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Sample records for precipitation separations process

  1. SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Stoughton, R.W.

    1961-10-24

    A process for separating tetravalent plutonium from aqueous solutions and from niobium and zirconium by precipitation on lanthanum oxalate is described. The oxalate ions of the precipitate may be decomposed by heating in the presence of an oxidizing agent, forming a plutonium compound readily soluble in acid. (AEC)

  2. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM BY REPEATED PRECIPITATION WITH AMPHOTERIC HYDROXIDE CARRIERS

    DOEpatents

    Faris, B.F.

    1960-04-01

    A multiple carrier precipitation method is described for separating and recovering plutonium from an aqueous solution. The hydroxide of an amphoteric metal is precipitated in an aqueous plutonium-containing solution. This precipitate, which carries plutonium, is then separated from the supernatant liquid and dissolved in an aqueous hydroxide solution, forming a second plutonium- containing solution. lons of an amphoteric metal which forms an insoluble hydroxide under the conditions existing in this second solution are added to the second solution. The precipitate which forms and which carries plutonium is separated from the supernatant liquid. Amphoteric metals which may be employed are aluminum, bibmuth, copper, cobalt, iron, lanthanum, nickel, and zirconium.

  3. PRECIPITATION METHOD OF SEPARATION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Magnusson, L.B.

    1958-07-01

    A process is described for the separation of neptunium from plutonium in an aqueous solution containing neptunium ions in a valence state not greater than +4, plutonium ioms in a valence state not greater than +4, and sulfate ions. The Process consists of adding hypochlorite ions to said solution in order to preferentially oxidize the neptunium and then adding lanthanum ions and fluoride ions to form a precipitate of LaF/sub 3/ carrying the plutonium, and thereafter separating the supernatant solution from the precipitate.

  4. Separation of particles precipitated from (U,RE){sub 3}O{sub 8} powder oxidation by dry process

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Jae Won; Lee Jung Won; Yang Myung Seung; Song Kee Chan; Park Geun Il

    2007-07-01

    The phase separation characteristics of RE elements from SIMFUEL (simulated spent fuel) was investigated by a high temperature oxidation at 1174{approx}1673 K using a fuel powder of (U,RE){sub 3}O{sub 8} in a single RE element system. A typical oxidation and reduction treatment followed by a dry milling process was introduced and investigated for a separation of the precipitated RE-rich (U{sub 1-y}RE{sub y})O{sub 2+z} particles and RE-poor U{sub 3}O{sub 8} particles formed by a high temperature oxidation. The XRD and SEM results indicate that an increase of the oxidation temperature increases the amount of the (U{sub 1-y}RE{sub y})O{sub 2+z} phase, while decreasing that of the RE-poor U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-type phase. Since the solubility of RE in the U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-type phase was almost constant regardless of the oxidation temperature, the decrease of the RE concentration in the RE-rich (U{sub 1-y}RE{sub y})O{sub 2+z} phase with an increasing oxidation temperature seems to be due to a diffusion of the U ion from the RE-poor U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-type phase to the RE-rich (U{sub 1-y}RE{sub y})O{sub 2+z} phase. The RE-rich (U{sub 1-y}RE{sub y})O{sub 2+z} particle precipitated from the RE-poor U{sub 3}O{sub 8} particle is mostly separated by a reduction and oxidation treatment at a typical temperature of the powdering process of uranium dioxide and completely separated by a dry milling. (authors)

  5. URANIUM PRECIPITATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Smith, H.W.; Simard, R.

    1957-12-01

    A method for the recovery of uranium from sulfuric acid solutions is described. In the present process, sulfuric acid is added to the uranium bearing solution to bring the pH to between 1 and 1.8, preferably to about 1.4, and aluminum metal is then used as a reducing agent to convert hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent state. As the reaction proceeds, the pH rises amd a selective precipitation of uranium occurs resulting in a high grade precipitate. This process is an improvement over the process using metallic iron, in that metallic aluminum reacts less readily than metallic iron with sulfuric acid, thus avoiding consumption of the reducing agent and a raising of the pH without accomplishing the desired reduction of the hexavalent uranium in the solution. Another disadvantage to the use of iron is that positive ferric ions will precipitate with negative phosphate and arsenate ions at the pH range employed.

  6. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM CONTAINING CARRIER PRECIPITATE BY CARBONATE METATHESIS AND SEPARATION OF SULFIDE IMPURITIES THEREFROM BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for recovering plutonium from foreign products wherein a carrier precipitate of lanthanum fluoride containing plutonium is obtained and includes the steps of dissolving the carrier precipitate in an alkali metal carbonate solution, adding a soluble sulfide, separating the sulfide precipitate, adding an alkali metal hydroxide, separating the resulting precipitate, washing, and dissolving in a strong acid.

  7. BASIC PEROXIDE PRECIPITATION METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM CONTAMINANTS

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Perlman, I.

    1959-02-10

    A process is described for the separation from each other of uranyl values, tetravalent plutonium values and fission products contained in an aqueous acidic solution. First the pH of the solution is adjusted to between 2.5 and 8 and hydrogen peroxide is then added to the solution causing precipitation of uranium peroxide which carries any plutonium values present, while the fission products remain in solution. Separation of the uranium and plutonium values is then effected by dissolving the peroxide precipitate in an acidic solution and incorporating a second carrier precipitate, selective for plutonium. The plutonium values are thus carried from the solution while the uranium remains flissolved. The second carrier precipitate may be selected from among the group consisting of rare earth fluorides, and oxalates, zirconium phosphate, and bismuth lihosphate.

  8. PRECIPITATION METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM CONTAMINATING ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, J.B.

    1958-02-18

    This patent relates to an improved method for the decontamination of plutonium. The process consists broadly in an improvement in a method for recovering plutonium from radioactive uranium fission products in aqueous solutions by decontamination steps including byproduct carrier precipitation comprising the step of introducing a preformed aqueous slurry of a hydroxide of a metal of group IV B into any aqueous acidic solution which contains the plutonium in the hexavalent state, radioactive uranium fission products contaminant and a by-product carrier precipitate and separating the metal hydroxide and by-product precipitate from the solution. The process of this invention is especially useful in the separation of plutonium from radioactive zirconium and columbium fission products.

  9. Gas-separation process

    DOEpatents

    Toy, Lora G.; Pinnau, Ingo; Baker, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A process for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material.

  10. IMPROVED PROCESS OF PLUTONIUM CARRIER PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Faris, B.F.

    1959-06-30

    This patent relates to an improvement in the bismuth phosphate process for separating and recovering plutonium from neutron irradiated uranium, resulting in improved decontamination even without the use of scavenging precipitates in the by-product precipitation step and subsequently more complete recovery of the plutonium in the product precipitation step. This improvement is achieved by addition of fluomolybdic acid, or a water soluble fluomolybdate, such as the ammonium, sodium, or potassium salt thereof, to the aqueous nitric acid solution containing tetravalent plutonium ions and contaminating fission products, so as to establish a fluomolybdate ion concentration of about 0.05 M. The solution is then treated to form the bismuth phosphate plutonium carrying precipitate.

  11. Isothermal separation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.

    1982-01-01

    The isothermal processes of membrane separation, supercritical extraction and chromatography were examined using availability analysis. The general approach was to derive equations that identified where energy is consumed in these processes and how they compare with conventional separation methods. These separation methods are characterized by pure work inputs, chiefly in the form of a pressure drop which supplies the required energy. Equations were derived for the energy requirement in terms of regular solution theory. This approach is believed to accurately predict the work of separation in terms of the heat of solution and the entropy of mixing. It can form the basis of a convenient calculation method for optimizing membrane and solvent properties for particular applications. Calculations were made on the energy requirements for a membrane process separating air into its components.

  12. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    McVey, W.H.; Reas, W.H.

    1959-03-10

    The separation of uranium from an aqueous solution containing a water soluble uranyl salt is described. The process involves adding an alkali thiocyanate to the aqueous solution, contacting the resulting solution with methyl isobutyl ketons and separating the resulting aqueous and organic phase. The uranium is extracted in the organic phase as UO/sub 2/(SCN)/sub/.

  13. Gas-separation process

    DOEpatents

    Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.; Baker, R.W.

    1994-01-25

    A process is described for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material. 6 figures.

  14. SEPARATION PROCESS FOR THORIUM SALTS

    DOEpatents

    Bridger, G.L.; Whatley, M.E.; Shaw, K.G.

    1957-12-01

    A process is described for the separation of uranium, thorium, and rare earths extracted from monazite by digesting with sulfuric acid. By carefully increasing the pH of the solution, stepwise, over the range 0.8 to 5.5, a series of selective precipitations will be achieved, with the thorium values coming out at lower pH, the rare earths at intermediate pH and the uranium last. Some mixed precipitates will be obtained, and these may be treated by dissolving in HNO/sub 3/ and contacting with dibutyl phosphate, whereby thorium or uranium are taken up by the organic phase while the rare earths preferentially remain in the aqueous solution.

  15. Process for phase separation

    DOEpatents

    Comolli, Alfred G.

    1979-01-01

    This invention provides a continuous process for separating a gaseous phase from a hydrocarbon liquid containing carbonaceous particulates and gases. The liquid is fed to a cylindrical separator, with the gaseous phase being removed therefrom as an overhead product, whereas the hydrocarbon liquid and the particulates are withdrawn as a bottoms product. By feeding the liquid tangentially to the separator and maintaining a particulate-liquid slurry downward velocity of from about 0.01 to about 0.25 fps in the separator, a total solids weight percent in the slurry of from about 0.1 to about 30%, a slurry temperature of from about 550.degree. to about 900.degree. F., a slurry residence time in the separator of from about 30 to about 360 seconds, and a length/diameter ratio for the separator of from about 20/1 to about 50/1, so that the characterization factor, .alpha., defined as ##STR1## DOES NOT EXCEED ABOUT 48 (.degree.R sec.sup.2)/ft, the deposit of carbonaceous materials on the interior surface of the separator may be substantially eliminated.

  16. SEPARATION OF FISSION PRODUCTS FROM PLUTONIUM BY PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Thompson, S.G.; Davidson, N.R.

    1959-09-01

    Fission product separation from hexavalent plutonium by bismuth phosphate precipitation of the fission products is described. The precipitation, according to this invention, is improved by coprecipitating ceric and zirconium phosphates (0.05 to 2.5 grams/liter) with the bismuth phosphate.

  17. ARSENATE CARRIER PRECIPITATION METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM NEUTRON IRRADIATED URANIUM AND RADIOACTIVE FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, S.G.; Miller, D.R.; James, R.A.

    1961-06-20

    A process is described for precipitating Pu from an aqueous solution as the arsenate, either per se or on a bismuth arsenate carrier, whereby a separation from uranium and fission products, if present in solution, is accomplished.

  18. Cyclic membrane separation process

    DOEpatents

    Bowser, John

    2004-04-13

    A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In one of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the other part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. Ambient air is charged to the membrane separation unit during the latter part of the cycle.

  19. Cyclic membrane separation process

    DOEpatents

    Nemser, Stuart M.

    2005-05-03

    A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In the first part of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the second part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. In one aspect of this invention, a vacuum is drawn in the membrane separation unit thus reducing overall VOC emissions.

  20. POLONIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Karraker, D.G.

    1959-07-14

    A liquid-liquid extraction process is presented for the recovery of polonium from lead and bismuth. According to the invention an acidic aqueous chloride phase containing the polonium, lead, and bismuth values is contacted with a tributyl phosphate ether phase. The polonium preferentially enters the organic phase which is then separated and washed with an aqueous hydrochloric solution to remove any lead or bismuth which may also have been extracted. The now highly purified polonium in the organic phase may be transferred to an aqueous solution by extraction with aqueous nitric acid.

  1. Precipitation Process and Apparatus Therefor

    DOEpatents

    Stang, Jr, L C

    1950-12-05

    This invention concerns an apparatus for remotely-controlled precipitation and filtration operations. Liquid within a precipitation chamber is maintained above a porous member by introducing air beneath the member; pressure beneath the porous member is reduced to suck the liquid through the member and effect filtration.

  2. Identifying Anomality in Precipitation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Safety, risk and economic analyses of engineering constructions such as storm sewer, street and urban drainage, and channel design are sensitive to precipitation storm properties. Whether the precipitation storm properties exhibit normal or anomalous characteristics remains obscure. In this study, we will decompose a precipitation time series as sequences of average storm intensity, storm duration and interstorm period to examine whether these sequences could be treated as a realization of a continuous time random walk with both "waiting times" (interstorm period) and "jump sizes" (average storm intensity and storm duration). Starting from this viewpoint, we will analyze the statistics of storm duration, interstorm period, and average storm intensity in four regions in southwestern United States. We will examine whether the probability distribution is temporal and spatial dependent. Finally, we will use fractional engine to capture the randomness in precipitation storms.

  3. PRECIPITATION METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM CONTAMINATING ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-02-24

    S>A method is described for separating plutonium, in a valence state of less than five, from an aqueous solution in which it is dissolved. The niethod consists in adding potassium and sulfate ions to such a solution while maintaining the solution at a pH of less than 7.1, and isolating the precipitate of potassium plutonium sulfate thus formed.

  4. Hydrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael; Xie, Xiaobing; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul; Wright, Harold

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  5. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Lyon, W.L.

    1962-04-17

    A method of separating uranium oxides from PuO/sub 2/, ThO/sub 2/, and other actinide oxides is described. The oxide mixture is suspended in a fused salt melt and a chlorinating agent such as chlorine gas or phosgene is sparged through the suspension. Uranium oxides are selectively chlorinated and dissolve in the melt, which may then be filtered to remove the unchlorinated oxides of the other actinides. (AEC)

  6. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, E.K.; Katzin, L.I.; Wolf, M.J.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of uranium from a mixture of uranium and thorium by organic solvent extraction from an aqueous solution is described. The uranium is separrted from an aqueous mixture of uranium and thorium nitrates 3 N in nitric acid and containing salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate, so as to bring ihe total nitrate ion concentration to a maximum of about 8 N by contacting the mixture with an immiscible aliphatic oxygen containing organic solvent such as diethyl carbinol, hexone, n-amyl acetate and the like. The uranium values may be recovered from the organic phase by back extraction with water.

  7. Processing NPP Bottoms by Ferrocyanide Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Savkin, A. E.; Slastennikov Y. T.; Sinyakin O. G.

    2002-02-25

    The purpose of work is a laboratory test of a technological scheme for cleaning bottoms from radionuclides by use of ozonization, ferrocyanide precipitation, filtration and selective sorption. At carrying out the ferrocyanide precipitation after ozonization, the specific activity of bottoms by Cs{sup 137} is reduced in 100-500 times. It has been demonstrated that the efficiency of ferrocyanide precipitation depends on the quality of consequent filtration. Pore sizes of a filter has been determined to be less than 0.2 {micro}m for complete separation of ferrocyanide residue. The comparison of two technological schemes for cleaning bottoms from radionuclides, characterized by presence of the ferrocyanide precipitation stage has been performed. Application of the proposed schemes allows reducing volumes of radioactive waste in many times.

  8. Determine separations process strategy decision

    SciTech Connect

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    This study provides a summary level comparative analysis of selected, top-level, waste treatment strategies. These strategies include No Separations, Separations (high-level/low-level separations), and Deferred Separations of the tank waste. These three strategies encompass the full range of viable processing alternatives based upon full retrieval of the tank wastes. The assumption of full retrieval of the tank wastes is a predecessor decision and will not be revisited in this study.

  9. Phosphate and potassium recovery from source separated urine through struvite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wilsenach, J A; Schuurbiers, C A H; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2007-01-01

    Phosphate can be recovered as struvite or apatite in fluidised bed reactors. Urine has a much higher phosphate concentration than sludge reject water, allowing simpler (and less expensive) process for precipitation of phosphates. A stirred tank reactor with a special compartment for liquid solid separation was used to precipitate struvite from urine. Magnesium ammonium phosphate as well as potassium magnesium phosphate are two forms of struvite that were successfully precipitated. Liquid/solid separation was very effective, but the compaction of struvite was rather poor in the case of potassium struvite. Crystals did not form clusters and maintained the typical orthorhombic structure. Ammonium struvite had slightly lower effluent phosphate concentrations, but an average of 95% of influent phosphate was removed regardless of ammonium or potassium struvite precipitation. Fluid mechanics is believed to be important and should inform further work. PMID:17126877

  10. Separation process using microchannel technology

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Perry, Steven T.; Arora, Ravi; Qiu, Dongming; Lamont, Michael Jay; Burwell, Deanna; Dritz, Terence Andrew; McDaniel, Jeffrey S.; Rogers, Jr.; William A.; Silva, Laura J.; Weidert, Daniel J.; Simmons, Wayne W.; Chadwell, G. Bradley

    2009-03-24

    The disclosed invention relates to a process and apparatus for separating a first fluid from a fluid mixture comprising the first fluid. The process comprises: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator in contact with a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the first fluid is sorbed by the sorption medium, removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing first fluid from the sorption medium and removing desorbed first fluid from the microchannel separator. The process and apparatus are suitable for separating nitrogen or methane from a fluid mixture comprising nitrogen and methane. The process and apparatus may be used for rejecting nitrogen in the upgrading of sub-quality methane.

  11. Three phase downhole separator process

    DOEpatents

    Cognata, Louis John

    2008-06-24

    Three Phase Downhole Separator Process (TPDSP) is a process which results in the separation of all three phases, (1) oil, (2) gas, and (3) water, at the downhole location in the well bore, water disposal injection downhole, and oil and gas production uphole.

  12. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Pinnau, Ingo; Segelke, Scott

    1997-01-01

    A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

  13. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

    1997-09-23

    A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

  14. PROCESS OF TREATING OR FORMING AN INSOLUBLE PLUTONIUM PRECIPITATE IN THE PRESENCE OF AN ORGANIC ACTIVE AGENT

    DOEpatents

    Balthis, J.H.

    1961-07-18

    Carrier precipitation processes for the separation of plutonium from fission products are described. In a process in which an insoluble precipitate is formed in a solution containing plutonium and fission products under conditions whereby plutonium is carried by the precipitate, and the precipitate is then separated from the remaining solution, an organic surface active agent is added to the mixture of precipitate and solution prior to separation of the precipitate from the supernatant solution, thereby improving the degree of separation of the precipitate from the solution.

  15. Efficient separations & processing crosscutting program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP) was created in 1991 to identify, develop, and perfect chemical and physical separations technologies and chemical processes which treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE complex. The ESP funds several multiyear tasks that address high-priority waste remediation problems involving high-level, low-level, transuranic, hazardous, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The ESP supports applied research and development (R & D) leading to the demonstration or use of these separations technologies by other organizations within the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management.

  16. Improvement in separation characteristics of protein precipitates by acoustic conditioning.

    PubMed

    Hoare, M; Titchener, N J; Foster, P R

    1987-01-01

    The effect of acoustic conditioning on the particle size distribution of isoelectric and calcium-ion-precipitated soya protein has been examined in low-residence-time chambers. In a previous study a beat frequency of 5 Hz obtained using a dual-source system of opposing vibrators was determined as giving optimal improvement in particle-settling characteristics for isoelectric soya protein precipitate. In this study the effect of amplitude of vibration, a measure of acoustic power input, and residence time of acoustic conditioning has been examined. Acoustic power input changed the flow pattern in the conditioning chamber from laminar streamline flow to a well-mixed, turbulent pattern. Such a mixing effect promoted the rapid aggregation of fine particles, a process that was modeled on the basis of orthokinetically controlled collisions. The rate of removal of fine particles due to acoustic conditioning was shown to be proportional to a mixing effect that was related to the acoustic power dissipated per unit volume. The consequences of fine-particle aggregation on the centrifugal recovery of the precipitate are discussed. PMID:18561125

  17. Continuous magnetic separator and process

    DOEpatents

    Oder, Robin R.; Jamison, Russell E.

    2008-04-22

    A continuous magnetic separator and process for separating a slurry comprising magnetic particles into a clarified stream and a thickened stream. The separator has a container with a slurry inlet, an overflow outlet for the discharge of the clarified slurry stream, and an underflow outlet for the discharge of a thickened slurry stream. Magnetic particles in the slurry are attracted to, and slide down, magnetic rods within the container. The slurry is thus separated into magnetic concentrate and clarified slurry. Flow control means can be used to control the ratio of the rate of magnetic concentrate to the rate of clarified slurry. Feed control means can be used to control the rate of slurry feed to the slurry inlet.

  18. PRECIPITATION METHOD FOR THE SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM AND RARE EARTHS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, S.G.

    1960-04-26

    A method of purifying plutonium is given. Tetravalent plutonium is precipitated with thorium pyrophosphate, the plutonium is oxidized to the tetravalent state, and then impurities are precipitated with thorium pyrophosphate.

  19. Extraction processes for bioproduct separation

    SciTech Connect

    Hartl, J.; Marr, R.

    1993-01-01

    The three-phase extraction process, a modification of reactive extraction, was investigated for its applicability in the separation of organic acids from fermentation broth. It was compared with reactive extraction, liquid membrane permeation, and supercritical fluid extraction. These processes are based on the use of amine extractants, which have to be dissolved in nonpolar solvents, for the extraction of carboxylic acids, hydroxycarboxylic acids, and aminocarboxylic acids. This paper considers the comparison of the above-mentioned processes. Furthermore, the extractability of acids from synthetic aqueous solutions and fermented broths was compared. Principal consideration was paid to the extraction of lactic acid, gluconic acid, citric acid, and L-leucine.

  20. PROCESS OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Brown, H.S.; Hill, O.F.

    1958-09-01

    A process is presented for recovering plutonium values from aqueous solutions. It comprises forming a uranous hydroxide precipitate in such a plutonium bearing solution, at a pH of at least 5. The plutonium values are precipitated with and carried by the uranium hydroxide. The carrier precipitate is then redissolved in acid solution and the pH is adjusted to about 2.5, causing precipitation of the uranous hydroxide but leaving the still soluble plutonium values in solution.

  1. METHOD OF SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM CARRIER PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, I.R.

    1959-09-22

    The recovery of plutonium from fluoride carrier precipitates is described. The precipitate is dissolved in zirconyl nitrate, ferric nitrate, aluminum nitrate, or a mixture of these complexing agents, and the plutonium is then extracted from the aqueous solution formed with a water-immiscible organic solvent.

  2. Olefin separation membrane and process

    DOEpatents

    Pinnau, I.; Toy, L.G.; Casillas, C.

    1997-09-23

    A membrane and process are disclosed for separating unsaturated hydrocarbons from fluid mixtures. The membrane and process differ from previously known membranes and processes, in that the feed and permeate streams can both be dry, the membrane need not be water or solvent swollen, and the membrane is characterized by a selectivity for an unsaturated hydrocarbon over a saturated hydrocarbon having the same number of carbon atoms of at least about 20, and a pressure-normalized flux of said unsaturated hydrocarbon of at least about 5{times}10{sup {minus}6}cm{sup 3}(STP)/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s{center_dot}cmHg, said flux and selectivity being measured with a gas mixture containing said unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, and in a substantially dry environment. 4 figs.

  3. Olefin separation membrane and process

    DOEpatents

    Pinnau, Ingo; Toy, Lora G.; Casillas, Carlos

    1997-01-01

    A membrane and process for separating unsaturated hydrocarbons from fluid mixtures. The membrane and process differ from previously known membranes and processes, in that the feed and permeate streams can both be dry, the membrane need not be water or solvent swollen, and the membrane is characterized by a selectivity for an unsaturated hydrocarbon over a saturated hydrocarbon having the same number of carbon atoms of at least about 20, and a pressure-normalized flux of said unsaturated hydrocarbon of at least about 5.times.10.sup.-6 cm.sup.3 (STP)/cm.sup.2 .multidot.s.multidot.cmHg, said flux and selectivity being measured with a gas mixture containing said unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, and in a substantially dry environment.

  4. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Garfinkel, David A.; Tucker, Julie D.; Haley, Daniel; Young, George A.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe–Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α‧) phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe–Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100–10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni–Mn–Si–Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α‧ interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101 alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni–Mn–Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core–shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby–Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30–36). ).

  5. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garfinkel, David A.; Tucker, Julie D.; Haley, Daniel A.; Young, George A.; Guo, Wei; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-16

    Here, three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe–Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α') phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe–Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100–10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni–Mn–Si–Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α' interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101more » alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni–Mn–Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core–shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby–Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30–36).« less

  6. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Garfinkel, David A; Tucker, Julie D; Haley, Daniel; Young, George A; Poplawsky, Jonathan D

    2016-06-24

    Three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe-Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α') phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe-Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100-10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni-Mn-Si-Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α' interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101 alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni-Mn-Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core-shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby-Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30-36). PMID:27181108

  7. Alternative separation steps for monoclonal antibody purification: combination of centrifugal partitioning chromatography and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Oelmeier, Stefan A; Ladd-Effio, Christopher; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2013-12-01

    Protein drugs continue to grow both in medicinal importance as in scale of their production. This furthers the interest in separation technologies that have the potential to replace chromatographic steps in a protein purification process. Two such unit operations that are employed in large scale in the chemical industry are extraction and precipitation. Their usefulness for the purification of proteins has been demonstrated, but the integration of such unit operations in a way that generate an output stream of high protein concentration and low process related impurities was missing. In this work, we employ centrifugal partitioning chromatography ('CPC') in combination with precipitation of the protein of interest to purify a cell culture supernatant of a monoclonal antibody producing cell line. Centrifugal partitioning chromatography was used as means of multi-step extraction using aqueous two-phase systems and was able to remove up to 88.2% of host cell protein ('HCP'). The following PEG driven precipitation and resolubilization of the protein of interest was use to condition the CPC output stream to suit subsequent chromatographic steps, to increase mAb concentration, remove the phase forming polymer, further improve HCP clearance, and integrate a low pH hold step for viral clearance. The entire process reduced HCP content by 99.4% while recovering 93% of the protein of interest. High throughput screening techniques were extensively employed during the development of the process. PMID:24182866

  8. Process for strontium-82 separation

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Taylor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    The process is for the selective separation of Sr-82 and Sr-85 from a proton-irradiated Mo target. It includes dissolving the Mo in H2O2 to form a solution which is then passed through a cationic resin, whereby Mo, Nb, Tc, Se, V, As, Ge, Zr, Rb ions remain in the solution, while Rb, Zn, Be, Co, Fe, Mn, Cr, Sr, Y, Zr ions are adsorbed. The resin is contacted with an acid solution to remove the adsorbed ions, forming a second solution. The second solution is evaporated and the residue dissolved in a dilute acid to form a third solution. After adjusting the acid molarity, the third solution is passed through a second cationic resin; this resin is contacted first with a dilute sulfuric acid solution and then with a dilute acid solution to remove the adsorbed Sr ions. Zr, Rb, and Y radioisotopes can also be recovered with additional steps.

