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Sample records for precipitated iron fischer-tropsch

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF PRECIPITATED IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. X. Lang; Dr. S. Chokkaram; Dr. L. Nowicki; G. Wei; Dr. Y. Ding; Dr. B. Reddy; Dr. S. Xiao

    1999-07-22

    Despite the current worldwide oil glut, the US will ultimately require large-scale production of liquid (transportation) fuels from coal. Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology, with its versatile product slate, may be expected to play a major role in production of transportation fuels via indirect coal liquefaction. Some of the F-T catalysts synthesized and tested at Texas A and M University under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-89PC89868 were more active than any other known catalysts developed for maximizing production of high molecular weight hydrocarbons (waxes). The objectives of the present contract were to demonstrate repeatability of catalyst performance and reproducibility of preparation procedures of two of these catalysts on a laboratory scale. Improvements in the catalyst performance were attempted through the use of: (a) higher reaction pressure and gas space velocity to maximize the reactor productivity; (b) modifications in catalyst preparation steps; and (c) different pretreatment procedures. Repeatability of catalyst performance and reproducibility of catalyst synthesis procedure have been successfully demonstrated in stirred tank slurry reactor tests. Reactor space-time-yield was increased up to 48% by increasing reaction pressure from 1.48 MPa to 2.17 MPa, while maintaining the gas contact time and synthesis gas conversion at a constant value. Use of calcination temperatures above 300 C, additional CaO promoter, and/or potassium silicate as the source of potassium promoter, instead of potassium bicarbonate, did not result in improved catalyst performance. By using different catalyst activation procedures they were able to increase substantially the catalyst activity, while maintaining low methane and gaseous hydrocarbon selectivities. Catalyst productivity in runs SA-0946 and SA-2186 was 0.71 and 0.86 gHC/g-Fe/h, respectively, and this represents 45-75% improvement in productivity relative to that achieved in Rheinpreussen's demonstration plant

  2. Development of Precipitated Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Burkur, D.B.; Ding, Y.; Chokkaram, S.

    1997-04-30

    Four (alumina or silica) supported catalysts were prepared by conventional impregnation of two commercial supports (silica - Davison grade 952; and alumina - Vista B). Nominal compositions (on mass basis) of synthesized catalysts are: (1) 100 Fe/5 Cu/6 K/139 SiO{sub 2} (2) 100 Fe/10 Cu/6 K/134 SiO{sub 2}, (3) 100 Fe/5 Cu/6 K/139 Al{sub 2}0{sub 3} and (4) 100 Fe/10 Cu/6 K/134 Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}. The corresponding weight % of iron (as metal) in the prepared catalysts is about 33.8%. Reduction behavior of the four supported catalysts was studied by both temperature programmed and isothermal reduction in hydrogen, and by isothermal reduction in CO at 280{degrees}C. Also, two precipitated promoted iron catalysts containing aluminum oxide as a binder, were reduced isothermally in the TGA unit with hydrogen at 240{degrees}C and 280{degrees}C. One of the two alumina containing catalysts (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/20 Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}) was tested in a slurry reactor (run SA-0097), and catalyst samples withdrawn from the reactor at various times on stream were characterized by XRD to determine bulk iron phases in the catalyst. Two slurry reactor tests were completed during this quarter. The first test (SA-0097) was conducted with alumina containing catalyst with nominal composition 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/20 Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}, which was synthesized previously in our laboratory (DOE Contract DE-AC22-85PC8001 1). The second test (SB-0627) was conducted with one of the silica supported catalysts which was prepared during this quarter: 100 Fe/5 Cu/6 K/139 SiO{sub 2} (Davison silica, grade 952). The performance of these two catalysts was inferior in comparison to our catalysts B (100 Fe/5 Cu/6 K/24 SiO{sub 2}) and C (100 Fe/3 Cu/4 K/16 SiO{sub 2}). Activity of these two catalysts was lower, catalyst deactivation rate was faster, and gaseous hydrocarbon selectivities were higher in comparison to the baseline catalysts B and C.

  3. Role of copper promotion in precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, R.J.; Xu, L.; Davis, B.H.

    1996-10-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was conducted on precipitated iron-silicon catalysts. The affect of copper promotion on the activity and selectivity of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and syngas activated catalysts is presented. High activity and stability have been obtained for potassium promoted catalysts when operating at 270{degrees}C; however, it has been found that promotion with potassium and copper is essential to obtaining good activity in a wax producing mode at 230{degrees}C. Promotion with copper is critical to achieving good activity when pretreating catalysts with hydrogen or with syngas at high pressure. XRD and Mossbauer data indicate that copper facilitates the reduction of iron oxide to metallic iron and iron carbides during hydrogen and syngas pretreatments.

  4. Mössbauer study of CO-precipitated Fischer-Tropsch iron catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. R. P. M.; Huggins, Frank E.; Mahajan, Vikram; Huffman, Gerald P.; Bukur, D. B.; Rao, V. U. S.

    1994-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy studies of precipitated Fischer-Tropsch (FT) iron catalysts, viz. 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/ x SiO2, where x=0,8, 16, 24, 25, 40, or 100, have shown that reduction of the oxide precursor in CO gives rise to χ-carbide Fe5C2 whose amount decreases with an increase of SiO2 content. The χ-carbide is converted into magnetite Fe3O4 while catalyzing the FT synthesis reaction. A correlation between FT activity and the content of χ-carbide in the catalysts was found, which indicated that χ-carbide is active for FT synthesis reaction.

  5. Nanoscale attrition during activation of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts: Implications for catalyst design

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Shroff, M.D.; Jin, Y.; Brooks, R.P.; Wilder, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    The Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) for the production of liquid hydrocarbons from coal-based synthesis gas has been the subject of renewed interest for conversion of coal to liquid fuels. The use of synthesis gas from modem energy-efficient gasifiers requires catalysts that can operate under low H{sub 2}/CO ratios, typically 0.7-0.9. Since the FTS stoichiometry requires a H{sub 2}/CO ratio of 2.0, catalysts that operate at lower ratios must catalyze the water gas shift reaction to make up the deficit in H{sub 2}. The use of iron-based catalysts for the process is attractive in view of their low cost, ready availability and high water-gas shift reactivity. Furthermore, iron catalysts at elevated pressures (10-15 atmospheres) produce the desired range of liquid hydrocarbons. AU these features make the use of Fe as an F-T catalyst extremely desirable. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, the preferred reactor type for industrial operation is the slurry bubble column reactor. The catalyst for this reactor is precipitated iron oxide which is spray dried to yield particles with diameter of 30-70 {mu}m. One major limitation of these catalysts is that they tend to undergo attrition during use, leading to problems in catalyst separation and recovery of liquid products from the reactor.

  6. Nanoscale attrition during activation of precipitated iron Fischer- Tropsch catalysts: Implications for catalyst design

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Shroff, M.D.; Jin, Y.; Brooks, R.P.; Wilder, J.A.; Harrington, M.S.; Sault, A.G.; Jackson, N.B.

    1996-06-01

    This work has shown that the kaolin binder that has been used in commercial Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis catalysts doe not offer any significant attrition resistance. This is due in part to its morphology (plate-like) and to its particle size being much greater than the primary crystallite size of the iron oxide catalyst. From a microscopic examination of these catalysts, it appears that if the nanoscale attrition of the iron catalyst is to be avoided, the iron must be well dispersed on the binder, and the binder must provide an interlocking microstructure that provides strength and stability to the 30-70 {mu}m agglomerates. The study of Fe/SiO{sub 2} catalysts has shown that co-precipitation of the iron and silica leads to formation of an amorphous glassy phase which is difficult to reduce even at 723K. On the other hand, when the iron was precipitated on a preformed silica, 25-40% of the iron could be reduced and carbided. The supported iron catalyst, after reduction, formed 15-20 nm iron carbide particles that look very similar to those on the unsupported catalyst. The major difference is these nanometer sized particles are anchored on a support and therefore would not be expected to breakup further and contribute to the fines generated as catalyst attrition proceeds. However, since only a fraction of the silica-supported iron can be reduced to the active carbide phase, our present efforts are devoted to moderating the Fe/SiO{sub 2} interaction by introducing an interfacial oxide phase. We are also studying the role of added Cu on the ease of reducibility of Fe/SiO{sub 2}. The implication of this work is that other binder materials should be explored that have a morphology that can strengthen the agglomerates and minimize the Fe-SiO{sub 2} interfacial reactions. This work is presently underway in our laboratory.

  7. Activation studies with a precipitated iron catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. II. Reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Nowicki, L.; Manne, R.K.; Lang, Xiaosu

    1995-09-01

    Effects of pretreatment conditions on catalyst performance (activity, selectivity, and stability with time) during Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis were studied in a fixed-bed reactor using a commercial precipitated iron catalyst (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2K/25 SiO{sub 2} on a mass basis). The catalyst activity increased slightly with time-on-stream after hydrogen reductions, which was accompanied with conversion of metallic iron and part of iron oxides to {epsilon}{prime}-carbide ({epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 22}C). Initial activity of the H{sub 2}-reduced catalyst at 280{degrees}C for 8 or 24 h was markedly lower than that obtained in other tests. This is attributed to slow carburization of large oxide particles and partial poisoning of catalyst sites by migration of sulfur from the bulk to the surface of the catalyst during the reduction. Pretreatments with carbon monoxide and syngas resulted in partial conversion of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to {chi}-carbide ({chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}). During FT synthesis the CO- and the syngas-pretreated catalyst deactivated slowly with time-on-stream, due to partial conversion of {chi}-carbide to less active iron oxide phases and buildup of carbonaceous deposits which block the active sites. The hydrogen-reduced catalyst at 280{degrees}C, for 1-24h, produced more methane and gaseous hydrocarbons than the CO- or the syngas-pretreated catalyst and favored secondary reactions (1-olefin hydrogenation, isomerization, and readsorption). 41 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Kinetics of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction on a precipitated promoted iron catalyst. 1. Experimental procedure and results

    SciTech Connect

    Lox, E.S.; Froment, G.F. )

    1993-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch reaction on a commercial promoted precipitated iron catalyst was studied in a tubular reactor under non-deactivating conditions of temperatures between 523 and 623 K, pressures between 0.6 and 2.1 MPa, hydrogen to carbon monoxide feed ratios between 3.0 and 6.0 mol/mol, and W/F[degree][sub CO] values between 9.2 and 63.0 kg[center dot]s/mol. The selectivity for carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrocarbons of different functionality with 2-15 carbon atoms in the molecule was obtained as a function of the carbon monoxide conversion, the reactor temperature, and the total pressure. The initial rate of formation of these products was measured as a function of the total pressure and the partial pressures of hydrogen and carbon monoxide at the reactor inlet. These experiments, combined with the information gained from the catalyst characterization, indicated that carbon dioxide is formed by the water gas shift reaction. Methane, n-paraffins, and 1-olefins with two and more carbon atoms in the molecule are all primary products of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The composition of the hydrocarbon product fraction, as a function of the number of carbon atoms in the hydrocarbon molecule, could be described by the Schulz-Flory distribution, although it is shown that the latter only approximately holds for the effluent of an integral reactor.

  9. The role of catalyst activation on the activity and attrition of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Shroff, M.D.; Harrington, M.S.; Coulter, K.E.; Sault, A.G.; Jackson, N.B.

    1995-12-31

    The results of this work indicate that magnetite is not catalytically active for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) in precipitated, unsupported iron catalysts, but the formation of the carbide phase is necessary to obtain FTS activity. The transformation of magnetite to carbide, though essential to obtain FTS activity, also causes the catalyst to break down. This can lead to severe problems during operation in a commercial slurry phase reactor. The results presented here imply that activation and attrition are simultaneous and complementary processes. In another study, we show that the catalyst can also under go attrition on a micron scale which is caused by lack of strength of the forces binding the catalyst primary particles in the agglomerates. Both these processes can make wax separation and product recovery extremely difficult. In this study, we have also shown that H{sub 2} reduction of this catalyst to metallic iron is detrimental to subsequent catalyst activity and causes a loss of surface area due to sintering of the iron crystallites. Reduction to metallic Fe also causes impurities such as S to segregate to the surface causing a complete loss of FTS activity. It has been shown that even submonolayer amounts of S can cause a dramatic decrease in FTS activity, hence reduction to metallic Fe should be avoided during activation of these catalysts. We have shown, however, that a mild H{sub 2} reduction to magnetite does not lead to S segregation to the surface, and is therefore acceptable.

  10. Technology development for iron and cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1999-11-01

    The impact of deuterium on the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis was studied with a precipitated iron catalyst in the slurry phase. Deuterium has been used by several research groups to better understand the mechanism of CO hydrogenation. Inverse (k{sub H}/k{sub D} < 1), normal (k{sub H}/k{sub D} > 1) and no isotope effect (k{sub H}/k{sub D} = 1) have been reported. The conflicting results are thought to arise because rate of reaction is a combination of kinetic and equilibrium factors. In summary, the presence of boron produced only minor changes on the properties of the cobalt catalyst. In earlier studies, it was shown that the presence of boron made the catalyst less susceptible to poisoning by sulfur. Steady-state supercritical Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was studied in the work using a fixed-bed reactor and an unpromoted Co/SiO{sub 2} catalyst. This serves as the baseline for promoted catalyst studies. A pentane-hexane mixture was used as the supercritical solvent. Overall reactor pressure, syngas partial pressure and contact time were kept constant to obtain a valid comparison of the impact of solvent density in the catalytic activity and selectivity. Three different partial pressures of the mixture were chosen based on the density-pressure curve in order to investigate the pressure tuning effect to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis near critical region.

  11. Iron on mixed zirconia-titania substrate Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Paul N.; Nordquist, Andrew F.; Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1986-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising iron co-deposited with or deposited on particles comprising a mixture of zirconia and titania, preferably formed by co-precipitation of compounds convertible to zirconia and titania, such as zirconium and titanium alkoxide. The invention also comprises the method of making this catalyst and an improved Fischer-Tropsch reaction process in which the catalyst is utilized.

  12. Development of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Lang, X.; Wei, G.; Xiao, S.

    1995-08-17

    Work continued on the development of catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Six catalysts were synthesised. The effects of a calcium oxide promoter were evaluated. Catalysts were characterized for pore size and BET surface area.

  13. Low nitrogen iron-containing Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and conversion of synthesis gas therewith

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, W.K.; Haag, W.O.; Kirker, G.W.; Klocke, D.J.

    1987-08-11

    This patent describes a process for converting syngas to hydrocarbons comprising: (a) contacting an iron-containing Fischer-Tropsch catalyst with a syngas stream under conditions effective to achieve high conversion of the syngas to substantial amounts of C/sub 3//sup +/ carbon compounds; (b) contacting the effluent stream from (a) with a shape selective crystalline zeolite having a Constraint Index of about 1 to 12; and (c) recovering from the effluent stream of (b) gasoline and distillate materials; the improvement which comprises preparing the iron-containing Fischer-Tropsch catalyst by a process which continuously precipitates an aqueous solution containing iron nitrate with aqueous ammonia at a pH of about 6.5 to 6.9 and a temperature ranging from about 70/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C and thereafter washing the resulting precipitate with an aqueous wash solution to produce a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst containing less than about 500 ppm nitrogen.

  14. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysts must undergo a pretreatment in order to be active. As part of the authors comprehensive study to maximize the activity of iron based precipitated Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, they are currently attempting to optimize the activation procedure. Although they are able to achieve high activity using CO pretreatment, the catalysts tend to deactivate suddenly and rapidly after 500 hr of synthesis. Kolbel reports high CO conversion comparable to these results at a lower gas flow (2.4 vs. 3.4 nL/hr-g(Fe)); however, he achieved greater stability with conversions reported to be 90% after 1,400 hrs. One possibility for Kolbel`s higher stability could be due to the activation procedure. Herein are reported the initial results of a study to optimize the catalyst composition and the operating conditions for the iron based slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis when synthesis gas activation is utilized.

  15. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Burtron H. Davis

    1999-04-30

    The impact of activation procedure on the phase composition of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts has been studied. Catalyst samples taken during activation and FT synthesis have been characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Formation of iron carbide is necessary for high FT activity. Hydrogen activation of precipitated iron catalysts results in reduction to predominantly metallic iron and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Metallic iron is not stable under FT 3 4 conditions and is rapidly converted to {epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 2.2}C. Activation with carbon monoxide or syngas 2.2 with low hydrogen partial pressure reduces catalysts to {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and a small amount of 5 2 superparamagnetic carbide. Exposure to FT conditions partially oxidizes iron carbide to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}; however, catalysts promoted with potassium or potassium and copper maintain a constant carbide content and activity after the initial oxidation. An unpromoted iron catalyst which was activated with carbon monoxide to produce 94% {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}, deactivated rapidly as the carbide was oxidized to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. No difference in activity, stability or deactivation rate was found for {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and {epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 2.2}C.

  16. Surface characterization of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kuivila, C.S.; Butt, J.B.; Stair, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the authors address XPS characterization of the iron phases associated with Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Results obtained for single-phase metal, oxide, and carbide samples are presented. Methods for estimating the extent of carbide formation during low conversion synthesis, and the extent of catalyst oxidation at high conversions are illustrated. This approach is used to monitor the evolution of an initially reduced, unsupported iron catalyst during synthesis at low conversion levels.

  17. Effect of potassium promotion on iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Raje, A.P.; O`Brien, R.J.; Davis, B.H.

    1998-11-15

    The effect of potassium on Fischer-Tropsch catalyst activity, kinetic parameters, and selectivity has been investigated for a precipitated iron catalyst that was employed with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio synthesis gas. A wide range of synthesis gas conversions have been obtained by varying space velocities over catalysts with various potassium loadings. Differing trends in catalyst activity with potassium loading were observed depending on the space velocity of synthesis gas conversion. As potassium loading increased, the catalyst activity either decreased (low conversion), passed through a maximum (intermediate conversion), or increased (high conversion). This is shown to be a result of the increasing dependency of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on the hydrogen formed by the water-gas shift reaction with increasing synthesis gas conversions. Both the rate constant and the adsorption parameter in a common two-parameter Fischer-Tropsch rate expression decreased with potassium loading; therefore, observed maxima in Fischer-Tropsch rate with potassium loading can be due to the opposing influences of these parameters. The effect of potassium on alkene selectivity was dependent on the number of carbon atoms of the hydrocarbons as well as the carbon monoxide conversion level. The extent of isomerization of 1-alkene product decreased with potassium loading, while the selectivity to methane decreased only slightly with increasing potassium content at CO conversions about 50% and higher.

  18. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND CONBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Burtron H. Davis

    2000-10-01

    The use of alkali promoters has been widely practiced. However, data to compare various promoters is limited for the iron-based catalysts and much of the available data were obtained at low pressure or under a variety of reaction conditions. The importance of the alkali promoter in determining catalytic activity, stability and selectivity merits a comparison of the promoters under suitable reaction conditions. The present study utilizes medium pressure synthesis conditions to compare the alkali promoters under the same reaction conditions and over a wide range of conversion levels. Iron-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts undergo a series of phase transformations during activation and use. Activation with carbon monoxide or syngas typically results in the conversion of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and ultimately to one or more carbides. During FT synthesis, iron carbides can be oxidized to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} if the H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} or CO{sub 2}/CO ratios are high enough. There has been considerable debate about the active phase of the FT synthesis. Some studies have indicated an active oxide species while most have supported a carbide species. Moessbauer spectroscopy has proven to be an effective technique for the analysis of iron-based FT catalysts. In situ Moessbauer studies have been reported; however, these studies have been performed at low pressure and low conversions. Studies performed at industrially relevant conditions have generally involved removing the catalyst from the reactor followed by passivation which, if not performed properly, will oxidize the catalyst. Herein are reported the Moessbauer results obtained on an unpromoted precipitated iron catalyst that was activated and reacted in a slurry phase, continuous stirred tank reactor at high conversion and under industrially relevant conditions.

  19. ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    JAMES G. GOODWIN, JR.; JAMES J. SPIVEY; K. JOTHIMURUGESAN; SANTOSH K. GANGWAL

    1998-09-17

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T when using low CO/H{sub 2} ratio synthesis gases derived from modern coal gasifiers. This is because in addition to reasonable F-T activity, the F-T catalysts also possess high water gas shift (WGS) activity. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, making the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research are to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition resistance of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance. Catalyst preparations will be based on the use of spray drying and will be scalable using commercially available equipment. The research will employ among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis, including long duration slurry reactor runs in order to ascertain the degree of success of the various preparations. The goal is to develop an Fe catalyst which can be used in a SBCR having only an internal filter for separation of the catalyst from the liquid product, without sacrificing F-T activity and selectivity. The effect of silica addition via coprecipitation and as a binder to a doubly promoted Fischer-Tropsch synthesis iron catalyst (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K) was studied. The catalysts were prepared by coprecipitation, followed by binder addition and drying in a 1

  20. ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    James G. Goodwin, Jr.; James J. Spivey; K. Jothimurugesan; Santosh K. Gangwal

    1999-03-29

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T when using low CO/H2 ratio synthesis gases derived from modern coal gasifiers. This is because in addition to reasonable F-T activity, the F-T catalysts also possess high water gas shift (WGS) activity. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, making the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research are to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition resistance of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance. Catalyst preparations will be based on the use of spray drying and will be scalable using commercially available equipment. The research will employ among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis, including long duration slurry reactor runs in order to ascertain the degree of success of the various preparations. The goal is to develop an Fe catalyst which can be used in a SBCR having only an internal filter for separation of the catalyst from the liquid product, without sacrificing F-T activity and selectivity. The effect of silica addition via coprecipitation and as a binder to a doubly promoted Fischer-Tropsch synthesis iron catalyst (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K) was studied. The catalysts were prepared by coprecipitation, followed by binder addition and drying in a 1 m

  1. The surface chemistry of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, D.J.; Hardenburgh, J.H.

    1986-04-01

    The indirect conversion of coal to liquid hydrocarbons via steam gasification followed by synthesis gas (CO/H/sub 2/) chemistry has been the subject of intensive study for a number of decades. A key technological challenge facing researchers in this area is control over the product distribution during the hydrocarbon synthesis step. In the case of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, it has been known that the addition of alkali to the metal catalyst has a significant impact on the product distribution. Iron catalysts treated with alkali produce less methane more alkenes and higher molecular weight products. In spite of numerous investigations, the details of this promotional effect are not understood on a molecular level. To explore the role of alkali in the surface chemistry of iron catalysts, the authors have carried out a combined surface science and catalytic kinetic study of a model iron catalyst with and without surface alkali.

  2. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1998-07-22

    The goal of the proposed work described in this Final Report was the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The work described here has optimized the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for a low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work has been conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies have been conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors have been studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance has been determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  3. Low nitrogen iron-containing Fischer-Tropsch catalyst for conversion of synthesis gas and process for preparing the catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, W.K.; Haag, W.O.; Kirker, G.W.; Klocke, D.J.

    1986-10-14

    A process is described for preparing an iron-containing Fischer-Tropsch catalyst by continuously precipitating an aqueous solution containing iron nitrate with aqueous ammonia, to form a precipitate-containing product which is thereafter dried. In the improvement described here a catalyst containing less than 500 ppm nitrogen is produced which comprises maintaining a pH of about 6.5 to 6.9 and a temperature of about 70/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/ C. during precipitation.

  4. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Abrevaya, H.; Gala, H.B.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scale up procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. The catalyst performance target in the slurry bubble-column reactor is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. Typical feed used to attain this level of conversion is preferred to have H{sub 2} and CO in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%.

  5. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalyst for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing H{sub 2} and CO in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0, the catalyst performance target in the slurry bubble-column reactor is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%.

  6. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scale-up procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble column reactors. With a feed containing H{sub 2}:CO in the ratio of 0.5 to 1.0, the catalyst performance target in the slurry bubble column reactor is 88% CO + H{sub 2}conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/h/gFe. The methane + ethane selectivity is desired to be no more than 4% and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%.

  7. Development of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report for the period July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.

    1996-12-02

    Two slurry reactor tests were completed in continuation of our studies on the effect of pretreatment conditions on catalyst reactivity and selectivity. Exceptionally good performance was obtained in run SA-2186, using the new pretreatment developed at Texas A&M University. The work on catalyst characterization by temperature programmed and isothermal reduction on a variety of iron catalysts, with different amounts of promoters, has been continued. These studies are complementing our work on pretreatment effect research, and provide additional insights into the effect of pretreatment procedures on the reduction behavior of iron catalysts. The overall objectives are to: (1) demonstrate repeatability of performance and preparation procedure of two high activity, high alpha iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts synthesized at Texas A&M University; (2) seek potential improvements in the catalysts performance through variation in process condition, pretreatment procedures and/or modifications in catalyst synthesis; (3) investigate performance of catalysts in a small bubble column slurry reactor; and (4) investigate feasibility of producing catalysts on a large scale in collaboration with a catalyst manufacturer.

  8. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Objectives are to develop active, stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. For a H[sub 2]-CO in molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0, catalyst performance target is 88% CO+H[sub 2] conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe, with no more than 4% methane/ethane selectivity and 1% conversion loss per week. During this period, it was found that the performance of the slurry-phase iron and copper oxide-based catalyst depends on the amount of K. Five catalysts with differing K contents were studied. The catalysts with the lowest K were more active than the ones with higher K levels. The one with the middle K level was judged best.

