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Sample records for precise point positioning

  1. Precise Point Positioning in the Airborne Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mowafy, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is widely used for positioning in the airborne mode such as in navigation as a supplementary system and for geo-referencing of cameras in mapping and surveillance by aircrafts and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) approach is an attractive positioning approach based on processing of un-differenced observations from a single GPS receiver. It employs precise satellite orbits and satellite clock corrections. These data can be obtained via the internet from several sources, e.g. the International GNSS Service (IGS). The data can also broadcast from satellites, such as via the LEX signal of the new Japanese satellite system QZSS. The PPP can achieve positioning precision and accuracy at the sub-decimetre level. In this paper, the functional and stochastic mathematical modelling used in PPP is discussed. Results of applying the PPP method in an airborne test using a small fixed-wing aircraft are presented. To evaluate the performance of the PPP approach, a reference trajectory was established by differential positioning of the same GPS observations with data from a ground reference station. The coordinate results from the two approaches, PPP and differential positioning, were compared and statistically evaluated. For the test at hand, positioning accuracy at the cm-to-decimetre was achieved for latitude and longitude coordinates and doubles that value for height estimation.

  2. Precise Point Positioning with Partial Ambiguity Fixing.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Reliable and rapid ambiguity resolution (AR) is the key to fast precise point positioning (PPP). We propose a modified partial ambiguity resolution (PAR) method, in which an elevation and standard deviation criterion are first used to remove the low-precision ambiguity estimates for AR. Subsequently the success rate and ratio-test are simultaneously used in an iterative process to increase the possibility of finding a subset of decorrelated ambiguities which can be fixed with high confidence. One can apply the proposed PAR method to try to achieve an ambiguity-fixed solution when full ambiguity resolution (FAR) fails. We validate this method using data from 450 stations during DOY 021 to 027, 2012. Results demonstrate the proposed PAR method can significantly shorten the time to first fix (TTFF) and increase the fixing rate. Compared with FAR, the average TTFF for PAR is reduced by 14.9% for static PPP and 15.1% for kinematic PPP. Besides, using the PAR method, the average fixing rate can be increased from 83.5% to 98.2% for static PPP, from 80.1% to 95.2% for kinematic PPP respectively. Kinematic PPP accuracy with PAR can also be significantly improved, compared to that with FAR, due to a higher fixing rate. PMID:26067196

  3. Precise Point Positioning with Partial Ambiguity Fixing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Reliable and rapid ambiguity resolution (AR) is the key to fast precise point positioning (PPP). We propose a modified partial ambiguity resolution (PAR) method, in which an elevation and standard deviation criterion are first used to remove the low-precision ambiguity estimates for AR. Subsequently the success rate and ratio-test are simultaneously used in an iterative process to increase the possibility of finding a subset of decorrelated ambiguities which can be fixed with high confidence. One can apply the proposed PAR method to try to achieve an ambiguity-fixed solution when full ambiguity resolution (FAR) fails. We validate this method using data from 450 stations during DOY 021 to 027, 2012. Results demonstrate the proposed PAR method can significantly shorten the time to first fix (TTFF) and increase the fixing rate. Compared with FAR, the average TTFF for PAR is reduced by 14.9% for static PPP and 15.1% for kinematic PPP. Besides, using the PAR method, the average fixing rate can be increased from 83.5% to 98.2% for static PPP, from 80.1% to 95.2% for kinematic PPP respectively. Kinematic PPP accuracy with PAR can also be significantly improved, compared to that with FAR, due to a higher fixing rate. PMID:26067196

  4. Precise Point Positioning Based on BDS and GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, ZhouZheng; Zhang, Hongping; Shen, Wenbin

    2014-05-01

    BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) has obtained the ability applying initial navigation and precise point services for the Asian-Pacific regions at the end of 2012 with the constellation of 5 Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), 5 Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO) and 4 Medium Earth Orbit (MEO). Till 2020, it will consist with 5 GEO, 3 IGSO and 27 MEO, and apply global navigation service similar to GPS and GLONASS. As we known, GPS precise point positioning (PPP) is a powerful tool for crustal deformation monitoring, GPS meteorology, orbit determination of low earth orbit satellites, high accuracy kinematic positioning et al. However, it accuracy and convergence time are influenced by the quality of pseudo-range observations and the observing geometry between user and Global navigation satellites system (GNSS) satellites. Usually, it takes more than 30 minutes even hours to obtain centimeter level position accuracy for PPP while using GPS dual-frequency observations only. In recent years, many researches have been done to solve this problem. One of the approaches is smooth pseudo-range by carrier-phase observations to improve pseudo-range accuracy. By which can improve PPP initial position accuracy and shorten PPP convergence time. Another sachems is to change position dilution of precision (PDOP) with multi-GNSS observations. Now, BDS has the ability to service whole Asian-Pacific regions, which make it possible to use GPS and BDS for precise positioning. In addition, according to researches on GNSS PDOP distribution, BDS can improve PDOP obviously. Therefore, it necessary to do some researches on PPP performance using both GPS observations and BDS observations, especially in Asian-Pacific regions currently. In this paper, we focus on the influences of BDS to GPS PPP mainly in three terms including BDS PPP accuracy, PDOP improvement and convergence time of PPP based on GPS and BDS observations. Here, the GPS and BDS two-constellation data are collected from

  5. GPS and Glonass Combined Static Precise Point Positioning (ppp)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, D.; Dwivedi, R.; Dikshit, O.; Singh, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs), satellite navigation is undergoing drastic changes. Presently, more than 70 satellites are already available and nearly 120 more satellites will be available in the coming years after the achievement of complete constellation for all four systems- GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou. The significant improvement in terms of satellite visibility, spatial geometry, dilution of precision and accuracy demands the utilization of combining multi-GNSS for Precise Point Positioning (PPP), especially in constrained environments. Currently, PPP is performed based on the processing of only GPS observations. Static and kinematic PPP solutions based on the processing of only GPS observations is limited by the satellite visibility, which is often insufficient for the mountainous and open pit mines areas. One of the easiest options available to enhance the positioning reliability is to integrate GPS and GLONASS observations. This research investigates the efficacy of combining GPS and GLONASS observations for achieving static PPP solution and its sensitivity to different processing methodology. Two static PPP solutions, namely standalone GPS and combined GPS-GLONASS solutions are compared. The datasets are processed using the open source GNSS processing environment gLAB 2.2.7 as well as magicGNSS software package. The results reveal that the addition of GLONASS observations improves the static positioning accuracy in comparison with the standalone GPS point positioning. Further, results show that there is an improvement in the three dimensional positioning accuracy. It is also shown that the addition of GLONASS constellation improves the total number of visible satellites by more than 60% which leads to the improvement of satellite geometry represented by Position Dilution of Precision (PDOP) by more than 30%.

  6. Assessing the Accuracy of the Precise Point Positioning Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnath, S. B.; Collins, P.; Seepersad, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) GPS data processing technique has developed over the past 15 years to become a standard method for growing categories of positioning and navigation applications. The technique relies on single receiver point positioning combined with the use of precise satellite orbit and clock information and high-fidelity error modelling. The research presented here uniquely addresses the current accuracy of the technique, explains the limits of performance, and defines paths to improvements. For geodetic purposes, performance refers to daily static position accuracy. PPP processing of over 80 IGS stations over one week results in few millimetre positioning rms error in the north and east components and few centimetres in the vertical (all one sigma values). Larger error statistics for real-time and kinematic processing are also given. GPS PPP with ambiguity resolution processing is also carried out, producing slight improvements over the float solution results. These results are categorised into quality classes in order to analyse the root error causes of the resultant accuracies: "best", "worst", multipath, site displacement effects, satellite availability and geometry, etc. Also of interest in PPP performance is solution convergence period. Static, conventional solutions are slow to converge, with approximately 35 minutes required for 95% of solutions to reach the 20 cm or better horizontal accuracy. Ambiguity resolution can significantly reduce this period without biasing solutions. The definition of a PPP error budget is a complex task even with the resulting numerical assessment, as unlike the epoch-by-epoch processing in the Standard Position Service, PPP processing involving filtering. An attempt is made here to 1) define the magnitude of each error source in terms of range, 2) transform ranging error to position error via Dilution Of Precision (DOP), and 3) scale the DOP through the filtering process. The result is a deeper

  7. Precise Point Positioning Using Triple GNSS Constellations in Various Modes.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a new dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) model, which combines the observations from three different global navigation satellite system (GNSS) constellations, namely GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou. Combining measurements from different GNSS systems introduces additional biases, including inter-system bias and hardware delays, which require rigorous modelling. Our model is based on the un-differenced and between-satellite single-difference (BSSD) linear combinations. BSSD linear combination cancels out some receiver-related biases, including receiver clock error and non-zero initial phase bias of the receiver oscillator. Forming the BSSD linear combination requires a reference satellite, which can be selected from any of the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou systems. In this paper three BSSD scenarios are tested; each considers a reference satellite from a different GNSS constellation. Natural Resources Canada's GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly introduced biases. A total of four data sets collected at four different IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the International GNSS Service Multi-GNSS Experiment (IGS-MGEX) network are used to correct the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou measurements in the post-processing PPP mode. A real-time PPP solution is also obtained, which is referred to as RT-PPP in the sequel, through the use of the IGS real-time service (RTS) for satellite orbit and clock corrections. However, only GPS and Galileo observations are used for the RT-PPP solution, as the RTS-IGS satellite products are not presently available for BeiDou system. All post-processed and real-time PPP solutions are compared with the traditional un-differenced GPS-only counterparts. It is shown that combining the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou observations in the post-processing mode improves the PPP convergence

  8. Precise Point Positioning Using Triple GNSS Constellations in Various Modes

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a new dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) model, which combines the observations from three different global navigation satellite system (GNSS) constellations, namely GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou. Combining measurements from different GNSS systems introduces additional biases, including inter-system bias and hardware delays, which require rigorous modelling. Our model is based on the un-differenced and between-satellite single-difference (BSSD) linear combinations. BSSD linear combination cancels out some receiver-related biases, including receiver clock error and non-zero initial phase bias of the receiver oscillator. Forming the BSSD linear combination requires a reference satellite, which can be selected from any of the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou systems. In this paper three BSSD scenarios are tested; each considers a reference satellite from a different GNSS constellation. Natural Resources Canada’s GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly introduced biases. A total of four data sets collected at four different IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the International GNSS Service Multi-GNSS Experiment (IGS-MGEX) network are used to correct the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou measurements in the post-processing PPP mode. A real-time PPP solution is also obtained, which is referred to as RT-PPP in the sequel, through the use of the IGS real-time service (RTS) for satellite orbit and clock corrections. However, only GPS and Galileo observations are used for the RT-PPP solution, as the RTS-IGS satellite products are not presently available for BeiDou system. All post-processed and real-time PPP solutions are compared with the traditional un-differenced GPS-only counterparts. It is shown that combining the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou observations in the post-processing mode improves the PPP convergence

  9. Single-frequency precise point positioning: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterle, Oskar; Stopar, Bojan; Pavlovčič Prešeren, Polona

    2015-08-01

    An analytical approach to single-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) is discussed in this paper. To obtain highest precision results, all biases must be eliminated or modelled to centimetre level. The use of the GRAPHIC ionosphere-free linear combination that is based on single-frequency phase and code observations eliminates the ionosphere bias; however, the rank deficient Gauss-Markov model is obtained. We explicitly determine rank deficiency of a Gauss-Markov model as a number of all ambiguity clusters, each of them defined as a set of all ambiguities overlapping in time. On the basis of S-transformation we prove that the single-frequency PPP represents an unbiased estimator for station coordinates and troposphere parameters, while it presents a biased estimator for ambiguities and receiver-clock error parameters. Additionally we describe the estimable parameters in each ambiguity cluster as the differences between ambiguity parameters and the sum of receiver-clock parameters with one of the ambiguities. We also show that any other particular solution on the basis of S-transformation is obtained only when the common least-squares estimation in single step is applied. The recursive least-squares estimation with parameter pre-elimination only determines the vector of unknowns as possible to transform through S-transformation, whereas the same does not hold for the cofactor matrix of unknowns. For a case study, we present our method on GPS data from 19 permanent stations (14 IGS and 5 EPN) in Europe, for 89 consecutive days in the beginning of 2013. The static case study revealed the precision of daily coordinates as 7.6, 11.7 and 19.6 mm for , and , respectively. The accuracies of the , and components were determined as 6.9, 13.5 and 31.4 mm, respectively, and were calculated using the Helmert transformation of weighted-mean daily single-frequency PPP and IGb08 coordinates. The estimated convergence times were relatively diverse, expanding from 1.75 h (CAGL

  10. Local troposphere augmentation for real-time precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junbo; Xu, Chaoqian; Guo, Jiming; Gao, Yang

    2014-12-01

    The IGS real-time service (RTS) enables real-time precise point positioning (PPP) at a global scale. A long convergence time however is still a challenging factor. In order to reduce the convergence time, external troposphere corrections could be introduced to remove the troposphere effects on the coordinate solution. This paper proposes the use of a local troposphere model to augment real-time PPP. First, undifferenced observations from a network of multiple stations are processed to estimate the station-based troposphere zenith wet delay (ZWD). A set of local troposphere fitting coefficients are then derived using a proposed optimal fitting model. Finally, the determined troposphere fitting coefficients are broadcast to users to reduce the convergence time in the user solution. A continuous operating reference station (CORS) network is utilized to assess the performance of the proposed approach under quiet and active troposphere conditions. The numerical results show that the overall fitting precisions of the local troposphere model can reach 1.42 and 1.05 cm under the two troposphere conditions. The convergence time of the positioning solutions, especially the height solution, can be greatly reduced using the local troposphere model. The horizontal accuracy of 9.2 cm and the vertical accuracy of 10.1 cm are obtainable under the quiet troposphere condition after 20 min of initialization time, compared to the 14.7 cm horizontal and 21.5 cm vertical accuracies in the conventional troposphere estimation approach. Moreover, the horizontal accuracies of 13.0 cm and the vertical accuracies of 12.4 cm have also been obtained after 20 min under the active troposphere condition.

  11. GLONASS ionosphere-free ambiguity resolution for precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banville, Simon

    2016-05-01

    Current GLONASS satellites transmit signals based on the frequency division multiple access (FDMA) technology. Due to equipment delays occurring within GNSS receivers, GLONASS carrier phase and code observations are contaminated by inter-frequency biases. As a consequence, GLONASS ambiguity parameters in long-baseline processing are typically estimated as float values. In this paper, a strategy is investigated which benefits from the frequency spacing of GLONASS frequencies on the L1 and L2 bands, allowing for an ionosphere-free ambiguity with a wavelength of approximately 5 cm to be defined; therefore, avoiding the problematic wide-lane ambiguity resolution. Based on 12 independent baselines with a mean inter-station distance of about 850 km over a 1-week period, it is demonstrated that close to 95 % of the estimated double-differenced ionosphere-free ambiguities are within 0.15 cycles of an integer, thereby suggesting that long-baseline ambiguity resolution can be achieved for GLONASS. Applying between-station ambiguity constraints in precise point positioning (PPP) solutions was found to improve longitudinal repeatability in static mode by more than 20 % for sessions between 2 and 6 h in duration. In kinematic mode, only limited improvements were made to the initial convergence period since the short wavelength of GLONASS ionosphere-free ambiguities requires the solution to be nearly converged before successful ambiguity resolution can be achieved.

  12. Deterministic and Stochastic Receiver Clock Modeling in Precise Point Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orliac, E.; Dach, R.; Wang, K.; Rothacher, M.; Voithenleitner, D.; Hugentobler, U.; Heinze, M.; Svehla, D.

    2012-04-01

    The traditional GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) data analysis assumes an independent set of clock corrections for each epoch. This introduces a huge number of parameters that are highly correlated with station height and troposphere parameters. If the number of clock parameters can be reduced, the GNSS processing procedure may be stabilized. Experiments with kinematic solutions for stations equipped with H-Maser clocks have confirmed this. On the other hand, static coordinates do not significantly benefit from changing the strategy in handling the clock parameter. In the current GNSS constellation only GIOVE-B and the GPS Block IIF satellite clocks seem to be good enough to be modeled instead of freely estimated for each epoch without losing accuracy at the level of phase measurements. With the Galileo constellation this will change in future. In this context, ESA (European Space Agency) funded a project on "Satellite and Station Clock Modelling for GNSS". In the frame of this project, various deterministic and stochastic clock models have been evaluated, implemented and assessed for both, station and satellite clocks. In this paper we focus on the impact of modeling the receiver clock in the processing of GNSS data in static and kinematic precise point positioning (PPP) modes. Initial results show that for stations connected to an H-Maser clock the stability of the vertical position for kinematic PPP could be improved by up to 60%. The impact of clock modeling on the estimation of troposphere parameters is also investigated, along with the role of the tropospheric modeling itself, by testing various sampling rates and relative constraints for the troposphere parameters. Finally, we investigate the convergence time of PPP when deterministic or stochastic clock modeling is applied to the receiver clock.

  13. Impact of selected troposphere models on Precise Point Positioning convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Jakub; Rzepecka, Zofia

    2016-04-01

    The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) absolute method is currently intensively investigated in order to reach fast convergence time. Among various sources that influence the convergence of the PPP, the tropospheric delay is one of the most important. Numerous models of tropospheric delay are developed and applied to PPP processing. However, with rare exceptions, the quality of those models does not allow fixing the zenith path delay tropospheric parameter, leaving difference between nominal and final value to the estimation process. Here we present comparison of several PPP result sets, each of which based on different troposphere model. The respective nominal values are adopted from models: VMF1, GPT2w, MOPS and ZERO-WET. The PPP solution admitted as reference is based on the final troposphere product from the International GNSS Service (IGS). The VMF1 mapping function was used for all processing variants in order to provide capability to compare impact of applied nominal values. The worst case initiates zenith wet delay with zero value (ZERO-WET). Impact from all possible models for tropospheric nominal values should fit inside both IGS and ZERO-WET border variants. The analysis is based on data from seven IGS stations located in mid-latitude European region from year 2014. For the purpose of this study several days with the most active troposphere were selected for each of the station. All the PPP solutions were determined using gLAB open-source software, with the Kalman filter implemented independently by the authors of this work. The processing was performed on 1 hour slices of observation data. In addition to the analysis of the output processing files, the presented study contains detailed analysis of the tropospheric conditions for the selected data. The overall results show that for the height component the VMF1 model outperforms GPT2w and MOPS by 35-40% and ZERO-WET variant by 150%. In most of the cases all solutions converge to the same values during first

  14. An Integer Precise Point Positioning technique for sea surface observations using a GPS buoy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fund, F.; Perosanz, F.; Testut, L.; Loyer, S.

    2013-04-01

    GPS data dedicated to sea surface observation are usually processed using differential techniques. Unfortunately, the precision of resulting kinematic positions is baseline-length dependent. So, high precision sea surface observations using differential GPS techniques are limited to coasts, lakes, and rivers. Recent improvements in GPS satellite products (orbits, clocks, and phase biases) make phase ambiguity fixing at the zero difference level achievable and opens up the observation of the sea surface without geographical constraints. This paper recalls the concept of the Integer Precise Point Positioning technique and discusses the precision of GPS buoy positioning. A sequential version of the GINS software has been implemented to achieve single epoch GPS positioning. We used 1 Hz data from a two week GPS campaign conducted in the Kerguelen Islands. A GPS buoy has been moored close to a radar gauge and 90 m away from a permanent GPS station. This infrastructure offers the opportunity to compare both kinematic Integer Precise Point Positioning and classical differential GPS positioning techniques to in situ radar gauge data. We found that Precise Point Positioning results are not significantly biased with respect to radar gauge data and that horizontal time series are consistent with differential processing at the sub-centimetre precision level. Nevertheless, standard deviations of height time series with respect to radar gauge data are typically [4-5] cm. The dominant driver for noise at this level is attributed to errors in tropospheric estimates which propagate into position solutions.

  15. Some aspects of improving Multi-GNSS real-time precise point positioning services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Ge, Maorong; Li, Xingxing; Schuh, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Multi-GNSS is expected to achieve a real-time precise point positioning service with better accuracy and reliability than GPS-only service. In this contribution, we address several critical challenges in implementing a GPS+GLONASS+BeiDou+Galileo service to provide global users with centimeter-level positioning in real-time based on the software system developed at GFZ. The specific issues of improving GLONASS orbit quality by resolving ambiguity over long baselines, estimation of inter-system/frequency biases, ambiguity resolution in real-time clock estimation and positioning, and computation efficiency are discussed and investigated in detail. Experimental validation is carried out based on the data streams of the IGS/MGEX network. The real-time orbit and clock products are assessed by comparison with the IGS/MGEX final products, and orbits are also assessed by overlapping day boundaries and satellite laser ranging. The phase bias (uncalibrated phase delay) products are evaluated by comparison with the post-processing results. It is demonstrated that multi-GNSS can contribute significantly to improving the global real-time precise point positioning service in terms of convergence time and accuracy. Keywords: Multi-GNSS, Real-Time, Precise Orbit Determination, Precise Point Positioning, Ambiguity Resolution, Inter-System/Frequency Bias, Algorithm Efficiency

  16. Precise Point Positioning for the Efficient and Robust Analysis of GPS Data from Large Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J. F.; Heflin, M. B.; Jefferson, D. C.; Watkins, M. M.; Webb, F. H.

    1997-01-01

    Networks of dozens to hundreds of permanently operating precision Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are emerging at spatial scales that range from 10(exp 0) to 10(exp 3) km. To keep the computational burden associated with the analysis of such data economically feasible, one approach is to first determine precise GPS satellite positions and clock corrections from a globally distributed network of GPS receivers. Their, data from the local network are analyzed by estimating receiver- specific parameters with receiver-specific data satellite parameters are held fixed at their values determined in the global solution. This "precise point positioning" allows analysis of data from hundreds to thousands of sites every (lay with 40-Mflop computers, with results comparable in quality to the simultaneous analysis of all data. The reference frames for the global and network solutions can be free of distortion imposed by erroneous fiducial constraints on any sites.

  17. Precise Point Positioning for the Efficient and Robust Analysis of GPS Data From Large Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J. F.; Heflin, M. B.; Jefferson, D. C.; Watkins, M. M.; Webb, F. H.

    1997-01-01

    Networks of dozens to hundreds of permanently operating precision Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are emerging at spatial scales that range from 10(exp 0) to 10(exp 3) km. To keep the computational burden associated with the analysis of such data economically feasible, one approach is to first determine precise GPS satellite positions and clock corrections from a globally distributed network of GPS receivers. Then, data from the local network are analyzed by estimating receiver specific parameters with receiver-specific data; satellite parameters are held fixed at their values determined in the global solution. This "precise point positioning" allows analysis of data from hundreds to thousands of sites every day with 40 Mflop computers, with results comparable in quality to the simultaneous analysis of all data. The reference frames for the global and network solutions can be free of distortion imposed by erroneous fiducial constraints on any sites.

  18. Precise Point Positioning with the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Qu, Lizhong; Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Su, Xing; Li, Xiaotao

    2014-01-01

    By the end of 2012, China had launched 16 BeiDou-2 navigation satellites that include six GEOs, five IGSOs and five MEOs. This has provided initial navigation and precise pointing services ability in the Asia-Pacific regions. In order to assess the navigation and positioning performance of the BeiDou-2 system, Wuhan University has built up a network of BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) around the World. The Position and Navigation Data Analyst (PANDA) software was modified to determine the orbits of BeiDou satellites and provide precise orbit and satellite clock bias products from the BeiDou satellite system for user applications. This article uses the BeiDou/GPS observations of the BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations to realize the BeiDou and BeiDou/GPS static and kinematic precise point positioning (PPP). The result indicates that the precision of BeiDou static and kinematic PPP reaches centimeter level. The precision of BeiDou/GPS kinematic PPP solutions is improved significantly compared to that of BeiDou-only or GPS-only kinematic PPP solutions. The PPP convergence time also decreases with the use of combined BeiDou/GPS systems. PMID:24406856

  19. Real-Time IGS products verification in the context of their use in Precise Point Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Tomasz; Bosy, Jaroslaw; Kaplon, Jan; Sierny, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is a positioning technique of single GNSS receiver which applies high quality products from permanent GNSS observations to utilize the computational potential of global network analysis. Estimated satellite orbits and clocks corrections are introduced into equation system as known parameters. PPP requires the application of precise products, since their quality directly reflects the positioning accuracy. In June 2007 IGS Real-time Pilot Project has started in order to satisfy real-time users, which is especially important for Precise Point Positioning. Currently available streams including precise orbits, clocks and code biases are standardized on RTCM-SC 104 formats and may be used as a substitute for ultra-rapid products. The target combination product performances are 0.3ns for satellite clock accuracy and orbit accuracy at the level of the IGS Ultra predictions with maximum latency of 10s. This study presents the quality assessment of currently available Real-Time IGS products. Long-term test include comparisons of disseminated information with final and high-rate products, stability assessment over time, as well as latency validation of available RTCM streams.

  20. Accelerating the Convergence Speed of Precise Point Positioning by Using Multi-mode GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Song; Jin-ming, Hao

    2016-04-01

    The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) does not need the support of base stations, and it has broad application prospects. However, the convergence time of PPP is long. In order to accelerate the convergence speed of PPP, the PPP model using multi-mode GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) is discussed. The experiments show that the convergence speed becomes faster by using the multi-mode GNSS, the mean percentage of time reduction for converging to different precisions (10 cm, 15 cm, and 20 cm) is 42%, 78%, and 74%, respectively; meanwhile, in the severe regions, such as in the mountainous regions, the number of observable satellites becomes fewer, and the PPP sometimes cannot achieve positioning using a simple system. But the PPP using multi-mode GNSS can achieve positioning and accelerate the convergence.

  1. Accelerating the Convergence Speed of Precise Point Positioning by Using Multi-GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, C.; Hao, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) does not need the support of base station, and it has broad application prospects. However, the convergence time of PPP is long. In order to accelerate the convergence speed of PPP, the PPP model using multi-GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) is discussed. The experiments show that the convergence speed becomes faster by using the multi-GNSS, the mean percentage of time reduction for converging to different precisions (10 cm, 15 cm, and 20 cm) is 42%, 78%, and 74%, respectively; meanwhile, in the severe regions, such as in the mountainous regions, the number of observed satellites becomes fewer, and the PPP sometimes cannot achieve positioning using single system. But PPP using multi-GNSS can achieve positioning and accelerate the convergence.

  2. A method of undifferenced ambiguity resolution for GPS+GLONASS precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wenting; Song, Weiwei; Lou, Yidong; Shi, Chuang; Yao, Yibin

    2016-05-01

    Integer ambiguity resolution is critical for achieving positions of high precision and for shortening the convergence time of precise point positioning (PPP). However, GLONASS adopts the signal processing technology of frequency division multiple access and results in inter-frequency code biases (IFCBs), which are currently difficult to correct. This bias makes the methods proposed for GPS ambiguity fixing unsuitable for GLONASS. To realize undifferenced GLONASS ambiguity fixing, we propose an undifferenced ambiguity resolution method for GPS+GLONASS PPP, which considers the IFCBs estimation. The experimental result demonstrates that the success rate of GLONASS ambiguity fixing can reach 75% through the proposed method. Compared with the ambiguity float solutions, the positioning accuracies of ambiguity-fixed solutions of GLONASS-only PPP are increased by 12.2%, 20.9%, and 10.3%, and that of the GPS+GLONASS PPP by 13.0%, 35.2%, and 14.1% in the North, East and Up directions, respectively.

  3. Precise Point Positioning technique for short and long baselines time transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejba, Pawel; Nawrocki, Jerzy; Lemanski, Dariusz; Foks-Ryznar, Anna; Nogas, Pawel; Dunst, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    In this work the clock parameters determination of several timing receivers TTS-4 (AOS), ASHTECH Z-XII3T (OP, ORB, PTB, USNO) and SEPTENTRIO POLARX4TR (ORB, since February 11, 2012) by use of the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technique were presented. The clock parameters were determined for several time links based on the data delivered by time and frequency laboratories mentioned above. The computations cover the period from January 1 to December 31, 2012 and were performed in two modes with 7-day and one-month solution for all links. All RINEX data files which include phase and code GPS data were recorded in 30-second intervals. All calculations were performed by means of Natural Resource Canada's GPS Precise Point Positioning (GPS-PPP) software based on high-quality precise satellite coordinates and satellite clock delivered by IGS as the final products. The used independent PPP technique is a very powerful and simple method which allows for better control of antenna positions in AOS and a verification of other time transfer techniques like GPS CV, GLONASS CV and TWSTFT. The PPP technique is also a very good alternative for calibration of a glass fiber link PL-AOS realized at present by AOS. Currently PPP technique is one of the main time transfer methods used at AOS what considerably improve and strengthen the quality of the Polish time scales UTC(AOS), UTC(PL), and TA(PL). KEY-WORDS: Precise Point Positioning, time transfer, IGS products, GNSS, time scales.

  4. Real-Time Single Frequency Precise Point Positioning Using SBAS Corrections.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Jia, Chun; Zhao, Lin; Cheng, Jianhua; Liu, Jianxu; Ding, Jicheng

    2016-01-01

    Real-time single frequency precise point positioning (PPP) is a promising technique for high-precision navigation with sub-meter or even centimeter-level accuracy because of its convenience and low cost. The navigation performance of single frequency PPP heavily depends on the real-time availability and quality of correction products for satellite orbits and satellite clocks. Satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) provides the correction products in real-time, but they are intended to be used for wide area differential positioning at 1 meter level precision. By imposing the constraints for ionosphere error, we have developed a real-time single frequency PPP method by sufficiently utilizing SBAS correction products. The proposed PPP method are tested with static and kinematic data, respectively. The static experimental results show that the position accuracy of the proposed PPP method can reach decimeter level, and achieve an improvement of at least 30% when compared with the traditional SBAS method. The positioning convergence of the proposed PPP method can be achieved in 636 epochs at most in static mode. In the kinematic experiment, the position accuracy of the proposed PPP method can be improved by at least 20 cm relative to the SBAS method. Furthermore, it has revealed that the proposed PPP method can achieve decimeter level convergence within 500 s in the kinematic mode. PMID:27517930

  5. Effect of the 24 September 2011 solar radio burst on precise point positioning service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Aquino, M.; Jong, Kees; Visser, Hans

    2014-03-01

    An intense solar radio burst occurred on 24 September 2011, which affected the tracking of Global Navigation Satellite Systems' (GNSS) signals by receivers located in the sunlit hemisphere of the Earth. This manuscript presents for the first time the impacts of this radio burst on the availability of Fugro's real-time precise point positioning service for GNSS receivers and on the quality of the L band data link used to broadcast this service. During the peak of the radio burst (12:50-13:20 UT), a reduction in the L band signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is observed. For some receiver locations, a reset in the position filter is observed, which can be either due to the reduction in the L band SNR or the reduction in the number of tracked GNSS satellites. This reset in the position filter is accompanied by degradation in the positioning accuracy, which is also discussed herein.

  6. Flight Evaluation of GPS Precise Point Positioning Software for Helicopter Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Yutaka; Murata, Masaaki

    In 2007 development and assessment of a precise point positioning (PPP) software for land vehicular navigation have been reported. This paper presents one phase of the continued study at NDA for further extension of the software to helicopter navigation. For 3D users, the height-dependent tropospheric delay is a critical factor, and so the sophisticated correction models and parameter estimation strategies have to be investigated to mitigate the delay effect. Since the precise positioning results become available only after the filter convergence and the filter generally converges rather slowly, speeding up the convergence has to be taken into special attention. In this paper we propose some new ideas to cope with this problem, and report the test using GPS helicopter flight data in post-processing. With proposed techniques including the variable Q and pseudo-observation concept, we show that point positioning accuracy at about decimeter level both horizontally and vertically can be achieved with improved convergence within about half an hour. We also show that the use of the high-rate (30-second) satellite clocks rather than the 5-minute clocks further improves positioning accuracy at sub-decimeter level in each 3D coordinate.

  7. Datum maintenance of the main Egyptian geodetic control networks by utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabah, Mostafa; Elmewafey, Mahmoud; Farahan, Magda H.

    2016-06-01

    A geodetic control network is the wire-frame or the skeleton on which continuous and consistent mapping, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and surveys are based. Traditionally, geodetic control points are established as permanent physical monuments placed in the ground and precisely marked, located, and documented. With the development of satellite surveying methods and their availability and high degree of accuracy, a geodetic control network could be established by using GNSS and referred to an international terrestrial reference frame used as a three-dimensional geocentric reference system for a country. Based on this concept, in 1992, the Egypt Survey Authority (ESA) established two networks, namely High Accuracy Reference Network (HARN) and the National Agricultural Cadastral Network (NACN). To transfer the International Terrestrial Reference Frame to the HARN, the HARN was connected with four IGS stations. The processing results were 1:10,000,000 (Order A) for HARN and 1:1,000,000 (Order B) for NACN relative network accuracy standard between stations defined in ITRF1994 Epoch1996. Since 1996, ESA did not perform any updating or maintaining works for these networks. To see how non-performing maintenance degrading the values of the HARN and NACN, the available HARN and NACN stations in the Nile Delta were observed. The Processing of the tested part was done by CSRS-PPP Service based on utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" and Trimble Business Center "TBC". The study shows the feasibility of Precise Point Positioning in updating the absolute positioning of the HARN network and its role in updating the reference frame (ITRF). The study also confirmed the necessity of the absent role of datum maintenance of Egypt networks.

  8. GPS/GLONASS time offset monitoring based on combined Precise Point Positioning (PPP) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G.; Zhang, Q.; Fu, W.; Guo, H.

    2015-06-01

    A new strategy is proposed to monitor GPS/GLONASS time offsets for common navigation users using a combined GPS/GLONASS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method based on the orbit and clock products of different time scales. The results of the inter-system GPS/GLONASS time offset, the user time offset and the inter-system device delay difference were obtained using the proposed method. The properties of these results were analyzed in terms of the stability, precision and variation characteristics. Moreover, the practicality of the time offset results in an actual navigation application was tested and demonstrated. The results indicate that the monitoring and prediction of the user time offset, but not the inter-system time offset, has important values for navigation users.

  9. Estimated results analysis and application of the precise point positioning based high-accuracy ionosphere delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-tai; Peng, Jun-huan

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of ionosphere delay estimated with precise point positioning is analyzed in this paper. The estimation, interpolation and application of the ionosphere delay are studied based on the processing of 24-h data from 5 observation stations. The results show that the estimated ionosphere delay is affected by the hardware delay bias from receiver so that there is a difference between the estimated and interpolated results. The results also show that the RMSs (root mean squares) are bigger, while the STDs (standard deviations) are better than 0.11 m. When the satellite difference is used, the hardware delay bias can be canceled. The interpolated satellite-differenced ionosphere delay is better than 0.11 m. Although there is a difference between the between the estimated and interpolated ionosphere delay results it cannot affect its application in single-frequency positioning and the positioning accuracy can reach cm level.

