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Sample records for preclinical efficacy studies

  1. Protective efficacy of Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara in preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Volz, Asisa; Sutter, Gerd

    2013-09-01

    Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is a tissue culture-derived, highly attenuated strain of vaccinia virus (VACV) exhibiting characteristic defective replication in cells from mammalian hosts. In the 1960s MVA was originally generated as a candidate virus for safer vaccination against smallpox. Now, MVA is widely used in experimental vaccine development targeting important infectious diseases and cancer. Versatile technologies for genetic engineering, large-scale production, and quality control facilitate R&D of recombinant and non-recombinant MVA vaccines matching today's requirements for new biomedical products. Such vaccines are attractive candidates for delivering antigens from pathogens against which no, or no effective vaccine is available, including emerging infections caused by highly pathogenic influenza viruses, chikungunya virus, West Nile virus or zoonotic orthopoxviruses. Other directions are seeking valuable vaccines against highly complex diseases such as AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Here, we highlight examples of MVA candidate vaccines against infectious diseases, and review the efforts made to assess both the efficacy of vaccination and immune correlates of protection in preclinical studies. PMID:23523402

  2. Pasteurization of bone for tumour eradication prior to reimplantation – An in vitro & pre-clinical efficacy study

    PubMed Central

    Kode, Jyoti; Taur, Prasad; Gulia, Ashish; Jambhekar, Nirmala; Agarwal, Manish; Puri, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: In current era of limb-salvage therapy, pasteurization of bone sarcomas is receiving growing attention as a potential extracorporeal treatment and cost-effective alternative to allografts and radiation before surgical reimplantation. Detailed in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical study to evaluate efficacy of pasteurization to eradicate malignant cells has not been reported yet. The present study was carried out to assess the efficacy of pasteurization to kill tumour cells both in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Surgically resected specimens of osteosarcomas (n=4) were cut into equal halves and one section was pasteurized by heating at 60°C to 65°C for 40 min. Paired samples before and after pasteurization were studied in vitro for DNA ploidy, evaluation of histological change and elimination of mitotic activity. These tissues were transplanted in immune-deficient NOD-SCID mice to evaluate effect on tumour-generating ability, presence of human nuclei, osteopontin and cytokine/chemokines released in tumour-transplanted mice. Results: Non-pasteurized tumour samples had viable tumour cells which exhibited significant growth in culture, increased proliferative ability and clonogenic potential while respective pasteurized tumour tissues did not grow in culture and did not exhibit clonogenicity. Flow cytometry revealed that propidium iodide positive dead cells increased significantly (P< 0.01) post pasteurization. Seven of 12 non-pasteurized tumour transplanted mice demonstrated tumour-forming ability as against 0 of 12 in pasteurized tumour transplanted mice. Solid tumour xenografts exhibited strong expression of anti-human nuclei and osteopontin by immunohistochemistry as well as secretary human interluekin-6 (IL-6) while pasteurized mice failed to express these markers. Interpretation & conclusions: This study has provided a basis to establish pasteurization as being efficacious in ensuring tumour eradication from resected bone tumour specimens. Pasteurized tumour bearing bone can thus safely be used to reconstruct large defects after tumour resection. PMID:24927346

  3. Chronic Electrical Stimulation with a Suprachoroidal Retinal Prosthesis: A Preclinical Safety and Efficacy Study

    PubMed Central

    Nayagam, David A. X.; Williams, Richard A.; Allen, Penelope J.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Luu, Chi D.; Salinas-LaRosa, Cesar M.; Finch, Sue; Ayton, Lauren N.; Saunders, Alexia L.; McPhedran, Michelle; McGowan, Ceara; Villalobos, Joel; Fallon, James B.; Wise, Andrew K.; Yeoh, Jonathan; Xu, Jin; Feng, Helen; Millard, Rodney; McWade, Melanie; Thien, Patrick C.; Williams, Chris E.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the safety and efficacy of chronic electrical stimulation of the retina with a suprachoroidal visual prosthesis. Methods Seven normally-sighted feline subjects were implanted for 96–143 days with a suprachoroidal electrode array and six were chronically stimulated for 70–105 days at levels that activated the visual cortex. Charge balanced, biphasic, current pulses were delivered to platinum electrodes in a monopolar stimulation mode. Retinal integrity/function and the mechanical stability of the implant were assessed monthly using electroretinography (ERG), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus photography. Electrode impedances were measured weekly and electrically-evoked visual cortex potentials (eEVCPs) were measured monthly to verify that chronic stimuli were suprathreshold. At the end of the chronic stimulation period, thresholds were confirmed with multi-unit recordings from the visual cortex. Randomized, blinded histological assessments were performed by two pathologists to compare the stimulated and non-stimulated retina and adjacent tissue. Results All subjects tolerated the surgical and stimulation procedure with no evidence of discomfort or unexpected adverse outcomes. After an initial post-operative settling period, electrode arrays were mechanically stable. Mean electrode impedances were stable between 11–15 k? during the implantation period. Visually-evoked ERGs & OCT were normal, and mean eEVCP thresholds did not substantially differ over time. In 81 of 84 electrode-adjacent tissue samples examined, there were no discernible histopathological differences between stimulated and unstimulated tissue. In the remaining three tissue samples there were minor focal fibroblastic and acute inflammatory responses. Conclusions Chronic suprathreshold electrical stimulation of the retina using a suprachoroidal electrode array evoked a minimal tissue response and no adverse clinical or histological findings. Moreover, thresholds and electrode impedance remained stable for stimulation durations of up to 15 weeks. This study has demonstrated the safety and efficacy of suprachoroidal stimulation with charge balanced stimulus currents. PMID:24853376

  4. Threats to Validity in the Design and Conduct of Preclinical Efficacy Studies: A Systematic Review of Guidelines for In Vivo Animal Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Valerie C.; Kimmelman, Jonathan; Fergusson, Dean; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.; Hackam, Dan G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The vast majority of medical interventions introduced into clinical development prove unsafe or ineffective. One prominent explanation for the dismal success rate is flawed preclinical research. We conducted a systematic review of preclinical research guidelines and organized recommendations according to the type of validity threat (internal, construct, or external) or programmatic research activity they primarily address. Methods and Findings We searched MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Google, and the EQUATOR Network website for all preclinical guideline documents published up to April 9, 2013 that addressed the design and conduct of in vivo animal experiments aimed at supporting clinical translation. To be eligible, documents had to provide guidance on the design or execution of preclinical animal experiments and represent the aggregated consensus of four or more investigators. Data from included guidelines were independently extracted by two individuals for discrete recommendations on the design and implementation of preclinical efficacy studies. These recommendations were then organized according to the type of validity threat they addressed. A total of 2,029 citations were identified through our search strategy. From these, we identified 26 guidelines that met our eligibility criteria—most of which were directed at neurological or cerebrovascular drug development. Together, these guidelines offered 55 different recommendations. Some of the most common recommendations included performance of a power calculation to determine sample size, randomized treatment allocation, and characterization of disease phenotype in the animal model prior to experimentation. Conclusions By identifying the most recurrent recommendations among preclinical guidelines, we provide a starting point for developing preclinical guidelines in other disease domains. We also provide a basis for the study and evaluation of preclinical research practice. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23935460

  5. Preclinical safety and efficacy studies with an affinity-enhanced epithelial junction opener and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Wang, Hongjie; Saydaminova, Kamola; Ho, Martin; May, Drew; Baldessari, Audrey; Gough, Michael; Drescher, Charles; Urban, Nicole; Roffler, Steve; Zubieta, Chloé; Carter, Darrick; Fender, Pascal; Lieber, André

    2015-01-01

    A central treatment resistance mechanism in solid tumors is the maintenance of epithelial junctions between malignant cells that prevent drug penetration into the tumor. We have developed a small recombinant protein (JO-1) that triggers the transient opening of intercellular junctions and thus increases the efficacy of monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapeutic drugs without causing toxicity in mouse tumor models. Here, we provide data toward the clinical translation of an affinity-enhanced version of JO-1, which we call JO-4, in combination with PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD)/Doxil for ovarian cancer therapy. We have presented X-ray crystallography data suggesting a structural basis for the higher affinity of JO-4 to DSG2. We also confirmed JO-4 efficacy in a xenograft model with primary ovarian cancer cells showing that JO-4 can salvage Doxil therapy when given at a dose that was threefold lower than the therapeutic dose. Furthermore, we tested the safety of intravenous JO-4 alone and in combination with Doxil in Macaca fascicularis, an adequate animal model for predicting toxicity in humans. Our studies did not show critical JO-4-related toxicity or an increase of Doxil-related side effects. Our efficacy and safety data will help to support an Investigational new drug-filing for a JO-4/Doxil combination treatment. PMID:26029716

  6. Efficacy of multiple exposure with low level He-Ne laser dose on acute wound healing: a pre-clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-02-01

    Investigations on the use of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for wound healing especially with the red laser light have demonstrated its pro-healing potential on a variety of pre-clinical and surgical wounds. However, until now, in LLLT the effect of multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation on acute wound healing on well-designed pre-clinical model is not much explored. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of multiple exposure of low dose Helium Neon laser on healing progression of full thickness excision wounds in Swiss albino mice. Further, the efficacy of the multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation was compared with the single exposure of optimum dose. Full thickness excision wounds (circular) of 15 mm diameter were created, and subsequently illuminated with the multiple exposures (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 exposure/ week until healing) of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 4.02 mWcm-2) laser at 0.5 Jcm-2 along with single exposure of optimum laser dose (2 J/cm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Classical biophysical parameters such as contraction kinetics, area under the curve and the mean healing time were documented as the assessment parameters to examine the efficacy of multiple exposures with low level laser dose. Experimental findings substantiated that either single or multiple exposures of 0.5 J/cm2 failed to produce any detectable alterations on wound contraction, area under the curve and mean healing time compared to single exposure of optimum dose (2 Jcm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Single exposure of optimum, laser dose was found to be ideal for acute wound healing.

  7. Allopregnanolone Preclinical Acute Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Studies to Predict Tolerability and Efficacy for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Ronald W.; Solinsky, Christine M.; Loya, Carlos M.; Salituro, Francesco G.; Rodgers, Kathleen E.; Bauer, Gerhard; Rogawski, Michael A.; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-01-01

    To develop allopregnanolone as a therapeutic for Alzheimer’s disease, we investigated multiple formulations and routes of administration in translationally relevant animal models of both sexes. Subcutaneous, topical (transdermal and intranasal), intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone were bolus-administered. Pharmacokinetic analyses of intravenous allopregnanolone in rabbit and mouse indicated that peak plasma and brain levels (3-fold brain/plasma ratios) at 5min were sufficient to activate neuroregenerative responses at sub-sedative doses. Slow-release subcutaneous suspension of allopregnanolone displayed 5-fold brain/plasma ratio at Cmax at 30min. At therapeutic doses by either subcutaneous or intravenous routes, allopregnanolone mouse plasma levels ranged between 34-51ng/ml by 30min, comparable to published endogenous human level in the third trimester of pregnancy. Exposure to subcutaneous, topical, intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone, at safe and tolerable doses, increased hippocampal markers of neurogenesis including BrdU and PCNA in young 3xTgAD and aged wildtype mice. Intravenous allopregnanolone transiently and robustly phosphorylated CREB within 5min and increased levels of neuronal differentiation transcription factor NeuroD within 4h. Neurogenic efficacy was achieved with allopregnanolone brain exposure of 300-500hr*ng/g. Formulations were tested to determine the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) and maximally tolerated doses (MTD) in male and female rats by sedation behavior time course. Sex differences were apparent, males exhibited ?40% more sedation time compared to females. Allopregnanolone formulated in sulfobutyl-ether-beta-cyclodextrin at optimized complexation ratio maximized allopregnanolone delivery and neurogenic efficacy. To establish the NOAEL and MTD for Allo-induced sedation using a once-per-week intravenous regenerative treatment regimen: In female rats the NOAEL was 0.5mg/kg and MTD 2mg/kg. The predicted MTD in human female is 0.37mg/kg. In male rats the NOAEL and MTD were less than those determined for female. Outcomes of these PK/PD studies predict a safe and efficacious dose range for initial clinical trials of allopregnanolone for Alzheimer’s disease. These findings have translational relevance to multiple neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:26039057

  8. In-Vivo Efficacy of Compliant 3D Nano-Composite in Critical-Size Bone Defect Repair: a Six Month Preclinical Study in Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Nitin; Pandey, Alok K.; Gurbani, Deepak; Khan, Kainat; Singh, Dhirendra; Chaudhari, Bhushan P.; Soni, Vivek P.; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Dhawan, Alok; Bellare, Jayesh R.

    2013-01-01

    Bone defects above critical size do not heal completely by itself and thus represent major clinical challenge to reconstructive surgery. Numerous bone substitutes have already been used to promote bone regeneration, however their use, particularly for critical-sized bone defects along with their long term in vivo safety and efficacy remains a concern. The present study was designed to obtain a complete healing of critical-size defect made in the proximal tibia of New Zealand White rabbit, using nano-hydroxyapatite/gelatin and chemically carboxymethylated chitin (n-HA/gel/CMC) scaffold construct. The bone-implant interfaces and defect site healing was evaluated for a period up to 25 weeks using radiography, micro-computed tomography, fluorescence labeling, and histology and compared with respective SHAM (empty contra lateral control). The viscoelastic porous scaffold construct allows easy surgical insertion and post-operatively facilitate oxygenation and angiogenesis. Radiography of defect treated with scaffold construct suggested expedited healing at defect edges and within the defect site, unlike confined healing at edges of the SHAM sites. The architecture indices analyzed by micro-computed tomography showed a significant increase in percentage of bone volume fraction, resulted in reconciled cortico-trabecular bone formation at n-HA/gel/CMC constructs treated site (15.2% to 52.7%) when compared with respective SHAM (10.2% to 31.8%). Histological examination and fluorescence labeling revealed that the uniformly interconnected porous surface of scaffold construct enhanced osteoblasts’ activity and mineralization. These preclinical data suggest that, n-HA/gel/CMC construct exhibit stimulation of bone's innate regenerative capacity, thus underscoring their use in guided bone regeneration. PMID:24204879

  9. A Preclinical Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Occlusin Trade-Mark-Sign 500 Artificial Embolization Device in Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Richard J.; Nation, Patrick N.; Polakowski, Robert; Biliske, Jennifer A.; Tiege, Paul B.

    2012-06-15

    Introduction: This study evaluated the safety, effectiveness, and biodegradation of a new embolic agent, Occlusin Trade-Mark-Sign 503 Artificial Embolization Device (OCL 503). The agent consists of biodegradable poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres (150-212 {mu}m) coated with type I bovine collagen and was compared with Embosphere{sup Registered-Sign} Microspheres (300-500 {mu}m) in this controlled study of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in sheep. Methods: Unilateral UAE was performed in 32 adult ewes randomly assigned. Vessels were embolized to effective stasis. The cohort was divided into four groups, which were sacrificed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: Both agents were 100% effective in achieving stasis. At 6 months, all OCL 503-treated arteries were occluded, the microspheres degraded with time, and at 12 months all four animals examined demonstrated recanalization. OCL 503 was found in the untreated uterine artery in one animal with no other evidence of non target embolization. In the Embosphere-treated group, all vessels remained occluded and microspheres were detected in the contralateral uterine artery in 6 of 15 examined vessels and in 10 vaginal, 2 ovarian, and 1 vesical artery. No procedural-related complications were seen in either group. Conclusions: OCL 503 is as effective an embolic agent as Embosphere{sup Registered-Sign} Microspheres when embolizing ovine uterine arteries and resorbs with time, allowing recanalization of the treated arteries. No device-related issues or adverse events were observed.

  10. Efficacy of Pimobendan in the Prevention of Congestive Heart Failure or Sudden Death in Doberman Pinschers with Preclinical Dilated Cardiomyopathy (The PROTECT Study)

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, NJ; Boswood, A; O'Grady, MR; Gordon, SG; Dukes-McEwan, J; Oyama, MA; Smith, S; Patteson, M; French, AT; Culshaw, GJ; Braz-Ruivo, L; Estrada, A; O'Sullivan, ML; Loureiro, J; Willis, R; Watson, P

    2012-01-01

    Background The benefit of pimobendan in delaying the progression of preclinical dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in Dobermans is not reported. Hypothesis That chronic oral administration of pimobendan to Dobermans with preclinical DCM will delay the onset of CHF or sudden death and improve survival. Animals Seventy-six client-owned Dobermans recruited at 10 centers in the UK and North America. Methods The trial was a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel group multicenter study. Dogs were allocated in a 1:1 ratio to receive pimobendan (Vetmedin capsules) or visually identical placebo. The composite primary endpoint was prospectively defined as either onset of CHF or sudden death. Time to death from all causes was a secondary endpoint. Results The proportion of dogs reaching the primary endpoint was not significantly different between groups (P = .1). The median time to the primary endpoint (onset of CHF or sudden death) was significantly longer in the pimobendan (718 days, IQR 441–1152 days) versus the placebo group (441 days, IQR 151–641 days) (log-rank P = 0.0088). The median survival time was significantly longer in the pimobendan (623 days, IQR 491–1531 days) versus the placebo group (466 days, IQR 236–710 days) (log-rank P = .034). Conclusion and Clinical Importance The administration of pimobendan to Dobermans with preclinical DCM prolongs the time to the onset of clinical signs and extends survival. Treatment of dogs in the preclinical phase of this common cardiovascular disorder with pimobendan can lead to improved outcome. PMID:23078651

  11. [Preclinical study of noopept toxicity].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, L P; Smol'nikova, N M; Alekseeva, S V; Nemova, E P; Sorokina, A V; Miramedova, M G; Kurapova, S P; Sidorina, E I; Kulakova, A V; Daugel'-Dauge, N O

    2002-01-01

    Within the framework of a preclinical investigation, the new nootrope drug noopept (N-phenyl-acetyl-L-propyl-glycine ethylate) was tested for chronic toxicity upon peroral administration in a dose of 10 or 100 mg/kg over 6 months in both male and female rabbits. The results of observations showed that noopept administered in this dose range induced no irreversible pathologic changes in the organs and systems studied and exhibited no allergenic, immunotoxic, and mutagen activity. The drug affected neither the generative function nor the antenatal or postnatal progeny development. Noopept produced a dose-dependent suppression of inflammation reaction to concanavalin A and stimulated the cellular and humoral immune response in mice. PMID:12025790

  12. Pre-clinical studies of toxin-specific Nanobodies: Evidence of in vivo efficacy to prevent fatal disturbances provoked by scorpion envenoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hmila, Issam; Cosyns, Bernard; Tounsi, Hayfa; Roosens, Bram; Caveliers, Vicky; Abderrazek, Rahma Ben; Boubaker, Samir; Muyldermans, Serge; Department of Structural Biology, VIB, Brussels ; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Bouhaouala-Zahar, Balkiss; Faculté de Médecine de Tunis, Université de Tunis-El Manar ; Lahoutte, Tony

    2012-10-15

    Scorpions represent a significant threat to humans and animals in various countries throughout the world. Recently, we introduced Nanobodies (Nbs) to combat more efficiently scorpion envenoming and demonstrated the performance of NbAahIF12 and NbAahII10 to neutralize scorpion toxins of Androctonus australis hector venom. A bispecific Nb construct (NbF12-10) comprising these two Nbs is far more protective than the classic Fab?{sub 2} based therapy and is the most efficient antivenom therapy against scorpion sting in preclinical studies. Now we investigate the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of {sup 99m}Tc labeled Nbs by in vivo imaging in rodents and compared these data with those of the Fab?{sub 2} product (PAS). The pharmacodynamics of the Nbs was investigated in rats by in vivo echocardiography and it is shown that NbF12-10 prevents effectively the hemodynamic disturbances induced by a lethal dose of venom. Moreover, even a late injection of NbF12-10 restores the heart rate and brings the blood pressure to baseline values. Histology confirms that NbF12-10 prevents lung and heart lesions of treated mice after envenoming. In conjunction, in this preclinical study, we provide proof of concept that NbF12-10 prevents effectively the fatal disturbances induced by Androctonus venom, and that the Nanobody based therapeutic has a potential to substitute the classic Fab?{sub 2} based product as immunotherapeutic in scorpion envenoming. Further clinical study using larger cohorts of animals should be considered to confirm the full protecting potential of our NbF12-10. -- Highlights: ? Nanobody therapy prevents the hemodynamic disturbances induced by a lethal dose. ? Late injection of Nanobody restores hemodynamic parameters to baseline values. ? Nanobody therapy prevents lung and heart lesions of treated mice after envenoming. ? Labeled Nanobody and Fab’2 pharmacokinetics curves reach plateau in favour of Nanobody.

  13. Preclinical Studies of Amixicile, a Systemic Therapeutic Developed for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infections That Also Shows Efficacy against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Alexandra M.; Olekhnovich, Igor; Warren, Cirle A.; Burgess, Stacey L.; Hontecillas, Raquel; Viladomiu, Monica; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guerrant, Richard L.; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Amixicile shows efficacy in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in a mouse model, with no recurrence of CDI. Since amixicile selectively inhibits the action of a B vitamin (thiamine pyrophosphate) cofactor of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), it may both escape mutation-based drug resistance and spare beneficial probiotic gut bacteria that do not express this enzyme. Amixicile is a water-soluble derivative of nitazoxanide (NTZ), an antiparasitic therapeutic that also shows efficacy against CDI in humans. In comparative studies, amixicile showed no toxicity to hepatocytes at 200 ?M (NTZ was toxic above 10 ?M); was not metabolized by human, dog, or rat liver microsomes; showed equivalence or superiority to NTZ in cytochrome P450 assays; and did not activate efflux pumps (breast cancer resistance protein, P glycoprotein). A maximum dose (300 mg/kg) of amixicile given by the oral or intraperitoneal route was well tolerated by mice and rats. Plasma exposure (rats) based on the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was 79.3 h · ?g/ml (30 mg/kg dose) to 328 h · ?g/ml (100 mg/kg dose), the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 20 ?g/ml, the time to the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 0.5 to 1 h, and the half-life was 5.6 h. Amixicile did not concentrate in mouse feces or adversely affect gut populations of Bacteroides species, Firmicutes, segmented filamentous bacteria, or Lactobacillus species. Systemic bioavailability was demonstrated through eradication of Helicobacter pylori in a mouse infection model. In summary, the efficacy of amixicile in treating CDI and other infections, together with low toxicity, an absence of mutation-based drug resistance, and excellent drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic metrics, suggests a potential for broad application in the treatment of infections caused by PFOR-expressing microbial pathogens in addition to CDI. PMID:24890599

  14. Preclinical studies of amixicile, a systemic therapeutic developed for treatment of Clostridium difficile infections that also shows efficacy against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Paul S; Bruce, Alexandra M; Olekhnovich, Igor; Warren, Cirle A; Burgess, Stacey L; Hontecillas, Raquel; Viladomiu, Monica; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guerrant, Richard L; Macdonald, Timothy L

    2014-08-01

    Amixicile shows efficacy in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in a mouse model, with no recurrence of CDI. Since amixicile selectively inhibits the action of a B vitamin (thiamine pyrophosphate) cofactor of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), it may both escape mutation-based drug resistance and spare beneficial probiotic gut bacteria that do not express this enzyme. Amixicile is a water-soluble derivative of nitazoxanide (NTZ), an antiparasitic therapeutic that also shows efficacy against CDI in humans. In comparative studies, amixicile showed no toxicity to hepatocytes at 200 ?M (NTZ was toxic above 10 ?M); was not metabolized by human, dog, or rat liver microsomes; showed equivalence or superiority to NTZ in cytochrome P450 assays; and did not activate efflux pumps (breast cancer resistance protein, P glycoprotein). A maximum dose (300 mg/kg) of amixicile given by the oral or intraperitoneal route was well tolerated by mice and rats. Plasma exposure (rats) based on the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was 79.3 h · ?g/ml (30 mg/kg dose) to 328 h · ?g/ml (100 mg/kg dose), the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 20 ?g/ml, the time to the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 0.5 to 1 h, and the half-life was 5.6 h. Amixicile did not concentrate in mouse feces or adversely affect gut populations of Bacteroides species, Firmicutes, segmented filamentous bacteria, or Lactobacillus species. Systemic bioavailability was demonstrated through eradication of Helicobacter pylori in a mouse infection model. In summary, the efficacy of amixicile in treating CDI and other infections, together with low toxicity, an absence of mutation-based drug resistance, and excellent drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic metrics, suggests a potential for broad application in the treatment of infections caused by PFOR-expressing microbial pathogens in addition to CDI. PMID:24890599

  15. Ushering in the study and treatment of preclinical Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Langbaum, Jessica B; Fleisher, Adam S; Chen, Kewei; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Lopera, Francisco; Quiroz, Yakeel T; Caselli, Richard J; Tariot, Pierre N; Reiman, Eric M

    2013-07-01

    Researchers have begun to characterize the subtle biological and cognitive processes that precede the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), and to set the stage for accelerated evaluation of experimental treatments to delay the onset, reduce the risk of, or completely prevent clinical decline. In this Review, we provide an overview of the experimental strategies, and brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid biomarker measures that are used in early detection and tracking of AD, highlighting at-risk individuals who could be suitable for preclinical monitoring. We discuss how advances in the field have contributed to reconceptualization of AD as a sequence of biological changes that occur during progression from preclinical AD, to mild cognitive impairment and finally dementia, and we review recently proposed research criteria for preclinical AD. Advances in the study of preclinical AD have driven the recognition that efficacy of at least some AD therapies may depend on initiation of treatment before clinical manifestation of disease, leading to a new era of AD prevention research. PMID:23752908

  16. USHERING IN THE STUDY AND TREATMENT OF PRECLINICAL ALZHEIMER DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Fleisher, Adam S.; Chen, Kewei; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Lopera, Francisco; Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Caselli, Richard J.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Reiman, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have begun to characterize the subtle biological and cognitive processes that precede the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), and to set the stage for accelerated evaluation of experimental treatments to delay the onset, reduce the risk of or completely prevent clinical decline. Here, we provide an overview of the experimental strategies, and brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid biomarker measures that are used in early detection and tracking of AD, highlighting at-risk individuals who could be suitable for preclinical monitoring. We discuss how these advances have contributed to reconceptualization of AD as a sequence of biological changes that occur during progression from preclinical AD, to mild cognitive impairment and finally dementia, and we review recently proposed research criteria for preclinical AD. Advances in the study of preclinical AD have driven the recognition that efficacy of at least some AD therapies may depend on initiation of treatment before clinical manifestation of disease, leading to a new era of AD prevention research. PMID:23752908

  17. Preclinical Childhood Sarcoma Models: Drug Efficacy Biomarker Identification and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Geier, Brian; Kurmashev, Dias; Kurmasheva, Raushan T.; Houghton, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 35?years, cure rates for pediatric cancers have increased dramatically. However, it is clear that further dose intensification using cytotoxic agents or radiation therapy is not possible without enhancing morbidity and long-term effects. Consequently, novel, less genotoxic, agents are being sought to complement existing treatments. Here, we discuss preclinical human tumor xenograft models of pediatric cancers that may be used practically to identify novel agents for soft tissue and bone sarcomas, and “omics” approaches to identifying biomarkers that may identify sensitive and resistant tumors to these agents. PMID:26380223

  18. Preclinical Studies of Novel Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The bone marrow (BM) milieu confers drug resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) cells to conventional therapies. Therefore novel biologically-based therapies are needed. Preclinical studies have identified and validated molecular targeted therapeutics in MM. In particular, recognition of the biologic significance of the BM microenvironment both in MM pathogenesis and as a potential target for novel therapeutics has already derived several promising approaches. Thalidomide, lenalidomide (Revlimid®) and bortezomib (Velcade®) are directed not only at MM cells, but also BM milieu, and have rapidly from the bench to the bedside and FDA approval to treat MM. PMID:17996589

  19. [Efficacy studies].

    PubMed

    Pedro-Botet, Juan; Flores-Le Roux, Juana A

    2014-07-01

    Pravafenix(®) is a fixed-dose combination of 40mg of pravastatin and 160 mg of fenofibrate. The rationale behind the use of Pravafenix(®) is based on the increased residual cardiovascular risk observed in high risk patients with hypertriglyceridemia and/or low HDL cholesterol levels despite treatment with statins in monotherapy. In this article, we review the available evidence on the clinical efficacy of Pravafenix(®), which shows complementary benefits in the overall lipid profile of high risk patients with mixed dyslipidemia not controlled with 40-mg pravastatin or 20-mg simvastatin. PMID:25043542

  20. Efficacy of oncolytic adenovirus expressing suicide genes and interleukin-12 in preclinical model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Freytag, SO; Barton, KN; Zhang, Y

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy has been shown to improve local tumor control in preclinical tumor models and in the clinic. Although local tumor control is important, for most human cancers, new therapies must also target metastatic disease if they are to have an impact on survival. Here, we test the hypothesis that adding cytokine gene therapy to our multimodal platform improves both local and metastatic tumor control in a preclinical model of prostate cancer. An oncolytic adenovirus (Ad5-yCD/mutTKSR39rep-mIL12) expressing two suicide genes and mouse interleukin-12 (IL-12) was generated. Relative to an adenovirus lacking IL-12 (Ad5-yCD/mutTKSR39rep), Ad5-yCD/mutTKSR39rep-mIL12 improved local and metastatic tumor control in the TRAMP-C2 prostate adenocarcinoma model, resulting in a significant increase in survival. Ad5-yCD/mutTKSR39rep-mIL12 resulted in high levels of IL-12 and interferon gamma in serum and tumor, increased natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte lytic activities, and the development of tumor-specific antitumor immunity. Immune cell depletion studies indicated that both the innate and adaptive arms of immunity were required for maximal Ad5-yCD/mutTKSR39rep-mIL12 activity. The results demonstrate that the addition of IL-12 significantly improves the efficacy of oncolytic adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy and provide the scientific basis for future trials targeting locally aggressive cancers. PMID:23842593

  1. A review of preclinical animal models utilised for TB vaccine evaluation in the context of recent human efficacy data?

    PubMed Central

    McShane, Helen; Williams, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is an urgent need for an improved TB vaccine. Vaccine development is hindered by the lack of immune correlates and uncertain predictive value of preclinical animal models. As data become available from human efficacy trials, there is an opportunity to evaluate the predictive value of the criteria used to select candidate vaccines. Here we review the efficacy in animal models of the MVA85A candidate vaccine in light of recent human efficacy data and propose refinements to the preclinical models with the aim of increasing their predictive value for human efficacy. PMID:24369986

  2. Oncolysis by paramyxoviruses: preclinical and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, Olga V; Guo, Zong S; Senin, Vyacheslav M; Senina, Anna V; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Chumakov, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies demonstrate that a broad spectrum of human malignant cells can be killed by oncolytic paramyxoviruses, which include cells of ecto-, endo-, and mesodermal origin. In clinical trials, significant reduction in size or even complete elimination of primary tumors and established metastases are reported. Different routes of viral administration (intratumoral, intravenous, intradermal, intraperitoneal, or intrapleural), and single- versus multiple-dose administration schemes have been explored. The reported side effects are grade 1 and 2, with the most common among them being mild fever. Some advantages in using para-myxoviruses as oncolytic agents versus representatives of other viral families exist. The cytoplasmic replication results in a lack of host genome integration and recombination, which makes paramyxoviruses safer and more attractive candidates for widely used therapeutic oncolysis in comparison with retroviruses or some DNA viruses. The list of oncolytic paramyxovirus representatives includes attenuated measles virus (MV), mumps virus (MuV), low pathogenic Newcastle disease (NDV), and Sendai (SeV) viruses. Metastatic cancer cells frequently overexpress on their surface some molecules that can serve as receptors for MV, MuV, NDV, and SeV. This promotes specific viral attachment to the malignant cell, which is frequently followed by specific viral replication. The paramyxoviruses are capable of inducing efficient syncytium-mediated lyses of cancer cells and elicit strong immunomodulatory effects that dramatically enforce anticancer immune surveillance. In general, preclinical studies and phase 1–3 clinical trials yield very encouraging results and warrant continued research of oncolytic paramyxoviruses as a particularly valuable addition to the existing panel of cancer-fighting approaches. PMID:26640815

  3. Antidepressant mechanism of ketamine: perspective from preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Scheuing, Lisa; Chiu, Chi-Tso; Liao, Hsiao-Mei; Chuang, De-Maw

    2015-01-01

    A debilitating mental disorder, major depressive disorder is a leading cause of global disease burden. Existing antidepressant drugs are not adequate for the majority of depressed patients, and large clinical studies have demonstrated their limited efficacy and slow response onset. Growing evidence of low-dose ketamine's rapid and potent antidepressant effects offers strong potential for future antidepressant agents. However, ketamine has considerable drawbacks such as its abuse potential, psychomimetic effects, and increased oxidative stress in the brain, thus limiting its widespread clinical use. To develop superior antidepressant drugs, it is crucial to better understand ketamine's antidepressant mechanism of action. Recent preclinical studies indicate that ketamine's antidepressant mechanism involves mammalian target of rapamycin pathway activation and subsequent synaptogenesis in the prefrontal cortex, as well as glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3?) inactivation. Adjunct GSK-3? inhibitors, such as lithium, can enhance ketamine's efficacy by augmenting and prolonging its antidepressant effects. Given the potential for depressive relapses, lithium in addition to ketamine is a promising solution for this clinical issue. PMID:26257598

  4. Evaluating the Suitability of Using Rat Models for Preclinical Efficacy and Side Effects with Inhaled Corticosteroids Nanosuspension Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Hu, Yiding; Blom, Jason D.; Thompson, David C.

    2010-06-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are often prescribed as first-line therapy for patients with asthma Despite their efficacy and improved safety profile compared with oral corticosteroids, the potential for systemic side effects continues to cause concern. In order to reduce the potential for systemic side effects, the pharmaceutical industry has begun efforts to generate new drugs with pulmonary-targeted topical efficacy. One of the major challenges of this approach is to differentiate both efficacy and side effects (pulmonary vs. systemic) in a preclinical animal model. In this study, fluticasone and ciclesonide were used as tool compounds to explore the possibility of demonstrating both efficacy and side effects in a rat model using pulmonary delivery via intratracheal (IT) instillation with nanosuspension formulations. The inhibition of neutrophil infiltration into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and cytokine (TNF?) production were utilized to assess pulmonary efficacy, while adrenal and thymus involution as well as plasma corticosterone suppression was measured to assess systemic side effects. Based on neutrophil infiltration and cytokine production data, the ED50s for ciclesonide and fluticasone were calculated to be 0.1 and 0.03 mg, respectively. At the ED50, the average adrenal involution was 7.6 ± 5.3% for ciclesonide versus 16.6 ± 5.1% for fluticasone, while the average thymus involution was 41.0 ± 4.3% for ciclesonide versus 59.5 ± 5.8% for fluticasone. However, the differentiation became less significant when the dose was pushed to the EDmax (0.3 mg for ciclesonide, 0.1 mg for fluticasone). Overall, the efficacy and side effect profiles of the two compounds exhibited differentiation at low to mid doses (0.03-0.1 mg ciclesonide, 0.01-0.03 mg fluticasone), while this differentiation diminished at the maximum efficacious dose (0.3 mg ciclesonide, 0.1 mg fluticasone), likely due to overdosing in this model. We conclude that the rat LPS model using IT administration of nanosuspensions of ICS is a useful tool to demonstrate pulmonary-targeted efficacy and to differentiate the side effects. However, it is only suitable at sub-maximum efficacious levels.

  5. PTEN status mediates 2ME2 anti-tumor efficacy in preclinical glioblastoma models: role of HIF1? suppression.

    PubMed

    Muh, Carrie R; Joshi, Shweta; Singh, Alok R; Kesari, Santosh; Durden, Donald L; Makale, Milan T

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common brain cancer and is highly lethal in both adults and children. 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) is a microtubule inhibitor that potently inhibits HIF1?, GBM angiogenesis and tumor growth in preclinical models. In patients, 2ME2 exhibits low toxicity and promising but inconsistent efficacy. Given its preclinical potency and its tolerability in patients, we sought to determine whether 2ME2 therapy could be enhanced by addressing resistance via combination therapy, and with biomarkers to identify responsive glioma subgroups. We demonstrate that the PTEN-PI3K axis regulates HIF1? in glioma models. We utilized isogenic-pairs of glioma cell lines, deficient in PTEN or stably reconstituted with PTEN, to determine the role of PTEN in 2ME2 sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Chou-Talalay synergy studies reveal significant synergy when a pan-PI3K inhibitor is combined with 2ME2. This synergistic activity was correlated with a synergistic suppression of HIF1? accumulation under hypoxic conditions in glioma models. In vivo, 2ME2 markedly inhibited tumor-induced angiogenesis and significantly reduced tumor growth only in a PTEN reconstituted GBM models in both subcutaneous and orthotopic intracranial mouse models. Collectively, these results: (1) suggest that PTEN status predicts sensitivity to 2ME2 and (2) justify exploration of 2ME2 combined with pan-PI3K inhibitors for the treatment of this intractable brain cancer. PMID:24162827

  6. [Preclinical study of Reamberin and Remaxol safety].

    PubMed

    Savateeva-Liubimova, T N; Lesiovskaia, E E; Sivak, K V; Stosman, K I; Shevchuk, M K; Dagaev, S G; Savateev, A V; Kovalenko, A L; Petrov, A Iu; Sukhanov, D S

    2010-11-01

    Preclinical safety of reamberin, a preparation of succinic acid intended for the treatment of patients with shock conditions of different etiology, and remaxol a drug intended for the treatment of patients with liver dysfunction caused by acute intoxication was performed. Both medicines belong to the 5th class of practically non-toxic drugs. Their administration to experimental animals for 30 days did not cause toxic effects on the functional and morphological state of main systems and organs. Both medicines do not affect specific (humoral and cellular) and non-specific immune response and do not cause sensibilization, mutagenic, embryotoxic and teratogenic effects, and also do no alter parameters of reproductive functions of rats. PMID:21254599

  7. Analgesia in Amphibians: Preclinical Studies and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Preclinical studies of analgesia in amphibians or recommendations for clinical use of analgesics in amphibian species are extremely limited. This article briefly reviews the issues surrounding the use of analgesics in amphibians starting with common definitions of pain and analgesia when applied to non-human animals. Nociceptive and endogenous opioid systems in amphibians are reviewed and results of preclinical research on opioid and non-opioid analgesics summarized. Recommended opioid and non-opioid analgesics are summarized and practical recommendations made for their clinical use. PMID:21074701

  8. PRECLINICAL STUDY Prediction of lymph node involvement in breast cancer

    E-print Network

    PRECLINICAL STUDY Prediction of lymph node involvement in breast cancer from primary tumor tissue- ther lymph node involvement in breast cancer is influenced by gene or miRNA expression of the primary tissue from a group of 96 breast cancer patients balanced for lymph node involvement using Affymetrix

  9. PRECLINICAL STUDIES Cribrostatin 6 induces death in cancer cells through

    E-print Network

    Hergenrother, Paul J.

    PRECLINICAL STUDIES Cribrostatin 6 induces death in cancer cells through a reactive oxygen species of cancer cell lines in culture, and its mechanism of action and scope of activity are unknown. Here we show . Apoptosis . Cancer stem cells . Transcript profile . Quiescent cells . Drug-resistant cell lines

  10. Bridging Translation by Improving Preclinical Study Design in AKI.

    PubMed

    de Caestecker, Mark; Humphreys, Ben D; Liu, Kathleen D; Fissell, William H; Cerda, Jorge; Nolin, Thomas D; Askenazi, David; Mour, Girish; Harrell, Frank E; Pullen, Nick; Okusa, Mark D; Faubel, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    Despite extensive research, no therapeutic interventions have been shown to prevent AKI, accelerate recovery of AKI, or reduce progression of AKI to CKD in patients. This failure in translation has led investigators to speculate that the animal models being used do not predict therapeutic responses in humans. Although this issue continues to be debated, an important concern that has not been addressed is whether improvements in preclinical study design can be identified that might also increase the likelihood of translating basic AKI research into clinical practice using the current models. In this review, we have taken an evidence-based approach to identify common weaknesses in study design and reporting in preclinical AKI research that may contribute to the poor translatability of the findings. We focused on use of N-acetylcysteine or sodium bicarbonate for the prevention of contrast-induced AKI and use of erythropoietin for the prevention of AKI, two therapeutic approaches that have been extensively studied in clinical trials. On the basis of our findings, we identified five areas for improvement in preclinical study design and reporting. These suggested and preliminary guidelines may help improve the quality of preclinical research for AKI drug development. PMID:26538634

  11. Preclinical efficacy and mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells in animal models of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Kyung; Lim, Sang Hee; Chung, In Sung; Park, Yunsoo; Park, Mi Jeong; Kim, Ju Young; Kim, Yong Guk; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2014-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are present in diverse tissues and organs, including bone marrow, umbilical cord, adipose tissue, and placenta. MSCs can expand easily in vitro and have regenerative stem cell properties and potent immunoregulatory activity. They inhibit the functions of dendritic cells, B cells, and T cells, but enhance those of regulatory T cells by producing immunoregulatory molecules such as transforming growth factor-?, hepatic growth factors, prostaglandin E2, interleukin-10, indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase, nitric oxide, heme oxygenase-1, and human leukocyte antigen-G. These properties make MSCs promising therapeutic candidates for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Here, we review the preclinical studies of MSCs in animal models for systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and summarize the underlying immunoregulatory mechanisms. PMID:24851097

  12. Extended Preclinical Safety, Efficacy and Stability Testing of a Live-attenuated Chikungunya Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Plante, Kenneth S; Rossi, Shannan L.; Bergren, Nicholas A.; Seymour, Robert L.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    We recently described a new, live-attenuated vaccine candidate for chikungunya (CHIK) fever, CHIKV/IRES. This vaccine was shown to be well attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious in protecting against CHIK virus (CHIKV) challenge of mice and nonhuman primates. To further evaluate its preclinical safety, we compared CHIKV/IRES distribution and viral loads in interferon-?/? receptor-incompetent A129 mice to another CHIK vaccine candidate, 181/clone25, which proved highly immunogenic but mildly reactive in human Phase I/II clinical trials. Compared to wild-type CHIK virus, (wt-CHIKV), both vaccines generated lower viral loads in a wide variety of tissues and organs, including the brain and leg muscle, but CHIKV/IRES exhibited marked restrictions in dissemination and viral loads compared to 181/clone25, and was never found outside the blood, spleen and muscle. Unlike wt-CHIKV, which caused disrupted splenic architecture and hepatic lesions, histopathological lesions were not observed in animals infected with either vaccine strain. To examine the stability of attenuation, both vaccines were passaged 5 times intracranially in infant A129 mice, then assessed for changes in virulence by comparing parental and passaged viruses for footpad swelling, weight stability and survival after subcutaneous infection. Whereas strain 181/clone25 p5 underwent a significant increase in virulence as measured by weight loss (from <10% to >30%) and mortality (from 0 to 100%), CHIKV/IRES underwent no detectible change in any measure of virulence (no significant weight loss and no mortality). These data indicate greater nonclinical safety of the CHIKV/IRES vaccine candidate compared to 181/clone25, further supporting its eligibility for human testing. PMID:26340754

  13. Preclinical profile of a potent gamma-secretase inhibitor targeting notch signaling with in vivo efficacy and pharmacodynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Luistro, Leopoldo; He, Wei; Smith, Melissa; Packman, Kathryn; Vilenchik, Maria; Carvajal, Daisy; Roberts, John; Cai, James; Berkofsky-Fessler, Windy; Hilton, Holly; Linn, Michael; Flohr, Alexander; Jakob-Røtne, Roland; Jacobsen, Helmut; Glenn, Kelli; Heimbrook, David; Boylan, John F

    2009-10-01

    Notch signaling is an area of great interest in oncology. RO4929097 is a potent and selective inhibitor of gamma-secretase, producing inhibitory activity of Notch signaling in tumor cells. The RO4929097 IC50 in cell-free and cellular assays is in the low nanomolar range with >100-fold selectivity with respect to 75 other proteins of various types (receptors, ion channels, and enzymes). RO4929097 inhibits Notch processing in tumor cells as measured by the reduction of intracellular Notch expression by Western blot. This leads to reduced expression of the Notch transcriptional target gene Hes1. RO4929097 does not block tumor cell proliferation or induce apoptosis but instead produces a less transformed, flattened, slower-growing phenotype. RO4929097 is active following oral dosing. Antitumor activity was shown in 7 of 8 xenografts tested on an intermittent or daily schedule in the absence of body weight loss or Notch-related toxicities. Importantly, efficacy is maintained after dosing is terminated. Angiogenesis reverse transcription-PCR array data show reduced expression of several key angiogenic genes. In addition, comparative microarray analysis suggests tumor cell differentiation as an additional mode of action. These preclinical results support evaluation of RO4929097 in clinical studies using an intermittent dosing schedule. A multicenter phase I dose escalation study in oncology is under way. PMID:19773430

  14. Preclinical efficacy of growth hormone-releasing hormone antagonists for androgen-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenholtz, Cale D.; Rick, Ferenc G.; Garcia, Maria I.; Zarandi, Marta; Cai, Ren-Zhi; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Burnstein, Kerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced hormone-sensitive prostate cancer responds to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT); however, therapeutic options for recurrent castration-resistant disease are limited. Because growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) are regulated in an autocrine fashion in prostate cancer, inhibition of GHRH-R represents a compelling approach to treatment. We investigated the effects of the latest series of improved, highly potent GHRH antagonists—MIA-602, MIA-606, and MIA-690—on the growth of androgen-dependent as well as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells in vitro and in vivo. GHRH-R and its splice variant, SV1, were present in 22Rv1, LNCaP, and VCaP human prostate cancer cell lines. Androgen-dependent LNCaP and VCaP cells expressed higher levels of GHRH-R protein compared with castration-resistant 22Rv1 cells; however, 22Rv1 expressed higher levels of SV1. In vitro, MIA-602 decreased cell proliferation of 22Rv1, LNCaP, and VCaP prostate cancer cell lines by 70%, 61%, and 20%, respectively (all P < 0.05), indicating direct effects of MIA-602. In vivo, MIA-602 was more effective than MIA-606 and MIA-690 and decreased 22Rv1 xenograft tumor volumes in mice by 63% after 3 wk (P < 0.05). No noticeable untoward effects or changes in body weight occurred. In vitro, the VCaP cell line was minimally inhibited by MIA-602, but in vivo, this line showed a substantial reduction in growth of xenografts in response to MIA-602, indicating both direct and systemic inhibitory effects. MIA-602 also further inhibited VCaP xenografts when combined with ADT. This study demonstrates the preclinical efficacy of the GHRH antagonist MIA-602 for treatment of both androgen-dependent and CRPC. PMID:24395797

  15. The efficacy of the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor Didox in preclinical models of AML.

    PubMed

    Cook, Guerry J; Caudell, David L; Elford, Howard L; Pardee, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy which leads to marrow failure, and ultimately death. There is a desperate need for new therapeutics for these patients. Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is the rate limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis. Didox (3,4-Dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid) is a novel RR inhibitor noted to be more potent than hydroxyurea. In this report we detail the activity and toxicity of Didox in preclinical models of AML. RR was present in all AML cell lines and primary patient samples tested. Didox was active against all human and murine AML lines tested with IC50 values in the low micromolar range (mean IC50 37 µM [range 25.89-52.70 µM]). It was active against primary patient samples at concentrations that did not affect normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Didox exposure resulted in DNA damage and p53 induction culminating in apoptosis. In syngeneic, therapy-resistant AML models, single agent Didox treatment resulted in a significant reduction in leukemia burden and a survival benefit. Didox was well tolerated, as marrow from treated animals was morphologically indistinguishable from controls. Didox exposure at levels that impaired leukemia growth did not inhibit normal HSC engraftment. In summary, Didox was well tolerated and effective against preclinical models of AML. PMID:25402485

  16. The Efficacy of the Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitor Didox in Preclinical Models of AML

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Guerry J.; Caudell, David L.; Elford, Howard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy which leads to marrow failure, and ultimately death. There is a desperate need for new therapeutics for these patients. Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is the rate limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis. Didox (3,4-Dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid) is a novel RR inhibitor noted to be more potent than hydroxyurea. In this report we detail the activity and toxicity of Didox in preclinical models of AML. RR was present in all AML cell lines and primary patient samples tested. Didox was active against all human and murine AML lines tested with IC50 values in the low micromolar range (mean IC50 37 µM [range 25.89–52.70 µM]). It was active against primary patient samples at concentrations that did not affect normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Didox exposure resulted in DNA damage and p53 induction culminating in apoptosis. In syngeneic, therapy-resistant AML models, single agent Didox treatment resulted in a significant reduction in leukemia burden and a survival benefit. Didox was well tolerated, as marrow from treated animals was morphologically indistinguishable from controls. Didox exposure at levels that impaired leukemia growth did not inhibit normal HSC engraftment. In summary, Didox was well tolerated and effective against preclinical models of AML. PMID:25402485

  17. Preclinical therapeutic efficacy of a novel pharmacologic inducer of apoptosis in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Chau, Vincent; Lim, S Kyun; Mo, Wei; Liu, Chiachi; Patel, Amish J; McKay, Renée M; Wei, Shuguang; Posner, Bruce A; De Brabander, Jef K; Williams, Noelle S; Parada, Luis F; Le, Lu Q

    2014-01-15

    Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is an autosomal disorder that affects neural crest-derived tissues, leading to a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. Patients commonly present with plexiform neurofibromas, benign but debilitating growths that can transform into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST), a main cause of mortality. Currently, surgery is the primary course of treatment for MPNST, but with the limitation that these tumors are highly invasive. Radiotherapy is another treatment option, but is undesirable because it can induce additional mutations. Patients with MPNST may also receive doxorubicin as therapy, but this DNA-intercalating agent has relatively low tumor specificity and limited efficacy. In this study, we exploited a robust genetically engineered mouse model of MPNST that recapitulates human NF1-associated MPNST to identify a novel small chemical compound that inhibits tumor cell growth. Compound 21 (Cpd21) inhibits growth of all available in vitro models of MPNST and human MPNST cell lines, while remaining nontoxic to normally dividing Schwann cells or mouse embryonic fibroblasts. We show that this compound delays the cell cycle and leads to cellular apoptosis. Moreover, Cpd21 can reduce MPNST burden in a mouse allograft model, underscoring the compound's potential as a novel chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:24285727

  18. Preclinical Development and In Vivo Efficacy of Ceftiofur-PLGA Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vilos, Cristian; Velasquez, Luis A.; Rodas, Paula I.; Zepeda, Katherine; Bong, Soung-Jae; Herrera, Natalia; Cantin, Mario; Simon, Felipe; Constandil, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery systems based on polymeric microparticles represent an interesting field of development for the treatment of several infectious diseases for humans and animals. In this work, we developed PLGA microparticles loaded with ceftiofur (PLGA-cef), a third- generation cephalosporin that is used exclusively used in animals. PLGA-cef was prepared by the double emulsion w/o/w method, and exhibited a diameter in the range of 1.5–2.2 ?m, and a negative ? potential in the range of -35 to -55 mV. The loading yield of PLGA-cef was ~7% and encapsulation efficiency was approximately 40%. The pharmacokinetic study demonstrated a sustained release profile of ceftiofur for 20 days. PLGA-cef administrated in a single dose was more effective than ceftiofur non-encapsulated in rats challenged with S. Typhimurium. The in vivo toxicological evaluation showed that PLGA-cef did not affect the blood biochemical, hematological and hemostasis parameters. Overall, the PLGA-cef showed slow in vivo release profile, high antibacterial efficacy, and low toxicity. The results obtained supports the safe application of PLGA-cef as sustained release platform in the veterinary industry. PMID:25915043

  19. Preclinical Development and In Vivo Efficacy of Ceftiofur-PLGA Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Vilos, Cristian; Velasquez, Luis A; Rodas, Paula I; Zepeda, Katherine; Bong, Soung-Jae; Herrera, Natalia; Cantin, Mario; Simon, Felipe; Constandil, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery systems based on polymeric microparticles represent an interesting field of development for the treatment of several infectious diseases for humans and animals. In this work, we developed PLGA microparticles loaded with ceftiofur (PLGA-cef), a third- generation cephalosporin that is used exclusively used in animals. PLGA-cef was prepared by the double emulsion w/o/w method, and exhibited a diameter in the range of 1.5-2.2 ?m, and a negative ? potential in the range of -35 to -55 mV. The loading yield of PLGA-cef was ~7% and encapsulation efficiency was approximately 40%. The pharmacokinetic study demonstrated a sustained release profile of ceftiofur for 20 days. PLGA-cef administrated in a single dose was more effective than ceftiofur non-encapsulated in rats challenged with S. Typhimurium. The in vivo toxicological evaluation showed that PLGA-cef did not affect the blood biochemical, hematological and hemostasis parameters. Overall, the PLGA-cef showed slow in vivo release profile, high antibacterial efficacy, and low toxicity. The results obtained supports the safe application of PLGA-cef as sustained release platform in the veterinary industry. PMID:25915043

  20. Role of self-efficacy and anxiety among pre-clinically disabled older adults when using compensatory strategies to complete daily tasks

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Torrance J.; Janelle, Christopher M.; Naugle, Kelly M.; Knaggs, Jeffrey; Hoover, Brian M.; Marsiske, Michael; Manini, Todd M.

    2012-01-01

    Classic developmental theory suggests that aging is associated with using compensatory strategies to prolong independence. While compensatory strategies are typically considered positive adaptations, they also signify an early phase in the disablement process — commonly known as pre-clinical disability. To build a better understanding of psychological constructs related to these early signs of disability, we examined the contribution of self-efficacy and state anxiety on using compensatory strategies among pre-clinically disabled older adults. Compensatory strategies were observed during performance of daily activities in 257 pre-clinically disabled older adults (67.6 ± 7.04), and self-efficacy and state anxiety were evaluated prior to performing each task. In univariate models, lower self-efficacy and higher anxiety were associated with more compensation (Spearman correlations: 0.15-0.48, p < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression indicated that low self-efficacy [Odds Ratio (OR): 1.70; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.40-2.08) and high anxiety (OR: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.10-1.63) were positively associated with using ? 6 compensatory strategies – a level signifying substantial compensation. When considered jointly with self-efficacy, the association with anxiety was reversed— higher anxiety demonstrated a lower likelihood of using compensation (OR: 0.70-0.73; 95% CI: 0.50-0.99). The addition of self-efficacy might remove the self-defeating cognitions characterizing anxiety allowing the remaining arousal component to appear beneficial. In conclusion, lower self-efficacy and higher anxiety are associated with using compensation to complete daily tasks among pre-clinically disabled older adults. Such psychological constructs may contribute to the use of compensatory strategies and represent future intervention targets to help reduce early signs of disability. PMID:22770713

  1. Neuraxial Analgesia In Neonates And Infants: Review of Clinical and Preclinical Strategies for the Development of Safety and Efficacy Data

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M.; Yaksh, Tony L.

    2015-01-01

    Neuraxial agents provide robust pain control, have the potential to improve outcomes, and are an important component of the perioperative care of children. Opioids or clonidine improve analgesia when added to perioperative epidural infusions; analgesia is significantly prolonged by addition of clonidine, ketamine, neostigmine or tramadol to single shot caudal injections of local anesthetic; and neonatal intrathecal anesthesia/analgesia is increasing in some centers. However, it is difficult to determine the relative risk-benefit of different techniques and drugs without detailed and sensitive data related to analgesia requirements, side-effects, and follow-up. Current data related to benefits and complications in neonates and infants are summarized, but variability in current neuraxial drug use reflects the relative lack of high quality evidence. Recent preclinical reports of adverse effects of general anesthetics on the developing brain have increased awareness of the potential benefit of neuraxial anesthesia/analgesia to avoid or reduce general anesthetic dose requirements. However, the developing spinal cord is also vulnerable to drug-related toxicity, and although there are well-established preclinical models and criteria for assessing spinal cord toxicity in adult animals, until recently there had been no systematic evaluation during early life. Therefore, the second half of this review presents preclinical data evaluating age-dependent changes in the pharmacodynamic response to different spinal analgesics, and recent studies evaluating spinal toxicity in specific developmental models. Finally, we advocate use of neuraxial agents with the widest demonstrable safety margin and suggest minimum standards for preclinical evaluation prior to adoption of new analgesics or preparations into routine clinical practice. PMID:22798528

  2. Preclinical examination of clofarabine in pediatric ependymoma: intratumoral concentrations insufficient to warrant further study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogesh T; Jacus, Megan O; Boulos, Nidal; Dapper, Jason D; Davis, Abigail D; Vuppala, Pradeep K; Freeman, Burgess B; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Throm, Stacy L; Gilbertson, Richard J; Stewart, Clinton F

    2015-05-01

    Clofarabine, a deoxyadenosine analog, was an active anticancer drug in our in vitro high-throughput screening against mouse ependymoma neurospheres. To characterize the clofarabine disposition in mice for further preclinical efficacy studies, we evaluated the plasma and central nervous system disposition in a mouse model of ependymoma. A plasma pharmacokinetic study of clofarabine (45 mg/kg, IP) was performed in CD1 nude mice bearing ependymoma to obtain initial plasma pharmacokinetic parameters. These estimates were used to derive D-optimal plasma sampling time points for cerebral microdialysis studies. A simulation of clofarabine pharmacokinetics in mice and pediatric patients suggested that a dosage of 30 mg/kg IP in mice would give exposures comparable to that in children at a dosage of 148 mg/m(2). Cerebral microdialysis was performed to study the tumor extracellular fluid (ECF) disposition of clofarabine (30 mg/kg, IP) in the ependymoma cortical allografts. Plasma and tumor ECF concentration-time data were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling approach. The median unbound fraction of clofarabine in mouse plasma was 0.79. The unbound tumor to plasma partition coefficient (K pt,uu: ratio of tumor to plasma AUCu,0-inf) of clofarabine was 0.12 ± 0.05. The model-predicted mean tumor ECF clofarabine concentrations were below the in vitro 1-h IC50 (407 ng/mL) for ependymoma neurospheres. Thus, our results show the clofarabine exposure reached in the tumor ECF was below that associated with an antitumor effect in our in vitro washout study. Therefore, clofarabine was de-prioritized as an agent to treat ependymoma, and further preclinical studies were not pursued. PMID:25724157

  3. Decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels: In basic research and preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Raymond M; Christman, Karen L

    2016-01-15

    A variety of decellularized materials have been developed that have demonstrated potential for treating cardiovascular diseases and improving our understanding of cardiac development. Of these biomaterials, decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels have shown great promise for creating cellular microenvironments representative of the native cardiac tissue and treating the heart after a myocardial infarction. Decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels derived from porcine cardiac tissue form a nanofibrous hydrogel once thermally induced at physiological temperatures. Use of isolated cardiac extracellular matrix in 2D and 3D in vitro platforms has demonstrated the capability to provide tissue specific cues for cardiac cell growth and differentiation. Testing of the myocardial matrix hydrogel as a therapy after myocardial infarction in both small and large animal models has demonstrated improved left ventricular function, increased cardiac muscle, and cellular recruitment into the treated infarct. Based on these results, steps are currently being taken to translate these hydrogels into a clinically used injectable biomaterial therapy. In this review, we will focus on the basic science and preclinical studies that have accelerated the development of decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels into an emerging novel therapy for treating the heart after a myocardial infarction. PMID:26056717

  4. Preclinical safety studies on autologous cultured human skin fibroblast transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Zhang, Shuying; Liu, Dai; Chai, Mi; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhao, Yuming

    2014-01-01

    Recently, FDA approved the clinical use of autologous fibroblasts (LAVIV™) for the improvement of nasolabial fold wrinkles in adults. The use of autologous fibroblasts for the augmentation of dermal and subcutaneous defects represents a potentially exciting natural alternative to the use of other filler materials for its long-term corrective ability and absence of allergic adverse effects proved by clinical application. However, compared to the clinical evidence, preclinical studies are far from enough. In this study, human skin-derived fibroblasts were cultured and expanded for both in vitro and in vivo observations. In vitro, the subcultured fibroblasts were divided into two groups. One set of cells underwent cell cycle and karyotype analysis at passages 5 and 10. The second group of cells was cocultured in medium with different concentrations of human skin extract D for the measurement of collagen concentration and cell count. In vivo, the subcultured fibroblasts were injected into nude mice subcutaneously. Biopsies were taken for morphology observation and specific collagen staining at 1, 2, and 3 months after injection. The results in vitro showed no significant differences in cell cycle distribution between passages 5 and 10. Cell proliferation and secretion were inhibited as the concentration of extract D increased. In vivo, the fibroblasts were remarkably denser on the experimental side with no dysplastic cells. Mitotic cells were easily observed at the end of the first month but were rare at the end of the third month. Type III collagen was detected at the end of the first month, while collagen type I was positive at the end of the second month. The content of both collagens increased as time passed. The above results indicated that the use of the autologous fibroblasts was safe, providing a basic support for clinical use of fibroblasts. PMID:23211390

  5. Fluorescence detection of tumors: studies on the early diagnosis of microscopic lesions in preclinical and clinical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, Thomas S.; McGinnis, Carolyn; Crean, David H.; Khan, S.; Liebow, Charles

    1991-06-01

    The growth of microscopic tumor lesions at or beyond treatment field lesions poses major problems in the diagnosis and curative treatment of numerous cancers. Early detection techniques which clearly define the extent of condemned or field spread of disease may improve the primary treatment of the disease. In vivo fluorescence photometry is a non-imaging technique which digitally displays relative fluorescence values in volts. The sensitivity of the instrument has allowed the detection of micrometastases in both pre-clinical and clinical studies using drug doses that are 80-90 lower than those used therapeutically. This technique is now being applied in preliminary experiments to the hamster cheek pouch models to (1) discern varying grades of dysplasia; (2) levels of uptake of the drug in normal growing and quiescent tumors. Results will be shown in two models in which this technique has shown to be efficacious preclinically in the Pollard rat adenocarcinoma model in which micrometastases in the lymph node have been detected, and preliminary studies involving the hamster cheek pouch model in which the pouch is painted with 9, 10 dimethyl-1, 2-benzanthracene (DMBA) for initiation and promotion of tumors. Clinically results will be shown in which fluorescence detection, confirmed by biopsy and histopathological examination, was capable of detecting the existence of micrometastatic involvement of less than 100 cells.

  6. Mouse Model for the Preclinical Study of Metastatic Disease

    Cancer.gov

    The successful development of new cancer therapeutics requires reliable preclinical data that are obtained from mouse models for cancer. Human tumor xenografts, which require transplantation of human tumor cells into an immune compromised mouse, represent the current standard mouse model for cancer. Since the immune system plays an important role in tumor growth, progression and metastasis, the current standard mouse model is not ideal for accurate prediction of therapeutic effectiveness in patients.

  7. MRI biomarkers for evaluation of treatment efficacy in preclinical diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Bruce A; Bissig, David; Dutczak, Oliver; Corbett, Shannon; North, Rob; Roberts, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: One sober consequence of the current epidemic of diabetes mellitus is that an increasing number of people world-wide will partially or completely lose their sight to diabetic retinopathy. Clinically, the sight-threatening complications of diabetes are diagnosed and treated based on visible retinal lesions (e.g., dot-blot hemorrhages or retinal neovascularization). However, such anatomical microvascular lesions are slow to respond with treatment. Thus, there remains an urgent need for imaging biomarkers that are abnormal before retinal lesions are visibly apparent and are responsive to treatment. Areas covered: Here, the development of new MRI methods, such as manganese-enhanced MRI, for evaluating early diabetes-evoked retinal pathophysiology, and its usefulness in guiding new treatments for diabetic retinopathy are reviewed. Expert opinion: In diabetic retinopathy, not all important diagnostic and prognostic needs are well served by optical methods. In the absence of gross anatomy changes, critical times when drug intervention is most likely to be successful at reducing vision loss are missed by most light-based methods and thus provide little help in guiding diagnosis and treatment. For example, before clinical symptoms, is there an optimal time to intervene with drug therapy? Is a drug reaching its target? How does one assess optimal drug dose, schedule, and routes? How well do current experimental models mimic the clinical condition? As discussed herein, MRI is as an analytical tool for addressing these unmet needs. Future clinical applications of MRI can be envisioned such as in clinical trials to assess drug treatment efficacy, or as an adjunct approach to refine or clarify a difficult clinical case. New MRI-generated hypotheses about the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and its treatment are discussed. In the coming years, a substantial growth in the development and application of MRI is expected to address relevant question in both the basic sciences and in the clinic. PMID:23786440

  8. Investigating the Efficacy of Practical Skill Teaching: A Pilot-Study Comparing Three Educational Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Stephen; Storr, Michael; Paynter, Sophie; Morgan, Prue; Ilic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Effective education of practical skills can alter clinician behaviour, positively influence patient outcomes, and reduce the risk of patient harm. This study compares the efficacy of two innovative practical skill teaching methods, against a traditional teaching method. Year three pre-clinical physiotherapy students consented to participate in a…

  9. Miltefosine Lipid Nanocapsules for Single Dose Oral Treatment of Schistosomiasis Mansoni: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, Maha M.; El-Moslemany, Riham M.; Ramadan, Alyaa A.; Amer, Eglal I.; El-Azzouni, Mervat Z.; El-Khordagui, Labiba K.