  9. [Separation and purification of Al13 by chemical precipitation and metathesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Hong; Shi, Bao-You; Wang, Dong-Sheng; Cui, Ya-Li

    2007-02-01

    PACls with different concentrations were prepared by adding sodium carbonate powder into AlCl13 solution. Medium concentration and high Al13 content of PACl was chosen to carry out Al13 separation processes. The influences of SO4/Al molar ratio and the initial total Al concentration on the precipitation reactions of sulfate with different Al species were investigated. The factors influencing the metathesis reaction between solid Al13-SO4 and Ba(NO3)2 were evaluated. Results showed that high Al13 PACl could be obtained at the medium high concentration range of 0.4 - 0.6 mol/L, the optimum SO4/Al ratio was 0.6:1 for precipitation- separation of Al13, Al13 -SO4 precipitates were mostly consisted of tetrahedral crystals. During the metathesis reaction, Ba/SO4 molar ratio of 1:1 is the optimal value. Small range temperature variation and ultrasonic action had no marked influence on metathesis reaction rate and final Al13 concentration. Higher initial Ba(NO3)2 concentration could produce higher concentration Al13 accordingly. The purity of Al13 solution could be reached to 92.1% statistically. PMID:17489196

  10. Process for strontium-82 separation

    DOEpatents

    Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Taylor, W.A.

    1992-12-01

    A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed. 1 fig.

  11. Process for strontium-82 separation

    DOEpatents

    Heaton, Richard C.; Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.

    1992-01-01

    A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed.

  12. PROCESS FOR THE SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS

    DOEpatents

    Gofman, J.W.; Connick, R.E.; Wahl, A.C.

    1959-01-27

    A method is presented for thc separation of plutonium from uranium and the fission products with which it is associated. The method is based on the fact that hexavalent plutonium forms an insoluble complex precipitate with sodium acetate, as does the uranyl ion, while reduced plutonium is not precipitated by sodium acetate. Several embodiments are shown, e.g., a solution containing plutonium and uranium in the hexavalent state may be contacted with sodium acetate causing the formation of a sodium uranyl acetate precipitate which carries the plutonium values while the fission products remain in solution. If the original solution is treated with a reducing agent, so that the plutonium is reduced while the uranium remains in the hexavalent state, and sodium and acetate ions are added, the uranium will precipitutc while the plutonium remains in solution effecting separation of the Pu from urarium.

  13. Photochemical precipitation of thorium and cerium and their separation from other ions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Das, M; Heyn, A H; Hoffman, M Z; Agarwal, R P

    1970-10-01

    Thorium was precipitated from homogeneous solution by exposing solutions of thorium and periodate in dilute perchloric acid to 253.7 nm radiation from a low-pressure mercury lamp. Periodate is reduced photochemically to iodate which causes the formation of a dense precipitate of the basic iodate of thorium(IV). The precipitate was redissolved, the iodate reduced, the thorium precipitated first as the hydroxide, then as the oxalate and ignited to the dioxide for weighing. Thorium(IV) solutions containing 8-200 mg of ThO(2) gave quantitative results with a standard deviation (s) of 0.2 mg. Separations from 25 mg each of iron, calcium, magnesium, 50 mg of yttrium and up to 500 mg of uranium(VI) were quantitative (s = 0.25 mg). Separations from rare earths, except cerium, were accomplished by using hexamethylenetetramine rather than ammonia for the precipitation of the hydroxide. Cerium(III) was similarly precipitated and converted into CeO(2) for weighing. Quantitative results were obtained for 13-150 mg of CeO(2) with a standard deviation of 0.2 mg. Separations from 200 mg of uranium were quantitative. Other rare earths and yttrium interfered seriously. The precipitates of the basic cerium(IV) and thorium iodates obtained are more compact than those obtained by direct precipitation and can be handled easily. Attempts to duplicate Suzuki's method for separating cerium from neodymium and yttrium were not successful. PMID:18960820

  14. Separation of americium, curium, and rare earths from high-level wastes by oxalate precipitation: experiments with synthetic waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    The separation of trivalent actinides and rare earths from other fission products in high-level nuclear wastes by oxalate precipitation followed by ion exchange (OPIX) was experimentally investigated using synthetic wastes and a small-scale, continuous-flow oxalic acid precipitation and solid-liquid separation system. Trivalent actinide and rare earth oxalates are relatively insoluble in 0.5 to 1.0 M HNO/sub 3/ whereas other fission product oxalates are not. The continuous-flow system consisted of one or two stirred-tank reactors in series for crystal growth. Oxalic acid and waste solutions were mixed in the first tank, with the product solid-liquid slurry leaving the second tank. Solid-liquid separation was tested by filters and by a gravity settler. The experiments determined the fraction of rare earths precipitated and separated from synthetic waste streams as a function of number of reactors, system temperature, oxalic acid concentration, liquid residence time in the process, power input to the stirred-tank reactors, and method of solid-liquid separation. The crystalline precipitate was characterized with respect to form, size, and chemical composition. These experiments are only the first step in converting a proposed chemical flowsheet into a process flowsheet suitable for large-scale remote operations at high activity levels.

  15. Precipitation processes as deduced by combining Doppler radar and disdrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Alan Douglas

    Precipitation processes are investigated in stratiform and convective weather systems by combining Doppler radar and disdrometer measurements. Vertical scans are designed to measure the standard radar data fields and the power spectrum of the vertical Doppler velocities with high spatial and temporal resolution. A new method, based on iterative application of a disdrometer-determined Z-R relation, is developed to estimate vertical winds from the vertical scan data. Using this method, radar-based raindrop size spectra calculated near the surface in light stratiform rain compare well with simultaneous measurements from a collocated disdrometer. A full raindrop size spectrum profile is deduced for a specific steady state case. It is found that the spectrum does not vary with height, suggesting that the spectral shape is mainly controlled by the ice particles occurring above the 0oC level. Vertical scan data are also combined with volume scan data obtained by the Atmospheric Environment Service King City radar to examine the precipitation structure of a hail producing region within a severe squall line. The vertical scan shows a large variation in precipitation structure and also reveals important storm features which, in this case, are not detected by the conventional volume scans, such as a weak echo vault, a downdraught outflow, and streaks of very high downward velocity corresponding to separate hail trajectories. The power spectra were used to identify and locate hailstones, to deduce the growth of descending hailstones, and to qualitatively examine properties of raindrop size spectra. A conceptual model of hail formation is proposed by comparing the deduced storm structure and precipitation processes with the analyses of two somewhat similar storms documented in the literature.

  16. Struvite precipitation thermodynamics in source-separated urine.

    PubMed

    Ronteltap, Mariska; Maurer, Max; Gujer, Willi

    2007-03-01

    Struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4).6H(2)O) precipitation eliminates phosphate efficiently from urine, a small but highly concentrated stream in the total flux of domestic wastewater. Precipitation experiments with hydrolysed urine evaluated the solubility product of struvite. The stored and fully hydrolysed urine had an ionic strength of between 0.33 and 0.56M and required the estimation of activity coefficients. From our data, we identified the Davies approximation with the two constants A=0.509 and B=0.3 as agreeing best with our laboratory results. The standard solubility product K(s)(0)=f(1)[NH4(+)]f(2)[Mg2+]f(3)[PO(4)(3-)] ([ ]=concentration of the species; f(x)=corresponding activity coefficient) of struvite in urine was found to be 10(-13.26+/-0.057) at 25 degrees C and the enthalpy of struvite formation DeltaH was 22.6(+/-1.1) kJmol(-1). The equilibrium calculations required the following dissolved complexes: [MgCO(3)](aq), [MgHCO(3)](+), [MgPO(4)](-), [NH4HPO4and [NaHPO(4)](-) and to a lesser extent [MgSO(4)](aq) and [NH(4)SO(4)](-). Organic complexes do not seem to influence the solubility product substantially. For practical purposes, a conditional solubility product K(s)(cond)=[Mg(aq)].[NH(4)(+)+NH(3)].[P(ortho)]=10(-7.57)M(3) was derived to calculate struvite solubility in urine at 25 degrees C, pH=9.0 and ionic strength I=0.4M directly from measured concentrations. PMID:17258264

  17. SEPARATION PROCESS FOR TRANSURANIC ELEMENT AND COMPOUNDS THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Magnusson, L.B.

    1958-04-01

    A process is described for the separation of neptunium, from aqueous solutions of neptunium, plutonium, uraniunn, and fission prcducts. This separation from an acidic aqueous solution of a tetravalent neptuniunn can be made by contacting the solution with a certain type of chelating,; agent, preferably dissolved in an organic solvent, to form a neptunium chelate compound. When the organic solvent is present, the neptunium chelate compound is extracted; otherwise, it precipitates from the aqueous solution and is separated by any suitable means. The chelating agent is a fluorinated BETA -diketone. such as trifluoroacetyl acetone.

  18. Separation processes: Playing a critical role

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, J.L.

    1995-10-01

    Separation processes are the main cog in the manufacturing well of the chemical process industries (CPI). They are used for such essential chores as removal of contaminants from raw materials, recovery and purification of primary products, and elimination of contaminants from effluent water and air streams. This article provides an overview of key separation processes, highlights recent commercial developments, and provides insights on expected new developments. It focuses o the core processes for fluid mixture separations--distillation, extraction, adsorption, membranes, and their hybrid systems. Other important processes, such as crystallization and fluid/particle separations, are left for others to cover. 40 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Fabrication of Separator Demonstration Facility process vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Oberst, E.F.

    1985-01-15

    The process vessel system is the central element in the Separator Development Facility (SDF). It houses the two major process components, i.e., the laser-beam folding optics and the separators pods. This major subsystem is the critical-path procurement for the SDF project. Details of the vaious parts of the process vessel are given.

  20. Separation of Niobium and Tantalum Pentafluoride by Selective Precipitation Using p-Phenylenediamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nete, M.; Purcell, W.; Nel, J. T.

    2016-07-01

    The similarity between Ta and Nb chemistry makes it difficult to find the appropriate reagents and chemical reactions for the separation of the two elements. This study investigated the precipitation behavior of TaF5 and NbF5 with p-phenylenediamine (PPDA). PPDA preferentially precipitated Nb from a 1:1 ratio of NbF5 and TaF5. Niobium recoveries of >80%, and only 4% Ta, were found in the precipitate of the reaction between (Nb/Ta)F5 and PPDA in ethanol. A separation factor of 100(9) indicated the potential for successful separation of Nb and Ta in a fluoride environment. A spectrophotometric study of the formation ratio of the newly formed Nb compound indicated a 1:1 metal:ligand ratio.

  1. PROCESS FOR SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1958-04-29

    A method is described for separating plutonium from aqueous acidic solutions of neutron-irradiated uranium and the impurities associated therewith. The separation is effected by adding, to the solution containing hexavalent uranium and plutonium, acetate ions and the ions of an alkali metal and those of a divalent metal and thus forming a complex plutonium acetate salt which is carried by the corresponding complex of uranium, such as sodium magnesium uranyl acetate. The plutonium may be separated from the precipitated salt by taking the same back into solution, reducing the plutonium to a lower valent state on reprecipitating the sodium magnesium uranyl salt, removing the latter, and then carrying the plutonium from ihe solution by means of lanthanum fluoride.

  2. PROCESS USING BISMUTH PHOSPHATE AS A CARRIER PRECIPITATE FOR FISSION PRODUCTS AND PLUTONIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Finzel, T.G.

    1959-03-10

    A process is described for separating plutonium from fission products carried therewith when plutonium in the reduced oxidation state is removed from a nitric acid solution of irradiated uranium by means of bismuth phosphate as a carrier precipitate. The bismuth phosphate carrier precipitate is dissolved by treatment with nitric acid and the plutonium therein is oxidized to the hexavalent oxidation state by means of potassium dichromate. Separation of the plutonium from the fission products is accomplished by again precipitating bismuth phosphate and removing the precipitate which now carries the fission products and a small percentage of the plutonium present. The amount of plutonium carried in this last step may be minimized by addition of sodium fluoride, so as to make the solution 0.03N in NaF, prior to the oxidation and prccipitation step.

  3. SEPARATION PROCESS FOR PROTACTINIUM AND COMPOUNDS THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Van Winkle, A.

    1959-07-21

    The separation of protactinium from aqueous solutions from its mixtures with thorium, uranium and fission products is described. The process for the separation comprises preparing an ion nitric acid solution containing protactinium in the pentavalent state and contacting the solution with a fluorinated beta diketone, such as trifluoroacetylacetone, either alone or as an organic solvent solution to form a pentavalent protactinium chelate compound. When the organic solvent is present the chelate compound is extracted; otherwise it is separated by filtration.

  4. Evaluation of separation and purification processes in the antibiotic industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowski, P.R.; Lee, D.D.; Byers, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    The different separation and purification processes for three major types of antibiotics, Penicillins, Cephalosporins and Tetracyclines will be discussed. All antibiotic, processing plants contain two majors sections, a relatively small and highly specialized fermentation section and a very large (60-80% of the plant) separation and purification section. The fermentation sections for the different antibiotics are essentially identical, except for differences in growth media and operating variables, but there are vast differences in the separation and purification sections. Several different separation methods are used including filtration, ultrafiltration, centrifugation, precipitation, extraction, chromatography and various membrane methods. Variables affecting the specific separation and purification configurations include final fermentation broth concentration, by-product formed during fermentation, the physical properties and molecular structure of the various antibiotics and special purification requirements. Necessary reductions in the separation and purification processes required for rebuilding the antibiotic industry after a national emergency are discussed along with several relatively new separation/purification methods that hold great promise for effecting these reductions, chromatography, supercritical fluid extraction (SCF), and membranes. 35 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

    2013-06-25

    The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

  6. Extraction of rare earth elements from hydrate-phosphate precipitates of apatite processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andropov, M. O.; Anufrieva, A. V.; Buynovskiy, A. S.; Makaseev, Y. N.; Mazov, I. N.; Nefedov, R. A.; Sachkov, V. I.; Stepanova, O. B.; Valkov, AV

    2016-01-01

    The features of extraction of rare earth elements (REE) were considered from hydrate-phosphate precipitates of REE of apatite processing by nitric acid technology. The preliminary purification of nitrate solution of REE from impurities of titanium, aluminum, iron, uranium and thorium was suggested to obtain stable solutions not forming precipitates. Washing the extract was recommended with the evaporated reextract that allows to obtain directly on the cascade of REE extraction the concentrated solutions suitable for the separation into groups by the extraction method. Technical decisions were suggested for the separation of REE in groups without the use of salting-out agent.

  7. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

    1990-08-21

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

  8. Daily spatiotemporal precipitation simulation using latent and transformed Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiber, William; Katz, Richard W.; Rajagopalan, Balaji

    2012-01-01

    A daily stochastic spatiotemporal precipitation generator that yields spatially consistent gridded quantitative precipitation realizations is described. The methodology relies on a latent Gaussian process to drive precipitation occurrence and a probability integral transformed Gaussian process for intensity. At individual locations, the model reduces to a Markov chain for precipitation occurrence and a gamma distribution for precipitation intensity, allowing statistical parameters to be included in a generalized linear model framework. Statistical parameters are modeled as spatial Gaussian processes, which allows for interpolation to locations where there are no direct observations via kriging. One advantage of such a model for the statistical parameters is that stochastic generator parameters are immediately available at any location, with the ability to adapt to spatially varying precipitation characteristics. A second advantage is that parameter uncertainty, generally unavailable with deterministic interpolators, can be immediately quantified at all locations. The methodology is illustrated on two data sets, the first in Iowa and the second over the Pampas region of Argentina. In both examples, the method is able to capture the local and domain aggregated precipitation behavior fairly well at a wide range of time scales, including daily, monthly, and annually.

  9. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Filardo, Giuseppe

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70.degree. C. and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution.

  10. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Filardo, G.

    1990-10-23

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70 C and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution. 1 fig.

  11. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Precipitation Processing System (PPS) GPM Mission Gridded Text Products Provide Surface Precipitation Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz; Kelley, O.; Kummerow, C.; Huffman, G.; Olson, W.; Kwiatkowski, J.

    2015-01-01

    In February 2015, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission core satellite will complete its first year in space. The core satellite carries a conically scanning microwave imager called the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), which also has 166 GHz and 183 GHz frequency channels. The GPM core satellite also carries a dual frequency radar (DPR) which operates at Ku frequency, similar to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar, and a new Ka frequency. The precipitation processing system (PPS) is producing swath-based instantaneous precipitation retrievals from GMI, both radars including a dual-frequency product, and a combined GMIDPR precipitation retrieval. These level 2 products are written in the HDF5 format and have many additional parameters beyond surface precipitation that are organized into appropriate groups. While these retrieval algorithms were developed prior to launch and are not optimal, these algorithms are producing very creditable retrievals. It is appropriate for a wide group of users to have access to the GPM retrievals. However, for researchers requiring only surface precipitation, these L2 swath products can appear to be very intimidating and they certainly do contain many more variables than the average researcher needs. Some researchers desire only surface retrievals stored in a simple easily accessible format. In response, PPS has begun to produce gridded text based products that contain just the most widely used variables for each instrument (surface rainfall rate, fraction liquid, fraction convective) in a single line for each grid box that contains one or more observations.This paper will describe the gridded data products that are being produced and provide an overview of their content. Currently two types of gridded products are being produced: (1) surface precipitation retrievals from the core satellite instruments GMI, DPR, and combined GMIDPR (2) surface precipitation retrievals for the partner constellation

  12. Flotation process for removal of precipitates from electrochemical chromate reduction unit

    DOEpatents

    DeMonbrun, James R.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Williams, Everett H.

    1976-01-01

    This invention is an improved form of a conventional electrochemical process for removing hexavalent chromium or other metal-ion contaminants from cooling-tower blowdown water. In the conventional process, the contaminant is reduced and precipitated at an iron anode, thus forming a mixed precipitate of iron and chromium hydroxides, while hydrogen being evolved copiously at a cathode is vented from the electrochemical cell. In the conventional process, subsequent separation of the fine precipitate has proved to be difficult and inefficient. In accordance with this invention, the electrochemical operation is conducted in a novel manner permitting a much more efficient and less expensive precipitate-recovery operation. That is, the electrochemical operation is conducted under an evolved-hydrogen partial pressure exceeding atmospheric pressure. As a result, most of the evolved hydrogen is entrained as bubbles in the blowdown in the cell. The resulting hydrogen-rich blowdown is introduced to a vented chamber, where the entrained hydrogen combines with the precipitate to form a froth which can be separated by conventional techniques. In addition to the hydrogen, two materials present in most blowdown act as flotation promoters for the precipitate. These are (1) air, with which the blowdown water becomes saturated in the course of normal cooling-tower operation, and (2) surfactants which commonly are added to cooling-tower recirculating-water systems to inhibit the growth of certain organisms or prevent the deposition of insoluble particulates.

  13. Separate olefin processing in sulfuric acid alkylation

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, S.A.; Graves, D.C.

    1995-09-01

    This paper will discuss the effects of alkylating propylene, butylenes and amylenes together and suggest alternative processing schemes which will minimize the negative synergies, improve octane and/or minimize acid consumption. The first option will show the impact of segregating the propylene and amylenes. In the second option, the benefit of alkylating the individual olefins at their optimal acid strengths will be presented. Additionally, each olefin`s optimal reaction conditions will be examined. Unfortunately, many refiners may not have the existing flexibility to take advantage of separate olefin processing. First, the majority of the propylene, butylenes and amylenes must be separate upon entry to the alkylation unit. If the olefins cannot be segregated upstream, separate olefin processing will not be as beneficial. If this is the case, then the benefits of separate olefin processing will have to be weighed versus the capital and energy costs required to separate them. In addition, small units may not have sufficient numbers of Contactors and settlers to achieve adequate segregation. Later in this paper, the modifications required in the alkylation unit for separate olefin processing will be discussed.

  14. PROCESSES FOR SEPARATING AND RECOVERING CONSTITUENTS OF NEUTRON IRRADIATED URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Connick, R.E.; Gofman, J.W.; Pimentel, G.C.

    1959-11-10

    Processes are described for preparing plutonium, particularly processes of separating plutonium from uranium and fission products in neutron-irradiated uraniumcontaining matter. Specifically, plutonium solutions containing uranium, fission products and other impurities are contacted with reducing agents such as sulfur dioxide, uranous ion, hydroxyl ammonium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, and ferrous ion whereby the plutoninm is reduced to its fluoride-insoluble state. The reduced plutonium is then carried out of solution by precipitating niobic oxide therein. Uranium and certain fission products remain behind in the solution. Certain other fission products precipitate along with the plutonium. Subsequently, the plutonium and fission product precipitates are redissolved, and the solution is oxidized with oxidizing agents such as chlorine, peroxydisulfate ion in the presence of silver ion, permanganate ion, dichromate ion, ceric ion, and a bromate ion, whereby plutonium is oxidized to the fluoride-soluble state. The oxidized solution is once again treated with niobic oxide, thus precipitating the contamirant fission products along with the niobic oxide while the oxidized plutonium remains in solution. Plutonium is then recovered from the decontaminated solution.

  15. Extractive condensation: A new separation process

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitsch, K.J.

    1999-10-01

    A new highly selective vapor-phase extraction process is described. Hydrogen bonding between a scavenging extractant and the substance to be extracted results in a high-boiling complex forming fog droplets readily separable from the remaining vapor. The process is exemplified by the extraction of acetic acid from the predominantly aqueous vapor stream of furfural reactors. Triethylamine is used as the extractant.

  16. Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel process technology

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Qiu, Dongming; Dritz, Terence Andrew; Neagle, Paul; Litt, Robert Dwayne; Arora, Ravi; Lamont, Michael Jay; Pagnotto, Kristina M.

    2007-07-31

    The disclosed invention relates to a process for separating methane or nitrogen from a fluid mixture comprising methane and nitrogen, the process comprising: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator, the microchannel separator comprising a plurality of process microchannels containing a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the methane or nitrogen is sorbed by the sorption medium, and removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing the methane or nitrogen from the sorption medium and removing the desorbed methane or nitrogen from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources.

  17. The Role of Aerosols on Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.

    2006-01-01

    Cloud physics is inevitably affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distribution below the clouds. Therefore, the size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effects of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, rainfall production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, a detailed spectral--bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e., pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail]. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e., 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions.

  18. Impact of Urban Surfaces on Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was established in 1988 by two United Nations organizations, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to assess the "risk of human-induced climate change". Such reports are used by decision-makers around the world to assess how our climate is changing. Its reports are widely respected and cited and have been highly influential in forming national and international responses to climate change. The Fourth Assessment report includes a section on the effects of surface processes on climate. This sub-chapter provides an overview of recent developments related to the impact of cities on rainfall. It highlights the possible mechanisms that buildings, urban heat islands, urban aerosols or pollution, and other human factors in cities that can affect rainfall.

  19. Modeling Cloud and Precipitation Processes - Considerations for Future Satellite Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heever, S. C.; Tao, W. K.; Saleeby, S. M.; Wu, D.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid developments in computing resources have allowed for cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations to be conducted over larger domains at higher spatial and temporal resolutions. Indeed, global CRMs are now a reality. Within such modeling frameworks, microphysical processes cannot be isolated from the vertical velocity that drives them, from the impact of energy exchanges due to phase changes, nor from the precipitation they produce, as has historically been the case with more highly parameterized frameworks. The increasing utilization of such high resolution, large-domain CRMs therefore introduces a new set of observational challenges. Instead of only taking into account global distributions of clouds and precipitation, observational strategies now need to be adapted to focus on the actual microphysical processes and feedbacks that are responsible for such cloud and precipitation distributions. Incorrectly representing such processes and feedbacks has significant implications for precipitation rates, efficiency and partitioning; the horizontal and vertical distribution of clouds; anvil ice properties; the partitioning between the liquid water and ice phase; and the location and amount of latent energy release associated with phase changes, all of which have subsequent implications for the global energy and water budget. Numerous microphysical and dynamical processes, and the feedbacks between them, are not well represented in CRMs. However, correctly simulating the magnitude of vertical velocity, as well as various ice processes appear to be particularly challenging. This talk will focus on the range of precipitation and cloud responses obtained within CRM simulations due to changes in the manner various ice processes are represented including melting, riming and shedding. Those parameters causing the greatest simulated cloud and precipitation responses will be identified. Factors impacting the representation of vertical velocity will also be addressed. Finally

  20. Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries

    DOEpatents

    Doherty, Joseph P.; Marek, James C.

