy on cellular responses to ferritin endocytosis. Moreover, pointing at an involvement of lysosomal proteolysis, ferritin cytotoxicity and lysosome fragility are aggravated by the protease inhibitor leupeptin. In contrast, EGF which suppresses ferritin-induced cell death attenuates ferritin-mediated LMP. In conclusion, we propose that HNE-P accumulation, lysosome dysfunction, and macroautophagy stimulated by ferritin endocytosis provoke lysosomal "metastability" in primary hepatocytes which permits cell survival as long as in- and extrinsic determinants (e.g., antioxidant availability, damage repair, EGF signaling) keep the degree of lysosomal destabilization below cell death-inducing thresholds. PMID:25532933

  15. Effects of radiofrequency radiation on human ferritin: an in vitro enzymun assay.

    PubMed

    Fattahi-Asl, Jafar; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Molood; Karbalae, Mojtaba; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Milad; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Hamid Reza

    2012-10-01

    Ferritin is a macromolecule and is responsible for the long term iron storage function in human serum and plasma. Recent studies have highlighted the role of cell phone exposure on central nervous system, immune function and reproduction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the human serum ferritin level could be interfered by the exposure to the 900 MHz GSM cell phones. Fifty human serum wells from 25 normal healthy donors were labeled with ruthenium to form a sandwich complex based on an immunoassay technique. All of them were placed into two batches, and the well heads in the first batch were exposed to 900 MHz exposure emitted from a speech mode cell phone (Nokia, Model 1202, India) for 30 min. Unexposed batch was served as the control sample under identical conditions and was compared with the exposed one in quantitative determination of ferritin using the Wilcoxon test with criterion level of P = 0.050. Human serum wells in the exposed batch showed a significant decrease in serum ferritin relative to the control batch (P = 0.029). The average ± SD ferritin level in the exposed batch was 84.94 ± 1.04 μg/L while it was 87.25 ± 0.83 μg/L for the unexposed batch. Radiofrequency electromagnetic waves emitted from cell phones may lead to oxidative stress and rapid diffusion of the human ferritin level in an in vitro enzymun assay. Also, the enzyme activity can be affected. Effects of exposure from mobile phones must be considered further. PMID:23724375

  16. Optimization of pre-transplantation conditions to enhance the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Haque, Nazmul; Kasim, Noor Hayaty Abu; Rahman, Mohammad Tariqur

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered a potential tool for cell based regenerative therapy due to their immunomodulatory property, differentiation potentials, trophic activity as well as large donor pool. Poor engraftment and short term survival of transplanted MSCs are recognized as major limitations which were linked to early cellular ageing, loss of chemokine markers during ex vivo expansion, and hyper-immunogenicity to xeno-contaminated MSCs. These problems can be minimized by ex vivo expansion of MSCs in hypoxic culture condition using well defined or xeno-free media i.e., media supplemented with growth factors, human serum or platelet lysate. In addition to ex vivo expansion in hypoxic culture condition using well defined media, this review article describes the potentials of transient adaptation of expanded MSCs in autologous serum supplemented medium prior to transplantation for long term regenerative benefits. Such transient adaptation in autologous serum supplemented medium may help to increase chemokine receptor expression and tissue specific differentiation of ex vivo expanded MSCs, thus would provide long term regenerative benefits. PMID:25678851

  17. Optimization of Pre-transplantation Conditions to Enhance the Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Nazmul; Kasim, Noor Hayaty Abu; Rahman, Mohammad Tariqur

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered a potential tool for cell based regenerative therapy due to their immunomodulatory property, differentiation potentials, trophic activity as well as large donor pool. Poor engraftment and short term survival of transplanted MSCs are recognized as major limitations which were linked to early cellular ageing, loss of chemokine markers during ex vivo expansion, and hyper-immunogenicity to xeno-contaminated MSCs. These problems can be minimized by ex vivo expansion of MSCs in hypoxic culture condition using well defined or xeno-free media i.e., media supplemented with growth factors, human serum or platelet lysate. In addition to ex vivo expansion in hypoxic culture condition using well defined media, this review article describes the potentials of transient adaptation of expanded MSCs in autologous serum supplemented medium prior to transplantation for long term regenerative benefits. Such transient adaptation in autologous serum supplemented medium may help to increase chemokine receptor expression and tissue specific differentiation of ex vivo expanded MSCs, thus would provide long term regenerative benefits. PMID:25678851

  18. Impact of Pre-Transplant Anti-T Cell Globulin (ATG) on Immune Recovery after Myeloablative Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Servais, Sophie; Menten-Dedoyart, Catherine; Beguin, Yves; Seidel, Laurence; Gothot, André; Daulne, Coline; Willems, Evelyne; Delens, Loïc; Humblet-Baron, Stéphanie; Hannon, Muriel; Baron, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-transplant infusion of rabbit anti-T cell globulin (ATG) is increasingly used as prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). However, the precise impact of pre-transplant ATG on immune recovery after PBSCT is still poorly documented. Methods In the current study, we compared immune recovery after myeloablative PBSCT in 65 patients who either received (n = 37) or did not (n = 28) pre-transplant ATG-Fresenius (ATG-F). Detailed phenotypes of circulating T, B, natural killer (NK) and invariant NKT (iNKT) cells were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry at serial time-points from day 40 to day 365 after transplantation. Thymic function was also assessed by sjTREC quantification. Serious infectious events were collected up to 2 years post-transplantation. Results Pre-transplant ATG-F had a prolonged (for at least up to 1-year) and selective negative impact on the T-cell pool, while it did not impair the recovery of B, NK nor iNKT cells. Among T cells, ATG-F selectively compromised the recovery of naïve CD4+, central memory CD4+ and naïve CD8+ cells, while it spared effector memory T and regulatory T cells. Levels of sjTRECs were similar in both cohorts at 1-year after PBSCT, suggesting that ATG-F unlikely impaired thymopoiesis at long-term after PBSCT. Finally, the incidence and rate of serious infections were similar in both groups, while ATG-F patients had a lower incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease. Conclusions Pre-transplant ATG-F induces long-lasting modulation of the circulating T-cell pool after myeloablative PBSCT, that may participate in preventing graft-versus-host disease without deeply compromising anti-pathogen defenses. PMID:26098781

  19. Ferritin and iron status in pregnancy: Relationship to fetal alcohol syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Baumstark, J.S.; Hill, W.C.; Chun, M.A.; Hunter, W.J. )

    1989-02-09

    Ferritin is a water soluble macromolecule of M{sub r} = 450,000 within whose inner core is stored approximately 4,500 atoms of iron (as ferric oxyhydroxide). The protein is the chief source of stored iron and its determination in serum is an excellent indicator of iron status. This laboratory is engaged in a study of iron metabolism and its relationship to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Ferritin and transferrin levels have been determined ion serial maternal sera, as well as cord serum. Patients were identified as high risk for the development of FAS by questionnaire. Transferrin levels for both maternal and cord serum were within normal literature values and increased, in maternal serum, at a rate of 5 mg/dl per week of gestation. Ferritin levels decreased at a rate of 1 ng/ml per gestational week. At term, the ferritin level for maternal serum in ten patients was 17 ng/ml {plus minus} 12 SD with a range of 2-35 ng/ml. The value for ferritin in cord serum was 78 {plus minus} 36 SD which is significantly lower than the normal mean value of 101 {plus minus} 52 ng/ml. Equating 101 ng/ml with 100% efficiency in iron metabolism it can be calculated that the high risk-for-FAS fetus is 23% less efficient in general iron metabolism than is the fetus of the normal patient. A decrease of 23% efficiency in iron metabolism could be associated with intrauterine growth retardation and/or the genesis of birth defects.

  20. Serum lipid pattern unifies following renal transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Koeppe, Silvie; Arbeiter, Klaus; Luckner, Doris; Salzer, Urike; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2003-09-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a common problem in solid organ transplant recipients. In this study we evaluated the role of pre-transplant renal replacement therapy on early and late changes of serum lipid levels in children following renal transplantation. In 46 children with chronic renal failure (median age 10.3 years) and 12 children with heart failure (median age 5.0 years), cholesterol and triglycerides were measured before and during follow-up after transplantation. Children with renal failure had significantly higher serum lipids than controls ( n=34, median age 9.2 years) and patients with heart failure. Pre transplantation, cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly lower in the hemodialysis than in the peritoneal dialysis population, whereas conservatively treated children had intermediate levels. After transplantation, serum cholesterol converged towards a mean level of 208 mg/dl and triglyceride levels converged towards a uniform level of 195 mg/dl at 9 months post transplant. The ratio of cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein significantly decreased from 4.7 to 3.8. The pattern of "post-transplant hyperlipidemia" was similar in both renal and cardiac allograft recipients. Hence, the early post-transplant changes of serum lipid pattern are markedly dependent on the mode of pre-transplant renal replacement therapy. Later, serum lipid levels were no longer influenced by prior renal replacement therapy and showed a new pattern of "post-transplant hyperlipidemia" in all children. PMID:12883978

  1. Mitochondrial ferritin in animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Galatro, Andrea; Puntarulo, Susana

    2007-01-01

    Ferritins play a role in preventing Fe toxicity because of their ability to sequester several thousand Fe atoms in their central cavity in a soluble, non-toxic bioavailable form. The identification of ferritin in mitochondria, an organelle with a constant generation of O2(-) as a by-product of the electron transfer, and the presence of a mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase activity opened up brand new metabolic interactions to be analyzed. In spite of cytosolic ferritins in mammals being ubiquitous, mitochondrial ferritin (mtF) expression is restricted to the testis, neuronal cells, islets of Langerhans, and as recently described to mice normal retinas. None was detected in major storage organs such as liver and spleen. MtF has about 80% identity to cytosolic H-chain and 55% to L-chain in its coding region. There has been reported some differences in the Fe binding and oxidation properties between mtF and cytosolic H-ferritin suggesting that mtF functions differently as an Fe storage protein within the mitochondria and perhaps has other function(s) in Fe homeostasis as well. Recently it was also presented evidence for the presence of ferritins in plant mitochondria. The understanding of the role of mitochondrial ferritin in Fe oxidative metabolism may be useful in approaching clinical situations such as the treatment of Friedreich's ataxia, X-linked sideroblastic anemia, and in other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:17127361

  2. Structure of Human Ferritin L Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,Z.; Li, C.; Ellenburg, M.; Soistman, E.; Ruble, J.; Wright, B.; Ho, J.; Carter, D.

    2006-01-01

    Ferritin is the major iron-storage protein present in all cells. It generally contains 24 subunits, with different ratios of heavy chain (H) to light chain (L), in the shape of a hollow sphere hosting up to 4500 ferric Fe atoms inside. H-rich ferritins catalyze the oxidation of iron(II), while L-rich ferritins promote the nucleation and storage of iron(III). Several X-ray structures have been determined, including those of L-chain ferritins from horse spleen (HoSF), recombinant L-chain ferritins from horse (HoLF), mouse (MoLF) and bullfrog (BfLF) as well as recombinant human H-chain ferritin (HuHF). Here, structures have been determined of two crystal forms of recombinant human L-chain ferritin (HuLF) obtained from native and perdeuterated proteins. The structures show a cluster of acidic residues at the ferrihydrite nucleation site and at the iron channel along the threefold axis. An ordered Cd{sup 2+} structure is observed within the iron channel, offering further insight into the route and mechanism of iron transport into the capsid. The loop between helices D and E, which is disordered in many other L-chain structures, is clearly visible in these two structures. The crystals generated from perdeuterated HuLF will be used for neutron diffraction studies.

  3. Ferritin as an early marker of graft rejection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Döring, Michaela; Cabanillas Stanchi, Karin Melanie; Feucht, Judith; Queudeville, Manon; Teltschik, Heiko-Manuel; Lang, Peter; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Handgretinger, Rupert; Müller, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of adverse events following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is mainly assigned to clinical symptoms or biopsies and thus rather unspecific and/or invasive. Studies indicate a distinct role of serum ferritin in HSCT and its correlation with adverse events such as graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), veno-occlusive disease (VOD), or infections. However, published data on the relevance of ferritin as a prognostic marker for post-transplant adverse events is rare, especially in pediatric patients. The present study analyzes ferritin plasma concentrations of 138 pediatric patients after HSCT between 2007 and 2010 including the control group (n = 21). Given the initial results regarding ferritin as a significant predictor for acute graft rejection after allogeneic HSCT in 9 of the 138 pediatric patients, serum ferritin of all pediatric patients (n = 27) who experienced graft rejection between 2007 and 2014 was analyzed. In addition, laboratory parameters including C-reactive protein (CRP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), fibrinogen, and D-dimer as possible differentiation markers for graft rejection were determined. In 24 (88.9 %) of the 27 pediatric patients with graft rejection, a significant increase of ferritin levels was observed 1 to 7 days prior to (P < 0.0001) and at the time of graft rejection (P < 0.0001). Moreover, there was an increase of D-dimer, CRP, LDH, and fibrinogen 1-7 days before graft rejection. Ferritin increased significantly at time of VOD (P = 0.0067), at time of intestinal (P < 0.0001) and skin GvHD (P < 0.0001), and at time of sepsis (P = 0.0005) and bacteremia (P = 0.0029). Ferritin might serve as a readily available identification marker for differentiation and identification of adverse events after HSCT in combination with other laboratory markers. PMID:26611853

  4. Factors Influencing Measurement of Serum Iron Concentration in Dogs: Diurnal Variation and Hyperferritinemia

    PubMed Central

    CHIKAZAWA, Seishiro; HORI, Yasutomo; KANAI, Kazutaka; ITO, Naoyuki; HOSHI, Fumio; ORINO, Koichi; WATANABE, Kiyotaka; HIGUCHI, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We evaluated diurnal variation and hyperferritinemia as factors that influence the values of serum iron concentration in dogs, using the International Committee for Standardization in Hematology (ICSH) colorimetric method. Serum iron levels were significantly higher in the morning than in the evening in 6 clinically healthy beagle dogs, and the maximum decrease in serum iron concentration was 47.3%. Moreover, the change in serum iron concentrations in 22 clinical canine cases with various serum ferritin levels was evaluated by immunoprecipitation of ferritin. The rate of decline in the serum iron concentrations positively correlated with serum ferritin levels (r=0.48, P=0.024). These results show that it is necessary to consider the sampling time and serum ferritin level for accurate interpretation of serum iron concentrations in dogs. PMID:23877842

  5. Is It Possible to Predict Pulmonary Complications and Mortality in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients from Pre-Transplantation Exhaled Nitric Oxide Levels?

    PubMed Central

    Köktürk, Nurdan; Yıldırım, Fatma; Aydoğdu, Müge; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Yeğin, Zeynep Arzu; Özkurt, Zübeyde Nur; Suyanı, Elif; Kıvılcım Oğuzülgen, İpek; Türköz Sucak, Gülsan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chemo/radiotherapy-induced free oxygen radicals and reactive oxygen derivatives contribute to the development of early and late transplantation-related pulmonary and extra-pulmonary complications in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. It has been proposed that an increase in fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) level indicates oxidative stress and inflammation in the airways. The aim of this prospective study is to evaluate the pre-transplantation FeNO levels in HSCT patients and to search for its role in predicting post-transplantation pulmonary complications and mortality. Materials and Methods: HSCT patients were included in the study prospectively between October 2009 and July 2011. Pre-transplantation FeNO levels were measured with a NIOX MINO® device prior to conditioning regimens. All patients were monitored prospectively for post-transplantation pulmonary complications with medical history, physical examination, chest X-ray, and pulmonary function tests. Results: A total of 56 patients (33 autologous, 23 allogeneic) with mean age of 45±13 years were included in the study, among whom 40 (71%) were male. Pre-transplantation FeNO level of the whole study group was found to be 24±13 (mean ± standard deviation) parts per billion (ppb). The FeNO level in allogeneic HSCT recipients was 19±6 ppb while it was 27±15 ppb in autologous HSCT recipients (p=0.042). No significant correlation was found between the pre-transplantation chemotherapy and radiotherapy protocols and baseline FeNO levels (p>0.05). Post-transplantation pulmonary toxicity was identified in 12 (21%) patients and no significant relationship was found between baseline FeNO levels and pulmonary toxicity. The survival rate of the whole study group for 1 year after transplantation was 70%. No significant relationship was identified between baseline FeNO values and survival (FeNO 19±7 ppb in patients who died and 26±15 ppb in the survivors; p=0.114). Conclusion

  6. Magnetic properties of artificially synthesized ferritins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. J.; Lee, H. I.; Cho, S.-B.; Yoon, S.; Suh, B. J.; Jang, Z. H.; St. Pierre, T. G.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, K.-S.

    2005-05-01

    Human ferritin homopolymers with H or L subunits (rHF and rLF) were genetically engineered in E coli. Apoferritins were then reconstituted with 2000 Fe atoms. A big difference was observed in the rates of iron uptake, whereas the mean core size was similar in rHF and rLF. Magnetization of the recombinant human ferritins were measured as functions of temperature and field. The blocking temperature TB(H) at low fields is considerably higher in rLF than in rHF. From the fit of M(H ) data to a modified Langevin function: M(H )=M0L(μpH/kBT)+χaH, the effective magnetic moment μp is found to be much larger in rLF than in rHF. Experimental data demonstrate that the magnetic properties, in particular, the uncompensated spins of ferritin core are related to the biomineralization process in ferritins.

  7. Urinary ferritin and cystatin C concentrations at different stages of kidney disease in leishmaniotic dogs.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, J D; Martinez-Subiela, S; Tvarijonaviciute, A; Caldin, M; Ceron, J J

    2015-04-01

    Traditional analytes do not detect early renal disease; therefore there is a need to find new early markers of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dogs to avoid the progression to irreversible renal damage. Our objective was to evaluate the presence of ferritin and cystatin C in urine of dogs with CKD and to relate their concentrations with the severity of the disease. Samples obtained from dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum were classified into four groups on the basis of the results of urinary protein/creatinine ratio and serum creatinine. This study shows that ferritin and cystatin C concentrations were increased in the urine of dogs with renal damage. Cystatin C value in urine only increased in severe stages of CKD with serum creatinine values >1.4 mg/dL, while the urinary ferritin concentration increased in dogs with proteinuria and serum creatinine <1.4 mg/dL, being, therefore, a renal biomarker earlier than creatinemia. PMID:25639693

  8. Solving Biology's Iron Chemistry Problem with Ferritin Protein Nanocages.

    PubMed

    Theil, Elizabeth C; Tosha, Takehiko; Behera, Rabindra K

    2016-05-17

    Ferritins reversibly synthesize iron-oxy(ferrihydrite) biominerals inside large, hollow protein nanocages (10-12 nm, ∼480 000 g/mol); the iron biominerals are metabolic iron concentrates for iron protein biosyntheses. Protein cages of 12- or 24-folded ferritin subunits (4-α-helix polypeptide bundles) self-assemble, experimentally. Ferritin biomineral structures differ among animals and plants or bacteria. The basic ferritin mineral structure is ferrihydrite (Fe2O3·H2O) with either low phosphate in the highly ordered animal ferritin biominerals, Fe/PO4 ∼ 8:1, or Fe/PO4 ∼ 1:1 in the more amorphous ferritin biominerals of plants and bacteria. While different ferritin environments, plant bacterial-like plastid organelles and animal cytoplasm, might explain ferritin biomineral differences, investigation is required. Currently, the physiological significance of plant-specific and animal-specific ferritin iron minerals is unknown. The iron content of ferritin in living tissues ranges from zero in "apoferritin" to as high as ∼4500 iron atoms. Ferritin biomineralization begins with the reaction of Fe(2+) with O2 at ferritin enzyme (Fe(2+)/O oxidoreductase) sites. The product of ferritin enzyme activity, diferric oxy complexes, is also the precursor of ferritin biomineral. Concentrations of Fe(3+) equivalent to 2.0 × 10(-1) M are maintained in ferritin solutions, contrasting with the Fe(3+) Ks ∼ 10(-18) M. Iron ions move into, through, and out of ferritin protein cages in structural subdomains containing conserved amino acids. Cage subdomains include (1) ion channels for Fe(2+) entry/exit, (2) enzyme (oxidoreductase) site for coupling Fe(2+) and O yielding diferric oxy biomineral precursors, and (3) ferric oxy nucleation channels, where diferric oxy products from up to three enzyme sites interact while moving toward the central, biomineral growth cavity (12 nm diameter) where ferric oxy species, now 48-mers, grow in ferric oxy biomineral. High ferritin protein

  9. Pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis is an independent risk factor for graft loss due to hepatic artery thrombosis in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Stine, Jonathan G.; Pelletier, Shawn J.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Porte, Robert J.; Northup, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatic artery thrombosis is an uncommon but catastrophic complication following liver transplantation. We hypothesize that recipients with portal vein thrombosis are at increased risk. Methods Data on all liver transplants in the U.S. during the MELD era through September 2014 were obtained from UNOS. Status one, multivisceral, living donor, re-transplants, pediatric recipients and donation after cardiac death were excluded. Logistic regression models were constructed for hepatic artery thrombosis with resultant graft loss within 90 days of transplantation. Results 63,182 recipients underwent transplantation; 662 (1.1%) recipients had early hepatic artery thrombosis; of those, 91 (13.8%) had pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis, versus 7.5% with portal vein thrombosis but no hepatic artery thrombosis (p < 0.0001). Portal vein thrombosis was associated with an increased independent risk of hepatic artery thrombosis (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.71–2.76, p < 0.001) as was donor risk index (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.65–2.48, p < 0.001). Heparin use at cross clamp, INR, and male donors were all significantly associated with lower risk. Discussion Pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis is associated with post-transplant hepatic artery thrombosis independent of other factors. Recipients with portal vein thrombosis might benefit from aggressive coagulation management and careful donor selection. More research is needed to determine causal mechanism. PMID:27017168

  10. IMPACT OF PRE-TRANSPLANT RITUXIMAB ON SURVIVAL AFTER AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR DIFFUSE LARGE B-CELL LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, Timothy S.; Hari, Parameswaran N.; Carreras, Jeanette; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Champlin, Richard E.; Chen, Yi-Bin; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Hale, Gregory A.; Ilhan, Osman; Khoury, H. Jean; Lister, John; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Marks, David I.; Munker, Reinhold; Pecora, Andrew L.; Rowlings, Philip A.; Shea, Thomas C.; Stiff, Patrick; Wiernik, Peter H.; Winter, Jane N.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; van Besien, Koen; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Vose, Julie M.