    2015-01-01

    Miltefosine (MFS) is an alkylphosphocholine used for the local treatment of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer and oral therapy of visceral leishmaniasis. Recently, the drug was reported in in vitro and preclinical studies to exert significant activity against different developmental stages of schistosomiasis mansoni, a widespread chronic neglected tropical disease (NTD). This justified MFS repurposing as a potential antischistosomal drug. However, five consecutive daily 20 mg/kg doses were needed for the treatment of schistosomiasis mansoni in mice. The present study aims at enhancing MFS efficacy to allow for a single 20mg/kg oral dose therapy using a nanotechnological approach based on lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) as oral nanovectors. MFS was incorporated in LNCs both as membrane-active structural alkylphospholipid component and active antischistosomal agent. MFS-LNC formulations showed high entrapment efficiency (EE%), good colloidal properties, sustained release pattern and physical stability. Further, LNCs generally decreased MFS-induced erythrocyte hemolytic activity used as surrogate indicator of membrane activity. While MFS-free LNCs exerted no antischistosomal effect, statistically significant enhancement was observed with all MFS-LNC formulations. A maximum effect was achieved with MFS-LNCs incorporating CTAB as positive charge imparting agent or oleic acid as membrane permeabilizer. Reduction of worm load, ameliorated liver pathology and extensive damage of the worm tegument provided evidence for formulation-related efficacy enhancement. Non-compartmental analysis of pharmacokinetic data obtained in rats indicated independence of antischistosomal activity on systemic drug exposure, suggesting possible gut uptake of the stable LNCs and targeting of the fluke tegument which was verified by SEM. The study findings put forward MFS-LNCs as unique oral nanovectors combining the bioactivity of MFS and biopharmaceutical advantages of LNCs, allowing targeting via the oral route. From a clinical point of view, data suggest MFS-LNCs as a potential single dose oral nanomedicine for enhanced therapy of schistosomiasis mansoni and possibly other diseases. PMID:26574746

  10. Optimization of Preclinical Animal Models

    E-print Network

    No biodistribution or target engagement data No tolerability data Underpowered single dose efficacy Limited PD data No biodistribution or target engagement data No tolerability data Underpowered single dose efficacy Limited PD data Preclinical Testing Pharmacokinetics Biodistribution and target engagem

  11. Copper-64 Dichloride as Theranostic Agent for Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Cristina; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; Villano, Carlo; Giacobbi, Beatrice; Coccetti, Daniela; Panichelli, Paola; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults with a median survival time less than one year. To date, there are only a limited number of effective agents available for GBM therapy and this does not seem to add much survival advantage over the conventional approach based on surgery and radiotherapy. Therefore, the development of novel therapeutic approaches to GBM is essential and those based on radionuclide therapy could be of significant clinical impact. Experimental evidence has clearly demonstrated that cancer cells have a particularly high fractional content of copper inside the nucleus compared to normal cells. This behavior can be conveniently exploited both for diagnosis and for delivering therapeutic payloads (theranostic) of the radionuclide copper-64 into the nucleus of cancerous cells by intravenous administration of its simplest chemical form as dichloride salt [64Cu]CuCl2. To evaluate the potential theranostic role of [64Cu]CuCl2 in GBM, the present work reports results from a preclinical study carried out in a xenografted GBM tumor mouse model. Biodistribution data of this new agent were collected using a small-animal PET tomograph. Subsequently, groups of tumor implanted nude mice were treated with [64Cu]CuCl2 to simulate single- and multiple-dose therapy protocols, and results were analyzed to estimate therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26649294

  12. Preclinical evaluation of efficacy and safety of an improved lentiviral vector for the treatment of ?-thalassemia and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Negre, Olivier; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Beuzard, Yves; Cavazzana, Marina; Christiansen, Lauryn; Courne, Céline; Deichmann, Annette; Denaro, Maria; de Dreuzy, Edouard; Finer, Mitchell; Fronza, Raffaele; Gillet-Legrand, Béatrix; Joubert, Christophe; Kutner, Robert; Leboulch, Philippe; Maouche, Leïla; Paulard, Anaïs; Pierciey, Francis J; Rothe, Michael; Ryu, Byoung; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Payen, Emmanuel; Veres, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    A previously published clinical trial demonstrated the benefit of autologous CD34(+) cells transduced with a selfinactivating lentiviral vector (HPV569) containing an engineered ?-globin gene (?(A-T87Q)-globin) in a subject with ? thalassemia major. This vector has been modified to increase transduction efficacy without compromising safety. In vitro analyses indicated that the changes resulted in both increased vector titers (3 to 4 fold) and increased transduction efficacy (2 to 3 fold). An in vivo study in which 58 ?-thalassemic mice were transplanted with vector- or mock-transduced syngenic bone marrow cells indicated sustained therapeutic efficacy. Secondary transplantations involving 108 recipients were performed to evaluate long-term safety. The six month study showed no hematological or biochemical toxicity. Integration site (IS) profile revealed an oligo/polyclonal hematopoietic reconstitution in the primary transplants and reduced clonality in secondary transplants. Tumor cells were detected in the secondary transplant mice in all treatment groups (including the control group), without statistical differences in the tumor incidence. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR demonstrated that tumor cells were not derived from transduced donor cells. This comprehensive efficacy and safety data provided the basis for initiating two clinical trials with this second generation vector (BB305) in Europe and in the USA in patients with ?-thalassemia major and sickle cell disease. PMID:25429463

  13. Preclinical Evaluation of Efficacy and Safety of an Improved Lentiviral Vector for the Treatment of ?-Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Negre, Olivier; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Beuzard, Yves; Cavazzana, Marina; Christiansen, Lauryn; Courne, Céline; Deichmann, Annette; Denaro, Maria; de Dreuzy, Edouard; Finer, Mitchell; Fronza, Raffaele; Béatrix, Gillet-Legrand; Joubert, Christophe; Kutner, Robert; Leboulch, Philippe; Maouche, Leïla; Paulard, Anaïs; Pierciey Jr., Francis J.; Rothe, Michael; Ryu, Byoung; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Payen, Emmanuel; Veres, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    A previously published clinical trial demonstrated the benefit of autologous CD34+ cells transduced with a self-inactivating lentiviral vector (HPV569) containing an engineered ?-globin gene (?A-T87Q globin) in a subject with ?-thalassemia major. This vector has been modified to increase transduction efficacy without compromising safety. In vitro analyses indicated that the changes resulted in both increased vector titers (3 to 4 fold) and increased transduction efficacy (2 to 3 fold). An in vivo study in which 58 ?-thalassemic mice were transplanted with vector- or mock-transduced syngenic bone marrow cells indicated sustained therapeutic efficacy. Secondary transplantations involving 108 recipients were performed to evaluate long-term safety. The six month study showed no hematological or biochemical toxicity. Integration site (IS) profile revealed an oligo/polyclonal hematopoietic reconstitution in the primary transplants and reduced clonality in secondary transplants. Tumor cells were detected in the secondary transplant mice in all treatment groups (including the control group), without statistical differences in the tumor incidence. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR demonstrated that tumor cells were not derived from transduced donor cells. This comprehensive efficacy and safety data provided the basis for initiating two clinical trials with this second generation vector (BB305) in Europe and in the USA in patients with ?-thalassemia major and sickle cell disease. PMID:25429463

  14. Preclinical efficacy of maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK) inhibition in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Alachkar, Houda; Mutonga, Martin B.G.; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Fulton, Noreen; Malnassy, Gregory; Herold, Tobias; Spiekermann, Karsten; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Matsuo, Yo; Stock, Wendy; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK), which was reported to be frequently up-regulated in various types of solid cancer, plays critical roles in formation and maintenance of cancer stem cells. However, little is known about the relevance of this kinase in hematologic malignancies. Here we report characterization of possible roles of MELK in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MELK is expressed in AML cell lines and AML blasts with higher levels in less differentiated cells. MELK is frequently upregulated in AML with complex karyotypes and is associated with worse clinical outcome. MELK knockdown resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis of leukemic cells. Hence, we investigated the potent anti-leukemia activity of OTS167, a small molecule MELK kinase inhibitor, in AML, and found that the compound induced cell differentiation and apoptosis as well as decreased migration of AML cells. MELK expression was positively correlated with the expression of FOXM1 as well as its downstream target genes. Furthermore, MELK inhibition resulted in downregulation of FOXM1 activity and the expression of its downstream targets. Taken together, and given that OTS167 is undergoing a phase I clinical trial in solid cancer, our study warrants clinical evaluation of this compound as a novel targeted therapy for AML patients. PMID:25365263

  15. Preclinical studies with synthetic peptides in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Amarilyo, Gil; Hahn, Bevra; La Cava, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease that causes multi-organ damage and significant morbidity and mortality. Various efforts have been made to modulate the imbalanced immune responses in this disease. The manipulation of the immune system through the use of soluble synthetic peptides serving as antigenic epitopes, in repeated doses, has been shown to induce immune tolerance and to reduce the clinical manifestations of the disease in murine models. Although clinical trials in humans with the anti-DNA Ig peptide hCDR1 have failed, recent results from a clinical trial with another peptide, p140, have shown promise. This review provides an overview on the preclinical and translational work with synthetic peptides in SLE. PMID:22201847

  16. Pre-clinical and Clinical Safety Studies of CMX-2043: A Cytoprotective Lipoic Acid Analogue for Ischaemia–Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kates, Steven A; Lader, Alan S; Casale, Ralph; Beeuwkes, Reinier

    2014-01-01

    CMX-2043 is an ?-lipoic acid analogue targeted to reduction of cellular injury and organ damage due to ischaemia–reperfusion injury (IRI). It has been shown to be effective in a rat model of cardiac IRI. The studies here reported evaluate its safety and pharmacokinetic profile in preparation for human clinical studies in procedures associated with IRI. Safety and tolerability were tested in standard pre-clinical in vitro and animal models and in a Phase 1 human clinical trial. CMX-2043 did not bind to a wide range of receptors and specific targets at approximately 4 ?g/mL (10 ?M). It was not mutagenic by Ames assay, did not produce chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and was negative for clastogenic potential. Toxicological studies in rats including both single and 14-day repeat intravenous doses and in dogs (single intravenous dose) with a 2-week recovery period were conducted. The NOAEL in rats and dogs was 30 and >10 mg/kg, respectively. No serious adverse events were reported in a placebo-controlled, sequential dose escalation Phase 1 clinical trial. The low toxicity in the pre-clinical studies and the absence of adverse events in the Phase 1 trial have supported investigation of CMX-2043 in a human efficacy trial. PMID:24751172

  17. Pre-clinical immunotoxicity studies of nanotechnology-formulated drugs: Challenges, considerations and strategy.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2015-12-28

    Assorted challenges in physicochemical characterization, sterilization, depyrogenation, and in the assessment of pharmacology, safety, and efficacy profiles accompany pre-clinical development of nanotechnology-formulated drugs. Some of these challenges are not unique to nanotechnology and are common in the development of other pharmaceutical products. However, nanoparticle-formulated drugs are biochemically sophisticated, which causes their translation into the clinic to be particularly complex. An understanding of both the immune compatibility of nanoformulations and their effects on hematological parameters is now recognized as an important step in the (pre)clinical development of nanomedicines. An evaluation of nanoparticle immunotoxicity is usually performed as a part of a traditional toxicological assessment; however, it often requires additional in vitro and in vivo specialized immuno- and hematotoxicity tests. Herein, I review literature examples and share the experience with the NCI Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory assay cascade used in the early (discovery-level) phase of pre-clinical development to summarize common challenges in the immunotoxicological assessment of nanomaterials, highlight considerations and discuss solutions to overcome problems that commonly slow or halt the translation of nanoparticle-formulated drugs toward clinical trials. Special attention will be paid to the grand-challenge related to detection, quantification and removal of endotoxin from nanoformulations, and practical considerations related to this challenge. PMID:26348388

  18. Exploratory Study of Factors Related to Educational Scores of First Preclinical Year Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitticharoon, Chantacha; Srisuma, Sorachai; Kanavitoon, Sawita; Summachiwakij, Sarawut

    2014-01-01

    The relationships among the scores of major subjects taught in the first preclinical year of a Thai medical school, previous academic achievements, and daily life activities are rarely explored. We therefore performed an exploratory study identifying various factors possibly related to the educational scores of these medical students.…

  19. Pamapimod, a novel p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor: preclinical analysis of efficacy and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ronald J; Dabbagh, Karim; Phippard, Deborah; Li, Ching; Suttmann, Rebecca T; Welch, Mary; Papp, Eva; Song, Kyung W; Chang, Kung-Ching; Leaffer, David; Kim, Yong-Nam; Roberts, Richard T; Zabka, Tanja S; Aud, Dee; Dal Porto, Joseph; Manning, Anthony M; Peng, Stanford L; Goldstein, David M; Wong, Brian R

    2008-12-01

    P38alpha is a protein kinase that regulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines, suggesting a role in the pathogenesis of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we describe the preclinical pharmacology of pamapimod, a novel p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor. Pamapimod inhibited p38alpha and p38beta enzymatic activity, with IC(50) values of 0.014 +/- 0.002 and 0.48 +/- 0.04 microM, respectively. There was no activity against p38delta or p38gamma isoforms. When profiled across 350 kinases, pamapimod bound only to four kinases in addition to p38. Cellular potency was assessed using phosphorylation of heat shock protein-27 and c-Jun as selective readouts for p38 and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), respectively. Pamapimod inhibited p38 (IC(50), 0.06 microM), but inhibition of JNK was not detected. Pamapimod also inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha production by monocytes, interleukin (IL)-1beta production in human whole blood, and spontaneous TNFalpha production by synovial explants from RA patients. LPS- and TNFalpha-stimulated production of TNFalpha and IL-6 in rodents also was inhibited by pamapimod. In murine collagen-induced arthritis, pamapimod reduced clinical signs of inflammation and bone loss at 50 mg/kg or greater. In a rat model of hyperalgesia, pamapimod increased tolerance to pressure in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting an important role of p38 in pain associated with inflammation. Finally, an analog of pamapimod that has equivalent potency and selectivity inhibited renal disease in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice. Our study demonstrates that pamapimod is a potent, selective inhibitor of p38alpha with the ability to inhibit the signs and symptoms of RA and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:18776065

  20. Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 2: a review of clinical studies with supporting preclinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Sarris, Jerome; McIntyre, Erica; Camfield, David A

    2013-04-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based anxiolytics has been absent to date. Thus, our aim was to provide a comprehensive narrative review of plant-based medicines that have clinical and/or preclinical evidence of anxiolytic activity. We present the article in two parts. In part one, we reviewed herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for anxiolytic activity have been performed. In this current article (part two), we review herbal medicines for which there have been both preclinical and clinical investigations of anxiolytic activity. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) for English language papers using the search terms 'anxiety' OR 'anxiety disorder' OR 'generalized anxiety disorder' OR 'social phobia' OR 'post-traumatic stress disorder' OR 'panic disorder' OR 'agoraphobia' OR 'obsessive compulsive disorder' in combination with the search terms 'Herb*' OR 'Medicinal Plants' OR 'Botanical Medicine' OR 'Chinese herb*', in addition to individual herbal medicines. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, of which 53 plants were included in the review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed here in part two), with the other 32 having solely preclinical evidence (reviewed in part one). Support for efficacy was found for chronic use (i.e. greater than one day) of the following herbs in treating a range of anxiety disorders in human clinical trials: Piper methysticum, Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Scutellaria lateriflora, Silybum marianum, Passiflora incarnata, Withania somniferum, Galphimia glauca, Centella asiatica, Rhodiola rosea, Echinacea spp., Melissa officinalis and Echium amoenum. For several of the plants studied, conclusions need to be tempered due to methodological issues such as small sample sizes, brief intervention durations and non-replication. Current evidence does not support Hypericum perforatum or Valeriana spp. for any anxiety disorder. Acute anxiolytic activity was found for Centella asiatica, Salvia spp., Melissa officinalis, Passiflora incarnata and Citrus aurantium. Bacopa monnieri has shown anxiolytic effects in people with cognitive decline. The therapeutic application of psychotropic plant-based treatments for anxiety disorders is also discussed, specifically Psychotria viridis and Banisteriopsis caarti (ayahuasca), Psilocybe spp. and cannabidiol-enriched (low tetrahydrocannabinol (?(9)-THC)) Cannabis spp. PMID:23653088

  1. Spinal Cord Tolerance in the Age of Spinal Radiosurgery: Lessons From Preclinical Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Paul M.; Boike, Thomas P.

    2011-04-01

    Clinical implementation of spinal radiosurgery has increased rapidly in recent years, but little is known regarding human spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction irradiation. In contrast, preclinical studies in single-fraction spinal cord tolerance have been ongoing since the 1970s. The influences of field length, dose rate, inhomogeneous dose distributions, and reirradiation have all been investigated. This review summarizes literature regarding single-fraction spinal cord tolerance in preclinical models with an emphasis on practical clinical significance. The outcomes of studies that incorporate uniform irradiation are surprisingly consistent among multiple small- and large-animal models. Extensive investigation of inhomogeneous dose distributions in the rat has demonstrated a significant dose-volume effect while preliminary results from one pig study are contradictory. Preclinical spinal cord dose-volume studies indicate that dose distribution is more critical than the volume irradiated suggesting that neither dose-volume histogram analysis nor absolute volume constraints are effective in predicting complications. Reirradiation data are sparse, but results from guinea pig, rat, and pig studies are consistent with the hypothesis that the spinal cord possesses a large capacity for repair. The mechanisms behind the phenomena observed in spinal cord studies are not readily explained and the ability of dose response models to predict outcomes is variable underscoring the need for further investigation. Animal studies provide insight into the phenomena and mechanisms of radiosensitivity but the true significance of animal studies can only be discovered through clinical trials.

  2. Curcumin nanoformulations: a review of pharmaceutical properties and preclinical studies and clinical data related to cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Naksuriya, Ornchuma; Okonogi, Siriporn; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Hennink, Wim E

    2014-03-01

    Curcumin, a natural yellow phenolic compound, is present in many kinds of herbs, particularly in Curcuma longa Linn. (turmeric). It is a natural antioxidant and has shown many pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-cancer, and anti-Alzheimer in both preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, curcumin has hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, cardioprotective, neuroprotective, hypoglycemic, antirheumatic, and antidiabetic activities and it also suppresses thrombosis and protects against myocardial infarction. Particularly, curcumin has demonstrated efficacy as an anticancer agent, but a limiting factor is its extremely low aqueous solubility which hampers its use as therapeutic agent. Therefore, many technologies have been developed and applied to overcome this limitation. In this review, we summarize the recent works on the design and development of nano-sized delivery systems for curcumin, including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and micelles, conjugates, peptide carriers, cyclodextrins, solid dispersions, lipid nanoparticles and emulsions. Efficacy studies of curcumin nanoformulations using cancer cell lines and in vivo models as well as up-to-date human clinical trials are also discussed. PMID:24439402

  3. Pre-clinical Models for Oral and Periodontal Reconstructive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, G.; Seol, Y.J.; Gruber, R.; Giannobile, W.V.

    2009-01-01

    The development of new medical formulations (NMF) for reconstructive therapies has considerably improved the available treatment options for individuals requiring periodontal repair or oral implant rehabilitation. Progress in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine modalities strongly depends on validated pre-clinical research. Pre-clinical testing has contributed to the recent approval of NMF such as GEM 21S® and INFUSE® bone grafts for periodontal and oral regenerative therapies. However, the selection of a suitable pre-clinical model for evaluation of the safety and efficacy of a NMF remains a challenge. This review is designed to serve as a primer to choose the appropriate pre-clinical models for the evaluation of NMF in situations requiring periodontal or oral reconstruction. Here, we summarize commonly used pre-clinical models and provide examples of screening and functional studies of NMF that can be translated into clinical use. PMID:19887682

  4. Preclinical antitumor efficacy of S-1: a new oral formulation of 5-fluorouracil on human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, M; Satake, H; Uchida, J; Shimamoto, Y; Kato, T; Takechi, T; Okabe, H; Fujioka, A; Nakano, K; Ohshimo, H; Takeda, S; Shirasaka, T

    1998-10-01

    S-1 is a new oral formulation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) consisted of 1M tegafur, 0.4M 5-chloro-2,4-dihydroxypyridine that inhibits a degradation of 5-FU, and 1M potassium oxonate that regulates the phosphorylation of 5-FU in the gastrointestinal tract, and has shown excellent antitumor efficacy against various murine tumors in rodents, compared to the oral tegafur-based antitumor drug, UFT (1M tegafur plus 4M uracil), which is used clinically in Japan. To assess the possibility of clinically using S-1, we investigated the antitumor effect of S-1 on various human solid tumor xenografts in athymic rats and mice. In the nude rat system, S-1 was significantly effective against all 12 tumor xenografts tested when its minimum toxic dose (15 mg/kg) was administered for 14 days. Three tumors, stomach (H-81), colon (KM12C) and breast (H-31) markedly regressed in response to treatment with S-1 but not with UFT. The antitumor potency of S-1 was weak against human tumors xenografted into nude mice and likely similar to that of UFT. The reason of the discrepancy in the efficacy of S-1 between rats and mice was found to be that the 5-FU levels in the blood and tumor tissue of rats after oral administration of S-1 persisted much longer than in mice, and this prolonged maintenance of plasma 5-FU levels was significantly related to the potent antitumor activity of S-1. In conclusion, the results of this study suggested that based on its biological and pharmacokinetic characteristics, oral S-1 should be active against various human cancers. PMID:9735397

  5. An Oral Formulation of YK-4-279: Preclinical Efficacy and Acquired Resistance Patterns in Ewing Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Lamhamedi-Cherradi, Salah-Eddine; Menegaz, Brian A; Ramamoorthy, Vandhana; Aiyer, Ramani A; Maywald, Rebecca L; Buford, Adrianna S; Doolittle, Dannette K; Culotta, Kirk S; O'Dorisio, James E; Ludwig, Joseph A

    2015-07-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a transcription factor-mediated pediatric bone tumor caused by a chromosomal translocation of the EWSR1 gene and one of several genes in the ETS family of transcription factors, typically FLI1 or ERG. Full activity of the resulting oncogenic fusion protein occurs only after binding RNA helicase A (RHA), and novel biologically targeted small molecules designed to interfere with that interaction have shown early promise in the preclinical setting. Herein, we demonstrate marked preclinical antineoplastic activity of an orally bioavailable formulation of YK-4-279 and identify mechanisms of acquired chemotherapy resistance that may be exploited to induce collateral sensitivity. Daily enteral administration of YK-4-279 led to significant delay in Ewing sarcoma tumor growth within a murine model. In advance of anticipated early-phase human clinical trials, we investigated both de novo and acquired mechanism(s) by which Ewing sarcoma cells evade YK-4-279-mediated cell death. Drug-resistant clones, formed by chronic in vitro exposure to steadily increased levels of YK-4-279, overexpressed c-Kit, cyclin D1, pStat3(Y705), and PKC isoforms. Interestingly, cross-resistance to imatinib and enzastaurin (selective inhibitors of c-Kit and PKC-?, respectively), was observed and the use of YK-4-279 with enzastaurin in vitro led to marked drug synergy, suggesting a potential role for combination therapies in the future. By advancing an oral formulation of YK-4-279 and identifying prominent mechanisms of resistance, this preclinical research takes us one step closer to a shared goal of curing adolescents and young adults afflicted by Ewing sarcoma. PMID:25964201

  6. Beneficial health effects of lupeol triterpene: a review of preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Hifzur Rahman; Saleem, Mohammad

    2011-02-14

    Since ancient times, natural products have been used as remedies to treat human diseases. Lupeol, a phytosterol and triterpene, is widely found in edible fruits, and vegetables. Extensive research over the last three decades has revealed several important pharmacological activities of lupeol. Various in vitro and preclinical animal studies suggest that lupeol has a potential to act as an anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-protozoal, anti-proliferative, anti-invasive, anti-angiogenic and cholesterol lowering agent. Employing various in vitro and in vivo models, lupeol has also been tested for its therapeutic efficiency against conditions including wound healing, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and arthritis. Lupeol has been found to be pharmacologically effective in treating various diseases under preclinical settings (in animal models) irrespective of varying routes of administration viz; topical, oral, intra-peritoneal and intravenous. It is noteworthy that lupeol has been reported to selectively target diseased and unhealthy human cells, while sparing normal and healthy cells. Published studies provide evidence that lupeol modulates the expression or activity of several molecules such as cytokines IL-2, IL4, IL5, IL?, proteases, ?-glucosidase, cFLIP, Bcl-2 and NF?B. This minireview discusses in detail the preclinical studies conducted with lupeol and provides an insight into its mechanisms of action. PMID:21118697

  7. Pre-clinical efficacy of combined therapy with novel ?-catenin antagonist BC2059 and histone deacetylase inhibitor against AML cells.

    PubMed

    Fiskus, W; Sharma, S; Saha, S; Shah, B; Devaraj, S G T; Sun, B; Horrigan, S; Leveque, C; Zu, Y; Iyer, S; Bhalla, K N

    2015-06-01

    The canonical wingless-type MMTV integration site (WNT)-?-catenin pathway is essential for self-renewal, growth and survival of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) stem/blast progenitor cells (BPCs). Deregulated WNT signaling inhibits degradation of ?-catenin, causing increased nuclear translocation and co-factor activity of ?-catenin with the transcriptional regulator T-cell factor (TCF) 4/lymphoid enhancer factor 1 in AML BPCs. Here, we determined the pre-clinical anti-AML activity of the anthraquinone oxime-analog BC2059 (BC), known to attenuate ?-catenin levels. BC treatment disrupted the binding of ?-catenin with the scaffold protein transducin ?-like 1 and proteasomal degradation and decline in the nuclear levels of ?-catenin. This was associated with reduced transcriptional activity of TCF4 and expression of its target genes, cyclin D1, c-MYC and survivin. BC treatment dose-dependently induced apoptosis of cultured and primary AML BPCs. Treatment with BC also significantly improved the median survival of immune-depleted mice engrafted with either cultured or primary AML BPCs, exhibiting nuclear expression of ?-catenin. Co-treatment with the pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat and BC synergistically induced apoptosis of cultured and primary AML BPCs, including those expressing FLT3-ITD, as well as further significantly improved the survival of immune-depleted mice engrafted with primary AML BPCs. These findings underscore the promising pre-clinical activity and warrant further testing of BC against human AML, especially those expressing FLT3-ITD. PMID:25482131

  8. Preclinical studies of indapamide, a new 2-methylindoline antihypertensive diuretic

    SciTech Connect

    Pruss, T.; Wolf, P.S.

    1983-07-01

    Indapamide is a new indoline antihypertensive diuretic agent whose chemical structure differs substantially from those of the thiazides. The hydrophobic indoline moiety of indapamide confers a lipid solubility to the molecule that is 5 to 80 times greater than that of the thiazide diuretics. Thus indapamide accumulates in vascular smooth muscle at a concentration 10 times higher than that of protein-free perfusate. The affinity of indapamide for vascular smooth muscle manifests itself in vitro and in vivo as a decrease in reactivity following various pharmacologic interventions. Moreover, in vitro studies have demonstrated that indapamide decreases the inward calcium current and the transmembrane influx of calcium. The diuretic effect of indapamide is predominantly due to inhibition of sodium reabsorption at the cortical diluting segment of the distal convoluted tubule. In animal studies, intravenous indapamide has no effect on glomerular filtration rate or renal blood flow. Indapamide is well absorbed and extensively metabolized in animals and humans, with biliary excretion being the predominant route of elimination in animals. Most important, repeat administration of indapamide to dogs with both kidneys removed produces no accumulation of intact indapamide or its metabolites. Extensive drug safety studies in animals indicate that indapamide produces no overt toxicity and exhibits a good margin of safety.

  9. Intradermal inactivated poliovirus vaccine: a preclinical dose-finding study.

    PubMed

    Kouiavskaia, Diana; Mirochnitchenko, Olga; Dragunsky, Eugenia; Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Troy, Stephanie; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2015-05-01

    Intradermal delivery of vaccines has been shown to result in dose sparing. We tested the ability of fractional doses of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) delivered intradermally to induce levels of serum poliovirus-neutralizing antibodies similar to immunization through the intramuscular route. Immunogenicity of fractional doses of IPV was studied by comparing intramuscular and intradermal immunization of Wistar rats using NanoPass MicronJet600 microneedles. Intradermal delivery of partial vaccine doses induced antibodies at titers comparable to those after immunization with full human dose delivered intramuscularly. The results suggest that intradermal delivery of IPV may lead to dose-sparing effect and reduction of the vaccination cost. PMID:25391313

  10. A Preclinical Study Combining the DNA Repair Inhibitor Dbait with Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Melanoma1

    PubMed Central

    Biau, Julian; Devun, Flavien; Jdey, Wael; Kotula, Ewa; Quanz, Maria; Chautard, Emmanuel; Sayarath, Mano; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Verrelle, Pierre; Dutreix, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Melanomas are highly radioresistant tumors, mainly due to efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Dbait (which stands for DNA strand break bait) molecules mimic DSBs and trap DNA repair proteins, thereby inhibiting repair of DNA damage induced by radiation therapy (RT). First, the cytotoxic efficacy of Dbait in combination with RT was evaluated in vitro in SK28 and 501mel human melanoma cell lines. Though the extent of RT-induced damage was not increased by Dbait, it persisted for longer revealing a repair defect. Dbait enhanced RT efficacy independently of RT doses. We further assayed the capacity of DT01 (clinical form of Dbait) to enhance efficacy of “palliative” RT (10 × 3 Gy) or “radical” RT (20 × 3 Gy), in an SK28 xenografted model. Inhibition of repair of RT-induced DSB by DT01 was revealed by the significant increase of micronuclei in tumors treated with combined treatment. Mice treated with DT01 and RT combination had significantly better tumor growth control and longer survival compared to RT alone with the “palliative” protocol [tumor growth delay (TGD) by 5.7-fold; median survival: 119 vs 67 days] or the “radical” protocol (TGD by 3.2-fold; median survival: 221 vs 109 days). Only animals that received the combined treatment showed complete responses. No additional toxicity was observed in any DT01-treated groups. This preclinical study provides encouraging results for a combination of a new DNA repair inhibitor, DT01, with RT, in the absence of toxicity. A first-in-human phase I study is currently under way in the palliative management of melanoma in-transit metastases (DRIIM trial). PMID:25379020

  11. Preclinical and Clinical Studies for Sodium Tungstate: Application in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bertinat, Romina; Nualart, Francisco; Li, Xuhang; Yáñez, Alejandro J.; Gomis, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder triggered by the deficient secretion of insulin by the pancreatic ?-cell or the resistance of peripheral tissues to the action of the hormone. Chronic hyperglycemia is the major consequence of this failure, and also the main cause of diabetic problems. Indeed, several clinical trials have agreed in that tight glycemic control is the best way to stop progression of the disease. Many anti-diabetic drugs for treatment of type 2 diabetes are commercially available, but no ideal normoglycemic agent has been developed yet. Moreover, weight gain is the most common side effect of many oral anti-diabetic agents and insulin, and increased weight has been shown to worsen glycemic control and increase the risk of diabetes progression. In this sense, the inorganic salt sodium tungstate (NaW) has been studied in different animal models of metabolic syndrome and diabetes, proving to have a potent effect on normalizing blood glucose levels and reducing body weight, without any hypoglycemic action. Although the liver has been studied as the main site of NaW action, positive effects have been also addressed in muscle, pancreas, brain, adipose tissue and intestine, explaining the effective anti-diabetic action of this salt. Here, we review NaW research to date in these different target organs. We believe that NaW deserves more attention, since all available anti-diabetic treatments remain suboptimal and new therapeutics are urgently needed. PMID:25995968

  12. Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin: preparation and preclinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Vera, D.R.; Stadalnik, R.C.; Krohn, K.A.

    1985-10-01

    Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin ((Tc) NGA), a labeled analog ligand to the hepatocyte-specific receptor, hepatic binding protein (HBP), was prepared and tested for labeling yield, stability, biodistribution, toxicity, and dosimetry. The ligand was synthesized by the covalent coupling of a carbohydrate bifunctional reagent, 2-imino-2-ethyloxymethyl-1-thiogalactose, to human serum albumin. Testing in mice and rabbits revealed the product to be nontoxic and apyrogenic. Biodistribution studies in rabbits demonstrated the liver as the single focus of tracer uptake. Dosimetry was based on kinetic studies in three baboons. Absorbed doses to liver, small intestine, urinary bladder wall, and uterus were 0.089, 0.28, 0.56, and 0.88 rad/mCi, respectively. Total body, lens of the eye, red marrow, ovaries, and testes were less than 0.06 rad/mCi. High liver specificity imparted by receptor binding combined with high labeling yield, stability, acceptable dosimetry, and safety provide (Tc)NGA with the attributes required for routine clinical assessment of hepatocyte function.

  13. Anticancer potential of curcumin: preclinical and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Kumar, Anushree; Bharti, Alok C

    2003-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a polyphenol derived from the plant Curcuma longa, commonly called turmeric. Extensive research over the last 50 years has indicated this polyphenol can both prevent and treat cancer. The anticancer potential of curcumin stems from its ability to suppress proliferation of a wide variety of tumor cells, down-regulate transcription factors NF-kappa B, AP-1 and Egr-1; down-regulate the expression of COX2, LOX, NOS, MMP-9, uPA, TNF, chemokines, cell surface adhesion molecules and cyclin D1; down-regulate growth factor receptors (such as EGFR and HER2); and inhibit the activity of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, protein tyrosine kinases and protein serine/threonine kinases. In several systems, curcumin has been described as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. Evidence has also been presented to suggest that curcumin can suppress tumor initiation, promotion and metastasis. Pharmacologically, curcumin has been found to be safe. Human clinical trials indicated no dose-limiting toxicity when administered at doses up to 10 g/day. All of these studies suggest that curcumin has enormous potential in the prevention and therapy of cancer. The current review describes in detail the data supporting these studies. PMID:12680238

  14. Improving the Quality of NINDS-Supported Preclinical and Clinical Research through Rigorous Study Design and Transparent Reporting

    E-print Network

    Levin, Judith G.

    Improving the Quality of NINDS-Supported Preclinical and Clinical Research through Rigorous Study Design and Transparent Reporting The mission of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders basic, translational, and clinical research. There is growing recognition that the quality

  15. Analgesic and hypnotic activities of Laghupanchamula: A preclinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ghildiyal, Shivani; Gautam, Manish K.; Joshi, Vinod K.; Goel, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Ayurvedic classics, two types of Laghupanchamula -five plant roots (LP) have been mentioned containing four common plants viz. Kantakari, Brihati, Shalaparni, and Prinshniparni and the fifth plant is either Gokshura (LPG) or Eranda (LPE). LP has been documented to have Shothahara (anti-inflammatory), Shulanashka (analgesic), Jvarahara (antipyretic), and Rasayana (rejuvenator) activities. Aim: To evaluate the acute toxicity (in mice), analgesic and hypnotic activity (in rats) of 50% ethanolic extract of LPG (LPGE) and LPE (LPEE). Materials and Methods: LPEG and LPEE were prepared separately by using 50% ethanol following the standard procedures. A graded dose (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) response study for both LPEE and LPGE was carried out for analgesic activity against rat tail flick response which indicated 500 mg/kg as the optimal effective analgesic dose. Hence, 500 mg/kg dose of LPEE and LPGE was used for hot plate test and acetic acid induced writhing model in analgesic activity and for evaluation of hypnotic activity. Results: Both the extracts did not produce any acute toxicity in mice at single oral dose of 2.0 g/kg. Both LPGE and LPEE (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) showed dose-dependent elevation in pain threshold and peak analgesic effect at 60 min as evidenced by increased latency period in tail-flick method by 25.1-62.4% and 38.2-79.0% respectively. LPGE and LPEE (500 mg/kg) increased reaction time in hot-plate test at peak 60 min analgesic effect by 63.2 and 85.8% and reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhes by 55.9 and 65.8% respectively. Both potentiated pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis as indicated by increased duration of sleep in treated rats. Conclusion: The analgesic and hypnotic effects of LP formulations authenticate their uses in Ayurvedic system of Medicine for painful conditions. PMID:25364205

  16. Osteogenic Potential of Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Preclinical Studies: A Systematic Review Using Modified ARRIVE and CONSORT Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthi, Murali; Bakkar, Mohammed; Jordan, Jack; Tran, Simon D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective. Dental stem cell-based tissue engineered constructs are emerging as a promising alternative to autologous bone transfer for treating bone defects. The purpose of this review is to systematically assess the preclinical in vivo and in vitro studies which have evaluated the efficacy of dental stem cells on bone regeneration. Methods. A literature search was conducted in Ovid Medline, Embase, PubMed, and Web of Science up to October 2014. Implantation of dental stem cells in animal models for evaluating bone regeneration and/or in vitro studies demonstrating osteogenic potential of dental stem cells were included. The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were used to ensure the quality of the search. Modified ARRIVE (Animal research: reporting in invivo experiments) and CONSORT (Consolidated reporting of trials) were used to critically analyze the selected studies. Results. From 1914 citations, 207 full-text articles were screened and 137 studies were included in this review. Because of the heterogeneity observed in the studies selected, meta-analysis was not possible. Conclusion. Both in vivo and in vitro studies indicate the potential use of dental stem cells in bone regeneration. However well-designed randomized animal trials are needed before moving into clinical trials. PMID:26106427

  17. Development of novel combined anticalcification protocols including immunologic modification for prolonged durability of cardiac xenograft: preclinical study using large-animal long-term circulatory models.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hong-Gook; Jeong, Saeromi; Shin, Jun-Seop; Park, Chung-Gyu; Kim, Yong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac xenografts are conventionally cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GA) to impart tissue stability, reduce antigenicity, and maintain tissue sterility. However, GA-fixed xenografts are prone to calcification after long-term implantation in humans, because of phospholipids, free aldehyde groups, and residual antigenicity. We evaluated preclinical safety and efficacy using large-animal long-term circulatory models for our novel combined anticalcification protocol including immunological modification, which had been proven effective in small animal experiments. Bovine/porcine xenografts were treated with decellularization, immunological modification with ?-galactosidase, GA fixation with organic solvent, and detoxification with glycine. Valve conduits made of these xenografts were transplanted into the pulmonary root of goats, and hemodynamic, radiological, immunohistopathological, and biochemical results were obtained for 12 months after implantation. Evaluation of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization demonstrated good hemodynamic status and function of the pulmonary xenograft valves. Durability of the xenografts was well preserved without calcification by specimen radiography and immunohistopathological examination. The calcium concentrations of the explanted xenografts were lower than the control xenografts. This preclinical study using large-animal long-term circulatory models demonstrated that our synergistic and simultaneous employment of multiple anticalcification therapies and novel tissue treatments, including immunological modifications, have promising safety and efficacy and should be examined further in future clinical studies. PMID:25303800

  18. Attempted and successful compensation in preclinical and early manifest neurodegeneration - a review of task FMRI studies.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Elisa; Minkova, Lora; Leitner, Mathias; Klöppel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Several models of neural compensation in healthy aging have been suggested to explain brain activity that aids to sustain cognitive function. Applying recently suggested criteria of "attempted" and "successful" compensation, we reviewed existing literature on compensatory mechanisms in preclinical Huntington's disease (HD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Both disorders constitute early stages of neurodegeneration ideal for examining compensatory mechanisms and developing targeted interventions. We strived to clarify whether compensation criteria derived from healthy aging populations can be applied to early neurodegeneration. To concentrate on the close coupling of cognitive performance and brain activity, we exclusively addressed task fMRI studies. First, we found evidence for parallels in compensatory mechanisms between healthy aging and neurodegenerative disease. Several studies fulfilled criteria of attempted compensation, while reports of successful compensation were largely absent, which made it difficult to conclude on. Second, comparing working memory studies in preclinical HD and aMCI, we identified similar compensatory patterns across neurodegenerative disorders in lateral and medial prefrontal cortex. Such patterns included an inverted U-shaped relationship of neurodegeneration and compensatory activity spanning from preclinical to manifest disease. Due to the lack of studies systematically targeting all criteria of compensation, we propose an exemplary study design, including the manipulation of compensating brain areas by brain stimulation. Furthermore, we delineate the benefits of targeted interventions by non-invasive brain stimulation, as well as of unspecific interventions such as physical activity or cognitive training. Unambiguously detecting compensation in early neurodegenerative disease will help tailor interventions aiming at sustained overall functioning and delayed clinical disease onset. PMID:25324786

  19. Comparative Plasma Exposure and Lung Distribution of Two Human Use Commercial Azithromycin Formulations Assessed in Murine Model: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Rivulgo, Virginia; Sparo, Mónica; Ceci, Mónica; Fumuso, Elida; Confalonieri, Alejandra; Sánchez Bruni, Sergio F.

    2013-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) therapeutic failure and relapses of patients treated with generic formulations have been observed in clinical practice. The main goal of this research was to compare in a preclinical study the serum exposure and lung tissue concentration of two commercial formulations AZM-based in murine model. The current study involved 264 healthy Balb-C. Mice were divided into two groups (n = 44): animals of Group A (reference formulation -R-) were orally treated with AZM suspension at 10?mg/kg of b.w. Experimental animals of Group B (generic formulation -G-) received identical treatment than Group A with a generic formulation AZM-based. The study was repeated twice as Phase II and III. Serum and lung tissue samples were taken 24?h post treatment. Validated microbiological assay was used to determine the serum pharmacokinetic and lung distribution of AZM. After the pharmacokinetic analysis was observed, a similar serum exposure for both formulations of AZM assayed. In contrast, statistical differences (P < 0.001) were obtained after comparing the concentrations of both formulations in lung tissue, being the values obtained for AUC and Cmax (AZM-R-) +1586 and 122%, respectively, than those obtained for AZM-G- in lung. These differences may indicate large differences on the distribution process of both formulations, which may explain the lack of efficacy/therapeutic failure observed on clinical practice. PMID:24073402

  20. Preclinical and clinical phase I studies of a new recombinant Filgrastim (BK0023) in comparison with Neupogen®

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Filgrastim or methionyl-granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Met-G-CSF), is a recombinant therapeutic protein widely used to treat severe neutropenia caused by myelosuppressive drugs in patients with nonmyeloid malignancies. In addition to its role in the regulation of granulopoiesis, treatment with G-CSF is considered the standard approach to mobilize CD34 positive (CD34+) mononuclear cells for reconstituting hemopoietic ability for bone marrow transplantation. An intended biosimilar filgrastim (coded BK0023) was produced in GMP conditions by E.coli fermentation according to an original recombinant process and showed physico-chemical properties and purity profile similar to Neupogen®, a commercial preparation of filgrastim. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the comparability of BK0023 to Neupogen® in terms of both in vitro biological activities and in vivo toxicology, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Methods Cell proliferation and radioligand binding assays were conducted in NFS-60 cells to compare the biological activity and functional interaction with the G-CSF receptor in vitro, while preclinical in vivo studies, including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics after repeated dose were performed in normal and neutropenic rats. A phase I study was carried out in healthy male volunteers treated by multiple-dose subcutaneous administration of BK0023 and Neupogen® to evaluate their pharmacodynamic effects as well as their pharmacokinetic and safety profile and to demonstrate their pharmacodynamic equivalence and pharmacokinetic bioequivalence. Results The results reported in this work demonstrate that BK0023 is comparable in terms of biological activity, efficacy and safety to Neupogen®. Conclusions BK0023 has the same pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy and safety as the reference commercial filgrastim Neupogen® and therefore could be further developed to become a convenient option to treat neutropenia in oncological patients. Trial registration Trial registration number (TRN): NCT01933971. Date of registration: Sept 6th 2013. PMID:24555723

  1. Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, Part 1: a review of preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Sarris, Jerome; McIntyre, Erica; Camfield, David A

    2013-03-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based anxiolytics has been absent to date. This article (part 1) reviews herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for anxiolytic activity have been performed. In part 2, we review herbal medicines for which there have been clinical investigations for anxiolytic activity. An open-ended, language-restricted (English) search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) using specific search criteria to identify herbal medicines that have been investigated for anxiolytic activity. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, from which 53 herbal medicines were included in the full review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed in part 2), with another 32 having solely preclinical studies (reviewed here in part 1). Preclinical evidence of anxiolytic activity (without human clinical trials) was found for Albizia julibrissin, Sonchus oleraceus, Uncaria rhynchophylla, Stachys lavandulifolia, Cecropia glazioui, Magnolia spp., Eschscholzia californica, Erythrina spp., Annona spp., Rubus brasiliensis, Apocynum venetum, Nauclea latifolia, Equisetum arvense, Tilia spp., Securidaca longepedunculata, Achillea millefolium, Leea indica, Juncus effusus, Coriandrum sativum, Eurycoma longifolia, Turnera diffusa, Euphorbia hirta, Justicia spp., Crocus sativus, Aloysia polystachya, Albies pindrow, Casimiroa edulis, Davilla rugosa, Gastrodia elata, Sphaerathus indicus, Zizyphus jujuba and Panax ginseng. Common mechanisms of action for the majority of botanicals reviewed primarily involve GABA, either via direct receptor binding or ionic channel or cell membrane modulation; GABA transaminase or glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibition; a range of monoaminergic effects; and potential cannabinoid receptor modulation. Future research should focus on conducting human clinical trials on the plants reviewed with promising anxiolytic activity. PMID:23436255

  2. Exploratory study of factors related to educational scores of first preclinical year medical students.

    PubMed

    Sitticharoon, Chantacha; Srisuma, Sorachai; Kanavitoon, Sawita; Summachiwakij, Sarayut

    2014-03-01

    The relationships among the scores of major subjects taught in the first preclinical year of a Thai medical school, previous academic achievements, and daily life activities are rarely explored. We therefore performed an exploratory study identifying various factors possibly related to the educational scores of these medical students. Questionnaires were sent out to all first preclinical year medical students, with 79.8% being returned (245/307 questionnaires). Positive correlations were revealed between the premedical year grade point average (pre-MD GPA) and anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry scores (R = 0.664, 0.521, and 0.653, respectively, P < 0.001 for all) by Pearson's method. Using multiple linear regression analysis, anatomy scores could be predicted by pre-MD GPA, student satisfaction with anatomy, the percentage of expected reading, monthly earnings, reading after class and near exam time, and duration of sleeping periods near exam time (R = 0.773, R(2) = 0.598, P < 0.001). Physiology scores could be estimated by pre-MD GPA, the percentage of expected reading, monthly earnings, and percentage of those who fell asleep during class and near exam time (R = 0.722, R(2) = 0.521, P < 0.001). Biochemistry scores could be calculated by pre-MD GPA, the percentage of expected reading, motivation to study medicine, student satisfaction with biochemistry, and exam performance expectations (R = 0.794, R(2) = 0.630, P < 0.001). In conclusion, pre-MD GPA and the percentage of expected reading are factors involved in producing good academic results in the first preclinical year. Anatomy and biochemistry, but not physiology, scores are influenced by satisfaction. PMID:24585466

  3. Food for Thought Look Back in Anger – What Clinical Studies Tell Us About Preclinical Work

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Summary Misled by animal studies and basic research? Whenever we take a closer look at the outcome of clinical trials in a field such as, most recently, stroke or septic shock, we see how limited the value of our preclinical models was. For all indications, 95% of drugs that enter clinical trials do not make it to the market, despite all promise of the (animal) models used to develop them. Drug development has started already to decrease its reliance on animal models: In Europe, for example, despite increasing R&D expenditure, animal use by pharmaceutical companies dropped by more than 25% from 2005 to 2008. In vitro studies are likewise limited: questionable cell authenticity, over-passaging, mycoplasma infections, and lack of differentiation as well as non-homeostatic and non-physiologic culture conditions endanger the relevance of these models. The standards of statistics and reporting often are poor, further impairing reliability. Alarming studies from industry show miserable reproducibility of landmark studies. This paper discusses factors contributing to the lack of reproducibility and relevance of pre-clinical research. The conclusion: Publish less but of better quality and do not rely on the face value of animal studies. PMID:23861075

  4. Assessment of an Orofacial Operant Pain Assay as a Preclinical Tool for Evaluating Analgesic Efficacy in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Harvey E; Queeney, Timothy J; Dunbar, Misha L; Eichner, Michael C; Del Castillo, Dania I; Battles, August H; Neubert, John K

    2015-01-01

    A model system capable of providing clinically relevant analgesic doses with minimal trauma has been elusive in laboratory animal medicine. Our laboratory has developed an orofacial operant pain system that effectively discriminates between nonnoxious and noxious thermal stimuli in rats and mice. Male and female rats (Crl:SD) and mice (Crl:SKR-HRhr) were trained to perform a task (placing their face through an opening and having their cheeks stay in contact with thermodes) to receive a reward (a solution of sweetened condensed milk). Currently accepted doses of buprenorphine were tested by using a crossover design. Pain was induced in both species by sensitizing the depilated skin over both cheeks with capsaicin cream or by creating a surgical incision (rats only) and then allowing the animals to contact a temperature-regulated thermode while obtaining a reward. Optimal antinociceptive doses included 0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg in male mice but only 0.05 mg/kg in female mice. In rats, optimal antinociceptive doses included 0.03 and 0.05 mg/kg for male rats but only 0.03 mg/kg for female rats. The 2 pain-induction models in rats (capsaicin cream and surgical incision) did not differ. Our orofacial operant pain assay can determine clinically relevant analgesic doses for rodents in a preclinical assay. The automated, investigator-independent nature of the assay, in conjunction with its high sensitivity, makes this method an improvement over traditional noninvasive methods, providing better data for developing optimal analgesic recommendations for rats and mice. PMID:26224444

  5. FV-162 is a novel, orally bioavailable, irreversible proteasome inhibitor with improved pharmacokinetics displaying preclinical efficacy with continuous daily dosing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Dove, P; Wang, X; Shamas-Din, A; Li, Z; Nachman, A; Oh, Y J; Hurren, R; Ruschak, A; Climie, S; Press, B; Griffin, C; Undzys, E; Aman, A; Al-awar, R; Kay, L E; O'Neill, D; Trudel, S; Slassi, M; Schimmer, A D

    2015-01-01

    Approved proteasome inhibitors have advanced the treatment of multiple myeloma but are associated with serious toxicities, poor pharmacokinetics, and most with the inconvenience of intravenous administration. We therefore sought to identify novel orally bioavailable proteasome inhibitors with a continuous daily dosing schedule and improved therapeutic window using a unique drug discovery platform. We employed a fluorine-based medicinal chemistry technology to synthesize 14 novel analogs of epoxyketone-based proteasome inhibitors and screened them for their stability, ability to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like proteasome, and antimyeloma activity in vitro. The tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamic activity, and antimyeloma efficacy of our lead candidate were examined in NOD/SCID mice. We identified a tripeptide epoxyketone, FV-162, as a metabolically stable, potent proteasome inhibitor cytotoxic to human myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma cells. FV-162 had limited toxicity and was well tolerated on a continuous daily dosing schedule. Compared with the benchmark oral irreversible proteasome inhibitor, ONX-0192, FV-162 had a lower peak plasma concentration and longer half-life, resulting in a larger area under the curve (AUC). Oral FV-162 treatment induced rapid, irreversible inhibition of chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity in murine red blood cells and inhibited tumor growth in a myeloma xenograft model. Our data suggest that oral FV-162 with continuous daily dosing schedule displays a favorable safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetic profile in vivo, identifying it as a promising lead for clinical evaluation in myeloma therapy. PMID:26158521

  6. The Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 4-Positive Allosteric Modulator VU0364770 Produces Efficacy Alone and in Combination with l-DOPA or an Adenosine 2A Antagonist in Preclinical Rodent Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Carrie K.; Bubser, Michael; Thompson, Analisa D.; Dickerson, Jonathan W.; Turle-Lorenzo, Nathalie; Amalric, Marianne; Blobaum, Anna L.; Bridges, Thomas M.; Morrison, Ryan D.; Jadhav, Satyawan; Engers, Darren W.; Italiano, Kimberly; Bode, Jacob; Daniels, J. Scott; Lindsley, Craig W.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder associated with severe motor impairments caused by the loss of dopaminergic innervation of the striatum. Previous studies have demonstrated that positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGlu4), including N-phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide, can produce antiparkinsonian-like effects in preclinical models of PD. However, these early mGlu4 PAMs exhibited unsuitable physiochemical properties for systemic dosing, requiring intracerebroventricular administration and limiting their broader utility as in vivo tools to further understand the role of mGlu4 in the modulation of basal ganglia function relevant to PD. In the present study, we describe the pharmacologic characterization of a systemically active mGlu4 PAM, N-(3-chlorophenyl)picolinamide (VU0364770), in several rodent PD models. VU0364770 showed efficacy alone or when administered in combination with l-DOPA or an adenosine 2A (A2A) receptor antagonist currently in clinical development (preladenant). When administered alone, VU0364770 exhibited efficacy in reversing haloperidol-induced catalepsy, forelimb asymmetry-induced by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the median forebrain bundle, and attentional deficits induced by bilateral 6-OHDA nigrostriatal lesions in rats. In addition, VU0364770 enhanced the efficacy of preladenant to reverse haloperidol-induced catalepsy when given in combination. The effects of VU0364770 to reverse forelimb asymmetry were also potentiated when the compound was coadministered with an inactive dose of l-DOPA, suggesting that mGlu4 PAMs may provide l-DOPA-sparing activity. The present findings provide exciting support for the potential role of selective mGlu4 PAMs as a novel approach for the symptomatic treatment of PD and a possible augmentation strategy with either l-DOPA or A2A antagonists. PMID:22088953

  7. Neuropharmacological Aspects of Crocus sativus L.: A Review of Preclinical Studies and Ongoing Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Singh, Damanpreet

    2015-01-01

    Crocus sativus L. (Iridaceae) is an important member of the genus Crocus having high medicinal value. Its dried stigmas, known as "saffron" are being widely used form past many centuries as a food additive, coloring agent, flavoring agent and a potential source of traditional medicine. The stigmas along with other botanical parts of Crocus sativus are being extensively used in ethnomedical treatment of varied central nervous system diseases. In line with its ethnomedical importance, several preclinical studies have been carried out to validate its traditional uses, identify active principle(s), understand pharmacological basis of therapeutic action and explore novel medicinal uses. The bioactive components of Crocus sativus have been found to modulate several synaptic processes via direct/indirect interplay with neurotransmitter receptor functions, interaction with neuronal death/survival pathways and alteration in neuronal proteins expression. Many clinical studies proving beneficial effect of Crocus sativus in depressive disorders, Alzheimer's disease and some other neurological abnormalities have also been carried out. Based on the vast literature reports available, an attempt has been made to comprehend the fragmented information on neuropharmacological aspects, chemistry and safety of Crocus sativus. Although the plant has been well explored, but still a large scope of future preclinical and clinical research exist to explore its potential in neurological diseases, that has been discussed in depth in the present review. PMID:25714974

  8. Developing a Measurement Tool for Assessing Physiotherapy Students' Self-Efficacy: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anne; Sheppard, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine if self-efficacy can be correlated with prior academic achievement and whether self-efficacy can be an outcome measure of education. A self-efficacy instrument was developed and administered to physiotherapy students following completion of their pre-clinical theory experience. The questionnaire results…

  9. Preclinical pharmacology, ocular tolerability and ocular hypotensive efficacy of a novel non-peptide bradykinin mimetic small molecule.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Najam A; Li, Linya; Katoli, Parvaneh; Xu, Shouxi; Veltman, James; Li, Byron; Scott, Daniel; Wax, Martin; Gallar, Juana; Acosta, Carmen; Belmonte, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    We sought to characterize the ocular pharmacology, tolerability and intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering efficacy of FR-190997, a non-peptidic bradykinin (BK) B2-receptor agonist. FR-190997 possessed a relatively high receptor binding affinity (Ki = 27 nM) and a high in vitro potency (EC50 = 18.3 ± 4.4 nM) for inositol-1-phosphate generation via human cloned B2-receptors expressed in host cells with mimimal activity at B1-receptors. It also mobilized intracellular Ca2+ in isolated human trabecular meshwork (h-TM), ciliary muscle (h-CM), and in immortalized non-pigmented ciliary epithelial (h-iNPE) cells (EC50s = 167-384 nM; Emax = 32-86% of BK-induced response). HOE-140, a selective B2-receptor antagonist, potently blocked the latter effects of FR-190997 (e.g., IC50 = 7.3 ± 0.6 nM in h-CM cells). FR-190997 also stimulated the release of prostaglandins (PGs) from h-TM and h-CM cells (EC50s = 60-84 nM; Emax = 29-44% relative to max. BK-induced effects). FR-190997 (0.3-300 ?g t.o.) did not activate cat corneal polymodal nociceptors and did not cause ocular discomfort in Dutch-Belted rabbits, but it was not well tolerated in New Zealand albino rabbits and Hartley guinea pigs. A single topical ocular (t.o.) dose of 1% FR-190997 in Dutch-Belted rabbits and mixed breed cats did not lower IOP. However, FR-190997 efficaciously lowered IOP of conscious ocular hypertensive cynomolgus monkey eyes (e.g., 34.5 ± 7.5% decrease; 6 h post-dose of 30 ?g t.o.; n = 8). Thus, FR-190997 is an unexampled efficacious ocular hypotensive B2-receptor non-peptide BK agonist that activates multiple signaling pathways to cause IOP reduction. PMID:25307520

  10. Preclinical stroke research – advantages and disadvantages of the most common rodent models of focal ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Macrae, IM

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the most commonly used rodent models and outcome measures in preclinical stroke research and discusses their strengths and limitations. Most models involve permanent or transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with therapeutic agents tested for their ability to reduce stroke-induced infarcts and improve neurological deficits. Many drugs have demonstrated preclinical efficacy but, other than thrombolytics, which restore blood flow, none have demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials. This failure to translate efficacy from bench to bedside is discussed alongside achievable steps to improve the ability of preclinical research to predict clinical efficacy: (i) Improvements in study quality and reporting. Study design must include randomization, blinding and predefined inclusion/exclusion criteria, and journal editors have the power to ensure statements on these and mortality data are included in preclinical publications. (ii) Negative and neutral studies must be published to enable preclinical meta-analyses and systematic reviews to more accurately predict drug efficacy in man. (iii) Preclinical groups should work within networks and agree on standardized procedures for assessing final infarct and functional outcome. This will improve research quality, timeliness and translational capacity. (iv) Greater uptake and improvements in non-invasive diagnostic imaging to detect and study potentially salvageable penumbral tissue, the target for acute neuroprotection. Drug effects on penumbra lifespan studied serially, followed by assessment of behavioural outcome and infarct within in the same animal group, will increase the power to detect drug efficacy preclinically. Similar progress in detecting drug efficacy clinically will follow from patient recruitment into acute stroke trials based on evidence of remaining penumbra. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-4 PMID:21457227

  11. Selective Allosteric Inhibition of MMP9 Is Efficacious in Preclinical Models of Ulcerative Colitis and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Scott; Kovalenko, Maria; Spangler, Rhyannon; Liu, Chian; Lee, Michael; O’Sullivan, Christopher; Barry-Hamilton, Vivian; Ghermazien, Haben; Mikels-Vigdal, Amanda; Garcia, Carlos A.; Jorgensen, Brett; Velayo, Arleene C.; Wang, Ruth; Adamkewicz, Joanne I.; Smith, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) is elevated in a variety of inflammatory and oncology indications, including ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer. MMP9 is a downstream effector and an upstream mediator of pathways involved in growth and inflammation, and has long been viewed as a promising therapeutic target. However, previous efforts to target matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP9, have utilized broad-spectrum or semi-selective inhibitors. While some of these drugs showed signs of efficacy in patients, all MMP-targeted inhibitors have been hampered by dose-limiting toxicity or insufficient clinical benefit, likely due to their lack of specificity. Here, we show that selective inhibition of MMP9 did not induce musculoskeletal syndrome (a characteristic toxicity of pan-MMP inhibitors) in a rat model, but did reduce disease severity in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced mouse model of ulcerative colitis. We also found that MMP9 inhibition decreased tumor growth and metastases incidence in a surgical orthotopic xenograft model of colorectal carcinoma, and that inhibition of either tumor- or stroma-derived MMP9 was sufficient to reduce primary tumor growth. Collectively, these data suggest that selective MMP9 inhibition is a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of inflammatory and oncology indications in which MMP9 is upregulated and is associated with disease pathology, such as ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer. In addition, we report the development of a potent and highly selective allosteric MMP9 inhibitor, the humanized monoclonal antibody GS-5745, which can be used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of MMP9 inhibition in patients. PMID:25961845

  12. Contribution of Large Pig for Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion and Transplantation Studies: The Preclinical Model

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, S.; Favreau, F.; Chatauret, N.; Thuillier, R.; Maiga, S.; Hauet, T.

    2011-01-01

    Animal experimentation is necessary to characterize human diseases and design adequate therapeutic interventions. In renal transplantation research, the limited number of in vitro models involves a crucial role for in vivo models and particularly for the porcine model. Pig and human kidneys are anatomically similar (characterized by multilobular structure in contrast to rodent and dog kidneys unilobular). The human proximity of porcine physiology and immune systems provides a basic knowledge of graft recovery and inflammatory physiopathology through in vivo studies. In addition, pig large body size allows surgical procedures similar to humans, repeated collections of peripheral blood or renal biopsies making pigs ideal for medical training and for the assessment of preclinical technologies. However, its size is also its main drawback implying expensive housing. Nevertheless, pig models are relevant alternatives to primate models, offering promising perspectives with developments of transgenic modulation and marginal donor models facilitating data extrapolation to human conditions. PMID:21403881

  13. Preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies using animal model of inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takuji

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described. PMID:24213461

  14. Preclinical animal acute toxicity studies of new developed MRI contrast agent based on gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, I. F.; Zhuk, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    Acute toxicity test of new developed MRI contrast agent based on disodium salt of gadopentetic acid complex were carried out on Mus musculus and Sprague Dawley rats according to guidelines of preclinical studies [1]. Groups of six animals each were selected for experiment. Death and clinical symptoms of animals were recorded during 14 days. As a result the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for female mice is 2.8 mM/kg of body weight, male mice - 1.4 mM/kg, female rats - 2.8 mM/kg, male rats - 5.6 mM/kg of body weight. No Observed Adverse Effect Dose (NOAEL) for female mice is 1.4 mM/kg, male mice - 0.7 mM/kg, male and female rats - 0.7 mM/kg. According to experimental data new developed MRI contrast agent based on Gd-DTPA complex is low-toxic.

  15. Recent trends in preclinical drug-drug interaction studies of flavonoids?-?Review of case studies, issues and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2015-11-01

    Because of health benefits that are manifested across various disease areas, the consumption of herbal products and/or health supplements containing different kinds of flavonoids has been on the rise. While the drug-drug interaction potential between flavonoids and co-ingested drugs still remain an issue, opportunities exist for the combination of flavonoids with suitable anti-cancer drugs to enhance the bioavailability of anti-cancer drugs and thereby reduce the dose size of the anti-cancer drugs and improve its therapeutic index. In recent years, scores of flavonoids have undergone preclinical investigation with variety of drugs encompassing therapeutic areas such as oncology (etoposide, doxorubicin, paclitaxel, tamoxifen etc.), immunosuppression (cyclosporine) and hypertension (losartan, felodipine, nitrendipine etc.). The review provides examples of the recent trends in the preclinical investigation of 14 flavonoids (morin, quercetin, silibinin, kaempferol etc.) with various co-administered drugs. The relevance of combination of flavonoids with anti-cancer drugs and a framework to help design the in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies to gain better mechanistic insights are discussed. Also, concise discussions on the various physiological factors that contribute for the reduced bioavailability of flavonoids along with the significant challenges in the data interpretation are provided. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26343418

  16. Integration of preclinical and clinical knowledge to predict intravenous PK in human: bilastine case study.

    PubMed

    Vozmediano, Valvanera; Ortega, Ignacio; Lukas, John C; Gonzalo, Ana; Rodriguez, Monica; Lucero, Maria Luisa

    2014-03-01

    Modern pharmacometrics can integrate and leverage all prior proprietary and public knowledge. Such methods can be used to scale across species or comparators, perform clinical trial simulation across alternative designs, confirm hypothesis and potentially reduce development burden, time and costs. Crucial yet typically lacking in integration is the pre-clinical stage. Prediction of PK in man, using in vitro and in vivo studies in different animal species, is increasingly well theorized but could still find wider application in drug development. The aim of the present work was to explore methods for bridging pharmacokinetic knowledge from animal species (i.v. and p.o.) and man (p.o.) into i.v. in man using the antihistamine drug bilastine as example. A model, predictive of i.v. PK in man, was developed on data from two pre-clinical species (rat and dog) and p.o. in man bilastine trials performed earlier. In the knowledge application stage, two different approaches were used to predict human plasma concentration after i.v. of bilastine: allometry (several scaling methods) and a semi-physiological method. Both approaches led to successful predictions of key i.v. PK parameters of bilastine in man. The predictive i.v. PK model was validated using later data from a clinical study of i.v. bilastine. Introduction of such knowledge in development permits proper leveraging of all emergent knowledge as well as quantification-based exploration of PK scenario, e.g. in special populations (pediatrics, renal insufficiency, comedication). In addition, the methods permit reduction or elimination and certainly optimization of learning trials, particularly those concerning alternative off-label administration routes. PMID:23619917

  17. Creative Self-Efficacy: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathisen, Gro Ellen; Bronnick, Kolbjorn S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of creativity training on creative self-efficacy. We developed a creativity course based on social cognitive theory. The course was conducted in two formats: a five-day course and a condensed one-day course. Samples consisted of students and municipality employees (five-day course), and special education teachers…

  18. Pharmacology should be at the centre of all preclinical and clinical studies on new psychoactive substances (recreational drugs).

    PubMed

    Green, A Richard; Nutt, David J

    2014-08-01

    Despite the publication of a substantial body of preclinical and clinical information on recent recreational drugs such as 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') and cathinone compounds such as mephedrone there remains a disturbing lack of consensus as to how dangerous these compounds are to the health of the individual and to society in general. This perspective proposes that use of good pharmacological practice should be mandatory in all preclinical and clinical studies. Its use will assist both translation and reverse translation of information produced in animals and clinical subjects. We propose several basic rules to be followed in all future studies. Preclinical studies should employ pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic integration thereby exposing animals to known or calculable drug concentrations. This will provide results relevant to pharmacology rather than toxicology and, crucially, data relevant to human drug use. Full experimental detail should be routinely provided, to allow comparison with other similar work. In clinical studies evidence should be provided that the drug under investigation has been ingested by the subjects being examined, and details given of all other drugs being ingested. Drug-drug interactions are an unavoidable confound but studies of a size that allows reliable statistical evaluation and preferably allows sub-group analysis, particularly by using meta-analysis, should help with this problem. This may require greater collaboration between investigative groups, as routinely occurs during pharmaceutical clinical trials. Other proposals include greater integration of preclinical and clinical scientists in both preclinical and clinical studies and changes in the law regarding Good Manufacturing Process (GMP) sourcing of drug for human studies. PMID:24674814

  19. Evaluation of the preclinical efficacy of four antivenoms, distributed in sub-Saharan Africa, to neutralize the venom of the carpet viper, Echis ocellatus, from Mali, Cameroon, and Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Laura V; Pla, Davinia; Herrera, María; Chippaux, Jean Philippe; Calvete, Juan J; Gutiérrez, José María

    2015-11-01

    Snakebite envenoming causes a heavy toll in sub-Saharan Africa in terms of mortality and sequelae. In the West African savannah, the viperid Echis ocellatus is responsible for the vast majority of bites. In the last decades, several new antivenoms have been introduced for the treatment of these envenomings, although the assessment of their preclinical efficacy against the venom of E. ocellatus has been studied only for some of them. This work analyzed comparatively the ability of four antivenoms (FAV Afrique, EchiTAb G, EchiTAB-Plus-ICP(®), and Inoserp™ Panafricain) to neutralize lethal, hemorrhagic, and in vitro coagulant activities of the venoms of E. ocellatus from Mali, Cameroon, and Nigeria. In addition, an immunoaffinity chromatography antivenomic protocol was used to assess the ability of the four antivenoms to bind to the proteins of these venoms. Results showed that all the antivenoms were effective in the neutralization of the three effects investigated, and were able to immunocapture, completely or partially, the most abundant components in the E. ocellatus venoms from the geographical origins sampled. Our observations also highlighted quantitative differences between antivenoms in their neutralizing and antivenomics profiles, especially regarding neutralization of in vitro coagulant activity, suggesting that different doses of these antivenoms are probably needed for an effective treatment of human envenomings by this species. PMID:26415904

  20. IGF ACTIVATION IN A MOLECULAR SUBCLASS OF HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA AND PRE-CLINICAL EFFICACY OF IGF-1R BLOCKAGE

    PubMed Central

    Tovar, Victoria; Alsinet, Clara; Villanueva, Augusto; Hoshida, Yujin; Chiang, Derek Y.; Solé, Manel; Thung, Swan; Moyano, Susana; Toffanin, Sara; Mínguez, Beatriz; Cabellos, Laia; Peix, Judit; Schwartz, Myron; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Bruix, Jordi; Llovet, Josep M.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims IGF signaling has a relevant role in a variety of human malignancies. We analyzed the underlying molecular mechanisms of IGF signaling activation in early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; BCLC class 0 or A) and assessed novel targeted therapies blocking this pathway Methods An integrative molecular dissection of the axis was conducted in a cohort of 104 HCCs analyzing gene and miRNA expression, structural aberrations and protein activation. The therapeutic potential of a selective IGF-1R inhibitor, the monoclonal antibody A12, was assessed in vitro and in a xenograft model of HCC Results Activation of the IGF axis was observed in 21% of early HCCs. Several molecular aberrations were identified, such as overexpression of IGF2 –resulting from reactivation of fetal promoters P3 and P4-, IGFBP3 downregulation and allelic losses of IGF2R 25% of cases). A gene signature defining IGF-1R activation was developed. Overall, activation of IGF signaling in HCC was significantly associated with mTOR signaling (p=0.035) and was clearly enriched in the Proliferation subclass of the molecular classification of HCC (p=0.001). We also found an inverse correlation between IGF activation and miR-100/miR-216 levels (FDR<0.05). In vitro studies showed that A12-induced abrogation of IGF-1R activation and downstream signaling significantly decreased cell viability and proliferation. In vivoA12 delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival, reducing proliferation rates and inducing apoptosis Conclusions Integrative genomic analysis showed enrichment of activation of IGF signaling in the Proliferation subclass of HCC. Effective blockage of IGF signaling with A12 provides the rationale for testing this therapy in clinical trials. PMID:20206398

  1. JNJ-40255293, a novel adenosine A2A/A1 antagonist with efficacy in preclinical models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Atack, John R; Shook, Brian C; Rassnick, Stefanie; Jackson, Paul F; Rhodes, Kenneth; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus H; Ahnaou, Abdallah; Te Riele, Paula; Langlois, Xavier; Hrupka, Brian; De Haes, Patrick; Hendrickx, Herman; Aerts, Nancy; Hens, Koen; Wellens, Annemie; Vermeire, Jef; Megens, Anton A H P

    2014-10-15

    Adenosine A2A antagonists are believed to have therapeutic potential in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). We have characterized the dual adenosine A2A/A1 receptor antagonist JNJ-40255293 (2-amino-8-[2-(4-morpholinyl)ethoxy]-4-phenyl-5H-indeno[1,2-d]pyrimidin-5-one). JNJ-40255293 was a high-affinity (7.5 nM) antagonist at the human A2A receptor with 7-fold in vitro selectivity versus the human A1 receptor. A similar A2A:A1 selectivity was seen in vivo (ED50's of 0.21 and 2.1 mg/kg p.o. for occupancy of rat brain A2A and A1 receptors, respectively). The plasma EC50 for occupancy of rat brain A2A receptors was 13 ng/mL. In sleep-wake encephalographic (EEG) studies, JNJ-40255293 dose-dependently enhanced a consolidated waking associated with a subsequent delayed compensatory sleep (minimum effective dose: 0.63 mg/kg p.o.). As measured by microdialysis, JNJ-40255293 did not affect dopamine and noradrenaline release in the prefrontal cortex and the striatum. However, it was able to reverse effects (catalepsy, hypolocomotion, and conditioned avoidance impairment in rats; hypolocomotion in mice) produced by the dopamine D2 antagonist haloperidol. The compound also potentiated the agitation induced by the dopamine agonist apomorphine. JNJ-40255293 also reversed hypolocomotion produced by the dopamine-depleting agent reserpine and potentiated the effects of l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesions of the nigro-striatal pathway, an animal model of Parkinson's disease. Extrapolating from the rat receptor occupancy dose-response curve, the occupancy required to produce these various effects in rats was generally in the range of 60-90%. The findings support the continued research and development of A2A antagonists as potential treatments for PD. PMID:25203719

  2. Examination performances of German and international medical students in the preclinical studying-term – A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Huhn, D.; Resch, F.; Duelli, R.; Möltner, A.; Huber, J.; Karimian Jazi, K.; Amr, A.; Eckart, W.; Herzog, W.; Nikendei, C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students with a migration background face several specific problems during their studies. International surveys show first indications that this group of students performs worse in written, oral or practical exams. However, so far, nothing is known about the performance of international students in written pre-clinical tests as well as in pre-clinical State Examinations for German-speaking countries. Method: A descriptive, retrospective analysis of the exam performances of medical students in the pre-clinical part of their studies was conducted at the Faculty of Medicine of Heidelberg in for the year 2012. Performance in written tests of the final exams in the second (N=276), third (N=292) and fourth semester (N=285) were compared between German students, students from EU countries and students from non-EU countries. Same comparison was drawn for the performance in the oral exam of the First State Examination in the period from 2009 - 2012 (N=1137). Results: German students performed significantly better than students with a non-EU migration background both in all written exams and in the oral State Examination (all p<.05). The performance of students with an EU migration background was significantly better than that of students with a non-EU background in the written exam at the end of the third and fourth semester (p<.05). Furthermore, German students completed the oral exam of the First State Examination significantly earlier than students with a non-EU migration background (<.01). Discussion: Due to its poorer performance in written and oral examinations and its simultaneously longer duration of study, the group of non-German medical students with a country of origin outside of the European Union has to be seen as a high-risk group among students with a migration background. For this group, there is an urgent need for early support to prepare for written and oral examinations. PMID:25228931

  3. Preclinical endodontic teaching

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaraopeta, Udaya; AlShwaimi, Emad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To provide an overview of the general curricula in preclinical endodontic training from 6 established dental schools in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This study was conducted in January 2014 including only schools that had more than 2 groups of student graduates prior to the study. We included 2 dental schools from the Central region, one from Qassim region, one from the Makkah region (west), one from Abha region (south west), and one from the eastern region. An internet-based questionnaire was sent to the course directors of preclinical endodontics department of the 6 schools. The survey comprised 20 questions that examined various aspects of preclinical endodontics. Results: It was demonstrated that a significant number of faculty members had Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees (n=21), Master’s degrees (n=15), and Saudi board certifications (n=8). We determined that the faculty to student ratio varied from 2:1 to 8: 1 among the colleges. The participating dental schools were found to teach the Step Back, as well as the Step Down techniques for root canal preparation. Five of the 6 schools implemented the use of nickel titanium rotary instruments. All dental schools predominantly used radiographs as the means of the working length determination. Conclusion: The curriculum for preclinical endodontics in Saudi Arabia is comparable to that followed in most European countries. A more comprehensive survey is needed that would involve more schools to formulate generalized guidelines for preclinical endodontic training in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25630011

  4. Timing of Decompressive Surgery of Spinal Cord after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: An Evidence-Based Examination of Pre-Clinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Julio C.; Noonan, Vanessa; Cadotte, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract While the recommendations for spine surgery in specific cases of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) are well recognized, there is considerable uncertainty regarding the role of the timing of surgical decompression of the spinal cord in the management of patients with SCI. Given this, we sought to critically review the literature regarding the pre-clinical and clinical evidence on the potential impact of timing of surgical decompression of the spinal cord on outcomes after traumatic SCI. The primary literature search was performed using MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. A secondary search strategy incorporated articles referenced in prior meta-analyses and systematic and nonsystematic review articles. Two reviewers independently assessed every study with regard to eligibility, level of evidence, and study quality. Of 198 abstracts of pre-clinical studies, 19 experimental studies using animal SCI models fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria. Despite some discrepancies in the results of those pre-clinical studies, there is evidence for a biological rationale to support early decompression of the spinal cord. Of 153 abstracts of clinical studies, 22 fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. While the vast majority of the clinical studies were level-4 evidence, there were two studies of level-2b evidence. The quality assessment scores varied from 7 to 25 with a mean value of 12.41. While 2 of 22 clinical studies assessed feasibility and safety, 20 clinical studies examined efficacy of early surgical intervention to stabilize and align the spine and to decompress the spinal cord; the most common definitions of early operation used 24 and 72?h after SCI as timelines. A number of studies indicated that patients who undergo early surgical decompression can have similar outcomes to patients who received a delayed decompressive operation. However, there is evidence to suggest that early surgical intervention is safe and feasible and that it can improve clinical and neurological outcomes and reduce health care costs. Based on the current clinical evidence using a Delphi process, an expert panel recommended that early surgical intervention should be considered in all patients from 8 to 24?h following acute traumatic SCI. PMID:20001726

  5. Ularitide for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure: from preclinical to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Anker, Stefan D; Ponikowski, Piotr; Mitrovic, Veselin; Peacock, W Frank; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-03-21

    The short- and long-term morbidity and mortality in acute heart failure is still unacceptably high. There is an unmet need for new therapy options with new drugs with a new mode of action. One of the drugs currently in clinical testing in Phase III is ularitide, which is the chemically synthesized form of the human natriuretic peptide urodilatin. Urodilatin is produced in humans by differential processing of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in distal renal tubule cells. Physiologically, urodilatin appears to be the natriuretic peptide involved in sodium homeostasis. Ularitide exerts its pharmacological actions such as vasodilation, diuresis, and natriuresis through the natriuretic peptide receptor/particulate guanylate cyclase/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway. In animal models of heart failure as well as Phase I and II clinical studies in heart failure patients, ularitide demonstrated beneficial effects such as symptom relief and vasodilation, while still preserving renal function. Subsequently, the pivotal acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) Phase III study, called TRUE-AHF, was started with the objectives to evaluate the effects of ularitide infusion on the clinical status and cardiovascular mortality of patients with ADHF compared with placebo. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical data supporting the potential use of ularitide in the treatment of ADHF. PMID:25670819

  6. Videotaped Feedback Method to Enhance Learning in Preclinical Operative Dentistry: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dipali Yogesh; Dadpe, Ashwini Manish; Kalra, Dheeraj Deepak; Garcha, Vikram P

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if a videotaped feedback method enhanced teaching and learning outcomes in a preclinical operative laboratory setting for novice learners. In 2013, 60 dental students at a dental school in India were randomly assigned to two groups: control (n=30) and experimental (n=30). The control group prepared a Class II tooth preparation for amalgam after receiving a video demonstration of the exercise. The experimental group received the same video demonstration as the control group, but they also participated in a discussion and analysis of the control groups' videotaped performance and then performed the same exercise. The self-evaluation scores (SS) and examiner evaluation scores (ES) of the two groups were compared using the unpaired t-test. The experimental group also used a five-point Likert scale to rate each item on the feedback form. The means of SS (13.65±2.43) and ES (14.75±1.97) of the experimental group were statistically higher than the means of SS (11.55±2.09) and ES (11.60±1.82) of the control group. Most students in the experimental group perceived that this technique enhanced their learning experience. Within the limits of this study, the videotaped feedback using both ideal and non-ideal examples enhanced the students' performance. PMID:26632301

  7. Preclinical systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Julie M; James, Judith A

    2014-11-01

    Preclinical lupus encompasses a spectrum from enhanced SLE risk without clinical symptoms to individuals with autoantibodies and some SLE clinical features without meeting ACR classification. Studies have identified antibody and serological biomarkers years before disease onset. Incomplete lupus and undifferentiated connective tissue disease may occur during preclinical disease periods, but only 10-20% of these individuals transition to SLE and many have a mild disease course. Further studies are warranted to characterize biomarkers of early disease, identify individuals in need of close monitoring or preventive interventions, and elucidate mechanisms of disease pathogenesis without confounding factors of immunosuppressive medications or organ damage. PMID:25437281

  8. A Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Parameningeal Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma for Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Jody E.; Cantor, Emma L.; Ehlen, Macgregor S.; Banerjee, Avirup; Malempati, Suman; Stenzel, Peter; Woltjer, Randy L.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Goodwin, Neal C.; Yang, Yan; Kaur, Pali; Bult, Carol J.; Airhart, Susan D.; Keller, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS) is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents. Parameningeal eRMS is a variant that is often more difficult to treat than eRMS occurring at other sites. A 14-year-old female with persistent headaches and rapid weight loss was diagnosed with parameningeal eRMS. She progressed and died despite chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide plus 50.4?Gy radiation therapy to the primary tumor site. Tumor specimens were acquired by rapid autopsy and tumor tissue was transplanted into immunodeficient mice to create a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) animal model. As autopsy specimens had an ALK R1181C mutation, PDX tumor bearing animals were treated with the pan-kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib but demonstrated no decrease in tumor growth, suggesting that single agent kinase inhibitor therapy may be insufficient in similar cases. This unique parameningeal eRMS PDX model is publicly available for preclinical study. PMID:26696773

  9. Computed tomography-based rigidity analysis: a review of the approach in preclinical and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Camacho, Juan C; Iyoha-Bello, Otatade; Behrouzi, Shohreh; Snyder, Brian D; Nazarian, Ara

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of fracture risk in patients afflicted with osseous neoplasms has long presented a problem for orthopedic oncologists. These patients are at risk for developing pathologic fractures through lytic defects in the appendicular and axial skeleton with devastating consequences on their quality of life. Lesions with a high risk of fracture may require prophylactic surgical stabilization, whereas low-risk lesions can be treated conservatively. Therefore, effective prevention of pathologic fractures depends on accurate assessment of fracture risk and is a critical step to avoid debilitating complications. Given the complex nature of osseous neoplasms, treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach; yet, little consensus regarding fracture risk assessment exists among physicians involved in the care of these patients. In order to improve the overall standard of care, specific criteria must be adopted to formulate consistent and accurate fracture risk predictions. However, clinicians make subjective assessments about fracture risk on plain radiographs using guidelines now recognized to be inaccurate. Osseous neoplasms alter both the material and geometric properties of bone; failure to account for changes in both of these parameters limits the accuracy of current fracture risk assessments. Rigidity, the capacity to resist deformation upon loading, is a structural property that integrates both the material and geometric properties of bone. Therefore, rigidity can be used as a mechanical assay of the changes induced by lytic lesions to the structural competency of bone. Using this principle, computed tomography (CT)-based structural rigidity analysis (CTRA) was developed and validated in a series of preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:25396051

  10. A New Mini-External Fixator for Treating Hallux Valgus: A Preclinical, Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Erdil, Mehmet; Ceylan, Hasan Huseyin; Polat, Gokhan; Kara, Deniz; Bozdag, Ergun; Sunbuloglu, Emin

    2016-01-01

    Proximal metatarsal osteotomy is the most effective technique for correcting hallux valgus deformities, especially in metatarsus primus varus. However, these surgeries are technically demanding and prone to complications, such as nonunion, implant failure, and unexpected extension of the osteotomy to the tarsometatarsal joint. In a preclinical study, we evaluated the biomechanical properties of the fixator and compared it with compression screws for treating hallux valgus with a proximal metatarsal osteotomy. Of 18 metatarsal composite bone models proximally osteotomized, 9 were fixed with a headless compression screw and 9 with the mini-external fixator. A dorsal angulation of 10° and displacement of 10 mm were defined as the failure threshold values. Construct stiffness and the amount of interfragmentary angulation were calculated at various load cycles. All screw models failed before completing 1000 load cycles. In the fixator group, only 2 of 9 models (22.2%) failed before 1000 cycles, both between the 600th and 700th load cycles. The stability of fixation differed significantly between the groups (p < .001). The stability provided by the mini-external fixator was superior to that of compression screw fixation. Additional testing of the fixator is indicated. PMID:26190777

  11. Preclinical safety and effectiveness studies of ultrasonic propulsion of kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Jonathan D.; Dunmire, Barbrina; Wang, Yak-Nam; Simon, Julianna C.; Liggitt, H. Denny; Paun, Marla; Cunitz, Bryan W.; Starr, Frank; Bailey, Michael R.; Penniston, Kristina; Lee, Franklin Chong-Ho; Hsi, Ryan S.; Sorensen, Mathew D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide an update on a research device to ultrasonically reposition kidney stones transcutaneously. This paper reports preclinical safety and effectiveness studies, survival data, modifications of the system, and testing in a stone-forming porcine model. These data formed the basis for regulatory approval to test the device in humans. Materials and Methods The ultrasound burst was shortened to 50ms from previous investigations with 1s bursts. Focused ultrasound was used to expel 2–5mm calcium oxalate monohydrate stones placed ureteroscopically in five pigs. Additionally, de novo stones were imaged and repositioned in a stone-forming porcine model. Acute safety studies were performed targeting two kidneys (6 sites) and three pancreases (8 sites). Survival studies followed 10 animals for one week after simulated treatment. Serum and urine analyses were performed and tissues were evaluated histologically. Results All ureteroscopically-implanted stones (6/6) were repositioned out of the kidney in 14 ± 8 minutes with 13 ± 6 bursts. On average, three bursts moved a stone more than 4mm and collectively accounted for the majority of relocation. Stones (3mm) were detected and repositioned in the 200-kg stone-forming model. No injury was detected in the acute or survival studies. Conclusions Ultrasonic propulsion is safe and effective in the porcine model. Stones were expelled from the kidney. De novo stones formed in a large porcine model were repositioned. No adverse effects were identified with the acute studies directly targeting kidney or pancreatic tissue or during the survival studies indicating no evidence of delayed tissue injury. PMID:24975708

  12. Stem Cell Therapies for Knee Cartilage Repair: The Current Status of Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John A.; Little, Dianne; Toth, Alison P.; Moorman, Claude T.; Tucker, Bradford S.; Ciccotti, Michael G.; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Background Articular cartilage damage of the knee is common, causing significant morbidity worldwide. Many adult tissues contain cells that are able to differentiate into multiple cell types, including chondrocytes. These stem cells have gained significant attention over the past decade and may become frontline management for cartilage defects in the very near future. Purpose The role of stem cells in the treatment of knee osteochondral defects was reviewed. Recent animal and clinical studies were reviewed to determine the benefits and potential outcomes of using stem cells for cartilage defects. Study Design Literature review. Methods A PubMed search was undertaken. The key phrase “stem cells and knee” was used. The search included reviews and original articles over an unlimited time period. From this search, articles outlining animal and clinical trials were selected. A search of current clinical trials in progress was performed on the clinicaltrials.gov website, and “stem cells and knee” was used as the search phrase. Results Stem cells have been used in many recent in vitro and animal studies. A number of cell-based approaches for cartilage repair have progressed from preclinical animal studies into clinical trials. Conclusion The use of stem cells for the treatment of cartilage defects is increasing in animal and clinical studies. Methods of delivery of stem cells to the knee’s cartilage vary from direct injection to implantation with scaffolds. While these approaches are highly promising, there is currently limited evidence of a direct clinical benefit, and further research is required to assess the overall outcome of stem cell therapies for knee cartilage repair. PMID:24220016

  13. HD047703, a New Promising Anti-Diabetic Drug Candidate: In Vivo Preclinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, SoRa; Kim, Dae Hoon; Kim, Young-Seok; Ha, Tae-Young; Yang, Jin; Park, Soo Hyun; Jeong, Kwang Won; Rhee, Jae-Keol

    2014-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptor 119 (GPR119) has emerged as a novel target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. GPR119 is involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from the pancreatic ?-cells and intestinal cells. In this study, we identified a novel small-molecule GPR119 agonist, HD047703, which raises intracellular cAMP concentrations in pancreatic ?-cells and can be expected to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from human GPR119 receptor stably expressing cells (CHO cells). We evaluated the acute efficacy of HD047703 by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in normal C57BL/6J mice. Then, chronic administrations of HD047703 were performed to determine its efficacy in various diabetic rodent models. Single administration of HD047703 caused improved glycemic control during OGTT in a dose-dependent manner in normal mice, and the plasma GLP-1 level was also increased. With respect to chronic efficacy, we observed a decline in blood glucose levels in db/db, ob/ob and DIO mice. These results suggest that HD047703 may be a potentially promising anti-diabetic agent. PMID:25414769

  14. HD047703, a New Promising Anti-Diabetic Drug Candidate: In Vivo Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, SoRa; Kim, Dae Hoon; Kim, Young-Seok; Ha, Tae-Young; Yang, Jin; Park, Soo Hyun; Jeong, Kwang Won; Rhee, Jae-Keol

    2014-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptor 119 (GPR119) has emerged as a novel target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. GPR119 is involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from the pancreatic ?-cells and intestinal cells. In this study, we identified a novel small-molecule GPR119 agonist, HD047703, which raises intracellular cAMP concentrations in pancreatic ?-cells and can be expected to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from human GPR119 receptor stably expressing cells (CHO cells). We evaluated the acute efficacy of HD047703 by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in normal C57BL/6J mice. Then, chronic administrations of HD047703 were performed to determine its efficacy in various diabetic rodent models. Single administration of HD047703 caused improved glycemic control during OGTT in a dose-dependent manner in normal mice, and the plasma GLP-1 level was also increased. With respect to chronic efficacy, we observed a decline in blood glucose levels in db/db, ob/ob and DIO mice. These results suggest that HD047703 may be a potentially promising anti-diabetic agent. PMID:25414769

  15. Nanomedicines for cancer therapy: state-of-the-art and limitations to pre-clinical studies that hinder future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidczyk, Charlene; Russell, Luisa; Searson, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The ability to efficiently deliver a drug or gene to a tumor site is dependent on a wide range of factors including circulation time, interactions with the mononuclear phagocyte system, extravasation from circulation at the tumor site, targeting strategy, release from the delivery vehicle, and uptake in cancer cells. Nanotechnology provides the possibility of creating delivery systems where the design constraints are decoupled, allowing new approaches for reducing the unwanted side effects of systemic delivery, increasing tumor accumulation, and improving efficacy. The physico-chemical properties of nanoparticle-based delivery platforms introduce additional complexity associated with pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation. To assess the impact of nanoparticle-based delivery systems, we first review the design strategies and pharmacokinetics of FDA-approved nanomedicines. Next we review nanomedicines under development, summarizing the range of nanoparticle platforms, strategies for targeting, and pharmacokinetics. We show how the lack of uniformity in preclinical trials prevents systematic comparison and hence limits advances in the field.