    1989-01-01

    A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

  1. Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries

    DOEpatents

    Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

    1987-02-25

    A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Thermodynamics for separation-process technology

    SciTech Connect

    Prausnitz, J.M.

    1995-10-01

    When contemplating or designing a separation process, every chemical engineer at once recognizes the thermodynamic boundary conditions that must be satisfied: when a mixture is continuously processed to yield at least partially purified products, energy and mass must be conserved and work must be done. In his daily tasks, a chemical engineer uses thermodynamic concepts as tacit, almost subconscious, knowledge. Thus, qualitative thermodynamics significantly informs process conception at its most fundamental level. However, quantitative design requires detailed knowledge of thermodynamic relations and physical chemistry. Most process engineers, concerned with flow sheets and economics, cannot easily command that detailed knowledge and therefore it is advantageous for them to maintain close contact with those specialists who do. Quantitative chemical thermodynamics provides an opportunity to evaluate possible separation processes not only because it may give support to the process engineer`s bold imagination but also because, when coupled with molecular models, it can significantly reduce the experimental effort required to determine an optimum choice of process alternatives. Six examples are presented to indicate the application of thermodynamics for conventional and possible future separation processes.

  3. PROCESS OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM VALUES BY ELECTRODEPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Whal, A.C.

    1958-04-15

    A process is described of separating plutonium values from an aqueous solution by electrodeposition. The process consists of subjecting an aqueous 0.1 to 1.0 N nitric acid solution containing plutonium ions to electrolysis between inert metallic electrodes. A current density of one milliampere io one ampere per square centimeter of cathode surface and a temperature between 10 and 60 d C are maintained. Plutonium is electrodeposited on the cathode surface and recovered.

  4. Separation process using pervaporation and dephlegmation

    DOEpatents

    Vane, Leland M.; Mairal, Anurag P.; Ng, Alvin; Alvarez, Franklin R.; Baker, Richard W.

    2004-06-29

    A process for treating liquids containing organic compounds and water. The process includes a pervaporation step in conjunction with a dephlegmation step to treat at least a portion of the permeate vapor from the pervaporation step. The process yields a membrane residue stream, a stream enriched in the more volatile component (usually the organic) as the overhead stream from the dephlegmator and a condensate stream enriched in the less volatile component (usually the water) as a bottoms stream from the dephlegmator. Any of these may be the principal product of the process. The membrane separation step may also be performed in the vapor phase, or by membrane distillation.

  5. Separation of platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions containing aluminum, magnesium and iron using solvent extraction and precipitation methods.

    PubMed

    Raju, B; Kumar, J Rajesh; Lee, Jin-Young; Kwonc, Hyuk-Sung; Kantam, M Lakshmi; Reddy, B Ramachandra

    2012-08-15

    The solvent extraction and precipitation methods have been used to develop a process to separate platinum and rhodium from a synthetic chloride solutions containing other associated metals such as (mg/L): Pt-364, Rh-62, Al-13880, Mg-6980, Fe-1308 at <1M HCl acidity. At pH 3.4, the quantitative precipitation of Al and Fe was achieved using 10 wt% Na(3)PO(4)·12H(2)O, with ~4% loss of Pt and Rh due to adsorption phenomenon. The selective separation of platinum was carried out with 0.01 M Aliquat 336 (a quaternary ammonium salt) at an aqueous to organic ratio (A/O) of 3.3 in two stages. Stripping of Pt from loaded organic (LO) at O/A ratio 6 with 0.5 M thiourea (tu) and HCl indicated that ~99.9% stripping efficiency. In stripping studies, needle like crystals of Pt were found and identified as tetrakis (thiourea) platinum (II) chloride ([Pt(tu)(4)]Cl(2)). The selective precipitation of rhodium was performed with (NH(4))(2)S from platinum free raffinate with a recovery of >99%. PMID:22664260

  6. Actinide Lanthanide Separation Process – ALSEP

    SciTech Connect

    Gelis, Artem V.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2014-01-29

    Separation of the minor actinides (Am, Cm) from the lanthanides at an industrial scale remains a significant technical challenge for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. To increase the safety of used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing, as well as reduce associated costs, a novel solvent extraction process has been developed. The process allows for partitioning minor actinides, lanthanides and fission products following uranium/plutonium/neptunium removal; minimizing the number of separation steps, flowsheets, chemical consumption, and waste. This new process, Actinide Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP), uses an organic solvent consisting of a neutral diglycolamide extractant, either N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) or N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA), and an acidic extractant 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]), dissolved in an aliphatic diluent (e.g. n-dodecane). The An/Ln co-extraction is conducted from moderate-to-strong nitric acid, while the selective stripping of the minor actinides from the lanthanides is carried out using a polyaminocarboxylic acid/citrate buffered solution at pH anywhere between 3 and 4.5. The extraction and separation of the actinides from the fission products is very effective in a wide range of HNO3 concentrations and the minimum separation factors for lanthanide/Am exceed 30 for Nd/Am, reaching > 60 for Eu/Am under some conditions. The experimental results presented here demonstrate the great potential for a combined system, consisting of a neutral extractant such as T2EHDGA or TODGA, and an acidic extractant such as HEH[EHP], for separating the minor actinides from the lanthanides.

  7. Stoichiometric hydroxyapatite obtained by precipitation and sol gel processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, C. G.; Barba, C. P.; Munguia, N.

    2005-06-01

    Three methods for obtaining hydroxiapatite (HA) are described. HA is a very interesting ceramic because of its many medical applications. The first two precipitation methods start from calcium and phosphorous compounds, whereas the third method is a sol-gel process that uses alcoxides. The products were characterized and compared. The observed differences are important for practical applications.

  8. Process of precipitating zirconium or hafnium from spent pickling solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, C.L.; Walker, R.G.

    1991-12-31

    This patent describes a process for regenerating a spent, fluoride-containing pickle solution used in the pickling of zirconium or hafnium metal or their alloys. It comprises adding to the spent pickle solution a sufficient amount of sodium sulfate to precipitate sodium zirconium or hafnium fluoride.

  9. The Actinide-Lanthanide Separation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Gelis, Artem V.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Niver, Cynthia M.; Smoot, Margaret R.

    2014-02-21

    The Actinide-Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP) process is described. The process uses an extractant phase consisting of either N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA) or N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) combined with 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]). The neutral TODGA or T2EHDGA serves to co-extract the trivalent actinide and lanthanide ions from nitric acid media. Switching the aqueous phase chemistry to a citrate buffered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) solution at pH 2.5 to 4 results in selective transfer of the actinides to the aqueous phase, thus resulting in separation of these two groups of elements.

  10. FLUORINE PROCESS FOR SEPARATION OF MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Brown, H.S.

    1958-05-01

    A process is described for separating plutoniunn from neutron-irradiated uranium, which consists of reacting the irradiated uranium mass with HF to form the tetrafluorides of U, Pu, and Np, and then reacting this mixture of tetrafluorides with fiuorine at temperature between 140 and 315 d C. This causes volatile hexafluorides of U and Np to form while at the temperature employed the Pu tetrafluoride is unaffected and remains as a residue.

  11. Foam flotation as a separation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currin, B. L.

    1986-01-01

    The basic principles of foam separation techniques are discussed. A review of the research concerning bubble-particle interaction and its role in the kinetics of the flotation process is given. Most of the research in this area deals with the use of theoretical models to predict the effects of bubble and particle sizes, of liquid flow, and of various forces on the aperture and retention of particles by bubbles. A discussion of fluid mechanical aspects of particle flotation is given.

  12. ION EXCHANGE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Taylor, M.D.

    1961-07-11

    Ion exchange processes for the separation of plutonium from fission products are described. In accordance with these processes an aqueous solution containing plutonium and fission products is contacted with a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring adsorption of plutonium and fission products on the resin. A portion of the fission product is then eluted with a solution containing 0.05 to 1% by weight of a carboxylic acid. Plutonium is next eluted with a solution containing 2 to 8 per cent by weight of the same carboxylic acid, and the remaining fission products on the resin are eluted with an aqueous solution containing over 10 per cent by weight of sodium bisulfate.

  13. Membrane Separation Processes at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde

    2002-01-01

    The primary focus of Kennedy Space Center's gas separation activities has been for carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon used in oxygen production technologies for Martian in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) projects. Recently, these studies were expanded to include oxygen for regenerative life support systems. Since commercial membrane systems have been developed for separation of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen, initially the studies focused on these membrane systems, but at lower operating temperatures and pressures. Current investigations art examining immobilized liquids and solid sorbents that have the potential for higher selectivity and lower operating temperatures. The gas separation studies reported here use hollow fiber membranes to separate carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon in the temperature range from 230 to 300 K. Four commercial membrane materials were used to obtain data at low feed and permeate pressures. These data were used with a commercial solution-diffusion modeling tool to design a system to prepare a buffer gas from the byproduct of a process to capture Martian carbon dioxide. The system was designed to operate, at 230 K with a production rate 0.1 sLpm; Feed composition 30% CO2, 44% N2, and 26% Ar; Feed pressure 104 kPa (780); and Permeate pressure 1 kPa (6 torr); Product concentration 600 ppm CO2. This new system was compared with a similar system designed to operate at ambient temperatures (298 K). The systems described above, along with data, test apparatus, and models are presented.

  14. Modelling and dynamic simulation of struvite precipitation from source-separated urine.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Philip A; Wallace, James W; Tickle, Julian C

    2013-01-01

    A model of a mixed-mode nutrient recovery reactor is developed for a urine feed, incorporating complex solution thermodynamics, dynamic conservation relations and a power-law kinetic expression for crystal growth from seed crystals. Simulations at nominal operating conditions predict phosphorus recoveries greater than 99%, based on existing process kinetic parameters and operating conditions employed in previously published studies. The overall rate of nutrient recovery depends on the saturation index of the precipitating solid, the available surface area for mass transfer and the feed rate of the limiting constituent ion. Under the conditions considered, the nutrient feed rate appears to be the limiting factor for precipitation. Simulations demonstrate that diurnal feed flow variations of ±50% have a small effect on the rate of nutrient recovery. Overall, the study shows that valuable insights are gained in relation to process performance predictions, which should lead to more confident process design, operation and control. PMID:23787310

  15. Surfactants for separation processes: Enhanced ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Sadaoui, Z.; Azoug, C.; Charbit, G.; Charbit, F.

    1998-08-01

    Pollution by toxic metal compounds is a deep concern in all industrial countries. A process based on enhanced ultrafiltration is proposed in order to separate cadmium and chromate ions from wastewater. Inorganic membranes (zirconium oxide coated on carbon) are used in the separation cell, and ionic surfactants (NaDS or CTABr) are added in the effluent. The surfactants, which entrap metal ions present in the feed, are retained by the membrane barrier and thus the permeate is clear of metal compounds. This paper is devoted to precise experimental fields in which the permeate is lower than 0.2 g{center_dot}m{sup {minus}3} for cadmium and 0.1 g{center_dot}m{sup {minus}3} for chromate, these concentrations being the standards for European countries. The paper presents only experimental results describing the influence of operating conditions on the efficiency of the separation; a theory of rejection of pure surfactant by the same membranes has recently been published. As long as the feed concentration is less than or equal to 150 g{center_dot}m{sup {minus}3} for cadmium or 20 g{center_dot}m{sup {minus}3} for hexavalent chromium (respectively, 750 or 200 times the norm), a satisfactory permeate is obtained in a single stage process at 25 and 30 C; more than 99% of metallic ions is retained.

  16. Separation of spatial and temporal structure of auroral particle precipitation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudouridis, A.; Spence, H.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the dominant temporal and spatial scales of auroral features is instrumental in understanding the various mechanisms responsible for auroral particle precipitation. Single spacecraft data suffer from temporal/spatial ambiguity. In an effort to separate the temporal and spatial variations of the aurora, we use electron and ion precipitation data from two co-orbiting satellites, F6 and F8 of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP). The two spacecraft have almost identical polar orbits with a small difference in period. As a result the time difference between the two measurements varies with time. We use two statistical tools in order to determine the most probable lifetimes and spatial dimensions of the prevalent auroral features, Cross Correlation Analysis (CCA) and Cross Spectral Analysis (CSA). The CCA is applied to the magnetic latitude series of electron and ion, integral number and energy fluxes measured by the two DMSP spacecraft. As one spacecraft overtakes the other, the variable time lag between the two measurements results in different cross correlation of the two series. We explore the dependence of this variation on the time lag between the satellites. We find that the electron precipitation exhibits a decreasing correlation between the two spacecraft with increasing time lag, whereas there is only a small similar effect for the ion precipitation data. For the CSA we compute the so-called coherence function as a function of frequency (or inverse wavelength), and hence size of the auroral features. The coherence function is a measure of the stability of auroral features of different sizes. We investigate its variation as a function of the time separation between the two DMSP spacecraft measurements. We show that the coherence function of both electrons and ions remains high for up to 1.5 min spacecraft separations for all features larger than about 100 km in width. For smaller features the coherence is lower even for time lags of

  17. Process Control for Precipitation Prevention in Space Water Recovery Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam; Callahan, Michael R.; Muirhead, Dean

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recover and purify water through physiochemical processes is crucial for realizing long-term human space missions, including both planetary habitation and space travel. Because of their robust nature, rotary distillation systems have been actively pursued by NASA as one of the technologies for water recovery from wastewater primarily comprised of human urine. A specific area of interest is the prevention of the formation of solids that could clog fluid lines and damage rotating equipment. To mitigate the formation of solids, operational constraints are in place that limits such that the concentration of key precipitating ions in the wastewater brine are below the theoretical threshold. This control in effected by limiting the amount of water recovered such that the risk of reaching the precipitation threshold is within acceptable limits. The water recovery limit is based on an empirically derived worst case wastewater composition. During the batch process, water recovery is estimated by monitoring the throughput of the system. NASA Johnson Space Center is working on means of enhancing the process controls to increase water recovery. Options include more precise prediction of the precipitation threshold. To this end, JSC is developing a means of more accurately measuring the constituent of the brine and/or wastewater. Another means would be to more accurately monitor the throughput of the system. In spring of 2015, testing will be performed to test strategies for optimizing water recovery without increasing the risk of solids formation in the brine.

  18. The effect of small scale variablity in isotopic composition of precipitation on hydrograph separation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Benjamin; van Meerveld, Ilja; Seibert, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Understanding runoff processes is important for predictions of streamflow quantity and quality. The two-component isotope hydrograph separation (IHS) method is a valuable tool to study how catchments transform rainfall into runoff. IHS allows the stormflow hydrograph to be separated into rainfall (event water) and water that was stored in the catchment before the event (pre-event water). To be able to perform an IHS, water samples of baseflow (pre-event water) and stormflow are collected at the stream outlet. Rainfall is usually collected at one location by hand as an event total or sampled sequentially during the event. It is usually assumed that the spatial variability in rainfall and the isotopic composition of rainfall are negligible for small (<10km2) catchments. However, different studies have shown that precipitation can vary within short distances. Subsequently it remains unclear how the spatio-temproal variability of rainfall and the stable isotope composition of rainfall affect the results of an IHS. In this study, we investigated the effects of the spatio-temporal variability in the isotopic composition of rainfall across a small headwater catchment in Switzerland. Rainfall was measured at eight locations and three streams (catchment area of 0.15, 0.23, and 0.7 km2). The isotopic composition of rainfall and streamflow were sampled for 10 different rain events (P: 5 mm intervals, Q: 12 to 51 samples per events). This dataset was used to perform a two-component isotope hydrograph separation. The results show that for some events the spatial variability in total rainfall, mean and maximum rainfall intensity and stable isotope composition of rainfall was high. There was no relation between the stable isotope composition of rainfall and the rainfall sum, rainfall intensity or altitude. The spatial variability of the isotopic composition of rainfall was for 4 out of the 10 events as large as the temporal variability in the isotopic composition. Different

  19. Precipitation softening: a pretreatment process for seawater desalination.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, George M; Zayyat, Ramez M; Al-Hindi, Mahmoud

    2014-02-01

    Reduction of membrane fouling in reverse osmosis systems and elimination of scaling of heat transfer surfaces in thermal plants are a major challenge in the desalination of seawater. Precipitation softening has the potential of eliminating the major fouling and scaling species in seawater desalination plants, thus allowing thermal plants to operate at higher top brine temperatures and membrane plants to operate at a reduced risk of fouling, leading to lower desalinated water costs. This work evaluated the use of precipitation softening as a pretreatment step for seawater desalination. The effectiveness of the process in removing several scale-inducing materials such as calcium, magnesium, silica, and boron was investigated under variable conditions of temperature and pH. The treatment process was also applied to seawater spiked with other known fouling species such as iron and bacteria to determine the efficiency of removal. The results of this work show that precipitation softening at a pH of 11 leads to complete elimination of calcium, silica, and bacteria; to very high removal efficiencies of magnesium and iron (99.6 and 99.2 %, respectively); and to a reasonably good removal efficiency of boron (61 %). PMID:24151028

  20. Indian summer monsoon precipitating clouds: role of microphysical process rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Anupam; Chaudhari, Hemantkumar S.; Pokhrel, Samir; Saha, Subodh K.

    2016-04-01

    The budget analysis of microphysical process rates based on Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) products are presented in the study. The relative importance of different microphysical process rates, which is crucial for GCMs, is investigated. The autoconversion and accretion processes are found to be vital for Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM). The map-to-map correlations are examined between observed precipitation and MERRA reanalysis. The pattern correlations connote the fidelity of the MERRA datasets used here. Results of other microphysical parameters (e.g. ice water content from CloudSat, high cloud fraction from CALIPSO and MODIS, latent heating from TRMM, cloud ice mixing ratio from MERRA) are presented in this study. The tropospheric temperature from reanalysis product of MERRA and NCEP are also analyzed. Furthermore, the linkages between cloud microphysics production rates and dynamics, which are important for North-South tropospheric temperature gradient for maintaining the ISM circulation, are also discussed. The study demonstrates the microphysical process rates, which are actually responsible for the cloud hydrometeors and precipitation formation on the monsoon intraseasonal oscillations timescale. Cloud to rain water auto-conversion and snow accretion rates are the dominant processes followed by the rain accretion. All these tendency terms replicates the similar spatial patterns as that of precipitation. The quantification of microphysical process rates and precipitation over different regions are shown here. The freezing rate is also imperative for the formation of cloud ice as revealed by the observation. Freezing rates at upper level and snow accretion at middle level may have effect on latent heating release. Further it can modulate the north-south temperature gradient which can influence the large-scale monsoon dynamics. The rain water evaporation is also considered as a key aspect for controlling the low level

  1. Liquid-liquid phase separation in supersaturated lysozyme solutions and associated precipitate formation/crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschol, Martin; Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-08-01

    Using cloud point determinations, the phase boundaries (binodals) for metastable liquid-liquid (L-L) separation in supersaturated hen egg white lysozyme solutions with 3%, 5%, and 7% (w/v) NaCl at pH=4.5 and protein concentrations c between 40 and 400 mg/ml were determined. The critical temperature for the binodal increased approximately linearly with salt concentration. The coexisting liquid phases both remained supersaturated but differed widely in protein concentration. No salt repartitioning was observed between the initial and the two separated liquid phases. After the L-L separation, due to the presence of the high protein concentration phase, crystallization occurred much more rapidly than in the initial solution. At high initial protein concentrations, a metastable gel phase formed at temperatures above the liquid binodal. Both crystal nucleation and gel formation were accelerated in samples that had been cycled through the binodal. Solutions in the gel and L-L regions yielded various types of precipitates. Based on theoretical considerations, previous observations with other proteins, and our experimental results with lysozyme, a generic phase diagram for globular proteins is put forth. A limited region in the (T,c) plane favorable for the growth of protein single crystals is delineated.

  2. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation in Supersaturated Lysozyme Solutions and Associated Precipitate Formation/Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muschol, Martin; Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-01-01

    Using cloud point determinations, the phase boundaries (binodals) for metastable liquid-liquid (L-L) separation in supersaturated hen egg white lysozyme solutions with 3%, 5%, and 7% (wlv) NaCl at pH= 4.5 and protein concentrations c between 40 and 400 mg/ml were determined. The critical temperature for the binodal increased approximately linearly with salt concentration. The coexisting liquid phases both remained supersaturated but differed widely in protein concentration. No salt repartitioning was observed between the initial and the two separated liquid phases. After the L-L separation, due to the presence of the high protein concentration phase, crystallization occurred much more rapidly than in the initial solution. At high initial protein concentrations, a metastable gel phase formed at temperatures above the liquid binodal. Both crystal nucleation and gel formation were accelerated in samples that had been cycled through the binodal. Solutions in the gel and L-L regions yielded various types of precipitates. Based on theoretical considerations, previous observations with other proteins, and our experimental results with lysozyme, a generic phase diagram for globular proteins is put forth. A limited region in the (T,c) plane favorable for the growth of protein single crystals is delineated.

  3. Separation processes during binary monotectic alloy production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1984-01-01

    Observation of microgravity solidification processes indicates that outside of sedimentation, at least two other important effects can separate the phases: critical-point wetting and spreading; and thermal migration of second-phase droplets due to interfacial tension gradients. It is difficult to study these surface tension effects while in a unit gravity field. In order to investigate the processes occurring over a temperature range, i.e., between a consolute point and the monotectic temperature, it is necessary to use a low-gravity environment. The MSFC drop tube (and tower), the ballistic trajectory KC-135 airplane, and the Space Shuttle are ideal facilities to aid formation and testing of hypotheses. Much of the early work in this area focuses on transparent materials so that process dynamics may be studied by optical techniques such as photography for viewing macro-processes; holography for studying diffusional growth; spinodal decomposition and coalescence; ellipsometry for surface wetting and spreading effects; and interferometry and spectroscopy for small-scale spatial resolution of concentration profiles.

  4. Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX+ Separation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    ALena Paulenova; George F. Vandegrift, III; Kenneth R. Czerwinski

    2009-10-01

    The project "Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX+ Separation Processes” is led by Dr. Alena Paulenova of Oregon State University under collaboration with Dr. George Vandegrift of ANL and Dr. Ken Czerwinski of the University of Nevada at Las Vegas. The objective of the project is to examine the chemical speciation of plutonium in UREX+ (uranium/tributylphosphate) extraction processes for advanced fuel technology. Researchers will analyze the change in speciation using existing thermodynamics and kinetic computer codes to examine the speciation of plutonium in aqueous and organic phases. They will examine the different oxidation states of plutonium to find the relative distribution between the aqueous and organic phases under various conditions such as different concentrations of nitric acid, total nitrates, or actinide ions. They will also utilize techniques such as X-ray absorbance spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering for determining plutonium and uranium speciation in all separation stages. The project started in April 2005 and is scheduled for completion in March 2008.

  5. Process, including membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2001-01-01

    Processes for providing improved methane removal and hydrogen reuse in reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved methane removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the reactor recycle loop across membranes selective in favor of methane over hydrogen, and capable of exhibiting a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the process conditions.

  6. Separation of isotopes by cyclical processes

    DOEpatents

    Hamrin, Jr., Charles E.; Weaver, Kenny

    1976-11-02

    Various isotopes of hydrogen are separated by a cyclic sorption process in which a gas stream containing the isotopes is periodically passed through a high pressure column containing a palladium sorbent. A portion of the product from the high pressure column is passed through a second column at lower pressure to act as a purge. Before the sorbent in the high pressure column becomes saturated, the sequence is reversed with the stream flowing through the former low-pressure column now at high pressure, and a portion of the product purging the former high pressure column now at low pressure. The sequence is continued in cyclic manner with the product being enriched in a particular isotope.

  7. Unmasking the effect of a precipitation pulse on the biological processes composing Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Ballesteros, Ana; Sanchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Serrano-Ortiz, Penelope; Oyonarte, Cecilio; Kowalski, Andrew S.; Perez-Priego, Oscar; Domingo, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Drylands occupy 47.2% of the global terrestrial area and are key ecosystems that significantly determine the inter-annual variability of the global carbon balance. However, it is still necessary to delve into the functional behavior of arid and semiarid ecosystems due to the complexity of drivers and interactions between underpinning processes (whether biological or abiotic) that modulate net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE). In this context, water inputs are crucial to biological organisms survival in arid ecosystems and frequently arrive via rain events that are commonly stochastic and unpredictable (i.e. precipitation pulses) and strongly control arid land ecosystem structure and function. The eddy covariance technique can be used to investigate the effect of precipitation pulses on NEE, but provide limited understanding of what exactly happens after a rain event. The chief reasons are that, firstly, we cannot measure separately autotrophic and heterotrophic components, and secondly, the partitioning techniques widely utilized to separate Gross Primary Production and Total Ecosystem Respiration, do not work properly in these water-limited ecosystems, resulting in biased estimations of plant and soil processes. Consequently, it is essential to combine eddy covariance measurements with other techniques to disentangle the different biological processes composing NEE that are activated by a precipitation pulse. Accordingly, the main objectives of this work were: (i) to quantify the contribution of precipitation pulse events to annual NEE using the eddy covariance technique in a semiarid steppe located in Almería (Spain), and (ii) to simulate a realistic precipitation pulse in order to understand its effect on the ecosystem, soil and plant CO2 exchanges by using a transitory-state closed canopy chamber, soil respiration chambers and continuous monitoring CO2 sensors inserted in the subsoil. Preliminary results showed, as expected, a delay between soil and plant

  8. Evaluation of Co-precipitation Processes for the Synthesis of Mixed-Oxide Fuel Feedstock Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Emory D; Voit, Stewart L; Vedder, Raymond James

    2011-06-01

    processes include (1) feed solution concentration adjustment, (2) precipitant concentration and addition methods, (3) pH, temperature, mixing method and time, (4) valence adjustment, (5) solid precipitate separation from the filtrate 'mother liquor,' generally by means of centrifugation or filtration, and (6) temperatures and times for drying, calcination, and reduction of the MOX product powder. Also a recovery step is necessary because of low, but finite solubility of the U/TRU metals in the mother liquor. The recovery step usually involves destruction of the residual precipitant and disposal of by-product wastes. Direct denitrations of U/TRU require fewer steps, but must utilize various methods to enable production of MOX with product characteristics that are acceptable for recycle fuel fabrication. The three co-precipitation processes considered for evaluation are (1) the ammonia co-precipitation process being developed in Russia, (2) the oxalate co-precipitation process, being developed in France, and (3) the ammonium-uranyl-plutonyl-carbonate (AUPuC) process being developed in Germany. Two direct denitration processes are presented for comparison: (1) the 'Microwave Heating (MH)' automated multi-batch process developed in Japan and (2) the 'Modified Direct Denitration (MDD)' continuous process being developed in the USA. Brief comparative descriptions of the U/TRU co-conversion processes are described. More complete details are provided in the references.