    2010-01-01

    Incorporation of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab into front-line regimens for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has resulted in improved survival. Despite this progress, many patients develop refractory or recurrent DLBCL and then receive autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AuHCT). It is unclear to what extent pre-transplant exposure to rituximab affects outcomes following AuHCT. Outcomes of 994 patients receiving AuHCT for DLBCL between 1996 and 2003 were analyzed according to whether rituximab was (n=176, “+R” group) or was not (n=818, “ −R” group) administered with front-line or salvage therapy prior to AuHCT. The +R group had superior progression-free survival (50% versus 38%, p=0.008) and overall survival (57% versus 45%, p=0.006) at 3 years. Platelet and neutrophil engraftment were not affected by exposure to rituximab. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) did not differ significantly between the +R and −R groups. In multivariate analysis, the +R group had improved progression-free survival (relative risk of relapse/progression or death 0.64, p<0.001) and improved overall survival (relative risk of death of 0.74, p=0.039). We conclude that pre-transplant rituximab is associated with a lower rate of progression and improved survival following AuHCT for DLBCL, with no evidence of impaired engraftment or increased NRM. PMID:19822306

  11. Ferritins as Nanoplatforms for Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Zipeng; Tang, Wei; Todd, Trever; Xie, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Due to unique architecture and surface properties, ferritin has emerged as an important class of biomaterial. Many studies suggest that ferritin and its derivatives hold great potential in a wide range of bio-applications. Areas covered In this review, we summarize recent progress on employing ferritins as a platform to construct functional nanoparticles for applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, cell tracking, and drug delivery. Expert opinion As a natural polymer, ferritins afford advantages such as high biocompatibility, good biodegradability, and a relatively long plasma half-life. These attributes put ferritins ahead of conventional materials in clinical translation for imaging and drug delivery purposes. PMID:25070839

  12. The analysis of N-glycolylneuraminic acid(NeuGc) of hepatoma tissue and K562 cell ferritins using HPLC and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Hideo; Sasabe, Masataka; Miyazaki, Ryuunosuke; Matsuda, Haruo; Fukai, Fumio; Hanada, Kazuki; Hirano, Hisashi; Takasaki, Seiichi

    2006-07-01

    Ferritin is an iron-storage protein and its serum level is known to increase in the patient of with inflammation and malignant tumor. To further elucidate the difference between ferritins from normal human liver tissue and that of cancer cells, their sialic acids were analyzed. The Western blot analysis and the cytochemical staining using anti-NeuGc antiserum indicated that ferritins from the human hepatocarcinoma tissue and malignant K562 cells contain NeuGc, but that from the normal liver does not. The result was also confirmed by HPLC analysis and MALDI-TOF/MS analysis of sialic acids which were derivatized by the DMB method. It was also shown that the sialic acid content in hepatocarcinoma ferritin was much higher than that in the normal liver ferritin. These results suggest that normal and cancerous liver ferritins are qualitatively and quantitatively different in sialylation. In addition, K562 cells were shown to express NeuGc even if the cells were cultured in serum-free media which lack NeuGc. This is of interest from the current concept that expression of NeuGc in human cells is due to uptake and utilization of exogenous NeuGc. PMID:25792781

  13. Characterization of nuclear ferritin and mechanism of translocation

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Ferritin, normally considered a cytoplasmic iron-storage protein, is also found in cell nuclei. It is an established fact that H-ferritin is the major form of nuclear ferritin, but little is known about the roles of ferritin in nuclei or about the mechanisms that control its appearance within the nuclear volume. In the present study, we show that, for human SW1088 astrocytoma cells, the nuclear and cytoplasmic forms of H-ferritin are products of the same mRNA. Histochemical and biochemical evidence is presented showing that ferritin is distributed non-randomly within the nuclear volume and that it preferentially associates with heterochromatin. Both cytoplasmic and nuclear populations of H-ferritin contain mixtures of non- and O-glycosylated forms, but the nuclear population is enriched in O-glycosylated forms. Cells treated with alloxan, a potent inhibitor of O-glycosylation, contained significantly less nuclear ferritin compared with cells grown in control media. Alloxan inhibited the reappearance of H-ferritin in nuclei of cells released from conditions of iron depletion, but did not prevent its disappearance from nuclei of cells undergoing iron depletion. These results suggest that O-glycosylation accompanies the transfer of ferritin from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, but does not influence the reverse process. The picture that emerges is one in which ferritin translocation between the cytoplasm and the nucleus is post-translationally regulated and responds to environmental and nutritional cues. PMID:15675895

  14. THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SERUM FERRITIN AND URIC ACID IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    OBJECTIVE: Urate forms a coordination complex with Fe(3+) which does not support electron transport. The only enzymatic source of urate is xanthine oxidoreductase. If a major purpose of xanthine oxidoreductase is the production of urate to function as an iron chelator and antioxi...

  15. Independent Pre-Transplant Recipient Cancer Risk Factors after Kidney Transplantation and the Utility of G-Chart Analysis for Clinical Process Control

    PubMed Central

    Kurok, Marlene; Goldis, Alon; Dreier, Maren; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Gwinner, Wilfried; Barthold, Marc; Liebeneiner, Jan; Winny, Markus; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Kleine, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to identify independent pre-transplant cancer risk factors after kidney transplantation and to assess the utility of G-chart analysis for clinical process control. This may contribute to the improvement of cancer surveillance processes in individual transplant centers. Patients and Methods 1655 patients after kidney transplantation at our institution with a total of 9,425 person-years of follow-up were compared retrospectively to the general German population using site-specific standardized-incidence-ratios (SIRs) of observed malignancies. Risk-adjusted multivariable Cox regression was used to identify independent pre-transplant cancer risk factors. G-chart analysis was applied to determine relevant differences in the frequency of cancer occurrences. Results Cancer incidence rates were almost three times higher as compared to the matched general population (SIR = 2.75; 95%-CI: 2.33–3.21). Significantly increased SIRs were observed for renal cell carcinoma (SIR = 22.46), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (SIR = 8.36), prostate cancer (SIR = 2.22), bladder cancer (SIR = 3.24), thyroid cancer (SIR = 10.13) and melanoma (SIR = 3.08). Independent pre-transplant risk factors for cancer-free survival were age <52.3 years (p = 0.007, Hazard ratio (HR): 0.82), age >62.6 years (p = 0.001, HR: 1.29), polycystic kidney disease other than autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) (p = 0.001, HR: 0.68), high body mass index in kg/m2 (p<0.001, HR: 1.04), ADPKD (p = 0.008, HR: 1.26) and diabetic nephropathy (p = 0.004, HR = 1.51). G-chart analysis identified relevant changes in the detection rates of cancer during aftercare with no significant relation to identified risk factors for cancer-free survival (p<0.05). Conclusions Risk-adapted cancer surveillance combined with prospective G-chart analysis likely improves cancer surveillance schemes by adapting processes to identified risk factors and by using G-chart alarm

  16. Pre-transplant Evaluation of Donor Urinary Biomarkers can Predict Reduced Graft Function After Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Tai Yeon; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Lee, Yonggu; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Lee, Kyoung-Bun; Lee, Sik; Park, Suk Joo; Park, Jae Berm; Han, Miyeon; Lim, Hye Jin; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several recipient biomarkers are reported to predict graft dysfunction, but these are not useful in decision making for the acceptance or allocation of deceased donor kidneys; thus, it is necessary to develop donor biomarkers predictive of graft dysfunction. To address this issue, we prospectively enrolled 94 deceased donors and their 109 recipients who underwent transplantation between 2010 and 2013 at 4 Korean transplantation centers. We investigated the predictive values of donor urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), and L-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) for reduced graft function (RGF). We also developed a prediction model of RGF using these donor biomarkers. RGF was defined as delayed or slow graft function. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to generate a prediction model, which was internally validated using a bootstrapping method. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association of biomarkers with 1-year graft function. Notably, donor urinary NGAL levels were associated with donor AKI (P = 0.014), and donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP were predictive for RGF, with area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUROC) of 0.758 and 0.704 for NGAL and L-FABP, respectively. The best-fit model including donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine conveyed a better predictive value for RGF than donor serum creatinine alone (P = 0.02). In addition, we generated a scoring method to predict RGF based on donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine levels. Diagnostic performance of the RGF prediction score (AUROC 0.808) was significantly better than that of the DGF calculator (AUROC 0.627) and the kidney donor profile index (AUROC 0.606). Donor urinary L-FABP levels were also predictive of 1-year graft function (P = 0.005). Collectively, these findings suggest donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP to be useful biomarkers for RGF, and support

  17. Pre-transplant Evaluation of Donor Urinary Biomarkers can Predict Reduced Graft Function After Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koo, Tai Yeon; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Lee, Yonggu; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Lee, Kyoung-Bun; Lee, Sik; Park, Suk Joo; Park, Jae Berm; Han, Miyeon; Lim, Hye Jin; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-03-01

    Several recipient biomarkers are reported to predict graft dysfunction, but these are not useful in decision making for the acceptance or allocation of deceased donor kidneys; thus, it is necessary to develop donor biomarkers predictive of graft dysfunction. To address this issue, we prospectively enrolled 94 deceased donors and their 109 recipients who underwent transplantation between 2010 and 2013 at 4 Korean transplantation centers. We investigated the predictive values of donor urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), and L-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) for reduced graft function (RGF). We also developed a prediction model of RGF using these donor biomarkers. RGF was defined as delayed or slow graft function. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to generate a prediction model, which was internally validated using a bootstrapping method. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association of biomarkers with 1-year graft function. Notably, donor urinary NGAL levels were associated with donor AKI (P = 0.014), and donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP were predictive for RGF, with area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUROC) of 0.758 and 0.704 for NGAL and L-FABP, respectively. The best-fit model including donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine conveyed a better predictive value for RGF than donor serum creatinine alone (P = 0.02). In addition, we generated a scoring method to predict RGF based on donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine levels. Diagnostic performance of the RGF prediction score (AUROC 0.808) was significantly better than that of the DGF calculator (AUROC 0.627) and the kidney donor profile index (AUROC 0.606). Donor urinary L-FABP levels were also predictive of 1-year graft function (P = 0.005). Collectively, these findings suggest donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP to be useful biomarkers for RGF, and support the use of

  18. Alternative ferritin mRNA translation via internal initiation

    PubMed Central

    Daba, Alina; Koromilas, Antonis E.; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin stores and detoxifies an excess of intracellular iron, and thereby plays an important role in the metabolism of this metal. As unshielded iron promotes oxidative stress, ferritin is crucial in maintaining cellular redox balance and may also modulate cell growth, survival, and apoptosis. The expression of ferritin is controlled by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. In light of the well-established transcriptional induction of ferritin by inflammatory signals, we examined how ferritin mRNA translation responds to stress conditions. We first used HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells engineered for coumermycin-inducible expression of PKR, a stress kinase that inhibits protein synthesis in virus-infected cells by phosphorylating eIF2α. In this setting, iron triggered partial ferritin mRNA translation despite a PKR-induced global shutdown in protein synthesis. Moreover, iron-mediated ferritin synthesis was evident in cells infected with an attenuated strain of poliovirus; when eIF4GI was cleaved, eIF2α was phosphorylated, and host protein synthesis was inhibited. Under global inhibition of protein synthesis or specific inhibition of ferritin mRNA translation in cells overexpressing PKR or IRP1, respectively, we demonstrate association of ferritin mRNA with heavy polysomes. Further experiments revealed that the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR) of ferritin mRNA contains a bona fide internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Our data are consistent with the existence of an alternative, noncanonical mechanism for ferritin mRNA translation, which may primarily operate under stress conditions to protect cells from oxidative stress. PMID:22271759

  19. Ultrasensitive Nanoimmunosensor by coupling non-covalent functionalized graphene oxide platform and numerous ferritin labels on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Akter, Rashida; Jeong, Bongjin; Choi, Jong-Soon; Rahman, Md Aminur

    2016-06-15

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical nanostructured immunosensor for a breast cancer biomarker carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) was fabricated using non-covalent functionalized graphene oxides (GO/Py-COOH) as sensor probe and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs)-supported numerous ferritin as labels. The immunosensor was constructed by immobilizing a monoclonal anti-CA 15-3 antibody on the GO modified cysteamine (Cys) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on an Au electrode (Au/Cys) through the amide bond formation between the carboxylic acid groups of GO/Py-COOH and amine groups of anti-CA 15-3. Secondary antibody conjugated MWCNT-supported ferritin labels (Ab2-MWCNT-Ferritin) were prepared through the amide bond formation between amine groups of Ab2 and ferritin and carboxylic acid groups of MWCNTs. The detection of CA 15-3 was based on the enhanced bioelectrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide mediated by hydroquinone (HQ) at the GO/Py-COOH-based sensor probe. The GO/Py-COOH-based sensor probe and Ab2-MWCNT-Ferritin labels were characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique, CA 15-3 can be selectively detected as low as 0.01 ± 0.07 U/mL in human serum samples. Additionally, the proposed CA 15-3 immunosensor showed excellent selectivity and better stability in human serum samples, which demonstrated that the proposed immunosensor has potentials in proteomic researches and diagnostics. PMID:26820360

  20. Enrichment and characterization of ferritin for nanomaterial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Mutskova, Radina; Schwartz, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin is a ubiquitous iron storage protein utilized as a nanomaterial for labeling biomolecules and nanoparticle construction. Commercially available preparations of horse spleen ferritin, widely used as a starting material, contain a distribution of ferritins with different iron loads. We describe a detailed approach to the enrichment of differentially loaded ferritin molecules by common biophysical techniques such as size exclusion chromatography and preparative ultracentrifugation, and characterize these preparations by dynamic light scattering, and analytical ultracentrifugation. We demonstrate a combination of methods to standardize an approach for determining the chemical load of nearly any particle, including nanoparticles and metal colloids. Purification and characterization of iron content in monodisperse ferritin species is particularly critical for several applications in nanomaterial science.

  1. Ferritin family proteins and their use in bionanotechnology.

    PubMed

    He, Didi; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2015-12-25

    Ferritin family proteins are found in all kingdoms of life and act to store iron within a protein cage and to protect the cell from oxidative damage caused by the Fenton reaction. The structural and biochemical features of the ferritins have been widely exploited in bionanotechnology applications: from the production of metal nanoparticles; as templates for semi-conductor production; and as scaffolds for vaccine design and drug delivery. In this review we first discuss the structural properties of the main ferritin family proteins, and describe how their organisation specifies their functions. Second, we describe materials science applications of ferritins that rely on their ability to sequester metal within their cavities. Finally, we explore the use of ferritin as a container for drug delivery and as a scaffold for the production of vaccines. PMID:25573765

  2. Enrichment and characterization of ferritin for nanomaterial applications.

    PubMed

    Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Mutskova, Radina; Schwartz, Chad

    2016-01-29

    Ferritin is a ubiquitous iron storage protein utilized as a nanomaterial for labeling biomolecules and nanoparticle construction. Commercially available preparations of horse spleen ferritin, widely used as a starting material, contain a distribution of ferritins with different iron loads. We describe a detailed approach to the enrichment of differentially loaded ferritin molecules by common biophysical techniques such as size exclusion chromatography and preparative ultracentrifugation, and characterize these preparations by dynamic light scattering, and analytical ultracentrifugation. We demonstrate a combination of methods to standardize an approach for determining the chemical load of nearly any particle, including nanoparticles and metal colloids. Purification and characterization of iron content in monodisperse ferritin species is particularly critical for several applications in nanomaterial science. PMID:26656976

  3. Ferritin family proteins and their use in bionanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    He, Didi; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin family proteins are found in all kingdoms of life and act to store iron within a protein cage and to protect the cell from oxidative damage caused by the Fenton reaction. The structural and biochemical features of the ferritins have been widely exploited in bionanotechnology applications: from the production of metal nanoparticles; as templates for semi-conductor production; and as scaffolds for vaccine design and drug delivery. In this review we first discuss the structural properties of the main ferritin family proteins, and describe how their organisation specifies their functions. Second, we describe materials science applications of ferritins that rely on their ability to sequester metal within their cavities. Finally, we explore the use of ferritin as a container for drug delivery and as a scaffold for the production of vaccines. PMID:25573765

  4. Ferritin-Templated Quantum-Dots for Quantum Logic Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Kim, Seon-Jeong; Elliott, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Quantum logic gates (QLGs) or other logic systems are based on quantum-dots (QD) with a stringent requirement of size uniformity. The QD are widely known building units for QLGs. The size control of QD is a critical issue in quantum-dot fabrication. The work presented here offers a new method to develop quantum-dots using a bio-template, called ferritin, that ensures QD production in uniform size of nano-scale proportion. The bio-template for uniform yield of QD is based on a ferritin protein that allows reconstitution of core material through the reduction and chelation processes. One of the biggest challenges for developing QLG is the requirement of ordered and uniform size of QD for arrays on a substrate with nanometer precision. The QD development by bio-template includes the electrochemical/chemical reconsitution of ferritins with different core materials, such as iron, cobalt, manganese, platinum, and nickel. The other bio-template method used in our laboratory is dendrimers, precisely defined chemical structures. With ferritin-templated QD, we fabricated the heptagonshaped patterned array via direct nano manipulation of the ferritin molecules with a tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). We also designed various nanofabrication methods of QD arrays using a wide range manipulation techniques. The precise control of the ferritin-templated QD for a patterned arrangement are offered by various methods, such as a site-specific immobilization of thiolated ferritins through local oxidation using the AFM tip, ferritin arrays induced by gold nanoparticle manipulation, thiolated ferritin positioning by shaving method, etc. In the signal measurements, the current-voltage curve is obtained by measuring the current through the ferritin, between the tip and the substrate for potential sweeping or at constant potential. The measured resistance near zero bias was 1.8 teraohm for single holoferritin and 5.7 teraohm for single apoferritin, respectively.

  5. Ferritin and ferrihydrite nanoparticles as iron sources for Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Dehner, Carolyn; Morales-Soto, Nydia; Behera, Rabindra K.; Shrout, Joshua; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolism of iron derived from insoluble and/ or scarce sources is essential for pathogenic and environmental microbes. The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to acquire iron from exogenous ferritin was assessed; ferritin is an iron-concentrating and antioxidant protein complex composed of a catalytic protein and caged ferrihydrite nanomineral synthesized from Fe(II) and O2 or H2O2. Ferritin and free ferrihydrite supported growth of P. aeruginosa with indistinguishable kinetics and final culture densities. The P. aeruginosa PAO1 mutant (ΔpvdDΔpchEF), which is incapable of siderophore production, grew as well as the wild type when ferritin was the iron source. Such data suggest that P. aeruginosa can acquire iron by siderophore-independent mechanisms, including secretion of small-molecule reductant(s). Protease inhibitors abolished the growth of the siderophore-free strain on ferritins, with only a small effect on growth of the wild type; predictably, protease inhibitors had no effect on growth with free ferrihydrite as the iron source. Proteolytic activity was higher with the siderophore-free strain, suggesting that the role of proteases in the degradation of ferritin is particularly important for iron acquisition in the absence of siderophores. The combined results demonstrate the importance of both free ferrihydrite, a natural environmental form of iron and a model for an insoluble form of partly denatured ferritin called hemosiderin, and caged ferritin iron minerals as bacterial iron sources. Ferritin is also revealed as a growth promoter of opportunistic, pathogenic bacteria such a P. aeruginosa in diseased tissues such as the cystic fibrotic lung, where ferritin concentrations are abnormally high. PMID:23417538

  6. Long Term Clinical Outcome of Patients with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency who Received Related Donor Bone Marrow Transplants without Pre-transplant Chemotherapy or Post-transplant GVHD Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Railey, Mary Dell; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine long term health benefits of non-ablative bone marrow transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), we investigated our cohort of 161 related donor bone marrow transplanted SCID patients. Only 16 (10%) had HLA-identical donors. Study design All 124 survivors were sent questionnaires about their current clinical statuses. Details from clinic visits were also compiled. One hundred eleven patients (90%) were reached. We compared outcomes of patients transplanted before and after 3.5 months of life and by molecular defect. Results The overall survival rate is 77%, but the rate for the 48 infants transplanted in the first 3.5 months of life is 94%, compared with 70% for the 113 transplanted after 3.5 months (p=0.002). Twenty-eight (76%) of the 37 deceased patients died from viral infections present at diagnosis. One or more clinical problems were reported to have been present in the past two years in 71 (64%) of the survivors, although 95 (86%) are considered healthy by their families. Conclusions Most patients with SCID transplanted with related donor marrow without pre-transplant chemotherapy have done well long-term, but those transplanted at <3.5 months of age had a superior survival rate, a lower rate of clinical problems, less need for booster transplants and better nutritional status. PMID:19818451

  7. Energetics of surface confined ferritin during iron loading.

    PubMed

    Federici, Stefania; Padovani, Francesco; Poli, Maura; Rodriguez, Fernando Carmona; Arosio, Paolo; Depero, Laura E; Bergese, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    We report on the first quantitative picture on how iron loading inside ferritin molecules occurs when they are self-assembled onto solid surfaces. Recombinant human ferritin H-chain with ferroxidase activity was adsorbed onto microcantilever beams to form a stable close-packed thin film. The obtained nanomechanical system was used to track in real time the energetics of inter-ferritin surface interactions during incubation with Fe(II) for iron loading. We observed that iron loading is accompanied by increasing attractive in-plane inter-ferritin interactions able to perform a maximum surface work of 6.0±1.5mJ/m(2), corresponding to a surface energy variation per ferritin of about 40kbT. Unique to this protein surface transformation, part of the surface work is exerted by the attractive electrostatic forces arising among the new born nanosized iron cores inside the ferritin shells. The remaining work comes from subtle action of steric, bridging and depletion forces. These findings are of fundamental interest and add important information for the rational development of ferritin nanotechnology. PMID:27281237

  8. Electrochemically Controlled Reconstitution of Immobilized Ferritins for Bioelectronic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Choi, Sang H.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Chu, Sang-Hong; King, Glen C.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2007-01-01

    Site-specific reconstituted nanoparticles were fabricated via electrochemically-controlled biomineralization through the immobilization of biomolecules. The work reported herein includes the immobilization of ferritin with various surface modifications, the electrochemical biomineralization of ferritins with different inorganic cores, and the electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen on the reconstituted Pt-cored ferritins. Protein immobilization on the substrate is achieved by anchoring ferritins with dithiobis-N-succinimidyl propionate (DTSP). A reconstitution process of site-specific electrochemical biomineralization with a protein cage loads ferritins with different core materials. The ferritin acts as a nano-scale template, a biocompatible cage, and a separator between the nanoparticles. This first demonstration of electrochemically controlled site-specific reconstitution of biomolecules provides a new tool for biomineralization and opens the way to produce the bio-templated nanoparticles by electrochemical control. The nanosized platinum-cored ferritins on gold displayed good catalytic activity for the electrochemical reduction of oxygen, which is applicable to biofuel cell applications. This results in a smaller catalyst loading on the electrodes for fuel cells or other bioelectronic devices.