  16. Challenges for Preclinical Investigations of Human Biofield Modalities.

    PubMed

    Gronowicz, Gloria; Bengston, William; Yount, Garret

    2015-11-01

    Preclinical models for studying the effects of the human biofield have great potential to advance our understanding of human biofield modalities, which include external qigong, Johrei, Reiki, therapeutic touch, healing touch, polarity therapy, pranic healing, and other practices. A short history of Western biofield studies using preclinical models is presented and demonstrates numerous and consistent examples of human biofields significantly affecting biological systems both in vitro and in vivo. Methodological issues arising from these studies and practical solutions in experimental design are presented. Important questions still left unanswered with preclinical models include variable reproducibility, dosing, intentionality of the practitioner, best preclinical systems, and mechanisms. Input from the biofield practitioners in the experimental design is critical to improving experimental outcomes; however, the development of standard criteria for uniformity of practice and for inclusion of multiple practitioners is needed. Research in human biofield studies involving preclinical models promises a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of biofield therapies and will be important in guiding clinical protocols and integrating treatments with conventional medical therapies. PMID:26665042

  17. Pharmacological treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis – preclinical and clinical studies of pirfenidone, nintedanib, and N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Myllärniemi, Marjukka; Kaarteenaho, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    Three recent clinical trials on the pharmacologic treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) mark a new chapter in the management of patients suffering from this very severe fibrotic lung disease. This review article summarizes the published investigations on the preclinical studies of three novel IPF drugs, namely pirfenidone, nintedanib, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). In addition, the study protocols, differences, and the main findings in the recent clinical trials of these pharmacological treatments are reviewed. The strategy for drug development and the timeline from the discovery to the clinical use have been very different in these regimens. Pirfenidone was discovered in 1976 but only recently received approval in most countries, and even now its exact mechanism of action is unknown. On the contrary, nintedanib (BIBF1120) was identified in large drug screening tests as a very specific inhibitor of certain tyrosine kinases, but no published data on preclinical tests existed until 2014. NAC, a mucolytic drug with an antioxidant mechanism of action was claimed to possess distinct antifibrotic properties in several experimental models but proved to be ineffective in a recent randomized placebo-controlled trial. At present, no curative treatment is available for IPF. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of IPF as well as relevant preclinical tests including animal models and in vitro experiments on human lung cells are needed to promote the development of therapeutic drugs. PMID:26557253

  18. Determinants of the Efficacy of Cardiac Ischemic Preconditioning: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Animal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wever, Kimberley E.; Hooijmans, Carlijn R.; Riksen, Niels P.; Sterenborg, Thomas B.; Sena, Emily S.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel; Warlé, Michiel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) of the heart is a protective strategy in which a brief ischemic stimulus immediately before a lethal ischemic episode potently limits infarct size. Although very promising in animal models of myocardial infarction, IPC has not yet been successfully translated to benefit for patients. Objective To appraise all preclinical evidence on IPC for myocardial infarction and identify factors hampering translation. Methods and results Using systematic review and meta-analysis, we identified 503 animal studies reporting infarct size data from 785 comparisons between IPC-treated and control animals. Overall, IPC reduced myocardial infarction by 24.6% [95%CI 23.5, 25.6]. Subgroup analysis showed that IPC efficacy was reduced in comorbid animals and non-rodents. Efficacy was highest in studies using 2–3 IPC cycles applied <45 minutes before myocardial infarction. Local and remote IPC were equally effective. Reporting of study quality indicators was low: randomization, blinding and a sample size calculation were reported in 49%, 11% and 2% of publications, respectively. Conclusions Translation of IPC to the clinical setting may be hampered by the observed differences between the animals used in preclinical IPC studies and the patient population, regarding comorbidity, sex and age. Furthermore, the IPC protocols currently used in clinical trials could be optimized in terms of timing and the number of ischemic cycles applied. In order to inform future clinical trials successfully, future preclinical studies on IPC should aim to maximize both internal and external validity, since poor methodological quality may limit the value of the preclinical evidence. PMID:26580958

  19. Irinotecan delivery by microbubble-assisted ultrasound - A pilot preclinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Novell, Anthony; Serrière, Sophie; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2012-11-01

    Irinotecan is conventionally used for the treatment of colorectal cancer. However, its administration is associated with severe side effects. Targeted drug delivery using ultrasound (US) combined with microbubbles offers new opportunities to increase the therapeutic effectiveness of antitumor treatment and to reduce toxic exposure to healthy tissues. The objective of this study is to investigate the safety and efficacy of in-vivo delivery of irinotecan by microbubble-assisted US in human glioblastoma model (U-87 MG). In order to validate the potential of this new method in-vivo, subcutaneous tumors were implanted in the flank of nude mouse and treated when they reached a volume of 100 mm3. In the first study, the measured volumes with caliper and anatomic ultrasound imaging were compared for the monitoring and the quantification of tumor growth during 27 days. Ultrasound imaging measurements were positively correlated to caliper measurements. The tumor treatment consisted of an i.v. injection of irinotecan (20 mg/kg) followed one hour later by i.v. administration of MM1 microbubble and an US insonation using a single-element transducer operating at 1MHz (400 kPa, 10 kHz PRF 40% DC, 3 min). The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated for 39 days by measuring the tumor volume before and after treatment using a caliper and based on ultrasound images using an 18 MHz probe (Vevo 2100). Our results showed that anatomical ultrasound imaging was as efficient as caliper for the monitoring and the quantification of tumor growth. Moreover, irinotecan delivery by sonoporation induced a significant decrease of glioblastoma tumor volume and an increase of tumor-doubling time compared to the tumor treated by irinotecan alone. In conclusion, this novel therapeutic approach has promising features since it can be used to reduce the injected drug dose and to achieve a better therapeutic efficacy.

  20. Combination treatment with hypoxia-activated prodrug evofosfamide (TH-302) and mTOR inhibitors results in enhanced antitumor efficacy in preclinical renal cell carcinoma models

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jessica D; Ahluwalia, Dharmendra; Liu, Qian; Li, Wenwu; Wang, Yan; Meng, Fanying; Bhupathi, Deepthi; Matteucci, Mark D; Hart, Charles P

    2015-01-01

    Tumors often consist of hypoxic regions which are resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy. Evofosfamide (also known as TH-302), a 2-nitroimidazole triggered hypoxia-activated prodrug, preferentially releases the DNA cross-linker bromo-isophosphoramide mustard in hypoxic cells. The intracellular kinase mTOR plays a key role in multiple pathways which are important in cancer progression. Here we investigated the enhanced efficacy profile and possible mechanisms of evofosfamide in combination with mTOR inhibitor (mTORi) everolimus or temsirolimus in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) xenograft models. The antitumor activities of the mTORi everolimus or temsirolimus alone, evofosfamide alone, or the combination were investigated in the 786-O and Caki-1 RCC cells in vitro and in vivo xenograft models. Two schedules were tested in which evofosfamide was started on the same day as the mTORi or 1 week after. Combination mechanisms were investigated by measuring a panel of pharmacodynamic biomarkers by immunohistochemistry. Antitumor efficacy in both RCC xenograft models was enhanced by the combination of evofosfamide and mTORi. Evofosfamide reduced the increased hypoxia induced by mTORi. Combination treatment induced increased DNA damage, decreased cell proliferation, and decreased survivin. Addition of mTORi did not change evofosfamide-mediated cytotoxicity in 786-O or Caki-1 cells in vitro which might suggest cell non-autonomous effects, specifically increased tumor hypoxia, are important for the in vivo combination activity. Taken together, evofosfamide potentiates the antitumor efficacy of mTOR inhibitors and inhibits the increased tumor hypoxia caused by mTOR inhibition. These studies provide a translational rationale for combining evofosfamide with mTOR inhibitors in clinical studies. PMID:26328245

  1. Trajectories of memory decline in preclinical Alzheimer's disease: results from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Flagship Study of ageing.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Robert H; Lim, Yen Ying; Ames, David; Harrington, Karra; Restrepo, Carolina; Martins, Ralph N; Rembach, Alan; Laws, Simon M; Masters, Colin L; Villemagne, Victor L; Rowe, Christopher C; Maruff, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Memory changes in preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) are often characterized by heterogenous trajectories. However, data regarding the nature and determinants of predominant trajectories of memory changes in preclinical AD are lacking. We analyzed data from 333 cognitively healthy older adults who participated in a multicenter prospective cohort study with baseline and 18-, 36-, and 54-month follow-up assessments. Latent growth mixture modeling revealed 3 predominant trajectories of memory change: a below average, subtly declining memory trajectory (30.9%); a below average, rapidly declining memory trajectory (3.6%); and an above average, stable memory trajectory (65.5%). Compared with the stable memory trajectory, high ?? (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 2.1), and lower Mini-Mental State Examination (RRR = 0.6) and full-scale IQ (RRR = 0.9) scores were independently associated with the subtly declining memory trajectory; and high ?? (RRR = 8.3), APOE ?4 carriage (RRR = 6.1), and greater subjective memory impairment (RRR = 1.2) were independently associated with the rapidly declining memory trajectory. Compared with the subtly declining memory trajectory group, APOE ?4 carriage (RRR = 8.4), and subjective memory complaints (RRR = 1.2) were associated with a rapidly declining memory trajectory. These results suggest that the preclinical phase of AD may be characterized by 2 predominant trajectories of memory decline that have common (e.g., high ??) and unique (e.g., APOE ?4 genotype) determinants. PMID:25585532

  2. Synthesis, characterization and preclinical studies of two-photon-activated targeted PDT therapeutic triads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, C. W.; Starkey, J. R.; Rebane, A.; Meng, F.; Gong, A.; Drobizhev, M.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) continues to evolve into a mature clinical treatment of a variety of cancer types as well as age-related macular degeneration of the eye. However, there are still aspects of PDT that need to be improved in order for greater clinical acceptance. While a number of new PDT photo-sensitizers, sometimes referred to as second- or third- generation therapeutic agents, are currently under clinical investigation, the direct treatment through the skin of subcutaneous tumors deeper than 5 mm remains problematic. Currently approved PDT porphyrin photo-sensitizers, as well as several modified porphyrins (e.g. chlorins, bacteriochlorins, etc.) that are under clinical investigation can be activated at 630-730 nm, but none above 800 nm. It would be highly desirable if new PDT paradigms could be developed that would allow photo-activation deep in the tissue transparency window in the Near-infrared (NIR) above 800 nm to reduce scattering and absorption phenomena that reduce deep tissue PDT efficacy. Rasiris and MPA Technologies have developed new porphyrins that have greatly enhanced two-photon absorption ( P A ) cross-sections and can be activated deep in the NIR (ca. 780-850 nm). These porphyrins can be incorporated into a therapeutic triad that also employs an small molecule targeting agent that directs the triad to over-expressed tumor receptor sites, and a NIR onephoton imaging agent that allows tracking the delivery of the triad to the tumor site, as well as clearance of excess triad from healthy tissue prior to the start of PDT treatment. We are currently using these new triads in efficacy studies with a breast cancer cell line that has been transfected with luciferase genes that allow implanted tumor growth and post- PDT treatment efficacy studies in SCID mouse models by following the rise and decay of the bioluminescence signal. We have also designed highly absorbing and scattering collagen breast cancer phantoms in which we have demonstrated dramatic cell kill to a depth of at least 4 cm. We have also demonstrated that at the wavelength and laser fluences used in the treatment of implanted tumors in the mouse mammary fat pads, there is little, if any, damage to the skin or internal mouse organs. In addition, we have also demonstrated that the implanted tumors can be treated to a depth of more than 1 cm by direct radiation through the dorsal side of the mouse.

  3. Systematic Approach to Remediation in Basic Science Knowledge for Preclinical Students: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amara, Francis

    Remediation of pre-clerkship students for deficits in basic science knowledge should help them overcome their learning deficiencies prior to clerkship. However, very little is known about remediation in basic science knowledge during pre-clerkship. This study utilized the program theory framework to collect and organize mixed methods data of the remediation plan for pre-clerkship students who failed their basic science cognitive examinations in a Canadian medical school. This plan was analyzed using a logic model narrative approach and compared to literature on the learning theories. The analysis showed a remediation plan that was strong on governance and verification of scores, but lacked: clarity and transparency of communication, qualified remedial tutors, individualized diagnosis of learner's deficits, and student centered learning. Participants admitted uncertainty about the efficacy of the remediation process. A remediation framework is proposed that includes student-centered participation, individualized learning plan and activities, deliberate practice, feedback, reflection, and rigorous reassessment.

  4. Attempted and Successful Compensation in Preclinical and Early Manifest Neurodegeneration – A Review of Task fMRI Studies

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, Elisa; Minkova, Lora; Leitner, Mathias; Klöppel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Several models of neural compensation in healthy aging have been suggested to explain brain activity that aids to sustain cognitive function. Applying recently suggested criteria of “attempted” and “successful” compensation, we reviewed existing literature on compensatory mechanisms in preclinical Huntington’s disease (HD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Both disorders constitute early stages of neurodegeneration ideal for examining compensatory mechanisms and developing targeted interventions. We strived to clarify whether compensation criteria derived from healthy aging populations can be applied to early neurodegeneration. To concentrate on the close coupling of cognitive performance and brain activity, we exclusively addressed task fMRI studies. First, we found evidence for parallels in compensatory mechanisms between healthy aging and neurodegenerative disease. Several studies fulfilled criteria of attempted compensation, while reports of successful compensation were largely absent, which made it difficult to conclude on. Second, comparing working memory studies in preclinical HD and aMCI, we identified similar compensatory patterns across neurodegenerative disorders in lateral and medial prefrontal cortex. Such patterns included an inverted U-shaped relationship of neurodegeneration and compensatory activity spanning from preclinical to manifest disease. Due to the lack of studies systematically targeting all criteria of compensation, we propose an exemplary study design, including the manipulation of compensating brain areas by brain stimulation. Furthermore, we delineate the benefits of targeted interventions by non-invasive brain stimulation, as well as of unspecific interventions such as physical activity or cognitive training. Unambiguously detecting compensation in early neurodegenerative disease will help tailor interventions aiming at sustained overall functioning and delayed clinical disease onset. PMID:25324786

  5. Preclinical and Pilot Clinical Studies of Docetaxel Chemoradiation for Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yuhchyau; Pandya, Kishan J.; Hyrien, Ollivier; Keng, Peter C.; Smudzin, Therese; Anderson, Joy; Qazi, Raman; Smith, Brian; Watson, Thomas J.; Feins, Richard H.; Johnstone, David W.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Local and distant failure rates remain high despite aggressive chemoradiation (CRT) treatment for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. We conducted preclinical studies of docetaxel's cytotoxic and radiosensitizing effects on lung cancer cell lines and designed a pilot study to target distant micrometastasis upfront with one-cycle induction chemotherapy, followed by low-dose radiosensitizing docetaxel CRT. Methods and Materials: A preclinical study was conducted in human lung cancer cell lines NCI 520 and A549. Cells were treated with two concentrations of docetaxel for 3 h and then irradiated immediately or after a 24-h delay. A clonogenic survival assay was conducted and analyzed for cytotoxic effects vs. radiosensitizing effects of docetaxel. A pilot clinical study was designed based on preclinical study findings. Twenty-two patients were enrolled with a median follow-up of 4 years. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 75 mg/m{sup 2} of docetaxel and 75 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin on Day 1 and 150 mg/m{sup 2} of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on Days 2 through 10. Concurrent CRT was started 3 to 6 weeks later with twice-weekly docetaxel at 10 to 12 mg/m{sup 2} and daily delayed radiation in 1.8-Gy fractions to 64.5 Gy for gross disease. Results: The preclinical study showed potent cytotoxic effects of docetaxel and subadditive radiosensitizing effects. Delaying radiation resulted in more cancer cell death. The pilot clinical study resulted in a median survival of 32.6 months for the entire cohort, with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 50% and 19%, respectively, and a distant metastasis-free survival rate of 61% for both 3 and 5 years. A pattern-of-failure analysis showed 75% chest failures and 36% all-distant failures. Therapy was well tolerated with Grade 3 esophagitis observed in 23% of patients. Conclusions: One-cycle full-dose docetaxel/cisplatin induction chemotherapy with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor followed by pulsed low-dose docetaxel CRT is promising with regard to its antitumor activity, low rates of distant failure, and low toxicity, suggesting that this regimen deserves further investigation.

  6. Study Skills Course Impact on Academic Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wernersbach, Brenna M.; Crowley, Susan L.; Bates, Scott C.; Rosenthal, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Although study skills courses improve student retention, the impact of study skills courses on students' academic self-efficacy has not been investigated. The present study examined pre- and posttest levels of academic self-efficacy in college students enrolled in a study skills course (n = 126) compared to students enrolled in a general education…

  7. Self-Efficacy and Statistics Performance among Sport Studies Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Andrew M.; Hall, Ross; Lane, John

    2004-01-01

    The present study explored predictive paths between performance accomplishments, self-efficacy, and performance among Sport Studies students taking a Level 1 statistics module. Fifty-eight Level 1 Sport Studies undergraduate degree students completed a 44-item self-efficacy measure and an assessment of perceived academic success at the start of…

  8. The Humanized NOD/SCID Mouse as a Preclinical Model to Study the Fate of Encapsulated Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Vaithilingam, Vijayaganapathy; Oberholzer, Jose; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Tuch, Bernard E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite encouraging results in animal models, the transplantation of microencapsulated islets into humans has not yet reached the therapeutic level. Recent clinical trials using microencapsulated human islets in barium alginate showed the presence of dense fibrotic overgrowth around the microcapsules with no viable islets. The major reason for this is limited understanding of what occurs when encapsulated human islets are allografted. This warrants the need for a suitable small animal model. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of NOD/SCID mice reconstituted with human PBMCs (called humanized NOD/SCID mice) as a preclinical model. In this model, human T cell engraftment could be achieved, and CD45+ cells were observed in the spleen and peripheral blood. Though the engrafted T cells caused a small fibrotic overgrowth around the microencapsulated human islets, this failed to stop the encapsulated islets from functioning in the diabetic recipient mice. The ability of encapsulated islets to survive in this mouse model might partly be attributed to the presence of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-10, which are known to induce graft tolerance. In conclusion, this study showed that the hu-NOD/SCID mouse is not a suitable preclinical model to study the allograft rejection mechanisms of encapsulated human islets. As another result, the maintained viability of transplanted islets on the NOD/SCID background emphasized a critical role of protective mechanisms in autoimmune diabetes transplanted subjects due to specific immunoregulatory effects provided by IL-4 and IL-10. PMID:20703439

  9. Pre-clinical and clinical walking kinematics in female breeding pigs with lameness: A nested case-control cohort study.

    PubMed

    Stavrakakis, S; Guy, J H; Syranidis, I; Johnson, G R; Edwards, S A

    2015-07-01

    Gait profiles were investigated in a cohort of female pigs experiencing a lameness period prevalence of 29% over 17 months. Gait alterations before and during visually diagnosed lameness were evaluated to identify the best quantitative clinical lameness indicators and early predictors for lameness. Pre-breeding gilts (n=?84) were recruited to the study over a period of 6 months, underwent motion capture every 5 weeks and, depending on their age at entry to the study, were followed for up to three successive gestations. Animals were subject to motion capture in each parity at 8 weeks of gestation and on the day of weaning (28 days postpartum). During kinematic motion capture, the pigs walked on the same concrete walkway and an array of infra-red cameras was used to collect three dimensional coordinate data of reflective skin markers attached to the head, trunk and limb anatomical landmarks. Of 24 pigs diagnosed with lameness, 19 had preclinical gait records, whilst 18 had a motion capture while lame. Depending on availability, data from one or two preclinical motion capture 1-11 months prior to lameness and on the day of lameness were analysed. Lameness was best detected and evaluated using relative spatiotemporal gait parameters, especially vertical head displacement and asymmetric stride phase timing. Irregularity in the step-to-stride length ratio was elevated (deviation? ? 0.03) in young pigs which presented lameness in later life (odds ratio 7.2-10.8). PMID:25986130

  10. Application of in vivo metabolomics to preclinical/toxicological studies: case study on phenytoin-induced systemic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kamp, H; Fabian, E; Groeters, S; Herold, M; Krennrich, G; Looser, R; Mattes, W; Mellert, W; Prokoudine, A; Ruiz-Noppinger, P; Strauss, V; Walk, T; Wiemer, J; van Ravenzwaay, B

    2012-09-01

    BASF and Metanomics have built-up the database MetaMap(®)-Tox containing rat plasma metabolome data for more than 500 reference compounds. Phenytoin was administered to five Wistar rats of both sexes at dietary dose levels of 600 and 2400 ppm over 28 days and metabolome analysis was performed on days 7, 14 and 28. Clinical pathology did not indicate clear evidence for liver toxicity, whereas liver histopathology revealed slight centrilobular hepatocellular hypertrophy. The metabolome analysis of phenytoin shows metabolome changes at both dose levels and the comparison with MetaMap-Tox indicated strong evidence for liver enzyme induction, as well as liver toxicity. Moreover, evidence for kidney and indirect thyroid effects were observed. This assessment was based on the metabolite changes induced, similarities to specific toxicity patterns and the whole metabolome correlation within MetaMap-Tox. As compared with the classical read-out, a more comprehensive picture of phenytoin's effects is obtained from the metabolome analysis, demonstrating the added value of metabolome data in preclinical/ toxicological studies. PMID:23046269

  11. Preclinical Studies for Cartilage Repair: Recommendations from the International Cartilage Repair Society.

    PubMed

    Hurtig, Mark B; Buschmann, Michael D; Fortier, Lisa A; Hoemann, Caroline D; Hunziker, Ernst B; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; McIlwraith, C Wayne; Sah, Robert L; Whiteside, Robert A

    2011-04-01

    Investigational devices for articular cartilage repair or replacement are considered to be significant risk devices by regulatory bodies. Therefore animal models are needed to provide proof of efficacy and safety prior to clinical testing. The financial commitment and regulatory steps needed to bring a new technology to clinical use can be major obstacles, so the implementation of highly predictive animal models is a pressing issue. Until recently, a reductionist approach using acute chondral defects in immature laboratory species, particularly the rabbit, was considered adequate; however, if successful and timely translation from animal models to regulatory approval and clinical use is the goal, a step-wise development using laboratory animals for screening and early development work followed by larger species such as the goat, sheep and horse for late development and pivotal studies is recommended. Such animals must have fully organized and mature cartilage. Both acute and chronic chondral defects can be used but the later are more like the lesions found in patients and may be more predictive. Quantitative and qualitative outcome measures such as macroscopic appearance, histology, biochemistry, functional imaging, and biomechanical testing of cartilage, provide reliable data to support investment decisions and subsequent applications to regulatory bodies for clinical trials. No one model or species can be considered ideal for pivotal studies, but the larger animal species are recommended for pivotal studies. Larger species such as the horse, goat and pig also allow arthroscopic delivery, and press-fit or sutured implant fixation in thick cartilage as well as second look arthroscopies and biopsy procedures. PMID:26069576

  12. Preclinical studies on the pharmacokinetics, safety, and toxicology of oxfendazole: toward first in human studies.

    PubMed

    Codd, Ellen E; Ng, Hanna H; McFarlane, Claire; Riccio, Edward S; Doppalapudi, Rupa; Mirsalis, Jon C; Horton, R John; Gonzalez, Armando E; Garcia, H Hugo; Gilman, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    A 2-week study in rats identified target organs of oxfendazole toxicity to be bone marrow, epididymis, liver, spleen, testis, and thymus. Female rats had greater oxfendazole exposure and exhibited toxicities at lower doses than did males. Decreased white blood cell levels, a class effect of benzimidazole anthelmintics, returned to normal during the recovery period. The no observed adverse effect level was determined to be >5 but <25 mg/kg/d and the maximum tolerated dose 100 mg/kg/d. The highest dose, 200 mg/kg/d, resulted in significant toxicity and mortality, leading to euthanization of the main study animals in this group after 7 days. Oxfendazole did not exhibit genetic toxicology signals in standard Ames bacterial, mouse lymphoma, or rat micronucleus assays nor did it provoke safety concerns when evaluated for behavioral effects in rats or cardiovascular safety effects in dogs. These results support the transition of oxfendazole to First in Human safety studies preliminary to its evaluation in human helminth diseases. PMID:25701764

  13. Taking Journal Clubs off Autopilot: A Case Study of Teaching Literature Evaluation Skills to Preclinical MD/PhD Students

    PubMed Central

    Currier, Rebecca L.; Schneider, Marguerite Reid; Heubi, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers designed learner-directed journal clubs to develop literature evaluation skills in preclinical students. Sessions balanced student-led discussion with structured objectives and faculty support. During the pilot with preclinical MD/PhD students, self-rated mastery improved over all 17 measured objectives. Six exercises have since been incorporated into the full medical school curriculum. PMID:24634798

  14. Taking Journal Clubs off Autopilot: A Case Study of Teaching Literature Evaluation Skills to Preclinical MD/PhD Students.

    PubMed

    Currier, Rebecca L; Schneider, Marguerite Reid; Heubi, James E

    2013-12-01

    Researchers designed learner-directed journal clubs to develop literature evaluation skills in preclinical students. Sessions balanced student-led discussion with structured objectives and faculty support. During the pilot with preclinical MD/PhD students, self-rated mastery improved over all 17 measured objectives. Six exercises have since been incorporated into the full medical school curriculum. PMID:24634798

  15. Preclinical profile of cabazitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Vrignaud, Patricia; Semiond, Dorothée; Benning, Veronique; Beys, Eric; Bouchard, Hervé; Gupta, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    First-generation taxanes have changed the treatment paradigm for a wide variety of cancers, but innate or acquired resistance frequently limits their use. Cabazitaxel is a novel second-generation taxane developed to overcome such resistance. In vitro, cabazitaxel showed similar antiproliferative activity to docetaxel in taxane-sensitive cell lines and markedly greater activity in cell lines resistant to taxanes. In vivo, cabazitaxel demonstrated excellent antitumor activity in a broad spectrum of docetaxel-sensitive tumor xenografts, including a castration-resistant prostate tumor xenograft, HID28, where cabazitaxel exhibited greater efficacy than docetaxel. Importantly, cabazitaxel was also active against tumors with innate or acquired resistance to docetaxel, suggesting therapeutic potential for patients progressing following taxane treatment and those with docetaxel-refractory tumors. In patients with tumors of the central nervous system (CNS), and in patients with pediatric tumors, therapeutic success with first-generation taxanes has been limited. Cabazitaxel demonstrated greater antitumor activity than docetaxel in xenograft models of CNS disease and pediatric tumors, suggesting potential clinical utility in these special patient populations. Based on therapeutic synergism observed in an in vivo tumor model, cabazitaxel is also being investigated clinically in combination with cisplatin. Nonclinical evaluation of the safety of cabazitaxel in a range of animal species showed largely reversible changes in the bone marrow, lymphoid system, gastrointestinal tract, and male reproductive system. Preclinical safety signals of cabazitaxel were consistent with the previously reported safety profiles of paclitaxel and docetaxel. Clinical observations with cabazitaxel were consistent with preclinical results, and cabazitaxel is indicated, in combination with prednisone, for the treatment of patients with hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel. In conclusion, the demonstrated activity of cabazitaxel in tumors with innate or acquired resistance to docetaxel, CNS tumors, and pediatric tumors made this agent a candidate for further clinical evaluation in a broader range of patient populations compared with first-generation taxanes. PMID:25378905

  16. Therapeutic vaccination and immunomodulation in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B: preclinical studies in the woodchuck.

    PubMed

    Kosinska, Anna D; Liu, Jia; Lu, Mengji; Roggendorf, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) may lead to subclinical, acute or chronic hepatitis. In the prevaccination era, HBV infections were endemic due to frequent mother to child transmission in large regions of the world. However, there are still estimated 240 million chronic HBV carriers today and ca. 620,000 patients die per year due to HBV-related liver diseases. Recommended treatment of chronic hepatitis B with interferon-? and/or nucleos(t)ide analogues does not lead to satisfactory results. Induction of HBV-specific T cells by therapeutic vaccination or immunomodulation may be an innovative strategy to overcome virus persistence. Vaccination with commercially available HBV vaccines in patients with or without therapeutic reduction of viral load did not result in effective immune control of HBV infection, suggesting that combination of antiviral treatment with new formulations of therapeutic vaccines is needed. The woodchuck (Marmota monax) and its HBV-like woodchuck hepatitis virus are a useful preclinical animal model for developing new therapeutic approaches in chronic hepadnaviral infections. Several innovative approaches combining antiviral treatments using nucleos(t)ide analogues, with prime-boost vaccination using DNA vaccines, new hepadnaviral antigens or recombinant adenoviral vectors were tested in the woodchuck model. In this review, we summarize these encouraging results obtained with these therapeutic vaccines. In addition, we present potential innovations in immunostimulatory strategies by blocking the interaction of the inhibitory programmed death receptor 1 with its ligand in this animal model. PMID:25535101

  17. Targeted toxins for glioblastoma multiforme: pre-clinical studies and clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt M; Xiong, Weidong; Liu, Chunyan; Puntel, Mariana; Yagiz, Kader; Muhammad, Akm Ghulam; Mineharu, Yohei; Foulad, David; Wibowo, Mia; Assi, Hikmat; Baker, Gregory J; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2011-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. GBM is very aggressive due to its poor cellular differentiation and invasiveness, which makes complete surgical resection virtually impossible. Therefore, GBM's invasive nature as well as its intrinsic resistance to current treatment modalities makes it a unique therapeutic challenge. Extensive examination of human GBM specimens has uncovered that these tumors overexpress a variety of receptors that are virtually absent in the surrounding non-neoplastic brain. Human GBMs overexpress receptors for cytokines, growth factors, ephrins, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), and transferrin, which can be targeted with high specificity by linking their ligands with highly cytotoxic molecules, such as Diptheria toxin and Pseudomonas exotoxin A. We review the preclinical development and clinical translation of targeted toxins for GBM. In view of the clinical experience, we conclude that although these are very promising therapeutic modalities for GBM patients, efforts should be focused on improving the delivery systems utilized in order to achieve better distribution of the immuno-toxins in the tumor/resection cavity. Delivery of targeted toxins using viral vectors would also benefit enormously from improved strategies for local delivery. PMID:21707497

  18. NIH initiative to balance sex of animals in preclinical studies: generative questions to guide policy, implementation, and metrics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In May of 2014, the NIH Director together with the Director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health announced plans to take a multi-dimensional approach to address the over reliance on male cells and animals in preclinical research. The NIH is engaging the scientific community in the development of policies to improve the sex balance in research. The present, past, and future presidents of the Organization for the Study of Sex Differences, in order to encourage thoughtful discussion among scientists, pose a series of questions to generate ideas in three areas: 1. research strategies, 2. educational strategies, and 3. strategies to monitor effectiveness of policies to improve the sex balance in research. By promoting discussion within the scientific community, a consensus will evolve that will move science forward in a productive and effective manner. PMID:25780556

  19. Genetic engineering of murine CD8+ and CD4+ T cells for pre-clinical adoptive immunotherapy studies

    PubMed Central

    Kerkar, Sid P; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Yang, Shicheng; Borman, Zachary; Muranski, Pawel; Ji, Yun; Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Kaiser, Andrew DM; Hinrichs, Christian; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Scott, Christopher; Gattinoni, Luca; Morgan, Richard A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2011-01-01

    T-cell-receptor (TCR) gene therapy enables for the rapid creation of antigen-specific T cells from mice of any strain and represents a valuable tool for pre-clinical immunotherapy studies. Here, we describe the superiority of gamma-retroviral vectors compared to lentiviral vectors for transduction of murine T cells and surprisingly illustrate robust gene-transfer into phenotypically naïve/memory-stem cell (CD62Lhi/CD44low) and central memory (CD62Lhi/CD44hi) CD8+ T cells using murine-stem-cell-based gamma-retroviral vectors (MSGV1). We created MSGV1 vectors for a MHC-class I restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) specific for the melanocyte-differentiation antigen, gp100 (MSGV1-pmel-1), and a MHC-class II restricted TCR specific for tyrosinase-related-protein-1 (MSGV1-TRP-1), and found that robust gene expression required codon optimization of TCR sequences for the pmel-1 TCR. To test for functionality, we adoptively transferred TCR-engineered T cells into mice bearing B16 melanomas and observed delayed growth of established tumors with pmel-1TCR engineered CD8+ T cells and significant tumor regression with TRP-1 TCR transduced CD4+ T cells. We simultaneously created lentiviral vectors encoding the pmel-1TCR, but found that these vectors mediated low TCR expression in murine T cells, but robust gene expression in other murine and human cell lines. These results indicate that preclinical murine models of adoptive immunotherapies are more practical using gamma-retroviral rather than lentiviral vectors. PMID:21499127

  20. Evaluation of dietetic product innovations: the relative role of preclinical and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Makrides, Maria; Gibson, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    A variety of systems are used to establish efficacy of food ingredients. Immortal human cell lines have the advantage of rapid throughput and often have the ability to point to mechanisms of action. Transgenic and natural variants of animals (usually rats and mice) have proven to be extremely useful in elucidating effects in vivo, although extrapolation of results to humans has risks. Animal models are also useful in establishing safety and toxic levels of ingredients. Human trials have the most relevance to society. Types of evidence for efficacy rise from improved status level in subjects as a result of eating food (long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid, levels in erythrocytes), change in surrogate markers as a result of eating food (plasma cholesterol or glutathione peroxidase activity), change in a physiological outcome (such as visual evoked potential acuity or heart rate variability) through to the highest level of evidence, a change in a clinical outcome (improved global development, reduction in infections) established in randomized controlled trials. Ultimately, there is a need for tests of pragmatic interventions that can easily be incorporated into usual dietary practices of the culture in which it is tested. PMID:20664222

  1. The discovery of rivaroxaban: translating preclinical assessments into clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Kubitza, Dagmar; Perzborn, Elisabeth; Berkowitz, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants that target a single coagulation factor (such as factor Xa or thrombin) have been developed in recent years in an attempt to address some of the limitations of traditional anticoagulants. Rivaroxaban is an oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor that inhibits free and clot-bound factor Xa and factor Xa in the prothrombinase complex. Preclinical studies demonstrated a potent anticoagulant effect of rivaroxaban in plasma as well as the ability of this agent to prevent and treat venous and arterial thrombosis in animal models. These studies led to an extensive phase I clinical development program that investigated the pharmacological properties of rivaroxaban in humans. In these studies, rivaroxaban was shown to exhibit predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and to have no clinically relevant interactions with many commonly prescribed co-medications. The pharmacodynamic effects of rivaroxaban (for example, inhibition of factor Xa and prolongation of prothrombin time) were closely correlated with rivaroxaban concentrations in plasma. The encouraging findings from preclinical and early clinical studies were expanded upon in large, randomized phase III studies, which demonstrated the clinical efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban in a broad spectrum of patients. This article provides an overview of the discovery and development of rivaroxaban, describing the pharmacodynamic profile established in preclinical studies and the optimal translation to clinical studies in healthy subjects and patient populations. PMID:24324436

  2. Preclinical study of using multiphoton microscopy to diagnose liver cancer and differentiate benign and malignant liver lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Gang; Wu, Xiufeng; Zhou, Dong; Xie, Shusen; Jiang, Jiahao; Ying, Mingang; Jia, Fan; Chen, Jianxin; Zhou, Jian

    2012-02-01

    Recently, the miniaturized multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and multiphoton probe allow the clinical use of multiphoton endoscopy for diagnosing cancer via ``optical biopsy''. The purpose of this study was to establish MPM optical diagnostic features for liver cancer and evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MPM optical diagnosis. Firstly, we performed a pilot study to establish the MPM diagnostic features by investigating 60 surgical specimens, and found that high-resolution MPM images clearly demonstrated apparent differences between benign and malignant liver lesions in terms of their tissue architecture and cell morphology. Cancer cells, characterized by irregular size and shape, enlarged nuclei, and increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, were identified by MPM images, which were comparable to hematoxylin-eosin staining images. Secondly, we performed a blinded study to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MPM optical diagnosis by investigating another 164 specimens, and found that the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MPM diagnosis was 96.32%, 96.43%, and 96.34%, respectively. In conclusion, it is feasible to use MPM to diagnose liver cancer and differentiate benign and malignant liver lesions. This preclinical study provides the groundwork for further using multiphoton endoscopy to perform real-time noninvasive ``optical biopsy'' for liver lesions in the near future.

  3. Does Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Directly Depress Myocardial Function? A Review of Clinical Cases and Preclinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Suffredini, Dante A; Sampath-Kumar, Hanish; Li, Yan; Ohanjanian, Lernik; Remy, Kenneth E; Cui, Xizhong; Eichacker, Peter Q

    2015-01-01

    The US outbreak of B.anthracis infection in 2001 and subsequent cases in the US and Europe demonstrate that anthrax is a continuing risk for the developed world. While several bacterial components contribute to the pathogenesis of B. anthracis, production of lethal toxin (LT) is strongly associated with the development of hypotension and lethality. However, the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular instability LT produces are unclear. Some evidence suggests that LT causes shock by impairing the peripheral vasculature, effects consistent with the substantial extravasation of fluid in patients dying with B. anthracis. Other data suggests that LT directly depresses myocardial function. However a clinical correlate for this latter possibility is less evident since functional studies and post-mortem examination in patients demonstrate absent or minimal cardiac changes. The purposes of this review were to first present clinical studies of cardiac functional and histologic pathology with B. anthracis infection and to then examine in vivo, in vitro, and ex vivo preclinical studies of LT's myocardial effects. Together, these data suggest that it is unclear whether that LT directly depresses cardiac function. This question is important for the clinical management and development of new therapies for anthrax and efforts should continue to be made to answer it. PMID:26703730

  4. Does Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Directly Depress Myocardial Function? A Review of Clinical Cases and Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Suffredini, Dante A.; Sampath-Kumar, Hanish; Li, Yan; Ohanjanian, Lernik; Remy, Kenneth E.; Cui, Xizhong; Eichacker, Peter Q.

    2015-01-01

    The US outbreak of B.anthracis infection in 2001 and subsequent cases in the US and Europe demonstrate that anthrax is a continuing risk for the developed world. While several bacterial components contribute to the pathogenesis of B. anthracis, production of lethal toxin (LT) is strongly associated with the development of hypotension and lethality. However, the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular instability LT produces are unclear. Some evidence suggests that LT causes shock by impairing the peripheral vasculature, effects consistent with the substantial extravasation of fluid in patients dying with B. anthracis. Other data suggests that LT directly depresses myocardial function. However a clinical correlate for this latter possibility is less evident since functional studies and post-mortem examination in patients demonstrate absent or minimal cardiac changes. The purposes of this review were to first present clinical studies of cardiac functional and histologic pathology with B. anthracis infection and to then examine in vivo, in vitro, and ex vivo preclinical studies of LT’s myocardial effects. Together, these data suggest that it is unclear whether that LT directly depresses cardiac function. This question is important for the clinical management and development of new therapies for anthrax and efforts should continue to be made to answer it. PMID:26703730

  5. Photodynamic therapy with the phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4: The case experience with preclinical mechanistic and early clinical-translational studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Janine D.; Scull, Heather

    2007-11-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is emerging as a promising non-invasive treatment for cancers. PDT involves either local or systemic administration of a photosensitizing drug, which preferentially localizes within the tumor, followed by illumination of the involved organ with light, usually from a laser source. Here, we provide a selective overview of our experience with PDT at Case Western Reserve University, specifically with the silicon phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4. We first review our in vitro studies evaluating the mechanism of cell killing by Pc 4-PDT. Then we briefly describe our clinical experience in a Phase I trial of Pc 4-PDT and our preliminary translational studies evaluating the mechanisms behind tumor responses. Preclinical work identified (a) cardiolipin and the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL as targets of Pc 4-PDT, (b) the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, with the key participation of caspase-3, as a central response of many human cancer cells to Pc 4-PDT, (c) signaling pathways that could modify apoptosis, and (d) a formulation by which Pc 4 could be applied topically to human skin and penetrate at least through the basal layer of the epidermis. Clinical-translational studies enabled us to develop an immunohistochemical assay for caspase-3 activation, using biopsies from patients treated with topical Pc 4 in a Phase I PDT trial for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Results suggest that this assay may be used as an early biomarker of clinical response.

  6. Reform in Teaching Preclinical Pathophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yong-Yu; Li, Kun; Yao, Hong; Xu, Xiao-Juan; Cai, Qiao-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Pathophysiology is a scientific discipline that studies the onset and progression of pathological conditions and diseases, and pathophysiology is one of the core courses in most preclinical medical curricula. In China, most medical schools house a Department of Pathophysiology, in contrast to medical schools in many developed countries. The staff…

  7. Sources of Self-Efficacy in Mathematics: A Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Ellen L.; Pajares, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate items with which to assess A. Bandura's (1997) theorized sources of self-efficacy among middle school mathematics students. Results from Phase 1 (N=1111) were used to develop and refine items for subsequent use. In Phase 2 of the study (N=824), a 39-item, four-factor exploratory model fit best.…

  8. Self-Efficacy and Strategies to Influence the Study Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jungert, Tomas; Rosander, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between student influence and academic self-efficacy in a sample of 275 students in two Master's programmes in Engineering. Students in only one of the programmes studied according to problem-based learning (PBL). Results indicate that students choosing strategies to influence course content or structure,…

  9. Academic Probation Preclinical or

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Academic Probation 2nd Preclinical or Clinical F 1st Preclinical or Clinical F 3rd Clinical Y 2nd = off probation /continue ---------------------- Fail = 1 F See below Student meets with ADSA & DOSLER Pass = off probation /continue ---------------------- Fail = 1 F See below Student meets with ADSA

  10. Volume cerebral blood flow reduction in pre-clinical stage of Alzheimer disease: evidence from an ultrasonographic study.

    PubMed

    Maalikjy Akkawi, Nabil; Borroni, B; Agosti, C; Magoni, M; Broli, M; Pezzini, A; Padovani, A

    2005-05-01

    The association of decreased cerebral blood flow with the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been a recent target of interest. By using neuroimaging techniques, growing attention has been devoted to the identification of preclinical AD. In this study, color duplex sonography of cervical arteries was used to measure mean cerebral blood flow (CBF) on 55 amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients. Two years after enrollment, excluding patients who progressed to dementia other than AD, two subgroups were identified, patients who developed AD (MCI converters) and patients with preserved cognitive and functional level (MCI non-converters). Examining the mean difference of CBF measured at baseline in the two subgroups obtained, a significant difference was noticed (MCI converters 539.3 +/- 114.3 vs MCI non converters 636.0 +/- 143.9, p < 0.05). MCI patients with CBF higher than median value (558 ml/min) had lower risk of developing AD (specificity 72.2%, sensitivity 68.4%) within a two year follow-up. Ultrasonography of the cervical arteries is a simple, non invasive and widespread technique useful in detecting CBF decline during the MCI stage, thus identifying patients who later will convert to AD. PMID:15726249

  11. Singapore Teachers' Personal and General Efficacy for Teaching Primary Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Peter; Tan, Geok-Chin Ivy

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the sense of Teacher Efficacy (TE) belief held by Singapore teachers for teaching primary social studies. Teacher Efficacy, which comprises Personal Teaching Efficacy (PTE) and General Teaching Efficacy (GTE), was measured. A group of 116 primary school teachers attending a social studies in-service…

  12. The Efficacy of Self-Paced Study in Multitrial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jonge, Mario; Tabbers, Huib K.; Pecher, Diane; Jang, Yoonhee; Zeelenberg, René

    2015-01-01

    In 2 experiments we investigated the efficacy of self-paced study in multitrial learning. In Experiment 1, native speakers of English studied lists of Dutch-English word pairs under 1 of 4 imposed fixed presentation rate conditions (24 × 1 s, 12 × 2 s, 6 × 4 s, or 3 × 8 s) and a self-paced study condition. Total study time per list was equated for…

  13. Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Rocco, Daniela Marisa; García-Bournissen, Facundo

    2015-11-01

    Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%). Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction. PMID:26587586

  14. Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Rocco, Daniela Marisa; García-Bournissen, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%). Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction. PMID:26587586

  15. Preclinical Studies of the Potent and Selective Nicotinic ?4?2 Receptor Ligand VMY-2-95

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and development of small molecules that antagonize neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors may provide new ligands for evaluation in models of depression or addiction. We discovered a small molecule, VMY-2-95, a nAChR ligand with picomolar affinity and high selectivity for ?4?2 receptors. In this study, we investigated its preclinical profile in regards to solubility, lipophilicity, metabolic stability, intestinal permeability, bioavailability, and drug delivery to the rat brain. Metabolic stability of VMY-2-95·2HCl was monitored on human liver microsomes, and specific activity of VMY-2-95·2HCl on substrate metabolism by CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 was tested in a high-throughput manner. The intestinal transport of VMY-2-95·2HCl was studied through Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability. VMY-2-95·2HCl was soluble in water and chemically stable, and the apparent partition coefficient was 0.682. VMY-2-95·2HCl showed significant inhibition of CYP2C9 and 2C19, but weak or no effect on 1A2, 2D6, and 3A4. The Caco-2 cell model studies revealed that VMY-2-95·2HCl was highly permeable with efflux ratio of 1.11. VMY-2-95·2HCl achieved a maximum serum concentration of 0.56 mg/mL at 0.9 h and was orally available with a half-life of ?9 h. Furthermore, VMY-2-95·2HCl was detected in the rat brain after 3 mg/kg oral administration and achieved a maximal brain tissue concentration of 2.3 ?g/g within 60 min. Overall, the results demonstrate that VMY-2-95·2HCl has good drug like properties and can penetrate the blood–brain barrier with oral administration. PMID:25533629

  16. Pre-Clinical Atherosclerosis due to HIV Infection: Carotid Intima-Medial Thickness Measurements from the FRAM Study

    PubMed Central

    Grunfeld, C.; Delaney, J.A.C.; Wanke, C.; Currier, J.S.; Scherzer, R.; Biggs, M. L.; Tien, P.; Shlipak, M.; Sidney, S.; Polak, J.F.; O'Leary, D.; Bacchetti, P.; Kronmal, R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. However, it is controversial whether HIV infection contributes to accelerated atherosclerosis independent of traditional CVD risk factors. Methods Cross-sectional study of HIV-infected and control subjects without pre-existing CVD from the study of Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Pre-clinical atherosclerosis was assessed by carotid intima-medial thickness (IMT) measurements in the internal/bulb and common regions in HIV-infected and control subjects after adjusting for traditional CVD risk factors. Results For internal carotid, mean IMT was 1.17±0.50mm for HIV-infected participants and 1.06±0.58mm for controls (p<0.0001). After multivariable adjustment for demographic characteristics, the mean difference of HIV-infected vs. controls was +0.188mm (95%CI 0.113-0.263, p<0.0001). Further adjustment for traditional CVD risk factors modestly attenuated the HIV association (+0.148mm, 95%CI 0.072-0.224, p=0.0001). For the common carotid, HIV infection was independently associated with greater IMT (+0.033mm, 95%CI 0.010, 0.056, p=0.005). The association of HIV infection with IMT was similar to that of smoking which was also associated with greater IMT (internal +0.173mm, common +0.020mm). Conclusions Even after adjustment for traditional CVD risk factors, HIV infection was accompanied by more extensive atherosclerosis measured by IMT. The stronger association of HIV infection with IMT in the internal/bulb region compared to the common carotid may explain previous discrepancies in the literature. The association of HIV infection with IMT was similar to that of traditional CVD risk factors, such as smoking. PMID:19455012

  17. Preclinical studies of the potent and selective nicotinic ?4?2 receptor ligand VMY-2-95.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hyesik; Song, Jun-ke; Yenugonda, Venkata Mahidhar; Zhang, Li; Shuo, Tian; Cheema, Amrita K; Kong, Yali; Du, Guan-hua; Brown, Milton L

    2015-02-01

    The discovery and development of small molecules that antagonize neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors may provide new ligands for evaluation in models of depression or addiction. We discovered a small molecule, VMY-2-95, a nAChR ligand with picomolar affinity and high selectivity for ?4?2 receptors. In this study, we investigated its preclinical profile in regards to solubility, lipophilicity, metabolic stability, intestinal permeability, bioavailability, and drug delivery to the rat brain. Metabolic stability of VMY-2-95·2HCl was monitored on human liver microsomes, and specific activity of VMY-2-95·2HCl on substrate metabolism by CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 was tested in a high-throughput manner. The intestinal transport of VMY-2-95·2HCl was studied through Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability. VMY-2-95·2HCl was soluble in water and chemically stable, and the apparent partition coefficient was 0.682. VMY-2-95·2HCl showed significant inhibition of CYP2C9 and 2C19, but weak or no effect on 1A2, 2D6, and 3A4. The Caco-2 cell model studies revealed that VMY-2-95·2HCl was highly permeable with efflux ratio of 1.11. VMY-2-95·2HCl achieved a maximum serum concentration of 0.56 mg/mL at 0.9 h and was orally available with a half-life of ?9 h. Furthermore, VMY-2-95·2HCl was detected in the rat brain after 3 mg/kg oral administration and achieved a maximal brain tissue concentration of 2.3 ?g/g within 60 min. Overall, the results demonstrate that VMY-2-95·2HCl has good drug like properties and can penetrate the blood-brain barrier with oral administration. PMID:25533629

  18. The Efficacy of Math Coaching: An Evaluative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbins, C. Neelie

    2010-01-01

    There is a lack of implementation of instructional strategies to assist middle school teachers in improving mathematics education for their students. Coaching is one solution to this problem, but its impact on student achievement is unclear. This case study evaluated the relationship between coaching and teacher efficacy and the impact of these…

  19. Year 3 ASK/FOSS Efficacy Study. CRESST Report 782

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osmundson, Ellen; Dai, Yunyun; Herman, Joan

    2011-01-01

    This efficacy study was designed to examine the traditional FOSS curriculum (Delta Publishing, Full Option Science System/FOSS, magnetism and electricity, structures of life, and water modules, 2005), and the new ASK/FOSS curriculum (magnetism and electricity, structures of life, and water modules, 2005), a revised version of the original FOSS…

  20. Racer efficacy study - Bixby, Fall 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed competition is a primary concern for conventional and organic vegetable producers. Racer (ammonium nonanoate) is labeled for non-food use and efforts are currently underway to label it as a bio-herbicide for organically grown food crops. The objective of this study was to investigate differen...

  1. Studies on the Efficacy of Child Psychoanalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonagy, Peter; Moran, George S.

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes three studies on psychoanalytic psychotherapeutic treatment of diabetic children and adolescents with grossly abnormal blood glucose profiles necessitating repeated admissions to hospital. Used time series analysis, comparative analysis, and single-case experimental design to illustrate effectiveness of psychotherapeutic intervention…

  2. Preclinical studies identify non-apoptotic low-level caspase-3 as therapeutic target in pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Luyet, Camille; Schulze, Katja; Sayar, Beyza S; Howald, Denise; Müller, Eliane J; Galichet, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    The majority of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) patients suffer from a live-threatening loss of intercellular adhesion between keratinocytes (acantholysis). The disease is caused by auto-antibodies that bind to desmosomal cadherins desmoglein (Dsg) 3 or Dsg3 and Dsg1 in mucous membranes and skin. A currently unresolved controversy in PV is whether apoptosis is involved in the pathogenic process. The objective of this study was to perform preclinical studies to investigate apoptotic pathway activation in PV pathogenesis with the goal to assess its potential for clinical therapy. For this purpose, we investigated mouse and human skin keratinocyte cultures treated with PV antibodies (the experimental Dsg3 monospecific antibody AK23 or PV patients IgG), PV mouse models (passive transfer of AK23 or PVIgG into adult and neonatal mice) as well as PV patients' biopsies (n=6). A combination of TUNEL assay, analyses of membrane integrity, early apoptotic markers such as cleaved poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) and the collapse of actin cytoskeleton failed to provide evidence for apoptosis in PV pathogenesis. However, the in vitro and in vivo PV models, allowing to monitor progression of lesion formation, revealed an early, transient and low-level caspase-3 activation. Pharmacological inhibition confirmed the functional implication of caspase-3 in major events in PV such as shedding of Dsg3, keratin retraction, proliferation including c-Myc induction, p38MAPK activation and acantholysis. Together, these data identify low-level caspase-3 activation downstream of disrupted Dsg3 trans- or cis-adhesion as a major event in PV pathogenesis that is non-synonymous with apoptosis and represents, unlike apoptotic components, a promising target for clinical therapy. At a broader level, these results posit that an impairment of adhesive functions in concert with low-level, non-lethal caspase-3 activation can evoke profound cellular changes which may be of relevance for other diseases including cancer. PMID:25748204

  3. Choosing preclinical study models of diabetic retinopathy: key problems for consideration

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Xue-Song; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Ding, Yong; Zhong, Jing-Xiang; So, Kwok-Fai

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus in the eye. Although the clinical treatment for DR has already developed to a relative high level, there are still many urgent problems that need to be investigated in clinical and basic science. Currently, many in vivo animal models and in vitro culture systems have been applied to solve these problems. Many approaches have also been used to establish different DR models. However, till now, there has not been a single study model that can clearly and exactly mimic the developmental process of the human DR. Choosing the suitable model is important, not only for achieving our research goals smoothly, but also, to better match with different experimental proposals in the study. In this review, key problems for consideration in choosing study models of DR are discussed. These problems relate to clinical relevance, different approaches for establishing models, and choice of different species of animals as well as of the specific in vitro culture systems. Attending to these considerations will deepen the understanding on current study models and optimize the experimental design for the final goal of preventing DR. PMID:25429204

  4. Metabolic phenotyping applied to pre-clinical and clinical studies of acetaminophen metabolism and hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Coen, Muireann

    2015-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) is a widely used analgesic that is safe at therapeutic doses but is a major cause of acute liver failure (ALF) following overdose. APAP-induced hepatotoxicity is related to the formation of an electrophilic reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), which is detoxified through conjugation with reduced glutathione (GSH). One method that has been applied to study APAP metabolism and hepatotoxicity is that of metabolic phenotyping, which involves the study of the small molecule complement of complex biological samples. This approach involves the use of high-resolution analytical platforms such as NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to generate information-rich metabolic profiles that reflect both genetic and environmental influences and capture both endogenous and xenobiotic metabolites. Data modeling and mining and the subsequent identification of panels of candidate biomarkers are typically approached with multivariate statistical tools. We review the application of multi-platform metabolic profiling for the study of APAP metabolism in both in vivo models and humans. We also review the application of metabolic profiling for the study of endogenous metabolic pathway perturbations in response to APAP hepatotoxicity, with a particular focus on metabolites involved in the biosynthesis of GSH and those that reflect mitochondrial function such as long-chain acylcarnitines. Taken together, this body of work sheds much light on the mechanism of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and provides candidate biomarkers that may prove of translational relevance for improved stratification of APAP-induced ALF. PMID:25533740

  5. AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy for Choroideremia: Preclinical Studies in Personalized Models

    PubMed Central

    Vasireddy, Vidyullatha; Kohnke, Monika; Black, Aaron D.; Alexandrov, Krill; Zhou, Shangzhen; Maguire, Albert M.; Chung, Daniel C.; Mac, Helen; Sullivan, Lisa; Gadue, Paul; Bennicelli, Jeannette L.; French, Deborah L.; Bennett, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Choroideremia (CHM) is an X- linked retinal degeneration that is symptomatic in the 1st or 2nd decade of life causing nyctalopia and loss of peripheral vision. The disease progresses through mid-life, when most patients become blind. CHM is a favorable target for gene augmentation therapy, as the disease is due to loss of function of a protein necessary for retinal cell health, Rab Escort Protein 1 (REP1).The CHM cDNA can be packaged in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV), which has an established track record in human gene therapy studies, and, in addition, there are sensitive and quantitative assays to document REP1 activity. An animal model that accurately reflects the human condition is not available. In this study, we tested the ability to restore REP1 function in personalized in vitro models of CHM: lymphoblasts and induced pluripotent stems cells (iPSCs) from human patients. The initial step of evaluating safety of the treatment was carried out by evaluating for acute retinal histopathologic effects in normal-sighted mice and no obvious toxicity was identified. Delivery of the CHM cDNA to affected cells restores REP1 enzymatic activity and also restores proper protein trafficking. The gene transfer is efficient and the preliminary safety data are encouraging. These studies pave the way for a human clinical trial of gene therapy for CHM. PMID:23667438

  6. Neural Stem Cell-Mediated Enzyme-Prodrug Therapy for Glioma: Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Aboody, Karen S.; Najbauer, Joseph; Metz, Marianne Z.; D’Apuzzo, Massimo; Gutova, Margarita; Annala, Alexander J.; Synold, Timothy W.; Couture, Larry A.; Blanchard, Suzette; Moats, Rex A.; Garcia, Elizabeth; Aramburo, Soraya; Valenzuela, Valerie V.; Frank, Richard T.; Barish, Michael E.; Brown, Christine E.; Kim, Seung U.; Badie, Behnam; Portnow, Jana

    2013-01-01

    High-grade gliomas are extremely difficult to treat because they are invasive and therefore are not curable by surgical resection; the toxicity of currently chemo- and radiation therapies limits the doses that can be used. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have inherent tumor-tropic properties that enable their use as delivery vehicles that can target enzyme/prodrug therapy selectively to tumors. We have used a cytosine deaminase (CD)-expressing clonal human NSC line, HB1.F3.CD, to home to gliomas in mice and locally convert the tumor-localized prodrug 5-fluorocytosine to the active chemotherapeutic 5-fluorouracil. In vitro studies confirmed that the NSCs have normal karyotype, tumor tropism, and CD expression, indicating that these cells are genetically and functionally stable. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that these NSCs retained tumor tropism, even in mice pre-treated with radiation or dexamethasone to mimic clinically relevant adjuvant therapies. We evaluated safety and toxicity after intracerebral administration of the NSCs in non-tumor bearing, and in orthotopic glioma-bearing, immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice. We detected no difference in toxicity associated with conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil, no NSCs outside the brain, and no histological evidence of pathology or tumorigenesis attributable to the NSCs. The average tumor volume in mice that received HB1.F3.CD NSCs and 5-fluorocytosine was approximately one-third that of the average volume in control mice. On the basis of these results, we conclude that combination therapy with HB1.F3.CD NSCs and 5-fluorocytosine is safe, non-toxic and effective in mice. These data have led to approval of a first-inhuman study of an allogeneic NSC-mediated enzyme/prodrug targeted cancer therapy in patients with recurrent high-grade glioma. PMID:23658244

  7. Pre-clinical study of 21 approved drugs in the mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Carre-Pierrat, Maïté; Lafoux, Aude; Tanniou, Guillaume; Chambonnier, Lucie; Divet, Alexandra; Fougerousse, Francoise; Huchet-Cadiou, Corinne; Ségalat, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genetic disease caused by the absence of functional dystrophin, remains without adequate treatment. Although great hopes are attached to gene and cell therapies, identification of active small molecules remains a valid option for new treatments. We have studied the effect of 20 approved pharmaceutical compounds on the muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx5Cv mice. These compounds were selected as the result of a prior screen of 800 approved molecules on a dystrophin mutant of the invertebrate animal model Cænorhabditis elegans. Drugs were administered to the mice through maternal feeding since 2weeks of life and mixed in their food after the 3rd week of life. The effects of the drugs on mice were evaluated both at 6weeks and 16weeks. Each drug was tested at two concentrations. Prednisone was added to the molecule list as a positive control. To investigate treatment efficiency, more than 30 histological, biochemical and functional parameters were recorded. This extensive study reveals that tricyclics (Imipramine and Amitriptyline) are beneficial to the fast muscles of mdx mice. It also highlights a great variability of responses according to time, muscles and assays. PMID:21392993

  8. Preclinical episodes of orofacial pain symptoms and their association with healthcare behaviors in the OPPERA prospective cohort study.