  9. Stochastic investigation of precipitation process for climatic variability identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriadou, Alexia; Petsiou, Amalia; Feloni, Elisavet; Kastis, Paris; Iliopoulou, Theano; Markonis, Yannis; Tyralis, Hristos; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2016-04-01

    The precipitation process is important not only to hydrometeorology but also to renewable energy resources management. We use a dataset consisting of daily and hourly records around the globe to identify statistical variability with emphasis on the last period. Specifically, we investigate the occurrence of mean, maximum and minimum values and we estimate statistical properties such as marginal probability distribution function and the type of decay of the climacogram (i.e., mean process variance vs. scale). Acknowledgement: This research is conducted within the frame of the undergraduate course "Stochastic Methods in Water Resources" of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA). The School of Civil Engineering of NTUA provided moral support for the participation of the students in the Assembly.

  10. Experimental investigation of Mars meandering rivers: Chemical precipitation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Lim, Y.; Cleveland, J.; Reid, E.; Jew, C.

    2014-12-01

    On Earth, meandering streams occur where the banks are resistant to erosion, which enhances narrow and deep channels. Often this is because the stream banks are held firm by vegetation. The ancient, highly sinuous channels with cutoffs found on Mars are enigmatic because vegetation played no role in providing bank cohesion and enhancing fine sediment deposition. Possible causes of the meandering therefore include ice under permafrost conditions and chemical processes. We conducted carbonate flume experiments to investigate possible mechanisms creating meandering channels other than vegetation. The experiment includes a tank that dissolves limestone by adding CO2 gas and produces artificial spring water, peristaltic pumps to drive water through the system, a heater to control the temperature of the spring water, and a flume where carbonate sediment deposits. Spring water containing dissolved calcium and carbonate ions moves through a heater to increase temperature, and then into the flume. The flume surface is open to the air to allow CO2 degassing, decrease temperature, and increase pH, which promotes carbonate precipitation. A preliminary experiment was done and successfully created a meander pattern that evolved over a 3-day experiment. The experiment showed lateral migration of the bend and avulsion of the stream, similar to a natural meander. The lateral variation in flow speed increased the local residence time of water, thus increasing the degassing of CO2 on the two sides of the flow and promoting more precipitation. This enhanced precipitation on the sides provided a mechanism to build levees along the channel and created a stream confined in a narrow path. This mechanism also potentially applies to Earthly single thread and/or meandering rivers developed and recorded before vegetation appeared on Earth's surface.

  11. Integration of advanced nuclear materials separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, G.D.; Worl, L.A.; Padilla, D.D.; Berg, J.M.; Neu, M.P.; Reilly, S.D.; Buelow, S.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project has examined the fundamental chemistry of plutonium that affects the integration of hydrothermal technology into nuclear materials processing operations. Chemical reactions in high temperature water allow new avenues for waste treatment and radionuclide separation.Successful implementation of hydrothermal technology offers the potential to effective treat many types of radioactive waste, reduce the storage hazards and disposal costs, and minimize the generation of secondary waste streams. The focus has been on the chemistry of plutonium(VI) in solution with carbonate since these are expected to be important species in the effluent from hydrothermal oxidation of Pu-containing organic wastes. The authors investigated the structure, solubility, and stability of the key plutonium complexes. Installation and testing of flow and batch hydrothermal reactors in the Plutonium Facility was accomplished. Preliminary testing with Pu-contaminated organic solutions gave effluent solutions that readily met discard requirements. A new effort in FY 1998 will build on these promising initial results.

  12. Actinide and lanthanide separation process (ALSEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Guelis, Artem V.

    2013-01-15

    The process of the invention is the separation of minor actinides from lanthanides in a fluid mixture comprising, fission products, lanthanides, minor actinides, rare earth elements, nitric acid and water by addition of an organic chelating aid to the fluid; extracting the fluid with a solvent comprising a first extractant, a second extractant and an organic diluent to form an organic extractant stream and an aqueous raffinate. Scrubbing the organic stream with a dicarboxylic acid and a chelating agent to form a scrubber discharge. The scrubber discharge is stripped with a simple buffering agent and a second chelating agent in the pH range of 2.5 to 6.1 to produce actinide and lanthanide streams and spent organic diluents. The first extractant is selected from bis(2-ethylhexyl)hydrogen phosphate (HDEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl)2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (HEH(EHP)) and the second extractant is selected from N,N,N,N-tetra-2-ethylhexyl diglycol amide (TEHDGA) and N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyl-3-oxapentanediamide (TODGA).

  13. IPHEx 2014: Observations of Orographic Precipitation Processes in the Southern Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, A. P.; Petersen, W. A.; Lang, T. J.; Wilson, A. M.; Duan, Y.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Cifelli, R.; Schwaller, M.; Wolff, D. B.; Miller, D. K.; Gourley, J. J.; Petters, M.

    2014-12-01

    The focus of the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx) in the Southern Appalachians and including the Piedmont and Coastal Plain regions of North Carolina was to characterize warm season orographic precipitation regimes, and to investigate the relationship between precipitation regimes and hydrologic processes in regions of complex terrain. IPHEX consisted of two phases: 1) an extended observing period (EOP) from October 2013 through October 2014 including a science-grade high elevation raingauge network, in addition to the fixed regional observing system; a disdrometer network consisting of twenty separate clusters; three mobile profiling facilities including MicroRain Radars, microwave radiometers, radiosondes, and microphysics characterization instruments; and 2) an intense observing period (IOP) from May-July of 2014 post GPM launch focusing on 4D mapping of precipitation structure during which NASA's NPOL S-band scanning dual-polarization radar, the dual-frequency Ka-Ku, dual polarimetric, Doppler radar (D3R), four additional MRRs, and the NOAA NOXP radar were deployed along with the long-term fixed instrumentation. During the IOP, high altitude and "in the column" measurements were conducted using the NASA ER-2 and the UND Citation aircraft. By taking place after the launch of the GPM satellite, IPHEx provided the first opportunity for coordinated observations among all platforms. Here, we present a first synthesis of ground-based observations of precipitation processes and science findings from IPHEx, including a 4D physically-based integration of multisensor observations incorporating DPR Level 1 products in the inner mountain region that captures the complex vertical structure of microphysical processes modulated by orography, and a first interrogation of GMI and DPR Level 2 products in the IPHEX domain.

  14. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-10-05

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF).

  15. Prediction of separation process results in OGMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzov, V. L.; Dmitrievskaya, T. Yu.; Piskunov, A. N.; Fedorov, V. K.; Cheremnykh, P. A.; Yaremenko, V. N.

    1990-01-01

    The wet magnetic separation of ore fine particles containing 32-40% of iron in the form of hematite is experimentally investigated. The extraction parameter distribution W( X) of particles is obtained at the open-gradient magnetic separator, X = κD2, κ - being the relative magnetic susceptibility of a paramagnetic or diamagnetic particle, D, its size.

  16. PEROXIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Perlman, I.

    1958-09-16

    reduced state, from hexavalent uranium. It consists in treating an aqueous solution containing such uranium and plutonium ions with sulfate ions in order to form a soluble uranium sulfate complex and then treating the solution with a soluble thorium compound and a soluble peroxide compound in order to ferm a thorium peroxide carrier precipitate which carries down with it the plutonium peroxide present. During this treatment the pH of the solution must be maintained between 2 and 3.

  17. Responses of Precipitation and Hydrologic Processes to Tropical SST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Li, X.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the research is to identify the mechanisms in the response of tropical precipitation and atmospheric hydrologic cycle to sea surface temperature (SST) variability at seasonal-to-interannual time scales, and to utilize the knowledge for better understanding of climate feedback processes relevant to global change. As a first step to achieve the goal, we characterize the inter-relationship among convective/stratiform rain, ice/water clouds water vapor, and SST using TRMM satellite data and a cloud-resolving model. We examined the daily hydrologic variables [column water vapor (PW), cloud liquid water (CW), rainfall rates (RR)] as a function of SST using high-resolution data (0.25 x 0.25, daily) derived from TRMM satellite measurements. Comparing the winter of 97/98 (El Nino condition) against the winter of 99/00 (La Nina condition), area-mean values of all four hydrologic variables in cloudy areas within the tropical Pacific are higher in the El Nino winter than in the La Nina winter. This is consistent with previous observational analyses and SST warming experiments (idealized or ENSO-like) that showed the interaction between hydrologic cyclic and radiation at the seasonal to interannual time scales leads to intensified tropical circulation and hydrologic cycle. However, there is evidence that the enhanced hydrologic cycle over the warm pool is accompanied by an expansion of radiatively -driven subsidence in response to a stronger SST gradient between warm pool and surrounding cold pool. The expanding subsidence effectively reduces cloud amounts over the warm pool. Our analysis of daily variability further indicates a more vigorous water cycle characterized by higher PW, CW, and RR in response to overall warming. This is expected from the Clausius Clapeyron relation as a thermodynamic response to warming. However cloudy areas decrease in response to overall warming. This may be due to factors that are fundamentally different. One possibility is that in a

  18. Segregation, precipitation, and α -α' phase separation in Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuronen, A.; Granroth, S.; Heinonen, M. H.; Perälä, R. E.; Kilpi, T.; Laukkanen, P.; Lâng, J.; Dahl, J.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Kokko, K.; Ropo, M.; Johansson, B.; Vitos, L.

    2015-12-01

    Iron-chromium alloys, the base components of various stainless steel grades, have numerous technologically and scientifically interesting properties. However, these features are not yet sufficiently understood to allow their full exploitation in technological applications. In this work, we investigate segregation, precipitation, and phase separation in Fe-Cr systems analyzing the physical mechanisms behind the observed phenomena. To get a comprehensive picture of Fe-Cr alloys as a function of composition, temperature, and time the present investigation combines Monte Carlo simulations using semiempirical interatomic potential, first-principles total energy calculations, and experimental spectroscopy. In order to obtain a general picture of the relation of the atomic interactions and properties of Fe-Cr alloys in bulk, surface, and interface regions several complementary methods have to be used. Using the exact muffin-tin orbitals method with the coherent potential approximation (CPA-EMTO) the effective chemical potential as a function of Cr content (0-15 at. % Cr) is calculated for a surface, second atomic layer, and bulk. At ˜10 at. % Cr in the alloy the reversal of the driving force of a Cr atom to occupy either bulk or surface sites is obtained. The Cr-containing surfaces are expected when the Cr content exceeds ˜10 at. %. The second atomic layer forms about a 0.3 eV barrier for the migration of Cr atoms between the bulk and surface atomic layer. To get information on Fe-Cr in larger scales we use semiempirical methods. However, for Cr concentration regions less than 10 at. %, the ab initio (CPA-EMTO) result of the important role of the second atomic layer to the surface is not reproducible from the large-scale Monte Carlo molecular dynamics (MCMD) simulation. On the other hand, for the nominal concentration of Cr larger than 10 at. % the MCMD simulations show the precipitation of Cr into isolated pockets in bulk Fe-Cr and the existence of the upper limit of

  19. Using Doppler spectra to separate hydrometeor populations and analyze ice precipitation in multilayered mixed-phase clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Rambukkange, Mahlon P.; Verlinde, J.; Eloranta, E. W.; Flynn, Connor J.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2011-01-31

    Multimodality of cloud radar Doppler spectra is used to partition cloud particle phases and to separate distinct ice populations in the radar sample volume, thereby facilitating analysis of individual ice showers in multilayered mixed-phase clouds. A 35-GHz cloud radar located at Barrow, Alaska, during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment collected the Doppler spectra. Data from a pair of collocated depolarization lidars confirmed the presence of two liquid cloud layers reported in this study. Surprisingly, both of these cloud layers were embedded in ice precipitation yet maintained their liquid. Our spectral separation of the ice precipitation yielded two distinct ice populations: ice initiated within the two liquid cloud layers and ice precipitation formed in higher cloud layers. Comparisons of ice fall velocity versus radar reflectivity relationships derived for distinct showers reveal that a single relationship might not properly represent the ice showers during this period.

  20. Using Visualization and Computation in the Analysis of Separation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, Yong Lak; Choudhary, Devashish

    2006-01-01

    For decades, every chemical engineer has been asked to have a background in separations. The required separations course can, however, be uninspiring and superficial because understanding many separation processes involves conventional graphical methods and commercial process simulators. We utilize simple, user-­friendly mathematical software,…

  1. SEPARATION PROCESS FOR ZIRCONIUM AND COMPOUNDS THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, H.W.; Thomas, J.R.

    1959-06-30

    The separation of zirconium from columbium, rare earths, yttrium and the alkaline earth metals, such mixtures of elements occurring in zirconium ores or neutron irradiated uranium is described. According to the invention a suitable separation of zirconium from a one normal acidic aqueous solution containing salts, nitrates for example, of tetravalent zirconium, pentavalent columbium, yttrium, rare earths in the trivalent state and alkaline earths can be obtained by contacting the aqueous solution with a fluorinated beta diketonc alone or in an organic solvent solution, such as benzene, to form a zirconium chelate compound. When the organic solvent is present the zirconium chelate compound is directly extracted; otherwise it is separated by filtration. The zirconium may be recovered from contacting the organic solvent solution containing the chelated compound by back extraction with either an aqueous hydrofluoric acid or an oxalic acid solution.

  2. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Lambert, D.P.

    1992-11-09

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for tetraphenylborate precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92-737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The program was in conjunction with reducing the nitrite ion level in DWPF feed.

  3. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Lambert, D.P.

    1992-11-09

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for tetraphenylborate precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92-737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The program was in conjunction with reducing the nitrite ion level in DWPF feed.

  4. Wet separation processes as method to separate limestone and oil shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurme, Martin; Karu, Veiko

    2015-04-01

    Biggest oil shale industry is located in Estonia. Oil shale usage is mainly for electricity generation, shale oil generation and cement production. All these processes need certain quality oil shale. Oil shale seam have interlayer limestone layers. To use oil shale in production, it is needed to separate oil shale and limestone. A key challenge is find separation process when we can get the best quality for all product types. In oil shale separation typically has been used heavy media separation process. There are tested also different types of separation processes before: wet separation, pneumatic separation. Now oil shale industry moves more to oil production and this needs innovation methods for separation to ensure fuel quality and the changes in quality. The pilot unit test with Allmineral ALLJIG have pointed out that the suitable new innovation way for oil shale separation can be wet separation with gravity, where material by pulsating water forming layers of grains according to their density and subsequently separates the heavy material (limestone) from the stratified material (oil shale)bed. Main aim of this research is to find the suitable separation process for oil shale, that the products have highest quality. The expected results can be used also for developing separation processes for phosphorite rock or all others, where traditional separation processes doesn't work property. This research is part of the study Sustainable and environmentally acceptable Oil shale mining No. 3.2.0501.11-0025 http://mi.ttu.ee/etp and the project B36 Extraction and processing of rock with selective methods - http://mi.ttu.ee/separation; http://mi.ttu.ee/miningwaste/

  5. Sample selection and testing of separation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Phase partitioning, which has become an important tool for the separation and purification of biological materials, was studied. Instruments available for this technique were researched and a countercurrent distribution apparatus, the Biosheff MK2N, was purchased. Various proteins, polysaccharides and cells were studied as models to determine operating procedures and conditions for this piece of equipment. Results were compared with those obtained from other similar equipment, including a nonsynchronous coil planet centrifuge device. Additionally, work was done with affinity ligands attached to PEG, which can further enhance the separation capabilities of phase partitioning.

  6. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM IMPURITIES

    DOEpatents

    Wahl, A.C.

    1957-11-12

    A method is described for separating plutonium from aqueous solutions containing uranium. It has been found that if the plutonium is reduced to its 3+ valence state, and the uranium present is left in its higher valence state, then the differences in solubility between certain salts (e.g., oxalates) of the trivalent plutonium and the hexavalent uranium can be used to separate the metals. This selective reduction of plutonium is accomplished by adding iodide ion to the solution, since iodide possesses an oxidation potential sufficient to reduce plutonium but not sufficient to reduce uranium.

  7. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Butler, T.A.; Johns, I.B.

    1959-03-10

    The removal of fission products such as strontium, barium, cesium, rubidium, or iodine from neutronirradiated uranium is described. Uranium halide or elemental halogen is added to melted irradiated uranium to convert the fission products to either more volatile compositions which vaporize from the melt or to higher melting point compositions which separate as solids.

  8. Process, including PSA and membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2001-01-01

    An improved process for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons. The process includes a pressure swing adsorption step, a compression/cooling step and a membrane separation step. The membrane step relies on achieving a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the conditions of the process.

  9. Processing energetic materials with supercritical fluid precipitation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essel, Jonathan

    Research has shown that nano-sized particles of explosives have a reduced sensitivity to impact and shock. Nano-sized energetic particles have also shown promise in improving the performance of propellants and explosives. Therefore, a method to produce nano-sized explosive particles could be ideal for sensitivity and performance reasons. Supercritical fluid precipitation has been shown to produce nano-sized explosive particles effectively. This research explores the feasibility of processing energetic materials using three different supercritical fluid precipitation techniques. The first technique is called the Rapid Expansion of a Supercritical Solution (RESS). The RESS process dissolves a solute in a supercritical fluid and then rapidly expands the resulting solution through a nozzle to produce small (nano-sized) and uniform particles from a high degree of supersaturation. The second technique is the Rapid Expansion of a Supercritical Solution into a Liquid Solvent (RESOLV) Process. This process is similar to the RESS process except the supercritical solution is expanded into a liquid and dispersant solution to reduce particle agglomeration and to reduce the size of the particles further. The final technique investigated is the Rapid Expansion of a Supercritical Solution with a Nonsolute (RESS-N) process in which the precipitating solute is used to encapsulate or coat a nonsoluble substance by heterogeneous nucleation. This works takes both a theoretical an empirical approach. On the theoretical side, a numerical code that accounts for nucleation and condensation in the RESS process was written in FORTRAN to predict how altering pre-expansion pressures and pre-expansion temperatures in the RESS process could affect the final particle size of the produced RDX. It was determined that pre-expansion temperature had a marginal impact on final particle size but higher pre-expansion pressures were beneficial in forming smaller particles. Also, a software program called

  10. Separation of Ce and La from Synthetic Chloride Leach Solution of Monazite Sand by Precipitation and Solvent Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banda, Raju; Jeon, Ho Seok; Lee, Man Seung

    2014-12-01

    Precipitation and solvent extraction experiments have been performed to recover light rare earths from simulated monazite sand chloride leach solutions. Precipitation conditions were obtained to recover Ce by adding NaClO as an oxidant. Among some cationic extractants (PC 88A, D2EHPA, Cyanex 272, LIX 63), PC 88A showed the best performance to separate La from the resulting chloride solution. Furthermore, the mixture of PC 88A with other solvating (TBP, TOPO) and amine extractants (Alamine 336, Aliquat 336) was tested to increase the separation factor of La from Pr and Nd. The use of mixed extractants greatly enhanced the separation of La from the two other metals. McCabe-Thiele diagrams for the extraction of Pr and Nd with the PC 88A/Alamine 336 mixture were constructed.

  11. Life cycle comparison of centralized wastewater treatment and urine source separation with struvite precipitation: Focus on urine nutrient management.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Stephanie K L; Boyer, Treavor H

    2015-08-01

    Alternative approaches to wastewater management including urine source separation have the potential to simultaneously improve multiple aspects of wastewater treatment, including reduced use of potable water for waste conveyance and improved contaminant removal, especially nutrients. In order to pursue such radical changes, system-level evaluations of urine source separation in community contexts are required. The focus of this life cycle assessment (LCA) is managing nutrients from urine produced in a residential setting with urine source separation and struvite precipitation, as compared with a centralized wastewater treatment approach. The life cycle impacts evaluated in this study pertain to construction of the urine source separation system and operation of drinking water treatment, decentralized urine treatment, and centralized wastewater treatment. System boundaries include fertilizer offsets resulting from the production of urine based struvite fertilizer. As calculated by the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and Other Environmental Impacts (TRACI), urine source separation with MgO addition for subsequent struvite precipitation with high P recovery (Scenario B) has the smallest environmental cost relative to existing centralized wastewater treatment (Scenario A) and urine source separation with MgO and Na3PO4 addition for subsequent struvite precipitation with concurrent high P and N recovery (Scenario C). Preliminary economic evaluations show that the three urine management scenarios are relatively equal on a monetary basis (<13% difference). The impacts of each urine management scenario are most sensitive to the assumed urine composition, the selected urine storage time, and the assumed electricity required to treat influent urine and toilet water used to convey urine at the centralized wastewater treatment plant. The importance of full nutrient recovery from urine in combination with the substantial chemical inputs required for N recovery

  12. Separation of Am-Cm from Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ waste solutions by in-canyon-tank precipitation as oxalates

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.W.; Burney, G.A.; Wilson, T.W.; McKibben, J.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Holtzscheiter, E.W.; Campbell, T.G.

    1982-04-01

    A process for recovery of Am-Cm residues from high-activity waste concentrates has been developed specifically for application in Savannah River Plant (SRP) canyon tanks. The Am-Cm residues were collected from a campaign to produce plutonium containing high isotopic concentrations of /sup 242/Pu. The separation of Am-Cm from the high-activity waste stream, containing about 2M Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, is necessary to produce an acceptable feed solution for a later pressurized cation exchange chromatography separation and purification step. The new process includes formic acid denitration, adjustment of contaminating cations by evaporation and water dilution, and oxalate precipitation of the actinides and lanthanides. After washing, the precipitate was dissolved in 8M nitric acid and the oxalate was destroyed by nitric acid oxidation that was catalyzed by manganous ions. This new process generates about one-fourth the waste of the californium solvent extraction process, which it replaced. The new process also produces a cleaner feed solution for the pressurized cation exchange chromatography separation and purification step.

  13. SEPARATION OF FISSION PRODUCT VALUES FROM THE HEXAVALENT PLUTONIUM BY CARRIER PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Davies, T.H.

    1959-12-15

    An improved precipitation of fission products on bismuth phosphate from an aqueous mineral acid solution also containing hexavalent plutonium by incorporating, prior to bismuth phosphate precipitation, from 0.05 to 2.5 grams/ liter of zirconium phosphate, niobium oxide. and/or lanthanum fluoride is described. The plutonium remains in solution.

  14. Use of surfactants in alumina precipitation in the bayer process

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, D.O.; Davis, D.C.

    1988-04-12

    In the method for producing alumina trihydrate crystals by crystallization of alumina trihydrate from a hot, caustic pregnant Bayer process liquor, to obtain a reduced percent of small size crystals -325 mesh fraction thereby to increase the yield of crystals coarser than -325 mesh subsequently to be processed to yield aluminum, the improvement is described comprising the addition to the pregnant liquor, after red mud separation and immediately prior to crystallization of alumina trihydrate, of two mutually soluble components (A) and (B) in an amount effective to increase the yield of the coarser crystals, component (A) being a surfactant which will disperse component (B) in the pregnant liquor and component (B) being an oil in which the surfactant is dissolved and having a boiling point above the temperature prevailing alumina hydrate crystallization.

  15. Process for separating high viscosity bitumen from tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; Misra, M.

    1983-10-18

    A novel process is disclosed for separating high viscosity bitumen from tar sand. The process includes grinding the tar sand to obtain phase disengagement of the bitumen phase from the sand phase and thereafter using flotation techniques to obtain phase separation of the bitumen phase from the sand phase. Phase disengagement is assisted by using a suitable wetting agent during the crushing step while the phase separation step is assisted by the inclusion of a promoter oil for the flotation step.

  16. Process for separating high viscosity bitumen from tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; Misra, M.

    1983-10-18

    A process is described for separating high viscosity bitumen from tar sand. The process includes grinding the tar sand to obtain disengagement of the bitumen from the sand phase and thereafter using flotation techniques to obtain phase separation of the bitumen phase from the sand phase. Phase disengagement is assisted by using a suitable wetting agent during the crushing step, while the phase separation step is assisted by the inclusion of a promoter oil for the flotation step. 6 claims.

  17. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE STRONIUM AND TRANSURANIC SEPARATION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    SMALLEY CS

    2011-04-25

    In order to meet contract requirements on the concentrations of strontium-90 and transuranic isotopes in the immobilized low-activity waste, strontium-90 and transuranics must be removed from the supernate of tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. The process currently proposed for this application is an in-tank precipitation process using strontium nitrate and sodium permanganate. Development work on the process has not proceeded since 2005. The purpose of the evaluation is to identify whether any promising alternative processes have been developed since this issue was last examined, evaluate the alternatives and the baseline process, and recommend which process should be carried forward.