  10. Tightly Coupled Integration of Ionosphere-Constrained Precise Point Positioning and Inertial Navigation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhouzheng; Zhang, Hongping; Ge, Maorong; Niu, Xiaoji; Shen, Wenbin; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The continuity and reliability of precise GNSS positioning can be seriously limited by severe user observation environments. The Inertial Navigation System (INS) can overcome such drawbacks, but its performance is clearly restricted by INS sensor errors over time. Accordingly, the tightly coupled integration of GPS and INS can overcome the disadvantages of each individual system and together form a new navigation system with a higher accuracy, reliability and availability. Recently, ionosphere-constrained (IC) precise point positioning (PPP) utilizing raw GPS observations was proven able to improve both the convergence and positioning accuracy of the conventional PPP using ionosphere-free combined observations (LC-PPP). In this paper, a new mode of tightly coupled integration, in which the IC-PPP instead of LC-PPP is employed, is implemented to further improve the performance of the coupled system. We present the detailed mathematical model and the related algorithm of the new integration of IC-PPP and INS. To evaluate the performance of the new tightly coupled integration, data of both airborne and vehicle experiments with a geodetic GPS receiver and tactical grade inertial measurement unit are processed and the results are analyzed. The statistics show that the new approach can further improve the positioning accuracy compared with both IC-PPP and the tightly coupled integration of the conventional PPP and INS. PMID:25763647

  11. Tightly coupled integration of ionosphere-constrained precise point positioning and inertial navigation systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhouzheng; Zhang, Hongping; Ge, Maorong; Niu, Xiaoji; Shen, Wenbin; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The continuity and reliability of precise GNSS positioning can be seriously limited by severe user observation environments. The Inertial Navigation System (INS) can overcome such drawbacks, but its performance is clearly restricted by INS sensor errors over time. Accordingly, the tightly coupled integration of GPS and INS can overcome the disadvantages of each individual system and together form a new navigation system with a higher accuracy, reliability and availability. Recently, ionosphere-constrained (IC) precise point positioning (PPP) utilizing raw GPS observations was proven able to improve both the convergence and positioning accuracy of the conventional PPP using ionosphere-free combined observations (LC-PPP). In this paper, a new mode of tightly coupled integration, in which the IC-PPP instead of LC-PPP is employed, is implemented to further improve the performance of the coupled system. We present the detailed mathematical model and the related algorithm of the new integration of IC-PPP and INS. To evaluate the performance of the new tightly coupled integration, data of both airborne and vehicle experiments with a geodetic GPS receiver and tactical grade inertial measurement unit are processed and the results are analyzed. The statistics show that the new approach can further improve the positioning accuracy compared with both IC-PPP and the tightly coupled integration of the conventional PPP and INS. PMID:25763647

  12. Impact of orbit, clock and EOP errors in GNSS Precise Point Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackman, C.

    2012-12-01

    Precise point positioning (PPP; [1]) has gained ever-increasing usage in GNSS carrier-phase positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) since its inception in the late 1990s. In this technique, high-precision satellite clocks, satellite ephemerides and earth-orientation parameters (EOPs) are applied as fixed input by the user in order to estimate receiver/location-specific quantities such as antenna coordinates, troposphere delay and receiver-clock corrections. This is in contrast to "network" solutions, in which (typically) less-precise satellite clocks, satellite ephemerides and EOPs are used as input, and in which these parameters are estimated simultaneously with the receiver/location-specific parameters. The primary reason for increased PPP application is that it offers most of the benefits of a network solution with a smaller computing cost. In addition, the software required to do PPP positioning can be simpler than that required for network solutions. Finally, PPP permits high-precision positioning of single or sparsely spaced receivers that may have few or no GNSS satellites in common view. A drawback of PPP is that the accuracy of the results depend directly on the accuracy of the supplied orbits, clocks and EOPs, since these parameters are not adjusted during the processing. In this study, we will examine the impact of orbit, EOP and satellite clock estimates on PPP solutions. Our primary focus will be the impact of these errors on station coordinates; however the study may be extended to error propagation into receiver-clock corrections and/or troposphere estimates if time permits. Study motivation: the United States Naval Observatory (USNO) began testing PPP processing using its own predicted orbits, clocks and EOPs in Summer 2012 [2]. The results of such processing could be useful for real- or near-real-time applications should they meet accuracy/precision requirements. Understanding how errors in satellite clocks, satellite orbits and EOPs propagate

  13. Near-real-time regional troposphere models for the GNSS precise point positioning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, T.; Kaplon, J.; Bosy, J.; Sierny, J.; Wilgan, K.

    2013-05-01

    The GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) technique requires high quality product (orbits and clocks) application, since their error directly affects the quality of positioning. For real-time purposes it is possible to utilize ultra-rapid precise orbits and clocks which are disseminated through the Internet. In order to eliminate as many unknown parameters as possible, one may introduce external information on zenith troposphere delay (ZTD). It is desirable that the a priori model is accurate and reliable, especially for real-time application. One of the open problems in GNSS positioning is troposphere delay modelling on the basis of ground meteorological observations. Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformatics of Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences (IGG WUELS) has developed two independent regional troposphere models for the territory of Poland. The first one is estimated in near-real-time regime using GNSS data from a Polish ground-based augmentation system named ASG-EUPOS established by Polish Head Office of Geodesy and Cartography (GUGiK) in 2008. The second one is based on meteorological parameters (temperature, pressure and humidity) gathered from various meteorological networks operating over the area of Poland and surrounding countries. This paper describes the methodology of both model calculation and verification. It also presents results of applying various ZTD models into kinematic PPP in the post-processing mode using Bernese GPS Software. Positioning results were used to assess the quality of the developed models during changing weather conditions. Finally, the impact of model application to simulated real-time PPP on precision, accuracy and convergence time is discussed.

  14. A method of undifferenced ambiguity resolution for GPS+GLONASS precise point positioning.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wenting; Song, Weiwei; Lou, Yidong; Shi, Chuang; Yao, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Integer ambiguity resolution is critical for achieving positions of high precision and for shortening the convergence time of precise point positioning (PPP). However, GLONASS adopts the signal processing technology of frequency division multiple access and results in inter-frequency code biases (IFCBs), which are currently difficult to correct. This bias makes the methods proposed for GPS ambiguity fixing unsuitable for GLONASS. To realize undifferenced GLONASS ambiguity fixing, we propose an undifferenced ambiguity resolution method for GPS+GLONASS PPP, which considers the IFCBs estimation. The experimental result demonstrates that the success rate of GLONASS ambiguity fixing can reach 75% through the proposed method. Compared with the ambiguity float solutions, the positioning accuracies of ambiguity-fixed solutions of GLONASS-only PPP are increased by 12.2%, 20.9%, and 10.3%, and that of the GPS+GLONASS PPP by 13.0%, 35.2%, and 14.1% in the North, East and Up directions, respectively. PMID:27222361

  15. A method of undifferenced ambiguity resolution for GPS+GLONASS precise point positioning

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Wenting; Song, Weiwei; Lou, Yidong; Shi, Chuang; Yao, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Integer ambiguity resolution is critical for achieving positions of high precision and for shortening the convergence time of precise point positioning (PPP). However, GLONASS adopts the signal processing technology of frequency division multiple access and results in inter-frequency code biases (IFCBs), which are currently difficult to correct. This bias makes the methods proposed for GPS ambiguity fixing unsuitable for GLONASS. To realize undifferenced GLONASS ambiguity fixing, we propose an undifferenced ambiguity resolution method for GPS+GLONASS PPP, which considers the IFCBs estimation. The experimental result demonstrates that the success rate of GLONASS ambiguity fixing can reach 75% through the proposed method. Compared with the ambiguity float solutions, the positioning accuracies of ambiguity-fixed solutions of GLONASS-only PPP are increased by 12.2%, 20.9%, and 10.3%, and that of the GPS+GLONASS PPP by 13.0%, 35.2%, and 14.1% in the North, East and Up directions, respectively. PMID:27222361

  16. On biases in precise point positioning with multi-constellation and multi-frequency GNSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mowafy, A.; Deo, M.; Rizos, C.

    2016-03-01

    Various types of biases in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data preclude integer ambiguity fixing and degrade solution accuracy when not being corrected during precise point positioning (PPP). In this contribution, these biases are first reviewed, including satellite and receiver hardware biases, differential code biases, differential phase biases, initial fractional phase biases, inter-system receiver time biases, and system time scale offset. PPP models that take account of these biases are presented for two cases using ionosphere-free observations. The first case is when using primary signals that are used to generate precise orbits and clock corrections. The second case applies when using additional signals to the primary ones. In both cases, measurements from single and multiple constellations are addressed. It is suggested that the satellite-related code biases be handled as calibrated quantities that are obtained from multi-GNSS experiment products and the fractional phase cycle biases obtained from a network to allow for integer ambiguity fixing. Some receiver-related biases are removed using between-satellite single differencing, whereas other receiver biases such as inter-system biases are lumped with differential code and phase biases and need to be estimated. The testing results show that the treatment of biases significantly improves solution convergence in the float ambiguity PPP mode, and leads to ambiguity-fixed PPP within a few minutes with a small improvement in solution precision.

  17. Precise point positioning with quad-constellations: GPS, BeiDou, GLONASS and Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Changsheng; Gao, Yang; Pan, Lin; Zhu, Jianjun

    2015-07-01

    Multi-constellation GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) first became feasible back to 2007 but with only two constellations, namely GPS and GLONASS. With the availability of more satellites and precise orbit and clock products from BeiDou and Galileo, it is possible now to investigate PPP with four constellations, namely GPS, BeiDou, GLONASS and Galileo. This research aims at investigating the quad-constellation PPP for position determination and analyzing its positioning performance. A quad-constellation PPP model is developed to simultaneously process the observations from all the four GNSS systems. The developed model is also applicable to the PPP processing with observations from single, dual or triple constellations. The analysis on PPP accuracy and convergence time is conducted based on data processing results from both static and kinematic tests of single-constellation and multi-constellations. The three-hour static positioning results indicate that the BeiDou-only PPP accuracy is worse than the GPS-only PPP. The RMSs of position errors for BeiDou-only PPP are 5.2 cm, 2.7 cm and 8.3 cm in east, north and up directions while the ones for GPS-only PPP are 3.9 cm, 1.6 cm and 5.7 cm. The GPS/BeiDou PPP improves the positioning accuracy by 28%, 6% and 7% and reduces the convergence time by 26%, 13% and 14% over the GPS-only PPP in three coordinate components, respectively. The GPS/GLONASS PPP achieves slightly better performance than the GPS/BeiDou PPP. The triple-constellation PPP further increases the positioning accuracy and decreases the convergence time over the dual-constellation PPP. The improvement of positioning performance is not significant after adding Galileo due to currently limited number of satellites. Similar to the static positioning, the quad-constellation kinematic PPP also significantly improves the positioning performance in contrast with single-constellation and dual-constellations. The time varying characteristics of the time differences

  18. Modeling and Assessment of GPS/BDS Combined Precise Point Positioning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junping; Wang, Jungang; Zhang, Yize; Yang, Sainan; Chen, Qian; Gong, Xiuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technique enables stand-alone receivers to obtain cm-level positioning accuracy. Observations from multi-GNSS systems can augment users with improved positioning accuracy, reliability and availability. In this paper, we present and evaluate the GPS/BDS combined PPP models, including the traditional model and a simplified model, where the inter-system bias (ISB) is treated in different way. To evaluate the performance of combined GPS/BDS PPP, kinematic and static PPP positions are compared to the IGS daily estimates, where 1 month GPS/BDS data of 11 IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) stations are used. The results indicate apparent improvement of GPS/BDS combined PPP solutions in both static and kinematic cases, where much smaller standard deviations are presented in the magnitude distribution of coordinates RMS statistics. Comparisons between the traditional and simplified combined PPP models show no difference in coordinate estimations, and the inter system biases between the GPS/BDS system are assimilated into receiver clock, ambiguities and pseudo-range residuals accordingly. PMID:27455278

  19. Modeling and Assessment of GPS/BDS Combined Precise Point Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junping; Wang, Jungang; Zhang, Yize; Yang, Sainan; Chen, Qian; Gong, Xiuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technique enables stand-alone receivers to obtain cm-level positioning accuracy. Observations from multi-GNSS systems can augment users with improved positioning accuracy, reliability and availability. In this paper, we present and evaluate the GPS/BDS combined PPP models, including the traditional model and a simplified model, where the inter-system bias (ISB) is treated in different way. To evaluate the performance of combined GPS/BDS PPP, kinematic and static PPP positions are compared to the IGS daily estimates, where 1 month GPS/BDS data of 11 IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) stations are used. The results indicate apparent improvement of GPS/BDS combined PPP solutions in both static and kinematic cases, where much smaller standard deviations are presented in the magnitude distribution of coordinates RMS statistics. Comparisons between the traditional and simplified combined PPP models show no difference in coordinate estimations, and the inter system biases between the GPS/BDS system are assimilated into receiver clock, ambiguities and pseudo-range residuals accordingly. PMID:27455278

  20. Evaluation of single frequency GPS precise point positioning assisted with external ionosphere sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoddousi-Fard, Reza; Lahaye, François

    2016-05-01

    Single frequency code and single frequency code and phase GPS precise point positioning scenarios using various ionospheric sources are evaluated by assessing their performances with respect to dual frequency solutions. These include Canadian regional and global vertical total electron content (VTEC) maps produced by Natural Resources Canada and different International GNSS Service (IGS) coordination or analysis centres. Furthermore, two of the most commonly used single layer ionospheric mapping functions applied for conversion of VTEC to slant TEC are evaluated with each and every one of the ionospheric VTEC sources. Results show that the quality of code only solutions depends on ionospheric activity level, and the TEC map and mapping function selected. Code and phase single frequency solutions are also improved when assisted with an external ionosphere source.

  1. GPS/GLONASS Combined Precise Point Positioning with Receiver Clock Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuhong; Chen, Xinghan; Guo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that receiver clock modeling can reduce the correlation coefficients among the parameters of receiver clock bias, station height and zenith tropospheric delay. This paper introduces the receiver clock modeling to GPS/GLONASS combined precise point positioning (PPP), aiming to better separate the receiver clock bias and station coordinates and therefore improve positioning accuracy. Firstly, the basic mathematic models including the GPS/GLONASS observation equations, stochastic model, and receiver clock model are briefly introduced. Then datasets from several IGS stations equipped with high-stability atomic clocks are used for kinematic PPP tests. To investigate the performance of PPP, including the positioning accuracy and convergence time, a week of (1–7 January 2014) GPS/GLONASS data retrieved from these IGS stations are processed with different schemes. The results indicate that the positioning accuracy as well as convergence time can benefit from the receiver clock modeling. This is particularly pronounced for the vertical component. Statistic RMSs show that the average improvement of three-dimensional positioning accuracy reaches up to 30%–40%. Sometimes, it even reaches over 60% for specific stations. Compared to the GPS-only PPP, solutions of the GPS/GLONASS combined PPP are much better no matter if the receiver clock offsets are modeled or not, indicating that the positioning accuracy and reliability are significantly improved with the additional GLONASS satellites in the case of insufficient number of GPS satellites or poor geometry conditions. In addition to the receiver clock modeling, the impacts of different inter-system timing bias (ISB) models are investigated. For the case of a sufficient number of satellites with fairly good geometry, the PPP performances are not seriously affected by the ISB model due to the low correlation between the ISB and the other parameters. However, the refinement of ISB model weakens the

  2. GPS/GLONASS Combined Precise Point Positioning with Receiver Clock Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhong; Chen, Xinghan; Guo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that receiver clock modeling can reduce the correlation coefficients among the parameters of receiver clock bias, station height and zenith tropospheric delay. This paper introduces the receiver clock modeling to GPS/GLONASS combined precise point positioning (PPP), aiming to better separate the receiver clock bias and station coordinates and therefore improve positioning accuracy. Firstly, the basic mathematic models including the GPS/GLONASS observation equations, stochastic model, and receiver clock model are briefly introduced. Then datasets from several IGS stations equipped with high-stability atomic clocks are used for kinematic PPP tests. To investigate the performance of PPP, including the positioning accuracy and convergence time, a week of (1-7 January 2014) GPS/GLONASS data retrieved from these IGS stations are processed with different schemes. The results indicate that the positioning accuracy as well as convergence time can benefit from the receiver clock modeling. This is particularly pronounced for the vertical component. Statistic RMSs show that the average improvement of three-dimensional positioning accuracy reaches up to 30%-40%. Sometimes, it even reaches over 60% for specific stations. Compared to the GPS-only PPP, solutions of the GPS/GLONASS combined PPP are much better no matter if the receiver clock offsets are modeled or not, indicating that the positioning accuracy and reliability are significantly improved with the additional GLONASS satellites in the case of insufficient number of GPS satellites or poor geometry conditions. In addition to the receiver clock modeling, the impacts of different inter-system timing bias (ISB) models are investigated. For the case of a sufficient number of satellites with fairly good geometry, the PPP performances are not seriously affected by the ISB model due to the low correlation between the ISB and the other parameters. However, the refinement of ISB model weakens the

  3. GPS Seismology: Using Precise Point Positioning for Resolving Surface Wave Displacements from Large Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragert, H.; Henton, J. A.; Lahaye, F.; Kouba, J.; Larson, K. M.; Rogers, G. C.

    2010-12-01

    High-rate continuous GPS data can provide direct, high-quality measurements of surface wave displacements generated by large earthquakes (Larson et al., 2003; Bock et al., 2004; Larson, 2009). To achieve high precision, differential positioning is often used in the GPS analysis strategy with distant reference stations held fixed. In this presentation, we examine the use of the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technique to estimate epoch-by-epoch positions at single stations. Specifically, we use the PPP software developed by Natural Resources Canada (Heroux and Kouba, 2001) to analyze high-rate (5 Hz) GPS data collected at stations of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) in southern California at the time of the M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake of April 4, 2010. The hypocenter for this earthquake was located in northern Baja California, approximately 50 km south of Mexicali on the US-Mexico border, at a depth of ~10 km. Large horizontal displacements were observed at a number of PBO GPS sites, with the largest peak-to-peak displacements exceeding 90 cm in the east-west component for 10-sec period waves observed at El Centro, CA (P496), located about 70 km northeast of the epicenter. The PPP technique clearly resolved surface waves with 1 to 2 cm amplitudes at sites more than 800 km away from the epicenter, illustrating that surface waves eventually reach even distant reference sites within the period of interest and can thereby introduce artifacts for differential GPS positioning. Fine-tuning of PPP methodology revealed the following: 1) Since the quality of a PPP solution will not be optimal until the carrier phase ambiguities have converged (tens of minutes), it is best to begin the analyses well before the arrival of seismic waves. To reduce computations, the data for this convergence period need not be high-rate; 2) The use of 5-second precise satellite clock sampling instead of the nominal 30-second clock sampling minimized clock interpolation errors and

  4. Assessment of Integer Precise Point Positioning performances at different temporal scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fund, F.; Perosanz, F.; Mercier, F.; Loyer, S.

    2012-04-01

    Recent improvements in Precise Point Positioning (PPP) including ambiguity resolution (Integer PPP; IPPP) make this technique a potential alternative to the classical differential approach. Single epoch positioning is also a powerful strategy to make GPS observation data screening. If all local earth deformations are correctly taken into account, residuals of position time series might be used to assess the processing quality in terms of receiver performance and local environment, constellation orbits and clocks error projection, and processing options pertinence. The aim of this presentation is to quantify current performances of PPP and IPPP at various temporal and spatial scales. We present what user should expect with respect to the classical double difference approach and what are the current noise characteristics of residual PPP time series. We use several geodetic GPS receivers located to different latitudes and suffer from different multipath situations and meteorological conditions. First, every situation is evaluated in terms of PPP performance with respect to double differences approach. Results are presented as a function of batch durations from hours to several days. Then, we show that GPS IPPP time series still suffer from various spurious signals (random, periodic, jumps...). Sometimes, errors clearly have a sidereal orbital period and a frequency analysis is provided. Also, artificial "midnight jumps" can be introduced when processing 24-hours batch solutions.

  5. Slant Wet Delays from GNSS observations - Precise Point Positioning vs. Double Difference Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Gregor; Weber, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The tropospheric parameter SWD (Slant Wet Delay) is the path delay caused by the highly variable amount of humidity in the atmosphere at altitudes below 12 km. It can be derived from Numerical Weather Predication data or even more precisely from dual- or multi-frequency observations of a regional GNSS reference network. In order to find the most adequate processing strategy dual GNSS observations of a small network of reference stations were simulated and tropospheric parameters were estimated in Precise Point Positioning (PPP) and in Double Difference (DD) mode. In DD mode the integer character of the phase ambiguities remains which allows to fix them to their true values and to obtain the tropospheric zenith delay as well as north and east (N/E) gradients with highest precision over very short time periods. In PPP mode orbit and clock errors are not cancelled out which affects the quality of the tropospheric estimates. On the other hand it has the advantage that the GNSS observations are processed undifferenced. Latter is important because the Zero Difference Residuals (ZDR) contain the azimuthal-anisotropic part of the tropospheric delay which is not covered by the estimated parameters. From Double Difference Residuals (DDR) the ZDR can be recovered too but only conditionally since common tropospheric effects have been cancelled out in advance by differencing. In this presentation we show how good the anisotropic slant path delays can be obtained from GNSS observations processed using both concepts - the PPP and the DD approach. Therefore tropospheric zenith delays and N/E gradients were estimated and Pseudo-ZDR were reconstructed from DDR and afterwards compared with ZDR derived from the PPP solution. In addition it is shown how good both concepts are applicable for observations at very low elevation angles and under extreme weather conditions. The IGS final and ultra-rapid service products were taken into account to define the best strategy not only for post

  6. Performance Analysis of Several GPS/Galileo Precise Point Positioning Models.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of several precise point positioning (PPP) models, which combine dual-frequency GPS/Galileo observations in the un-differenced and between-satellite single-difference (BSSD) modes. These include the traditional un-differenced model, the decoupled clock model, the semi-decoupled clock model, and the between-satellite single-difference model. We take advantage of the IGS-MGEX network products to correct for the satellite differential code biases and the orbital and satellite clock errors. Natural Resources Canada's GPSPace PPP software is modified to handle the various GPS/Galileo PPP models. A total of six data sets of GPS and Galileo observations at six IGS stations are processed to examine the performance of the various PPP models. It is shown that the traditional un-differenced GPS/Galileo PPP model, the GPS decoupled clock model, and the semi-decoupled clock GPS/Galileo PPP model improve the convergence time by about 25% in comparison with the un-differenced GPS-only model. In addition, the semi-decoupled GPS/Galileo PPP model improves the solution precision by about 25% compared to the traditional un-differenced GPS/Galileo PPP model. Moreover, the BSSD GPS/Galileo PPP model improves the solution convergence time by about 50%, in comparison with the un-differenced GPS PPP model, regardless of the type of BSSD combination used. As well, the BSSD model improves the precision of the estimated parameters by about 50% and 25% when the loose and the tight combinations are used, respectively, in comparison with the un-differenced GPS-only model. Comparable results are obtained through the tight combination when either a GPS or a Galileo satellite is selected as a reference. PMID:26102495

  7. Performance Analysis of Several GPS/Galileo Precise Point Positioning Models

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of several precise point positioning (PPP) models, which combine dual-frequency GPS/Galileo observations in the un-differenced and between-satellite single-difference (BSSD) modes. These include the traditional un-differenced model, the decoupled clock model, the semi-decoupled clock model, and the between-satellite single-difference model. We take advantage of the IGS-MGEX network products to correct for the satellite differential code biases and the orbital and satellite clock errors. Natural Resources Canada’s GPSPace PPP software is modified to handle the various GPS/Galileo PPP models. A total of six data sets of GPS and Galileo observations at six IGS stations are processed to examine the performance of the various PPP models. It is shown that the traditional un-differenced GPS/Galileo PPP model, the GPS decoupled clock model, and the semi-decoupled clock GPS/Galileo PPP model improve the convergence time by about 25% in comparison with the un-differenced GPS-only model. In addition, the semi-decoupled GPS/Galileo PPP model improves the solution precision by about 25% compared to the traditional un-differenced GPS/Galileo PPP model. Moreover, the BSSD GPS/Galileo PPP model improves the solution convergence time by about 50%, in comparison with the un-differenced GPS PPP model, regardless of the type of BSSD combination used. As well, the BSSD model improves the precision of the estimated parameters by about 50% and 25% when the loose and the tight combinations are used, respectively, in comparison with the un-differenced GPS-only model. Comparable results are obtained through the tight combination when either a GPS or a Galileo satellite is selected as a reference. PMID:26102495

  8. Satellite- and Epoch Differenced Precise Point Positioning Based on a Regional Augmentation Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haojun; Chen, Junping; Wang, Jiexian; Wu, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) has been demonstrated as a simple and effective approach for user positioning. The key issue in PPP is how to shorten convergence time and improve positioning efficiency. Recent researches mainly focus on the ambiguity resolution by correcting residual phase errors at a single station. The success of this approach (referred to hereafter as NORM-PPP) is subject to how rapidly one can fix wide-lane and narrow-lane ambiguities to achieve the first ambiguity-fixed solution. The convergence time of NORM-PPP is receiver type dependent, and normally takes 15–20 min. Different from the general algorithm and theory by which the float ambiguities are estimated and the integer ambiguities are fixed, we concentrate on a differential PPP approach: the satellite- and epoch differenced (SDED) approach. In general, the SDED approach eliminates receiver clocks and ambiguity parameters and thus avoids the complicated residual phase modeling procedure. As a further development of the SDED approach, we use a regional augmentation network to derive tropospheric delay and remaining un-modeled errors at user sites. By adding these corrections and applying the Robust estimation, the weak mathematic properties due to the ED operation is much improved. Implementing this new approach, we need only two epochs of data to achieve PPP positioning converging to centimeter-positioning accuracy. Using seven days of GPS data at six CORS stations in Shanghai, we demonstrate the success rate, defined as the case when three directions converging to desired positioning accuracy of 10 cm, reaches 100% when the interval between the two epochs is longer than 15 min. Comparing the results of 15 min' interval to that of 10 min', it is observed that the position RMS improves from 2.47, 3.95, 5.78 cm to 2.21, 3.93, 4.90 cm in the North, East and Up directions, respectively. Combining the SDED coordinates at the starting point and the ED relative coordinates thereafter, we

  9. The application of GPS precise point positioning technology in aerial triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiuxiao; Fu, Jianhong; Sun, Hongxing; Toth, Charles

    In traditional GPS-supported aerotriangulation, differential GPS (DGPS) positioning technology is used to determine the 3-dimensional coordinates of the perspective centers at exposure time with an accuracy of centimeter to decimeter level. This method can significantly reduce the number of ground control points (GCPs). However, the establishment of GPS reference stations for DGPS positioning is not only labor-intensive and costly, but also increases the implementation difficulty of aerial photography. This paper proposes aerial triangulation supported with GPS precise point positioning (PPP) as a way to avoid the use of the GPS reference stations and simplify the work of aerial photography. Firstly, we present the algorithm for GPS PPP in aerial triangulation applications. Secondly, the error law of the coordinate of perspective centers determined using GPS PPP is analyzed. Thirdly, based on GPS PPP and aerial triangulation software self-developed by the authors, four sets of actual aerial images taken from surveying and mapping projects, different in both terrain and photographic scale, are given as experimental models. The four sets of actual data were taken over a flat region at a scale of 1:2500, a mountainous region at a scale of 1:3000, a high mountainous region at a scale of 1:32000 and an upland region at a scale of 1:60000 respectively. In these experiments, the GPS PPP results were compared with results obtained through DGPS positioning and traditional bundle block adjustment. In this way, the empirical positioning accuracy of GPS PPP in aerial triangulation can be estimated. Finally, the results of bundle block adjustment with airborne GPS controls from GPS PPP are analyzed in detail. The empirical results show that GPS PPP applied in aerial triangulation has a systematic error of half-meter level and a stochastic error within a few decimeters. However, if a suitable adjustment solution is adopted, the systematic error can be eliminated in GPS

  10. Ambiguity resolved precise point positioning with GPS and BeiDou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Li; Xiaohong, Zhang; Fei, Guo

    2016-07-01

    This paper focuses on the contribution of the global positioning system (GPS) and BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) observations to precise point positioning (PPP) ambiguity resolution (AR). A GPS + BDS fractional cycle bias (FCB) estimation method and a PPP AR model were developed using integrated GPS and BDS observations. For FCB estimation, the GPS + BDS combined PPP float solutions of the globally distributed IGS MGEX were first performed. When integrating GPS observations, the BDS ambiguities can be precisely estimated with less than four tracked BDS satellites. The FCBs of both GPS and BDS satellites can then be estimated from these precise ambiguities. For the GPS + BDS combined AR, one GPS and one BDS IGSO or MEO satellite were first chosen as the reference satellite for GPS and BDS, respectively, to form inner-system single-differenced ambiguities. The single-differenced GPS and BDS ambiguities were then fused by partial ambiguity resolution to increase the possibility of fixing a subset of decorrelated ambiguities with high confidence. To verify the correctness of the FCB estimation and the effectiveness of the GPS + BDS PPP AR, data recorded from about 75 IGS MGEX stations during the period of DOY 123-151 (May 3 to May 31) in 2015 were used for validation. Data were processed with three strategies: BDS-only AR, GPS-only AR and GPS + BDS AR. Numerous experimental results show that the time to first fix (TTFF) is longer than 6 h for the BDS AR in general and that the fixing rate is usually less than 35 % for both static and kinematic PPP. An average TTFF of 21.7 min and 33.6 min together with a fixing rate of 98.6 and 97.0 % in static and kinematic PPP, respectively, can be achieved for GPS-only ambiguity fixing. For the combined GPS + BDS AR, the average TTFF can be shortened to 16.9 min and 24.6 min and the fixing rate can be increased to 99.5 and 99.0 % in static and kinematic PPP, respectively. Results also show that GPS + BDS PPP AR outperforms

  11. A simplified and unified model of multi-GNSS precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junping; Zhang, Yize; Wang, Jungang; Yang, Sainan; Dong, Danan; Wang, Jiexian; Qu, Weijing; Wu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Additional observations from other GNSS s can augment GPS precise point positioning (PPP) for improved positioning accuracy, reliability and availability. Traditional multi-GNSS PPP model requires the estimation of inter-system bias (ISB) parameter. Based on the scaled sensitivity matrix (SSM) method, a quantitative approach for assessing parameter assimilation, we theoretically prove that the ISB parameter is not correlated with coordinate parameters and it can be assimilated into clock and ambiguity parameters. Thus, removing ISB from multi-GNSS PPP model does not affect coordinate estimation. Based on this analysis, we develop a simplified and unified model for multi-GNSS PPP, where ISB parameter does not need to be estimated and observations from different GNSS systems are treated in a unified way. To verify the new model, we implement the algorithm to the self-developed software to process 1 year GPS/GLONASS data of 53 IGS (International GNSS Service) worldwide stations and 1 month GPS/BDS data of 15 IGS MGEX (Multi-GNSS Experiment) stations. Two types of GPS/GLONASS and GPS/BDS combined PPP solution are performed, one is based on traditional model and the other implements the new model. RMSs of coordinate differences between the two type of solutions are few μm for daily static PPP and less than 0.02 mm for GPS/GLONASS kinematic PPP in the North, East and Up components, respectively. Considering the millimeter-level precision of current GNSS PPP solutions, these statistics demonstrate equivalent performance of the two solution types.

  12. Integrity monitoring in real-time precise point positioning in the presence of ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wezka, K.; Galas, R.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric disturbances are characterized as fast and random variability in the ionosphere. Those phenomena are difficult to predict, detect and model. Occurrence of some strong ionospheric disturbances can cause, inter alia degradation and interruption of GNSS signals. Therefore they are especially harmful for real-time applications, as for example Precise Point Positioning (PPP) in real time, where one of the most important requirements is to ensure the high level of reliability. In such applications verification and confirmation of a high trust degree towards the estimated coordinates is a very critical issue. In one of the previous papers (K. Wezka, 2012 -Identification of system performance parameters and their usability) two sets of parameters have been proposed for enhance reliability of the PPP. The first one for data quality control (QC) of the raw GNSS observations and the second one for examination of the quality, robustness and performance of various processing approaches (strategies). To the second group the following parameters has been proposed: accuracy, precision, availability, integrity and convergence time. In consideration of perturbation of GNSS signal resulting from sudden ionospheric disturbances, one of the most important demands is effective autonomous integrity monitoring. The poster presents first preliminary results of the applicability of the proposed parameters in order to ensure the high level of reliability/integrity of GNSS observations and positioning results under the presence of strong ionospheric anomalies. The data-set from continuously operated GNSS station located at high latitude, where ionospheric disturbances occur more frequently, were used for the analysis. Various selected Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) approaches for quality control of the GNSS observables are applied to the data sets recorded under different (low/quite and high) ionospheric activities. Based on those analyses the usability of the

  13. Evaluation of Precise Point Positioning accuracy under large total electron content variations in equatorial latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Bilbao, I.; Moreno Monge, B.; Rodríguez-Caderot, G.; Herraiz, M.; Radicella, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    The ionosphere is one of the largest contributors to errors in GNSS positioning. Although in Precise Point Positioning (PPP) the ionospheric delay is corrected to a first order through the 'iono-free combination', significant errors may still be observed when large electron density gradients are present. To confirm this phenomenon, the temporal behavior of intense fluctuations of total electron content (TEC) and PPP altitude accuracy at equatorial latitudes are analyzed during four years of different solar activity. For this purpose, equatorial plasma irregularities are identified with periods of high rate of change of TEC (ROT). The largest ROT values are observed from 19:00 to 01:00 LT, especially around magnetic equinoxes, although some differences exist between the stations depending on their location. Highest ROT values are observed in the American and African regions. In general, large ROT events are accompanied by frequent satellite signal losses and an increase in the PPP altitude error during years 2001, 2004 and 2011. A significant increase in the PPP altitude error RMS is observed in epochs of high ROT with respect to epochs of low ROT in years 2001, 2004 and 2011, reaching up to 0.26 m in the 19:00-01:00 LT period.