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Gary D.; Sanders, Anne E.; Bair, Eric; Brownstein, Naomi; Dampier, Dawn; Knott, Charles; Fillingim, Roger; Maixner, William O.; Smith, Shad; Greenspan, Joel; Dubner, Ron; Ohrbach, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The course of preclinical pain symptoms sheds light on the etiology and prognosis of chronic pain. We aimed to quantify rates of developing initial- and recurrent-symptoms of painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and to evaluate associations with health behaviors. In the OPPERA prospective cohort study, 2,719 people aged 18-44 years with lifetime absence of TMD when enrolled completed 25,103 quarterly (three-monthly) questionnaires during amedian 2.3-year follow-up period. Questionnaires documented TMD symptom episodes, headache, other body pain, health care attendance and analgesic usage and. Kaplan-Meier methods for clustered data estimated symptom-free survival time. Multivariable models assessed demographic variation in TMD symptom rates and evaluated associations with healthcare and analgesic use. One third of people developed TMD symptoms and for one quarter of symptomatic episodes, pain intensity was severe. Initial TMD symptoms developed at anannual rate of 18.8 episodes per 100 people. The annual rate more than doubled for first-recurrence and doubled again for second-or-subsequent recurrence such that, one year after first recurrence, 71% of people experienced second recurrence. The overall rate increased with age and was greater in African-Americans and lower in Asians relative to Whites. The probability of TMD symptoms was strongly associated with concurrent episodes of headache and body pain and with past episodes of TMD symptoms. Episodes of TMD symptoms, headache and body pain were associated with increases of ~10% in probability of analgesic usage and healthcare attendance. Yet, even when TMD, headache and body pain occurred concurrently, 27% of people neither attended healthcare nor used analgesics. PMID:23531476

  9. A Cre-conditional MYCN-driven neuroblastoma mouse model as an improved tool for preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Althoff, K; Beckers, A; Bell, E; Nortmeyer, M; Thor, T; Sprüssel, A; Lindner, S; De Preter, K; Florin, A; Heukamp, L C; Klein-Hitpass, L; Astrahantseff, K; Kumps, C; Speleman, F; Eggert, A; Westermann, F; Schramm, A; Schulte, J H

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer that originates from neural crest-derived cells, is the most common deadly solid tumor of infancy. Amplification of the MYCN oncogene, which occurs in approximately 20–25% of human neuroblastomas, is the most prominent genetic marker of high-stage disease. The availability of valid preclinical in vivo models is a prerequisite to develop novel targeted therapies. We here report on the generation of transgenic mice with Cre-conditional induction of MYCN in dopamine ?-hydroxylase-expressing cells, termed LSL-MYCN;Dbh-iCre. These mice develop neuroblastic tumors with an incidence of >75%, regardless of strain background. Molecular profiling of tumors revealed upregulation of the MYCN-dependent miR-17–92 cluster as well as expression of neuroblastoma marker genes, including tyrosine hydroxylase and the neural cell adhesion molecule 1. Gene set enrichment analyses demonstrated significant correlation with MYC-associated expression patterns. Array comparative genome hybridization showed that chromosomal aberrations in LSL-MYCN;Dbh-iCre tumors were syntenic to those observed in human neuroblastomas. Treatment of a cell line established from a tumor derived from a LSL-MYCN;Dbh-iCre mouse with JQ1 or MLN8237 reduced cell viability and demonstrated oncogene addiction to MYCN. Here we report establishment of the first Cre-conditional human MYCN-driven mouse model for neuroblastoma that closely recapitulates the human disease with respect to tumor localization, histology, marker expression and genomic make up. This mouse model is a valuable tool for further functional studies and to assess the effect of targeted therapies. PMID:25174395

  10. A Preclinical Study of Laryngeal Motor-Evoked Potentials as a Marker Vagus Nerve Activation.

    PubMed

    Grimonprez, Annelies; Raedt, Robrecht; De Taeye, Leen; Larsen, Lars Emil; Delbeke, Jean; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl

    2015-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a treatment for refractory epilepsy and depression. Previous studies using invasive recording electrodes showed that VNS induces laryngeal motor-evoked potentials (LMEPs) through the co-activation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and subsequent contractions of the laryngeal muscles. The present study investigates the feasibility of recording LMEPs in chronically VNS-implanted rats, using a minimally-invasive technique, to assess effective current delivery to the nerve and to determine optimal VNS output currents for vagal fiber activation. Three weeks after VNS electrode implantation, signals were recorded using an electromyography (EMG) electrode in the proximity of the laryngeal muscles and a reference electrode on the skull. The VNS output current was gradually ramped up from 0.1 to 1.0 mA in 0.1 mA steps. In 13/27 rats, typical LMEPs were recorded at low VNS output currents (median 0.3 mA, IQR 0.2-0.3 mA). In 11/27 rats, significantly higher output currents were required to evoke electrophysiological responses (median 0.7 mA, IQR 0.5-0.7 mA, [Formula: see text]). The latencies of these responses deviated significantly from LMEPs ([Formula: see text]). In 3/27 rats, no electrophysiological responses to simulation were recorded. Minimally invasive LMEP recordings are feasible to assess effective current delivery to the vagus nerve. Furthermore, our results suggest that low output currents are sufficient to activate vagal fibers. PMID:26510476

  11. Preclinical Studies in Support of Defibrotide for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma and Other Neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Rouleau, Cecile; Echart, Cinara; Menon, Krishna; Teicher, Beverly; Distaso, Maria; Palumbo, Antonio; Boccadoro, Mario; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Iacobelli, Massimo; Richardson, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the study Defibrotide (DF), an orally bioavailable polydisperse oligonucleotide has promising activity in hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), a stem cell transplantation-related toxicity, characterized by microangiopathy. The anti-thrombotic properties of DF and its minimal hemorrhagic risk could serve for treatment of cancer-associated thrombotic complications. Given its cytoprotective effect on endothelium, we investigated whether DF protects tumor cells from cytotoxic anti-tumor agents. Further, given its anti-adhesive properties, we evaluated whether DF modulates the protection conferred to multiple myeloma (MM) cells by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Methods-Results DF lacks significant single-agent in vitro cytotoxicity on MM or solid tumor cells and does not attenuate their in vitro response to dexamethasone, bortezomib, immunomodulatory thalidomide derivatives, and conventional chemotherapeutics, including melphalan and cyclophosphamide. Importantly, DF enhances in vivo chemosensitivity of MM and mammary carcinoma xenografts in animal models. In co-cultures of MM cells with BMSCs in vitro, DF enhances the MM cell sensitivity to melphalan and dexamethasone, decreases MM-BMSC adhesion and its sequelae, including NF-?B activation in MM and BMSCs, and associated cytokine production. Moreover, DF inhibits expression and/or function of key mediators of MM interaction with BMSC and endothelium, including heparanase, angiogenic cytokines and adhesion molecules. Conclusion Defibrotide’s in vivo chemosensitizing properties and lack of direct in vitro activity against tumor cells suggest that it favorably modulates antitumor interactions between BMSC and endothelia in the tumor microenvironment. These data support clinical studies of DF in combination with conventional and novel therapies to potentially improve patient outcome in MM and other malignancies. PMID:19228727

  12. Contributions of GABA to alcohol responsivity during adolescence: Insights from preclinical and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Silveri, Marisa M.

    2015-01-01

    There is a considerable body of literature demonstrating that adolescence is a unique age period, which includes rapid and dramatic maturation of behavioral, cognitive, hormonal and neurobiological systems. Most notably, adolescence is also a period of unique responsiveness to alcohol effects, with both hyposensitivity and hypersensitivity observed to the various effects of alcohol. Multiple neurotransmitter systems are undergoing fine-tuning during this critical period of brain development, including those that contribute to the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. The role of developmental maturation of the ?-amino-butyric acid (GABA) system, however, has received less attention in contributing to age-specific alcohol sensitivities. This review integrates GABA findings from human magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies as they may translate to understanding adolescent-specific responsiveness to alcohol effects. Better understanding of the vulnerability of the GABA system both during adolescent development, and in psychiatric conditions that include alcohol dependence, could point to a putative mechanism, boosting brain GABA, that may have increased effectiveness for treating alcohol abuse disorders. PMID:24631274

  13. Khat (Catha edulis F.) and cannabinoids: Parallel and contrasting behavioral effects in preclinical and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Geresu, Berhanu

    2015-11-01

    After a brief outline of Catha edulis F. (khat) and the cannabinoid systems, the interactions between the pharmacological effects of khat and cannabinoids will be reviewed. Khat chewing is a widespread habit that has a deep-rooted sociocultural tradition in Africa and the Middle East. Experimental studies conducted to investigate khat's central and peripheral effects have revealed an amphetamine-like mechanism of action mediated through the dopaminergic system. The endocannabinoid system comprises the receptors, the endogenous agonists and the related biochemical machinery responsible for synthesizing these substances and terminating their actions. Endocannabinoids are synthesized "on demand" from membrane phospholipids and then rapidly cleared by cellular uptake and enzymatic degradation. Khat and cannabinoids produce a body of parallel and contrasting behavioral effects. Concurrent consumption of khat and cannabinoids may increase the risk of getting or precipitating psychosis, has rewarding and motivational effect, increases the threshold of pain perception and impairs learning and memory. On the other hand, the action of cannabis to enhance food intake is likely to reduce khat's appetite suppressant effects. PMID:26469212

  14. Wound healing activity of NOE-aspirin: a pre-clinical study.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Mandeep; Gopalan Kutty, N; Mallikarjuna Rao, C

    2007-02-01

    Aspirin, one of the oldest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, impedes tissue repair by virtue of retarding inflammation. The present study was undertaken to find out if linking of nitrooxyethyl ester to aspirin reverses its healing-depressant propensity. Nitrooxyethyl ester of aspirin (NOE-Asp) was synthesized in our laboratory through well-established synthetic pathway, starting from aspirin through esterification with ethylene glycol and nitration with a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids at 0 degrees C. The effect of NOE-Asp on phases of healing such as collagenation, wound contraction and epithelialization and on scar size of healed wound was evaluated in three wound models-incision, dead space, and excision wounds. To assess its influence on the oxidative stress, the levels of glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbiturate reactive species (TBARS) were also determined in 10-day-old granulation tissue. NOE-Asp was further screened for its anti-inflammatory activity in rat paw edema model. NOE-Asp promoted collagenation (increase in breaking strength, granulation weight, and collagen content), wound contraction, and epithelialization phases of healing. NOE-Asp also showed a significant antioxidant effect in 10-day-old granulation tissue as compared to aspirin. The results vindicate our assumption that the esterification of aspirin with nirooxyethyl group reverses the healing-suppressant effect of aspirin. The compound also showed equipotent anti-inflammatory activity as aspirin. PMID:16978891

  15. Development of telmisartan in the therapy of spinal cord injury: pre-clinical study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Min; Tsai, Jo-Ting; Chang, Chen Kuei; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Lin, Jia-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background Decrease of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-? (PPAR?) expression has been observed after spinal cord injury (SCI). Increase of PPAR? may improve the damage in SCI. Telmisartan, the antihypertensive agent, has been mentioned to increase the expression of PPAR?. Thus, we are going to screen the effectiveness of telmisartan in SCI for the development of it in clinical application. Methods In the present study, we used compressive SCI in rats. Telmisartan was then used to evaluate the influence in rats after SCI. Change in PPAR? expression was identified by Western blots. Also, behavioral tests were performed to check the recovery of damage. Results Recovery of damage from SCI was observed in telmisartan-treated rats. Additionally, this action of telmisartan was inhibited by GSK0660 at the dose sufficient to block PPAR?. However, metformin at the dose enough to activate adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase failed to produce similar action as telmisartan. Thus, mediation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in this action of telmisartan can be rule out. Moreover, telmisartan reversed the expressions of PPAR? in rats with SCI. Conclusion The obtained data suggest that telmisartan can improve the damage of SCI in rats through an increase in PPAR? expression. Thus, telmisartan is useful to be developed as an agent in the therapy of SCI. PMID:26316709

  16. High-throughput monitoring of integration site clonality in preclinical and clinical gene therapy studies

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Frank A; Appelt, Jens-Uwe; Link, Barbara; Gerdes, Sebastian; Lehrer, Christina; Scholz, Simone; Paruzynski, Anna; Roeder, Ingo; Wenz, Frederik; Glimm, Hanno; von Kalle, Christof; Grez, Manuel; Schmidt, Manfred; Laufs, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Gene transfer to hematopoietic stem cells with integrating vectors not only allows sustained correction of monogenic diseases but also tracking of individual clones in vivo. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has been shown to be an accurate method to quantify individual stem cell clones, yet due to frequently limited amounts of target material (especially in clinical studies), it is not useful for large-scale analyses. To explore whether vector integration site (IS) recovery techniques may be suitable to describe clonal contributions if combined with next-generation sequencing techniques, we designed artificial ISs of different sizes which were mixed to simulate defined clonal situations in clinical settings. We subjected all mixes to either linear amplification–mediated PCR (LAM-PCR) or nonrestrictive LAM-PCR (nrLAM-PCR), both combined with 454 sequencing. We showed that nrLAM-PCR/454-detected clonality allows estimating qPCR-detected clonality in vitro. We then followed the kinetics of two clones detected in a patient enrolled in a clinical gene therapy trial using both, nrLAM-PCR/454 and qPCR and also saw nrLAM-PCR/454 to correlate to qPCR-measured clonal contributions. The method presented here displays a feasible high-throughput strategy to monitor clonality in clinical gene therapy trials is at hand. PMID:26052530

  17. Efficacy and mechanism of action of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib, lapatinib and neratinib in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer: preclinical and clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Segovia-Mendoza, Mariana; González-González, María E; Barrera, David; Díaz, Lorenza; García-Becerra, Rocío

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of tumors, including breast cancer, overexpress proteins of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. The interaction between family members activates signaling pathways that promote tumor progression and resistance to treatment. Human epidermal growth factor receptor type II (HER2) positive breast cancer represents a clinical challenge for current therapy. It has motivated the development of novel and more effective therapeutic EGFR family target drugs, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This review focuses on the effects of three TKIs mostly studied in HER2- positive breast cancer, lapatinib, gefitinib and neratinib. Herein, we discuss the mechanism of action, therapeutic advantages and clinical applications of these TKIs. To date, TKIs seem to be promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast tumors, either as monotherapy or combined with other pharmacological agents. PMID:26609467

  18. Photoacoustic spectroscopy in the monitoring of breast tumor development: a pre-clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, Mallika; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Ray, Satadru; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer type and its detection at an early stage can reduce the mortality rate substantially. With the aim to detect breast cancer early, by studying tumor progression in nude mice, a pulsed laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy set up has been designed and developed. MCF-7 cells xenografts were developed using six to eight weeks old female nude mice and tumor tissues were extracted on different days (10th, 15th and 20th Day) post injection and the corresponding photoacoustic spectra were recorded at 281nm excitation. A total of 144 time domain spectra were recorded from 36 animals belonging to the three time points (10th, 15th and 20th day post injection) and converted into frequency domains by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) tools of the MATLAB algorithms and analyzed. The frequency patterns of the tumor masses on 10th, 15th and 20th day of tumor development showed a gradual increase in intensity at certain frequencies, 5.93 x103 Hz, 15.9 x103 Hz, 29.69 x103 Hz and 32.5 x103 Hz in the FFT patterns indicating that these frequencies were more sensitive towards tumor development. Further analysis of the data yielded a clear variation in the spectral parameters with progression of the disease suggesting that the technique may be suitable for early detection of the disease. Thus, we expect that the developed setup may be useful in assessing the different phases of tumor development which may have clinical implications.

  19. Molecular actions and therapeutic potential of lithium in preclinical and clinical studies of CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Tso; Chuang, De-Maw

    2011-01-01

    Lithium has been used clinically to treat bipolar disorder for over half a century, and remains a fundamental pharmacological therapy for patients with this illness. Although lithium’s therapeutic mechanisms are not fully understood, substantial in vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that it has neuroprotective/neurotrophic properties against various insults, and considerable clinical potential for the treatment of several neurodegenerative conditions. Evidence from pharmacological and gene manipulation studies support the notion that glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition and induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated signaling are lithium’s main mechanisms of action, leading to enhanced cell survival pathways and alteration of a wide variety of downstream effectors. By inhibiting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated calcium influx, lithium also contributes to calcium homeostasis and suppresses calcium-dependent activation of pro-apoptotic signaling pathways. In addition, lithium decreases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate by inhibiting phosphoinositol phosphatases, a process recently identified as a novel mechanism for inducing autophagy. Through these mechanisms, therapeutic doses of lithium have been demonstrated to defend neuronal cells against diverse forms of death insults and to improve behavioral as well as cognitive deficits in various animal models of neurodegenerative diseases, including stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, fragile X syndrome, as well as Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s diseases, among others. Several clinical trials are also underway to assess the therapeutic effects of lithium for treating these disorders. This article reviews the most recent findings regarding the potential targets involved in lithium’s neuroprotective effects, and the implication of these findings for the treatment of a variety of diseases. PMID:20705090

  20. Bone metastasis imaging with SPECT/CT/MRI: a preclinical toolbox for therapy studies.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Pedro Gomes; Peters, Steffie; Rossin, Raffaella; Kaijzel, Eric L; Que, Ivo; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Grüll, Holger

    2015-06-01

    Bone is one of the most common metastatic target sites in breast cancer, with more than 200 thousand new cases of invasive cancer diagnosed in the US alone in 2011. We set out to establish a multimodality imaging platform for bone metastases in small animals as a tool to non-invasively quantify metastasis growth, imaging the ensuing bone lesions and possibly the response to treatment. To this end, a mouse model of osteolytic metastatic bone tumors was characterized with SPECT/CT and MRI over time. A cell line capable of forming bone metastases, MDA-MB-231, was genetically modified to stably express the reporter gene herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (hsv-1 tk). The intracellular accumulation of the radiolabeled tracer [(123)I]FIAU promoted by HSV-1 TK specifically pinpoints the location of tumor cells which can be imaged in vivo by SPECT. First, a study using tumors implanted subcutaneously was performed. The SPECT/MRI overlays and the ex vivo ?-counting showed a linear correlation in terms of %ID/cm(3) (R(2)=0.93) and %ID/g (R(2)=0.77), respectively. Then, bone metastasis growth was imaged weekly by SPECT/CT and T2-weighted MRI over a maximum of 40 days post-intracardiac injection of tumor cells. The first activity spots detectable with SPECT, around day 20 post-cell injection, were smaller than 2mm(3) and not yet visible by MRI and increased in volume and in %ID over the weeks. Osteolytic bone lesions were visible by CT (in vivo) and ?CT (ex vivo). The SPECT/MRI overlays also showed a linear correlation in terms of %ID/cm(3) (R(2)=0.86). In conclusion, a new multimodality imaging platform has been established that non-invasively combines images of active tumor areas (SPECT), tumor volume (MRI) and the corresponding bone lesions (CT and ?CT). To our knowledge this is the first report where the combination of soft tissue information from MRI, bone lesions by CT, and reporter gene imaging by SPECT is used to non-invasively follow metastatic bone lesions. PMID:25680341

  1. Preclinical models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chang-Il; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most difficult human malignancies to treat. The 5-year survival rate of PDA patients is 7% and PDA is predicted to become the second leading cancer-related cause of death in the USA. Despite intensive efforts, the translation of findings in preclinical studies has been ineffective, due partially to the lack of preclinical models that faithfully recapitulate features of human PDA. Here, we review current preclinical models for human PDA (eg human PDA cell lines, cell line-based xenografts and patient-derived tumour xenografts). In addition, we discuss potential applications of the recently developed pancreatic ductal organoids, three-dimensional culture systems and organoid-based xenografts as new preclinical models for PDA. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26419819

  2. Towards developing standard operating procedures for pre-clinical testing in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, Miranda D.; Radley, Hannah G.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; De Luca, Annamaria

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses various issues to consider when developing standard operating procedures for pre-clinical studies in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The review describes and evaluates a wide range of techniques used to measure parameters of muscle pathology in mdx mice and identifies some basic techniques that might comprise standardised approaches for evaluation. While the central aim is to provide a basis for the development of standardised procedures to evaluate efficacy of a drug or a therapeutic strategy, a further aim is to gain insight into pathophysiological mechanisms in order to identify other therapeutic targets. The desired outcome is to enable easier and more rigorous comparison of pre-clinical data from different laboratories around the world, in order to accelerate identification of the best pre-clinical therapies in the mdx mouse that will fast-track translation into effective clinical treatments for DMD. PMID:18499465

  3. Efficacy of the specific endothelin a receptor antagonist zibotentan (ZD4054) in colorectal cancer: a preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Haque, Samer-ul; Dashwood, Michael R; Heetun, Mohammed; Shiwen, Xu; Farooqui, Noreen; Ramesh, Bala; Welch, Hazel; Savage, Felicity J; Ogunbiyi, Olagunju; Abraham, David J; Loizidou, Marilena

    2013-08-01

    Endothelin 1 (ET-1) is overexpressed in cancer, contributing to disease progression. We previously showed that ET-1 stimulated proliferative, migratory, and contractile tumorigenic effects via the ET(A) receptor. Here, for the first time, we evaluate zibotentan, a specific ET(A) receptor antagonist, in the setting of colorectal cancer, in cellular models. Pharmacologic characteristics were further determined in patient tissues. Colorectal cancer lines (n = 4) and fibroblast strains (n = 6), isolated from uninvolved areas of colorectal cancer specimens, were exposed to ET-1 and/or ET(A)/(B) receptor antagonists. Proliferation (methylene blue), migration (scratch wounds), and contraction (gel lattices) were assessed. Receptor distribution and binding characteristics (K(d), B(max)) were determined using autoradiography on tissue sections and homogenates and cytospun cells, supported by immunohistochemistry. Proliferation was inhibited by ET(A) (zibotentan > BQ123; P < 0.05), migration by ET(B) > ET(A), and contraction by combined ET(A) and ET(B) antagonism. Intense ET-1 stromal binding correlated with fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Colorectal cancer lines and fibroblasts revealed high density and affinity ET-1 binding (B(max) = 2.435 fmol/1 × 10(6) cells, K(d) = 367.7 pmol/L; B(max) = 3.03 fmol/1 × 10(6) cells, K(d) = 213.6 pmol/L). In cancer tissues, ET(A) receptor antagonists (zibotentan; BQ123) reduced ET-1 binding more effectively (IC(50): 0.1-10 ?mol/L) than ET(B) receptor antagonist BQ788 (?IC(50), 1 mmol/L). ET-1 stimulated cancer-contributory processes. Its localization to tumor stroma, with greatest binding/affinity to fibroblasts, implicates these cells in tumor progression. ET(A) receptor upregulation in cancer tissues and its role in tumorigenic processes show the receptor's importance in therapeutic targeting. Zibotentan, the most specific ET(A) receptor antagonist available, showed the greatest inhibition of ET-1 binding. With its known safety profile, we provide evidence for zibotentan's potential role as adjuvant therapy in colorectal cancer. PMID:23723122

  4. Does interprofessional simulation increase self-efficacy: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Watters, Colm; Reedy, Gabriel; Ross, Alastair; Morgan, Nicola J; Handslip, Rhodri; Jaye, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In this work, we have compared uniprofessional and interprofessional versions of a simulation education intervention, in an attempt to understand more about whether it improves trainees’ self-efficacy. Background Interprofessionalism has been climbing the healthcare agenda for over 50?years. Simulation education attempts to create an environment for healthcare professionals to learn, without potential safety risks for patients. Integrating simulation and interprofessional education can provide benefits to individual learners. Setting The intervention took place in a high-fidelity simulation facility located on the campus of a large urban hospital. The centre provides educational activities for an Academic Health Sciences Centre. Approximately 2500 staff are trained at the centre each year. Participants One hundred and fifteen nurses and midwives along with 156 doctors, all within the early years of their postgraduate experience participated. All were included on the basis of their ongoing postgraduate education. Methods Each course was a one-day simulation course incorporating five clinical and one communication scenarios. After each a facilitated debriefing took place. A mixed methods approach utilised precourse and postcourse questionnaires measuring self-efficacy in managing emergency situations, communication, teamwork and leadership. Results Thematic analysis of qualitative data showed improvements in communication/teamwork and leadership, for doctors and nurses undergoing simulation training. These findings were confirmed by statistical analysis showing that confidence ratings improved in nurses and doctors overall (p<0.001). Improved outcomes from baseline were observed for interprofessional versus uniprofessional trained nurses (n=115; p<0.001). Postcourse ratings for doctors showed that interprofessional training was significantly associated with better final outcomes for a communication/teamwork dimension (n=156; p<0.05). Conclusions This study provides evidence that simulation training enhances participants’ self-efficacy in clinical situations. It also leads to increases in their perceived abilities relating to communication/teamwork and leadership/management of clinical scenarios. Interprofessional training showed increased positive effects on self-efficacy for nurses and doctors. PMID:25586366

  5. Premarket Safety and Efficacy Studies for ADHD Medications in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Florence T.; Kim, Jeong Min; Mandl, Kenneth D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic condition and pharmacotherapy is the mainstay of treatment, with a variety of ADHD medications available to patients. However, it is unclear to what extent the long-term safety and efficacy of ADHD drugs have been evaluated prior to their market authorization. We aimed to quantify the number of participants studied and their length of exposure in ADHD drug trials prior to marketing. Methods We identified all ADHD medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and extracted data on clinical trials performed by the sponsor and used by the FDA to evaluate the drug’s clinical efficacy and safety. For each ADHD medication, we measured the total number of participants studied and the length of participant exposure and identified any FDA requests for post-marketing trials. Results A total of 32 clinical trials were conducted for the approval of 20 ADHD drugs. The median number of participants studied per drug was 75 (IQR 0, 419). Eleven drugs (55%) were approved after <100 participants were studied and 14 (70%) after <300 participants. The median trial length prior to approval was 4 weeks (IQR 2, 9), with 5 (38%) drugs approved after participants were studied <4 weeks and 10 (77%) after <6 months. Six drugs were approved with requests for specific additional post-marketing trials, of which 2 were performed. Conclusions Clinical trials conducted for the approval of many ADHD drugs have not been designed to assess rare adverse events or long-term safety and efficacy. While post-marketing studies can fill in some of the gaps, better assurance is needed that the proper trials are conducted either before or after a new medication is approved. PMID:25007171

  6. Preclinical stem cell therapy in Chagas Disease: Perspectives for future research

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Ferreira, Reginaldo Justino; Irioda, Ana Carolina; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Chagas cardiomyopathy still remains a challenging problem that is responsible for high morbidity and mortality in Central and Latin America. Chagas disease disrupts blood microcirculation via various autoimmune mechanisms, causing loss of cardiomyocytes and severe impairment of heart function. Different cell types and delivery approaches in Chagas Disease have been studied in both preclinical models and clinical trials. The main objective of this article is to clarify the reasons why the benefits that have been seen with cell therapy in preclinical models fail to translate to the clinical setting. This can be explained by crucial differences between the cellular types and pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease, as well as the differences between human patients and animal models. We discuss examples that demonstrate how the results from preclinical trials might have overestimated the efficacy of myocardial regeneration therapies. Future research should focus, not only on studying the best cell type to use but, very importantly, understanding the levels of safety and cellular interaction that can elicit efficient therapeutic effects in human tissue. Addressing the challenges associated with future research may ensure the success of stem cell therapy in improving preclinical models and the treatment of Chagas disease. PMID:24392316

  7. A meta-analysis of threats to valid clinical inference in preclinical research of sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Valerie C; Demko, Nadine; Hakala, Amanda; MacKinnon, Nathalie; Federico, Carole A; Fergusson, Dean; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Poor study methodology leads to biased measurement of treatment effects in preclinical research. We used available sunitinib preclinical studies to evaluate relationships between study design and experimental tumor volume effect sizes. We identified published animal efficacy experiments where sunitinib monotherapy was tested for effects on tumor volume. Effect sizes were extracted alongside experimental design elements addressing threats to valid clinical inference. Reported use of practices to address internal validity threats was limited, with no experiments using blinded outcome assessment. Most malignancies were tested in one model only, raising concerns about external validity. We calculate a 45% overestimate of effect size across all malignancies due to potential publication bias. Pooled effect sizes for specific malignancies did not show apparent relationships with effect sizes in clinical trials, and we were unable to detect dose–response relationships. Design and reporting standards represent an opportunity for improving clinical inference. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08351.001 PMID:26460544

  8. An Exploratory Study of Teacher Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Professional Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romeo, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    The exploratory study sought to examine the relationships between teachers' self-efficacy beliefs and professional learning community. Specifically, this study presents a quantitative analysis of the relationship between teachers' perceptions of self-efficacy and PLC implementation. The Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES) (long form)…

  9. Orazipone, a locally acting immunomodulator, ameliorates intestinal radiation injury: A preclinical study in a novel rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Boerma, Marjan; Wang, Junru; Richter, Konrad K.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Intestinal radiation injury (radiation enteropathy) is relevant to cancer treatment, as well as to radiation accidents and radiation terrorism scenarios. This study assessed the protective efficacy of orazipone, a locally-acting small molecule immunomodulator. Methods and Materials: Male rats were orchiectomized, a 4-cm segment of small bowel was sutured to the inside of the scrotum, a proximal anteperistaltic ileostomy was created for intraluminal drug administration, and intestinal continuity was re-established by end-to-side anastomosis. After three weeks postoperative recovery, the intestine in the 'scrotal hernia' was exposed locally to single-dose or fractionated X-radiation. Orazipone (30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was administered daily through the ileostomy, either during and after irradiation, or only after irradiation. Structural, cellular, and molecular aspects of intestinal radiation toxicity were assessed two weeks after irradiation. Results: Orazipone significantly ameliorated histologic injury and transforming growth factor-{beta} immunoreactivity levels, both after single-dose and fractionated irradiation. Intestinal wall thickness was significantly reduced after single-dose and nonsignificantly after fractionated irradiation. Mucosal surface area and numbers of mast cells were partially restored by orazipone after single-dose irradiation. Conclusions: This work (1) demonstrates the utility of the ileostomy rat model for intraluminal administration of response modifiers in single-dose and fractionated radiation studies; (2) shows that mucosal immunomodulation during and/or after irradiation ameliorates intestinal toxicity; and (3) highlights important differences between single-dose and fractionated radiation regimens.

  10. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Yvonne; He, Pengfei; Chilla, Geetha Soujanya V. N.; Poh, Chueh Loo; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG at endpoint. Microscopic inspection revealed that LhCG engraftment restored cartilage thickness, promoted integration with surrounding native cartilage, produced abundant cartilage-specific matrix molecules, and re-established an intact superficial tangential zone. Importantly, the repair efficacy of LhCG was quantitatively shown to be comparable to native, unaffected cartilage in terms of biochemical composition and biomechanical properties. There were no complications related to the donor site of cartilage biopsy. Collectively, these results imply that LhCG engraftment may be a viable approach for articular cartilage repair. PMID:26549401

  11. OPTIMIZATION PRE-CLINICAL

    E-print Network

    Prostate Glycosides for Cancer Treatment PeptideVaccine Against Lupus Medical Food For GI Diseases AntiLEAD OPTIMIZATION PRE-CLINICAL DEVELOPMENT THERAPEUTICS CLINICAL TRIALSHIT TO LEADNEW DRUGS Drugs b Lactamase Inhibitors: Antibiotics II Small Molecules for Parkinson's Disease Triggered Release

  12. Anti-Plaque Efficacy of Herbal and 0.2% Chlorhexidine Gluconate Mouthwash: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, K A Ravi Varma; John, Sajil; Deepika, V; Dwijendra, K S; Reddy, Babu Ram; Chincholi, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mouthwashes are an adjunct to, not a substitute for, regular brushing and flossing. Chlorohexidine is cationic bis-biguanide broad spectrum antiseptic with both anti-plaque and antibacterial properties. It has side-effects like brownish discoloration of teeth and dorsum of the tongue, taste perturbation, oral mucosal ulceration, etc. To compare the antiplaque efficacy of herbal and chlorohexidine gluconate mouthwash. Materials and Methods: A double-blinded parallel, randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in the Department of Periodontics, MNR Dental College. Totally 100 preclinical dental students were randomized into three groups (0.2% chlorohexidine, Saline and herbal mouthwash). All the groups were made to refrain from their regular mechanical oral hygiene measures and were asked to rinse with given respective mouthwashes for 4 days. The gingival and plaque scores are evaluated on 1st day, and 5th day, and differences were compared statistically. Results: There was no significant difference in the gingival index (GI) and plaque index (PI) scores of the pre-rinsing scores of three groups and mean age of subjects in the three age groups, suggesting selected population for the three groups was homogenous. Mean GI and PI scores at the post rinsing stage were least for the Group A, followed by B and C. The difference of post rinsing PI and GI scores between Group A and Group B were statistically non-significant, which means anti-gingivitis and plaque inhibiting properties are similar for both. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study chlorhexidine gluconate and herbal mouthwash (Hiora) showed similar anti plaque activity with latter showing no side effects. PMID:26464549

  13. Performance characterization of a new CZT-based preclinical SPECT system: a comparative study of different collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, A. R.; Park, S.-J.; Choi, Y. Y.; Kim, K. M.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-09-01

    Triumph X-SPECT is a newly released CZT-based preclinical small-animal SPECT system with interchangeable collimators. The purpose of this work was to evaluate and systematically compare the imaging performances of three different collimators in the CZT-based preclinical small-animal system: a single-pinhole collimator (SPH), a multi-pinhole collimator (MPH) and a parallel-hole collimator. We measured the spatial resolutions and sensitivities of the three collimators with 99mTc sources, considering three distinct energy window widths (5, 10, and 20%), and used the NEMA NU4-2008 Image Quality phantom to test the imaging performance of the three collimators in terms of uniformity and spill-over ratio (SOR) for each energy window. With a 10% energy window width at a radius of rotation (ROR) of 30 mm, the system resolution of the SPH, MPH and parallel-hole collimators was 0.715, 0.855 and 3.270 mm FWHM, respectively. For the same energy window, the sensitivity of the system with SPH, MPH and parallel-hole collimators was 32.860, 152.514 and 49.205 counts/sec/MBq at a 100 mm source-to-detector distance and 6.790, 33.376 and 49.038 counts/sec/MBq at a 130 mm source-to-detector distance, respectively. The image noise and SORair for the three collimators were 20.137, 12.278 and 11.232 (%STDunif) and 0.106, 0.140 and 0.161, respectively. Overall, the results show that the SPH had better spatial resolution than the other collimators. The MPH had the highest sensitivity at 100 mm source-to-collimator distance, and the parallel-hole collimator had the highest sensitivity at 130 mm-source-to-detector distance. Therefore, the proper collimator for Triumph X-SPECT system must be determined by the task. These results provide valuable reference data and insight into the imaging performance of various collimators in CZT-based preclinical small-animal SPECT.

  14. Teacher Self-Efficacy and Teacher Burnout: A Study of Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaalvik, Einar M.; Skaalvik, Sidsel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was partly to test the factor structure of a recently developed Norwegian scale for measuring teacher self-efficacy and partly to explore relations between teachers' perception of the school context, teacher self-efficacy, collective teacher efficacy, teacher burnout, teacher job satisfaction, and teachers' beliefs that…

  15. Human B-cell cancer cell lines as a preclinical model for studies of drug effect in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Maria Bach; Falgreen, Steffen; Bødker, Julie Støve; Schmitz, Alexander; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Sørensen, Suzette; Madsen, Jakob; El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen; Johnsen, Hans Erik

    2014-11-01

    Drug resistance in cancer refers to recurrent or primary refractory disease following drug therapy. At the cellular level, it is a consequence of molecular functions that ultimately enable the cell to resist cell death-one of the classical hallmarks of cancer. Thus, drug resistance is a fundamental aspect of the cancer cell phenotype, in parallel with sustained proliferation, immortality, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Here we present a preclinical model of human B-cell cancer cell lines used to identify genes involved in specific drug resistance. This process includes a standardized technical setup for specific drug screening, analysis of global gene expression, and the statistical considerations required to develop resistance gene signatures. The state of the art is illustrated by the first-step classical drug screen (including the CD20 antibody rituximab, the DNA intercalating topoisomerase II inhibitor doxorubicin, the mitotic inhibitor vincristine, and the alkylating agents cyclophosphamide and melphalan) along with the generation of gene lists predicting the chemotherapeutic outcome as validated retrospectively in clinical trial datasets. This B-cell lineage-specific preclinical model will allow us to initiate a range of laboratory studies, with focus on specific gene functions involved in molecular resistance mechanisms. PMID:25072621

  16. White matter changes in preclinical Alzheimer's disease: a magnetic resonance imaging-diffusion tensor imaging study on cognitively normal older people with positive amyloid ? protein 42 levels.

    PubMed

    Molinuevo, José Luis; Ripolles, Pablo; Simó, Marta; Lladó, Albert; Olives, Jaume; Balasa, Mircea; Antonell, Anna; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; Rami, Lorena

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use diffusion tensor imaging measures to determine the existence of white matter microstructural differences in the preclinical phases of Alzheimer's disease, assessing cognitively normal older individuals with positive amyloid ? protein (A?42) levels (CN_A?42+) on the basis of normal cognition and cerebrospinal fluid A?42 levels below 500 pg/mL. Nineteen CN_A?42+ and 19 subjects with A?42 levels above 500 pg/mL (CN_A?42-) were included. We encountered increases in axial diffusivity (AxD) in CN_A?42+ relative to CN_A?42- in the corpus callosum, corona radiata, internal capsule, and superior longitudinal fasciculus bilaterally, and also in the left fornix, left uncinate fasciculus, and left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. However, no differences were found in other diffusion tensor imaging indexes. Cognitive reserve scores were positively associated with AxD exclusively in the CN_A?42+ group. The finding of AxD alteration together with preserved fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and radial diffusivity indexes in the CN_A?42+ group may indicate that, subtle axonal changes may be happening in the preclinical phases of Alzheimer's disease, whereas white matter integrity is still widely preserved. PMID:25002037

  17. Learning style preferences and academic success of preclinical allied health students.

    PubMed

    Good, Jonathan P; Ramos, Diane; D'Amore, Domenic C

    2013-01-01

    Student learning style modality preferences, in preclinical classes, were assessed using the visual-aural-read/write-kinesthetic (VARK) inventory. Preferences were assessed for 137 preclinical students, including those in nursing, physician's assistant, physical therapy, athletic training, and natural science programs using the online VARK inventory. All classes contained a majority of multimodal and a significantly high proportion of kinesthetic learners. No correlations were noted between modality preference strength and assessment performance in general biology classes; significant correlations were discovered for kinesthetic preference among the same cohort in subsequent human anatomy (negative correlation) and general physiology (positive correlation) classes. Assessment performance of nursing students in an anatomy and physiology class resulted in correlations with aural (negative correlation) and visual (positive correlation) preference strengths. Study findings are used to evaluate the efficacy of non-omnimodal delivery of content-focused science classes, before the students have developed the background knowledge or skills required to contextualize the learning. PMID:24326923

  18. [Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies]. DOE annual report, 1994--95

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The authors describe results which have not yet been published from their associated studies listed in the title. For the first, they discuss Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules, analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response, and human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals. Studies in phantoms includes a discussion of planar image quantitation, counts coincidence correction, organ studies, tumor studies, and {sup 90}Y quantitation with Bremsstrahlung imaging. The study on SPECT discusses attenuation correction and scatter correction. Preclinical studies investigated uptake of {sup 90}Y-BrE-3 in mice using autoradiography. Clinical studies discuss image quantitation verses counts from biopsy samples, S factors for radiation dose calculation, {sup 67}Cu imaging studies for lymphoma cancer, and {sup 111}In MoAb imaging studies for breast cancer to predict {sup 90}Y MoAb therapy.

  19. Preclinical Rheumatoid Arthritis (Autoantibodies): An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies demonstrate that there is a period of development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during which there are elevations of disease-related biomarkers, including autoantibodies, in the absence of and prior to the development of RA; this period can be termed ‘preclinical RA’. These ‘preclinical’ autoantibodies including rheumatoid factor and antibodies to citrullinated protein antigens, and more recent studies have also identified a wider variety of autoantibodies and a wide range of inflammatory biomarkers. These findings in conjunction with established and emerging data about genetic and environmental risk factors for RA support a model of disease development where certain factors lead to an initial triggering of RA-related autoimmunity that expands over time to the point where symptomatic arthritis classifiable as RA develops. Herein will be reviewed updates in the field, as well as a discussion of current limitations of our understanding of preclinical RA, and potential future directions for study. PMID:24643396

  20. Monitoring of anti-cancer treatment with 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET: a comprehensive review of pre-clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging of solid tumors with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is an evolving field with continuous development of new PET tracers and discovery of new applications for already implemented PET tracers. During treatment of cancer patients, a general challenge is to measure treatment effect early in a treatment course and by that to stratify patients into responders and non-responders. With 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) and 3’-deoxy-3’-[18F]fluorothymidine(18F-FLT) two of the cancer hallmarks, altered energy metabolism and increased cell proliferation, can be visualized and quantified non-invasively by PET. With 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET changes in energy metabolism and cell proliferation can thereby be determined after initiation of cancer treatment in both clinical and pre-clinical studies in order to predict, at an early time-point, treatment response. It is hypothesized that decreases in glycolysis and cell proliferation may occur in tumors that are sensitive to the applied cancer therapeutics and that tumors that are resistant to treatment will show unchanged glucose metabolism and cell proliferation. Whether 18F-FDG and/or 18F-FLT PET can be used for prediction of treatment response has been analyzed in many studies both following treatment with conventional chemotherapeutic agents but also following treatment with different targeted therapies, e.g. monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors. The results from these studies have been most variable; in some studies early changes in 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT uptake predicted later tumor regression whereas in other studies no change in tracer uptake was observed despite the treatment being effective. The present review gives an overview of pre-clinical studies that have used 18F-FDG and/or 18F-FLT PET for response monitoring of cancer therapeutics. PMID:26550536

  1. S 17092: a prolyl endopeptidase inhibitor as a potential therapeutic drug for memory impairment. Preclinical and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Morain, Philippe; Lestage, Pierre; De Nanteuil, Guillaume; Jochemsen, Roeline; Robin, Jean-Loïc; Guez, David; Boyer, Pierre-Alain

    2002-01-01

    Any treatment that could positively modulate central neuropeptides levels would provide a promising therapeutic approach to the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with aging and/or neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, based on the activity in rodents, S 17092 (2S,3aS,7aS)-1][(R,R)-2-phenylcyclopropyl]carbonyl]-2-[(thiazolidin-3-yl)carbonyl]octahydro-1H-indole) has been selected as a potent inhibitor of cerebral prolyl-endopeptidase (PEP). By retarding the degradation of neuroactive peptides, S 17092 was successfully used in a variety of memory tasks. These tasks explored short-term, long-term, reference and working memory in aged mice, as well as in rodents and monkeys with chemically induced amnesia or spontaneous memory deficits. S 17092 has also been safely administered to humans, and showed a clear peripheral expression of its mechanism of action through its inhibitory effect upon PEP activity in plasma. S 17092 exhibited central effects, as evidenced by EEG recording in healthy volunteers, and could improve a delayed verbal memory task. Collectively, the preclinical and clinical effects of S 17092 have suggested a promising role for this compound as an agent for the treatment of cognitive disorders associated with cerebral aging. PMID:12070525

  2. The role of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and addiction: combining preclinical evidence with human Positron Emission Tomography (PET) studies

    PubMed Central

    Terbeck, Sylvia; Akkus, Funda; Chesterman, Laurence P.; Hasler, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    In the present review, we deliver an overview of the involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) activity and density in pathological anxiety, mood disorders and addiction. Specifically, we will describe mGluR5 studies in humans that employed Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and combined the findings with preclinical animal research. This combined view of different methodological approaches—from basic neurobiological approaches to human studies—might give a more comprehensive and clinically relevant view of mGluR5 function in mental health than the view on preclinical data alone. We will also review the current research data on mGluR5 along the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC). Firstly, we found evidence of abnormal glutamate activity related to the positive and negative valence systems, which would suggest that antagonistic mGluR5 intervention has prominent anti-addictive, anti-depressive and anxiolytic effects. Secondly, there is evidence that mGluR5 plays an important role in systems for social functioning and the response to social stress. Finally, mGluR5's important role in sleep homeostasis suggests that this glutamate receptor may play an important role in RDoC's arousal and modulatory systems domain. Glutamate was previously mostly investigated in non-human studies, however initial human clinical PET research now also supports the hypothesis that, by mediating brain excitability, neuroplasticity and social cognition, abnormal metabotropic glutamate activity might predispose individuals to a broad range of psychiatric problems. PMID:25852460

  3. The application of selective reaction monitoring shows dysregulation of glycolysis in a preclinical model of schizophrenia

    E-print Network

    Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Alsaif, Murtada; Ernst, Agnes; Harris, Laura W.; Aerts, Nancy; Lenaerts, Ilse; Peeters, Pieter J.; Amess, Bob; Rahmoune, Hassan; Bahn, Sabine; Guest, Paul C.

    2012-03-15

    to the symptoms of the human disease. Therefore, there is a necessity of characterizing the preclinical models from a molecular point of view. Selective reaction monitoring (SRM) has already shown promise in preclinical and clinical studies for multiplex...

  4. Contrasting gray and white matter changes in preclinical Huntington disease

    E-print Network

    Aron, Adam

    Contrasting gray and white matter changes in preclinical Huntington disease An MRI study DD ABSTRACT Background: In Huntington disease (HD), substantial striatal atrophy precedes clinical motor of view; GM gray matter; HD Huntington disease; MRI magnetic resonance imaging; pre-HD preclinical HD

  5. Nebulized anticoagulants for acute lung injury - a systematic review of preclinical and clinical investigations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Data from interventional trials of systemic anticoagulation for sepsis inconsistently suggest beneficial effects in case of acute lung injury (ALI). Severe systemic bleeding due to anticoagulation may have offset the possible positive effects. Nebulization of anticoagulants may allow for improved local biological availability and as such may improve efficacy in the lungs and lower the risk of systemic bleeding complications. Method We performed a systematic review of preclinical studies and clinical trials investigating the efficacy and safety of nebulized anticoagulants in the setting of lung injury in animals and ALI in humans. Results The efficacy of nebulized activated protein C, antithrombin, heparin and danaparoid has been tested in diverse animal models of direct (for example, pneumonia-, intra-pulmonary lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-, and smoke inhalation-induced lung injury) and indirect lung injury (for example, intravenous LPS- and trauma-induced lung injury). Nebulized anticoagulants were found to have the potential to attenuate pulmonary coagulopathy and frequently also inflammation. Notably, nebulized danaparoid and heparin but not activated protein C and antithrombin, were found to have an effect on systemic coagulation. Clinical trials of nebulized anticoagulants are very limited. Nebulized heparin was found to improve survival of patients with smoke inhalation-induced ALI. In a trial of critically ill patients who needed mechanical ventilation for longer than two days, nebulized heparin was associated with a higher number of ventilator-free days. In line with results from preclinical studies, nebulization of heparin was found to have an effect on systemic coagulation, but without causing systemic bleedings. Conclusion Local anticoagulant therapy through nebulization of anticoagulants attenuates pulmonary coagulopathy and frequently also inflammation in preclinical studies of lung injury. Recent human trials suggest nebulized heparin for ALI to be beneficial and safe, but data are very limited. PMID:22546487

  6. The Economics of Reproducibility in Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Leonard P.; Cockburn, Iain M.; Simcoe, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Low reproducibility rates within life science research undermine cumulative knowledge production and contribute to both delays and costs of therapeutic drug development. An analysis of past studies indicates that the cumulative (total) prevalence of irreproducible preclinical research exceeds 50%, resulting in approximately US$28,000,000,000 (US$28B)/year spent on preclinical research that is not reproducible—in the United States alone. We outline a framework for solutions and a plan for long-term improvements in reproducibility rates that will help to accelerate the discovery of life-saving therapies and cures. PMID:26057340

  7. Porcine adipose-derived stem cells from buccal fat pad and subcutaneous adipose tissue for future preclinical studies in oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are progenitor cells used in bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Despite subcutaneous adipose tissue being more abundant, the buccal fat pad (BFP) is easily accessible for dentists and maxillofacial surgeons. For this reason, considering the need for preclinical study and the swine as an optimal animal model in tissue engineering applications, we compared the features of porcine ASCs (pASCs) from both tissue-harvesting sites. Methods ASCs were isolated from interscapular subcutaneous adipose tissue (ScI) and buccal fat pads of six swine. Cells were characterized for their stemness and multipotent features. Moreover, their osteogenic ability when cultured on titanium disks and silicon carbide-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposition fragments, and their growth in the presence of autologous and heterologous serum were also assessed. Results Independent of the harvesting site, no differences in proliferation, viability, and clonogenicity were observed among all the pASC populations. Furthermore, when induced toward osteogenic differentiation, both ScI- and BFP-pASCs showed an increase of collagen and calcified extracellular matrix (ECM) production, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteonectin expression, indicating their ability to differentiate toward osteoblast-like cells. In addition, they differentiated toward adipocyte-like cells, and chondrogenic induced pASCs were able to increase glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) production over time. When cells were osteoinduced on synthetic biomaterials, they significantly increased the amount of calcified ECM compared with control cells; moreover, titanium showed the osteoinductive effect on pASCs, also without chemical stimuli. Finally, these cells grew nicely in 10% FBS, and no benefits were produced by substitution with swine serum. Conclusions Swine buccal fat pad contains progenitor cells with mesenchymal features, and they also osteo-differentiate nicely in association with synthetic supports. We suggest that porcine BFP-ASCs may be applied in preclinical studies of periodontal and bone-defect regeneration. PMID:24330736

  8. Sibutramine in weight control: a dose-ranging, efficacy study.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, M; Rubio, A; Golik, A; Byrne, L; Scheinbaum, M L

    1991-09-01

    We tested the safety and efficacy of sibutramine, 5 and 20 mg, and placebo on weight loss. Medication was added to caloric restriction, behavior modification, and exercise in a parallel-group, double-blind clinical trial. Participants were 130% to 180% of ideal body weight and in good health. The study lasted 12 weeks over Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day. Weight loss during 8 weeks of study medication was: placebo, 1.4 +/- 2.1 kg (n = 19); 5 mg sibutramine, 2.9 +/- 2.3 kg (n = 18); and 20 mg sibutramine, 5.0 +/- 2.7 kg (n = 18) (p less than 0.05 sibutramine, 5 and 20 mg, versus placebo; p less than 0.05 sibutramine, 20 mg versus 5 mg). There is a significant dose-effect relationship. Five participants left the study before completion, all because of adverse events; placebo (one patient), 5 mg sibutramine (one patient), and 20 mg sibutramine (three patients). Sleep difficulties were noted by eight participants (20 mg sibutramine, seven patients; 5 mg, one patient; and placebo, no patients). Six of 21 participants receiving 20 mg complained of irritability, unusual impatience, or "excitation." Sibutramine, 5 and 20 mg, added to a multimodal program assisted participants in losing weight. PMID:1914367

  9. Comparative Effectiveness of 3-Dimensional vs 2-Dimensional and High-Definition vs Standard-Definition Neuroendoscopy: A Preclinical Randomized Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Cundy, Thomas P.; Di Marco, Aimee; Pratt, Philip; Nandi, Dipankar; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the potential benefits of 3-dimensional (3-D) vs 2-dimensional (2-D) and high-definition (HD) vs standard-definition (SD) endoscopic visualization have long been recognized in other surgical fields, such endoscopes are generally considered too large and bulky for use within the brain. The recent development of 3-D and HD neuroendoscopes may therefore herald improved depth perception, better appreciation of anatomic details, and improved overall surgical performance. OBJECTIVE: To compare simultaneously the effectiveness of 3-D vs 2-D and HD vs SD neuroendoscopy. METHODS: Ten novice neuroendoscopic surgeons were recruited from a university hospital. A preclinical randomized crossover study design was adopted to compare 3-D vs 2-D and HD vs SD neuroendoscopy. The primary outcomes were time to task completion and accuracy. The secondary outcomes were perceived task workload using the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Task Load Index and subjective impressions of the endoscopes using a 5-point Likert scale. RESULTS: Time to task completion was significantly shorter when using the 3-D vs the 2-D neuroendoscopy (P = .001), and accuracy of probe placement was significantly greater when using the HD vs the SD neuroendoscopy (P = .009). We found that 3-D endoscopy significantly improved perceived depth perception (P < .001), HD endoscopy significantly improved perceived image quality (P < .001), and both improved participants’ overall impression (P < .001). CONCLUSION: Three-dimensional neuroendoscopy and HD neuroendoscopy have differing but complementary effects on surgical performance, suggesting that neither alone can completely compensate for the lack of the other. There is therefore strong preclinical evidence to justify 3-D HD neuroendoscopy. ABBREVIATIONS: HD, high definition SD, standard definition PMID:24220007

  10. Evaluation of the clinical relevance and limitations of current pre-clinical models of peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Smriti Murali; Omer, Safraz Mohamed; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) usually results from atherosclerosis and associated thrombosis and limits blood supply to the lower limbs. Common presenting symptoms include intermittent claudication (IC), rest pain and tissue loss. When limb viability is threatened, known as critical limb ischaemia (CLI), surgical and endovascular interventions are frequently undertaken; however, these are not always successful and ultimately major amputation may be required. There is significant interest in developing new therapeutic approaches to manage PAD which can be applied to patients unlikely to benefit from interventional approaches. Many of the therapeutic agents successful in inducing angiogenesis and arteriogenesis in pre-clinical animal models of PAD have failed to have efficacy in human randomized control trials. One possible reason for this inability to translate findings to patients could be the type of pre-clinical animal models used. In the present review, we describe currently available pre-clinical models of PAD and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the available models. A detailed assessment of the currently available pre-clinical animal models shows major limitations such as variability in the surgical procedure used to induce limb ischaemia, variability in the strains of rodents used, lack of risk factors incorporated into the model and lack of standardized functional outcomes. The most commonly used outcome assessments in studies within pre-clinical models differ from those employed in clinical trials within PAD patients. Most current pre-clinical models are designed to produce acute ischaemia which leads to muscle necrosis and inflammation. Patients, however, most commonly present with chronic ischaemia suggesting that more representative models are needed to evaluate therapeutic modalities that can be potentially translated to clinical practice. PMID:26678170

  11. Characterization of Novel PI3K? Inhibitors as Potential Therapeutics for SLE and Lupus Nephritis in Pre-Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Haselmayer, Philipp; Camps, Montserrat; Muzerelle, Mathilde; El Bawab, Samer; Waltzinger, Caroline; Bruns, Lisa; Abla, Nada; Polokoff, Mark A.; Jond-Necand, Carole; Gaudet, Marilène; Benoit, Audrey; Bertschy Meier, Dominique; Martin, Catherine; Gretener, Denise; Lombardi, Maria Stella; Grenningloh, Roland; Ladel, Christoph; Petersen, Jørgen Søberg; Gaillard, Pascale; Ji, Hong

    2014-01-01

    SLE is a complex autoimmune inflammatory disease characterized by pathogenic autoantibody production as a consequence of uncontrolled T–B cell activity and immune-complex deposition in various organs, including kidney, leading to tissue damage and function loss. There is a high unmet need for better treatment options other than corticosteroids and immunosuppressants. Phosphoinositol-3 kinase ? (PI3K?) is a promising target in this respect as it is essential in mediating B- and T-cell function in mouse and human. We report the identification of selective PI3K? inhibitors that blocked B-, T-, and plasmacytoid dendritic cell activities in human peripheral blood and in primary cell co-cultures (BioMAP®) without detecting signs of undesired toxicity. In an IFN?-accelerated mouse SLE model, our PI3K? inhibitors blocked nephritis development, whether administered at the onset of autoantibody appearance or the onset of proteinuria. Disease amelioration correlated with normalized immune cell numbers in the spleen, reduced immune-complex deposition as well as reduced inflammation, fibrosis, and tissue damage in the kidney. Improvements were similar to those achieved with a frequently prescribed drug for lupus nephritis, the potent immunosuppressant mycophenolate mofetil. Finally, we established a pharmacodynamics/pharmacokinetic/efficacy model that revealed that a sustained PI3K? inhibition of 50% is sufficient to achieve full efficacy in our disease model. These data demonstrate the therapeutic potential of PI3K? inhibitors in SLE and lupus nephritis. PMID:24904582

  12. Characterization of Novel PI3K? Inhibitors as Potential Therapeutics for SLE and Lupus Nephritis in Pre-Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Haselmayer, Philipp; Camps, Montserrat; Muzerelle, Mathilde; El Bawab, Samer; Waltzinger, Caroline; Bruns, Lisa; Abla, Nada; Polokoff, Mark A; Jond-Necand, Carole; Gaudet, Marilène; Benoit, Audrey; Bertschy Meier, Dominique; Martin, Catherine; Gretener, Denise; Lombardi, Maria Stella; Grenningloh, Roland; Ladel, Christoph; Petersen, Jørgen Søberg; Gaillard, Pascale; Ji, Hong

    2014-01-01

    SLE is a complex autoimmune inflammatory disease characterized by pathogenic autoantibody production as a consequence of uncontrolled T-B cell activity and immune-complex deposition in various organs, including kidney, leading to tissue damage and function loss. There is a high unmet need for better treatment options other than corticosteroids and immunosuppressants. Phosphoinositol-3 kinase ? (PI3K?) is a promising target in this respect as it is essential in mediating B- and T-cell function in mouse and human. We report the identification of selective PI3K? inhibitors that blocked B-, T-, and plasmacytoid dendritic cell activities in human peripheral blood and in primary cell co-cultures (BioMAP(®)) without detecting signs of undesired toxicity. In an IFN?-accelerated mouse SLE model, our PI3K? inhibitors blocked nephritis development, whether administered at the onset of autoantibody appearance or the onset of proteinuria. Disease amelioration correlated with normalized immune cell numbers in the spleen, reduced immune-complex deposition as well as reduced inflammation, fibrosis, and tissue damage in the kidney. Improvements were similar to those achieved with a frequently prescribed drug for lupus nephritis, the potent immunosuppressant mycophenolate mofetil. Finally, we established a pharmacodynamics/pharmacokinetic/efficacy model that revealed that a sustained PI3K? inhibition of 50% is sufficient to achieve full efficacy in our disease model. These data demonstrate the therapeutic potential of PI3K? inhibitors in SLE and lupus nephritis. PMID:24904582

  13. A Study of Efficacy and Professional Development among Alternatively-Certified Teachers in Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, Carlyn

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive and comparative study was to investigate the self-assessed efficacy levels of alternatively-certified teachers in Arizona. More specifically, this study examined the teachers' perceived ability to influence student learning and the extent to which, if at all, their self-reported efficacy levels differed based on the…

  14. Clinical Self-Efficacy in Senior Nursing Students: A Mixed- Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdal, Marzieh; Masoudi Alavi, Negin; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical education has a basic role in nursing education, and effective clinical training establishes a sense of clinical self-efficacy in senior nursing students. Self-efficacy is a key component for acting independently in the nursing profession. Objectives: This study was designed to outline senior nursing students’ views about clinical self-efficacy and to determine its level in nursing students. Patients and Methods: A mixed-methods approach, including a quantitative cross-sectional study and qualitative content analysis,was used in this study. Participants were senior nursing students who were in their two last semesters. During the initial quantitative stage, all students in the 7th and 8th semesters of the nursing major were invited to participate. They were asked to complete the Nursing Clinical Self-Efficacy Scale (NCSES) and, during the subsequent qualitative stage, the 14 students in the 7th and 8th semesters were asked to participate in semi-structured interviews. Results: In the quantitative part, 58 students completed the self-efficacy questionnaire; the mean score was 219.28 ± 35.8, which showed moderate self-efficacy in students. Self-efficacy was different across skills. In the qualitative part, the 355 open codes that were extracted from the interviews were clustered to 12 categories and 3 themes. The main themes included the factors related to self-efficacy, outcomes of self-efficacy, and ways to improve self-efficacy. Conclusions: Students had moderate self-efficacy. Several factors such as environment, nursing colleagues, and clinical educators could influence the creation of clinical self-efficacy in nursing students. PMID:26576443

  15. Impact of Simulation and Clinical Experience on Self-efficacy in Nursing Students: Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Kimhi, Einat; Reishtein, Judith L; Cohen, Miri; Friger, Michael; Hurvitz, Nancy; Avraham, Rinat

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effect of simulation and clinical experience timing on self-confidence/self-efficacy for the nursing process. Using a randomized, double-crossover design, self-efficacy was measured 3 times. Although self-efficacy was significantly higher at time 1 for students who had clinical experience, there was no difference between the groups at the end of the course (time 2). Thus, simulation increased self-confidence/self-efficacy equivalently if placed either before or after clinical experience. PMID:26218009

  16. Reform in teaching preclinical pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Yu; Li, Kun; Yao, Hong; Xu, Xiao-Juan; Cai, Qiao-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Pathophysiology is a scientific discipline that studies the onset and progression of pathological conditions and diseases, and pathophysiology is one of the core courses in most preclinical medical curricula. In China, most medical schools house a Department of Pathophysiology, in contrast to medical schools in many developed countries. The staff in Chinese Departments of Pathophysiology generally consists of full-time instructors or lecturers who teach medical students. These lecturers are sometimes lacking in clinic knowledge and experiences. To overcome this, in recent years, we have been trying to bring new trends in teaching pathophysiology into our curriculum. Our purpose in writing this article was to share our experiences with our colleagues and peers worldwide in the hope that the insights we have gained in pathophysiology teaching will be of some value to educators who advocate teaching reform in medical schools. PMID:26628645

  17. Organizational Structure, Collegial Trust, and College Faculty Teaching Efficacy: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okpogba, Desmond

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-method study was to explore the relationship between faculty self-efficacy, organizational structure, and collegial trust. The concepts of teacher self-efficacy, organizational structure, and collegial trust were used to investigate any possible empirical relationships existing between these variables in a private,…

  18. Gender, Group Composition, Cooperation, and Self-Efficacy in Computer Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Tor

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study of Norwegian college students that investigated whether gender, group composition, or self-efficacy in computing has any impact on cooperation, giving or getting task-related help, and level of activity in student groups. Results confirms gender differences in self-efficacy in computing. (Author/LRW)

  19. Using Mathematics in Teaching Science Self-Efficacy Scale--UMSSS: A Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Can, Bilge Taskin; Gunhan, Berna Canturk; Erdal, Sevinc Ongel

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an instrument, Using Mathematics in Science Self-efficacy Scale (UMSSS), was developed in order to determine preservice science teachers' self-efficacy toward the use of mathematics in their lessons. Data gathered from 250 preservice science teachers were used for Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis…

  20. A Qualitative Case Study Exploring Self-Efficacy and Its Influence on Fourth Grade Mathematics Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prindle, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    The perception of higher self-efficacy in young children has been determined to be a better predictor of intellectual and academic performance than simply the acquisition of skills alone. This empirical qualitative single-case study was conducted in order to explore the influence of self-efficacy instruction on perceptions toward and achievement…

  1. Education for Sustainability: A Case Study of Preservice Primary Teachers' Knowledge and Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Effeney, Gerard; Davis, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between knowledge and efficacy for teaching sustainability in a sample of 266 pre-service primary teachers at a large, metropolitan university in Australia. A survey gathered information about the participant's attitudes and self-efficacy for education for sustainability, along with their perceived…

  2. A Confirmatory Study of Rating Scale Category Effectiveness for the Coaching Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2008-01-01

    This study extended validity evidence for measures of coaching efficacy derived from the Coaching Efficacy Scale (CES) by testing the rating scale categorizations suggested in previous research. Previous research provided evidence for the effectiveness of a four-category (4-CAT) structure for high school and collegiate sports coaches; it also…

  3. Emotional Intelligence and Teacher Efficacy: A Study of Turkish EFL Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocoglu, Zeynep

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between emotional intelligence and teacher efficacy among 90 English language pre-service teachers from a university in Turkey. Data sources included Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk-Hoy's Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale and Reuven Bar-On's Emotional Quotient Inventory. The findings indicated that Turkish EFL…

  4. Ultrasound guided fluorescence molecular tomography with improved quantification by an attenuation compensated born-normalization and in vivo preclinical study of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Baoqiang; Berti, Romain; Abran, Maxime; Lesage, Frédéric; Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Quebec H1T 1C8

    2014-05-15

    Ultrasound imaging, having the advantages of low-cost and non-invasiveness over MRI and X-ray CT, was reported by several studies as an adequate complement to fluorescence molecular tomography with the perspective of improving localization and quantification of fluorescent molecular targets in vivo. Based on the previous work, an improved dual-modality Fluorescence-Ultrasound imaging system was developed and then validated in imaging study with preclinical tumor model. Ultrasound imaging and a profilometer were used to obtain the anatomical prior information and 3D surface, separately, to precisely extract the tissue boundary on both sides of sample in order to achieve improved fluorescence reconstruction. Furthermore, a pattern-based fluorescence reconstruction on the detection side was incorporated to enable dimensional reduction of the dataset while keeping the useful information for reconstruction. Due to its putative role in the current imaging geometry and the chosen reconstruction technique, we developed an attenuation compensated Born-normalization method to reduce the attenuation effects and cancel off experimental factors when collecting quantitative fluorescence datasets over large area. Results of both simulation and phantom study demonstrated that fluorescent targets could be recovered accurately and quantitatively using this reconstruction mechanism. Finally, in vivo experiment confirms that the imaging system associated with the proposed image reconstruction approach was able to extract both functional and anatomical information, thereby improving quantification and localization of molecular targets.

  5. Preclinical study of SZ2080 material 3D microstructured scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering made by femtosecond direct laser writing lithography.

    PubMed

    Ma?iulaitis, Justinas; Deveikyt?, Milda; Rekštyt?, Sima; Bratchikov, Maksim; Darinskas, Adas; Šimbelyt?, Agn?; Daunoras, Gintaras; Laurinavi?ien?, Aida; Laurinavi?ius, Arvydas; Gudas, Rimtautas; Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Ma?iulaitis, Romaldas

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade DLW employing ultrafast pulsed lasers has become a well-established technique for the creation of custom-made free-form three-dimensional (3D) microscaffolds out of a variety of materials ranging from proteins to biocompatible glasses. Its potential applications for manufacturing a patient's specific scaffold seem unlimited in terms of spatial resolution and geometry complexity. However, despite few exceptions in which live cells or primitive organisms were encapsulated into a polymer matrix, no demonstration of an in vivo study case of scaffolds generated with the use of such a method was performed. Here, we report a preclinical study of 3D artificial microstructured scaffolds out of hybrid organic-inorganic (HOI) material SZ2080 fabricated using the DLW technique. The created 2.1 × 2.1 × 0.21 mm(3) membrane constructs are tested both in vitro by growing isolated allogeneic rabbit chondrocytes (Cho) and in vivo by implanting them into rabbit organisms for one, three and six months. An ex vivo histological examination shows that certain pore geometry and the pre-growing of Cho prior to implantation significantly improves the performance of the created 3D scaffolds. The achieved biocompatibility is comparable to the commercially available collagen membranes. The successful outcome of this study supports the idea that hexagonal-pore-shaped HOI microstructured scaffolds in combination with Cho seeding may be successfully implemented for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25797444

  6. Children's Self-Efficacy Scale: Initial Psychometric Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinelli, Selma de Cassia; Bartholomeu, Daniel; Caliatto, Susana Gakyia; Sassi, Adriana de Grecci

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development of a self-efficacy measure for elementary school children. A sample of 514 children, ages 8 to 11, enrolled in Grades 2 to 4 of public schools in Brazil was investigated. The scale included 78 descriptive items about academic situations, in which the child was required to respond on a 5-point scale, the…

  7. A rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS assay for the quantitation of deacetyl mycoepoxydiene in rat plasma with application to preclinical pharmacokinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanhui; Xu, Jiangbo; Xu, Jiaxing; Huang, Yaojian; Shen, Yuemao; Liu, ZhaoPing

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a high-performance liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for analysis of the deacetyl mycoepoxydiene in rat plasma. The analyte and internal standard (I.S.), benorilate, were extracted from rat plasma by precipitation protein and separated on a C(18) column using acetonitrile-0.5% formic acid as mobile phase. Detection was performed using a turbo-spray ionization source and mass spectrometric positive multi-reaction-monitoring-mode (+MRM) at an ion voltage of +4800 V. The assay was linear over the concentration range 5-5000 ng/mL with the lowest limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 5 ng/mL. The method also afforded satisfactory results in terms of the sensitivity, specificity, precision (intra- and inter-day, RSD<5.8%), accuracy, recovery as well as the stability of the analyte under various conditions. The method was successfully applied to a preclinical pharmacokinetic study in rats after a single intravenous administration of deacetyl mycoepoxydiene 10 mg/kg. PMID:22169059

  8. Discovery of a selective small-molecule melanocortin-4 receptor agonist with efficacy in a pilot study of sexual dysfunction in humans.

    PubMed

    Lansdell, Mark I; Hepworth, David; Calabrese, Andrew; Brown, Alan D; Blagg, Julian; Burring, Denise J; Wilson, Peter; Fradet, David; Brown, T Bruce; Quinton, Faye; Mistry, Neela; Tang, Kim; Mount, Natalie; Stacey, Peter; Edmunds, Nick; Adams, Cathryn; Gaboardi, Samantha; Neal-Morgan, Stevie; Wayman, Chris; Cole, Susan; Phipps, Joanne; Lewis, Mark; Verrier, Hugh; Gillon, Val; Feeder, Neil; Heatherington, Anne; Sultana, Stefan; Haughie, Scott; Martin, Steven W; Sudworth, Maria; Tweedy, Sarah

    2010-04-22

    The relevance of the melanocortin system to sexual activity is well established, and nonselective peptide agonists of the melanocortin receptors have shown evidence of efficacy in human sexual dysfunction. The role of the MC4 receptor subtype has received particular scrutiny, but the sufficiency of its selective activation in potentiating sexual response has remained uncertain owing to conflicting data from studies in preclinical species. We describe here the discovery of a novel series of small-molecule MC4 receptor agonists derived from library hit 2. The addition of methyl substituents at C3 and C5 of the 4-phenylpiperidin-4-ol ring was found to be markedly potency-enhancing, enabling the combination of low nanomolar potencies with full rule-of-five compliance. In general, the series shows only micromolar activity at other melanocortin receptors. Our preferred compound 40a provided significant systemic exposure in humans on both sublingual and oral administration and was safe and well tolerated up to the maximum tested dose. In a pilot clinical study of male erectile dysfunction, the highest dose of 40a tested (200 mg) provided a similar level of efficacy to sildenafil. PMID:20329799

  9. Electronic Cigarettes Efficacy and Safety at 12 Months: Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Maria; La Vecchia, Carlo; Marzuillo, Carolina; Gualano, Maria Rosaria; Liguori, Giorgio; Cicolini, Giancarlo; Capasso, Lorenzo; D'Amario, Claudio; Boccia, Stefania; Siliquini, Roberta; Ricciardi, Walter; Villari, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy as a tool of smoking cessation of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), directly comparing users of e-cigarettes only, smokers of tobacco cigarettes only, and smokers of both. Design Prospective cohort study. Final results are expected in 2019, but given the urgency of data to support policies on electronic smoking, we report the results of the 12-month follow-up. Data Sources Direct contact and structured questionnaires by phone or via internet. Methods Adults (30–75 years) were included if they were smokers of ?1 tobacco cigarette/day (tobacco smokers), users of any type of e-cigarettes, inhaling ?50 puffs weekly (e-smokers), or smokers of both tobacco and e-cigarettes (dual smokers). Carbon monoxide levels were tested in a sample of those declaring tobacco smoking abstinence. Main Outcome Measures Sustained smoking abstinence from tobacco smoking at 12 months, reduction in the number of tobacco cigarettes smoked daily. Data Synthesis We used linear and logistic regression, with region as cluster unit. Results Follow-up data were available for 236 e-smokers, 491 tobacco smokers, and 232 dual smokers (overall response rate 70.8%). All e-smokers were tobacco ex-smokers. At 12 months, 61.9% of the e-smokers were still abstinent from tobacco smoking; 20.6% of the tobacco smokers and 22.0% of the dual smokers achieved tobacco abstinence. Adjusting for potential confounders, tobacco smoking abstinence or cessation remained significantly more likely among e-smokers (adjusted OR 5.19; 95% CI: 3.35–8.02), whereas adding e-cigarettes to tobacco smoking did not enhance the likelihood of quitting tobacco and did not reduce tobacco cigarette consumption. E-smokers showed a minimal but significantly higher increase in self-rated health than other smokers. Non significant differences were found in self-reported serious adverse events (eleven overall). Conclusions Adding e-cigarettes to tobacco smoking did not facilitate smoking cessation or reduction. If e-cigarette safety will be confirmed, however, the use of e-cigarettes alone may facilitate quitters remaining so. Registration Number NCT01785537. PMID:26061661

  10. Autofluorescence imaging device for real-time detection and tracking of pathogenic bacteria in a mouse skin wound model: preclinical feasibility studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yichao Charlie; Kulbatski, Iris; Medeiros, Philip J.; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; Xu, Lizhen; Chen, Yonghong; DaCosta, Ralph S.

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infection significantly impedes wound healing. Clinical diagnosis of wound infections is subjective and suboptimal, in part because bacteria are invisible to the naked eye during clinical examination. Moreover, bacterial infection can be present in asymptomatic patients, leading to missed opportunities for diagnosis and treatment. We developed a prototype handheld autofluorescence (AF) imaging device (Portable Real-time Optical Detection, Identification and Guidance for Intervention-PRODIGI) to noninvasively visualize and measure bacterial load in wounds in real time. We conducted preclinical pilot studies in an established nude mouse skin wound model inoculated with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. We tested the feasibility of longitudinal AF imaging for in vivo visualization of bacterial load in skin wounds, validated by bioluminescence imaging. We showed that bacteria (S. aureus), occult to standard examination, can be visualized in wounds using PRODIGI. We also detected quantitative changes in wound bacterial load over time based on the antibiotic treatment and the correlation of bacterial AF intensity with bacterial load. AF imaging of wounds offers a safe, noninvasive method for visualizing the presence, location, and extent of bacteria as well as measuring relative changes in bacterial load in wounds in real time.