  9. XPS characterization of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kuivila, C.S.; Stair, P.C.; Butt, J.B.

    1986-04-01

    Analysis of Fe(2p) XPS and iron Auger spectra, combined with C(1s) XPS measurements, provides a valuable technique for studying the compositional behavior of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. The extent of catalyst oxidation during synthesis at high conversions may be estimated in terms of the area contribution of oxide phases to the Fe(2p) spectrum. Similarities between the metal and carbide core level spectra are likely to complicate the determination of these phases when oxides are present. Analysis of the metal and carbide contributions to the iron Auger spectrum provides an alternate method for monitoring surface carbide formation during low conversion synthesis. The ''surface compositions'' obtained in this manner are at best semi-quantitative, since the contribution of a particular phase to the XPS or Auger spectrum will depend on both the amount and distribution of that phase within the detected volume. In spite of this, the spectrum fitting technique should prove to be useful in characterizing the time and conversion dependent nature of the active catalyst surface.

  10. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Burtron H. Davis

    1998-04-01

    The goal of the proposed work is the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The catalyst that is developed will be suitable for testing at the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas or similar sized plant. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the ''standard-catalyst'' developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. The proposed work will optimize the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for this low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  11. Technology development for iron fischer-tropsch catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1997-05-14

    The goal of the proposed work is the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The catalyst that is developed will be suitable for testing at the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas or similar sized plant. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the `standard-catalyst` developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. The proposed work will optimize the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for this low- alpha catalyst. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high- alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for 5 catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  12. Technology Development for Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1997-12-16

    The goal of the proposed work is the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The catalyst that is developed will be suitable for testing at the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas or similar sized plant. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the `standard-catalyst` developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. The proposed work will optimize the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for this low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  13. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, R.J.; Raje, A.; Keogh, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this research project is to develop the technology for the production of physically robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry phase synthesis reactor development. The catalysts that are developed shall be suitable for testing in the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas, to produce either low-or high-alpha product distributions. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the {open_quotes}standard-catalyst{close_quotes} developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst this is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  14. The renaissance of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: on the multifaceted catalyst deactivation behaviour.

    PubMed

    de Smit, Emiel; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2008-12-01

    Iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, which are applied in the conversion of CO and H2 into longer hydrocarbon chains, are historically amongst the most intensively studied systems in heterogeneous catalysis. Despite this, fundamental understanding of the complex and dynamic chemistry of the iron-carbon-oxygen system and its implications for the rapid deactivation of the iron-based catalysts is still a developing field. Fischer-Tropsch catalysis is characterized by its multidisciplinary nature and therefore deals with a wide variety of fundamental chemical and physical problems. This critical review will summarize the current state of knowledge of the underlying mechanisms for the activation and eventual deactivation of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts and suggest systematic approaches for relating chemical identity to performance in next generation iron-based catalyst systems (210 references). PMID:19020686

  15. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1993-11-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch process has attracted a great deal of attention in terms of catalytic activity and selectivity to produce higher number hydrocarbons by reacting carbon monoxide and hydrogen at high pressures in the presence of catalysts. Shortly after the initial discovery, Fischer and Tropsch developed more active catalysts for indirect liquefaction. The product distribution resulting from the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) varies widely depending upon the catalysts, the temperature and pressure of reactions, pretreatment conditions, etc. It is desirable to improve the selectivity while maintaining the activity intact. One approach to achieve this task is the addition of promoters such as oxides of K, Mn, Ti, Mo, Ni, and Co, etc. It was observed that most of these promoted catalysts exhibit an increase in selectivity to higher hydrocarbons. For example, the addition of thoria as a promoter to cobalt-kieselguhr catalysts resulted in an enhanced yield of C{sub 5}{sup +} hydrocarbons. Even a small amount of thoria promoter ({approximately}0.4 wt %) addition to Co/ZSM-5 causes a remarkable increase in the conversion, shift activity, and C{sub 5}{sup +} selectivity. Thoria added as a promoter to a precipitated iron oxide catalyst appears to decrease wax selectivity. It is generally believed that the factors such as dispersion effects of rare earth oxides and thoria, the redox properties, and the basic properties of rare earth oxides and thorium oxides, greatly influence the activity and selectivity.

  16. Attrition Resistant Iron-Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Jothimurugesan, K.; Goodwin, J.G.; Spivey, J.J.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1997-03-26

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRS) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T when using low CO/H{sub 2} ratio synthesis gases derived from modem coal gasifiers. This is because in addition to reasonable F-T activity, the FT catalysts also possess high water gas shift (WGS) activity. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, making the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research are to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition resistance of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance. Catalyst preparations will be based on the use of spray drying and will be scalable using commercially available equipment. The research will employ among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis, including long duration slurry reactor runs in order to ascertain the degree of success of the various preparations. The goal is to develop an Fe catalyst which can be used in a SBCR having only an internal filter for separation of the catalyst from the liquid product, without sacrificing F-T activity and selectivity.

  17. Attrition Resistant Iron-Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts.

    SciTech Connect

    Jothimurugesan, K.; Goodwin, J.S.; Spivey, J.J.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1997-09-22

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T when using low CO/H{sub 2} ratio synthesis gases derived from modern coal gasifiers. This is because in addition to reasonable F-T activity, the F-T catalysts also possess high water gas shift (WGS) activity. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, making the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research are to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition resistance of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance. Catalyst preparations will be based on the use of spray drying and will be scalable using commercially available equipment. The research will employ among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis, including long duration slurry reactor runs in order to ascertain the degree of success of the various preparations. The goal is to develop an Fe catalyst which can be used in a SBCR having only an internal filter for separation of the catalyst from the liquid product, without sacrificing F-T activity and selectivity.

  18. Development of attrition resistant iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-20

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. The use of iron-based catalysts is attractive not only due to their low cost and ready availability, but also due to their high water-gas shift activity which makes it possible to use these catalysts with low H{sub 2}/CO ratios. However, a serious problem with use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, makes the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objective of this research is to develop robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry bubble column reactor. Specifically we aim to develop to: (1) improve the performance and preparation procedure of the high activity, high attrition resistant, high alpha iron-based catalysts synthesized at Hampton University (2) seek improvements in the catalyst performance through variations in process conditions, pretreatment procedures and/or modifications in catalyst preparation steps and (3) investigate the performance in a slurry reactor. The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to effects of pretreating procedures, using H{sub 2}, CO and syngas (H{sub 2}/CO = 0.67) as reductants, on the performance (activity, selectivity and stability with time) of a precipitated iron catalyst (100Fe/5Cu/4.2K/10SiO{sub 2} on a mass basis ) during F-T synthesis were studied in a fixed-bed reactor.

  19. A study on Raney iron catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch process in a slurry-phase reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhou, J.

    1997-12-31

    Raney Fe, prepared by extracting Al from Fe-Al alloy, exhibits a better activity during slurry phase FT synthesis and shows distinct selectivity in low weight hydrocarbon (alkanes). Its properties, a BET surface area of at least 22m{sup 2}/g, an average pore diameter of 30nm, and similar attrition resistance as fused iron, significantly contribute to the catalyst performance such as activity, product selectivity and free separation from the waxes. This paper describes catalyst preparation and performance tests in a slurry Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Three catalysts were compared: fused iron, precipitated iron, and Raney iron.

  20. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Burtron H. Davis

    1999-01-30

    The effects of copper on Fischer-Tropsch activity, selectivity and water-gas shift activity were studied over a wide range of syngas conversion. Three catalyst compositions were prepared for this study: (a) 100Fe/4.6Si/1.4K, (b) 100Fe/4.6Si/0.10Cu/1.4K and (c) 100Fe/4.6Si/2.0Cu/1.4K. The results are reported in Task 2. The literature review for cobalt catalysts is approximately 90% complete. Due to the size of the document, it has been submitted as a separate report labeled Task 6.

  1. ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    K. Jothimurugesan; James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Santosh K. Gangwal

    1999-10-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis to convert syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) derived from natural gas or coal to liquid fuels and wax is a well-established technology. For low H{sub 2} to CO ratio syngas produced from CO{sub 2} reforming of natural gas or from gasification of coal, the use of Fe catalysts is attractive because of their high water gas shift activity in addition to their high FT activity. Fe catalysts are also attractive due to their low cost and low methane selectivity. Because of the highly exothermic nature of the FT reaction, there has been a recent move away from fixed-bed reactors toward the development of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) that employ 30 to 90 {micro}m catalyst particles suspended in a waxy liquid for efficient heat removal. However, the use of FeFT catalysts in an SBCR has been problematic due to severe catalyst attrition resulting in fines that plug the filter employed to separate the catalyst from the waxy product. Fe catalysts can undergo attrition in SBCRs not only due to vigorous movement and collisions but also due to phase changes that occur during activation and reaction.

  2. Highly active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst for synthesis gas conversion to liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Lang, X.

    1999-09-01

    A precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst (100 Fe/3 Cu/4 K/16 SiO{sub 2} on mass basis) was tested in a stirred tank slurry reactor under reaction conditions representative of industrial practice using CO-rich synthesis gas (260 C, 1.5--2.2 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO = 2/3). Repeatability of performance and reproducibility of catalyst preparation procedure were successfully demonstrated on a laboratory scale. Catalyst productivity was increased by operating at higher synthesis pressure while maintaining a constant contact time in the reactor and through the use of different catalyst pretreatment procedures. In one of the tests (run SA-2186), the catalyst productivity was 0.86 (g hydrocarbons/g Fe/h) at syngas conversion of 79%, methane selectivity of 3% (weight percent of total hydrocarbons produced), and C{sub 5}+ hydrocarbon selectivity of 83 wt %. This represents a substantial improvement in productivity in comparison to state-of-the-art iron F-T catalysts. This catalyst is ideally suited for production of high-quality diesel fuels and C{sub 2}-c{sub 4} olefins from a coal-derived synthesis gas.

  3. Ultrafine particles of iron in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, D.; Pandya, K.

    1994-12-31

    Though direct combustion of natural gas is the most efficient use of this abundant, inexpensive, and cleaner fossil fuel, its potential to replace existing less efficient feedstocks for downstream processes is enormous. Direct conversion of methane to useful products under mild conditions is an ongoing area of research, and a few reported successes include higher hydrocarbons (C{sub 2}-C{sub 6}) synthesis on Pt at 250{degrees}C, Hg-catalyzed synthesis of methanol at 180{degrees}C, and acetic acid synthesis catalyzed by aqueous RhCl{sub 3} at 100{degrees}C. Since these approaches are in early stages of development, improvements in other known routes are of interest. Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis is an indirect route to catalytic production of liquid fuels from synthesis gas derived from carbonaceous sources. The process is still uneconomical for widespread use due to low space-time-yield (STY), low product selectivity, and catalyst intolerance to sulfur. To address these aspects, a few reports describe the use of ultrafine particle (UFP) catalysts in slurry-phase F-T synthesis, We recently reported that a commercially available unsupported UFP FeZO{sub 3} material (NANOCAT{trademark}) (Mean particle diameter (MPD) = 3 nm; surface area (SA) - 255 m{sup 2}/g) slurried in a C{sub 30} hydrocarbon solvent, after reduction at 280{degrees}C under CO, catalyzed conversion of balanced synthesis gas (H{sub 2}/CO = 2/1) at {>=} 220{degrees}C and {<=} 3 MPa. Described below are additional runs carried out to further scrutinize the Fe UFP system.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2001-09-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. The use of iron-based catalysts is attractive not only due to their low cost and ready availability, but also due to their high water-gas shift activity which makes it possible to use these catalysts with low H{sub 2}/CO ratios. However, a serious problem with use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, makes the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. Recently, fundamental understanding of physical attrition is being addressed by incorporating suitable binders into the catalyst recipe. This has resulted in the preparation of a spray dried Fe-based catalyst having aps of 70 mm with high attrition resistance. This Fe-based attrition resistant, active and selective catalyst gave 95% CO conversion through 125 hours of testing in a fixed-bed at 270 C, 1.48 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO=0.67 and 2.0 NL/g-cat/h with C{sub 5}{sup +} selectivity of >78% and methane selectivity of <5%. However, further development of the catalyst is needed to address the chemical attrition due to phase changes that any Fe-catalyst goes through potentially causing internal stresses within the particle and resulting in weakening, spalling or cracking. The objective of this research is to develop robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry bubble column reactor. Specifically we aim to develop to: (i) improve the performance and preparation procedure of the high activity, high attrition resistant, high

  5. Iron Aerogel and Xerogel Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis of Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, S.; Huggins, F; Huffman, G; Ernst, R; Pugmire, R; Eyring, E

    2009-01-01

    Iron aerogels, potassium-doped iron aerogels, and potassium-doped iron xerogels have been synthesized and characterized and their catalytic activity in the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction has been studied. Iron aerogels and xerogels were synthesized by polycondensation of an ethanolic solution of iron(III) chloride hexahydrate with propylene oxide which acts as a proton scavenger for the initiation of hydrolysis and polycondensation. Potassium was incorporated in the iron aerogel and iron xerogel by adding aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to the ethanolic solutions of the Fe(III) precursor prior to addition of propylene oxide. Fischer-Tropsch activities of the catalysts were tested in a fixed bed reactor at a pressure of 100 psi with a H{sub 2}:CO ratio of 2:1. Iron aerogels were found to be active for F-T synthesis, and their F-T activities increased on addition of a K containing promoter. Moessbauer spectroscopic data are consistent with an open, nonrigid iron(III) aerogel structure progressing to an iron carbide/metallic iron catalyst via agglomeration as the F-T synthesis proceeds in the course of a 35 h fixed bed reaction test.

  6. Fischer-Tropsch process

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Paul N.; Pierantozzi, Ronald; Withers, Howard P.

    1987-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch process utilizing a product selective and stable catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range is disclosed. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consist of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of a Fischer-Tropsch metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

  7. Mechanism of promotion of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tau, L.M.; Dabbagh, H.; Chawla, B.; Davis, B.H.

    1987-12-31

    The kinetic isotope method (KIM) has been utilized in a study designed to determine the way in which promoters for iron catalysts impact the variety of primary and secondary reactions in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The KIM involves the addition of known or suspected intermediates to the synthesis gas feed. In order to follow the conversion of the added compound, and the products formed as a result of the addition, the added compound is labeled with a radioactive isotope of carbon. An analysis of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products readily permits one to identify those compounds that are derived from the added compound. Using this technique, results were obtained with unpromoted iron, iron promoted by Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, ThO/sub 2/, ZrO/sub 2/, and SiO/sub 2/, and alkali promoted iron catalysts. A combination of gas chromatographic, dry column chromatographic and liquid chromatographic techniques allowed us to determine the /sup 14/C present in compounds over the C/sub 1/--C/sub 22/ range in the alkane and alkene fractions. A continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was used for most of the experimental studies. 108 refs., 100 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. ɛ-Iron carbide as a low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ke; Sun, Bo; Lin, Jun; Wen, Wen; Pei, Yan; Yan, Shirun; Qiao, Minghua; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zong, Baoning

    2014-12-01

    ɛ-Iron carbide has been predicted to be promising for low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (LTFTS) targeting liquid fuel production. However, directional carbidation of metallic iron to ɛ-iron carbide is challenging due to kinetic hindrance. Here we show how rapidly quenched skeletal iron featuring nanocrystalline dimensions, low coordination number and an expanded lattice may solve this problem. We find that the carbidation of rapidly quenched skeletal iron occurs readily in situ during LTFTS at 423-473 K, giving an ɛ-iron carbide-dominant catalyst that exhibits superior activity to literature iron and cobalt catalysts, and comparable to more expensive noble ruthenium catalyst, coupled with high selectivity to liquid fuels and robustness without the aid of electronic or structural promoters. This finding may permit the development of an advanced energy-efficient and clean fuel-oriented FTS process on the basis of a cost-effective iron catalyst.

  9. ε-Iron carbide as a low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Sun, Bo; Lin, Jun; Wen, Wen; Pei, Yan; Yan, Shirun; Qiao, Minghua; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zong, Baoning

    2014-01-01

    ε-Iron carbide has been predicted to be promising for low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (LTFTS) targeting liquid fuel production. However, directional carbidation of metallic iron to ε-iron carbide is challenging due to kinetic hindrance. Here we show how rapidly quenched skeletal iron featuring nanocrystalline dimensions, low coordination number and an expanded lattice may solve this problem. We find that the carbidation of rapidly quenched skeletal iron occurs readily in situ during LTFTS at 423-473 K, giving an ε-iron carbide-dominant catalyst that exhibits superior activity to literature iron and cobalt catalysts, and comparable to more expensive noble ruthenium catalyst, coupled with high selectivity to liquid fuels and robustness without the aid of electronic or structural promoters. This finding may permit the development of an advanced energy-efficient and clean fuel-oriented FTS process on the basis of a cost-effective iron catalyst. PMID:25503569

  10. Nitrided iron catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in the eighties

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    A survey covers the preparation and structure of nitrided iron catalysts and their activity, selectivity, and stability for the reaction of synthesis gas in comparison with iron catalysts pretreated by various other methods, as measured in laboratory reactors; a comparison of product distributions obtained in fluidized-bed, slurry, and oil-circulation fixed bed pilot plants with nitrided catalysts and by the Kellogg entrained catalyst process SASOL, which uses a reduced iron catalyst; and possible methods for refining the Fischer-Tropsch products from nitrided iron catalysts for producing gasoline, including bauxite treatment, the Mobil process for converting oxygenates to high-octane gasoline and C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ olefins, and an alkylation-polymerization process for converting the C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ fraction to high-octane blending stocks.

  11. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Amitava Sarkar; James K. Neathery; Burtron H. Davis

    2006-12-31

    A fundamental filtration study was started to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. Slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems is the preferred mode of operation since the reaction is highly exothermic. Consequently, heavy wax products in one approach may be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. Achieving an efficient wax product separation from iron-based catalysts is one of the most challenging technical problems associated with slurry-phase iron-based FTS and is a key factor for optimizing operating costs. The separation problem is further compounded by attrition of iron catalyst particles and the formation of ultra-fine particles.

  12. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.

    1992-08-26

    The preparation of binderless iron oxide spheres has been achieved by a novel sol-gel forming procedure. The starting material is a solution of iron (III) 2-ethylhexanoate in mineral spirits. This solution is added dropwise to an ammoniacal solution of methanol. The low viscosity of the methanol causes the formation of small droplets of the iron solution. The immiscibility of the mineral spirit solution in the methanol and the difference in surface tensions cause the droplets to assume a spherical shape. The presence of ammonia and water at low levels in the methanol promotes the hydrolysis of the iron (III) 2-ethylhexanoate, which causes the spherical particles to harden. The iron-containing spheres can then be isolated by filtration. These spheres are the first ones reported to be made of 100% iron oxide and prepared without a binder. In the initial preparations, the spheres are 100 to 200{mu}m in diameter. Some problems remain to be resolved with this new method of preparation.

  13. Morphological transformation during activation and reaction of an iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, N.B.; Kohler, S.; Harrington, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this project is to support the development of slurry-phase bubble column processes being studied at the La Porte Alternative Fuel Development Unit. This paper describes the aspects of Sandia`s recent work regarding the advancement and understanding of the iron catalyst used in the slurry phase process. A number of techniques were used to understand the chemical and physical effects of pretreatment and reaction on the attrition and carbon deposition characteristics of iron catalysts. Unless otherwise stated, the data discussed was derived form experiments carried out on the catalyst chosen for the summer 1994 Fischer-Tropsch run at LaPorte, UCI 1185-78-370, (an L 3950 type) that is 88% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11% CuO, and 0.052%K{sub 2}O.

  14. Preparation of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts from cobalt/iron hydrotalcites

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, B.H.; Boff, J.J.; Zarochak, M.F.

    1995-12-31

    Compounds with the (hydrotalcites) have properties that make them attractive as precursors for Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. A series of single-phase hydrotalcites with cobalt/iron atom ratios ranging from 75/25 to 25/75 has been synthesized. Mixed cobalt/iron oxides have been prepared from these hydrotalcites by controlled thermal decomposition. Thermal decomposition at temperatures below 600 {degrees}C typically produced a single-phase mixed metal oxide with a spinel structure. The BET surface areas of the spinal samples have been found to be as high as about 150 m{sup 2}/g. Appropriate reducing pretreatments have been developed for several of these spinels and their activity, selectivity, and activity and selectivity maintenance have been examined at 13 MPa in a fixed-bed microreactor.

  15. Closed system Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy. [deuterium-carbon monoxide reaction catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nooner, D. W.; Gibert, J. M.; Gelpi, E.; Oro, J.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were performed in which meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy were used to catalyze (in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) the reaction of deuterium and carbon monoxide in a closed vessel. Normal alkanes and alkenes and their monomethyl substituted isomers and aromatic hydrocarbons were synthesized. Iron oxide and oxidized-reduced Canyon Diablo used as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts were found to produce aromatic hydrocarbons in distributions having many of the features of those observed in carbonaceous chondrites, but only at temperatures and reaction times well above 300 C and 6-8 h.

  16. Iron and cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts prepared by the solvated metal-atom technique

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, P.F.; Pennella, F.; Klabunde, K.J.; Imizu, Y.

    1986-10-01

    It is reasonable that at low metal loadings a more active catalyst would result from deposition on a support of a metal in the reduced, metallic state. Deposition of less than 5 wt% cobalt on alumina in the form of cobalt carbonyl produced catalysts of good activity. The Solvated Metal Atom Deposition Technique (SMAD) provides a method of catalyst preparation for which the deposition of metallic catalysts on a support has been demonstrated. This note reports a comparative study of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis activity of iron and cobalt catalysts prepared by this technique and supported on silica with less than 5 wt% of the metal, and of analogous catalysts prepared by conventional impregnation techniques. 16 references.

  17. Nanocrystalline Iron-Ore-Based Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Yong, Seok; Park, Ji Chan; Lee, Ho-Tae; Yang, Jung-Il; Hong, SungJun; Jung, Heon; Chun, Dong Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Nanocrystalline iron ore particles were fabricated by a wet-milling process using an Ultra Apex Mill, after which they were used as raw materials of iron-based catalysts for low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) below 280 degrees C, which usually requires catalysts with a high surface area, a large pore volume, and a small crystallite size. The wet-milling process using the Ultra Apex Mill effectively destroyed the initial crystallite structure of the natural iron ores of several tens to hundreds of nanometers in size, resulting in the generation of nanocrystalline iron ore particles with a high surface area and a large pore volume. The iron-ore-based catalysts prepared from the nanocrystalline iron ore particles effectively catalyzed the low-temperature FTS, displaying a high CO conversion (about 90%) and good C5+ hydrocarbon productivity (about 0.22 g/g(cat)(-h)). This demonstrates the feasibility of using the iron-ore-based catalysts as inexpensive and disposable catalysts for the low-temperature FTS. PMID:27433720

  18. Compositional aspects of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts: an x-ray photoelectron

    SciTech Connect

    Kuivila, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    Iron catalysts employed in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis consist of metallic, carbide, and oxide phases. The catalytic and compositional behavior of prereduced and unreduced iron catalysts were investigated in this study. Catalytic behavior was evaluated by measuring the rates of hydrocarbon formation in a 3:1 H/sub 2//CO mixture at one atmosphere and 250/sup 0/C. Iron phases which evolved near the catalyst surfaces were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and bulk phases present following the synthesis reactions were determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy. At low conversion levels, prereduced iron catalysts were gradually converted to iron carbide. At total CO conversion levels in the range of 30 to 40%, prereduced catalysts were converted primarily to iron carbide, although some surface oxide phases also formed. Unreduced Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ exhibited no initial synthesis activity, but underwent gradual activation and eventually became more active than the prereduced catalysts. The various phases of the iron catalysts were related to varying olefin production rates.

  19. Activation and promotion studies in a mixed slurry reactor with an iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline, H.W.; Zarochak, M.F.; Stencel, J.M.; Diehl, J.R.

    1987-03-01

    Synthesis gas was reacted over a coprecipitated iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalyst in a slurry reactor. The effect of various activation parameters - temperature, pressure, and gas composition - on subsequent catalyst activity and product selectivity was investigated. The gas composition had the most dramatic effect on the catalyst activation and the ensuing synthesis gas conversion. The effect of potassium promotion on catalyst activity and product selectivity was also studied in slurry reactor tests.

  20. Compositional aspect of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst: An XPS/reaction study

    SciTech Connect

    Kuivila, C.S.; Stair, P.C.; Butt, J.B. )

    1989-08-01

    The catalytic and compositional behaviors of prereduced and unreduced iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were investigated. Catalytic behavior was evaluated by measuring rates of hydrocarbon formation 3:1 H{sub 2}:CO mixture at 1 atm and 250C. Iron phases which evolved near the catalyst surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and bulk phases present following reaction were determined by Moessbauer spectroscopy. At low conversion levels the prereduced catalyst was gradually converted to iron carbide with no significant oxide phase formed. Synthesis activities increased initially with the formation of active surface carbon, but eventually lost some activity due to graphitic carbon formation. At higher conversions, the prereduced catalyst showed some formation of surface oxide phases and an inhibition of the synthesis rate due to water adsorption. Surface carbon accumulation was also suppressed under these conditions. Unreduced Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed no initial synthesis activity, but underwent a gradual activation to become even more active than the prereduced catalyst. The oxide catalyst was eventually completely reduced to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and any metallic phase formed was rapidly converted to iron carbide. Compared to reduced materials, the oxide catalyst accumulated considerably less surface carbon and showed no loss of activity for reaction times up to 48 h. XPS analysis suggests that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is active for synthesis.