  14. Combined GPS/GLONASS Precise Point Positioning with Fixed GPS Ambiguities

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Lin; Cai, Changsheng; Santerre, Rock; Zhu, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Precise point positioning (PPP) technology is mostly implemented with an ambiguity-float solution. Its performance may be further improved by performing ambiguity-fixed resolution. Currently, the PPP integer ambiguity resolutions (IARs) are mainly based on GPS-only measurements. The integration of GPS and GLONASS can speed up the convergence and increase the accuracy of float ambiguity estimates, which contributes to enhancing the success rate and reliability of fixing ambiguities. This paper presents an approach of combined GPS/GLONASS PPP with fixed GPS ambiguities (GGPPP-FGA) in which GPS ambiguities are fixed into integers, while all GLONASS ambiguities are kept as float values. An improved minimum constellation method (MCM) is proposed to enhance the efficiency of GPS ambiguity fixing. Datasets from 20 globally distributed stations on two consecutive days are employed to investigate the performance of the GGPPP-FGA, including the positioning accuracy, convergence time and the time to first fix (TTFF). All datasets are processed for a time span of three hours in three scenarios, i.e., the GPS ambiguity-float solution, the GPS ambiguity-fixed resolution and the GGPPP-FGA resolution. The results indicate that the performance of the GPS ambiguity-fixed resolutions is significantly better than that of the GPS ambiguity-float solutions. In addition, the GGPPP-FGA improves the positioning accuracy by 38%, 25% and 44% and reduces the convergence time by 36%, 36% and 29% in the east, north and up coordinate components over the GPS-only ambiguity-fixed resolutions, respectively. Moreover, the TTFF is reduced by 27% after adding GLONASS observations. Wilcoxon rank sum tests and chi-square two-sample tests are made to examine the significance of the improvement on the positioning accuracy, convergence time and TTFF. PMID:25237901

  15. On troposphere delay constraining in real-time GNSS Precise Point Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Tomasz; Kazmierski, Kamil; Bosy, Jaroslaw

    2015-04-01

    A common procedure in Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is to have the adjustment model accounting for the correction to an a priori value of the total troposphere delay (ZTD) given at the first epoch of data processing, and the troposphere wet delay filter is updated epoch by epoch. This approach requires some time so that a change in satellite geometry allows to efficiently de-correlate among tropospheric delay, receiver clock error and height. Empirical troposphere state models and mapping functions are available, however they may not reflect properly the actual state of the troposphere, especially in severe weather conditions. It might be more appropriate to take advantage on a regional troposphere model derived from near real-time (NRT) processing of GBAS network. To evaluate the impact of troposphere constraining in real-time PPP, one week long period was selected, that was characterized with active troposphere conditions. Using the development version of original GNSS-WARP software, a 1 Hz kinematic positioning was performed for 10 selected Polish GBAS stations using IGS Real-Time Service (RTS) products. Two processing strategies were used, one reflecting the common PPP approach and the second with NRT ZTD to constrain the troposphere delay estimates. GPS only and GPS+GLONASS positioning was performed and analyzed using both strategies. For unconstrained solutions, the convergence time of one hour (GPS only) and 15 minutes (GPS+GLONASS) was reached, providing the sub-decimeter accuracy in horizontal and vertical component. However, for some epochs, and outlying height estimates were observed with the residuals reaching up to 0.5m with the estimated error of 0.2m. At the same time, the unconstrained estimated troposphere delay differs up to 12 cm from the reference NRT ZTD solution. In case the troposphere delay is constrained, all three coordinate components remains accurate and precise for entire processing period after the convergence is reached. From the

  16. Precise Point Positioning with Ionosphere Estimation and application of Regional Ionospheric Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galera Monico, J. F.; Marques, H. A.; Rocha, G. D. D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The ionosphere is one of most difficult source of errors to be modelled in the GPS positioning, mainly when applying data collected by single frequency receivers. Considering Precise Point Positioning (PPP) with single frequency data the options available include, for example, the use of Klobuchar model or applying Global Ionosphere Maps (GIM). The GIM contains Vertical Electron Content (VTEC) values that are commonly estimated considering a global network with poor covering in certain regions. For this reason Regional Ionosphere Maps (RIM) have been developed considering local GNSS network, for instance, the La Plata Ionospheric Model (LPIM) developed inside the context of SIRGAS (Geocentric Reference System for Americas). The South American RIM are produced with data from nearly 50 GPS ground receivers and considering these maps are generated for each hour with spatial resolution of one degree it is expected to provide better accuracy in GPS positioning for such region. Another possibility to correct for ionosphere effects in the PPP is to apply the ionosphere estimation technique based on Kalman filter. In this case, the ionosphere can be treated as a stochastic process and a good initial guess is necessary what can be obtained from an ionospheric map. In this paper we present the methodology involved with ionosphere estimation by using Kalman filter and also the application of global and regional ionospheric maps in the PPP as first guess. The ionosphere estimation strategy was implemented in the house software called RT_PPP that is capable of accomplishing PPP either for single or dual frequency data. GPS data from Brazilian station near equatorial region were processed and results with regional maps were compared with those by using global maps. Improvements of the order 15% were observed. In case of ionosphere estimation, the estimated coordinates were compared with ionosphere free solution and after PPP convergence the results reached centimeter accuracy.

  17. Integration of GPS Precise Point Positioning and MEMS-Based INS Using Unscented Particle Filter

    PubMed Central

    Abd Rabbou, Mahmoud; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Integration of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Inertial Navigation System (INS) integrated system involves nonlinear motion state and measurement models. However, the extended Kalman filter (EKF) is commonly used as the estimation filter, which might lead to solution divergence. This is usually encountered during GPS outages, when low-cost micro-electro-mechanical sensors (MEMS) inertial sensors are used. To enhance the navigation system performance, alternatives to the standard EKF should be considered. Particle filtering (PF) is commonly considered as a nonlinear estimation technique to accommodate severe MEMS inertial sensor biases and noise behavior. However, the computation burden of PF limits its use. In this study, an improved version of PF, the unscented particle filter (UPF), is utilized, which combines the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and PF for the integration of GPS precise point positioning and MEMS-based inertial systems. The proposed filter is examined and compared with traditional estimation filters, namely EKF, UKF and PF. Tightly coupled mechanization is adopted, which is developed in the raw GPS and INS measurement domain. Un-differenced ionosphere-free linear combinations of pseudorange and carrier-phase measurements are used for PPP. The performance of the UPF is analyzed using a real test scenario in downtown Kingston, Ontario. It is shown that the use of UPF reduces the number of samples needed to produce an accurate solution, in comparison with the traditional PF, which in turn reduces the processing time. In addition, UPF enhances the positioning accuracy by up to 15% during GPS outages, in comparison with EKF. However, all filters produce comparable results when the GPS measurement updates are available. PMID:25815446

  18. Integration of GPS precise point positioning and MEMS-based INS using unscented particle filter.

    PubMed

    Abd Rabbou, Mahmoud; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Integration of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Inertial Navigation System (INS) integrated system involves nonlinear motion state and measurement models. However, the extended Kalman filter (EKF) is commonly used as the estimation filter, which might lead to solution divergence. This is usually encountered during GPS outages, when low-cost micro-electro-mechanical sensors (MEMS) inertial sensors are used. To enhance the navigation system performance, alternatives to the standard EKF should be considered. Particle filtering (PF) is commonly considered as a nonlinear estimation technique to accommodate severe MEMS inertial sensor biases and noise behavior. However, the computation burden of PF limits its use. In this study, an improved version of PF, the unscented particle filter (UPF), is utilized, which combines the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and PF for the integration of GPS precise point positioning and MEMS-based inertial systems. The proposed filter is examined and compared with traditional estimation filters, namely EKF, UKF and PF. Tightly coupled mechanization is adopted, which is developed in the raw GPS and INS measurement domain. Un-differenced ionosphere-free linear combinations of pseudorange and carrier-phase measurements are used for PPP. The performance of the UPF is analyzed using a real test scenario in downtown Kingston, Ontario. It is shown that the use of UPF reduces the number of samples needed to produce an accurate solution, in comparison with the traditional PF, which in turn reduces the processing time. In addition, UPF enhances the positioning accuracy by up to 15% during GPS outages, in comparison with EKF. However, all filters produce comparable results when the GPS measurement updates are available. PMID:25815446

  19. Triple-frequency GPS precise point positioning with rapid ambiguity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jianghui; Bock, Yehuda

    2013-05-01

    At present, reliable ambiguity resolution in real-time GPS precise point positioning (PPP) can only be achieved after an initial observation period of a few tens of minutes. In this study, we propose a method where the incoming triple-frequency GPS signals are exploited to enable rapid convergences to ambiguity-fixed solutions in real-time PPP. Specifically, extra-wide-lane ambiguity resolution can be first achieved almost instantaneously with the Melbourne-Wübbena combination observable on L2 and L5. Then the resultant unambiguous extra-wide-lane carrier-phase is combined with the wide-lane carrier-phase on L1 and L2 to form an ionosphere-free observable with a wavelength of about 3.4 m. Although the noise of this observable is around 100 times the raw carrier-phase noise, its wide-lane ambiguity can still be resolved very efficiently, and the resultant ambiguity-fixed observable can assist much better than pseudorange in speeding up succeeding narrow-lane ambiguity resolution. To validate this method, we use an advanced hardware simulator to generate triple-frequency signals and a high-grade receiver to collect 1-Hz data. When the carrier-phase precisions on L1, L2 and L5 are as poor as 1.5, 6.3 and 1.5 mm, respectively, wide-lane ambiguity resolution can still reach a correctness rate of over 99 % within 20 s. As a result, the correctness rate of narrow-lane ambiguity resolution achieves 99 % within 65 s, in contrast to only 64 % within 150 s in dual-frequency PPP. In addition, we also simulate a multipath-contaminated data set and introduce new ambiguities for all satellites every 120 s. We find that when multipath effects are strong, ambiguity-fixed solutions are achieved at 78 % of all epochs in triple-frequency PPP whilst almost no ambiguities are resolved in dual-frequency PPP. Therefore, we demonstrate that triple-frequency PPP has the potential to achieve ambiguity-fixed solutions within a few minutes, or even shorter if raw carrier-phase precisions are

  20. Determination of earthquake magnitude using GPS displacement waveforms from real-time precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Rongxin; Shi, Chuang; Song, Weiwei; Wang, Guangxing; Liu, Jingnan

    2014-01-01

    For earthquake and tsunami early warning and emergency response, earthquake magnitude is the crucial parameter to be determined rapidly and correctly. However, a reliable and rapid measurement of the magnitude of an earthquake is a challenging problem, especially for large earthquakes (M > 8). Here, the magnitude is determined based on the GPS displacement waveform derived from real-time precise point positioning (RTPPP). RTPPP results are evaluated with an accuracy of 1 cm in the horizontal components and 2-3 cm in the vertical components, indicating that the RTPPP is capable of detecting seismic waves with amplitude of 1 cm horizontally and 2-3 cm vertically with a confidence level of 95 per cent. In order to estimate the magnitude, the unique information provided by the GPS displacement waveform is the horizontal peak displacement amplitude. We show that the empirical relation of Gutenberg (1945) between peak displacement and magnitude holds up to nearly magnitude 9.0 when displacements are measured with GPS. We tested the proposed method for three large earthquakes. For the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, our method provides a magnitude of M7.18 ± 0.18. For the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake the estimated magnitude is M8.74 ± 0.06, and for the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake the value is M8.7 ± 0.1 after excluding some near-field stations. We, therefore, conclude that depending on the availability of high-rate GPS observations, a robust value of magnitude up to 9.0 for a point source earthquake can be estimated within tens of seconds or a few minutes after an event using a few GPS stations close to the epicentre. The rapid magnitude could be as a pre-requisite for tsunami early warning, fast source inversion and emergency response is feasible.

  1. Ambiguity resolution in precise point positioning with hourly data for global single receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Li, Pan; Guo, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Integer ambiguity resolution (IAR) can improve precise point positioning (PPP) performance significantly. IAR for PPP became a highlight topic in global positioning system (GPS) community in recent years. More and more researchers focus on this issue. Progress has been made in the latest years. In this paper, we aim at investigating and demonstrating the performance of a global zero-differenced (ZD) PPP IAR service for GPS users by providing routine ZD uncalibrated fractional offsets (UFOs) for wide-lane and narrow-lane. Data sets from all IGS stations collected on DOY 1, 100, 200 and 300 of 2010 are used to validate and demonstrate this global service. Static experiment results show that an accuracy better than 1 cm in horizontal and 1-2 cm in vertical could be achieved in ambiguity-fixed PPP solution with only hourly data. Compared with PPP float solution, an average improvement reaches 58.2% in east, 28.3% in north and 23.8% in vertical for all tested stations. Results of kinematic experiments show that the RMS of kinematic PPP solutions can be improved from 21.6, 16.6 and 37.7 mm to 12.2, 13.3 and 34.3 mm for the fixed solutions in the east, north and vertical components, respectively. Both static and kinematic experiments show that wide-lane and narrow-lane UFO products of all satellites can be generated and provided in a routine way accompanying satellite orbit and clock products for the PPP user anywhere around the world, to obtain accurate and reliable ambiguity-fixed PPP solutions.

  2. Accuracy improvement techniques in Precise Point Positioning method using multiple GNSS constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileios Psychas, Dimitrios; Delikaraoglou, Demitris

    2016-04-01

    The future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), including modernized GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou, offer three or more signal carriers for civilian use and much more redundant observables. The additional frequencies can significantly improve the capabilities of the traditional geodetic techniques based on GPS signals at two frequencies, especially with regard to the availability, accuracy, interoperability and integrity of high-precision GNSS applications. Furthermore, highly redundant measurements can allow for robust simultaneous estimation of static or mobile user states including more parameters such as real-time tropospheric biases and more reliable ambiguity resolution estimates. This paper presents an investigation and analysis of accuracy improvement techniques in the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method using signals from the fully operational (GPS and GLONASS), as well as the emerging (Galileo and BeiDou) GNSS systems. The main aim was to determine the improvement in both the positioning accuracy achieved and the time convergence it takes to achieve geodetic-level (10 cm or less) accuracy. To this end, freely available observation data from the recent Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service, as well as the open source program RTKLIB were used. Following a brief background of the PPP technique and the scope of MGEX, the paper outlines the various observational scenarios that were used in order to test various data processing aspects of PPP solutions with multi-frequency, multi-constellation GNSS systems. Results from the processing of multi-GNSS observation data from selected permanent MGEX stations are presented and useful conclusions and recommendations for further research are drawn. As shown, data fusion from GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou systems is becoming increasingly significant nowadays resulting in a position accuracy increase (mostly in the less favorable East direction) and a large reduction of convergence

  3. Influence of meteorological data and horizontal gradient of tropospheric model on precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Jiang, Nan; Xu, Guochang; Yang, Yuanxi; Schuh, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Using GPT2 derived meteorological data and actual meteorological observations can achieve the same positioning precision in the most areas worldwide except for the Antarctic region. However, the improvement of the actual meteorological observations on the positioning result is significant comparing to using GPT2 derived meteorological data in Antarctic. In the case of 5° elevation cut-off angle, the height precision can be improved by 25%. Furthermore, when the elevation cut-off angle is lower, the effect of the actual meteorological observations on the positioning precision is more significant in Antarctic due to the retention of low elevation angle observations. This study also shows that the influence of tropospheric horizontal gradient correction can improve the PPP precision. Under the lower elevation cut-off angle and higher humidity conditions, especially in summer time and low-latitudes area, the usefulness of the horizontal gradient correction is remarkable. The average improvement of N, E and U directions can reach up to 51%, 15% and 30%, respectively.

  4. Real Time Precise Point Positioning: Preliminary Results for the Brazilian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Haroldo; Monico, João.; Hirokazu Shimabukuro, Milton; Aquino, Marcio

    2010-05-01

    GNSS positioning can be carried out in relative or absolute approach. In the last years, more attention has been driven to the real time precise point positioning (PPP). To achieve centimeter accuracy with this method in real time it is necessary to have available the satellites precise coordinates as well as satellites clocks corrections. The coordinates can be used from the predicted IGU ephemeris, but the satellites clocks must be estimated in a real time. It can be made from a GNSS network as can be seen from EUREF Permanent Network. The infra-structure to realize the PPP in real time is being available in Brazil through the Brazilian Continuous Monitoring Network (RBMC) together with the Sao Paulo State GNSS network which are transmitting GNSS data using NTRIP (Networked Transport of RTCM via Internet Protocol) caster. Based on this information it was proposed a PhD thesis in the Univ. Estadual Paulista (UNESP) aiming to investigate and develop the methodology to estimate the satellites clocks and realize PPP in real time. Then, software is being developed to process GNSS data in the real time PPP mode. A preliminary version of the software was called PPP_RT and is able to process GNSS code and phase data using precise ephemeris and satellites clocks. The PPP processing can be accomplished considering the absolute satellite antenna Phase Center Variation (PCV), Ocean Tide Loading (OTL), Earth Body Tide, among others. The first order ionospheric effects can be eliminated or minimized by ion-free combination or parameterized in the receiver-satellite direction using a stochastic process, e.g. random walk or white noise. In the case of ionosphere estimation, a pseudo-observable is introduced in the mathematical model for each satellite and the initial value can be computed from Klobuchar model or from Global Ionospheric Map (GIM). The adjustment is realized in the recursive mode and the DIA (Detection Identification and Adaptation) is used for quality control. In

  5. An Investigation on the Reliability of Deformation Analysis at Simulated Network Depending on the Precise Point Position Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durdag, U. M.; Erdogan, B.; Hekimoglu, S.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation analysis plays an important role for human life safety; hence investigating the reliability of the obtained results from deformation analysis is crucial. The deformation monitoring network is established and the observations are analyzed periodically. The main problem in the deformation analysis is that if there is more than one displaced point in the monitoring network, the analysis methods smear the disturbing effects of the displaced points over all other points which are not displaced. Therefore, only one displaced point can be detected successfully. The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) gives opportunity to prevent smearing effect of the displaced points. In this study, we have simulated a monitoring network that consisting four object points and generated six different scenarios. The displacements were added to the points by using a device that the GPS antenna was easily moved horizontally and the seven hours static GPS measurements were carried out. The measurements were analyzed by using online Automatic Precise Positioning Service (APPS) to obtain the coordinates and covariance matrices. The results of the APPS were used in the deformation analysis. The detected points and true displaced points were compared with each other to obtain reliability of the method. According to the results, the analysis still detect stable points as displaced points. For the next step, we are going to search the reason of the wrong results and deal with acquiring more reliable results.

  6. An Efficient Real-Time Precise Point Positioning (RT-PPP) Solution for Offshore Surveys in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazeem, Mohamed; Nurhan Çelik, Rahmi

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the international global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) service (IGS) has launched the real-time service (IGS-RTS). The IGS-RTS has shown promise accuracy in precise point positioning applications. Currently, the precise point positioning technique is used extensively in marine applications. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the real-time precise point positioning (RT-PPP) solution using the IGS-RTS for offshore surveys in Turkey. Dual-frequency GPS data is collected onboard a vessel and then processed using the Bernese 5.2 PPP module. The IGS-RTS precise orbit and clock products are used in order to account for the satellite orbit and clock products. To investigate the accuracy of the RT-PPP technique, the positioning accuracy is assessed and compared with the traditional double-difference solution. It is shown that the RT-PPP solution has good agreement with the double-difference solution. Also, the proposed solution efficiently fulfills the international maritime organization (IMO) standards for the offshore surveys.

  7. Precision Pointing System Development

    SciTech Connect

    BUGOS, ROBERT M.

    2003-03-01

    The development of precision pointing systems has been underway in Sandia's Electronic Systems Center for over thirty years. Important areas of emphasis are synthetic aperture radars and optical reconnaissance systems. Most applications are in the aerospace arena, with host vehicles including rockets, satellites, and manned and unmanned aircraft. Systems have been used on defense-related missions throughout the world. Presently in development are pointing systems with accuracy goals in the nanoradian regime. Future activity will include efforts to dramatically reduce system size and weight through measures such as the incorporation of advanced materials and MEMS inertial sensors.

  8. On the convergence of ionospheric constrained precise point positioning (IC-PPP) based on undifferential uncombined raw GNSS observations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongping; Gao, Zhouzheng; Ge, Maorong; Niu, Xiaoji; Huang, Ling; Tu, Rui; Li, Xingxing

    2013-01-01

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) has become a very hot topic in GNSS research and applications. However, it usually takes about several tens of minutes in order to obtain positions with better than 10 cm accuracy. This prevents PPP from being widely used in real-time kinematic positioning services, therefore, a large effort has been made to tackle the convergence problem. One of the recent approaches is the ionospheric delay constrained precise point positioning (IC-PPP) that uses the spatial and temporal characteristics of ionospheric delays and also delays from an a priori model. In this paper, the impact of the quality of ionospheric models on the convergence of IC-PPP is evaluated using the IGS global ionospheric map (GIM) updated every two hours and a regional satellite-specific correction model. Furthermore, the effect of the receiver differential code bias (DCB) is investigated by comparing the convergence time for IC-PPP with and without estimation of the DCB parameter. From the result of processing a large amount of data, on the one hand, the quality of the a priori ionosphere delays plays a very important role in IC-PPP convergence. Generally, regional dense GNSS networks can provide more precise ionosphere delays than GIM and can consequently reduce the convergence time. On the other hand, ignoring the receiver DCB may considerably extend its convergence, and the larger the DCB, the longer the convergence time. Estimating receiver DCB in IC-PPP is a proper way to overcome this problem. Therefore, current IC-PPP should be enhanced by estimating receiver DCB and employing regional satellite-specific ionospheric correction models in order to speed up its convergence for more practical applications. PMID:24253190

  9. On the Convergence of Ionospheric Constrained Precise Point Positioning (IC-PPP) Based on Undifferential Uncombined Raw GNSS Observations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongping; Gao, Zhouzheng; Ge, Maorong; Niu, Xiaoji; Huang, Ling; Tu, Rui; Li, Xingxing

    2013-01-01

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) has become a very hot topic in GNSS research and applications. However, it usually takes about several tens of minutes in order to obtain positions with better than 10 cm accuracy. This prevents PPP from being widely used in real-time kinematic positioning services, therefore, a large effort has been made to tackle the convergence problem. One of the recent approaches is the ionospheric delay constrained precise point positioning (IC-PPP) that uses the spatial and temporal characteristics of ionospheric delays and also delays from an a priori model. In this paper, the impact of the quality of ionospheric models on the convergence of IC-PPP is evaluated using the IGS global ionospheric map (GIM) updated every two hours and a regional satellite-specific correction model. Furthermore, the effect of the receiver differential code bias (DCB) is investigated by comparing the convergence time for IC-PPP with and without estimation of the DCB parameter. From the result of processing a large amount of data, on the one hand, the quality of the a priori ionosphere delays plays a very important role in IC-PPP convergence. Generally, regional dense GNSS networks can provide more precise ionosphere delays than GIM and can consequently reduce the convergence time. On the other hand, ignoring the receiver DCB may considerably extend its convergence, and the larger the DCB, the longer the convergence time. Estimating receiver DCB in IC-PPP is a proper way to overcome this problem. Therefore, current IC-PPP should be enhanced by estimating receiver DCB and employing regional satellite-specific ionospheric correction models in order to speed up its convergence for more practical applications. PMID:24253190

  10. Precise angular position measurement of a point source in an optoelectronic system with CCD arrays upon a single readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedko, Evgeny G.; Zvereva, Elena N.

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the method of angular position measuring of a point source in a system with a CCD array by means of linear dimension - time slot - code transformation and assessment of the potential accuracy of the method, which is determined by instrumental irremovable random errors of measurement in terms of optimal processing of incoming information with a single reading it with CCD - lines. This work introduces an optoelectronic system circuit with CCD arrays with stretched sensing elements and a point of reference for angular position measuring. In this case the arrays have images projections of both the reference point source and the target point source, whose angular position is measured with high precision. From the CCD array output the signals arrive at an optimal (or apt) linear filter, and then to the signal peak position detection circuit, which provides the minimum error due to noise impact. Pulse edges, corresponding to the signals maximum, make a time interval filled with high-frequency counting pulses. The number of pulses in this interval will correspond to the measured angular position of the target point source. In terms of the statistical decision theory this work analyses random errors given the signals spectral function that, in turn, accounts for the transfer function of the optical system and the CCD array as an image analyzer. This article also presents analysis of how measurement accuracy depends on frequency of information readout from the CCD-arrays for different values of signal-to-noise ratio. Error analysis of the proposed optoelectronic circuits showed that measurements can be made upon a single readout with an accuracy of 0.01 and even 0,001 pixels.

  11. Impacts of real-time satellite clock errors on GPS precise point positioning-based troposphere zenith delay estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junbo; Xu, Chaoqian; Li, Yihe; Gao, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) has become a cost-effective tool to determine troposphere zenith total delay (ZTD) with accuracy comparable to other atmospheric sensors such as the radiosonde, the water vapor radiometer, the radio occultation and so on. However, the high accuracy of GPS troposphere ZTD estimates relies on the precise satellite orbit and clock products available with various latencies. Although the International GNSS Service (IGS) can provide predicted orbit and clock products for real-time applications, the predicted clock accuracy of 3 ns cannot always guarantee the high accuracy of troposphere ZTD estimates. Such limitations could be overcome by the use of the newly launched IGS real-time service which provides 5 cm orbit and 0.2-1.0 ns (an equivalent range error of 6-30 cm) clock products in real time. Considering the relatively larger magnitude of the clock error than that of the orbit error, this paper investigates the effect of real-time satellite clock errors on the GPS precise point positioning (PPP)-based troposphere ZTD estimation. Meanwhile, how the real-time satellite clock errors impact the GPS PPP-based troposphere ZTD estimation has also been studied to obtain the most precise ZTD solutions. First, two types of real-time satellite clock products are assessed with respect to the IGS final clock product in terms of accuracy and precision. Second, the real-time GPS PPP-based troposphere ZTD estimation is conducted using data from 34 selected IGS stations over three independent weeks in April, July and October, 2013. Numerical results demonstrate that the precision, rather than the accuracy, of the real-time satellite clock products impacts the real-time PPP-based ZTD solutions more significantly. In other words, the real-time satellite clock product with better precision leads to more precise real-time PPP-based troposphere ZTD solutions. Therefore, it is suggested that users should select and apply real-time satellite products with

  12. Real-time GPS sensing of atmospheric water vapor: Precise point positioning with orbit, clock, and phase delay corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Dick, Galina; Ge, Maorong; Heise, Stefan; Wickert, Jens; Bender, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The recent development of the International Global Navigation Satellite Systems Service Real-Time Pilot Project and the enormous progress in precise point positioning (PPP) techniques provide a promising opportunity for real-time determination of Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) using GPS ground networks for various geodetic and meteorological applications. In this study, we develop a new real-time GPS water vapor processing system based on the PPP ambiguity fixing technique with real-time satellite orbit, clock, and phase delay corrections. We demonstrate the performance of the new real-time water vapor estimates using the currently operationally used near-real-time GPS atmospheric data and collocated microwave radiometer measurements as an independent reference. The results show that an accuracy of 1.0 ~ 2.0 mm is achievable for the new real-time GPS based IWV value. Data of such accuracy might be highly valuable for time-critical geodetic (positioning) and meteorological applications.

  13. Modeling and assessment of triple-frequency BDS precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fei; Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Jinling; Ren, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    The latest generation of GNSS satellites such as GPS BLOCK-IIF, Galileo and BDS are transmitting signals on three or more frequencies, thus having more choices in practice. At the same time, new challenges arise for integrating the new signals. This paper contributes to the modeling and assessment of triple-frequency PPP with BDS data. First, three triple-frequency PPP models are developed. The observation model and stochastic model are designed and extended to accommodate the third frequency. In particular, new biases such as differential code biases and inter-frequency biases as well as the parameterizations are addressed. Then, the relationships between different PPP models are discussed. To verify the triple-frequency PPP models, PPP tests with real triple-frequency data were performed in both static and kinematic scenarios. Results show that the three triple-frequency PPP models agree well with each other. Additional frequency has a marginal effect on the positioning accuracy in static PPP tests. However, the benefits of third frequency are significant in situations of where there is poor tracking and contaminated observations on frequencies B1 and B2 in kinematic PPP tests.

  14. Accuracy Assessment of the Precise Point Positioning for Different Troposphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguz Selbesoglu, Mahmut; Gurturk, Mert; Soycan, Metin

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the accuracy and repeatability of PPP technique at different latitudes by using different troposphere delay models. Nine IGS stations were selected between 00-800 latitudes at northern hemisphere and southern hemisphere. Coordinates were obtained for 7 days at 1 hour intervals in summer and winter. At first, the coordinates were estimated by using Niell troposphere delay model with and without including north and east gradients in order to investigate the contribution of troposphere delay gradients to the positioning . Secondly, Saastamoinen model was used to eliminate troposphere path delays by using standart atmosphere parameters were extrapolated for all station levels. Finally, coordinates were estimated by using RTCA-MOPS empirical troposphere delay model. Results demonstrate that Niell troposphere delay model with horizontal gradients has better mean values of rms errors 0.09 % and 65 % than the Niell troposphere model without horizontal gradients and RTCA-MOPS model, respectively. Saastamoinen model mean values of rms errors were obtained approximately 4 times bigger than the Niell troposphere delay model with horizontal gradients.

  15. Estimation of precipitable water vapour using kinematic GNSS precise point positioning over an altitude range of 1 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S. R.; Penna, N. T.; Clarke, P. J.; Webster, S.; Martin, I.

    2013-12-01

    The estimation of total precipitable water vapour (PWV) using kinematic GNSS has been investigated since around 2001, aiming to extend the use of static ground-based GNSS, from which PWV estimates are now operationally assimilated into numerical weather prediction models. To date, kinematic GNSS PWV studies suggest a PWV measurement agreement with radiosondes of 2-3 mm, almost commensurate with static GNSS measurement accuracy, but only shipborne experiments have so far been carried out. As a first step towards extending such sea level-based studies to platforms that operate at a range of altitudes, such as airplanes or land based vehicles, the kinematic GNSS estimation of PWV over an exactly repeated trajectory is considered. A data set was collected from a GNSS receiver and antenna mounted on a carriage of the Snowdon Mountain Railway, UK, which continually ascends and descends through 950 m of vertical relief. Static GNSS reference receivers were installed at the top and bottom of the altitude profile, and derived zenith wet delay (ZWD) was interpolated to the altitude of the train to provide reference values together with profile estimates from the 100 m resolution runs of the Met Office's Unified Model. We demonstrate similar GNSS accuracies as obtained from previous shipborne studies, namely a double difference relative kinematic GNSS ZWD accuracy within 14 mm, and a kinematic GNSS precise point positioning ZWD accuracy within 15 mm. The latter is a more typical airborne PWV estimation scenario i.e. without the reliance on ground-based GNSS reference stations. We show that the kinematic GPS-only precise point positioning ZWD estimation is enhanced by also incorporating GLONASS observations.

  16. Assessment of precipitable water vapor derived from ground-based BeiDou observations with Precise Point Positioning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Li, Wenwen; Shi, Chuang; Zhao, Qile; Su, Xing; Qu, Lizhong; Liu, Zhizhao

    2015-01-01

    Precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimation from Global Positioning System (GPS) has been extensively studied and used for meteorological applications. However PWV estimation using the emerging BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) is very limited. In this paper the PWV estimation strategy and the evaluation of the results inferred from ground-based BDS observations using Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method are presented. BDS and GPS data from 10 stations distributed in the Asia-Pacific and West Indian Ocean regions during the year 2013 are processed using the PANDA (Position and Navigation Data Analyst) software package. The BDS-PWV and GPS-PWV are derived from the BDS-only and GPS-only observations, respectively. The PPP positioning differences between BDS-only and GPS-only show a standard deviation (STD) <1 cm in the east and north components and 1-3 cm in vertical component. The BDS-PWV and GPS-PWV at the HKTU station (Hong Kong, China) is compared with PWV derived from a radiosonde station (about 1 km distance) over a 6-month period. The GPS-PWV shows a good agreement with radiosonde-PWV with a bias of 0.002 mm and a STD of 2.49 mm while BDS-PWV has with a bias of -2.04 mm and STD 2.68 mm with respect to radiosonde-PWV. This indicates that the PWV estimated from the BDS can achieve similar precision as PWV from GPS. The BDS-PWV is compared to GPS-PWV at 10 stations. The mean bias and STD of their differences at 10 stations are 0.78 mm and 1.77 mm, respectively. The mean root mean square (RMS) value is 2.00 mm by considering the GPS-PWV as reference truth. This again confirms that the BDS-PWV has a good agreement with the GPS-PWV. It clearly indicates that the BDS is ready for the high precision meteorological applications in the Asia-Pacific and West Indian Ocean regions and that BDS alone can be used for PWV estimation with an accuracy comparable to GPS.

  17. Precise point positioning performance in the presence of the 28 October 2003 sudden increase in total electron content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Bilbao, I.; Radicella, S. M.; Rodríguez-Caderot, G.; Herraiz, M.

    2015-10-01

    Intense disturbances in the ionosphere may produce perturbations in Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) radio signals that in the most severe cases produce receiver tracking problems, which in turn impact on GNSS positioning accuracy. In this paper we present a case study related to the sudden increase in total electron content (SITEC) induced by the X17.2 solar flare that occurred on 28 October 2003. This is the largest SITEC ever recorded by means of the rate of change of total electron content. A solar radio burst (SRB) occurred in the same period which caused GNSS signal fading and in some cases complete signal loss. Although SITEC contribution to the signal noise cannot be separated from that of SRB, in this paper we show that accuracy degradation may happen in kinematic precise point positioning (PPP) in several stations of the sunlit hemisphere when 30 s sampling rate data are analyzed. The observed errors in the position are the result of the difficulties that cycle slip (CS) detection strategies have to deal with the observables that have been affected by the SITEC.

  18. Atmosphere Mitigation in Precise Point Positioning Ambiguity Resolution for Earthquake Early Warning in the Western U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J.; Bock, Y.; Reuveni, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquake early warning (EEW) is a time-critical system and typically relies on seismic instruments in the area around the source to detect P waves (or S waves) and rapidly issue alerts. Thanks to the rapid development of real-time Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), a good number of sensors have been deployed in seismic zones, such as the western U.S. where over 600 GPS stations are collecting 1-Hz high-rate data along the Cascadia subduction zone, San Francisco Bay area, San Andreas fault, etc. GNSS sensors complement the seismic sensors by recording the static offsets while seismic data provide highly-precise higher frequency motions. An optimal combination of GNSS and accelerometer data (seismogeodesy) has advantages compared to GNSS-only or seismic-only methods and provides seismic velocity and displacement waveforms that are precise enough to detect P wave arrivals, in particular in the near source region. Robust real-time GNSS and seismogeodetic analysis is challenging because it requires a period of initialization and continuous phase ambiguity resolution. One of the limiting factors is unmodeled atmospheric effects, both of tropospheric and ionospheric origin. One mitigation approach is to introduce atmospheric corrections into precise point positioning with ambiguity resolution (PPP-AR) of clients/stations within the monitored regions. NOAA generates hourly predictions of zenith troposphere delays at an accuracy of a few centimeters, and 15-minute slant ionospheric delays of a few TECU (Total Electron Content Unit) accuracy from both geodetic and meteorological data collected at hundreds of stations across the U.S. The Scripps Orbit and Permanent Array Center (SOPAC) is experimenting with a regional ionosphere grid using a few hundred stations in southern California, and the International GNSS Service (IGS) routinely estimates a Global Ionosphere Map using over 100 GNSS stations. With these troposphere and ionosphere data as additional

  19. Rapid earthquake magnitude from real-time GPS precise point positioning for earthquake early warning and emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Rongxin; Shi, Chuang; Song, Weiwei; Wang, Guangxing; Liu, Jingnan

    2014-05-01

    For earthquake early warning (EEW) and emergency response, earthquake magnitude is the crucial parameter to be determined rapidly and correctly. However, a reliable and rapid measurement of the magnitude of an earthquake is a challenging problem, especially for large earthquakes (M>8). Here, the magnitude is determined based on the GPS displacement waveform derived from real-time precise point positioning (PPP). The real-time PPP results are evaluated with an accuracy of 1 cm in the horizontal components and 2-3 cm in the vertical components, indicating that the real-time PPP is capable of detecting seismic waves with amplitude of 1cm horizontally and 2-3cm vertically with a confidence level of 95%. In order to estimate the magnitude, the unique information provided by the GPS displacement waveform is the horizontal peak displacement amplitude. We show that the empirical relation of Gutenberg (1945) between peak displacement and magnitude holds up to nearly magnitude 9.0 when displacements are measured with GPS. We tested the proposed method for three large earthquakes. For the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, our method provides a magnitude of M7.18±0.18. For the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake the estimated magnitude is M8.74±0.06, and for the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake the value is M8.7±0.1 after excluding some near-field stations. We therefore conclude that depending on the availability of high-rate GPS observations, a robust value of magnitude up to 9.0 for a point source earthquake can be estimated within 10s of seconds or a few minutes after an event using a few GPS stations close to the epicenter. The rapid magnitude could be as a pre-requisite for tsunami early warning, fast source inversion, and emergency response is feasible.