  11. Preclinical Dose-Finding Study With a Liver-Tropic, Recombinant AAV-2/8 Vector in the Mouse Model of Galactosialidosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Huimin; Gomero, Elida; Bonten, Erik; Gray, John T; Allay, Jim; Wu, Yanan; Wu, Jianrong; Calabrese, Christopher; Nienhuis, Arthur; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Galactosialidosis (GS) is a lysosomal storage disease linked to deficiency of the protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). Similarly to GS patients, Ppca-null mice develop a systemic disease of the reticuloendothelial system, affecting most visceral organs and the nervous system. Symptoms include severe nephropathy, visceromegaly, infertility, progressive ataxia, and shortened life span. Here, we have conducted a preclinical, dose-finding study on a large cohort of GS mice injected intravenously at 1 month of age with increasing doses of a GMP-grade rAAV2/8 vector, expressing PPCA under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Treated mice, monitored for 16 weeks post-treatment, had normal physical appearance and behavior without discernable side effects. Despite the restricted expression of the transgene in the liver, immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses of other systemic organs, serum, and urine showed a dose-dependent, widespread correction of the disease phenotype, suggestive of a protein-mediated mechanism of cross-correction. A notable finding was that rAAV-treated GS mice showed high expression of PPCA in the reproductive organs, which resulted in reversal of their infertility. Together these results support the use of this rAAV-PPCA vector as a viable and safe method of gene delivery for the treatment of systemic disease in non-neuropathic GS patients. PMID:22008912

  12. Preclinical Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Properties of Cardiac Adipose Tissue Progenitor Cells Using Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Direct Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Perea-Gil, Isaac; Monguió-Tortajada, Marta; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Borràs, Francesc E.; Roura, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based strategies to regenerate injured myocardial tissue have emerged over the past decade, but the optimum cell type is still under scrutiny. In this context, human adult epicardial fat surrounding the heart has been characterized as a reservoir of mesenchymal-like progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs) with potential clinical benefits. However, additional data on the possibility that these cells could trigger a deleterious immune response following implantation are needed. Thus, in the presented study, we took advantage of the well-established low immunogenicity of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to comparatively assess the immunomodulatory properties of cardiac ATDPCs in an in vitro allostimulatory assay using allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). Similar to UCBMSCs, increasing amounts of seeded cardiac ATDPCs suppressed the alloproliferation of T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6, TNF?, and IFN?) was also specifically modulated by the different numbers of cardiac ATDPCs cocultured. In summary, we show that cardiac ATDPCs abrogate T cell alloproliferation upon stimulation with allogeneic mature MDDCs, suggesting that they could further regulate a possible harmful immune response in vivo. Additionally, UCBMSCs can be considered as valuable tools to preclinically predict the immunogenicity of prospective regenerative cells. PMID:25861626

  13. Preclinical Study of Novel Gene Silencer Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamide Targeting Human TGF-?1 Promoter for Hypertrophic Scars in a Common Marmoset Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Jun; Fukuda, Noboru; Inoue, Takashi; Nakai, Shigeki; Saito, Kosuke; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Nagase, Hiroki; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Itoh, Toshio; Soma, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report a preclinical study of a pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide that targets the human transforming growth factor (hTGF)-?1 gene as a novel transcriptional gene silencer in a common marmoset primate model. We designed and then synthesized PI polyamides to target the hTGF-?1 promoter. We examined effects of seven PI polyamides (GB1101-1107) on the expression of hTGF-?1 mRNA stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in human vascular smooth muscle cells. GB1101, GB1105 and GB1106 significantly inhibited hTGF-?1 mRNA expression. We examined GB1101 as a PI polyamide to hTGF-?1 for hypertrophic scars in marmosets in vivo. Injection of GB1101 completely inhibited hypertrophic scar formation at 35 days post-incision and inhibited cellular infiltration, TGF-?1 and vimentin staining, and epidermal thickness. Mismatch polyamide did not affect hypertrophic scarring or histological changes. Epidermis was significantly thinner with GB1101 than with water and mismatch PI polyamides. We developed the PI polyamides for practical ointment medicines for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. FITC-labeled GB1101 with solbase most efficiently distributed in the nuclei of epidermal keratinocytes, completely suppressed hypertropic scarring at 42 days after incision, and considerably inhibited epidermal thickness and vimentin-positive fibroblasts. PI polyamides targeting hTGF-?1 promoter with solbase ointment will be practical medicines for treating hypertrophic scars after surgical operations and skin burns. PMID:25938472

  14. Relationship between Critical Thinking Skills and Success in Preclinical Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jane N.; Markert, Ronald J.

    1994-01-01

    A study of 92 medical students found that critical thinking skills, as measured by the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal, were moderately predictive of academic success during the preclinical years of medical education. (Author/MSE)

  15. The prevalence and consequences of burnout on a group of preclinical dental students

    PubMed Central

    Atalayin, Cigdem; Balkis, Murat; Tezel, Huseyin; Onal, Banu; Kayrak, Gul

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of burnout among a group of Turkish preclinical dental students, to compare the level of burnout and to determine the consequences in structural equation model. Materials and Methods: Preclinical dental students (n = 329, 50.5% of females and 49.5% of males) aged between 18 and 24 took part in the study. Maslach burnout inventory student version, academic satisfaction scale, and personal information sheet were used to gather data. Pearson correlation analyses, t-test, and one-way ANOVA were used for statistical analysis. The proposed theoretical model was tested via observed variable path analysis using maximum likelihood parameter estimation with AMOS 7.0. Results: About 22.3% of students had high level of emotional exhaustion, 16.7% of students had high level of cynicism, and 17.9% of students suffered from high level of reduced academic efficacy. While the students attending the first grade reported higher level of reduced academic efficacy, the students in the third grade reported higher level of emotional exhaustion. Academic workload played an important role in the development of burnout. As consequences of burnout, students with high levels of burnout intended to change their current major and did not to plan to continue to postgraduate education. Students with high level of burnout reported less level of academic satisfaction and academic achievement. Conclusions: Creating awareness on the burnout of dental students from the preclinical period may be useful for prevention and more compatible dental education environment. PMID:26430363

  16. The Exploration of Elementary School Teachers' Internet Self-Efficacy and Information Commitments: A Study in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Ying-Tien; Wang, Li-Jen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore teachers' Internet self-efficacy and information commitments. More importantly, this study also attempted to identify possible factors that affect the teachers' Internet self-efficacy. The participants were 301 elementary school teachers. In this study, the Internet Self-efficacy Survey (ISS) and the Information…

  17. Image-guided drug delivery: preclinical applications and clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Tarun; Rizzo, Larissa; Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2015-08-01

    Image-guided drug delivery refers to the combination of drug targeting and imaging. Preclinically, image-guided drug delivery can be used for several different purposes, including for monitoring biodistribution, target site accumulation, off-target localization, drug release and drug efficacy. Clinically, it holds significant potential for preselecting patients. In this editorial, we briefly summarize the main principles of image-guided drug delivery, and we describe its potential for facilitating, furthering and personalizing nanomedicine treatments. PMID:26083469

  18. Image-guided Drug Delivery : Preclinical Applications and Clinical Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery refers to the combination of drug targeting and imaging. Preclinically, image-guided drug delivery can be used for several different purposes, e.g. for monitoring biodistribution, target site accumulation, off-target localization, drug release and drug efficacy. Clinically, it holds significant potential for preselecting patients. In this perspective, we briefly summarize the main principles of image-guided drug delivery, and we describe its potential for facilitating, furthering and personalizing nanomedicine treatments. PMID:26083469

  19. 21 CFR 201.200 - Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising. 201.200 Section 201.200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  20. 77 FR 12310 - Drugs for Human Use; Drug Efficacy Study Implementation; Prescription Drugs That Contained...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-1978-N-0441] (formerly 78N-0324); DESI 10392] Drugs for Human Use; Drug Efficacy Study Implementation; Prescription...

  1. 77 FR 43337 - Drugs for Human Use; Drug Efficacy Study Implementation; Certain Prescription Drugs Offered for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket Nos. FDA-1975-N-0336...Hydrocortisone Acetate and Pramoxine Hydrochloride] Drugs for Human Use; Drug Efficacy Study Implementation; Certain...

  2. 21 CFR 201.200 - Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising. 201.200 Section 201.200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  3. 21 CFR 201.200 - Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising. 201.200 Section 201.200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  4. 21 CFR 201.200 - Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising. 201.200 Section 201.200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  5. 21 CFR 201.200 - Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising. 201.200 Section 201.200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  6. Methodological Standardization for the Preclinical Evaluation of Renal Sympathetic Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Sakakura, Kenichi; Ladich, Elena; Edelman, Elazer R.; Markham, Peter; Stanley, James R.L.; Keating, John; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Virmani, Renu; Joner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter ablation of renal autonomic nerves is a viable option for the treatment of resistent arterial hypertension; however, structured preclinical evaluation with standardization of analytical procedures remains a clear gap in this field. Here we discuss the topics relevant to the preclinical model for the evaluation of renal denervation (RDN) devices and report methodologies and criteria towards standardization of the safety and efficacy assessment, including histopathological evaluations of the renal artery, peri-arterial nerves, and associated peri-adventitial tissues. The preclinical swine renal artery model can be used effectively to assess both the safety and efficacy of RDN technologies. Assessment of the efficacy of RDN modalities primarily focuses on the determination of the depth of penetration of treatment-related injury (eg, necrosis) of the peri-arterial tissues and its relationship (ie, location and distance) and affect on the associated renal nerves and the correlation thereof with proxy biomarkers including renal norepinephrine concentrations and nerve-specific immunohistochemical stains (eg, tyrosine hydroxylase). The safety evaluation of RDN technologies involves assessing for adverse effects on tissues local to the site of treatment (ie, on the arterial wall) as well as tissues at a distance (eg, soft tissue, veins, arterial branches, skeletal muscle, adrenal gland, ureters). Increasing experience will help to create a standardized means of examining all arterial beds subject to ablative energy and in doing so enable us to proceed to optimize development and assessment of these emerging technologies. PMID:25240550

  7. Quantile Regression with a Change-point Model for Longitudinal Data: An Application to the Study of Cognitive Changes in Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenxi; Dowling, N. Maritza; Chappell, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Summary Progressive and insidious cognitive decline that interferes with daily life is the defining characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Epidemiological studies have found that the pathological process of AD begins years before a clinical diagnosis is made and can be highly variable within a given population. Characterizing cognitive decline in the preclinical phase of AD is critical for the development of early intervention strategies when disease-modifying therapies may be most effective. In the last decade, there has been an increased interest in the application of change-point models to longitudinal cognitive outcomes prior to and after diagnosis. Most of the proposed statistical methodology for describing decline relies upon distributional assumptions that may not hold. In this paper, we introduce a quantile regression with a change-point model for longitudinal data of cognitive function in persons bound to develop AD. A change-point in our model reflects the transition from the cognitive decline due to normal aging to the accelerated decline due to disease progression. Quantile regression avoids common distributional assumptions on cognitive outcomes and allows the covariate effects and the change-point to vary for different quantiles of the response. We provided an approach for estimating the model parameters, including the change-point, and presented inferential procedures based on the asymptotic properties of the estimators. A simulation study showed that the estimation and inferential procedures perform reasonably well in finite samples. The practical use of our model was illustrated by an application to longitudinal episodic memory outcomes from two cohort studies of aging and AD. PMID:25892034

  8. Teaching Induction: A Study on the Effectiveness of Induction Programs among Urban High School Teacher Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrey, Jason H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact that induction programs have on self-efficacy of new teachers in urban, Midwestern high schools. Because induction programs have been used to measure elements of new teacher self-efficacy, it remains important to study this topic, and explore the information in an urban setting where self-efficacy

  9. A Preclinical Murine Model of Hepatic Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Kevin C.; Foley, Kelly; Olino, Kelly; Leubner, Ashley; Mayo, Skye C.; Jain, Ajay; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Schulick, Richard D.; Yoshimura, Kiyoshi; Edil, Barish; Zheng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Numerous murine models have been developed to study human cancers and advance the understanding of cancer treatment and development. Here, a preclinical, murine pancreatic tumor model of hepatic metastases via a hemispleen injection of syngeneic murine pancreatic tumor cells is described. This model mimics many of the clinical conditions in patients with metastatic disease to the liver. Mice consistently develop metastases in the liver allowing for investigation of the metastatic process, experimental therapy testing, and tumor immunology research. PMID:25285458

  10. Safety data on 19 vehicles for use in 1?month oral rodent pre-clinical studies: administration of hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin causes renal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Healing, Guy; Sulemann, Tabassum; Cotton, Peter; Harris, Jayne; Hargreaves, Adam; Finney, Rowena; Kirk, Sarah; Schramm, Carolin; Garner, Clare; Pivette, Perrine; Burdett, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Potential new drugs are assessed in pre-clinical in vivo studies to determine their safety profiles. The drugs are formulated in vehicles suitable for the route of administration and the physicochemical properties of the drug, aiming to achieve optimal exposure in the test species. The availability of safety data on vehicles is often limited (incomplete data, access restricted/private databases). Nineteen potentially useful vehicles that contained new and/or increased concentrations of excipients and for which little safety data have been published were tested. Vehicles were dosed orally once daily to HanWistar rats for a minimum of 28?days and a wide range of toxicological parameters were assessed. Only 30% (w/v) hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin was found unsuitable owing to effects on liver enzymes (AST, ALT and GLDH), urinary volume and the kidneys (tubular vacuolation and tubular pigment). 20% (v/v) oleic acid caused increased salivation and hence this vehicle should be used with caution. As 40% (v/v) tetraethylene glycol affected urinary parameters, its use should be carefully considered, particularly for compounds suspected to impact the renal system and studies longer than 1?month. There were no toxicologically significant findings with 10% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide, 20% (v/v) propylene glycol, 33% (v/v) Miglyol®812, 20% (w/v) Kolliphor®RH40, 10% (w/v) Poloxamer 407, 5% (w/v) polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 or 10% (v/v) Labrafil®M1944. All other vehicles tested caused isolated or low magnitude effects which would not prevent their use. The aim of sharing these data, including adverse findings, is to provide meaningful information for vehicle selection, thereby avoiding repetition of animal experimentation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25959454

  11. Safety, Pharmacokinetic, and Efficacy Studies of Oral DB868 in a First Stage Vervet Monkey Model of Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Thuita, John K.; Wolf, Kristina K.; Murilla, Grace A.; Liu, Qiang; Mutuku, James N.; Chen, Yao; Bridges, Arlene S.; Mdachi, Raymond E.; Ismail, Mohamed A.; Ching, Shelley; Boykin, David W.; Hall, James Edwin; Tidwell, Richard R.; Paine, Mary F.; Brun, Reto; Wang, Michael Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    There are no oral drugs for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, sleeping sickness). A successful oral drug would have the potential to reduce or eliminate the need for patient hospitalization, thus reducing healthcare costs of HAT. The development of oral medications is a key objective of the Consortium for Parasitic Drug Development (CPDD). In this study, we investigated the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of a new orally administered CPDD diamidine prodrug, 2,5-bis[5-(N-methoxyamidino)-2-pyridyl]furan (DB868; CPD-007-10), in the vervet monkey model of first stage HAT. DB868 was well tolerated at a dose up to 30 mg/kg/day for 10 days, a cumulative dose of 300 mg/kg. Mean plasma levels of biomarkers indicative of liver injury (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase) were not significantly altered by drug administration. In addition, no kidney-mediated alterations in creatinine and urea concentrations were detected. Pharmacokinetic analysis of plasma confirmed that DB868 was orally available and was converted to the active compound DB829 in both uninfected and infected monkeys. Treatment of infected monkeys with DB868 began 7 days post-infection. In the infected monkeys, DB829 attained a median Cmax (dosing regimen) that was 12-fold (3 mg/kg/day for 7 days), 15-fold (10 mg/kg/day for 7 days), and 31-fold (20 mg/kg/day for 5 days) greater than the IC50 (14 nmol/L) against T. b. rhodesiense STIB900. DB868 cured all infected monkeys, even at the lowest dose tested. In conclusion, oral DB868 cured monkeys with first stage HAT at a cumulative dose 14-fold lower than the maximum tolerated dose and should be considered a lead preclinical candidate in efforts to develop a safe, short course (5–7 days), oral regimen for first stage HAT. PMID:23755309

  12. Development of an in vitro model for the simultaneous study of the efficacy and hematotoxicity of antileukemic compounds.

    PubMed

    Valeri, Antonio; Alonso-Ferrero, María Eugenia; Cerrato, Laura; Martínez, Sandra; Bueren, Juan A; Albella, Beatriz

    2010-12-15

    Hematopoietic system displays a wide spectrum of cell populations hierarchically organized in the bone marrow. Homeostasis in this system requires equilibrium between the self-renewal of the stem cells and their capacity of differentiation. Any failure on this equilibrium could lead to fatal consequences, such as the development of leukemia. Due to its rapid rate of renewal, hematopoietic tissue is a major target for antitumoral compounds and often becomes a dose limiting factor in the development of antineoplastics. Our aim was to develop an in vitro model for predicting the efficacy of antitumoral compounds on leukemic cells and their toxic effects on the healthy hematopoietic cells. The mouse myelomonocytic leukemia WEHI-3b was transduced with a lentiviral vector for expressing the green fluorescence protein. Mixed semisolid clonogenic cultures of transduced WEHI-3b and murine bone marrow cells were exposed to five pharmaceuticals: daunorubicin (positive control), atropine sulphate (negative control) and three in different stages of clinical development (trabectedin, Zalypsis(®) and PM01183). Colonies of leukemic cells were distinguishable from healthy CFU-GM under fluorescence microscope. The sensitivity of leukemic cells to daunorubicin, trabectedin, Zalypsis(®) and PM01183 was higher compared to healthy cells. The effect of a non-antitumoral compound, atropine sulphate, was the same on both populations. Our results show that this in vitro model is a valuable tool for studying the effect of antitumoral compounds in both tumoral and normal hematopoietic cells under the same toxic microenvironment and could safe time and facilitate the reduction of the number of animals used in preclinical development of pharmaceuticals. PMID:20883753

  13. Adjuvant anticholinesterase therapy for the management of epilepsy-induced memory deficit: a critical pre-clinical study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Awanish; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy is one of the major neurological disorders still awaiting safer drugs with improved antiepileptic effect and lesser side effects. Apart from epilepsy itself, AEDs also have been shown to induce cognitive impairment in patients with epilepsy. There are limited data for the treatment of this menace. As cholinergic approach has widely been practiced for the restoration of memory in various neurodegenerative disorders, this study was envisaged to evaluate add on effect of acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (tacrine) with phenytoin in pentylenetetrazole-kindling-induced learning and memory deficit in mice. In this study, mice were kindled using subconvulsive dose of pentylenetetrazole (35 mg/kg, i.p.; at interval of 48 ± 2 hr) and successfully kindled animals were divided into different groups and treated with vehicle, phenytoin and phenytoinin in combination with tacrine (0.3 mg/kg), atropine (1 mg/kg) and tacrine + atropine. Effect of different interventions on learning and memory was evaluated using elevated plus maze and passive shock avoidance on days 5, 10, 15 and 20. Phenytoin-treated kindled animals were associated with learning and memory deficit, while tacrine supplementation improved memory deficit with increased seizure severity score. Atropine treatment significantly reversed the protective effect of tacrine. Neurochemical findings also support the behavioural finding of the study. Our results suggest the use of anticholinesterases, with better seizure tolerance, for the management of cognitive impairment of epilepsy, as adjunct therapy. PMID:24890882

  14. Preclinical Evaluation of DMA, a Bisbenzimidazole, as Radioprotector: Toxicity, Pharmacokinetics, and Biodistribution Studies in Balb/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Nimesh, Hemlata; Tiwari, Vinod; Yang, Chunhua; Gundala, Sushma R; Chuttani, Krishna; Hazari, Puja P; Mishra, Anil K; Sharma, Abhisheak; Lal, Jawahar; Katyal, Anju; Aneja, Ritu; Tandon, Vibha

    2015-10-01

    Radiotherapy, a therapeutic modality of cancer treatment, nonselectively damages normal tissues as well as tumor tissues. The search is ongoing for therapeutic agents that selectively reduce radiation-induced normal tissue injury without reducing tumoricidal effect, thereby increasing the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy. Our laboratory established 5-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-2-[2'-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5'benzimidazolyl] benzimidazole (DMA) as noncytotoxic radioprotector in mammalian cells. DMA showed an excellent radioprotection in mice at single nontoxic oral dose by a dose-reduction factor of 1.28. An oxygen radical absorbing capacity assay confirmed its free-radical quenching ability. Single bolus dose and 28-days of repeated administration of DMA in mice for toxicity studies determined an LD50 of >2000 mg/kg body weight (bw) and 225 mg/kg bw, respectively, suggesting DMA is safe. Histopathology, biochemical parameters, and relative organ weight analysis revealed insignificant changes in the DMA-treated animals. The pharmacokinetic study of DMA at oral and intravenous doses showed its C(max) = 1 hour, bioavailability of 8.84%, elimination half-life of 4 hours, and an enterohepatic recirculation. Biodistribution study in mice with Ehrlich ascites tumors showed that (99m)Tc-DMA achieved its highest concentration in 1 hour and was retained up to 4 hours in the lungs, liver, kidneys, and spleen, and in a low concentration in the tumor, a solicited property of any radioprotector to protect normal cells over cancerous cells. We observed that the single-dose treatment of tumor-bearing mice with DMA 2 hours before 8 Gy total body irradiation showed an impressive rescue of radiation-induced morbidity in terms of weight loss and mortality without a change in tumor response. PMID:26240287

  15. Development of Allogeneic NK Cell Adoptive Transfer Therapy in Metastatic Melanoma Patients: In Vitro Preclinical Optimization Studies

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Michal J.; Shoham, Tsipi; Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Zabari, Naama; Ortenberg, Rona; Yakirevitch, Arkadi; Nagler, Arnon; Loewenthal, Ron; Schachter, Jacob; Markel, Gal

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have long been considered as potential agents for adoptive cell therapy for solid cancer patients. Until today most studies utilized autologous NK cells and yielded disappointing results. Here we analyze various modular strategies to employ allogeneic NK cells for adoptive cell transfer, including donor-recipient HLA-C mismatching, selective activation and induction of melanoma-recognizing lysis receptors, and co-administration of antibodies to elicit antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC). We show that NK cell activation and induction of the relevant lysis receptors, as well as co-administration of antibodies yield substantial anti-cancer effects, which are functionally superior to HLA-C mismatching. Combination of the various strategies yielded improved effects. In addition, we developed various clinically-compatible ex vivo expansion protocols that were optimized according to fold expansion, purity and expression of lysis receptors. The main advantages of employing allogeneic NK cells are accessibility, the ability to use a single donor for many patients, combination with various strategies associated with the mechanism of action, e.g. antibodies and specific activation, as well as donor selection according to HLA or CD16 genotypes. This study rationalizes a clinical trial that combines adoptive transfer of highly potent allogeneic NK cells and antibody therapy. PMID:23483943

  16. A Novel Pre-Clinical Murine Model to Study the Life Cycle and Progression of Cervical and Anal Papillomavirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn R.; Balogh, Karla K.; Cooper, Timothy K.; Hu, Jiafen; Christensen, Neil D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Papillomavirus disease and associated cancers remain a significant health burden in much of the world. The current protective vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix, are expensive and not readily available to the underprivileged. In addition, the vaccines have not gained wide acceptance in the United States nor do they provide therapeutic value. Papillomaviruses are strictly species specific and thus human viruses cannot be studied in an animal host. An appropriate model for mucosal disease has long been sought. We chose to investigate whether the newly discovered mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1, could infect mucosal tissues in Foxn1nu/Foxn1nu mice. Methods The vaginal and anal canals of Foxn1nu/Foxn1nu mice were gently abraded using Nonoxynol-9 and “Doctor’s BrushPicks” and MmuPV1 was delivered into the vaginal tract or the anal canal. Results Productive vaginal, cervical and anal infections developed in all mice. Vaginal/cervical infections could be monitored by vaginal lavage. Dysplasias were evident in all animals. Conclusions Anogenital tissues of a common laboratory mouse can be infected with a papillomavirus unique to that animal. This observation will pave the way for fundamental virological and immunological studies that have been challenging to carry out heretofore due to lack of a suitable model system. PMID:25803616

  17. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxygglucose-guided breast cancer surgery with a positron-sensitive probe: Validation in preclinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Raylman, R.R.; Fisher, S.J.; Brown, R.S.; Ethier, S.P.; Wahl, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, the feasibility of utilizing 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) in conjunction with a positron-sensitive intraoperative probe to guide breast tumor excision was investigated. The probe was constructed with a plastic scintillator tip coupled to a photomultiplier tube with fiber optic cable. Anticipated resolution degradation was evaluated by measurement of line spread functions in the presence of background radiation. Realistic photon background distributions were simulated with a human torso phantom and a cardiac insert. The relationship between resolution and energy threshold was measured to find the optimal discriminator settings. In addition, probe sensitivity as a function of energy threshold was determined for various size-simulated tumors. Finally, the ability to localize breast cancers in vivo was tested in a rodent model. Mammary rat tumors implanted in Lewis rats were examined after injection with FDG; these results were correlated with those of histologic analyses. Measurements of line spread functions indicated that resolution could be maximized in a realistic background photon environment by increasing the energy threshold to levels at or above the Compton continuum edge (340 keV). At this setting, the probe`s sensitivity was determined to be 58 and 11 cps/{mu}Ci for 3.18- and 6.35-mm diameter simulated tumors, respectively. Probe readings correlated well with histologic results; the probe was generally able to discriminate between tumor and normal tissue. This study indicates that breast cancer surgery guided by a positron-sensitive probe warrants future evaluation in breast-conserving surgery of patients with breast cancer. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Resilience to the effects of social stress: evidence from clinical and preclinical studies on the role of coping strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Susan K.; Bhatnagar, Seema

    2014-01-01

    The most common form of stress encountered by people stems from one’s social environment and is perceived as more intense than other types of stressors. One feature that may be related to differential resilience or vulnerability to stress is the type of strategy used to cope with the stressor, either active or passive coping. This review focuses on models of social stress in which individual differences in coping strategies produce resilience or vulnerability to the effects of stress. Neurobiological mechanisms underlying these individual differences are discussed. Overall, the literature suggests that there are multiple neural mechanisms that underlie individual differences in stress-induced resilience and vulnerability. How these mechanisms interact with one another to produce a resilient or vulnerable phenotype is not understood and such mechanisms have been poorly studied in females and in early developmental periods. Finally, we propose that resilience may be stress context specific and resilience phenotypes may need to be fine-tuned to suit a shifting environment. PMID:25580450

  19. Recruitment for an efficacy study in chemoprevention--the Concerned Smoker Study.

    PubMed

    Arnold, A; Johnstone, B; Stoskopf, B; Skingley, P; Browman, G; Levine, M; Hryniuk, W

    1989-09-01

    Efficacy studies are important for the development of long-term cancer prevention strategies. Recruitment aims for a highly motivated group of participants. The Concerned Smoker Study is aimed at smokers with at least a 15 pack-year history and bronchial atypia on sputum sampling Recruitment has been primarily through use of the media. During the first year of randomization 905 potential participants expressed interest. Of these, 80 were eventually randomized. With over 60 participants having completed the study only one has defaulted and compliance with the study protocol has been high. Participants became aware of the study through the following sources: daily newspaper 36.6%, weekly newspaper 16.2%, television 14.9%, radio 13.8%, community television 1.3%, other sources 13.3%. Over 90% of potential participants who initially express interest in such a chemoprevention project may not ultimately be suitable. The population chosen for such studies may not be very representative of the more general population; however, a high degree of compliance can be obtained which will provide valuable information on treatment efficacy. PMID:2694164

  20. A Cross-Sectional Study of Engineering Students' Self-Efficacy by Gender, Ethnicity, Year, and Transfer Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Concannon, James P.; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2009-01-01

    This is a cross-sectional study of 519 undergraduate engineering majors' self-efficacy beliefs at a large, research extensive, Midwestern university. Engineering self-efficacy is an individual's belief in his or her ability to successfully negotiate the academic hurdles of the engineering program. Engineering self-efficacy was obtained from four…

  1. Preclinical assessment of infant formula.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Infant formulas are the sole or predominant source of nutrition for many infants and are fed during a sensitive period of development and may therefore have short- and long-term consequences for infant health. Preclinical safety assessment therefore needs to include both short-term and long-term studies in animals. It is recommended that procedures are instituted by which experts may serve as independent scientists for companies developing novel products, without having their integrity compromised, and later serve the legislative institutions. A two-level assessment approach to determine the potential toxicity of a novel ingredient, its metabolites, and their effects in the matrix on developing organ systems has been suggested by IOM. This appears reasonable, as novel ingredients can be of different levels of concern. The use of modern methods in genomics and proteomics should be considered in these evaluation processes as well as novel methods to evaluate outcomes, including metabolomics and molecular techniques to assess the microbiome. PMID:22699767

  2. A Novel Inherently Radiopaque Bead for Transarterial Embolization to Treat Liver Cancer - A Pre-clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Rafael; Sharma, Karun; Dreher, Matthew R.; Ashrafi, Koorosh; Mirpour, Sahar; Lin, MingDe; Schernthaner, Ruediger E.; Schlachter, Todd R.; Tacher, Vania; Lewis, Andrew L.; Willis, Sean; den Hartog, Mark; Radaelli, Alessandro; Negussie, Ayele H.; Wood, Bradford J.; Geschwind, Jean-François H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Embolotherapy using microshperes is currently performed with soluble contrast to aid in visualization. However, administered payload visibility dimishes soon after delivery due to soluble contrast washout, leaving the radiolucent bead's location unknown. The objective of our study was to characterize inherently radiopaque beads (RO Beads) in terms of physicomechanical properties, deliverability and imaging visibility in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. Materials and Methods: RO Beads, which are based on LC Bead® platform, were compared to LC Bead. Bead size (light microscopy), equilibrium water content (EWC), density, X-ray attenuation and iodine distribution (micro-CT), suspension (settling times), deliverability and in vitro penetration were investigated. Fifteen rabbits were embolized with either LC Bead or RO Beads + soluble contrast (iodixanol-320), or RO Beads+dextrose. Appearance was evaluated with fluoroscopy, X-ray single shot, cone-beam CT (CBCT). Results: Both bead types had a similar size distribution. RO Beads had lower EWC (60-72%) and higher density (1.21-1.36 g/cc) with a homogeneous iodine distribution within the bead's interior. RO Beads suspension time was shorter than LC Bead, with durable suspension (>5 min) in 100% iodixanol. RO Beads ?300 µm were deliverable through a 2.3-Fr microcatheter. Both bead types showed similar penetration. Soluble contrast could identify target and non-target embolization on fluoroscopy during administration. However, the imaging appearance vanished quickly for LC Bead as contrast washed-out. RO Beads+contrast significantly increased visibility on X-ray single shot compared to LC Bead+contrast in target and non-target arteries (P=0.0043). Similarly, RO beads demonstrated better visibility on CBCT in target arteries (P=0.0238) with a trend in non-target arteries (P=0.0519). RO Beads+dextrose were not sufficiently visible to monitor embolization using fluoroscopy. Conclusion: RO Beads provide better conspicuity to determine target and non-target embolization compared to LC Bead which may improve intra-procedural monitoring and post-procedural evaluation of transarterial embolization. PMID:26722371

  3. SU-E-J-156: Preclinical Inverstigation of Dynamic Tumor Tracking Using Vero SBRT Linear Accelerator: Motion Phantom Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mamalui-Hunter, M; Wu, J; Li, Z; Su, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Following the ‘end-to-end testing’ paradigm of Dynamic Target Tracking option in our Image-Guided dedicated SBRT VeroTM linac, we verify the capability of the system to deliver planned dose to moving targets in the heterogeneous thorax phantom (CIRSTM). The system includes gimbaled C-band linac head, robotic 6 degree of freedom couch and a tumor tracking method based on predictive modeling of target position using fluoroscopically tracked implanted markers and optically tracked infrared reflecting external markers. Methods: 4DCT scan of the motion phantom with the VisicoilTM implanted marker in the close vicinity of the target was acquired, the ‘exhale’=most prevalent phase was used for planning (iPlan by BrainLabTM). Typical 3D conformal SBRT treatment plans aimed to deliver 6-8Gy/fx to two types of targets: a)solid water-equivalent target 3cm in diameter; b)single VisicoilTM marker inserted within lung equivalent material. The planning GTV/CTV-to-PTV margins were 2mm, the block margins were 3 mm. The dose calculated by MonteCarlo algorithm with 1% variance using option Dose-to-water was compared to the ion chamber (CC01 by IBA Dosimetry) measurements in case (a) and GafchromicTM EBT3 film measurements in case (b). During delivery, the target 6 motion patterns available as a standard on CIRSTM motion phantom were investigated: in case (a), the target was moving along the designated sine or cosine4 3D trajectory; in case (b), the inserted marker was moving sinusoidally in 1D. Results: The ion chamber measurements have shown the agreement with the planned dose within 1% under all the studied motion conditions. The film measurements show 98.1% agreement with the planar calculated dose (gamma criteria: 3%/3mm). Conclusion: We successfully verified the capability of the SBRT VeroTM linac to perform real-time tumor tracking and accurate dose delivery to the target, based on predictive modeling of the correlation between implanted marker motion and external surrogate of breathing motion.

  4. Preclinical evaluation of 89Zr-labeled anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody RG7356 in mice and cynomolgus monkeys: Prelude to Phase 1 clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Vugts, Danielle J; Heuveling, Derrek A; Stigter-van Walsum, Marijke; Weigand, Stefan; Bergstrom, Mats; van Dongen, Guus A M S; Nayak, Tapan K

    2014-01-01

    RG7356 is a humanized antibody targeting the constant region of CD44. RG7356 was radiolabeled with (89)Zr for preclinical evaluations in tumor xenograft-bearing mice and normal cynomolgus monkeys to enable study of its biodistribution and the role of CD44 expression on RG7356 uptake.   Studies with (89)Zr-RG7356 were performed in mice bearing tumor xenografts that differ in the level of CD44 expression (CD44(+) or CD44(-)) and RG7356 responsiveness (resp or non-resp): MDA-MB-231 (CD44(+), resp), PL45 (CD44(+), non-resp) and HepG2 (CD44(-), non-resp). Immuno-PET whole body biodistribution studies were performed in normal cynomolgus monkeys to determine normal organ uptake after administration of a single dose. At 1, 2, 3, and 6 days after injection, (89)Zr-RG7356 uptake in MDA-MB-231 (CD44(+), resp) xenografts was nearly constant and about 9 times higher than in HepG2 (CD44(-), non-resp) xenografts (range 27.44 ± 12.93 to 33.13 ± 7.42% ID/g vs. 3.25 ± 0.38 to 3.90 ± 0.58% ID/g). Uptake of (89)Zr-RG7356 was similar in MDA-MB-231 (CD44(+), resp) and PL45 (CD44(+), non-resp) xenografts. Studies in monkeys revealed antibody uptake in spleen, salivary glands and bone marrow, which might be related to the level of CD44 expression. (89)Zr-RG7356 uptake in these normal organs decreased with increasing dose levels of unlabeled RG7356. (89)Zr-RG7356 selectively targets CD44(+) responsive and non-responsive tumors in mice and CD44(+) tissues in monkeys. These studies indicate the importance of accurate antibody dosing in humans to obtain optimal tumor targeting. Moreover, efficient binding of RG7356 to CD44(+) tumors may not be sufficient in itself to drive an anti-tumor response. PMID:24492295

  5. Navigating non-positivity in neighbourhood studies: an analysis of collective efficacy and violence

    PubMed Central

    Ahern, Jennifer; Cerda, Magdalená; Lippman, Sheri A; Tardiff, Kenneth J; Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Background In multilevel studies, strong correlations of neighbourhood exposures with individual and neighbourhood confounders may generate problems with non-positivity (ie, inferences that are `off-support'). The authors used propensity restriction and matching to (1) assess the utility of propensity restriction to ensure analyses are `on-support' and (2) examine the relation between collective efficacy and violence in a previously unstudied city. Methods Associations between neighbourhood collective efficacy and violent victimisation were estimated in data from New York City in 2005 (n=4000) using marginal models and propensity matching. Results In marginal models adjusted for individual confounders and limited to observations `on-support', under conditions of high collective efficacy, the estimated prevalence of violent victimisation was 3.5/100, while under conditions of low collective efficacy, it was 7.5/100, resulting in a difference of 4.0/100 (95% CI 2.6 to 5.8). In propensity-matched analysis, the comparable difference was 4.0/100 (95% CI 2.1 to 5.9). In analyses adjusted for individual and neighbourhood confounders and limited to observations 'on-support', the difference in violent victimisation associated with collective efficacy was 3.1/100 (95% CI 1.2 to 5.2) in marginal models and 2.4/100 (95% CI 0.2 to 4.5) in propensity-matched analysis. Analyses without support restrictions produced surprisingly similar results. Conclusions Under conditions of high collective efficacy, there was about half the prevalence of violence compared with low collective efficacy. The results contribute to a growing body of evidence that suggests collective efficacy may shape violence, and illustrate how careful techniques can be used to disentangle exposures from highly correlated confounders without relying on model extrapolation. PMID:22918895

  6. Assessing the Effects of Collaborative Professional Learning: Efficacy Shifts in a Three-Year Mathematics Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Catherine D.; Flynn, Tara

    2012-01-01

    Researchers examine the outcomes of professional collaborative inquiry in mathematics on teacher efficacy in a three-year study of teacher professional learning in Canada. The study applies a mixed methods approach involving over 200 teachers and 1000 students as well as case study sites in English and French. The collaborative inquiry-based…

  7. Measuring the Efficacy of Code Clone Information in a Bug Localization Task: An Empirical Study

    E-print Network

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Measuring the Efficacy of Code Clone Information in a Bug Localization Task: An Empirical Study clone detection techniques and tools. However, there has been little human-based empirical study a study that investigates the usefulness of code clone information for performing a bug localization task

  8. Lesson study: Professional development and its impact on science teacher self-efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Megan Rae

    This study focuses on an analysis of a professional development program known as lesson study via data obtained during an in-service professional development program for secondary school science teachers. The purpose of this study was to examine the self-efficacy beliefs of one group of science teachers related to their experiences in a lesson study. Another purpose for this research, aligned with the first, included a theoretical analysis of the lesson study construct to see if its design promoted positive self-efficacy beliefs of its participants. The research is framed within the context of social constructivism and self-efficacy and is qualitative in nature and utilized descriptive analysis as a means of research. Case studies were conducted detailing two of the six participants. Data sources included researcher field notes and transcriptions of all planning and debriefing sessions; individual interviews with each participant and the schools' principal; a participant questionnaire, and the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument. Themes that emerged included the positive perceptions of lesson study as a collaborative and teacher-centered experience; the understanding that lesson study can instill a sense of professionalism to those who participate in the process; the sense that discussing student learning using objective observations from classroom is a powerful way to assess learning and uncover personal teacher beliefs; and the insight that the time commitment that lesson study requires can inhibit teachers and schools from sustaining it as a form of on-going professional development. Although these themes are consistent with the research on lesson study in Japan and elsewhere in the United States, they also extend the research on self-efficacy and science teacher professional development. In the end, this study supported some of the conclusions of the self-efficacy research as it relates to professional development while also adding that interpersonal relationships is a relevant consideration in the development of science teacher's self-efficacy. From this study, it is apparent that teachers who are collaboratively involved in a supportive setting such as lesson study can increase their level of self-efficacy and thus improve their teaching practice.

  9. The preclinical and clinical activity of aviscumine: a potential anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Zwierzina, Heinz; Bergmann, Lothar; Fiebig, Heiner; Aamdal, Steinar; Schöffski, Patrick; Witthohn, Klaus; Lentzen, Hans

    2011-07-01

    Extracts from the European mistletoe plant Viscumalbum have been studied for decades for their direct and indirect anticancer activity. Therefore, scientists were interested in identifying the active compound (mistletoe lectin) in these extracts and making it available as a highly purified molecule for drug development. Recombinant mistletoe lectin (INN: aviscumine) was produced in Escherichiacoli. It has been shown to have immunomodulatory and cytotoxic activity in invitro and in animal models and can target tumour cells. Clinical phase I studies also demonstrated immunomodulatory activity, which appears to have a positive effect on disease stabilisation. This review explores the current knowledge base for aviscumine's mechanism of action, efficacy and side-effects in both preclinical studies and clinical trials, and it considers aviscumine's potential as a cancer therapy. PMID:21482461

  10. Comparative study of the neurotrophic effects elicited by VEGF-B and GDNF in preclinical in vivo models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yue, X; Hariri, D J; Caballero, B; Zhang, S; Bartlett, M J; Kaut, O; Mount, D W; Wüllner, U; Sherman, S J; Falk, T

    2014-01-31

    Vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGF-B) has recently been shown to be a promising novel neuroprotective agent for several neurodegenerative conditions. In the current study we extended previous work on neuroprotective potential for Parkinson's disease (PD) by testing an expanded dose range of VEGF-B (1 and 10 ?g) and directly comparing both neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects of VEGF-B in progressive unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) PD models to a single dose of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, 10 ?g), that has been established by several groups as a standard in both preclinical PD models. In the amphetamine-induced rotational tests the treatment with 1 and 10 ?g VEGF-B resulted in significantly improved motor function of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats compared to vehicle-treated 6-OHDA-lesioned rats in the neuroprotection paradigm. Both doses of VEGF-B caused an increase in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cell and fiber count in the substantia nigra (SN) and striatum in the neuroprotective experiment. The effect size was comparable to the effects seen with GDNF. In the neurorestoration paradigm, VEGF-B injection had no significant effect in either the behavioral or the immunohistochemical analyses, whereas GDNF injection significantly improved the amphetamine-induced rotational behavior and reduced TH-positive neuronal cell loss in the SN. We also present a strong positive correlation (p=1.9e-50) of the expression of VEGF-B with nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes involved in fatty acid metabolism in rat midbrain, pointing to the mitochondria as a site of action of VEGF-B. GDNF showed a positive correlation with nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes that was not nearly as strong (p=0.018). VEGF-B counteracted rotenone-induced reduction of (a) fatty acid transport protein 1 and 4 levels and (b) both Akt protein and phosphorylation levels in SH-SY5Y cells. We further verified VEGF-B expression in the human SN pars compacta of healthy controls and PD patients, in neuronal cells that show co-expression with neuromelanin. These results have demonstrated that VEGF-B has potential as a neuroprotective agent for PD therapy and should be further investigated. PMID:24291725

  11. Evaluation Of Microdosing Strategies For Studies In Preclinical Drug Development: Demonstration Of Linear Pharmacokinetics In Dogs Of A Nucleoside Analogue Over A 50-Fold Dose Range

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, P; Vogel, J S; Rose, M J; Ubick, E A; Brunner, J E; Wallace, M A; Adelsberger, J K; Baker, M P; Henderson, P T; Pearson, P G; Baillie, T A

    2004-04-22

    The technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was validated successfully and utilized to study the pharmacokinetics and disposition in dogs of a preclinical drug candidate (Compound A), after oral and intravenous administration. The primary objective of this study was to examine whether Compound A displayed linear kinetics across sub-pharmacological (microdose) and pharmacological dose ranges in an animal model, prior to initiation of a human microdose study. The AMS-derived disposition properties of Compound A were comparable to data obtained via conventional techniques such as LC-MS/MS and liquid scintillation counting analyses. Thus, Compound A displayed multiphasic kinetics and possessed low plasma clearance (4.4 mL/min/kg), a long terminal elimination half-life (19.4 hr) and high oral bioavailability (82%). Currently there are no published comparisons of the kinetics of a pharmaceutical compound at pharmacological versus sub-pharmacological doses employing microdosing strategies. The present study thus provides the first description of the pharmacokinetics of a drug candidate assessed under these two dosing regimens. The data demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic properties of Compound A were similar following dosing at 0.02 mg/kg as at 1 mg/kg, indicating that in the case of Compound A, the kinetics of absorption, distribution and elimination in the dog appear to be linear across this 50-fold dose range. Moreover, the exceptional sensitivity of AMS provided a pharmacokinetic profile of Compound A, even following a microdose, which revealed aspects of the disposition of this agent that were inaccessible by conventional techniques. The applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are broad ranging and vary from studying environmental and ecological issues such as the isotopic composition of the atmosphere, soil and water (Hughen et al., 2000; Beck et al., 2001; Keith-Roach et al., 2001; Mironov et al., 2002), to archaeology and volcanology (Stafford et al., 1984; Vogel et al., 1990; Smith et al., 1999) to its use as a bioanalytical tool for nutritional research (Buchholz et al., 1999; Deuker et al., 2000; Weaver and Liebman, 2002). Biomedical applications of AMS and its use in the arena of pharmaceutical research also have been detailed in review articles (Barker and Garner, 1999; Garner, 2000; Turteltaub and Vogel, 2000). To date, most studies on the metabolism and disposition of xenobiotics by AMS have focused on how carcinogens bind to DNA and proteins to form adducts (Turteltaub et al., 1990, 1997; Frantz et al., 1995; Dingley et al., 1999; Li et al., 2003). Its application to the field of pharmaceutical sciences has been limited to a few studies (Kaye et al., 1997; Young et al., 2001; Garner et al., 2002). However, the pharmaceutical industry is becoming increasingly aware of the potential benefits that may accrue from the ultra high sensitivity afforded by AMS in terms of evaluating the pharmacokinetics of lead drug candidates in early development. Specifically, AMS allows administration of sub-pharmacological doses (microdoses) of carbon-14 or tritium-labeled investigational drugs to animals or humans at radiologically insignificant levels with the goal of obtaining preliminary information regarding the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of test compounds (Turteltaub and Vogel, 2000). An unresolved issue, however, is whether the pharmacokinetics determined following a microdose are representative of those following a conventional (pharmacological) dose (Lappin and Garner, 2003). This paper examines the linearity of kinetics of an antiviral nucleoside analogue, Compound A, across sub-pharmacological and pharmacological dose ranges in the dog prior to initiation of a human microdose study. The specific objectives of this study, therefore, were (1) to assess the pharmacokinetics of Compound A in dogs by a conventional dosing approach utilizing LC-MS/MS for sample analysis, (2) to assess the pharmacokinetics of Compound A in dogs by the microdose approach utilizing AMS for sample ana

  12. The Interplay between Motivation, Self-Efficacy, and Approaches to Studying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prat-Sala, Merce; Redford, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background: The strategies students adopt in their study are influenced by a number of social-cognitive factors and impact upon their academic performance. Aims: The present study examined the interrelationships between motivation orientation (intrinsic and extrinsic), self-efficacy (in reading academic texts and essay writing), and approaches to…

  13. Career Development Interventions and Academic Self-Efficacy and Motivation: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykeman, Cass; Wood, Chris; Ingram, Michael; Herr, Edwin L.

    The impact of career development interventions on career and technical education (CTE) students' academic self-efficacy and motivation was explored in a pilot study that elicited responses from 293 students at 20 high schools across the United States. The study included a literature review, survey of high school seniors that examined 44…

  14. The Efficacy of Collaborative Strategic Reading in Middle School Science and Social Studies Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman, Alison G.; Klingner, Janette K.; Buckley, Pamela; Annamma, Subini; Lasser, Cristin J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a multi-component reading comprehension instructional approach, Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR), compared to business-as-usual instructional methods with 19 teachers and 1074 students in middle school social studies and science classrooms in a large urban district. Researchers collaborated with school…

  15. Preservice Elementary Teachers' Development of Self-Efficacy and Confidence to Teach Science: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunning, Amanda M.; Mensah, Felicia Moore

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the self-efficacy of one preservice elementary school teacher (Kasey) during and after her participation in Science in Childhood Education--a 16-week, elementary preservice science methods course. The case study of this teacher is situated in the context of the class as a whole. This is accomplished through interviewing the one…

  16. Two preclinical tests to evaluate anticancer activity and to help validate drug candidates for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to assessing preclinical anticancer activity do not reliably predict drug efficacy in cancer patients. Most of the compounds that show remarkable anticancer effects in preclinical models actually fail when tested in clinical trials. We blame these failures on the complexity of the disease and on the limitations of the preclinical tools we require for our research. This manuscript argues that this lack of clinical response may also be caused by poor in vitro and in vivo preclinical designs, in which cancer patients' needs are not fully considered. Then, it proposes two patient-oriented tests to assess in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity and to help validate drug candidates for clinical evaluation. PMID:25859551

  17. Plasma levels and clinical response with imipramine in a study comparing efficacy with mianserin and nomifensine

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, S. A.; Roy, D.; Wynne-Willson, S.; Robinson, C.; Montgomery, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    1 The comparative antidepressant efficacy of 150 mg imipramine, 60 mg mianserin and 150 mg nomifensine was studied in 45 depressed patients in a six week double-blind investigation. 2 In the efficacy analysis of 41 patients completing the study there was no overall significant difference in efficacy between the groups. Individual group comparisons showed no significant difference in response between mianserin and nomifensine, and mianserin and imipramine. There was a significant (z=1.99, P<0.05) improved response in the imipramine compared with the nomifensine treated group. The imipramine treated group were significantly older. 3 No significant plasma concentration/clinical response relationships were demonstrated with nomifensine, mianserin, imipramine or desipramine. 4 Plasma level monitoring of imipramine recommended by some investigators does not seem to be appropriate. PMID:6337608

  18. Studies examining the efficacy of ankle foot orthoses should report activity level and mechanical evidence.

    PubMed

    Harlaar, Jaap; Brehm, Merel; Becher, Jules G; Bregman, Daan J J; Buurke, Jaap; Holtkamp, Fred; De Groot, Vincent; Nollet, Frans

    2010-09-01

    Ankle Foot Orthoses (AFOs) to promote walking ability are a common treatment in patients with neurological or muscular diseases. However, guidelines on the prescription of AFOs are currently based on a low level of evidence regarding their efficacy. Recent studies aiming to demonstrate the efficacy of wearing an AFO in respect to walking ability are not always conclusive. In this paper it is argued to recognize two levels of evidence related to the ICF levels. Activity level evidence expresses the gain in walking ability for the patient, while mechanical evidence expresses the correct functioning of the AFO. Used in combination for the purpose of evaluating the efficacy of orthotic treatment, a conjunct improvement at both levels reinforces the treatment algorithm that is used. Conversely, conflicting outcomes will challenge current treatment algorithms and the supposed working mechanism of the AFO. A treatment algorithm must use relevant information as an input, derived from measurements with a high precision. Its result will be a specific AFO that matches the patient's needs, specified by the mechanical characterization of the AFO footwear combination. It is concluded that research on the efficacy of AFOs should use parameters from two levels of evidence, to prove the efficacy of a treatment algorithm, i.e., how to prescribe a well-matched AFO. PMID:20738235

  19. Vortioxetine, a novel antidepressant with multimodal activity: review of preclinical and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Connie; Asin, Karen E; Artigas, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Vortioxetine, a novel antidepressant for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), is a 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist, 5-HT1A receptor agonist and serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) inhibitor. Here we review its preclinical and clinical properties and discuss translational aspects. Vortioxetine increases serotonergic, noradrenergic, dopaminergic, cholinergic, histaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in brain structures associated with MDD. These multiple effects likely derive from its interaction with 5-HT-receptor-mediated negative feedback mechanisms controlling neuronal activity. In particular, 5-HT3 receptors may play a prominent role, since their blockade i) increases pyramidal neuron activity by removing 5-HT3 receptor-mediated excitation of GABA interneurons, and ii) augments SSRI effects on extracellular 5-HT. However, modulation of the other 5-HT receptor subtypes also likely contributes to vortioxetine's pharmacological effects. Preclinical animal models reveal differences from SSRIs and SNRIs, including antidepressant-like activity, increased synaptic plasticity and improved cognitive function. Vortioxetine had clinical efficacy in patients with MDD: 11 placebo-controlled studies (including one in elderly) with efficacy in 8 (7 positive, 1 supportive), 1 positive active comparator study plus a positive relapse prevention study. In two positive studies, vortioxetine was superior to placebo in pre-defined cognitive outcome measures. The clinically effective dose range (5-20mg/day) spans ~50 to >80% SERT occupancy. SERT and 5-HT3 receptors are primarily occupied at 5mg, while at 20mg, all targets are likely occupied at functionally relevant levels. The side-effect profile is similar to that of SSRIs, with gastrointestinal symptoms being most common, and a low incidence of sexual dysfunction and sleep disruption possibly ascribed to vortioxetine's receptor modulation. PMID:25016186

  20. Study of the efficacy of antimalarial drugs delivered inside targeted immunoliposomal nanovectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbán, Patricia; Estelrich, Joan; Adeva, Alberto; Cortés, Alfred; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2011-12-01

    Paul Ehrlich's dream of a 'magic bullet' that would specifically destroy invading microbes is now a major aspect of clinical medicine. However, a century later, the implementation of this medical holy grail continues being a challenge in three main fronts: identifying the right molecular or cellular targets for a particular disease, having a drug that is effective against it, and finding a strategy for the efficient delivery of sufficient amounts of the drug in an active state exclusively to the selected targets. In a previous work, we engineered an immunoliposomal nanovector for the targeted delivery of its contents exclusively to Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells [pRBCs]. In preliminary assays, the antimalarial drug chloroquine showed improved efficacy when delivered inside immunoliposomes targeted with the pRBC-specific monoclonal antibody BM1234. Because difficulties in determining the exact concentration of the drug due to its low amounts prevented an accurate estimation of the nanovector performance, here, we have developed an HPLC-based method for the precise determination of the concentrations in the liposomal preparations of chloroquine and of a second antimalarial drug, fosmidomycin. The results obtained indicate that immunoliposome encapsulation of chloroquine and fosmidomycin improves by tenfold the efficacy of antimalarial drugs. The targeting antibody used binds preferentially to pRBCs containing late maturation stages of the parasite. In accordance with this observation, the best performing immunoliposomes are those added to Plasmodium cultures having a larger number of late form-containing pRBCs. An average of five antibody molecules per liposome significantly improves in cell cultures the performance of immunoliposomes over non-functionalized liposomes as drug delivery vessels. Increasing the number of antibodies on the liposome surface correspondingly increases performance, with a reduction of 50% parasitemia achieved with immunoliposomes encapsulating 4 nM chloroquine and bearing an estimated 250 BM1234 units. The nanovector prototype described here can be a valuable platform amenable to modification and improvement with the objective of designing a nanostructure adequate to enter the preclinical pipeline as a new antimalarial therapy.

  1. Reading Fluency and Self-Efficacy: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Sandra L. Nes

    2005-01-01

    In this case study, reading fluency was examined within the context of a paired reading instructional intervention. Additionally, this study explored reader self perceptions and the nature of the lived experience of reading for a less skilled reader. A single subject changing criterion design was employed. Baseline reading fluency data were…

  2. Effective Teaching and Learning Environments and Principal Self-Efficacy in Oklahoma: Replication of a Previous Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate a previous study by Smith et al. (2006) that explored principal self-efficacy beliefs for facilitating effective instructional environments at their schools. There has been limited research conducted on principal's self-efficacy, and the studies that have been completed on the topic have not been…

  3. Exercise Self-Efficacy and Perceived Wellness among College Students in a Basic Studies Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidman, Cara L.; D'Abundo, Michelle Lee; Hritz, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    University basic studies courses provide a valuable opportunity for facilitating the knowledge, skills, and beliefs that develop healthy behaviors to last a lifetime. Belief in one's ability to participate in physical activity, exercise self-efficacy, is a psychological construct that has had a documented impact on physical activity. Although…

  4. 21 CFR 201.200 - Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising. 201.200 Section 201.200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Commissioner of Food and Drugs from the National Academy of Sciences (1969).” As the report notes, this...

  5. Development of Academic Self-Efficacy in Women during College: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Savala

    2013-01-01

    Although women account for more than 50% of the college degrees awarded nationally, The College of Idaho has had a challenge retaining female students. There are any number of reasons for women's struggle to persist at the college, but one of the most basic may be a matter of self-efficacy. This mixed methods study used a combination of…

  6. Teacher Efficacy Beliefs in Collaborative Learning Communities: A Statewide Study in Large High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Maryalice B.

    2012-01-01

    This observational study explored the connections between collaborative teacher learning communities as related to teacher efficacy in the largest high schools in Ohio. These communities are typically called Small Learning Communities and Professional Learning Communities. Small Learning Communities are usually created with academic content area…

  7. Math and Science Pursuits: A Self-Efficacy Intervention Comparison Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Elizabeth D.; Porter, Sarah H.; Israel, Tania; Brown, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared two interventions to increase math self-efficacy among undergraduate students. Ninety-nine first-year undergraduate students participated in an intervention involving performance accomplishment or an intervention combining performance accomplishment and belief-perseverance techniques in which participants constructed a…

  8. Collaborative Curriculum Design to Increase Science Teaching Self-Efficacy: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velthuis, Chantal; Fisser, Petra; Pieters, Jules

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish whether participation in a teacher design team (TDT) is an effective way to increase the science teaching self-efficacy of primary school teachers who vary in their levels of experience and interest in science. A TDT is a group of at least 2 teachers from the same or related subjects working together to…

  9. A Quantitative Study Examining Teacher Stress, Burnout, and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Timar D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative, correlational study was to examine the relationships between stress, burnout, and self-efficacy in public school teachers in the Turks and Caicos Islands. The Teacher Stress Inventory was used to collect data on teacher stress, the Maslach Burnout Inventory Educators Survey was used to obtain data on teacher…

  10. Neuroprotective Efficacy of Methylene Blue in Ischemic Stroke: An MRI Study

    E-print Network

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Neuroprotective Efficacy of Methylene Blue in Ischemic Stroke: An MRI Study Qiang Shen1,2,3 , Fang, Department of Veterans Affairs, San Antonio, Texas, United States of America. Abstract Methylene blue (MB treatment strategies for stroke ever more urgent. Methylene blue USP (MB) is a FDA-grandfathered drug

  11. Advantages of Papio anubis for preclinical testing of immunotoxicity of candidate therapeutic antagonist antibodies targeting CD28.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Nicolas; Mary, Caroline; Le Bas-Bernardet, Stephanie; Daguin, Veronique; Belarif, Lyssia; Chevalier, Melanie; Hervouet, Jeremy; Minault, David; Ville, Simon; Charpy, Vianney; Blancho, Gilles; Vanhove, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Antagonist anti-CD28 antibodies prevent T-cell costimulation and are functionally different from CTLA4Ig since they cannot block CTLA-4 and PDL-1 co-inhibitory signals. They demonstrated preclinical efficacy in suppressing effector T cells while enhancing immunoregulatory mechanisms. Because a severe cytokine release syndrome was observed during the Phase 1 study with the superagonist anti-CD28 TGN1412, development of other anti-CD28 antibodies requires careful preclinical evaluation to exclude any potential immunotoxicity side-effects. The failure to identify immunological toxicity of TGN1412 using macaques led us to investigate more relevant preclinical models. We report here that contrary to macaques, and like in man, all baboon CD4-positive T lymphocytes express CD28 in their effector memory cells compartment, a lymphocyte subtype that is the most prone to releasing cytokines after reactivation. Baboon lymphocytes are able to release pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro in response to agonist or superagonist anti-CD28 antibodies. Furthermore, we compared the reactivity of human and baboon lymphocytes after transfer into non obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) interleukin-2r? knockout mice and confirmed that both cell types could release inflammatory cytokines in situ after injection of agonistic anti-CD28 antibodies. In contrast, FR104, a monovalent antagonistic anti-CD28 antibody, did not elicit T cell activation in these assays, even in the presence of anti-drug antibodies. Infusion to baboons also resulted in an absence of cytokine release. In conclusion, the baboon represents a suitable species for preclinical immunotoxicity evaluation of anti-CD28 antibodies because their effector memory T cells do express CD28 and because cytokine release can be assessed in vitro and trans vivo. PMID:24598534

  12. Malaria Vaccine Adjuvants: Latest Update and Challenges in Preclinical and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Elena; Salvador, Aiala; Igartua, Manoli; Hernández, Rosa María; Pedraz, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    There is no malaria vaccine currently available, and the most advanced candidate has recently reported a modest 30% efficacy against clinical malaria. Although many efforts have been dedicated to achieve this goal, the research was mainly directed to identify antigenic targets. Nevertheless, the latest progresses on understanding how immune system works and the data recovered from vaccination studies have conferred to the vaccine formulation its deserved relevance. Additionally to the antigen nature, the manner in which it is presented (delivery adjuvants) as well as the immunostimulatory effect of the formulation components (immunostimulants) modulates the immune response elicited. Protective immunity against malaria requires the induction of humoral, antibody-dependent cellular inhibition (ADCI) and effector and memory cell responses. This review summarizes the status of adjuvants that have been or are being employed in the malaria vaccine development, focusing on the pharmaceutical and immunological aspects, as well as on their immunization outcomings at clinical and preclinical stages. PMID:23710439

  13. MEMS-enabled implantable drug infusion pumps for laboratory animal research, preclinical, and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ellis; Hoang, Tuan

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in implantable drug delivery devices is needed for novel pharmaceutical compounds such as certain biologics, gene therapy, and other small molecules that are not suitable for administration by oral, topical, or intravenous routes. This invasive dosing scheme seeks to directly bypass physiological barriers presented by the human body, release the appropriate drug amount at the site of treatment, and maintain the drug bioavailability for the required duration of administration to achieve drug efficacy. Advances in microtechnologies have led to novel MEMS-enabled implantable drug infusion pumps with unique performance and feature sets. In vivo demonstration of micropumps for laboratory animal research and preclinical studies include acute rapid radiolabeling, short-term delivery of nanomedicine for cancer treatment, and chronic ocular drug dosing. Investigation of MEMS actuators, valves, and other microstructures for on-demand dosing control may enable next generation implantable pumps with high performance within a miniaturized form factor for clinical applications. PMID:22926321

  14. MEMS-enabled implantable drug infusion pumps for laboratory animal research, preclinical, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ellis; Hoang, Tuan

    2012-11-01

    Innovation in implantable drug delivery devices is needed for novel pharmaceutical compounds such as certain biologics, gene therapy, and other small molecules that are not suitable for administration by oral, topical, or intravenous routes. This invasive dosing scheme seeks to directly bypass physiological barriers presented by the human body, release the appropriate drug amount at the site of treatment, and maintain the drug bioavailability for the required duration of administration to achieve drug efficacy. Advances in microtechnologies have led to novel MEMS-enabled implantable drug infusion pumps with unique performance and feature sets. In vivo demonstration of micropumps for laboratory animal research and preclinical studies include acute rapid radiolabeling, short-term delivery of nanomedicine for cancer treatment, and chronic ocular drug dosing. Investigation of MEMS actuators, valves, and other microstructures for on-demand dosing control may enable next generation implantable pumps with high performance within a miniaturized form factor for clinical applications. PMID:22926321

  15. A Preclinical Assessment of Neural Stem Cells as Delivery Vehicles for Anti-Amyloid Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Njie, eMalick G.; Kantorovich, Svetlana; Astary, Garrett W.; Green, Cameron; Zheng, Tong; Semple-Rowland, Susan L.; Steindler, Dennis A.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Streit, Wolfgang J.; Borchelt, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Transplantation of neural stems cells (NSCs) could be a useful means to deliver biologic therapeutics for late-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we conducted a small preclinical investigation of whether NSCs could be modified to express metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), a secreted protease reported to degrade aggregated A? peptides that are the major constituents of the senile plaques. Our findings illuminated three issues with using NSCs as delivery vehicles for this particular application. First, transplanted NSCs generally failed to migrate to amyloid plaques, instead tending to colonize white matter tracts. Second, the final destination of these cells was highly influenced by how they were delivered. We found that our injection methods led to cells largely distributing to white matter tracts, which are anisotropic conduits for fluids that facilitate rapid distribution within the CNS. Third, with regard to MMP9 as a therapeutic to remove senile plaques, we observed high concentrations of endogenous metalloproteinases around amyloid plaques in the mouse models used for these preclinical tests with no evidence that the NSC-delivered enzymes elevated these activities or had any impact. Interestingly, MMP9-expressing NSCs formed substantially larger grafts. Overall, we observed long-term survival of NSCs in the brains of mice with high amyloid burden. Therefore, we conclude that such cells may have potential in therapeutic applications in AD but improved targeting of these cells to disease-specific lesions may be required to enhance efficacy. PMID:22496779

  16. Longitudinal evaluation of cryolipolysis efficacy: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Eric F

    2013-06-01

    Cryolipolysis treatment, or cold-induced destruction of adipocytes, provides a noninvasive option for localized subcutaneous fat reduction without damaging the overlying skin or adjacent structures. This case study examines the long-term visibility of fat layer reduction subsequent to cryolipolysis treatment, through longitudinal evaluation. Two male subjects were unilaterally treated on one flank. Baseline and postprocedure photographs (at 2 or 5 years) of the treated and contralateral untreated flanks display durable results despite natural fluctuations in body weight. PMID:23725309

  17. Mathematics: Self-Efficacy, Identity, and Achievement among African American Males from the High School Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Calvin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship existed between mathematics self-efficacy and mathematics identity to mathematics achievement among African American males from High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09). Subsequently, the extent to which mathematics self-efficacy and mathematics identity accounted for low and…

  18. Differential efficacy of endodontic obturation procedures: an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Ardizzoni, Andrea; Generali, Luigi; Righi, Elena; Baschieri, Maria C; Cavani, Francesco; Manca, Lidia; Lugli, Eleonora; Migliarese, Luigi; Blasi, Elisabetta; Neglia, Rachele G

    2014-07-01

    By means of a double-chamber model, different root canal filling materials and procedures were compared. Briefly, the root canals of single-rooted human teeth, extracted for periodontal reasons, were instrumented and obturated by gutta-percha/Pulp Canal Sealer EWT (PCS) or by Resilon, in association with different sealers (Real Seal, RelyX Unicem or Meta). Obturation was achieved by traditional continuous wave of condensation technique (TCWCT), a modified version of it (MCWCT), or single cone technique (SCT). The obturated roots, inserted in a double-chamber model, were sterilized by gamma irradiation. Next, Enterococcus faecalis was added to the upper chamber and the specimens were incubated at 37 °C for up to 120 days; the development of turbidity in the lower chambers' broths indicated bacterial leakage through the obturated root canals. The kinetics of leakage were analyzed in different groups by means of Kaplan-Meier statistics and compared by log-rank test. The results showed that root canals obturated with either gutta-percha/PCS using the MCWCT, Resilon/Real Seal SCT or Resilon/RelyX Unicem using the TCWCT displayed significantly better performance than the remaining groups (p < 0.01). Histological evaluation, performed to investigate microbial localization inside specimens, confirmed that this parameter varied according to the obturation procedures and materials employed. This ex vivo study indicates that gutta-percha/PCS, if used with the MCWCT, is as effective as Resilon when coupled to Real Seal with the SCT or, interestingly, to RelyX Unicem with the TCWCT. These data suggest that further improvement of the currently employed root canal filling procedures is achievable, depending on both the filling materials and the technique employed, thus encouraging clinical studies in this direction. PMID:23836051

  19. Key considerations in the preclinical development of biosimilars.

    PubMed

    Bui, Lynne A; Hurst, Susan; Finch, Gregory L; Ingram, Beverly; Jacobs, Ira A; Kirchhoff, Carol F; Ng, Chee-Keng; Ryan, Anne M

    2015-05-01

    Biosimilar development requires several steps: selection of an appropriate reference biologic, understanding the key molecular attributes of that reference biologic and development of a manufacturing process to match these attributes of the reference biologic product. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the FDA guidance documents state that, in lieu of conducting extensive preclinical and clinical studies typically required for approval of novel biologics, biosimilars must undergo a rigorous similarity evaluation. The aim of this article is to increase understanding of the preclinical development and evaluation process for biosimilars, as required by the regulatory agencies, that precedes the clinical testing of biosimilars in humans. PMID:25912284

  20. Prediction of preclinical operative dentistry performance in two instructional methods.

    PubMed

    Boyd, M A; Wood, W W; Conry, R F

    1980-06-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of manual and academic variables in predicting preclinical operative technique performance. In addition, it tested and compared two teaching methods and their effects on performance outcomes. Simple correlations and stepwise multiple regression analysis were used. Although correlations were low, they were significant for predicting performance using the Perceptual Motor Ability Test (PMAT) of the Dental Admission Test (DAT). The treatment of the two groups showed that students with low or average two dimension (2D) scores on the PMAT benefited from an alternate teaching method in the preclinical operative technique course. PMID:6929307

  1. Chemoprevention of Head and Neck Cancer by Simultaneous Blocking of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Cyclooxygenase-2 Signaling Pathways: Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong M.; Zhang, Hongzheng; Saba, Nabil; Chen, Amy; Nannapaneni, Sreenivas; Amin, A.R.M. Ruhul; Müller, Susan; Lewis, Melinda; Sica, Gabriel; Kono, Scott; Brandes, Johann C.; Grist, William; Moreno-Williams, Rachel; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Thomas, Sufi M.; Chen, Zhengjia; Shin, Hyung Ju C.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Chen, Zhuo Georgia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the efficacy and underlying molecular mechanism of a novel chemopreventive strategy combining epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (COX-2I). Experimental Design We examined the inhibition of tumor cell growth by combined EGFR-TKI (erlotinib) and COX-2I (celecoxib) treatment using head and neck cancer (HNC) cell lines and a preventive xenograft model. We studied the antiangiogenic activity of these agents and examined the affected signaling pathways by immunoblotting analysis in tumor cell lysates and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) analyses on the mouse xenograft tissues and blood, respectively. Biomarkers in these signaling pathways were studied by IHC, EIA, and an antibody array analysis in samples collected from participants in a phase I chemoprevention trial of erlotinib and celecoxib. Results The combined treatment inhibited HNC cell growth significantly more potently than either single agent alone in cell line and xenograft models, and resulted in greater inhibition of cell cycle progression at G1 phase than either single drug. The combined treatment modulated the EGFR and mTOR signaling pathways. A phase I chemoprevention trial of combined erlotinib and celecoxib revealed an overall pathologic response rate of 71% at time of data analysis. Analysis of tissue samples from participants consistently showed downregulation of EGFR, pERK and pS6 levels after treatment, which correlated with clinical response. Conclusion Treatment with erlotinib combined with celecoxib offers an effective chemopreventive approach through inhibition of EGFR and mTOR pathways, which may serve as potential biomarkers to monitor the intervention of this combination in the clinic. PMID:23422093

  2. A validation study of goal orientations and self-efficacy scales.

    PubMed

    Acarlar, Gizem; Bilgiç, Reyhan

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the validity and reliability of goal orientation and self-efficacy scales. The scales were administered to 264 university students (154 from engineering departments, 110 from business administration). Two samples were used. In the first sample, the original factor model was tested with confirmatory factor analysis. In the second sample, the Turkish versions of the scales were factor analyzed. Principal components analysis resulted in three components for the Goal Orientation scale: Learning goal orientation, Performance-prove goal orientation, and Performance-avoid goal orientation. The Self-efficacy scale had one factor as expected. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were satisfactory. The results did not fully support the use of current Turkish versions of the scales. Results of the studies are discussed along with the strengths and limitations of the study and suggestions for further development of the scales. PMID:21319613

  3. Micro-ultrasound for preclinical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Foster, F. Stuart; Hossack, John; Adamson, S. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, non-invasive preclinical imaging has emerged as an important tool to facilitate biomedical discovery. Not only have the markets for these tools accelerated, but the numbers of peer-reviewed papers in which imaging end points and biomarkers have been used have grown dramatically. High frequency ‘micro-ultrasound’ has steadily evolved in the post-genomic era as a rapid, comparatively inexpensive imaging tool for studying normal development and models of human disease in small animals. One of the fundamental barriers to this development was the technological hurdle associated with high-frequency array transducers. Recently, new approaches have enabled the upper limits of linear and phased arrays to be pushed from about 20 to over 50 MHz enabling a broad range of new applications. The innovations leading to the new transducer technology and scanner architecture are reviewed. Applications of preclinical micro-ultrasound are explored for developmental biology, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. With respect to the future, the latest developments in high-frequency ultrasound imaging are described. PMID:22866232

  4. Antidepressant efficacy of agomelatine: meta-analysis of published and unpublished studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To systematically review published and unpublished efficacy studies of agomelatine in people with depression. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Literature search (Pubmed, Embase, Medline), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, European Medicines Agency (EMA) regulatory file for agomelatine, manufacturers of agomelatine (Servier). Eligibility criteria Double blind randomised placebo and comparator controlled trials of agomelatine in depression with standard depression rating scales. Data synthesis Studies were pooled by using a random effects model with DerSimonian and Laird weights for comparisons with placebo and comparator antidepressant. The primary efficacy measure (change in rating scale score) was summarised with standardised mean difference (SMD; a measure of effect size) and secondary outcome measures with relative risks. All results were presented with 95% confidence intervals. Statistical heterogeneity was explored by visual inspection of funnel plots and by the I2 statistic. Moderators of effect were explored by meta-regression. Results We identified 20 trials with 7460 participants meeting inclusion criteria (11 in the published literature, four from the European Medicines Agency file, and five from the manufacturer). Almost all studies used the 17 item Hamilton depression rating scale (score 0-50). Agomelatine was significantly more effective than placebo with an effect size (SMD) of 0.24 (95% confidence interval 0.12 to 0.35) and relative risk of response 1.25 (1.11 to 1.4). Compared with other antidepressants, agomelatine showed equal efficacy (SMD 0.00, ?0.09 to 0.10). Significant heterogeneity was uncovered in most analyses, though risk of bias was low. Published studies were more likely than unpublished studies to have results that suggested advantages for agomelatine. Conclusions Agomelatine is an effective antidepressant with similar efficacy to standard antidepressants. Published trials generally had more favourable results than unpublished studies. PMID:24647162

  5. Mitigating risk in academic preclinical drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Inglese, James; Walters, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    The number of academic drug discovery centres has grown considerably in recent years, providing new opportunities to couple the curiosity-driven research culture in academia with rigorous preclinical drug discovery practices used in industry. To fully realize the potential of these opportunities, it is important that academic researchers understand the risks inherent in preclinical drug discovery, and that translational research programmes are effectively organized and supported at an institutional level. In this article, we discuss strategies to mitigate risks in several key aspects of preclinical drug discovery at academic drug discovery centres, including organization, target selection, assay design, medicinal chemistry and preclinical pharmacology. PMID:25829283

  6. Efficacy of Thematic Units on Language and Literacy: A Collaborative Study of a Shelter Unit Intervention with Struggling First Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Suzan L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of using thematic units in small group instructional settings for struggling readers to increase oral language in the areas of receptive, expressive, and written vocabulary. This research examined the efficacy of using thematic units in small group instructional settings for struggling readers…

  7. The Design of Pre-Service Inclusive Education Courses and Their Effects on Self-Efficacy: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Julie; Bain, Alan

    2010-01-01

    This study compared two versions of a 13-week mandatory undergraduate inclusive education course to determine their effects on the self-efficacy of pre-service elementary education teachers. For the purposes of the research, the self-efficacy construct was applied specifically to working with students who have inclusive educational needs. The…

  8. Efficacy of Atomoxetine in Children with Severe Autistic Disorders and Symptoms of ADHD: An Open-Label Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charnsil, Chawanun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to examine the efficacy of atomoxetine in treating symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children with severe autistic disorder. Method: Children with severe autistic disorder who had symptoms of ADHD were given atomoxetine for 10 weeks. The efficacy of atomoxetine was evaluated by using the…

  9. Preclinical dosimetry of magnetic fluid hyperthermia for bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea; Etienne, Wiguins; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-02-01

    Background Despite positive efficacy, thermotherapy is not widely used in clinical oncology. Difficulties associated with field penetration and controlling power deposition patterns in heterogeneous tissue have limited its use for heating deep in the body. Heat generation using iron-oxide super-paramagnetic nanoparticles excited with magnetic fields has been demonstrated to overcome some of these limitations. The objective of this preclinical study is to investigate the feasibility of treating bladder cancer with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Methods The bladders of 25 female rats were injected with 0.4 ml of Actium Biosystems magnetite-based nanoparticles (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) via catheters inserted in the urethra. To assess the distribution of nanoparticles in the rat after injection we used the 7 T small animal MRI system (Bruker ClinScan, Bruker BioSpin MRI GmbH, Ettlingen, Germany). Heat treatments were performed with a small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) with a goal of raising bladder temperature to 42°C in <10min and maintaining for 60min. Temperatures were measured throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic temperature probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec Canada) to characterize our ability to localize heat within the bladder target. Results The MRI study confirms the effectiveness of the catheterization procedure to homogenously distribute nanoparticles throughout the bladder. Thermal dosimetry data demonstrate our ability to controllably raise temperature of rat bladder >1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that a MFH system provides well-localized heating of rat bladder with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues.