  1. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1996-01-09

    The affect of copper promotion on the activity and selectivity of hydrogen pretreated, precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts was studied. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was carried out in the slurry phase in one in one liter continuous stirred tank reactors at a space velocity of 3.lNL h{sup {minus}1} g{sup {minus}1}(Fe), H{sub 2}:CO = 0.7 at either 270{degree}C or 230{degree}C. Catalysts with atomic compositions relative to iron of 10OFe/4.4Si/l.OK and 10OFe/4.4Si/2.6Cu/l.OK were used at 270{degree}C and catalysts with the compositions of 100Fe/4.4Si/4.2K and 10OFe/4.4Si/2.6Cu/4.2K were used at 230{degree}C. XRD and Moessbauer spectroscopy both show that the 10OFe/4.4Si/2.6Cu/l.OK catalyst contained approximately 24% {alpha}-Fe with the remainder Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} after a 24 h pretreatment with hydrogen at 220{degree}C. Copper promotion was found to substantially increase the activity and productivity of the catalysts. Catalysts promoted with copper reached maximum activity within 100 h of synthesis while catalysts with no copper went through an induction period. The activity of the hydrogen pretreated 10OFe/4.4Si/2.6Cu/1.0K catalyst operated at 270{degree}C was comparable to the activity of the the 100Fe/4.4Si/l.OK catalyst after pretreatment with carbon monoxide or syngas at one atmosphere pressure. However, the activity of the hydrogen pretreated 1O0Fe/4.4Si/2.6Cu/4.2K catalyst at 230{degree}C was found to be substantially lower than the same catalyst pretreated with carbon monoxide or syngas at one atmosphere pressure.

  2. Manganese-oxide-supported iron Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts: physical and catalytic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitman, K.M.; Baerns, M.; Butt, J.B.

    1987-06-01

    It has been claimed that catalysts containing iron and manganese are especially selective for production of low molecular weight olefins in the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. In this study a new system, manganese-oxide-supported iron, Fe/MnO, was prepared, subjected to various calcination and reduction treatments, and then employed as a FT catalyst. Reaction studies were run with approximately 1/1: CO/H/sub 2/ feed at 515 and 540 K and 7.8 and 14.8 bar pressure. Although low conversions were employed, the synthesis rate decreased strongly with increasing conversion. Compared to conventional Fe catalysts, the Fe/MnO was more active for water-gas shift and less selective for methane and alcohols, especially at higher conversions, lower temperature, and higher pressure. Olefin selectivity was high, hydrogen chemisorption was depressed, and secondary hydrogenation was not apparent. In general it is concluded that the manganese-supported iron does promote FT selectivity for low molecular weight olefins, but at the expense of high CO/sub 2/ formation.

  3. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

    2004-03-31

    In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was started to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. Slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems is the preferred mode of production since the reaction is highly exothermic. Consequently, heavy wax products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. Achieving an efficient wax product separation from iron-based catalysts is one of the most challenging technical problems associated with slurry-phase FTS. The separation problem is further compounded by catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. Existing pilot-scale equipment was modified to include a filtration test apparatus. After undergoing an extensive plant shakedown period, filtration tests with cross-flow filter modules using simulant FTS wax slurry were conducted. The focus of these early tests was to find adequate mixtures of polyethylene wax to simulate FTS wax. Catalyst particle size analysis techniques were also developed. Initial analyses of the slurry and filter permeate particles will be used by the research team to design improved filter media and cleaning strategies.

  4. Iron alloy Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. V. FeCo on Y zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.; Schwartz, L.H.; Butt, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    A series of Fe, Co, and FeCo catalysts on Y-zeolite support, prepared both by ion exchange and impregnation, has been investigated and compared with a previously reported series supported on wide-pore SiO/sub 2/. Characterization methods were X-ray diffraction, H/sub 2/ and CO chemisorption, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and atomic absorption. The oxidation, reduction, and carburization behavior of the iron-containing catalysts were observed by Moessbauer spectroscopy. The reversibility of FeY (ion exchanged) in oxidation-reduction cycles was confirmed. The ion-exchanged catalysts (FeY, FeCoY) do not show any iron metal, or alloy or carbide phase after reduction or attempted carburization. In contrast with prior results with silica-supported Fe and FeCo, where there appear to be significant differences, Fe/HY (impregnated) and FeCo/HY appear quite similar in characterization by Moessbauer spectroscopy and in reaction behavior. A 1/1:CO/H/sub 2/ feed was used to investigate the Fischer-Tropsch reaction at 1 atm and 523 K. Some additional runs were made at a total pressure of 13.6 atm. As in prior studies it was found that the CO turnover frequency in general decreases with increasing CO conversion. A higher selectivity for higher molecular weight products is found for HY-supported catalysts, and in all cases an approximate behavior in accord with the Schultz-Anderson distribution was observed. 23 references.

  5. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of this research project is to develop the technology for the production of physically robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry phase synthesis reactor development. The catalysts that are developed shall be suitable for testing in the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas, to produce either low- or high-alpha product distributions. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the ``standard-catalyst`` developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. The proposed work will optimize the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for this low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst this is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, select and aging characteristics. The research is divided into four major topical areas: (a) catalyst preparation and characterization, (b) product characterization, (c) reactor operations, and (d) data assessment. Accomplishments for this period are described.

  6. SBA-15-Supported Iron Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Production of Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kim,D.; Dunn, B.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.; Kang, M.; Yie, J.; Eyring, E.

    2006-01-01

    Iron supported on SBA-15, a mesoporous structured silica, has been developed as a catalyst for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons. The catalysts retain the high surface area of the support, {approx}500 m{sup 2}/g, average pore size, and pore volume. Inclusion of aluminum into the SBA-15 did not significantly alter these parameters. XRD, XAFS, and Moessbauer spectroscopies were used to characterize the catalyst before and after being subjected to the reaction conditions. Prior to reaction, the iron was distributed among {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}3, ferrihydrite, and minor {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. After reaction, the iron phases detected were nonmagnetic iron oxides, iron carbide, and metallic iron. The length of the induction period typically seen with iron-based F-T catalysts was strongly dependent on the amount of aluminum present in the catalyst. With no aluminum, the induction period lasted about 25 h, whereas the induction period decreased to less than 5 h with an Al:Si mass ratio of 0.010. A further increase in aluminum content lengthened the induction period, but always remained less than that without aluminum. Catalyst activity and product selectivity were also strongly dependent on aluminum content with the maximum diesel fuel fraction, C{sub 11+}, occurring with the Al:Si ratio of 0.010 and a CO conversion of 37%. The small concentration of aluminum may serve to increase the rate of iron carbide formation, whereas higher concentrations may begin to inhibit the rate.

  7. SBA-15-supported iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch production of diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Dae Jung Kim; Brian C. Dunn; Frank Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman; Min Kang; Jae Eui Yie; Edward M. Eyring

    2006-12-15

    Iron supported on SBA-15, a mesoporous structured silica, has been developed as a catalyst for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons. The catalysts retain the high surface area of the support, {approximately}500 m{sup 2}/g, average pore size, and pore volume. Inclusion of aluminum into the SBA-15 did not significantly alter these parameters. XRD, XAFS, and Moessbauer spectroscopies were used to characterize the catalyst before and after being subjected to the reaction conditions. Prior to reaction, the iron was distributed among {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ferrihydrite, and minor {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. After reaction, the iron phases detected were nonmagnetic iron oxides, iron carbide, and metallic iron. The length of the induction period typically seen with iron-based F-T catalysts was strongly dependent on the amount of aluminum present in the catalyst. With no aluminum, the induction period lasted about 25 h, whereas the induction period decreased to less than 5 h with an Al:Si mass ratio of 0.010. A further increase in aluminum content lengthened the induction period, but always remained less than that without aluminum. Catalyst activity and product selectivity were also strongly dependent on aluminum content with the maximum diesel fuel fraction, C{sub 11+}, occurring with the Al:Si ratio of 0.010 and a CO conversion of 37%. The small concentration of aluminum may serve to increase the rate of iron carbide formation, whereas higher concentrations may begin to inhibit the rate. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 7, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing H{sub 2} and CO in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0 to the slurry bubble-column reactor, the catalyst performance target is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%. Contract Tasks are as follows: 1.0--Catalyst development, 1.1--Technology assessment, 1.2--Precipitated catalyst preparation method development, 1.3--Novel catalyst preparation methods investigation, 1.4--Catalyst pretreatment, 1.5--Catalyst characterization, 2.0--Catalyst testing, 3.0--Catalyst aging studies, and 4.0--Preliminary design and cost estimate of a catalyst synthesis facility. This paper reports progress made on catalyst development.

  9. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 9, September 26, 1992--December 26, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1992-12-31

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0 to the slurry bubble-column reactor, the catalyst performance target is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%. Contract Tasks are as follows: 1.0--Catalyst development, 1.1--Technology assessment, 1.2--Precipitated catalyst preparation method development, 1.3--Novel catalyst preparation methods investigation, 1.4--Catalyst pretreatment, 1.5--Catalyst characterization, 2.0--Catalyst testing, 3.0--Catalyst aging studies, and 4.0--Preliminary design and cost estimate of a catalyst synthesis facility. This paper reports progress on Task 1.3.

  10. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 6, December 26, 1991--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing H{sub 2} and CO in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0 to the slurry bubble-column reactor, the catalyst performance target is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%. Contract Tasks are as follows: 1.0--Catalyst development, 1.1--Technology assessment, 1.2--Precipitated catalyst preparation method development, 1.3--Novel catalyst preparation methods investigation, 1.4--Catalyst pretreatment, 1.5--Catalyst characterization, 2.0--Catalyst testing, 3.0--Catalyst aging studies, and 4.0--Preliminary design and cost estimate of a catalyst synthesis facility. This paper reports progress made on catalyst development.

  11. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 10, December 26, 1992--March 26, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0 to the slurry bubble-column reactor, the catalyst performance target is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%. Contract tasks are as follows: 1.0: Catalyst development; 1.1--Technology assessment; 1.2--Precipitated catalyst preparation method development; 1.3--Novel catalyst preparation methods investigation; 1.4--Catalyst pretreatment; 1.5--Catalyst characterization; 2.0--Catalyst testing; 3.0--Catalyst aging studies, and 4.0--Preliminary design and cost estimate of a catalyst synthesis facility. This paper reports progress made on Task 1.2 and 2.0.

  12. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 8, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1992-12-31

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0 to the slurry bubble-column reactor, the catalyst performance target is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%. Contract Tasks are as follows: 1.0--Catalyst development, 1.1--Technology assessment, 1.2--Precipitated catalyst preparation method development, 1.3--Novel catalyst preparation methods investigation, 1.4--Catalyst pretreatment, 1.5--Catalyst characterization, 2.0--Catalyst testing, 3.0--Catalyst aging studies, and 4.0--Preliminary design and cost estimate of a catalyst synthesis facility. This paper reports progress made on Task 1.

  13. Development of improved iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Final technical report: Project 6464

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Ledakowicz, S.; Koranne, M.

    1994-02-28

    Despite the current worldwide oil glut, the United States will ultimately require large-scale production of liquid (transportation) fuels from coal. Slurry phase Fischer Tropsch (FT) technology, with its versatile product slate, may be expected to play a major role in production of transportation fuels via indirect coal liquefaction. Texas A&M University (TAMU) with sponsorship from the US Department of Energy, Center for Energy and Mineral Resources at TAMU, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., has been working on development of improved iron FT catalysts and characterization of hydrodynamic parameters in two- and three-phase bubble columns with FT derived waxes. Our previous studies have provided an improved understanding of the role of promoters (Cu and K), binders (silica) and pretreatment procedures on catalyst activity, selectivity and longevity (deactivation). The objective of the present contract was to develop improved catalysts with enhanced slurry phase activity and higher selectivity to liquid fuels and wax. This was accomplished through systematic studies of the effects of pretreatment procedures and variations in catalyst composition (promoters and binders). The major accomplishments and results in each of these two main areas of research are summarized here.

  14. Manganese oxide-supported iron Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts: physical and catalytic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitman, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, manganese oxide-supported iron (Fe/MnO) was prepared by impregnation of powdered manganese (II) oxide with aqueous iron(III) nitrate and subjected to various calcination and reduction treatments. It was then employed as a catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) and its steady-state activity and selectivity behavior was observed. The FTS reaction studies were run with nearly equimolal carbon monoxide/hydrogen feed at 515 and 540 K, 7.9 and 14.8 bar pressure. Feed conversion level was kept low in order to avoid transport limitations, and was varied by adjusting space velocity. The FTS reaction rate decreased strongly with increasing conversion. Compared to unpromoted iron catalysts, the Fe/MnO catalysts were more active for the water-gas shift reaction and less selective for methane and alcohols, especially at higher conversion, lower temperature and higher pressure. The olefin selectivity was high and secondary hydrogenation was not apparent. Catalysts calcined at higher temperature exhibited stronger effects of promotion, and yielded unusually high selectivity for C/sub 2/ to C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons at low temperature and high pressure. The general conclusion is that manganese promotion or iron can promote FTS selectivity towards low molecular weight olefins, but at the expense of high carbon dioxide formation. The Fe/MnO was also physically examined using Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Iron and manganese were found to interact strongly in the calcined catalyst, though extensive phase separation occurred during reduction. The promoting effects are apparently due to partial surface coverage of iron with MnO, the extent of which is enhanced by wetter reducing conditions.

  15. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

    2004-09-30

    In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The shakedown phase of the pilot-scale filtration platform was completed at the end of the last reporting period. A study of various molecular weight waxes was initiated to determine the effect of wax physical properties on the permeation rate without catalyst present. As expected, the permeation flux was inversely proportional to the nominal average molecular weight of the polyethylene wax. Even without catalyst particles present in the filtrate, the filtration membranes experience fouling during an induction period on the order of days on-line. Another long-term filtration test was initiated using a batch of iron catalyst that was previously activated with CO to form iron carbide in a separate continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. The permeation flux stabilized more rapidly than that experienced with unactivated catalyst tests.

  16. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

    2005-03-31

    In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. In this reporting period, a series of crossflow filtration experiments were initiated to study the effect of olefins and oxygenates on the filtration flux and membrane performance. Iron-based FTS reactor waxes contain a significant amount of oxygenates, depending on the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Mono-olefins and aliphatic alcohols were doped into an activated iron catalyst slurry (with Polywax) to test their influence on filtration properties. The olefins were varied from 5 to 25 wt% and oxygenates from 6 to 17 wt% to simulate a range of reactor slurries reported in the literature. The addition of an alcohol (1-dodecanol) was found to decrease the permeation rate while the olefin added (1-hexadecene) had no effect on the permeation rate. A passive flux maintenance technique was tested that can temporarily increase the permeate rate for 24 hours.

  17. Moessbauer study of iron-carbide growth and Fischer-Tropsch activity

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    There is a need to establish a correlation between the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) activity of an iron-based catalyst and the catalyst phase during FT synthesis. The nature of iron phases formed during activation and FT synthesis is influenced by the gas used for activation. Moessbauer investigations of iron-based catalysts subjected to pretreatment in gas atmospheres containing mixtures of CO, H{sub 2}, and He have been carried out. Studies on UCI 1185-57 catalyst indicate that activation of the catalyst in CO leads to the formation of 100% magnetite and the magnetite formed gets rapidly converted to at least 90% of x-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} during activation. The x-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} formed during activation gets partly (= 25%) converted back to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} during FT synthesis and both x-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} reach constant values. On the other hand, activation of the catalyst in synthesis gas leads to formation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and which is slowly converted to x-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and e-Fe{sub 2.2}C during activation, and both carbide phases increase slowly during FT synthesis. FT synthesis activity is found to give rise to {approx} 70% (H2+CO) conversion in the case of CO activated catalyst as compared to {approx} 20% (H2+CO) conversion in the case of synthesis gas-activated catalyst.

  18. Exploring iron-based multifunctional catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: a review.

    PubMed

    Abelló, Sònia; Montané, Daniel

    2011-11-18

    The continuous increase in oil prices together with an increase in carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere has prompted an increased interest in the production of liquid fuels from non-petroleum sources to ensure the continuation of our worldwide demands while maximizing CO(2) utilization. In this sense, the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) technology provides a feasible option to render high value-added hydrocarbons. Alternative sources, such as biomass or coal, offer a real possibility to realize these purposes by making use of H(2)-deficient or CO(2)-rich syngas feeds. The management of such feeds ideally relies on the use of iron catalysts, which exhibit the unique ability to adjust the H(2)/CO molar ratio to an optimum value for hydrocarbon synthesis through the water-gas-shift reaction. Taking advantage of the emerging attention to hybrid FT-synthesis catalysts based on cobalt and their associated benefits, an overview of the current state of literature in the field of iron-based multifunctional catalysts is presented. Of particular interest is the use of zeolites in combination with a FT catalyst in a one-stage operation, herein named multifunctional, which offer key opportunities in the modification of desired product distributions and selectivity, to eventually overcome the quality limitations of the fuels prepared under intrinsic FT conditions. This review focuses on promising research activities addressing the conversion of syngas to liquid fuels mediated by iron-based multifunctional materials, highlights their preparation and properties, and discusses their implication and challenges in the area of carbon utilization through H(2)/CO(+CO(2)) mixtures. PMID:22083868

  19. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Burtron H. Davis

    2005-09-30

    In this reporting period, a study of ultra-fine iron catalyst filtration was initiated to study the behavior of ultra-fine particles during the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids filtration. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The change of particle size during the slurry-phase FTS has monitored by withdrawing catalyst sample at different TOS. The measurement of dimension of the HRTEM images of samples showed a tremendous growth of the particles. Carbon rims of thickness 3-6 nm around the particles were observed. This growth in particle size was not due to carbon deposition on the catalyst. A conceptual design and operating philosophy was developed for an integrated wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor to be used in Phase II of this research program. The system will utilize a primary inertial hydroclone followed by a Pall Accusep cross-flow membrane. Provisions for cleaned permeate back-pulsing will be included to as a flux maintenance measure.

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of nanoparticle size effect on kinetics in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis by lanthanum promoted iron catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhaei Pour, Ali; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Behroozsarand, Alireza; Khodagholi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-08-01

    The kinetic parameters of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on iron catalyst are analyzed by size-dependent thermodynamic method. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic equation is considered for evaluation of catalytic activity of lanthanum promoted iron catalyst. A series of unsupported iron catalysts with different particle sizes were prepared via microemulsion method. The experimental results showed that catalyst activity pass from a maximum value by increasing the iron particle size. Also, data presented that iron particle size has considerable effects on adsorption parameters and FTS rates. The ratio of surface tension ( σ) to nanoparticle radius ( r) is important in FTS reaction on iron catalyst. Finally, the results showed that by increasing of iron particle size from 18 to 45 nm the activation energies of catalysts and heats of adsorption of catalysts as two main parameters of FTS reaction increased from 89 to 114 kJ/mol and from 51 to 71 kJ/mol, respectively.

  1. Moessbauer study of iron-carbide growth and Fischer-Tropsch activity

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    There is a need to establish a correlation between the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) activity of an iron-based catalyst and the catalyst phase during FT synthesis. The nature of iron phases formed during activation and FT synthesis is influenced by the nature of the gas and pressure apart from other parameters like temperature, flow rate etc., used for activation. Moessbauer investigations of iron-based catalysts subjected to pretreatment at two different pressures in gas atmospheres containing mixtures of CO, H{sub 2}, and He have been carried out. Studies on UCI 1185-57 (64%Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/5%CuO/1%K{sub 2}O/30% Kaolin) catalyst indicate that activation of the catalyst in CO at 12 atms. leads to the formation of 100% magnetite and the magnetite formed gets rapidly converted to at least 90% of {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} during activation. The FT activity was found to be good at 70-80% of (H{sub 2}+CO) conversion. On the other hand, activation. The FT activity was found to be good at 70-80% of (H{sub 2}+CO) conversion. On the other hand, activation of the catalyst in synthesis gas at 12 atms. leads to formation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and it gets sluggishly converted to {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and {epsilon}-Fe{sub 2.2}C during activation and both continue to grow slowly during FT synthesis. FT activity is found to be poor. Pretreatment of the catalyst, 100fe/3.6Si/0.71K at a low pressure of 1 atms. in syngas gave rise to the formation of {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and good FT activity. On the other hand, pretreatment of the catalyst, 100Fe/3.6Si/0.71K at a relatively high pressure of 12 atms. in syngas did not give rise to the formation any carbide and FT activity was poor.

  2. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over iron-based catalysts in slurry reactors. Reaction rates, kinetics and implications for improving hydrocarbon productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Raje, A.P.; Davis, B.H.

    1996-10-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis is carried out over a high activity precipitated iron catalyst promoted with silica and potassium in a slurry reactor. Reaction rates (FTS and water gas shift) and partial pressures are evaluated over a wide range of CO conversions (10 to 90%) and space velocities at 270{degrees}C, 175 psig and a H{sub 2}/CO ratio of 0.67. The partial pressure of water exhibits a maximum at intermediate CO conversion. Both the fraction of CO converted to hydrocarbons and the hydrocarbon space time yield decrease with increasing CO conversion. This implies that it would be beneficial to have lower conversion per pass in the reactor with recycle to achieve a high overall conversion. The data as well as experiments with water and CO{sub 2} addition enable us to determine a kinetic expression for the catalyst which shows negligible inhibition of the reaction rate by water or CO{sub 2}.

  3. Characterization of working iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts using quantitative diffraction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansker, Linda Denise

    This study presents the results of the ex-situ characterization of working iron Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (F-TS) catalysts, reacted hundreds of hours at elevated pressures, using a new quantitative x-ray diffraction analytical methodology. Compositions, iron phase structures, and phase particle morphologies were determined and correlated with the observed reaction kinetics. Conclusions were drawn about the character of each catalyst in its most and least active state. The identity of the active phase(s) in the Fe F-TS catalyst has been vigorously debated for more than 45 years. The highly-reduced catalyst, used to convert coal-derived syngas to hydrocarbon products, is thought to form a mixture of oxides, metal, and carbides upon pretreatment and reaction. Commonly, Soxhlet extraction is used to effect catalyst-product slurry separation; however, the extraction process could be producing irreversible changes in the catalyst, contributing to the conflicting results in the literature. X-ray diffraction doesn't require analyte-matrix separation before analysis, and can detect trace phases down to 300 ppm/2 nm; thus, working catalyst slurries could be characterized as-sampled. Data were quantitatively interpreted employing first principles methods, including the Rietveld polycrystalline structure method. Pretreated catalysts and pure phases were examined experimentally and modeled to explore specific behavior under x-rays. Then, the working catalyst slurries were quantitatively characterized. Empirical quantitation factors were calculated from experimental data or single crystal parameters, then validated using the Rietveld method results. In the most active form, after pretreatment in H 2 or in CO at Pambient, well-preserved working catalysts contained significant amounts of Fe7C3 with trace alpha-Fe, once reaction had commenced at elevated pressure. Amounts of Fe3O 4 were constant and small, with carbide dpavg < 15 nm. Small amounts of Fe7C3 were found in unreacted

  4. Phase transformation of iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yaming

    Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis is used to convert syngas to liquid hydrocarbons using iron-based catalysts. However, the nature of the active phase and phase transformations during F-T synthesis are not well understood. In this work, the phase transformations of Fe catalysts both during F-T synthesis and controlled treatment conditions have been studied using cross-section transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Catalyst samples were obtained from F-T synthesis runs at medium pressure (1.48 MPa) with a H2:CO ratio of 0.7. Samples were analyzed without removal of the wax to preserve the catalyst microstructure intact and prevent oxidation due to air exposure. In all active Fe catalysts, a highly dispersed chi-carbide (Fe5C2) phase with an average particle size <10 nm was seen to be present along with larger sized particles of hexagonal Fe 7C3. On the other hand, the carbide phase whose XRD pattern resembles that obtained by the Barton and Gale was found to be associated with catalysts of low activity. All carbide particles are covered with amorphous carbonaceous layers as seen by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). In a series of separate experiments, phase transformations that occur during catalyst activation at atmospheric pressure were studied. During direct CO carburization of iron oxide at 250°C, multiple nucleation sites lead to formation of smaller Fe carbide particles predominantly of the Barton-Gale carbide. However, starting from metallic Fe we obtain a chi-carbide phase without significant change in particle size. Treatment in syngas (H 2:CO = 0.7) results in less complete carburization and larger particle sizes for both the carbide and the magnetite phases. The presence of trace amounts of water vapor during reduction appears to cause formation of large faceted magnetite crystals, which are difficult to further transform to the active carbide phase. The silica support is effective at keeping the Fe phases

  5. Potassium effects on activated-carbon-supported iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wenping Ma; Edwin L. Kugler; Dady B. Dadyburjor

    2007-08-15

    The effect of potassium on the activity, selectivity, and distribution of products (hydrocarbons and oxygenates) was studied over iron catalysts supported on activated carbon (AC) for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). This is part of a wider study on the incremental effects of components (including the support) of a multicomponent (Fe-Cu-Mo-K/AC) FTS catalyst. The range of potassium loading used was 0-2 wt%. A fixed-bed reactor was used under the conditions of 260-300{sup o}C, 300 psig, and 3 Nl/g cat/h, using syngas with a H{sub 2}/CO molar feed ratio of 0.9. Both FTS and water-gas shift activities increase after the addition of 0.9 wt % potassium, whereas an opposite trend is observed with the addition of 2 wt % potassium. This is shown to be the result of interaction between the decrease of both the activation energy (E{sub a}) and the pre-exponental factor (k{sub 0}) with the amount of potassium promoter added. Detectable hydrocarbons up to C{sub 34} and oxygenates up to C{sub 5} are formed on the Fe/AC catalysts with or without potassium. The potassium promoter significantly suppresses formation of methane and methanol and shifts selectivities to higher-molecular-weight hydrocarbons (C{sub 5+}) and alcohols (C{sub 2}-C{sub 5}). Meanwhile, the potassium promoter changes paraffin and olefin distributions. At least for carbon numbers of 25 or less, increasing the K level to 0.9 wt % greatly decreases the amount of n-paraffins and internal olefins (i.e., those with the double bond in other than the terminal positions) and dramatically increases branched paraffins and 1-olefins, but a further increase in the K level shows little additional improvement. The addition of potassium changes the effect of temperature on the selectivity to oxygenates. In the absence of K, oxygenate selectivity decreases with temperature. However, when K is present, the selectivity is almost independent of the temperature. 71 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Enhanced Fischer-Tropsch synthesis performance of iron-based catalysts supported on nitric acid treated N-doped CNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhua; Liu, Renjie; Xu, Yan; Ma, Xinbin

    2015-08-01

    Iron-based catalysts supported on N-doped CNTs (NCNTs) treated by various concentrations of nitric acid for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) were investigated. An improved catalytic performance for the iron catalyst supported on acid treated NCNTs was obtained and the suitable nitric acid concentration was 10 M. The physiochemical properties of the NCNTs and the corresponding catalysts were characterized by BET, TEM, XRD, XPS, TGA and H2-TPR. The acid treatment removed the impurity and amorphous carbon, damaged the bamboo-like structure and increased the number of oxygen-containing functional groups and graphitization degree on the NCNTs. The more iron particles located inside the channels of NCNTs, the better catalytic FTS performance due to high dispersion and reducibility.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2003-12-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis to convert syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) derived from natural gas or coal to liquid fuels and wax is a well-established technology. For low H{sub 2} to CO ratio syngas produced from CO{sub 2} reforming of natural gas or from gasification of coal, the use of Fe catalysts is attractive because of their high water gas shift activity in addition to their high FT activity. Fe catalysts are also attractive due to their low cost and low methane selectivity. Because of the highly exothermic nature of the FT reaction, there has been a recent move away from fixed-bed reactors toward the development of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) that employ 30 to 90 {micro}m catalyst particles suspended in a waxy liquid for efficient heat removal. However, the use of Fe FT catalysts in an SBCR has been problematic due to severe catalyst attrition resulting in fines that plug the filter employed to separate the catalyst from the waxy product. Fe catalysts can undergo attrition in SBCRs not only due to vigorous movement and collisions but also due to phase changes that occur during activation and reaction. The objectives of this research were to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance. The catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation, followed by binder addition and spray drying at 250 C in a 1 m diameter, 2 m tall spray dryer. The binder silica content was varied from 0 to 20 wt %. The results show that use of small amounts of precipitated SiO{sub 2} alone in spray-dried Fe catalysts can result in good attrition resistance. All catalysts investigated with SiO{sub 2} wt% {le} 12 produced fines less than 10 wt% during the jet cup attrition test, making them suitable for long-term use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Thus, concentration rather than type of SiO{sub 2

  8. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 12, June 26, 1993--September 26, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1994-07-01

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scale-up procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0 to the slurry bubble column reactor, the catalyst performance target is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/g Fe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%.