  20. GLONASS Precise Point Positioning with Ambiguity Resolution (PPP-AR) and its Integration with GPS for Earthquake Early Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Y.; Geng, J.; Avallone, A.; Ganas, A.; Melgar, D.; Riquelme, S.

    2015-12-01

    GPS has been recognized as an essential technique to measure static and dynamic displacements for earthquake early warning (EEW), in particular for near-field large earthquake monitoring where broadband seismometers clip, filtering of strong-motion accelerometer data eliminates the static component, and seismic data are affected by magnitude saturation. We have developed a prototype EEW system for the U.S. West Coast using real-time precise point positioning with ambiguity resolution (PPP-AR). It includes about 200 GPS stations spanning the areas of greatest seismic risk: Cascadia, the San Francisco Bay Area and southern California, using IGS ultra-rapid orbits and a North-America based GPS network well outside the region of expected deformation to estimate satellite clock and fractional cycle biases. We have analyzed, retrospectively in real time, earthquakes from Mw5.1 to Mw9.0; we can detect dynamic displacements with a precision of about one cm, but we've encountered several issues that could improve our operational system. Reinitialization of the integer-cycle phase ambiguities is problematic when a (not unusual) data gap of more than about 5 minutes is encountered. Also, ambiguity resolution is less reliable when there are only a limited number (six or less) of GPS satellites available. Nowadays, GNSS is evolving to a true multi-constellation environment with GLONASS having been restored to a 24-satellite constellation in 2012. We present a method for GNSS (GPS+GLONASS) PPP-AR to improve on the performance of GPS PPP-AR in EEW. We find that GNSS-AR has higher reliability in achieving ambiguity-fixed solutions, improves vertical accuracy by 20%, reduces initialization time to less than 7 minutes from about 20 minutes, and reduces outlier rates from 1.2% to below 0.2%. We use three earthquakes to demonstrate GNSS-AR, the M7.8 2014 Iquique, Chile aftershock, and Mw 6.9 2014 North Aegean, Greece and Mw 6.3 2009 L'Aquila, Italy earthquakes.

  1. BeiDou phase bias estimation and its application in precise point positioning with triple-frequency observable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shengfeng; Lou, Yidong; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan

    2015-10-01

    At present, the BeiDou system (BDS) enables the practical application of triple-frequency observable in the Asia-Pacific region, of many possible benefits from the additional signal; this study focuses on exploiting the contribution of zero difference (ZD) ambiguity resolution (AR) to the precise point positioning (PPP). A general modeling strategy for multi-frequency PPP AR is presented, in which, the least squares ambiguity decorrelation adjustment (LAMBDA) method is employed in ambiguity fixing based on the full variance-covariance ambiguity matrix generated from the raw data processing model. Because of the reliable fixing of BDS L1 ambiguity faces more difficulty, the LAMBDA method with partial ambiguity fixing is proposed to enable the independent and instantaneous resolution of extra wide-lane (EWL) and wide-lane (WL). This mechanism of sequential ambiguity fixing is demonstrated for resolving ZD satellite phase bias and performing triple-frequency PPP AR with two reference station networks with a typical baseline of up to 400 and 800 km, respectively. Tests show that about of the EWL and WL phase bias of BDS has a consistency of better than 0.1 cycle, and this value decreases to 80 % for L1 phase bias for Experiment I, while all the solutions of Experiment II have a similar RMS of about 0.12 cycles. In addition, the repeatability of the daily mean phase bias agree to 0.093 cycles and 0.095 cycles for EWL and WL on average, which is much smaller than 0.20 cycles of L1. To assess the improvement of fixed PPP brought by applying the third frequency signal as well as the above phase bias, various ambiguity fixing strategy are considered in the numerical demonstration. It is shown that the impact of the additional signal is almost negligible when only float solution involved. It is also shown that by fixing EWL and WL together, as opposed to the single ambiguity fixing, will leads to an improvement in PPP accuracy by about on average. Attributed to the efficient

  2. System for precise position registration

    DOEpatents

    Sundelin, Ronald M.; Wang, Tong

    2005-11-22

    An apparatus for enabling accurate retaining of a precise position, such as for reacquisition of a microscopic spot or feature having a size of 0.1 mm or less, on broad-area surfaces after non-in situ processing. The apparatus includes a sample and sample holder. The sample holder includes a base and three support posts. Two of the support posts interact with a cylindrical hole and a U-groove in the sample to establish location of one point on the sample and a line through the sample. Simultaneous contact of the third support post with the surface of the sample defines a plane through the sample. All points of the sample are therefore uniquely defined by the sample and sample holder. The position registration system of the current invention provides accuracy, as measured in x, y repeatability, of at least 140 .mu.m.

  3. Ultra-precision positioning assembly

    DOEpatents

    Montesanti, Richard C.; Locke, Stanley F.; Thompson, Samuel L.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for ultra-precision positioning. A slide base provides a foundational support. A slide plate moves with respect to the slide base along a first geometric axis. Either a ball-screw or a piezoelectric actuator working separate or in conjunction displaces the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis. A linking device directs a primary force vector into a center-line of the ball-screw. The linking device consists of a first link which directs a first portion of the primary force vector to an apex point, located along the center-line of the ball-screw, and a second link for directing a second portion of the primary force vector to the apex point. A set of rails, oriented substantially parallel to the center-line of the ball-screw, direct movement of the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis and are positioned such that the apex point falls within a geometric plane formed by the rails. The slide base, the slide plate, the ball-screw, and the linking device together form a slide assembly. Multiple slide assemblies can be distributed about a platform. In such a configuration, the platform may be raised and lowered, or tipped and tilted by jointly or independently displacing the slide plates.

  4. Point measurements of mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet using precision vertical Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Gordon S.; Whillans, Ian M.

    2000-07-01

    Rates of ice sheet thickening or thinning in Greenland are measured using the coffee-can technique. This entails computing the difference in the vertical velocity of markers anchored in firn and the long-term rate of snow accumulation. The velocities are obtained from repeat surveys using the Global Positioning System (GPS). With corrections for densification and along-slope flow, this difference is the local mass balance. For two sites in western Greenland (Camp Century and a site just south of the EGIG line (Crawford Point)) results show ice sheet thinning. A third west Greenland site (inland from Upernavik) is close to balance. Two sites, Dye-2 in western Greenland and Summit, are thickening slowly.

  5. Precision pointing mechanism for intersatellite optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, T.; O'Sullivan, B.; Russell, J.; Scholl, L.

    1989-09-01

    The SILEX project is an experimental communication system aimed at demonstrating, in orbit, the feasibility of intersatellite optical communications using semiconductor lasers. As part of this project, a precision mechanism has been developed to point the transmitted beam ahead of the current receiving satellite position. This is necessary due to the relative motion of the satellites, the narrow beam, and the finite velocity of light. The design and construction of a prototype of this device is discussed along with measurements of performance. The technique as described can be used in many applications requiring precision beam steering or rotation control.

  6. Assessment of Three Tropospheric Delay Models (IGGtrop, EGNOS and UNB3m) Based on Precise Point Positioning in the Chinese Region.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxing; Yuan, Yunbin; Li, Wei; Li, Ying; Chai, Yanju

    2016-01-01

    Tropospheric delays are one of the main sources of errors in the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). They are usually corrected by using tropospheric delay models, which makes the accuracy of the models rather critical for accurate positioning. To provide references for suitable models to be chosen for GNSS users in China, we conduct herein a comprehensive study of the performances of the IGGtrop, EGNOS and UNB3m models in China. Firstly, we assess the models using 5 years' Global Positioning System (GPS) derived Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) series from 25 stations of the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC). Then we study the effects of the models on satellite positioning by using various Precise Point Positioning (PPP) cases with different tropospheric delay resolutions, the observation data processed in PPP is from 21 base stations of CMONOC for a whole year of 2012. The results show that: (1) the Root Mean Square (RMS) of the IGGtrop model is about 4.4 cm, which improves the accuracy of ZTD estimations by about 24% for EGNOS and 19% for UNB3m; (2) The positioning error in the vertical component of the PPP solution obtained by using the IGGtrop model is about 15.0 cm, which is about 30% and 21% smaller than those of the EGNOS and UNB3m models, respectively. In summary, the IGGtrop model achieves the best performance among the three models in the Chinese region. PMID:26805834

  7. Assessment of Three Tropospheric Delay Models (IGGtrop, EGNOS and UNB3m) Based on Precise Point Positioning in the Chinese Region

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongxing; Yuan, Yunbin; Li, Wei; Li, Ying; Chai, Yanju

    2016-01-01

    Tropospheric delays are one of the main sources of errors in the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). They are usually corrected by using tropospheric delay models, which makes the accuracy of the models rather critical for accurate positioning. To provide references for suitable models to be chosen for GNSS users in China, we conduct herein a comprehensive study of the performances of the IGGtrop, EGNOS and UNB3m models in China. Firstly, we assess the models using 5 years’ Global Positioning System (GPS) derived Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) series from 25 stations of the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC). Then we study the effects of the models on satellite positioning by using various Precise Point Positioning (PPP) cases with different tropospheric delay resolutions, the observation data processed in PPP is from 21 base stations of CMONOC for a whole year of 2012. The results show that: (1) the Root Mean Square (RMS) of the IGGtrop model is about 4.4 cm, which improves the accuracy of ZTD estimations by about 24% for EGNOS and 19% for UNB3m; (2) The positioning error in the vertical component of the PPP solution obtained by using the IGGtrop model is about 15.0 cm, which is about 30% and 21% smaller than those of the EGNOS and UNB3m models, respectively. In summary, the IGGtrop model achieves the best performance among the three models in the Chinese region. PMID:26805834

  8. Tightly Coupled Integration of GPS Ambiguity Fixed Precise Point Positioning and MEMS-INS through a Troposphere-Constrained Adaptive Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Han, Houzeng; Xu, Tianhe; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) makes use of the undifferenced pseudorange and carrier phase measurements with ionospheric-free (IF) combinations to achieve centimeter-level positioning accuracy. Conventionally, the IF ambiguities are estimated as float values. To improve the PPP positioning accuracy and shorten the convergence time, the integer phase clock model with between-satellites single-difference (BSSD) operation is used to recover the integer property. However, the continuity and availability of stand-alone PPP is largely restricted by the observation environment. The positioning performance will be significantly degraded when GPS operates under challenging environments, if less than five satellites are present. A commonly used approach is integrating a low cost inertial sensor to improve the positioning performance and robustness. In this study, a tightly coupled (TC) algorithm is implemented by integrating PPP with inertial navigation system (INS) using an Extended Kalman filter (EKF). The navigation states, inertial sensor errors and GPS error states are estimated together. The troposphere constrained approach, which utilizes external tropospheric delay as virtual observation, is applied to further improve the ambiguity-fixed height positioning accuracy, and an improved adaptive filtering strategy is implemented to improve the covariance modelling considering the realistic noise effect. A field vehicular test with a geodetic GPS receiver and a low cost inertial sensor was conducted to validate the improvement on positioning performance with the proposed approach. The results show that the positioning accuracy has been improved with inertial aiding. Centimeter-level positioning accuracy is achievable during the test, and the PPP/INS TC integration achieves a fast re-convergence after signal outages. For troposphere constrained solutions, a significant improvement for the height component has been obtained. The overall positioning accuracies of the height

  9. Tightly Coupled Integration of GPS Ambiguity Fixed Precise Point Positioning and MEMS-INS through a Troposphere-Constrained Adaptive Kalman Filter.

    PubMed

    Han, Houzeng; Xu, Tianhe; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) makes use of the undifferenced pseudorange and carrier phase measurements with ionospheric-free (IF) combinations to achieve centimeter-level positioning accuracy. Conventionally, the IF ambiguities are estimated as float values. To improve the PPP positioning accuracy and shorten the convergence time, the integer phase clock model with between-satellites single-difference (BSSD) operation is used to recover the integer property. However, the continuity and availability of stand-alone PPP is largely restricted by the observation environment. The positioning performance will be significantly degraded when GPS operates under challenging environments, if less than five satellites are present. A commonly used approach is integrating a low cost inertial sensor to improve the positioning performance and robustness. In this study, a tightly coupled (TC) algorithm is implemented by integrating PPP with inertial navigation system (INS) using an Extended Kalman filter (EKF). The navigation states, inertial sensor errors and GPS error states are estimated together. The troposphere constrained approach, which utilizes external tropospheric delay as virtual observation, is applied to further improve the ambiguity-fixed height positioning accuracy, and an improved adaptive filtering strategy is implemented to improve the covariance modelling considering the realistic noise effect. A field vehicular test with a geodetic GPS receiver and a low cost inertial sensor was conducted to validate the improvement on positioning performance with the proposed approach. The results show that the positioning accuracy has been improved with inertial aiding. Centimeter-level positioning accuracy is achievable during the test, and the PPP/INS TC integration achieves a fast re-convergence after signal outages. For troposphere constrained solutions, a significant improvement for the height component has been obtained. The overall positioning accuracies of the height

  10. Millimeter-accuracy GPS landslide monitoring using Precise Point Positioning with Single Receiver Phase Ambiguity (PPP-SRPA) resolution: a case study in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. Q.

    2013-03-01

    Continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) monitoring is essential for establishing the rate and pattern of superficial movements of landslides. This study demonstrates a technique which uses a stand-alone GPS station to conduct millimeter-accuracy landslide monitoring. The Precise Point Positioning with Single Receiver Phase Ambiguity (PPP-SRPA) resolution employed by the GIPSY/OASIS software package (V6.1.2) was applied in this study. Two-years of continuous GPS data collected at a creeping landslide were used to evaluate the accuracy of the PPP-SRPA solutions. The criterion for accuracy was the root-mean-square (RMS) of residuals of the PPP-SRPA solutions with respect to "true" landslide displacements over the two-year period. RMS is often regarded as repeatability or precision in GPS literature. However, when contrasted with a known "true" position or displacement it could be termed RMS accuracy or simply accuracy. This study indicated that the PPP-SRPA resolution can provide an accuracy of 2 to 3 mm horizontally and 8 mm vertically for 24-hour sessions with few outliers (< 1%) in the Puerto Rico region. Horizontal accuracy below 5 mm can be stably achieved with 4-hour or longer sessions if avoiding the collection of data during extreme weather conditions. Vertical accuracy below 10 mm can be achieved with 8-hour or longer sessions. This study indicates that the PPP-SRPA resolution is competitive with the conventional carrier-phase double-difference network resolution for static (longer than 4 hours) landslide monitoring while maintaining many advantages. It is evident that the PPP-SRPA method would become an attractive alternative to the conventional carrier-phase double-difference method for landslide monitoring, notably in remote areas or developing countries.

  11. Precision Pointing of IBEX-Lo Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hłond, M.; Bzowski, M.; Möbius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Heirtzler, D.; Schwadron, N. A.; O'Neill, M. E.; Clark, G.; Crew, G. B.; Fuselier, S.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-02-01

    Post-launch boresight of the IBEX-Lo instrument on board the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is determined based on IBEX-Lo Star Sensor observations. Accurate information on the boresight of the neutral gas camera is essential for precise determination of interstellar gas flow parameters. Utilizing spin-phase information from the spacecraft attitude control system (ACS), positions of stars observed by the Star Sensor during two years of IBEX measurements were analyzed and compared with positions obtained from a star catalog. No statistically significant differences were observed beyond those expected from the pre-launch uncertainty in the Star Sensor mounting. Based on the star observations and their positions in the spacecraft reference system, pointing of the IBEX satellite spin axis was determined and compared with the pointing obtained from the ACS. Again, no statistically significant deviations were observed. We conclude that no systematic correction for boresight geometry is needed in the analysis of IBEX-Lo observations to determine neutral interstellar gas flow properties. A stack-up of uncertainties in attitude knowledge shows that the instantaneous IBEX-Lo pointing is determined to within ~0fdg1 in both spin angle and elevation using either the Star Sensor or the ACS. Further, the Star Sensor can be used to independently determine the spacecraft spin axis. Thus, Star Sensor data can be used reliably to correct the spin phase when the Star Tracker (used by the ACS) is disabled by bright objects in its field of view. The Star Sensor can also determine the spin axis during most orbits and thus provides redundancy for the Star Tracker.

  12. PRECISION POINTING OF IBEX-Lo OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hlond, M.; Bzowski, M.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Heirtzler, D.; Schwadron, N. A.; Neill, M. E. O'; Clark, G.; Crew, G. B.; Fuselier, S.; McComas, D. J. E-mail: eberhard.moebius@unh.edu E-mail: stephen.a.fuselier@linco.com E-mail: DMcComas@swri.edu

    2012-02-01

    Post-launch boresight of the IBEX-Lo instrument on board the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is determined based on IBEX-Lo Star Sensor observations. Accurate information on the boresight of the neutral gas camera is essential for precise determination of interstellar gas flow parameters. Utilizing spin-phase information from the spacecraft attitude control system (ACS), positions of stars observed by the Star Sensor during two years of IBEX measurements were analyzed and compared with positions obtained from a star catalog. No statistically significant differences were observed beyond those expected from the pre-launch uncertainty in the Star Sensor mounting. Based on the star observations and their positions in the spacecraft reference system, pointing of the IBEX satellite spin axis was determined and compared with the pointing obtained from the ACS. Again, no statistically significant deviations were observed. We conclude that no systematic correction for boresight geometry is needed in the analysis of IBEX-Lo observations to determine neutral interstellar gas flow properties. A stack-up of uncertainties in attitude knowledge shows that the instantaneous IBEX-Lo pointing is determined to within {approx}0.{sup 0}1 in both spin angle and elevation using either the Star Sensor or the ACS. Further, the Star Sensor can be used to independently determine the spacecraft spin axis. Thus, Star Sensor data can be used reliably to correct the spin phase when the Star Tracker (used by the ACS) is disabled by bright objects in its field of view. The Star Sensor can also determine the spin axis during most orbits and thus provides redundancy for the Star Tracker.

  13. Combined GPS and GALILEO instantaneous precise positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgosz, P.; Paziewski, J.; Stepniak, K.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation provides results of the research aimed at precise positioning using single-epoch GPS and Galileo observations. The main goal was to develop algorithms that allow obtaining reliable centimeter-level position when using just a single epoch of pseudorange and carrier phase GPS and Galileo data in a single functional model. The presented algorithms are based on relative precise positioning using double-differenced observations in both single baseline and network mode. Fast and reliable ambiguity resolution is the key for rapid and single-epoch precise positioning. In order to support ambiguity resolution using small amount of data, special emphasis was put on mitigation of ionospheric and tropospheric delays. The functional model was based on constrained least squares estimation. The LAMBDA method was applied for ambiguity resolution and a multi-criteria statistical tests are used for ambiguity validation. These algorithms were implemented in GINPOS software developed at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn. The results of combined GPS+Galileo processing were compared to the solutions obtained using GPS-only and Galileo-only data. Since there are just two test Galileo satellites on orbit, Spirent multi-GNSS simulator was used to obtain Galileo and GPS signals. The processed baselines reached up to 35-70 km. The results based on the simulated data show that even though single-epoch precise positioning is possible with GPS only, adding Galileo data increases availability and reliability of the user position.

  14. High-precision positioning of radar scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dheenathayalan, Prabu; Small, David; Schubert, Adrian; Hanssen, Ramon F.

    2016-05-01

    Remote sensing radar satellites cover wide areas and provide spatially dense measurements, with millions of scatterers. Knowledge of the precise position of each radar scatterer is essential to identify the corresponding object and interpret the estimated deformation. The absolute position accuracy of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) scatterers in a 2D radar coordinate system, after compensating for atmosphere and tidal effects, is in the order of centimeters for TerraSAR-X (TSX) spotlight images. However, the absolute positioning in 3D and its quality description are not well known. Here, we exploit time-series interferometric SAR to enhance the positioning capability in three dimensions. The 3D positioning precision is parameterized by a variance-covariance matrix and visualized as an error ellipsoid centered at the estimated position. The intersection of the error ellipsoid with objects in the field is exploited to link radar scatterers to real-world objects. We demonstrate the estimation of scatterer position and its quality using 20 months of TSX stripmap acquisitions over Delft, the Netherlands. Using trihedral corner reflectors (CR) for validation, the accuracy of absolute positioning in 2D is about 7 cm. In 3D, an absolute accuracy of up to ˜ 66 cm is realized, with a cigar-shaped error ellipsoid having centimeter precision in azimuth and range dimensions, and elongated in cross-range dimension with a precision in the order of meters (the ratio of the ellipsoid axis lengths is 1/3/213, respectively). The CR absolute 3D position, along with the associated error ellipsoid, is found to be accurate and agree with the ground truth position at a 99 % confidence level. For other non-CR coherent scatterers, the error ellipsoid concept is validated using 3D building models. In both cases, the error ellipsoid not only serves as a quality descriptor, but can also help to associate radar scatterers to real-world objects.

  15. Enhanced precision pointing jitter suppression system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Jerold P.; Luniewicz, Michael F.; Sargent, Darryl

    2002-06-01

    Space based defense systems, such as a Space Based Laser (SBL), and space based surveillance systems share a common objective: extremely high resolution Line of Sight (LOS) target imaging. In order to achieve the mission objectives, their beam control subsystem must provide precise LOS pointing and tracking capabilities with suppression of LOS jitter. Draper Laboratory has developed concepts and instrumentation that address these needs based upon a stabilized inertial platform mechanization that holds a collimated light source, called the Inertial Pseudo Star Reference Unit (IPSRU). This paper describes the original IPSRU design and a design concept for a new High Performance version of the IPSRU system (HP-IPSRU) that meet the jitter stabilization needs of the SBL. The IPSRU provides an inertially stabilized optical probe beam that provides a precise pointing and tracking reference with nanoradian jitter performance. The IPSRU serves as a master reference for stabilizing imaging and weapon system pointing and tracking. This paper describes the IPSRU system, its measured error allocation and integrated performance. It presents the error budget required to achieving the 5 nrad rms jitter stabilization performance projected to be necessary for an operational Space Based Laser system. A conceptual design for the HP-IPSRU is presented.

  16. Inertial Pointing and Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Robert (Inventor); Robbins, Fred (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An inertial pointing and control system and method for pointing to a designated target with known coordinates from a platform to provide accurate position, steering, and command information. The system continuously receives GPS signals and corrects Inertial Navigation System (INS) dead reckoning or drift errors. An INS is mounted directly on a pointing instrument rather than in a remote location on the platform for-monitoring the terrestrial position and instrument attitude. and for pointing the instrument at designated celestial targets or ground based landmarks. As a result. the pointing instrument and die INS move independently in inertial space from the platform since the INS is decoupled from the platform. Another important characteristic of the present system is that selected INS measurements are combined with predefined coordinate transformation equations and control logic algorithms under computer control in order to generate inertial pointing commands to the pointing instrument. More specifically. the computer calculates the desired instrument angles (Phi, Theta. Psi). which are then compared to the Euler angles measured by the instrument- mounted INS. and forms the pointing command error angles as a result of the compared difference.

  17. Precision pointing and tracking system /PPTS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, T. K.; Leblanc, D. R.; Mettler, E.; Gaalema, S. D.

    1978-01-01

    As part of its advanced development work, JPL is developing a Precision Pointing and Tracking System (PPTS) for science platform control on unmanned planetary spacecraft. The PPTS will extend science capabilities on future missions by providing highly accurate (10 arcsec) and stable (0.2 arcsec) pointing of the platform. Key features of the design include closed-loop tracking of target bodies using an optical sensor and decoupling of spacecraft dynamics via high-bandwidth, inertially stabilized control. This paper discusses the analyses and design. Computer simulations were used to establish the feasibility of the design approach and to verify that the performance requirements can be met. A breadboard demonstration of the entire system is expected in late 1980.

  18. Precise Applications Of The Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.

    1992-01-01

    Report represents overview of Global Positioning System (GPS). Emphasizes those aspects of theory, history, and status of GPS pertaining to potential utility for highly precise scientific measurements. Current and anticipated applications include measurements of crustal motions in seismically active regions of Earth, measurements of rate of rotation of Earth and orientation of poles, tracking of non-GPS spacecraft in orbit around Earth, surveying, measurements of radio-signal-propagation delays, determinations of coordinates of ground stations, and transfer of precise time signals worldwide.

  19. Precise Positioning of Ships for Maritime Disasters Prevention Using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, J.; Heo, M.; Chun, S.; Park, S.; Cho, D.

    2010-12-01

    Most ships use the marine DGPS (Differential Global Positioning System) service to know position information in the sea. In Korea, the Ministry of Land Transport and Maritime Affairs (MLTM) provides the nationwide DGPS (NDGPS) service to users trying to secure the safety of traffic of ships. The precision of ship position information obtained by the MLTM NDGPS system is about 1-2m. When ships pass through courses under bridges, ship collisions can occur with the bridges because of the few meter-level precision of position information. In this study, as a feasibility test, we estimated positions of ships at sea to predict the collisions between ships and bridges using DGPS, carrier phase DGPS (CDGPS), and precise point positioning (PPP) techniques were used. We conducted ship borne GPS observations in the south sea of Korea. To process the GPS data, GIPSY-OASIS (GPS Inferred Positioning System-Orbit Analysis and Simulation Software) developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and CDGPS MATLAB program developed by Korea Space Research Institute were used. Antenna phase center variations, ocean tidal loading displacements, and azimuthal gradients of the atmosphere were corrected or estimated as standard procedures of high-precision GIPSY-OASIS data processing. As a result, the position precision decreased to decimeter-level with increasing the quantity of motion such as velocity, pitch and roll of the ship and buoys.

  20. Precision pointing and control of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bantell, M. H., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The problem and long term objectives for the precision pointing and control of flexible spacecraft are given. The four basic objectives are stated in terms of two principle tasks. Under Task 1, robust low order controllers, improved structural modeling methods for control applications and identification methods for structural dynamics are being developed. Under Task 2, a lab test experiment for verification of control laws and system identification algorithms is being developed. For Task 1, work has focused on robust low order controller design and some initial considerations for structural modeling in control applications. For Task 2, work has focused on experiment design and fabrication, along with sensor selection and initial digital controller implementation. Conclusions are given.

  1. Precise CCD positions of Apophis in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, N.; Peng, Q. Y.; Zhang, X. L.; Zhang, Q. F.; Li, Z.; Meng, X. H.

    2015-12-01

    298 CCD observations during the year 2013 have been reduced to derive the precise positions of near-Earth asteroid (99942) Apophis. The observations were made by the 2.4-m telescope at Yunnan Observatory over 10 nights. The position and proper motion errors of the reference stars in the USNO CCD Astrograph Catalogue 4 (UCAC4) star catalogue are corrected by using the newest correction table provided by Farnocchia et al. The geometric distortion of the field of view is also derived from the unbiased star positions in UCAC4 and removed. The theoretical position of Apophis was retrieved from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Horizons system. Our results show that the mean O-Cs (observed minus computed) are 0.016 and 0.034 arcsec in right ascension and declination, respectively. The dispersions of our observations are estimated at 0.041 and 0.045 arcsec in right ascension and declination, respectively.

  2. Point Positioning Service for Natural Hazard Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Sever, Y. E.

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to improve natural hazard monitoring, JPL has invested in updating and enlarging its global real-time GNSS tracking network, and has launched a unique service - real-time precise positioning for natural hazard monitoring, entitled GREAT Alert (GNSS Real-Time Earthquake and Tsunami Alert). GREAT Alert leverages the full technological and operational capability of the JPL's Global Differential GPS System [www.gdgps.net] to offer owners of real-time dual-frequency GNSS receivers: Sub-5 cm (3D RMS) real-time, absolute positioning in ITRF08, regardless of location Under 5 seconds turnaround time Full covariance information Estimates of ancillary parameters (such as troposphere) optionally provided This service enables GNSS networks operators to instantly have access to the most accurate and reliable real-time positioning solutions for their sites, and also to the hundreds of participating sites globally, assuring inter-consistency and uniformity across all solutions. Local authorities with limited technical and financial resources can now access to the best technology, and share environmental data to the benefit of the entire pacific region. We will describe the specialized precise point positioning techniques employed by the GREAT Alert service optimized for natural hazard monitoring, and in particular Earthquake monitoring. We address three fundamental aspects of these applications: 1) small and infrequent motion, 2) the availability of data at a central location, and 3) the need for refined solutions at several time scales

  3. Precision Linear Actuator for Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) Siderostat Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant; Braun, David; Hankins, Steve; Koenig, John; Moore, Don

    2008-01-01

    'SIM PlanetQuest will exploit the classical measuring tool of astrometry (interferometry) with unprecedented precision to make dramatic advances in many areas of astronomy and astrophysics'(1). In order to obtain interferometric data two large steerable mirrors, or Siderostats, are used to direct starlight into the interferometer. A gimbaled mechanism actuated by linear actuators is chosen to meet the unprecedented pointing and angle tracking requirements of SIM. A group of JPL engineers designed, built, and tested a linear ballscrew actuator capable of performing submicron incremental steps for 10 years of continuous operation. Precise, zero backlash, closed loop pointing control requirements, lead the team to implement a ballscrew actuator with a direct drive DC motor and a precision piezo brake. Motor control commutation using feedback from a precision linear encoder on the ballscrew output produced an unexpected incremental step size of 20 nm over a range of 120 mm, yielding a dynamic range of 6,000,000:1. The results prove linear nanometer positioning requires no gears, levers, or hydraulic converters. Along the way many lessons have been learned and will subsequently be shared.

  4. Design and Analysis of Precise Pointing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young K.

    2000-01-01

    The mathematical models of Glovebox Integrated Microgravity Isolation Technology (g- LIMIT) dynamics/control system, which include six degrees of freedom (DOF) equations of motion, mathematical models of position sensors, accelerometers and actuators, and acceleration and position controller, were developed using MATLAB and TREETOPS simulations. Optimal control parameters of G-LIMIT control system were determined through sensitivity studies and its performance were evaluated with the TREETOPS model of G-LIMIT dynamics and control system. The functional operation and performance of the Tektronix DTM920 digital thermometer were studied and the inputs to the crew procedures and training of the DTM920 were documented.

  5. Precision absolute positional measurement of laser beams.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, Ewan D; Bogenstahl, Johanna; Hough, James; Killow, Christian J; Perreur-Lloyd, Michael; Robertson, David I; Ward, Henry

    2013-04-20

    We describe an instrument which, coupled with a suitable coordinate measuring machine, facilitates the absolute measurement within the machine frame of the propagation direction of a millimeter-scale laser beam to an accuracy of around ±4 μm in position and ±20 μrad in angle. PMID:23669658

  6. High precision applications of the global positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a constellation of U.S. defense navigation satellites which can be used for military and civilian positioning applications. A wide variety of GPS scientific applications were identified and precise positioning capabilities with GPS were already demonstrated with data available from the present partial satellite constellation. Expected applications include: measurements of Earth crustal motion, particularly in seismically active regions; measurements of the Earth's rotation rate and pole orientation; high-precision Earth orbiter tracking; surveying; measurements of media propagation delays for calibration of deep space radiometric data in support of NASA planetary missions; determination of precise ground station coordinates; and precise time transfer worldwide.

  7. Method and system for ultra-precision positioning

    DOEpatents

    Montesanti, Richard C.; Locke, Stanley F.; Thompson, Samuel L.

    2005-01-11

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for ultra-precision positioning. A slide base provides a foundational support. A slide plate moves with respect to the slide base along a first geometric axis. Either a ball-screw or a piezoelectric actuator working separate or in conjunction displaces the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis. A linking device directs a primary force vector into a center-line of the ball-screw. The linking device consists of a first link which directs a first portion of the primary force vector to an apex point, located along the center-line of the ball-screw, and a second link for directing a second portion of the primary force vector to the apex point. A set of rails, oriented substantially parallel to the center-line of the ball-screw, direct movement of the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis and are positioned such that the apex point falls within a geometric plane formed by the rails. The slide base, the slide plate, the ball-screw, and the linking device together form a slide assembly. Multiple slide assemblies can be distributed about a platform. In such a configuration, the platform may be raised and lowered, or tipped and tilted by jointly or independently displacing the slide plates.

  8. Analysis of a method for precisely relating a seafloor point to a distant point on land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiess, F. N.; Lowenstein, C. D.; Mcintyre, M. O.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the environmental constraints and engineering aspects of the acoustic portion of a system for making geodetic ties between undersea reference points and others on land is described. Important areas in which to make such observations initially would be from the California mainland out to oceanic points seaward of the San Andreas fault, and across the Aleutian Trench. The overall approach would be to operate a GPS receiver in a relative positioning (interferometric) mode to provide the long range element of the baseline determination (10 to 1,000 km) and an array of precision sea floor acoustic transponders to link the locally moving sea surface GPS antenna location to a fixed sea floor point. Analyses of various environmental constrants (tides, waves, currents, sound velocity variations) lead to the conclusion that, if one uses a properly designed transponder having a remotely controllable precise retransmission time delay, and is careful with regard to methods for installing these on the sea floor, one should, in many ocean locations, be able to achieve sub-decimeter overall system accuracy. Achievements of cm accuracy or better will require additional understanding of time and space scales of variation of sound velocity structure in the ocean at relevant locations.

  9. Precision analysis of passive BD aided pseudolites positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yan

    2007-11-01

    In recent years BD (BeiDou positioning system), an active satellite navigation system, has been widely applied in geodetic survey, precise engineering survey and GNC (guide, navigation and control system) of weapons because of its reliability and availability. However, it has several problems on the accuracy, anti-interference and active-positioning. A passive BD aided pseudolites positioning system is introduced in details in this paper. The configuration and the operating principle of system are presented. In analyzing the precision of location, one of the crucial aspects to be studied is how to determine the arrangement of the pseudolites to get the good GDOP, which is discussed in the different arrangements of the pseudolites in this paper. The simulation results show that the VDOP (vertical dilution of precision) of BD is improved due to introducing the pseudolites. The experiments indicate the validity of the methods and the improvement of the positioning precision in the BD aided pseudolite system.