  18. A pilot-scale study of cryolite precipitation from high fluoride-containing wastewater in a reaction-separation integrated reactor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ke; Zhou, Kanggen; Yang, Youcai; Du, Hu

    2013-07-01

    Fluoride removal by traditional precipitation generates huge amounts of a water-rich sludge with low quality, which has no commercial or industrial value. The present study evaluated the feasibility of recovering fluoride as low water content cryolite from industrial fluoride-containing wastewater. A novel pilot-scale reaction-separation integrated reactor was designed. The results showed that the seed retention time in the reactor was prolonged to strengthen the induced crystallization process. The particle size of cryolite increased with increasing seed retention time, which decreased the water content. The recovery rate of cryolite was above 75% under an influent fluoride concentration of 3500 mg/L, a reaction temperature of 500C, and an influent flow of 40 L/hr. The cryolite products that precipitated from the reactor were small in volume, large in particle size, low in water content, high in crystal purity, and recyclable. PMID:24218844

  19. Cryogenic methane separation/catalytic hydrogasification process analysis. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Klosek, J.

    1981-08-01

    In both the Rockwell and the Exxon gasification processors, the desired product methane needs to be separated from the reaction products and some of the other synthesis gas products recycled. This separation is not easy and cryogenic methane separation results from the Rockwell process gas at 932 psia and containing 3725 ppM of benzene are reported. The benzene was recovered by partial condensation and carbon adsorption. Other details are given. In the Exxon process three preliminary plant designs for acid gas removal and cryogenic methane separation from the raw gas at 250 psig were evaluated. (LTN)

  20. Thermodynamic Analysis of Nanoporous Membrane Separation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan

    2011-03-01

    We give an analysis of desalination energy requirements in order to quantify the potential for future improvements in desalination membrane technology. Our thermodynamic analysis makes it possible to draw conclusions from the vast array of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations present in the literature as well as create a standardized comparison for measuring and reporting experimental reverse osmosis material efficiency. Commonly employed methods for estimating minimum desalination energy costs have been revised to include operations at positive input stream recovery ratios using a thermodynamic cycle analogous to the Carnot cycle. Several gaps in the statistical mechanical theory of irreversible processes have also been identified which may in the future lead to improved communication between materials engineering models and statistical mechanical simulation. Simulation results for silica surfaces and nanochannels are also presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Analysis and computer tools for separation processes involving nonideal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, A.

    1992-05-01

    The objectives of this research, were to continue to further both the theoretical understanding of and the development of computer tools (algorithms) for separation processes involving nonideal mixtures. These objectives were divided into three interrelated major areas -- the mathematical analysis of the number of steady-state solutions to multistage separation processes, the numerical analysis of general, related fixed-point methods, and the development and implementation of computer tools for process simulation.

  2. Multi-Element Preconcentration/Separation of Some Metal Ions in Environmental Samples by Using Co-precipitation.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Aydin, Ayse; Kizil, Nebiye

    2016-01-01

    A preconcentration/separation system for cadmium(II), nickel(II), copper(II), lead(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), and manganese(II) ions has been established prior to their atomic absorption spectrometric determinations. The procedure is based on the co-precipitation of these ions by the aid of a praseodymium hydroxide (Pr(OH)3) precipitate. The precipitate was dissolved in 0.5 mL of concentrated HNO3, and made up to 10.0 mL with water. The analytes were determined by a flame atomic absorption spectrometer. The effects of analytical parameters including pH, amounts of praseodymium as carrier element, sample volume, etc. on the recoveries of heavy metals were investigated. The effects of matrix ions were also examined. The limits of detection for analyte ions were found in the range between 0.7-5.2 μg/L. The validation of this present procedure was verified by the analysis of certified reference materials, TMDA-54.4 (fortified water) and NIST 1570a (spinach leaves). The proposed co-precipitation procedure was applied for the determination of cadmium(II), nickel(II), copper(II), lead(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), and manganese(II) ions in various environmental water samples. PMID:27053469

  3. PRECIPITATION OF PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.L.

    1958-07-15

    An lmprovement in the separation of protactinium from aqueous nitric acid solutions is described. 1t covers the use of lead dioxide and tin dioxide as carrier precipitates for the protactinium. In carrying out the process, divalent lead or divalent tin is addcd to the solution and oxidized, causing formation of a carrier precipitate of lead dioxide or stannic oxide, respectively.

  4. Wavefield separation in the process of transform between data domains

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, X.; Wu, L.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a method of wave field separation. As the matrix of wave field separation is the function of the apparent slowness p and velocities, using the matrix in the processes of {tau}-p transform, f-k transform or discrete Radon transform, the velocities of Vp and Vs can vary with depth. The analysis and a practical example given in the paper show that the method is an efficient means in wave field separation.

  5. Metal-affinity separations: A new dimension in protein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, F.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Rapid growth in the preparative and high-resolution analytical applications of metal-affinity chromatography demonstrate the appeal of metal recognition as a basis for protein separations. Stable, inexpensive chelated metals effectively mimic biospecific interactions, providing selective ligands for protein binding. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of metal-protein recognition that underlie metal-affinity separations. Also discussed are schemes for integrating metal-affinity purifications into the expression and bioprocessing of recombinant proteins. Promising future developments include new metal-affinity processes for analytical and preparative-scale separations and a range of techniques for enhancing the selectivity of metal-affinity separations.

  6. Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Jr., Henry D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for separating isotopes as well as other mixtures by utilizing the behavior of dilute repulsive or weakly attractive elements of the mixtures as the critical point of the solvent is approached.

  7. Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, H.D. Jr.

    1993-04-20

    A process is described for separating isotopes as well as other mixtures by utilizing the behavior of dilute repulsive or weakly attractive elements of the mixtures as the critical point of the solvent is approached.

  8. Technical and economical assessment of formic acid to recycle phosphorus from pig slurry by a combined acidification-precipitation process.

    PubMed

    Daumer, M-L; Picard, S; Saint-Cast, P; Dabert, P

    2010-08-15

    Dissolution by acidification followed by a liquid/solid separation and precipitation of phosphorus from the liquid phase is one possibility to recycle phosphorus from livestock effluents. To avoid increase of effluent salinity by using mineral acids in the recycling process, the efficiency of two organic acids, formic and acetic acid, in dissolving the mineral phosphorus from piggery wastewater was compared. The amount of formic acid needed to dissolve the phosphorus was reduced three fold, compared to acetic acid. The amount of magnesium oxide needed for further precipitation was decreased by two with formic acid. Neither the carbon load nor the effluent salinity was significantly increased by using formic acid. An economical comparison was performed for the chemical recycling process (mineral fertilizer) vs. centrifugation (organic fertilizer) considering the centrifugation and the mineral fertilizers sold in the market. After optimisation of the process, the product could be economically competitive with mineral fertilizer as superphosphate in less than 10 years. PMID:20471746

  9. Process for separating water and solids from fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Filho, J.H.; Bachmann, D.L.

    1987-11-17

    A process for separating water and solid particles from a fuel oil feedstock is described comprising: subjecting the feedstock to a first separation in a scroll type centrifugal separator to form a first recovered fuel stream and an oil cake; subjecting at least the first recovered fuel stream to a second separation in a centrifugal disc separator to form a clean fuel stream, an oil-bearing water stream and a sludge stream; treating the oil-bearing water stream in a separator to recover the oil; treating the oil cake removed from the first separation with a solvent in order to form a suspension; mixing the suspension with the sludge stream to form a mixture; feeding the mixture to a filter press to yield a solid reject and a filtrate; separating the filtrate into a decantate and recovered oil; mixing at least a portion of the recovered oil with first recovered fuel stream to form a semi-cleaned fuel stream; and subjecting the semi-cleaned fuel stream to the second separation in a centrifugal disc separator to form the clean fuel stream.

  10. Automated separation process for radioanalytical purposes at nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Nagy, L G; Vajda, N; Vodicska, M; Zagyvai, P; Solymosi, J

    1987-10-01

    Chemical separation processes have been developed to remove the matrix components and thus to determine fission products, especially radioiodine nuclides, in the primary coolant of WWER-type nuclear reactors. Special procedures have been elaborated to enrich long-lived nuclides in waste waters to be released and to separate and enrich caesium isotopes in the environment. All processes are based mainly on ion-exchange separations using amorphous zirconium phosphate. Automated equipment was constructed to meet the demands of the plant personnel for serial analysis. PMID:3680447

  11. Process for separating high viscosity bitumen from tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; Misra, M.

    1984-12-04

    A novel process for separating high viscosity bitumen from tar sand. The process includes grinding the tar sand to obtain phase disengagement of the bitumen phase from the sand phase and thereafter using flotation techniques to obtain phase separation of the bitumen phase from the sand phase. Phase disengagement is assisted by using a suitable wetting agent such as sodium carbonate or sodium silicate during the grinding step, while the phase separation step is assisted by the inclusion of a promoter oil for the flotation step.

  12. Active management of naturally separated flow over a solid surface. Part 2. The separation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, A.; Wygnanski, I.

    2004-07-01

    The controlled separation of flow from an inclined straight flap at high inclination angles was investigated experimentally. The separation process was initiated by an abrupt change in the excitation emanating from a slot at the flap shoulder. A complete cessation of the actuation resulted in formation of a large vortex above the flap akin to the familiar ‘dynamic stall vortex’ (DSV) seen over oscillating airfoils in pitch. The DSV temporarily increased the aerodynamic load over the flap before it dropped to its low separated value. The duration of this overload decreased as the flap inclination increased. The use of periodic excitation during separation slowed down the rate of separation and changed its character depending on the amplitude and the frequency used. Forcing separation by switching the excitation to a high frequency (3 {<} F(+} {<) 8) reduced or even eliminated the increase in flap loading that is associated with the DSV. A switch to low frequencies (F(+} {<) 1) extended the duration of separation and increased the transient overload during the initial stage of the process.

  13. Separation of transglutaminase by thermo-responsive affinity precipitation using l-thyroxin as ligand.

    PubMed

    Li, Sipeng; Ding, Zhaoyang; Cao, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Transglutaminase (TGase) is widely used in the food industry. In this study, TGase was purified by affinity precipitation using l-thyroxin, coupled to a thermo-responsive polymer (PNBN), as an affinity ligand. The lower critical solution temperature and recovery of the affinity polymer were 31.0 °C and 99.6 %, respectively. The optimal adsorption condition was 0.02 mol/L phosphate buffer (pH 5.0). The recoveries 99.01 % (protein) and 98.85 % (activity) were obtained by 0.2 mol/L Gly-NaOH buffer (pH 10.0) as the elution agent. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and FortéBio Octet system were used to explore the interactions between l-thyroxin and TGase. The results show that l-thyroxin is suitable for affinity precipitation of TGase. The purity of the final product was verified using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PMID:26835219

  14. Process parameters and morphology in puerarin, phospholipids and their complex microparticles generation by supercritical antisolvent precipitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yang, Da-Jian; Chen, Shi-Lin; Chen, Si-Bao; Chan, Albert Sun-Chi

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and evaluate a new method for the production of puerarin phospholipids complex (PPC) microparticles. The advanced particle formation method, solution enhanced dispersion by supercritical fluids (SEDS), was used for the preparation of puerarin (Pur), phospholipids (PC) and their complex particles for the first time. Evaluation of the processing variables on PPC particle characteristics was also conducted. The processing variables included temperature, pressure, solution concentration, the flow rate of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and the relative flow rate of drug solution to CO2. The morphology, particle size and size distribution of the particles were determined. Meanwhile Pur and phospholipids were separately prepared by gas antisolvent precipitation (GAS) method and solid characterization of particles by the two supercritical methods was also compared. Pur formed by GAS was more orderly, purer crystal, whereas amorphous Pur particles between 0.5 and 1microm were formed by SEDS. The complex was successfully obtained by SEDS exhibiting amorphous, partially agglomerated spheres comprised of particles sized only about 1microm. SEDS method may be useful for the processing of other pharmaceutical preparations besides phospholipids complex particles. Furthermore adopting a GAS process to recrystallize pharmaceuticals will provide a highly versatile methodology to generate new polymorphs of drugs in addition to conventional techniques. PMID:18440736

  15. Advanced process for precipitation of lignin from ethanol organosolv spent liquors.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Peter; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Lorenz, Heike; Leschinsky, Moritz; Unkelbach, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    An advanced process for lignin precipitation from organosolv spent liquors based on ethanol evaporation was developed. The process avoids lignin incrustations in the reactor, enhances filterability of the precipitated lignin particles and significantly reduces the liquor mass in downstream processes. Initially, lignin solubility and softening properties were understood, quantified and exploited to design an improved precipitation process. Lignin incrustations were avoided by targeted precipitation of solid lignin at specific conditions (e.g. 100 mbar evaporation pressure, 43°C and 10%wt. of ethanol in lignin dispersion) in fed-batch operation at lab and pilot scale. As result of evaporation the mass of spent liquor was reduced by about 50%wt., thus avoiding large process streams. By controlled droplet coalescence the mean lignin particle size increased from below 10 μm to sizes larger than 10 μm improving the significantly filterability. PMID:26459197

  16. Performance of biofuel processes utilising separate lignin and carbohydrate processing.

    PubMed

    Melin, Kristian; Kohl, Thomas; Koskinen, Jukka; Hurme, Markku

    2015-09-01

    Novel biofuel pathways with increased product yields are evaluated against conventional lignocellulosic biofuel production processes: methanol or methane production via gasification and ethanol production via steam-explosion pre-treatment. The novel processes studied are ethanol production combined with methanol production by gasification, hydrocarbon fuel production with additional hydrogen produced from lignin residue gasification, methanol or methane synthesis using synthesis gas from lignin residue gasification and additional hydrogen obtained by aqueous phase reforming in synthesis gas production. The material and energy balances of the processes were calculated by Aspen flow sheet models and add on excel calculations applicable at the conceptual design stage to evaluate the pre-feasibility of the alternatives. The processes were compared using the following criteria: energy efficiency from biomass to products, primary energy efficiency, GHG reduction potential and economy (expressed as net present value: NPV). Several novel biorefinery concepts gave higher energy yields, GHG reduction potential and NPV. PMID:26056782

  17. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING ACTINIDE AND LANTHANIDE METAL VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrandt, R.A.; Hyman, H.H.; Vogler, S.

    1962-08-14

    A process of countercurrently extracting an aqueous mineral acid feed solution for the separation of actinides from lanthanides dissolved therern is described. The feed solution is made acid-defrcient with alkali metal hydroxide prior to.contact with acid extractant; during extraction, however, acid is transferred from organic to aqueous solution and the aqueous solution gradually becomes acid. The acid-deficient phase ' of the process promotes the extraction of the actinides, while the latter acid phase'' of the process improves retention of the lanthanides in the aqueous solution. This provides for an improved separation. (AEC)

  18. A Reverse Osmosis System for an Advanced Separation Process Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, C. S.; Paccione, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    Focuses on the development of a pilot unit for use in an advanced separations process laboratory in an effort to develop experiments on such processes as reverse osmosis, ultrafiltration, adsorption, and chromatography. Discusses reverse osmosis principles, the experimental system design, and some experimental studies. (TW)

  19. EFFECT OF SEPARATION PROCESSES ON THE FORMATION OF BROMINATED THMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Separation treatment processes are being investigated as a way to control the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished waters. These processes remove natural organic matter before a disinfection is applied, thus limiting the amount of material available to form D...

  20. PROCESS OF SEPARATING URANIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Warf, J.C.

    1958-08-19

    A process is described for separating uranium values from aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions. The process consists in contacting the uramium bearing solution with an organic solvent, tributyl phosphate, preferably diluted with a less viscous organic liquida whereby the uranyl nitrate is extracted into the organic solvent phase. The uranvl nitrate may be recovered from the solvent phase bv back extracting with an aqueous mediuin.

  1. Precipitation-adsorption process for the decontamination of nuclear waste supernates

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Lien-Mow; Kilpatrick, Lester L.

    1984-01-01

    High-level nuclear waste supernate is decontaminated of cesium by precipitation of the cesium and potassium with sodium tetraphenyl boron. Simultaneously, strontium-90 is removed from the waste supernate sorption of insoluble sodium titanate. The waste solution is then filtered to separate the solution decontaminated of cesium and strontium.

  2. Precipitation-adsorption process for the decontamination of nuclear waste supernates

    DOEpatents

    Lee, L.M.; Kilpatrick, L.L.

    1982-05-19

    High-level nuclear waste supernate is decontaminated of cesium by precipitation of the cesium and potassium with sodium tetraphenyl boron. Simultaneously, strontium-90 is removed from the waste supernate sorption of insoluble sodium titanate. The waste solution is then filtered to separate the solution decontaminated of cesium and strontium.

  3. Design of a continuous process setup for precipitated calcium carbonate production from steel converter slag.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Hannu-Petteri; Zevenhoven, Ron

    2014-03-01

    A mineral carbonation process "slag2PCC" for carbon capture, utilization, and storage is discussed. Ca is extracted from steel slag by an ammonium salt solvent and carbonated with gaseous CO2 after the separation of the residual slag. The solvent is reused after regeneration. The effects of slag properties such as the content of free lime, fractions of Ca, Si, Fe, and V, particle size, and slag storage on the Ca extraction efficiency are studied. Small particles with a high free-lime content and minor fractions of Si and V are the most suitable. To limit the amount of impurities in the process, the slag-to-liquid ratio should remain below a certain value, which depends on the slag composition. Also, the design of a continuous test setup (total volume ∼75 L) is described, which enables quick process variations needed to adapt the system to the varying slag quality. Different precipitated calcium carbonate crystals (calcite and vaterite) are generated in different parts of the setup. PMID:24578147

  4. CONCENTRATION OF Pu USING AN IODATE PRECIPITATE

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1960-02-23

    A method is given for separating plutonium from lanthanum in a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation process for the recovery of plutonium values from an aqueous solution. The carrier precipitation process includes the steps of forming a lanthanum fluoride precipi- . tate, thereby carrying plutonium out of solution, metathesizing the fluoride precipitate to a hydroxide precipitate, and then dissolving the hydroxide precipitate in nitric acid. In accordance with the invention, the nitric acid solution, which contains plutonium and lanthanum, is made 0.05 to 0.15 molar in potassium iodate. thereby precipitating plutonium as plutonous iodate and the plutonous iodate is separated from the lanthanum- containing supernatant solution.

  5. Air separation by the Moltox process. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.C.

    1981-04-01

    Results are described of a development program on a new and energy-saving process for air separation. The Moltox process involves reversibly reacting oxygen in air with a recirculating salt solution, such that oxygen is extracted without depressurizing the remaining nitrogen. Energy savings of approximately 50% are indicated for this process compared to conventional cryogenic air separation. The development program consisted of design, construction, and operation of a 6 liter/minute pilot plant; optimization of the process flowsheet through computer modelling; investigation of engineering aspects of the process including corrosion, safety, and NO/sub x/ generation; and an economic comparison to conventional cryogenic practice. All objectives were satisfactorily achieved except for continuous operation of the pilot plant, and the modifications necessary to achieve that have been identified. Economically the Moltox process shows a substantial advantage over large scale cryogenic plants which are powered by fuel vice electricity.

  6. Cryogenic methane separation/catalytic hydrogasification process analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cassano, A.A.; Hilton, M.F.; Li, T.C.; Tsao, T.R.

    1980-02-14

    The objective of this program was to recommend the most attractive combinations of acid gas removal methane separation systems for the Exxon Catalytic Coal Gasification (CCG) and the Rockwell Hydrogasification process currently undergoing development supported by DOE. The program was comprised of the following tasks. Screening to define the most promising integration scheme for each gasification process; development of a process flowsheet, heat and material balance, P and ID, equipment specification, utility summary, and plot plan for the process combination selected; and preparation of detailed economic and final report. The results of the study are documented in this report. The evaluations were performed using data supplied by the prime coal gasification contractors and the vendors of proprietary acid gas removal processes. This information, combined with Air Products' in-house capabilities in acid gas and cryogenic separation processses, was used to develop process designs and cost estimates for each integrated system. The design based and economic criteria employed in the study are described.

  7. Hydrogen-methane separation processes and related phenomena. [112 references

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J.T.; Wang, S.S.; Yang, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    A thorough and up-dated literature survey has been conducted on processes for separating hydrogen and methane. This was done in conjunction with our work of developing a more energy-efficient and lower-cost process based on cyclic, fixed-bed processes using coal chars as the sorbents. Although the review has covered all hydrocarbon separation processes, the focuses were on physical adsorption phenomena and theories (for both single and mixed gases), surface and pore characteristics of coals and heat-treated coals, and the continuous or semi-continuous chromatographic separation methods. There has been a sharply increasing interest in the past 10 to 15 years in developing processes for hydrocarbon separation based on adsorption/desorption; this is particularly true since the energy costs became increasingly higher recently. The rigorous work on competitive adsorption and on the cyclic (including parametric pumping) processes has all been done in the past 13 years. On the other hand, it is disappointing to find the absence of knowledge on adsorption on coal chars and the lack of it on adsorption on raw coals as well.

  8. Separation of products from mild coal gasification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wallman, P.H.

    1991-09-11

    The primary mild coal gasification product mixture containing noncondensible gas, high-boiling hydrocarbon vapors and entrained fines is difficult to process into the desired pure products: gas, liquids, and dry solids. This challenge for mild coal gasification process development has been studied by surveying the technical literature for suitable separations processes and for similar issues in related processes. The choice for a first-stage solids separation step is standard cyclones, arranged in parallel trains for large-volume applications in order to take advantage of the higher separation efficiency of smaller cyclones. However, mild gasification pilot-plant data show entrainment of ultrafine particles for which standard cyclones have poor separation efficiency. A hot secondary solids separation step is needed for the ultrafine entrainment in order to protect the liquid product from excessive amounts of contaminating solids. The secondary solids separation step is similar to many high-temperature flue-gas applications with an important complicating condition: Mild gasifier vapors form coke on surfaces in contact with the vapors. Plugging of the filter medium by coke deposition is concluded to be the main product separation problem for mild gasification. Three approaches to solution of this problem are discussed in the order of preference: (1) a barrier filter medium made of a perforated foil that is easy to regenerate, (2) a high-efficiency cyclone coupled with recycle of a solids-containing tar fraction for coking/cracking in the gasifier, and (3) a granular moving bed filter with regeneration of the bed material. The condensation of oil vapors diluted by noncondensible gas is analyzed thermodynamically, and the conclusion is that existing commercial oil fractionator designs are adequate as long as the vapor stream does not contain excessive amounts of solids. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  9. A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

    2010-12-14

    A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

  10. Magnetic particle separation process for hazardous and radionuclide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, L.; Pourfarzaneh, M.

    1997-12-31

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation program was initially funded by DOE EM-50 to develop processes for the efficient separation of radionuclides and other hazardous metals. This process has stimulated the partnership between industry and ANL for many applications related to hazardous metal problems in industry. In-tank or near-tank hazardous metals separation using magnetic particles that have selective coating is a new approach to the problems of metal removal and recycling [of industrial (e.g., mining, printing circuit board, plating)] corrosive waste streams. This concept of coated magnetic particles promises simple, compact processing at very low costs and employs mature chemical separations technologies to remove and recover hazardous metals from aqueous solutions. The selective chemical extractants are attached to inexpensive magnetic carrier particles. Surfaces of small particles composed of rare earths or ferromagnetic materials are treated to retain chemical extractants (e.g., TBP, CMPO, quaternary amines, carboxylic acid). After selective partitioning of contaminants to the surface layer, magnets are used to collect the loaded particles from the tank. The particles can be regenerated by stripping the contaminants and the selective metals can be recovered and recycled from the strip solution. This process and its related equipment are simple enough to be used for recovery/recycling and waste minimization activities at many industrial sites. Both the development of the process for hazardous and radioactive waste and the transfer of the technology will be discussed.

  11. Color separation in forensic image processing using interactive differential evolution.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Harris; Rahnamayan, Shahryar; Siddiqi, Areeb

    2015-01-01

    Color separation is an image processing technique that has often been used in forensic applications to differentiate among variant colors and to remove unwanted image interference. This process can reveal important information such as covered text or fingerprints in forensic investigation procedures. However, several limitations prevent users from selecting the appropriate parameters pertaining to the desired and undesired colors. This study proposes the hybridization of an interactive differential evolution (IDE) and a color separation technique that no longer requires users to guess required control parameters. The IDE algorithm optimizes these parameters in an interactive manner by utilizing human visual judgment to uncover desired objects. A comprehensive experimental verification has been conducted on various sample test images, including heavily obscured texts, texts with subtle color variations, and fingerprint smudges. The advantage of IDE is apparent as it effectively optimizes the color separation parameters at a level indiscernible to the naked eyes. PMID:25400037

  12. A novel electrochemical process for the recovery and recycling of ferric chloride from precipitation sludge.

    PubMed

    Mejia Likosova, E; Keller, J; Poussade, Y; Freguia, S

    2014-03-15

    During wastewater treatment and drinking water production, significant amounts of ferric sludge (comprising ferric oxy-hydroxides and FePO4) are generated that require disposal. This practice has a major impact on the overall treatment cost as a result of both chemical addition and the disposal of the generated chemical sludge. Iron sulfide (FeS) precipitation via sulfide addition to ferric phosphate (FePO4) sludge has been proven as an effective process for phosphate recovery. In turn, iron and sulfide could potentially be recovered from the FeS sludge, and recycled back to the process. In this work, a novel process was investigated at lab scale for the recovery of soluble iron and sulfide from FeS sludge. Soluble iron is regenerated electrochemically at a graphite anode, while sulfide is recovered at the cathode of the same electrochemical cell. Up to 60 ± 18% soluble Fe and 46 ± 11% sulfide were recovered on graphite granules for up-stream reuse. Peak current densities of 9.5 ± 4.2 A m(-2) and minimum power requirements of 2.4 ± 0.5 kWh kg Fe(-1) were reached with real full strength FeS suspensions. Multiple consecutive runs of the electrochemical process were performed, leading to the successful demonstration of an integrated process, comprising FeS formation/separation and ferric/sulfide electrochemical regeneration. PMID:24397913

  13. Direct solid-state precipitation-processed A15 /Nb3Al/ superconducting material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, M.; Morris, J. W., Jr.