  10. Multicriteria Optimization Model for the Study of the Efficacy of Skin Antiaging Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cri?an, Maria; Cappare, Guido; Neam?iu, Luciana; Chiorean, Ioana; Lup?a, Liana; Cri?an, Diana; Badea, Radu

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of the cutaneous structure after topical treatment with P63 antiaging complex, assessed with high frequency ultrasound, is studied by means of multicriteria optimization model. Due to the fact that the impact of the treatment may influence the quality of life, a medical index which measures, from this point of view, the efficacy of the treatment is given, also taking into account medical and economical aspects. PMID:22481971

  11. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-05: Internal Dosimetric Calculations for Several Imaging Radiopharmaceuticals in Preclinical Studies and Quantitative Assessment of the Mouse Size Impact On Them. Realistic Monte Carlo Simulations Based On the 4D-MOBY Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kostou, T; Papadimitroulas, P; Kagadis, GC; Loudos, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Commonly used radiopharmaceuticals were tested to define the most important dosimetric factors in preclinical studies. Dosimetric calculations were applied in two different whole-body mouse models, with varying organ size, so as to determine their impact on absorbed doses and S-values. Organ mass influence was evaluated with computational models and Monte Carlo(MC) simulations. Methods: MC simulations were executed on GATE to determine dose distribution in the 4D digital MOBY mouse phantom. Two mouse models, 28 and 34 g respectively, were constructed based on realistic preclinical exams to calculate the absorbed doses and S-values of five commonly used radionuclides in SPECT/PET studies (18F, 68Ga, 177Lu, 111In and 99mTc).Radionuclide biodistributions were obtained from literature. Realistic statistics (uncertainty lower than 4.5%) were acquired using the standard physical model in Geant4. Comparisons of the dosimetric calculations on the two different phantoms for each radiopharmaceutical are presented. Results: Dose per organ in mGy was calculated for all radiopharmaceuticals. The two models introduced a difference of 0.69% in their brain masses, while the largest differences were observed in the marrow 18.98% and in the thyroid 18.65% masses.Furthermore, S-values of the most important target-organs were calculated for each isotope. Source-organ was selected to be the whole mouse body.Differences on the S-factors were observed in the 6.0–30.0% range. Tables with all the calculations as reference dosimetric data were developed. Conclusion: Accurate dose per organ and the most appropriate S-values are derived for specific preclinical studies. The impact of the mouse model size is rather high (up to 30% for a 17.65% difference in the total mass), and thus accurate definition of the organ mass is a crucial parameter for self-absorbed S values calculation.Our goal is to extent the study for accurate estimations in small animal imaging, whereas it is known that there is a large variety in the anatomy of the organs.

  12. Pre-clinical versus clinical medical students’ attitudes towards the poor in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the poverty-related attitudes of pre-clinical medical students (first and second years) versus clinical medical students (third and fourth years). First through fourth year medical students voluntarily completed the Attitude Towards Poverty scale. First and second year students were classified together in the preclinical group and third and fourth year students together in the clinical group. A total of 297 students participated (67% response rate). Statistically significant differences were noted between pre-clinical and clinical students for scores on the subscales personal deficiency (P<0.001), stigma (P=0.023), and for total scores (P=0.016). Scores across these subscales and for total scores were all higher in the clinical group. The only subscale which did not show statistical significance between pre-clinical and clinical students was the structural perspective. Medical students in their clinical training have a less favorable attitude towards the poor than their preclinical counterparts. PMID:26582628

  13. Developing Potential Candidates of Preclinical Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Founds, Sandra; Zeng, Xuemei; Lykins, David; Roberts, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for developing molecules of interest in preclinical preeclampsia from candidate genes that were discovered on gene expression microarray analysis has been challenged by limited access to additional first trimester trophoblast and decidual tissues. The question of whether these candidates encode secreted proteins that may be detected in maternal circulation early in pregnancy has been investigated using various proteomic methods. Pilot studies utilizing mass spectrometry based proteomic assays, along with enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), and Western immunoblotting in first trimester samples are reported. The novel targeted mass spectrometry methods led to robust multiple reaction monitoring assays. Despite detection of several candidates in early gestation, challenges persist. Future antibody-based studies may lead to a novel multiplex protein panel for screening or detection to prevent or mitigate preeclampsia. PMID:26580600

  14. An experimental study of an educational intervention to promote maternal self-efficacy in breastfeeding 1

    PubMed Central

    Dodt, Regina Cláudia Melo; Joventino, Emanuella Silva; Aquino, Priscilla Souza; Almeida, Paulo César; Ximenes, Lorena Barbosa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to build, validate and assess an educational intervention using the flip chart titled "I Can Breastfeed My Child." Method: an experimental study using a pretest, intervention and posttest, as well as a control group. A total of 201 women, who had been hospitalized immediately, for at least 6 hours, postpartum. The mothers were allocated to the intervention (100 women) or control groups (101 women) according to the length of their hospital stay. The effectiveness of the flip chart was assessed by applying the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale - Short-Form at admission, discharge and by telephone in the second month postpartum. The intervention and control groups were similar in their socio-demographic, obstetric and gynecological variables. Results: the intervention was beneficial because mothers in the intervention group had higher self-efficacy scores, more mothers continued breastfeeding and mothers had a longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding, both at the time of hospital discharge and at the second month postpartum, with statistically significant associations. Conclusions: this experimental study assessed the educational strategy mediated via the flip chart titled "I Can Breastfeed My Child" as being effective both in increasing self-efficacy and increasing the duration of breastfeeding. PMID:26444176

  15. Efficacy of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors versus nootropics in Alzheimer's disease: a retrospective, longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Tsolaki, M; Pantazi, T; Kazis, A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of nootropics (piracetam, aniracetam, nimodopine and dihydroergicristine) versus acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChE-Is) (tacrine and donepezil) in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. This is a retrospective study of 510 patients with Alzheimer's disease. To determine clinical efficacy of treatment, we used the mean change over time in scores for the following tests: the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE); the Cambridge Cognitive Examination for the Elderly; and the Functional Rating Scale for Symptoms of Dementia. In all patients and in patients with severe Alzheimer's disease (baseline MMSE < 11), no significant differences were seen in the neuropsychological test scores between the two treatment groups. In patients with moderate dementia (baseline MMSE between 11 and 20), however, there was a significantly greater deterioration, as shown on the CAMCOG scale, after 12 months' treatment for patients receiving AChE-Is compared with those receiving nootropics (-4.38 for AChE-Is group versus 1.48 for nootropics group). For patients with mild dementia (baseline MMSE score between 21 and 26), there was a significantly greater deterioration on the MMSE scale for each time-point in the nootropics group compared with the AChE-Is group. In conclusion, we did not find any strong evidence that a difference in efficacy exists between AChE-Is and nootropics in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:11277345

  16. Efficacy assessment of SNP sets for genome-wide disease association studies.

    PubMed

    Wollstein, Andreas; Herrmann, Alexander; Wittig, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Franke, Andre; Nürnberg, Peter; Schreiber, Stefan; Krawczak, Michael; Hampe, Jochen

    2007-01-01

    The power of a genome-wide disease association study depends critically upon the properties of the marker set used, particularly the number and physical spacing of markers, and the level of inter-marker association due to linkage disequilibrium. Extending our previously devised theoretical framework for the entropy-based selection of genetic markers, we have developed a local measure of the efficacy of a marker set, relative to including a maximally polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the map position of interest. Using this quantitative criterion, we evaluated five currently available SNP sets, namely Affymetrix 100K and 500K, and Illumina 100K, 300K and 550K in the CEU, YRI and JPT + CHB HapMap populations. At 50% relative efficacy, the commercial marker sets cover between 19 and 68% of the human genome, depending upon the population under study. An optimal technology-independent 500K marker set constructed from HapMap for Caucasians, in contrast, would achieve 73% coverage at the same relative efficacy. PMID:17726055

  17. Are Prospective Elementary School Teachers' Social Studies Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Related to Their Learning Approaches in a Social Studies Teaching Methods Course?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dündar, Sahin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to contribute to the growing literature on learning approaches and teacher self-efficacy beliefs by examining associations between prospective elementary school teachers' learning approaches in a social studies teaching methods course and their social studies teaching efficacy beliefs. One hundred ninety-two prospective elementary…

  18. Palifermin for the protection and regeneration of epithelial tissues following injury: new findings in basic research and pre-clinical models

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Paul W; Mark Cross, Lawrence J; McAuley, Daniel F; Farrell, Catherine L

    2013-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a paracrine-acting epithelial mitogen produced by cells of mesenchymal origin, that plays an important role in protecting and repairing epithelial tissues. Pre-clinical data initially demonstrated that a recombinant truncated KGF (palifermin) could reduce gastrointestinal injury and mortality resulting from a variety of toxic exposures. Furthermore, the use of palifermin in patients with hematological malignancies reduced the incidence and duration of severe oral mucositis experienced after intensive chemoradiotherapy. Based upon these findings, as well as the observation that KGF receptors are expressed in many, if not all, epithelial tissues, pre-clinical studies have been conducted to determine the efficacy of palifermin in protecting different epithelial tissues from toxic injury in an attempt to model various clinical situations in which it might prove to be of benefit in limiting tissue damage. In this article, we review these studies to provide the pre-clinical background for clinical trials that are described in the accompanying article and the rationale for additional clinical applications of palifermin. PMID:24151975

  19. Preclinical Bioassay of a Polypropylene Mesh for Hernia Repair Pretreated with Antibacterial Solutions of Chlorhexidine and Allicin: An In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Köhler, Bárbara; García-Moreno, Francisca; Brune, Thierry; Pascual, Gemma; Bellón, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic mesh infection constitutes one of the major complications following hernia repair. Antimicrobial, non-antibiotic biomaterials have the potential to reduce bacterial adhesion to the mesh surface and adjacent tissues while avoiding the development of novel antibiotic resistance. This study assesses the efficacy of presoaking reticular polypropylene meshes in chlorhexidine or a chlorhexidine and allicin combination (a natural antibacterial agent) for preventing bacterial infection in a short-time hernia-repair rabbit model. Methods Partial hernia defects (5 x 2 cm) were created on the lateral right side of the abdominal wall of New Zealand White rabbits (n = 21). The defects were inoculated with 0.5 mL of a 106 CFU/mL Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 strain and repaired with a DualMesh Plus antimicrobial mesh or a Surgipro mesh presoaked in either chlorhexidine (0.05%) or allicin-chlorhexidine (900 ?g/mL-0.05%). Fourteen days post-implant, mesh contraction was measured and tissue specimens were harvested to evaluate bacterial adhesion to the implant surface (via sonication, S. aureus immunolabeling), host-tissue incorporation (via staining, scanning electron microscopy) and macrophage response (via RAM-11 immunolabeling). Results The polypropylene mesh showed improved tissue integration relative to the DualMesh Plus. Both the DualMesh Plus and the chlorhexidine-soaked polypropylene meshes exhibited high bacterial clearance, with the latter material showing lower bacterial yields. The implants from the allicin-chlorhexidine group displayed a neoformed tissue containing differently sized abscesses and living bacteria, as well as a diminished macrophage response. The allicin-chlorhexidine coated implants exhibited the highest contraction. Conclusions The presoaking of reticular polypropylene materials with a low concentration of chlorhexidine provides the mesh with antibacterial activity without disrupting tissue integration. Due to the similarities found with the antimicrobial DualMesh Plus material, the chlorhexidine concentration tested could be utilized as a prophylactic treatment to resist infection by prosthetic mesh during hernia repair. PMID:26556805

  20. Acoustic bubble removal to enhance SWL efficacy at high shock rate: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Roberts, William W; Cain, Charles A; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A; Hall, Timothy L

    2014-01-01

    Rate-dependent efficacy has been extensively documented in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) stone comminution, with shock waves (SWs) delivered at a low rate producing more efficient fragmentation in comparison to those delivered at high rates. Cavitation is postulated to be the primary source underlying this rate phenomenon. Residual bubble nuclei that persist along the axis of SW propagation can drastically attenuate the waveform's negative phase, decreasing the energy which is ultimately delivered to the stone and compromising comminution. The effect is more pronounced at high rates, as residual nuclei have less time to passively dissolve between successive shocks. In this study, we investigate a means of actively removing such nuclei from the field using a low-amplitude acoustic pulse designed to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescence. To test the efficacy of this bubble removal scheme, model kidney stones were treated in vitro using a research electrohydraulic lithotripter. SWL was applied at rates of 120, 60, or 30?SW/min with or without the incorporation of bubble removal pulses. Optical images displaying the extent of cavitation in the vicinity of the stone were also collected for each treatment. Results show that bubble removal pulses drastically enhance the efficacy of stone comminution at the higher rates tested (120 and 60?SW/min), while optical images show a corresponding reduction in bubble excitation along the SW axis when bubble removal pulses are incorporated. At the lower rate of 30?SW/min, no difference in stone comminution or bubble excitation was detected with the addition of bubble removal pulses, suggesting that remnant nuclei had sufficient time for more complete dissolution. These results corroborate previous work regarding the role of cavitation in rate-dependent SWL efficacy, and suggest that the effect can be mitigated via appropriate control of the cavitation environment surrounding the stone. PMID:23957846

  1. Acoustic Bubble Removal to Enhance SWL Efficacy at High Shock Rate: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rate-dependent efficacy has been extensively documented in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) stone comminution, with shock waves (SWs) delivered at a low rate producing more efficient fragmentation in comparison to those delivered at high rates. Cavitation is postulated to be the primary source underlying this rate phenomenon. Residual bubble nuclei that persist along the axis of SW propagation can drastically attenuate the waveform's negative phase, decreasing the energy which is ultimately delivered to the stone and compromising comminution. The effect is more pronounced at high rates, as residual nuclei have less time to passively dissolve between successive shocks. In this study, we investigate a means of actively removing such nuclei from the field using a low-amplitude acoustic pulse designed to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescence. To test the efficacy of this bubble removal scheme, model kidney stones were treated in vitro using a research electrohydraulic lithotripter. SWL was applied at rates of 120, 60, or 30?SW/min with or without the incorporation of bubble removal pulses. Optical images displaying the extent of cavitation in the vicinity of the stone were also collected for each treatment. Results show that bubble removal pulses drastically enhance the efficacy of stone comminution at the higher rates tested (120 and 60?SW/min), while optical images show a corresponding reduction in bubble excitation along the SW axis when bubble removal pulses are incorporated. At the lower rate of 30?SW/min, no difference in stone comminution or bubble excitation was detected with the addition of bubble removal pulses, suggesting that remnant nuclei had sufficient time for more complete dissolution. These results corroborate previous work regarding the role of cavitation in rate-dependent SWL efficacy, and suggest that the effect can be mitigated via appropriate control of the cavitation environment surrounding the stone. PMID:23957846

  2. Anti Cariogenic Efficacy of Herbal and Conventional Tooth Pastes - A Comparative In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    K P, Mohankumar; N K, Priya; G S, Madhushankari

    2013-01-01

    Background: An upsurge of herbal products in various catalogues of fast moving consumer goods is evident. Dental creams or pastes which have numerous brands since years, have addition of many more herbal tooth pastes. Main claim of these herbal tooth pastes being effective reduction in cavities and plaque control. Proven fact is that proper brushing with a tooth brush and tooth paste brings down the caries incidence, and there is a substantial amount of contribution made by indispensable ingredient i.e, tooth pastes and their antibacterial component. Aim: To evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of various herbal tooth pastes available in the market and compare it with a conventional tooth paste with known antibacterial effect. Materials & Methods: The antibacterial efficacy of five herbal tooth pastes and two conventional tooth pastes with different ingredients was evaluated by the zone of inhibition created around the disc on the culture plates against streptococcus mutans and lactobacillus acidophilus. Results: The herbal tooth pastes showed similar efficacy as that of the conventional tooth pastes. One herbal tooth paste with multiple herbal ingredients had greater zone of inhibition compared to the conventional tooth pastes and other herbal tooth pastes. Conclusion: Herbal tooth pastes have similar antibacterial effect as conventional tooth pastes. Tooth paste with multiple herbal ingredients is more efficient than the tooth pastes with fewer herbal ingredients in an anticariogenic property. How to cite this article: Mohan Kumar K P, Priya N K, Madhushankari G S. Anti Cariogenic Efficacy of Herbal and Conventional Tooth Pastes - A Comparative In-Vitro Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(2):8-13. PMID:24155585

  3. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a long preclinical period?

    PubMed

    Eisen, Andrew; Kiernan, Matthew; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Swash, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is conventionally considered as commencing with the recognition of clinical symptoms. We propose that, in common with other neurodegenerations, the pathogenic mechanisms culminating in ALS phenotypes begin much earlier in life. Animal models of genetically determined ALS exhibit pathological abnormalities long predating clinical deficits. The overt clinical ALS phenotype may develop when safety margins are exceeded subsequent to years of mitochondrial dysfunction, neuroinflammation or an imbalanced environment of excitation and inhibition in the neuropil. Somatic mutations, the epigenome and external environmental influences may interact to trigger a metabolic cascade that in the adult eventually exceeds functional threshold. A long preclinical and subsequent presymptomatic period pose a challenge for recognition, since it offers an opportunity for protective and perhaps even preventive therapeutic intervention to rescue dysfunctional neurons. We suggest, by analogy with other neurodegenerations and from SOD1 ALS mouse studies, that vulnerability might be induced in the perinatal period. PMID:24648037

  4. 21 CFR 310.6 - Applicability of “new drug” or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01...drugâ or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study implementation notices...hearing to identical, related, and similar drug products. 310.6 Section...

  5. 21 CFR 310.6 - Applicability of “new drug” or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01...drugâ or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study implementation notices...hearing to identical, related, and similar drug products. 310.6 Section...

  6. 21 CFR 310.6 - Applicability of “new drug” or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01...drugâ or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study implementation notices...hearing to identical, related, and similar drug products. 310.6 Section...

  7. 21 CFR 310.6 - Applicability of “new drug” or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01...drugâ or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study implementation notices...hearing to identical, related, and similar drug products. 310.6 Section...

  8. 21 CFR 310.6 - Applicability of “new drug” or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01...drugâ or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study implementation notices...hearing to identical, related, and similar drug products. 310.6 Section...

  9. [Efficacy, toxicity and mechanism of insecticide KR-100: a preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Zhi, Guo-Zhou; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Zheng, Xue-Li; Chai, Ke-Sheng; Chen, Jin-Bo; Lin, Li-Feng; Cai, Song-Wu

    2002-04-01

    KR-100 is a newly developed long-lasting insecticide that incorporates cinerins substance, drug-release control substance and synergistic agent following certain procedures under carefully regulated conditions. Tests of the efficacy, toxicity, stability and long-term effect of KR-100 were conducted, and it was show that the insecticide possessed strong and long-lasting effect against mosquitoes, flies and cockroaches but was by no means toxic to human. Morphological study of KR-100 under scanning electron microscope revealed porous membrane form. This insecticide, therefore, can be safely applied with good pesticidal effect. PMID:12390738

  10. A Comparison of the ?2/3/5 Selective Positive Allosteric Modulators L-838,417 and TPA023 in Preclinical Models of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Nickolls, Sarah; Mace, Hannah; Fish, Rebecca; Edye, Michelle; Gurrell, Rachel; Ivarsson, Magnus; Pitcher, Tom; Tanimoto-Mori, Sachi; Richardson, Denise; Sweatman, Catherine; Nicholson, Janet; Ward, Cameron; Jinks, John; Bell, Christine; Young, Kimberly; Rees, Huw; Moss, Andrew; Kinloch, Ross; McMurray, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    GABAA receptors containing ?2/3 subunits are current targets in the battle to develop new pain medications, as they are expressed in the spinal cord where increasing inhibitory drive should result in analgesia. However, this approach is prone to a range of side effects including sedation, cognitive impairment, and abuse as a consequence of the widespread influence of GABA. The ability to make subtype selective low-efficacy benzodiazepine compounds, which potentiate the action of GABA at specific ? subunits, has the potential to reduce this side effect profile. In this study, we have investigated the effects of the medium-efficacy positive allosteric modulator (PAM) L-838,417 and the low-efficacy PAM TPA023 in a number of preclinical inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. We conclude that either the higher level of efficacy at ?2/3 or efficacy at ?5 is required for compounds to have a significant analgesic effect in a range of models, and, therefore, although the side-effect profile of compounds can be reduced compared to typical benzodiazepines, it is unlikely that it can be completely eliminated. PMID:22162674

  11. Photoacoustic tomography of vascular therapy in a preclinical mouse model of colorectal carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. P.; Ogunlade, O.; Zhang, E.; Laufer, J.; Rajkumar, V.; Pedley, R. B.; Beard, P.

    2014-03-01

    Vascular therapy in oncology exploits the differences between normal blood vessels and abnormal tumour neoangiogenesis to selectively target cancer. For optimal treatment efficacy, and translation of novel compounds, the response of the tumour vasculature needs to be assessed. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is capable of this as it provides highly spatially resolved 3D images of vascular networks in biological tissue to cm depths. In preclinical models of cancer this is sufficient to encompass entire subcutaneous tumours, and can therefore be used to evaluate pharmacological intervention directed at the vasculature. In this study the vascular disrupting agent OXi4503 was used to treat subcutaneous tumour mouse models of two human colorectal carcinoma tumour types (SW1222, LS174T) at a range of concentrations (40mg/kg, 10mg/kg, 1mg/kg and sham dose control). The characteristic destruction of tumour vasculature caused by OXi4503 was observed by PAT and confirmed ex vivo via histology. Differences observed between the two tumour types assessed demonstrate the importance of tumour microenvironment and pathophysiology on response to therapy. Differential response to different doses of OXi4503 was observed, with outward tumour growth only seen once entire tumour viability had been re-established; this demonstrates the potential of PAT to act as a biomarker of response for the translation of novel anti-vascular compounds and also within the clinic. This study shows clearly that PAT can accurately assess the time course of drug action and relapse of pharmacodynamic effect in preclinical models of cancer and the important translational prospects for vascular targeted tumour therapies.

  12. Protective Vaccination against Papillomavirus-Induced Skin Tumors under Immunocompetent and Immunosuppressive Conditions: A Preclinical Study Using a Natural Outbred Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Vinzón, Sabrina E.; Braspenning-Wesch, Ilona; Müller, Martin; Geissler, Edward K.; Nindl, Ingo; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Certain cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which are ubiquitous and acquired early during childhood, can cause a variety of skin tumors and are likely involved in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer, especially in immunosuppressed patients. Hence, the burden of these clinical manifestations demands for a prophylactic approach. To evaluate whether protective efficacy of a vaccine is potentially translatable to patients, we used the rodent Mastomys coucha that is naturally infected with Mastomys natalensis papillomavirus (MnPV). This skin type papillomavirus induces not only benign skin tumours, such as papillomas and keratoacanthomas, but also squamous cell carcinomas, thereby allowing a straightforward read-out for successful vaccination in a small immunocompetent laboratory animal. Here, we examined the efficacy of a virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccine on either previously or newly established infections. VLPs raise a strong and long-lasting neutralizing antibody response that confers protection even under systemic long-term cyclosporine A treatment. Remarkably, the vaccine completely prevents the appearance of benign as well as malignant skin tumors. Protection involves the maintenance of a low viral load in the skin by an antibody-dependent prevention of virus spread. Our results provide first evidence that VLPs elicit an effective immune response in the skin under immunocompetent and immunosuppressed conditions in an outbred animal model, irrespective of the infection status at the time of vaccination. These findings provide the basis for the clinical development of potent vaccination strategies against cutaneous HPV infections and HPV-induced tumors, especially in patients awaiting organ transplantation. PMID:24586150

  13. In Vivo Stabilization of a Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist Enhances PET Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy of Prostate Cancer in Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chatalic, Kristell L.S.; Konijnenberg, Mark; Nonnekens, Julie; de Blois, Erik; Hoeben, Sander; de Ridder, Corrina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; van Gent, Dik C.; Nock, Berthold A.; Maina, Theodosia; van Weerden, Wytske M.; de Jong, Marion

    2016-01-01

    A single tool for early detection, accurate staging, and personalized treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) would be a major breakthrough in the field of PCa. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeting peptides are promising probes for a theranostic approach for PCa overexpressing GRPR. However, the successful application of small peptides in a theranostic approach is often hampered by their fast in vivo degradation by proteolytic enzymes, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP). Here we show for the first time that co-injection of a NEP inhibitor (phosphoramidon (PA)) can lead to an impressive enhancement of diagnostic sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of the theranostic 68Ga-/177Lu-JMV4168 GRPR-antagonist. Co-injection of PA (300 µg) led to stabilization of 177Lu-JMV4168 in murine peripheral blood. In PC-3 tumor-bearing mice, PA co-injection led to a two-fold increase in tumor uptake of 68Ga-/177Lu-JMV4168, 1 h after injection. In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 68Ga-JMV4168, PA co-injection substantially enhanced PC-3 tumor signal intensity. Radionuclide therapy with 177Lu-JMV4168 resulted in significant regression of PC-3 tumor size. Radionuclide therapy efficacy was confirmed by production of DNA double strand breaks, decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Increased survival rates were observed in mice treated with 177Lu-JMV4168 plus PA as compared to those without PA. This data shows that co-injection of the enzyme inhibitor PA greatly enhances the theranostic potential of GRPR-radioantagonists for future application in PCa patients. PMID:26722377

  14. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Ten Commercially Available Herbal Dentifrices against Specific Oral Microflora – In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Padma; Hemalatha; Reddy, Srikanth; Doshi, Dolar; Kulkarni, Suhas; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine and compare the antimicrobial efficacy of ten commercially available herbal dentifrices against specific strains of oral microflora using a standard diffusion method at full strength and 1:1 dilution at 24 h. Materials and Methods: The standard strains of Streptococcus. mutans (ATCC 21293), Streptococcus sangius (MTCC 442), Actinomyces viscosus (ATCC 3268), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 2592), Streptococcus pyogenes (MTCC 442) and Candida albicans (ATCC 183) were obtained. Antimicrobial efficacy of the dentifrices was tested in triplicate, at full strength and 1:1 dilution with the sterile water using a standard diffusion method for 24 h at 37°C. The antimicrobial efficacy was tested by observing the zones of inhibition in millimeters surrounding disk containing the dentifrice. Mean standard deviation and standard error of mean of the inhibitory zones was calculated for each herbal dentifrice. p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Danth Kanthi (DK) was the most effective against all the microorganisms producing larger zones of inhibition at 24 h (F.S – 40±1.5; 1:1 dilution – 40±2.71). Amar Premium (AP) also produced larger zones of inhibition against all microorganisms except S. aureus. Of all the dentifrices, least zones of inhibitions i.e., around 5 mm was observed against S. aureus by Amar Premium (AP) and Dabur Babool (DB) at 24 h. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, it can be concluded that all herbal dentifrices exhibited antimicrobial activity against the selected oral microorganisms, with DK being the most effective. Hence, it can be inferred that herbal dentifrices can also be recommended like the conventional formulations. PMID:26023642

  15. Growth Hormone Protects the Intestine Preserving Radiotherapy Efficacy on Tumors: A Short-Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Caz, Victor; Elvira, Marcos; Tabernero, Maria; Grande, Antonio G.; Lopez-Plaza, Bricia; de Miguel, Enrique; Largo, Carlota; Santamaria, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy on tumors is hampered by its devastating adverse effects on healthy tissue, particularly that of the gastrointestinal tract. These effects cause acute symptoms that are so disruptive to patients that they can lead to interruption of the radiotherapy program. These adverse effects could limit the intensity of radiation received by the patient, resulting in a sublethal dose to the tumor, thus increasing the risk of tumor resistance. The lack of an effective treatment to protect the bowel during radiation therapy to allow higher radiation doses that are lethal to the tumor has become a barrier to implementing effective therapy. In this study, we present a comparative analysis of both intestinal and tumor tissue in regard to the efficacy and the preventive impact of a short-term growth hormone (GH) treatment in tumor-bearing rats as a protective agent during radiotherapy. Our data show that the exogenous administration of GH improved intestinal recovery after radiation treatment while preserving the therapeutic effect against the tumor. GH significantly increased proliferation in the irradiated intestine but not in the irradiated tumors, as assessed by Positron Emission Tomography and the proliferative markers Ki67, cyclin D3, and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen. This proliferative effect was consistent with a significant increase in irradiated intestinal villi and crypt length. Furthermore, GH significantly decreased caspase-3 activity in the intestine, whereas GH did not produce this effect in the irradiated tumors. In conclusion, short-term GH treatment protects the bowel, inducing proliferation while reducing apoptosis in healthy intestinal tissue and preserving radiotherapy efficacy on tumors. PMID:26670463

  16. Preclinical hyperthyroidism in multinodular goiter.

    PubMed

    Gemsenjäger, E; Staub, J J; Girard, J; Heitz, P

    1976-10-01

    The thyrotropin (TSH) response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone(TRH) (200 mug iv) was determined in 80 surgical patients with nontoxic multinodular goiter. The TSH reserve was normal in multinodular goiter. The TSH reserve was normal in 55 and elavated in 8 patients. No TSH response to TRH (deltaTSH less than or equal to 1 muU/ml) was detectable in 17 patients (21%). Individual and mean serum T4, FT4I and serum T3 values did not differ from normal in 13 of the TRH unresponsive patients; in 4 patients FT4I or serum T3 was marginally elevated. No statistical differences were noted for I131-uptake, PBI131 and conversion rate between controls and TRH unresponsive patients. All patients who failed to respond to TRH were euthyroid on clinical evaluation. Goiters were large multinodular and long-standing in most instances. In 12 tested subjects TRH responsiveness recovered following partial thyroidectomy. In 3 of 7 TRH unresponsive euthyroid patients tested 9-12 days post surgery a transient lack of TSH to respond to TRH was observed. Recovery of TRH responsiveness was accompanied by a significant (P IS LESS THAN 0, 02) decrease in serum T4and FT4I in the euthyroid range, whereas no change in serum T3 occurred. It is suggested that TRH unresponsiveness represents a state of preclinical hyperthyroidism maintained by autonomously functioning goiter compartments. PMID:61970

  17. A comparative study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combination topical preparations in acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jasleen; Sehgal, Vijay K; Gupta, Anita K; Singh, Surinder P

    2015-01-01

    Background: The combinations of topical keratolytics with anti-microbials and topical retinoids with antimicrobials are commonly prescribed in the treatment of acne. Aim: The present study was undertaken with the aim of comparing the efficacy and safety of topical benzoyl peroxide and clindamycin versus topical benzoyl peroxide and nadifloxacin versus topical tretinoin and clindamycin in patients of acne vulgaris. Materials and Methods: 100 patients between 15 and 35 years having ?2 and ?30 inflammatory and/or noninflammatory lesions with Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) score 2/3 were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group A was prescribed benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel and clindamycin 1% gel, Group B was prescribed benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel and nadifloxacin 1% cream and Group C was prescribed tretinoin 0.025% and clindamycin 1% gel. Total number of lesions and adverse effects during the treatment were assessed at 0, 4, 8, 12 weeks with IGA score. Results: There was statistically significant reduction in total number of lesions with better improvement in Group A. Adverse drug reactions during the study showed a better safety profile of Group B which is found to be statistically significant also. Conclusion: These findings confirm that Group A is more efficacious and Group B is safest among the other two groups. PMID:26097817

  18. Career interest, self-efficacy, and perception in undecided and nursing undergraduate students: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Fillman, Valentina M

    2015-01-01

    Career choice variables of career interest, self-efficacy, and perception were chosen based upon Social Cognitive Career Theory concepts for study between nursing and undecided undergraduate student groups. Components of the Career Search Questionnaire and Perceptions of Professional Nursing instruments were combined and adapted to form the Career Choice Survey for use in this research. This web-based survey totaling 40 questions was sent to 577 undergraduate students with a 12% response rate (N=68). Due to the need to increase nursing recruitment and retention, hypotheses were developed that distinguish if any relationship existed between groups. Findings of this quantitative study resulted in statistically significant results on two of the three variable hypotheses (p=.006 for career interest, p=.002 for self-efficacy, p=.395 for perception), aligning with previous research and provide insight into the change in nursing perception. Overall, scores for each subscale were encouraging to current nurses and expected from undecided students. Implications for practice include increases in accurate nursing portrayal in the media and early career counseling to younger populations. Nurse educators can further research in career choice with focus on continuing education for current nurses and recruitment of young nursing hopefuls. PMID:25218036

  19. Synaptic Efficacy as a Function of Ionotropic Receptor Distribution: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Sushmita L.; Bouteiller, Jean-Marie C.; Hu, Eric Y.; Ambert, Nicolas; Greget, Renaud; Bischoff, Serge; Baudry, Michel; Berger, Theodore W.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic synapses are the most prevalent functional elements of information processing in the brain. Changes in pre-synaptic activity and in the function of various post-synaptic elements contribute to generate a large variety of synaptic responses. Previous studies have explored postsynaptic factors responsible for regulating synaptic strength variations, but have given far less importance to synaptic geometry, and more specifically to the subcellular distribution of ionotropic receptors. We analyzed the functional effects resulting from changing the subsynaptic localization of ionotropic receptors by using a hippocampal synaptic computational framework. The present study was performed using the EONS (Elementary Objects of the Nervous System) synaptic modeling platform, which was specifically developed to explore the roles of subsynaptic elements as well as their interactions, and that of synaptic geometry. More specifically, we determined the effects of changing the localization of ionotropic receptors relative to the presynaptic glutamate release site, on synaptic efficacy and its variations following single pulse and paired-pulse stimulation protocols. The results indicate that changes in synaptic geometry do have consequences on synaptic efficacy and its dynamics. PMID:26480028

  20. Field study on the efficacy of an oral 2% ivermectin formulation in horses.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, André Antonio; Santos, Anderson Tintino dos; Allegretti, Silmara Marques

    2011-01-01

    Twenty horses naturally infected with nematodes were included in a blind, controlled field study on efficacy and safety of an oral 2% ivermectin formulation at a dose of 0.2 mg.kg(-1). Horses were divided into treated and non-treated (control) groups with ten animals each based on preliminary counts of eggs per gram of feces (EPG). Stool samples were collected after treatment for identification of nematode species. Clinical evaluations and EPG counts were performed on days 0, +5, +14 and +19. Nineteen nematode species were identified: Coronocyclus ulambajari, Craterostomum acuticaudatum, Cyathostomum catinatum, Cyathostomum pateratum, Cylicocyclus brevicapsulatus, Cylicocyclus insigne, Cylicocyclus leptostomum, Cylicocyclus nassatus, Cylicocyclus ultrajectinus, Cylicocyclus spp., Cylicostephanus calicatus, Cylicostephanus longibursatus, Cylicostephanus poculatus, Habronema muscae, Habronema spp., Parascaris equorum, Poteriostomum imparidentatum, Oxyuris equi and Triodontophorus spp. The mean EPG counts of treated and non-treated (control) groups on Days ?15, 0, +5, +14 and +19 were 1925, 1340, 0, 12.5, 0, 1470, 790, 875, 1605 and 1240 respectively. The efficacy of treatment on Days +5, +14 and +19 was 100, 99.2 and 100% respectively, with a significant difference compared to the control group (p < 0.01). The product was considered to be safe with no findings of clinical significant changes during the study. PMID:21722495

  1. Efficacy of Epley's Maneuver in Treating BPPV Patients: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Sushil; Awasthi, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadouriya, Sunil Kumar Singh; Saxena, Rohit; Pathak, Vivek Kumar; Bisht, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo and balance disorders are among the most common symptoms encountered in patients who visit ENT outpatient department. This is associated with risk of falling and is compounded in elderly persons with other neurologic deficits and chronic medical problems. BPPV is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo. BPPV is a common vestibular disorder leading to significant morbidity, psychosocial impact, and medical costs. The objective of Epley's maneuver, which is noninvasive, inexpensive, and easily administered, is to move the canaliths out of the canal to the utricle where they no longer affect the canal dynamics. Our study aims to analyze the response to Epley's maneuver in a series of patients with posterior canal BPPV and compares the results with those treated exclusively by medical management alone. Even though many studies have been conducted to prove the efficacy of this maneuver, this study reinforces the validity of Epley's maneuver by comparison with the medical management. PMID:26495002

  2. Efficacy of Steroid Pulse Therapy for Autoimmune Pancreatitis Type 1: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Mitsuru; Takagi, Tadayuki; Suzuki, Rei; Konno, Naoki; Watanabe, Ko; Nakamura, Jun; Kikuchi, Hitomi; Waragai, Yuichi; Asama, Hiroyuki; Takasumi, Mika; Hikichi, Takuto; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is treatable with steroids, but relapse is frequent. The efficacy of steroid pulse therapy has been shown for various autoimmune diseases, but has not become established therapy. In this study, we reviewed the efficacy of steroid pulse therapy in 24 subjects who were diagnosed with AIP type 1 at our hospital. Patient characteristics, time-course of serum IgG4, and the cumulative relapse-free survival rate were compared between patients who received oral steroid therapy (oral group) and those who were treated with steroid pulse therapy (pulse group). Serum IgG4 was reduced significantly after therapy in both groups and the 5-year cumulative relapse-free survival rates in the two groups did not differ significantly (oral group 46.9%, pulse group 77.8%). However, in a subset of cases with diffuse pancreatic swelling, this rate was significantly lower in the oral group (33.3% vs. 100.0%, p = 0.046). These results suggest that steroid pulse therapy is effective for prevention of relapse in AIP patients with diffuse pancreatic swelling. PMID:26381760

  3. Comparison of Plaque Inhibiting Efficacies of Aloe Vera and Propolis Tooth Gels: A Randomized PCR Study

    PubMed Central

    Sunkara, Musalaiah Svv; Pantareddy, Indeevar; Sudhakar, Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    Backgound and Aim Allopathic medications used for periodontal disease are known to be associated with various side effects. Hence a search for naturotherapies are on the rise. Among the natural pharmacons available aloevera and propolis are considered to be effective and free from adverse effects. Taking this into account, the present study was done to compare the plaque inhibiting efficacies of Aloe vera and Propolis tooth gels in patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods Forty patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis were randomly allocated to groups A and B containing 20 patients each. Patients in group A were advised to use Aloe vera tooth gel while those in group B were advised to use Propolis tooth gel. Clinical and microbiologic parameters using Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were recorded at baseline and after 3 months. Results Student t-test was performed for all the obtained results. In the Aloe vera group, comparison of baseline PCR and after 3 month results showed reduction only in P. gingivalis (p=0.001), where as statistically significant reduction in all the three red complex microorganisms was seen in propolis group. All the clinical parameters (Plaque Index, Gingival Index, Bleeding on Probing, Probing pocket Depth, and Clinical Attachment Level) in both the groups showed statistically significant reductions after 3 months. Conclusion Propolis showed a statistically significant reduction in plaque, microbiologic and clinical parameters. However, clinical trials of longer durations with larger sample sizes are required to evaluate the efficacy. PMID:26501001

  4. A Self-Efficacy Scale for Clinical Nurse Leaders: Results of a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Mattia J; Nokes, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Introduced in 2003, the Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) role is the first new nursing role introduced in more than 30 years. The hallmark of CNL practice is the management of client-centered care and clinical excellence at the point of care. As part of multifaceted efforts to implement the CNL role, understanding how an individual's self-efficacy with the identified role competencies changes over time has important implications for individuals, educational programs preparing CNLs, and health care organizations employing CNLs. In this study, preliminary psychometric analyses assessing the construct validity, reliability, and discriminant validity for a new state-specific scale (CNL Self-Efficacy Scale) that assesses nurses' perceptions of their ability to function effectively as a CNL are reported. Because self-confidence is a key predictor of successful role transition, job satisfaction, and job performance, measuring individuals' self-confidence with the core competencies associated with the CNL role over time will be important to gain the full benefit of this innovative, unit-based advanced generalist role. PMID:26259337

  5. Efficacy of double gloving technique in major and minor oral surgical procedures: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Padhye, Mukul N.; Girotra, Charu; Khosla, Aman R.; Gupta, Kavita V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: A prospective analysis was carried out over a 1-year period to assess gloves used during 100 major and 100 minor oral surgical procedures to test for efficacy of double gloving in oral surgical procedures. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of double gloving technique in preventing cross infection in both major and minor oral surgical procedures. Materials and Methods: Gloves used during 100 major and 100 minor oral surgical procedures were analyzed to check for glove perforations and skin punctures. 100 sterile gloves were tested as control. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square test was used to determine whether there was any difference between the expected and observed values in various categories. Results: A higher number of glove perforations was seen in minor oral surgical procedures compared with major surgeries, dominant hand compared with the nondominant, outer gloves compared with the inner, in procedures which took a longer duration of time to complete, in procedures involving wiring and in the index finger followed by the thumb and the palm. Conclusion: Double gloving technique using sterile gloves can be used as an effective means of infection control for all major and minor surgical procedures, especially high-risk procedures involving patients who maybe suffering from or carriers of blood-borne infections. PMID:23483758

  6. A Comparative Study of Efficacy and Safety of Agomelatine and Escitalopram in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nukala, Srikrishna; Palla, Jayasree; Nambaru, Lakshmana Rao; Kasturi, Satyanarayana Murthy

    2015-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a mental disorder characterized by episodes of depressed mood, loss of interest or pleasure, feeling of guilt or low self-esteem, loss of energy, altered sleep patterns and difficulty in concentration. Objective This study was carried out to compare the efficacy and safety of Agomelatine with Escitalopram in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Design and Setting This is a prospective study conducted at Outpatient Department of Psychiatry, GSL Medical College & General hospital, Rajahmundry, India. Materials and Methods Patients with newly diagnosed major depressive disorder (DSM-IV-TR) with minimum score of 20 in Hamilton depression rating scale were randomly assigned Agomelatine (25-50 mg/day) or Escitalopram (10-20 mg/day) for a period of 8 weeks. The main efficacy outcome considered was the mean change of HAM-D17 score from baseline to end of therapy. Secondary outcome measures were Clinical Global Impressions–improvement (CGI) and severity (CGI-S) rating scales. Statistical Analysis Student t-test was used for comparing the groups and chi-square test was used for assessing the qualitative variables. For all statistical analysis p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The drugs under study effectively reduced depressive symptoms at all the time points. The percentage of responders at 8weeks (last post baseline value) was 65.38% with Agomelatine and 57.40% with Escitalopram. The difference between the drugs was statistically not significant in all evaluations (p>0.05). The mean CGI-S and CGI-I scores were decreased in both the groups (p<0.05) and there was no statistically significant difference between the groups at any assessment during the study period. Both the treatment groups showed favourable safety profile. Conclusion The study results supported that Agomelatine is therapeutically similar to Escitalopram in terms of antidepressant effect. PMID:26266196

  7. Comparison of a newly-designed stack-up collimator with conventional parallel-hole collimators in pre-clinical CZT gamma camera systems: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-10-01

    Recently, many studies have been conducted with pixelated semiconductor detectors that use cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) because these detectors have many advantages in pre-clinical gamma imaging. Collimators play an extremely important role in the imaging performance of pixelated semiconductor gamma cameras. In our previous study, based on the pixelated semiconductor gamma camera system we recommended the use of a pixelated parallel-hole collimator with equal hole and pixel sizes; this approach improved both the sensitivity and the spatial resolution. However, the pixelated parallel-hole collimator had two major limitations: (a) Although its sensitivity was higher than that of pinhole systems, the pixelated parallel-hole collimator may have still resulted in a partial loss of sensitivity due to its small collimator hole size. (b) The pixelated parallel-hole collimator with an adequate septal height was difficult to manufacture due to its small holes. Here, we present a new design for a parallel-hole collimator, which uses the stack-up method and a CZT pixelated semiconductor gamma camera system. The purpose of this study was to compare the performances of various geometric designs of our newly-designed parallel-hole collimator with those of conventional parallel-hole collimators [low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) and low-energy high-sensitivity (LEHS)]. The detector was modeled as an eValuator-2500 (eV Microelectronics Inc., Saxonburg, PA, USA) (3-mm thick, 0.5-mm pixel size) by using a Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation. The proposed parallel-hole collimator consisted of two overlapping parallel-hole collimators. The size of each hole in the proposed parallel-hole collimator was four times that of the hole in the pixelated parallel-hole collimator. The overlap ratios of these collimators were 1 : 1, 1 : 2, 2 : 1, 1 : 5, and 5 : 1. To evaluate and compare the performances of these systems, we evaluated the sensitivity and the spatial resolution of each system. The average sensitivities of the proposed parallel-hole collimators with overlap ratios of 1 : 1, 1 : 2 or 2 : 1, and 1 : 5 or 5 : 1 and of the LEHS conventional parallel-hole collimator were 2.17, 3.45, 13.90, and 3.68 times higher than the average sensitivities of the LEHR conventional parallel-hole collimator, respectively. The average spatial resolution also varied depending on the distance from the collimator. In conclusion, we successfully designed a novel parallel-hole collimator for pre-clinical imaging; this novel collimator employs the stack-up method with a CZT pixelated semiconductor gamma camera.

  8. Efficacy and safety of moxifloxacin in community acquired pneumonia: a prospective, multicenter, observational study (CAPRIVI)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity, hospitalization, and mortality worldwide. Management of CAP for many patients requires rapid initiation of empirical antibiotic treatment, based on the spectrum of activity of available antimicrobial agents and evidence on local antibiotic resistance. Few data exist on the severity profile and treatment of hospitalized CAP patients in Eastern and Central Europe and the Middle East, in particular on use of moxifloxacin (Avelox®), which is approved in these regions. Methods CAPRIVI (Community Acquired Pneumonia: tReatment wIth AVelox® in hospItalized patients) was a prospective observational study in 12 countries: Croatia, France, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russia, Ukraine, and Macedonia. Patients aged >18 years were treated with moxifloxacin 400 mg daily following hospitalization with a CAP diagnosis. In addition to efficacy and safety outcomes, data were collected on patient history and disease severity measured by CRB-65 score. Results 2733 patients were enrolled. A low severity index (i.e., CRB-65 score <2) was reported in 87.5% of CAP patients assessed (n?=?1847), an unexpectedly high proportion for hospitalized patients. Moxifloxacin administered for a mean of 10.0 days (range: 2.0 to 39.0 days) was highly effective: 96.7% of patients in the efficacy population (n?=?2152) improved and 93.2% were cured of infection during the study. Severity of infection changed from “moderate” or “severe” in 91.8% of patients at baseline to “no infection” or “mild” in 95.5% at last visit. In the safety population (n?=?2595), 127 (4.9%) patients had treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and 40 (1.54%) patients had serious TEAEs; none of these 40 patients died. The safety results were consistent with the known profile of moxifloxacin. Conclusions The efficacy and safety profiles of moxifloxacin at the recommended dose of 400 mg daily are characterized in this large observational study of hospitalized CAP patients from Eastern and Central Europe and the Middle East. The high response rate in this study, which included patients with a range of disease severities, suggests that treatment with broader-spectrum drugs such as moxifloxacin is appropriate for patients with CAP who are managed in hospital. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00987792 PMID:24975809

  9. Aminopyrazole–Phenylalanine Based GPR142 Agonists: Discovery of Tool Compound and in Vivo Efficacy Studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we report the lead optimization of amrinone–phenylalanine based GPR142 agonists. Structure–activity relationship studies led to the discovery of aminopyrazole–phenylalanine carboxylic acid 22, which exhibited good agonistic activity, high target selectivity, desirable pharmacokinetic properties, and no cytochrome P450 or hERG liability. Compound 22, together with its orally bioavailable ethyl ester prodrug 23, were found to be suitable for in vivo proof-of-concept studies. Compound 23 displayed good efficacy in a mouse oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Compound 22 showed GPR142 dependent stimulation of insulin secretion in isolated mouse islets and demonstrated a statistically significant glucose lowering effect in a mouse model bearing transplanted human islets. PMID:24900757

  10. Preclinical safety testing for cell-based products using animals.

    PubMed

    McBlane, James W

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of preclinical testing include to show why there might be therapeutic benefit in patients and to provide information on the product's toxicity. For cell-based products, given even once, there may be long term exposure and this could imply, unlike for conventional drugs, that all preclinical studies may be needed prior to first human use. The duration of exposure to cells should be studied in animals to guide toxicity assessments. Distribution of cells after administration by a route resembling that intended in humans should be studied to understand potential risks. Risk of tumour formation with the product may also need to be characterised. To the extent that this information can be generated by in vitro testing, studies in animals may not be needed and limitations on the capability of preclinical data to predict human toxicity are recognised: species-specificity make some cell products act only in humans and a human cell-product might be expected to be rejected by immunocompetent animals. Does this suggest testing in immunosuppressed animals or of development of an animal-cell product supposedly similar to the human cell product? No single answer seems to fit every situation. PMID:26026578

  11. Association of Learning Styles with Research Self-Efficacy: Study of Short-Term Research Training Program for Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Dumbauld, Jill; Black, Michelle; Depp, Colin A.; Daly, Rebecca; Curran, Maureen A.; Winegarden, Babbi; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose With a growing need for developing future physician scientists, identifying characteristics of medical students who are likely to benefit from research training programs is important. This study assessed if specific learning styles of medical students, participating in federally funded short-term research training programs, were associated with research self-efficacy, a predictor of research career success. Method Seventy-five first-year medical students from 28 medical schools, selected to participate in two competitive NIH-supported summer programs for research training in aging, completed rating scales to evaluate learning styles at baseline, and research self-efficacy before and after training. We examined associations of individual learning styles (visual-verbal, sequential-global, sensing-intuitive, and active-reflective) with students’ gender, ranking of medical school, and research self-efficacy. Results Research self-efficacy improved significantly following the training programs. Students with a verbal learning style reported significantly greater research self-efficacy at baseline, while visual, sequential, and intuitive learners demonstrated significantly greater increases in research self-efficacy from baseline to post-training. No significant relationships were found between learning styles and students’ gender or ranking of their medical school. Conclusions Assessments of learning styles may provide useful information to guide future training endeavors aimed at developing the next generation of physician-scientists. PMID:25079678

  12. Safety and efficacy of buprenorphine/naloxone in opioid-dependent patients: an Italian observational study.

    PubMed

    Magnelli, Fernanda; Biondi, Lorita; Calabria, Roberto; Fiore, Angelo; Peluso, Eugenio; Vonella, Domenico; Rota, Amerigo Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Opioid dependence is a growing problem. Methadone is an established agent for the treatment of opioid dependence, but there is a risk of this agent being abused, a potential for interaction with antiretroviral agents and a risk of cardiac toxicity. Another option is the partial mu-opioid receptor opioid agonist buprenorphine, which has been used successfully to manage opioid dependence. While the risk of abuse is lower than that for methadone, there is still a risk. The sublingual combination formulation of buprenorphine and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (buprenorphine/naxolone) is a newer agent with reduced abuse potential, and has been shown to have promising efficacy for opioid dependence. We describe the results of an observational study investigating the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine/naloxone in opioid-dependent patients. A total of 77 patients were included and were switched from buprenorphine to sublingual tables of buprenorphine/naloxone; the buprenorphine dosage was titrated to achieve good control of withdrawal symptoms. The prevalence of withdrawal symptoms, craving, constipation, cramps, insomnia, sexual activity, depression, sweating, distress, bone/joint pain and drowsiness were compared over the first 30 days of treatment (period 1) and the total 120-day study duration (period 2). The average buprenorphine/naloxone dose in period 1 was 7.3 mg/day and 12.7 mg/day in period 2. Most patients did not experience any withdrawal symptoms in either period 1 or period 2. Fewer than 20% of patients experienced any cravings over the 120-day study period. Importantly, the adverse effects observed were usually mild, with very few patients experiencing significant adverse effects. This study shows that buprenorphine/naloxone is an effective and well tolerated treatment for opioid withdrawal when the dosage is titrated to achieve good control of withdrawal symptoms. Switching from buprenorphine alone to buprenorphine/naloxone was possible with very little discomfort for the patient and effective retained patients in treatment. PMID:20450242

  13. A Flexible, Preclinical, Medical School Curriculum Increases Student Academic Productivity and the Desire to Conduct Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Justin G.; Grande, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, small blocks of flexible curriculum time, termed selectives, were implemented in the Mayo Medical School preclinical curriculum. Selectives permitted students to pursue professional endeavors, such as research, service, and career exploration, in the preclinical years. The purpose of this study was to survey current and former Mayo…

  14. Dual serotonin and noradrenaline uptake inhibitor class of antidepressants potential for greater efficacy or just hype?

    PubMed

    Wong, David T; Bymaster, Frank P

    2002-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies support the rationale that development of single molecules, which would promote serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission by inhibiting simultaneously the uptake of both monoamines, would potentially result in improved antidepressant drugs. Currently, the dual inhibitors of serotonin and noradrenaline uptake are venlafaxine, milnacipran and duloxetine. Based on the preclinical studies, the three drugs do show properties of inhibiting uptake of both monoamines in vitro and in vivo in the following order of decreasing potency: duloxetine, venlafaxine and milnacipran, and all exhibit low affinity at neuronal receptors of neurotransmitters, suggesting low side-effect potential. In double-blind, controlled studies, venlafaxine and milnacipran were repeatedly shown to be as efficacious as tricyclic antidepressant drugs in treating major depressive disorder, while one double-blind, placebo-controlled trial showed the antidepressant efficacy of duloxetine. Specifically designed comparative trials of dual uptake inhibitors against the other agents are needed to establish whether the dual uptake inhibitors show improvement in efficacy, rate of responders, antidepressive effects and/or remission. PMID:12079200

  15. Comparative Study for Efficacy and Safety of Adenoidectomy according to the Surgical Method: A Prospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Hyun; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Sung Wan; Kim, Young Hyo; Nam, Jung Gwon; Park, Seok-Won; Park, Chan-Soon; Bae, Woo Yong; Yeo, Nam-Kyung; Won, Tae-Bin; Lee, Seung Hoon; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Hyoung Joo; Kim, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Sung-Wook; Choi, Jeong-Seok; Han, Doo Hee; Choi, Ji Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective There have been several operative techniques for adenoidectomy and their efficacy and morbidity are different according to the technique. This prospective multicenter study was aimed to compare the efficacy and morbidity of coblation adenoidectomy (CA) with those of power-assisted adenoidectomy. Study Design Prospective multi-institutional study. Methods Children who underwent CA, power-assisted adenoidectomy with cauterization (PAA+C) or without cauterization (PAA-C) due to adenoid hypertrophy were enrolled from 13 hospitals between July 2013 and June 2014. Mean operation time, degree of intraoperative bleeding and postoperative bleeding rate were evaluated. Results A total of 388 children (mean age ± standard deviation = 6.6 ± 2.5 years; 245 males and 143 females) were included. According to the adenoidectomy technique, the children were classified into 3 groups: (1) CA (n = 116); (2) PAA+C (n = 153); and (3) PAA-C (n = 119). Significant differences were not found in age and sex among three groups. In the CA group, mean operation time was significantly shorter (P < 0.001) and degree of intraoperative bleeding was significantly less (P < 0.001) compared to PAA+C or PAA-C group. Delayed postoperative bleeding rate of PAA-C group was significantly higher than that of CA or PAA+C group (P = 0.016). Conclusions This prospective multicenter study showed that CA was superior to PAA in terms of mean operation time and degree of intraoperative bleeding. PMID:26267337

  16. Preliminary Study of the Autism Self-Efficacy Scale for Teachers (ASSET)

    PubMed Central

    Ruble, Lisa A.; Toland, Michael D.; Birdwhistell, Jessica L.; McGrew, John H.; Usher, Ellen L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate a new measure, the Autism Self-Efficacy Scale for Teachers (ASSET) for its dimensionality, internal consistency, and construct validity derived in a sample of special education teachers (N = 44) of students with autism. Results indicate that all items reflect one dominant factor, teachers’ responses to items were internally consistent within the sample, and compared to a 100-point scale, a 6-point response scale is adequate. ASSET scores were found to be negatively correlated with scores on two subscale measures of teacher stress (i.e., self-doubt/need for support and disruption of the teaching process) but uncorrelated with teacher burnout scores. The ASSET is a promising tool that requires replication with larger samples. PMID:23976899

  17. Efficacy and Tolerability of Antibiotic Combinations in Neurobrucellosis: Results of the Istanbul Study

    PubMed Central

    Ulu-Kilic, Ay?egül; Kilic, Selim; Karahocagil, Mustafa; Shehata, Ghaydaa; Eren-Tulek, Necla; Yetkin, Funda; Celen, Mustafa Kemal; Ceran, Nurgul; Gul, Hanefi Cem; Mert, Gurkan; Tekin-Koruk, Suda; Dizbay, Murat; Inal, Ayse Seza; Nayman-Alpat, Sayg?n; Bosilkovski, Mile; Inan, Dilara; Saltoglu, Nese; Abdel-Baky, Laila; Adeva-Bartolome, Maria Teresa; Ceylan, Bahad?r; Sacar, Suzan; Turhan, Vedat; Y?lmaz, Emel; Elaldi, Nazif; Kocak-Tufan, Zeliha; U?urlu, Kenan; Dokuzo?uz, Ba?ak; Y?lmaz, Hava; Gundes, Sibel; Guner, Rahmet; Ozgunes, Nail; Ulcay, Asim; Unal, Serhat; Dayan, Saim; Gorenek, Levent; Karakas, Ahmet; Tasova, Yesim; Usluer, Gaye; Bayindir, Yasar; Kurtaran, Behice; Sipahi, Oguz Resat; Leblebicioglu, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    No data on whether brucellar meningitis or meningoencephalitis can be treated with oral antibiotics or whether an intravenous extended-spectrum cephalosporin, namely, ceftriaxone, which does not accumulate in phagocytes, should be added to the regimen exist in the literature. The aim of a study conducted in Istanbul, Turkey, was to compare the efficacy and tolerability of ceftriaxone-based antibiotic treatment regimens with those of an oral treatment protocol in patients with these conditions. This retrospective study enrolled 215 adult patients in 28 health care institutions from four different countries. The first protocol (P1) comprised ceftriaxone, rifampin, and doxycycline. The second protocol (P2) consisted of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, rifampin, and doxycycline. In the third protocol (P3), the patients started with P1 and transferred to P2 when ceftriaxone was stopped. The treatment period was shorter with the regimens which included ceftriaxone (4.40 ± 2.47 months in P1, 6.52 ± 4.15 months in P2, and 5.18 ± 2.27 months in P3) (P = 0.002). In seven patients, therapy was modified due to antibiotic side effects. When these cases were excluded, therapeutic failure did not differ significantly between ceftriaxone-based regimens (n = 5/166, 3.0%) and the oral therapy (n = 4/42, 9.5%) (P = 0.084). The efficacy of the ceftriaxone-based regimens was found to be better (n = 6/166 [3.6%] versus n = 6/42 [14.3%]; P = 0.017) when a composite negative outcome (CNO; relapse plus therapeutic failure) was considered. Accordingly, CNO was greatest in P2 (14.3%, n = 6/42) compared to P1 (2.6%, n = 3/117) and P3 (6.1%, n = 3/49) (P = 0.020). Seemingly, ceftriaxone-based regimens are more successful and require shorter therapy than the oral treatment protocol. PMID:22155822

  18. Anticancer efficacy and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity studies of Aspergiolide A in early drug development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Qi, Xin; Li, Dehai; Zhu, Tianjiao; Mo, Xiaomei; Li, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Since the first anthracycline was discovered, many other related compounds have been studied in order to overcome its defects and improve efficacy. In the present paper, we investigated the anticancer effects of a new anthracycline, aspergiolide A (ASP-A), from a marine-derived fungus in vitro and in vivo, and we evaluated the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity drug properties in early drug development. We found that ASP-A had activity against topoisomerase II that was comparable to adriamycin. ASP-A decreased the growth of various human cancer cells in vitro and induced apoptosis in BEL-7402 cells via a caspase-dependent pathway. The anticancer efficacy of ASP-A on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts was further assessed in vivo. Results showed that, compared with the vehicle group, ASP-A exhibited significant anticancer activity with less loss of body weight. A pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study revealed that ASP-A was rapidly cleared in a first order reaction kinetics manner, and was enriched in cancer tissue. The maximal tolerable dose (MTD) of ASP-A was more than 400 mg/kg, and ASP-A was not considered to be potentially genotoxic or cardiotoxic, as no significant increase of micronucleus rates or inhibition of the hERG channel was seen. Finally, an uptake and transport assay of ASP-A was performed in monolayers of Caco-2 cells, and ASP-A was shown to be absorbed through the active transport pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that ASP-A has anticancer activity targeting topoisomerase II, with a similar structure and mechanism to adriamycin, but with much lower toxicity. Nonetheless, further molecular structure optimization is necessary. PMID:25378909

  19. A Comparative Study of Pre-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs before and after Work-Integrated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matoti, S. N.; Junqueira, K. E.; Odora, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the teaching efficacy beliefs of pre-service teachers before and after work-integrated learning (WIL) in a South African University of Technology. The comparison groups were formed based on the criterion of WIL. Pre-service teachers in their third year of the B.Ed. (FET) programme participated in the study

  20. Service Learning and Its Influenced to Pre-Service Teachers: Social Responsibility and Self-Efficacy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasertsang, Parichart; Nuangchalerm, Prasart; Pumipuntu, Chaloey

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to study pre-service teachers on social responsibility and self-efficacy through service learning. The mixed methodology included two major procedures (i) the actual use of a developed service learning instructional model by means of action research principles and qualitative research and (ii) the study into the…

  1. Diagnosing Self-Efficacy in Intelligent Tutoring Systems: An Empirical Study

    E-print Network

    Young, R. Michael

    , 16], devising affectively informed models of social interaction [13, 18, 20], and detecting student interactions and, ultimately, learning. Self-efficacy is an affective construct that has been found-efficacy is influenced by (and influences) affective state. Thus, physiological data might be used to predict a students

  2. Preclinical and Translational PET/MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wehrl, Hans F; Wiehr, Stefan; Divine, Mathew R; Gatidis, Sergios; Gullberg, Grant T; Maier, Florian C; Rolle, Anna-Maria; Schwenck, Johannes; Thaiss, Wolfgang M; Pichler, Bernd J

    2014-05-15

    Combined PET and MR imaging (PET/MR imaging) has progressed tremendously in recent years. The focus of current research has shifted from technologic challenges to the application of this new multimodal imaging technology in the areas of oncology, cardiology, neurology, and infectious diseases. This article reviews studies in preclinical and clinical translation. The common theme of these initial results is the complementary nature of combined PET/MR imaging that often provides additional insights into biologic systems that were not clearly feasible with just one modality alone. However, in vivo findings require ex vivo validation. Combined PET/MR imaging also triggers a multitude of new developments in image analysis that are aimed at merging and using multimodal information that ranges from better tumor characterization to analysis of metabolic brain networks. The combination of connectomics information that maps brain networks derived from multiparametric MR data with metabolic information from PET can even lead to the formation of a new research field that we would call cometomics that would map functional and metabolic brain networks. These new methodologic developments also call for more multidisciplinarity in the field of molecular imaging, in which close interaction and training among clinicians and a variety of scientists is needed. PMID:24833493

  3. A Comparative Study on the Efficacy of Solifenacin Succinate in Patients with Urinary Frequency with or without Urgency

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Park, Won Hee; Park, Choal Hee; Lee, Jeong Gu; Lee, Jeong Zoo; Kim, Duk Yoon; Na, Yong Gil; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Choo, Myung-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Patients with overactive bladder (OAB) often have trouble perceiving urgency because of difficulties in distinguishing between urgency and desire to void. Empirical antimuscarinic treatment of patients with frequency only may be reasonable if conservative management has failed. We compared the efficacy of solifenacin in patients with frequency with or without urgency. Materials and Methods This multicenter, 12-week, open-label, comparative, non-inferiority clinical trial assessed whether the solifenacin efficacy for frequency without urgency is non-inferior to its efficacy for frequency with urgency. All patients had micturition frequency ?8 voids/day with or without urgency. Primary efficacy variable: daily frequency change at 12 weeks relative to baseline. Secondary efficacy variables: change at 12 weeks relative to baseline in Patients' Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC), OAB Symptom Score (OABSS), and Benefit, Satisfaction, Willingness to continue (BSW) questionnaire. Results Of the 286 enrolled patients, 240 (83.9%) completed the study (without urgency n?=?115; with urgency n?=?125). Full dataset analysis revealed that the groups without and with urgency exhibited significant reductions in daily micturition frequency of ?2.49±0.35 (mean ± standard error) and ?2.63±0.37, respectively. The lower limit of the 95% two-sided CI of the comparison of the two group means was ?1.14, which is smaller than the ?0.8 margin of clinical equivalence. The two groups did not differ in improvement in PPBC, OABSS, or BSW scores. Both tolerated the treatment well. Conclusions It was not possible to verify that the solifenacin efficacy for frequency alone was non-inferior to its efficacy for OAB. Nevertheless, solifenacin tended to be effective for frequency regardless of urgency. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00979472 PMID:25401784

  4. Efficacy of certain yogic and naturopathic procedures in premature ejaculation: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Prasad; Gupta, Kshama

    2013-01-01

    Context: Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common sexual disorder of young males. Even though there are number of treatment options available for PE, patient's satisfaction and drug side effects remain to be a problem. Non-pharmacological treatment options like Yoga and Naturopathy have been implicated in sexual fulfillment, pleasure and efficacy of some of these approaches has been established in previous studies. Aim: To assess the efficacy of certain yogic and naturopathic procedures in the management of PE. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 patients with PE satisfying the DSM IV TR diagnostic criteria were selected and allotted into two groups, Yoga group and Naturopathic group by following the randomization method. In the Yoga group, various asanas, mudra, bandha and pranayama were practiced 1 hour daily for 21 days. In the Naturopathy group, lower abdomen massage and steam bath, hip bath and lingasnana, mud pack on lower abdomen, and acupressure were done 1 hour daily for 21 days. Criteria of assessment were based on the scoring of Premature Ejaculation Severity Index (PESI). Statistical analysis was done by using paired and unpaired “t” tests. Results: In the Yoga group (n = 6), 7.3% relief was observed (P < 0.01) and in the Naturopathy group (n = 6), 2.4% of relief was observed (P > 0.05) on the total score of PESI. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) found in between the two groups. Conclusion: Both Yoga and Naturopathic procedures didn’t provide relief (<25%) on total score of PESI. PMID:23930030

  5. Pharmacologic Management of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Target Identification and Preclinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kornegay, Joe N.; Spurney, Christopher F.; Nghiem, Peter P.; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked human disorder in which absence of the protein dystrophin causes degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. For the sake of treatment development, over and above definitive genetic and cell-based therapies, there is considerable interest in drugs that target downstream disease mechanisms. Drug candidates have typically been chosen based on the nature of pathologic lesions and presumed underlying mechanisms and then tested in animal models. Mammalian dystrophinopathies have been characterized in mice (mdx mouse) and dogs (golden retriever muscular dystrophy [GRMD]). Despite promising results in the mdx mouse, some therapies have not shown efficacy in DMD. Although the GRMD model offers a higher hurdle for translation, dogs have primarily been used to test genetic and cellular therapies where there is greater risk. Failed translation of animal studies to DMD raises questions about the propriety of methods and models used to identify drug targets and test efficacy of pharmacologic intervention. The mdx mouse and GRMD dog are genetically homologous to DMD but not necessarily analogous. Subcellular species differences are undoubtedly magnified at the whole-body level in clinical trials. This problem is compounded by disparate cultures in clinical trials and preclinical studies, pointing to a need for greater rigor and transparency in animal experiments. Molecular assays such as mRNA arrays and genome-wide association studies allow identification of genetic drug targets more closely tied to disease pathogenesis. Genes in which polymorphisms have been directly linked to DMD disease progression, as with osteopontin, are particularly attractive targets. PMID:24936034

  6. The preclinical data forum network: A new ECNP initiative to improve data quality and robustness for (preclinical) neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Steckler, Thomas; Brose, Katja; Haas, Magali; Kas, Martien J; Koustova, Elena; Bespalov, Anton

    2015-10-01

    Current limitations impeding on data reproducibility are often poor statistical design, underpowered studies, lack of robust data, lack of methodological detail, biased reporting and lack of open data sharing, coupled with wrong research incentives. To improve data reproducibility, robustness and quality for brain disease research, a Preclinical Data Forum Network was formed under the umbrella of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP). The goal of this network, members of which met for the first time in October 2014, is to establish a forum to collaborate in precompetitive space, to exchange and develop best practices, and to bring together the members from academia, pharmaceutical industry, publishers, journal editors, funding organizations, public/private partnerships and non-profit advocacy organizations. To address the most pertinent issues identified by the Network, it was decided to establish a data sharing platform that allows open exchange of information in the area of preclinical neuroscience and to develop an educational scientific program. It is also planned to reach out to other organizations to align initiatives to enhance efficiency, and to initiate activities to improve the clinical relevance of preclinical data. Those Network activities should contribute to scientific rigor and lead to robust and relevant translational data. Here we provide a synopsis of the proceedings from the inaugural meeting. PMID:26073278

  7. Safety and Efficacy of Ferric Carboxymaltose in Anemic Pregnant Women: A Retrospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pels, Anouk; Ganzevoort, Wessel

    2015-01-01

    Background. Anemia during pregnancy is commonly caused by iron deficiency and can have severe consequences for both the mother and the developing fetus. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the safety and efficacy of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) in pregnant women. Methods. All women treated with FCM for anemia during pregnancy between 2010 and 2012 at our institution were included. A matched control group was selected, including women who either were nonanemic or had anemia but were not considered for intravenous iron. Main outcome measures were maternal safety and pregnancy outcomes. Results. The study included 128 patients (FCM: 64; control: 64). Median FCM dose was 1000?mg and median gestational age at the time of first treatment was 34 weeks and 6 days. Median Hb increased from 8.4?g/dL (interquartile range 7.7; 8.9?g/dL) at the first FCM administration to 10.7?g/dL (9.8; 11.5?g/dL; n = 46 with available Hb at delivery) at the time of delivery, achieving levels similar to those in the control group (10.8?g/dL [9.8; 11.8?g/dL; n = 48]). No treatment-related adverse events were reported and no statistically significant differences in pregnancy outcomes were observed between groups. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this case control study, FCM was a safe and efficient treatment of anemia during pregnancy.