  10. Multi-GNSS real-time precise orbit/clock/UPD products and precise positioning service at GFZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Ge, Maorong; Liu, Yang; Fritsche, Mathias; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The rapid development of multi-constellation GNSSs (Global Navigation Satellite Systems, e.g., BeiDou, Galileo, GLONASS, GPS) and the IGS (International GNSS Service) Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) bring great opportunities and challenges for real-time precise positioning service. In this contribution, we present a GPS+GLONASS+BeiDou+Galileo four-system model to fully exploit the observations of all these four navigation satellite systems for real-time precise orbit determination, clock estimation and positioning. A rigorous multi-GNSS analysis is performed to achieve the best possible consistency by processing the observations from different GNSS together in one common parameter estimation procedure. Meanwhile, an efficient multi-GNSS real-time precise positioning service system is designed and demonstrated by using the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) and International GNSS Service (IGS) data streams including stations all over the world. The addition of the BeiDou, Galileo and GLONASS systems to the standard GPS-only processing, reduces the convergence time almost by 70%, while the positioning accuracy is improved by about 25%. Some outliers in the GPS-only solutions vanish when multi-GNSS observations are processed simultaneous. The availability and reliability of GPS precise positioning decrease dramatically as the elevation cutoff increases. However, the accuracy of multi-GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) is hardly decreased and few centimeters are still achievable in the horizontal components even with 40° elevation cutoff.

  11. Precision of vertical position estimates from very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    It is found that the precision of VLBI measurements of vertical crustal motions is limited by errors in the modeling of the propagation delay through the earth's neutral atmosphere, and by errors in finding the orientation of a fixed crust coordinate system in the VLBI reference frame. The repeatability of baseline length measurements study indicates a vertical position precision of about 8 cm, averaged over 13 sites and 4.5 years of data, while the repeatability of vertical position estimates for a Richmond, FL site is found to yield a precision of about 7 cm for 42 observations made over an 11-month period. An overall precision of 8 cm for a 24-hour VLBI observing session is obtained, and the effects of earth orientation parameter errors is contingent on the distances between the VLBI sites.

  12. Precision optical metrology with alkali-atom isoclinic points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Nathan; Driskell, Travis; Camparo, James

    2016-06-01

    Vapour-phase spectroscopy rarely involves transitions between well-isolated atomic states. Routinely, the spectra comprise overlapped Doppler/pressure-broadened resonances, which leads to a “pulling” of the spectral peaks from their true atomic resonance frequencies. This pulling gives the absorption resonances a temperature sensitivity, which limits their utility for precision spectroscopy when sub-Doppler techniques are not viable. Here, we discuss the use of alkali isoclinic points as a solution to this problem.

  13. Reactionless gimbal actuator for precision pointing of large payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laskin, R. A.; Kopf, E. H.; Sirlin, S. W.; Spanos, J. T.; Wiktor, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    A novel actuator for application to precision pointing gimbal systems is described. The new actuator, dubbed the Reactuator, is capable of large output torques for payload pointing while minimizing reaction torques that can excite gimbal support structure. The Reactuator is able to approach reactionless operation by using an integral wheel to absorb the reaction torques. The advantages that result are described through analysis and simulation examples. Methods for designing control algorithms for the Reactuator are discussed and the results of preliminary breadboard tests are presented.

  14. Astrophysical Adaptation of Points, the Precision Optical Interferometer in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.; Babcock, Robert W.; Murison, Marc A.; Noecker, M. Charles; Phillips, James D.; Schumaker, Bonny L.; Ulvestad, James S.; McKinley, William; Zielinski, Robert J.; Lillie, Charles F.

    1996-01-01

    POINTS (Precision Optical INTerferometer in Space) would perform microarcsecond optical astrometric measurements from space, yielding submicroarcsecond astrometric results from the mission. It comprises a pair of independent Michelson stellar interferometers and a laser metrology system that measures both the critical starlight paths and the angle between the baselines. The instrument has two baselines of 2 m, each with two subapertures of 35 cm; by articulating the angle between the baselines, it observes targets separated by 87 to 93 deg. POINTS does global astrometry, i.e., it measures widely separated targets, which yields closure calibration, numerous bright reference stars, and absolute parallax. Simplicity, stability, and the mitigation of systematic error are the central design themes. The instrument has only three moving-part mechanisms, and only one of these must move with sub-milliradian precision; the other two can tolerate a precision of several tenths of a degree. Optical surfaces preceding the beamsplitter or its fold flat are interferometrically critical; on each side of the interferometer, there are only three such. Thus, light loss and wavefront distortion are minimized. POINTS represents a minimalistic design developed ab initio for space. Since it is intended for astrometry, and therefore does not require the u-v-plane coverage of an imaging, instrument, each interferometer need have only two subapertures. The design relies on articulation of the angle between the interferometers and body pointing to select targets; the observations are restricted to the 'instrument plane.' That plane, which is fixed in the pointed instrument, is defined by the sensitive direction for the two interferometers. Thus, there is no need for siderostats and moving delay lines, which would have added many precision mechanisms with rolling and sliding parts that would be required to function throughout the mission. Further, there is no need for a third interferometer

  15. Novel linear piezoelectric motor for precision position stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Shi, Yunlai; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Junshan

    2016-03-01

    Conventional servomotor and stepping motor face challenges in nanometer positioning stages due to the complex structure, motion transformation mechanism, and slow dynamic response, especially directly driven by linear motor. A new butterfly-shaped linear piezoelectric motor for linear motion is presented. A two-degree precision position stage driven by the proposed linear ultrasonic motor possesses a simple and compact configuration, which makes the system obtain shorter driving chain. Firstly, the working principle of the linear ultrasonic motor is analyzed. The oscillation orbits of two driving feet on the stator are produced successively by using the anti-symmetric and symmetric vibration modes of the piezoelectric composite structure, and the slider pressed on the driving feet can be propelled twice in only one vibration cycle. Then with the derivation of the dynamic equation of the piezoelectric actuator and transient response model, start-upstart-up and settling state characteristics of the proposed linear actuator is investigated theoretically and experimentally, and is applicable to evaluate step resolution of the precision platform driven by the actuator. Moreover the structure of the two-degree position stage system is described and a special precision displacement measurement system is built. Finally, the characteristics of the two-degree position stage are studied. In the closed-loop condition the positioning accuracy of plus or minus <0.5 μm is experimentally obtained for the stage propelled by the piezoelectric motor. A precision position stage based the proposed butterfly-shaped linear piezoelectric is theoretically and experimentally investigated.

  16. Design of a reversible single precision floating point subtractor.

    PubMed

    Anantha Lakshmi, Av; Sudha, Gf

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, Reversible logic has emerged as a major area of research due to its ability to reduce the power dissipation which is the main requirement in the low power digital circuit design. It has wide applications like low power CMOS design, Nano-technology, Digital signal processing, Communication, DNA computing and Optical computing. Floating-point operations are needed very frequently in nearly all computing disciplines, and studies have shown floating-point addition/subtraction to be the most used floating-point operation. However, few designs exist on efficient reversible BCD subtractors but no work on reversible floating point subtractor. In this paper, it is proposed to present an efficient reversible single precision floating-point subtractor. The proposed design requires reversible designs of an 8-bit and a 24-bit comparator unit, an 8-bit and a 24-bit subtractor, and a normalization unit. For normalization, a 24-bit Reversible Leading Zero Detector and a 24-bit reversible shift register is implemented to shift the mantissas. To realize a reversible 1-bit comparator, in this paper, two new 3x3 reversible gates are proposed The proposed reversible 1-bit comparator is better and optimized in terms of the number of reversible gates used, the number of transistor count and the number of garbage outputs. The proposed work is analysed in terms of number of reversible gates, garbage outputs, constant inputs and quantum costs. Using these modules, an efficient design of a reversible single precision floating point subtractor is proposed. Proposed circuits have been simulated using Modelsim and synthesized using Xilinx Virtex5vlx30tff665-3. The total on-chip power consumed by the proposed 32-bit reversible floating point subtractor is 0.410 W. PMID:24455466

  17. Precisely detecting atomic position of atomic intensity images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijun; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai; Li, Junjie; Wang, Jincheng; Zhou, Yaohe

    2015-03-01

    We proposed a quantitative method to detect atomic position in atomic intensity images from experiments such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and simulation such as phase field crystal modeling. The evaluation of detection accuracy proves the excellent performance of the method. This method provides a chance to precisely determine atomic interactions based on the detected atomic positions from the atomic intensity image, and hence to investigate the related physical, chemical and electrical properties. PMID:25544105

  18. Precision matters for position decoding in the early fly embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Mariela D.; Tkacik, Gasper; Wieschaus, Eric F.; Bialek, William; Gregor, Thomas

    Genetic networks can determine cell fates in multicellular organisms with precision that often reaches the physical limits of the system. However, it is unclear how the organism uses this precision and whether it has biological content. Here we address this question in the developing fly embryo, in which a genetic network of patterning genes reaches 1% precision in positioning cells along the embryo axis. The network consists of three interconnected layers: an input layer of maternal gradients, a processing layer of gap genes, and an output layer of pair-rule genes with seven-striped patterns. From measurements of gap gene protein expression in hundreds of wild-type embryos we construct a ``decoder'', which is a look-up table that determines cellular positions from the concentration means, variances and co-variances. When we apply the decoder to measurements in mutant embryos lacking various combinations of the maternal inputs, we predict quantitative changes in the output layer such as missing, altered or displaced stripes. We confirm these predictions by measuring pair-rule expression in the mutant embryos. Our results thereby show that the precision of the patterning network is biologically meaningful and a necessary feature for decoding cell positions in the early fly embryo.

  19. The instrument pointing system: Precision attitude control in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Ralf; Woelker, Albrecht

    1990-06-01

    The Spacelab Instrument Pointing System (IPS) is a three axes gimbal system providing pointing and stabilization in the arcsec range to a variety of space experiments with a mass of up to 7000 kg. The IPS demonstrated its control performance during the maiden flight in July 1985, the Spacelab 2 mission on board the Space Shuttle Challenger. The most challenging problem for attitude control in space is the disturbance compensation in the presence of structural flexibilities. Kalman filtering based on optical sensor and gyro measurements as well as flexible mode attenuation and feedforward control were indispensable to achieve high precision. To further enhance the IPS pointing performance and versatility, a new, more autonomous computer and sensor concept has been conceived providing the capacity for a higher degree of automation as well as improved pointing and closed loop tracking control. The autonomy and control capacity of the enhanced IPS establish the basis to accommodate the IPS as long-term available tracking and pointing platform on the International Space Station Freedom (ISF).

  20. Precision optical pointing and tracking from spacecraft with vibrational noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Held, K. J.; Barry, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The results of an investigation of the performance of three basic precision pointing and tracking control subsystems considered for application to satellite to satellite optical communication missions are discussed. The three-control subsystems include: (1) gyro-stabilized, (2) mass-stabilized and (3) complementary filter. The sources of error included in the analysis included: (1) sensor noise from the optical detector, (2) host satellite baseframe vibrational noise and (3) frictional and bearing noise. The measured vibrational and disturbance data from the LANDSAT satellite was used to generate the power spectral density parameter needed to model the baseframe noise environments of the two satellites used for the evaluation. The results of the study indicate that the 1 microradian rms pointing and tracking accuracy may be achieved with either the gyro-stabilized or the complementary filter approach.

  1. High-precision position-specific isotope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Corso, Thomas N.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Intramolecular carbon isotope distributions reflect details of the origin of organic compounds and may record the status of complex systems, such as environmental or physiological states. A strategy is reported here for high-precision determination of 13C/12C ratios at specific positions in organic compounds separated from complex mixtures. Free radical fragmentation of methyl palmitate, a test compound, is induced by an open tube furnace. Two series of peaks corresponding to bond breaking from each end of the molecule are analyzed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry and yield precisions of SD(δ-13C) < 0.4‰. Isotope labeling in the carboxyl, terminal, and methyl positions demonstrates the absence of rearrangement during activation and fragmentation. Negligible isotopic fractionation was observed as degree of fragmentation was adjusted by changing pyrolysis temperature. [1-13C]methyl palmitate with overall δ-13C = 4.06‰, yielded values of +457‰ for the carboxyl position, in agreement with expectations from the dilution, and an average of −27.95‰ for the rest of the molecule, corresponding to −27.46‰ for the olefin series. These data demonstrate the feasibility of automated high-precision position-specific analysis of carbon for molecules contained in complex mixtures. PMID:11038597

  2. A system for load isolation and precision pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keckler, C. R.; Hamilton, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    A system capable of satisfying the accuracy and stability requirements dictated by Shuttle-borne payloads utilizing large optics has been under joint NASA/Sperry development. This device, denoted the Annular Suspension and Pointing System, employs a unique combination of conventional gimbals and magnetic bearing actuators, thereby providing for the complete isolation of the payload from its external environment, as well as for extremely accurate and stable pointing (equal to about 0.01 arcsec). This effort has been pursued through the fabrication and laboratory evaluation of engineering model hardware. Results from these tests have been instrumental in generating high fidelity computer simulations of this load isolation and precision pointing system, and in permitting confident predictions of the system's on-orbit performance. The applicability of this system to the Solar Optical Telescope mission has been examined using the computer simulation. The worst case pointing error predicted for this payload while subjected to vernier reaction control system thruster firings and crew motions aboard the Shuttle was approximately 0.006 arcsec.

  3. The Online Positioning User Service: a Web Utility for Precise Geodetic Positioning in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Geoscientists often require precise positioning capability to support research. Accurate Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning is a specialized skill involving expertise and fraught with accuracy-compromising nuances. With the goal of providing a robust and high accuracy positioning tool and enhanced access to the United States' National Spatial Reference System (NSRS), the nation's fundamental positioning infrastructure, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) developed the Online Positioning User Service (OPUS). OPUS is a free Web utility for processing user-submitted GNSS observations and producing geodetic coordinates referenced to both NSRS and a global reference frame. Relying on NGS' national network of GNSS Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS), OPUS is a powerful and user-friendly tool for production and scientific research. OPUS is widely used in geomatics professions and holds great, yet not fully tapped, potential for research geoscientists requiring accurate positional information. OPUS became operational in 2002 as a single point processing tool for multi-hour GPS occupations (OPUS-Static). Its capability has since evolved, adding the ability to process short (15 minutes) sessions (OPUS-RapidStatic) and to provide a solution sharing option. All OPUS variations have proven to be popular, with typical monthly submissions now numbering 40,000. In 2014, NGS released a network version of OPUS, OPUS-Projects, the focus of this discussion. Although other versions of OPUS process a single GNSS occupation per submission, OPUS-Projects offers rigorous geodetic network analysis and processing capability by assembling and processing GNSS observations collected over time and at multiple locations. Least squares geodetic network adjustment of included observations results in an optimal set of station coordinates, including their uncertainties and graphical statistical plots, derived from user-submitted observation data, CORS observation

  4. A comparison of four precise global positioning system geodetic receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goad, C. C.; Sims, M. L.; Young, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    Four precise global positioning system (GPS) geodetic receivers were operated simultaneously in January and February 1984 over ten baselines ranging in distance from 13 to 1304 km. Several of the baselines had been previously measured using very long baseline interferometry and, therefore, provide very good standards to which the satellite results can be compared. Results of these experiments are presented along with a brief description of each receiver and the associated analysis techniques.

  5. Helicopter precision approach capability using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, David N.

    1992-01-01

    The period between 1 July and 31 December, 1992, was spent developing a research plan as well as a navigation system document and flight test plan to investigate helicopter precision approach capability using the Global Positioning System (GPS). In addition, all hardware and software required for the research was acquired, developed, installed, and verified on both the test aircraft and the ground-based reference station.

  6. High-precision pointing with the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppi, Sergio; Pernechele, Claudio; Pisanu, Tonino; Morsiani, Marco

    2010-07-01

    We present here the systems aimed to measure and minimize the pointing errors for the Sardinia Radio Telescope: they consist of an optical telescope to measure errors due to the mechanical structure deformations and a lasers system for the errors due to the subreflector displacement. We show here the results of the tests that we have done on the Medicina 32 meters VLBI radio telescope. The measurements demonstrate we can measure the pointing errors of the mechanical structure, with an accuracy of about ~1 arcsec. Moreover, we show the technique to measure the displacement of the subreflector, placed in the SRT at 22 meters from the main mirror, within +/-0.1 mm from its optimal position. These measurements show that we can obtain the needed accuracy to correct also the non repeatable pointing errors, which arise on time scale varying from seconds to minutes.

  7. Selective assemblies of giant tetrahedra via precisely controlled positional interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mingjun; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Wang, Jing; Mei, Shan; Dong, Xuehui; Li, Yiwen; Li, Mingxuan; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Aida, Takuzo; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Yue, Kan; Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2015-04-01

    Self-assembly of rigid building blocks with explicit shape and symmetry is substantially influenced by the geometric factors and remains largely unexplored. We report the selective assembly behaviors of a class of precisely defined, nanosized giant tetrahedra constructed by placing different polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecular nanoparticles at the vertices of a rigid tetrahedral framework. Designed symmetry breaking of these giant tetrahedra introduces precise positional interactions and results in diverse selectively assembled, highly ordered supramolecular lattices including a Frank-Kasper A15 phase, which resembles the essential structural features of certain metal alloys but at a larger length scale. These results demonstrate the power of persistent molecular geometry with balanced enthalpy and entropy in creating thermodynamically stable supramolecular lattices with properties distinct from those of other self-assembling soft materials.

  8. Precision positioning of earth orbiting remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, William G.; Yunck, T. P.; Wu, S. C.

    1987-01-01

    Decimeter tracking accuracy is sought for a number of precise earth sensing satellites to be flown in the 1990's. This accuracy can be achieved with techniques which use the Global Positioning System (GPS) in a differential mode. A precisely located global network of GPS ground receivers and a receiver aboard the user satellite are needed, and all techniques simultaneously estimate the user and GPS satellite states. Three basic navigation approaches include classical dynamic, wholly nondynamic, and reduced dynamic or hybrid formulations. The first two are simply special cases of the third, which promises to deliver subdecimeter accuracy for dynamically unpredictable vehicles down to the lowest orbit altitudes. The potential of these techniques for tracking and gravity field recovery will be demonstrated on NASA's Topex satellite beginning in 1991. Applications to the Shuttle, Space Station, and dedicated remote sensing platforms are being pursued.

  9. Centroiding Experiment for Determining the Positions of Stars with High Precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, T.; Araki, H.; Hanada, H.; Tazawa, S.; Gouda, N.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Niwa, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We have experimented with the determination of the positions of star images on a detector with high precision such as 10 microarcseconds, required by a space astrometry satellite, JASMINE. In order to accomplish such a precision, we take the following two procedures. (1) We determine the positions of star images on the detector with the precision of about 0.01 pixel for one measurement, using an algorithm for estimating them from photon weighted means of the star images. (2) We determine the positions of star images with the precision of about 0.0001-0.00001 pixel, which corresponds to that of 10 microarcseconds, using a large amount of data over 10000 measurements, that is, the error of the positions decreases according to the amount of data. Here, we note that the procedure 2 is not accomplished when the systematic error in our data is not excluded adequately even if we use a large amount of data. We first show the method to determine the positions of star images on the detector using photon weighted means of star images. This algorithm, used in this experiment, is very useful because it is easy to calculate the photon weighted mean from the data. This is very important in treating a large amount of data. Furthermore, we need not assume the shape of the point spread function in deriving the centroid of star images. Second, we show the results in the laboratory experiment for precision of determining the positions of star images. We obtain that the precision of estimation of positions of star images on the detector is under a variance of 0.01 pixel for one measurement (procedure 1). We also obtain that the precision of the positions of star images becomes a variance of about 0.0001 pixel using about 10000 measurements (procedure 2).

  10. Mapping stream habitats with a global positioning system: Accuracy, precision, and comparison with traditional methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauwalter, D.C.; Fisher, W.L.; Belt, K.C.

    2006-01-01

    We tested the precision and accuracy of the Trimble GeoXT??? global positioning system (GPS) handheld receiver on point and area features and compared estimates of stream habitat dimensions (e.g., lengths and areas of riffles and pools) that were made in three different Oklahoma streams using the GPS receiver and a tape measure. The precision of differentially corrected GPS (DGPS) points was not affected by the number of GPS position fixes (i.e., geographic location estimates) averaged per DGPS point. Horizontal error of points ranged from 0.03 to 2.77 m and did not differ with the number of position fixes per point. The error of area measurements ranged from 0.1% to 110.1% but decreased as the area increased. Again, error was independent of the number of position fixes averaged per polygon corner. The estimates of habitat lengths, widths, and areas did not differ when measured using two methods of data collection (GPS and a tape measure), nor did the differences among methods change at three stream sites with contrasting morphologies. Measuring features with a GPS receiver was up to 3.3 times faster on average than using a tape measure, although signal interference from high streambanks or overhanging vegetation occasionally limited satellite signal availability and prolonged measurements with a GPS receiver. There were also no differences in precision of habitat dimensions when mapped using a continuous versus a position fix average GPS data collection method. Despite there being some disadvantages to using the GPS in stream habitat studies, measuring stream habitats with a GPS resulted in spatially referenced data that allowed the assessment of relative habitat position and changes in habitats over time, and was often faster than using a tape measure. For most spatial scales of interest, the precision and accuracy of DGPS data are adequate and have logistical advantages when compared to traditional methods of measurement. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media

  11. High precision pointing with a multiline spectrometer at the VTT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staiger, J.

    2012-12-01

    We are investigating the pointing quality of the VTT, Tenerife under the aspect of suitability for long-term heliosesimological observations. Tests have shown that thermal and mechanical loads within the telescope may create spurious image drifts with shift rates of up to 5 arcsec per hour. During daylong recordings this will reduce significantly the effective size of the field-of-view and may infer artificial lateral movements into the data. The underlying problem that not all image position offsets developing during a measurement may be compensated for is common to most high-resolution solar telescopes independently of the type of pointing system used. We are developing new approaches to address this problem which are to be tested in the near future at the VTT. The simulations established so far show that the problem may be reduced by more than 90 %.

  12. High-precision positioning system of four-quadrant detector based on the database query

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Deng, Xiao-guo; Su, Xiu-qin; Zheng, Xiao-qiang

    2015-02-01

    The fine pointing mechanism of the Acquisition, Pointing and Tracking (APT) system in free space laser communication usually use four-quadrant detector (QD) to point and track the laser beam accurately. The positioning precision of QD is one of the key factors of the pointing accuracy to APT system. A positioning system is designed based on FPGA and DSP in this paper, which can realize the sampling of AD, the positioning algorithm and the control of the fast swing mirror. We analyze the positioning error of facular center calculated by universal algorithm when the facular energy obeys Gauss distribution from the working principle of QD. A database is built by calculation and simulation with MatLab software, in which the facular center calculated by universal algorithm is corresponded with the facular center of Gaussian beam, and the database is stored in two pieces of E2PROM as the external memory of DSP. The facular center of Gaussian beam is inquiry in the database on the basis of the facular center calculated by universal algorithm in DSP. The experiment results show that the positioning accuracy of the high-precision positioning system is much better than the positioning accuracy calculated by universal algorithm.

  13. Precise Positioning with Multi-GNSS and its Advantage for Seismic Parameters Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Li, X.; Babeyko, A. Y.; Ge, M.

    2015-12-01

    Together with the ongoing modernization of U.S. GPS and Russian GLONASS, the two new emerging global navigation satellite systems (BeiDou from China and Galileo from European Union) have already been running and multi-GNSS era is coming. Compared with single system, multi-GNSS can significantly improve the satellite visibility, optimize the spatial geometry, reduce dilution of precision and will be of great benefits to both scientific applications and engineering services. In this contribution, we focus mainly on its potential advantages for earthquake parameters estimation and tsunami early warning. First, we assess the precise positioning performance of multi-GNSS by an out-door experiment on a shaking table. Three positioning methods were used to retrieve the simulated seismic signal: precise point positioning (PPP), variometric approach for displacements analysis stand-alone engine (VADASE) and temporal point positioning (TPP). In addition to that, with respect to VADASE and TPP, we extended the original dual-frequency model to single-frequency model and then tested the algorithms. Accuracy, reliability, and continuity were evaluated and analyzed in detail accordingly. Our results revealed that multi-GNSS offer more precise and robust positioning results over GPS-only. At last, as a case study, multi-GNSS data recorded during 2014 Pisagua Earthquake were re-processed. Using co-seismic displacements from GPS and multi-GNSS, earthquake and the aftermath tsunami were inverted, respectively.

  14. Closed loop high precision position control system with optical scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Cheng-liang; Liao, Yuan; He, Zhong-wu; Luo, Zhong-xiang; Huang, Zhi-wei; Wan, Min; Hu, Xiao-yang; Fan, Guo-bin; Liang, Zheng

    2008-03-01

    With the developments of science of art, there are more and more demands on the high resolution control of position of object to be controlled, such as lathe, product line, elements in the optical resonant cavity, telescope, and so on. As one device with high resolution, the optical scale has more and more utility within the industrial and civil applications. With one optical scale and small DC servo motor, one closed loop high resolution position control system is constructed. This apparatus is used to control the position of the elements of optical system. The optical scale is attached on the object or reference guide way. The object position is sampled by a readhead of non-contact optical encoder. Control system processes the position information and control the position of object through the motion control of servo DC motor. The DC motor is controlled by one controller which is connected to an industrial computer. And the micro frictionless slide table does support the smooth motion of object to be controlled. The control algorithm of system is PID (Proportional-Integral-Differential) methods. The PID control methods have well ROBUST. The needed data to control are position, velocity and acceleration of the object. These three parameters correspond to the PID characters respectively. After the accomplishments of hardware, GUI (Graphical user interface), that is, the software of control system is also programmed. The whole system is assembled by specialized worker. Through calibration experiments, the coefficients of PID are obtained respectively. And then the precision of position control of the system is about 0.1μm.

  15. Electrostatic microactuators for precise positioning of neural microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Muthuswamy, Jit; Okandan, Murat; Jain, Tilak; Gilletti, Aaron

    2005-10-01

    Microelectrode arrays used for monitoring single and multineuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time likely due to micromotion of neurons away from the microelectrode, gliosis around the recording site and also brain movement due to behavior. We report here novel electrostatic microactuated microelectrodes that will enable precise repositioning of the microelectrodes within the brain tissue. Electrostatic comb-drive microactuators and associated microelectrodes are fabricated using the SUMMiT V (Sandia's Ultraplanar Multilevel MEMS Technology) process, a five-layer polysilicon micromachining technology of the Sandia National labs, NM. The microfabricated microactuators enable precise bidirectional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with accuracy in the order of 1 microm. The microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multiunit activity. The microactuators are capable of driving the microelectrodes in the brain tissue with forces in the order of several micro-Newtons. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats in acute experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the insulation, packaging and interconnect issues will be necessary before this technology can be validated in long-term experiments. PMID:16235660

  16. Electrostatic Microactuators for Precise Positioning of Neural Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Muthuswamy, Jit; Okandan, Murat; Jain, Tilak; Gilletti, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays used for monitoring single and multineuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time likely due to micromotion of neurons away from the microelectrode, gliosis around the recording site and also brain movement due to behavior. We report here novel electrostatic microactuated microelectrodes that will enable precise repositioning of the microelectrodes within the brain tissue. Electrostatic comb-drive microactuators and associated microelectrodes are fabricated using the SUMMiT V™ (Sandia's Ultraplanar Multilevel MEMS Technology) process, a five-layer polysilicon micromachining technology of the Sandia National labs, NM. The microfabricated microactuators enable precise bidirectional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with accuracy in the order of 1 μm. The microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multiunit activity. The microactuators are capable of driving the microelectrodes in the brain tissue with forces in the order of several micro-Newtons. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats in acute experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the insulation, packaging and interconnect issues will be necessary before this technology can be validated in long-term experiments. PMID:16235660

  17. Automated vision-guided precision-positioning in microassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabelow, Rudiger; Boedcher, Alexander

    2002-10-01

    In this paper the assembly of micro-optic components using image processing is introduced. An automated positioning process for laser resonators, which is handled manually until now, is implemented in a prototypical scale. For this work a cartesian precision-robot is used in combination with an image processing system including two cameras with different resolutions and perspectives. The components to be positioned are presented orderless on a pallet and have to be detected, gripped and aligned with an edge after calculating position and angle correction values. With a camera that is mounted vertically on the Z-axis of the robot the position of the components on the pallet is detected. Although vacuum grippers are typically not able to centre components one has to be used in this process as the effecting surface on the sides of the laser resonators may not be touched. To correct the errors that were caused by the suction of the vacuum gripper a second image processing is used to get values for a correction of position and angle. These images are taken with the help of a mirror that is positioned in an angle of 45°. With this mirror a horizontal mounted camera can take pictures of the gripper holding the laser resonator from underneath. Very good results could be achieved during an experimental evaluation, caused by the second image processing in particular. The results showed that it is possible to get a position error of only a few micrometers. In the whole process primarily the lighting system was identified as the critical factor.

  18. Precise CCD positions of Phoebe in 2011-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q. Y.; Wang, N.; Vienne, A.; Zhang, Q. F.; Li, Z.; Meng, X. H.

    2015-05-01

    346 new CCD observations during the years 2011-2014 have been reduced to derive the precise positions of Phoebe, the ninth satellite of Saturn. The observations were made by the 2.4 m telescope at Yunnan Observatory over nine nights. Due to the use of a focal-reducer on the telescope, its significant geometric distortion is solved for and removed for each CCD field of view. The positions of Phoebe are measured with respect to the stars in UCAC2 catalogue. The theoretical position of Phoebe was retrieved from the Institute de Méchanique Céleste et de Calcul des Éphémérides ephemeris which includes the latest theory PH12 by Desmars et al., while the position of Saturn was obtained from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory ephemeris DE431. Our results show that the mean O-Cs (observed minus computed) are -0.02 and -0.07 arcsec in right ascension and declination, respectively. The dispersions of our observations are estimated at about 0.04 arcsec in each direction.

  19. Numerical Algorithms for Precise and Efficient Orbit Propagation and Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Ben K.

    Motivated by the growing space catalog and the demands for precise orbit determination with shorter latency for science and reconnaissance missions, this research improves the computational performance of orbit propagation through more efficient and precise numerical integration and frame transformation implementations. Propagation of satellite orbits is required for astrodynamics applications including mission design, orbit determination in support of operations and payload data analysis, and conjunction assessment. Each of these applications has somewhat different requirements in terms of accuracy, precision, latency, and computational load. This dissertation develops procedures to achieve various levels of accuracy while minimizing computational cost for diverse orbit determination applications. This is done by addressing two aspects of orbit determination: (1) numerical integration used for orbit propagation and (2) precise frame transformations necessary for force model evaluation and station coordinate rotations. This dissertation describes a recently developed method for numerical integration, dubbed Bandlimited Collocation Implicit Runge-Kutta (BLC-IRK), and compare its efficiency in propagating orbits to existing techniques commonly used in astrodynamics. The BLC-IRK scheme uses generalized Gaussian quadratures for bandlimited functions. It requires significantly fewer force function evaluations than explicit Runge-Kutta schemes and approaches the efficiency of the 8th-order Gauss-Jackson multistep method. Converting between the Geocentric Celestial Reference System (GCRS) and International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) is necessary for many applications in astrodynamics, such as orbit propagation, orbit determination, and analyzing geoscience data from satellite missions. This dissertation provides simplifications to the Celestial Intermediate Origin (CIO) transformation scheme and Earth orientation parameter (EOP) storage for use in positioning and

  20. GPS-based satellite tracking system for precise positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, T. P.; Melbourne, W. G.; Thornton, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    NASA is developing a Global Positioning System (GPS) based measurement system to provide precise determination of earth satellite orbits, geodetic baselines, ionospheric electron content, and clock offsets between worldwide tracking sites. The system will employ variations on the differential GPS observing technique and will use a network of nine fixed ground terminals. Satellite applications will require either a GPS flight receiver or an on-board GPS beacon. Operation of the system for all but satellite tracking will begin by 1988. The first major satellite application will be a demonstration of decimeter accuracy in determining the altitude of TOPEX in the early 1990's. By then the system is expected to yield long-baseline accuracies of a few centimeters and instantaneous time synchronization to 1 ns.

  1. Robot positioning based on point-to-point motion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y. S.; Cho, H. S.; Koh, K. C.

    2000-03-20

    This paper presents an optimal search method for determining the base location of a robot manipulator so that the robot can have a designated point-to-point (PTP) motion capabilities. Based on the topological characterization of the manipulator workspace and the definitions of various p-connectivity, a computational method is developed for enumerating various PTP motion capabilities into quantitative cost functions. Then an unconstrained search by minimizing the cost function yields the task feasible location of the robot base. This methodology is useful for placement of mobile manipulators and robotic workcell layout design.

  2. An approach for filtering hyperbolically positioned underwater acoustic telemetry data with position precision estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meckley, Trevor D.; Holbrook, Christopher M.; Wagner, C. Michael; Binder, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The use of position precision estimates that reflect the confidence in the positioning process should be considered prior to the use of biological filters that rely on a priori expectations of the subject’s movement capacities and tendencies. Position confidence goals should be determined based upon the needs of the research questions and analysis requirements versus arbitrary selection, in which filters of previous studies are adopted. Data filtering with this approach ensures that data quality is sufficient for the selected analyses and presents the opportunity to adjust or identify a different analysis in the event that the requisite precision was not attained. Ignoring these steps puts a practitioner at risk of reporting errant findings.

  3. A linear actuator for precision positioning of dual objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuxin; Cao, Jie; Guo, Zhao; Yu, Haoyong

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a linear actuator for precision positioning of dual objects is proposed based on a double friction drive principle using a single piezoelectric element (PZT). The linear actuator consists of an electromagnet and a permanent magnet, which are connected by the PZT. The electromagnet serves as an object 1, and another object (object 2) is attached on the permanent magnet by the magnetic force. For positioning the dual objects independently, two different friction drive modes can be alternated by an on-off control of the electromagnet. When the electromagnet releases from the guide way, it can be driven by impact friction force generated by the PZT. Otherwise, when the electromagnet clamps on the guide way and remains stationary, the object 2 can be driven based on the principle of smooth impact friction drive. A prototype was designed and constructed and experiments were carried out to test the basic performance of the actuator. It has been verified that with a compact size of 31 mm (L) × 12 mm (W) × 8 mm (H), the two objects can achieve long strokes on the order of several millimeters and high resolutions of several tens of nanometers. Since the proposed actuator allows independent movement of two objects by a single PZT, the actuator has the potential to be constructed compactly.

  4. Precision Pointing Control System (PPCS) star tracker test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Tests performed on the TRW precision star tracker are described. The unit tested was a two-axis gimballed star tracker designed to provide star LOS data to an accuracy of 1 to 2 sec. The tracker features a unique bearing system and utilizes thermal and mechanical symmetry techniques to achieve high precision which can be demonstrated in a one g environment. The test program included a laboratory evaluation of tracker functional operation, sensitivity, repeatibility, and thermal stability.