  9. Photoacoustic molecular imaging of ferritin as a reporter gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, S.; Carson, A.; Kim, K.

    2012-02-01

    Spectral analysis of photoacoustic (PA) molecular imaging (PMI) of ferritin expressed in human melanoma cells (SK-24) was performed in vitro. Ferritin is a ubiquitously expressed protein which stores iron that can be detected by PA imaging, allowing ferritin to act as a reporter gene. To over-express ferritin, SK-24 cells were co-transfected with plasmid expressing Heavy chain ferritin (H-FT) and plasmid expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C1) using LipofectamineTM 2000. Non-transfected SK-24 cells served as a negative control. Fluorescent imaging of EGFP confirmed transfection and transgene expression in co-transfected cells. To detect iron accumulation in SK-24 cells, a focused high frequency ultrasonic transducer (60 MHz, f/1.5), synchronized to a pulsed laser (<20mJ/cm2), was used to scan the PA signal from 680 nm to 950 nm (in 10 nm increments) from the surface of the 6-well culturing plate. PA signal intensity from H-FT transfected SK-24 cells was not different from that of non-transfected SK-24 cells at wavelengths less than 770 nm, but was over 4 dB higher than non-transfected SK-24 cells at 850 ~ 950 nm. Fluorescent microscopy indicates significant accumulation of ferritin in H-FT transfected SK-24 cells, with little ferritin expression in non-transfected SK-24 cells. The PA spectral analysis clearly differentiates transfected SK-24 cells from nontransfected SK-24 cells with significantly increased iron signal at 850 ~ 950 nm, and these increased signals were associated with transfection of H-FT plasmid. As such, the feasibility of ferritin as a reporter gene for PMI has been demonstrated in vitro. The use of ferritin as a reporter gene represents a new concept for PA imaging, and may provide various opportunities for molecular imaging and basic science research.

  10. Prognostic Value of the Pre-Transplant Diastolic Pulmonary Artery Pressure to Pulmonary Capillary Wedge Pressure Gradient (DPG) in Cardiac Transplant Recipients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tedford, Ryan J.; Beaty, Claude A.; Mathai, Stephen C.; Kolb, Todd M.; Damico, Rachel; Hassoun, Paul M.; Leary, Peter J.; Kass, David A.; Shah, Ashish S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the transpulmonary gradient (TPG) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) are commonly used to differentiate heart failure patients with pulmonary vascular disease from those with passive pulmonary hypertension (PH), elevations in TPG and PVR may not always reflect pre-capillary PH. Recently, it has been suggested an elevated diastolic pulmonary artery pressure to pulmonary capillary wedge pressure gradient (DPG) may be better indicator of pulmonary vascular remodeling, and therefore, may be of added prognostic value in patients with PH being considered for cardiac transplantation. Methods Utilizing the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) database, we retrospectively reviewed all primary adult (age >17 years) orthotropic heart transplant recipients between 1998–2011. All patients with available pre-transplant hemodynamic data and PH (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25mmHg were included (n=16,811). We assessed the prognostic value of DPG on post-transplant survival in patients with PH and an elevated TPG and PVR. Results In patients with PH and a TPG > 12mmHg (n=5,827), there was no difference in survival at up to 5 years post-transplant between high (defined as ≥3, ≥5, ≥7, or ≥10mmHg) and low DPG groups (<3, <5, <7, or <10mmHg). Similarly, there was no difference in survival between high and low DPG groups in those with a PVR > 3 wood units (n=6,270). Defining an elevated TPG as > 15mmHg (n=3,065) or an elevated PVR > 5 (n=1783) yielded similar results. Conclusions In the largest analysis to date investigating the prognostic value of DPG, an elevated DPG had no impact on post-transplant survival in patients with PH and an elevated TPG and PVR. PMID:24462554

  11. Pre-transplant angiotensin II type 1receptor antibodies: a risk factor for decreased kidney graft function in the early post-transplant period?

    PubMed

    Hernández-Méndez, Erick Alejandro; Arreola-Guerra, José Manuel; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E; Ramírez, Julia B; Calleja, Said; Castelán, Natalia; Salcedo, Isaac; Vilatobá, Mario; Contreras, Alan G; Gabilondo, Bernardo; Granados, Julio; Alberú, Josefina

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antibodies (AT1Rab) are associated to a significantly lower graft survival and a higher risk of acute rejection after kidney transplantation. This study aimed to evaluate graft function and BPAR during the 1st year post-transplant (PT) in adult kidney transplant recipients (KTR), between 03/2009 and 08/2012. Pre-KT sera were screened for AT1Rab (ELISA) and HLA-DSA (Luminex). Three groups were analyzed: AT1Rab only (n = 13); HLA-DSA only (n = 8); and no AT1Rab or HLA-DSA (n = 90). No differences were observed in clinical characteristics across groups. A higher percentage of BPAR was observed in the AT1Rab positive group, but this difference was not significant. KTR with AT1Rab had a lower mean eGFR (20 mL/min/1.73m2) when compared to KTR with no Abs at 12 months. The significant difference in eGFR was observed since the 1st month PT. Multivariate analysis showed 4 factors independently and significantly associated with eGFR at 12mos PT: BPAR (-18.7 95%, CI -28.2 to -9.26, p<0.001), AT1Rab (-10.51, CI -20.9 to -0.095, p = 0.048), donor age (-0.42, CI -0.75 to -0.103 p = 0.010), and recipient age (-0.36, CI -0.67 to -0.048, p = 0.024). In this study AT1Rab in pre-transplant sera from KTR, was an independent and significant risk factor contributing to a lower eGFR 12 months. PT. This finding deserves to be confirmed in a larger KTR population. PMID:25695237

  12. The Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) of Marginal Donors Allocated by Standardized Pre-Transplant Donor Biopsy Assessment: Distribution and Association with Graft Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfini, I.; Buzio, C.; Zanelli, P.; Palmisano, A.; Cremaschi, E.; Vaglio, A.; Piotti, G.; Melfa, L.; La Manna, G.; Feliciangeli, G.; Cappuccilli, M.; Scolari, M.P.; Capelli, I.; Panicali, L.; Baraldi, O.; Stefoni, S.; Buscaroli, A.; Ridolfi, L.; D'Errico, A.; Cappelli, G.; Bonucchi, D.; Rubbiani, E.; Albertazzi, A.; Mehrotra, A.; Cravedi, P.; Maggiore, U.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-transplant donor biopsy (PTDB)-based marginal-donor allocation systems to single or dual renal transplantation could increase the use of organs with Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) in the highest range (e.g. >80 or >90), whose discard rate approximates 50% in the US. To test this hypothesis, we retrospectively calculated the KDPI and analyzed the outcomes of 442 marginal kidney transplants (340 single transplants: 278 with a PTDB Remuzzi score <4 [median KDPI:87; interquartile range(IQR):78-94] and 62 with a score =4 [median KDPI:87; IQR:76-93]; 102 dual transplants [median KDPI: 93; IQR:86-96]) and 248 single standard transplant controls [median KDPI:36; IQR:18-51]. PTDB-based allocation of marginal grafts led to a limited discard rate of 15% for kidneys with KDPI of 80-90 and of 37% for kidneys with a KDPI of 91-100. Although 1-year eGFRs were significantly lower in recipients of marginal kidneys (-9.3, -17.9, and -18.8ml/min, for dual transplants, single kidneys with PTDB score <4, and =4, respectively; P<0.001), graft survival (median follow-up 3.3 years) was similar between marginal and standard kidney transplants (hazard ratio: 1.20 [95% confidence interval: 0.80 to 1.79; P=0.38]). In conclusion, PTDB-based allocation allows the safe transplantation of kidneys with KDPI in the highest range that may otherwise be discarded. PMID:25155294

  13. Ferritin nanocontainers that self-direct in synthetic polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengonul, Merih C.

    Currently, there are many approaches to introduce functionality into synthetic polymers. Among these, for example, are copolymerization, grafting, and blending methods. However, modifications made by such methods also change the thermodynamics and rheological properties of the polymer system of interest, and each new modification often requires a costly reoptimization of polymer processing. Such a reoptimalization would not be necessary if new functionality could be introduced via a container whose external surface is chemically and physically tuned to interact with the parent polymer. The contents of the container could then be changed without changing other important properties of the parent polymer. In this context this thesis project explores an innovative nanocontainer platform which can be introduced into phase-separating homopolymer blends. Ferritin is a naturally existing nanocontainer that can be used synthetically to package and selectively transport functional moieties to a particular phase that is either in the bulk or on the surface of a homopolymer blend system. The principal focus of this work centers on modifying the surface of wild ferritin to: (1) render modified ferritin soluble in a non-aqueous solvent; and (2) impart it with self-directing properties when exposed to a homopolymer blend surface or incorporated into the bulk of a homopolymer blend. Wild ferritin is water soluble, and this research project successfully modified wild ferritin by grafting either amine-functional poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) or short-chain alkanes to carbodiimide activated carboxylate groups on ferritin's surface. Such modified ferritin is soluble in dichloromethane (DCM). Modification was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography, zeta-potential measurements, and electrospray mass spectroscopy. FT-IR was used to quantify the extent of PEGylation of the reaction products through area ratios of the -C-O-C asymmetric stretching vibration of the grafted PEG chains to the

  14. Conceptions and First Results on the Electrocrystallization Behaviour of Ferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno,A.; Rivera, M.

    2005-01-01

    The role of electrochemical processes on Fe and CdSO{sub 4} in the crystallization of horse spleen ferritin has been investigated using the cyclic voltammetry technique. It was found that although both species exhibit important redox properties in the presence of an external applied potential, CdSO4 played a leading role not only in the nucleation process but also in the growth behavior and morphology of ferritin crystals.

  15. Ferritin Is Required in Multiple Tissues during Drosophila melanogaster Development

    PubMed Central

    Blowes, Liisa M.; Missirlis, Fanis; Riesgo-Escovar, Juan R.

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, iron is stored in the cellular endomembrane system inside a protein cage formed by 24 ferritin subunits of two types (Fer1HCH and Fer2LCH) in a 1:1 stoichiometry. In larvae, ferritin accumulates in the midgut, hemolymph, garland, pericardial cells and in the nervous system. Here we present analyses of embryonic phenotypes for mutations in Fer1HCH, Fer2LCH and in both genes simultaneously. Mutations in either gene or deletion of both genes results in a similar set of cuticular embryonic phenotypes, ranging from non-deposition of cuticle to defects associated with germ band retraction, dorsal closure and head involution. A fraction of ferritin mutants have embryonic nervous systems with ventral nerve cord disruptions, misguided axonal projections and brain malformations. Ferritin mutants die with ectopic apoptotic events. Furthermore, we show that ferritin maternal contribution, which varies reflecting the mother’s iron stores, is used in early development. We also evaluated phenotypes arising from the blockage of COPII transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, feeding the secretory pathway, plus analysis of ectopically expressed and fluorescently marked Fer1HCH and Fer2LCH. Overall, our results are consistent with insect ferritin combining three functions: iron storage, intercellular iron transport, and protection from iron-induced oxidative stress. These functions are required in multiple tissues during Drosophila embryonic development. PMID:26192321

  16. Ferritin, an iron source in meat for Staphylococcus xylosus?

    PubMed

    Vermassen, Aurore; Talon, Régine; Leroy, Sabine

    2016-05-16

    Staphylococcus xylosus is frequently isolated from food of animal origin. Moreover, this species is one of the major starter cultures used for meat fermentation. Iron is a key element for growth and survival of bacteria. Meat is particularly rich in haemic (myoglobin and haemoglobin) and non-haemic (ferritin and transferrin) iron sources. Ferritin is a storage protein able to capture large quantities of iron. It is highly resistant to microbial attack and few microorganisms can use it as an iron source. Surprisingly, we found that the S. xylosus C2a strain grows in the presence of ferritin as a sole iron source. A three-cistron operon was highly overexpressed under ferritin iron growth conditions. We generated a deletion-insertion in the first gene of the operon and evaluated the phenotype of the mutant. The mutant showed decreased growth because it was less able to acquire iron from ferritin. Transcriptional analysis of the mutant revealed downregulation of several genes involved in the response to oxidative stress. This study characterized for the first time the capacity of a Staphylococcus to use iron from ferritin and revealed that a potential reductive pathway was involved in this acquisition. We hypothesize that this ability could give an advantage to S. xylosus in meat products. PMID:26971013

  17. Ferritin-based nanocrystals for solar energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, John; Erickson, Stephen; Olsen, Cameron; Embley, Jacob; Smith, Trevor; Watt, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Ferritin is a 12 nm diameter hollow protein with an 8 nm cavity that can be filled with a variety of nanocrystals (ferrihydrite being native). We report on several experiments with ferritin-based nanocrystals designed to utilize ferritin for solar energy harvesting. First, we have shown that the native band gap can be altered by controlling nanocrystal size, by replacing the native iron oxide core with other metal oxides, and by depositing halides and oxo-anions with the iron oxide core. This gives available band gaps of 1.6 to 2.3 eV. Theoretical efficiency calculations based on these band gaps show that the efficiency of a multi-junction solar cell based on layered structures of ferritin can be as high as 44.9 %, and up to 63.1 % if a ferritin-based material with band gap of 1.1 eV can be developed. For the latter case, the efficiencies remain quite high even in a current-matched configuration, namely 50.0 %. We have also demonstrated that photo-excitation of these materials can produce charge separation and give rise to usable electrons; we have used photo-excited electrons to reduce gold in solution and thereby produce gold nanoparticles on the surface of the ferritin. This technique can potentially be extended to platinum, whose nanoparticles catalyze water splitting. This research was partially supported by the Utah Office of Energy Development, Governor's Energy Leadership Scholars Program.

  18. Soybean Ferritin Forms an Iron-Containing Oligomer in Tofu Even after Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taro

    2015-10-14

    Ferritin, a multimeric iron storage protein distributed in almost all living kingdoms, has been highlighted recently as a nutritional iron source in plant-derived foodstuffs, because ferritin iron is suggested to have high bioavailability. In soybean seeds, ferritin contributes largely to the net iron contents. Here, the oligomeric states and iron contents of soybean ferritin during food processing (especially tofu gel formation) were analyzed. Ferritin was purified from tofu gel as an iron-containing oligomer (approximately 1000 Fe atoms per oligomer), which was composed of two types of subunits similar to the native soybean seed ferritin. Circular dichroism spectra also showed no differences in α-helical structure between native soybean ferritin and tofu ferritin. The present data demonstrate that ferritin was stable during the heat treatment (boiling procedure) in food processing, although partial denaturation was observed at temperatures higher than 80 °C. PMID:26390371

  19. Hemoglobin and Ferritin Concentrations in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Adediran, Adewumi; Uche, Ebele; Akinbami, Akinsegun; Dada, Akin; Wakama, Tamunomieibi; Damulak, Dapus; Ajibola, Sarah; Okwegbuna, Oluwakemi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a clinical condition characterized by insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity, has been linked with raised levels of serum ferritin (Sfr) concentrations. OBJECTIVES This study was carried out to compare hemoglobin (Hb) and Sfr concentrations in patients with MetS, regular donors and first-time donors. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 102 subjects who were between 18 and 60 years were enrolled for the study. They were divided into three groups. The first group (n = 20) was made up of 5 males and 15 females, all who met the criteria that define MetS. The second group (n = 52; M = 34, F = 18) were regular donors, while the last group (n = 30; M = 16, F = 14) were first-time donors or those who had not donated before. Following an overnight fast, 20 mL of venous blood was drawn from each subject. About 5 mL of this was put into sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) specimen bottles for the full blood count parameters with Sysmex KX-21N hematology analyzer (made in Japan). The remaining 15 mL had serum separated for Sfr assay using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a commercial assay kit manufactured by Teco Diagnostics. RESULTS Significant difference was found in the mean Sfr concentration of subjects with MetS (163 ± 136.92 ng/mL) and regular donors (41.46 ± 40.33 ng/mL), P = 0.001. The mean Sfr concentrations of subjects with MetS (163 ± 136.92 ng/mL) were also higher than that of first-time donors (102.46 ± 80.26 ng/mL), but it was not statistically significant, P = 0.053. The Hb concentrations of the three groups were not significantly different. CONCLUSION Sfr concentrations of regular donors were lower than that of subjects with MetS and first-time donors. The difference between regular donors and subjects with MetS was statistically significant. However, there is no significant difference in the Hb concentrations in the three groups. MetS is not associated with

  20. Iron Overload Coordinately Promotes Ferritin Expression and Fat Accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haizhen; Jiang, Xue; Wu, Jieyu; Zhang, Linqiang; Huang, Jingfei; Zhang, Yuru; Zou, Xiaoju; Liang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    The trace element iron is crucial for living organisms, since it plays essential roles in numerous cellular functions. Systemic iron overload and the elevated level of ferritin, a ubiquitous intracellular protein that stores and releases iron to maintain the iron homeostasis in cells, has long been epidemiologically associated with obesity and obesity-related diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms of this association remain unclear. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that iron overload induces the expression of sgk-1, encoding the serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase, to promote the level of ferritin and fat accumulation. Mutation of cyp-23A1, encoding a homolog of human cytochrome P450 CYP7B1 that is related to neonatal hemochromatosis, further enhances the elevated expression of ftn-1, sgk-1, and fat accumulation. sgk-1 positively regulates the expression of acs-20 and vit-2, genes encoding homologs of the mammalian FATP1/4 fatty acid transport proteins and yolk lipoproteins, respectively, to facilitate lipid uptake and translocation for storage under iron overload. This study reveals a completely novel pathway in which sgk-1 plays a central role to synergistically regulate iron and lipid homeostasis, offering not only experimental evidence supporting a previously unverified link between iron and obesity, but also novel insights into the pathogenesis of iron and obesity-related human metabolic diseases. PMID:27017620

  1. High ferritin levels have major effects on the morphology of erythrocytes in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bester, Janette; Buys, Antoinette V.; Lipinski, Boguslaw; Kell, Douglas B.; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Unliganded iron both contributes to the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and also changes the morphology of erythrocytes (RBCs). We tested the hypothesis that these two facts might be linked, i.e., that the RBCs of AD individuals have a variant morphology, that might have diagnostic or prognostic value. Methods: We included a literature survey of AD and its relationships to the vascular system, followed by a laboratory study. Four different microscopy techniques were used and results statistically compared to analyze trends between high and normal serum ferritin (SF) AD individuals. Results: Light and scanning electron microscopies showed little difference between the morphologies of RBCs taken from healthy individuals and from normal SF AD individuals. By contrast, there were substantial changes in the morphology of RBCs taken from high SF AD individuals. These differences were also observed using confocal microscopy and as a significantly greater membrane stiffness (measured using force-distance curves). Conclusion: We argue that high ferritin levels may contribute to an accelerated pathology in AD. Our findings reinforce the importance of (unliganded) iron in AD, and suggest the possibility both of an early diagnosis and some means of treating or slowing down the progress of this disease. PMID:24367334

  2. The ratio of sTfR/ferritin is associated with the expression level of TfR in rat bone marrow cells after endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Zhao, Jiexiu; Zhao, Binxiu; Gao, Qi; Xu, Jincheng; Liu, Dongsen

    2012-06-01

    Currently, it is unclear which index of haematological parameters could be used to most easily monitor iron deficiency during endurance training. To address this question, 16 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups: a sedentary group (n = 8) and an exercised group (n = 8). Initially, animals in the exercise group started running on a treadmill at a rate of 30 m/min, on a 0% grade, for 1 min/session. Running time was gradually increased by 2 min/day. The training plan was one session per day during the initial 2 weeks and two sessions per day during the third to ninth week. At the end of the 9-week experiment, we analysed the blood of the experimental animals for haemoglobin levels, erythrocyte numbers, haematocrit, serum iron levels, total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation, serum ferritin levels and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) levels, and we calculated the ratio of sTfR/ferritin. Erythrocyte numbers, haemoglobin levels and haematocrit values were decreased after 9 weeks of exercise, but sTfR and sTfR/ferritin values were increased (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). The training regime significantly increased TfR mRNA levels in the bone marrow cells of the exercised rats compared with the sedentary group (1.8 ± 0.5 vs. 1.1 ± 0.2, P < 0.01). These results revealed a significant correlation between TfR levels in the bone marrow cells and the ratio of sTfR/ferritin (r = 0.517; P < 0.01) and sTfR levels (r = 0.206; P < 0.05) in sedentary and exercised rats. In conclusion, we show that sTfR indices and the ratio of sTfR/ferritin could be useful indicators for monitoring iron deficiency during endurance training. PMID:22207220

  3. Salt-Dependent Aggregation and Assembly of E coli-Expressed Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Jiao, Chengfeng; Xiao, Yue; Wang, Luowei; Yu, Cheng; Liu, Jialin; Yu, Yongli

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin, with the primary function of iron storage, is a nearly ubiquitous protein found in most living organisms. Our recent investigations suggest that ferritin can assemble nanoparticles. So we use ferritin as a novel type of delivery vehicle for recombinant epitope vaccines. And, we found that ferritin form nonnative aggregates depended sensitively on NaCl concentrations. Here, we report that ferritin is an ion-sensitive protein and has the attribute of salt-dependent aggregation. Our results indicate that recombinant ferritin can be released as a soluble form from Escherichia coli at low NaCl concentrations (≤50 mmol/L). Moreover, this result affords us to confirm a proper self-assembling solution for soluble ferritin or other ferritin-based fusion proteins to assemble nanoparticles. PMID:26977139

  4. METAL-DEPENDENT EXPRESSION OF FERRITIN AND LACTOFERRIN BY RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased availability of catalytically active metal has been associated with an oxidative injury. The sequestration of transition metals within intracellular ferritin confers an antioxidant function to this protein. Such storage by ferritin requires that the metal be transported...