  9. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 2, December 26, 1990--March 26, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalyst for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing H{sub 2} and CO in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0, the catalyst performance target in the slurry bubble-column reactor is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%.

  10. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 3, March 27, 1991--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Abrevaya, H.; Gala, H.B.

    1991-12-31

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scale up procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. The catalyst performance target in the slurry bubble-column reactor is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. Typical feed used to attain this level of conversion is preferred to have H{sub 2} and CO in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%.

  11. Study of the effects of potassium addition to supported iron catalysts in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.G.; Moskovits, M.

    1988-10-20

    The Fischer-Tropsch activity of supported iron catalysts prepared via electrochemical techniques has been evaluated as a function of potassium addition. Catalyst pretreatment in 0.09, 0.18, and 0.27 M K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solutions generated potassium levels of 1.7, 2.8, and 3.9 wt %, respectively. Pretreatment in 0.18 M KOH provided a catalyst with 2.3 wt% potassium and facilitated comparison of the effects of the basicity of the pretreatment solution upon catalyst activity. A maximum in catalyst activity and CO conversion was noted upon increasing K content, followed by a sharp decline in activity at potassium levels in excess of the maximum. The hydrogenation ability of the catalyst decreased, and a shift to higher molecular weight products was observed, with increasing potassium content. The type of pretreatment solution had little effect on the catalyst activity or the product selectivity.

  12. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 1, September 26, 1990--December 26, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scale-up procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble column reactors. With a feed containing H{sub 2}:CO in the ratio of 0.5 to 1.0, the catalyst performance target in the slurry bubble column reactor is 88% CO + H{sub 2}conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/h/gFe. The methane + ethane selectivity is desired to be no more than 4% and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%.

  13. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 11, March 26, 1993--June 26, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1994-05-01

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron (Fe) Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0 to the slurry bubble-column reactor, the catalyst performance target is 88% CO+H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/g Fe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%.

  14. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report number 13, 26 September 1993--26 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1994-08-01

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron (Fe) Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scale up procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0 to the slurry bubble-column reactor, the catalyst performance target is 88% CO+H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/g Fe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%. Results are presented from experimental work performed during this report period.

  15. A comparison of the activity, selectivity and kinetics of several iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dictor, R.A.; Bell, A.T.

    1986-03-01

    Much attention in the area of Fischer-Tropsch chemistry has been directed at slurry-phase reactor systems because of facilitated temperature control and the ability to operate continuously using hydrogen-lean feeds. The ability to predict and control the behavior of bubble column Ft reactors requires a detailed understanding of the reaction kinetics and mass transfer limitations. The authors examined the effects of temperature, reactant partial pressures, gas velocity and feed ratio on catalyst activity and selectivity for a number of catalysts: Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, potassium-promoted Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Fe, Fe/sub 3/C, and a fused iron ammonia synthesis catalyst. The goal of this communication is to determine the effects of structural features (e.g., surface area, promoters, etc.) on the activities and selectivities of these catalysts.

  16. Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, R.D. ); Rao, V.U.S.; Cinquegrane, G.; Stiegel, G.J. )

    1990-02-01

    The slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process has attracted considerable attention recently. The process can make liquid fuels by reacting hydrogen-lean synthesis gas produced from modern energy-efficient gasifiers. continuing assessment of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) has a high priority within an indirect liquefaction program, a part of the liquid fuels program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and executed by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Funding for the indirect liquefaction program in 1990:0090 is anticipated to be about $8.5 million compared to $6.6 million in 1989 and a like amount in the year before. The studies within the program are conducted by industry, universities, national laboratories and in-house PETC research and development. This article reviews preparation and properties of iron-based catalysts, including recent patent activities and in-depth process analysis of slurry-phase FTS. The review provides an analysis of Fischer-Tropsch catalyst research and development trends and describes options to increase selectivity for iron-based catalysts in a slurry phase.

  17. Insight into CH(4) formation in iron-catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

    PubMed

    Huo, Chun-Fang; Li, Yong-Wang; Wang, Jianguo; Jiao, Haijun

    2009-10-21

    Spin-polarized density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the carbon pathways and hydrogenation mechanism for CH(4) formation on Fe(2)C(011), Fe(5)C(2)(010), Fe(3)C(001), and Fe(4)C(100). We find that the surface C atom occupied sites are more active toward CH(4) formation. In Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS), CO direct dissociation is very difficult on perfect Fe(x)C(y) surfaces, while surface C atom hydrogenation could occur easily. With the formation of vacancy sites by C atoms escaping from the Fe(x)C(y) surface, the CO dissociation barrier decreases largely. As a consequence, the active carburized surface is maintained. Based on the calculated reaction energies and effective barriers, CH(4) formation is more favorable on Fe(5)C(2)(010) and Fe(2)C(011), while Fe(4)C(100) and Fe(3)C(001) are inactive toward CH(4) formation. More importantly, it is revealed that the reaction energy and effective barrier of CH(4) formation have a linear relationship with the charge of the surface C atom and the d-band center of the surface, respectively. On the basis of these correlations, one can predict the reactivity of all active surfaces by analyzing their surface properties and further give guides for catalyst design in FTS. PMID:19780531

  18. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with coal derived syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Raje, A.; O`Brien, R.J.; Davis, B.H.

    1998-12-31

    The effect of potassium on catalyst activity, kinetic parameters and selectivity has been investigated for a precipitated iron catalyst with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio synthesis gas. A wide range of synthesis gas conversions have been obtained by varying space velocities over catalysts with various potassium loadings. Differing trends in catalyst activity with potassium loading were observed depending on the space velocity or synthesis gas conversion. As potassium loading increased, the catalyst activity either decreased (low conversions), passed through a maximum (intermediate conversions) or increased (high conversions). This is shown to be a result of the increasing dependency of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on the hydrogen formed by the water-gas shift reaction with increasing synthesis gas conversions. Both the rate constant and the adsorption parameter in a common two-parameter Fischer-Tropsch rate expression decreased with potassium loading; therefore, observed maxima in Fischer-Tropsch rate with potassium loading can be due to the opposing influences of these parameters.

  19. Study of the carburization of an iron catalyst during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: influence on its catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pijolat, M.; Perrichon, V.; Bussiere, P.

    1987-09-01

    The fast transformation of an ironalumina catalyst into Fe/sub 2+x/C during the H/sub 2/ + CO reaction was followed by in situ Moessbauer spectroscopy at 523 K and the behavior was compared with changes in catalytic activity for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. After a few hours of synthesis, no metallic iron could be detected by either Moessbauer or IR spectroscopy, whereas the CO conversion was still half of that observed initially. The nature of the sites responsible for the remaining activity is discussed. The interpretation of the Moessbauer spectra has permitted the determination of the stoichiometry of the Fe/sub 2+x/C carbide (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.4), and hence the following of the change of x during the reaction. Thus, the activity in CO hydrogenation could be related to the number of carbon vacancies in the iron carbide, i.e., to the extent of the metallic character of this carbide. This concept of the variation of hydrogenating properties of the carbide with the carbon content has been supported by similar catalytic results obtained in the room temperature hydrogenation of ethylene performed on carbides of different stoichiometry

  20. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 4, June 26, 1991--September 26, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.

    1991-12-31

    Objectives are to develop active, stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. For a H{sub 2}-CO in molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0, catalyst performance target is 88% CO+H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe, with no more than 4% methane/ethane selectivity and 1% conversion loss per week. During this period, it was found that the performance of the slurry-phase iron and copper oxide-based catalyst depends on the amount of K. Five catalysts with differing K contents were studied. The catalysts with the lowest K were more active than the ones with higher K levels. The one with the middle K level was judged best.

  1. The influence of particle size and structure on the Mossbauer spectra of iron carbides formed during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gatte, R.R.; Phillips, J.

    1986-01-01

    Characterization of the active and stable phase of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts has been a topic of investigation for several years. Yet, a great deal of controversy still surrounds the identity of the phase(s) present during synthesis. This stems from the fact that neither X-ray nor Mossbauer studies have proven capable of unambiguously characterizing the metastable carbides formed. Investigations of the metastable, octahedral carbides (as they have been termed) have been going on for many years, dating back to at least 1949. The iron structure has been assigned as HCP (or 'nearly' HCP) with the carbon atoms occupying the octahedral holes. The most notable of these are the epsilon and epsilon' carbides. X-ray results have, however, been rather unsatisfactory for many reasons. For instance, the commercial catalysts studied contained many metallic additives and in most cases the small crystallite sizes gave rise to broad, poorly resolved lines. In recent years, emphasis has shifted toward the use of Mossbauer spectroscopy for in-situ studies of the carburization behavior. It is shown that if spectra are collected for a single sample over a range of temperatures, and if relaxation effects are properly accounted for, the Mossbauer results can give not only accurate identification of the phase(s) present but also quantitative particle size information and qualitative information regarding particle structure and the nature of particle/support interaction.

  2. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1996-01-19

    The objective of this research project is to develop the technology for the production of physically robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry phase synthesis reactor development. The catalysts that are developed shall be suitable for testing in the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas, to produce either low- or high-alpha product distributions. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the ``standard-catalyst`` developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. The proposed work will optimize the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for this low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst this is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics. The research is divided into four major topical areas: (a) catalyst preparation and characterization, (b) product characterization, (c) reactor operations, and (d) data assessment. Accomplishments to date are described.

  3. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this research project is to develop the technology for the production of physically robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry phase synthesis reactor development. The catalysts that are developed shall be suitable for testing in the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas, to produce either low- or high-alpha product distributions. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the ``standard-catalyst`` developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. The proposed work will optimize the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for this low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics. The research is divided into four major topical areas: (a) catalyst preparation and characterization, (b) product characterization, (c) reactor operations, and (d) data assessment. Accomplishments for this period are discussed.

  4. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1996-08-07

    The objective of this research project is to develop the technology for the production of physically robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry phase synthesis reactor development. The catalysts that are developed shall be suitable for testing in the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas, to produce either low- or high-alpha product distributions. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the ``standard-catalyst`` developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. The proposed work will optimize the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for this low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst this is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics. The research is divided into four major topical areas: (a) catalyst preparation and characterization, (b) product characterization, (c) reactor operations, and (d) data assessment.

  5. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-18

    The objective of this research project is to develop the technology for the production of physically robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry phase synthesis reactor development. The catalysts that are developed shall be suitable for testing in the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas, to produce either low- or high-alpha product distributions. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the {open_quotes}standard-catalyst{close_quotes} developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. The proposed work will optimize the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for this low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst this is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics. The research is divided into four major topical areas: (a) catalyst preparation and characterization, (b) product characterization, (c) reactor operations, and (d) data assessment.

  6. Proposal of a new product characterization model for the iron-based low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    F. Gideon Botes

    2007-06-15

    A new product characterization model has been proposed for the iron-based low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (Fe-LTFT) synthesis. The chain-length-dependent desorption model is based on the premise that the increase in chain-growth probability and decrease in the olefin/paraffin ratio with the carbon number in the Fe-LTFT synthesis is essentially a characteristic of the primary product spectrum. The model could successfully describe the olefin and paraffin distributions in the C{sub 3+} range. The ethylene/ethane ratio is overestimated by the model because of the high reactivity of ethylene for secondary hydrogenation. However, the total C{sub 2} formation rate was predicted almost perfectly, while the methane formation rate was described adequately, using parameter values that were obtained from the C{sub 3}-C{sub 10} product fraction. This is a true extrapolation, because the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} data were not used at all for the estimation of the parameter values. This may be the first product characterization model that can successfully be extrapolated to the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} components without introducing additional (unique) parameter values for these products. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Effect of Potassium Addition on Coprecipitated Iron Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Using Bio-oil-syngas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhao-xiang; Dong, Ting; Kan, Tao; Li, Quan-xin

    2008-04-01

    The effects of potassium addition and the potassium content on the activity and selectivity of coprecipitated iron catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) were studied in a fixed bed reactor at 1.5 MPa, 300°C, and contact time (W/F) of 12.5 gcath/mol using the model bio-oil-syngas of H2/CO/CO2/N2 (62/8/25/5, vol%). It was found that potassium addition increases the catalyst activity for FTS and the reverse water gas shift reaction. Moreover, potassium increases the average molecular weight (chain length) of the hydrocarbon products. With the increase of potassium content, it was found that CH4 selectivity decreases and the selectivity of liquid phase products (C5+) increases. The characteristics of FTS catalysts with different potassium content were also investigated by various characterization measurements including X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area. Based on experimental results, 100Fe/6Cu/16Al/6K (weight ratio) was selected as the optimal catalyst for FTS from bio-oil-syngas. The results indicate that the 100Fe/6Cu/16Al/6K catalyst is one of the most promising candidates to directly synthesize liquid bio-fuel using bio-oil-syngas.

  8. Study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over iron-based catalysts using a well-stirred slurry reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Dictor, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over iron catalysts has been researched for well over 60 years, yet relatively few detailed investigations of the kinetics and selectivity of hydrocarbon synthesis have been done using unpromoted bulk iron-based catalysts. In this investigation, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, potassium-promoted Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, fused iron, Fe/sub 3/C, and Fe were tested for their activity and selectivity for hydrocarbon synthesis, and comparisons were made between the catalysts. Experiments were done using a well-stirred slurry reaction which was free of temperature and concentration gradients. The effluent from the reactor was analyzed on line using a dual-column gas chromatograph. The compositions of fresh and used catalyst samples were determined using X-ray diffraction. The activity of fused iron catalyst increases with extent of reduction in H/sub 2/ - attributed to increases in surface area. Principal products are normal 1-olefins and paraffins, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O; branched olefins, aldehydes and alcohols are also formed. The catalyst has very little hydrogenation or isomerization activity due to potassium promotion. Aldehydes reduce to alcohols; the water-gas-shift reaction occurs. The kinetics and selectivity observed using potassium-promoted Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were nearly identical to those of fused iron. In the absence of promoter, the products are almost exclusively n-olefins, n-paraffins, CH/sub 3/OH, H/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/. Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is active for hydrogenation and isomerization.

  9. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts: A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Amit A. Gokhale; Rahul P. Nabar; Calvin H. Bartholomew; Hu Zou; Brian Critchfield

    2006-03-03

    Efforts during this second year focused on four areas: (1) continued searching and summarizing of published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) investigation of CO adsorption/desorption and temperature programmed hydrogenation (TPH) of carbonaceous species after FTS on unsupported iron and alumina-supported iron catalysts; (3) activity tests of alumina-supported iron catalysts in a fixed bed reactor; (4) sequential design of experiments, for the collection of rate data in a Berty CSTR reactor, and nonlinear-regression analysis to obtain kinetic parameters. Literature sources describing mechanistic and kinetic studies of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts were compiled in a review. Temperature-programmed desorption/reaction methods (the latter using mass-spectrometry detection and also thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA)) were utilized to study CO adsorption/-desorption on supported and unsupported iron catalysts. Molecular and dissociative adsorptions of CO occur on iron catalysts at 25-150 C. The amounts adsorbed and bond strengths of adsorption are influenced by supports and promoters. That CO adsorbs dissociatively on polycrystalline Fe at temperatures well below those of FT reaction indicates that CO dissociation is facile and unlikely to be the rate-limiting step during FTS. Carbonaceous species formed after FT reaction for only 5 minutes at 200 C were initially hydrogenated under mild, isothermal condition (200 C and 1 atm), followed by TPH to 800 C. During the mild, isothermal hydrogenation, only about 0.1-0.2 mL of atomic carbon is apparently removed, while during TPH to 800 C multilayer equivalents of atomic, polymeric, carbidic, and graphitic carbons are removed. Rates of CO conversion on alumina-supported iron catalysts at 220-260 C and 20 atm are correlated well by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood expression, derived assuming carbon hydrogenation to CH and OH recombination to water to be

  10. Iron oxide pillared clay with large gallery height: Synthesis and properties as a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Rightor, E.G.; Tsou, Mingshin; Pinnavaia, T.J. )

    1991-07-01

    New iron oxide pillared montmorillonites have been prepared by the reaction of Na{sup +} montmorillonite with base-hydrolyzed solutions of Fe{sup 3+} salts and subsequent thermal conversion of the intercalated polycations. Depending on the hydrolysis conditions used to generate the pillaring solutions, pillared products with basal spacings in the range 18 to 25 {angstrom} were obtained. Under optimum hydrolysis conditions (base/metal = 2.0 meq/mol, aging time = 23-147 hr) the pillared products contained 6.8-9.8 Fe{sup 3+} ions per O{sub 20}(OH){sub 4} unit cell and exhibited basal spacings of 25-29 {angstrom}. These latter spacings corresponded to exceptionally large gallery heights of 15-19 {angstrom}. Upon calcination at 300C, the spacings decreased to 23-27 {angstrom}. N{sub 2} BET surface areas after outgassing at 350C were in the range 270 to 350 m{sup 2}/g. The pillared products are active catalysts that have undergone Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons at 275 C and 120 {minus}psi (CO:H{sub 2}=1:2). The hydrocarbon distribution in the C{sub 1}-C{sub 6} range (1.3% conversion) followed Anderson-Schulz-Flory statistics with a chain propagation probability of {alpha} = 0.49. X-ray energy dispersive analysis indicated that substantial amounts of the intercalated iron migrated to the edge sites of the clay particles under reaction conditions. The redistribution of iron resulted in a distribution of gallery heights sufficiently heterogeneous to preclude Bragg X-ray scattering along the 001 direction. Iron migration also occurred upon exposure of the pillared products to the ambient atmosphere for prolonged periods ({ge}3 months).

  11. An Auger electron spectroscopy study of the activation of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. I. Hydrogen activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G. )

    1993-03-01

    Activation procedures can have a dramatic effect on the activity of iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. CO conversion over a 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst (parts by weight) can vary by nearly a factor of 3, depending on activation. In contrast, a 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst displays only minor variations in activity with activation conditions. An ultra-high vacuum surface analysis chamber coupled to an atmospheric pressure reactor has been used to measure the surface compositions of these catalysts following various hydrogen activation procedures. Activation of the 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst in H[sub 2] results in rapid reduction of iron to the metallic state, and segregation of sulfur to the catalyst surface. The sulfur arises from bulk sulfate impurities present in the metal nitrates used to prepare the catalyst. Sulfur coverage increases with both activation time and temperature, due to an increase in the rate of sulfur diffusion with temperature. F-T activity of this catalyst varies inversely with sulfur coverage, consistent with the well-known poisoning effect of sulfur on F-T synthesis. For the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst no significant variations in surface composition are observed as a function of hydrogen activation temperature, consistent with the absence of any variations in catalyst activity. Only partial reduction of iron to a mixture of Fe[sub x]O and Fe[sub 3]O[sub 4] is observed for this catalyst for all activation conditions investigated. Using electron beam effects to remove potassium and silica shows that one or both of these components inhibits reduction of iron to the metallic state in the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst. 48 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. An Auger electron spectroscopy study of the activation of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. II. Carbon monoxide activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G. ); Datye, A.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Activation procedures can have a dramatic effect on the activity of iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. CO conversion over a 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst (parts by weight) can vary by nearly a factor of 3, depending on activation treatment. In contrast, a 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst displays little dependence of F-T activity on activation treatment. An ultra-high vacuum surface analysis chamber coupled to an atmospheric reactor has been used to measure the surface composition of these catalysts following activation in carbon monoxide at 280[degrees]C, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and BET surface area measurements have been used to investigate catalyst morphology. CO activation of the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst at 280[degrees]C results in partial reduction of iron to a mixture of Fe[sub x]O and Fe[sub 3]O[sub 4], and an overall surface composition very similar to that obtained following hydrogen activation at 220 or 280[degrees]C, consistent with the invariance of F-T activity with activation treatment for this catalyst. Activation of the 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst in CO at 280[degrees]C results in the formation of iron carbide particles, growth of graphitic carbon (C[sub g]) filaments, and formation of a thick, porous, C[sub g] layer covering the carbide particles. Differences in F-T activity between the hydrogen- and CO-activated 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst are discussed in terms of surface composition and catalyst morphology. The difference in sensitivity of the two catalysts to activation conditions is related to differences in the extent of reduction of the catalysts. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts: A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Rahul P. Nabar

    2006-09-29

    Work continued on the development of a microkinetic model of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on supported and unsupported Fe catalysts. The following aspects of the FT mechanism on unsupported iron catalysts were investigated on during this third year: (1) the collection of rate data in a Berty CSTR reactor based on sequential design of experiments; (2) CO adsorption and CO-TPD for obtaining the heat of adsorption of CO on polycrystalline iron; and (3) isothermal hydrogenation (IH) after Fischer Tropsch reaction to identify and quantify surface carbonaceous species. Rates of C{sub 2+} formation on unsupported iron catalysts at 220 C and 20 atm correlated well to a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type expression, derived assuming carbon hydrogenation to CH and OH recombination to water to be rate-determining steps. From desorption of molecularly adsorbed CO at different temperatures the heat of adsorption of CO on polycrystalline iron was determined to be 100 kJ/mol. Amounts and types of carbonaceous species formed after FT reaction for 5-10 minutes at 150, 175, 200 and 285 C vary significantly with temperature. Mr. Brian Critchfield completed his M.S. thesis work on a statistically designed study of the kinetics of FTS on 20% Fe/alumina. Preparation of a paper describing this work is in progress. Results of these studies were reported at the Annual Meeting of the Western States Catalysis and at the San Francisco AIChE meeting. In the coming period, studies will focus on quantitative determination of the rates of kinetically-relevant elementary steps on unsupported Fe catalysts with/without K and Pt promoters by SSITKA method. This study will help us to (1) understand effects of promoter and support on elementary kinetic parameters and (2) build a microkinetics model for FTS on iron. Calculations using periodic, self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods were performed on models of defected Fe surfaces, most significantly the stepped Fe(211) surface. Binding

  14. Studies on nanosized iron based modified catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis application.

    PubMed

    Park, MoonJu; Kang, Jung Shik; Na, Ki Poong; Lee, Sang Deuk; Awate, S V; Moon, Dong Ju

    2011-02-01

    To improve catalytic performance iron based catalyst, the effects of some metal promoters, especially potassium, copper and other transition metal oxides as well as different supports have been reported. A series of Fe/K/Cu catalysts promoted with magnesium and ceria by precipitation method, followed by impregnation method; keeping Cu and K content same. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, N2 physisorption, TPR and TEM techniques. From XRD, the presence of hematite (Fe2O3) phase was detected in all precipitated iron catalysts and CFe2.5 phase in all used catalysts. TPR results showed that addition of Mg facilitated the reduction of Fe2O3 and decrease in reduction temperature. The catalytic performance was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor at 250 degrees C, 2 MPa pressure and H2/CO molar ratio of 2. Concentration of Mg was found to affect the CO conversion and product distribution. It was found that precipitated iron catalyst Fe/Mg/Cu/K with Mg/Fe ratio of 0.1 showed highest conversion (60.6%) and C5(+) selectivity (92.4%) among all catalysts tested. PMID:21456209

  15. ATOMIC-SCALE DESIGN OF IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS: A COMBINED COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, EXPERIMENTAL, AND MICROKINETIC MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Amit A. Gokhale; Rahul P. Nabar; Calvin H. Bartholomew; Hu Zou; Brian Critchfield

    2005-03-22

    Efforts during this first year focused on four areas: (1) searching/summarizing published FTS mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) construction of mass spectrometer-TPD and Berty CSTR reactor systems; (3) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron and alumina-supported iron catalysts at various iron loadings (4) Determination of thermochemical parameters such as binding energies of reactive intermediates, heat of FTS elementary reaction steps, and kinetic parameters such as activation energies, and frequency factors of FTS elementary reaction steps on a number of model surfaces. Literature describing mechanistic and kinetic studies of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts was compiled in a draft review. Construction of the mass spectrometer-TPD system is 90% complete and of a Berty CSTR reactor system 98% complete. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by nonaqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2}, thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. The alumina-supported iron catalysts will be used for kinetic and mechanistic studies. In the coming year, adsorption/desorption properties, rates of elementary steps, and global reaction rates will be measured for these catalysts, with and without promoters, providing a database for understanding effects of dispersion, metal loading, and support on elementary kinetic parameters and for validation of computational models that incorporate effects of surface structure and promoters. Furthermore, using state-of-the-art self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods, we have extensively studied the thermochemistry and kinetics of various elementary steps on

  16. Application of a novel TPR EXAFS/XANES method using a multi-sample holder to characterize promoted iron and cobalt fFischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts.