  8. The Efficacy of Nasal Steroids in Treatment of Otitis Media with Effusion: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; Nofal, Ahmad Abdel-Fattah; Khazbak, Alaa Omar; Sayed, Ahmad Ebrahim El; Hassan, Mohammad Ramadan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction?Otitis media with effusion (OME) continues to be an important pediatric clinical problem, and more studies are needed to decide the proper treatment for it. Objective?To assess the efficacy of nasal steroids in the management of OME by comparing its results with that of oral steroid and that of nasal saline spray as placebo. Methods?This study was carried on 60 patients with OME who were divided into three groups: in group 1, 20 patients received mometasone furoate spray, one puff in each nostril daily, for 3 months; in group 2, 20 patients received oral prednisolone, 5?mg three times per day for the first 3 weeks; in group 3, 20 patients received nasal saline spray, one puff in each nostril daily for 3 months. Results?A highly significant difference between systemic or topical (nasal spray) steroid therapy and saline nasal spray was detected (p??0.05). Conclusion?Nasal steroid spray can be used as an effective treatment for OME, giving a significant result similar to systemic steroid. Further studies are needed to investigate its use for longer duration and in recurrent cases. PMID:26491474

  9. A six-week clinical study to compare the stain removal efficacy of three dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Nathoo, Salim; Petrone, Margaret E; DeVizio, William; Chaknis, Patricia; Volpe, Anthony R

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this double-blind clinical study was to compare the tooth whitening efficacy (stain removal) of a new commercially available tooth whitening dentifrice (Colgate Total Plus Whitening Toothpaste) containing 0.2% triclosan and 3.0% PVM/MA copolymer in a 0.243% sodium fluoride/high cleaning silica base, with that of two commercially available dentifrices, Crest Multi-Care Advanced Cleaning Toothpaste and Colgate Winterfresh Gel Fluoride Toothpaste. Following a baseline examination to assess extrinsic tooth stain, qualifying adult male and female subjects were randomized into three treatment groups which were balanced for gender, age and level of extrinsic tooth stain. Subjects were asked to brush their teeth twice (morning and evening) for one minute with their assigned dentifrice using a soft-bristled toothbrush. Examinations for extrinsic tooth stain were repeated after six weeks' use of the study dentifrices. One-hundred and twenty-three (123) subjects complied with the protocol and completed the study. At the six-week examination, subjects assigned to the Colgate Total Plus Whitening Toothpaste treatment group exhibited statistically significant reductions in extrinsic tooth stain area and extrinsic tooth stain intensity relative to those subjects assigned to the Crest Multi-Care Advanced Cleaning Toothpaste and the Colgate Winterfresh Gel Fluoride Toothpaste. PMID:11695214

  10. The Efficacy of Nasal Steroids in Treatment of Otitis Media with Effusion: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; Nofal, Ahmad Abdel-Fattah; Khazbak, Alaa Omar; Sayed, Ahmad Ebrahim El; Hassan, Mohammad Ramadan

    2015-10-01

    Introduction?Otitis media with effusion (OME) continues to be an important pediatric clinical problem, and more studies are needed to decide the proper treatment for it. Objective?To assess the efficacy of nasal steroids in the management of OME by comparing its results with that of oral steroid and that of nasal saline spray as placebo. Methods?This study was carried on 60 patients with OME who were divided into three groups: in group 1, 20 patients received mometasone furoate spray, one puff in each nostril daily, for 3 months; in group 2, 20 patients received oral prednisolone, 5?mg three times per day for the first 3 weeks; in group 3, 20 patients received nasal saline spray, one puff in each nostril daily for 3 months. Results?A highly significant difference between systemic or topical (nasal spray) steroid therapy and saline nasal spray was detected (p??0.05). Conclusion?Nasal steroid spray can be used as an effective treatment for OME, giving a significant result similar to systemic steroid. Further studies are needed to investigate its use for longer duration and in recurrent cases. PMID:26491474

  11. Efficacy of 0.25% Lemongrass Oil Mouthwash: A Three Arm Prospective Parallel Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Pritam; Tangade, Pradeep; Rajput, Prashant; Batra, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Background Chlorhexidine mouthwash has earned eponym of gold standard to treat and/or prevent periodontal diseases. However, the present study was carried out to explore an alternative herbal mouthwash. Aim To compare the anti-plaque and anti-gingivitis efficacy of a 0.25% lemongrass oil mouthwash to that of 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthwash. Materials and Methods A double-blinded parallel designed clinical trial with 60 subjects was taken for the study. Baseline plaque index (PI) & gingival index (GI) score was recorded. Oral prophylaxis was done and the plaque score was set at zero. Then, subjects were randomly allocated into 3 groups (N=20 in each): 0.25% lemongrass oil mouthwash, 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthwash and oral prophylaxis only. Subjects were asked to swish with respective mouthwash twice daily for 21 days. Subjects were again re-evaluated on 14th and 21st day for GI and PI. Comparison of the mean difference among the variables was performed by parametric tests. Results Lemongrass oil mouthwash group showed highest reduction in GI & PI at both 14th and 21st day, which was statistically significant (p?0.05). Conclusion Lemongrass oil mouthwash can also be used as a good herbal alternative to chlorhexidine mouthwash, so further studies are needed. PMID:26557608

  12. Gene Transfer for Ischemic Heart Failure in a Preclinical Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Ladage, Dennis; Tilemann, Lisa; Fish, Kenneth; Kawase, Yoshiaki; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2011-01-01

    Various emerging technologies are being developed for patients with heart failure. Well-established preclinical evaluations are necessary to determine their efficacy and safety. Gene therapy using viral vectors is one of the most promising approaches for treating cardiac diseases. Viral delivery of various different genes by changing the carrier gene has immeasurable therapeutic potential. In this video, the full process of an animal model of heart failure creation followed by gene transfer is presented using a swine model. First, myocardial infarction is created by occluding the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery. Heart remodeling results in chronic heart failure. Unique to our model is a fairly large scar which truly reflects patients with severe heart failure who require aggressive therapy for positive outcomes. After myocardial infarct creation and development of scar tissue, an intracoronary injection of virus is demonstrated with simultaneous nitroglycerine infusion. Our injection method provides simple and efficient gene transfer with enhanced gene expression. This combination of a myocardial infarct swine model with intracoronary virus delivery has proven to be a consistent and reproducible methodology, which helps not only to test the effect of individual gene, but also compare the efficacy of many genes as therapeutic candidates. PMID:21633324

  13. A Comparative Study of the Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Successful Men and Women in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeldin, Amy L.; Britner, Shari L.; Pajares, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the personal stories of men who selected careers in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) to better understand the ways in which their self-efficacy beliefs were created and subsequently influenced their academic and career choices. Analysis of 10 narratives revealed that mastery…

  14. A Validation and Reliability Study of the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Christina M.; De Ayala, R. J.; Lebow, Ryan; Hayden, Emily

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain validity evidence for the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE). Construct validity evidence identifies four subscales: Goal-Setting for Physical Activity, Goal-Setting for Healthy Food Choices, Decision-Making for Physical Activity, and Decision-Making for Healthy Food…

  15. Antecedents of Mathematics Self-Efficacy Beliefs for Middle and High School Students: An Instrument Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freed, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    There were three primary purposes for this study. First, I investigated the psychometric properties of the Sources of Middle School Mathematics Self-Efficacy (SMMSE) scale (Usher, 2007; Usher & Pajares, 2009) with high school students. Validation for expanded use of the SMMSE scale was achieved by assessing the instrument's psychometric…

  16. 21 CFR 310.6 - Applicability of “new drug” or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability of ânew drugâ or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study implementation notices and notices of opportunity for hearing to identical, related, and similar drug products. 310.6 Section 310.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  17. Efficacy of Different Precooling Agents and Topical Anesthetics on the Pain Perception during Intraoral Injection: A Comparative Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lathwal, Garima; Pandit, Inder Kumar; Gugnani, Neeraj; Gupta, Monika

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Topical anesthesia is widely advocated in pediatric dentistry practice to reduce pain and anxiety produced by administration of local anesthesia. Cryoanesthesia to lessen the injection pain has also been reported to be promising. However, sparse literature reports exist regarding clinical efficacy of these agents. Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of the refrigerant (1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane/1,1,1,2-tetrafluo-roethane), benzocaine and ice on the pain perception during intraoral injection using visual analog scale (VAS) and sound, eye, motor (SEM) scale. Study design: In this Spit-mouth design study, a total of 160 patients between the age group of 5 and 8 years were selected and were randomly divided into two equal groups having 80 patients in each group. Results: Ice cone has shown lower mean scores (p < 0.001) as compared to benzocaine and refrigerant whereas no significant difference was observed between refrigerant and benzocaine (p > 0.05) on both the scales. Conclusion: Ice cone had shown significantly higher efficacy as compared to benzocaine and refrigerant. How to cite this article: Lathwal G, Pandit IK, Gugnani N, Gupta M. Efficacy of Different Precooling Agents and Topical Anesthetics on the Pain Perception during Intraoral Injection: A Comparative Clinical Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):119-122. PMID:26379379

  18. 21 CFR 310.6 - Applicability of “new drug” or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Applicability of ânew drugâ or safety or effectiveness findings in drug efficacy study implementation notices and notices of opportunity for hearing to identical, related, and similar drug products. 310.6 Section 310.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  19. Efficacy and morbidity of water soluble and oil-based myelography. Study compares both methods in 314 patients.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, E T; Rezaian, S M; Northcutt, C; Boyd, W; Fundell, L; Anderson, C; Malesky, E

    1986-01-01

    Retrospective studies were carried out on 314 patients who underwent oil-based or water-soluble myelography between July 1981 and July 1982 in two community hospitals. Morbidities and efficacies were compared and it was concluded that metrizamide myelography is a preferable method. PMID:3453436

  20. Enabling Structure and Collective Efficacy: A Study of Teacher Perceptions in Elementary Divisions of American Schools in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, Dereck H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between enabling school structure and collective efficacy as perceived by teachers working in an elementary division of an American School in Mexico. A descriptive design was used to investigate the relationship between teacher perception of school structure and collective teacher…

  1. An Outcome Study of Career Decision Self-Efficacy and Indecision in an Undergraduate Constructivist Career Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier-Reed, Tabitha L.; Skaar, Nicole R.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored outcomes in a constructivist career course. Using a pretest-posttest design, the authors assessed the empowerment (operationalized as career decision self-efficacy) and career indecision of 82 culturally diverse college students at a large, midwestern university. Data were analyzed using a multivariate analysis of variance.…

  2. A Pilot Study on the Efficacy of Melodic Based Communication Therapy for Eliciting Speech in Nonverbal Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandiford, Givona A.; Mainess, Karen J.; Daher, Noha S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of Melodic Based Communication Therapy (MBCT) to traditional speech and language therapy for eliciting speech in nonverbal children with autism. Participants were 12 nonverbal children with autism ages 5 through 7 randomly assigned to either treatment group. Both groups made significant…

  3. A Study of the Efficacy of Computerized Skill Building for Adolescents: Reducing Aggression and Increasing Pro-Social Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Robin; Repa, J. Theodore

    This article describes a pilot study that evaluated the efficacy of a computer-based, behavioral skill-building program in reducing aggression and improving academic performance among middle school students. The program is Ripple Effects'"Relate for Teens," a media rich, interactive application based on combining a proprietary learning system with…

  4. Prenatal Antidepressant Exposure: Clinical and Preclinical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, Chase H.; Stowe, Zachary N.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of any maternal illness during pregnancy warrants consideration of the consequences of the illness and/or medication for both the mother and unborn child. In the case of major depressive disorder, which affects up to 10–20% of pregnant women, the deleterious effects of untreated depression on the offspring can be profound and long lasting. Progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanism(s) of action of antidepressants, fetal exposure to these medications, and serotonin’s role in development. New technologies and careful study designs have enabled the accurate sampling of maternal serum, breast milk, umbilical cord serum, and infant serum psychotropic medication concentrations to characterize the magnitude of placental transfer and exposure through human breast milk. Despite this progress, the extant clinical literature is largely composed of case series, population-based patient registry data that are reliant on nonobjective means and retrospective recall to determine both medication and maternal depression exposure, and limited inclusion of suitable control groups for maternal depression. Conclusions drawn from such studies often fail to incorporate embryology/neurotransmitter ontogeny, appropriate gestational windows, or a critical discussion of statistically versus clinically significant. Similarly, preclinical studies have predominantly relied on dosing models, leading to exposures that may not be clinically relevant. The elucidation of a defined teratological effect or mechanism, if any, has yet to be conclusively demonstrated. The extant literature indicates that, in many cases, the benefits of antidepressant use during pregnancy for a depressed pregnant woman may outweigh potential risks. PMID:24567054

  5. The frequency of early-activated hapten-specific B cell subsets predicts the efficacy of vaccines for nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Laudenbach, M; Tucker, A M; Runyon, S P; Carroll, F I; Pravetoni, M

    2015-11-17

    Therapeutic vaccines for nicotine addiction show pre-clinical efficacy. Yet, clinical evaluation of the first-generation nicotine vaccines did not meet expectations because only a subset of immunized subjects achieved effective serum antibody levels. Recent studies suggest that vaccine design affects B cell activation, and that the frequency of the hapten-specific B cell subsets contributes to vaccine efficacy against drugs of abuse. To extend this hypothesis to nicotine immunogens, we synthesized a novel hapten containing a carboxymethylureido group at the 2-position of the nicotine structure (2CMUNic) and compared its efficacy to the previously characterized 6CMUNic hapten. Haptens were conjugated to the keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) carrier protein, and evaluated for efficacy against nicotine in mice using the clinically approved alum adjuvant. Using a novel fluorescent antigen-based magnetic enrichment strategy paired with multicolor flow cytometry analysis, polyclonal hapten-specific B cell subsets were measured in mice immunized with either 6CMUNic-KLH or 2CMUNic-KLH. The 6CMUNic-KLH showed significantly greater efficacy than 2CMUNic-KLH on nicotine distribution to serum and to the brain. The 6CMUNic-KLH elicited higher anti-nicotine serum antibody titers, and greater expansion of hapten-specific B cells than 2CMUNic-KLH. Within the splenic polyclonal B cell population, a higher number of hapten-specific IgM(high) and germinal centre B cells predicted greater vaccine efficacy against nicotine distribution. These early pre-clinical findings suggest that hapten structure affects activation of B cells, and that variations in the frequency of early-activated hapten-specific B cell subsets underlie individual differences in vaccine efficacy. PMID:26409811

  6. A pilot study: the efficacy of virgin coconut oil as ocular rewetting agent on rabbit eyes.

    PubMed

    Mutalib, Haliza Abdul; Kaur, Sharanjeet; Ghazali, Ahmad Rohi; Chinn Hooi, Ng; Safie, Nor Hasanah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. An open-label pilot study of virgin coconut oil (VCO) was conducted to determine the safety of the agent as ocular rewetting eye drops on rabbits. Methods. Efficacy of the VCO was assessed by measuring NIBUT, anterior eye assessment, corneal staining, pH, and Schirmer value before instillation and at 30?min, 60?min, and two weeks after instillation. Friedman test was used to analyse any changes in all the measurable variables over the period of time. Results. Only conjunctival redness with instillation of saline agent showed significant difference over the period of time (P < 0.05). However, further statistical analysis had shown no significant difference at 30?min, 60?min, and two weeks compared to initial measurement (P > 0.05). There were no changes in the NIBUT, limbal redness, palpebral conjunctiva redness, corneal staining, pH, and Schirmer value over the period of time for each agent (P > 0.05). Conclusion. VCO acts as safe rewetting eye drops as it has shown no significant difference in the measurable parameter compared to commercial brand eye drops and saline. These study data suggest that VCO is safe to be used as ocular rewetting agent on human being. PMID:25802534

  7. A follow up study on the efficacy of metadoxine in the treatment of alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Guerrini, Irene; Gentili, Claudio; Nelli, Gloria; Guazzelli, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Background We carried out a three months follow-up study on the efficacy of metadoxine in a cohort of alcoholics admitted to the Alcohol misuse Long-term Treatment (ALT) Unit – University of Pisa (Italy). We analyzed the clinical data, psychometric tests and blood tests of 160 alcoholics on admission and after 3 months of treatment. We compared 58 pts treated with metadoxine (MET) with 102 pts who did not receive (NULL) any drug as an adjunct to the psycho-educational interventions provided by the ALT Unit. Results At follow-up, the patients in treatment with metadoxine showed a significant improvement in the rate of complete abstinence (44.8% vs. 21.6%; chi square: 8.45, df = 1, p < 0.0037). Furthermore, the number of drop-outs at three months of treatment was also significantly lower in the MET than in the NULL group (17% vs. 57%; chi square of 23.22, df = 1, p < 0.001). Conclusion Our findings support the use of metadoxine in the management of alcohol dependence. However, randomized clinical trials are necessary to confirm and replicate them. This study raises the importance of identifying new pharmacological compounds effective on the outcome of alcoholism in order to help patients to best adhere to treatment programs and to prevent the development of mental and physical complications due to chronic and heavy use of alcohol. PMID:17176456

  8. A Pilot Study: The Efficacy of Virgin Coconut Oil as Ocular Rewetting Agent on Rabbit Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Mutalib, Haliza Abdul; Kaur, Sharanjeet; Ghazali, Ahmad Rohi; Chinn Hooi, Ng; Safie, Nor Hasanah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. An open-label pilot study of virgin coconut oil (VCO) was conducted to determine the safety of the agent as ocular rewetting eye drops on rabbits. Methods. Efficacy of the VCO was assessed by measuring NIBUT, anterior eye assessment, corneal staining, pH, and Schirmer value before instillation and at 30?min, 60?min, and two weeks after instillation. Friedman test was used to analyse any changes in all the measurable variables over the period of time. Results. Only conjunctival redness with instillation of saline agent showed significant difference over the period of time (P < 0.05). However, further statistical analysis had shown no significant difference at 30?min, 60?min, and two weeks compared to initial measurement (P > 0.05). There were no changes in the NIBUT, limbal redness, palpebral conjunctiva redness, corneal staining, pH, and Schirmer value over the period of time for each agent (P > 0.05). Conclusion. VCO acts as safe rewetting eye drops as it has shown no significant difference in the measurable parameter compared to commercial brand eye drops and saline. These study data suggest that VCO is safe to be used as ocular rewetting agent on human being. PMID:25802534

  9. Using self-efficacy theory to educate a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A case study of 1-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ka??kç?, Magfiret K

    2011-02-01

    Self-efficacy is important in determining which activities or situations an individual will perform or avoid. This is a case study report to explore the utility of structured education programme on strengthening self-efficacy in an older adult with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To comprehensively evaluate this intervention, a combined qualitative and quantitative approach was used. Although qualitative data were collected following the interview guide, quantitative data were collected by the demographic data form and the COPD Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) at the preprogramme and postprogramme stage. The patient's self-efficacy scores improved after 8 weeks of the structured education programme and remained relatively constant on all the repeated measurements after education. Qualitative data were identified as 'difficulties' and 'facilities'. This study indicates that, by applying a self-efficacy theory, a planned education programme could be useful in improving both short-term and long-term self-efficacy in patients with COPD. PMID:21251148

  10. Effect of telomerase inhibition on preclinical models of malignant rhabdoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yafang; Bobb, Daniel; Lu, Yunbiao; He, Jianping; Dome, Jeffrey S

    2014-09-01

    Novel treatment approaches are desperately needed for malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT). Telomerase is an attractive therapeutic target because it is specific to cancer and critical for cancer cell immortality. We evaluated the effect of the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat in preclinical models of MRT. Three MRT cell lines, BT-12, G401, and RT-peri, were treated with the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat. The effects of imetelstat on telomere length, DNA damage response, and cell proliferation were assessed. The efficacy of imetelstat in vivo was evaluated in subcutaneous xenografts derived from each of the cell lines. Treatment with imetelstat resulted in inhibition of telomerase activity, marked telomere shortening, and activation of the DNA damage response pathway, as measured by formation of ?-H2AX nuclear foci, phosphorylation of ATM, and phosphorylation of TP53. Imetelstat-treated G401 cells underwent complete growth arrest after 16 passages. The other two cell lines exhibited growth inhibition. Imetelstat resulted in 40-50% growth inhibition compared to placebo-treated controls in all three xenograft models. The activity of imetelstat as a single agent suggests that further studies of telomerase inhibitors in combination with other agents may be warranted. PMID:25441685

  11. Pomegranate Extracts in the Management of Men's Urologic Health: Scientific Rationale and Preclinical and Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Nils; N, Kroeger; Belldegrun, A S; A S, Belldegrun; Pantuck, A J; A J, Pantuck

    2013-01-01

    Multiple strands of research provide growing evidence that diet, nutrition, and life style play a role in the development and the course of urological diseases. Numerous micronutrients and polyphenols found in soy, green tea, and many fruits and vegetables have been described to impact diseases including erectile dysfunction, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and prostate cancer. However, oftentimes these reports lack both a scientific rationale and supportive evidence base. The efficacy of pomegranate, on the other hand, in the modulation of central biological processes like inflammation, hypoxia, and oxidative stress that are important in the pathogenesis of urological maladies has been robustly demonstrated in preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies. Moreover, clinical trials have further supported its use in the treatment of several diseases, in particular in the management of prostate cancer. Herein, we critically review the scientific knowledge about the current role and future prospects for the use of pomegranate extracts in the therapy of erectile dysfunction, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and prostate cancer. PMID:23589721

  12. Selective inhibitors of nuclear export avert progression in preclinical models of inflammatory demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Jeffery D.; Herbin, Olivier; de la Hera, Belén; Vidaurre, Oscar G.; Moy, Gregory A.; Sun, Qingxiang; Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Albrecht, Stephanie; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; McCauley, Dilara; Chook, Yuh Min; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Kidd, Grahame J.; Shacham, Sharon; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Axonal damage has been associated with aberrant protein trafficking. This study characterizes a novel class of compounds targeting nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling, by binding to the catalytic groove of the nuclear export protein XPO1/CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance protein1). Oral administration of novel reversible CRM1 inhibitors in preclinical murine models of demyelination significantly attenuated disease progression, even when started after the onset of paralysis. Clinical efficacy was associated with decreased proliferation of immune cells, characterized by nuclear accumulation of cell cycle inhibitors, and preservation of cytoskeletal integrity even in demyelinated axons. Neuroprotection was not limited to models of demyelination, but observed also in other mouse models of axonal damage (i.e. kainic acid injection) and detected in cultured neurons after knockdown of Xpo1, the gene encoding for CRM1. A proteomic screen for target molecules revealed that CRM1 inhibitors in neurons prevented nuclear export of molecules associated with axonal damage while retaining transcription factors modulating neuroprotection. PMID:25706475

  13. Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel, Orally Bioavailable Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) KPT-335 in Spontaneous Canine Cancer: Results of a Phase I Study

    PubMed Central

    London, Cheryl A.; Bernabe, Luis Feo; Barnard, Sandra; Kisseberth, William C.; Borgatti, Antonella; Henson, Mike; Wilson, Heather; Jensen, Kiersten; Ito, Daisuke; Modiano, Jaime F.; Bear, Misty D.; Pennell, Michael L.; Saint-Martin, Jean-Richard; McCauley, Dilara; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the activity of Selective Inhibitors of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds that inhibit the function of the nuclear export protein Exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) against canine tumor cell lines and perform a Phase I clinical trial of KPT-335 in dogs with spontaneous cancer to provide a preliminary assessment of biologic activity and tolerability. Methods and Findings Canine tumor cell lines derived from non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), mast cell tumor, melanoma and osteosarcoma exhibited growth inhibition and apoptosis in response to nanomolar concentrations of SINE compounds; NHL cells were particularly sensitive with IC50 concentrations ranging from 2–42 nM. A Phase I clinical trial of KPT-335 was performed in 17 dogs with NHL (naive or relapsed), mast cell tumor or osteosarcoma. The maximum tolerated dose was 1.75 mg/kg given orally twice/week (Monday/Thursday) although biologic activity was observed at 1 mg/kg. Clinical benefit (CB) including partial response to therapy (PR, n?=?2) and stable disease (SD, n?=?7) was observed in 9/14 dogs with NHL with a median time to progression (TTP) for responders of 66 days (range 35–256 days). A dose expansion study was performed in 6 dogs with NHL given 1.5 mg/kg KPT-335 Monday/Wednesday/Friday; CB was observed in 4/6 dogs with a median TTP for responders of 83 days (range 35–354 days). Toxicities were primarily gastrointestinal consisting of anorexia, weight loss, vomiting and diarrhea and were manageable with supportive care, dose modulation and administration of low dose prednisone; hepatotoxicity, anorexia and weight loss were the dose limiting toxicities. Conclusions This study provides evidence that the novel orally bioavailable XPO1 inhibitor KPT-335 is safe and exhibits activity in a relevant, spontaneous large animal model of cancer. Data from this study provides critical new information that lays the groundwork for evaluation of SINE compounds in human cancer. PMID:24503695

  14. Antiepileptic efficacy of lamotrigine in phenobarbital-resistant and -responsive epileptic rats: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Claudia; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    About 25% of patients with epilepsy are refractory to treatment, so that new, more effective antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are urgently needed. Animal models that simulate the clinical situation with individuals responding and not responding to treatment are important to determine mechanisms of AED resistance and develop novel more effective treatments. We have previously developed and characterized such a model in which spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) develop after a status epilepticus induced by sustained electrical stimulation of the basolateral amygdala. In this model, prolonged treatment of epileptic rats with phenobarbital (PB) results in two subgroups, PB responders and PB nonresponders. When PB nonresponders were treated in previous experiments with phenytoin (PHT), 83% of the PB-resistant rats were also resistant to PHT. In the present study we examined if rats with PB resistant seizures are also resistant to lamotrigine (LTG), using continuous EEG/video recording of spontaneous seizures over 10 consecutive weeks. For this purpose, a new group of epileptic rats was produced and selected by treatment with PB into responders and nonresponders. As in previous studies, PB nonresponders had a significantly higher seizure frequency before onset of treatment. During subsequent treatment with LTG, all PB nonresponders and 60% of the PB responders exhibited >75% reduction of seizure frequency and were therefore considered as LTG responders. Plasma levels of LTG did not differ significantly between responders and nonresponders. The data of this pilot study indicate that LTG is more effective than PHT to suppress seizures in PB nonresponders in this model, but that not all PB responders also respond to LTG. Overall, our data provide further evidence that AED studies in post-SE TLE models are useful in determining and comparing AED efficacy and investigating predictors and mechanisms of pharmacoresistance. PMID:24908562

  15. The clinical efficacy of using autologous platelet rich plasma in hip arthroplasty: A retrospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Atif; Shaaban, Hamid; Tibayan, Restituto; Miller, Richard; Boairdo, Richard; Guron, Gunwant

    2015-01-01

    Background: Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is a blood derivative concentrate of platelets, fibrin and growth factors obtained through withdrawal and centrifugation of autologous blood and use for its inherent hemostatic and adhesive properties to promote wound healing. Hip arthroplasty is often associated with significant perioperative complications including blood loss necessitating blood transfusions, which can lead to multiple adverse reactions, infection transmission, and longer hospital stay. Materials and Methods: We conducted this retrospective comparative study to determine whether the use of PRP can reduce the bleeding complications in hip replacement surgeries and therefore decrease analgesic requirements and shorten the hospital stay. Results: Sixty patients had consecutive hip replacement surgeries. The study group (n=23) received PRP applications while the control group (n=37) were operated without PRP applications. Postoperative drop of hemoglobin, number of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, analgesic requirements, and duration of hospital stay were recorded. There was no significant difference in the drop of hemoglobin preoperatively and postoperatively comparing study and control groups (P=0.75). There was no difference in transfusion requirements between the two groups (P=0.16) but there was trend toward less transfusion in the PRP-treated group. There were also no statistical differences in analgesic use (P=0.83) and lengths of hospitalization (P=0.68) between the two groups. Conclusion: We concluded that there is no clinical efficacy in using PRP in hip replacement surgeries. We recommend a larger prospective study be conducted to determine its clinical utility as an optimization strategy to improve outcome after hip arthroplasty PMID:25810634

  16. A Comparative Study of Teaching Efficacy in Pre-Service and In-Service Teachers in Korean Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, SoJung; Moon, HyukJun

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the differences between pre-service and in-service teachers in terms of their levels of teaching efficacy and teaching professionalism. In addition, the patterns in predictors of teachers' teaching efficacy were compared between the two subgroups of this study. Five hundred and seventy-three…

  17. Preclinical study of a novel hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal pump for long-term cardiopulmonary support : In vivo performance during percutaneous cardiopulmonary support.

    PubMed

    Tsukiya, Tomonori; Mizuno, Toshihide; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2015-12-01

    An extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump with a hydrodynamically levitated impeller was developed for use in a durable extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) system. The present study examined the biocompatibility of the blood pump during long-term use by conducting a series of 30-day chronic animal experiments. The ECMO system was used to produce a percutaneous venoarterial bypass between the venae cavae and carotid artery in adult goats. No anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy was administered during the experiments. Three out of four animals survived for the scheduled 30-day period, and the blood pumps and membrane oxygenators both exhibited sufficient hydrodynamic performance and good antithrombogenicity, while one animal died of massive bleeding from the outflow cannulation site. The animals' plasma free hemoglobin had returned to within the normal range by 1 week after the surgical intervention, and their hemodynamic and biochemistry parameters remained within their normal ranges throughout the experiment. The explanted centrifugal blood pumps did not display any trace of thrombus formation. Based on the biocompatibility demonstrated in this study, the examined centrifugal blood pump, which includes a hydrodynamically levitated impeller, is suitable for use in durable ECMO systems. PMID:25975380

  18. Hypocholesterolemic Efficacy of Quercetin Rich Onion Juice in Healthy Mild Hypercholesterolemic Adults: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tsong-Ming; Chiu, Hui-Fang; Shen, You-Cheng; Chung, Chia-Chun; Venkatakrishnan, Kamesh; Wang, Chin-Kun

    2015-12-01

    Onion (Allium cepa L.) is widely employed as a food ingredient as well as traditional remedy to treat fever, burns, and scurvy. The present study focused on the modulator efficacy of the quercetin rich onion juice on lipid profile and antioxidant status in mildly hypercholesterolemic subjects. Twenty-four healthy subjects with mild hypercholesterolemia (?200 mg/dL) were recruited and divided into two groups, and they consumed 100 mL of onion juice or placebo every day for 8 weeks. Fasting blood samples were collected at initial, 2nd, 6th, 8th, 10th week for estimating various biochemical assays, as well as anthropometric indices. After 8 weeks of intervention, onion juice greatly decreased (p?

  19. Efficacy and safety of eltrombopag in treatment-refractory primary immune thrombocytopenia: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Eser, Ali; Toptas, Tayfur; Kara, Osman; Sezgin, Aslihan; Noyan-Atalay, Figen; Yilmaz, Guven; Ozgumus, Toluy; Pepedil-Tanrikulu, Funda; Kaygusuz-Atagunduz, Isik; Firatli-Tuglular, Tulin

    2016-01-01

    Eltrombopag was used in patients with chronic primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) who did not tolerate or were refractory to two or more previous treatments. The primary aims of the study were to determine the efficacy and safety of long-term eltrombopag treatment. Data were extracted from medical chart records retrospectively. Platelet count of at least 50?000/?l at any time point during the treatment was defined as the 'response'. Median duration of eltrombopag treatment was 29 weeks (11-74). The number of patients who had a platelet count of at least 50?000/?l at any time point was 26 (83.9%). The response was achieved by the second week in most of the patients. Concomitant ITP medications were withdrawn in nine out of the 11 patients. Eltrombopag was discontinued in one patient due to sustained response despite discontinuation of the treatment. Age, sex, concomitant ITP treatments, and previous ITP treatment failures had no impact on the treatment response. The treatment was discontinued due to thrombosis in only four patients. Four patients experienced a minor bleeding event. Hepatotoxicity and all other adverse events were mild and manageable. Eltrombopag is effective, safe, and well tolerated in the long-term treatment of chronic ITP patients. PMID:26258668

  20. The antiplaque efficacy of propolis-based herbal toothpaste: A crossover clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Nagesh; Bapat, Salil; Asawa, Kailash; Tak, Mridula; Chaturvedi, Pulkit; Gupta, Vivek V.; George, Pradeep P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In recent years, herbal products have been suggested as an economic, safe and probably effective alternative for prevention and control of various oral diseases. But still there are some products which need to be evaluated. Of lately, Propolis is one such product. To assess and compare the efficacy of herbal dentifrice containing Propolis with Miswak and Colgate total toothpastes in controlling plaque formation. Materials and Methods: A double blind, randomized, crossover study design was conducted among thirty healthy dental students. After oral prophylaxis all subjects were given a washout product for one week period. Subjects were then made to brush with (washout product) for 1 minute followed by 1 minute brushing with assigned test product. The baseline MGMPI plaque scores were recorded. Subjects were then refrained from oral hygiene for 24 hours, and were recalled to be re-disclosed and re-measured for plaque formation. This procedure was repeated according to crossover design after a washout period of (2 week). Statistical tests used were Krukalwallis and Wilcoxon sign rank test. Results: There was a significant difference in 24 hour score between the test products evaluated. When the change from baseline to 24 hours was analyzed, the test product Propolis resulted in a consistently and significantly (p < 0.05) lower MGMPI mean scores than the Colgate Total and Miswak toothpastes. Conclusion: Propolis was found to be safe and effective in reducing plaque accumulation when compared to Miswak and Colgate total toothpaste. PMID:26283831

  1. Preliminary study of therapeutic efficacy of a new fasciolicidal drug derived from Commiphora molmol (myrrh).

    PubMed

    Massoud, A; El Sisi, S; Salama, O; Massoud, A

    2001-08-01

    Myrrh (from the stem of the Commiphora molmol tree) is an oleo gum resin that may prove efficacious for the treatment of fascioliasis. We studied 7 patients who were passing Fasciola eggs in their stools and treated them with myrrh. The drug (a formulation consisting of 8 parts of resin and 3.5 parts of volatile oils, all extracted from myrrh) was given in a dose of 12 mg/kg per day for 6 consecutive days in the morning on an empty stomach. Patients were followed for 3 months. The therapy proved to be effective, with pronounced improvement of the general condition and amelioration of all symptoms and signs. A dramatic drop in the egg count was detected at the end of treatment. Eggs were no longer detectable in the feces 3 weeks after treatment and after a follow-up period of 3 months. High eosinophilic counts, elevated liver enzymes, and Fasciola antibody titers returned to nearly normal. No signs of toxicity or adverse effects were observed. We conclude that the formulation of myrrh is safe, well tolerated, and effective for treating fascioliasis. PMID:11508399

  2. Memory self-efficacy predicts memory performance: results from a 6-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Valentijn, Susanne A M; Hill, Robert D; Van Hooren, Susan A H; Bosma, Hans; Van Boxtel, Martin P J; Jolles, Jelle; Ponds, Rudolf W H M

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between memory self-efficacy (MSE) and a 6-year follow-up assessment of memory functioning in a sample of Dutch older adults. MSE was assessed by a Dutch abridged version of the Metamemory in Adulthood questionnaire (MIA; R. A. Dixon, D. F. Hultsch, & C. Hertzog, 1988; C. Hertzog, D. F. Hultsch, & R. A. Dixon, 1989; R. W. H. M. Ponds & J. Jolles, 1996). The total MSE score predicted memory performance at 6 years, as measured by the Visual Verbal Learning Task (VVLT; N. Brand & J. Jolles, 1985). A separate analysis of the different MSE subscales indicated that the MIA Change score was the most salient domain-specific MSE predictor of subsequent memory performance after 6 years. An extreme groups analysis of the MIA Change score revealed a pattern of performance for those who perceived that their memory was worsening, performing less well on the 3 trials of the VVLT when these were readministered at the 6-year follow-up. PMID:16594801

  3. Long chain lipid based tamoxifen NLC. Part II: pharmacokinetic, biodistribution and in vitro anticancer efficacy studies.

    PubMed

    Shete, Harshad; Chatterjee, Sushmita; De, Abhijit; Patravale, Vandana

    2013-09-15

    Long chain lipid (LCL) based tamoxifen loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (Tmx-NLCs) meant to target intestinal lymphatic systems (ILSs) was developed and characterized previously. The aim of the present work was to evaluate in vitro efficacy of developed Tmx-NLC against breast cancer cell lines and to confirm the hypothesis of targeting ILS after single dose oral administration. In vitro anticancer activity of Tmx-NLC was assessed in human estrogen receptor expressing breast cancer cell lines viz. MCF-7 and ZR-75-1. The study revealed relatively improved activity for Tmx-NLC compared to free Tmx against MCF-7 cells. However, the activity was compromised against ZR-75-1 cells which could be attributed to its up regulation of MUC1 gene. Confocal and flow cytometric analysis revealed remarkable intracellular uptake of Tmx-NLC and its localization in nuclear and perinuclear region of cells. Tmx-NLC exhibited distinctly different pharmacokinetic profile compared to Tamoxifen suspension (Tmx-susp) and exhibited an increment in the bioavailability by 2.71-fold and prolonged the T1/2 by 7.10-fold. Moreover, detectable drug concentration in mesenteric lymph nodes justifies our hypothesis of targeting ILS and explains the major uptake of Tmx to occur via lymphatic system. PMID:23535344

  4. Efficacy Study of Broken Rice Maltodextrin in In Vitro Wound Healing Assay

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed Amin, Zahiah; Koh, Soo Peng; Yeap, Swee Keong; Abdul Hamid, Nur Syazwani; Tan, Chin Ping; Long, Kamariah

    2015-01-01

    Maltodextrins that contain both simple sugars and polymers of saccharides have been widely used as ingredients in food products and pharmaceutical delivery systems. To date, no much work has been reported on the applications of maltodextrin from broken rice (RB) sources. Therefore, the objective of this work was to investigate the in vitro wound healing efficacy of RB maltodextrin at different conditions. Wounds treated with lower dextrose equivalent (DE) range (DE 10–14) of maltodextrins at a concentration of 10% obtained from RB were found to be able to heal the wounds significantly faster (p < 0.01) than maltodextrin with higher DE ranges (DE 15–19 and DE 20–24) and concentrations of 5% and 20%. The findings from both BrdU and MTT assay further confirmed its wound healing properties as the NIH 3T3 fibroblast wounded cells were able to proliferate without causing cytotoxic effect when wounded cell was treated with maltodextrin. All these findings indicated that the RB maltodextrin could perform better than the commercial maltodextrin at the same DE range. This study showed that RB maltodextrins had better functionality properties than other maltodextrin sources and played a beneficial role in wound healing application. PMID:26436094

  5. [Study on the efficacy of genetically engineered vaccines against hepatitis B for interruption of perinatal transmission].

    PubMed

    Kang, P; Shen, X M; Yu, H M

    1995-07-01

    The infectivity rate of newborn babies who had been borne from HBsAG(+), HBeAg(+) and anti-HBc(+) mothers was very high (85%). 142 babies born in the hospital were divided into three groups, in this study. In the group 1, 57 babies were inoculated with 20 micrograms recombinant DNA vaccinia vaccines against hepatitis B. The injections were given at newborn, 1 month, and 6 months, respectively. In group 2, 41 babies were inoculated with 20 micrograms genetic engineering vaccines against hepatitis B at same time were intervals as group 1. In group 3, 44 newborn babies were inoculated with 10 micrograms as same vaccines as group 2 HBIG plus 1ml (200 U/ml), at same time intervals as group 1. The immune pretection rates of newborn babies in three groups were 88.2%, 85.9% and 100%, respectively. The anti-HBs pasitive conversion rates were 82%, 86% and 98%, respectively. The group 3 was compared with group 1 and 2. Statistical analysis showed the significant differences (P < 0.05). The result showed the immune program of group 3 was superior to that of group 1 and 2, and none of the 44 babies in group 3 were infected. The efficacy of immunization by genetic engineering vaccines were superior to that of blood-derived vaccine. The genetic engineering vaccines against hepatitis B would be more useful for interruption of perinatal transmission of HBV. PMID:8631089

  6. [Hygienic verification of the ASKORS automated system for preclinical diagnosis in Donets Basin mines].

    PubMed

    Reshetiuk, A L; Trunova, O A; Perederi?, G S; Belaia, I I

    1996-01-01

    Automated system ASKORS for medical risk assessment is non-laborious and highly informative method of preclinical diagnosis, that enables to determine medical risk groups in accordance with specific features of medical examination. Data obtained by ASKORS in examination of the staffers in Donbass mines provides important hygienic information on association of health state and performance of the workers with their work conditions. Application of ASKORS as first preclinical diagnostic tool enables to avoid meticulous medical screening of the working populations subjected to-mandatory medical examinations. With that, the efficacy and quality of medical examinations are believed to increase. ASKORS (or its competitive analog) can become an important means monitoring health state and performance among workers engaged into Ukrainian industry, especially for assessment of medical risk. PMID:8963588

  7. Preclinical Mouse Models To Study Human OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Selvi; Lozano-Mena, Gloria; van Esch, Anita; Wagenaar, Els; van Tellingen, Olaf; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2015-12-01

    The impact of OATP drug uptake transporters in drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is increasingly recognized. OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 are human hepatic uptake transporters that can mediate liver uptake of a wide variety of drugs. Recently, we generated transgenic mice with liver-specific expression of human OATP1B1 or OATP1B3 in a mouse Oatp1a/1b knockout background. Here, we investigated the applicability of these mice in OATP-mediated drug-drug interaction studies using the prototypic OATP inhibitor rifampicin and a good OATP substrate, the anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX). We next assessed the possibility of OATP-mediated interactions between telmisartan and MTX, a clinically relevant drug combination. Using HEK293 cells overexpressing OATP1B1 or OATP1B3, we estimated IC50 values for both rifampicin (0.9 or 0.3 ?M) and telmisartan (6.7 or 7.9 ?M) in inhibiting OATP-mediated MTX uptake in vitro. Using wild-type, Oatp1a/1b-/-, and OATP1B1- or OATP1B3-humanized transgenic mice, we found that rifampicin inhibits hepatic uptake of MTX mediated by the mouse Oatp1a/1b and human OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 transporters at clinically relevant concentrations. This highlights the applicability of these mouse models for DDI studies and may be exploited in the clinic to reduce the dose and thus methotrexate-mediated toxicity. On the other hand, telmisartan inhibited only human OATP1B1-mediated hepatic uptake of MTX at concentrations higher than those used in the clinic; therefore risks for OATP-mediated clinical DDIs for this drug combination are likely to be low. Overall, we show here that OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-humanized mice can be used as in vivo tools to assess and possibly predict clinically relevant DDIs. PMID:26474710

  8. Key Findings from Preclinical and Clinical Drug Interaction Studies Presented in New Drug and Biological License Applications Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2014.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingjing; Ritchie, Tasha K; Zhou, Zhu; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory approval documents contain valuable information, often not published, to assess the drug-drug interaction (DDI) profile of newly marketed drugs. This analysis aimed to systematically review all drug metabolism, transport, pharmacokinetics, and DDI data available in the new drug applications and biologic license applications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2014, using the University of Washington Drug Interaction Database, and to highlight the significant findings. Among the 30 new drug applications and 11 biologic license applications reviewed, 35 new molecular entities (NMEs) were well characterized with regard to drug metabolism, transport, and/or organ impairment and were fully analyzed in this review. In vitro, a majority of the NMEs were found to be substrates or inhibitors/inducers of at least one drug metabolizing enzyme or transporter. In vivo, when NMEs were considered as victim drugs, 16 NMEs had at least one in vivo DDI study with a clinically significant change in exposure (area under the time-plasma concentration curve or Cmax ratio ?2 or ?0.5), with 6 NMEs shown to be sensitive substrates of cytochrome P450 enzymes (area under the time-plasma concentration curve ratio ?5 when coadministered with potent inhibitors): paritaprevir and naloxegol (CYP3A), eliglustat (CYP2D6), dasabuvir (CYP2C8), and tasimelteon and pirfenidone (CYP1A2). As perpetrators, seven NMEs showed clinically significant inhibition involving both enzymes and transporters, although no clinically significant induction was observed. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and pharmacogenetics studies were used for six and four NMEs, respectively, to optimize dosing recommendations in special populations and/or multiple impairment situations. In addition, the pharmacokinetic evaluations in patients with hepatic or renal impairment provided useful quantitative information to support drug administration in these fragile populations. PMID:26424199

  9. Preclinical safety, toxicology, and biodistribution study of adenoviral gene therapy with sVEGFR-2 and sVEGFR-3 combined with chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tuppurainen, Laura; Sallinen, Hanna; Kokki, Emmi; Koponen, Jonna; Anttila, Maarit; Pulkkinen, Kati; Heikura, Tommi; Toivanen, Pyry; Hämäläinen, Kirsi; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Heinonen, Seppo; Alitalo, Kari; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Antiangiogenic and antilymphangiogenic gene therapy with soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and soluble VEGFR-3 in combination with chemotherapy is a potential new treatment for ovarian carcinoma. We evaluated the safety, toxicology, and biodistribution of intravenous AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3 combined with chemotherapy in healthy rats (n=90) before entering a clinical setting. The study groups were: AdLacZ and AdLacZ with chemotherapy as control groups, low dose AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3, high dose AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3, combination of low dose AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3 with chemotherapy, combination of high dose AdsVEGFR-2 and AdVEGFR-3 with chemotherapy, and chemotherapy only. The follow-up time was 4 weeks. Safety and toxicology were assessed by monitoring the clinical status of the animals and by histological, hematological, and clinical chemistry parameters. For the biodistribution studies, quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used. Low dose (2×10(10) vp) AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3 gene therapy was well tolerated, even when gene therapy was combined with chemotherapy. Notably, only transient elevation of liver enzymes and mild regenerative changes were seen in liver after the gene transfer in the groups that received high doses (2×10(11) vp) of AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3 with or without chemotherapy. No life-threatening adverse effects were noticed in any of the treatment groups. The highest protein concentration of soluble VEGFR-2 (sVEGFR-2) in circulation was seen 1 week after the gene transfer. The combination of chemotherapy to gene therapy seemed to prolong the time of detectable transgene protein at least 1 week in the circulation. The expression of AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3 transgenes was mainly seen in the liver and spleen as detected by qRT-PCR. According to these results, AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3 gene therapy combined with chemotherapy is safe and can be brought to clinical testing in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:23692381

  10. Preclinical Pharmacokinetic Studies of the Tritium Labelled D-Enantiomeric Peptide D3 Developed for the Treatment of Alzheimer´s Disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Leithold, Leonie H E; Post, Julia; Ziehm, Tamar; Mauler, Jörg; Gremer, Lothar; Cremer, Markus; Schartmann, Elena; Shah, N Jon; Kutzsche, Janine; Langen, Karl-Josef; Breitkreutz, Jörg; Willbold, Dieter; Willuweit, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Targeting toxic amyloid beta (A?) oligomers is currently a very attractive drug development strategy for treatment of Alzheimer´s disease. Using mirror-image phage display against A?1-42, we have previously identified the fully D-enantiomeric peptide D3, which is able to eliminate A? oligomers and has proven therapeutic potential in transgenic Alzheimer´s disease animal models. However, there is little information on the pharmacokinetic behaviour of D-enantiomeric peptides in general. Therefore, we conducted experiments with the tritium labelled D-peptide D3 (3H-D3) in mice with different administration routes to study its distribution in liver, kidney, brain, plasma and gastrointestinal tract, as well as its bioavailability by i.p. and p.o. administration. In addition, we investigated the metabolic stability in liver microsomes, mouse plasma, brain, liver and kidney homogenates, and estimated the plasma protein binding. Based on its high stability and long biological half-life, our pharmacokinetic results support the therapeutic potential of D-peptides in general, with D3 being a new promising drug candidate for Alzheimer´s disease treatment. PMID:26046986

  11. Determination of lansoprazole enantiomers in dog plasma by column-switching liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and its application to a preclinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Sun, Yantong; Meng, Xiangjun; Yang, Bo; Wang, Jian; Yang, Yan; Gu, Jingkai

    2015-09-01

    Lansoprazole, a selective proton pump inhibitor, has a chiral benzimidazole sulfoxide structure and is used for the treatment of gastric acid hypersecretory related diseases. To investigate its stereoselective pharmacokinetics, a column-switching liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of lansoprazole enantiomers in dog plasma using (+)-pantoprazole as an internal standard. After a simple protein precipitation procedure with acetonitrile, matrix components left behind after sample preparation were further eliminated from the sample by reversed-phase chromatography on a C18 column. The fluent was fed to a chiral column for the separation of lansoprazole enantiomers. Baseline separation of lansoprazole enantiomers was achieved on a Chiralcel OZ-RH column using acetonitrile/0.1% formic acid in water (35:65, v/v) as the mobile phase at 40°C. The linearity of the calibration curves ranged from 3 to 800 ng/mL for each enantiomer. Intra- and inter-day precisions ranged from 2.1 to 7.3% with an accuracy of ±1.7% for (+)-lansoprazole, and from 1.6 to 6.9% with an accuracy of ±3.5% for (-)-lansoprazole, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied for the stereoselective pharmacokinetic study of lansoprazole in beagle dog after intravenous infusion. PMID:26081874

  12. Preclinical Pharmacokinetic Studies of the Tritium Labelled D-Enantiomeric Peptide D3 Developed for the Treatment of Alzheimer´s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Leithold, Leonie H. E.; Post, Julia; Ziehm, Tamar; Mauler, Jörg; Gremer, Lothar; Cremer, Markus; Schartmann, Elena; Shah, N. Jon; Kutzsche, Janine; Langen, Karl-Josef; Breitkreutz, Jörg; Willbold, Dieter; Willuweit, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Targeting toxic amyloid beta (A?) oligomers is currently a very attractive drug development strategy for treatment of Alzheimer´s disease. Using mirror-image phage display against A?1-42, we have previously identified the fully D-enantiomeric peptide D3, which is able to eliminate A? oligomers and has proven therapeutic potential in transgenic Alzheimer´s disease animal models. However, there is little information on the pharmacokinetic behaviour of D-enantiomeric peptides in general. Therefore, we conducted experiments with the tritium labelled D-peptide D3 (3H-D3) in mice with different administration routes to study its distribution in liver, kidney, brain, plasma and gastrointestinal tract, as well as its bioavailability by i.p. and p.o. administration. In addition, we investigated the metabolic stability in liver microsomes, mouse plasma, brain, liver and kidney homogenates, and estimated the plasma protein binding. Based on its high stability and long biological half-life, our pharmacokinetic results support the therapeutic potential of D-peptides in general, with D3 being a new promising drug candidate for Alzheimer´s disease treatment. PMID:26046986

  13. The efficacy of minimal contact interventions for acute tinnitus: a randomised controlled study.

    PubMed

    Nyenhuis, Nele; Zastrutzki, Sarah; Weise, Cornelia; Jäger, Burkard; Kröner-Herwig, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Acute tinnitus can lead to substantial distress and eventually result in long-lasting impairment. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioural intervention (delivered as Internet self-management, bibliotherapy or group training) to the information-only control condition. Applicants suffered from subjective tinnitus for up to six months, were between 18 and 75 years old and received no other tinnitus-related psychological treatment. A total of 304 participants were randomly assigned to one of the four study arms. Tinnitus distress, depressive symptoms, psychosomatic discomfort and treatment satisfaction were assessed. At the post-assessment tinnitus distress was significantly lower in the Internet and the group training conditions compared to the control condition. Inter-group effect sizes were moderate to large. At follow-up, all active training conditions showed significantly reduced tinnitus distress compared to the control condition (intention-to-treat analysis). An additional completer analysis showed a significant reduction in tinnitus distress only for the group condition. All effect sizes were moderate. There were no differences regarding psychosomatic discomfort, but depressive symptoms were reduced in the group condition at the post-assessment (intention-to-treat analysis). Treatment satisfaction was significantly higher in the training conditions. The dropout rate was 39%. The present study shows that distress can be reduced as early as the acute stadium and that minimal-contact interventions are a promising way to do this. In particular, the Internet and group conditions led to a large, immediate decrease in distress, and the participants were highly satisfied with the training. PMID:22413736

  14. A Preclinical Model of Inflammatory Breast Cancer to Study the Involvement of CXCR4 and ACKR3 in the Metastatic Process

    PubMed Central

    Wurth, Roberto; Tarn, Kevin; Jernigan, Danielle; Fernandez, Sandra V.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Fatatis, Alessandro; Meucci, Olimpia

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive and invasive tumor, accounting for 2.5% of all breast cancer cases, and characterized by rapid progression, regional and distant metastases, younger age of onset, and lower overall survival. Presently, there are no effective therapies against IBC and a paucity of model systems. Our aim was to develop a clinically relevant IBC model that would allow investigations on the role of chemokine receptors in IBC metastasis. Primary cultures of tumor cells were isolated from pleural exudates of an IBC patient and grown as spheres or monolayers. We developed a human xenograft model where patient-derived IBC cells, stably transduced with lentiviral vectors expressing fluorescent and bioluminescent markers, were inoculated directly into the left ventricle of mice. Our in vivo data show that these IBC cells (FC-IBC02A) are able to seed and proliferate into various organs, including brain, lungs, lymph nodes, and bone, closely replicating the metastatic spread observed in IBC patients. Moreover, cells were able to generate tumors when grafted in the mammary fat pad of mice. RT-PCR and microscopy studies revealed expression of both CXCR4 and ACKR3 receptors in FC-IBC02A cells. Furthermore, CXCL12 (the endogenous chemokine ligand of these receptors) induced transendothelial migration of these cells and stimulated signaling pathways involved in cell survival and migration - an effect reduced by CXCR4 or ACKR3 antagonists. This new model can be used to develop chemokine-based pharmacological approaches against the IBC metastatic process. This work also provides the first evidence of ACKR3 expression in IBC cells. PMID:26500026

  15. RPF151, a novel capsaicin-like analogue: in vitro studies and in vivo preclinical antitumor evaluation in a breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adilson Kleber; Tavares, Maurício Temotheo; Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda Mesquita; de Azevedo, Ricardo Alexandre; Teixeira, Sarah Fernandes; Ferreira-Junior, Wilson Alves; Bertin, Ariane Matiello; de-Sá-Junior, Paulo Luiz; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; Figueiredo, Carlos Rogério; Cury, Yara; Damião, Mariana Celestina Frojuello Costa Bernstorff; Parise-Filho, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Capsaicin, the primary pungent component of the chili pepper, has antitumor activity. Herein, we describe the activity of RPF151, an alkyl sulfonamide analogue of capsaicin, against MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. RPF151 was synthetized, and molecular modeling was used to compare capsaicin and RPF151. Cytotoxicity of RPF151 on MDA-MB-231 was also evaluated by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell cycle analysis, by flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis of cycle-related proteins were used to evaluate the antiproliferative mechanisms. Apoptosis was evaluated by phosphatidyl-serine externalization, cleavage of Ac-YVAD-AMC, and Bcl-2 expression. The production of reactive oxygen species was evaluated by flow cytometry. RPF151 in vivo antitumor effects were investigated in murine MDA-MB-231 model. This study shows that RPF151 downregulated p21 and cyclins A, D1, and D3, leading to S-phase arrest and apoptosis. Although RPF151 has induced the activation of TRPV-1 and TRAIL-R1/DR4 and TRAIL-2/DR5 on the surface of MDA-MB-231 cells, its in vivo antitumor activity was TRPV-1-independent, thus suggesting that RPF151 should not have the same pungency-based limitation of capsaicin. In silico analysis corroborated the biological findings, showing that RPF151 has physicochemical improvements over capsaicin. Overall, the activity of RPF151 against MDA-MB-231 and its lower pungency suggest that it may have a relevant role in cancer therapy. PMID:25894379

  16. A Preclinical Model of Inflammatory Breast Cancer to Study the Involvement of CXCR4 and ACKR3 in the Metastatic Process.

    PubMed

    Wurth, Roberto; Tarn, Kevin; Jernigan, Danielle; Fernandez, Sandra V; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Fatatis, Alessandro; Meucci, Olimpia

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive and invasive tumor, accounting for 2.5% of all breast cancer cases, and characterized by rapid progression, regional and distant metastases, younger age of onset, and lower overall survival. Presently, there are no effective therapies against IBC and a paucity of model systems. Our aim was to develop a clinically relevant IBC model that would allow investigations on the role of chemokine receptors in IBC metastasis. Primary cultures of tumor cells were isolated from pleural exudates of an IBC patient and grown as spheres or monolayers. We developed a human xenograft model where patient-derived IBC cells, stably transduced with lentiviral vectors expressing fluorescent and bioluminescent markers, were inoculated directly into the left ventricle of mice. Our in vivo data show that these IBC cells (FC-IBC02A) are able to seed and proliferate into various organs, including brain, lungs, lymph nodes, and bone, closely replicating the metastatic spread observed in IBC patients. Moreover, cells were able to generate tumors when grafted in the mammary fat pad of mice. RT-PCR and microscopy studies revealed expression of both CXCR4 and ACKR3 receptors in FC-IBC02A cells. Furthermore, CXCL12 (the endogenous chemokine ligand of these receptors) induced transendothelial migration of these cells and stimulated signaling pathways involved in cell survival and migration - an effect reduced by CXCR4 or ACKR3 antagonists. This new model can be used to develop chemokine-based pharmacological approaches against the IBC metastatic process. This work also provides the first evidence of ACKR3 expression in IBC cells. PMID:26500026

  17. [Chromatography-efficacy relation study between HPLC fingerprints and allelopathic effect of Salvia miltiorrhiza aqueous solution on radish].

    PubMed

    Niu, Min; Liu, Hong-Yan; Li, Jia; Zhang, Yong-qing

    2015-03-01

    To explore the effective components represented by fingerprint contributed to allelopathic effect of different Salvia miltiorrhiza aqueous concentration on seeds and seedlings of radish, grey relational analysis was used to establish the chromatography-efficacy relation. The results show that 15 peaks devote high allelopathic contribution to radish seeds and seedlings. The study will provide a new concept for allelochemicals screening and study. PMID:26087550

  18. The efficacy of triclabendazole and other anthelmintics against Fasciola hepatica in controlled studies in cattle.

    PubMed

    Richards, R J; Bowen, F L; Essenwein, F; Steiger, R F; Büscher, G

    1990-03-01

    In eight controlled tests 274 cattle were used to assess the efficacies of triclabendazole, albendazole, clorsulon, nitroxynil, oxyclozanide and rafoxanide against Fasciola hepatica. Against one-, two- and four-week-old early immature fluke the mean efficacies of triclabendazole given orally at 12 mg/kg were 88.1, 95.3 and 90.7 per cent, respectively. Clorsulon, nitroxynil and rafoxanide administered at recommended dose rates showed negligible activity against these stages of the parasite. Against six- and eight-week-old infections the mean efficacies of triclabendazole at 12 mg/kg were 87.5 per cent and 95.7 per cent, respectively. Against F hepatica aged six weeks, albendazole and oxyclozanide showed no activity and clorsulon, nitroxynil and rafoxanide had only slight to moderate activity. The efficacies of triclabendazole, clorsulon, nitroxynil and rafoxanide against 10- or 12-week-old parasites were 100, 99.0, 99.1 and 90.1 per cent, respectively. Albendazole and oxyclozanide showed poor efficacy against 12-week-old infections. PMID:2316160

  19. The study of perceived stress, coping strategy and self-efficacy of Chinese undergraduate nursing students in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang-Fang; Lei, Xiao-Ling; He, Wei; Gu, Yan-Hong; Li, Dong-Wen

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the coping strategy and the effects of self-efficacy of Chinese undergraduate nursing students when they face the stress in clinical practice. Convenience sampling was used to recruit undergraduate nursing students in Mainland China who have practiced 3 months in hospitals in their final college year. Self-report questionnaires including demographics, Perceived Stress Scale, coping behaviour inventory and Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale were collected. The results showed that during clinical practice, assignments and workload were the most common stress to students; transference was the most frequently used coping strategy by students. Self-efficacy not only had a positive main effect in predicting the frequency of use of staying optimistic and problem solving strategies but also moderated the effects of stress from taking care of patients on transference strategy, as well as stress from assignments and workload on problem solving strategy. It is essential to bolster the students' self-efficacy to reduce stress and adopt positively the coping strategies during clinical practice. PMID:24750234

  20. The interplay between knowledge, perceived efficacy, and concern about global warming and climate change: a one-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Milfont, Taciano L

    2012-06-01

    If the long-term goal of limiting warming to less than 2°C is to be achieved, rapid and sustained reductions of greenhouse gas emissions are required. These reductions will demand political leadership and widespread public support for action on global warming and climate change. Public knowledge, level of concern, and perceived personal efficacy, in positively affecting these issues are key variables in understanding public support for mitigation action. Previous research has documented some contradictory associations between knowledge, personal efficacy, and concern about global warming and climate change, but these cross-sectional findings limit inferences about temporal stability and direction of influence. This study examines the relationships between these three variables over a one-year period and three waves with national data from New Zealand. Results showed a positive association between the variables, and the pattern of findings was stable and consistent across the three data points. More importantly, results indicate that concern mediates the influence of knowledge on personal efficacy. Knowing more about global warming and climate change increases overall concern about the risks of these issues, and this increased concern leads to greater perceived efficacy and responsibility to help solving them. Implications for risk communication are discussed. PMID:22489642

  1. Self-efficacy in providing smoking-cessation services among psychiatric nurses in central and southern Taiwan: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Su-Er; Wang, Ai-Ling; Shu, Bih-Ching

    2015-04-01

    Smoking by psychiatric patients remains prevalent. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to understand the influence of self-efficacy and its correlates among psychiatric nurses when providing smoking-cessation services (SCS). A convenience sample of 193 nurses from psychiatric institutions was obtained. Surveys were conducted using self-report measures regarding SCS provided by psychiatric nurses. The survey questions focused on self-efficacy, attitude, practical experience, and smoke-free policies, and their implementation in the workplace. The participants reported low self-efficacy for providing SCS in their self-assessment, as demonstrated by their scores of 55.3?±?20.4, on a scale of 0 (low confidence) to 100 (high confidence). Using multiple linear regressions, statistically-significant, relevant factors included perceived provider-related barriers in providing SCS, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, the nurse's attitude towards a patient smoking, and the nurse's frequency and practical experience in providing SCS. The correlates of this self-efficacy can serve as a reference for in-service curriculum planning of SCS by psychiatric nurses. In addition, policies to limit exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke should be explored. PMID:25582504

  2. A multicentre open-label safety and efficacy study of tetrodotoxin for cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, N.A.; Lapointe, B.; Ong–Lam, M.; Dubuc, B.; Walde, D.; Gagnon, B.; Love, R.; Goel, R.; Hawley, P.; Ngoc, A. Ho; du Souich, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer pain is highly prevalent, and existing treatments are often insufficient to provide adequate relief. Objectives We assessed the long-term safety and efficacy of subcutaneous tetrodotoxin treatment in reducing the intensity of chronic cancer-related pain. Methods In this multicentre open-label longitudinal trial, 30 ?g tetrodotoxin was administered subcutaneously twice daily for 4 days in a heterogeneous cohort of patients with persistent pain despite opioids and other analgesics. “Responder” was defined as a mean reduction of 30% or more in pain intensity from baseline; and “clinical responder” as some pain reduction, but less than 30%, plus agreement on the part of both the patient and the physician that a meaningful analgesic response to treatment had occurred. Results Of 45 patients who entered the longitudinal trial, 41 had sufficient data for analysis. Of all 45 patients, 21 (47%) met the criteria for “responder” [16 patients (36%)] or “clinical responder” [5 patients (11%)]. Onset of pain relief was typically cumulative over days, and after administration ended, the analgesic effect subsided over the course of a few weeks. No evidence of loss of analgesic effect was observed during subsequent treatments (2526 patient–days in total and a maximum of 400 days in 1 patient). One patient withdrew from the study because of adverse events. Toxicity was usually mild (82%) or moderate (13%), and remained so through subsequent treatment cycles, with no evidence of cumulative toxicity or tolerance. Conclusions Long-term treatment with tetrodotoxin is associated with acceptable toxicity and, in a substantial minority of patients, resulted in a sustained analgesic effect. Further study of tetrodotoxin for moderate-to-severe cancer pain is warranted. PMID:21655148

  3. Transfection system of amino-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles: in vitro efficacy, biodegradability, and immunogenicity study.

    PubMed

    Mostaghaci, Babak; Susewind, Julia; Kickelbick, Guido; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Loretz, Brigitta

    2015-03-11

    Many methods have been developed in order to use calcium phosphate (CaP) for delivering nucleotides into living cells. Surface functionalization of CaP nanoparticles (CaP NPs) with N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane was shown recently to achieve dispersed NPs with a positive surface charge, capable of transfection (Chem. Mater. 2013, 25 (18), 3667). In this study, different crystal structures of amino-modified CaP NPs (brushite and hydroxyapatite) were investigated for their interaction in cell culture systems in more detail. Qualitative (confocal laser scanning microscopy) and quantitative (flow cytometry) transfection experiments with two cell lines showed the higher transfection efficacy of brushite versus hydroxyapatite. The transfection also revealed a cell type dependency. HEK293 cells were easier to transfect compared to A549 cells. This result was supported by the cytotoxicity results. A549 cells showed a higher degree of tolerance toward the CaP NPs. Further, the impact of the surface modification on the interaction with macrophages and complement as two important components of the innate immune system were considered. The amine surface functionalization had an effect of decreasing the release of proinflammatory cytokines. The complement interaction investigated by a C3a complement activation assay did show no significant differences between CaP NPs without or with amine modification and overall weak interaction. Finally, the degradation of CaP NPs in biological media was studied with respect to the two crystal structures and at acidic and neutral pH. Both amino-modified CaP NPs disintegrate within days at neutral pH, with a notable faster disintegration of brushite NPs at acidic pH. In summary, the fair transfection capability of this amino functionalized CaP NPs together with the excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, and low immunogenicity make them interesting candidates for further evaluation. PMID:25692576

  4. Safety and efficacy of Qurse-e-istisqua in chronic hepatitis C Infection: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Rehan, Harmeet Singh; Chopra, Deepti; Yadav, Madhur; Wardhan, Neeta; Manak, Seema; Siddiqui, KM; Aslam, Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Qurse-e-istisqua (Q-e-I), an Unani medicine commonly prescribed to treat liver disorders. Objectives: To study efficacy and safety of Q-e-I in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Methods: In this randomized double-blind exploratory study, 60 naive patients of HCV infection were assigned to receive either interferon?2a (IFN?2a) (3 mIU, subcutaneous, thrice weekly), ribavirin (RBV) (1000 mg, orally, twice daily in divided doses) and placebo (n = 30) or IFN?2a, RBV and Q-e-I (5 g, orally, thrice daily in divided doses) (n = 30). HCV RNA levels, serum hyaluronic acid (SHA), ultrasound image scoring for fibrosis, liver and renal function test, prothrombin time, were done at the baseline and thereafter periodically. Results: Early virologic response (EVR), end of treatment response (ETR) and sustained virologic response (SVR) were 90%, 96.6% and 90% in the control group and 86.6%, 90.0% and 83.3% in the treatment group. SHA level was lower in the treatment group at the end of the treatment as compared to the control group. Mean end of follow-up ultrasound image scoring for fibrosis in the control and the treatment group was 1.37 ± 0.07 and 1.22 ± 0.06 respectively. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were significantly lower in the treatment group than the control group at 1-month. Commonly observed adverse drug reactions included fever, hair fall, fatigue, anemia, and diarrhea. Conclusion: Q-e-I was well tolerated and showed anti-fibrotic activity. EVR, ETR and SVR suggested that Q-e-I do not have any anti-HCV activity. Early recovery in AST and inhibition of progress of fibrosis in Q-e-I group was probably due to the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of its ingredients. PMID:25821315

  5. Comparison of Antimicrobial Efficacy of Triclosan- Containing, Herbal and Homeopathy Toothpastes- An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Fawaz, Mohammed Alimullah; Narahari, Rao; Shahela, Tanveer; Syed, Afroz

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of antimicrobial agents is one of the important strategies to prevent oral diseases. These agents vary in their abilities to deliver preventive and therapeutic benefits. Objectives This invitro study was conducted to assess antimicrobial efficacy of different toothpastes against various oral pathogens. Materials and Methods A total of nine toothpastes in three groups were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 0266P) and Candida albicans (Laboratory Strain) by modified agar well diffusion method. Statistical Analysis was performed using Minitab Software. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results Triclosan-based dental formulation with combination of fluoride (1000ppm) exhibited higher antimicrobial activity against test organisms than the combination of lower fluoride-concentration or sodium monofluorophosphate. Among herbal dentifrices, formulation containing Neem, Pudina, Long, Babool, Turmeric and Vajradanti showed significant antimicrobial activity against all the four tested microorganisms (p<0.05). However, against Streptococcus mutans, all three herbal products showed significant antimicrobial activity. Homeo products showed least antimicrobial activity on the tested strains. Formulation with kreosotum, Plantago major and calendula was significantly effective only against Streptococcus mutans. Conclusion In the present study, antimicrobial activity of the toothpaste containing both triclosan and fluoride (1000ppm) as active ingredients showed a significant difference (p< 0.05) against all four tested microflora compared to that of with lower fluoride-concentration or sodium monofluorophosphate. Of herbal groups, the only dentifrice containing several phytochemicals was found to be significantly effective and comparable to triclosan-fluoride (1000ppm) formulation. Thus, this herbal toothpaste can be used as alternative to triclosan-based formulations. However, these results might not be clinically useful unless tested invivo. PMID:26557516

  6. Efficacy and safety of infliximab in active SLE: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Uppal, S S; Hayat, S J; Raghupathy, R

    2009-07-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) plays a major role in propagating the inflammatory processes responsible for tissue damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and is overexpressed both systemically and locally in this disease. Hence, this pilot study was carried out to assess the safety and efficacy of TNF blockade in patients with active SLE. A total of 46 individuals (27 patients with active SLE and 19 healthy control volunteers) were the subjects of this study. Nine patients with SLE were allocated to treatment arm and 18 were allocated to control arm. In addition to conventional treatment, treatment arm received infliximab infusions 3 mg/kg body weight at 0, 2, 6 weeks and then q 8 weeks for a total of 24 weeks, that is, a total of five doses. Patients were closely monitored for infection. Clinical, laboratory and treatment data were entered into a pre-designed proforma. Health status (SF-36), patient global assessment (PGA) of disease activity, disease activity scores by SLEDAI and organ damage by SLICC/ACR-DI (American College Rheumatology) were measured at baseline and end of the study. Relevant immunological studies included serum levels of TNF-alpha and soluble TNF receptors-1 (p55 srTNF-alpha) and -2 (p75 srTNF-alpha), C3 and C4 complement levels, anti-dsDNA antibody titres (IgM, IgG and IgA isotypes), anti-cardiolipin titres (IgM, IgG and IgA isotypes) and anti-beta2GPI (Glycoprotein I) antibody titres (IgM, IgG and IgA isotypes). Four patients from treatment arm dropped out due to infliximab infusion reaction and 12 patients dropped out from the control arm. The treatment group showed significantly greater improvement in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Improvements in several SF-36 subscales, PGA and VAS-Fatigue (Visual Analogue Scale) were also greater in the treatment group but did not achieve statistical significance. The mean levels of TNF-alpha, soluble TNF receptors-1 (p55 srTNF-alpha) and -2 (p75 srTNF-alpha) were higher in the SLE group compared with the healthy controls but did not change significantly over the study period. We did not face any safety issues with infliximab in this study. In view of improvement in several SLE parameters and good safety profile of infliximab, anti-TNF-alpha therapy is an interesting candidate approach for treating SLE. PMID:19502264

  7. Efficacy of Crest Herbal Toothpaste in “Clearing Internal Heat”: A Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Xu; Liu, Yue-Yun; Wang, Shao-Xian; Li, Xiao-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Evaluation of the efficacy of Crest Herbal Crystal Toothpaste in “clearing internal heat.” Methods. This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled parallel design clinical test of a product that was already on the market. 72 subjects were randomly assigned to control group (group A with Colgate Herbal Salty Toothpaste) or treatment group (group B with Crest Herbal Crystal Toothpaste) with ratio of 1?:?2. Subjects were instructed to brush with 1g toothpaste for 2 minutes each time, 2 times per day in a 4-aweek test period; measurement with the rating scale on the efficacy of “clearing internal heat” for the herbal toothpaste was done at baseline, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks of toothpaste usage. Results. The rating scale on efficacy of “clearing internal heat” for the herbal toothpaste reveals that the primitive points of 72-case intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis and 67-case per-protocol (PP) analysis for subjects in group A and subjects in group B were found to be reduced progressively with statistical significance (P < 0.05). The overall effective rates for group A and group B were, respectively, 62.50%, 56.25% (ITT) and 62.50%, 60.64% (PP). The statistical results indicated that the symptoms of fire-heat for both groups of subjects have been improved after application of toothpaste. Conclusion. The efficacy of Crest Herbal Crystal Toothpaste in “clearing internal heat” was confirmed by the trial as compared to Colgate Herbal Salty Toothpaste. And its efficacy was objectively evaluated by the rating scale on efficacy of “clearing internal heat.” PMID:24228064

  8. Safety and Efficacy of Nicotine Replacement Therapy in the Perioperative Period: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Margaret B; Warner, David O

    2015-11-01

    Patients who smoke cigarettes are at increased risk for development of complications both during and after surgical procedures, including respiratory, cardiac, and healing-related complications. Abstinence from smoking can considerably reduce these risks. Pharmacotherapy, including nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), is an important component of efficacious tobacco use interventions. However, the use of NRT in the perioperative period is controversial. In this narrative review, we discuss the current evidence for the efficacy and safety of NRT in patients scheduled for surgical procedures, with emphasis on evidence from human studies. We performed a literature search for articles published from January 1, 1990, through May 1, 2015, in the PubMed online database using various permutations of the Medical Subject Headings terms surgery; surgical procedures, operative; nicotine; and smoking cessation. Studies were selected for inclusion according to their relevance to the preclinical and clinical evidence pertaining to how NRT affects surgical outcome and long-term rates of abstinence from tobacco. There is strong evidence that NRT enhances the efficacy of tobacco use interventions. Some preclinical studies suggest that nicotine in high doses that exceed those produced by NRT decreases the viability of skin flaps. Although the available data are limited, there is no evidence from human studies that NRT increases the risk of healing-related or cardiovascular complications. Individual clinical trials of tobacco use interventions that include NRT have revealed either no effect or a reduction in complication rates. Therefore, given the benefits of smoking abstinence to both perioperative outcomes and long-term health and the efficacy of NRT in achieving and maintaining abstinence, any policies that prohibit the use of NRT in surgical patients should be reexamined. PMID:26455889

  9. High School Students' Epistemological Beliefs, Conceptions of Learning, and Self-Efficacy for Learning Biology: A Study of Their Structural Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadi, Özlem; Dagyar, Miray

    2015-01-01

    The current work reveals the data of the study which examines the relationships among epistemological beliefs, conceptions of learning, and self-efficacy for biology learning with the help of the Structural Equation Modeling. Three questionnaires, the Epistemological Beliefs, the Conceptions of Learning Biology and the Self-efficacy for Learning…

  10. A Study of the Impact of a School-Based, Job-Embedded Professional Development Program on Elementary and Middle School Teacher Efficacy for Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skoretz, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a school-based, job-embedded professional development program on elementary and middle school teacher efficacy for technology integration. Teacher efficacy has been identified as a strong predictor of whether the content of professional development will transfer to classroom practice…

  11. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization for Unresectable Standard-chemorefractory Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Survival, Efficacy, and Safety Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rafi, Shoaib; Piduru, Sarat M.; El-Rayes, Bassel; Kauh, John S.; Kooby, David A.; Sarmiento, Juan M.; Kim, Hyun S.