  5. Low Serum Hepcidin in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Saitis, Asterios; Gabeta, Stella; Eliades, Petros; Paraskeva, Efrosini; Zachou, Kalliopi; Koukoulis, George K.; Mamalaki, Avgi; Dalekos, George N.; Simos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin, a liver hormone, is important for both innate immunity and iron metabolism regulation. As dysfunction of the hepcidin pathway may contribute to liver pathology, we analysed liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases. Hepcidin mRNA levels were determined in liver biopsies obtained from 126 patients with HCV (n = 21), HBV (n = 23), autoimmune cholestatic disease (primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis; PBC/PSC; n = 34), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH; n = 16) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD; n = 32). Sera sampled on the biopsy day from the same patients were investigated for serum hepcidin levels. Hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels correlated positively with ferritin and negatively with serum γ-GT levels. However, no correlation was found between serum hepcidin and either ferritin or liver hepcidin mRNA. Both serum hepcidin and the serum hepcidin/ferritin ratio were significantly lower in AIH and PBC/PSC patients’ sera compared to HBV, HCV or NAFLD (P<0.001 for each comparison) and correlated negatively with serum ALP levels. PBC/PSC and AIH patients maintained low serum hepcidin during the course of their two-year long treatment. In summary, parallel determination of liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases shows that circulating hepcidin and its respective ratio to ferritin are significantly diminished in patients with autoimmune liver diseases. These novel findings, once confirmed by follow-up studies involving bigger size and better-matched disease subgroups, should be taken into consideration during diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune liver diseases. PMID:26270641

  6. Vascular Accessibility of Endothelial Targeted Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khoshnejad, Makan; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Pulsipher, Katherine W; Dai, Chuanyun; Hood, Elizabeth D; Arguiri, Evguenia; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Dmochowski, Ivan J; Greineder, Colin F; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2016-03-16

    Targeting nanocarriers to the endothelium, using affinity ligands to cell adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, holds promise to improve the pharmacotherapy of many disease conditions. This approach capitalizes on the observation that antibody-targeted carriers of 100 nm and above accumulate in the pulmonary vasculature more effectively than free antibodies. Targeting of prospective nanocarriers in the 10-50 nm range, however, has not been studied. To address this intriguing issue, we conjugated monoclonal antibodies (Ab) to ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 or their single chain antigen-binding fragments (scFv) to ferritin nanoparticles (FNPs, size 12 nm), thereby producing Ab/FNPs and scFv/FNPs. Targeted FNPs retained their typical symmetric core-shell structure with sizes of 20-25 nm and ∼4-5 Ab (or ∼7-9 scFv) per particle. Ab/FNPs and scFv/FNPs, but not control IgG/FNPs, bound specifically to cells expressing target molecules and accumulated in the lungs after intravenous injection, with pulmonary targeting an order of magnitude higher than free Ab. Most intriguing, the targeting of Ab/FNPs to ICAM-1, but not PECAM-1, surpassed that of larger Ab/carriers targeted by the same ligand. These results indicate that (i) FNPs may provide a platform for targeting endothelial adhesion molecules with carriers in the 20 nm size range, which has not been previously reported; and (ii) ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 (known to localize in different domains of endothelial plasmalemma) differ in their accessibility to circulating objects of this size, common for blood components and nanocarriers. PMID:26718023

  7. Iron-independent induction of ferritin H chain by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L L; Miller, S C; Torti, S V; Tsuji, Y; Torti, F M

    1991-01-01

    Iron increases the synthesis of the iron-storage protein, ferritin, largely by promoting translation of preexisting mRNAs for both the H and L ferritin isoforms (H, heavy, heart, acidic; L, light, liver, basic). We have recently cloned and sequenced a full-length cDNA to murine ferritin H and identified ferritin H as a gene induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha, cachectin). Using primary human myoblasts, we have now examined the relationship between TNF-alpha and iron in regulating ferritin. Four lines of evidence suggest that TNF-alpha regulates ferritin independently of iron. First, evaluation of mRNA showed that TNF-alpha increased ferritin H chain specifically, provoking no change in steady-state levels of ferritin L mRNA; iron, in contrast, increased the mRNA of both isoforms. Second, the increase in ferritin H protein synthesis observed during TNF-alpha treatment was dependent on an increase in ferritin H mRNA: actinomycin D blocked the TNF-alpha-induced changes in ferritin H but did not inhibit the translational induction of ferritin seen with iron treatment. Third, equal ferritin mRNA induction was observed in iron-loaded cells and in cells depleted of iron by a permeant chelator, 2,2'-dipyridyl. Fourth, ferritin H induction by TNF-alpha and iron was additive over the entire range of iron concentrations, even at TNF-alpha doses known to maximally stimulate ferritin H mRNA levels. Nonetheless, the role of iron in translational regulation of ferritin was retained in TNF-alpha-treated cells; effective biosynthesis of TNF-alpha-induced, H-subunit-predominant ferritin protein required iron and could be enhanced by treatment of the cells with additional iron or blocked by 2,2'-dipyridyl. Finally, we observed that the TNF-alpha-mediated increase in ferritin synthesis peaked at 8 hr and was followed by a decrease in both H and L isoferritin synthesis; the addition of iron, however, reversed the late-occurring depression in ferritin synthesis. This

  8. Crosslinking of hemin to a specific site on the 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jihjing; Thach, R.E. ); Patino, M.M.; Gaffield, L.; Walden. W.E. ); Smith, A. )

    1991-07-15

    Incubation of a 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein (FRP) with small amounts of radiolabeled hemin resulted in the formation of a strong interaction between the two that was stable to SDS/PAGE. Of seven other proteins tested individually, only apohemopexin and bovine serum albumin showed similar crosslinking ability, albeit to a much lower extent. ({sup 14}C)Hemin specifically crosslinked to FRP in the presence of a 50-fold excess of total wheat germ proteins. Inclusion of catalase did not prevent the reaction of hemin with FRP, suggesting that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not involved. The subsequent addition of a stoichiometric amount of apohemopexin did not reverse the reaction. Exhaustive digestion of the complex with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease produced a major labeled peptide of 17 kDa. These results show the existence of a highly specific, uniquely reactive hemin binding site on FRP.

  9. Genome-wide comparison of ferritin family from Archaea, Bacteria, Eukarya, and Viruses: its distribution, characteristic motif, and phylogenetic relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lina; Xie, Ting; Hu, Qingqing; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Chen, Wanping

    2015-10-01

    Ferritins are highly conserved proteins that are widely distributed in various species from archaea to humans. The ubiquitous characteristic of these proteins reflects the pivotal contribution of ferritins to the safe storage and timely delivery of iron to achieve iron homeostasis. This study investigated the ferritin genes in 248 genomes from various species, including viruses, archaea, bacteria, and eukarya. The distribution comparison suggests that mammals and eudicots possess abundant ferritin genes, whereas fungi contain very few ferritin genes. Archaea and bacteria show considerable numbers of ferritin genes. Generally, prokaryotes possess three types of ferritin (the typical ferritin, bacterioferritin, and DNA-binding protein from starved cell), whereas eukaryotes have various subunit types of ferritin, thereby indicating the individuation of the ferritin family during evolution. The characteristic motif analysis of ferritins suggested that all key residues specifying the unique structural motifs of ferritin are highly conserved across three domains of life. Meanwhile, the characteristic motifs were also distinguishable between ferritin groups, especially phytoferritins, which show a plant-specific motif. The phylogenetic analyses show that ferritins within the same subfamily or subunits are generally clustered together. The phylogenetic relationships among ferritin members suggest that both gene duplication and horizontal transfer contribute to the wide variety of ferritins, and their possible evolutionary scenario was also proposed. The results contribute to a better understanding of the distribution, characteristic motif, and evolutionary relationship of the ferritin family.

  10. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340 Section 866.5340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... affecting iron metabolism, such as hemochromatosis (iron overload) and iron deficiency amemia....

  11. Folic acid conjugated ferritins as photosensitizer carriers for photodynamic therapy†

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Zipeng; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Weizhong

    2015-01-01

    We coupled folic acid as a tumour targeting ligand to the surface of ferritins and loaded them with ZnF16Pc. The resulting nanoconjugates can efficiently home to 4T1 tumours in vivo, and, with photoirradiation, leading to suppressed tumour growth and tumour metastasis. PMID:25998995

  12. Accumulation and translation of ferritin heavy chain transcripts following anoxia exposure in a marine invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Larade, Kevin; Storey, Kenneth B

    2004-03-01

    Differential screening of a Littorina littorea (the common periwinkle) cDNA library identified ferritin heavy chain as an anoxia-induced gene in hepatopancreas. Northern blots showed that ferritin heavy chain transcript levels were elevated twofold during anoxia exposure, although nuclear run-off assays demonstrated that ferritin heavy chain mRNAs were not transcriptionally upregulated during anoxia. Polysome analysis indicated that existing ferritin transcripts were actively translated during the anoxic period. This result was confirmed via western blotting, which demonstrated a twofold increase in ferritin heavy chain protein levels during anoxia, with a subsequent decrease to control levels during normoxic recovery. Organ culture experiments using hepatopancreas slices demonstrated a >50% increase in ferritin heavy chain transcript levels in vitro under conditions of anoxia and freezing, as well as after incubation with the second messenger cGMP. Taken together, these results suggest that ferritin heavy chain is actively regulated during anoxia exposure in the marine snail, L. littorea. PMID:15010486

  13. Correlation Between C-reactive Protein and Non-enzymatic Antioxidants (Albumin, Ferritin, Uric Acid and Bilirubin) in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beciragic, Amela; Resic, Halima; Prohic, Nejra; Karamehic, Jasenko; Smajlovic, Ajdin; Masnic, Fahrudin; Ajanovic, Selma; Coric, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Increased levels of C-Reactive Protein are found in 30-60% on hemodialysis patients and it is closely associated with the progression of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Non enzymatic antioxidants are antioxidants which primarily retain potentially dangerous ions of iron and copper in their inactive form and thereby prevent its participation in the production of free radicals. Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the relationship of CRP and non enzymatic antioxidants (albumin, ferritin, uric acid and bilirubin) i.e. examine the importance of CRP as a serum biomarker in assessing the condition of inflammation and its relationship to antioxidant protection in patients on hemodialysis. Methods: The study was cross-sectional, clinical, comparative and descriptive. The study involved 100 patients (non diabetic) on chronic hemodialysis. The control group consisted of 50 subjects without subjective and objective indicators of chronic renal disease. In all patients, the concentration of CRP as well as concentrations of non enzymatic antioxidants were determined. Results: In the group of hemodialysis patients 60% were men and 40% women. The average age of hemodialysis patients was 54.13 ± 11.8 years and the average age of the control group 41.72 ± 9.8 years. The average duration of hemodialysis treatment was 91.42 ± 76.2 months. In the group of hemodialysis patients statistically significant, negative linear correlation was determined between the concentration of CRP in and albumin concentration (rho = -0.251, p = 0.012) as well as negative, statistics insignificant, linear correlation between serum CRP and the concentration of uric acid (r = -0.077, p = 0.448). Furthermore, the positive, linear correlation was determined between serum CRP and ferritin (r = 0.159, p = 0.114) and positive linear correlation between CRP and total serum bilirubin (r = 0.121, p = 0.230). In the control group was determined a statistically significant

  14. Increased Dietary Intake of Saturated Fatty Acid Heptadecanoic Acid (C17:0) Associated with Decreasing Ferritin and Alleviated Metabolic Syndrome in Dolphins.

    PubMed

    Venn-Watson, Stephanie K; Parry, Celeste; Baird, Mark; Stevenson, Sacha; Carlin, Kevin; Daniels, Risa; Smith, Cynthia R; Jones, Richard; Wells, Randall S; Ridgway, Sam; Jensen, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    Similar to humans, bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) can develop metabolic syndrome and associated high ferritin. While fish and fish-based fatty acids may protect against metabolic syndrome in humans, findings have been inconsistent. To assess potential protective factors against metabolic syndrome related to fish diets, fatty acids were compared between two dolphin populations with higher (n = 30, Group A) and lower (n = 19, Group B) mean insulin (11 ± 12 and 2 ± 5 μIU/ml, respectively; P < 0.0001) and their dietary fish. In addition to higher insulin, triglycerides, and ferritin, Group A had lower percent serum heptadecanoic acid (C17:0) compared to Group B (0.3 ± 0.1 and 1.3 ± 0.4%, respectively; P < 0.0001). Using multivariate stepwise regression, higher percent serum C17:0, a saturated fat found in dairy fat, rye, and some fish, was an independent predictor of lower insulin in dolphins. Capelin, a common dietary fish for Group A, had no detectable C17:0, while pinfish and mullet, common in Group B's diet, had C17:0 (41 and 67 mg/100g, respectively). When a modified diet adding 25% pinfish and/or mullet was fed to six Group A dolphins over 24 weeks (increasing the average daily dietary C17:0 intake from 400 to 1700 mg), C17:0 serum levels increased, high ferritin decreased, and blood-based metabolic syndrome indices normalized toward reference levels. These effects were not found in four reference dolphins. Further, higher total serum C17:0 was an independent and linear predictor of lower ferritin in dolphins in Group B dolphins. Among off the shelf dairy products tested, butter had the highest C17:0 (423mg/100g); nonfat dairy products had no detectable C17:0. We hypothesize that humans' movement away from diets with potentially beneficial saturated fatty acid C17:0, including whole fat dairy products, could be a contributor to widespread low C17:0 levels, higher ferritin, and metabolic syndrome. PMID:26200116

  15. Increased Dietary Intake of Saturated Fatty Acid Heptadecanoic Acid (C17:0) Associated with Decreasing Ferritin and Alleviated Metabolic Syndrome in Dolphins

    PubMed Central

    Venn-Watson, Stephanie K.; Parry, Celeste; Baird, Mark; Stevenson, Sacha; Carlin, Kevin; Daniels, Risa; Smith, Cynthia R.; Jones, Richard; Wells, Randall S.; Ridgway, Sam; Jensen, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Similar to humans, bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) can develop metabolic syndrome and associated high ferritin. While fish and fish-based fatty acids may protect against metabolic syndrome in humans, findings have been inconsistent. To assess potential protective factors against metabolic syndrome related to fish diets, fatty acids were compared between two dolphin populations with higher (n = 30, Group A) and lower (n = 19, Group B) mean insulin (11 ± 12 and 2 ± 5 μIU/ml, respectively; P < 0.0001) and their dietary fish. In addition to higher insulin, triglycerides, and ferritin, Group A had lower percent serum heptadecanoic acid (C17:0) compared to Group B (0.3 ± 0.1 and 1.3 ± 0.4%, respectively; P < 0.0001). Using multivariate stepwise regression, higher percent serum C17:0, a saturated fat found in dairy fat, rye, and some fish, was an independent predictor of lower insulin in dolphins. Capelin, a common dietary fish for Group A, had no detectable C17:0, while pinfish and mullet, common in Group B’s diet, had C17:0 (41 and 67 mg/100g, respectively). When a modified diet adding 25% pinfish and/or mullet was fed to six Group A dolphins over 24 weeks (increasing the average daily dietary C17:0 intake from 400 to 1700 mg), C17:0 serum levels increased, high ferritin decreased, and blood-based metabolic syndrome indices normalized toward reference levels. These effects were not found in four reference dolphins. Further, higher total serum C17:0 was an independent and linear predictor of lower ferritin in dolphins in Group B dolphins. Among off the shelf dairy products tested, butter had the highest C17:0 (423mg/100g); nonfat dairy products had no detectable C17:0. We hypothesize that humans’ movement away from diets with potentially beneficial saturated fatty acid C17:0, including whole fat dairy products, could be a contributor to widespread low C17:0 levels, higher ferritin, and metabolic syndrome. PMID:26200116

  16. Stimulation of albumin endocytosis by cationized ferritin in cultured aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sprague, E.A.; Kelley, J.L.; Suenram, C.A.; Valente, A.J.; Abreu-Macomber, M.; Schwartz, C.J.

    1985-12-01

    Anionic microdomains within the aortic smooth muscle cell (SMC) surface glycocalyx represent a potential barrier to the endocytosis of anionic plasma proteins. Cultured SMCs exposed briefly to cationized ferritin (CF) exhibit ultrastructural aggregations of surface anionic sites resulting in intervening areas essentially devoid of anionic charge. Preincubation of cultured aortic medial SMCs with 0.2 mg/ml CF for 1 minute at 37 C resulted in a 4-fold increase in binding and a 13-fold increase in internalization of /sup 125/I-human serum albumin (/sup 125/I-HSA) relative to cells pretreated with native ferritin. When both the CF preincubation and the endocytosis were performed at 4 C, the influence of CF was abolished. Studies at 4 C indicated that CF pretreatment of SMC at 37 C induced high affinity (Kd = 1.5 nM) saturable /sup 125/I-HSA binding, in addition to low-affinity nonsaturable binding. These results were further confirmed by binding competition studies using increasing concentrations of unlabeled HSA. In contrast, low-density lipoprotein, a large anionic molecule, failed to compete with /sup 125/I-HSA for binding sites on CF-pretreated SMCs at either 4 or 37 C. Pulse-chase studies at 37 C indicated that 20-30% of internalized /sup 125/I-HSA was degraded, and 40-50% exocytosed within 24 hours in CF-treated cells. CF pretreatment of the SMCs did not significantly enhance the uptake of /sup 14/C-sucrose as a measure of fluid-phase endocytosis at 30 and 60 minutes. The results of these studies emphasize the potentially important regulatory roles of cell-surface anionic charge distribution and cationic molecules in cellular endocytosis.

  17. Comparison of plasma ferritin concentration versus the ratio of plasma transferrin receptor to ferritin in estimating body iron stores: results of 4 intervention trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: To develop global programs for the control of iron deficiency, simple, low-cost, accurate indicators of iron status are needed. Objectives: To compare estimates of body iron stores, as calculated from either plasma ferritin concentration alone (BI-ferritin) or the ratio of plasma transf...

  18. Folic acid conjugated ferritins as photosensitizer carriers for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Zipeng; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Weizhong; Xie, Jin

    2015-06-01

    We coupled folic acid as a tumour targeting ligand to the surface of ferritins and loaded them with ZnF16Pc. The resulting nanoconjugates can efficiently hone in on 4T1 tumours in vivo, and, with photoirradiation, leading to suppressed tumour growth and tumour metastasis.We coupled folic acid as a tumour targeting ligand to the surface of ferritins and loaded them with ZnF16Pc. The resulting nanoconjugates can efficiently hone in on 4T1 tumours in vivo, and, with photoirradiation, leading to suppressed tumour growth and tumour metastasis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experiments and ex vivo imaging results. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01833a

  19. Mapping of mitochondrial ferritin in the brainstem of Macaca fascicularis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingchun; Yang, Hongkuan; Guan, Hongpeng; Bellier, Jean-Pierre; Zhao, Shiguang; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2016-07-22

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt), a recently-studied iron storage protein, which we suspect is an important defense against oxidative stress in neurons and elsewhere. The 242-amino acid FtMt precursor protein is cleaved to mature protein (of molecular weight about 22-kDa) in the mitochondrial matrix. Compared with the ubiquitously expressed traditional ferritin (H-ferritin and L-ferritin), FtMt has been found in fewer locations including the testis, heart and brain. Previous studies have reported that the expression of FtMt in mouse and human brain is predominantly localized to neurons and partly to glial cells, and FtMt exerts protective effects on neurons by maintaining normal function and regulates apoptosis in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. To find out the function of FtMt in neurodegenerative disease, we had a novel antibody made against human FtMt and characterized it via Western blot analysis, immunoabsorption testing, and double immunofluorescence histochemistry. Then we used this new FtMt antibody to map the distribution of FtMt in the monkey brainstem. We demonstrated widespread distribution of FtMt immunoreactivity throughout the monkey brainstem, with variable staining intensity. FtMt immunoreactivity was observed in the extrapyramidal system, sensory trigeminal nerve nuclei, some motor nuclei including ambiguous nucleus, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and hypoglossal nucleus, and some dorsal column nuclei such as the gracile nucleus and cuneate nucleus. In addition, double immunohistochemical stainings confirmed that FtMt immunoreactivity was co-localized with catecholaminergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (63.64%), substantia nigra pars compacta (69.18%), and ventral tegmental area (56.89%). The distribution of FtMt which we found in the brainstem implies possible involvement of FtMt in several physiological mechanisms, especially in the catecholaminergic neurons, and the possibility of significant involvement in neurodegenerative

  20. Electrical Conductivity of Ferritin Proteins by Conductive AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Degao; Watt, Gerald D.; Harb, John N.; Davis, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements were performed on single apoferritin and holoferritin molecules by conductive atomic force microscopy. Conductivity of self-assembled monolayer films of ferritin molecules on gold surfaces was also measured. Holoferritin was 5-25 times more conductive than apoferritin, indicating that for holoferritin most electron-transfer goes through the ferrihydrite core. With 1 V applied, the average electrical currents through single holoferritin and apoferritin molecules were 2.6 PA and 0.19 PA, respectively.