  5. Two-axis Beam Steering Mirror Control system for Precision Pointing and Tracking Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ulander, K

    2006-02-08

    Precision pointing and tracking of laser beams is critical in numerous military and industrial applications. This is particularly true for systems requiring atmospheric beam propagation. Such systems are plagued by environmental influences which cause the optical signal to break up and wander. Example applications include laser communications, precision targeting, active imaging, chemical remote sensing, and laser vibrometry. The goal of this project is to build a beam steering system using a two-axis mirror to maintain precise pointing control. Ultimately, position control to 0.08% accuracy (40 {micro}rad) with a bandwidth of 200 Hz is desired. The work described encompasses evaluation of the instrumentation system and the subsequent design and implementation of an analog electronic controller for a two-axis mirror used to steer the beam. The controller operates over a wide temperature range, through multiple mirror resonances, and is independent of specific mirrors. The design was built and successfully fielded in a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory free-space optics experiment. All measurements and performance parameters are derived from measurements made on actual hardware that was built and field tested. In some cases, specific design details have been omitted that involve proprietary information pertaining to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory patent positions and claims. These omissions in no way impact the general validity of the work or concepts presented in this thesis.

  6. Antenna pointing compensation based on precision optical measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L.; Vivian, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The pointing control loops of the Deep Space Network 70 meter antennas extend only to the Intermediate Reference Structure (IRS). Thus, distortion of the structure forward of the IRS due to unpredictable environmental loads can result in uncompensated boresight shifts which degrade blind pointing accuracy. A system is described which can provide real time bias commands to the pointing control system to compensate for environmental effects on blind pointing performance. The bias commands are computed in real time based on optical ranging measurements of the structure from the IRS to a number of selected points on the primary and secondary reflectors.

  7. Study on global control network precision positioning method in visual shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chang-yu; Zhu, Ji-gui

    2013-08-01

    Large-size visual shape measurement based on ICP (iterative closest point) mosaicing algorithm generally has a larger cumulative error; however, this problem can be well solved by precision positioning global control network. Therefore, this method is widely used in large-size visual shape measurement. Since the positioning accuracy of the global control network is the key influencing factor of the final measurement accuracy, the method of precision positioning global control network is researched, which is dependent on the principle of portable close-range photogrammetry. The precision positioning theory and mathematical model of global control network are investigated in this paper. Bundle adjustment optimization algorithm is the core of this measurement system, the solution method of this algorithm is introduced in detail, which can improve the model solution accuracy. As is known, the initial value of the algorithm has a direct influence on the convergence of the result, so obtaining the initial value is a key part of the measurement system, including control points matching technology, stations orientation technology and the technology of obtaining the initial value of the three-dimensional coordinates of global control points. New technological breakthroughs were made based on the existing researches to get a more precious and stable initial value. Firstly, a nonlinear adjustment model based control points matching method is proposed, which significantly improves the correct matching rate when the control points distribute intensively. Secondly, a new station orientation method without using an external orientation device is studied, which greatly improves the shooting freedom and expands the range of the spatial distribution of the measurement stations. Finally, a camera calibration method independent with the imaging model is explored, which converts image coordinate information into image angle information. Thus, the initial value calculation accuracy of

  8. The precision study of mark position after binarization for dynamic tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guoce; Zhang, Jin; Deng, Huaxia; Yu, Liandong

    2016-01-01

    As a method of non-contact, binocular vision technique is important for vibration test. When measuring the vibrating objects, the frame rate of cameras must match the vibration frequency of the object. If the objects vibrate in high-frequency, it will lead massive image data. However, the speed of data transmission is limited by massive data. Thus, in order to deal with these data, data compression is inevitable before data transmission. Binarization is a simple and fast process to minimize the size of the image data. But the pixel locations of the marked points may change after binarization, which will inevitably affect the reconstruction of the marked points and further influence the precision of the measurement data. In this paper, the parameters which influence the position of various types of marked points are studied after binarization for dynamic test. A vibration table is employed to provide a standard moving motion. The frequency and amplitude is given by the controller of the vibration table. Three types of marked points, dot, circle and cross, are studied in this research. The obtained images in the dynamic test are minimized after binarization, and the pixel locations of the marked points are obtained. The change of pixel location is studied for the different types of the marked points with the comparison experiments and the precision of the reconstruction is investigated later.

  9. Precision Pointing for the Laser Interferometry Space Antenna Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, T. Tupper; Maghami, P. G.

    2003-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is a planned NASA-ESA gravitational wave detector consisting of three spacecraft in heliocentric orbit. Lasers are used to measure distance fluctuations between proof masses aboard each spacecraft to the picometer level over a 5 million kilometer separation. Each spacecraft and its two laser transmit/receive telescopes must be held stable in pointing to less than 8 nanoradians per root Hertz in the frequency band 0.1-100 mHz. The pointing error is sensed in the received beam and the spacecraft attitude is controlled with a set of micro-Newton thrusters. Requirements, sensors, actuators, control design, and simulations are described.

  10. Fundamental concepts and limitations in precision pointing and tracking problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Carroll D.; Masten, Michael K.

    1993-10-01

    In this paper, we first describe the generic pointing and tracking problems in a general dynamical system/state-space context. Then, we analyze the information-theoretical aspects of the various uncertain signals in those problems, and establish some fundamental performance limitations those uncertainties induce, using various results and principles of modern control theory. It is shown that the introduction of 'waveform models' for uncertain signals, leading to an extended-state formulation of pointing and tracking problems, is the most effective rational means of coping with those fundamental limitations.

  11. Dynamic isolation via momentum compensation for precision instrument pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, D.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of a momentum-compensated inertially stabilized platform (IPPADS) for carrying scientific instruments is presented, the platform's function as a mechanical diode is explained, and the implications of momentum compensation for platform pointing and cost are discussed. The equations of motion for momentum compensation in the IPPADS five-body system are derived, and the results are used to computer simulate the system under consideration with two examples.

  12. Pointing Control System for a High Precision Flight Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    BENTLEY,ANTHONY E.; WILCOXEN,JEFFREY LEE

    2000-12-01

    A pointing control system is developed and tested for a flying gimbaled telescope. The two-axis pointing system is capable of sub-microradian pointing stability and high accuracy in the presence of large host vehicle jitter. The telescope also has high agility--it is capable of a 50-degree retarget (in both axes simultaneously) in less than 2 seconds. To achieve the design specifications, high-accuracy, high-resolution, two-speed resolvers were used, resulting in gimbal-angle measurements stable to 1.5 microradians. In addition, on-axis inertial angle displacement sensors were mounted on the telescope to provide host-vehicle jitter cancellation. The inertial angle sensors are accurate to about 100 nanoradians, but do not measure low frequency displacements below 2 Hz. The gimbal command signal includes host-vehicle attitude information, which is band-limited. This provides jitter data below 20 Hz, but includes a variable latency between 15 and 25 milliseconds. One of the most challenging aspects of this design was to combine the inertial-angle-sensor data with the less perfect information in the command signal to achieve maximum jitter reduction. The optimum blending of these two signals, along with the feedback compensation were designed using Quantitative Feedback Theory.

  13. Global Bundle Adjustment with Variable Orientation Point Distance for Precise Mars Express Orbit Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostelmann, J.; Heipke, C.

    2016-06-01

    The photogrammetric bundle adjustment of line scanner image data requires a precise description of the time-dependent image orientation. For this task exterior orientation parameters of discrete points are used to model position and viewing direction of a camera trajectory via polynomials. This paper investigates the influence of the distance between these orientation points on the quality of trajectory modeling. A new method adapts the distance along the trajectory to the available image information. Compared to a constant distance as used previously, a better reconstruction of the exterior orientation is possible, especially when image quality changes within a strip. In our research we use image strips of the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), taken to map the Martian surface. Several experiments on the global image data set have been carried out to investigate how the bundle adjustment improves the image orientation, if the new method is employed. For evaluation the forward intersection errors of 3D points derived from HRSC images, as well as their remaining height differences to the MOLA DTM are used. In 13.5 % (515 of 3,828) of the image strips, taken during this ongoing mission over the last 12 years, high frequency image distortions were found. Bundle adjustment with a constant orientation point distance was able to reconstruct the orbit in 239 (46.4 %) cases. A variable orientation point distance increased this number to 507 (98.6 %).

  14. Precision Pointing Reconstruction and Geometric Metadata Generation for Cassini Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Robert S.; Showalter, Mark R.; Gordon, Mitchell K.

    2014-11-01

    Analysis of optical remote sensing (ORS) data from the Cassini spacecraft is a complicated and labor-intensive process. First, small errors in Cassini’s pointing information (up to ~40 pixels for the Imaging Science Subsystem Narrow Angle Camera) must be corrected so that the line of sight vector for each pixel is known. This process involves matching the image contents with known features such as stars, ring edges, or moon limbs. Second, metadata for each pixel must be computed. Depending on the object under observation, this metadata may include lighting geometry, moon or planet latitude and longitude, and/or ring radius and longitude. Both steps require mastering the SPICE toolkit, a highly capable piece of software with a steep learning curve. Only after these steps are completed can the actual scientific investigation begin.We are embarking on a three-year project to perform these steps for all 300,000+ Cassini ISS images as well as images taken by the VIMS, UVIS, and CIRS instruments. The result will be a series of SPICE kernels that include accurate pointing information and a series of backplanes that include precomputed metadata for each pixel. All data will be made public through the PDS Rings Node (http://www.pds-rings.seti.org). We expect this project to dramatically decrease the time required for scientists to analyze Cassini data. In this poster we discuss the project, our current status, and our plans for the next three years.

  15. Strategies for high-precision Global Positioning System orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.; Border, James S.

    1987-01-01

    Various strategies for the high-precision orbit determination of the GPS satellites are explored using data from the 1985 GPS field test. Several refinements to the orbit determination strategies were found to be crucial for achieving high levels of repeatability and accuracy. These include the fine tuning of the GPS solar radiation coefficients and the ground station zenith tropospheric delays. Multiday arcs of 3-6 days provided better orbits and baselines than the 8-hr arcs from single-day passes. Highest-quality orbits and baselines were obtained with combined carrier phase and pseudorange solutions.

  16. Precise Pointing for Radio Science Occultations and Radar Mapping During the Cassini Mission at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation challenges and lessons learned from radar and radio science pointing observations during the Cassini mission at Saturn. Implementation of the precise desired pointing reveals key issues in the ground system, the flight system, and the pointing paradigm itself. To achieve accurate pointing on some observations, specific workarounds had to be implemented and folded into the sequence development process. Underlying Cassini's pointing system is a remarkable construct known as Inertial Vector Propagation.

  17. Precise space–time positioning for entanglement harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Martínez, Eduardo; Sanders, Barry C.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the crucial role of relative space–time positioning between the two detectors in an operational two-party entanglement-harvesting protocol. Specifically we show that the protocol is robust if imprecision in spatial positioning and clock synchronization are much smaller than the spatial separation between the detectors and its light-crossing time thereof. This in principle guarantees robustness if the imprecision is comparable to a few times the size of the detectors, which suggests entanglement harvesting could be explored for tabletop experiments. On the other hand, keeping the effects of this imprecision under control would be demanding on astronomical scales.

  18. LAMOST fiber unit positional precision passive detection exploiting the technique of template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengxin; Zhao, Yongheng; Luo, Ali

    2012-09-01

    The large sky area multi-object fiber spectroscopic telescope (LAMOST) is an innovative reflecting schmidt telescope, promising a very high spectrum acquiring rate of several ten-thousands of spectra per night. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, LAMOST makes reconfiguration of fibers accurately according to the positions of objects in minutes and fine adjusting the fibers. As a key problem, High precision positioning detection of LAMOST fiber positioning unit has always been highly regarded and some detection schemes have been proposed. Among these, active detection method, which determines the final accurate position of optical fiber end with the help of lighting the fiber, has been most widely researched, but this kind of method could not be applied in LAMOST real-time observation because it needs projecting light into fiber. A novel detection idea exploiting the technique of template matching is presented in this paper. As we know, final position of a specific fiber end can be easily inferred by its corresponding revolving angles of the central revolving axle and bias revolving axle in double revolving style, so the key point in this problem is converted to the accurate determination of these revolving angles. Template matching technique are explored to acquire the matching parameters for its real-time collected imagery, and thus determine the corresponding revolving angle of the central revolving axle and bias revolving axle respectively. Experiments results obtained with data acquired from LAMOST site are used to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of this novel method.

  19. Investigation on the pinch point position in heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lisheng; Shi, Weixiu

    2016-06-01

    The pinch point is important for analyzing heat transfer in thermodynamic cycles. With the aim to reveal the importance of determining the accurate pinch point, the research on the pinch point position is carried out by theoretical method. The results show that the pinch point position depends on the parameters of the heat transfer fluids and the major fluid properties. In most cases, the pinch point locates at the bubble point for the evaporator and the dew point for the condenser. However, the pinch point shifts to the supercooled liquid state in the near critical conditions for the evaporator. Similarly, it shifts to the superheated vapor state with the condensing temperature approaching the critical temperature for the condenser. It even can shift to the working fluid entrance of the evaporator or the supercritical heater when the heat source fluid temperature is very high compared with the absorbing heat temperature. A wrong position for the pinch point may generate serious mistake. In brief, the pinch point should be founded by the iterative method in all conditions rather than taking for granted.

  20. Global positioning system measurements for crustal deformation: Precision and accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prescott, W.H.; Davis, J.L.; Svarc, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of 27 repeated observations of Global Positioning System (GPS) position-difference vectors, up to 11 kilometers in length, indicates that the standard deviation of the measurements is 4 millimeters for the north component, 6 millimeters for the east component, and 10 to 20 millimeters for the vertical component. The uncertainty grows slowly with increasing vector length. At 225 kilometers, the standard deviation of the measurement is 6, 11, and 40 millimeters for the north, east, and up components, respectively. Measurements with GPS and Geodolite, an electromagnetic distance-measuring system, over distances of 10 to 40 kilometers agree within 0.2 part per million. Measurements with GPS and very long baseline interferometry of the 225-kilometer vector agree within 0.05 part per million.

  1. Elimination of thermal instability in precise positioning of Galfenol actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodsi, Mojtaba; Saleem, Ashraf; Özer, Abdullah; Bahadur, Issam; Alam, Khurshid; Al-Yahmadi, Amur; Ghodsi, Mohammad Hadi; Hoshyarmanesh, Hamidreza; Sheykholeslami, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a new method to eliminate deviation in positioning caused by coil's heat generation in magnetostrictive actuators. The advantages of the proposed system are compactness, high controllability and high reliability. The actuator package consists of Galfenol as active element and a magnification mechanism combined with a Peltier element or thermoelectric cooler (TEC). By using the temperature sensor, a thermoelectric cooler (TEC) is activated to reduce the temperature of the coil. However, the reduction of temperature by TEC alone is not enough to eliminate the error and controlling of applied voltage is also required. A simple PI controller for coil's current is combined with TEC and by reducing the temperature and current simultaneously, the positioning error is vanished completely.

  2. High precision global positioning system for mining applications

    SciTech Connect

    O`Grady, M.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses today`s satellite technology that has lead to the development of a system that will increase safety and production in surface mining. The Department of Defense is maintaining a satellite system made up of 24 NavStar satellites that allow the use of their frequencies to position equipment anywhere on Earth. The previous satellite system was called the Transit system or Sat-Nav. It consisted of low-orbit satellites (not many up there) that ground-based receivers needed three days of logged data to process sub-meter accuracy positions. With the NavStar network of satellites, centimeter accuracy can be achieved within just a few minutes. Changes to the way one used to survey in the mining industry are being replaced with the Global Positioning System. It has proven to be a system that is more accurate and after the typical learning curve that is required by any new system, will lead to higher productivity; hence, financial rewards are in the immediate future.

  3. Adaptive Neural Star Tracker Calibration for Precision Spacecraft Pointing and Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.

    1996-01-01

    The Star Tracker is an essential sensor for precision pointing and tracking in most 3-axis stabilized spacecraft. In the interest (of) improving pointing performance by taking advantage of dramatic increases in flight computer power and memory anticipated over the next decade, this paper investigates the use of a neural net for adaptive in-flight calibration of the Star Tracker.

  4. Obtaining Glenoid Positioning Data from Scapular Palpable Points In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Trafimow, Jordan H.; Aruin, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    Both clinical and biomechanical problems affecting the shoulder joint suggest that investigators should study force transmission into and out from the scapula. To analyze force transmission between the humeral head and the glenoid, one must know the position of the glenoid. Studies have analyzed the position of the scapula from the positions of three palpable points, but the position of the glenoid relative to three palpable points has not been studied. Dry scapulae (N = 13) were subjected to X-rays and a critical angle, Θ (which relates the plane determined by the three palpable points on the scapula to a plane containing the glenoid center and the first two palpable points) was calculated. The mean value for Θ was 28.5 ± 5.60 degrees. The obtained Θ allows us to determine the position of the glenoid from three palpable points. This information could be used in calculation of forces across the shoulder joint, which in turn would allow optimizing the choice of strengthening exercises. PMID:23653863

  5. Double-Precision Floating-Point Cores V1.9

    SciTech Connect

    Govindu, Gokul; Scrofano, Ronald

    2005-10-15

    In studying the acceleration of scientific computing applications with reconfigurable hardware, such as field programmable gate arrays, one finds that many scientific applications require high-precision, floating-point arithmetic that is not innately supported in reconfigurable hardware. Consequently, we have written VDL code that describes hardware for performing double-precision (64-bit) floating-point arithmetic. From this code, it is possible for users to implement double-precision floating-point operations on FPGAs or any other hardware device to which VHDL code can be synthesized. Specifically, we have written code for four floating-point cores. Each core performs one operation: one performs addition/subtraction, one performs multiplication, one performs division, and one performs square root. The code includes parameters that determine the features of the floating-point cores, such as what types of floating-point numbers are supported and what roudning modes are supported. These parameters influence the frequency achievable by the designs as well as the chip area required for the designs. The parameters are chosen so that the floating-point cores have varyinig amounts of compliance with the industry standard for floating-point cores have varying amounts of compliance with the industry standard for floating-point arithmetic, IEEE standard 754. There is an additional parameter that determines the number of pipelining stages in the floating-point cores.

  6. Double-Precision Floating-Point Cores V1.9

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-10-15

    In studying the acceleration of scientific computing applications with reconfigurable hardware, such as field programmable gate arrays, one finds that many scientific applications require high-precision, floating-point arithmetic that is not innately supported in reconfigurable hardware. Consequently, we have written VDL code that describes hardware for performing double-precision (64-bit) floating-point arithmetic. From this code, it is possible for users to implement double-precision floating-point operations on FPGAs or any other hardware device to which VHDL code canmore » be synthesized. Specifically, we have written code for four floating-point cores. Each core performs one operation: one performs addition/subtraction, one performs multiplication, one performs division, and one performs square root. The code includes parameters that determine the features of the floating-point cores, such as what types of floating-point numbers are supported and what roudning modes are supported. These parameters influence the frequency achievable by the designs as well as the chip area required for the designs. The parameters are chosen so that the floating-point cores have varyinig amounts of compliance with the industry standard for floating-point cores have varying amounts of compliance with the industry standard for floating-point arithmetic, IEEE standard 754. There is an additional parameter that determines the number of pipelining stages in the floating-point cores.« less

  7. High-precision three-dimensional coordinate measurement with subwavelength-aperture-fiber point diffraction interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daodang; Xu, Yangbo; Chen, Xixi; Wang, Fumin; Kong, Ming; Zhao, Jun

    2014-11-01

    To overcome the accuracy limitation due to the machining error of standard parts in measurement system, a threedimensional coordinate measurement method with subwavelength-aperture-fiber point diffraction interferometer (PDI) is proposed, in which the high-precision measurement standard is obtained from the ideal point-diffracted spherical wavefront instead of standard components. On the basis of the phase distribution demodulated from point-diffraction interference field, high-precision three-dimensional coordinate measurement is realized with numerical iteration optimization algorithm. The subwavelength-aperture fiber is used as point-diffraction source to get precise and highenergy spherical wavefront within high aperture angle range, by which the conflict between diffraction wave angle and energy in traditional PDI can be avoided. Besides, a double-iterative method based on Levenbery-Marquardt algorithm is proposed to realize precise reconstruct three-dimensional coordinate. The analysis shows that the proposed method can reach the measurement precision better than microns within a 200×200×300 (in unit of mm) working volume. This measurement method does not rely on the initial iteration value in numerical coordinate reconstruction, and also has high measurement precision, large measuring range, fast processing speed and preferable anti-noise ability. It is of great practicality for measurement of three-dimensional coordinate and calibration of measurement system.

  8. Progress in Bathymetric Surveys: Combining High Precision Positioning in Real Time with a Continuous Vertical Datum in Remote Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévesque, S.; Robin, C. M. I.; MacLeod, K.; Fadaie, K.

    2014-12-01

    For most of its bathymetric survey activities, the Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS) requires high precision, three dimensional positioning. As part of a pilot project, one of its launches was equipped with a GNSS receiver processing a high precision correction service in real time (HP-GPS*C) via the internet using satellite telecommunication. This service was provided by Natural Resources Canada/Canadian Geodetic Survey (NRCan/CGS). The bathymetric data from a survey in eastern Hudson Bay performed by CHS in Fall 2013 was post -processed using different standard methods. This resulted in high precision positions that were compared with positions corrected with the real-time precise point positioning (PPP) service (HP-GPS*C) from NRCan/CGS. CHS bathymetric surveys must be referred to chart datum, the hydrographical vertical datum defined for use on nautical charts. In the Canadian north, another limitation to high precision bathymetric work is the availability of tide observations and/or predictions. The territory is vast and tide data is limited in space and in time while predicted tides are not always accurate. This makes reductions of bathymetric soundings to Chart datum difficult. To address this problem, CHS and NRCan/CGS have collaborated to produce a Continuous Vertical Datum for Canadian Waters (CVDCW), which incorporates data from NRCan's geoid model, tide gauge and GPS data, satellite altimetry, and ocean models. Thus high precision positioning provides ellipsoidal heights for the bathymetric depths, and the CVDCW allows to correct these ellipsoidal heights to chart datum. Comparisons of the bathymetry from the pilot survey corrected for tide data versus the bathymetry referred to its ellipsoidal height corrected to chart datum with the CVDCW are given to demonstrate the relative changes to the depths. This also illustrates the advantage of a continuous vertical datum with its potential to be combined with real-time high precision positioning.

  9. Precise mean sea level measurements using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelecy, Thomas M.; Born, George H.; Parke, Michael E.; Rocken, Christian

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a sea level measurement test conducted off La Jolla, California, in November of 1991. The purpose of this test was to determine accurate sea level measurements using a Global Positioning System (GPS) equipped buoy. These measurements were intended to be used as the sea level component for calibration of the ERS 1 satellite altimeter. Measurements were collected on November 25 and 28 when the ERS 1 satellite overflew the calibration area. Two different types of buoys were used. A waverider design was used on November 25 and a spar design on November 28. This provided the opportunity to examine how dynamic effects of the measurement platform might affect the sea level accuracy. The two buoys were deployed at locations approximately 1.2 km apart and about 15 km west of a reference GPS receiver located on the rooftop of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. GPS solutions were computed for 45 minutes on each day and used to produce two sea level time series. An estimate of the mean sea level at both locations was computed by subtracting tide gage data collected at the Scripps Pier from the GPS-determined sea level measurements and then filtering out the high-frequency components due to waves and buoy dynamics. In both cases the GPS estimate differed from Rapp's mean altimetric surface by 0.06 m. Thus, the gradient in the GPS measurements matched the gradient in Rapp's surface. These results suggest that accurate sea level can be determined using GPS on widely differing platforms as long as care is taken to determine the height of the GPS antenna phase center above water level. Application areas include measurement of absolute sea level, of temporal variations in sea level, and of sea level gradients (dominantly the geoid). Specific applications would include ocean altimeter calibration, monitoring of sea level in remote regions, and regional experiments requiring spatial and

  10. GPS-based orbit determination and point positioning under selective availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Sever, Yoaz E.; Yunck, Thomas P.; Wu, Sien-Chong

    1990-01-01

    Selective availability (SA) degrades the positioning accuracy for nondifferential users of the GPS Standard Positioning Service (SPS). The often quoted SPS accuracy available under normal conditions is 100 m 2DRMS. In the absence of more specific information, many prospective SPS users adopt the 100 m value in their planning, which exaggerates the error in many cases. SA error is examined for point positioning and dynamic orbit determination for an orbiting user. To minimize SA error, nondifferential users have several options: expand their field of view; observe as many GPS satellites as possible; smooth the error over time; and employ precise GPS ephemerides computed independently, as by NASA and the NGS, rather than the broadcast ephemeris. Simulations show that 3D point position error can be kept to 30 m, and this can be smoothed to 3 m in a few hours.

  11. GPS-based orbit determination and point positioning under selective availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Sever, Yoaz E.; Yunck, Thomas P.; Wu, Sien-Chong

    Selective availability (SA) degrades the positioning accuracy for nondifferential users of the GPS Standard Positioning Service (SPS). The often quoted SPS accuracy available under normal conditions is 100 m 2DRMS. In the absence of more specific information, many prospective SPS users adopt the 100 m value in their planning, which exaggerates the error in many cases. SA error is examined for point positioning and dynamic orbit determination for an orbiting user. To minimize SA error, nondifferential users have several options: expand their field of view; observe as many GPS satellites as possible; smooth the error over time; and employ precise GPS ephemerides computed independently, as by NASA and the NGS, rather than the broadcast ephemeris. Simulations show that 3D point position error can be kept to 30 m, and this can be smoothed to 3 m in a few hours.

  12. Generic parabolic points are isolated in positive characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindahl, Karl-Olof; Rivera-Letelier, Juan

    2016-05-01

    We study analytic germs in one variable with a parabolic fixed point at the origin, over an ultrametric ground field of positive characteristic. It is conjectured that for such a germ the origin is isolated as a periodic point. Our main result is an affirmative solution of this conjecture in the case of a generic germ with a prescribed multiplier. The genericity condition is explicit: the power series is minimally ramified, i.e. the degree of the first nonlinear term of each of its iterates is as small as possible. Our main technical result is a computation of the first significant terms of a minimally ramified power series. From this we obtain a lower bound for the norm of nonzero periodic points, from which we deduce our main result. As a by-product we give a new and self-contained proof of a characterization of minimally ramified power series in terms of the iterative residue.

  13. Design Considerations for Miniaturized Control Moment Gyroscopes for Rapid Retargeting and Precision Pointing of Small Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patankar, Kunal; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Roithmayr, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design as well as characterization of a practical control moment gyroscope (CMG) based attitude control system (ACS) for small satellites in the 15-20 kilogram mass range performing rapid retargeting and precision pointing maneuvers. The paper focuses on the approach taken in the design of miniaturized CMGs while considering the constraints imposed by the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components as well as the size of the satellite. It is shown that a hybrid mode is more suitable for COTS based moment exchange actuators; a mode that uses the torque amplification of CMGs for rapid retargeting and direct torque capabilities of the flywheel motors for precision pointing. A simulation is provided to demonstrate on-orbit slew and pointing performance.

  14. Precision Pointing Control System (PPCS) system design and analysis. [for gimbaled experiment platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frew, A. M.; Eisenhut, D. F.; Farrenkopf, R. L.; Gates, R. F.; Iwens, R. P.; Kirby, D. K.; Mann, R. J.; Spencer, D. J.; Tsou, H. S.; Zaremba, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    The precision pointing control system (PPCS) is an integrated system for precision attitude determination and orientation of gimbaled experiment platforms. The PPCS concept configures the system to perform orientation of up to six independent gimbaled experiment platforms to design goal accuracy of 0.001 degrees, and to operate in conjunction with a three-axis stabilized earth-oriented spacecraft in orbits ranging from low altitude (200-2500 n.m., sun synchronous) to 24 hour geosynchronous, with a design goal life of 3 to 5 years. The system comprises two complementary functions: (1) attitude determination where the attitude of a defined set of body-fixed reference axes is determined relative to a known set of reference axes fixed in inertial space; and (2) pointing control where gimbal orientation is controlled, open-loop (without use of payload error/feedback) with respect to a defined set of body-fixed reference axes to produce pointing to a desired target.

  15. Study of precise positioning at L-band using communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The L-band positioning experiment is reported which encompassed experiment design, experimentation, and data reduction and analysis. In the experiment the ATS-5 synchronous satellite L-band transponder was used in conjunction with the modified ALPHA 2 navigation receivers to demonstrate the technical capability of precision position fixing for oceanographic purposes. The feasibility of using relative ranging techniques implemented by two identical receiving systems, properly calibrated, to determine a line of position accurately on the surface of the earth was shown. The program demonstrated the level of resolution, repeatibility, precision, and accuracy of existing modest-cost effective navigation equipment. The experiment configuration and data reduction techniques were developed in parallel with the hardware modification tasks. Test results verify the ability of a satellite-based system to satisfy the requirements of precision position fixing.

  16. Positional Information, Positional Error, and Readout Precision in Morphogenesis: A Mathematical Framework

    PubMed Central

    Tkačik, Gašper; Dubuis, Julien O.; Petkova, Mariela D.; Gregor, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The concept of positional information is central to our understanding of how cells determine their location in a multicellular structure and thereby their developmental fates. Nevertheless, positional information has neither been defined mathematically nor quantified in a principled way. Here we provide an information-theoretic definition in the context of developmental gene expression patterns and examine the features of expression patterns that affect positional information quantitatively. We connect positional information with the concept of positional error and develop tools to directly measure information and error from experimental data. We illustrate our framework for the case of gap gene expression patterns in the early Drosophila embryo and show how information that is distributed among only four genes is sufficient to determine developmental fates with nearly single-cell resolution. Our approach can be generalized to a variety of different model systems; procedures and examples are discussed in detail. PMID:25361898

  17. Positional information, positional error, and readout precision in morphogenesis: a mathematical framework.

    PubMed

    Tkačik, Gašper; Dubuis, Julien O; Petkova, Mariela D; Gregor, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The concept of positional information is central to our understanding of how cells determine their location in a multicellular structure and thereby their developmental fates. Nevertheless, positional information has neither been defined mathematically nor quantified in a principled way. Here we provide an information-theoretic definition in the context of developmental gene expression patterns and examine the features of expression patterns that affect positional information quantitatively. We connect positional information with the concept of positional error and develop tools to directly measure information and error from experimental data. We illustrate our framework for the case of gap gene expression patterns in the early Drosophila embryo and show how information that is distributed among only four genes is sufficient to determine developmental fates with nearly single-cell resolution. Our approach can be generalized to a variety of different model systems; procedures and examples are discussed in detail. PMID:25361898

  18. A device to improve the SNR of the measurement of the positional floating reference point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingying; Rong, Xuzheng; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Kexin

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies have preliminarily validated the floating reference method and shown that it has the potential to improve the accuracy of non-invasive blood glucose sensing by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy. In order to make this method practical, it is necessary to precisely verify and measure the existence and variation features of the positional floating reference point. In this talk, a device which can precisely verify and measure the positional floating reference point is built. Since the light intensity of diffuse reflectance from the tested sample is very weak, a multipath detecting fibers system was built to improve signal-to-noise ratio. In this system, the fibers encircle the light source fiber which is regarded as the reference center of detecting fibers while they are moving. In addition, the position of each fiber is accurately controlled by manual translation stage to keep all detecting fibers always in the same radius around light source fiber. This ensures that received signal is coming from the same radial distance of light source. The variation of signal-to-noise ratio along with the different radial distance was investigated based on experiments. Results show that the application of this device could improve signal-to-noise ratio, and provide a new experimental method for the further study of positional floating reference point.

  19. Code Single Point Positioning Using Nominal GNSS Constellations (Future Perception)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, A. M. A.

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have an endless number of applications in industry, science, military, transportation and recreation & sports. Two systems are currently in operation, namely GPS (the USA Global Positioning System) and GLONASS (the Russian GLObal NAvigation Satellite System), and a third is planned, the European satellite navigation system GALILEO. The potential performance improvements achievable through combining these systems could be significant and expectations are high. The need is inevitable to explore the future of positioning from different nominal constellations. In this research paper, Bernese 5.0 software could be modified to simulate and process GNSS observations from three different constellations (GPS, GLONASS and Galileo) using different combinations. This study presents results of code single point positioning for five stations using the three constellations and different combinations.

  20. An Approach for High-precision Stand-alone Positioning in a Dynamic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halis Saka, M.; Metin Alkan, Reha; Ozpercin, Alişir

    2015-04-01

    In this study, an algorithm is developed for precise positioning in dynamic environment utilizing a single geodetic GNSS receiver using carrier phase data. In this method, users should start the measurement on a known point near the project area for a couple of seconds making use of a single dual-frequency geodetic-grade receiver. The technique employs iono-free carrier phase observations with precise products. The equation of the algorithm is given below; Sm(t(i+1))=SC(ti)+[ΦIF (t(i+1) )-ΦIF (ti)] where, Sm(t(i+1)) is the phase-range between satellites and the receiver, SC(ti) is the initial range computed from the initial known point coordinates and the satellite coordinates and ΦIF is the ionosphere-free phase measurement (in meters). Tropospheric path delays are modelled using the standard tropospheric model. To accomplish the process, an in-house program was coded and some functions were adopted from Easy-Suite available at http://kom.aau.dk/~borre/easy. In order to assess the performance of the introduced algorithm in a dynamic environment, a dataset from a kinematic test measurement was used. The data were collected from a kinematic test measurement in Istanbul, Turkey. In the test measurement, a geodetic dual-frequency GNSS receiver, Ashtech Z-Xtreme, was set up on a known point on the shore and a couple of epochs were recorded for initialization. The receiver was then moved to a vessel and data were collected for approximately 2.5 hours and the measurement was finalized on a known point on the shore. While the kinematic measurement on the vessel were carried out, another GNSS receiver was set up on a geodetic point with known coordinates on the shore and data were collected in static mode to calculate the reference trajectory of the vessel using differential technique. The coordinates of the vessel were calculated for each measurement epoch with the introduced method. With the purpose of obtaining more robust results, all coordinates were calculated

  1. A New Blind Pointing Model Improves Large Reflector Antennas Precision Pointing at Ka-Band (32 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)-Deep Space Network (DSN) subnet of 34-m Beam Waveguide (BWG) Antennas was recently upgraded with Ka-Band (32-GHz) frequency feeds for space research and communication. For normal telemetry tracking a Ka-Band monopulse system is used, which typically yields 1.6-mdeg mean radial error (MRE) pointing accuracy on the 34-m diameter antennas. However, for the monopulse to be able to acquire and lock, for special radio science applications where monopulse cannot be used, or as a back-up for the monopulse, high-precision open-loop blind pointing is required. This paper describes a new 4th order pointing model and calibration technique, which was developed and applied to the DSN 34-m BWG antennas yielding 1.8 to 3.0-mdeg MRE pointing accuracy and amplitude stability of 0.2 dB, at Ka-Band, and successfully used for the CASSINI spacecraft occultation experiment at Saturn and Titan. In addition, the new 4th order pointing model was used during a telemetry experiment at Ka-Band (32 GHz) utilizing the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft while at a distance of 0.225 astronomical units (AU) from Earth and communicating with a DSN 34-m BWG antenna at a record high rate of 6-megabits per second (Mb/s).