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, G.; Sarkar, A.; Ji, Y.; Davis, B. H.; Cronauer, D.; Kropf, A. J.; Marshall, C. L.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Kentucky

    2008-01-01

    Coal-to-liquids. Iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts are not only used commercially for high temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, but are increasingly becoming the focus for converting low H{sub 2}/CO ratio synthesis gas at lower temperature. Such low temperature processing yields hydrocarbon distributions with higher {alpha} values, and as a consequence, much less light hydrocarbon gas production (and especially, less methane). Another benefit to the use of iron-based catalysts is that the product slate is richer in {alpha}-olefinic products, which are more valuable than the paraffinic products produced using cobalt-based catalysts. Iron-based catalysts are often used to convert low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas, because the catalysts can intrinsically adjust the syngas ratio upward by converting a fraction of CO by reaction with H{sub 2}O to produce H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} via the water-gas shift reaction.

  17. Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

    1996-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy has currently a program to develop Fischer-Tropsch catalysts which are active at low H{sub 2}/Co ratio of 0.67. The Center for Applied Energy Research, University of Kentucky and Texas A&M University have been developing Fischer- Tropsch catalysts which are active at a low H{sub 2}/Co ratio of 0.67. It is of interest to find out any relationships that may exist between the iron phases that are produced during activation and FT synthesis and the activity of the catalysts. Moessbauer spectroscopy investigations were carried out on 32 iron-base catalysts during the period under review. Eleven catalysts withdrawn from slurry type of reactors during and at the end of FT synthesis were received from the University of Kentucky. Twenty one catalysts withdrawn at the end of the run from both the slurry and fixed-bed reactors were received from Texas A&M University.

  18. Reoxidation and deactivation of supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Schanke, D.; Bergene, E.; Adnanes, E.

    1995-12-31

    As a result of the highly exothermic nature of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, heat transfer considerations limit the maximum conversion per pass in fixed-bed processes, whereas slurry reactors can operate at higher conversions. During Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on cobalt catalysts, high conversions will generate high partial pressures of water at the reactor exit, due to the low water gas shift activity of cobalt. In addition, the extensive back-mixing in slurry reactors will give a relatively uniform concentration profile in the reactor, characterized by a high concentration of water and low reactant concentrations. From the commercial iron-catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in fixed-bed (Arge) reactors it is known that the catalyst deactivates by oxidation of iron by CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O near the exit of the reactor. Although bulk oxidation of cobalt during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is not thermodynamically favored, it was early speculated that surface oxidation of cobalt could occur during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The purpose of the present work is to describe the influence of water on the deactivation behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported cobalt catalysts. The possibility of cobalt oxidation during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was investigated by model studies.

  19. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts; A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Manos Mavrikakis; James Dumesic; Rahul Nabar; Calvin Bartholonew; Hu Zou; Uchenna Paul

    2008-09-29

    This work focuses on (1) searching/summarizing published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron catalysts with/without potassium/platinum promoters; (3) measurement of H{sub 2} and CO adsorption/dissociation kinetics on iron catalysts using transient methods; (3) analysis of the transient rate data to calculate kinetic parameters of early elementary steps in FTS; (4) construction of a microkinetic model of FTS on iron, and (5) validation of the model from collection of steady-state rate data for FTS on iron catalysts. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by non-aqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2} and thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. Kinetic parameters for CO adsorption, CO dissociation, and surface carbon hydrogenation on these catalysts were determined from temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO and temperature programmed surface hydrogenation (TPSR), temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH), and isothermal, transient hydrogenation (ITH). A microkinetic model was constructed for the early steps in FTS on polycrystalline iron from the kinetic parameters of elementary steps determined experimentally in this work and from literature values. Steady-state rate data were collected in a Berty reactor and used for validation of the microkinetic model. These rate data were fitted to 'smart' Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expressions derived from a sequence of elementary steps and using a combination of fitted steady-state parameters and parameters specified from the transient

  20. Diffusion limitations in Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Post, M.F.M.; Van'tHoog, A.C.; Minderhoud, J.K.; Sie, S.T. . Lab.)

    1989-07-01

    The extent of diffusion limitations in the catalytic conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons by the Fischer-Tropsch reaction has been established for a number of iron- and cobalt-based catalysts. The studies were performed in a fixed-bed microreactor system at temperatures in the range 473-523 {Kappa}. Variation of catalyst particle size in the range 0.2.-2.6 mm shows that the conversion of synthesis gas decreases considerably when the average particle size is increased. The effects of variation of particle size and pore diameter have been quantified with the Thiele model for diffusion limitations. Evidence has accumulated that the limited mobility of reactant molecules in the liquid-filled pores of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts is the main cause of retardation of the reaction rates. The experimentally determined reaction rates with various catalysts operated under different conditions show an excellent fit with the theoretical model.

  1. Moessbauer spectroscopy study of iron-based catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.

    1995-12-01

    Mossbauer investigations of iron-based catalysts containing the promoters K, and Cu, and binders consisting of oxides of Al, Si and Zr were carried out. Catalysts subjected to pretreatment in gas atmospheres containing mixtures of CO, H{sub 2}, and He have been studied. It is shown that the nature of binders, promoters and pretreatment of a catalyst influence the iron-phases formed during pretreatment and FT synthesis. Activation of the catalysts in CO leads to rapid and almost complete formation of {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} during activation and gives rise to high (H{sub 2}+CO) conversion. On the other hand, activation of the catalysts in synthesis gas leads to slow and incomplete formation of carbides and low (H{sub 2}+CO) conversion.

  2. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Adam Crawford; Burtron H. Davis

    2006-09-30

    In the previous reporting period, modifications were completed for integrating a continuous wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor. During the current reporting period, a shakedown of the system was completed. Several problems were encountered with the progressive cavity pump used to circulate the wax/catalyst slurry though the cross-flow filter element and reactor. During the activation of the catalyst with elevated temperature (> 270 C) the elastomer pump stator released sulfur thereby totally deactivating the iron-based catalyst. Difficulties in maintaining an acceptable leak rate from the pump seal and stator housing were also encountered. Consequently, the system leak rate exceeded the expected production rate of wax; therefore, no online filtration could be accomplished. Work continued regarding the characterization of ultra-fine catalyst structures. The effect of carbidation on the morphology of iron hydroxide oxide particles was the focus of the study during this reporting period. Oxidation of Fe (II) sulfate results in predominantly {gamma}-FeOOH particles which have a rod-shaped (nano-needles) crystalline structure. Carbidation of the prepared {gamma}-FeOOH with CO at atmospheric pressure produced iron carbides with spherical layered structure. HRTEM and EDS analysis revealed that carbidation of {gamma}-FeOOH particles changes the initial nano-needles morphology and generates ultrafine carbide particles with irregular spherical shape.

  3. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1995-05-02

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has been studied over the best low-alpha catalyst developed at the CAER. A wide range of synthesis gas conversions were obtained by varying the space velocity. The experimental results show that: (1) the rate of the water gas shift reaction is lower than the rate of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction at low conversions (< 60%) whereas it closely approaches the rate of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis at high conversions, (2) the fraction of CO converted to hydrocarbons is higher at low and intermediate conversions whereas it is smaller at high conversions, (3) the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the product gas is equal to the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the inlet synthesis gas at an intermediate conversion level of 67%. These findings suggest that it would be beneficial to carry out the reaction at intermediate conversions. This would result in an optimum use of CO to produce hydrocarbons rather than CO{sub 2}. High overall conversions can be obtained by either using a second reactor or recycling the product gas using a single reactor. If the intermediate conversion in a single pass is maintained at 67% there would be no need to adjust the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the recycle stream or the feed to the second reactor as the product gas from a single pass would have the same H{sub 2}/CO ratio as the feed synthesis gas. The optimum reaction rate expression for synthesis gas conversion which has been developed for this catalyst shows that CO is strongly adsorbed on the catalyst and that the reaction products such as water and CO{sub 2} do not inhibit the reaction rate.

  4. Slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zarochak, M.F.; McDonald, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in the slurry phase has attracted attention in recent years due to its numerous advantages. Among these advantages are the ability of the liquid phase to handle the large heats of reaction and thereby control reaction temperature, the ability to handle low H/sub 2//CO ratio synthesis gas without needing a preliminary water-gas shift step, and the relatively low capital and operating costs for slurry systems. Slurry-phase work at PETC has focused on understanding effects of catalyst preparation and pretreatment, of reaction conditions (T, P, H/sub 2//CO), and of operating conditions (space velocity, methods of wax removal) on catalyst synthesis behavior (activity, selectivity, and maintenance of activity and selectivity). Better understanding of the effects of these factors on F-T synthesis leads to improvements in process technology. This work focuses on the effects of catalyst pretreatment on synthesis behavior. Developing an effective F-T catalyst pretreatment procedure is a problem limited almost exclusively to iron catalysts. This paper reports some recent results on the effects of pretreatment. Synthesis runs were made using one of two different pretreatments given a potassium-promoted precipitated iron catalyst. Besides these reaction experiments, catalyst samples were periodically withdrawn from the stirred autoclave for characterization by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  5. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Burtron H. Davis

    2006-03-31

    The morphological and chemical nature of ultrafine iron catalyst particles (3-5 nm diameters) during activation/FTS was studied by HRTEM, EELS, and Moessbauer spectroscopy. With the progress of FTS, the carbide re-oxidized to magnetite and catalyst activity gradually decreased. The growth of oxide phase continued and average particle size also increased simultaneously. The phase transformation occurred in a ''growing oxide core'' manner with different nano-zones. The nano-range carbide particles did not show fragmentation or attrition as generally observed in micrometer range particles. Nevertheless, when the dimension of particles reached the micrometer range, the crystalline carbide phase appeared to be sprouted on the surface of magnetite single crystal. In the previous reporting period, a design and operating philosophy was developed for an integrated wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor to be used in Phase II of this research program. During the current reporting period, we have started construction of the new filtration system and began modifications to the 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) reactor. The system will utilize a primary wax separation device followed by a Pall Accusep or Membralox ceramic cross-flow membrane. As of this writing, the unit is nearly complete except for the modification of a moyno-type pump; the pump was shipped to the manufacturer to install a special leak-free, high pressure seal.

  6. Stability and reactivity of ϵ-χ-θ iron carbide catalyst phases in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: controlling μ(C).

    PubMed

    de Smit, Emiel; Cinquini, Fabrizio; Beale, Andrew M; Safonova, Olga V; van Beek, Wouter; Sautet, Philippe; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2010-10-27

    The stability and reactivity of ϵ, χ, and θ iron carbide phases in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts as a function of relevant reaction conditions was investigated by a synergistic combination of experimental and theoretical methods. Combined in situ X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy/X-ray Diffraction/Raman Spectroscopy was applied to study Fe-based catalysts during pretreatment and, for the first time, at relevant high pressure Fischer-Tropsch synthesis conditions, while Density Functional Theory calculations formed a fundamental basis for understanding the influence of pretreatment and FTS conditions on the formation of bulk iron carbide phases. By combining theory and experiment, it was found that the formation of θ-Fe(3)C, χ-Fe(5)C(2), and ϵ-carbides can be explained by their relative thermodynamic stability as imposed by gas phase composition and temperature. Furthermore, it was shown that a significant part of the Fe phases was present as amorphous carbide phases during high pressure FTS, sometimes in an equivalent amount to the crystalline iron carbide fraction. A catalyst containing mainly crystalline χ-Fe(5)C(2) was highly susceptible to oxidation during FTS conditions, while a catalyst containing θ-Fe(3)C and amorphous carbide phases showed a lower activity and selectivity, mainly due to the buildup of carbonaceous deposits on the catalyst surface, suggesting that amorphous phases and the resulting textural properties play an important role in determining final catalyst performance. The findings further uncovered the thermodynamic and kinetic factors inducing the ϵ-χ-θ carbide transformation as a function of the carbon chemical potential μ(C). PMID:20925335

  7. Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : iron-containing particulate catalysts. Activity report : January 1, 2001 - December 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Cronauer, D.; Chemical Engineering

    2006-05-12

    Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry--specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. It is desired that selectivity be directed toward producing diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. The goal is to produce shape-selective catalysts that have the potential to limit the formation of longchain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage'. This cage also restricts their loss by attrition during use in slurry-bed reactors. The first stage of this program was to prepare and evaluate iron-containing particulate catalysts. This activity report centers upon this first stage of experimentation with particulate FT catalysts. (For reference, a second experimental stage is under way to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes.) To date, experimentation has centered upon the evaluation of a sample of iron-based, spray-dried catalyst prepared by B.H. Davis of the Center of Applied Energy Research (CAER) and samples of his catalyst onto which inorganic 'shells' were deposited. The reference CAER catalyst contained a high level of dispersed fine particles, a portion of which was removed by differential settling. Reaction conditions have been established using a FT laboratory unit such that reasonable levels of CO conversion can be achieved, where therefore a valid catalyst comparison can be made. A wide range of catalytic activities was observed with SiO{sub 2}-coated FT catalysts. Two techniques were used for SiO{sub 2}coating. The first involved a caustic precipitation of SiO{sub 2} from an

  8. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, A.; Erickson, J.; Smiley, B.; Vaughan, C.

    1983-09-01

    The performance of an iron-copper Fischer-Tropsch catalyst was studied in a slurry CSTR at 227/sup 0/C and 790 kPa (100 psig). Catalyst performance was similar to other iron-based catalysts studied previously with respect to conversion of CO, conversion of CO + H/sub 2/, and to the product distribution. CO conversion increased with decreasing space velocity, ranging from approximately 60% at 1570 h/sup -1/ to over 90% at 488 h/sup -1/. The H/sub 2/ to CO usage ratio was approximately 0.7, indicating that the catalyst is a good water-gas shift catalyst as well as a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Reaction products could be described by a Flory distribution with a chain growth probability (..cap alpha..) of 0.67, which is in the gasoline range. In some runs, methanol was added continuously to the reactor feed, but instead of being incorporated into the reaction, the methanol oxidized and deactivated the catalyst. 31 references, 12 figures, 10 tables.

  9. Effects of H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/ on the activity and composition of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The composition of an iron Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst is strongly affected by the % conversion of H/sub 2/-CO syngas. At low % conversion, the strongly reducing syngas mixture tends to covert metallic or oxidic iron species to a bulk iron carbide phase or phases. As % syngas conversion increases, H/sub 2/ and CO are converted to organic products, and to H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/. The gas mixture can therefore oxidize an iron catalyst. However, the catalyst's synthesis behavior (activity, selectivity, activity and selectivity maintenance) also depends strongly on % syngas conversion. Thus, an iron catalyst's composition and synthesis behavior are not easily correlated under typical F-T reaction conditions. This study was designed to determine how the build-up of H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/ during reaction affect F-T catalyst composition and synthesis behavior. Reaction rate measurements were conducted at differential % syngas conversion using catalyst wafers mounted in an in-situ cell. This cell allowed Mossbauer effect spectroscopy of the used catalyst for determination of the catalyst composition. Additional H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/ were added to syngas to determine the effects on catalyst composition, activity and selectivity. Furthermore, these experiments were carried out at pressures well above atmospheric, the pressure range required for good iron F-T catalyst behavior. Thus, results presented here are more closely related to the state of working F-T catalysts than are previous in-situ Mossbauer studies of iron catalysts, which were done almost exclusively at atmospheric pressure. This paper focuses on initial experiments involving the addition of only H/sub 2/O, not CO/sub 2/, to a syngas stream.

  10. Supported fischer-tropsch catalyst and method of making the catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Paul N.; Pierantozzi, Ronald; Withers, Howard P.

    1987-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a method of making the catalyst for a Fischer-Tropsch process utilizing the catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas, is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range is disclosed. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consist of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of a Fischer-Tropsch metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

  11. Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

    1995-10-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy investigations were carried out on 14 iron-based catalysts during the period under review. The catalyst 100Fe/4.4Si/0.71K (all atomic ratios) was subjected to activation first in syngas and subsequently in CO gas atmosphere. Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis was carried out on the above catalyst. Another catalyst 100Fe/4.4Si/2.6Cu/0.71K (all atomic ratios) activated in syngas and subjected to FT synthesis was also studied to understand the effect of added Cu on the phase distribution and its effect on the FT activity. The following trends were observed: (1) activation of the catalyst in syngas, H{sub 2}/CO, lead to the formation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and no carbides were formed, the FT activity was found to be low at 9--12% (H{sub 2}+CO) conversion; (2) activation of the catalyst in CO for 22hrs lead to the formation of 33% of {chi}-carbide and the FT activity was found to be high at 88% maximum; (3) addition of copper to the catalyst has improved the FT activity for those catalysts pretreated in syngas at elevated pressures.

  12. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report for period ending December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, R.J.; Xu, Liguang; Bi, Xiangxin; Eklund, P.; Davis, B.H.

    1993-12-31

    Conversion data as a function of time of synthesis for the two catalysts are shown in Figures 2 and 3. In general the precipitated catalyst is more active than the iron carbide catalyst with syn-gas conversions starting at 80% as compared to 50% for the latter; however, both catalysts deactivated with increasing reaction time. A comparison of the C{sub 2}, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} olefin selectivities at 26% CO conversion (precipitated catalyst-336 hr of synthesis, iron carbide catalyst-122 hr of synthesis) are shown in Figure 4. Surprisingly the precipitated catalyst had a higher olefin content than the iron carbide catalyst. It has been reported that a similar iron carbide catalyst has higher selectivity for the production of olefins than a ``conventionally prepared`` Fe/Co catalyst. The discrepancy may be due in part to comparing the olefin selectivity of the two catalysts at different conversions. Their ``conventional catalyst`` had a C{sub 2}{minus}C{sub 4} olefin content of 37% at 72% conversion compared to 86% olefin at 55% conversion for the iron carbide catalyst. In general the olefin selectivity of a catalyst is highest at low conversions. The iron carbide catalyst of this study produces more hydrocarbons than the precipitated catalyst; furthermore, it produces a higher fraction of C{sub 3} + (86% vs. 84%) and C{sub 5}+ (67% vs. 61%) hydrocarbons (Figure 5). Correspondingly, the iron carbide catalyst produces less methane and ethane than the precipitated catalyst (Figure 6). These hydrocarbon and C{sub 5}+ selectivities are similar to those reported earlier.

  13. Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst for Aviation Fuel Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaRee, Ana B.; Best, Lauren M.; Bradford, Robyn L.; Gonzalez-Arroyo, Richard; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    As the oil supply declines, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to nonpetroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. The Fischer-Tropsch process uses a gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen which is converted into various liquid hydrocarbons; this versatile gas-to-liquid technology produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fischer-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur and aromatic compounds. It is most commonly catalyzed by cobalt supported on alumina, silica, or titania or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Cobalt is typically used more often than iron, in that cobalt is a longer-active catalyst, has lower water-gas shift activity, and lower yield of modified products. Promoters are valuable in improving Fischer-Tropsch catalyst as they can increase cobalt oxide dispersion, enhance the reduction of cobalt oxide to the active metal phase, stabilize a high metal surface area, and improve mechanical properties. Our goal is to build up the specificity of the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst while adding less-costly transition metals as promoters; the more common promoters used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are rhenium, platinum, and ruthenium. In this report we will describe our preliminary efforts to design and produce catalyst materials to achieve our goal of preferentially producing C8 to C18 paraffin compounds in the NASA Glenn Research Center Gas-To-Liquid processing plant. Efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center for producing green fuels using non-petroleum feedstocks support both the Sub-sonic Fixed Wing program of Fundamental Aeronautics and the In Situ Resource Utilization program of the Exploration Technology Development and Demonstration program.

  14. Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst for Aviation Fuel Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deLaRee, Ana B.; Best, Lauren M.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2011-01-01

    As the oil supply declines, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to non-petroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. The Fischer-Tropsch process uses a gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen which is converted into various liquid hydrocarbons; this versatile gas-to-liquid technology produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fischer-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur and aromatic compounds. It is most commonly catalyzed by cobalt supported on alumina, silica, or titania or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Cobalt is typically used more often than iron, in that cobalt is a longer-active catalyst, has lower water-gas shift activity, and lower yield of modified products. Promoters are valuable in improving Fischer-Tropsch catalyst as they can increase cobalt oxide dispersion, enhance the reduction of cobalt oxide to the active metal phase, stabilize a high metal surface area, and improve mechanical properties. Our goal is to build up the specificity of the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst while adding less-costly transition metals as promoters; the more common promoters used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are rhenium, platinum, and ruthenium. In this report we will describe our preliminary efforts to design and produce catalyst materials to achieve our goal of preferentially producing C8 to C18 paraffin compounds in the NASA Glenn Research Center Gas-To-Liquid processing plant. Efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center for producing green fuels using non-petroleum feedstocks support both the Sub-sonic Fixed Wing program of Fundamental Aeronautics and the In Situ Resource Utilization program of the Exploration Technology Development and Demonstration program.

  15. Bulk and surface structure of a Ni Fe/Al2O3 catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis studied by Mössbauer, infrared spectroscopy and magnetic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boellaard, E.; van der Kraan, A. M.; Geus, J. W.

    1992-04-01

    Deposition precipitation of a stoichiometric nickel-ironcyanide complex onto an alumina support and subsequent calcination and reduction has resulted in the formation of a homogeneous metallic alloy which exhibits activity for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. During hydrocarbon synthesis conditions only a fraction of the metallic phase is converted in a phase which is most likely a thermally unstable (nickel-)iron carbide.

  16. Diffusion limitations in Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Post, M.F.M.; Sie, S.T. Badhuisweg 3, 1031 CM Amsterdam )

    1988-01-01

    Indirect conversion of natural hydrocarbon resources such as natural gas into transportation fuels or chemicals usually involves the conversion to carbon monoxide and hydrogen (synthesis gas), followed by a catalytic conversion to the desired products via e.g. the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction. In a fixed-bed mode of operation, the FT catalyst generally consists of particles of a few mm in size, for pressure-drop and heat-transfer considerations. To investigate whether diffusion limitations inside larger catalyst particles play a role during the synthesis reaction, the authors have made an extensive study using a number of iron- and cobalt-based catalysts, in which they have evaluated and quantified the effects of catalyst particle size and pore diameter on reaction rates. The effects due to variation of particle size and pore diameter have been quantified with the Thiele model for diffusion limitations.

  17. Research Opportunities for Fischer-Tropsch Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Nancy B.

    1999-06-30

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was discovered in Germany in the 1920's and has been studied by every generation since that time. As technology and chemistry, in general, improved through the decades, new insights, catalysts, and technologies were added to the Fischer-Tropsch process, improving it and making it more economical with each advancement. Opportunities for improving the Fischer-Tropsch process and making it more economical still exist. This paper gives an overview of the present Fischer-Tropsch processes and offers suggestions for areas where a research investment could improve those processes. Gas-to-liquid technology, which utilizes the Fischer Tropsch process, consists of three principal steps: Production of synthesis gas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) from natural gas, the production of liquid fuels from syngas using a Fischer-Tropsch process, and upgrading of Fischer-Tropsch fuels. Each step will be studied for opportunities for improvement and areas that are not likely to reap significant benefits without significant investment.

  18. Application of equilibrium analysis to a Fischer-Tropsch product

    SciTech Connect

    Norval, G.W. ); Phillips, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    In the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process, synthesis gas is converted, inter alia, to aliphatic hydrocarbons, consisting predominantly of n-alkanes and n-alkenes, over iron- or cobalt-based catalysts. The product composition follows an Anderson-Schults-Flory (ASF) distribution. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that the ASF distribution (Eq. (1)) can be derived from an equilibrium basis, and the consequences arising therefrom are discussed.