  1. Clinical utility of serum tests for iron deficiency in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Burns, E R; Goldberg, S N; Lawrence, C; Wenz, B

    1990-02-01

    Serum iron and ferritin measurements lack the requisite sensitivity and/or specificity to accurately diagnose iron deficiency. To determine their utility in hospitalized patients, the authors compared the results of these tests with the presence of stainable iron in bone marrow aspirates of 301 patients. Forty (13.3%) had absent marrow iron. The serum diagnosis of iron deficiency was accepted on the basis of the following: iron less than 11 mumol/L, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) greater than 45 mumol/L, transferrin saturation (%Sat) less than 0.20, and ferritin less than 13 micrograms/L for females and less than 25 micrograms/L for males. Using these criteria, iron deficiency was correctly diagnosed by serum iron in 41%, TIBC in 84%, %Sat in 50%, and ferritin in 90% of the patients. The serum ferritin is clearly the only useful serum test for diagnosing iron deficiency in hospitalized patients but is limited by a low sensitivity. The bone marrow examination is the most sensitive test for diagnosing iron deficiency in hospitalized patients. PMID:2242107

  2. The Ferritin Superfamily: Supramolecular Templates for Materials Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Masaki; Kang, Sebyung; Reichhardt, Courtney; Harlen, Kevin; Douglas, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Members of the ferritin superfamily are multi-subunit cage-like proteins with a hollow interior cavity. These proteins possess three distinct surfaces, i.e. interior and exterior surfaces of the cages and interface between subunits. The interior cavity provides a unique reaction environment in which the interior reaction is separated from the external environment. In biology the cavity is utilized for sequestration of irons and biomineralization as a mechanism to render Fe inert and sequester it from the external environment. Material scientists have been inspired by this system and exploited a range of ferritin superfamily proteins as supramolecular templates to encapsulate nanoparticles and/or as well-defined building blocks for fabrication of higher order assembly. Besides the interior cavity, the exterior surface of the protein cages can be modified without altering the interior characteristics. This allows us to deliver the protein cages to a targeted tissue in vivo or to achieve controlled assembly on a solid substrate to fabricate higher order structures. Furthermore, the interface between subunits is utilized for manipulating chimeric self-assembly of the protein cages and in the generation of symmetry-broken Janus particles. Utilizing these ideas, the ferritin superfamily has been exploited for development of a broad range of materials with applications from biomedicine to electronics. PMID:20026386

  3. Transient overexpression of human H- and L-ferritin chains in COS cells.

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, B; Perrone, F; Bourgeois, M; Beaumont, C; Panzeri, M C; Cozzi, A; Sangregorio, R; Santambrogio, P; Albertini, A; Arosio, P; Levi, S

    1998-01-01

    The understanding of the in vitro mechanisms of ferritin iron incorporation has greatly increased in recent years with the studies of recombinant and mutant ferritins. However, little is known about how this protein functions in vivo, mainly because of the lack of cellular models in which ferritin expression can be modulated independently from iron. To this aim, primate fibroblastoid COS-7 cells were transiently transfected with cDNAs for human ferritin H- and L-chains under simian virus 40 promoter and analysed within 66 h. Ferritin accumulation reached levels 300-500-fold higher than background, with about 40% of the cells being transfected. Thus ferritin concentration in individual cells was increased up to 1000-fold over controls with no evident signs of toxicity. The exogenous ferritin subunits were correctly assembled into homopolymers, but did not affect either the size or the subunit composition of the endogenous heteropolymeric fraction of ferritin, which remained essentially unchanged in the transfected and non-transfected cells. After 18 h of incubation with [59Fe]ferric-nitrilotriacetate, cellular iron incorporation was similar in the transfected and non-transfected cells and most of the protein-bound radioactivity was associated with ferritin heteropolymers, while H- and L-homopolymers remained iron-free. Cell co-transfection with cDNAs for H- and L-chains produced ferritin heteropolymers that also did not increase cellular iron incorporation. It is concluded that transient transfection of COS cells induces a high level of expression of ferritin subunits that do not co-assemble with the endogenous ferritins and have no evident activity in iron incorporation/metabolism. PMID:9461525

  4. Cytoprotective effects of ferritin on doxorubicin-induced breast cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    BURANRAT, BENJAPORN; CONNOR, JAMES R.

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is a major iron storage protein and essential for iron homeostasis. It has a wide range of functions in the body including iron delivery, immunosuppression, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation. Ferritin is overexpressed in many cancer cells, but its precise role in cancer is unclear. In the present study, we examined the functional roles of ferritin in protecting the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line against treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin. The effects of ferritin (human liver ferritin) and doxorubicin on the human MCF-7 breast cancer cell line were evaluated using the cell viability assay. The impact of decreasing ferritin light chain (FTL) and ferritin heavy chain (FTH) expression on doxorubicin sensitivity was assessed using siRNA. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also measured using the fluorescence probe CM-H2DCFDA. The mechanism of modulated chemosensitivity was evaluated by western blot analysis. Ferritin treatment activated MCF-7 cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. While treatment with doxorubicin alone significantly increased intracelullar ROS production, the addition of ferritin decreased this ROS formation, thereby reducing doxorubicin-induced MCF-7 cell death. The inhibition of FTL and FTH by siRNA sensitized cells to doxorubicin. Treatment with doxorubicin alone significantly induced the cell cycle-dependent kinase inhibitor protein p21, whereas ferritin reduced p21 expression. Thus, ferritin plays a critical role in protecting MCF-7 cells against the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. A targeted reduction of ferritin may be a useful strategy for overcoming chemoresistance in breast cancer. PMID:26352101

  5. Ferritin is associated with the aberrant tau filaments present in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, M.; Valpuesta, J. M.; de Garcini, E. M.; Quintana, C.; Arrasate, M.; López Carrascosa, J. L.; Rábano, A.; García de Yébenes, J.; Avila, J.

    1998-01-01

    Tau-containing filaments purified from the brain of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) patients were isolated and characterized. These filaments co-purify with regular particles that biophysical and biochemical methods identified as ferritin shells. In vivo, brain tau accumulation in PSP co-localized with ferritin. These results suggest that ferritin/iron could modulate the formation of tau aggregates in PSP. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:9626057

  6. Relationship between Serum Iron Profile and Blood Groups among the Voluntary Blood Donors of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M M; Adnan, S D; Karim, S; Al-Mamun, M A; Faruki, M A; Islam, K; Nandy, S

    2016-04-01

    Blood donation results in a substantial iron loss and subsequent mobilization from body stores. Chronic iron deficiency is a well-recognized complication of regular blood donation. The present study conducted to compare the level of serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and percentage transferrin saturation in different ABO and Rhesus type blood groups among the voluntary blood donors of Bangladesh. The present prospective study included 100 healthy voluntary donors attending at Department of Blood Transfusion, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka between the periods of July 2013 to Jun 2014. From each donor 10mL venous blood sample was taken and divided into heparinized and non-heparinized tubes for determination of hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), serum iron (SI), total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and serum ferritin by standard laboratory methods. Percentage of transferrin saturation (TS) calculated from serum iron and TIBC. Data were analyzed with SPSS (version 16) software and comparisons between groups were made using student's t-test and one way ANOVA. In the present study mean±SD of age of the respondents was 27.2±6.5 years with a range of 18 to 49 years and 81.0% were male and 19.0% were female. Among the donors 18.0% had blood group A, 35.0% had blood group B, 14.0% had blood group AB and 33.0% had blood group O. Among the donors 91.0% had rhesus positive and 9.0% had rhesus negative. Donors with blood group O had lowest haemoglobin, serum iron and transferring saturation levels. Donors with blood group A had highest TIBC level. Donors with blood group B had lowest serum ferritin level. An independent samples 't' test showed statistically significant difference in serum ferritin and percentage transferrin saturation between blood group AB and blood group O and in percentage transferrin saturation between blood group B and blood group O. One way ANOVA showed that there is no significant difference in haemoglobin, serum iron, serum

  7. Phosphate and arsenate removal efficiency by thermostable ferritin enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus using radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Sevcenco, Ana-Maria; Paravidino, Monica; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S; Wolterbeek, Hubert Th; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2015-06-01

    Oxo-anion binding properties of the thermostable enzyme ferritin from Pyrococcus furiosus were characterized with radiography. Radioisotopes (32)P and (76)As present as oxoanions were used to measure the extent and the rate of their absorption by the ferritin. Thermostable ferritin proved to be an excellent system for rapid phosphate and arsenate removal from aqueous solutions down to residual concentrations at the picomolar level. These very low concentrations make thermostable ferritin a potential tool to considerably mitigate industrial biofouling by phosphate limitation or to remove arsenate from drinking water. PMID:25817554

  8. Homeostatic Mechanisms for Iron Storage Revealed by Genetic Manipulations and Live Imaging of Drosophila Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Missirlis, Fanis; Kosmidis, Stylianos; Brody, Tom; Mavrakis, Manos; Holmberg, Sara; Odenwald, Ward F.; Skoulakis, Efthimios M. C.; Rouault, Tracey A.

    2007-01-01

    Ferritin is a symmetric, 24-subunit iron-storage complex assembled of H and L chains. It is found in bacteria, plants, and animals and in two classes of mutations in the human L-chain gene, resulting in hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome or in neuroferritinopathy. Here, we examined systemic and cellular ferritin regulation and trafficking in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. We showed that ferritin H and L transcripts are coexpressed during embryogenesis and that both subunits are essential for embryonic development. Ferritin overexpression impaired the survival of iron-deprived flies. In vivo expression of GFP-tagged holoferritin confirmed that iron-loaded ferritin molecules traffic through the Golgi organelle and are secreted into hemolymph. A constant ratio of ferritin H and L subunits, secured via tight post-transcriptional regulation, is characteristic of the secreted ferritin in flies. Differential cellular expression, conserved post-transcriptional regulation via the iron regulatory element, and distinct subcellular localization of the ferritin subunits prior to the assembly of holoferritin are all important steps mediating iron homeostasis. Our study revealed both conserved features and insect-specific adaptations of ferritin nanocages and provides novel imaging possibilities for their in vivo characterization. PMID:17603097

  9. Radioimmunoassay of tumor markers in serum of patients with renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cordoni-Voutsas, M.; Glaubitt, D.; Wagner, W.; Lichtenberg, T.

    1984-01-01

    Having noted an increased serum level of TPA and CEA in patients with renal carcinoma the authors extended these studies by using a larger number of tumor markers. In 15 patients (11 men and 4 women after menopause) aged 33 to 74 years who had renal carcinoma, among them 3 with tumor metastases, the serum concentration of TPA, CA 12-5, CEA, AFP, ferritin, prolactin, ..beta..-HCG, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. Monoclonal antibodies were used in the determination of serum CA 12-5 and CEA. In all patients surgical treatment, irradiation, or cytostatic therapy had not been performed. In serum the normal range was exceeded by TPA in 7 patients, CA 12-5 in 3, CEA and AFP in one each, ferritin in 12, prolactin in 2, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin in 10 patients. In one man serum prolactin was reduced. Serum ..beta..-HCG was normal in all patients. According to these results serum ferritin, TPA, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin are of great value as tumor markers in patients with renal carcinoma. In several patients the increase of serum ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin may be ascribed partly to deterioration of renal function. As no consistent patterns of tumor markers in serum were observed it is recommended to determine several tumor markers and not only one of them during the follow-up of patients. Radioimmunoassays for measuring the serum level of tumor markers, especially ferritin, TPA, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin, may considerably assist in the management of patients with renal carcinoma by providing early information about tumor recurrence or metastases.

  10. Mutated recombinant human heavy-chain ferritins and myelosuppression in vitro and in vivo: a link between ferritin ferroxidase activity and biological function.

    PubMed Central

    Broxmeyer, H E; Cooper, S; Levi, S; Arosio, P

    1991-01-01

    Human heavy-chain (H-) ferritin muteins obtained by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis, together with wild-type recombinant human H- and light-chain (L-) ferritins, were evaluated for in vitro effects on the suppression of human bone marrow myeloid progenitor cells and for in vivo effects on marrow and splenic myelopoiesis in C3H/HeJ mice. The 10 H-ferritin muteins exhibited alterations of various regions of the molecule, including ones exposed on the outer surface, on the inner cavity, and on the hydrophilic and hydrophobic channels and of the four-alpha-helix bundle forming the subunit structure. They were stable and were electrophoretically analogous to wild-type H-ferritin. The muteins showed in vitro and in vivo myelosuppressive activity analogous to wild type, except for mutein 222, which was totally inactive and which lacked ferroxidase activity. Recombinant human L-ferritin, devoid of ferroxidase activity, was also inactive as a suppressor. The results demonstrate that H-ferritin myelosuppressive and ferroxidase activities are linked. One possibility is that ferroxidase activity may interfere with the cellular uptake of transferrin iron that is needed for cell proliferation, an interpretation consistent with the presently described ability of hemin to overcome H-ferritin suppressive effects. PMID:1992468

  11. Iron Oxide Biominerals in Protein Nanocages, the Ferritins: Easing Into Life With Oxygen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theil, E. C.

    2008-12-01

    Organisms with ferritins could represent the progenitors of organisms that successfully made the transition to aerobic life. Ferritins are protein nanocages (8 or 12 nm diameter) that catalyze reactions between Fe(II) and O2 or H2O2 to synthesize ferrihydrite-like biominerals of Fe2O3(H2 O)n; phosphate is sometimes incorporated during mineralization. All groups of organisms, archea, bacteria, plants and animals have ferritins. Catalytic reactions between Fe and O occur in the protein cage with the products moving into the central protein cavity (5 or 8 nm diameter) where mineralization occurs; mineral sizes reach 4500 Fe with more than 7000 O atoms in the large cavities of maxi-ferritins and 500 Fe with more than 800 O atoms in the smaller, mini-ferritins, also called Dps proteins. H2O2 is preferentially used by mini-ferritins in archea and bacteria, contrasting with O2, preferentially used by maxi-ferritins in bacteria plants and animals, and some bacterial mini-ferritins that use either H2O2 or O2, to oxidize Fe(II) during biomineralization. The study of ferritins in contemporary organisms can illuminate mechanisms for oxygen and oxidant responses in changing environments now and in the past. Multiple genes encoding ferritins are often regulated by different environmental stimuli and in multi-cellular organisms, by tissue-specific, differentiation programs. The single celled E.coli has four ferritin genes, encoding three maxi-ferritins, one with a heme cofactor (bacterioferritin), and one mini-ferritin (Dps), expressed at different points in the culture cycle and/or in response to different stresses. Environmental iron, oxygen and peroxide all change the amounts of ferritin. When iron is plentiful, mineralized ferritin accumulates. Ferritin iron is recovered during periods of iron deficiency, apparently by selective unfolding of gated pores in ferritin protein nanocage that expose the mineral to reductants. Gene (DNA) transcription is the genetic target for iron

  12. Effect of supplementation with ferrous sulfate or iron bis-glycinate chelate on ferritin concentration in Mexican schoolchildren: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies worldwide. It is more prevalent when iron requirements are increased during pregnancy and during growth spurts of infancy and adolescence. The last stage in the process of iron depletion is characterized by a decrease in hemoglobin concentration, resulting in iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency, even before it is clinically identified as anemia, compromises the immune response, physical capacity for work, and intellectual functions such as attention level. Therefore, interventions addressing iron deficiency should be based on prevention rather than on treatment of anemia. The aim of this study was to compare short- and medium-term effects on ferritin concentration of daily supplementation with ferrous sulfate or iron bis-glycinate chelate in schoolchildren with iron deficiency but without anemia. Methods Two hundred schoolchildren from public boarding schools in Mexico City who had low iron stores as assessed by serum ferritin concentration but without anemia were randomly assigned to a daily supplement of 30 mg/day of elemental iron as ferrous sulfate or iron bis-glycinate chelate for 12 weeks. Iron status was evaluated at baseline, one week post-supplementation (short term), and 6 months (medium term) after supplementation. Results Ferritin concentration increased significantly between baseline and post-supplementation as well as between baseline and 6 months after supplementation. One week post-supplementation no difference was found in ferritin concentration between iron compounds, but 6 months after supplementation ferritin concentration was higher in the group that received bis-glycinate chelate iron. However, there is no difference in the odds for low iron storage between 6 months after supplementation versus the odds after supplementation; nor were these odds different by type of supplement. Hemoglobin concentration did not change significantly in either group after

  13. Design and Validation of an Augmented Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index Comprising Pretransplant Ferritin, Albumin, and Platelet Count for Prediction of Outcomes after Allogeneic Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Jennifer E; Storer, Barry E; Armand, Philippe; Raimondi, Roberto; Gibson, Christopher; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Ciceri, Fabio; Oneto, Rosi; Bruno, Benedetto; Martin, Paul J; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storb, Rainer; Sorror, Mohamed L

    2015-08-01

    Pretransplant values of serum ferritin, albumin, and peripheral blood counts were previously suggested to provide prognostic information about hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes. Whether these "biomarkers" have prognostic value independent of each other and the HCT-comorbidity index (HCT-CI) is unknown. We analyzed data from 3917 allogeneic HCT recipients at multiple sites in the United States and Italy using multivariate models including each biomarker and the HCT-CI. Data from all sites were then randomly divided into a training set (n = 2352) to develop weights for the relevant biomarkers to be added to the HCT-CI scores and a validation set (n = 1407) to validate an augmented HCT-CI compared with the original index. Multivariate analysis with data from one site showed that ferritin, albumin, and platelets-not neutrophils or hemoglobin-were independently associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (NRM) and decreased overall survival. Findings were validated in data from the other sites. Subsequently, in a training set from all sites, ferritin >2500 mg/dL (hazard ratio [HR], 1.69); albumin 3 to 3.5 g/dL (HR, 1.61) and <3.0 g/dL (HR, 2.27); and platelets 50 to <100,000 (HR, 1.28), 20 to <50,000 (HR, 1.29), and <20,000 (HR, 1.55) were statistically significantly associated with NRM. Weights were assigned to these laboratory values following the same equation used to design the original index. In the validation set, the addition of the biomarkers to the original index to develop an augmented HCT-CI resulted in a statistically significant increase in a higher c-statistic estimate for prediction of NRM (P = .0007). Ferritin, albumin, and platelet counts are important prognostic markers that further refine the discriminative power of the HCT-CI for transplant outcomes. PMID:25862589

  14. Moving Fe2+ from ferritin ion channels to catalytic OH centers depends on conserved protein cage carboxylates

    PubMed Central

    Behera, Rabindra K.; Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2014-01-01

    Ferritin biominerals are protein-caged metabolic iron concentrates used for iron–protein cofactors and oxidant protection (Fe2+ and O2 sequestration). Fe2+ passage through ion channels in the protein cages, like membrane ion channels, required for ferritin biomineral synthesis, is followed by Fe2+ substrate movement to ferritin enzyme (Fox) sites. Fe2+ and O2 substrates are coupled via a diferric peroxo (DFP) intermediate, λmax 650 nm, which decays to [Fe3+–O–Fe3+] precursors of caged ferritin biominerals. Structural studies show multiple conformations for conserved, carboxylate residues E136 and E57, which are between ferritin ion channel exits and enzymatic sites, suggesting functional connections. Here we show that E136 and E57 are required for ferritin enzyme activity and thus are functional links between ferritin ion channels and enzymatic sites. DFP formation (Kcat and kcat/Km), DFP decay, and protein-caged hydrated ferric oxide accumulation decreased in ferritin E57A and E136A; saturation required higher Fe2+ concentrations. Divalent cations (both ion channel and intracage binding) selectively inhibit ferritin enzyme activity (block Fe2+ access), Mn2+ << Co2+ < Cu2+ < Zn2+, reflecting metal ion–protein binding stabilities. Fe2+–Cys126 binding in ferritin ion channels, observed as Cu2+–S–Cys126 charge-transfer bands in ferritin E130D UV-vis spectra and resistance to Cu2+ inhibition in ferritin C126S, was unpredicted. Identifying E57 and E136 links in Fe2+ movement from ferritin ion channels to ferritin enzyme sites completes a bucket brigade that moves external Fe2+ into ferritin enzymatic sites. The results clarify Fe2+ transport within ferritin and model molecular links between membrane ion channels and cytoplasmic destinations. PMID:24843174

  15. Absorption of iron from ferritin is independent of heme iron and ferrous salts in women and rat intestinal segments.

    PubMed

    Theil, Elizabeth C; Chen, Huijun; Miranda, Constanza; Janser, Heinz; Elsenhans, Bernd; Núñez, Marco T; Pizarro, Fernando; Schümann, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    Ferritin iron from food is readily bioavailable to humans and has the potential for treating iron deficiency. Whether ferritin iron absorption is mechanistically different from iron absorption from small iron complexes/salts remains controversial. Here, we studied iron absorption (RBC (59)Fe) from radiolabeled ferritin iron (0.5 mg) in healthy women with or without non-ferritin iron competitors, ferrous sulfate, or hemoglobin. A 9-fold excess of non-ferritin iron competitor had no significant effect on ferritin iron absorption. Larger amounts of iron (50 mg and a 99-fold excess of either competitor) inhibited iron absorption. To measure transport rates of iron that was absorbed inside ferritin, rat intestinal segments ex vivo were perfused with radiolabeled ferritin and compared to perfusion with ferric nitrilotriacetic (Fe-NTA), a well-studied form of chelated iron. Intestinal transport of iron absorbed inside exogenous ferritin was 14.8% of the rate measured for iron absorbed from chelated iron. In the steady state, endogenous enterocyte ferritin contained >90% of the iron absorbed from Fe-NTA or ferritin. We found that ferritin is a slow release source of iron, readily available to humans or animals, based on RBC iron incorporation. Ferritin iron is absorbed by a different mechanism than iron salts/chelates or heme iron. Recognition of a second, nonheme iron absorption process, ferritin endocytosis, emphasizes the need for more mechanistic studies on ferritin iron absorption and highlights the potential of ferritin present in foods such as legumes to contribute to solutions for global iron deficiency. PMID:22259191

  16. Resistive random access memory utilizing ferritin protein with Pt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenuma, Mutsunori; Kawano, Kentaro; Zheng, Bin; Okamoto, Naofumi; Horita, Masahiro; Yoshii, Shigeo; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2011-05-01

    This study reports controlled single conductive paths found in resistive random access memory (ReRAM) formed by embedding Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) in NiO film. Homogeneous Pt NPs produced and placed by ferritin protein produce electric field convergence which leads to controlled conductive path formation. The ReRAM with Pt NPs shows stable switching behavior. A Pt NP density decrease results in an increase of OFF state resistance and decrease of forming voltage, whereas ON resistance was independent of the Pt NP density, which indicates that a single metal NP in a memory cell will achieve low power and stable operation.

  17. Engineering protein interfaces yields ferritin disassembly and reassembly under benign experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Zhang, S; Xu, C; Zhao, G

    2016-06-11

    Ferritin nanocages are promising platforms for drug encapsulation. However, extreme conditions (pH ≤ 2) required for dissociation limit their application. Here, we engineered protein interfaces to yield ferritin nanocages which disassemble at pH 4.0 and reassemble at pH 7.5. During this process, bioactive molecules can be encapsulated within the protein cavity. PMID:27194454

  18. Comparative Study of Human Liver Ferritin and Chicken Liver by Mössbauer Spectroscopy. Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Milder, O. B.; Semionkin, V. A.; Prokopenko, P. G.; Malakheeva, L. I.

    2004-12-01

    A comparative study of normal human liver ferritin and livers from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease was made by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Small differences of quadrupole splitting and isomer shift were found for human liver ferritin and chicken liver. Mössbauer parameters for liver from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease were the same.

  19. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    ABSTRACT

    Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  20. On the mineral core of ferritin-like proteins: structural and magnetic characterization.