  2. High-Precision Floating-Point Arithmetic in ScientificComputation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.

    2004-12-31

    At the present time, IEEE 64-bit floating-point arithmetic is sufficiently accurate for most scientific applications. However, for a rapidly growing body of important scientific computing applications, a higher level of numeric precision is required: some of these applications require roughly twice this level; others require four times; while still others require hundreds or more digits to obtain numerically meaningful results. Such calculations have been facilitated by new high-precision software packages that include high-level language translation modules to minimize the conversion effort. These activities have yielded a number of interesting new scientific results in fields as diverse as quantum theory, climate modeling and experimental mathematics, a few of which are described in this article. Such developments suggest that in the future, the numeric precision used for a scientific computation may be as important to the program design as are the algorithms and data structures.

  3. Precision Analysis of Point-And Photogrammetric Measurements for Corridor Mapping: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, P.; Blázquez, M.; Sastre, J.; Colomina, I.

    2016-03-01

    This paper addresses the key aspects of the sensor orientation and calibration approach within the mapKITE concept for corridor mapping, focusing on the contribution analysis of point-and-scale measurements of kinematic ground control points. MapKITE is a new mobile, simultaneous terrestrial and aerial, geodata acquisition and post-processing method. On one hand, the acquisition system is a tandem composed of a terrestrial mobile mapping system and an unmanned aerial system, the latter equipped with a remote sensing payload, and linked through a 'virtual tether', that is, a real-time waypoint supply from the terrestrial vehicle to the unmanned aircraft. On the other hand, mapKITE entails a method for geodata post-processing (specifically, sensor orientation and calibration) based on the described acquisition paradigm, focusing on few key aspects: the particular geometric relationship of a mapKITE network - the aerial vehicle always observes the terrestrial one as they both move -, precise air and ground trajectory determination - the terrestrial vehicle is regarded as a kinematic ground control point - and new photogrammetric measurements - pointing on and measuring the scale of an optical target on the roof of the terrestrial vehicle - are exploited. In this paper, we analyze the performance of aerial image orientation and calibration in mapKITE for corridor mapping, which is the natural application niche of mapKITE, based on the principles and procedures of integrated sensor orientation with the addition of point-and-scale photogrammetric measurements of the kinematic ground control points. To do so, traditional (static ground control points, photogrammetric tie points, aerial control) and new (pointing-and-scaling of kinematic ground control points) measurements have been simulated for mapKITE corridor mapping missions, consisting on takeoff and calibration pattern, single-pass corridor operation potentially performing calibration patterns, and landing and

  4. A novel orientation and position measuring system for large & medium scale precision assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuhe; Qiu, Yongrong; Chen, Yanxiang; Guan, Kaisen

    2014-11-01

    In the field of precision assembly of large & medium scale, the orientation and position measurement system is quite demanding. In this paper a novel measuring system, consisting of four motorized stages, a laser rangefinder, an autocollimator and a camera is proposed to assist precision assembly. Through the design of coaxial optical system, the autocollimator is integrated with a laser rangefinder into a collimation rangefinder, which is used for measuring orientation and position synchronously. The laser spot is adopted to guide autocollimation over a large space and assist the camera in finding collimated measurand. The mathematical models and practical calibration methods for measurement are elaborated. The preliminary experimental results agree with the methods currently being used for orientation and position measurement. The measuring method provides an alternative choice for the metrology in precision assembly.

  5. Importance of precise positioning for proton beam therapy in the base of skull and cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Tatsuzaki, H; Urie, M M

    1991-08-01

    Using proton beam therapy, high doses have been delivered to chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the base of skull and cervical spine. Dose inhomogeneity to the tumors has been accepted in order to maintain normal tissue tolerances, and detailed attention to patient immobilization and to precise positioning has minimized the margins necessary to ensure these dose constraints. This study examined the contribution of precise positioning to the better dose localization achieved in these treatments. Three patients whose tumors represented different anatomic geometries were studied. Treatment plans were developed which treated as much of the tumor as possible to 74 Cobalt-Gray-Equivalent (CGE) while maintaining the central brain stem and central spinal cord at less than or equal to 48 CGE, the surface of the brain stem, surface of the spinal cord, and optic structures at less than or equal to 60 CGE, and the temporal lobes at less than or equal to 5% likelihood of complication using a biophysical model of normal tissue complication probability. Two positioning accuracies were assumed: 3 mm and 10 mm. Both proton beam plans and 10 MV X ray beam plans were developed with these assumptions and dose constraints. In all cases with the same positioning uncertainties, the proton beam plans delivered more dose to a larger percentage of the tumor volume and the estimated tumor control probability was higher than with the X ray plans. However, without precise positioning both the proton plans and the X ray plans deteriorated, with a 12% to 25% decrease in estimated tumor control probability. In all but one case, the difference between protons with good positioning and poor positioning was greater than the difference between protons and X rays, both with good positioning. Hence in treating these tumors, which are in close proximity to critical normal tissues, attention to immobilization and precise positioning is essential. With good positioning, proton beam therapy permits higher

  6. Positive deconvolution for superimposed extended source and point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannelli, J.-F.; Coulais, A.

    2005-08-01

    The paper deals with the construction of images from visibilities acquired using aperture synthesis instruments: Fourier synthesis, deconvolution, and spectral interpolation/extrapolation. Its intended application is to specific situations in which the imaged object possesses two superimposed components: (i) an extended component together with (ii) a set of point sources. It is also specifically designed to the case of positive maps, and accounts for a known support. Its originality lies within joint estimation of the two components, coherently with data, properties of each component, positivity and possible support. We approach the subject as an inverse problem within a regularization framework: a regularized least-squares criterion is specifically proposed and the estimated maps are defined as its minimizer. We have investigated several options for the numerical minimization and we propose a new efficient algorithm based on augmented Lagrangian. Evaluation is carried out using simulated and real data (from radio interferometry) demonstrating the capability to accurately separate the two components.

  7. Precision absolute measurement and alignment of laser beam direction and position.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Daniel; Müller, Vitali; Heinzel, Gerhard

    2014-10-01

    For the construction of high-precision optical assemblies, direction and position measurement and control of the involved laser beams are essential. While optical components such as beamsplitters and mirrors can be positioned and oriented accurately using coordinate measuring machines (CMMs), the position and direction control of laser beams is a much more intriguing task since the beams cannot be physically contacted. We present an easy-to-implement method to both align and measure the direction and position of a laser beam using a CMM in conjunction with a position-sensitive quadrant photodiode. By comparing our results to calibrated angular and positional measurements we can conclude that with the proposed method, a laser beam can be both measured and aligned to the desired direction and position with 10 μrad angular and 3 μm positional accuracy. PMID:25322238

  8. Compact Integration of a GSM-19 Magnetic Sensor with High-Precision Positioning using VRS GNSS Technology.

    PubMed

    Martín, Angel; Padín, Jorge; Anquela, Ana Belén; Sánchez, Juán; Belda, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic data consists of a sequence of collected points with spatial coordinates and magnetic information. The spatial location of these points needs to be as exact as possible in order to develop a precise interpretation of magnetic anomalies. GPS is a valuable tool for accomplishing this objective, especially if the RTK approach is used. In this paper the VRS (Virtual Reference Station) technique is introduced as a new approach for real-time positioning of magnetic sensors. The main advantages of the VRS approach are, firstly, that only a single GPS receiver is needed (no base station is necessary), reducing field work and equipment costs. Secondly, VRS can operate at distances separated 50-70 km from the reference stations without degrading accuracy. A compact integration of a GSM-19 magnetometer sensor with a geodetic GPS antenna is presented; this integration does not diminish the operational flexibility of the original magnetometer and can work with the VRS approach. The coupled devices were tested in marshlands around Gandia, a city located approximately 100 km South of Valencia (Spain), thought to be the site of a Roman cemetery. The results obtained show adequate geometry and high-precision positioning for the structures to be studied (a comparison with the original low precision GPS of the magnetometer is presented). Finally, the results of the magnetic survey are of great interest for archaeological purposes. PMID:22574055

  9. Research on input shaping algorithm for rapid positioning of ultra-precision dual-stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fazhi; Wang, Yan; Chen, Xinglin; He, Ping

    2015-08-01

    As a high-precision servo motion platform, the dual-stage lithographic system uses lots of long-stroke air-bearing linear motors to achieve rapid positioning. Residual vibration, resulting from direct drive, almost zero damping, parallel decoupling structure and high velocity, leads to too long settling time and is one of the key factors in slowing the speed of positioning. To suppress the residual vibration and realize the high positioning precision in shorter settling time, this paper designs feedforward controller with input shaping algorithm for the rotary motor. Traditional input shaper is sensitive to system models and it is very difficult to get the parameters. A parameter self-learning method based on PSO(Particle Swarm Optimization) is proposed in this paper. The simulation of the system is performed by MATLAB/Simulation. The experimental results indicate that the input shaping algorithm proposed in this paper brings about significant reduction in the positioning time of the dual-stage.

  10. Dense Image Matching for Mars Express HRSC Imagery Based on Precise Point Prediction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, X.; Xu, Q.; Miao, J.; Hou, Y. F.; Xing, S.; Lan, C. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Currently, Mars Express HRSC imagery is an essential data source to derive high accuracy Mars topographic data. In view of the characteristics of Martian surface satellite imagery, a dense image matching scheme for HRSC imagery based on precise point prediction method is proposed. The image matching strategies of our method are elaborated in detail. Based on the proposed method, DEM and DOM of Martian surface are derived and compared with those published by ESA. The experiment results show that the root mean square error in planar direction is about three pixels, while the root mean square error in height direction is about one pixel. Moreover, the mean square error in plane direction show a certain systematic error and the reasons are analysed. Experiment results also demonstrate that the point prediction accuracy for corresponding points is up to 1-3 pixels.

  11. Analysis of precision in tumor tracking based on optical positioning system during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; Shen, Junshu; Li, Bing; Chen, Junting; Zhu, Xixu; Ge, Yun; Wang, Yongjian

    2016-03-19

    Tumor tracking is performed during patient set-up and monitoring of respiratory motion in radiotherapy. In the clinical setting, there are several types of equipment for this set-up such as the Electronic Portal imaging Device (EPID) and Cone Beam CT (CBCT). Technically, an optical positioning system tracks the difference between the infra ball reflected from body and machine isocenter. Our objective is to compare the clinical positioning error of patient setup between Cone Beam CT (CBCT) with the Optical Positioning System (OPS), and to evaluate the traditional positioning systems and OPS based on our proposed approach of patient positioning. In our experiments, a phantom was used, and we measured its setup errors in three directions. Specifically, the deviations in the left-to-right (LR), anterior-to-posterior (AP) and inferior-to-superior (IS) directions were measured by vernier caliper on a graph paper using the Varian Linear accelerator. Then, we verified the accuracy of OPS based on this experimental study. In order to verify the accuracy of phantom experiment, 40 patients were selected in our radiotherapy experiment. To illustrate the precise of optical positioning system, we designed clinical trials using EPID. From our radiotherapy procedure, we can conclude that OPS has higher precise than conventional positioning methods, and is a comparatively fast and efficient positioning method with respect to the CBCT guidance system. PMID:27257880

  12. Sliding mode control of magnetic suspensions for precision pointing and tracking applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misovec, Kathleen M.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Johnson, Bruce G.; Hedrick, J. Karl

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed nonlinear control method, sliding mode control, is examined as a means of advancing the achievable performance of space-based precision pointing and tracking systems that use nonlinear magnetic actuators. Analytic results indicate that sliding mode control improves performance compared to linear control approaches. In order to realize these performance improvements, precise knowledge of the plant is required. Additionally, the interaction of an estimating scheme and the sliding mode controller has not been fully examined in the literature. Estimation schemes were designed for use with this sliding mode controller that do not seriously degrade system performance. The authors designed and built a laboratory testbed to determine the feasibility of utilizing sliding mode control in these types of applications. Using this testbed, experimental verification of the authors' analyses is ongoing.

  13. Nonlinear relative position control of precise formation flying using polynomial eigenstructure assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Chen, XueQin; Tsourdos, Antonios; White, Brian A.; Wu, YunHua

    2011-06-01

    A nonlinear relative position control algorithm is designed for spacecraft precise formation flying. Taking into account the effect of J2 gravitational perturbations and atmospheric drag, the relative motion dynamic equation of the formation flying is developed in a quasi-linear parameter-varying (QLPV) form without approximation. Base on this QLPV model, polynomial eigenstructure assignment (PEA) is applied to design the controller. The resulting PEA controller is a function of system state and parameters, and produces a closed-loop system with invariant performance over a wide range of conditions. Numerical simulation results show that the performance can fulfill precise formation flying requirements.

  14. Dilution of Precision-Based Lunar Navigation Assessment for Dynamic Position Fixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sands, Obed S.; Connolly, Joseph W.; Welch, Bryan W.; Carpenter, James R.; Ely, Todd A.; Berry, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Vision for Space Exploration is focused on the return of astronauts to the Moon. While navigation systems have already been proven in the Apollo missions to the moon, the current exploration campaign will involve more extensive and extended missions requiring new concepts for lunar navigation. In contrast to Apollo missions, which were limited to the near-side equatorial region of the moon, missions under the Exploration Systems Initiative will require navigation on the moon's limb and far-side. As these regions have poor Earth visibility, a navigation system comprised solely of Earth-based tracking stations will not provide adequate navigation solutions in these areas. In this paper, a Dilution of Precision (DoP) based analysis of the performance of a network of Moon orbiting satellites is provided. The analysis extends previous analysis of a Lunar Network (LN) of navigation satellites by providing an assessment of the capability associated with a variety of assumptions. These assumptions are with regard to the navigation receiver and satellite visibility. The assessment is accomplished by making appropriately formed estimates of DoP. Different adaptations of DoP (i.e. GDoP, PDoP, etc.) are associated with a different set of assumptions regarding augmentations to the navigation receiver or transceiver. A significant innovation described in this paper is the "Generalized" Dilution of Precision. In the same sense that the various versions of DoP can be represented as a functional of the observability grammian, Generalized DoP is defined as a functional of the sum of observability grammians associated with a batch of radiometric measurements. Generalized DoP extends the DoP concept to cases in which radiometric range and range-rate measurements are integrated over time to develop an estimate of user position (referred to here as a 'dynamic' solution.) Generalized DoP allows for the inclusion of cases in which the receiver location is underdetermined when

  15. Development of stewart platforms for active vibration isolation and precision pointing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Wang, Benli

    2007-07-01

    Vibration isolation and extreme precision pointing is needed for future space telescopes, imaging sensors, laser communication, space-borne optical interferometer, and other sensitive payloads which have increased performance, depending on sustained sub-microradian pointing accuracy and stability. However, the vibration sources are increased due to the large flexible structures, truss-type structures and motion devices. The spatial Stewart platform (hexapod), built by smart materials and smart structures, is a promising way to address these issues, especially for the six degree-of-freedom control purpose, since the platform offers several advantages over the serial counterparts and other methods. Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), University of Washington, the Hexapod Research Group of University of Wyoming, CSA Engineering Inc, Honeywell Satellite Systems Operation and other groups have done a lot of research, this paper provides a representative look at the state-of-the-art technology and research in active vibration isolation and precision pointing applied in space.

  16. Is Precise Point Postioning able to characterize the deformation of the Rhine Graben ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrion, Eric; Masson, Frédéric; Ulrich, Patrice

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, an increasing number of GNSS studies have been done processing the data using Precise Point Positioning (PPP) methods instead of differential methods. PPP methods are generally simple to implement even compared to double differences methods. The decrease of accuracy generated by the use of PPP methods instead of differential methods is generally considered as small, not damageable for the quality of the tectonic interpretation of the results. The aim of our study is to evaluate this decrease for a GNSS study performed in a very low deformation zone, the Upper Rhine Graben (URG). We want to put forward the pros and cons of PPP method. The URG is the central part of the 1000 kilometers long Cenozoic rift system, which extends from the North Sea to the Mediterranean Sea. The URG takes place from Basel to Frankfurt. It is 300 kilometers long and 40 kilometers wide, orientated North-Northeast/South-Southwest graben. The Vosges and the Black Forest represent the graben shoulders. The URG is one of the most active seismic areas in north-western Europe, as demonstrated by the Basel earthquake of 1356. In this area the data of a network of more than 70 stations, the GNSS Upper Rhine Graben Network (GURN), recording during more than 5 years (including several stations recording about 15 years) are available. Velocities were evaluated using a PPP software (CSRS-PPP) and GAMIT/GLOBK as differential software reference. With very long time series, we can provide strong conclusions. After some corrections (outliers and jumps) and comparing the 2 methods, the PPP is a really fast processing but seems to be less accurate than differential method. The consistency of neighbour stations is clearly better using GAMIT/GLOBK than PPP. The mean difference between the 2 methods is of the order 0.7mm/yr for an average time series of 9 years (5 years to 12 years). The PPP method is not suited for the Rhine Graben context with too small crustal displacements. The

  17. Input shaping for three-dimensional slew maneuvers of a precision pointing flexible spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Robinett, R.D.

    1994-04-01

    A method is presented for input torque shaping for three-dimensional slew maneuvers of a precision pointing flexible spacecraft. The method determines the torque profiles for fixed-time, rest-to-rest maneuvers which minimizes a specified performance index. Spacecraft dynamics are formulated in such a manner that the rigid body and flexible motions are decoupled. Furthermore, assembly by making use of finite element analysis results. Input torque profiles are determined by solving an associated optimization problem using dynamic programming. Three example problems are provided to demonstrate the application of the method.

  18. Precise positioning method for multi-process connecting based on binocular vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ding, Lichao; Zhao, Kai; Li, Xiao; Wang, Ling; Jia, Zhenyuan

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace, the demand for metal coating parts such as antenna reflector, eddy-current sensor and signal transmitter, etc. is more and more urgent. Such parts with varied feature dimensions, complex three-dimensional structures, and high geometric accuracy are generally fabricated by the combination of different manufacturing technology. However, it is difficult to ensure the machining precision because of the connection error between different processing methods. Therefore, a precise positioning method is proposed based on binocular micro stereo vision in this paper. Firstly, a novel and efficient camera calibration method for stereoscopic microscope is presented to solve the problems of narrow view field, small depth of focus and too many nonlinear distortions. Secondly, the extraction algorithms for law curve and free curve are given, and the spatial position relationship between the micro vision system and the machining system is determined accurately. Thirdly, a precise positioning system based on micro stereovision is set up and then embedded in a CNC machining experiment platform. Finally, the verification experiment of the positioning accuracy is conducted and the experimental results indicated that the average errors of the proposed method in the X and Y directions are 2.250 μm and 1.777 μm, respectively.

  19. Accuracy and reliability of multi-GNSS real-time precise positioning: GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou, and Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Ge, Maorong; Dai, Xiaolei; Ren, Xiaodong; Fritsche, Mathias; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-06-01

    In this contribution, we present a GPS+GLONASS+BeiDou+Galileo four-system model to fully exploit the observations of all these four navigation satellite systems for real-time precise orbit determination, clock estimation and positioning. A rigorous multi-GNSS analysis is performed to achieve the best possible consistency by processing the observations from different GNSS together in one common parameter estimation procedure. Meanwhile, an efficient multi-GNSS real-time precise positioning service system is designed and demonstrated by using the multi-GNSS Experiment, BeiDou Experimental Tracking Network, and International GNSS Service networks including stations all over the world. The statistical analysis of the 6-h predicted orbits show that the radial and cross root mean square (RMS) values are smaller than 10 cm for BeiDou and Galileo, and smaller than 5 cm for both GLONASS and GPS satellites, respectively. The RMS values of the clock differences between real-time and batch-processed solutions for GPS satellites are about 0.10 ns, while the RMS values for BeiDou, Galileo and GLONASS are 0.13, 0.13 and 0.14 ns, respectively. The addition of the BeiDou, Galileo and GLONASS systems to the standard GPS-only processing, reduces the convergence time almost by 70 %, while the positioning accuracy is improved by about 25 %. Some outliers in the GPS-only solutions vanish when multi-GNSS observations are processed simultaneous. The availability and reliability of GPS precise positioning decrease dramatically as the elevation cutoff increases. However, the accuracy of multi-GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) is hardly decreased and few centimeter are still achievable in the horizontal components even with 40 elevation cutoff. At 30 and 40 elevation cutoffs, the availability rates of GPS-only solution drop significantly to only around 70 and 40 %, respectively. However, multi-GNSS PPP can provide precise position estimates continuously (availability rate is more than 99

  20. Precise computer controlled positioning of robot end effectors using sensory feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. C.; Tsai, J. S. H.; Mcinnis, B. C.; Shieh, L. S.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary study of the combined position/force control using sensory feedback for a one-dimensional manipulator model, which may count for the spacecraft docking problem or to be extended to the multijoint robot manipulator problem, has been performed. The additional degrees of freedom introduced by the compliant force sensor is included in the system dynamics in the design of precise position control. State feedback based on pole placement method and with integral control is used to design the position controller. A simple constant gain force controller is used as an example to illustrate the dependence of the stability and steady-state accuracy of the overall position/force control on the design of the inner position controller. Supportive simulation results are also provided.

  1. Precise computer controlled positioning of robot end effectors using force sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, L. S.; Mcinnis, B. C.; Wang, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    A thorough study of combined position/force control using sensory feedback for a one-dimensional manipulator model, which may count for the spacecraft docking problem or be extended to the multi-joint robot manipulator problem, was performed. The additional degree of freedom introduced by the compliant force sensor is included in the system dynamics in the design of precise position control. State feedback based on the pole placement method and with integral control is used to design the position controller. A simple constant gain force controller is used as an example to illustrate the dependence of the stability and steady-state accuracy of the overall position/force control upon the design of the inner position controller. Supportive simulation results are also provided.

  2. Effects of finite-precision arithmetic on interior-point methods for nonlinear programming.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S. J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2001-10-23

    We show that the effects of finite-precision arithmetic in forming and solving the linear system that arises at each iteration of primal-dual interior-point algorithms for nonlinear programming are benign, provided that the iterates satisfy centrality and feasibility conditions of the type usually associated with path-following methods. When we replace the standard assumption that the active constraint gradients are independent by the weaker Mangasarian--Fromovitz constraint qualification, rapid convergence usually is attainable, even when cancellation and roundoff errors occur during the calculations. In deriving our main results, we prove a key technical result about the size of the exact primal-dual step. This result can be used to modify existing analysis of primal-dual interior-point methods for convex programming, making it possible to extend the superlinear local convergence results to the nonconvex case.

  3. An analysis of the double-precision floating-point FFT on FPGAs.

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmert, K. Scott; Underwood, Keith Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Advances in FPGA technology have led to dramatic improvements in double precision floating-point performance. Modern FPGAs boast several GigaFLOPs of raw computing power. Unfortunately, this computing power is distributed across 30 floating-point units with over 10 cycles of latency each. The user must find two orders of magnitude more parallelism than is typically exploited in a single microprocessor; thus, it is not clear that the computational power of FPGAs can be exploited across a wide range of algorithms. This paper explores three implementation alternatives for the fast Fourier transform (FFT) on FPGAs. The algorithms are compared in terms of sustained performance and memory requirements for various FFT sizes and FPGA sizes. The results indicate that FPGAs are competitive with microprocessors in terms of performance and that the 'correct' FFT implementation varies based on the size of the transform and the size of the FPGA.

  4. A High Precision Position Sensor Design and Its Signal Processing Algorithm for a Maglev Train

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Song; Long, Zhiqiang; He, Ning; Chang, Wensen

    2012-01-01

    High precision positioning technology for a kind of high speed maglev train with an electromagnetic suspension (EMS) system is studied. At first, the basic structure and functions of the position sensor are introduced and some key techniques to enhance the positioning precision are designed. Then, in order to further improve the positioning signal quality and the fault-tolerant ability of the sensor, a new kind of discrete-time tracking differentiator (TD) is proposed based on nonlinear optimal control theory. This new TD has good filtering and differentiating performances and a small calculation load. It is suitable for real-time signal processing. The stability, convergence property and frequency characteristics of the TD are studied and analyzed thoroughly. The delay constant of the TD is figured out and an effective time delay compensation algorithm is proposed. Based on the TD technology, a filtering process is introduced in to improve the positioning signal waveform when the sensor is under bad working conditions, and a two-sensor switching algorithm is designed to eliminate the positioning errors caused by the joint gaps of the long stator. The effectiveness and stability of the sensor and its signal processing algorithms are proved by the experiments on a test train during a long-term test run. PMID:22778582

  5. A high precision position sensor design and its signal processing algorithm for a maglev train.

    PubMed

    Xue, Song; Long, Zhiqiang; He, Ning; Chang, Wensen

    2012-01-01

    High precision positioning technology for a kind of high speed maglev train with an electromagnetic suspension (EMS) system is studied. At first, the basic structure and functions of the position sensor are introduced and some key techniques to enhance the positioning precision are designed. Then, in order to further improve the positioning signal quality and the fault-tolerant ability of the sensor, a new kind of discrete-time tracking differentiator (TD) is proposed based on nonlinear optimal control theory. This new TD has good filtering and differentiating performances and a small calculation load. It is suitable for real-time signal processing. The stability, convergence property and frequency characteristics of the TD are studied and analyzed thoroughly. The delay constant of the TD is figured out and an effective time delay compensation algorithm is proposed. Based on the TD technology, a filtering process is introduced in to improve the positioning signal waveform when the sensor is under bad working conditions, and a two-sensor switching algorithm is designed to eliminate the positioning errors caused by the joint gaps of the long stator. The effectiveness and stability of the sensor and its signal processing algorithms are proved by the experiments on a test train during a long-term test run. PMID:22778582

  6. Preliminary assessment of the basic navigation and precise positioning performance of BDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qile; Hu, Zhigang; Li, Min; Guo, Jing; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan

    2014-05-01

    Following the general guideline of starting with regional services and then expanding to global services, the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System(BDS) is steadily accelerating the construction. By the end of 2012, the BDS already consists of fourteen networking satellites, including five GEO satellites, five IGSO satellites, and four MEO satellites, and owns full operational capability for China and its surrounding areas. Both basic navigation and precise positioning performance of current BDS (with 5GEO+5IGSO+4MEO satellites) during January to December of 2013 are evaluated in this presentation. In China and its surrounding area, the positioning accuracy using BDS opening service is about 10 meters in both horizontal and vertical direction. Users can get high precise service using BDS only, and both BDS and GPS users can be benefitted from combination of the two systems.

  7. Precise VLA positions and flux-density measurements of the Jupiter system

    SciTech Connect

    Muhleman, D.O.; Berge, G.L.; Rudy, D.; Niell, A.E.

    1986-12-01

    VLA C array configuration observations at 2 and 6 cm are presented for Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto at eastern and western elongations with respect to Jupiter, which allowed measurements in right ascension and declination of the satellites with an rms precision of about + or - 0.03 arcsec. The transfer of the mean offsets of Ganymede to Jupiter yields offsets of -0.185 + or - 0.03 arcsec and -0.06 + or - 0.03 arcsec, with respect to JPL-DE-200, at the mean epoch of April 28, 1983; the large offset in right ascension is a combination of the Jupiter ephemeris error and the error in the frame tie of the Jovian planets with the VLBI system of precise positions which was used as the absolute reference frame for the observations. A significant error is noted in the orbital position of Callisto with respect to Ganymede. 12 references.

  8. Etching of deep grooves for the precise positioning of cleaves in semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.E.; Hemenway, B.R.; Wilt, D.P.

    1985-03-01

    Photoelectrochemical etching of InP is used to etch deep (80 ..mu..m), narrow (20 ..mu..m) grooves. The grooves are used to precisely position cleaves in semiconductor lasers and to demonstrate the first wafer processing of long/short cleaved-coupled-cavity (C/sup 3/) lasers. Large numbers of low threshold C/sup 3/ lasers wth very similar cavity lengths were obtained.

  9. Advanced THz sensor array for precise position and material properties recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sešek, Aleksander; Trontelj, Janez; Å vigelj, Andrej

    2014-06-01

    The precise position of objects in the industrial process, assembly lines, conveyers, or processing bins is essential for fast and high quality production. In many robotized setups the material type and its properties are crucial. When several types of materials or parts are used, material recognition is required. Advanced robotics systems depend on various sensors to recognize material properties, and high resolution cameras with expensive laser measuring systems are used to determine the precise object position. The purpose of this paper is to present how the THz sensor and THz waves can be applicable for such precise object position sensing and its material properties in real time. One of the additional features of such a THz sensor array is also the ability to see behind barriers that are transparent for THz waves. This allows the system to obtain precise dimensions, position, and material properties of the object, which are invisible for visible light or anyhow obscured to other vision systems. Furthermore, a 3D THz image of the object can also be obtained and, in cases when a visual picture is available, its fusion with a THz image is possible. In the paper a THz sensor array, operating at a 300GHz central frequency and at room conditions is presented, together with the proposed vision system description. The target is illuminated with a frequency modulated, solid state THz source, and provides output power around 1mW. By mixing of the illuminating and reflected signals, the resulting difference frequency signal is obtained. Its amplitude and phase carry all relevant information of the target. Some measurement results are also shown and discussed.

  10. Testing of an End-Point Control Unit Designed to Enable Precision Control of Manipulator-Coupled Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C.; Ghosh, Dave; Tobbe, Patrick A.; Weathers, John M.; Manouchehri, Davoud; Lindsay, Thomas S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an end-point control concept designed to enable precision telerobotic control of manipulator-coupled spacecraft. The concept employs a hardware unit (end-point control unit EPCU) that is positioned between the end-effector of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System and the payload. Features of the unit are active compliance (control of the displacement between the end-effector and the payload), to allow precision control of payload motions, and inertial load relief, to prevent the transmission of loads between the end-effector and the payload. This paper presents the concept and studies the active compliance feature using a simulation and hardware. Results of the simulation show the effectiveness of the EPCU in smoothing the motion of the payload. Results are presented from initial, limited tests of a laboratory hardware unit on a robotic arm testbed at the l Space Flight Center. Tracking performance of the arm in a constant speed automated retraction and extension maneuver of a heavy payload with and without the unit active is compared for the design speed and higher speeds. Simultaneous load reduction and tracking performance are demonstrated using the EPCU.

  11. High precision series solutions of differential equations: Ordinary and regular singular points of second order ODEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noreen, Amna; Olaussen, Kåre

    2012-10-01

    A subroutine for a very-high-precision numerical solution of a class of ordinary differential equations is provided. For a given evaluation point and equation parameters the memory requirement scales linearly with precision P, and the number of algebraic operations scales roughly linearly with P when P becomes sufficiently large. We discuss results from extensive tests of the code, and how one, for a given evaluation point and equation parameters, may estimate precision loss and computing time in advance. Program summary Program title: seriesSolveOde1 Catalogue identifier: AEMW_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 991 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 488116 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: PC's or higher performance computers. Operating system: Linux and MacOS RAM: Few to many megabytes (problem dependent). Classification: 2.7, 4.3 External routines: CLN — Class Library for Numbers [1] built with the GNU MP library [2], and GSL — GNU Scientific Library [3] (only for time measurements). Nature of problem: The differential equation -s2({d2}/{dz2}+{1-ν+-ν-}/{z}{d}/{dz}+{ν+ν-}/{z2})ψ(z)+{1}/{z} ∑n=0N vnznψ(z)=0, is solved numerically to very high precision. The evaluation point z and some or all of the equation parameters may be complex numbers; some or all of them may be represented exactly in terms of rational numbers. Solution method: The solution ψ(z), and optionally ψ'(z), is evaluated at the point z by executing the recursion A(z)={s-2}/{(m+1+ν-ν+)(m+1+ν-ν-)} ∑n=0N Vn(z)A(z), ψ(z)=ψ(z)+A(z), to sufficiently large m. Here ν is either ν+ or ν-, and Vn(z)=vnz. The recursion is initialized by A(z)=δzν,for n

  12. Analytical Examinations and Compensation Based on Rolling Friction Model for Slow Settling Response in Precise Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshihiro; Iwasaki, Makoto

    This paper presents a rolling friction model-based friction compensation for precise tracking control of linear motor-driven table systems. Rolling friction in mechanisms behaves as a nonlinear elastic element in the micro-displacement region, and deteriorates the tracking performance with slow settling response in positioning. In this paper, therefore, the rolling friction characteristic is mathematically formulated and is adopted to analytical examinations and compensator design to improve the slow settling response. The proposed compensation has been verified by experiments by using a prototype for industrial positioning devices.

  13. Pupil tracking optical coherence tomography for precise control of pupil entry position

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Nankivil, Derek; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Lujan, Brandon J.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    To maximize the collection efficiency of back-scattered light, and to minimize aberrations and vignetting, the lateral position of the scan pivot of an optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal scanner should be imaged to the center of the ocular pupil. Additionally, several retinal structures including Henle’s Fiber Layer (HFL) exhibit reflectivities that depend on illumination angle, which can be controlled by varying the pupil entry position of the OCT beam. In this work, we describe an automated method for controlling the lateral pupil entry position in retinal OCT by utilizing pupil tracking in conjunction with a 2D fast steering mirror placed conjugate to the retinal plane. We demonstrate that pupil tracking prevents lateral motion artifacts from impeding desired pupil entry locations, and enables precise pupil entry positioning and therefore control of the illumination angle of incidence at the retinal plane. We use our prototype pupil tracking OCT system to directly visualize the obliquely oriented HFL. PMID:26417510

  14. The Feasibility of the Disturbance Accommodating Controller for Precision Antenna Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gresham, L. L.; Lansing, F. L.; Guiar, C. N.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a pointing (position loop) controller for the NASA-JPL Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas using the Disturbance Accommodating Control (DAC) theory. A model that includes state dependent disturbances was developed, and an example demonstrating the noise estimator is presented as an initial phase in the controller design. The goal is to improve pointing accuracy by the removal of the systematic errors caused by the antenna misalignment as well as sensor noise and random wind and thermal disturbances. Preliminary simulation results show that the DAC technique is successful in both cancelling the imposed errors and maintaining an optimal control policy.