    1980-12-01

    A 'solid-state precipitation' process was used to prepare superconducting tapes containing Nb3Al in a niobium matrix. Small ingots of Nb-(17-19 at. %)Al were prepared by arc melting, homogenizing, quenching, warm rolling into tape, and aging at 750-900 C to precipitate the A15 phase. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed Nb3Al precipitation in fine particles which formed a semicontinuous network over subgrain boundaries formed by the recovery of deformation-induced dislocations. Promising high-field critical currents were obtained (current density approximately 10 thousand A/sq cm in a field of 14 T at 4.2 K).

  14. Identification of RNase-resistant RNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts: Separation from chromosomal DNA by selective precipitation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Blanca V; Malczewskyj, Eric T; Cabiya, Joshua M; Lewis, L Kevin; Maeder, Corina

    2016-01-01

    High-quality chromosomal DNA is a requirement for many biochemical and molecular biological techniques. To isolate cellular DNA, standard protocols typically lyse cells and separate nucleic acids from other biological molecules using a combination of chemical and physical methods. After a standard chemical-based protocol to isolate chromosomal DNA from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and then treatment with RNase A to degrade RNA, two RNase-resistant bands persisted when analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Interestingly, such resistant bands did not appear in preparations of Escherichia coli bacterial DNA after RNase treatment. Several enzymatic, chemical, and physical methods were employed in an effort to remove the resistant RNAs, including use of multiple RNases and alcohol precipitation, base hydrolysis, and chromatographic methods. These experiments resulted in the development of a new method for isolation of S. cerevisiae chromosomal DNA. This method utilizes selective precipitation of DNA in the presence of a potassium acetate/isopropanol mixture and produces high yields of chromosomal DNA without detectable contaminating RNAs. PMID:26416692

  15. Storage effects on separated pink salmon processing byproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is growing demand for utilizing fish byproducts and individual byproduct parts such as heads and viscera components can be collected directly from the commercial processing line. These separated parts can be made into specialized feeds or other end products. The storage and stability propertie...

  16. Process of treating cellulosic membrane and alkaline with membrane separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    The improvement of water-soluble cellulose ether membranes for use as separators in concentrated alkaline battery cells is discussed. The process of contacting membranes with an aqueous alkali solution of concentration less than that of the alkali solution to be used in the battery but above that at which the membrane is soluble is described.

  17. Measurements of temporal and spatial sequences of events in periodic precipitation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Shoichi; Müller, Stefan C.; Ross, John

    1982-02-01

    A series of new experiments on Liesegang ring (or band) formation is presented which is concerned with the temporal and spatial evolution of the process of structure formation. We have chosen NH4OH and MgSO4 to form rings of Mg(OH)2 precipitate in a gelatin gel, as well as KI and Pb(NO3)2 for periodic precipitation of PbI2 in an agar gel. A temporal sequence of events during the entire period from the start of a Liesegang experiment in a test tube to the completion of the final ring pattern has been determined at many locations in the tube by visual observations and by measurements of transmitted light, of scattered light, of deflection of the transmitted light beam, and of gravity effects. After diffusion of one electrolyte into the gel medium containing the second electrolyte results in an ion product larger than three times the solubility product, at any and all points in space, we observe the onset of homogeneous nucleation of colloidal particles by a steplike increase of the index of refraction. The colloid concentration and the particle number density at the nucleation site are estimated to be 10-2 mol/l and 1015 to 1016 cm-3, respectively. Nucleation is followed by the growth of colloidal particles which gives rise to distinct light scattering (turbidity). Both nucleation and colloid formation take place in space continuously; the fronts of these phenomena move through the system and obey a simple diffusion law. A substantial time interval after their passage, there arises a localized gradient of the index of refraction at the prospective ring positions which indicates onset of structure formation by means of a focusing mechanism. While the localized gradient becomes more pronounced and narrower in space, the turbidity in the regions on either side of the ring location decreases, which indicates a depletion in colloidal material in the neighboring zones. Eventually, a sharp band of visible precipitate appears, which is clearly separated from the preceding

  18. Development of the Actinide-Lanthanide Separation (ALSEP) Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Niver, Cynthia M.; Gelis, Artem V.

    2014-09-30

    Separating the minor actinide elements (Am and Cm) from acidic high-level raffinates arising from the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel is an important step in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Most proposed approaches to this problem involve two solvent extraction steps: 1) co-extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and actinides, followed by 2) separation of the actinides from the lanthanides. The objective of our work is to develop a single solvent-extraction process for isolating the minor actinide elements. We report here a solvent containing N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) combined with 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]) that can be used to separate the minor actinides in a single solvent-extraction process. T2EHDGA serves to co-extract the trivalent actinide and lanthanide ions from nitric acid solution. Switching the aqueous phase chemistry to a citrate buffered solution of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine-N,N',N'-triacetic acid at pH 2.5 to 4 results in selective transfer of the actinides to the aqueous phase, thus affecting separation of the actinides from the lanthanides. Separation factors between the lanthanides and actinides are approximately 20 in the pH range of 3 to 4, and the distribution ratios are not highly dependent on the pH in this system.

  19. Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Efficient Separations and Processing (ESP) Crosscutting Program was created in 1991 to identify, develop, and perfect separations technologies and processes to treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE Complex. The ESP funds several multi-year tasks that address high-priority waste remediation problems involving high-level, low-level, transuranic, hazardous, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The ESP supports applied research and development (R and D) leading to demonstration or use of these separations technologies by other organizations within DOE-EM. Treating essentially all DOE defense wastes requires separation methods that concentrate the contaminants and/or purify waste streams for release to the environment or for downgrading to a waste form less difficult and expensive to dispose of. Initially, ESP R and D efforts focused on treatment of high-level waste (HLW) from underground storage tanks (USTs) because of the potential for large reductions in disposal costs and hazards. As further separations needs emerge and as waste management and environmental restoration priorities change, the program has evolved to encompass the breadth of waste management and environmental remediation problems.

  20. Membrane processes and devices for separation of bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Bazinet, Laurent; Firdaous, Loubna

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, functional foods and nutraceuticals has attracted much attention, particularly for their impact on human health and prevention of certain diseases. Consequently, the production and properties of bioactive peptides has received an increasing scientific interest over the past few years. Considering that most functional peptides are present in complex matrices containing a large number of hydrolyzed protein fractions, their separation and purification are required. Conventional pressure-driven processes can be used for amino acids and peptides separation but are limited by their fouling problems and their low selectivity when separating similar sized biomolecules. To improve the separation efficiency, an external electric field was applied during pressure-driven filtration. However, the pressure gradient brings about the accumulation of peptides at the nearby membrane surface and affects the membrane transport selectivity. Processes combining an electrical field as a driving force to porous membranes have been developed for the separation of biopeptides to obtain better purified products. Compounds of higher molecular weights than the membrane cut-off can be separated. The first trials were carried-out to perform the separation of amino acids and peptides with a filtration module specially designed and using one ultrafiltration membrane. More recently, electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membranes has been developed to fractionate simultaneously acidic and basic peptides, using a conventional electrodialysis cell, in which some ion exchange membranes are replaced by ultrafiltration ones. The perspectives in this field will be the understanding of the interactions of peptides and membrane as well as the development of new membrane materials limitating or increasing these interactions to improve the selectivity and the yield of production of specific peptides. This review article also discusses recent patents related to bioactive peptides. PMID

  1. Process to remove actinides from soil using magnetic separation

    DOEpatents

    Avens, Larry R.; Hill, Dallas D.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Stewart, Walter F.; Tolt, Thomas L.; Worl, Laura A.

    1996-01-01

    A process of separating actinide-containing components from an admixture including forming a slurry including actinide-containing components within an admixture, said slurry including a dispersion-promoting surfactant, adjusting the pH of the slurry to within a desired range, and, passing said slurry through a pretreated matrix material, said matrix material adapted to generate high magnetic field gradients upon the application of a strong magnetic field exceeding about 0.1 Tesla whereupon a portion of said actinide-containing components are separated from said slurry and remain adhered upon said matrix material is provided.

  2. CATIONIC EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE SEPARATION OF RARE EARTHS

    DOEpatents

    Choppin, G.R.; Thompson, S.G.; Harvey, B.G.

    1960-02-16

    A process for separating mixtures of elements in the lanthanum and actinium series of the periodic table is described. The mixture of elements is dissolved in 0.05 M HCI, wherein the elements exist as tripositive ions. The resulting solution is then transferred to a column of cationic exchange resin and the column eluted with 0.1 to 0.6 M aqueous ammonium alpha hydroxy isobutyrate solution of pH 3.8 to 5.0. The use of ammonium alpha hydroxy isobutyrate as an eluting agent results in sharper and more rapid separations than previously obtainable with eluants such as citric, tartaric, glycolic, and lactic acids.

  3. Separate and combined effects of temperature and precipitation change on maize yields in sub-Saharan Africa for mid- to late-21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waha, K.; Müller, C.; Rolinski, S.

    2013-07-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important food crops and very common in all parts of sub-Saharan Africa. In 2010 53 million tons of maize were produced in sub-Saharan Africa on about one third of the total harvested cropland area (~ 33 million ha). Our aim is to identify the limiting agroclimatic variable for maize growth and development in sub-Saharan Africa by analyzing the separated and combined effects of temperature and precipitation. Under changing climate, both climate variables are projected to change severely, and their impacts on crop yields are frequently assessed using process-based crop models. However it is often unclear which agroclimatic variable will have the strongest influence on crop growth and development under climate change and previous studies disagree over this question.

  4. Tributylphosphate in the In-Tank Precipitation Process Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.; Hobbs, D.T.; Swingle, R.F.

    1993-11-23

    A material balance investigation and evaluation of n- tributylphosphate (TBP) recycle throughout ITP and its carryover to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was performed. Criticality and DWPF-related issues were determined to pose no adverse consequences due to TBP addition. Effects of decomposition products were also considered. Flammability of 1-butanol, a TBP decomposition product, in Tank 22 was investigated. Calculations show that Tank 22 would be ventilated with air at a rate sufficient to maintain a 1-butanol concentration (volume percent) well below 25 percent of the lower flammability limit (LFL) for 1-butanol.

  5. Pressure swing permeation: Novel process for gas separation by membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Pan, C.Y.; Ivory, J.

    2000-04-01

    A novel process for gas separation, called pressure swing permeation, was investigated to elevate the relatively low permeate pressure by pressurization with high-pressure feed gas, thereby reducing or eliminating additional permeate compression costs where a pressurized permeate is required. This process uses two or more membrane modules and operates in a cyclic fashion, with each module repeatedly undergoing the sequential steps of feed admission and permeation, residual removal, permeate reception, permeate pressurization, and product withdrawal. The unsteady-state permeation associated with pressure swing permeation was studied parametrically, and a bench-scale unit compromising two hollow-fiber membrane modules in parallel was tested for H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation to demonstrate the effectiveness of the process. The permeate product at a pressure as high as the feed pressure can be produced without using a compressor. This is impossible with traditional steady-state processes where a pressure differential across the membrane must be maintained. The pressure swing permeation is analogous to pressure swing adsorption and has the potential to be synergistically integrated with the pressure swing adsorption process for enhanced separation of gases.

  6. A Preliminary Analysis of Precipitation Properties and Processes during NASA GPM IFloodS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence; Gatlin, Patrick; Petersen, Walt; Wingo, Matt; Lang, Timothy; Wolff, Dave

    2014-01-01

    The Iowa Flood Studies (IFloodS) is a NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) ground measurement campaign, which took place in eastern Iowa from May 1 to June 15, 2013. The goals of the field campaign were to collect detailed measurements of surface precipitation using ground instruments and advanced weather radars while simultaneously collecting data from satellites passing overhead. Data collected by the radars and other ground instruments, such as disdrometers and rain gauges, will be used to characterize precipitation properties throughout the vertical column, including the precipitation type (e.g., rain, graupel, hail, aggregates, ice crystals), precipitation amounts (e.g., rain rate), and the size and shape of raindrops. The impact of physical processes, such as aggregation, melting, breakup and coalescence on the measured liquid and ice precipitation properties will be investigated. These ground observations will ultimately be used to improve rainfall estimates from satellites and in particular the algorithms that interpret raw data for the upcoming GPM mission's Core Observatory satellite, which launches in 2014. The various precipitation data collected will eventually be used as input to flood forecasting models in an effort to improve capabilities and test the utility and limitations of satellite precipitation data for flood forecasting. In this preliminary study, the focus will be on analysis of NASA NPOL (S-band, polarimetric) radar (e.g., radar reflectivity, differential reflectivity, differential phase, correlation coefficient) and NASA 2D Video Disdrometers (2DVDs) measurements. Quality control and processing of the radar and disdrometer data sets will be outlined. In analyzing preliminary cases, particular emphasis will be placed on 1) documenting the evolution of the rain drop size distribution (DSD) as a function of column melting processes and 2) assessing the impact of range on ground-based polarimetric radar estimates of DSD properties.

  7. Automated process for solvent separation of organic/inorganic substance

    DOEpatents

    Schweighardt, Frank K.

    1986-01-01

    There is described an automated process for the solvent separation of organic/inorganic substances that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In the process, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control apparatus. The mixture in the filter is agitated by ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process.

  8. Automated process for solvent separation of organic/inorganic substance

    DOEpatents

    Schweighardt, F.K.

    1986-07-29

    There is described an automated process for the solvent separation of organic/inorganic substances that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In the process, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control apparatus. The mixture in the filter is agitated by ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process. 4 figs.

  9. Separation of bioactive peptides by membrane processes: technologies and devices.

    PubMed

    Bazinet, Laurent; Firdaous, Loubna

    2013-04-01

    Although many patents reported bioactive peptides with numerous demonstrated bioactivities and potential applications, there exist some limitations to the production of large quantities to satisfy the growing market demands. Indeed, considering that most functional peptides are present in complex matrices containing a large number of hydrolyzed protein fractions, their separation and purification are required. Some advances have been made in the use of conventional pressure-driven processes for the continuous production and separation of peptides, however, most of these patented technologies are not scalable and demonstrate a low selectivity when separating similar sized biomolecules. To improve the separation efficiency, the use of an external electric field during pressure-driven filtration was proposed and patented. However, whatever the claims, the pressure gradient brings about the accumulation of peptides at the nearby membrane surface and affects the membrane transport selectivity. To overcome these drawbacks, a recent patent proposed the simultaneous fractionation of acidic and basic peptides, using a conventional electrodialysis cell, in which some ion exchange membranes are replaced by ultrafiltration ones. The perspectives in the field of peptide separation will be the development of new membrane materials and new equipments such as microfluidic devices to improve selectivity and yield of production. PMID:23003009

  10. An Improved Process for Precipitating Cyanide Ions from the Barren Solution at Different pHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Gabriela V.; Parga, José R.; Valenzuela, Jesus L.; Vázquez, Victor; Valenzuela, Alejandro; Rodriguez, Mario

    2016-02-01

    In recent decades, the use of metal sulfides instead of hydroxide precipitation in hydrometallurgical processes has gained prominence. Some arguments for its preferential use are as follows: a high degree of metal removal at relatively low pH values, the sparingly soluble nature of sulfide precipitates, favorable dewatering characteristics, and the stability of the formed metal sulfides. The Merrill-Crowe zinc-precipitation process has been applied worldwide in a large number of operations for the recovery of gold and silver from cyanide solutions. However, in some larger plants, the quality of this precious precipitate is low because copper, zinc and especially lead are precipitated along with gold and silver. This results in higher consumption of zinc dust and flux during the smelting of the precipitate, the formation of the matte, and a shorter crucible life. The results show that pH has a significant effect on the removal efficiency of zinc and copper cyanide ions. The optimal pH range was determined to be 3-4, and the removal efficiency of zinc and copper cyanide ions was up to 99%.

  11. Contributions of TRMM to Our Understanding of Precipitation Processes and Climate Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.

    2005-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), a joint U.S./Japan effort, has completed seven and a half years in orbit. This successful research mission studying precipitation processes and climatology has also become a key element in the routine monitoring of global precipitation. The package of rain measuring instrumentation, including the first rain radar and microwave radiometer combination in space, continues to function perfectly, and the satellite has the capability to operate for a number of additional years, providing a unique, long-term record of global tropical precipitation characteristics. A summary of research highlights will be presented covering topics ranging over climate analysis, improving forecasts, and storm and precipitation processes. A focus of the talk will be the important role of TRMM data in multi-satellite precipitation analyses at fine time scales and in improving our understanding of the validity of climate-scale variations through comparison with, and eventual improvement of, the GEWEX Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) 25-year data set.

  12. PROCESS USING POTASSIUM LANTHANUM SULFATE FOR FORMING A CARRIER PRECIPITATE FOR PLUTONIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Angerman, A.A.

    1958-10-21

    A process is presented for recovering plutonium values in an oxidation state not greater than +4 from fluoride-soluble fission products. The process consists of adding to an aqueous acidic solution of such plutonium values a crystalline potassium lanthanum sulfate precipitate which carries the plutonium values from the solution.

  13. EVALUATION OF THE E-SOX PROCESS ON THE EPA PILOT ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a small pilot-scale evaluation of the E-SOx process, undertaken to obtain information needed to conduct a planned 5 MWe field pilot demonstration. he process uses an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for combined sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal and particu...

  14. Isothermal separation processes update. Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    England, C.

    1984-08-01

    The isothermal processes of membrane separation, supercritical extraction and condensed-phase chromatography were examined using availability analysis, a method which addresses the thermodynamic value of energy as well as its amount. The general approach was to derive equations that identified where energy, expressed in terms of thermodynamic work, is consumed in these processes and how they compare with conventional separation methods. These separation methods are characterized by pure work inputs, chiefly in the form of a pressure drop which supplies the required energy. Equations were derived for the energy requirement in terms of the theories of ideal and regular solutions. This approach is believed to accurately predict the work of separation in terms of the heat of solution and the entropy of mixing. It can form the basis of a convenient calculation method for optimizing membrane and solvent properties for particular applications. Close examination of supercritical extraction found a relatively simple thermodynamic relationship among the thermodynamic properties of the solvent, the entropy of mixing, and the heat of solution. This allows a direct estimate of the work requirements. The actual work, however, is largely due to the requirement to cycle pressure at high levels in this method. Still, the energy requirements are very low, making up for usually high capital costs for equipment. 12 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  15. DECONTAMINATION OF PLUTONIUM FOR FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE DURING OXALATE PRECIPITATION, FILTRATION AND CALCINATION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.

    2012-07-25

    Due to analytical limitations for the determination of fluoride (F) and chloride (Cl) in a previous anion exchange study, an additional study of the decontamination of Pu from F and Cl by oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination was performed. Anion product solution from the previous impurity study was precipitated as an oxalate, filtered, and calcined to produce an oxide for analysis by pyrohydrolysis for total Cl and F. Analysis of samples from this experiment achieved the purity specification for Cl and F for the proposed AFS-2 process. Decontamination factors (DF's) for the overall process (including anion exchange) achieved a DF of {approx}5000 for F and a DF of {approx}100 for Cl. Similar experiments where both HF and HCl were spiked into the anion product solution to a {approx}5000 {micro}g /g Pu concentration showed a DF of 5 for F and a DF of 35 for Cl across the combined precipitation-filtration-calcination process steps.

  16. Cryogenic methane separation/catalytic hydrogasification process analysis. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Klosek, J.

    1980-12-02

    The objective of this extension of DOE contract No. DEAC01-78ET10325, Cryogenic Methane Separation/Catalytic Hydrogasification Process Analysis, is to perform trade-off and optimization studies for the Rockwell/Cities Service Short Residence Time Hydrogasification (SRTH) and the Exxon Catalytic Coal Gasification (CCG) processes in the acid gas removal and cryogenic separation areas. The contract extension is divided into nine (9) subtasks. Each subtask studies the effect of variation of a keV design parameter on the treatment cost of the SNG produced. All subtasks will be conducted under the Task I scope of the original DOE contract No. ET-78-C-01-3044, which includes block flow sheet, overall heat and material balance, utility summary, four-line equipment description, investment and treatment cost summaries and final report writing in addition to monthly and quarterly reports. Planning and progress by both companies is described briefly.

  17. NEST-GENERATION TCAP HYDROGEN ISOTOPE SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L; Henry Sessions, H; Anita Poore, A; William Jacobs, W; Christopher Williams, C

    2007-08-07

    A thermal cycling absorption process (TCAP) for hydrogen isotope separation has been in operation at Savannah River Site since 1994. The process uses a hot/cold nitrogen system to cycle the temperature of the separation column. The hot/cold nitrogen system requires the use of large compressors, heat exchanges, valves and piping that is bulky and maintenance intensive. A new compact thermal cycling (CTC) design has recently been developed. This new design uses liquid nitrogen tubes and electric heaters to heat and cool the column directly so that the bulky hot/cold nitrogen system can be eliminated. This CTC design is simple and is easy to implement, and will be the next generation TCAP system at SRS. A twelve-meter column has been fabricated and installed in the laboratory to demonstrate its performance. The design of the system and its test results to date is discussed.

  18. COLUMBIC OXIDE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM IONS

    DOEpatents

    Beaton, R.H.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for separating plutonium ions from a solution of neutron irradiated uranium in which columbic oxide is used as an adsorbert. According to the invention the plutonium ion is selectively adsorbed by Passing a solution containing the plutonium in a valence state not higher than 4 through a porous bed or column of granules of hydrated columbic oxide. The adsorbed plutonium is then desorbed by elution with 3 N nitric acid.

  19. Countercurrent Process for Lignin Separation from Biomass Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran Kadam; Ed Lehrburger

    2006-03-31

    The overall goal of the project was to test the concept of using a twin-screw extruder to conduct autohydrolysis pretreatment of wheat straw in countercurrent fashion, demonstrate in situ solid/liquid separation, and produce a low-lignin cellulose product using ethanol as an extractant. The resultant solid product is suitable for sugar production through enzymatic hydrolysis and for pulp applications. Pilot-scale equipment was used to successfully demonstrate the process both for sugar and pulp applications.

  20. CSER 00-003 Criticality Safety Evaluation report for PFP Magnesium Hydroxide Precipitation Process for Plutonium Stabilization Glovebox 3

    SciTech Connect

    LAN, J.S.

    2000-07-13

    This Criticality Safety Evaluation Report analyzes the stabilization of plutonium/uranium solutions in Glovebox 3 using the magnesium hydroxide precipitation process at PFP. The process covered are the receipt of diluted plutonium solutions into three precipitation tanks, the precipitation of plutonium from the solution, the filtering of the plutonium precipitate from the solution, the scraping of the precipitate from the filter into boats, and the initial drying of the precipitated slurry on a hot plate. A batch (up to 2.5 kg) is brought into the glovebox as plutonium nitrate, processed, and is then removed in boats for further processing. This CSER establishes limits for the magnesium hydroxide precipitation process in Glovebox 3 to maintain criticality safety while handling fissionable material.

  1. Precipitation process in a Mg–Gd–Y alloy grain-refined by Al addition

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jichun; Zhu, Suming; Easton, Mark A.; Xu, Wenfan; Wu, Guohua; Ding, Wenjiang

    2014-02-15

    The precipitation process in Mg–10Gd–3Y (wt.%) alloy grain-refined by 0.8 wt.% Al addition has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The alloy was given a solution treatment at 520 °C for 6 h plus 550 °C for 7 h before ageing at 250 °C. Plate-shaped intermetallic particles with the 18R-type long-period stacking ordered structure were observed in the solution-treated state. Upon isothermal ageing at 250 °C, the following precipitation sequence was identified for the α-Mg supersaturated solution: β″ (D0{sub 19}) → β′ (bco) → β{sub 1} (fcc) → β (fcc). The observed precipitation process and age hardening response in the Al grain-refined Mg–10Gd–3Y alloy are compared with those reported in the Zr grain-refined counterpart. - Highlights: • The precipitation process in Mg–10Gd–3Y–0.8Al (wt.%) alloy has been investigated. • Particles with the 18R-type LPSO structure were observed in the solution state. • Upon ageing at 250 °C, the precipitation sequence is: β″ → β′ → β1 (fcc) → β. • The Al grain-refined alloy has a lower hardness than the Zr refined counterpart.

  2. Forecasting and nowcasting process: A case study analysis of severe precipitation event in Athens, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsangouras, Ioannis; Nastos, Panagiotis; Avgoustoglou, Euripides; Gofa, Flora; Pytharoulis, Ioannis; Kamberakis, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    An early warning process is the result of interplay between the forecasting and nowcasting interactions. Therefore, (1) an accurate measurement and prediction of the spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall over an area and (2) the efficient and appropriate description of the catchment properties are important issues in atmospheric hazards (severe precipitation, flood, flash flood, etc.). In this paper, a forecasting and nowcasting analysis is presented, regarding a severe precipitation event that took place on September 21, 2015 in Athens, Greece. The severe precipitation caused a flash flood event at the suburbs of Athens, with significant impacts to the local society. Quantitative precipitation forecasts from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts and from the COSMO.GR atmospheric model, including ensemble forecast of precipitation and probabilistic approaches are analyzed as tools in forecasting process. Satellite remote sensing data close and six hours prior to flash flood are presented, accompanied with radar products from Hellenic National Meteorological Service, illustrating the ability to depict the convection process.