    PubMed

    García-Prieto, A; Alonso, J; Muñoz, D; Marcano, L; Abad Díaz de Cerio, A; Fernández de Luis, R; Orue, I; Mathon, O; Muela, A; Fdez-Gubieda, M L

    2016-01-14

    It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS)) and a magnetic study of the mineral core biomineralized by horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and three prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins: bacterial ferritin (FtnA) and bacterioferritin (Bfr) from Escherichia coli and archaeal ferritin (PfFtn) from Pyrococcus furiosus. The prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins have been studied under native conditions and inside the cells for the sake of preserving their natural attributes. They share with HoSF a nanocrystalline structure rather than an amorphous one as has been frequently reported. However, the presence of phosphorus changes drastically the short-range order and magnetic response of the prokaryotic cores with respect to HoSF. The superparamagnetism observed in HoSF is absent in the prokaryotic proteins, which show a pure atomic-like paramagnetic behaviour attributed to phosphorus breaking the Fe-Fe exchange interaction. PMID:26666195

  1. Induction of ferritin synthesis by water deficit and iron excess in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    DeLaat, Daiane Mariele; Colombo, Carlos Augusto; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Carbonell, Sergio Augusto Morais

    2014-03-01

    Ferritins are molecules for iron storage present in most living beings. In plants, ferritin is an essential iron homeostasis regulator and therefore plays a fundamental role in control of iron induced by oxidative stress or by excess of iron ions. Ferritin gene expression is modulated by various environmental factors, including the intensity of drought, cold, light and pathogenic attack. Common bean, one of the most important species in the Brazilian diet, is also affected by insufficiency or lack of water. Thus, the present study was conducted for the purpose of determining the levels of expression of ferritins transcripts in leaf tissues of three common bean cultivars (BAT 477, Carioca Comum and IAC-Diplomata) under osmotic shock caused by polyethylene glycol 6000 and by iron excess. The expression of three ferritins genes (PvFer1, PvFer2 and PvFer3), determined by quantitative PCR, indicated a difference in the expression kinetics among the cultivars. All the ferritin genes were actively transcribed under iron excess and water deficit conditions. The cultivars most responsive to treatments were BAT 477 and IAC-Diplomata. All the cultivars responded to treatments. Nevertheless, the ferritin genes were differentially regulated according to the cultivars. Analysis of variance indicated differences among cultivars in expression of the genes PvFer1 and PvFer3. Both genes were most responsive to treatments. This result suggests that ferritin genes may be functionally important in acclimatization of common bean under iron excess or water deficit conditions. PMID:24390245

  2. Molecular characterization of the iron binding protein ferritin in Eisenia andrei earthworms.

    PubMed

    Procházková, Petra; Dvořák, Jiří; Šilerová, Marcela; Roubalová, Radka; Škanta, František; Halada, Petr; Bilej, Martin

    2011-10-10

    Ferritin is a storage protein that plays a key role in iron metabolism. In this study, we report on the sequence characterization of a ferritin-coding cDNA in Eisenia andrei earthworms isolated by RT-PCR using degenerated primers, and we suggest the presence of a putative IRE in the 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA. The obtained ferritin sequence was compared with those of other animals showing sequence and structure homology in consensus sites, including the iron-responsive element (IRE) and ferroxidase centers. Despite the sequence homology in the E. andrei mRNA of ferritin with the sequences of other animals in consensus IRE sites, the presented cytosine in the IRE of E. andrei ferritin in the expected position does not form a conventional bulge. The presence of ferritin in the coelomic fluid of E. andrei was proven by iron staining assay. Moreover, aconitase activity in the coelomic fluid was assessed by aconitase assay, suggesting the presence of an iron regulatory protein. Quantitative analysis revealed changes in the gene expression levels of ferritin in coelomocytes in response to bacterial challenge, reaching the maximum level 8h after the stimulation with both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:21723382

  3. Biologically Derived Nanoparticle Arrays via a Site-Specific Reconstitution of Ferritin and their Electrochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Choi, Sang H.; Lillehei, Peter T.; King, Glen C.; Elliott, James R.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Park, Yeonjoon; Watt, Gerald D.

    2004-01-01

    Nanoparticle arrays biologically derived from an electrochemically-controlled site-specific biomineralization were fabricated on a gold substrate through the immobilization process of biomolecules. The work reported herein includes the immobilization of ferritin with various surface modifications, the electrochemical biomineralization of ferritins with different inorganic cores, the fabrication of self-assembled arrays with the immobilized ferritin, and the electrochemical characterization of various core materials. Protein immobilization on the substrate is achieved by anchoring ferritins with dithiobis-N-succinimidyl propionate (DTSP). A reconstitution process of electrochemical site-specific biomineralization with a protein cage loads ferritins with different core materials such as Pt, Co, Mn, and Ni. The ferritin acts as a nano-scale template, a biocompatible cage, and a separator between the nanoparticles. The nano-sized metalcored ferritins on a gold substrate displayed a good electrochemical activity for the electron transport and storage, which is suitable for bioelectronics applications such as biofuel cell, bionanobattery, biosensors, etc. Keywords: Ferritin, immobilization, site-specific reconstitution, biomineralization, and bioelectronics

  4. Molecular characterization and gene expression of the channel catfish Ferritin H subunit after bacterial infection and iron treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferritins are the major iron storage protein in the cytoplasm of cells, responsible for regulating levels of intracellular iron. Ferritin genes are widely distributed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In mammals, ferritin molecules are composed of heavy- (H) and light- (L) chain subunits; amphibia...

  5. Magnetically induced behaviour of ferritin corpuscles in avian ears: can cuticulosomes function as magnetosomes?

    PubMed Central

    Jandacka, Petr; Burda, Hynek; Pistora, Jaromir

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoreception is an enigmatic, poorly understood sensory ability, described mainly on the basis of behavioural studies in animals of diverse taxa. Recently, corpuscles containing superparamagnetic iron-storage protein ferritin were found in the inner ear hair cells of birds, a predominantly single ferritin corpuscle per cell. It was suggested that these corpuscles might represent magnetosomes and function as magnetosensors. Here we determine ferritin low-field paramagnetic susceptibility to estimate its magnetically induced intracellular behaviour. Physical simulations show that ferritin corpuscles cannot be deformed or rotate in weak geomagnetic fields, and thus cannot provide magnetoreception via deformation of the cuticular plate. Furthermore, we reached an alternative hypothesis that ferritin corpuscle in avian ears may function as an intracellular electromagnetic oscillator. Such an oscillator would generate additional cellular electric potential related to normal cell conditions. Though the phenomenon seems to be weak, this effect deserves further analyses. PMID:25551148

  6. Embedding of individual ferritin molecules in large, self-supporting silica nanofilms.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Shigenori; Muto, Emi; Kunitake, Toyoki

    2007-04-10

    We report herein the fabrication of ferritin-embedded self-supporting silica nanofilms via a simple spin-coating process. Ferritin was employed as a template molecule, and solutions of ferritin and silica were spread on a polymer-coated silicon substrate, in this order. After dissolving the polymer underlayer by simply immersing ethanol, a centimeter-sized self-supporting nanofilm of ferritin/silica composite with a thickness of 15 nm was successfully transferred onto an alumina membrane without the film breaking. Ozone and hydrochloric acid solution treatment removed the template ferritin molecules from the composite film to produce corresponding transmembrane nanoholes. The reported method is very simple, and the fabrication of a protein-embedded self-supporting nanofilm enables the design of biomembrane-mimetic devices. PMID:17328567

  7. Ferritin2 gene in paraquat-susceptible and resistant biotypes of horseweed Conyza canadensis (L.) Cronq.

    PubMed

    Soós, Vilmos; Jóri, Balázs; Páldi, Emil; Szego, Dóra; Szigeti, Zoltán; Rácz, Ilona; Lásztity, Demeter

    2006-09-01

    Ferritins, the multimeric iron storage proteins, are the main regulators of the cellular level of uncomplexed iron. Ferritins are encoded by small gene families and expressed differentially under various developmental conditions depending on iron availability, effect of hormones or oxygen radical generating agents. In the present work the primary structure of the ferritin2 gene from resistant and susceptible biotypes of horseweed Conyza canadensis was determined. This gene was found to exhibit great similarity and possess all the structural characteristics of known plant ferritin2 genes. The C. canadensis ferritin2 genes had identical primary structure in the two biotypes and were upregulated by paraquat (Pq) in both susceptible and resistant plants. The enhanced expression level was probably connected with defence reactions in the plants after Pq treatment. PMID:16949961

  8. Ferritin-Polymer Conjugates: Grafting Chemistry and Integration into Nanoscale Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Y Hu; D Samanta; S Parelkar; S Hong; Q Wang; T Russell; T Emrick

    2011-12-31

    Controlled free radical polymerization chemistry is used to graft polymer chains to the corona of horse spleen ferritin (HSF) nanocages. Specifically, poly(methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (polyMPC) and poly(PEG methacrylate) (polyPEGMA) chains are grafted onto the nanocages by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), in which the molecular weight of the polymer grafts is controlled by the monomer-to-initiator feed ratio. PolyMPC and polyPEGMA-grafted ferritin show a generally suppressed inclusion into diblock copolymer films relative to native ferritin, and the polymer coating is seen to mask the ferritin nanocages from antibody recognition. The solubility of polyPEGMA-coated ferritin in organic solvents enables its processing with polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymers, and selective integration into the PEO domains of microphase-separated copolymer structures.

  9. Pre-transplant achievement of negativity in minimal residual disease and French-American-British L1 morphology predict superior outcome after allogeneic transplant for Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: an analysis of Southeast Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liyuan; Hao, Siguo; Diong, Colin; Goh, Yeow-Tee; Gopalakrishnan, Sathish; Ho, Aloysius; Hwang, William; Koh, Liang-Piu; Koh, Mickey; Lim, Zi-Yi; Loh, Yvonne; Poon, Michelle; Tan, Lip-Kun; Tan, Patrick; Linn, Yeh-Ching

    2015-05-01

    To better understand predictive factors and improve the clinical outcome of allogeneic transplant for patients with Philadelphia positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we analyzed 67 Southeast Asian patients transplanted in our institutions. Multivariate analysis showed that disease status before transplant, year of transplant and, interestingly, French-American-British (FAB) subtype had a significant impact on overall survival (OS) and non-relapse mortality. Patients who were minimal residual disease (MRD) negative at transplant had a 3-year OS of 73% compared to those who were MRD positive (45%) and refractory (0%). The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 18% and 36% for the MRD negative and positive groups, respectively. FAB L1 subtype had a significantly superior 3-year OS of 63% vs. 29% for L2 subtype. Pre-transplant use of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor significantly improved outcomes in univariate but not multivariate analysis, as it served to induce more patients into MRD negativity, which was the factor that directly improved transplant outcome. PMID:25139689

  10. Serum Hepcidin Levels in Childhood-Onset Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Azab, Seham F.; Akeel, Nagwa E.; Abdalhady, Mohamed A.; Elhewala, Ahmed A.; Ali, Al Shymaa A.; Amin, Ezzat K.; Sarhan, Dina T.; Almalky, Mohamed A.A.; Elhindawy, Eman M.; Salam, Mohamed M.A.; Soliman, Attia A.; Abdellatif, Sawsan H.; Ismail, Sanaa M.; Elsamad, Nahla A.; Hashem, Mustafa I.A.; Aziz, Khalid A.; Elazouni, Osama M.A.; Arafat, Manal S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recently, hepcidin, an antimicrobial-like peptide hormone, has evolved as the master regulator of iron homeostasis. Despite the growing evidence of iron imbalance in childhood-onset ischemic stroke, serum hepcidin level in those patients has not yet been researched. In this study, we aimed to estimate serum (hepcidin) level in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients and to investigate whether subcutaneous enoxaparin sodium, which is a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) derivative, could modulate serum hepcidin level in those patients. This was a case–control study included 60 (AIS) cases, and 100 healthy children with comparable age and gender as control group. For all subjects’ serum hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble transferrin receptor [sTfR]) levels were assessed by (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] method). Iron parameters including (serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, and total iron binding capacity [TIBC]) were also measured. The patients were subdivided according to treatment with an LMWH derivative into 2 groups and serum hepcidin levels were assessed initially and 1 week after stroke onset for all cases. We found that AIS cases had higher serum iron, ferritin, and IL6 levels compared to the control group (all P < 0.01). Serum hepcidin was significantly higher in AIS cases (median, 36[15–73]ng/mL) compared to the control group (median, 24[10–41]ng/mL; P < 0.01). On the 1st day of AIS diagnosis, serum hepcidin levels were similar in both stroke subgroups (P > 0.05). However, on the 7th day of diagnosis serum hepcidin level decreased significantly in AIS cases treated with LMWH (group 1) (median, 36 vs 21 ng/mL; P < 0.01, respectively). Meanwhile, no significant change was observed in serum hepcidin level in AIS cases not treated with LMWH (group 2) (P > 0.05). Serum hepcidin showed significant positive correlations with serum iron, transferrin saturation, ferritin, and IL6 (r = 0.375, P < 0

  11. Specific repression of β-globin promoter activity by nuclear ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Broyles, Robert H.; Belegu, Visar; DeWitt, Christina R.; Shah, Sandeep N.; Stewart, Charles A.; Pye, Quentin N.; Floyd, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Developmental hemoglobin switching involves sequential globin gene activations and repressions that are incompletely understood. Earlier observations, described herein, led us to hypothesize that nuclear ferritin is a repressor of the adult β-globin gene in embryonic erythroid cells. Our data show that a ferritin-family protein in K562 cell nuclear extracts binds specifically to a highly conserved CAGTGC motif in the β-globin promoter at −153 to −148 bp from the cap site, and mutation of the CAGTGC motif reduces binding 20-fold in competition gel-shift assays. Purified human ferritin that is enriched in ferritin-H chains also binds the CAGTGC promoter segment. Expression clones of ferritin-H markedly repress β-globin promoter-driven reporter gene expression in cotransfected CV-1 cells in which the β-promoter has been stimulated with the transcription activator erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF). We have constructed chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter plasmids containing either a wild-type or mutant β-globin promoter for the −150 CAGTGC motif and have compared the constructs for susceptibility to repression by ferritin-H in cotransfection assays. We find that stimulation by cotransfected EKLF is retained with the mutant promoter, whereas repression by ferritin-H is lost. Thus, mutation of the −150 CAGTGC motif not only markedly reduces in vitro binding of nuclear ferritin but also abrogates the ability of expressed ferritin-H to repress this promoter in our cell transfection assay, providing a strong link between DNA binding and function, and strong support for our proposal that nuclear ferritin-H is a repressor of the human β-globin gene. Such a repressor could be helpful in treating sickle cell and other genetic diseases. PMID:11481480

  12. Fe(2+) substrate transport through ferritin protein cage ion channels influences enzyme activity and biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Behera, Rabindra K; Torres, Rodrigo; Tosha, Takehiko; Bradley, Justin M; Goulding, Celia W; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2015-09-01

    Ferritins, complex protein nanocages, form internal iron-oxy minerals (Fe2O3·H2O), by moving cytoplasmic Fe(2+) through intracage ion channels to cage-embedded enzyme (2Fe(2+)/O2 oxidoreductase) sites where ferritin biomineralization is initiated. The products of ferritin enzyme activity are diferric oxy complexes that are mineral precursors. Conserved, carboxylate amino acid side chains of D127 from each of three cage subunits project into ferritin ion channels near the interior ion channel exits and, thus, could direct Fe(2+) movement to the internal enzyme sites. Ferritin D127E was designed and analyzed to probe properties of ion channel size and carboxylate crowding near the internal ion channel opening. Glu side chains are chemically equivalent to, but longer by one -CH2 than Asp, side chains. Ferritin D127E assembled into normal protein cages, but diferric peroxo formation (enzyme activity) was not observed, when measured at 650 nm (DFP λ max). The caged biomineral formation, measured at 350 nm in the middle of the broad, nonspecific Fe(3+)-O absorption band, was slower. Structural differences (protein X-ray crystallography), between ion channels in wild type and ferritin D127E, which correlate with the inhibition of ferritin D127E enzyme activity include: (1) narrower interior ion channel openings/pores; (2) increased numbers of ion channel protein-metal binding sites, and (3) a change in ion channel electrostatics due to carboxylate crowding. The contributions of ion channel size and structure to ferritin activity reflect metal ion transport in ion channels are precisely regulated both in ferritin protein nanocages and membranes of living cells. PMID:26202907

  13. Characterization of ferritin 2 for the control of tick infestations.

    PubMed

    Hajdusek, Ondrej; Almazán, Consuelo; Loosova, Gabriela; Villar, Margarita; Canales, Mario; Grubhoffer, Libor; Kopacek, Petr; de la Fuente, José

    2010-04-01

    Ixodes ricinus is one the most abundant tick species in Europe and these ticks transmit pathogens causing human and animal diseases. The cattle ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) spp., affect cattle production in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Development of vaccines directed against tick proteins may reduce tick infestations and the transmission of tick-borne pathogens. However, a limiting step in tick vaccine development has been the identification of tick protective antigens. Herein, the tick iron metabolism pathway was targeted in an effort to identify new tick protective antigens. Recombinant I. ricinus (IrFER2) and Rhipicephalus microplus (RmFER2) ferritin 2 proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and used to immunize rabbits and cattle, respectively. Vaccination with IrFER2 reduced I. ricinus tick numbers, weight and fertility in rabbits with an overall vaccine efficacy (E) of 98%. Control of cattle tick, R. microplus and Rhipicephalus annulatus infestations was obtained in vaccinated cattle with overall E of 64% and 72%, respectively. Notably, the efficacy of the RmFER2 vaccine was similar to that obtained with Bm86 against R. microplus. These collective results demonstrated the feasibility of using ferritin 2 to develop vaccines for the control of tick infestations. PMID:20171306

  14. [How to handle unexpected biological abnormalities observed in the pre-donation workup for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: an SFGM-TC report on pre-transplant cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Toxoplasma gondii, or syphilis IgM positive serology test].

    PubMed

    Duléry, R; Giraud, C; Beaumont, J-L; Bilger, K; Borel, C; Dhedin, N; Thiebaut, A; Willems, E; Alain, S; Alfandari, S; Dewilde, A; Jouet, J-P; Milpied, N; Yakoub-Agha, I

    2013-08-01

    In the attempt to harmonize clinical practices between different French transplantation centers, the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapy (SFGM-TC) set up the third annual series of workshops which brought together practitioners from all member centers and took place in October 2012 in Lille. Here we report our results and recommendations regarding the management of pre-transplant donor's cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Toxoplasma gondii, or syphilis IgM positive serology test. PMID:24011960

  15. FER1 and FER2 encoding two ferritin complexes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts are regulated by iron.

    PubMed

    Long, Joanne C; Sommer, Frederik; Allen, Michael D; Lu, Shu-Fen; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2008-05-01

    Two unlinked genes FER1 and FER2 encoding ferritin subunits were identified in the Chlamydomonas genome. An improved FER2 gene model, built on the basis of manual sequencing and incorporation of unplaced reads, indicated 49% identity between the ferritin subunits. Both FER1 and FER2 transcripts are increased in abundance as iron nutrition is decreased but the pattern for each gene is distinct. Using subunit-specific antibodies, we monitored expression at the protein level. In response to low iron, ferritin1 subunits and the ferritin1 complex are increased in parallel to the increase in FER1 mRNA. Nevertheless, the iron content of the ferritin1 complex is decreased. This suggests that increased expression results in increased capacity for iron binding in the chloroplast of iron-limited cells, which supports a role for ferritin1 as an iron buffer. On the other hand, ferritin2 abundance is decreased in iron-deprived cells, indicative of the operation of iron-nutrition-responsive regulation at the translational or post-translational level for FER2. Both ferritin subunits are plastid localized but ferritin1 is quantitatively recovered in soluble extracts of cells while ferritin2 is found in the particulate fraction. Partial purification of the ferritin1 complex indicates that the two ferritins are associated in distinct complexes and do not coassemble. The ratio of ferritin1 to ferritin2 is 70:1 in iron-replete cells, suggestive of a more dominant role of ferritin1 in iron homeostasis. The Volvox genome contains orthologs of each FER gene, indicating that the duplication of FER genes and potential diversification of function occurred prior to the divergence of species in the Volvocales. PMID:18493046

  16. Can Serum Gdf-15 be Associated with Functional Iron Deficiency in Hemodialysis Patients?

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Hakki; Cakmak, Muzaffer; Darcin, Tahir; Inan, Osman; Bilgic, Mukadder Ayse; Bavbek, Nuket; Akcay, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Functional iron deficiency (FID) incidence is gradually increasing in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Recently, high levels of GDF-15 supressed the iron regulatory protein hepcidin and GDF-15 expression increased in iron-deficient patients. The relationship between FID, GDF-15, and hepcidin is currently unknown. The present study aimed to evaluate the association between GDF-15, hepcidin, and FID in chronic HD patients. Serum GDF-15 and hepcidin concentrations were measured in 105 HD patients and 40 controls. FID is defined as serum ferritin >800 ng/mL, TSAT <25 %, Hb levels <11 g/dL, and reticulocyte haemoglobin content (CHr) <29 pg. Serum GDF-15 and hepcidin levels were increased significantly in HD patients with FID, compared to HD patients without anemia and controls. GDF-15 correlated with ferritin, hepcidin, and CRP in the entire cohort. GDF-15 was related to ferritin and CRP in HD patients with FID. GDF-15 is better diagnostic marker than hepcidin for detection of FID [AUC = 0.982 (0.013) versus AUC = 0.921 (0.027); P = 0.0324]. GDF-15 appears to be a promising tool for detection of FID. High levels of ferritin and CRP correlated with GDF-15. Our results support GDF-15 as a new mediator of FID via hepcidin, chronic inflammation, or unknown pathways. PMID:27065587

  17. Is His54 a gating residue for the ferritin ferroxidase site?

    PubMed

    Bernacchioni, Caterina; Ciambellotti, Silvia; Theil, Elizabeth C; Turano, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Ferritin is a ubiquitous iron concentrating nanocage protein that functions through the enzymatic oxidation of ferrous iron and the reversible synthesis of a caged ferric-oxo biomineral. Among vertebrate ferritins, the bullfrog M homopolymer ferritin is a frequent model for analyzing the role of specific amino acids in the enzymatic reaction and translocation of iron species within the protein cage. X-ray crystal structures of ferritin in the presence of metal ions have revealed His54 binding to iron(II) and other divalent cations, with its imidazole ring proposed as "gate" that influences iron movement to/from the active site. To investigate its role, His54 was mutated to Ala. The H54A ferritin variant was expressed and its reactivity studied via UV-vis stopped-flow kinetics. The H54A variant exhibited a 20% increase in the initial reaction rate of formation of ferric products with 2 or 4 Fe²⁺/subunit and higher than 200% with 20 Fe²⁺/subunit. The possible meaning of the increased efficiency of the ferritin reaction induced by this mutation is proposed taking advantage of the comparative sequence analysis of other ferritins. The data here reported are consistent with a role for His54 as a metal ion trap that maintains the correct levels of access of iron to the active site. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. PMID:25727028