  15. Single-point position and transition defects in continuous time quantum walks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z. J.; Wang, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of continuous time quantum walks (CTQW) with both position and transition defects defined at a single point in the line. Analytical solutions of both traveling waves and bound states are obtained, which provide valuable insight into the dynamics of CTQW. The number of bound states is found to be critically dependent on the defect parameters, and the localized probability peaks can be readily obtained by projecting the state vector of CTQW on to these bound states. The interference between two bound states are also observed in the case of a transition defect. The spreading of CTQW probability over the line can be finely tuned by varying the position and transition defect parameters, offering the possibility of precision quantum control of the system. PMID:26323855

  16. The Evaluation of Surface Morphology Using Flexure Guided Nano-Positioning System and Ultra-Precision Lathe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Nam-Su; Kim, Jae-Yeol

    In this study, piezoelectric actuator, Flexure guide, Power transmission element and control method and considered for Nano-positioning system apparatus. The main objectives of this thesis were to develop the 3-axis Ultra-precision stages which enable the 3-axis control by the manipulation of the piezoelectric actuator and to enhance the precision of the Ultra-Precision CNC lathe which is responsible for the ductile mode machining of the hardened-brittle material where the machining is based on the single crystal diamond. Ultra-precision CNC lathe is used for machining and motion error of the machine are compensated by using 3-axis Ultra-precision stage. Through the simulation and experiments on ultra-precision positioning, stability and priority on Nano-positioning system with 3-axis ultra-precision stage and control algorithm are secured by using NI Labview. And after applying the system, is to analyze the surface morphology of the mold steel (SKD61)

  17. Track Level Compensation Look-up Table Improves Antenna Pointing Precision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, Wodek; Baher, Farrokh; Gama, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The pointing accuracy of the NASA Deep Space Network antennas is significantly impacted by the unevenness of the antenna azimuth track. The track unevenness causes repeatable antenna rotations, and repeatable pointing errors. The paper presents the improvement of the pointing accuracy of the antennas by implementing the track-level-compensation look-up table. The table consists of three axis rotations of the alidade as a function of the azimuth position. The paper presents the development of the table, based on the measurements of the inclinometer tilts, processing the measurement data, and determination of the three-axis alidade rotations from the tilt data. It also presents the determination of the elevation and cross-elevation errors of the antenna as a function of the alidade rotations. The pointing accuracy of the antenna with and without a table was measured using various radio beam pointing techniques. The pointing error decreased when the table was used, from 1.5 mdeg to 1.2 mdeg in elevation, and from 20.4 mdeg to 2.2 mdeg in cross-elevation.

  18. Asynchronous RTK precise DGNSS positioning method for deriving a low-latency high-rate output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhang; Hanfeng, Lv; Dingjie, Wang; Yanqing, Hou; Jie, Wu

    2015-07-01

    Low-latency high-rate (1 Hz) precise real-time kinematic (RTK) can be applied in high-speed scenarios such as aircraft automatic landing, precise agriculture and intelligent vehicle. The classic synchronous RTK (SRTK) precise differential GNSS (DGNSS) positioning technology, however, is not able to obtain a low-latency high-rate output for the rover receiver because of long data link transmission time delays (DLTTD) from the reference receiver. To overcome the long DLTTD, this paper proposes an asynchronous real-time kinematic (ARTK) method using asynchronous observations from two receivers. The asynchronous observation model (AOM) is developed based on undifferenced carrier phase observation equations of the two receivers at different epochs with short baseline. The ephemeris error and atmosphere delay are the possible main error sources on positioning accuracy in this model, and they are analyzed theoretically. In a short DLTTD and during a period of quiet ionosphere activity, the main error sources decreasing positioning accuracy are satellite orbital errors: the "inverted ephemeris error" and the integration of satellite velocity error which increase linearly along with DLTTD. The cycle slip of asynchronous double-differencing carrier phase is detected by TurboEdit method and repaired by the additional ambiguity parameter method. The AOM can deal with synchronous observation model (SOM) and achieve precise positioning solution with synchronous observations as well, since the SOM is only a specific case of AOM. The proposed method not only can reduce the cost of data collection and transmission, but can also support the mobile phone network data link transfer mode for the data of the reference receiver. This method can avoid data synchronizing process besides ambiguity initialization step, which is very convenient for real-time navigation of vehicles. The static and kinematic experiment results show that this method achieves 20 Hz or even higher rate output in

  19. DORIS-based point mascons for the long term stability of precise orbit solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerri, L.; Lemoine, J. M.; Mercier, F.; Zelensky, N. P.; Lemoine, F. G.

    2013-08-01

    In recent years non-tidal Time Varying Gravity (TVG) has emerged as the most important contributor in the error budget of Precision Orbit Determination (POD) solutions for altimeter satellites' orbits. The Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission has provided POD analysts with static and time-varying gravity models that are very accurate over the 2002-2012 time interval, but whose linear rates cannot be safely extrapolated before and after the GRACE lifespan. One such model based on a combination of data from GRACE and Lageos from 2002-2010, is used in the dynamic POD solutions developed for the Geophysical Data Records (GDRs) of the Jason series of altimeter missions and the equivalent products from lower altitude missions such as Envisat, Cryosat-2, and HY-2A. In order to accommodate long-term time-variable gravity variations not included in the background geopotential model, we assess the feasibility of using DORIS data to observe local mass variations using point mascons. In particular, we show that the point-mascon approach can stabilize the geographically correlated orbit errors which are of fundamental interest for the analysis of regional Mean Sea Level trends based on altimeter data, and can therefore provide an interim solution in the event of GRACE data loss. The time series of point-mass solutions for Greenland and Antarctica show good agreement with independent series derived from GRACE data, indicating a mass loss at rate of 210 Gt/year and 110 Gt/year respectively.

  20. Astrometry with Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor number 3: Position-mode stability and precision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, G. F.; Mcarthur, B.; Nelan, E.; Story, D.; Whipple, A. L.; Jefferys, W. H.; Wang, Q.; Shelus, P. J.; Hemenway, P. D.; Mccartney, J.

    1994-01-01

    We report results from a test exploring the long- and short-term astrometric stability of Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) #3. A test field was observed 40 times over 522 days to determine the precision and accuracy of FGS astrometry and to measure the character and magnitude of possible secular scale changes. We examine the astrometric data and the associated guide-star data to determine random errors. These data are also explored to find sources of systematic error. After correcting for some systematic effects we obtain a precision of 0.002 arcsec (2 mas) per observation (RSS of x and y). This is relative astrometry within a central 2.5 arcmin FGS field of view for any orientation. We find that the scale varies over time and confirm the sense of the trend with independent data. From the 40 observation sets we produce a catalog of an astrometry test field containing eight stars whose relative positions are known to an average 0.7 and 0.9 mas in x and y. One reference star has a relative parallax of 3.1 plus or minus 0.5 mas. Finally, we report that eleven observation sets acquired over 387 days produce parallaxes and relative positions with 1-mas precision.

  1. Concepts for AutomatedPrecise Low Earth Orbiter Navigation With the Global Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichten, S. M.; Thornton, C. L.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, T. P.

    1998-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is widely used for satellite positioning and navigation and for numerous geolocation activities. Real-time, onboard positioning accuracies for low Earth orbiters (LEOs) currently vary from 50 to 100 m for stand-alone conventional GPS tracking to somewhat better than 10 m with sophisticated onboard data filtering. Wide-area differential techniques, such as those supported by the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) under development by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, offer real-time, kinematic positioning accuracies ranging from a few meters to better than a meter over well-defined local regions. This article describes a concept for extending the wide-area differential GPS techniques to achieve global, real-time positioning of LEOs at submeter accuracies. GPS design and operation policy issues that currently limit real-time, onboard precision positioning are discussed. The article then examines a number of proposed system design enhancements under consideration by the U.S. Department of Defense for the next-generation GPS, termed GPS III. These potential enhancements, if implemented, would enable global real-time, stand-alone position accuracies of a few decimeters for kinematic users and better than 10 cm for LEOs. Such capabilities could dramatically impact NASA missions by greatly lowering ground operations costs, as well as navigation and orbit determination costs in general.

  2. Demonstration of precise estimation of polar motion parameters with the global positioning system: Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    Data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) were used to determine precise polar motion estimates. Conservatively calculated formal errors of the GPS least squares solution are approx. 10 cm. The GPS estimates agree with independently determined polar motion values from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at the 5 cm level. The data were obtained from a partial constellation of GPS satellites and from a sparse worldwide distribution of ground stations. The accuracy of the GPS estimates should continue to improve as more satellites and ground receivers become operational, and eventually a near real time GPS capability should be available. Because the GPS data are obtained and processed independently from the large radio antennas at the Deep Space Network (DSN), GPS estimation could provide very precise measurements of Earth orientation for calibration of deep space tracking data and could significantly relieve the ever growing burden on the DSN radio telescopes to provide Earth platform calibrations.

  3. Piping inspection instrument carriage with precise and repeatable position control and location determination

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, M.; Talarek, T.R.; Zollinger, W.T.; Heckendorn, F.M. II; Park, L.R.

    1994-02-15

    An instrument carriage for inspection of piping comprises front and rear leg assemblies for engaging the interior of the piping and supporting and centering the carriage therein, and an instrumentation arm carried by a shaft system running from the front to rear leg assemblies. The shaft system has a screw shaft for moving the arm axially and a spline gear for moving the arm azimuthally. The arm has a pair of air cylinders that raise and lower a plate in the radial direction. On the plate are probes including an eddy current probe and an ultrasonic testing probe. The ultrasonic testing probe is capable of spinning 360[degree] about its axis. The instrument carriage uses servo motors and pressurized air cylinders for precise actuation of instrument components and precise, repeatable actuation of position control mechanisms. 8 figures.

  4. Piping inspection instrument carriage with precise and repeatable position control and location determination

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, Mark; Talarek, Ted R.; Zollinger, W. Thor; Heckendorn, II, Frank M.; Park, Larry R.

    1994-01-01

    An instrument carriage for inspection of piping comprises front and rear leg assemblies for engaging the interior of the piping and supporting and centering the carriage therein, and an instrumentation arm carried by a shaft system running from the front to rear leg assemblies. The shaft system has a screw shaft for moving the arm axially and a spline gear for moving the arm azimuthally. The arm has a pair of air cylinders that raise and lower a plate in the radial direction. On the plate are probes including an eddy current probe and an ultrasonic testing probe. The ultrasonic testing probe is capable of spinning 360.degree. about its axis. The instrument carriage uses servo motors and pressurized air cylinders for precise actuation of instrument components and precise, repeatable actuation of position control mechanisms.

  5. High-precision measurement of pixel positions in a charge-coupled device.

    PubMed

    Shaklan, S; Sharman, M C; Pravdo, S H

    1995-10-10

    The high level of spatial uniformity in modern CCD's makes them excellent devices for astrometric instruments. However, at the level of accuracy envisioned by the more ambitious projects such as the Astrometric Imaging Telescope, current technology produces CCD's with significant pixel registration errors. We describe a technique for making high-precision measurements of relative pixel positions. We measured CCD's manufactured for the Wide Field Planetary Camera II installed in the Hubble Space Telescope. These CCD's are shown to have significant step-and-repeat errors of 0.033 pixel along every 34th row, as well as a 0.003-pixel curvature along 34-pixel stripes. The source of these errors is described. Our experiments achieved a per-pixel accuracy of 0.011 pixel. The ultimate shot-noise limited precision of the method is less than 0.001 pixel. PMID:21060522

  6. A polyphenylene dendrimer drug transporter with precisely positioned amphiphilic surface patches.

    PubMed

    Stangenberg, René; Wu, Yuzhou; Hedrich, Jana; Kurzbach, Dennis; Wehner, Daniel; Weidinger, Gilbert; Kuan, Seah Ling; Jansen, Malin Insa; Jelezko, Fedor; Luhmann, Heiko J; Hinderberger, Dariush; Weil, Tanja; Müllen, Klaus

    2015-02-18

    The design and synthesis of a polyphenylene dendrimer (PPD 3) with discrete binding sites for lipophilic guest molecules and characteristic surface patterns is presented. Its semi-rigidity in combination with a precise positioning of hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups at the periphery yields a refined architecture with lipophilic binding pockets that accommodate defined numbers of biologically relevant guest molecules such as fatty acids or the drug doxorubicin. The size, architecture, and surface textures allow to even penetrate brain endothelial cells that are a major component of the extremely tight blood-brain barrier. In addition, low to no toxicity is observed in in vivo studies using zebrafish embryos. The unique PPD scaffold allows the precise placement of functional groups in a given environment and offers a universal platform for designing drug transporters that closely mimic many features of proteins. PMID:25182694

  7. Point-of-Care Technologies for Precision Cardiovascular Care and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    King, Kevin; Grazette, Luanda P.; Paltoo, Dina N.; McDevitt, John T.; Sia, Samuel K.; Barrett, Paddy M.; Apple, Fred S.; Gurbel, Paul A.; Weissleder, Ralph; Leeds, Hilary; Iturriaga, Erin J.; Rao, Anupama; Adhikari, Bishow; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Galis, Zorina S.; Libby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care technologies (POC or POCT) are enabling innovative cardiovascular diagnostics that promise to improve patient care across diverse clinical settings. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a working group to discuss POCT in cardiovascular medicine. The multidisciplinary working group, which included clinicians, scientists, engineers, device manufacturers, regulatory officials, and program staff, reviewed the state of the POCT field; discussed opportunities for POCT to improve cardiovascular care, realize the promise of precision medicine, and advance the clinical research enterprise; and identified barriers facing translation and integration of POCT with existing clinical systems. A POCT development roadmap emerged to guide multidisciplinary teams of biomarker scientists, technologists, health care providers, and clinical trialists as they: 1) formulate needs assessments; 2) define device design specifications; 3) develop component technologies and integrated systems; 4) perform iterative pilot testing; and 5) conduct rigorous prospective clinical testing to ensure that POCT solutions have substantial effects on cardiovascular care. PMID:26977455

  8. Track-Level-Compensation Look-Up Table Improves Antenna Pointing Precision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W.; Baher, F.; Gama, E.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the improvement of the beam-waveguide antenna pointing accuracy due to the implementation of the track-level-compensation look-up table. It presents the development of the table, from the measurements of the inclinometer tilts to the processing of the measurement data and the determination of the threeaxis alidade rotations. The table consists of three axis rotations of the alidade as a function of the azimuth position. The article also presents the equations to determine the elevation and cross-elevation errors of the antenna as a function of the alidade rotations and the antenna azimuth and elevation positions. The table performance was verified using radio beam pointing data. The pointing error decreased from 4.5 mdeg to 1.4 mdeg in elevation and from 14.5 mdeg to 3.1 mdeg in cross-elevation. I. Introduction The Deep Space Station 25 (DSS 25) antenna shown in Fig. 1 is one of NASA s Deep Space Network beam-waveguide (BWG) antennas. At 34 GHz (Ka-band) operation, it is necessary to be able to track with a pointing accuracy of 2-mdeg root-mean-square (rms). Repeatable pointing errors of several millidegrees of magnitude have been observed during the BWG antenna calibration measurements. The systematic errors of order 4 and lower are eliminated using the antenna pointing model. However, repeatable pointing errors of higher order are out of reach of the model. The most prominent high-order systematic errors are the ones caused by the uneven azimuth track. The track is shown in Fig. 2. Manufacturing and installation tolerances, as well as gaps between the segments of the track, are the sources of the pointing errors that reach over 14-mdeg peak-to-peak magnitude, as reported in [1,2]. This article presents a continuation of the investigations and measurements of the pointing errors caused by the azimuth-track-level unevenness that were presented in [1] and [2], and it presents the implementation results. Track-level-compensation (TLC) look

  9. Automatic registration of laser point cloud using precisely located sphere targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanmin; Shi, Hongbin; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Sphere targets are used extensively in terrestrial laser scanning registration; however, in practice, it is still a time-consuming and labor-intensive task. This paper proposes an automatic registration method for laser point clouds based on sphere targets' detection. First, a modified eight-neighbors check method is applied to mark occluding edge points. Then, for the sphere targets in the raster structure, occluding edge points are clustered, and circle and sphere detections are sequentially implemented in the cluster node and circular area, respectively. The sphere models that pass through multilevel constraints are considered the final results. Next, triangles constructed using three arbitrary noncollinear sphere centers in each scan station are selected as registration primitives and the area and interior angles of each are selected as similarity measures. Finally, the congruent sphere centers between two scan stations are matched in an iterative manner and used to calculate the transformation matrix. The results of experiments in which a lab was scanned from two locations indicate that our method can effectively detect four sphere targets in more than 10 million point clouds within ˜1.5 min, with the largest position error between congruent points <2 mm.

  10. Geodetic point positioning with GPS (Global Positioning System) carrier beat phase data from the CASA (Central and South America) Uno experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Malys, S.; Jensen, P.A. )

    1990-04-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) carrier beat phase data collected by the TI4100 GPS receiver has been successfully utilized by the US Defense Mapping Agency in an algorithm which is designed to estimate individual absolute geodetic point positions from data collected over a few hours. The algorithm uses differenced data from one station and two to four GPS satellites at a series of epochs separated by 30 second intervals. The precise GPS ephemerides and satellite clock states, held fixed in the estimation process, are those estimated by the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC). Broadcast ephemerides and clock states are also utilized for comparative purposes. An outline of the data corrections applied, the mathematical model and the estimation algorithm are presented. Point positioning results and statistics are presented for a globally-distributed set of stations which contributed to the CASA Uno experiment. Statistical assessment of 114 GPS point positions at 11 CASA Uno stations indicates that the overall standard deviation of a point position component, estimated from a few hours of data, is 73 centimeters. Solution of the long line geodetic inverse problem using repeated point positions such as these can potentially offer a new tool for those studying geodynamics on a global scale.

  11. A Precise Position and Attitude Determination System for Lightweight Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eling, C.; Klingbeil, L.; Wieland, M.; Kuhlmann, H.

    2013-08-01

    In many unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) applications a direct georeferencing is required. The reason can be that the UAV flies autonomous and must be navigated precisely, or that the UAV performs a remote sensing operation, where the position of the camera has to be known at the moment of the recording. In our application, a project called Mapping on Demand, we are motivated by both of these reasons. The goal of this project is to develop a lightweight autonomously flying UAV that is able to identify and measure inaccessible three-dimensional objects by use of visual information. Due to payload and space limitations, precise position and attitude determination of micro- and mini-sized UAVs is very challenging. The limitations do not only affect the onboard computing capacity, but they are also noticeable when choosing the georeferencing sensors. In this article, we will present a new developed onboard direct georeferencing system which is real-time capable, applicable for lightweight UAVs and provides very precise results (position accuracy σ < 5 cm and attitude accuracy σ < 0.5 deg). In this system GPS, inertial sensors, magnetic field sensors, a barometer as well as stereo video cameras are used as georeferencing sensors. We will describe the hardware development and will go into details of the implemented software. In this context especially the RTK-GPS software and the concept of the attitude determination by use of inertial sensors, magnetic field sensors as well as an onboard GPS baseline will be highlighted. Finally, results of first field tests as well as an outlook on further developments will conclude this contribution.

  12. Improved treatment of global positioning system force parameters in precise orbit determination applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigue, Y.; Lichten, S. M.; Muellerschoen, R. J.; Blewitt, G.; Heflin, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    Data collected from a worldwide 1992 experiment were processed at JPL to determine precise orbits for the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). A filtering technique was tested to improve modeling of solar-radiation pressure force parameters for GPS satellites. The new approach improves orbit quality for eclipsing satellites by a factor of two, with typical results in the 25- to 50-cm range. The resultant GPS-based estimates for geocentric coordinates of the tracking sites, which include the three DSN sites, are accurate to 2 to 8 cm, roughly equivalent to 3 to 10 nrad of angular measure.

  13. Precise positioning of cancerous cells on PDMS substrates with gradients of elasticity.

    PubMed

    Raczkowska, J; Prauzner-Bechcicki, S

    2016-10-01

    In this work the novel method to create PDMS substrates with continuous and discrete elasticity gradients of different shapes and dimensions over the large areas was introduced. Elastic properties of the sample were traced using force spectroscopy (FS) and quantitative imaging (QI) mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Then, fluorescence microscopy was applied to investigate the effect of elastic properties on proliferation of bladder cancer cells (HCV29). Obtained results show that cancerous cells proliferate significantly more effective on soft PDMS, whereas the stiff one is almost cell-repellant. This strong impact of substrate elasticity on cellular behavior is driving force enabling precise positioning of cells. PMID:27620629

  14. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints.

    PubMed

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component. PMID:27043580

  15. Vibratory response modeling and verification of a high precision optical positioning system.

    SciTech Connect

    Barraza, J.; Kuzay, T.; Royston, T. J.; Shu, D.

    1999-06-18

    A generic vibratory-response modeling program has been developed as a tool for designing high-precision optical positioning systems. Based on multibody dynamics theory, the system is modeled as rigid-body structures connected by linear elastic elements, such as complex actuators and bearings. The full dynamic properties of each element are determined experimentally or theoretically, then integrated into the program as inertial and stiffness matrices. Utilizing this program, the theoretical and experimental verification of the vibratory behavior of a double-multilayer monochromator support and positioning system is presented. Results of parametric design studies that investigate the influence of support floor dynamics and highlight important design issues are also presented. Overall, good matches between theory and experiment demonstrate the effectiveness of the program as a dynamic modeling tool.

  16. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints

    PubMed Central

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component. PMID:27043580

  17. Two-stage rule-based precision positioning control of a piezoelectrically actuated table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, W. M.; Tarng, Y. S.; Nian, C. Y.; Nurhadi, H.

    2010-05-01

    This article proposes a two-stage rule-based precision positioning control method for the linear piezoelectrically actuated table (LPAT). During coarse-tuning stage, the LPAT is actuated by coarse voltages towards the target of 20 µm at a higher velocity; and during fine-tuning stage, it is driven by fine voltage steadily and accurately to reach the target position. The rule-based method is employed to establish the control rules for the voltages and displacements of the two stages using statistical methods. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed control method can reach steady state quickly, and the steady-state error can be reduced to less than or equal to 0.02 µm for small travel (±0.1 µm) and large travel (±20 mm).

  18. Real-time, autonomous precise satellite orbit determination using the global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, David Ben

    2000-10-01

    The desire for autonomously generated, rapidly available, and highly accurate satellite ephemeris is growing with the proliferation of constellations of satellites and the cost and overhead of ground tracking resources. Autonomous Orbit Determination (OD) may be done on the ground in a post-processing mode or in real-time on board a satellite and may be accomplished days, hours or immediately after observations are processed. The Global Positioning System (GPS) is now widely used as an alternative to ground tracking resources to supply observation data for satellite positioning and navigation. GPS is accurate, inexpensive, provides continuous coverage, and is an excellent choice for autonomous systems. In an effort to estimate precise satellite ephemeris in real-time on board a satellite, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) created the GPS Enhanced OD Experiment (GEODE) flight navigation software. This dissertation offers alternative methods and improvements to GEODE to increase on board autonomy and real-time total position accuracy and precision without increasing computational burden. First, GEODE is modified to include a Gravity Acceleration Approximation Function (GAAF) to replace the traditional spherical harmonic representation of the gravity field. Next, an ionospheric correction method called Differenced Range Versus Integrated Doppler (DRVID) is applied to correct for ionospheric errors in the GPS measurements used in GEODE. Then, Dynamic Model Compensation (DMC) is added to estimate unmodeled and/or mismodeled forces in the dynamic model and to provide an alternative process noise variance-covariance formulation. Finally, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) is implemented in the form of Genetic Model Compensation (GMC) to optimize DMC forcing noise parameters. Application of GAAF, DRVID and DMC improved GEODE's position estimates by 28.3% when applied to GPS/MET data collected in the presence of Selective Availability (SA), 17.5% when SA is removed from the GPS

  19. GNSS tropospheric gradients with high temporal resolution and their effect on precise positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixian; Li, Xingxing; Li, Zhenhong; Heinkelmann, Robert; Nilsson, Tobias; Dick, Galina; Ge, Maorong; Schuh, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The tropospheric horizontal gradients with high spatiotemporal resolutions provide important information to describe the azimuthally asymmetric delays and significantly increase the ability of ground-based GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) within the field of meteorological studies, like the nowcasting of severe rainfall events. The recent rapid development of multi-GNSS constellations has potential to provide such high-resolution gradients with a significant degree of accuracy. In this study, we develop a multi-GNSS process for the precise retrieval of high-resolution tropospheric gradients. The tropospheric gradients with different temporal resolutions, retrieved from both single-system and multi-GNSS solutions, are validated using independent numerical weather models (NWM) data and water vapor radiometer (WVR) observations. The benefits of multi-GNSS processing for the retrieval of tropospheric gradients, as well as for the improvement of precise positioning, are demonstrated. The multi-GNSS high-resolution gradients agree well with those derived from the NWM and WVR, especially for the fast-changing peaks, which are mostly associated with synoptic fronts. The multi-GNSS gradients behave in a much more stable manner than the single-system estimates, especially in cases of high temporal resolution, benefiting from the increased number of observed satellites and improved observation geometry. The high-resolution multi-GNSS gradients show higher correlation with the NWM and WVR gradients than the low-resolution gradients. Furthermore, the precision of station positions can also be noticeably improved by multi-GNSS fusion, and enhanced results can be achieved if the high-resolution gradient estimation is performed, instead of the commonly used daily gradient estimation in the multi-GNSS data processing.

  20. Radioisotopic Tie Points of the Quaternary Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale (GITS): How Accurate and Precise?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    Reversals and excursions of the geomagnetic field are recorded globally by sedimentary and volcanic rocks. These geodynamo instabilities provide a rich set of chronostratigraphic tie points for the Quaternary period that can provide tests of age models central to paleoclimate studies. Radioisotopic dating of volcanic rocks, mainly 40Ar/39Ar dating of lava flows, coupled with astronomically-dated deep sea sediments, reveals 10 polarity reversals and 27 field excursions during the Quaternary (Singer, 2014). A key question concerns the uncertainties associated with radioisotopic dates of those geodynamo instabilities that have been identified both in terrestrial volcanic rocks and in deep sea sediments. These particular features offer the highest confidence in linking 40Ar/39Ar dates to the global marine climate record. Geological issues aside, for rocks in which the build-up of 40Ar by decay of 40K may be overwhelmed by atmospheric 40Ar at the time of eruption, the uncertainty in 40Ar/39Ar dates derives from three sources: (1) analytical uncertainty associated with measurement of the isotopes; this is straightforward to estimate; (2) systematic uncertainties stemming from the age of standard minerals, such as the Fish Canyon sanidine, and in the 40K decay constant; and (3) systematic uncertainty introduced during analysis, mainly the size and reproducibility of procedural blanks. Whereas 1 and 2 control the precision of an age determination, 2 and 3 also control accuracy. In parallel with an astronomical calibration of 28.201 Ma for the Fish Canyon sanidine standard, awareness of the importance of procedural blanks, and a new generation multi-collector mass spectrometer capable of exceptionally low-blank and isobar-free analysis, are improving both accuracy and precision of 40Ar/39Ar dates. Results from lavas recording the Matuyama-Brunhes reversal, the Santa Rosa excursion, and the reversal at the top of the Cobb Mtn subchron demonstrate these advances. Current best

  1. Influence of the TEC fluctuations in the polar region on precise GPS positioning.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieradzki, Rafal; Paziewski, Jacek; Wielgosz, Pawel

    2014-05-01

    The ionospheric delay is an atmoshperic effect influencing on Global Navigation Satellite System signals. On the one hand it is a factor limiting the accuracy of the GNSS positioning, and on the other it makes satellite observations a very good source of the information on the ionospheric conditions. The degradation of the relative positioning accuracy and reliability can be connected with high gradients of the total electron content or with the TEC fluctuations. The latter of these effects mainly occurs in the equatorial and polar regions. The ionosphere near the geomagnetic poles is characterized by relatively small TEC values in comparison to the other regions. However, the connection between the magnetosphere and ionosphere systems in the polar regions allows particle precipitation and leads to very strong ionospheric dynamics. In this work, performance of the GNSS precise relative positioning under disturbed ionospheric conditions in the northern polar region is studied. The test results are based on processing 24-hour data sets from the selected permanent GPS stations located in Greenland. The studies cover several days of high and low solar activity, and also periods of a geomagnetic storm characterized by intensive TEC fluctuations. The data processing was carried out in static and kinematic modes. The GINPOS software developed at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn was used for positioning tests. The study confirms and presents the influence of the ionospheric and geomagnetic activity in the polar region on the results in coordinate and ambiguity domains.

  2. A study of attitude control concepts for precision-pointing non-rigid spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Attitude control concepts for use onboard structurally nonrigid spacecraft that must be pointed with great precision are examined. The task of determining the eigenproperties of a system of linear time-invariant equations (in terms of hybrid coordinates) representing the attitude motion of a flexible spacecraft is discussed. Literal characteristics are developed for the associated eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system. A method is presented for determining the poles and zeros of the transfer function describing the attitude dynamics of a flexible spacecraft characterized by hybrid coordinate equations. Alterations are made to linear regulator and observer theory to accommodate modeling errors. The results show that a model error vector, which evolves from an error system, can be added to a reduced system model, estimated by an observer, and used by the control law to render the system less sensitive to uncertain magnitudes and phase relations of truncated modes and external disturbance effects. A hybrid coordinate formulation using the provided assumed mode shapes, rather than incorporating the usual finite element approach is provided.

  3. Three-Point Gear/Lead Screw Positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calco, Frank S.

    1993-01-01

    Triple-ganged-lead-screw positioning mechanism drives movable plate toward or away from fixed plate and keeps plates parallel to each other. Designed for use in tuning microwave resonant cavity. Other potential applications include adjustable bed plates and cantilever tail stocks in machine tools, adjustable platforms for optical equipment, and lifting platforms.

  4. Evaluation of Point Positioning Using the Global Positioning System and the Quasi-Zenith Satellite System as Measured from South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung-Kyu; Cho, Chang-Hyun; Cho, Jung Ho

    2015-12-01

    The Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS), a dedicated regional Japanese satellite system currently under development, was designed to complement the performance of the Global Positioning System (GPS). The high elevation angle of the QZSS satellite is expected to enhance the effectiveness of GPS in urban environments. Thus, the work described in this paper, aimed to investigate the effect of QZSS on GPS performance, by processing the GPS and QZSS measurements recorded at the Bohyunsan reference station in South Korea. We used these data, to evaluate the satellite visibility, carrier-to-noise density (C/No), performance of single point positioning, and Dilution of Precision (DOP). The QZSS satellite is currently available over South Korea for 19 hours at an elevation angle of more than 10 degrees. The results showed that the impact of the QZSS on users' vertical positioning is greatest when the satellite is above 80 degrees of elevation. As for Precise Point Positioning (PPP) performance, the combined GPS/QZSS kinematic PPP was found to improve the positioning accuracy compared to the GPS only kinematic PPP.

  5. Effect of different head positions on the jaw closing point during tapping movements.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Nishigawa, K; Bando, E; Hosoki, M

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of different head positions on jaw closing points during tapping movements. The jaw movements of 20 adult volunteers were assessed using a new jaw-tracking device. All subjects had stable maximal intercuspation with their natural dentitions. The subjects were asked to seat on a dental chair with their head upright, and tapping movements were recorded for 5 s without any further instructions. After the chair was reclined to the horizontal position, tapping movements were also recorded with the head in the supine position. The location of the tapping point was defined as the jaw position which was the most closed to the maximum intercuspal position during each tapping stroke. Fifteen tapping points were obtained from the upright and supine head positions of each subject. Six-hundred tapping points were compared to evaluate the effects of different head positions. With the head upright, tapping points were relatively stable and close to the jaw position at the maximum intercuspation. However, in the supine position, tapping points varied widely and shifted forward. The average distance between the positions of the incisal point at the maximum intercuspation and at the tapping points was 0.11 mm (SD, 0.10) in the upright position and 0.30 mm (SD, 0.08) in the supine position. A Wilcoxon signed rank test showed a significant difference (P < 0.01) between these distances. We conclude that tapping points shift anteriorly in the supine position. PMID:18976269

  6. Using BeiDou system for precise positioning in central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasniak, Dawid; Cellmer, Slawomir; Nowel, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    In 2012 the Chinese navigation satellite system called BeiDou System (BDS) has reached the regional operational capabilities over the area of East Asia. Currently the BDS system consists of 5 medium orbit satellites MEO, 6 geosynchronous satellites IGSO and 5 geostationary satellites GEO and provides regional coverage by its navigation signals. Also in Europe BDS satellites can be used to determine position. In 2015 the third phase of BSD system development has started, aimed at providing global coverage and compatibility with other GNSS systems. As a result, BDS will broadcast signals at the same frequency as GPS L1 and L5 and Galileo E1, E5a and E5b. In the presented research we carried out relative positioning using the MAFA method. This was the first time when this method was applied to process BDS signals. The results show that it is possible to obtain precise position in central Europe using BDS signals only. However, with its current constellation, this is not possible 24/7, but in periodic time windows.

  7. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.A.; Unser, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y posit ion entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. No computers are involved. No software is required. Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design m their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM.

  8. A 145-base pair DNA sequence that positions itself precisely and asymmetrically on the nucleosome core.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, N; Felsenfeld, G; Rushton, B M; McGhee, J D

    1984-01-01

    A 145-bp DNA sequence, cloned from Escherichia coli, was reconstituted into nucleosome core particles by a number of methods. The behaviour of the resulting complex upon sucrose gradient sedimentation and nucleoprotein gel electrophoresis closely resembled that of control bulk nucleosome core particles. DNase I digestion of the 32P-end-labelled complex revealed the 10-bp periodicity of cleavages expected for DNA bound on a histone surface. The narrow cleavage sites observed (1 bp wide) imply that the sequence occupies a single preferred position on the nucleosome core, accurate to the level of single base pairs. By relating the digestion pattern observed to the pattern of site protection found for random sequence nucleosomes, the DNA position was found to be offset by 17 bp from that in the normal core particle. A number of experiments argue against the involvement of length or end effects and suggest that it is some feature of the DNA sequence itself that determines this precise positioning of DNA on the nucleosome. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6096135

  9. SURFING: A Program for Precise Determination of Sample Position in Stress Measurements Via Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.-Q.

    2000-08-08

    Precise determination of the specimen position relative to the sampling volume for texture and stress measurements by neutron diffraction is difficult or sometimes impossible using only optical devices due to large or irregular sample dimensions and/or complicated shape of the sampling volume. The knowledge of the shape and size of the sampling volume allows development of a general mathematical model for the intensity variation with a parallelogram-shape sampling volume moving from outside to inside the specimen for both transmission and reflection geometric set-ups. Both fixed slits and radial collimators are options in defining the geometrical setup. The attenuation by the sample also has been taken into account in this model. Experimental results agree well with the model calculations. The program SURFING is based on the model calculation and was written in Labwindows/CVI{copyright}.

  10. High-precision orbit determination for high-earth elliptical orbiters using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, S. M.; Estefan, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Orbit covariance analyses pertaining to the Japanese VLBI Space Observatory Program (VSOP) MUSES-B satellite and to the International VLBI Satellite are presented. It is determined that a combination of Doppler and GPS measurements can provide the orbit accuracy required to support advanced radio interferometric experiments. For the VSOP, the required orbit accuracy of 130 m is easily met with two-way Doppler as the primary type of data; the 0.4 cm/s VSOP velocity requirement is also feasible provided that precise ground calibrations of tropospheric delays and station coordinates are available. It is concluded that combining the data from a VSOP GPS flight instrument with the ground GPS and two-way Doppler data will significantly enhance orbit determination accuracy in position and velocity.