    2013-04-15

    To assess the overall survival, efficacy, and safety of radioembolization with yttrium-90 (Y90) for unresectable standard-chemorefractory intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Patients with unresectable standard-chemorefractory ICC treated with Y90 were studied. Survival was calculated from the date of first Y90 procedure. Tumor response was assessed with the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria on follow-up computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (NCI CTCAE), version 3, were used for complications. Statistical analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier estimator by the log rank test. Nineteen patients underwent a total of 24 resin-based Y90 treatments. Median survival from the time of diagnosis and first Y90 procedure was 752 {+-} 193 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 374-1130] and 345 {+-} 128 (95 % CI 95-595) days, respectively. Median survival with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 1 (n = 15) and ECOG performance status 2 (n = 4) was 450 {+-} 190 (95 % CI 78-822) and 345 {+-} 227 (95 % CI 0-790) days, respectively (p = .214). Patients with extrahepatic metastasis (n = 11) had a median survival of 404 {+-} 309 (95 % CI 0-1010) days versus 345 {+-} 117 (95 % CI 115-575) days for patients without metastasis (n = 8) (p = .491). No mortality was reported within 30 days from first Y90 radioembolization. One patient developed grade 3 thrombocytopenia as assessed by NCI CTCAE. Fatigue and transient abdominal pain were observed in 4 (21 %) and 6 (32 %) patients, respectively. Y90 radioembolization is effective for unresectable standard-chemorefractory ICC.

  12. Ciprofloxacin DPI: a randomised, placebo-controlled, phase IIb efficacy and safety study on cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dorkin, Henry L; Staab, Doris; Operschall, Elisabeth; Alder, Jeff; Criollo, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of infective bronchitis involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a cornerstone of care in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This phase IIb, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy and safety of ciprofloxacin dry powder for inhalation (DPI) in this population. Methods Patients with CF, ?12?years of age (N=286), were randomised to ciprofloxacin DPI (32.5?mg (n=93) or 48.75?mg (n=93)), or corresponding placebo (32.5?mg, n=65; 48.75?mg, n=35) twice daily for 28?days. The primary objective was the change in forced expiratory volume in 1?s (FEV1) from baseline (day 0) to end of treatment (day 29) in the intent-to-treat population for ciprofloxacin DPI compared with the corresponding placebo group. Results The primary effectiveness objective was not met; there were no significant differences in change in FEV1 between ciprofloxacin DPI and the corresponding placebo group for either dose (p=0.154). However, in pooled analyses, FEV1 decline from baseline to treatment end was significantly lower with ciprofloxacin DPI than with placebo (pooled data; p=0.02). Ciprofloxacin DPI showed positive effects on sputum bacterial load and quality of life, but these effects were not maintained at the 4-week follow-up. Ciprofloxacin DPI was well tolerated and there were no significant differences in type/incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events by treatment group (p=0.115). Conclusions Further investigations are needed to determine the full scope of the beneficial effects of ciprofloxacin DPI for patients with CF. Trial registration number Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00645788; EudraCT 2008-008314-40. PMID:26688732

  13. Artemisinin-Naphthoquine Combination Therapy for Uncomplicated Pediatric Malaria: a Tolerability, Safety, and Preliminary Efficacy Study

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, John; Moore, Brioni; Lee, Sook Ting; Senn, Michèle; Griffin, Susan; Lautu, Dulci; Salman, Sam; Siba, Peter; Mueller, Ivo

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin-naphthoquine (ART-NQ) is a fixed-dose coformulated antimalarial therapy recommended as a single-dose treatment and marketed in Papua New Guinea among other tropical countries. We conducted a tolerability, safety, and efficacy study of ART-NQ for Papua New Guinean children aged 5 to 12 years with uncomplicated malaria, comparing single-dose ART-NQ (15 and 6 mg/kg of body weight) given with water (group 1; n = 15), single-dose ART-NQ (22 and 9 mg/kg) given with milk (group 2; n = 17), or two daily doses of 22 and 9 mg/kg given with water (group 3; n = 16). Of the 48 children (45 with Plasmodium falciparum malaria, 2 with Plasmodium vivax malaria, and 1 with mixed-species malaria), 2 in group 2 did not attend all follow-up assessments. All regimens were well tolerated, with no serious adverse events. There were no clinically significant changes in pulse, blood pressure, rate-corrected electrocardiographic QT, routine biochemistry/hematology, or hearing after treatment. Fever clearance was prompt. Mean 50% parasite clearance times were 4, 4, and 5 h for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. One group 1 patient had PCR-confirmed P. falciparum recrudescence at day 23; four had PCR-confirmed P. falciparum reinfections on day 28 or 42; and three had P. vivax infections detected on day 42. The only recurrent parasitemia in groups 2 and 3 occurred in a group 2 child who developed a P. vivax infection on day 42. Day 14 gametocyte positivity levels were 20%, 27%, and 9% in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The lower single ART-NQ dose was associated with relatively frequent recurrence of parasitemia, but the prolonged gametocytemia in all three groups has implications for the transmission of malaria. PMID:22330921

  14. Safety and efficacy of hysteroscopic sterilization compared with laparoscopic sterilization: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jialin; Pfeifer, Samantha; Schlegel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the safety and efficacy of hysteroscopic sterilization with the “Essure” device with laparoscopic sterilization in a large, all-inclusive, state cohort. Design Population based cohort study. Settings Outpatient interventional setting in New York State. Participants Women undergoing interval sterilization procedure, including hysteroscopic sterilization with Essure device and laparoscopic surgery, between 2005 and 2013. Main outcomes measures Safety events within 30 days of procedures; unintended pregnancies and reoperations within one year of procedures. Mixed model accounting for hospital clustering was used to compare 30 day and 1 year outcomes, adjusting for patient characteristics and other confounders. Time to reoperation was evaluated using frailty model for time to event analysis. Results We identified 8048 patients undergoing hysteroscopic sterilization and 44?278 undergoing laparoscopic sterilization between 2005 and 2013 in New York State. There was a significant increase in the use of hysteroscopic procedures during this period, while use of laparoscopic sterilization decreased. Patients undergoing hysteroscopic sterilization were older than those undergoing laparoscopic sterilization and were more likely to have a history of pelvic inflammatory disease (10.3% v 7.2%, P<0.01), major abdominal surgery (9.4% v 7.9%, P<0.01), and cesarean section (23.2% v 15.4%, P<0.01). At one year after surgery, hysteroscopic sterilization was not associated with a higher risk of unintended pregnancy (odds ratio 0.84 (95% CI 0.63 to 1.12)) but was associated with a substantially increased risk of reoperation (odds ratio 10.16 (7.47 to 13.81)) compared with laparoscopic sterilization. Conclusions Patients undergoing hysteroscopic sterilization have a similar risk of unintended pregnancy but a more than 10-fold higher risk of undergoing reoperation compared with patients undergoing laparoscopic sterilization. Benefits and risks of both procedures should be discussed with patients for informed decisions making. PMID:26462857

  15. Study of the Efficacy of Real Time-PCR Method for Amikacin Determination Using Microbial Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Yeganeh, Farshid; Tamizi, Elnaz; Zahedi, Amin; Asefi, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Microbial assay is used to determine the potency of antibiotics and vitamins. In spite of its advantages like simplicity and easiness, and to reveal the slight changes in the molecules, the microbial assay suffers from significant limitations; these methods are of lower specificity, accuracy and sensitivity. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the efficacy of real time-PCR technique in comparison with turbidimetric method for microbial assay of amikacin. Methods: Microbial determination of amikacin by turbidimetric method was performed according to USP. Also amikacin concentrations were determined by microbial assay using taq-man quantitative PCR method. Standard curves in different concentration for both methods were plotted and method validation parameters of linearity, precision and accuracy were calculated using statistical procedures. Results: The RT-PCR method was linear in the wider concentration range (5.12 – 38.08 for RT-PCR versus 8.00 – 30.47 for turbidimetric method) with a better correlation coefficient (0.976 for RT-PCR versus 0.958 for turbidimetric method). RT-PCR method with LOQ of 5.12 ng/ml was more sensitive than turbidimetric method with LOQ of 8.00 ng/ml and the former could detect and quantify low concentrations of amikacin. The results of accuracy and precision evaluation showed that the RT-PCR method was accurate and precise in all of the tested concentration. Conclusion: The RT-PCR method described here provided an accurate and precise technique for measurement of amikacin potency and it can be a candidate for microbial determination of the antibiotics with the same test organism. PMID:26236655

  16. Feasibility and efficacy of cognitive telerehabilitation in early Alzheimer’s disease: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Jelcic, Nela; Agostini, Michela; Meneghello, Francesca; Bussè, Cinzia; Parise, Sara; Galano, Antonietta; Tonin, Paolo; Dam, Mauro; Cagnin, Annachiara

    2014-01-01

    Background This pilot study compared the effects of lexical-semantic stimulation through telecommunication technology (LSS-tele) with in-person LSS (LSS-direct) and unstructured cognitive treatment (UCS) in patients with early Alzheimer’s disease. Methods Twenty-seven patients with Alzheimer’s disease in the very early stage (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] >26/30) were divided into three groups: seven patients received LSS-tele treatment, ten received standard LSS-direct intervention, and ten participants underwent UCS as control condition. Intervention treatments consisted of two weekly sessions of LSS (through teleconference or face to face depending on group assignment) or UCS exercises administered to small groups throughout a 3-month period. The main outcome measures were changes of global cognitive performance, language abilities, and memory function. Secondary outcome measures were changes in attention, working memory, executive functions, and visual-spatial abilities tests. Results The mean MMSE score improved significantly in LSS-tele and LSS-direct treatments; LSS-tele improved language abilities, both phonemic and semantic, and stabilized delayed verbal episodic memory with respect to an improved performance after the LSS-direct intervention and to a memory decline observed in the control group. Improvement was not achieved in any neuropsychological test score after UCS. Conclusion Clinical application of telecommunication technology to cognitive rehabilitation of elderly patients with neurodegenerative cognitive impairment is feasible and may improve global cognitive performance. Technical aspects to ameliorate efficacy of delivery may further improve its impact on domain-specific cognitive abilities. PMID:25284993

  17. Biodistribution and Efficacy Studies of the Proteasome Inhibitor BSc2118 in a Mouse Melanoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Mlynarczuk-Bialy, Izabela; Doeppner, Thorsten R.; Golab, Jakub; Nowis, Dominika; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M.; Parobczak, Kamil; Wigand, Moritz E.; Hajdamowicz, Malgorzata; Bia?y, ?ukasz P.; Aniolek, Olga; Henklein, Petra; Bähr, Mathias; Schmidt, Boris; Kuckelkorn, Ulrike; Kloetzel, Peter-M.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the proteasome offers many therapeutic possibilities in inflammation as well as in neoplastic diseases. However, clinical use of proteasome inhibitors is limited by the development of resistance or severe side effects. In our study we characterized the anti-tumor properties of the novel proteasome inhibitor BSc2118. The sensitivity of tumor lines to BSc2118 was analyzed in comparison to bortezomib using crystal violet staining in order to assess cell viability. The In Vivo distribution of BSc2118 in mouse tissues was tracked by a fluorescent-modified form of BSc2118 (BSc2118-FL) and visualized by confocal microscopy. Inhibition of the 20S proteasome was monitored both in cultured cell lines and in mice, respectively. Finally, safety and efficacy of BSc2118 was evaluated in a mouse melanoma model. BSc2118 inhibits proliferation of different tumor cell lines with a similar potency as compared with bortezomib. Systemic administration of BSc2118 in mice is well tolerated, even when given in a dose of 60 mg/kg body weight. After systemic injection of BSc2118 or bortezomib similar proteasome inhibition patterns are observed within the murine organs. Detection of BSc2118-FL revealed correlation of distribution pattern of BSc2118 with inhibition of proteasomal activity in cells or mouse tissues. Finally, administration of BSc2118 in a mouse melanoma model shows significant local anti-tumor effects. Concluding, BSc2118 represents a novel low-toxic agent that might be alternatively used for known proteasome inhibitors in anti-cancer treatment. PMID:25389452

  18. Case-Based Lessons: A Quantitative Study of How Case Studies Impact Teacher Efficacy for the Application of Principles of Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Kathrine Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to provide a response to the following question: Does the use of video case studies focused on motivation increase undergraduates' sense of efficacy for applying principles of motivation? I examined the proposed research question using quantitative methods over the course of two 10-week quarters.…

  19. Omics Meets Biology: Application to the Design and Preclinical Assessment of Antivenoms

    PubMed Central

    Calvete, Juan J.; Sanz, Libia; Pla, Davinia; Lomonte, Bruno; Gutiérrez, José María

    2014-01-01

    Snakebite envenoming represents a neglected tropical disease that has a heavy public health impact worldwide, mostly affecting poor people involved in agricultural activities in Africa, Asia, Latin America and Oceania. A key issue that complicates the treatment of snakebite envenomings is the poor availability of the only validated treatment for this disease, antivenoms. Antivenoms can be an efficacious treatment for snakebite envenoming, provided they are safe, effective, affordable, accessible and administered appropriately. The shortage of antivenoms in various regions, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa and some parts of Asia, can be significantly alleviated by optimizing the use of current antivenoms and by the generation of novel polyspecific antivenoms having a wide spectrum of efficacy. Complementing preclinical testing of antivenom efficacy using in vivo and in vitro functional neutralization assays, developments in venomics and antivenomics are likely to revolutionize the design and preclinical assessment of antivenoms by being able to test new antivenom preparations and to predict their paraspecific neutralization to the level of species-specific toxins. PMID:25517863

  20. Two-dimensional inverse planning and delivery with a preclinical image guided microirradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, James M. P.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.; Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; The Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Recent advances in preclinical radiotherapy systems have provided the foundation for scaling many of the elements of clinical radiation therapy practice to the dimensions and energy demanded in small animal studies. Such systems support the technical capabilities to accurately deliver highly complex dose distributions, but methods to optimize and deliver such distributions remain in their infancy. This study developed an optimization method based on empirically measured two-dimensional dose kernel measurements to deliver arbitrary planar dose distributions on a recently developed small animal radiotherapy platform.Methods: A two-dimensional dose kernel was measured with repeated radiochromic film measurements for the circular 1 mm diameter fixed collimator of the small animal radiotherapy system at 1 cm depth in a solid water phantom. This kernel was utilized in a sequential quadratic programming optimization framework to determine optimal beam positions and weights to deliver an arbitrary desired dose distribution. The positions and weights were then translated to a set of stage motions to automatically deliver the optimized dose distribution. End-to-end efficacy of the framework was quantified through five repeated deliveries of two dosimetric challenges: (1) a 5 mm radius bullseye distribution, and (2) a “sock” distribution contained within a 9 × 13 mm bounding box incorporating rectangular, semicircular, and exponentially decaying geometric constructs and a rectangular linear dose gradient region. These two challenges were designed to gauge targeting, geometric, and dosimetric fidelity.Results: Optimization of the bullseye and sock distributions required 2.1 and 5.9 min and utilized 50 and 77 individual beams for delivery, respectively. Automated delivery of the resulting optimized distributions, validated using radiochromic film measurements, revealed an average targeting accuracy of 0.32 mm, and a dosimetric delivery error along four line profiles taken through the sock distribution of 3.9%. Mean absolute delivery error across the 0–1 Gy linear dose gradient over 7.5 mm was 0.01 Gy.Conclusions: The work presented here demonstrates the potential for complex dose distributions to be planned and automatically delivered with millimeter scale heterogeneity at submillimeter accuracy. This capability establishes the technical foundation for preclinical validation of biologically guided radiotherapy investigations and development of unique radiobiological experiments.

  1. Imaging-guided preclinical trials of vascular targeting in prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmuk, James

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy in American men and is characterized by dependence on androgens (Testosterone/Dihydrotestosterone) for growth and survival. Although reduction of serum testosterone levels by surgical or chemical castration transiently inhibits neoplastic growth, tumor adaptation to castrate levels of androgens results in the generation of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Progression to CRPC following androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been associated with changes in vascular morphology and increased angiogenesis. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that targeting tumor vasculature in combination with ADT would result in enhanced therapeutic efficacy against prostate cancer. Methods: To test this hypothesis, we examined the therapeutic activity of a tumor-vascular disrupting agent (tumor-VDA), EPC2407 (Crolibulin(TM)), alone and in combination with ADT in a murine model of prostate cancer (Myc-CaP). A non-invasive multimodality imaging approach based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and ultrasound (US) was utilized to characterize tumor response to therapy and to guide preclinical trial design. Imaging results were correlated with histopathologic (H&E) and immunohistochemical (CD31) assessment as well as tumor growth inhibition and survival analyses. Results: Our imaging techniques were able to capture an acute reduction (within 24 hours) in tumor perfusion following castration and VDA monotherapy. BLI revealed onset of recurrent disease 5-7 days post castration prior to visible tumor regrowth suggestive of vascular recovery. Administration of VDA beginning 1 week post castration for 3 weeks resulted in sustained vascular suppression, inhibition of tumor regrowth, and conferred a more pronounced survival benefit compared to either monotherapy. Conclusion: The high mortality rate associated with CRPC underscores the need for investigating novel treatment strategies for this patient population. The results of our preclinical studies demonstrated the therapeutic potential of vascular targeting in combination with ADT against prostate cancer as well as highlight the capability of imaging to guide study design. Further investigation into the utility of VDAs in combination with ADT in prostate cancer is warranted.

  2. Overview status of preclinical safety assessment for immunomodulatory biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Green, J D; Black, L E

    2000-04-01

    Scientists from academia, industry, FDA, European and Japanese regulatory groups met to discuss key considerations that are central to the safe and expeditious development of novel biologic agents that are thought to act by modulation of the host immune system. In the presentations and case studies, particular attention was given to the current clinical experience with immunosuppressant agents. Many new biologic agents (such as humanized monoclonal antibodies) have been developed to interact in a highly specific manner with their target. However, their pharmacologic properties may be more complex than originally appreciated, impacting on clinical trial designs. The goal of preclinical safety assessment should be to provide some assurance that patients will be protected from any unacceptable risks by defining "safe" and "active" doses. For immunomodulatory molecules, particular attention is paid to defining potential for increased risks of lymphoproliferative disorders, opportunistic infections, and immune impairment. To address these issues, a wide variety of preclinical studies, mainly in non-human primates, have been performed for the purpose of assessing the potential risk of drug-induced, human immunotoxicity. Case studies presented at this symposium showed the feasibility of assessing humoral and cell-mediated aspects of the immune system, using antigen and neoantigen challenges, immunohistochemical, and flow cytometric (FACS) methods. In some cases, homologous forms of the biologic agent and "humanized" transgenic models have been used to assess potential clinical risks. These data have been useful in providing some assurance that severe adverse effects would not be induced in patients. Despite these limitations, it is important that industry sponsors provide information to regulatory authorities, the clinical investigator, and patients that provides the best feasible basis for risk assessment, safe clinical trial design, informed consent, and eventually, appropriate labeling. It is recognized that existing preclinical models often have significant limitations. Consequently, the sponsor's and regulatory authority's experienced judgement has determined whether or not the purported benefits of the novel therapeutic agent are balanced by the potential short- and long-term risks. In this field of development, preclinical models often need to reflect recent technology innovations; therefore, these models are not always "validated" in a conventional sense. Experience to date suggests that improved methods and approaches are needed as these agents are developed for use in lower or moderate risk patient populations. Consequently, there is an increased need for an industry/regulatory partnership in order to achieve progress in these risk assessment areas. PMID:10918509

  3. Pharmacokinetic and efficacy study of cisplatin and paclitaxel formulated in a new injectable poly(sebacic-co-ricinoleic acid) polymer.

    PubMed

    Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Khan, Wahid; Pawar, Rajendra P; Tabakman, Rinat; Naftali, Esmira; Winkler, Ilan; Kaufman, Olga; Klapper, Leah; Domb, Abraham J

    2012-09-01

    Injectable biodegradable polymer poly(sebacic-co-ricinoleic acid), P(SA-RA) is currently under development for intratumoral (IT) delivery of drugs for treating solid tumors. This study presents formulation development, pharmacokinetic and efficacy studies of two anticancer drugs (cisplatin and paclitaxel) formulated with P(SA-RA) polymer. In pharmacokinetic study, systemic exposure and pharmacokinetic parameters of cisplatin/paclitaxel following single intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) doses of cisplatin/paclitaxel was compared with intramuscular (IM) or SC doses of cisplatin/paclitaxel formulated with P(SA-RA) polymer in male CD rat. Simultaneously, the tumor reduction effect and toxicity for these formulations were evaluated in human FaDu head and neck tumor xenograft subcutaneous nude mouse model. Pharmacokinetic data reflect the lower maximal concentrations and sustained release of polymer-cisplatin/paclitaxel formulations compared to standard cisplatin/paclitaxel administration. Regarding efficacy study, a single IT or near the tumor injection (NT) of polymer-paclitaxel or polymer-cisplatin formulation significantly reduced the tumor size, compared to the standard paclitaxel or cisplatin treatments. No death or toxicity and no effect on body weight as well as macroscopic and/or microscopic changes in or near the injected area were observed, proving biocompatibility and acceptability of polymer-formulations. In conclusion, the developed formulation demonstrated controlled release and significant efficacy in delivering these agents and exhibit potential for further clinical development. PMID:22732267

  4. A randomized prospective study to assess the efficacy of two cold-therapy treatments following carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, J

    2001-01-01

    A prospective randomized study was performed comparing the efficacy of controlled cold therapy (CCT) with the efficacy of ice therapy in the postoperative treatment of 72 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately after surgery, patients applied either a temperature-controlled cooling blanket (CCT) or a standard ice pack over their surgical dressings. Pain was assessed by visual analog scale and swelling by wrist circumference preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and on postoperative day 3. Patients kept log books of daily treatment times. Narcotic use (of Vicodin ES) was determined by pill count at day 3 and by daily log book recordings. Patients who used CCT showed significantly greater reduction in pain, edema (wrist circumference), and narcotic use at postoperative day 3 than did those using ice therapy. This study indicates that after carpal tunnel surgery, the use of CCT, compared with traditional ice therapy, provides patients with greater comfort and lessens the need for narcotics. PMID:11511016

  5. Safety and efficacy of human breast milk Lactobacillus fermentum CECT 5716. A mini-review of studies with infant formulae.

    PubMed

    López-Huertas, E

    2015-01-01

    Human breast milk has been described as a source of lactic acid bacteria. Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 is a human breast milk strain whose probiotic properties, safety and efficacy has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, including controlled trials with human adults. Since the origin of this probiotic strain is human breast milk, we aimed to investigate the safety and efficacy of an infant and a follow-on formulas supplemented with this strain of L. fermentum. We carried out two randomised controlled trials: one trial with infants of 6-12 months of age (follow-on formula study) and another one with infants from 1 to 5 months of age (infant formula study). The results from the trials showed that the probiotic formulas were safe, well tolerated and might be useful for the prevention of community-acquired infections. PMID:25519525

  6. Promoting Social Skill Development in Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders: A Feasibility and Efficacy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Kathleen; White, Susan Williams; Pachler, Maryellen; Lau, Monika; Lewis, Moira; Klin, Ami; Scahill, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    A randomized controlled design was employed to evaluate a social skills intervention for children with pervasive developmental disorders. Aims included evaluating the acceptability of the program and gathering preliminary evidence on efficacy. Forty-four children, ages 8-11 years, were randomly assigned to treatment or wait list. Treatment…

  7. Does Delaying Judgments of Learning Really Improve the Efficacy of Study Decisions? Not So Much

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Daniel R.; Smith, Troy A.; Muntean, William J.

    2012-01-01

    A widely held assumption in metamemory is that better, more accurate metamemory monitoring leads to better, more efficacious restudy decisions, reflected in better memory performance--we refer to this causal chain as the "restudy selectivity hypothesis". In 3 sets of experiments, we tested this hypothesis by factorially manipulating metamemory…

  8. Preservice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Teaching Self-Efficacy-Forming Experiences: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siwatu, Kamau Oginga

    2011-01-01

    The author used an explanatory mixed methods research design. The first phase involved the collection of quantitative data to examine the nature of preservice teachers' (N = 192) culturally responsive teaching self-efficacy beliefs. Follow-up face-to-face interviews were carried out with a subsample selected from Phase 1 participants. These…

  9. Self-Efficacy and Classroom Management: A Correlation Study Regarding the Factors That Influence Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Stephanie Diamond

    2012-01-01

    Classroom management has proved to be a plaguing aspect of the teaching and learning process over the past century. This single skill has heavily contributed to teacher stress and burnout (Gordon, 2002;Jepson & Forrest, 2006), teacher turnover (Ritter & Hancock, 2007; Rosas & West, 2009), overall teacher self-efficacy (Caprara,…

  10. Using Self-Efficacy to Measure Primary School Teachers' Perception of ICT: Results from Two Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanni, F.; Rega, I.; Cantoni, L.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold. First, the final results of two research projects, which investigated the impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on primary schools teachers in disadvantaged areas in Brazil (BET k-12) and South Africa (MELISSA), are presented and discussed. Second, the Self-Efficacy construct is proposed as a…

  11. Sex Partnership and Self-Efficacy Influence Depression in Chinese Transgender Women: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoshi; Wang, Lie; Hao, Chun; Gu, Yuan; Song, Wei; Wang, Jian; Chang, Margaret M.; Zhao, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Background Transgender women often suffer from transition-related discrimination and loss of social support due to their gender transition, which may pose considerable psychological challenges and may lead to a high prevalence of depression in this population. Increased self-efficacy may combat the adverse effects of gender transition on depression. However, few available studies have investigated the protective effect of self-efficacy on depression among transgender women, and there is a scarcity of research describing the mental health of Chinese transgender women. This study aims to describe the prevalence of depression among Chinese transgender women and to explore the associated factors. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Shenyang, Liaoning Province of China by convenience sampling from January 2014 to July 2014. Two hundred and nine Chinese transgender women were interviewed face-to-face with questionnaires that covered topics including the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), demographic characteristics, transition status, sex partnership, perceived transgender-related discrimination, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) and the adapted General Self-efficacy Scale (GSES). A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed to explore the factors associated with SDS scores. Results The prevalence of depression among transgender women was 45.35%. Transgender women with regular partners or casual partners exhibited higher SDS scores than those without regular partners or casual partners. Regression analyses showed that sex partnership explained most (16.6%) of the total variance in depression scores. Self-efficacy was negatively associated with depression. Conclusions Chinese transgender women experienced high levels of depression. Depression was best predicted by whether transgender women had a regular partner or a casual partner rather than transgender-related discrimination and transition status. Moreover, self-efficacy had positive effects on attenuating depression due to gender transition. Therefore, interventions should focus on improving the sense of self-efficacy among these women to enable them to cope with depression and to determine risky sex partnership characteristics, especially for regular and casual partners. PMID:26367265

  12. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/6 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Review of Preclinical and Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Vidula, Neelima; Rugo, Hope S

    2016-02-01

    For millions of women, breast cancer remains a potentially life-endangering diagnosis. With advances in research, new therapies targeted to tumor biology are emerging to treat the most common form of this disease. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitors are a new class of therapeutic agents that have the potential to improve the outcomes of patients with hormone receptor-positive (HR(+)) breast cancer. Three CDK 4/6 inhibitors have been investigated for the treatment of HR(+) breast cancer, including palbociclib (PD 0332991), ribociclib (LEE011), and abemaciclib (LY2835219). Palbociclib recently received accelerated Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of HR(+) metastatic breast cancer in combination with letrozole, and recent data suggest improved outcome when combined with fulvestrant. In this article, the mechanism of action of CDK 4/6 inhibitors, preclinical studies on their efficacy, ongoing clinical trials in breast cancer, and toxicity profiles are reviewed. PMID:26303211

  13. Efficacy of EZStep in the management of plantar fasciitis: a prospective, randomized study.

    PubMed

    Al-Bluwi, Mohammed T; Sadat-Ali, Mir; Al-Habdan, Ibrahim M; Azam, Mohammed Q

    2011-08-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. Despite extensive efforts foot surgeons continue to debate the best modality of treatment. Analgesics, shoe inserts, stretching exercises, steroid injection, night splints, and extracorporeal shock wave therapy have proved effective in one group but fail in others. This study evaluated the efficacy of EZStep, a new foot brace for the management of plantar fasciitis. A total of 198 patients were randomized in 2 groups; group 1 (study group) received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; 4-6 weeks) and EZStep whereas group 2 (control group) received either NSAID and physiotherapy alone (2A) or NSAID, physiotherapy, and local steroid injection (2B). None of the patients received over-the-counter insoles or strapping of plantar arch to avoid any bias in randomization. Evaluations included measurement of weight and height, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SFMPQ). After 8 weeks, patients were reevaluated, and assessment for the VAS and SFMPQ with treatment outcome was performed. Patients with VAS scores ?3 were considered as excellent, ?4 as good, and ?7 as poor. The posttreatment evaluation showed that VAS scores were in the range from 2.97 ± 1.06 to 7.64 ± 2.9 (2A), P = .001, 95% confidence interval (CI) <-4.104; for 2B P = .001, CI <-2.44, and SFMPQ was 21.7 ± 4.5 and 69.2 ± 5.8 (group 2A; P = .001, 95% CI <-46.44). Compared with group 2B the SFMPQ was 66.5 ± 4.3 (P = .001, 95% CI <-30.720). In group 1 as per VAS, 86 (73.5%) were evaluated as excellent, 15 (12.8%) as good, and 16 (13.6%) as poor. Our study shows that the regular use of EZStep with short course of NSAIDs (4-6 weeks) was effective in ameliorating symptoms in more than 85% of patients suffering from plantar fasciitis. PMID:21868794

  14. Efficacy of Rebamipide and Levamisole in the Treatment of Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Ulcer - A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    M K, Parvathi Devi; D N S V, Ramesh; Koppal, Shrinivas; Rukmangada, Thriveni; Byatnal, Aditi A

    2014-01-01

    Context (Background): Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is an inflammatory condition of unknown aetiology characterized by painful recurrent, single or multiple ulcerations of the oral mucosa. Aims: To compare the efficacy of rebamipide, a gastro-protective agent and levamisole, an immunomodulating agent in the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Materials and Methods: Hundred patients diagnosed with recurrent aphthous stomatitis were enrolled in the study. Fifty patients were assigned randomly to each of the two treatment groups. After the clinical diagnosis and ulcer measurement, a subjective evaluation of symptoms was done for each subject. Both the drugs were given orally at specified intervals. Ulcer measurements and subjective evaluations were made at day one. Statistical Analysis: Analysis was done using various test like Mann Whitney and t-test. Results and Conclusion: The overall results showed mean number of episodes whose values were not statistically significant (p=0.43), neither were the mean number of ulcers (p=0.75), or values for mean size of ulcers (p=0.91). However, the overall results suggested that efficacy of rebamipide is almost same as that of the efficacy of previously proved drug levamisole. The current study with a three months follow up, including patients with high scores of pain, aphthae count, ulcer size and frequency of occurrence showed better results in both the study groups. However, rebamipide is suggested to be well tolerated and may therefore be useful in the treatment and prevention of frequently recurrent aphthous ulcers not restricted to Behcet’s disease. PMID:25584301

  15. Restoring Study 329: efficacy and harms of paroxetine and imipramine in treatment of major depression in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Le Noury, Joanna; Nardo, John M; Healy, David; Raven, Melissa; Tufanaru, Catalin; Abi-Jaoude, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To reanalyse SmithKline Beecham’s Study 329 (published by Keller and colleagues in 2001), the primary objective of which was to compare the efficacy and safety of paroxetine and imipramine with placebo in the treatment of adolescents with unipolar major depression. The reanalysis under the restoring invisible and abandoned trials (RIAT) initiative was done to see whether access to and reanalysis of a full dataset from a randomised controlled trial would have clinically relevant implications for evidence based medicine. Design Double blind randomised placebo controlled trial. Setting 12 North American academic psychiatry centres, from 20 April 1994 to 15 February 1998. Participants 275 adolescents with major depression of at least eight weeks in duration. Exclusion criteria included a range of comorbid psychiatric and medical disorders and suicidality. Interventions Participants were randomised to eight weeks double blind treatment with paroxetine (20-40 mg), imipramine (200-300 mg), or placebo. Main outcome measures The prespecified primary efficacy variables were change from baseline to the end of the eight week acute treatment phase in total Hamilton depression scale (HAM-D) score and the proportion of responders (HAM-D score ?8 or ?50% reduction in baseline HAM-D) at acute endpoint. Prespecified secondary outcomes were changes from baseline to endpoint in depression items in K-SADS-L, clinical global impression, autonomous functioning checklist, self-perception profile, and sickness impact scale; predictors of response; and number of patients who relapse during the maintenance phase. Adverse experiences were to be compared primarily by using descriptive statistics. No coding dictionary was prespecified. Results The efficacy of paroxetine and imipramine was not statistically or clinically significantly different from placebo for any prespecified primary or secondary efficacy outcome. HAM-D scores decreased by 10.7 (least squares mean) (95% confidence interval 9.1 to 12.3), 9.0 (7.4 to 10.5), and 9.1 (7.5 to 10.7) points, respectively, for the paroxetine, imipramine and placebo groups (P=0.20). There were clinically significant increases in harms, including suicidal ideation and behaviour and other serious adverse events in the paroxetine group and cardiovascular problems in the imipramine group. Conclusions Neither paroxetine nor high dose imipramine showed efficacy for major depression in adolescents, and there was an increase in harms with both drugs. Access to primary data from trials has important implications for both clinical practice and research, including that published conclusions about efficacy and safety should not be read as authoritative. The reanalysis of Study 329 illustrates the necessity of making primary trial data and protocols available to increase the rigour of the evidence base. PMID:26376805

  16. Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Changes in Preclinical Diabetic Retinopathy: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaofei; Nie, Chuang; Gong, Yan; Zhang, Ying; Jin, Xin; Wei, Shihui; Zhang, Maonian

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy is a microvascular neurodegenerative disorder in diabetic patients. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer changes have been described in patients with preclinical diabetic retinopathy, but study results have been inconsistent. Objective To assess changes in peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in diabetic patients with preclinical diabetic retinopathy. Methods A literature search was conducted through PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Library. Case-control studies on RNFL thickness in preclinical diabetic retinopathy patients and healthy controls were retrieved. A meta-analysis of weighted mean difference and a sensitivity analysis were performed using RevMan 5.2 software. Results Thirteen case-control studies containing 668 diabetic patients and 556 healthy controls were selected. Peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly reduced in patients with preclinical diabetic retinopathy compared to healthy controls in studies applying Optical Coherence Tomography (-2.88?m, 95%CI: -4.44 to -1.32, P = 0.0003) and in studies applying Scanning Laser Polarimeter (-4.21?m, 95%CI: -6.45 to -1.97, P = 0.0002). Reduction of RNFL thickness was significant in the superior quadrant (-3.79?m, 95%CI: -7.08 to -0.50, P = 0.02), the inferior quadrant (-2.99?m, 95%CI: -5.44 to -0.54, P = 0.02) and the nasal quadrant (-2.88?m, 95%CI: -4.93 to -0.82, P = 0.006), but was not significant in the temporal quadrant (-1.22?m, 95%CI: -3.21 to 0.76, P = 0.23), in diabetic patients. Conclusion Peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly decreased in preclinical diabetic retinopathy patients compared to healthy control. Neurodegenerative changes due to preclinical diabetic retinopathy need more attention. PMID:25965421

  17. Development of computational small animal models and their applications in preclinical imaging and therapy research.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-01-01

    The development of multimodality preclinical imaging techniques and the rapid growth of realistic computer simulation tools have promoted the construction and application of computational laboratory animal models in preclinical research. Since the early 1990s, over 120 realistic computational animal models have been reported in the literature and used as surrogates to characterize the anatomy of actual animals for the simulation of preclinical studies involving the use of bioluminescence tomography, fluorescence molecular tomography, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, microcomputed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and optical imaging. Other applications include electromagnetic field simulation, ionizing and nonionizing radiation dosimetry, and the development and evaluation of new methodologies for multimodality image coregistration, segmentation, and reconstruction of small animal images. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the history and fundamental technologies used for the development of computational small animal models with a particular focus on their application in preclinical imaging as well as nonionizing and ionizing radiation dosimetry calculations. An overview of the overall process involved in the design of these models, including the fundamental elements used for the construction of different types of computational models, the identification of original anatomical data, the simulation tools used for solving various computational problems, and the applications of computational animal models in preclinical research. The authors also analyze the characteristics of categories of computational models (stylized, voxel-based, and boundary representation) and discuss the technical challenges faced at the present time as well as research needs in the future. PMID:26745904

  18. The Clinical Efficacy of Mometasone Furoate in Multi-Lamellar Emulsion for Eczema: A Double-blinded Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Han; Lee, Hyun Jong; Park, Chun Wook; Kim, Kyu Han; Lee, Kwang Hoon; Ro, Byung In

    2013-01-01

    Background Topical application of corticosteroids also has an influence on skin barrier impairment. Physiological lipid mixtures, such as multi-lamellar emulsion (MLE) containing a natural lipid component leads to effective recovery of the barrier function. Objective The purpose of this study was to conduct an evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy and skin barrier protection of topical mometasone furoate in MLE. Methods A multi-center randomized, double-blind, controlled study was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of mometasone furoate cream in MLE for Korean patients with eczema. The study group included 175 patients with eczema, who applied either mometasone furoate in MLE cream or methylprednisolone aceponate cream for 2 weeks. Treatment efficacy was evaluated using the physician's global assessment of clinical response (PGA), trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), and visual analogue scale (VAS) for pruritus. Patients were evaluated using these indices at days 4, 8, and 15. Results Comparison of PGA score, TEWL, and VAS score at baseline with those at days 4, 8, and 15 of treatment showed a significant improvement in both groups. Patients who applied mometasone furoate in MLE (74.8%) showed better results (p<0.05) than those who applied methylprednisolone aceponate (47.8%). The TEWL improvement ratio was higher in the mometasone furoate in MLE group than that in the methylprednisolone aceponate group, and VAS improvement was also better in the mometasone furoate in MLE group. Conclusion Mometasone furoate in MLE has a better therapeutic efficacy as well as less skin barrier impairment than methylprednisolone aceponate. PMID:23467551

  19. A cognitive rehabilitation paradigm effective in male rats lacks efficacy in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Kristopher D; Granter-Button, Shirley; Harley, Carolyn W; Moody-Corbett, Frances; Peeling, James; Corbett, Dale

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction, as a consequence of dementia, is a significant cause of morbidity lacking efficacious treatment. Females comprise at least half of this demographic but have been vastly underrepresented in preclinical studies. The current study addressed this gap by assessing the protective efficacy of physical exercise and cognitive activity on learning and memory outcomes in a rat model of vascular dementia. Forty ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats (?6 months old) were exposed to either a diet high in saturated fats and refined sugars or standard laboratory chow and underwent either chronic bilateral carotid occlusion or Sham surgery. Learning and memory abilities were evaluated using standard cognitive outcomes over the ensuing 6 months, followed by histologic analyses of hippocampal CA1 neurons. In Experiment 1, we confirmed hypoperfusion-induced cognitive dysfunction using a 2 × 2 (Surgery × Diet) experimental design, without alterations in hippocampal architecture. In Experiment 2, hypoperfused animals were either exposed to alternating days of physical (wheel running) and cognitive activity (modified Hebb–Williams maze) or sedentary housing. In contrast to males, this combination rehabilitation paradigm did not improve cognition or histopathologic outcomes in hypoperfused animals. These findings, highlighting differences between female and male animals, show the necessity of including both sexes in preclinical experimentation. PMID:25052554

  20. Schistosome Vaccine Adjuvants in Preclinical and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Rachel; You, Hong; McManus, Donald; Toth, Istvan

    2014-01-01

    There is currently no vaccine available for human use for any parasitic infections, including the helminth disease, schistosomiasis. Despite many researchers working towards this goal, one of the focuses has been on identifying new antigenic targets. The bar to achieve protective efficacy in humans was set at a consistent induction of 40% protection or better by the World Health Organisation (WHO), and although this is a modest goal, it is yet to be reached with the six most promising schistosomiasis vaccine candidates (Sm28GST, IrV5, Sm14, paramyosin, TPI, and Sm23). Adjuvant selection has a large impact on the effectiveness of the vaccine, and the use of adjuvants to aid in the stimulation of the immune system is a critical step and a major variable affecting vaccine development. In addition to a comprehensive understanding of the immune system, level of protection and the desired immune response required, there is also a need for a standardised and effective adjuvant formulation. This review summarises the status of adjuvants that have been or are being employed in schistosomiasis vaccine development focusing on immunisation outcomes at preclinical and clinical stages. PMID:26344751

  1. Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Hepasphere 30–60 ?m. Safety and Efficacy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Malagari, Katerina; Pomoni, Maria; Moschouris, Hippokratis; Kelekis, Alexios; Charokopakis, Angelos Bouma, Evanthia Spyridopoulos, Themistoklis; Chatziioannou, Achilles; Sotirchos, Vlasios; Karampelas, Theodoros Tamvakopoulos, Constantin; Filippiadis, Dimitrios; Karagiannis, Enangelos; Marinis, Athanasios; Koskinas, John; Kelekis, Dimitrios A.

    2013-11-22

    Background: This study examined the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using a newly developed size of a superabsorbent polymer drug-eluting embolic material.MethodsForty-five patients with documented HCC (Child–Pugh score A/B: 55.5 %/44.5 %) were embolized with HepaSphere microspheres 30–60 ?m with escalation of lesion, dose, and frequency of re-embolization. Local response was evaluated with modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). Plasma levels of doxorubicin were measured in 24 patients at baseline and at 5, 20, 40, 60, and 120 min, at 6, 24, and 48 h, and at 7 days, respectively, to determine doxorubicin in plasma (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC). Measurements of three patients who underwent lipiodol-based conventional chemoembolization (c-TACE) were also performed.ResultsTACE with HepaSphere was well tolerated with an acceptable safety profile and no 30-day mortality. Response rates were calculated on intention-to-treat basis with complete response (CR) in 17.8 % reaching 22.2 % for the target lesion. Overall partial response (PR) was seen in 51.1 %, stable disease in 20 %, and progressive disease in 11.1 % of patients. Overall objective response (CR + PR), including patients treated at all dosages of doxorubicin, was seen in 68.9 % of cases. After a median follow-up of 15.6 months, 1-year survival is 100 %. Doxorubicin AUC was significantly lower in patients with HepaSphere 30–60 ?m (35,195 ± 27,873 ng × min/ml) than in patients with conventional TACE (103,960 ± 16,652 ng × min/ml; p = 0.009). Cmax was also significantly lower with HepaSphere 30–60 ?m (83.9 ± 32.1 ng/ml) compared with c-TACE (761.3 ± 58.8 ng/ml; p = 0.002).ConclusionHepaSphere 30–60 ?m is an effective drug-eluting embolic material with a favourable pharmacokinetic profile.

  2. A comparative efficacy study of photic driving brainwave entrainment technology with a novel form of more direct entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Richard Thomas

    This exploratory study compared the efficacy of a novel brainwave electromagnetic (EM) entrainment technology against a more conventional technology utilizing the photic-driving technique. Both experimental conditions were also compared with a 7-minute control session that took place immediately before each stimulation session. The Schumann Resonance (SR) frequency was selected as the delivery signal and was chosen because of previous findings suggesting that entrainment to this frequency can often produce transpersonal if not paranormal, experiences in the entrainee, which sometimes resemble remote viewing or out-of-body experiences. A pilot study determined which of two novel entrainment modalities (a copper coil or a 16-solenoid headset) worked most effectively for use with the rest of the study. In the main study, an artificial SR signal at 7.8Hz was delivered during the photic-driving sessions, but a recording of the real-time SR was used to deliver the entrainment signal during sessions devoted to the electromagnetic entrainment modality. Sixteen participants were recruited from the local area, and EEG recordings were acquired via a 32-channel Deymed electroencephalography system. Comparative analyses were performed between the control and experimental portions of each session to assess for efficacy of the novel entrainment modality used, and, in the main study, between the electromagnetic and photic-driving sessions, to assess for differential entrainment efficacy between these groups. A follow-up study was additionally performed primarily to determine whether responders could replicate their entrainment effect from the main study. Results showed that EM entrainment appeared to be possible but is not nearly as robust or reliable as photic driving. Additionally, no profound transpersonal or paranormal experiences were elicited during the course of the study, and, when asked, participants were not able to determine with any degree of success, when the stimulation coil was turned on or off.

  3. A novel lung explant model for the ex vivo study of efficacy and mechanisms of anti-influenza drugs.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Ben; Staples, Karl J; Moese, Stefan; Meldrum, Eric; Ward, Jon; Dennison, Patrick; Havelock, Tom; Hinks, Timothy S C; Amer, Khalid; Woo, Edwin; Chamberlain, Martin; Singh, Neeta; North, Malcolm; Pink, Sandy; Wilkinson, Tom M A; Djukanovi?, Ratko

    2015-06-15

    Influenza A virus causes considerable morbidity and mortality largely because of a lack of effective antiviral drugs. Viral neuraminidase inhibitors, which inhibit viral release from the infected cell, are currently the only approved drugs for influenza, but have recently been shown to be less effective than previously thought. Growing resistance to therapies that target viral proteins has led to increased urgency in the search for novel anti-influenza compounds. However, discovery and development of new drugs have been restricted because of differences in susceptibility to influenza between animal models and humans and a lack of translation between cell culture and in vivo measures of efficacy. To circumvent these limitations, we developed an experimental approach based on ex vivo infection of human bronchial tissue explants and optimized a method of flow cytometric analysis to directly quantify infection rates in bronchial epithelial tissues. This allowed testing of the effectiveness of TVB024, a vATPase inhibitor that inhibits viral replication rather than virus release, and to compare efficacy with the current frontline neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir. The study showed that the vATPase inhibitor completely abrogated epithelial cell infection, virus shedding, and the associated induction of proinflammatory mediators, whereas oseltamivir was only partially effective at reducing these mediators and ineffective against innate responses. We propose, therefore, that this explant model could be used to predict the efficacy of novel anti-influenza compounds targeting diverse stages of the viral replication cycle, thereby complementing animal models and facilitating progression of new drugs into clinical trials. PMID:25934861

  4. A Novel Lung Explant Model for the Ex Vivo Study of Efficacy and Mechanisms of Anti-Influenza Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Karl J.; Moese, Stefan; Meldrum, Eric; Ward, Jon; Dennison, Patrick; Havelock, Tom; Hinks, Timothy S. C.; Amer, Khalid; Woo, Edwin; Chamberlain, Martin; Singh, Neeta; North, Malcolm; Pink, Sandy; Wilkinson, Tom M. A.; Djukanovi?, Ratko

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus causes considerable morbidity and mortality largely because of a lack of effective antiviral drugs. Viral neuraminidase inhibitors, which inhibit viral release from the infected cell, are currently the only approved drugs for influenza, but have recently been shown to be less effective than previously thought. Growing resistance to therapies that target viral proteins has led to increased urgency in the search for novel anti-influenza compounds. However, discovery and development of new drugs have been restricted because of differences in susceptibility to influenza between animal models and humans and a lack of translation between cell culture and in vivo measures of efficacy. To circumvent these limitations, we developed an experimental approach based on ex vivo infection of human bronchial tissue explants and optimized a method of flow cytometric analysis to directly quantify infection rates in bronchial epithelial tissues. This allowed testing of the effectiveness of TVB024, a vATPase inhibitor that inhibits viral replication rather than virus release, and to compare efficacy with the current frontline neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir. The study showed that the vATPase inhibitor completely abrogated epithelial cell infection, virus shedding, and the associated induction of proinflammatory mediators, whereas oseltamivir was only partially effective at reducing these mediators and ineffective against innate responses. We propose, therefore, that this explant model could be used to predict the efficacy of novel anti-influenza compounds targeting diverse stages of the viral replication cycle, thereby complementing animal models and facilitating progression of new drugs into clinical trials. PMID:25934861

  5. The Efficacy and Safety of Arbekacin and Vancomycin for the Treatment in Skin and Soft Tissue MRSA Infection: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji-Hee; Lee, Ju-Hyung; Moon, Mi-Kyoung; Kim, Ju-Sin; Won, Kyoung-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections, and use of vancomycin for the treatment of MRSA infection has increased. Unfortunately, vancomycin-resistant enterococcus have been reported, as well as vancomycin-resistant S. aureus. Arbekacin is an antibacterial agent and belongs to the aminoglycoside family of antibiotics. It was introduced to treat MRSA infection. We studied the clinical and bacteriological efficacy and safety of arbekacin compared to vancomycin in the treatment of infections caused by MRSA. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective case-control study of patients who were admitted to tertiary Hospital from January 1st, 2009 to December 31st, 2010, and received the antibiotics arbekacin or vancomycin. All the skin and soft tissue MRSA infected patients who received arbekacin or vancomycin were enrolled during the study period. The bacteriological efficacy response (BER) was classified with improved and failure. The improved BER was defined as no growth of MRSA, where failure was defined as growth of MRSA, culture at the end of therapy or during treatment. Clinical efficacy response (CER) was classified as improved and failure. Improved CER was defined as resolution or reduction of the majority of signs and symptoms related to the original infection. Failure was defined as no resolution and no reduction of majority of the signs and symptoms, or worsening of one or more signs and symptoms, or new symptoms or signs associated with the original infection or a new infection. Results Totally, 122 patients (63/99 in arbekacin, 59/168 in vancomycin group) with skin and soft tissue infection who recieved arbekacin or vancomcyin at least 4 days were enrolled and analysed. The bacteriological efficacy response [improved, arbekacin vs vancomycin; 73.0% (46/63), 95% confidence interval (CI) 60.3 to 83.4% vs 83.1% (49/59), 95% CI 71.0 to 91.6%] and clinical efficacy response [improved, arbekacin vs vancomycin; 67.2% (41/61), 95% CI 52.0 to 76.7% vs 78.0% (46/59), 95% CI 65.3 to 87.7%] were similar between the two groups (P=0.264, 0.265). The complication rate was significantly higher in the vancomycin group [29/59(49.2%), 95% CI 35.9 to 62.5%] than arbekacin [10/63(15.9%), 95% CI 8.4 to 29.0%] (P<0.001). Conclusions Arbekacin could be considered as an alternative antibiotics for vancomycin in skin and soft tissue infection with MRSA. However, further prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm this finding. PMID:24265951

  6. Efficacy, Tolerability, and Safety of Oxybutynin Chloride in Pediatric Neurogenic Bladder With Spinal Dysraphism: A Retrospective, Multicenter, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hoon; Kim, Kyoung Rok; Lee, Yong Seung; Han, Sang Won; Kim, Kun Suk; Song, Sang Hoon; Baek, Minki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Anticholinergics are a key element in treating neurogenic detrusor overactivity, but only limited data are available in the pediatric population, thus limiting the application to children even for oxybutynin chloride (OC), a prototype drug. This retrospective study was designed to provide data regarding the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of OC in the pediatric population (0-15 years old) with spinal dysraphism (SD). Materials and Methods Records relevant to OC use for neurogenic bladder were gathered and scrutinized from four specialized clinics for pediatric urology. The primary efficacy outcomes were maximal cystometric capacity (MCC) and end filling pressure (EFP). Data on tolerability, compliance, and adverse events (AEs) were also analyzed. Results Of the 121 patient records analyzed, 41 patients (34%) received OC at less than 5 years of age. The range of prescribed doses varied from 3 to 24 mg/d. The median treatment duration was 19 months (range, 0.3-111 months). Significant improvement of both primary efficacy outcomes was noted following OC treatment. MCC increased about 8% even after adjustment for age-related increases in MCC. Likewise, mean EFP was reduced from 33 to 21 cm H2O. More than 80% of patients showed compliance above 70%, and approximately 50% of patients used OC for more than 1 year. No serious AEs were reported; constipation and facial flushing consisted of the major AEs. Conclusions OC is safe and efficacious in treating pediatric neurogenic bladder associated with SD. The drug is also tolerable and the safety profile suggests that adjustment of dosage for age may not be strictly observed. PMID:25512818

  7. Perfusion Preservation of the Donor Heart: Basic Science to Pre-Clinical

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Andrew L.; Gallegos, Robert; Ogden, Irene M.; Bianco, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: As a consequence of technology improvements and refinement, perfusion of the donor heart has moved from the research laboratory to clinical studies. Multiple investigators are currently leading pre-clinical trials of devices using perfusion preservation, and one device is now in European clinical trials. One major problem with the donor heart is the high metabolism relative to other organs, and depletion of ATP leads rapidly to acidosis and necrosis of the myocardium. Two techniques in development to address the issue are normothermic and hypothermic perfusion. This review examines the current issues regarding donor heart preservation and techniques of pre-clinical evaluation necessary for regulatory approval. PMID:19806796

  8. Vaginal effects of ospemifene in the ovariectomized rat preclinical model of menopause.

    PubMed

    Unkila, Mikko; Kari, Seppo; Yatkin, Emrah; Lammintausta, Risto

    2013-11-01

    Ospemifene is a unique tissue-selective estrogen agonist/antagonist (also known as a selective estrogen receptor modulator [SERM]) with demonstrated efficacy in Phase 3 studies of postmenopausal women with vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA). This report describes preclinical studies on the effects of ospemifene in the ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of menopause. Ospemifene (10mg/kg/day) and the SERM comparator, raloxifene (10mg/kg/day) were administered for 2 weeks and both increased vaginal weight; ospemifene was more effective than raloxifene. In addition, ospemifene had a greater effect on increasing vaginal epithelial height compared with raloxifene. The effect on uterine weight was less pronounced for both ospemifene and raloxifene. The ED50 of ospemifene on vaginal epithelial height was 0.39mg/kg/day and the magnitude was nearly the same as was seen with the positive control, 17?-ethinyl estradiol (EE2). In a histological analysis of ospemifene-treated rat vaginas, basal cells were overlaid by 2 to 3 cell layers of thickened goblet-like mucified cells apically; however, the cornification observed with EE2 was absent. Estrogenic activity of ospemifene was confirmed by upregulation of progesterone receptors in vaginal epithelium and stroma. Ospemifene showed similar affinity for estrogen receptor (ER)-? and ER-?, but an overall lower affinity than estradiol. Ospemifene antagonized estrogen response element (ERE)-mediated transactivation on MCF-7 cells, confirming its anti-estrogenic activity in breast cancer cells. The dose response for ospemifene in the rat is consistent with that observed in clinical studies of ospemifene 30 and 60mg, showing that the OVX rat is a highly predictive model of SERM activity in postmenopausal VVA. PMID:23665515

  9. Artificial Neural Network Analysis in Preclinical Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Motalleb, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In this study, artificial neural network (ANN) analysis of virotherapy in preclinical breast cancer was investigated. Materials and Methods: In this research article, a multilayer feed-forward neural network trained with an error back-propagation algorithm was incorporated in order to develop a predictive model. The input parameters of the model were virus dose, week and tamoxifen citrate, while tumor weight was included in the output parameter. Two different training algorithms, namely quick propagation (QP) and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM), were used to train ANN. Results: The results showed that the LM algorithm, with 3-9-1 arrangement is more efficient compared to QP. Using LM algorithm, the coefficient of determination (R2) between the actual and predicted values was determined as 0.897118 for all data. Conclusion: It can be concluded that this ANN model may provide good ability to predict the biometry information of tumor in preclinical breast cancer virotherapy. The results showed that the LM algorithm employed by Neural Power software gave the better performance compared with the QP and virus dose, and it is more important factor compared to tamoxifen and time (week). PMID:24381857

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Liposomal Amphotericin B for the Treatment of Mucosal Leishmaniasis from the New World: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Mirella A; Leão, Aline C Q; de Cassia Soler, Rita; Lindoso, José Angelo L

    2015-12-01

    The standard treatment of mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) is pentavalent antimonials, agents with serious adverse effects. Alternative agents include amphotericin B deoxycholate and liposomal amphotericin B. We performed a retrospective study including 29 patients treated with liposomal amphotericin B, most of whom had comorbidities, history of previous treatment of ML, and contraindications to the use of antimonial pentavalent or amphotericin B deoxycholate. We observed a cure rate of 93.1%. Kidney failure was the most important side effect, reported in five patients (17.2%). This study showed a good efficacy and safety profile of liposomal amphotericin B in patients with ML and contraindications to the use of other agents. PMID:26483120

  11. A comparative study of instructional efficacy between first and second-career teachers in secondary school math and science courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Royal Anthony

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to use Dr. James Stronge’s taxonomy of the qualities of effective teachers to determine whether there are significant differences in the instructional efficacy between first- and second-career teachers who teach math and science. Methodology: A causal-comparative study examined the effects of variables that cannot be manipulated experimentally. The survey instrument was a 50-tem self-identifying questionnaire addressing the 6 research questions used to determine significance between first- and second-career teachers in their classroom efficacy. Findings: A Mann-Whitney U-test determined there was an overall significant difference [p < 0.01] between first- and second-career teachers in their classroom efficacy, with second-career teachers being more aligned with research-based best practices for efficacy. Conclusions: The existing construct for hiring teachers should be reconsidered, so that teachers identified as effective by research-based methods are employed from the outset. Adult maturation patterns suggest that early adults serving as instructors are less effective for at least the first 3 to 5 years of the teachers’ career. This could be resolved by amending the criteria for teacher entry into the classroom. Maturity of the teacher plays a significant role in their classroom efficacy. Existing research has provided a construct for identifying effective teachers. Recommendations: Require teaching graduates to gain at least 5 years of practical experience in the disciplines in which they seek a license to teach before entering the classroom. Increase the age for teachers entering the profession to at least 26 before allowing them into the classroom to allow for adult maturation processes to occur. Increase the rigor for a teaching certification to the point where only high content knowledge instructors could pass. Require all potential teachers to be certified on a regular basis so that they have to keep up with the technology and the most current information of their professions. Develop an assessment to allow the instructor to display knowledge of the research-based best practices for instruction.

  12. Recent Developments in Preclinical DNA Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Kenji; Wada, Yoshiyuki; Shimada, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    The advantages of genetic immunization of the new vaccine using plasmid DNAs are multifold. For example, it is easy to generate plasmid DNAs, increase their dose during the manufacturing process, and sterilize them. Furthermore, they can be stored for a long period of time upon stabilization, and their protein encoding sequences can be easily modified by employing various DNA-manipulation techniques. Although DNA vaccinations strongly increase Th1-mediated immune responses in animals, several problems persist. One is about their weak immunogenicity in humans. To overcome this problem, various genetic adjuvants, electroporation, and prime-boost methods have been developed preclinically, which are reviewed here. PMID:26344468

  13. Finding a better drug for epilepsy: preclinical screening strategies and experimental trial design.

    PubMed

    Simonato, Michele; Löscher, Wolfgang; Cole, Andrew J; Dudek, F Edward; Engel, Jerome; Kaminski, Rafal M; Loeb, Jeffrey A; Scharfman, Helen; Staley, Kevin J; Velíšek, Libor; Klitgaard, Henrik

    2012-11-01

    The antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) introduced during the past two decades have provided several benefits: they offered new treatment options for symptomatic treatment of seizures, improved ease of use and tolerability, and lowered risk for hypersensitivity reactions and detrimental drug-drug interactions. These drugs, however, neither attenuated the problem of drug-refractory epilepsy nor proved capable of preventing or curing the disease. Therefore, new preclinical screening strategies are needed to identify AEDs that target these unmet medical needs. New therapies may derive from novel targets identified on the basis of existing hypotheses for drug-refractory epilepsy and the biology of epileptogenesis; from research on genetics, transcriptomics, and epigenetics; and from mechanisms relevant for other therapy areas. Novel targets should be explored using new preclinical screening strategies, and new technologies should be used to develop medium- to high-throughput screening models. In vivo testing of novel drugs should be performed in models mimicking relevant aspects of drug refractory epilepsy and/or epileptogenesis. To minimize the high attrition rate associated with drug development, which arises mainly from a failure to demonstrate sufficient clinical efficacy of new treatments, it is important to define integrated strategies for preclinical screening and experimental trial design. An important tool will be the discovery and implementation of relevant biomarkers that will facilitate a continuum of proof-of-concept approaches during early clinical testing to rapidly confirm or reject preclinical findings, and thereby lower the risk of the overall development effort. In this review, we overview some of the issues related to these topics and provide examples of new approaches that we hope will be more successful than those used in the past. PMID:22708847

  14. Case studies of community college non-science majors: Effects of self-regulatory interventions on biology self-efficacy and biological literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Matthew J.

    Science literacy has been at the heart of current reform efforts in science education. The focus on developing essential skills needed for individual ability to be literate in science has been at the forefront of most K--12 science curricula. Reform efforts have begun to stretch into the postsecondary arena as well, with an ever increasing dialogue regarding the need for attention to science literacy by college students, especially non-science majors. This study set out to investigate how the use of self-regulatory interventions (specifically, goal setting, concept mapping, and reflective writing) affected student biology self-efficacy and biological literacy. This study employed a qualitative research design, analyzing three case studies. Participants in the study received ten self-regulatory interventions as a set of portfolio assignments. Portfolio work was qualitatively analyzed and coded for self-efficacy, as well as evidence of biological literacy. A biology self-efficacy survey was administered pre- and post- to provide a means of self-efficacy data triangulation. Literacy data was supported via a biological literacy rubric, constructed specifically for this study. Results indicated that mastery experiences were the source of biology self-efficacy. Self-efficacy for specific tasks increased over time, and changes in self-efficacy were corroborated by the self-efficacy survey. Students were found to express biological literacy at nominal, functional, or conceptual levels depending on the specific task. This was supported by data from the biological literacy rubric scores. Final conclusions and implications for the study indicated the need for further research with more samples of students in similar and different contexts. Given the fact that the literature in this area is sparse, the results obtained here have only begun to delve into this area of research. Generalization to other biology courses or contexts outside of the one presented in this study was cautioned until future studies can be conducted.

  15. Efficacy and tolerability of switching to ziprasidone from olanzapine, risperidone or haloperidol: an international, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Alptekin, Koksal; Hafez, Jamal; Brook, Shlomo; Akkaya, Cengiz; Tzebelikos, Errikos; Ucok, Alp; El Tallawy, Hamdy; Danaci, Aysen-Esen; Lowe, Wing; Karayal, Onur N

    2009-09-01

    To compare the effectiveness of a switch from haloperidol (N=99), olanzapine (N=82), or risperidone (N=104) to 12 weeks of treatment with 80-160 mg/day ziprasidone in patients with stable schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Stable outpatients with persistent symptoms or troublesome side effects were switched using one of three 1-week taper/switch strategies as determined by the investigator. Efficacy was assessed using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale score, Clinical Global Impression, Positive and Negative Symptom Scale, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, and the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale, and tolerability by using standard measures of weight change, extrapyramidal symptoms, and laboratory findings. Suboptimal efficacy was the primary reason for switching. The preferred switch strategy was immediate discontinuation, and the preferred dosing regimen was 120 mg/day. Completer rates were 68, 60, and 86% in the haloperidol, risperidone, and olanzapine pre-switch groups, respectively. At week 12, a switch to ziprasidone resulted in statistically significant improvement from baseline on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale score, Clinical Global Impression-Improvement, Positive and Negative Symptom Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning scales, reduction in extrapyramidal symptoms and a neutral impact on metabolic parameters. Switch from olanzapine and risperidone resulted in weight reduction and from haloperidol in some weight increase. In conclusion, oral ziprasidone of 80-160 mg/day with food was a clinically valuable treatment option for stable patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder experiencing suboptimal efficacy or poor tolerability with haloperidol, olanzapine, or risperidone. PMID:19531959

  16. Association of research self-efficacy with medical student career interests, specialization, and scholarship: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bierer, S Beth; Prayson, Richard A; Dannefer, Elaine F

    2015-05-01

    This study used variables proposed in social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to focus the evaluation of a research curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University (CCLCM). Eight cohorts of CCLCM medical students completed a web-based version of the six-scale Clinical Research Appraisal Inventory-Short Form (CRAI-SF) items at matriculation (n = 128) or graduation (n = 111) during 2009-2013. Parametric statistics were used to compare CRAI-SF scales to domains proposed in SCCT: trainees' characteristics (gender, training level, advanced degree), career interests, career intentions (medical specialty), and performance (peer-reviewed publications and required thesis topic). A number of lessons emerged in using theory to frame the evaluation of a complex educational program. Graduates rated their research self-efficacy significantly higher on all six CRAI-SF scales with large effect sizes (>.90) on five scales (Conceptualizing a Study, Study Design and Analysis, Responsible Research Conduct, Collaborating with Others, and Reporting a Study). Women and men did not have significantly different scores on CRAI-SF scales (p > .05), suggesting that the research program provides adequate supports for women students. Most thesis projects addressed clinical (36.9 %, n = 41) or translational (34.2 %, n = 38) research topics. The CRAI-SF discriminated between medical school matriculates and graduates, suggesting that research self-efficacy increases with mastery experiences. No significant relationships occurred between CRAI-SF scores and graduates' thesis topics or chosen clinical specialty. Correlations demonstrated significant relationships between graduates' perceptions of research self-efficacy and their interest in clinical research careers. PMID:25037264

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis: a study of pulse-technique efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Price, A.C.; Kirshner, H.S.; Allen, J.H.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-11-01

    Forty-two patients with the clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were examined by proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 0.5 T. An extensive protocol was used to facilitate a comparison of the efficacy of different pulse techniques. Results were also compared in 39 cases with high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (CT). MRI revealed characteristic abnormalities in each case, whereas CT was positive in only 15 of 33 patients. Cerebral abnormalities were best shown with the T2-weighted spin-echo sequence: brainstem lesions were best defined on the inversion-recovery sequence.

  18. Promoting blood vessel growth in ischemic diseases: challenges in translating preclinical potential into clinical success

    PubMed Central

    Dragneva, Galina; Korpisalo, Petra; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenic therapy, which involves the use of an exogenous stimulus to promote blood vessel growth, is an attractive approach for the treatment of ischemic diseases. It has been shown in animal models that the stimulation of blood vessel growth leads to the growth of the whole vascular tree, improvement of ischemic tissue perfusion and improved muscle aerobic energy metabolism. However, very few positive results have been gained from Phase 2 and 3 clinical angiogenesis trials. Many reasons have been given for the failures of clinical trials, including poor transgene expression (in gene-therapy trials) and instability of the vessels induced by therapy. In this Review, we discuss the selection of preclinical models as one of the main reasons why clinical translation has been unsuccessful thus far. This issue has received little attention, but could have had dramatic implications on the expectations of clinical trials. We highlight crucial differences between human patients and animal models with regards to blood flow and pressure, as well as issues concerning the chronic nature of ischemic diseases in humans. We use these as examples to demonstrate why the results from preclinical trials might have overestimated the efficacy of angiogenic therapies developed to date. We also suggest ways in which currently available animal models of ischemic disease could be improved to better mimic human disease conditions, and offer advice on how to work with existing models to avoid overestimating the efficacy of new angiogenic therapies. PMID:23471910

  19. Promoting blood vessel growth in ischemic diseases: challenges in translating preclinical potential into clinical success.

    PubMed

    Dragneva, Galina; Korpisalo, Petra; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-03-01

    Angiogenic therapy, which involves the use of an exogenous stimulus to promote blood vessel growth, is an attractive approach for the treatment of ischemic diseases. It has been shown in animal models that the stimulation of blood vessel growth leads to the growth of the whole vascular tree, improvement of ischemic tissue perfusion and improved muscle aerobic energy metabolism. However, very few positive results have been gained from Phase 2 and 3 clinical angiogenesis trials. Many reasons have been given for the failures of clinical trials, including poor transgene expression (in gene-therapy trials) and instability of the vessels induced by therapy. In this Review, we discuss the selection of preclinical models as one of the main reasons why clinical translation has been unsuccessful thus far. This issue has received little attention, but could have had dramatic implications on the expectations of clinical trials. We highlight crucial differences between human patients and animal models with regards to blood flow and pressure, as well as issues concerning the chronic nature of ischemic diseases in humans. We use these as examples to demonstrate why the results from preclinical trials might have overestimated the efficacy of angiogenic therapies developed to date. We also suggest ways in which currently available animal models of ischemic disease could be improved to better mimic human disease conditions, and offer advice on how to work with existing models to avoid overestimating the efficacy of new angiogenic therapies. PMID:23471910

  20. Studies on polymer-coated zinc oxide nanoparticles: UV-blocking efficacy and in vivo toxicity.