  18. Hepcidin/Ferritin Quotient Helps to Predict Spontaneous Recovery from Iron Loss following Blood Donation

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Ramin; Kroll, Christine; Plonné, Dietmar; Jahrsdörfer, Bernd; Schrezenmeier, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Iron supplementation is generally recommended for blood donors even though there are inter-individual differences in iron homeostasis. Methods Ferritin levels of repeat donors were compared with first-time donors, retrospectively. Prospectively, we tested 27 male repeat donors for the following parameters at the day of blood donation as well as 1, 3, 7, 10, and 56 days thereafter: ferritin, hepcidin, transferrin, transferrin receptor, hemoglobin, erythropoietin, reticulocytes, hemoglobin in reticulocyte, twisted gastrulation protein homolog 1, and growth differentiation factor-15. Results 56 days after blood donation, donors' average ferritin dropped to 55% (range 30-100%) compared to the initial value. Of all tested parameters hepcidin showed the highest and most significant changes beginning 1 day after donation and lasting for the whole period of 56 days. Along with ferritin, there was a high variation in hepcidin levels indicating inter-individual differences in hepcidin response to iron loss. Donors with a hepcidin/ferritin quotient < 0.3 regained 60% of their initial ferritin after 56 days, while those with a quotient ≥ 0.3 reached less than 50%. Conclusion As hepcidin appears to integrate erythropoietic and iron-loading signals, clinical measurement of hepcidin (together with the hepcidin-ferritin ratio) may become a useful indicator of erythropoiesis and iron kinetics. PMID:26733771

  19. A facile synthesis of fluorescent silver nanoclusters with human ferritin as a synthetic and interfacing ligand.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Hwan; Ahn, Byungjun; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Chang Soo; Jung, Yongwon

    2015-05-21

    Water-soluble fluorescent silver nanoclusters (NCs) formed on biomolecule ligands have been extensively studied due to their great potential as new biocompatible fluorescent materials for biosensors. As synthetic ligands, proteins in particular can provide unique structures and functions to the assembled fluorescent silver clusters. A key challenge, however, is to develop appropriate protein ligands and synthetic approaches for cluster formation, especially using native aqueous solutions, to fully preserve the valuable properties of the protein templates. Here we report a human ferritin-templated synthesis of fluorescent silver NCs under neutral aqueous buffer conditions. The unique metal binding property of ferritin and an optimized silver ion reduction allowed us to produce highly stable fluorescent silver NCs that are steadily assembled in the cage-like ferritin proteins. The fluorescent clusters were also successfully assembled on genetically engineered ferritin with antibody-binding protein G. The resulting protein G-ferritin-silver NC complex fully retained the ferritin structure as well as the antibody binding ability. The present silver nanoclusters on ferritin (Ft-Ag NCs) also showed highly specific Cu(2+)-induced fluorescence quenching. By exploiting the large but stable nature of ferritin, we fabricated a highly robust and porous hydrogel sensor system for rapid Cu(2+) detection, where the Ft-Ag NCs were stably encapsulated in surface-bound hydrogels with large pore sizes. Our Ft-Ag NCs that are formed under native aqueous conditions will have great potential as a new fluorescent material with the high structural and functional diversities of ferritin. PMID:25848642

  20. The Hyphal-Associated Adhesin and Invasin Als3 of Candida albicans Mediates Iron Acquisition from Host Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Ricardo S.; Brunke, Sascha; Albrecht, Antje; Thewes, Sascha; Laue, Michael; Edwards, John E.; Filler, Scott G.; Hube, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Iron sequestration by host iron-binding proteins is an important mechanism of resistance to microbial infections. Inside oral epithelial cells, iron is stored within ferritin, and is therefore not usually accessible to pathogenic microbes. We observed that the ferritin concentration within oral epithelial cells was directly related to their susceptibility to damage by the human pathogenic fungus, Candida albicans. Thus, we hypothesized that host ferritin is used as an iron source by this organism. We found that C. albicans was able to grow on agar at physiological pH with ferritin as the sole source of iron, while the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae could not. A screen of C. albicans mutants lacking components of each of the three known iron acquisition systems revealed that only the reductive pathway is involved in iron utilization from ferritin by this fungus. Additionally, C. albicans hyphae, but not yeast cells, bound ferritin, and this binding was crucial for iron acquisition from ferritin. Transcriptional profiling of wild-type and hyphal-defective C. albicans strains suggested that the C. albicans invasin-like protein Als3 is required for ferritin binding. Hyphae of an Δals3 null mutant had a strongly reduced ability to bind ferritin and these mutant cells grew poorly on agar plates with ferritin as the sole source of iron. Heterologous expression of Als3, but not Als1 or Als5, two closely related members of the Als protein family, allowed S. cerevisiae to bind ferritin. Immunocytochemical localization of ferritin in epithelial cells infected with C. albicans showed ferritin surrounding invading hyphae of the wild-type, but not the Δals3 mutant strain. This mutant was also unable to damage epithelial cells in vitro. Therefore, C. albicans can exploit iron from ferritin via morphology dependent binding through Als3, suggesting that this single protein has multiple virulence attributes. PMID:19023418

  1. Ferritin and Soluble Transferrin Receptors in Type 2 Diabetic and Non-diabetic Post-menopausal Women in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Md Ruhul, A; Sharmin, H; Luthfor, A; Farzana, S; Liaquat, A

    2010-12-01

    This cross-sectional comparative study was aimed at investigating the iron status of a group of post-menopausal women with and without diabetes. Thirty-five post-menopausal women in each group were selected purposively from among patients attending the out-patient department of Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), a specialist hospital, and two of its satellite clinics, all in Dhaka. Patients were enrolled based on their existing records. The subjects were matched on age, menstrual status and fasting status at blood draw. Ferritin, serum soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR) and fasting plasma glucose were measured by standard methods. Dietary information was collected by a specific food frequency questionnaire. No significant difference in plasma ferritin [62.02 ng/ml, (range: 4.68-288.89) vs 54.25 ng/ml (range: 4.58-137.17); p=0.28] was observed between the groups. But a higher level of plasma sTfR was found in diabetic women [(21.12 nmol/l (range: 7.91-39.79) vs 17.63 nmol/l (range: 10.30-110.00); p<0.01]. TFR-F index showed no difference between diabetic and control (p=0.25). Significantly a lower hemoglobin level [10.58±0.67 g/dl vs11.76±1.5 g/dl; p<0.01] was detected in diabetic women. Plasma sTfR (log) did not show any significant association with the dietary parameters and iron indices. No significant association between fasting glucose, ferritin and sTfR was seen except for haemoglobin (r=0.39, p=0.05). Total iron intake recorded was more than the requirement, and was significantly higher in control group [38.11mg/day (range: 19.83-105.63) vs 56.65 mg/day (range: 29.75-109.54); p<0.01)]. More than 97 % of total iron was of plant origin. No differences in heme iron [0.85 mg/day (range: 0.09-4.07) vs. 0.96 mg/day (range: 0.04-4.34), p= 0.17] and vitamin C intake was observed between the groups. Iron indices of non-diabetic women were within the normal range. A higher level of sTfR and a

  2. Ferritin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid predict Alzheimer's disease outcomes and are regulated by APOE

    PubMed Central

    Ayton, Scott; Faux, Noel G.; Bush, Ashley I.; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack Jr., Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Khachaturian, Zaven; Sorensen, Greg; Kuller, Lew; Raichle, Marc; Paul, Steven; Davies, Peter; Fillit, Howard; Hefti, Franz; Holtzman, Davie; Marcel Mesulam, M.; Potter, William; Snyder, Peter; Schwartz, Adam; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Harvey, Danielle; Bernstein, Matthew; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Landau, Susan; Cairns, Nigel J.; Householder, Erin; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Faber, Kelley; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Thal, Leon; Buckholtz, Neil; Albert, Marylyn; Frank, Richard; Hsiao, John; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D'Agostino II, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Murali Doraiswamy, P.; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Saleem Ismail, M.; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging-Yuek; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristine; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Hudson, Leon; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B.; Kitzmiller, Tamar J.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Finger, Elizabether; Pasternak, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Elizabeth Smith, Karen; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Raudin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Fargher, Kristin; Ashok Raj, Balebail; Neylan, Thomas; Grafman, Jordan; Davis, Melissa; Morrison, Rosemary; Hayes, Jacqueline; Finley, Shannon; Friedl, Karl; Fleischman, Debra; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; James, Olga; Massoglia, Dino; Jay Fruehling, J.; Harding, Sandra; Peskind, Elaine R.; Petrie, Eric C.; Li, Gail; Yesavage, Jerome A.; Taylor, Joy L.; Furst, Ansgar J.

    2015-01-01

    Brain iron elevation is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, but the impact of iron on disease outcomes has not been previously explored in a longitudinal study. Ferritin is the major iron storage protein of the body; by using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of ferritin as an index, we explored whether brain iron status impacts longitudinal outcomes in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort. We show that baseline CSF ferritin levels were negatively associated with cognitive performance over 7 years in 91 cognitively normal, 144 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 67 AD subjects, and predicted MCI conversion to AD. Ferritin was strongly associated with CSF apolipoprotein E levels and was elevated by the Alzheimer's risk allele, APOE-ɛ4. These findings reveal that elevated brain iron adversely impacts on AD progression, and introduce brain iron elevation as a possible mechanism for APOE-ɛ4 being the major genetic risk factor for AD. PMID:25988319

  3. On the mineral core of ferritin-like proteins: structural and magnetic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Prieto, A.; Alonso, J.; Muñoz, D.; Marcano, L.; Abad Díaz de Cerio, A.; Fernández de Luis, R.; Orue, I.; Mathon, O.; Muela, A.; Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS)) and a magnetic study of the mineral core biomineralized by horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and three prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins: bacterial ferritin (FtnA) and bacterioferritin (Bfr) from Escherichia coli and archaeal ferritin (PfFtn) from Pyrococcus furiosus. The prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins have been studied under native conditions and inside the cells for the sake of preserving their natural attributes. They share with HoSF a nanocrystalline structure rather than an amorphous one as has been frequently reported. However, the presence of phosphorus changes drastically the short-range order and magnetic response of the prokaryotic cores with respect to HoSF. The superparamagnetism observed in HoSF is absent in the prokaryotic proteins, which show a pure atomic-like paramagnetic behaviour attributed to phosphorus breaking the Fe-Fe exchange interaction.It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM

  4. Ferritin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid predict Alzheimer's disease outcomes and are regulated by APOE.

    PubMed

    Ayton, Scott; Faux, Noel G; Bush, Ashley I

    2015-01-01

    Brain iron elevation is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, but the impact of iron on disease outcomes has not been previously explored in a longitudinal study. Ferritin is the major iron storage protein of the body; by using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of ferritin as an index, we explored whether brain iron status impacts longitudinal outcomes in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort. We show that baseline CSF ferritin levels were negatively associated with cognitive performance over 7 years in 91 cognitively normal, 144 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 67 AD subjects, and predicted MCI conversion to AD. Ferritin was strongly associated with CSF apolipoprotein E levels and was elevated by the Alzheimer's risk allele, APOE-ɛ4. These findings reveal that elevated brain iron adversely impacts on AD progression, and introduce brain iron elevation as a possible mechanism for APOE-ɛ4 being the major genetic risk factor for AD. PMID:25988319

  5. Central role for ferritin in the day/night regulation of iron homeostasis in marine phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Botebol, Hugo; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Šuták, Robert; Six, Christophe; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Schatt, Philippe; Vergé, Valérie; Kirilovsky, Amos; Morrissey, Joe; Léger, Thibaut; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Gueneugues, Audrey; Bowler, Chris; Blain, Stéphane; Bouget, François-Yves

    2015-01-01

    In large regions of the open ocean, iron is a limiting resource for phytoplankton. The reduction of iron quota and the recycling of internal iron pools are among the diverse strategies that phytoplankton have evolved to allow them to grow under chronically low ambient iron levels. Phytoplankton species also have evolved strategies to cope with sporadic iron supply such as long-term storage of iron in ferritin. In the picophytoplanktonic species Ostreococcus we report evidence from observations both in the field and in laboratory cultures that ferritin and the main iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrate assimilation pathways show opposite diurnal expression patterns, with ferritin being maximally expressed during the night. Biochemical and physiological experiments using a ferritin knock-out line subsequently revealed that this protein plays a central role in the diel regulation of iron uptake and recycling and that this regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for cell survival under iron limitation. PMID:26553998

  6. Structural characterization of encapsulated ferritin provides insight into iron storage in bacterial nanocompartments.

    PubMed

    He, Didi; Hughes, Sam; Vanden-Hehir, Sally; Georgiev, Atanas; Altenbach, Kirsten; Tarrant, Emma; Mackay, C Logan; Waldron, Kevin J; Clarke, David J; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Ferritins are ubiquitous proteins that oxidise and store iron within a protein shell to protect cells from oxidative damage. We have characterized the structure and function of a new member of the ferritin superfamily that is sequestered within an encapsulin capsid. We show that this encapsulated ferritin (EncFtn) has two main alpha helices, which assemble in a metal dependent manner to form a ferroxidase center at a dimer interface. EncFtn adopts an open decameric structure that is topologically distinct from other ferritins. While EncFtn acts as a ferroxidase, it cannot mineralize iron. Conversely, the encapsulin shell associates with iron, but is not enzymatically active, and we demonstrate that EncFtn must be housed within the encapsulin for iron storage. This encapsulin nanocompartment is widely distributed in bacteria and archaea and represents a distinct class of iron storage system, where the oxidation and mineralization of iron are distributed between two proteins. PMID:27529188

  7. Effect of the structure of gallic acid and its derivatives on their interaction with plant ferritin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qunqun; Zhou, Kai; Ning, Yong; Zhao, Guanghua

    2016-12-15

    Gallic acid and its derivatives co-exist with protein components in foodstuffs, but there is few report on their interaction with proteins. On the other hand, plant ferritin represents not only a novel class of iron supplement, but also a new nanocarrier for encapsulation of bioactive nutrients. However, plant ferritin is easy to be degraded by pepsin in the stomach, thereby limiting its application. Herein, we investigated the interaction of gallic acid and its derivatives with recombinant soybean seed H-2 ferritin (rH-2). We found that these phenolic acids interacted with rH-2 in a structure-dependent manner; namely, gallic acid (GA), methyl gallate (MEGA) and propyl gallate (PG) having three HO groups can bind to rH-2, while their analogues with two HO groups cannot. Consequently, such binding largely inhibited ferritin degradation by pepsin. These findings advance our understanding of the relationship between the structure and function of phenolic acids. PMID:27451180

  8. Central role for ferritin in the day/night regulation of iron homeostasis in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Botebol, Hugo; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Šuták, Robert; Six, Christophe; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Schatt, Philippe; Vergé, Valérie; Kirilovsky, Amos; Morrissey, Joe; Léger, Thibaut; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Gueneugues, Audrey; Bowler, Chris; Blain, Stéphane; Bouget, François-Yves

    2015-11-24

    In large regions of the open ocean, iron is a limiting resource for phytoplankton. The reduction of iron quota and the recycling of internal iron pools are among the diverse strategies that phytoplankton have evolved to allow them to grow under chronically low ambient iron levels. Phytoplankton species also have evolved strategies to cope with sporadic iron supply such as long-term storage of iron in ferritin. In the picophytoplanktonic species Ostreococcus we report evidence from observations both in the field and in laboratory cultures that ferritin and the main iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrate assimilation pathways show opposite diurnal expression patterns, with ferritin being maximally expressed during the night. Biochemical and physiological experiments using a ferritin knock-out line subsequently revealed that this protein plays a central role in the diel regulation of iron uptake and recycling and that this regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for cell survival under iron limitation. PMID:26553998

  9. FERRITIN EXPRESSION AFTER IN VITRO EXPOSURES OF HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES TO SILICA IS IRON-DEPENDENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increased availability of catalytically active iron after silica exposure can present an oxidative injury to a living system. Sequestration of reactive iron would, therefore, confer a protective effect. The intracellular storage of iron by ferritin within macrophages can limi...

  10. Transferrin receptor and ferritin-H are developmentally regulated in oligodendrocyte lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunxia; Guan, Qiang; Chen, Yuhui; Han, Hongjie; Liu, Wuchao; Nie, Zhiyu

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential trophic element that is required for cell viability and differentiation, especially in oligodendrocytes, which consume relatively high rates of energy to produce myelin. Multiple iron metabolism proteins are expressed in the brain including transferrin receptor and ferritin-H. However, it is still unknown whether they are developmentally regulated in oligodendrocyte lineage cells for myelination. Here, using an in vitro cultured differentiation model of oligodendrocytes, we found that both transferrin receptor and ferritin-H are significantly upregulated during oligodendrocyte maturation, implying the essential role of iron in the development of oligodendrocytes. Additional different doses of Fe(3+) in the cultured medium did not affect oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation or ferritin-H expression but decreased the expression of the transferrin receptor. These results indicate that upregulation of both transferrin receptor and ferritin-H contributes to maturation and myelination of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. PMID:25206366

  11. Genetic manipulation of iron biomineralization enhances MR relaxivity in a ferritin-M6A chimeric complex.

    PubMed

    Radoul, Marina; Lewin, Limor; Cohen, Batya; Oren, Roni; Popov, Stanislav; Davidov, Geula; Vandsburger, Moriel H; Harmelin, Alon; Bitton, Ronit; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Neeman, Michal; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin has gained significant attention as a potential reporter gene for in vivo imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, due to the ferritin ferrihydrite core, the relaxivity and sensitivity for detection of native ferritin is relatively low. We report here on a novel chimeric magneto-ferritin reporter gene - ferritin-M6A - in which the magnetite binding peptide from the magnetotactic bacteria magnetosome-associated Mms6 protein was fused to the C-terminal of murine h-ferritin. Biophysical experiments showed that purified ferritin-M6A assembled into a stable protein cage with the M6A protruding into the cage core, enabling magnetite biomineralisation. Ferritin-M6A-expressing C6-glioma cells showed enhanced (per iron) r2 relaxivity. MRI in vivo studies of ferritin-M6A-expressing tumour xenografts showed enhanced R2 relaxation rate in the central hypoxic region of the tumours. Such enhanced relaxivity would increase the sensitivity of ferritin as a reporter gene for non-invasive in vivo MRI-monitoring of cell delivery and differentiation in cellular or gene-based therapies. PMID:27211820

  12. Genetic manipulation of iron biomineralization enhances MR relaxivity in a ferritin-M6A chimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    Radoul, Marina; Lewin, Limor; Cohen, Batya; Oren, Roni; Popov, Stanislav; Davidov, Geula; Vandsburger, Moriel H.; Harmelin, Alon; Bitton, Ronit; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Neeman, Michal; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin has gained significant attention as a potential reporter gene for in vivo imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, due to the ferritin ferrihydrite core, the relaxivity and sensitivity for detection of native ferritin is relatively low. We report here on a novel chimeric magneto-ferritin reporter gene – ferritin-M6A – in which the magnetite binding peptide from the magnetotactic bacteria magnetosome-associated Mms6 protein was fused to the C-terminal of murine h-ferritin. Biophysical experiments showed that purified ferritin-M6A assembled into a stable protein cage with the M6A protruding into the cage core, enabling magnetite biomineralisation. Ferritin-M6A-expressing C6-glioma cells showed enhanced (per iron) r2 relaxivity. MRI in vivo studies of ferritin-M6A-expressing tumour xenografts showed enhanced R2 relaxation rate in the central hypoxic region of the tumours. Such enhanced relaxivity would increase the sensitivity of ferritin as a reporter gene for non-invasive in vivo MRI-monitoring of cell delivery and differentiation in cellular or gene-based therapies. PMID:27211820

  13. The etiological relation between serum iron level and infection incidence in hemodialysis uremic patients.

    PubMed

    Galić, Gordan; Tomić, Monika; Galesić, Kresimir; Kvesić, Ante; Soljić, Martina; Londar, Zdravka; Valencić, Maksim; Martinović, Zeljko; Vuckov, Sime

    2011-03-01

    Through the treatment of anaemia in dialysis patients part of the iron ions remain free in the serum which is at the bacterias disposal for growth and the strengthening of their virulence. The linear relation of the increased serum iron level and tissue iron stores in the body and the infection incidence in dialysed patients has become more emphasised. The need of a clearly defined upper threshold of the serum iron concentration limit has been mentioned in scientific journals intensely, and consequently the demand for more precise professional instructions for anaemia treatment. For the purpose of participating in these professional and scientific discussions, we have observed the relation between the iron overload of the organism and complication incidence in 120 of our haemodialysis uremic patients, with special emphasis on infections. It has been established that the sepses incidence is much higher in patients with a serum ferritin concentration above 500 microg/L, than in those patients with a ferritin level lower than the mentioned value ( 2 = 7.857, p = 0.005). The incidence of vascular access infection is significantly higher in those patients with a serum ferritin level above 500 microg/L than in those patients with a ferritin level lower than the mentioned value (Chi2 = 23.186, p = 0.001). Furthermore, it has been determined that the incidence of total infection in patients is 3.8 episodes per 100 patients months, which is in accordance to the referral values of other authors. CONCLUSION--In the analysis of the achieved results, it has been determined that the infection incidence is significantly higher in dialysed patients with a serum iron level higher than 500 g/L, than in those patients with lower values. PMID:21667534

  14. Preparation and Representation of Recombinant Mn-Ferritin Flower-Like Spherical Aggregates from Marine Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liping; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Yunyun; Chu, Shuangshuang; He, Weina; Li, Ye; Su, Xiurong

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin has important functions in the transition and storage of toxic metal ions, but its regulation and function in many invertebrate species are still largely unknown. In our previous work, the cDNA sequence of Sinonovacula constricta, Apostichopus japonicas and Acaudina leucoprocta were constructed and efficiently expressed in E. Coli BL21 under IPTG induction. In this follow-up study, the recombinant ferritins were exposed to heavy metal manganese. The manganese concentration levels in three recombinant ferritins were greater than horse spleen ferritin (HSF). Compared with HSF, the amount of manganese enrichment in the three recombinant ferritins was 1.75-fold, 3.25-fold and 2.42-fold increases in ScFER, AjFER, and AlFER, respectively. After phosphate stimulation, the concentration of manganese increased and was higher than the ordinary dialysis control groups. The ScFER was four times its baseline value. The AjFER and AlFER were 1.4- and 8-fold higher, respectively. The AlFER sample stimulated by phosphate was 22-fold that of HSF. The morphologies of the resulting Mn-Ferritin from different marine invertebrates were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. Surface morphologies were lamella flower-like and are consistent with changes in surface morphologies of the standard Mn-HSF. Invertebrate recombinant ferritin and HSF both can uptake manganese. We found that the structure of A. leucoproctarecombinant Mn-Ferritin aggregate changed over time. The surface formed lamella flower-like aggregate, but gradually merged to create a relatively uniform plate-like phase of aggregate spherically and fused without clear boundaries. PMID:25879665

  15. Three ferritin subunit analogs in Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus) and their response to microbial stimulation.