  19. Tailored fischer-tropsch synthesis product distribution

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Yong; Cao, Chunshe; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-06-19

    Novel methods of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are described. It has been discovered that conducting the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over a catalyst with a catalytically active surface layer of 35 microns or less results in a liquid hydrocarbon product with a high ratio of C.sub.5-C.sub.20:C.sub.20+. Descriptions of novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts and reactors are also provided. Novel hydrocarbon compositions with a high ratio of C.sub.5-C.sub.20:C.sub.20+ are also described.

  20. Development of improved iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1992--31 March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.

    1992-04-24

    Three tests (two fixed bed and one stirred tank slurry reactor) were completed during the reporting period. Also, the work on catalyst characterization by different techniques (atomic absorption, BET surface area and pore size distribution and x-ray powder diffraction).The performance of a precipitated iron catalyst with nominal composition lOOFe/0.3Cu/0.8K has been evaluated in two fixed bed reactor tests designated FB-0142 and FB-0352 following pretreatment with syngas (H{sub 2}/CO=0.67) at 280{degree}C, 3Nl/g-cat/h and atomspheric pressure for 8 hours. Flow interruption occurred in the first test (FB-0142) at about 72h on stream, and the second test (FB-0352) was to assess any potential adverse effects of this flow interruption on performance of the catalyst. The catalyst was tested at 250{degree}C, 200 psig, 2Nl/g-cat/h using syngas of the same composition as that employed during the pretreatment. Initial conversions in both tests were high (about 84%) but the catalyst deactivated fairly rapidly. The (H{sub 2} + CO) conversion at the end of the first test (120h on stream) was about 52%, whereas the syngas conversion at the end of the second test (150h) was about 55%, indicating that the brief flow interruption during test FB-0142 had resulted in higher deactivation rate. Hydrocarbon selectivities in both tests were similar and their average values werr: (CH{sub 4})=4.7, (C{sub 2}{minus}C{sub 4})=19.5, (C{sub 5}{minus}C{sub 11})=25.3 and C{sub 12}{sup +}=50.5 wt%.

  1. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Mukesh, D.; Patel, S.A.; Zimmerman, W.H.; Rosynek, M.P.; Kellogg, L.J.

    1990-04-01

    This report describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating improved catalysts for a slurry Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process for converting synthesis gas to high quality transportation fuels (gasoline and distillate). The improvements in catalyst performance were sought by studying effects of pretreatment conditions, promoters and binders/supports. A total of 20 different, iron based, catalysts were evaluated in 58 fixed bed reactor tests and 10 slurry reactor tests. The major accomplishments and conclusions are summarized below. The pretreatment conditions (temperature, duration and the nature of reducing gas) have significant effect on catalyst performance (activity, selectivity and stability) during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. One of precipitated unsupported catalysts had hydrocarbon selectivity similar to Mobil`s I-B catalyst in high wax mode operation, and had not experienced any loss in activity during 460 hours of testing under variable process conditions in a slurry reactor. The effect of promoters (copper and potassium) on catalyst performance during FT synthesis has been studied in a systematic way. It was found that potassium promotion increases activities of the FT and water-gas-shift (WGS) reactions, the average molecular weight of hydrocarbon products, and suppresses the olefin hydrogenation and isomerization reactions. The addition of binders/supports (silica or alumina) to precipitated Fe/Cu/K catalysts, decreased their activity but improved their stability and hydrocarbon selectivity. The performance of catalysts of this type was very promising and additional studies are recommended to evaluate their potential for use in commercial slurry reactors.

  2. Moderated ruthenium fischer-tropsch synthesis catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, Hayim

    1991-01-01

    The subject Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprises moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation.

  3. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. [DOE patent

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Perkins, P.

    Novel compounds are described which are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  4. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Lech Nowicki; Jiang Wang; Wen-Ping Ma

    2003-09-29

    This report covers the first year of this three-year research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H{sup 2}O, CO{sub 2}, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the reporting period we have completed one STSR test with precipitated iron catalyst obtained from Ruhrchemie AG (Oberhausen-Holten, Germany). This catalyst was initially in commercial fixed bed reactors at Sasol in South Africa. The catalyst was tested at 13 different sets of process conditions, and had experienced a moderate deactivation during the first 500 h of testing (decrease in conversion from 56% to 50% at baseline process conditions). The second STSR test has been initiated and after 270 h on stream, the catalyst was tested at 6 different sets of process conditions.

  5. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir B. Bukur

    2004-09-29

    This report covers the second year of this three-year research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the second year of the project we completed the STSR test SB-26203 (275-343 h on stream), which was initiated during the first year of the project, and another STSR test (SB-28603 lasting 341 h). Since the inception of the project we completed 3 STSR tests, and evaluated catalyst under 25 different sets of process conditions. A precipitated iron catalyst obtained from Ruhrchemie AG (Oberhausen-Holten, Germany) was used in all tests. This catalyst was used initially in commercial fixed bed reactors at Sasol in South Africa. Also, during the second year we performed a qualitative analysis of experimental data from all three STSR tests. Effects of process conditions (reaction temperature, pressure, feed composition and gas space velocity) on water-gas-shift (WGS) activity and hydrocarbon product distribution have been determined.

  6. Fischer-Tropsch Wastewater Utilization

    DOEpatents

    Shah, Lalit S.

    2003-03-18

    The present invention is generally directed to handling the wastewater, or condensate, from a hydrocarbon synthesis reactor. More particularly, the present invention provides a process wherein the wastewater of a hydrocarbon synthesis reactor, such as a Fischer-Tropsch reactor, is sent to a gasifier and subsequently reacted with steam and oxygen at high temperatures and pressures so as to produce synthesis gas. The wastewater may also be recycled back to a slurry preparation stage, where solid combustible organic materials are pulverized and mixed with process water and the wastewater to form a slurry, after which the slurry fed to a gasifier where it is reacted with steam and oxygen at high temperatures and pressures so as to produce synthesis gas.

  7. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 4, June 26, 1991--September 26, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.

    1992-08-26

    The preparation of binderless iron oxide spheres has been achieved by a novel sol-gel forming procedure. The starting material is a solution of iron (III) 2-ethylhexanoate in mineral spirits. This solution is added dropwise to an ammoniacal solution of methanol. The low viscosity of the methanol causes the formation of small droplets of the iron solution. The immiscibility of the mineral spirit solution in the methanol and the difference in surface tensions cause the droplets to assume a spherical shape. The presence of ammonia and water at low levels in the methanol promotes the hydrolysis of the iron (III) 2-ethylhexanoate, which causes the spherical particles to harden. The iron-containing spheres can then be isolated by filtration. These spheres are the first ones reported to be made of 100% iron oxide and prepared without a binder. In the initial preparations, the spheres are 100 to 200{mu}m in diameter. Some problems remain to be resolved with this new method of preparation.

  8. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to explore the significance of a magnetic transition in an iron based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst that is active for the hydrogenation of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warringham, Robbie; McFarlane, Andrew R.; MacLaren, Donald A.; Webb, Paul B.; Tooze, Robert P.; Taylor, Jon; Ewings, Russell A.; Parker, Stewart F.; Lennon, David

    2015-11-01

    An iron based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst is evaluated using CO hydrogenation at ambient pressure as a test reaction and is characterised by a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), powder X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed oxidation, Raman scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The INS spectrum of the as-prepared bulk iron oxide pre-catalyst (hematite, α-Fe2O3) is distinguished by a relatively intense band at 810 cm-1, which has previously been tentatively assigned as a magnon (spinon) feature. An analysis of the neutron scattering intensity of this band as a function of momentum transfer unambiguously confirms this assignment. Post-reaction, the spinon feature disappears and the INS spectrum is characterised by the presence of a hydrocarbonaceous overlayer. A role for the application of INS in magnetic characterisation of iron based FTS catalysts is briefly considered.

  9. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to explore the significance of a magnetic transition in an iron based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst that is active for the hydrogenation of CO.

    PubMed

    Warringham, Robbie; McFarlane, Andrew R; MacLaren, Donald A; Webb, Paul B; Tooze, Robert P; Taylor, Jon; Ewings, Russell A; Parker, Stewart F; Lennon, David

    2015-11-01

    An iron based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst is evaluated using CO hydrogenation at ambient pressure as a test reaction and is characterised by a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), powder X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed oxidation, Raman scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The INS spectrum of the as-prepared bulk iron oxide pre-catalyst (hematite, α-Fe2O3) is distinguished by a relatively intense band at 810 cm(-1), which has previously been tentatively assigned as a magnon (spinon) feature. An analysis of the neutron scattering intensity of this band as a function of momentum transfer unambiguously confirms this assignment. Post-reaction, the spinon feature disappears and the INS spectrum is characterised by the presence of a hydrocarbonaceous overlayer. A role for the application of INS in magnetic characterisation of iron based FTS catalysts is briefly considered. PMID:26547178

  10. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to explore the significance of a magnetic transition in an iron based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst that is active for the hydrogenation of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Warringham, Robbie; McFarlane, Andrew R.; Lennon, David; MacLaren, Donald A.; Webb, Paul B.; Tooze, Robert P.; Taylor, Jon; Ewings, Russell A.; Parker, Stewart F.

    2015-11-07

    An iron based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst is evaluated using CO hydrogenation at ambient pressure as a test reaction and is characterised by a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), powder X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed oxidation, Raman scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The INS spectrum of the as-prepared bulk iron oxide pre-catalyst (hematite, α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is distinguished by a relatively intense band at 810 cm{sup −1}, which has previously been tentatively assigned as a magnon (spinon) feature. An analysis of the neutron scattering intensity of this band as a function of momentum transfer unambiguously confirms this assignment. Post-reaction, the spinon feature disappears and the INS spectrum is characterised by the presence of a hydrocarbonaceous overlayer. A role for the application of INS in magnetic characterisation of iron based FTS catalysts is briefly considered.

  11. Development of improved iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.

    1993-04-20

    The objective of proposed research is the development of catalysts with enhanced slurry phase activity and better selectivity to fuel range products, through a more detailed understanding and systematic studies of the effects of pretreatment procedures and promoters/binders (silica) on catalyst performance. Studies of both supported and unsupported iron/copper/potassium catalysts are presented.

  12. Development of improved iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.

    1993-07-15

    The objective of proposed research is the development of catalysts with enhanced slurry phase activity and better selectivity to fuel range products, through a more detailed understanding and systematic studies of the effects of pretreatment procedures and promoters/binders (silica) on catalyst performance. Studies of both supported and unsupported iron/copper/potassium catalysts are presented.

  13. Development of improved iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.

    1993-01-29

    The objective of proposed research is the development of catalysts with enhanced slurry phase activity and better selectivity to fuel range products, through a more detailed understanding and systematic studies of the effects of pretreatment procedures and promoters/binders (silica) on catalyst performance. Studies of both supported and unsupported iron/copper/potassium catalysts are presented.

  14. Development of improved iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.

    1992-07-15

    The objective of proposed research is the development of catalysts with enhanced slurry phase activity and better selectivity to fuel range products, through a more detailed understanding and systematic studies of the effects of pretreatment procedures and promoters/binders (silica) on catalyst performance. Studies of both supported and unsupported iron/copper/potassium catalysts are presented.

  15. Development of improved iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.

    1992-10-23

    The objective of proposed research is the development of catalysts with enhanced slurry phase activity and better selectivity to fuel range products, through a more detailed understanding and systematic studies of the effects of pretreatment procedures and promoters/binders (silica) on catalyst performance. Studies of both supported and unsupported iron/copper/potassium catalysts are presented.

  16. Development of improved iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.

    1993-10-21

    The objective of proposed research is the development of catalysts with enhanced slurry phase activity and better selectivity to fuel range products, through a more detailed understanding and systematic studies of the effects of pretreatment procedures and promoters/binders (silica) on catalyst performance. Studies of both supported and unsupported iron/copper/potassium catalysts are presented.

  17. Effect of process conditions on olefin selectivity during conventional and supercritical Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Lang, X.; Akgerman, A.; Feng, Z.

    1997-07-01

    A precipitated iron catalyst (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO{sub 2} on mass basis) was tested in a fixed-bed reactor under a variety of process conditions during conventional Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) and supercritical Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (SFTS). In both modes of operation it was found that: total olefin content decreases whereas 2-olefin content increases with either increase in conversion or H{sub 2}/CO molar feed ratio. Total olefin and 2-olefin selectivities were essentially independent of reaction temperature. The effect of conversion was more pronounced during conventional FTS. Comparison of olefin selectivities in the two modes of operation reveals that total olefin content is greater while the 2-olefin content is smaller during SFTS. Also, both the decrease in total olefin content and the increase in 2-olefin content with increase in carbon number (i.e., molecular weight of hydrocarbon products) was significantly less pronounced during SFTS in comparison to the conventional FTS. The obtained results suggest that 1-olefins, and to a smaller extent n-paraffins, are the primary products of FTS. Secondary reactions (isomerization, hydrogenation, and readsorption) of high molecular weight {alpha}-olefins occur to a smaller extent during SFTS, due to higher diffusivities and desorption rates of {alpha}-olefins in the supercritical propane than in the liquid-filled catalyst pores (conventional FTS).

  18. Fischer-Tropsch slurry phase process variations to understand wax formations: Quarterly report, January 1, 1988-March 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, C.N.

    1988-01-01

    A method has been developed for caluclating the three parameters needed to characterize the carbon number distribution of products of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. using non-linear regression, experiemental data are fit by a modified Schulz-Flory model which has two chain growth probabilities. Excellent fit is shown for data from precipitated and fused iron catalysts. The model is used to calculate selectivity information of interest in catalyst comparison and reactor design. Advantages of this model over asymptotic regression methods are discussed in detail. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Fischer-Tropsch slurry phase process variations to understand wax formation

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, C.N.; Hanlon, R.T.; Matsumoto, D.K.; Donnelly, T.J.; Yates, I.C.

    1989-10-01

    Use of a slurry-type reactor with an iron catalyst for Fischer- Tropsch synthesis from low H{sub 2}/CO syngas offers the potential advantages of excellent temperature control, flexibility in catalyst addition and removal and internal water gas shift. The most important likely process variations were studied to determine how they affect product selectivity. A C-73 reduced fused magnetite was used as a base-line catalyst since it is mechanically rugged and resistant to process upsets, but several precipitated iron catalysts were also studied and the performances of the various catalysts are compared. We have also developed an improved method of analyzing product distribution data. Information is provided on changes in product distribution during start-up, effect of water content, and correlations of these with composition of the iron catalyst as determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy. Methods of reliable performance testing in a slurry reactor are discussed. 26 refs., 27 figs.

  20. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this study was to investigate Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) in the supercritical phase employing a commercial precipitated iron catalysts. As the supercritical fluid the authors used propane and n-hexane. The catalyst had a nominal composition of 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO{sub 2} on mass basis and was used in a fixed bed reactor under both normal (conventional) and supercritical conditions. Experimental data were obtained at different temperatures (235 C, 250 C, and 260 C) and synthesis gas feed compositions (H{sub 2}/CO molar feed ratio of 0.67, 1.0 and 2.0) in both modes of operation under steady state conditions. The authors compared the performance of the precipitated iron catalyst in the supercritical phase, with the data obtained in gas phase (fixed bed reactor) and slurry phase (STS reactor). Comparisons were made in terms of bulk catalyst activity and various aspects of product selectivity (e.g. lumped hydrocarbon distribution and olefin content as a function of carbon number). In order to gain better understanding of the role of intraparticle mass transfer during FTS under conventional or supercritical conditions, the authors have measured diffusivities of representative hydrocarbon products in supercritical fluids, as well as their effective diffusion rates into the pores of catalyst at the reaction conditions. They constructed a Taylor dispersion apparatus to measure diffusion coefficients of hydrocarbon products of FTS in sub and supercritical ethane, propane, and hexane. In addition, they developed a tracer response technique to measure the effective diffusivities in the catalyst pores at the same conditions. Based on these results they have developed an equation for prediction of diffusion in supercritical fluids, which is based on the rough hard sphere theory.

  1. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1981-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  2. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1981-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula PS -R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS -H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS -Br; treating said PS -Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS -Li; substituting said PS - Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  3. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1980-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  4. Multicomponent modelling of Fischer-Tropsch slurry reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Van Vuuren, D.S.; Heydenrych, M.D.

    1985-08-01

    In the multicomponent model developed for a Fischer-Tropsch slurry reactor, the water-gas shift reaction is assumed to be in equilibrium. This is supported by literature data on iron-based catalysts above 523 K and synthesis gas conversion above about 50%. A Schulz-Flory product distribution is used. Investigation of the effects of back-mixing and interphase mass transfer using the model shows that, although the mass transfer rates in full-scale reactors are fast compared with reaction rates, the ratio of the mass transfer rates of reactants and products is important in determining gas velocity and gas hold-up and hence reactor performance.

  5. Novel Attrition-Resistant Fischer Tropsch Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Weast, Logan, E.; Staats, William, R.

    2009-05-01

    There is a strong national interest in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process because it offers the possibility of making liquid hydrocarbon fuels from reformed natural gas or coal and biomass gasification products. This project explored a new approach that had been developed to produce active, attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that are based on glass-ceramic materials and technology. This novel approach represented a promising solution to the problem of reducing or eliminating catalyst attrition and maximizing catalytic activity, thus reducing costs. The technical objective of the Phase I work was to demonstrate that glass-ceramic based catalytic materials for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis have resistance to catalytic deactivation and reduction of particle size superior to traditional supported Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials. Additionally, these novel glass-ceramic-based materials were expected to exhibit catalytic activity similar to the traditional materials. If successfully developed, the attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials would be expected to result in significant technical, economic, and social benefits for both producers and public consumers of Fischer-Tropsch products such as liquid fuels from coal or biomass gasification. This program demonstrated the anticipated high attrition resistance of the glass-ceramic materials. However, the observed catalytic activity of the materials was not sufficient to justify further development at this time. Additional testing documented that a lack of pore volume in the glass-ceramic materials limited the amount of surface area available for catalysis and consequently limited catalytic activity. However, previous work on glass-ceramic catalysts to promote other reactions demonstrated that commercial levels of activity can be achieved, at least for those reactions. Therefore, we recommend that glass-ceramic materials be considered again as potential Fischer-Tropsch catalysts if it can be

  6. Catalyst structure and method of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Yong; Vanderwiel, David P.; Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Gao, Yufei; Baker, Eddie G.

    2004-06-15

    The present invention includes Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, reactions using Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, methods of making Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, processes of hydrogenating carbon monoxide, and fuels made using these processes. The invention provides the ability to hydrogenate carbon monoxide with low contact times, good conversion rates and low methane selectivities. In a preferred method, the catalyst is made using a metal foam support.

  7. Catalyst structure and method of fischer-tropsch synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Vanderwiel, David P [Richland, WA; Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Baker, Eddie G [Pasco, WA

    2002-12-10

    The present invention includes Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, reactions using Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, methods of making Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, processes of hydrogenating carbon monoxide, and fuels made using these processes. The invention provides the ability to hydrogenate carbon monoxide with low contact times, good conversion rates and low methane selectivities. In a preferred method, the catalyst is made using a metal foam support.

  8. Fischer-Tropsch kinetic studies with cobalt-manganese oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, M.J.; Everson, R.C.; Espinoza, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to establish the reaction mechanism for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, in the presence of the water-gas shift reaction, over a cobalt-manganese oxide catalyst under conditions favoring the formation of gaseous, liquid, and solid (waxes) hydrocarbons (210--250 C and 6--26 bar). A micro-fixed-bed reactor was used with a cobalt-manganese oxide catalyst prepared by a coprecipitation method. An integral reactor model involving both Fischer-Tropsch and water-gas shift reaction kinetics was used to describe the overall performance. Reaction rate equations based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson models for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction (hydrocarbon forming) and empirical reaction rate equations for the water-gas shift reaction from the literature were tested. Different combinations of the reaction rate equation were evaluated with the aid of a nonlinear regression procedure. It was found that a reaction rate equation for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction based on the enolic theory performed slightly better than a reaction rate equation based on the carbide theory. Reaction rate constants for the cobalt-manganese oxide catalyst are reported, and it is concluded that this catalyst also behaves very much like iron-based catalysts.

  9. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis for clean transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, L.; Bao, S.; O`Brien, R.J.; Raje, A.; Davis, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    The products from the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and the rates of conversion of the reactants (H{sub 2} and CO) have been determined for a range of flow rates. Based upon conversion rates, an iron catalyst should be utilized at lower CO conversion levels. The fraction of CO converted to hydrocarbons decreases with increasing CO conversion. Thus, it is suggested that a F-T process employing recycle or multiple reactors is more appropriate for an iron catalyst than operating a single reactor at high (> 95%) CO conversion levels. The data indicate that an iron catalyst is preferred over a cobalt catalyst for some process conditions (e.g., high space velocity, high total pressure).

  10. F-T process using an iron on mixed zirconia-titania supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Paul N.; Nordquist, Andrew F.; Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising iron co-deposited with or deposited on particles comprising a mixture of zirconia and titania, preferably formed by co-precipitation of compounds convertible to zirconia and titania, such as zirconium and titanium alkoxide. The invention also comprises the method of making this catalyst and an improved Fischer-Tropsch reaction process in which the catalyst is utilized.

  11. Comparative study of oil-slurry process to fixed-bed process in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, T.; Kunugi, T.

    1982-01-01

    Differences between the oil-slurry process and the fixed-bed process on catalyst activity and C/sub 1/-C/sub 4/ product selectivity in the Fischer-Tropsch systhesis are described for a precipitated iron catalyst at reaction temperatures of 200 to 250/sup 0/C. Other reaction conditions used were those usually used for the two processes but were not the same for both processes. The data indicated that the catalyst activity is due to the presence of metallic iron suppresses the formation of CH/sub 4/ and favors the C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ hydrocarbon formation, and the experimental data preclude the formation of iron carbide for the oil-slurry process. An activation energy of 79.1kJ/mole was obtained at temperatures of 230 to 242/sup 0/C. (BLM)

  12. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Miller, James G.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1989-01-01

    A cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst having an improved steam treated, acid extracted LZ-210 support is taught. The new catalyst system demonstrates improved product selectivity at Fischer-Tropsch reaction conditions evidenced by lower methane production, higher C.sub.5.sup.+ yield and increased olefin production.

  13. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P. ); Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P. )

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  14. Development of process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P. ); Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P. )

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  15. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P. ); Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P. )

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  16. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P. ); Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P. )

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  17. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P. ); Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P. )

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst comparisons. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  18. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P. ); Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P. )

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  19. Development of improved iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. [Iron catalyst with nominal composition 100Fe/0. 3Cu/0. 8K

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.

    1992-04-24

    Three tests (two fixed bed and one stirred tank slurry reactor) were completed during the reporting period. Also, the work on catalyst characterization by different techniques (atomic absorption, BET surface area and pore size distribution and x-ray powder diffraction).The performance of a precipitated iron catalyst with nominal composition lOOFe/0.3Cu/0.8K has been evaluated in two fixed bed reactor tests designated FB-0142 and FB-0352 following pretreatment with syngas (H{sub 2}/CO=0.67) at 280{degree}C, 3Nl/g-cat/h and atomspheric pressure for 8 hours. Flow interruption occurred in the first test (FB-0142) at about 72h on stream, and the second test (FB-0352) was to assess any potential adverse effects of this flow interruption on performance of the catalyst. The catalyst was tested at 250{degree}C, 200 psig, 2Nl/g-cat/h using syngas of the same composition as that employed during the pretreatment. Initial conversions in both tests were high (about 84%) but the catalyst deactivated fairly rapidly. The (H{sub 2} + CO) conversion at the end of the first test (120h on stream) was about 52%, whereas the syngas conversion at the end of the second test (150h) was about 55%, indicating that the brief flow interruption during test FB-0142 had resulted in higher deactivation rate. Hydrocarbon selectivities in both tests were similar and their average values werr: (CH{sub 4})=4.7, (C{sub 2}{minus}C{sub 4})=19.5, (C{sub 5}{minus}C{sub 11})=25.3 and C{sub 12}{sup +}=50.5 wt%.

  20. Performance testing with a gas-liquid-solid system in a mechanically-stirred reactor: The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, T.J.; Satterfield, C.N.

    1987-01-01

    Careful attention to reactor operating procedures and methods of product trapping and analysis is required to obtain accurate and reliable data on selectivity and kinetics when a wide variety of products are formed. Useful methods are discussed in detail. The focus of attention is on use of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts studied in a well-mixed slurry reactor, but many of the findings apply to other catalysts and reactor systems used for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or to other reactions in which a complex mixture of products is formed. Some apparent discrepancies in the literature regarding catalyst activity and selectivity in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are explained by analysis of the pertinent experimental systems. 50 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Amino acids in a Fischer Tropsch type synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. L.; Lawless, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    One postulation is described for the presence of organic compounds in meteorites which states that they were formed during the condensation of the solar nebula. A viable laboratory simulation of these conditions can be modeled after the industrial Fischer Tropsch reaction, which is known to produce organic compounds called hydrocarbons. In this simulation, a mixture of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and ammonia is heated in the presence of iron meteorite. The reaction products for amino acids, a class of organic compounds important to life, were examined. A large number of these compounds is found in meteorites and other chemical evolution experiments, but only small quantities of a few amino acids were found in the present simulation work. These results are at odds with the existing literature in which many amino acids were reported.

  2. Liquid phase Fischer-Tropsch (II) demonstration in the Laporte Alternative Fuels Development Unit. Final topical report. Volume 7, Appendix. Task 1, Engineering modifications (Fischer-Tropsch II demonstration) and Task 2, AFDU shakedown, operations, deactivation and disposal (Fischer-Tropsch II demonstration)

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, B.L.