  3. Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2011-09-28

    This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

  4. FAHP ranking and selection of pretreatment module for membrane separation processes in textile cluster.

    PubMed

    Manekar, Pravin; Nandy, Tapas; Sargaonkar, Abha; Rathi, Barkha; Karthik, Manikavasagam

    2011-01-01

    Recent development in membrane manufacturing and extensive application of membranes in effluent treatment has opened up a new water resource. The effluent pretreatment module plays a critical role in membrane performance. Appropriate selection of conventional and advanced pretreatment modules in membrane separation processes (MSP) is significant to the success of zero effluent discharge (ZED). This study addresses performance assessment of eight conventional and advanced pretreatment modules implemented for wastewater management in a textile cluster in South India. The comparative pollutant reduction, capital, operation and maintenance (OM) cost of pretreatment modules are discussed. The ranking and interdependence of the pretreatment modules were analyzed through fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (FAHP) with MATLAB software. The pretreatment module IV ranked third with a composite weight of 15.46%. The integrated study of performance assessment and FAHP resulted in an optimum pretreatment module IV comprising the sequence of chemical precipitation, bio-oxidation processes (activated sludge processes) followed by chemical precipitation, to achieve the ZED. This study provides a techno-economically feasible solution for selection of an effective pretreatment module for MSP in the textile cluster. PMID:20728348

  5. Used nuclear fuel separations process simulation and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, C.; Krebs, J.F.; Copple, J.M.; Frey, K.E.; Maggos, L.E.; Figueroa, J.; Willit, J.L.; Papadias, D.D.

    2013-07-01

    Recent efforts in separations process simulation at Argonne have expanded from the traditional focus on solvent extraction flowsheet design in order to capture process dynamics and to simulate other components, processing and systems of a used nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. For example, the Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction (AMUSE) code has been enhanced to make it both more portable and more readily extensible. Moving away from a spreadsheet environment makes the addition of new species and processes simpler for the expert user, which should enable more rapid implementation of chemical models that simulate evolving processes. The dyAMUSE (dynamic AMUSE) version allows the simulation of transient behavior across an extractor. Electrochemical separations have now been modeled using spreadsheet codes that simulate the electrochemical recycle of fast reactor fuel. The user can follow the evolution of the salt, products, and waste compositions in the electro-refiner, cathode processors, and drawdown as a function of fuel batches treated. To further expand capabilities in integrating multiple unit operations, a platform for linking mathematical models representing the different operations that comprise a reprocessing facility was adapted to enable systems-level analysis and optimization of facility functions. (authors)

  6. SEPARATION OF AMERICIUM FROM PROMETHIUM

    DOEpatents

    Pressly, R.E.

    1959-07-01

    Promethium-147 is separated from americium in acidic aqueous solution by adding fluosilicic acid to the solution, heating the solution to form a promethium precipitate and separating the precipitate from solution. The precipitate is then re-dissolved by ihe addition of boric acid and nitric acid, and re-precipitated by the addition of fluosilicic acid. This procedure is repeated six or more times to obtain a relatively americium-free promeihium precipitate. Americium may be separately recovered from the supernatant liquids. This process is applicable to the recovery of promethium from fission-product solutions which have been allowed to decay for a period of two to four years.

  7. Understanding runoff processes in a semi-arid environment through isotope and hydrochemical hydrograph separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, V. V.; Saraiva Okello, A. M. L.; Wenninger, J. W.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of runoff generation mechanisms is crucial for the sustainable management of river basins such as the allocation of water resources or the prediction of floods and droughts. However, identifying the mechanisms of runoff generation has been a challenging task, even more so in arid and semi-arid areas where high rainfall and streamflow variability, high evaporation rates, and deep groundwater reservoirs increase the complexity of hydrological process dynamics. Isotope and hydrochemical tracers have proven to be useful in identifying runoff components and their characteristics. Moreover, although widely used in humid-temperate regions, isotope hydrograph separations have not been studied in detail in arid and semi-arid areas. Thus the purpose of this study is to determine if isotope hydrograph separations are suitable for the quantification and characterization of runoff components in a semi-arid catchment considering the hydrological complexities of these regions. Through a hydrochemical characterization of the surface water and groundwater sources of the catchment and two and three component hydrograph separations, runoff components of the Kaap Catchment in South Africa were quantified using both, isotope and hydrochemical tracers. No major disadvantages while using isotope tracers over hydrochemical tracers were found. Hydrograph separation results showed that runoff in the Kaap catchment is mainly generated by groundwater sources. Two-component hydrograph separations revealed groundwater contributions between 64 and 98% of total runoff. By means of three-component hydrograph separations, runoff components were further separated into direct runoff, shallow and deep groundwater components. Direct runoff, defined as the direct precipitation on the stream channel and overland flow, contributed up to 41% of total runoff during wet catchment conditions. Shallow groundwater defined as the soil water and near-surface water component, contributed up to 45

  8. Assessing Precipitation Isotope Variations during Atmospheric River Events to Reveal Dominant Atmospheric/Hydrologic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe-Glynn, S. E.; Johnson, K. R.; Yoshimura, K.; Buenning, N. H.; Welker, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Extreme precipitation events across the Western US commonly associated with atmospheric rivers (ARs), whereby extensive fluxes of moisture are transported from the subtropics, can result in major damage and are projected by most climate models to increase in frequency and severity. However, they are difficult to project beyond ~ten days and the location of landfall and topographically induced precipitation is even more uncertain. Water isotopes, often used to reconstruct past rainfall variability, are useful natural tracers of atmospheric hydrologic processes. Because of the typical tropical and sub-tropical origins, ARs can carry unique water isotope (δ18O and δ2H, d-excess) signatures that can be utilized to provide source and process information that can lead to improving AR predictions. Recent analysis of the top 10 weekly precipitation total samples from Sequoia National Park, CA, of which 9 contained AR events, shows a high variability in the isotopic values. NOAA Hysplit back trajectory analyses reveals a variety of trajectories and varying latitudinal source regions contributed to moisture delivered to this site, which may explain part of the high variability (δ2H = -150.03 to -49.52 ‰, δ18O = -19.27 to -7.20 ‰, d-excess = 4.1 to 25.8). Here we examine the top precipitation totals occurring during AR events and the associated isotopic composition of precipitation samples from several sites across the Western US. We utilize IsoGSM, an isotope-enabled atmospheric general circulation model, to characterize the hydrologic processes and physical dynamics contributing to the observed isotopic variations. We investigate isotopic influences from moisture source location, AR speed, condensation height, and associated temperature. We explore the dominant controls on spatial and temporal variations of the isotopic composition of AR precipitation which highlights different physical processes for different AR events.

  9. Vanadium recovery from oil fly ash by leaching, precipitation and solvent extraction processes.

    PubMed

    Navarro, R; Guzman, J; Saucedo, I; Revilla, J; Guibal, E

    2007-01-01

    In order to reduce the environmental impact due to land disposal of oil fly ash from power plants and to valorize this waste material, the removal of vanadium was investigated using leaching processes (acidic and alkaline treatments), followed by a second step of metal recovery from leachates involving either solvent extraction or selective precipitation. Despite a lower leaching efficiency (compared to sulfuric acid), sodium hydroxide was selected for vanadium leaching since it is more selective for vanadium (versus other transition metals). Precipitation was preferred to solvent extraction for the second step in the treatment since: (a) it is more selective; enabling complete recovery of vanadate from the leachate in the form of pure ammonium vanadate; and (b) stripping of the loaded organic phase (in the solvent extraction process) was not efficient. Precipitation was performed in a two-step procedure: (a) aluminum was first precipitated at pH 8; (b) then ammonium chloride was added at pH 5 to bring about vanadium precipitation. PMID:16563726

  10. A stepwise recovery of metals from hybrid cathodes of spent Li-ion batteries with leaching-flotation-precipitation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanfang; Han, Guihong; Liu, Jiongtian; Chai, Wencui; Wang, Wenjuan; Yang, Shuzhen; Su, Shengpeng

    2016-09-01

    The recovering of valuable metals in spent lithium-ion battery cathodes brings about economic and environmental benefits. A stepwise leaching-flotation-precipitation process is adopted to separate and recover Li/Fe/Mn from the mixed types of cathode materials (hybrid wastes of LiFePO4 and LiMn2O4). The optimal operating conditions for the stepwise recovery process are determined and analyzed by factorial design, thermodynamics calculation, XRD and SEM characterization in this study. First, Li/Fe/Mn ions are released from the cathode using HCl assisted with H2O2 in the acid leaching step. The leachability of metals follows the series Li > Fe > Mn in the acidic environment. Then Fe3+ ions are selectively floated and recovered as FeCl3 from the leachate in the flotation step. Finally, Mn2+/Mn3+ and Li+ ions are sequentially precipitated and separated as MnO2/Mn2O3 and Li3PO4 using saturated KMnO4 solution and hot saturated Na3PO4 solution, respectively. Under the optimized and advisable conditions, the total recovery of Li, Fe and Mn is respectively 80.93 ± 0.16%, 85.40 ± 0.12% and 81.02 ± 0.08%. The purity for lithium, ferrum and manganese compounds is respectively 99.32 ± 0.07%, 97.91 ± 0.05% and 98.73 ± 0.05%. This stepwise process could provide an alternative way for the effective separation and recovery of metal values from spent Li-ion battery cathodes in industry.

  11. Large-scale superconducting separator for Kaolin processing

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, A.J, Jr. ); Selvaggi, J.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Currently, high gradient magnetic separators (HGMSs) are used almost exclusively by the clay processing industry, particularly in producing an extremely white kaolin for the paper, coatings and rubber industries where a bright additive is desirable. As mined, the clay is a light cream color-not white. Many of these impurities can be removed chemically using a reducing agent such as sodium hydrosulfite in low pH, sulfuric acid, and alum. High purity, however, can be obtained by removing trace amounts of paramagnetic particles (100% finer than 2 {mu}m). This is accomplished by separating these particles from 28 wt% kaolin in a water slurry retaining them on magnetic wool, which is then periodically regenerated.

  12. Process for separation and preconcentration of radium from water

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato; Bartsch, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    A process for preconcentrating and separating radium from a contaminated solution containing at least water and radium includes the steps of adding a quantity of a water-soluble macrocyclic polyether to the contaminated solution to form a combined solution. An acid is added to the combined solution to form an acidic combined solution having an ›H.sup.+ ! concentration of about 0.5M. The acidic combined solution is contacted with a sulfonic acid-based strong acid cation exchange medium or a organophilic sulfonic acid medium having a plurality of binding sites thereon to bind the radium thereto and to form a radium-depleted solution. The radium-depleted solution is separated from the strong acid cation exchange medium or organophilic sulfonic acid medium. The radium remaining bound to the exchange medium or organophilic reagent is then stripped from the exchange medium or organophilic medium and the activity of the radium is measured.

  13. Process for separation and preconcentration of radium from water

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, M.; Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarizia, R.; Bartsch, R.A.

    1999-01-26

    A process for preconcentrating and separating radium from a contaminated solution containing at least water and radium includes the steps of adding a quantity of a water-soluble macrocyclic polyether to the contaminated solution to form a combined solution. An acid is added to the combined solution to form an acidic combined solution having an [H{sup +}] concentration of about 0.5M. The acidic combined solution is contacted with a sulfonic acid-based strong acid cation exchange medium or a organophilic sulfonic acid medium having a plurality of binding sites thereon to bind the radium thereto and to form a radium-depleted solution. The radium-depleted solution is separated from the strong acid cation exchange medium or organophilic sulfonic acid medium. The radium remaining bound to the exchange medium or organophilic reagent is then stripped from the exchange medium or organophilic medium and the activity of the radium is measured. 24 figs.

  14. Extreme Daily Precipitation in North American Climate Simulations: Scales and Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutowski, W. J., Jr.; Glisan, J. M.; Kawazoe, S.; Smalley, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the ability of global and regional climate models to simulate extreme daily precipitation and supporting processes for midlatitude and Arctic regions of North America. Regional model output comes from the NARCCAP archive and simulations by an Arctic version of WRF; global model output comes from the CMIP5 archive. The NARCCAP results also include output from a time-slice, high-resolution global simulation. All regional model output is at half degree resolution, whereas the CMIP5 resolutions vary but are coarser than the regional model resolutions. The combined analysis allows us to assess added value of finer resolution in simulating extreme precipitation. Analysis focuses on selected regions of North America for winter (DJF) and summer (JJA), building on several previous analyses focused on this region. In addition to comparing results from the different models, we also compare simulated precipitation and supporting processes with those obtained from observed precipitation and reanalysis atmospheric states. In the central U.S., the models generally reproduce well the precipitation-vs.-intensity spectrum seen in observations, with a tendency for coarse-resolution global models to produce somewhat less intense precipitation. In contrast, all models are deficient in high intensity precipitation in Alaska. Further analysis focuses on precipitation events exceeding the 99.5 percentile that occur simultaneously at several points in the region, yielding so-called "widespread events". Analysis of 500 hPa heights, near-surface circulation and fields such as temperature and humidity reveal the processes leading to extreme events in the models and observations. The finer resolution models generally reproduce the physical behavior of these extreme events, with the coarser models showing a smoother rendition. In the central U.S., for winter, these events are produced by slowly moving low-pressure systems that all models simulate fairly well. In Alaska, these events

  15. Formation of Asymmetrical Structured Silica Controlled by a Phase Separation Process and Implication for Biosilicification

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jia-Yuan; Yao, Qi-Zhi; Li, Xi-Ming; Zhou, Gen-Tao; Fu, Sheng-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Biogenetic silica displays intricate patterns assembling from nano- to microsize level and interesting non-spherical structures differentiating in specific directions. Several model systems have been proposed to explain the formation of biosilica nanostructures. Of them, phase separation based on the physicochemical properties of organic amines was considered to be responsible for the pattern formation of biosilica. In this paper, using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS, Si(OCH2CH3)4) as silica precursor, phospholipid (PL) and dodecylamine (DA) were introduced to initiate phase separation of organic components and influence silica precipitation. Morphology, structure and composition of the mineralized products were characterized using a range of techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), infrared spectra (IR), and nitrogen physisorption. The results demonstrate that the phase separation process of the organic components leads to the formation of asymmetrically non-spherical silica structures, and the aspect ratios of the asymmetrical structures can be well controlled by varying the concentration of PL and DA. On the basis of the time-dependent experiments, a tentative mechanism is also proposed to illustrate the asymmetrical morphogenesis. Therefore, our results imply that in addition to explaining the hierarchical porous nanopatterning of biosilica, the phase separation process may also be responsible for the growth differentiation of siliceous structures in specific directions. Because organic amine (e.g., long-chair polyamines), phospholipids (e.g., silicalemma) and the phase separation process are associated with the biosilicification of diatoms, our results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of biosilicification. PMID:23585878

  16. Formation of asymmetrical structured silica controlled by a phase separation process and implication for biosilicification.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jia-Yuan; Yao, Qi-Zhi; Li, Xi-Ming; Zhou, Gen-Tao; Fu, Sheng-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Biogenetic silica displays intricate patterns assembling from nano- to microsize level and interesting non-spherical structures differentiating in specific directions. Several model systems have been proposed to explain the formation of biosilica nanostructures. Of them, phase separation based on the physicochemical properties of organic amines was considered to be responsible for the pattern formation of biosilica. In this paper, using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS, Si(OCH2CH3)4) as silica precursor, phospholipid (PL) and dodecylamine (DA) were introduced to initiate phase separation of organic components and influence silica precipitation. Morphology, structure and composition of the mineralized products were characterized using a range of techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), infrared spectra (IR), and nitrogen physisorption. The results demonstrate that the phase separation process of the organic components leads to the formation of asymmetrically non-spherical silica structures, and the aspect ratios of the asymmetrical structures can be well controlled by varying the concentration of PL and DA. On the basis of the time-dependent experiments, a tentative mechanism is also proposed to illustrate the asymmetrical morphogenesis. Therefore, our results imply that in addition to explaining the hierarchical porous nanopatterning of biosilica, the phase separation process may also be responsible for the growth differentiation of siliceous structures in specific directions. Because organic amine (e.g., long-chair polyamines), phospholipids (e.g., silicalemma) and the phase separation process are associated with the biosilicification of diatoms, our results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of biosilicification. PMID:23585878

  17. FORMATION PROCESSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF REACTIVE AND NON-REACTIVE MINERAL PRECIPITATES IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral precipitates in zero-valent iron PRBs can be classified by formation processes into three groups: 1) those that result from changes in chemical conditions (i.e., change in pH, e.g., calcite); 2) those that are a consequence of microbial activity (i.e., sulfate reduction, ...

  18. Effects of Outer Plasmasphere Processes on Atmospheric Precipitation: A Multipoint Observational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, P. J.; Foster, J. C.; Coster, A. J.; Halford, A.; Millan, R. M.; Wygant, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Earth's inner and outer radiation belts are surrounded by a natural high intensity radiation environment, composed of high energy and relativistic particles. The dynamic outer plasmasphere overlaps the outer radiation belt beyond L=2.5 and can play a key role in modulating the outer radiation belt. In particular, ambient cold plasma density associated with plasmaspheric structure and density gradients in the plasmasphere boundary layer (PBL) can regulate the occurrence and characteristics of wave-particle interactions (WPI) leading to large changes in precipitation/loss efficiency. These interactions are efficient at scattering high energy particles into the atmospheric loss cone, resulting in spatially localized enhancements in outer radiation belt acceleration and precipitation. We discuss a multi-point observational case study of the relationship of dayside radiation belt precipitation temporal and spatial dynamics to outer plasmasphere processes during a coronal mass ejection driven shock injection and plasmasphere reconfiguration event on 2014-01-09. We combine in-situ magnetosphere diagnostics from the Van Allen Probes A and B spacecraft with in-situ data from multiple BARREL balloons measuring atmospheric precipitation in the afternoon MLT sector, near the Van Allen Probes magnetic footprints. Van Allen Probes and THEMIS E data from their respective EFW instruments determines electric field structure and thermal electron density configurations to L~7. Finally, we place the in-situ diagnostics in a larger context using GPS ground based total electron content observations of L <= 4 wide field plasmaspheric structure and PBL dynamics. We present analysis explaining the observed atmospheric precipitation, and demonstrating the significance of the outer plasmasphere boundary location in processes leading to energetic electron precipitation. Such multi-instrument analysis demonstrates that consideration of interconnected system-level processes leads to a clearer

  19. SEPARATION PROCESS FOR TRANSURANIC ELEMENT AND COMPOUNDS THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Calvin, M.

    1958-10-14

    S> A process is presented for the separation of pluto nium from uranium and fission products in an aqueous acidic solution by use of a chelating agent. The plutonium is maintained in the tetravalent state and the uranium in the hexavalent state, and the acidic concentration is adjusted to about 1 N bar. The aqueous solution is then contacted with a water-immiscible organic solvent solution and the chelating agent. The chelating agents covered by this invention comprise a group of compounds characterized as fluorinated beta-diketones.

  20. Synthesis of crystallization-distillation hybrid separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D.A.; Ng, K.M.

    1997-07-01

    A systematic method to synthesize crystallization-distillation hybrid separation processes is presented. Two classes of hybrids are identified for binary mixtures. The first bypasses azeotropes and tangent pinches, while the second bypasses eutectics. Guidelines for flow-sheet selection are proposed based on an analysis of simple eutectic, constant relative volatility systems. In addition, the hybrids are compared to both extractive and adductive crystallization in order to determine the conditions under which solvent-based crystallization techniques outperform the proposed hybrid configurations. The method is extended to ternary mixture. The use of stream combination and complex distillation columns is also considered.

  1. Process for the separation of components from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

    1973-10-01

    A process for the removal, from gaseous mixtures of a desired component selected from oxygen, iodine, methyl iodide, and lower oxides of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur is described. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatmospheric pressure to preferentially absorb the desired component in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed constituents of the gaseous mixture are withdrawn from the absorption zone. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in the desired component is withdrawn separately from the zone, following which the desired component is recovered from the fluorocarbon absorbent. (Official Gazette)

  2. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1999-01-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

  3. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, T.N.

    1999-08-24

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area. 12 figs.

  4. Process for separating hydrocarbon gas constituents utilizing a fractionator

    SciTech Connect

    Aghili, H.K.

    1987-10-06

    A process is described for separating the constituents of a gas stream comprising: (a) lowering the temperature of the gas stream; (b) supplying the lower temperature gas stream to a high pressure separator; (c) lowering the pressure of the predominantly vapor stream; (d) supplying the lower pressure vapor stream to an upper region of a demethanizer column; (e) lowering the pressure of the predominantly fluid stream; (f) supplying the lower pressure fluid stream to the demethanizer column at an elevation below the vapor stream; (g) removing cold vapor residue gas from an upper region of the demethanizer column; (h) passing the vapor residue gas through at least one heat exchanger to raise the temperature of the vapor residue gas; (i) compressing the vapor residue gas for delivery elsewhere; (j) removing a cold demethanized product from a lower region of the demethanizer column; (k) supplying at least a portion of the demethanized product to a fractionator wherein the fractionator operates as a distillation column; (l) separating the demethanized product into an ethane overhead product and a deethanized bottom product; (m) removing a generally liquid deethanized product from a lower region of the fractionator; (n) drawing off a portion of the deethanized product; (o) lowering the temperature of the drawn off product; and, (p) supplying the lower temperature deethanized product to the top of the demethanizer column.

  5. Citrate based ``TALSPEAK`` lanthanide-actinide separation process

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Bond, W.D.; Toth, L.M.; Davis, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    The potential hazard posed to future generations by long-lived radionuclides such as the transuranic elements (TRU) is perceived as a major problem associated with the use of nuclear power. TRU wastes have to remain isolated from the environment for ``geological`` periods of time. The costs of building, maintaining, and operating a ``geological TRU repository`` can be very high. Therefore, there are significant economical advantages in segregating the relatively low volume of TRU wastes from other nuclear wastes. The chemical behavior of lanthanides and actinides, 4f and 5f elements respectively, is rather similar. As a consequence, the separation of these two groups is difficult. The ``TALSPEAK`` process (Trivalent Actinide Lanthanide Separations by Phosphorus-reagent Extraction from Aqueous Complexes) is one of the few means available to separate the trivalent actinides from the lanthanides. The method is based on the preferential complexation of the trivalent actinides by an aminopolyacetic acid. Cold experiments showed that by using citric acid the deleterious effects produced by impurities such as zirconium are greatly reduced.

  6. Cryogenic methane separation/catalytic hydrogasification process analysis. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Klosek, J.

    1981-02-13

    The objective of this coordinated research program is to obtain the most attractive combinations of acid gas removal, methane separation for the Exxon Catalytic Coal Gasification (CCG) and the Rockwell/Cities Service Hydrogasification processes. The program is divided into nine subtasks with each subtask studying the effect of variation of a key design parameter on the treatment cost of the SNG produced. Progress reports of 8 subtasks are presented. The following are some of the highlights. Subtask 1 - Heat and material balance and equipment sizing was completed for the cryogenic methane separation. The overall material balance is presented in a table. Subtask 2 - Preliminary designs for MEA and DEA gas removal systems were established. Subtasks 3 to 5 - Economic evaluation is in proress. Subtask 6 - The SNG product compressor train was simulated for the case where sufficient SNG fuel is withdrawn from the product compressors to fire the dryer reactivation heater. Subtask 7 - Acid gas removal and cryogenic separation equipment was resized to accommodate Exxon's request for a two-train plant design. Subtask 8 - The Benfield and Selexol systems will be evaluated for acid gas removal.

  7. Effect of some organic solvent-water mixtures composition on precipitated calcium carbonate in carbonation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopacka-Łyskawa, Donata; Kościelska, Barbara; Karczewski, Jakub

    2015-05-01

    Precipitated calcium carbonate particles were obtained during carbonation of calcium hydroxide slurry with carbon dioxide. Aqueous solutions of isopropyl alcohol, n-butanol and glycerol were used as solvents. Concentration of organic additives in the reactive mixture was from 0% to 20% (vol). Precipitation process were performed in a stirred tank reactor equipped with gas distributor. Multimodal courses of particles size distribution were determined for produced CaCO3 particles. Calcium carbonate as calcite was precipitated in all experiments. The mean Sauter diameter of CaCO3 particles decreased when the concentration of all used organic additives increased. The amount of small particle fraction in the product increased with the increasing concentration of organic solvents. Similar physical properties of used liquid phase resulted in the similar characteristics of obtained particles.

  8. A Data System Architecture for Measurement Based Systems: Precipitation Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2003-01-01

    NASA s Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) is changing focus from single satellite missions to measurement oriented programs. An example of this paradigm shift is the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) project. GPM is conceptualized as a rolling-wave of measurement possibilities all focused on the key precipitation parameter. In response to this shift to measurement programs and also integral to the ESE s new strategy for processing and management its data, a measurement based approach is also critical for data processing system that support measurement programs like GPM. This paper provides an overview of the paradigm shift from mission to measurement. It also presents a summary of the ESE s new strategy for its data systems. Building on this background the paper details the architectural, design and implementation aspects of the Precipitation Processing System (PPS). The PPS is an evolution of a single point system developed for the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission to a generic precipitation data system. The paper provides the context within which PPS will support the GPM program.