    PubMed

    You, Xiuling; Sheng, Jianghong; Liu, Liu; Nie, Dongsong; Liao, Zhiyong

    2015-10-01

    Ferritin, an evolutionarily conserved iron-binding protein, plays important roles in iron storage and detoxification and in host immune response to invading stimulus as well. In the present study, we identified three ferritin subunit analog cDNAs from Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus). All the three ferritin subunit cDNAs had a putative iron responsive element in the 5'-untranslated region. Two deduced ferritin subunits (designated as cgsFerH and cgsFerM) had the highest identity of 90% to H type subunit of vertebrate ferritins, while another deduced ferritin subunit (designated as cgsFerL) had the highest identity of 84% to L type subunit of vertebrate ferritins. The Chinese giant salamander ferritin (cgsFer) was widely expressed in various tissues, with highest expression for cgsFerH and cgsFerL in liver and highest expression for cgsFerM in spleen. Infection of Chinese giant salamander with A. davidianus ranavirus showed significant induction of cgsFer expression. Both lipopolysaccharide and iron challenge drastically augmented cgsFer expression in the splenocytes and hepatocytes from Chinese giant salamander. In addition, recombinant cgsFers bound to ferrous iron in a dose-dependent manner, with significant ferroxidase activity. Furthermore, the recombinant cgsFer inhibited the growth of the pathogen Vibrio anguillarum. These results indicated that cgsFer was potential candidate of immune molecules involved in acute phase response to invading microbial pathogens in Chinese giant salamander possibly through its regulatory roles in iron homeostasis. PMID:26319314

  16. Immunohistochemical distribution of ferritin, lactoferrin, and transferrin in granulomas of bovine paratuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Momotani, E; Furugouri, K; Obara, Y; Miyata, Y; Ishikawa, Y; Yoshino, T

    1986-01-01

    Granulomatous lesions of bovine paratuberculosis contained ferritin, lactoferrin, and a small amount of transferrin, as demonstrated by the immunohistochemical method. Macrophages in the normal bovine ileum did not contain lactoferrin and transferrin; however, ferritin was found in individual macrophages of Peyer's patches. These results may help elucidate the relationship between intracellular growth of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and the presence of iron-binding proteins in the granulomas. Images PMID:3699898

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Tumors Colonized with Bacterial Ferritin-Expressing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Scadeng, Miriam; Geissinger, Ulrike; Haddad, Daniel; Basse-Lüsebrink, Thomas C.; Gbureck, Uwe; Jakob, Peter; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that human ferritin can be used as a reporter of gene expression for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Bacteria also encode three classes of ferritin-type molecules with iron accumulation properties. Methods and Findings Here, we investigated whether these bacterial ferritins can also be used as MRI reporter genes and which of the bacterial ferritins is the most suitable reporter. Bacterial ferritins were overexpressed in probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917. Cultures of these bacteria were analyzed and those generating highest MRI contrast were further investigated in tumor bearing mice. Among members of three classes of bacterial ferritin tested, bacterioferritin showed the most promise as a reporter gene. Although all three proteins accumulated similar amounts of iron when overexpressed individually, bacterioferritin showed the highest contrast change. By site-directed mutagenesis we also show that the heme iron, a unique part of the bacterioferritin molecule, is not critical for MRI contrast change. Tumor-specific induction of bacterioferritin-expression in colonized tumors resulted in contrast changes within the bacteria-colonized tumors. Conclusions Our data suggest that colonization and gene expression by live vectors expressing bacterioferritin can be monitored by MRI due to contrast changes. PMID:21984917

  18. Ferritin Levels in Colombian Children: Findings from the 2010 National Nutrition Survey (ENSIN).

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Martínez-Torres, Javier; González-Ruíz, Katherine; Lobelo, Felipe

    2016-04-01

    Low ferritin is associated with many adverse health outcomes and is highly prevalent worldwide. The aim of this study was to describe the key findings related to plasma ferritin levels to identify the prevalence and associated sociodemographic factors in a representative sample of children in Colombia, based on the 2010 National Nutrition Survey. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 6650 Colombian children between the ages of 5 and 12. Plasma ferritin levels were determined by chemiluminescence. Sociodemographic data was assessed by computer-assisted personal interview technology. All analyses were conducted considering the complex nature of the sample. Of the children assessed, 3.5% had low ferritin, defined as levels <12 µg/L. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed increased risks for low ferritin levels among black or Afro-Colombian ethnic group and for those living in the northern, western and southern regions of the country. In conclusion, a significant prevalence of anemia caused by low ferritin levels was found and various sociodemographic factors were associated with this finding in Colombia. Continued surveillance and implementation of interventions to improve dietary patterns among the identified high-risk groups should be considered. Implementing these recommendations can help reduce manifestations of iron deficiency (e.g., delays in infant and child development) and thus improve public health. PMID:27058547

  19. Identification and involvement of ferritin in the response to pathogen challenge in the abalone, Haliotis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    He, Jian; Jiang, Jingzhe; Gu, Lu; Zhao, Manman; Wang, Ruixuan; Ye, Lingtong; Yao, Tuo; Wang, Jiangyong

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating data has demonstrated that ferritin plays an important role in host defense responses against infection by pathogens in many organisms. In this study, ultracentrifugation was used to isolate ferritin from abalone, Haliotis diversicolor, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis revealed that this ferritin consisted of two subunits (designated as HdFer1 and HdFer2). There are no disulfide bonds between the HdFer1 and HdFer2 subunits; however, these subunits co-assemble to form heteropolymers. A novel ferritin subunit (HdFer2) was cloned from H. diversicolor by 5' and 3' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) approach. The full-length HdFer2 cDNA sequence consists of 878 bp with an open reading frame of 513 bp that encodes a protein that is 170 amino acids in length. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that HdFer1 and HdFer2 were transcribed in various tissues, such as the mantle, gill and hepatopancreas, with the highest levels of expression in the hepatopancreas. Following a challenge with the pathogen, Vibrio harveyi, the expression of HdFer1 and HdFer2 were markedly induced at different times. This study has identified a novel ferritin subunit in H. diversicolor which will contribute to further exploration of the role of ferritin in mollusk innate immune defense against invading pathogens. PMID:26875633

  20. Ferritin Levels in Colombian Children: Findings from the 2010 National Nutrition Survey (ENSIN)

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Martínez-Torres, Javier; González-Ruíz, Katherine; Lobelo, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Low ferritin is associated with many adverse health outcomes and is highly prevalent worldwide. The aim of this study was to describe the key findings related to plasma ferritin levels to identify the prevalence and associated sociodemographic factors in a representative sample of children in Colombia, based on the 2010 National Nutrition Survey. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 6650 Colombian children between the ages of 5 and 12. Plasma ferritin levels were determined by chemiluminescence. Sociodemographic data was assessed by computer-assisted personal interview technology. All analyses were conducted considering the complex nature of the sample. Of the children assessed, 3.5% had low ferritin, defined as levels <12 µg/L. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed increased risks for low ferritin levels among black or Afro-Colombian ethnic group and for those living in the northern, western and southern regions of the country. In conclusion, a significant prevalence of anemia caused by low ferritin levels was found and various sociodemographic factors were associated with this finding in Colombia. Continued surveillance and implementation of interventions to improve dietary patterns among the identified high-risk groups should be considered. Implementing these recommendations can help reduce manifestations of iron deficiency (e.g., delays in infant and child development) and thus improve public health. PMID:27058547

  1. The influence of reaction temperature on biomineralization of ferrihydrite cores in human H-ferritin.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lanxiang; Cao, Changqian; Pan, Yongxin

    2012-02-01

    Ferritin is not only important for iron storage and detoxification in living organisms, but a multifunctional size-constrained nanoplatform for biomimetic nanoparticles. In order to tailor the biomimetic nanoparticles for future applications, it is essential to investigate the effects of external factors such as temperature on the particle size and structure of reconstituted cores in ferritin. In this study, we systematically investigated the mineral composition, crystallinity, and particle size of human H-ferritin (HuHF) reconstituted at four different temperatures (25, 30, 37, and 42°C) by integrated magnetic and transmission electron microscopy analyses. Our results showed that the particle size of reconstituted ferrihydrite cores (~5 nm) in HuHF was temperature-independent. However, the significant changes of the induced magnetization at 5 T field (M(5T)) and remanent magnetization (M(r)) at 5 K clearly showed that the crystallinity of reconstituted cores increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the reaction temperature deeply affects the structural order of reconstituted ferrihydrite cores rather than the particle size, and the reconstituted cores become more ordered at higher reaction temperatures. Our findings provide useful insights into biomineralization of ferritin under in vivo fever condition as well as in biomimetic synthesis of nanomaterials using ferritin. Furthermore, the rock magnetic methods should be very useful approaches for characterizing finite ferritin nanoparticles. PMID:22020807

  2. 3-Hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase-2 and ferritin-H synergistically regulate intracellular iron.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuoming; Velpula, Kiran K; Devireddy, Lax

    2014-05-01

    Siderophores are best known as small iron-binding molecules that facilitate iron uptake in bacteria and fungi. In our previous study, we demonstrated that eukaryotes also produce siderophore-like molecules via a remarkably conserved biosynthetic pathway. A member of the short-chain dehydrogenase family of reductases, 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase-2, catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the biogenesis of the mammalian siderophore. Physiologically, depletion of the mammalian siderophore by inhibiting expression of the 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase-2 gene (Bdh2) results in abnormal accumulation of intracellular iron, increased oxidative stress, and mitochondrial iron deficiency. Thus, the mammalian siderophore is an important regulator of cellular iron homeostasis. The cellular iron storage protein ferritin also regulates iron metabolism and protects cells from oxidative stress. Depletion of ferritin results in intracellular iron accumulation, predisposes to oxidative stress, and confers a growth advantage to cells. We therefore hypothesize that the siderophore and ferritin coregulate cellular iron metabolism/homeostasis in eukaryotes. We tested this prediction by depleting both the siderophore and ferritin. This resulted in a marked accumulation of cellular iron, and caused increased sensitivity to oxidants. Interestingly, cells lacking both the siderophore and ferritin proliferated at a higher rate than cells lacking either of these components alone. Taken together, our findings suggest that the siderophore and ferritin synergistically regulate cellular iron levels. PMID:24673886

  3. Glutamyl cysteine dipeptide suppresses ferritin expression and alleviates liver injury in iron-overload rat model.

    PubMed

    Salama, Samir A; Al-Harbi, Mohammad S; Abdel-Bakky, Mohamed S; Omar, Hany A

    2015-08-01

    Despite its biological importance, iron is a pro-oxidant element and its accumulation results in tissue injury. Iron overload diseases such as thalassemia and hereditary hemochromatosis are commonly associated with liver tissue injury. Glutamyl cysteine (GC) is a dipeptide with antioxidant properties owing to its cysteine residue. The aim of the current work was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of GC against iron overload-induced liver injury. Rats were distributed into five groups; normal control, GC control, iron-treated (150 mg/kg ip injection) and both iron and GC-treated (total iron: 150 mg/kg ip and GC: 50 mg or 100 mg/kg/day ip for 30 days). Our results showed that treatment with GC at the two-dose levels attenuated iron-induced liver tissue injury as evidenced by significant reduction in serum activity of liver enzymes ALT and AST, amelioration of iron-induced histopathological alteration, suppression of iron-induced oxidative stress as demonstrated by significant reduction of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl content beside elevation of total antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione and the antioxidant enzymes GPx and SOD in liver tissue. In addition, GC significantly reduced levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β and activity of the apoptotic marker caspase-3 in liver tissues. To our surprise, GC reduced liver iron content and ferritin expression, denoting the possible iron chelation competency. Collectively our results highlight evidence for the hepatoprotective effect of GC against iron overload-induced liver injury that is potentially mediated through suppression of oxidative tissue injury, attenuation of inflammatory response, amelioration of hepatocellular apoptosis and possibly through iron chelation. PMID:26093100

  4. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong J.; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Zhaohui; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-15

    Ferritins are nano-scale globular protein cages encapsulating a ferric core. They widely exist in animals, plants, and microbes, playing indispensable roles in iron homeostasis. Interestingly, our study clearly demonstrates that ferritin has an enzyme-mimic activity derived from its ferric nano-core, but not the protein cage. Further study revealed that the mimic-enzyme activity of ferritin is more thermally stable and pH-tolerant compared with horseradish peroxidase. Considering the abundance of ferritin in numerous organisms, this finding may indicate a new role of ferritin in antioxidant and detoxification metabolisms. In addition, as a natural protein-caged nanoparticle with an enzyme-mimic activity, ferritin is readily conjugated with biomolecules to construct nano-biosensors, thus holds promising potential for facile and biocompatible labeling for sensitive and robust bioassays in biomedical applications.

  5. Decreased serum prohepcidin concentration in patients with polycythemia vera*

    PubMed Central

    Kwapisz, Justyna; Żekanowska, Ewa; Jasiniewska, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Iron deficiency is a common complication in patients with polycythemia vera (PV). Hepcidin is a principal regulator of iron homeostasis. The aim of our study was to assess prohepcidin, a hepcidin precursor, and other iron status parameters in the serum of PV patients. Methods: The study was performed in 60 patients (F/M 26/34) aged 38~84 (66±10) years. The control group consisted of 20 healthy volunteers, age and sex matched. The following parameters were determined in blood serum samples: prohepcidin concentration, iron content, unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin saturation (TfS), and concentrations of ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR). Results: All PV patients showed significantly lower levels of prohepcidin, higher levels of sTfR and TIBC compared to the control group. 40% of the patients from the study group showed concentrations of ferritin below the normal range and significantly lower levels of serum iron and TfS, and significantly higher levels of sTfR, UIBC and TIBC in comparison with the rest of the study group. In this group of patients, prohepcidin concentrations were significantly lower than those in other patients. Conclusion: The results indicate that PV patients suffer from iron metabolism disorders. The decreased serum level of prohepcidin in PV patients may be a result of iron deficiency. PMID:19882752

  6. Ferritin binds to light chain of human H-kininogen and inhibits kallikrein-mediated bradykinin release.

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Narayanan; Torti, Suzy V; Torti, Frank M

    2002-01-01

    Ferritin is an iron-storage protein that exists in both intracellular and extracellular compartments. We have previously identified H-kininogen (high-molecular-weight kininogen) as a ferritin-binding protein [Torti and Torti (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 13630-13635]. H-Kininogen is a precursor of the potent pro-inflammatory peptide bradykinin, which is released from H-kininogen following cleavage of H-kininogen by the serine protease kallikrein. In this report, we demonstrate that binding of ferritin to H-kininogen occurs via the modified light chain of H-kininogen, and that ferritin binds preferentially to activated H-kininogen. We further demonstrate that binding of ferritin to H-kininogen retards the proteolytic cleavage of H-kininogen by kallikrein and its subsequent release of bradykinin from H-kininogen. Ferritin does not interfere with the ability of kallikrein to digest a synthetic substrate, suggesting that ferritin specifically impedes the ability of kallikrein to digest H-kininogen, perhaps by steric hindrance. Based on these results, we propose a model of sequential H-kininogen cleavage and ferritin binding. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the binding of ferritin to H-kininogen may serve to modulate bradykinin release. PMID:12071855

  7. Coupling Heme and Iron Metabolism via Ferritin H Chain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Inflammation and immunity can be associated with varying degrees of heme release from hemoproteins, eventually leading to cellular and tissue iron (Fe) overload, oxidative stress, and tissue damage. Presumably, these deleterious effects contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic infections. Recent Advances: Heme release from hemoglobin sensitizes parenchyma cells to undergo programmed cell death in response to proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor. This cytotoxic effect is driven by a mechanism involving intracellular accumulation of free radicals, which sustain the activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling transduction pathway. While heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) prevents programmed cell death, this cytoprotective effect requires the co-expression of ferritin H (heart/heavy) chain (FTH), which controls the pro-oxidant effect of labile Fe released from the protoporphyrin IX ring of heme. This antioxidant effect of FTH restrains JNK activation, whereas JNK activation inhibits FTH expression, a cross talk that controls metabolic adaptation to cellular Fe overload associated with systemic infections. Critical Issues and Future Directions: Identification and characterization of the mechanisms via which FTH provides metabolic adaptation to tissue Fe overload should provide valuable information to our current understanding of the pathogenesis of systemic infections as well as other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1754–1769. PMID:24124891

  8. The formation of ferritin from apoferritin. Kinetics and mechanism of iron uptake

    PubMed Central

    Macara, I. G.; Hoy, T. G.; Harrison, Pauline M.

    1972-01-01

    Ferritin has a high capacity as an iron store, incorporating some 4500 iron atoms as a microcrystalline ferric oxide hydrate. Starting from apoferritin, or ferritin of low iron content, Fe2+ and an oxidizing agent, the uptake of iron can be recorded spectrophotometrically. Progress curves were obtained and the reconstituted ferritin was shown by several physical methods to be similar to natural ferritin. The progress curves of iron uptake by apoferritin are sigmoidal; those for ferritins of low iron content are hyperbolic. The rate of iron uptake is dependent on the amount of iron already present in the molecule. The distribution of iron contents among reconstituted ferritin molecules is inhomogeneous. These findings are interpreted in terms of a crystal growth model. The surface area of the crystallites forming inside the protein increases until the molecule is half full, and then declines. This surface controls the rate at which new material is deposited. The experimental results can best be accounted for by a two-stage mechanism, an initial slow `nucleation' stage, which is apparently zero order with respect to [Fe2+], followed by a more rapid `growth' stage. The rate of Fe2+ oxidation is increased in the presence of apoferritin as compared with controls. Ferritin can therefore be regarded as an enzyme to which the product remains firmly attached. The protein appears to increase the rate of `nucleation'. The apparent zero order of this stage suggests the presence of binding sites on the protein, which are saturated with respect to Fe2+. These sites are presumed also to be oxidation sites. The oxidation and subsequent formation of the ferric oxide hydrate may proceed according to one of three alternative models. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:5075227

  9. Ferritin has an important immune function in the ark shell Scapharca broughtonii.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Libing; Liu, Zhihong; Wu, Biao; Dong, Yinghui; Zhou, Liqing; Tian, Jiteng; Sun, Xiujun; Yang, Aiguo

    2016-06-01

    Ferritin, the principle cytosolic iron storage protein in the majority of living organisms, has important roles during immune process in invertebrates. Detailed information about ferritin in the ark shell Scapharca broughtonii, however, has been very limited. In this study, full-length ferritin (termed SbFer) was cloned by the rapid amplication of cDNA ends (RACE) method based upon the sequence from the transcriptome library. The cDNA contained a 182 bp 5'-untranslated region, a 519 bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 172 amino acids, a 229 bp 3'-untranslated region, and three introns (902, 373 and 402 bp) embedded in four exons. There was an iron response element (IRE) in the 5'-untranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence of SbFer possessed many characteristics of vertebrate H type ferritin, shared 63%-91% identity with mollusks and greater identity with vertebrate H type ferritin compared to the L type. The SbFer gene expression pattern examined by quantitative real-time PCR showed ferritin mRNA was expressed in all ark shell tissues examined. The highest levels of expression were found in hemocytes with decreasing levels of expression in foot, mantle, gill, adductor muscle and hepatopancreas. A challenge with Vibrio anguillarum resulted in time-dependent significant upregulation of SbFer mRNA, indicating SbFer participated actively in the bacterial defense process. Further analysis of the antibacterial activity indicated recombinant SbFer could function as an immune antibacterial agent to both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Taken together, these results suggested strongly that ferritin of the ark shell is involved in immune defense against microbial infection and it is a constitutive and inducible acute-phase protein. PMID:26724973

  10. Rate of Iron Transfer Through the Horse Spleen Ferritin Shell Determined by the Rate of Formation of Prussian Blue and Fe-desferrioxamine Within the Ferritin Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Bo; Watt, Richard K.; Galvez, Natividad; Dominquez-Vera, Jose M.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    Iron (2+ and 3+) is believed to transfer through the three-fold channels in the ferritin shell during iron deposition and release in animal ferritins. However, the rate of iron transit in and out through these channels has not been reported. The recent synthesis of [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-), Prussian Blue (PB) and desferrioxamine (DES) all trapped within the horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) interior makes these measurements feasible. We report the rate of Fe(2+) penetrating into the ferritin interior by adding external Fe(2+) to [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) encapsulated in the HoSF interior and measuring the rate of formation of the resulting encapsulated PB. The rate at which Fe(2+) reacts with [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) in the HoSF interior is much slower than the formation of free PB in solution and is proceeded by a lag period. We assume this lag period and the difference in rate represent the transfer of Fe(2+) through the HoSF protein shell. The calculated diffusion coefficient, D approx. 5.8 x 10(exp -20) square meters per second corresponds to the measured lag time of 10-20 s before PB forms within the HoSF interior. The activation energy for Fe(2+) transfer from the outside solution through the protein shell was determined to be 52.9 kJ/mol by conducting the reactions at 10 to approximately 40 C. The reaction of Fe(3+) with encapsulated [Fe(CN)6](4-) also readily forms PB in the HoSF interior, but the rate is faster than the corresponding Fe(2+) reaction. The rate for Fe(3+) transfer through the ferritin shell was confirmed by measuring the rate of the formation of Fe-DES inside HoSF and an activation energy of 58.4 kJ/mol was determined. An attempt was made to determine the rate of iron (2+ and 3+) transit out from the ferritin interior by adding excess bipyridine or DES to PB trapped within the HoSF interior. However, the reactions are slow and occur at almost identical rates for free and HoSF-encapsulated PB, indicating that the transfer of iron from the interior through the