    1995-09-01

    This report presents results from a demonstration of Liquid Phase Fischer-Tropsch (LPFT) technology in DOE`s Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. The run was conducted in a bubble column at the AFDU in May--June 1994. The 10-day run demonstrated a very high level of reactor productivity for LPFT, more than five times the previously demonstrated productivity (1). The productivity was constrained by mass transfer limitations, perhaps due to slurry thickening as a result of carbon formation on the catalyst. With a cobalt catalyst or an improved iron catalyst, if the carbon formation can be avoided, there is significant room for further improvements. This volume contains appendices for: reactor temperature stability; Mott Cross-flow filter test for F-T II; Fischer-Tropsch II run authorizations; Fischer-Tropsch II run chronology; liquid compositions; and F-T II / IIA Demonstration Mass Balances.

  3. Product evaluation of Fischer-Tropsch derived fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Marano, J.J.; Rogers, S.; Choi, G.N.; Kramer, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 have placed stringent requirements on the quality of transportation fuels. Most petroleum refiners are scrambling to meet provisions of the Amendments to be implemented between 1995 and 2000. These requirements will also have significant implications for the production of alternative fuels. These have been examined for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) derived fuels. This analysis was conducted in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project, Baseline Design/Economics for Advanced Fischer-Tropsch Technology, conducted by Bechtel and Amoco. The goal of this study was to develop a baseline design for indirect liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal using gasification, syngas conversion in slurry reactors with iron catalysts, and conventional refinery upgrading of the F-T derived hydrocarbon liquids. One alternative case using ZSM-5 upgrading technology was also considered. This study included complete capital and operating cost estimates for the processes. To perform economic analyses for the different design cases, the products from the liquefaction plant had to be valued relative to conventional transportation fuels. This task was accomplished by developing a Linear Programming (LP) model for a typical midwest refinery, and then feeding the F-T liquids to the refinery. In this way, the breakeven value determined for these materials is indicative of the price they could command if available in the marketplace. Inputs to the LP model include: refinery size, configuration, feedstocks, products, specifications, prices, and operating and capital recovery costs. The model was set up to be representative of conditions anticipated for the turn of the century. This required inclusion of fuel specifications from the CAAA of 1990 which have or will come into force by the year 2000.

  4. Improved Sasol Fischer-Tropsch processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, B.

    1995-12-31

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes can be used to produce either a light syncrude and light olefins or to produce heavy waxy hydrocarbons. The syncrude can be refined to environmentally friendly gasoline and diesel and the heavy hydrocarbons to specialty waxes or if hydrocracked, and/or isomerized, to produce excellent diesel, lube oils and a naphtha which is ideal feedstock for cracking. Over the last few years much better reactor systems have been developed for both high temperature FT (HTFT) and low temperature FT (LTFT). For HTFT the Sasol Advanced Synthol (SAS) reactor with solid-gas fluidization was developed. This gives very much the same product spectra as the CFB reactors, but does it much more effectively and cheaply. For LTFT, the Sasol Slurry Phase Distillate (SSPD) reactor, of the bubble column type, was developed which is a significant improvement on the tubular fixed bed (TFB) reactor used in the Arge process. The SSPD reactor can make products with the same carbon distribution as the TFB reactor with Schulz-Flory distribution alpha values 0,95 and higher. It has greater flexibility with respect to product distribution. The paper describes both reactors, and the integration of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with coal gasification.

  5. Reoxidation and deactivation of supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Schanke, D.; Hilmen, A.M.; Bergene, E.

    1995-12-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is an attractive possibility for conversion of natural gas into high quality liquid fuels. Due to its low water-gas shift activity, good activity/selectivity properties and relatively low price, cobalt is the choice of catalytic metal for natural gas conversion via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. In the cobalt-catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch reaction, oxygen is mainly rejected as water. In this paper we describe the influence of water on supported cobalt catalysts. The deactivation of supported Co catalysts was studied in a fixed-bed reactor using synthesis gas feeds containing varying concentrations of water vapour.

  6. The optimally performing Fischer-Tropsch catalyst.

    PubMed

    Filot, Ivo A W; van Santen, Rutger A; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2014-11-17

    Microkinetics simulations are presented based on DFT-determined elementary reaction steps of the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction. The formation of long-chain hydrocarbons occurs on stepped Ru surfaces with CH as the inserting monomer, whereas planar Ru only produces methane because of slow CO activation. By varying the metal-carbon and metal-oxygen interaction energy, three reactivity regimes are identified with rates being controlled by CO dissociation, chain-growth termination, or water removal. Predicted surface coverages are dominated by CO, C, or O, respectively. Optimum FT performance occurs at the interphase of the regimes of limited CO dissociation and chain-growth termination. Current FT catalysts are suboptimal, as they are limited by CO activation and/or O removal. PMID:25168456

  7. Upgrading of light Fischer-Tropsch products

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, P.P.

    1990-11-30

    The upgrading of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) light ends was studied at UOP in a program sponsored by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program was to increase the overall yield of marketable transportation fuels from the F-T upgrading complex by focusing on liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and naphtha. An overview of the entire light-ends program is presented in this paper. Although this contract is specifically concerned with light products (C{sub 3}-C{sub 11}), a separate DOE-sponsored program at UOP investigated the characterization and upgrading of the heavy end of the F-T product spectrum: F-T wax. An economic analysis of the light and heavy ends upgrading was performed to evaluate the conversion of F-T products to marketable transportation fuels. 9 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. The role of Fischer-Tropsch catalysis in solar nebula chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Monika E.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysis, the iron/nickel catalyzed conversion of CO and H2 to hydrocarbons, would have been the only thermally-driven pathway available in the solar nebula to convert CO into other forms of carbon. A major issue in meteoritics is to determine the origin of meteoritic organics: are they mainly formed from CO in the solar nebula via a process such as Fischer-Tropsch, or are they derived from interstellar organics? In order to determine the role that Fischer-Tropsch catalysis may have played in the organic chemical evolution of the solar nebula, we have developed a kinetic model for this process. Our model results agree well with experimental data from several existing laboratory studies. In contrast, empirical rate equations, which have been derived from experimental rate data for a limited temperature (T) and pressure (P) range, are inconsistent with experimental rate data for higher T and lower P. We have applied our model to pressure and temperature profiles for the solar nebula, during the epoch in which meteorite parent bodies condensed and agglomerated. We find that, under nebular conditions, the conversion rate of CO to CH4 does not simply increase with temperature as the empirically-derived equations suggest. Instead, our model results show that this process would have been most efficient in a fairly narrow region that coincides with the present position of the asteroid belt. Our results support the hypothesis that Fischer-Tropsch catalysis may have played a role in solar nebula chemistry by converting CO into less volatile materials that can be much more readily processed in the nebula and in parent bodies.

  9. The role of Fischer Tropsch catalysis in the origin of methane-rich Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Yasuhito; Sugita, Seiji; Shido, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro; Kadono, Toshihiko; Matsui, Takafumi

    2005-11-01

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysis, which converts CO and H 2 into CH 4 on the surface of iron catalyst, has been proposed to produce the CH 4 on Titan during its formation process in a circum-planetary subnebula. However, Fischer-Tropsch reaction rate under the conditions of subnebula have not been measured quantitatively yet. In this study, we conduct laboratory experiments to determine CH 4 formation rate and also conduct theoretical calculation of clathrate formation to clarify the significance of Fischer-Tropsch catalysis in a subnebula. Our experimental result indicates that the range of conditions where Fischer-Tropsch catalysis proceeds efficiently is narrow ( T˜500-600 K) in a subnebula because the catalysts are poisoned at temperatures above 600 K under the condition of subnebula (i.e., H 2/CO = 1000). This suggests that an entire subnebula may not become rich in CH 4 but rather that only limited region of a subnebula may enriched in CH 4 (i.e., CH 4-rich band formation). Our experimental result also suggests that both CO and CO 2 are converted into CH 4 within time significantly shorter than the lifetime of the solar nebula at the optimal temperatures around 550 K. The calculation result of clathration shows that CO 2-rich satellitesimals are formed in the catalytically inactive outer region of subnebula. In the catalytically active inner region, CH 4-rich satellitesimals are formed. The resulting CH 4-rich satellitesimals formed in this region play an important role in the origin of CH 4 on Titan. When our experimental data are applied to a high-pressure model for subnebula evolution, it would predict that there should be CO 2 underneath the Iapetus subsurface and no thick CO 2 ice layer on Titan's icy crust. Such surface and subsurface composition, which may be observed by Cassini-Huygens mission, would provide crucial information on the origin of icy satellites.

  10. Nanoscale platinum and iron-cobalt catalysts deposited in microchannel microreactors for use in hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of cyclohexene, selective oxidation of carbon monoxide and Fischer-Tropsch process to higher alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shihuai

    reactions of enormous commercial potential: Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis, and preferential oxidation of CO in fuel cell. An over 50% conversion of CO and 78% selectivity to propane in F-T synthesis has been achieved. Meanwhile, a 70% conversion of CO and 80% selectivity to CO2 in preferential oxidation is reached in the fuel cell feed gas reaction. Statistical modeling studies were done using a Central Composite Design (CCD) to achieve the optimal condition (temperature 158°C, CO: O2 ratio 1.77 and total flow rate 0.207 sccm) for preferential oxidation of CO in fuel cells.

  11. Improved Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, G.T.; Wilson, R.B.; McCarty, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    The monoruthenium cluster catalyst with a molecular sieve support and the tetraruthenium cluster catalyst with a sodium-Y zeolite support have been examined for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) performance at high pressure (6.9 MPa) in a slurry reactor and compared with conventional ruthenium with an alumina support and clean fused iron catalysts. Of the four catalysts tested, only the conventional ruthenium catalyst exhibited a chain growth factor of 0.88 and a methane selectivity of 6.6%, which are typical of slurry reactor results reported for iron catalysts under similar conditions. The other three catalysts tested showed low chain growth factors (ranging from 0.44 to 0.57) and high methane selectivity (ranging from 20 to 32%). A cobalt catalyst with approximately 50% sulfur coverage was prepared and tested for FTS activity and selectivity at ambient pressure and compared with the FTS performance of the clean and fully sulfided cobalt catalysts. The introduction of sulfur caused a decrease in methane selectivity and an increase in olefin selectivity with only a moderate decline in activity. 1 ref., 2 tabs.

  12. INTEGRATED FISCHER TROPSCH MODULAR PROCESS MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Richard Boardman; Anastasia M. Gribik; Rick A. Wood; Robert A. Carrington

    2007-12-01

    With declining petroleum reserves, increased world demand, and unstable politics in some of the world’s richest oil producing regions, the capability for the U.S. to produce synthetic liquid fuels from domestic resources is critical to national security and economic stability. Coal, biomass and other carbonaceous materials can be converted to liquid fuels using several conversion processes. The leading candidate for large-scale conversion of coal to liquid fuels is the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. Process configuration, component selection, and performance are interrelated and dependent on feed characteristics. This paper outlines a flexible modular approach to model an integrated FT process that utilizes a library of key component models, supporting kinetic data and materials and transport properties allowing rapid development of custom integrated plant models. The modular construction will permit rapid assessment of alternative designs and feed stocks. The modeling approach consists of three thrust areas, or “strands” – model/module development, integration of the model elements into an end to end integrated system model, and utilization of the model for plant design. Strand 1, model/module development, entails identifying, developing, and assembling a library of codes, user blocks, and data for FT process unit operations for a custom feedstock and plant description. Strand 2, integration development, provides the framework for linking these component and subsystem models to form an integrated FT plant simulation. Strand 3, plant design, includes testing and validation of the comprehensive model and performing design evaluation analyses.

  13. Improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Tong, G.T.; Chan, Y.W.; Huang, H.W.; McCarty, J.G.

    1989-02-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS)reaction is the established technology for the production of liquid fuels from coal by an indirect route using coal-derived syngas (CO + H{sub 2}). Modern FTS catalysts are potassium- and copper-promoted iron preparations. These catalysts exhibit moderate activity with carbon monoxide-rich feedstocks such as the syngas produced by advanced coal gasification processes. However, the relatively large yields of by-product methane and high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes detract from the production of desired liquid products in the C{sub 5}-C{sub 16} range needed for motor and aviation fuel. The goal of this program is to decrease undesirable portions of the FTS hydrocarbon yield by altering the Schultz-Flory polymerization product distribution through design and formulation of improved catalysts. Two approaches were taken: (1) reducing the yield of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes by using highly dispersed catalysts produced from surface-confined multiatomic clusters on acid supports and (2) suppressing methane production by uniformly pretreating active, selective conventional FTS catalysts with submonolayer levels of sulfur.

  14. Development of process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 April--30 June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P.; Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P.

    1988-12-31

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  15. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October-31 December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P.; Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P.

    1987-12-31

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  16. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 July--30 September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P.; Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P.

    1988-12-31

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  17. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October--31 December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P.; Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P.

    1988-12-31

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  18. Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts for selective transportation fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, W.E.; Cilen, N.; Withers, H.P. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The future use of coal as a source of conventional transportation fuel will depend on the development of an economical and energy efficient liquefaction process. Technologies that have been commercially proven or that are close to commercialization include the fixed- and fluidized-bed Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, methanol synthesis (fixed-bed and slurry-phase) and the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline process. Of these technologies, the Fischer-Tropsch hydrocarbon synthesis produces the widest slate of products and has been in operation for the longest period.

  19. A new synthesis of carbon encapsulated Fe5C2 nanoparticles for high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seok Yong; Chun, Dong Hyun; Yang, Jung-Il; Jung, Heon; Lee, Ho-Tae; Hong, Sungjun; Jang, Sanha; Lim, Jung Tae; Kim, Chul Sung; Park, Ji Chan

    2015-10-28

    Using a simple thermal treatment under a CO flow, uniform micrometer-sized iron oxalate dihydrate cubes prepared by hydrothermal reaction were transformed into Fe5C2@C nanoparticles to form a mesoporous framework; the final structure was successfully applied to the high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch reaction and it showed high activity (CO conversion = 96%, FTY = 1.5 × 10(-4) molCO gFe(-1) s(-1)) and stability. PMID:26416550

  20. An exploratory program for using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, A.W.; Dosch, R.G.; Sault, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to investigate the potential of hydrous metal oxide (HMO) ion exchangers, invented at Sandia National Laboratories, as Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. Metals known to be active in F-T synthesis (e.g. Fe, Co) were ion exchanged on hydrous metal oxide supports. Although HMO catalysts based on Zr, Nb, and Ta have been investigated in direct coal liquefaction studies, this effect focused on formulations based on the hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) system. The program has the goals of developing a catalyst with (1) high activity, (2) selectively to fuel range or other useful products, and (3) better properties for use in slurry reactors. The program has three main tasks: (1) catalyst synthesis, to develop methods for preparing catalysts having desirable F-T properties, (2) characterization, to investigate catalysts proving to have desirable properties by a variety of analytical techniques to determine correlations between activity and material properties and (3) testing to determine activity and selectivity of catalysts. This paper discussed results of activity testing of Ruhrchemie catalyst and some catalyst formulations prepared using ion exchange on hydrous titanium oxide and precipitation. For example, at 250{degree}C the Ruhrchemie catalyst converts {approximately}50% of the syngas feed to reaction products. In comparison, iron catalysts prepared by ion exchange and precipitation had conversions ranging from 20 to 50% over a temperature range of 250 to 275{degree}C of the syngas feed. In addition, results are Auger surface analysis of Ruhrchemie catalyst are presented. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Fischer-Tropsch wax characterization and upgrading: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, P.P.; Sturtevant, G.C.; Gregor, J.H.; Humbach, M.J.; Padrta, F.G.; Steigleder, K.Z.

    1988-06-06

    The characterization and upgrading of Fischer-Tropsch wax was studied. The focus of the program was to maximize the yield of marketable transportation fuels from the Fischer-Tropsch process. The wax was characterized using gel permeation chromatography (GPC), high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), infrared spectroscopy (IR), gas chromatography (GC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and various other physical analyses. Hydrocracking studies conducted in a pilot plant indicate that Fischer-Tropsch wax is an excellent feedstock. A high yield of excellent quality diesel fuel was produced with satisfactory catalyst performance at relatively mild operating conditions. Correlations for predicting key diesel fuel properties were developed and checked against actual laboratory blend data. The blending study was incorporated into an economic evaluation. Finally, it is possible to take advantage of the high quality of the Fischer-Tropsch derived distillate by blending a lower value light cycle oil (produced from a refinery FCC unit) representing a high aromatic and low cetane number. The blended stream meets diesel pool specifications (up to 60 wt % LCO addition). The value added to this blending stream further enhances the upgrading complex return. 22 refs., 39 figs., 48 tabs.

  2. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Miller, James G.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1989-01-01

    The promoter(s) Mn oxide or Mn oxide and Zr oxide are added to a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst combined with the molecular sieve TC-103 or TC-123 such that the resultant catalyst demonstrates improved product selectivity, stability and catalyst life. The improved selectivity is evidenced by lower methane production, higher C5+ yield and increased olefin production.

  3. Process for upgrading wax from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Derr, Jr., W. Rodman; Garwood, William E.; Kuo, James C.; Leib, Tiberiu M.; Nace, Donald M.; Tabak, Samuel A.

    1987-01-01

    The waxy liquid phase of an oil suspension of Fischer-Tropsch catalyst containing dissolved wax is separated out and the wax is converted by hydrocracking, dewaxing or by catalytic cracking with a low activity catalyst to provide a highly olefinic product which may be further converted to premium quality gasoline and/or distillate fuel.

  4. Process for upgrading wax from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Derr, W.R. Jr.; Garwood, W.E.; Kuo, J.C.; Leib, T.M.; Nace, D.M.; Tabak, S.A.

    1987-08-04

    The waxy liquid phase of an oil suspension of Fischer-Tropsch catalyst containing dissolved wax is separated out and the wax is converted by hydrocracking, dewaxing or by catalytic cracking with a low activity catalyst to provide a highly olefinic product which may be further converted to premium quality gasoline and/or distillate fuel. 2 figs.

  5. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process employing a moderated ruthenium catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, Hayim

    1990-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch type process produces hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using a novel catalyst comprising moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation.

  6. Simulation models and designs for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, G.N.; Kramer, S.J.; Tam, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    Process designs and economics were developed for three grass-roots indirect Fischer-Tropsch coal liquefaction facilities. A baseline and an alternate upgrading design were developed for a mine-mouth plant located in southern Illinois using Illinois No. 6 coal, and one for a mine-mouth plane located in Wyoming using Power River Basin coal. The alternate design used close-coupled ZSM-5 reactors to upgrade the vapor stream leaving the Fischer-Tropsch reactor. ASPEN process simulation models were developed for all three designs. These results have been reported previously. In this study, the ASPEN process simulation model was enhanced to improve the vapor/liquid equilibrium calculations for the products leaving the slurry bed Fischer-Tropsch reactors. This significantly improved the predictions for the alternate ZSM-5 upgrading design. Another model was developed for the Wyoming coal case using ZSM-5 upgrading of the Fischer-Tropsch reactor vapors. To date, this is the best indirect coal liquefaction case. Sensitivity studies showed that additional cost reductions are possible.

  7. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process employing a moderated ruthenium catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, H.

    1990-07-31

    A Fischer-Tropsch type process produces hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using a novel catalyst comprising moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation. 1 fig.

  8. Alternative Fuel Research in Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Angela D.; Klettlinger, Jennifer L.; Yen, Chia H.; Nakley, Leah M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has recently constructed an Alternative Fuels Laboratory which is solely being used to perform Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reactor studies, novel catalyst development and thermal stability experiments. Facility systems have demonstrated reliability and consistency for continuous and safe operations in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The purpose of this test facility is to conduct bench scale Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst screening experiments while focusing on reducing energy inputs, reducing CO2 emissions and increasing product yields within the F-T process. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is considered a gas to liquid process which reacts syn-gas (a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), over the surface of a catalyst material which is then converted into liquids of various hydrocarbon chain length and product distributions1. These hydrocarbons can then be further processed into higher quality liquid fuels such as gasoline and diesel. The experiments performed in this laboratory will enable the investigation of F-T reaction kinetics to focus on newly formulated catalysts, improved process conditions and enhanced catalyst activation methods. Currently the facility has the capability of performing three simultaneous reactor screening tests, along with a fourth fixed-bed reactor used solely for cobalt catalyst activation.

  9. Segregation of Fischer-Tropsch reactants on cobalt nanoparticle surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E A; Le, D; Jewell, A D; Murphy, C J; Rahman, T S; Sykes, E C H

    2014-06-21

    Using scanning tunnelling microscopy, we have visualized the segregation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, the two reactants in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, on cobalt nanoparticles at catalytically relevant coverages. Density functional theory was used to interrogate the relevant energetics. PMID:24825772

  10. Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.M.; Quiring, M.S.; Jensen, K.L.; Hickey, R.F.; Gillham, L.D.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes a process for the separation of catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The separation is accomplished by extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic. The purified catalyst can be upgraded by various methods.

  11. BASELINE DESIGN/ECONOMICS FOR ADVANCED FISCHER-TROPSCH TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Bechtel, along with Amoco as the main subcontractor, developed a Baseline design, two alternative designs, and computer process simulation models for indirect coal liquefaction based on advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology for the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC).

  12. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical reaction media

    SciTech Connect

    Subramaniam, B.; Bochniak, D.; Snavely, K.

    1993-01-01

    Our goals for this quarter were to complete construction of the reactor and analytical units for carrying out Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in liquid (n-hexadecane) and in supercritical n-hexane phases. Progress during this quarter was slower than expected.

  13. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in slurry-reactor systems. Quarterly report, August 1, 1981-October 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, C.N.; Bartos, T.; Huff, G.A. Jr.; Stenger, H.

    1981-01-01

    A large quantity of data were obtained with the fused iron catalyst under intrinsic kinetic conditions, covering for the first time 50 and 200 psi. These data are being analyzed for information about overall rates and product selectivity. Preliminary conclusions about a rate model are presented. Study of the effects of suspended solids on gas-liquid mass transfer was started. Most previous information is on aqueous systems, which is not readily translatable into predicted effects in organic liquids such as Fischer-Tropsch liquids. The most promising and useful method at present appears to be a chemical method based on absorption of CO/sub 2/ into an organic solution of an amine. A paper on a stirred-autoclave apparatus for studying the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bed in included.

  14. Fischer-Tropsch slurry phase process variations. Quarterly report, April 1-June 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, C.N.; Hanlon, R.; Matsumoto, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    In studies at 232/sup 0/C and 248/sup 0/C and 0.92 MPa, during the first 20 hours on stream, both Fischer-Tropsch synthesis activity and CO consumption increased to quasi-steady-state values. The bulk catalyst, initially ..cap alpha..-Fe, was converted to a mixture of ..cap alpha..-Fe and iron carbides, as determined by Moessbauer spectroscopy. During the first few hours, methane selectivity decreased markedly while the olefin/paraffin ratio increased. No change was observed in the C/sub 2/-C/sub 8/ product distribution with time on stream. When an industrial iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst is first put on stream some 20 to 40 hours may elapse before its activity and selectivity approach steady-state conditions and during this time the phases present in the catalyst usually change markedly. The present study used a fused triply-promoted magnetite catalyst, sold for use in ammonia synthesis, which is very similar to one of the kinds of iron catalyst used industrially at SASOL in South Africa. It was completely reduced initially. Reaction was carried out in semi-continuous fashion in a well-stirred 1-litter autoclave. We were particularly concerned with studying the activity and selectivity of this catalyst as it approached steady-state behavior and determining if this correlated with the phases present in the catalyst as determined by Moessbauer spectroscopy. 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Development of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1995--31 March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Lang, X.; Reddy, B.

    1995-05-23

    During the reporting period we completed synthesis of about 100 g of catalyst with nominal composition 100 Fe/3 Cu/4 K/16 SiO{sub 2} (S-3416-2), and of another batch (173 g) of the same catalyst (S-3416-3). Also, we synthesized two additional batches of catalyst with nominal composition 100 Fe/5 Cu/6 K/24 SiO{sub 2}, in the amounts of 240 g (S-5624-3) and 200 g (S-5624-4). These amounts are sufficient for all planned tests with these two catalysts for the entire duration of this contract. The synthesized catalysts were characterized by atomic absorption, and BET surface area and pore size distribution measurements.

  16. Development of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 July 1995--30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.

    1995-12-20

    The following accomplishments were made on task 4. Reproducibility of Catalyst Preparation: (1) Five slurry reactor tests were completed. Three tests were conducted using catalyst C (100 Fe/3 Cu/4 K/16 SiO{sub 2}) from three different batches (runs SB-2695, SB-2145 and SA-2715), and two tests were conducted with catalyst B (100 Fe/5 Cu/6 K/24 SiO{sub 2}) from two different preparation batches (runs SA-2615 and SB-2585). Performance of catalysts from different batches (activity, selectivity and deactivation rates) was similar to that of catalysts from the original batch (synthesized during DOE Contract DE- AC22-89PC89868). Thus, another major objective of the present contract, demonstration of reproducibility of catalyst preparation procedure and performance, has been accomplished. With these tests the work on Task 4 has been successfully completed. Two fixed bed reactor tests of catalysts B and C synthesized using potassium silicate solution as the source of potassium promoter were completed during this period (Task 5. The Effect of Source of Potassium and Basic Oxide Promoter). Activity of catalysts prepared using potassium silicate as the source of potassium promotion was somewhat higher, and their methane selectivities were higher than those of the corresponding catalysts prepared by incipient wetness impregnation using KHCO{sub 3} as the source of potassium promoter. However, these differences were not large, and may have been caused by experimental artifacts (e.g. existence of local hot spots in a reactor). A slurry reactor test (SA-2405) of catalyst with nominal composition 100 Fe/5 Cu/2 Ca/24 SiO{sub 2} was completed (Task 5). In general, the catalyst activity, space-time-yield, and hydrocarbon selectivities in this run during testing at:260{degrees}C, 2.17 MPa (300 psig), 2-2.6 Nl/g-cat/h and H{sub 2}CO=0.67 were quite good, and comparable to the best results obtained in our Laboratory.