  9. Heavy Oil Process Monitor: Automated On-Column Asphaltene Precipitation and Re-Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2007-03-31

    An automated separation technique was developed that provides a new approach to measuring the distribution profiles of the most polar, or asphaltenic components of an oil, using a continuous flow system to precipitate and re-dissolve asphaltenes from the oil. Methods of analysis based on this new technique were explored. One method based on the new technique involves precipitation of a portion of residua sample in heptane on a polytetrafluoroethylene-packed (PTFE) column. The precipitated material is re-dissolved in three steps using solvents of increasing polarity: cyclohexane, toluene, and methylene chloride. The amount of asphaltenes that dissolve in cyclohexane is a useful diagnostic of the thermal history of oil, and its proximity to coke formation. For example, about 40 % (w/w) of the heptane asphaltenes from unpyrolyzed residua dissolves in cyclohexane. As pyrolysis progresses, this number decrease to below 15% as coke and toluene insoluble pre-coke materials appear. Currently, the procedure for the isolation of heptane asphaltenes and the determination of the amount of asphaltenes soluble in cyclohexane spans three days. The automated procedure takes one hour. Another method uses a single solvent, methylene chloride, to re-dissolve the material that precipitates on heptane on the PTFE-packed column. The area of this second peak can be used to calculate a value which correlates with gravimetric asphaltene content. Currently the gravimetric procedure to determine asphaltenes takes about 24 hours. The automated procedure takes 30 minutes. Results for four series of original and pyrolyzed residua were compared with data from the gravimetric methods. Methods based on the new on-column precipitation and re-dissolution technique provide significantly more detail about the polar constituent's oils than the gravimetric determination of asphaltenes.

  10. Quantitative analysis of precipitation over Fukushima to understand the wet deposition process in March 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatagai, A.; Onda, Y.; Watanabe, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake caused a severe accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP), leading to the emission of large amounts of radioactive pollutants into the environment. The transport and diffusion of these radioactive pollutants in the atmosphere caused a disaster for residents in and around Fukushima. Studies have sought to understand the transport, diffusion, and deposition process, and to understand the movement of radioactive pollutants through the soil, vegetation, rivers, and groundwater. However, a detailed simulation and understanding of the distribution of radioactive compounds depend on a simulation of precipitation and on the information on the timing of the emission of these radioactive pollutants from the NPP. Past nuclear expansion studies have demonstrated the importance of wet deposition in distributing pollutants. Hence, this study examined the quantitative precipitation pattern in March 2011 using rain-gauge observations and X-band radar data from Fukushima University. We used the AMeDAS rain-gauge network data of 1) the Japan Meteorological Agency (1273 stations in Japan) and 2) the Water Information System (47 stations in Fukushima prefecture) and 3) the rain-gauge data of the Environmental Information Network of NTT Docomo (30 stations in Fukushima) to construct 0.05-degree mesh data using the same method used to create the APHRODITE daily grid precipitation data (Yatagai et al., 2009). Since some AMeDAS data for the coastal region were lost due to the earthquake, the complementary network of 2) and 3) yielded better precipitation estimates. The data clarified that snowfall was observed on the night of Mar 15 into the morning of Mar 16 throughout Fukushima prefecture. This had an important effect on the radioactive contamination pattern in Fukushima prefecture. The precipitation pattern itself does not show one-on-one correspondence with the contamination pattern. While the pollutants transported northeast of the

  11. Separation and Fixation of Toxic Components in Salt Brines Using a Water-Based Process

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, C.; Quach, A.; Birnie III, D.; Ela, W.; Saez, A.E.; Zelinski, B.; Smith, H.; Smith, G.

    2004-01-01

    Efforts to implement new water quality standards, increase water reuse and reclamation, and minimize the cost of waste storage motivate the development of new processes for stabilizing wastewater residuals that minimize waste volume, water content and the long-term environmental risk from related by-products. This work explores the use of an aqueous-based emulsion process to create an epoxy/rubber matrix for separating and encapsulating waste components from salt laden, arsenic contaminated, amorphous iron hydrate sludges. Such sludges are generated from conventional water purification precipitation/adsorption processes, used to convert aqueous brine streams to semi-solid waste streams, such as ion exchange/membrane separation, and from other precipitative heavy metal removal operations. In this study, epoxy and polystyrene butadiene (PSB) rubber emulsions are mixed together and then combined with a surrogate sludge. The surrogate sludge consists of amorphous iron hydrate with 1 part arsenic fixed to the surface of the hydrate per 10 parts iron mixed with sodium nitrate and chloride salts and water. The resulting emulsion is cured and dried at 80 °C to remove water. Microstructure characterization by electron microscopy confirms that the epoxy/PSB matrix surrounds and encapsulates the arsenic laden amorphous iron hydrate phase while allowing the salt to migrate to internal and external surfaces of the sample. Salt extraction studies indicate that the porous nature of the resulting matrix promotes the separation and removal of as much as 90% of the original salt content in only one hour. Long term leaching studies based on the use of the infinite slab diffusion model reveal no evidence of iron migration or, by inference, arsenic migration, and demonstrate that the diffusion coefficients of the unextracted salt yield leachability indices within regulations for non-hazardous landfill disposal. Because salt is the most mobile species, it is inferred that arsenic

  12. A method to separate temperature and precipitation signals encoded in tree-ring widths for the western Tien Shan Mountains, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenhuo; Gou, Xiaohua; Li, Jinbao; Huo, Yuxia; Fang, Keyan

    2015-10-01

    Separating temperature and precipitation signals encoded in tree rings is a complicated issue. Here, we present a separation method by combining two tree-ring width chronologies of Schrenk's spruce (Picea schrenkiana) from the upper and lower timberlines in the western Tien Shan Mountains, northwest China. Correlation analyses show that both chronologies correlate positively with precipitation. However, temperature correlates positively with the chronology from the upper timberline, while negatively with the chronology from the lower timberline. This suggests that the two chronologies contain similar precipitation information but opposite temperature signals. In light of this, we calculated the average and difference of the two chronologies, and found that each of them has a much stronger correlation with precipitation or temperature alone. Finally, we reconstructed local precipitation and temperature variations over the past 201 years by using the average and difference of the two chronologies. The two reconstructions do not have a significant correlation, but they have significant positive and negative relationships on the high- and low-frequency band, respectively.

  13. Process study and exergy analysis of a novel air separation process cooled by LNG cold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wendong; Duan, Jiao; Mao, Wenjun

    2014-02-01

    In order to resolve the problems of the current air separation process such as the complex process, cumbersome operation and high operating costs, a novel air separation process cooled by LNG cold energy is proposed in this paper, which is based on high-efficiency heat exchanger network and chemical packing separation technology. The operating temperature range of LNG cold energy is widened from 133K-203K to 113K-283K by high-efficiency heat exchanger network and air separation pressure is declined from 0.5MPa to about 0.35MPa due to packing separation technology, thereby greatly improve the energy efficiency. Both the traditional and novel air separation processes are simulated with air handling capacity of 20t·h-1. Comparing with the traditional process, the LNG consumption is reduced by 44.2%, power consumption decrease is 211.5 kWh per hour, which means the annual benefit will be up to 1.218 million CNY. And the exergy efficiency is also improved by 42.5%.

  14. X-band radar field campaign data analysis for orographic/warm-rain precipitation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcacchia, Leonardo; Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Gourley, Jonathan J.; Anagnostou, Marios N.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Bousquet, Olivier; Cheong, Boon-Leng; Maggioni, Viviana; Hong, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Accurate quantitative precipitation estimation over mountainous basins is of great importance because of their susceptibility to hazards such as flash floods, shallow landslides, and debris flows. It is usually hard to obtain reliable weather radar information in mountainous areas, due to difficulties connected to non-meteorological scattering and the elevation of the study sites. Such regions are particularly interested by orographic/warm-rain precipitation processes, characterized by no ice phase in the cloud and prevailing concentration of small drops in the drop size distribution. Field campaigns are able to provide complete and solid datasets in mountainous regions, thanks to mobile radars and the complementary information provided by rain gauges and disdrometers. This study analyzes datasets collected during the Hymex, IPHEX, and Colorado field campaigns in mountainous areas in Italy, France, North Carolina, and Colorado. Mobile X-band radars from the NOAA National Severe Storm Laboratory and the Advanced Radar Research Center at the University of Oklahoma are utilized. The X-band dual polarimetric radar data are corrected for attenuation through the SCOP algorithm, and evaluated against disdrometer and rain-gauge data. Warm-rain events are identified by looking at the Gorgucci, Cao-Zhang, and Kumjian-Ryzhkov parameter spaces relating polarimetric radar variables to precipitation development processes in the cloud and rain size distributions. A conceptual model for the vertical profile of precipitation and microphysical structure of the cloud is also derived, to be contrasted against other typical convective and stratiform profiles.

  15. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model (GCE): Improvements and Applications for Studying Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Zeng, Xiping; Li, Xiaowen; Matsui, Toshi; Mohr, Karen; Posselt, Derek; Chern, Jiundar; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Norris, Peter M.; Kang, In-Sik; Choi, Ildae; Hou, Arthur; Lau, K.-M.; Yang, Young-Min

    2014-01-01

    Convection is the primary transport process in the Earth's atmosphere. About two-thirds of the Earth's rainfall and severe floods derive from convection. In addition, two-thirds of the global rain falls in the tropics, while the associated latent heat release accounts for three-fourths of the total heat energy for the Earth's atmosphere. Cloud-resolving models (CRMs) have been used to improve our understanding of cloud and precipitation processes and phenomena from micro-scale to cloud-scale and mesoscale as well as their interactions with radiation and surface processes. CRMs use sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes and can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems. CRMs also allow for explicit interaction between clouds, outgoing longwave (cooling) and incoming solar (heating) radiation, and ocean and land surface processes. Observations are required to initialize CRMs and to validate their results. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) has been developed and improved at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center over the past three decades. It is amulti-dimensional non-hydrostatic CRM that can simulate clouds and cloud systems in different environments. Early improvements and testing were presented in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003a). A review on the application of the GCE to the understanding of precipitation processes can be found in Simpson and Tao (1993) and Tao (2003). In this paper, recent model improvements (microphysics, radiation and land surface processes) are described along with their impact and performance on cloud and precipitation events in different geographic locations via comparisons with observations. In addition, recent advanced applications of the GCE are presented that include understanding the physical processes responsible for diurnal variation, examining the impact of aerosols (cloud condensation nuclei or CCN and ice nuclei or IN) on

  16. Polymeric membrane and process for separation of aliphatically unsaturated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.S.W.

    1991-11-05

    This patent describes a process for separating at least one unsaturated hydrocarbon from a hydrocarbon feed steam containing the unsaturated hydrocarbon. It comprises contacting the feed stream against a first side of a solid, homogeneous membrane comprising a hydrophilic polymer selected from the group consisting of a polyvinylalcohol, polyvinylacetate, sulfonyl-containing polymers, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyethylene oxide, polyacrylamide, copolymers thereof, and blends thereof a transition metal or transition metal ion capable of reversibly complexing with the unsaturated hydrocarbon, and a hydrophilic salt of a Group I metal; and withdrawing at a second side of the membrane a permeate comprising the unsaturated hydrocarbon in higher concentration than in the feed stream. This patent also describes a solid, homogeneous membrane for separating at least one unsaturated hydrocarbon from a hydrocarbon stream containing the unsaturated hydrocarbon. It comprises a hydrophilic polymer selected from the group consisting of polyvinylalcohol, polyvinylacetate, sulfonyl-containing polymers, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyethylene oxide, polyacrylamide, copolymers thereof, and blends thereof, a transition metal or transition metal ion capable of reversibly complexing with the unsaturated hydrocarbon, and a hydrophilic salt of a Group I metal.

  17. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  18. Atmospheric circulation processes contributing to a multidecadal variation in reconstructed and modeled Indian monsoon precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qianru; Hu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    analysis of the recently reconstructed gridded May-September total precipitation in the Indian monsoon region for the past half millennium discloses significant variations at multidecadal timescales. Meanwhile, paleo-climate modeling outputs from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model 4.0 show similar multidecadal variations in the monsoon precipitation. One of those variations at the frequency of 40-50 years per cycle is examined in this study. Major results show that this variation is a product of the processes in that the meridional gradient of the atmospheric enthalpy is strengthened by radiation loss in the high-latitude and polar region. Driven by this gradient and associated baroclinicity in the atmosphere, more heat/energy is generated in the tropical and subtropical (monsoon) region and transported poleward. This transport relaxes the meridional enthalpy gradient and, subsequently, the need for heat production in the monsoon region. The multidecadal timescale of these processes results from atmospheric circulation-radiation interactions and the inefficiency in generation of kinetic energy from the potential energy in the atmosphere to drive the eddies that transport heat poleward. This inefficiency creates a time delay between the meridional gradient of the enthalpy and the poleward transport. The monsoon precipitation variation lags that in the meridional gradient of enthalpy but leads that of the poleward heat transport. This phase relationship, and underlining chasing process by the transport of heat to the need for it driven by the meridional enthalpy gradient, sustains this multidecadal variation. This mechanism suggests that atmospheric circulation processes can contribute to multidecadal timescale variations. Interactions of these processes with other forcing, such as sea surface temperature or solar irradiance anomalies, can result in resonant or suppressed variations in the Indian monsoon precipitation.

  19. Evaluating Cloud and Precipitation Processes in Numerical Models using Current and Potential Future Satellite Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heever, S. C.; Tao, W. K.; Skofronick Jackson, G.; Tanelli, S.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Petersen, W. A.; Kummerow, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud, aerosol and precipitation processes play a fundamental role in the water and energy cycle. It is critical to accurately represent these microphysical processes in numerical models if we are to better predict cloud and precipitation properties on weather through climate timescales. Much has been learned about cloud properties and precipitation characteristics from NASA satellite missions such as TRMM, CloudSat, and more recently GPM. Furthermore, data from these missions have been successfully utilized in evaluating the microphysical schemes in cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and global models. However, there are still many uncertainties associated with these microphysics schemes. These uncertainties can be attributed, at least in part, to the fact that microphysical processes cannot be directly observed or measured, but instead have to be inferred from those cloud properties that can be measured. Evaluation of microphysical parameterizations are becoming increasingly important as enhanced computational capabilities are facilitating the use of more sophisticated schemes in CRMs, and as future global models are being run on what has traditionally been regarded as cloud-resolving scales using CRM microphysical schemes. In this talk we will demonstrate how TRMM, CloudSat and GPM data have been used to evaluate different aspects of current CRM microphysical schemes, providing examples of where these approaches have been successful. We will also highlight CRM microphysical processes that have not been well evaluated and suggest approaches for addressing such issues. Finally, we will introduce a potential NASA satellite mission, the Cloud and Precipitation Processes Mission (CAPPM), which would facilitate the development and evaluation of different microphysical-dynamical feedbacks in numerical models.

  20. Using Multi-Scale Modeling Systems to Study the Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, exponentially increasing computer power has extended Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) integrations from hours to months, the number of computational grid points from less than a thousand to close to ten million. Three-dimensional models are now more prevalent. Much attention is devoted to precipitating cloud systems where the crucial 1-km scales are resolved in horizontal domains as large as 10,000 km in two-dimensions, and 1,000 x 1,000 km2 in three-dimensions. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that NWP and mesoscale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique. Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, a review of developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the results from using multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, and aerosols will be presented. Also how to use of the multi-satellite simulator to improve precipitation processes will be discussed.

  1. Using Multi-Scale Modeling Systems and Satellite Data to Study the Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei--Kuo; Chern, J.; Lamg, S.; Matsui, T.; Shen, B.; Zeng, X.; Shi, R.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, exponentially increasing computer power extended Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) integrations from hours to months, the number of computational grid points from less than a thousand to close to ten million. Three-dimensional models are now more prevalent. Much attention is devoted to precipitating cloud systems where the crucial 1-km scales are resolved in horizontal domains as large as 10,000 km in two-dimensions, and 1,000 x 1,000 sq km in three-dimensions. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that NWP and mesoscale models can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving models through nesting technique. Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model). (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, W8F). (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, a review of developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the results from using multi-scale modeling systems to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, and aerosols will be presented. Also how to use the multi-satellite simulator to improve precipitation processes will be discussed.

  2. Polymeric membrane and process for separating aliphatically unsaturated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.S.W.

    1991-05-14

    This patent describes a process for separating at least one unsaturated hydrocarbon from a hydrocarbon feed stream containing. It comprises: contacting the feed stream against a first side of a solid, homogeneous membrane consisting essentially of a hydrophilic polymer selected from the group consisting of polyvinylalcohol, polyvinylacetate, sulfonyl containing polymers, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyethylene oxide, polyacrylamide, copolymers thereof, and blends thereof, and a metal or metal ion capable of reversibly complexing with the unsaturated hydrocarbon, the metal or metal ion is distributed homogeneously in the hydrophilic polymer; and withdrawing at a second side of the membrane a permeate comprising the unsaturated hydrocarbon in higher concentration than in the feed stream; whereby the membrane provides high permeability and selectivity for unsaturated hydrocarbons and substantially increases the rate at which the permeate is withdrawn.

  3. Role of pH controlled DNA secondary structures in the reversible dispersion/precipitation and separation of metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Maji, Basudeb; Samanta, Suman K; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-04-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) oligomers (dA20, d[(C3TA2)3C3] or dT20) are able to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water at pH 7 through non-covalent wrapping on the nanotube surface. At lower pH, an alteration of the DNA secondary structure leads to precipitation of the SWNTs from the dispersion. The structural change of dA20 takes place from the single-stranded to the A-motif form at pH 3.5 while in case of d[(C3TA2)3C3] the change occurs from the single-stranded to the i-motif form at pH 5. Due to this structural change, the DNA is no longer able to bind the nanotube and hence the SWNT precipitates from its well-dispersed state. However, this could be reversed on restoring the pH to 7, where the DNA again relaxes in the single-stranded form. In this way the dispersion and precipitation process could be repeated over and over again. Variable temperature UV-Vis-NIR and CD spectroscopy studies showed that the DNA-SWNT complexes were thermally stable even at ∼90 °C at pH 7. Broadband NIR laser (1064 nm) irradiation also demonstrated the stability of the DNA-SWNT complex against local heating introduced through excitation of the carbon nanotubes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed the formation of a stable DNA-SWNT complex at pH 7 and also the generation of DNA secondary structures (A/i-motif) upon acidification. The interactions of ss-DNA with SWNTs cause debundling of the nanotubes from its assembly. Selective affinity of the semiconducting SWNTs towards DNA than the metallic ones enables separation of the two as evident from spectroscopic as well as electrical conductivity studies. PMID:24569668

  4. Engineering evaluation of neutralization and precipitation processes applicable to sludge treatment project

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, M.J.

    1998-08-25

    Engineering evaluations have been performed to determine likely unit operations and methods required to support the removal, storage, treatment and disposal of solids/sludges present in the K Basins at the Hanford Site. This evaluation was initiated to select a neutralization process for dissolver product solution resulting from nitric acid treatment of about 50 m{sup 3} of Hanford Site K Basins sludge. Neutralization is required to meet Tank Waste Remediation Waste System acceptance criteria for storage of the waste in the double shell tanks after neutralization, the supernate and precipitate will be transferred to the high level waste storage tanks in 200E Area. Non transuranic (TRU) solids residue will be transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). This report presents an overview of neutralization and precipitation methods previously used and tested. This report also recommends a neutralization process to be used as part of the K Basins Sludge Treatment Project and identifies additional operations requiring further evaluation.

  5. The Doubting Process: A Longitudinal Study of the Precipitants and Consequences of Religious Doubt

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Neal; Ellison, Christopher G.

    2010-01-01

    Religious doubt arises from a process in which there is a precipitant, the experience of doubt, a coping response, and a health-related outcome. We explore this process by assessing whether social factors precipitate doubt and the coping responses that are invoked to deal with it. Moreover, we evaluate whether these coping responses are, in turn, associated with health. The data reveal that, over time, people who encounter more negative interaction with fellow congregants have more doubts about religion, whereas more spiritual support and greater involvement in prayer groups are associated with less religious doubt. The findings further indicate that people who encounter more negative interaction are more likely to suppress religious doubts, but people who attend Bible study groups are more likely to seek spiritual growth when faced with doubt. Finally, the results suggest that suppressing religious doubt is associated with less favorable health, whereas seeking spiritual growth does not have a significant effect. PMID:20300487

  6. Tools for efficient design of multicomponent separation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Joshua Lee

    formulation and the relative effect of capital and operating cost is weighed for an example feed. Previous methods based on Underwood's equations have no accounting for the temperature at which utilities are required. To account for this, a thermodynamic efficiency function is developed which allows the complete search space to be ranklisted in order of the exergy loss occurring within the configuration. Examining these results shows that this objective function favors configurations which move their reboiler and condenser duties to milder temperature exchangers. A graphical interface is presented which allows interpretation of any of the above results in a quick and intuitive fashion, complete with system flow and composition data and the ability to filter the complete search space based on numerical and structural criteria. This provides a unique way to compare and contrast configurations as well as allowing considerations like column retrofit and maximum controllability to be considered. Using all five of these screening techniques, the traditional intuition-based methods of separations process design can be augmented with analytical and algorithmic tools which enable selection of a process design with low cost and high efficiency.

  7. Influence of Surface Processes over Africa on the Atlantic Marine ITCZ and South American Precipitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Cook, Kerry H.

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies show that the climatological precipitation over South America, particularly the Nordeste region, is influenced by the presence of the African continent. Here the influence of African topography and surface wetness on the Atlantic marine ITCZ (AMI) and South American precipitation are investigated.Cross-equatorial flow over the Atlantic Ocean introduced by north south asymmetry in surface conditions over Africa shifts the AMI in the direction of the flow. African topography, for example, introduces an anomalous high over the southern Atlantic Ocean and a low to the north. This results in a northward migration of the AMI and dry conditions over the Nordeste region.The implications of this process on variability are then studied by analyzing the response of the AMI to soil moisture anomalies over tropical Africa. Northerly flow induced by equatorially asymmetric perturbations in soil moisture over northern tropical Africa shifts the AMI southward, increasing the climatological precipitation over northeastern South America. Flow associated with an equatorially symmetric perturbation in soil moisture, however, has a very weak cross-equatorial component and very weak influence on the AMI and South American precipitation. The sensitivity of the AMI to soil moisture perturbations over certain regions of Africa can possibly improve the skill of prediction.

  8. Analyses of precipitation processes of BIS(dimethylglyoximato)Ni(II) and related complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskii, M. I.; Wakita, H.; Masuda, I.

    1983-03-01

    Precipitates of Ni(dioximato) 2 complexes, where dioximato is 2,3-butanedione dioximate (dimethyglyoximate: dmgH), 2,3-pentanedione dioximate (ethylmethylglyoximate: emgH) or 1,2-cyclohexanedione dioximate (nioximate: nioxH) monoanions, were formed by a manner of direct mixing of NiCl 2 and dioxime solutions in the molar ratios: [dioxime]/[NiCl 2] is 0.57-5.0 for dmgH 2, 1.0-2.2 for emgH 2, and 0.03-0.09 for nioxH 2. The precipitation processes followed by light-scattering measurements were found to fit Avrami's equation. This fact made it possible for us to obtain the induction periods for the precipitation. The p values, the number of molecules in a "nucleus", were estimated from these induction periods and the evaluated concentrations for the supersaturated solutions of the complexes; these values were 3.58 for Ni(dmgH) 2, 2.73 for Ni(emgH) 2, and 2.81 for Ni(nioxH) 2 precipitates.

  9. Martian Air Separation for In-Situ Resource Utilization Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacArthur, J. R.; Way, J. D.; Baldwin, R. M.; Mason, L. W.

    2002-01-01

    We will introduce the concept of using synthetic organic and inorganic membranes for the separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The class of applications targeted in this project are known as In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). ISRU involves the use of resources present on Mars, such as atmospheric gases, a concept that will dramatically reduce the amount of material that must be transferred from Earth to support a mission. ISRU technologies will provide many of the consumables required for a manned mission, such as rocket propellant, water, oxygen and buffer gases. The Martian atmosphere is primarily CO2, and also contains a few percent nitrogen and argon. Martian CO2 is a principal component of several ISRU processes that may be used in a manned Mars mission. For example, the Sabatier/Electrolysis (SE) process reacts atmospheric CO2 with hydrogen to produce methane (fuel), water, and oxygen. Pure gas and mixed gas permeation tests with CO2, Ar, N2, and O2 were performed over the temperature range 243 K to 295 K with a several candidate membrane materials including rubbery polymers (silicone rubber and PEBAX) and supported faujasite zeolite membranes. In experiments with commercially available silicone rubber membranes, the pure gas CO2 permeance (flux/driving force) increases from 460 GPUs to 655 GPUs as the temperature decreases from 295 K to 243 K. A GPU is a commonly used unit of permeance and is defined as 10-6 cm3(STP)/cm2-s-cm Hg. The ideal carbon dioxide/nitrogen separation factor (ratio of pure gas permeances) increases from 7.5 to 17.5 over the same temperature range. However, in mixed gas experiments, the CO2/N2 separation factor was much lower, increasing from 4.5 to 6 as the temperature decreased from 295 K to 243 K. This difference was attributed to plasticization of the rubbery polymer membrane by CO2.

  10. Water balance and magnesium control in electrolytic zinc plants using the E.Z. selective zinc precipitation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthew, I. G.; Newman, O. M. G.; Palmer, D. J.

    1980-03-01

    There is an increasing tendency for modern electrolytic zinc plants to experience water balance and magnesium control problems because of the simultaneous need to maximize zinc recovery and produce environmentally acceptable leach residues and precipitates. The Selective Zinc Precipitation process developed by the Electrolytic Zinc Company of Australasia involves the precipitation of basic zinc sulfate using limestone. Water balance and magnesium control may be achieved by either discarding the process filtrate, or by using it to wash precipitates in a closed circuit operation. The process filter cake is used as a neutralizing agent in the zinc plant. The process can be operated over a wide range of temperatures and calcined zinc concentrate may be preferred to limestone as a zinc precipitant to minimize the discard of sulfate. This paper is particularly concerned with a quantitative assessment of various modes of integrating the process into modern electrolytic zinc plants.