  17. Attrition resistant bulk iron catalysts and processes for preparing and using same

    DOEpatents

    Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy; Goodwin, Jr., James G.; Gangwal, Santosh K.

    2007-08-21

    An attrition resistant precipitated bulk iron catalyst is prepared from iron oxide precursor and a binder by spray drying. The catalysts are preferably used in carbon monoxide hydrogenation processes such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. These catalysts are suitable for use in fluidized-bed reactors, transport reactors and, especially, slurry bubble column reactors.

  18. Metal organic framework-mediated synthesis of highly active and stable Fischer-Tropsch catalysts.

    PubMed

    Santos, Vera P; Wezendonk, Tim A; Jaén, Juan José Delgado; Dugulan, A Iulian; Nasalevich, Maxim A; Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Chojecki, Adam; Sartipi, Sina; Sun, Xiaohui; Hakeem, Abrar A; Koeken, Ard C J; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Davidian, Thomas; Meima, Garry R; Sankar, Gopinathan; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Depletion of crude oil resources and environmental concerns have driven a worldwide research on alternative processes for the production of commodity chemicals. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process for flexible production of key chemicals from synthesis gas originating from non-petroleum-based sources. Although the use of iron-based catalysts would be preferred over the widely used cobalt, manufacturing methods that prevent their fast deactivation because of sintering, carbon deposition and phase changes have proven challenging. Here we present a strategy to produce highly dispersed iron carbides embedded in a matrix of porous carbon. Very high iron loadings (>40 wt %) are achieved while maintaining an optimal dispersion of the active iron carbide phase when a metal organic framework is used as catalyst precursor. The unique iron spatial confinement and the absence of large iron particles in the obtained solids minimize catalyst deactivation, resulting in high active and stable operation. PMID:25740709

  19. Metal organic framework-mediated synthesis of highly active and stable Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Vera P.; Wezendonk, Tim A.; Jaén, Juan José Delgado; Dugulan, A. Iulian; Nasalevich, Maxim A.; Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Chojecki, Adam; Sartipi, Sina; Sun, Xiaohui; Hakeem, Abrar A.; Koeken, Ard C. J.; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Davidian, Thomas; Meima, Garry R.; Sankar, Gopinathan; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Depletion of crude oil resources and environmental concerns have driven a worldwide research on alternative processes for the production of commodity chemicals. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process for flexible production of key chemicals from synthesis gas originating from non-petroleum-based sources. Although the use of iron-based catalysts would be preferred over the widely used cobalt, manufacturing methods that prevent their fast deactivation because of sintering, carbon deposition and phase changes have proven challenging. Here we present a strategy to produce highly dispersed iron carbides embedded in a matrix of porous carbon. Very high iron loadings (>40 wt %) are achieved while maintaining an optimal dispersion of the active iron carbide phase when a metal organic framework is used as catalyst precursor. The unique iron spatial confinement and the absence of large iron particles in the obtained solids minimize catalyst deactivation, resulting in high active and stable operation.

  20. The role of zeolite in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over cobalt-zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sineva, L. V.; Asalieva, E. Yu; Mordkovich, V. Z.

    2015-11-01

    The review deals with the specifics of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis for the one-stage syncrude production from CO and H2 in the presence of cobalt-zeolite catalytic systems. Different types of bifunctional catalysts (hybrid, composite) combining a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and zeolite are reviewed. Special attention focuses on the mechanisms of transformations of hydrocarbons produced in the Fischer-Tropsch process on zeolite acid sites under the synthesis conditions. The bibliography includes 142 references.

  1. Compression-ignition fuel properties of Fischer-Tropsch syncrude

    SciTech Connect

    Suppes, G.J.; Terry, J.G.; Burkhart, M.L.; Cupps, M.P.

    1998-05-01

    Fischer-Tropsch conversion of natural gas to liquid hydrocarbon fuel typically includes Fischer-Tropsch synthesis followed by refining (hydrocracking and distillation) of the syncrude into mostly diesel or kerosene with some naphtha (a feedstock for gasoline production). Refining is assumed necessary, possibly overlooking the exception fuel qualities of syncrude for more direct utilization as a compression-ignition (CI) fuel. This paper evaluates cetane number, viscosity, cloud-point, and pour-point properties of syncrude and blends of syncrude with blend stocks such as ethanol and diethyl ether. The results show that blends comprised primarily of syncrude are potentially good CI fuels, with pour-point temperature depression being the largest development obstacle. The resulting blends may provide a much-needed and affordable alternative CI fuel. Particularly good market opportunities exist with Environmental Policy Act (EPACT) applications.

  2. Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry

    DOEpatents

    White, Curt M.; Quiring, Michael S.; Jensen, Karen L.; Hickey, Richard F.; Gillham, Larry D.

    1998-10-27

    In a catalytic process for converting synthesis gas including hydrogen and carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons and oxygenates by a slurry Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, the wax product along with dispersed catalyst is removed from the slurry and purified by removing substantially all of the catalyst prior to upgrading the wax and returning a portion to the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Separation of the catalyst particles from the wax product is accomplished by dense gas and/or liquid extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic in nature. The purified catalyst free wax product can be subsequently upgraded by various methods such as hydrogenation, isomerization, hydrocracking, conversion to gasoline and other products over ZSM-5 aluminosilicate zeolite, etc. The catalyst particles are returned to the Fischer-Tropsch Reactor by slurring them with a wax fraction of appropriate molecular weight, boiling point and viscosity to avoid reactor gelation.

  3. Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry

    DOEpatents

    White, C.M.; Quiring, M.S.; Jensen, K.L.; Hickey, R.F.; Gillham, L.D.

    1998-10-27

    In a catalytic process for converting synthesis gas including hydrogen and carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons and oxygenates by a slurry Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, the wax product along with dispersed catalyst is removed from the slurry and purified by removing substantially all of the catalyst prior to upgrading the wax and returning a portion to the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Separation of the catalyst particles from the wax product is accomplished by dense gas and/or liquid extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic in nature. The purified catalyst-free wax product can be subsequently upgraded by various methods such as hydrogenation, isomerization, hydrocracking, conversion to gasoline and other products over ZSM-5 aluminosilicate zeolite, etc. The catalyst particles are returned to the Fischer-Tropsch Reactor by mixing them with a wax fraction of appropriate molecular weight, boiling point and viscosity to avoid reactor gelation. 2 figs.

  4. Emissions from Trucks using Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Brent Bailey; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

    1998-10-19

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process can be used to synthesize diesel fuels from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuels may also be economically competitive with California B- diesel fuel if produced in large volumes. overview of Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel production and engine emissions testing is presented. Previous engine laboratory tests indicate that F-T diesel is a promising alternative fuel because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and substantial exhaust emissions reductions can be realized. The authors have performed preliminary tests to assess the real-world performance of F-T diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks. Seven White-GMC Class 8 trucks equipped with Caterpillar 10.3 liter engines were tested using F-T diesel fuel. Vehicle emissions tests were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The trucks were found to perform adequately on neat F-T diesel fuel. Compared to a California diesel fuel baseline, neat F-T diesel fuel emitted about 12% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 24% lower particulate matter over a five-mile driving cycle.

  5. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYSTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski

    2005-09-29

    This report covers the third year of this research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the reporting period we utilized experimental data from the STSR, that were obtained during the first two years of the project, to perform vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) calculations and estimate kinetic parameters. We used a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS) with estimated values of binary interaction coefficients for the VLE calculations. Calculated vapor phase compositions were in excellent agreement with experimental values from the STSR under reaction conditions. Occasional discrepancies (for some of the experimental data) between calculated and experimental values of the liquid phase composition were ascribed to experimental errors. The VLE calculations show that the vapor and the liquid are in thermodynamic equilibrium under reaction conditions. Also, we have successfully applied the Levenberg-Marquardt method (Marquardt, 1963) to estimate parameters of a kinetic model proposed earlier by Lox and Froment (1993b) for FTS on an iron catalyst. This kinetic model is well suited for initial studies where the main goal is to learn techniques for parameter estimation and statistical analysis of estimated values of model parameters. It predicts that the chain growth parameter ({alpha}) and olefin to paraffin ratio are independent of carbon number, whereas our experimental data show that they vary with the carbon number

  6. The development of precipitated iron catalysts with improved stability

    SciTech Connect

    Abrevaya, H.

    1992-05-06

    The objective of this program is to identify the chemical principles governing the deactivation of precipitated iron catalysts during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and to use these chemical principles in the design of catalysts suitable for slurry reactors. The performance targets are 88% CO+H{sub 2} conversion with less than 1% deactivation/day for 1 month and a methane and ethane selectivity of no more than 7% (based on hydrocarbons and oxygenates only) at a space velocity of at least 2 normal liters per hr per gram iron (NL/hr/gFe) using a synthesis gas with 0.5-1.0 H{sub 2}:CO ratio in a slurry reactor.

  7. An experimental study on Fischer-Tropsch catalysis: Implications for impact phenomena and nebular chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Yasuhito; Sugita, Seiji; Shido, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro; Kadono, Toshihiko; Matsui, Takafumi

    2006-05-01

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysis, by which CO and H2 are converted to CH4 on the surface of transition metals, has been considered to be one of the most important chemical reactions in many planetary processes, such as the formation of the solar and circumplanetary nebulae, the expansion of vapor clouds induced by cometary impacts, and the atmospheric re-entry of vapor condensate due to asteroidal impacts. However, few quantitative experimental studies have been conducted for the catalytic reaction under conditions relevant to these planetary processes. In this study, we conduct Fischer-Tropsch catalytic experiments at low pressures (1.3 × 10-4 bar ≤ P ≤ 5.3 × 10 -1 bar) over a wide range of H2/CO ratios (0.25-1000) using pure iron, pure nickel, and iron-nickel alloys. We analyze what gas species are produced and measure the CH4 formation rate. Our results indicate that the CH4 formation rate for iron catalysts strongly depends on both pressure and the H2/CO ratio, and that nickel is a more efficient catalyst at lower pressures and lower H2/CO ratios. This difference in catalytic properties between iron and nickel may come from the reaction steps concerning disproportionation of CO, hydrogenation of surface carbon, and the poisoning of the catalyst. These results suggest that nickel is important in the atmospheric re-entry of impact condensate, while iron is efficient in circumplanetary subnebulae. Our results also indicate that previous numerical models of iron catalysis based on experimental data at 1 bar considerably overestimate CH4 formation efficiency at lower pressures, such as the solar nebula and the atmospheric re-entry of impact condensate.

  8. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski

    2006-09-29

    This report covers the fourth year of a research project conducted under the University Coal Research Program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) employing iron-based catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred-tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (water, carbon dioxide, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the fourth year of the project, an analysis of experimental data collected during the second year of this project was performed. Kinetic parameters were estimated utilizing product distributions from 27 mass balances. During the reporting period two kinetic models were employed: a comprehensive kinetic model of Dr. Li and co-workers (Yang et al., 2003) and a hydrocarbon selectivity model of Van der Laan and Beenackers (1998, 1999) The kinetic model of Yang et al. (2003) has 24 parameters (20 parameters for hydrocarbon formation, and 4 parameters for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction). Kinetic parameters for the WGS reaction and FTS synthesis were estimated first separately, and then simultaneously. The estimation of these kinetic parameters employed the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method and the trust-region reflective Newton large-scale (LS) method. A genetic algorithm (GA) was incorporated into estimation of parameters for FTS reaction to provide initial estimates of model parameters. All reaction rate constants and activation energies were found to be positive, but at the 95% confidence level the intervals were large. Agreement between predicted and experimental reaction rates has been fair to good. Light hydrocarbons are predicted fairly accurately, whereas the model underpredicts values of higher molecular weight

  9. 40 CFR 721.10178 - Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10178 Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as distillates (Fischer-Tropsch),...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  15. Trapping Planetary Noble Gases During the Fischer-Tropsch-Type Synthesis of Organic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, N. M.; Meshik, A.

    2010-01-01

    When hydrogen, nitrogen and CO arc exposed to amorphous iron silicate surfaces at temperatures between 500 - 900K, a carbonaceous coating forms via Fischer-Tropsch type reactions!, Under normal circumstances such a catalytic coating would impede or stop further reaction. However, we find that this coating is a better catalyst than the amorphous iron silicates that initiate these rcactions:u . The formation of a self-perpetuating catalytic coating on grain surfaces could explain the rich deposits of macromolecular carbon found in primitive meteorites and would imply that protostellar nebulae should be rich in organic materiaL Many more experiments are needed to understand this chemical system and its application to protostellar nebulae.

  16. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. [Tenth] quarterly technical progress report, 1 January--31 March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P.; Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P.

    1989-12-31

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  17. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, 1 January--31 March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P.; Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P.

    1988-12-31

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst comparisons. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  18. Microkinetics of oxygenate formation in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction.

    PubMed

    van Santen, Rutger A; Ghouri, Minhaj; Hensen, Emiel M J

    2014-06-01

    Microkinetics simulations are presented on the intrinsic activity and selectivity of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction with respect to the formation of long chain oxygenated hydrocarbons. Two different chain growth mechanisms are compared: the carbide chain growth mechanism and the CO insertion chain growth mechanism. The microkinetics simulations are based on quantum-chemical data on reaction rate parameters of the elementary reaction steps of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction available in the literature. Because the overall rate constant of chain growth remains too low the CO insertion chain growth mechanism is not found to produce higher hydrocarbons, except for ethylene and acetaldehyde or the corresponding hydrogenated products. According to the carbide mechanism available quantum-chemical data are consistent with high selectivity to long chain oxygenated hydrocarbon production at low temperature. The anomalous initial increase with temperature of the chain growth parameter observed under such conditions is reproduced. It arises from the competition between the apparent rate of C-O bond activation to produce "CHx" monomers to be inserted into the growing hydrocarbon chain and the rate of chain growth termination. The microkinetics simulations data enable analysis of selectivity changes as a function of critical elementary reaction rates such as the rate of activation of the C-O bond of CO, the insertion rate of CO into the growing hydrocarbon chain or the rate constant of methane formation. Simulations show that changes in catalyst site reactivity affect elementary reaction steps differently. This has opposing consequences for oxygenate production selectivity, so an optimizing compromise has to be found. The simulation results are found to be consistent with most experimental data available today. It is concluded that Fischer-Tropsch type catalysis has limited scope to produce long chain oxygenates with high yield, but there is an opportunity to improve the yield of C2

  19. Catalyst and reactor development for a liquid phase Fischer-Tropsch process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The preparation, characterization, and performance of a range of metal catalysts for use in slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch technology was investigated with the objective of developing new compositions with improved selectivity for gasoline and diesel fuel range hydrocarbons. A series of conventional catalysts was identified for testing for both gas and slurry phases. A gas phase screening protocol was set up to allow reasonably rapid determination of each catalyst's synthesis gas conversion characteristic over a range of operating conditions. The catalysts selected represented a range of catalytic metals known to promote conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbon liquids. Both precipitates and supported variations of these metals were studied. Catalysts studied include: ruthenium-based catalysts with osmium, and cobalt carbonyl supported on zirconia promoted. 23 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Chanenchuk, C.A.; Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments to study the cobalt-catalyzed and iron-catalyzed reactions of light 1-alkenes added to synthesis gas have been performed and analyzed. On cobalt, data have been obtained at 220{degrees}C, 0.45 to 1.48 MPA and a synthesis gas flow rate between 0.015 and 0.030 Nl/gcat/min with H{sub 2}/CO feeds of 1.45 to 2.25. On fused iron, data were collected at 248{degrees}C, 0.79 to 1.48 MPa and a synthesis gas flow rate between 0.005 and 0.030 Nl/gcat/min of H{sub 2}/CO feeds of 0.5 to 1.5 C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 3}H{sub 6}, and 1-C{sub 4}H{sub 8} were added to the synthesis gas feed in concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 1.2 mol. % of total feed. 1-Alkenes incorporate into growing chains on the catalyst surface of both catalysts, probably by initiating and/or terminating the chain growth process. Only ethene is believed to propagate chain growth significantly. The propensity of the 1-alkenes to incorporate decreases with increasing carbon number of the 1-alkene. The double-{alpha} behavior which is exhibited by most Fischer-Tropsch catalysts can be explained as the sum of two growth processes, one stepwise single-carbon growth and the other 1-alkene incorporation. Both alkene addition study data and the effects of process variables on the selectivity of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts can be explained within the framework of this theory. 19 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Mechanism and microkinetics of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction.

    PubMed

    van Santen, R A; Markvoort, A J; Filot, I A W; Ghouri, M M; Hensen, E J M

    2013-10-28

    The increasing availability of quantum-chemical data on surface reaction intermediates invites one to revisit unresolved mechanistic issues in heterogeneous catalysis. One such issue of particular current interest is the molecular basis of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Here we review current molecular understanding of this reaction that converts synthesis gas into longer hydrocarbons where we especially elucidate recent progress due to the contributions of computational catalysis. This perspective highlights the theoretical approach to heterogeneous catalysis that aims for kinetic prediction from quantum-chemical first principle data. Discussion of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction from this point of view is interesting because of the several mechanistic options available for this reaction. There are many proposals on the nature of the monomeric single C atom containing intermediate that is inserted into the growing hydrocarbon chain as well as on the nature of the growing hydrocarbon chain itself. Two dominant conflicting mechanistic proposals of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction that will be especially compared are the carbide mechanism and the CO insertion mechanism, which involve cleavage of the C-O bond of CO before incorporation of a CHx species into the growing hydrocarbon chain (the carbide mechanism) or after incorporation into the growing hydrocarbon chain (the CO insertion mechanism). The choice of a particular mechanism has important kinetic consequences. Since it is based on molecular information it also affects the structure sensitivity of this particular reaction and hence influences the choice of catalyst composition. We will show how quantum-chemical information on the relative stability of relevant reaction intermediates and estimates of the rate constants of corresponding elementary surface reactions provides a firm foundation to the kinetic analysis of such reactions and allows one to discriminate between the different mechanistic options. The paper will

  2. Deactivation of slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, R.J.; Zarochak, M.F.; Deffenbaugh, P.W.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

    1996-12-31

    The influence of the liquid medium on Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) chemistry has received only minimal attention in the literature. The focus of this investigation was to determine the impact of the liquid starting medium on syngas (H{sub 2}+CO) conversion in a 1-liter CSTR. The results of the work indicate a greater deactivation rate for the F-T reaction in heavier starting media, average carbon number {ge}48, versus a medium with an average carbon number of 28.

  3. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

    1997-10-31

    The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for the recovery and fractionation of the wax product from the slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. The wax, comprised mostly of branched and linear alkanes with a broad molecular weight distribution up to C{sub 100}, will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent.

  4. Studying Fischer-Tropsch catalysts using transmission electron microscopy and model systems of nanoparticles on planar supports.

    SciTech Connect

    Thune, P. C.; Weststrate, C. J.; Moodley, P.; Saib, A. M.; van de Loosdrecht, J.; Miller, J. T.; Niemantsverdriet, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle model systems on planar supports form a versatile platform for studying morphological and compositional changes of catalysts due to exposure to realistic reaction conditions. We review examples from our work on iron and cobalt catalysts, which can undergo significant rearrangement in the reactive environment of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The use of specially designed, silicon based supports with thin film SiO{sub 2} enables the application of transmission electron microscopy, which has furnished important insight into e.g. the mechanisms of catalyst regeneration.

  5. Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer Tropsch

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelin, G.

    1991-02-28

    The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction. The three routes to be investigated are: addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch; addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst; and addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. Work conducted during the first quarter has concentrated in the design of a laboratory-scale bubble column slurry reactor (BCSR) capable of operating at suitable temperatures and pressures for each of the three routes defined above. For design purposes the reactor has been configured as a one-inch diameter bubble column reactor for conversion of synthesis gas and operating with a wax paraffin (C{sub 30}{sup +}) liquid medium. This design has been finalized, thereby reaching milestone M1. The paper discusses the important design parameters (hydrodynamics, mass transfer, kinetics, and heat transfer) as well as the relationship of lab scale to industrial scale BCSR, parameter estimations, and the design of the bench-scale BCSR. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. An innovative catalyst system for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas-shift catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, C.N.; Yates, I.C.; Chanenchuk, C.

    1991-07-01

    The feasibility of using a mechanical mixture of a Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} water-gas-shift (WGS) catalyst for hydrocarbon synthesis in a slurry reactor has been established. Such a mixture can combine the superior product distribution from cobalt with the high activity for the WGS reaction characteristic of iron. Weight ratios of Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} to Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} of 0.27 and 0.51 for the two catalysts were studied at 240{degrees}C, 0.79 MPa, and in situ H{sub 2}/CO ratios between 0.8 and 3.0. Each catalyst mixture showed stable Fischer-Tropsch activity for about 400 hours-on-stream at a level comparable to the cobalt catalyst operating alone. The Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst exhibited a very slow loss of activity under these conditions, but when operated alone it was stable in a slurry reactor at 200--220{degrees}C, 0.79--1.48 MPa, and H{sub 2}/CO in situ ratios between 1.0 and 2.0. The presence of the water-gas-shift catalyst did not affect the long-term stability of the primary Fischer-Tropsch selectivity, but did increase the extent of secondary reactions, such as l-alkene hydrogenation and isomerization.

  7. A new synthesis of carbon encapsulated Fe5C2 nanoparticles for high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seok Yong; Chun, Dong Hyun; Yang, Jung-Il; Jung, Heon; Lee, Ho-Tae; Hong, Sungjun; Jang, Sanha; Lim, Jung Tae; Kim, Chul Sung; Park, Ji Chan

    2015-10-01

    Using a simple thermal treatment under a CO flow, uniform micrometer-sized iron oxalate dihydrate cubes prepared by hydrothermal reaction were transformed into Fe5C2@C nanoparticles to form a mesoporous framework; the final structure was successfully applied to the high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch reaction and it showed high activity (CO conversion = 96%, FTY = 1.5 × 10-4 molCO gFe-1 s-1) and stability.Using a simple thermal treatment under a CO flow, uniform micrometer-sized iron oxalate dihydrate cubes prepared by hydrothermal reaction were transformed into Fe5C2@C nanoparticles to form a mesoporous framework; the final structure was successfully applied to the high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch reaction and it showed high activity (CO conversion = 96%, FTY = 1.5 × 10-4 molCO gFe-1 s-1) and stability. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experimental procedures, SEM images of FeNi and FeCo oxalate hydrate particles, particle size and pore size distributions, FT activity and selectivity, hydrocarbon product distribution, ASF plot, and Mössbauer parameters of the Fe5C2@C catalyst. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05787f

  8. Studies of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction on Co(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerlings, J. J. C.; Zonnevylle, M. C.; de Groot, C. P. M.

    1991-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch reaction has been studied over Co(0001) in the temperature range between 220 and 300 °C at 1 bar total pressure and an H 2 : CO ratio of 2 : 1. It was found that the activation energies for methane, ethane and propane formation are equ which suggests similar rate determining steps. We propose that α-hydrogenation of a C nH 2 n+1 surface species is rate limiting. Olefins are formed via β-dehydrogenation of the same species. The olefins take part in a consecutive reaction and are finally converted to paraffins. The product distribution was found to follow Schulz-Flory kinetics with a chain growth probability of 0.2 at 250 °C. Post-reaction spectroscopy with EELS and Auger indicated the presence of CO and CH x ( x = 1, 2, 3) fragments on the surface.

  9. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical reaction media

    SciTech Connect

    Subramaniam, B.

    1995-05-01

    The goal of the proposed research is to develop novel reactor operating strategies for the catalytic conversion of syngas to transportation grade fuels and oxygenates using near-critical (nc) fluids as reaction media. This will be achieved through systematic investigations aimed at a better fundamental understanding of the physical and chemical rate processes underlying catalytic syngas conversion in nc reaction media. Syngas conversion to fuels and fuel additives on Fe catalysts (Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) was investigated. Specific objectives are to investigate the effects of various nc media, their flow rates and operating pressure on syngas conversion, reactor temperature profiles, product selectivity and catalyst activity in trickle-bed reactors. Solvents that exhibit gas to liquid-like densities with relatively moderate pressure changes (from 25 to 60 bars) at typical syngas conversion temperatures (in the 220-280{degree}C range) will be chosen as reaction media.

  10. Diesel production from Fischer-Tropsch: the past, the present, and new concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Dieter Leckel

    2009-05-15

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is technically classified into two categories, the high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (HTFT) and the low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (LTFT) processes. The criterion for this classification is the operating temperature of the synthesis, which ranges between 310-340{sup o}C for the HTFT process and 210-260{sup o}C for the LTFT process. A Fischer-Tropsch facility can be divided into roughly three sections, synthesis gas (syngas) generation, FT synthesis, and refining of the synthetic crude (syncrude). Fischer-Tropsch refineries differ regarding the product upgrading, and both transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced. Regarding the FT refinery history, the configuration of each refinery also reflects the requirements of the fuel specification at that time. This paper gives a condensed overview of how Fischer-Tropsch facilities changed during the last 70 years and focuses in particular on the diesel fuel produced. Some conceptual flow schemes are additionally presented with emphasis on the combined upgrading of the high boiling part of the FT product spectrum with liquids derived from coal pyrolysis. 52 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs.