Science.gov

Sample records for preclinical toxicology studies

  1. Preclinical studies on the pharmacokinetics, safety, and toxicology of oxfendazole: toward first in human studies.

    PubMed

    Codd, Ellen E; Ng, Hanna H; McFarlane, Claire; Riccio, Edward S; Doppalapudi, Rupa; Mirsalis, Jon C; Horton, R John; Gonzalez, Armando E; Garcia, H Hugo; Gilman, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    A 2-week study in rats identified target organs of oxfendazole toxicity to be bone marrow, epididymis, liver, spleen, testis, and thymus. Female rats had greater oxfendazole exposure and exhibited toxicities at lower doses than did males. Decreased white blood cell levels, a class effect of benzimidazole anthelmintics, returned to normal during the recovery period. The no observed adverse effect level was determined to be >5 but <25 mg/kg/d and the maximum tolerated dose 100 mg/kg/d. The highest dose, 200 mg/kg/d, resulted in significant toxicity and mortality, leading to euthanization of the main study animals in this group after 7 days. Oxfendazole did not exhibit genetic toxicology signals in standard Ames bacterial, mouse lymphoma, or rat micronucleus assays nor did it provoke safety concerns when evaluated for behavioral effects in rats or cardiovascular safety effects in dogs. These results support the transition of oxfendazole to First in Human safety studies preliminary to its evaluation in human helminth diseases. PMID:25701764

  2. Application of in vivo metabolomics to preclinical/toxicological studies: case study on phenytoin-induced systemic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kamp, H; Fabian, E; Groeters, S; Herold, M; Krennrich, G; Looser, R; Mattes, W; Mellert, W; Prokoudine, A; Ruiz-Noppinger, P; Strauss, V; Walk, T; Wiemer, J; van Ravenzwaay, B

    2012-09-01

    BASF and Metanomics have built-up the database MetaMap(®)-Tox containing rat plasma metabolome data for more than 500 reference compounds. Phenytoin was administered to five Wistar rats of both sexes at dietary dose levels of 600 and 2400 ppm over 28 days and metabolome analysis was performed on days 7, 14 and 28. Clinical pathology did not indicate clear evidence for liver toxicity, whereas liver histopathology revealed slight centrilobular hepatocellular hypertrophy. The metabolome analysis of phenytoin shows metabolome changes at both dose levels and the comparison with MetaMap-Tox indicated strong evidence for liver enzyme induction, as well as liver toxicity. Moreover, evidence for kidney and indirect thyroid effects were observed. This assessment was based on the metabolite changes induced, similarities to specific toxicity patterns and the whole metabolome correlation within MetaMap-Tox. As compared with the classical read-out, a more comprehensive picture of phenytoin's effects is obtained from the metabolome analysis, demonstrating the added value of metabolome data in preclinical/ toxicological studies. PMID:23046269

  3. Metabolomics in Toxicology and Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Daneshian, Mardas; Kamp, Hennicke; Bois, Frederic Y.; Clench, Malcolm R.; Coen, Muireann; Donley, Beth; Fischer, Steven M.; Ekman, Drew R.; Fabian, Eric; Guillou, Claude; Heuer, Joachim; Hogberg, Helena T.; Jungnickel, Harald; Keun, Hector C.; Krennrich, Gerhard; Krupp, Eckart; Luch, Andreas; Noor, Fozia; Peter, Erik; Riefke, Bjoern; Seymour, Mark; Skinner, Nigel; Smirnova, Lena; Verheij, Elwin; Wagner, Silvia; Hartung, Thomas; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Leist, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Metabolomics, the comprehensive analysis of metabolites in a biological system, provides detailed information about the biochemical/physiological status of a biological system, and about the changes caused by chemicals. Metabolomics analysis is used in many fields, ranging from the analysis of the physiological status of genetically modified organisms in safety science to the evaluation of human health conditions. In toxicology, metabolomics is the -omics discipline that is most closely related to classical knowledge of disturbed biochemical pathways. It allows rapid identification of the potential targets of a hazardous compound. It can give information on target organs and often can help to improve our understanding regarding the mode-of-action of a given compound. Such insights aid the discovery of biomarkers that either indicate pathophysiological conditions or help the monitoring of the efficacy of drug therapies. The first toxicological applications of metabolomics were for mechanistic research, but different ways to use the technology in a regulatory context are being explored. Ideally, further progress in that direction will position the metabolomics approach to address the challenges of toxicology of the 21st century. To address these issues, scientists from academia, industry, and regulatory bodies came together in a workshop to discuss the current status of applied metabolomics and its potential in the safety assessment of compounds. We report here on the conclusions of three working groups addressing questions regarding 1) metabolomics for in vitro studies 2) the appropriate use of metabolomics in systems toxicology, and 3) use of metabolomics in a regulatory context. PMID:23665807

  4. Preclinical safety, toxicology, and biodistribution study of adenoviral gene therapy with sVEGFR-2 and sVEGFR-3 combined with chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tuppurainen, Laura; Sallinen, Hanna; Kokki, Emmi; Koponen, Jonna; Anttila, Maarit; Pulkkinen, Kati; Heikura, Tommi; Toivanen, Pyry; Hämäläinen, Kirsi; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Heinonen, Seppo; Alitalo, Kari; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Antiangiogenic and antilymphangiogenic gene therapy with soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and soluble VEGFR-3 in combination with chemotherapy is a potential new treatment for ovarian carcinoma. We evaluated the safety, toxicology, and biodistribution of intravenous AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3 combined with chemotherapy in healthy rats (n=90) before entering a clinical setting. The study groups were: AdLacZ and AdLacZ with chemotherapy as control groups, low dose AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3, high dose AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3, combination of low dose AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3 with chemotherapy, combination of high dose AdsVEGFR-2 and AdVEGFR-3 with chemotherapy, and chemotherapy only. The follow-up time was 4 weeks. Safety and toxicology were assessed by monitoring the clinical status of the animals and by histological, hematological, and clinical chemistry parameters. For the biodistribution studies, quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used. Low dose (2×10(10) vp) AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3 gene therapy was well tolerated, even when gene therapy was combined with chemotherapy. Notably, only transient elevation of liver enzymes and mild regenerative changes were seen in liver after the gene transfer in the groups that received high doses (2×10(11) vp) of AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3 with or without chemotherapy. No life-threatening adverse effects were noticed in any of the treatment groups. The highest protein concentration of soluble VEGFR-2 (sVEGFR-2) in circulation was seen 1 week after the gene transfer. The combination of chemotherapy to gene therapy seemed to prolong the time of detectable transgene protein at least 1 week in the circulation. The expression of AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3 transgenes was mainly seen in the liver and spleen as detected by qRT-PCR. According to these results, AdsVEGFR-2 and AdsVEGFR-3 gene therapy combined with chemotherapy is safe and can be brought to clinical testing in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:23692381

  5. [Preclinical study of noopept toxicity].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, L P; Smol'nikova, N M; Alekseeva, S V; Nemova, E P; Sorokina, A V; Miramedova, M G; Kurapova, S P; Sidorina, E I; Kulakova, A V; Daugel'-Dauge, N O

    2002-01-01

    Within the framework of a preclinical investigation, the new nootrope drug noopept (N-phenyl-acetyl-L-propyl-glycine ethylate) was tested for chronic toxicity upon peroral administration in a dose of 10 or 100 mg/kg over 6 months in both male and female rabbits. The results of observations showed that noopept administered in this dose range induced no irreversible pathologic changes in the organs and systems studied and exhibited no allergenic, immunotoxic, and mutagen activity. The drug affected neither the generative function nor the antenatal or postnatal progeny development. Noopept produced a dose-dependent suppression of inflammation reaction to concanavalin A and stimulated the cellular and humoral immune response in mice. PMID:12025790

  6. PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY GUIDE TO GRADUATE STUDY

    E-print Network

    Pillow, Jonathan

    i PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY GUIDE TO GRADUATE STUDY COLLEGE OF PHARMACY The University of Texas at Austin (September 2013) This "Pharmacology and Toxicology Guide to Graduate Study" of the College on graduate studies. #12;ii Certification page Required by all Pharmacology and Toxicology students

  7. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, pharmacology and toxicology of lisdexamfetamine: a novel d-amphetamine pro-drug.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Peter H; Pennick, Michael; Secker, Roger

    2014-12-01

    Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) is a novel pro-drug of d-amphetamine that is currently used for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children aged ? 6 years and adults. LDX is enzymatically cleaved to form d-amphetamine following contact with red blood cells, which reduces the rate of appearance and magnitude of d-amphetamine concentration in the blood and hence the brain when compared with immediate-release d-amphetamine at equimolar doses. Thus, the increase of striatal dopamine efflux and subsequent increase of locomotor activity following d-amphetamine is less prominent and slower to attain maximal effect following an equimolar dose of LDX. Furthermore, unlike d-amphetamine, the pharmacodynamic effects of LDX are independent of the route of administration underlining the requirement to be hydrolyzed by contact with red blood cells. It is conceivable that these pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences may impact the psychostimulant properties of LDX in the clinic. This article reviews the preclinical pharmacokinetics, pharmacology, and toxicology of LDX. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. PMID:24594478

  8. Preclinical Studies of Novel Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The bone marrow (BM) milieu confers drug resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) cells to conventional therapies. Therefore novel biologically-based therapies are needed. Preclinical studies have identified and validated molecular targeted therapeutics in MM. In particular, recognition of the biologic significance of the BM microenvironment both in MM pathogenesis and as a potential target for novel therapeutics has already derived several promising approaches. Thalidomide, lenalidomide (Revlimid®) and bortezomib (Velcade®) are directed not only at MM cells, but also BM milieu, and have rapidly from the bench to the bedside and FDA approval to treat MM. PMID:17996589

  9. Oncolysis by paramyxoviruses: preclinical and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, Olga V; Guo, Zong S; Senin, Vyacheslav M; Senina, Anna V; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Chumakov, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies demonstrate that a broad spectrum of human malignant cells can be killed by oncolytic paramyxoviruses, which include cells of ecto-, endo-, and mesodermal origin. In clinical trials, significant reduction in size or even complete elimination of primary tumors and established metastases are reported. Different routes of viral administration (intratumoral, intravenous, intradermal, intraperitoneal, or intrapleural), and single- versus multiple-dose administration schemes have been explored. The reported side effects are grade 1 and 2, with the most common among them being mild fever. Some advantages in using para-myxoviruses as oncolytic agents versus representatives of other viral families exist. The cytoplasmic replication results in a lack of host genome integration and recombination, which makes paramyxoviruses safer and more attractive candidates for widely used therapeutic oncolysis in comparison with retroviruses or some DNA viruses. The list of oncolytic paramyxovirus representatives includes attenuated measles virus (MV), mumps virus (MuV), low pathogenic Newcastle disease (NDV), and Sendai (SeV) viruses. Metastatic cancer cells frequently overexpress on their surface some molecules that can serve as receptors for MV, MuV, NDV, and SeV. This promotes specific viral attachment to the malignant cell, which is frequently followed by specific viral replication. The paramyxoviruses are capable of inducing efficient syncytium-mediated lyses of cancer cells and elicit strong immunomodulatory effects that dramatically enforce anticancer immune surveillance. In general, preclinical studies and phase 1–3 clinical trials yield very encouraging results and warrant continued research of oncolytic paramyxoviruses as a particularly valuable addition to the existing panel of cancer-fighting approaches. PMID:26640815

  10. An Indexing Coverage Study of Toxicological Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Ruth Reinke

    1973-01-01

    The goal of this study was an appraisal of indexing coverage for the interdisciplinary field of toxicology. Information of research significance was limited to primary literature, defined as published documents containing original data from experimental work or case studies. (6 references) (Author/NH)

  11. 40 CFR 159.165 - Toxicological and ecological studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01...Toxicological and ecological studies. 159.165 Section 159.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...Toxicological and ecological studies. Adverse effects...

  12. TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES OF SMOKE OBSCURANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An exposure facility was designed and constructed to support health effect studies of inhaled smoke obscurants generated from light lubricating oils. Concentrations are monitored using gravimetric filter sample analysis and continuous RAM-1 aerosol monitors. Chemical consistency ...

  13. [Preclinical study of Reamberin and Remaxol safety].

    PubMed

    Savateeva-Liubimova, T N; Lesiovskaia, E E; Sivak, K V; Stosman, K I; Shevchuk, M K; Dagaev, S G; Savateev, A V; Kovalenko, A L; Petrov, A Iu; Sukhanov, D S

    2010-11-01

    Preclinical safety of reamberin, a preparation of succinic acid intended for the treatment of patients with shock conditions of different etiology, and remaxol a drug intended for the treatment of patients with liver dysfunction caused by acute intoxication was performed. Both medicines belong to the 5th class of practically non-toxic drugs. Their administration to experimental animals for 30 days did not cause toxic effects on the functional and morphological state of main systems and organs. Both medicines do not affect specific (humoral and cellular) and non-specific immune response and do not cause sensibilization, mutagenic, embryotoxic and teratogenic effects, and also do no alter parameters of reproductive functions of rats. PMID:21254599

  14. Analgesia in Amphibians: Preclinical Studies and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Preclinical studies of analgesia in amphibians or recommendations for clinical use of analgesics in amphibian species are extremely limited. This article briefly reviews the issues surrounding the use of analgesics in amphibians starting with common definitions of pain and analgesia when applied to non-human animals. Nociceptive and endogenous opioid systems in amphibians are reviewed and results of preclinical research on opioid and non-opioid analgesics summarized. Recommended opioid and non-opioid analgesics are summarized and practical recommendations made for their clinical use. PMID:21074701

  15. PRECLINICAL STUDY Prediction of lymph node involvement in breast cancer

    E-print Network

    PRECLINICAL STUDY Prediction of lymph node involvement in breast cancer from primary tumor tissue- ther lymph node involvement in breast cancer is influenced by gene or miRNA expression of the primary tissue from a group of 96 breast cancer patients balanced for lymph node involvement using Affymetrix

  16. PRECLINICAL STUDIES Cribrostatin 6 induces death in cancer cells through

    E-print Network

    Hergenrother, Paul J.

    PRECLINICAL STUDIES Cribrostatin 6 induces death in cancer cells through a reactive oxygen species of cancer cell lines in culture, and its mechanism of action and scope of activity are unknown. Here we show . Apoptosis . Cancer stem cells . Transcript profile . Quiescent cells . Drug-resistant cell lines

  17. Bridging Translation by Improving Preclinical Study Design in AKI.

    PubMed

    de Caestecker, Mark; Humphreys, Ben D; Liu, Kathleen D; Fissell, William H; Cerda, Jorge; Nolin, Thomas D; Askenazi, David; Mour, Girish; Harrell, Frank E; Pullen, Nick; Okusa, Mark D; Faubel, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    Despite extensive research, no therapeutic interventions have been shown to prevent AKI, accelerate recovery of AKI, or reduce progression of AKI to CKD in patients. This failure in translation has led investigators to speculate that the animal models being used do not predict therapeutic responses in humans. Although this issue continues to be debated, an important concern that has not been addressed is whether improvements in preclinical study design can be identified that might also increase the likelihood of translating basic AKI research into clinical practice using the current models. In this review, we have taken an evidence-based approach to identify common weaknesses in study design and reporting in preclinical AKI research that may contribute to the poor translatability of the findings. We focused on use of N-acetylcysteine or sodium bicarbonate for the prevention of contrast-induced AKI and use of erythropoietin for the prevention of AKI, two therapeutic approaches that have been extensively studied in clinical trials. On the basis of our findings, we identified five areas for improvement in preclinical study design and reporting. These suggested and preliminary guidelines may help improve the quality of preclinical research for AKI drug development. PMID:26538634

  18. Ushering in the study and treatment of preclinical Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Langbaum, Jessica B; Fleisher, Adam S; Chen, Kewei; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Lopera, Francisco; Quiroz, Yakeel T; Caselli, Richard J; Tariot, Pierre N; Reiman, Eric M

    2013-07-01

    Researchers have begun to characterize the subtle biological and cognitive processes that precede the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), and to set the stage for accelerated evaluation of experimental treatments to delay the onset, reduce the risk of, or completely prevent clinical decline. In this Review, we provide an overview of the experimental strategies, and brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid biomarker measures that are used in early detection and tracking of AD, highlighting at-risk individuals who could be suitable for preclinical monitoring. We discuss how advances in the field have contributed to reconceptualization of AD as a sequence of biological changes that occur during progression from preclinical AD, to mild cognitive impairment and finally dementia, and we review recently proposed research criteria for preclinical AD. Advances in the study of preclinical AD have driven the recognition that efficacy of at least some AD therapies may depend on initiation of treatment before clinical manifestation of disease, leading to a new era of AD prevention research. PMID:23752908

  19. USHERING IN THE STUDY AND TREATMENT OF PRECLINICAL ALZHEIMER DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Fleisher, Adam S.; Chen, Kewei; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Lopera, Francisco; Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Caselli, Richard J.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Reiman, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have begun to characterize the subtle biological and cognitive processes that precede the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), and to set the stage for accelerated evaluation of experimental treatments to delay the onset, reduce the risk of or completely prevent clinical decline. Here, we provide an overview of the experimental strategies, and brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid biomarker measures that are used in early detection and tracking of AD, highlighting at-risk individuals who could be suitable for preclinical monitoring. We discuss how these advances have contributed to reconceptualization of AD as a sequence of biological changes that occur during progression from preclinical AD, to mild cognitive impairment and finally dementia, and we review recently proposed research criteria for preclinical AD. Advances in the study of preclinical AD have driven the recognition that efficacy of at least some AD therapies may depend on initiation of treatment before clinical manifestation of disease, leading to a new era of AD prevention research. PMID:23752908

  20. Pharmacology should be at the centre of all preclinical and clinical studies on new psychoactive substances (recreational drugs).

    PubMed

    Green, A Richard; Nutt, David J

    2014-08-01

    Despite the publication of a substantial body of preclinical and clinical information on recent recreational drugs such as 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') and cathinone compounds such as mephedrone there remains a disturbing lack of consensus as to how dangerous these compounds are to the health of the individual and to society in general. This perspective proposes that use of good pharmacological practice should be mandatory in all preclinical and clinical studies. Its use will assist both translation and reverse translation of information produced in animals and clinical subjects. We propose several basic rules to be followed in all future studies. Preclinical studies should employ pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic integration thereby exposing animals to known or calculable drug concentrations. This will provide results relevant to pharmacology rather than toxicology and, crucially, data relevant to human drug use. Full experimental detail should be routinely provided, to allow comparison with other similar work. In clinical studies evidence should be provided that the drug under investigation has been ingested by the subjects being examined, and details given of all other drugs being ingested. Drug-drug interactions are an unavoidable confound but studies of a size that allows reliable statistical evaluation and preferably allows sub-group analysis, particularly by using meta-analysis, should help with this problem. This may require greater collaboration between investigative groups, as routinely occurs during pharmaceutical clinical trials. Other proposals include greater integration of preclinical and clinical scientists in both preclinical and clinical studies and changes in the law regarding Good Manufacturing Process (GMP) sourcing of drug for human studies. PMID:24674814

  1. Some current approaches for studying combination toxicology in chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Yang, R S

    1996-01-01

    Using conventional toxicology methodologies and at the mode and rate of studying chemicals in the last 25 yr, it is doubtful that society will ever have adequate toxicology information on the majority of the chemicals we used now on in the future. Considering further the issue of health effects of chemical mixture exposure (i.e. real-world issues), the problem of not being able to obtain adequate toxicology information is amplified. From a different perspective, concerns over animal rights have raised the consciousness of many biomedical researchers regarding animal experimentation. As many as 17-100 million animals are estimated to be killed for biomedical research in the US alone each year; therefore, minimizing animal usage judiciously in toxicological research should be in the mind of every responsible toxicologist. From these considerations, it is apparent that new, alternative, less animal-intensive, shorter-term and less expensive toxicology methods must be developed if there is to be a reasonable chance to deal with the hundreds of thousand of chemicals, as well as the near-infinite number of chemical mixtures, in the environment. Some of the recent advances indeed are heading towards that direction. In this article, a number of approaches for research work on combination toxicology of chemical mixtures are given; the examples are selected based on one or more of the following criteria: (1) minimizing animal usage; (2) shortening experimental durations; (3) studying environmentally realistic concentrations; (4) utilizing statistical/mathematical modelling; (5) advancing efficient experimental designs and (6) developing predictive toxicology. PMID:9119313

  2. 40 CFR 159.165 - Toxicological and ecological studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... under the criteria of 40 CFR 156.62. (b) Ecological studies. The results of a study of the toxicity of a... follows: (a) Toxicological studies. (1) The results of a study of the toxicity of a pesticide to humans or... period. (iii) At a higher incidence or frequency. (iv) In a different species, strain, sex, or...

  3. An algorithm for evaluating potential tissue drug distribution in toxicology studies from readily available pharmacokinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Dambach, Donna M; Hartley, Dylan H; Ford, Kevin; Theil, Frank-Peter; Harstad, Eric; Halladay, Jason; Choo, Edna; Boggs, Jason; Liederer, Bianca M; Dean, Brian; Diaz, Dolores

    2013-10-01

    Having an understanding of drug tissue accumulation can be informative in the assessment of target organ toxicities; however, obtaining tissue drug levels from toxicology studies by bioanalytical methods is labor-intensive and infrequently performed. Additionally, there are no described methods for predicting tissue drug distribution for the experimental conditions in toxicology studies, which typically include non-steady-state conditions and very high exposures that may saturate several processes. The aim was the development of an algorithm to provide semiquantitative and quantitative estimates of tissue-to-plasma concentration ratios (Kp ) for several tissues from readily available parameters of pharmacokinetics (PK) such as volume of distribution (Vd ) and clearance of each drug, without performing tissue measurement in vivo. The computational approach is specific for the oral route of administration and non-steady-state conditions and was applied for a dataset of 29 Genentech small molecules such as neutral compounds as well as weak and strong organic bases. The maximum success rate in predicting Kp values within 2.5-fold error of observed Kp values was 82% at low doses (<100 mg/kg) in preclinical species. Prediction accuracy was relatively lower with saturation at high doses (?100 mg/kg); however, an approach to perform low-to-high dose extrapolations of Kp values was presented and applied successfully in most cases. An approach for the interspecies scaling was also applied successfully. Finally, the proposed algorithm was used in a case study and successfully predicted differential tissue distribution of two small-molecule MET kinase inhibitors, which had different toxicity profiles in mice. This newly developed algorithm can be used to predict the partition coefficients Kp for small molecules in toxicology studies, which can be leveraged to optimize the PK drivers of tissue distribution in an attempt to decrease drug tissue level, and improve safety margins. PMID:23878104

  4. DTP | Toxicology and Pharmacology Branch (TPB)

    Cancer.gov

    Hendriks, H.R., J. Plowman, D.P. Berger, K.D. Paull, H.H. Fiebig, Ø. Fodstat, H.C. Dreef-van der Meulen, R.E.C. Henrar, H.M. Pinedo and G. Schwartsmann, 1992. Preclinical Antitumor Activity and Animal Toxicology Studies of Rhizoxin, a Novel Tubulin-interacting Agent, Annals of Oncol., 3, 755-763.

  5. Pre-clinical and Clinical Safety Studies of CMX-2043: A Cytoprotective Lipoic Acid Analogue for Ischaemia–Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kates, Steven A; Lader, Alan S; Casale, Ralph; Beeuwkes, Reinier

    2014-01-01

    CMX-2043 is an ?-lipoic acid analogue targeted to reduction of cellular injury and organ damage due to ischaemia–reperfusion injury (IRI). It has been shown to be effective in a rat model of cardiac IRI. The studies here reported evaluate its safety and pharmacokinetic profile in preparation for human clinical studies in procedures associated with IRI. Safety and tolerability were tested in standard pre-clinical in vitro and animal models and in a Phase 1 human clinical trial. CMX-2043 did not bind to a wide range of receptors and specific targets at approximately 4 ?g/mL (10 ?M). It was not mutagenic by Ames assay, did not produce chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and was negative for clastogenic potential. Toxicological studies in rats including both single and 14-day repeat intravenous doses and in dogs (single intravenous dose) with a 2-week recovery period were conducted. The NOAEL in rats and dogs was 30 and >10 mg/kg, respectively. No serious adverse events were reported in a placebo-controlled, sequential dose escalation Phase 1 clinical trial. The low toxicity in the pre-clinical studies and the absence of adverse events in the Phase 1 trial have supported investigation of CMX-2043 in a human efficacy trial. PMID:24751172

  6. Antidepressant mechanism of ketamine: perspective from preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Scheuing, Lisa; Chiu, Chi-Tso; Liao, Hsiao-Mei; Chuang, De-Maw

    2015-01-01

    A debilitating mental disorder, major depressive disorder is a leading cause of global disease burden. Existing antidepressant drugs are not adequate for the majority of depressed patients, and large clinical studies have demonstrated their limited efficacy and slow response onset. Growing evidence of low-dose ketamine's rapid and potent antidepressant effects offers strong potential for future antidepressant agents. However, ketamine has considerable drawbacks such as its abuse potential, psychomimetic effects, and increased oxidative stress in the brain, thus limiting its widespread clinical use. To develop superior antidepressant drugs, it is crucial to better understand ketamine's antidepressant mechanism of action. Recent preclinical studies indicate that ketamine's antidepressant mechanism involves mammalian target of rapamycin pathway activation and subsequent synaptogenesis in the prefrontal cortex, as well as glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3?) inactivation. Adjunct GSK-3? inhibitors, such as lithium, can enhance ketamine's efficacy by augmenting and prolonging its antidepressant effects. Given the potential for depressive relapses, lithium in addition to ketamine is a promising solution for this clinical issue. PMID:26257598

  7. Protective efficacy of Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara in preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Volz, Asisa; Sutter, Gerd

    2013-09-01

    Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is a tissue culture-derived, highly attenuated strain of vaccinia virus (VACV) exhibiting characteristic defective replication in cells from mammalian hosts. In the 1960s MVA was originally generated as a candidate virus for safer vaccination against smallpox. Now, MVA is widely used in experimental vaccine development targeting important infectious diseases and cancer. Versatile technologies for genetic engineering, large-scale production, and quality control facilitate R&D of recombinant and non-recombinant MVA vaccines matching today's requirements for new biomedical products. Such vaccines are attractive candidates for delivering antigens from pathogens against which no, or no effective vaccine is available, including emerging infections caused by highly pathogenic influenza viruses, chikungunya virus, West Nile virus or zoonotic orthopoxviruses. Other directions are seeking valuable vaccines against highly complex diseases such as AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Here, we highlight examples of MVA candidate vaccines against infectious diseases, and review the efforts made to assess both the efficacy of vaccination and immune correlates of protection in preclinical studies. PMID:23523402

  8. Decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels: In basic research and preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Raymond M; Christman, Karen L

    2016-01-15

    A variety of decellularized materials have been developed that have demonstrated potential for treating cardiovascular diseases and improving our understanding of cardiac development. Of these biomaterials, decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels have shown great promise for creating cellular microenvironments representative of the native cardiac tissue and treating the heart after a myocardial infarction. Decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels derived from porcine cardiac tissue form a nanofibrous hydrogel once thermally induced at physiological temperatures. Use of isolated cardiac extracellular matrix in 2D and 3D in vitro platforms has demonstrated the capability to provide tissue specific cues for cardiac cell growth and differentiation. Testing of the myocardial matrix hydrogel as a therapy after myocardial infarction in both small and large animal models has demonstrated improved left ventricular function, increased cardiac muscle, and cellular recruitment into the treated infarct. Based on these results, steps are currently being taken to translate these hydrogels into a clinically used injectable biomaterial therapy. In this review, we will focus on the basic science and preclinical studies that have accelerated the development of decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels into an emerging novel therapy for treating the heart after a myocardial infarction. PMID:26056717

  9. Preclinical safety studies on autologous cultured human skin fibroblast transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Zhang, Shuying; Liu, Dai; Chai, Mi; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhao, Yuming

    2014-01-01

    Recently, FDA approved the clinical use of autologous fibroblasts (LAVIV™) for the improvement of nasolabial fold wrinkles in adults. The use of autologous fibroblasts for the augmentation of dermal and subcutaneous defects represents a potentially exciting natural alternative to the use of other filler materials for its long-term corrective ability and absence of allergic adverse effects proved by clinical application. However, compared to the clinical evidence, preclinical studies are far from enough. In this study, human skin-derived fibroblasts were cultured and expanded for both in vitro and in vivo observations. In vitro, the subcultured fibroblasts were divided into two groups. One set of cells underwent cell cycle and karyotype analysis at passages 5 and 10. The second group of cells was cocultured in medium with different concentrations of human skin extract D for the measurement of collagen concentration and cell count. In vivo, the subcultured fibroblasts were injected into nude mice subcutaneously. Biopsies were taken for morphology observation and specific collagen staining at 1, 2, and 3 months after injection. The results in vitro showed no significant differences in cell cycle distribution between passages 5 and 10. Cell proliferation and secretion were inhibited as the concentration of extract D increased. In vivo, the fibroblasts were remarkably denser on the experimental side with no dysplastic cells. Mitotic cells were easily observed at the end of the first month but were rare at the end of the third month. Type III collagen was detected at the end of the first month, while collagen type I was positive at the end of the second month. The content of both collagens increased as time passed. The above results indicated that the use of the autologous fibroblasts was safe, providing a basic support for clinical use of fibroblasts. PMID:23211390

  10. Pre-clinical immunotoxicity studies of nanotechnology-formulated drugs: Challenges, considerations and strategy.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2015-12-28

    Assorted challenges in physicochemical characterization, sterilization, depyrogenation, and in the assessment of pharmacology, safety, and efficacy profiles accompany pre-clinical development of nanotechnology-formulated drugs. Some of these challenges are not unique to nanotechnology and are common in the development of other pharmaceutical products. However, nanoparticle-formulated drugs are biochemically sophisticated, which causes their translation into the clinic to be particularly complex. An understanding of both the immune compatibility of nanoformulations and their effects on hematological parameters is now recognized as an important step in the (pre)clinical development of nanomedicines. An evaluation of nanoparticle immunotoxicity is usually performed as a part of a traditional toxicological assessment; however, it often requires additional in vitro and in vivo specialized immuno- and hematotoxicity tests. Herein, I review literature examples and share the experience with the NCI Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory assay cascade used in the early (discovery-level) phase of pre-clinical development to summarize common challenges in the immunotoxicological assessment of nanomaterials, highlight considerations and discuss solutions to overcome problems that commonly slow or halt the translation of nanoparticle-formulated drugs toward clinical trials. Special attention will be paid to the grand-challenge related to detection, quantification and removal of endotoxin from nanoformulations, and practical considerations related to this challenge. PMID:26348388

  11. Mouse Model for the Preclinical Study of Metastatic Disease

    Cancer.gov

    The successful development of new cancer therapeutics requires reliable preclinical data that are obtained from mouse models for cancer. Human tumor xenografts, which require transplantation of human tumor cells into an immune compromised mouse, represent the current standard mouse model for cancer. Since the immune system plays an important role in tumor growth, progression and metastasis, the current standard mouse model is not ideal for accurate prediction of therapeutic effectiveness in patients.

  12. A toxicological study of gadolinium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    London, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show gadolinium nitrate to have potential sensitizing properties. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated that it was cutaneously a severe irritant. This material was considered an irritant in the rabbit eye application studies. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Toxicological study on pramiverine (author's transl).

    PubMed

    Eberstein, M; Frohberg, H; Hofmann, A; Jochmann, G; Metallinos, A; Schiling, B; Weisse, G

    1976-04-01

    4,4-Diphenyl-N-isopropyl-cyclohexylamine-hydrochloride (pramiverine, Sistalgin) was investigated alone and in combination (1 + 1000) with N-methyl-N-(2,3-dimethyl-5-oxo-1-phenyl-3-pyrazolin-4-yl)-aminomethanesulfonate (metamizole) in various species for acute toxicity after oral and intravenous administration, for local tolerance and subacute toxicity. In addition, long-term trials and reproduction toxicity studies were performed with pramiverine. Pramiverine was only slightly toxic and was well tolerated locally as an ampoule solution also in combination with metamizole. The acute trials of the two compounds in mice and rats like the subacute study in rats showed that the toxicity of metamizole was not increased by pramiverine. Rats tolerated in the long-term trial all pramiverine doses examined (0.5; 5.0; 50.0 mg/kg), while cholinolytic concomitant effects were observed in dogs under higher doses (5.0 and 20.0 mg/kg). Pramiverine did not have a foetotoxic and teratogenic effect in mice, rats and rabbits. In the perinatal and postnatal experiment in rats no effect on foetal development, viability and growth of the offspring as well as the course of labour and lactation ability of the dams was observed. PMID:989019

  14. Preclinical studies with synthetic peptides in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Amarilyo, Gil; Hahn, Bevra; La Cava, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease that causes multi-organ damage and significant morbidity and mortality. Various efforts have been made to modulate the imbalanced immune responses in this disease. The manipulation of the immune system through the use of soluble synthetic peptides serving as antigenic epitopes, in repeated doses, has been shown to induce immune tolerance and to reduce the clinical manifestations of the disease in murine models. Although clinical trials in humans with the anti-DNA Ig peptide hCDR1 have failed, recent results from a clinical trial with another peptide, p140, have shown promise. This review provides an overview on the preclinical and translational work with synthetic peptides in SLE. PMID:22201847

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF REFERENCE ARTEMIA III FOR MARINE TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ASTM Practice for Using Brine Shrimp Nauplii as Food for Test Animals in Aquatic Toxicology Tests (E 1203) suggests use of Reference Artemis as a reference standard for evaluating other batches of brine shrimp as food for organisms used in toxicology. in 1988, the U.S. EPA was ab...

  16. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM): an alternative predictive model in acute toxicological studies for anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Kue, Chin Siang; Tan, Kae Yi; Lam, May Lynn; Lee, Hong Boon

    2015-01-01

    The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a preclinical model widely used for vascular and anti-vascular effects of therapeutic agents in vivo. In this study, we examine the suitability of CAM as a predictive model for acute toxicology studies of drugs by comparing it to conventional mouse and rat models for 10 FDA-approved anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, carmustine, camptothecin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cisplatin, aloin, mitomycin C, actinomycin-D, melphalan). Suitable formulations for intravenous administration were determined before the average of median lethal dose (LD50) and median survival dose (SD(50)) in the CAM were measured and calculated for these drugs. The resultant ideal LD(50) values were correlated to those reported in the literature using Pearson's correlation test for both intravenous and intraperitoneal routes of injection in rodents. Our results showed moderate correlations (r(2)=0.42 - 0.68, P<0.005-0.05) between the ideal LD(50) values obtained using the CAM model with LD(50) values from mice and rats models for both intravenous and intraperitoneal administrations, suggesting that the chick embryo may be a suitable alternative model for acute drug toxicity screening before embarking on full toxicological investigations in rodents in development of anticancer drugs. PMID:25736707

  17. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM): an alternative predictive model in acute toxicological studies for anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    KUE, Chin Siang; TAN, Kae Yi; LAM, May Lynn; LEE, Hong Boon

    2015-01-01

    The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a preclinical model widely used for vascular and anti-vascular effects of therapeutic agents in vivo. In this study, we examine the suitability of CAM as a predictive model for acute toxicology studies of drugs by comparing it to conventional mouse and rat models for 10 FDA-approved anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, carmustine, camptothecin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cisplatin, aloin, mitomycin C, actinomycin-D, melphalan). Suitable formulations for intravenous administration were determined before the average of median lethal dose (LD50) and median survival dose (SD50) in the CAM were measured and calculated for these drugs. The resultant ideal LD50 values were correlated to those reported in the literature using Pearson’s correlation test for both intravenous and intraperitoneal routes of injection in rodents. Our results showed moderate correlations (r2=0.42 ? 0.68, P<0.005–0.05) between the ideal LD50 values obtained using the CAM model with LD50 values from mice and rats models for both intravenous and intraperitoneal administrations, suggesting that the chick embryo may be a suitable alternative model for acute drug toxicity screening before embarking on full toxicological investigations in rodents in development of anticancer drugs. PMID:25736707

  18. THE USE OF STEM CELLS FOR TOXICOLOGY STUDIES AND RISK ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In general terms, toxicology studies are used in support of risk assessments of adverse health outcomes as a result of exposures to chemical and physical agents. In particular, toxicological data are used to provide information that aids in the assessment of disease outcomes at e...

  19. Exploratory Study of Factors Related to Educational Scores of First Preclinical Year Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitticharoon, Chantacha; Srisuma, Sorachai; Kanavitoon, Sawita; Summachiwakij, Sarawut

    2014-01-01

    The relationships among the scores of major subjects taught in the first preclinical year of a Thai medical school, previous academic achievements, and daily life activities are rarely explored. We therefore performed an exploratory study identifying various factors possibly related to the educational scores of these medical students.…

  20. ORAL TOXICOLOGY STUDIES WITH XYLENE ISOMERS AND MIXED XYLENES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Xylene isomers and mixed xylenes were administered to male and female Sprague-Dawley rats to evaluate their effects on standard toxicological parameters rnhich included body and organ weights, hematology, serum chemistries, urinalysis and histopathological examination. n the init...

  1. Developmental Toxicology##

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental toxicology encompasses the study of developmental exposures, pharmacokinetics, mechanisms, pathogenesis, and outcomes potentially leading to adverse health effects. Manifestations of developmental toxicity include structural malformations, growth retardation, functi...

  2. Environmental Toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, David A.; Welbourn, Pamela

    2002-03-01

    Environmental Toxicology is a comprehensive introductory textbook dealing with most aspects of the subject, from the molecular to the ecosystem level. Early chapters deal with basic to advanced concepts, methods and approaches. The next discusses the environmental toxicology of individual or groups of substances. The third part addresses complex issues, in which many of the concepts, approaches and substances covered in earlier parts are incorporated. The fourth part includes chapters on risk assessment, rehabilitation and regulatory toxicology. The book concludes with a summary of present and future areas of emphasis. Each chapter contains a comprehensive list of references and further reading, case studies from different jurisdictions, and student exercises.

  3. International Recommendations for Training Future Toxicologic Pathologists Participating in Regulatory-Type, Nonclinical Toxicity Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Bolon, Brad; Barale-Thomas, Erio; Bradley, Alys; Ettlin, Robert A.; Franchi, Carla A.S.; George, Catherine; Giusti, Anna Maria; Hall, Robert; Jacobsen, Matthew; Konishi, Yoichi; Ledieu, David; Morton, Daniel; Park, Jae-Hak; Scudamore, Cheryl L.; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Vijayasarathi, S.K.; Wijnands, Marcel V.W.

    2010-01-01

    The International Federation of Societies of Toxicologic Pathologists (IFSTP) proposes a common global framework for training future toxicologic pathologists who will support regulatory-type nonclinical toxicology studies. Trainees optimally should undertake a scientific curriculum of at least 5 years at an accredited institution leading to a clinical degree (veterinary medicine or medicine). Trainees should then obtain 4 or more years of intensive pathology practice during a residency and/or on-the-job “apprenticeship,” at least 2 years of which must be focused on regulatory-type toxicologic pathology topics. Possession of a recognized pathology qualification (i.e., certification) is highly recommended. A non-clinical pathway (e.g., a graduate degree in medical biology or pathology) may be possible if medically trained pathologists are scarce, but this option is not optimal. Regular, lifelong continuing education (peer review of nonclinical studies, professional meetings, reading, short courses) will be necessary to maintain and enhance one’s understanding of current toxicologic pathology knowledge, skills, and tools. This framework should provide a rigorous yet flexible way to reliably train future toxicologic pathologists to generate, interpret, integrate, and communicate data in regulatory-type, nonclinical toxicology studies. PMID:22272030

  4. Spinal Cord Tolerance in the Age of Spinal Radiosurgery: Lessons From Preclinical Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Paul M.; Boike, Thomas P.

    2011-04-01

    Clinical implementation of spinal radiosurgery has increased rapidly in recent years, but little is known regarding human spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction irradiation. In contrast, preclinical studies in single-fraction spinal cord tolerance have been ongoing since the 1970s. The influences of field length, dose rate, inhomogeneous dose distributions, and reirradiation have all been investigated. This review summarizes literature regarding single-fraction spinal cord tolerance in preclinical models with an emphasis on practical clinical significance. The outcomes of studies that incorporate uniform irradiation are surprisingly consistent among multiple small- and large-animal models. Extensive investigation of inhomogeneous dose distributions in the rat has demonstrated a significant dose-volume effect while preliminary results from one pig study are contradictory. Preclinical spinal cord dose-volume studies indicate that dose distribution is more critical than the volume irradiated suggesting that neither dose-volume histogram analysis nor absolute volume constraints are effective in predicting complications. Reirradiation data are sparse, but results from guinea pig, rat, and pig studies are consistent with the hypothesis that the spinal cord possesses a large capacity for repair. The mechanisms behind the phenomena observed in spinal cord studies are not readily explained and the ability of dose response models to predict outcomes is variable underscoring the need for further investigation. Animal studies provide insight into the phenomena and mechanisms of radiosensitivity but the true significance of animal studies can only be discovered through clinical trials.

  5. Toxicology study of the high-energy plasticizer FEFO

    SciTech Connect

    Swearengen, P.M.; Johnson, J.S.

    1989-03-01

    This document contains information on the high energy plasticizer FEFO (1,1'-(methylenebis(oxy))bis(2-fluoro-2,2-dinitroethanel)). It includes interview comments from thirteen known users of the chemical through December, 1987. Included as appendices are other reference documents on FEFO. The first of these, Appendix A, is a survey on worker experiences with FEFO, Appendix B is a toxicology screening study of FEFO. Appendix C is a material safety data sheet on FEFO. Appendix D is an internal memorandum on personnel hazards associated with FEFO. Appendix E is a series of excerpted pages from a formerly classified document at the China Lake Naval Weapons Laboratory. Appendix F is a file on medical treatment associated with FEFO exposure. The interview comments and the appendices of related information on FEFO were provided to the LLNL Health Services Department along with Industrial Hygiene recommendations from the Safety Science Group. The response of the Health Services Director is included in this document as a preface. Taken together, the document and the medical observations provide a summary of information and recommended guidance for the safe handling of the high energy plasticizer FEFO. The material is believed to be quite biologically active by all observers. It is also believed that by correct use of strict industrial hygiene controls it can be used in large amounts with relative safety.

  6. Preclinical and clinical phase I studies of a new recombinant Filgrastim (BK0023) in comparison with Neupogen®

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Filgrastim or methionyl-granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Met-G-CSF), is a recombinant therapeutic protein widely used to treat severe neutropenia caused by myelosuppressive drugs in patients with nonmyeloid malignancies. In addition to its role in the regulation of granulopoiesis, treatment with G-CSF is considered the standard approach to mobilize CD34 positive (CD34+) mononuclear cells for reconstituting hemopoietic ability for bone marrow transplantation. An intended biosimilar filgrastim (coded BK0023) was produced in GMP conditions by E.coli fermentation according to an original recombinant process and showed physico-chemical properties and purity profile similar to Neupogen®, a commercial preparation of filgrastim. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the comparability of BK0023 to Neupogen® in terms of both in vitro biological activities and in vivo toxicology, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Methods Cell proliferation and radioligand binding assays were conducted in NFS-60 cells to compare the biological activity and functional interaction with the G-CSF receptor in vitro, while preclinical in vivo studies, including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics after repeated dose were performed in normal and neutropenic rats. A phase I study was carried out in healthy male volunteers treated by multiple-dose subcutaneous administration of BK0023 and Neupogen® to evaluate their pharmacodynamic effects as well as their pharmacokinetic and safety profile and to demonstrate their pharmacodynamic equivalence and pharmacokinetic bioequivalence. Results The results reported in this work demonstrate that BK0023 is comparable in terms of biological activity, efficacy and safety to Neupogen®. Conclusions BK0023 has the same pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy and safety as the reference commercial filgrastim Neupogen® and therefore could be further developed to become a convenient option to treat neutropenia in oncological patients. Trial registration Trial registration number (TRN): NCT01933971. Date of registration: Sept 6th 2013. PMID:24555723

  7. Beneficial health effects of lupeol triterpene: a review of preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Hifzur Rahman; Saleem, Mohammad

    2011-02-14

    Since ancient times, natural products have been used as remedies to treat human diseases. Lupeol, a phytosterol and triterpene, is widely found in edible fruits, and vegetables. Extensive research over the last three decades has revealed several important pharmacological activities of lupeol. Various in vitro and preclinical animal studies suggest that lupeol has a potential to act as an anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-protozoal, anti-proliferative, anti-invasive, anti-angiogenic and cholesterol lowering agent. Employing various in vitro and in vivo models, lupeol has also been tested for its therapeutic efficiency against conditions including wound healing, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and arthritis. Lupeol has been found to be pharmacologically effective in treating various diseases under preclinical settings (in animal models) irrespective of varying routes of administration viz; topical, oral, intra-peritoneal and intravenous. It is noteworthy that lupeol has been reported to selectively target diseased and unhealthy human cells, while sparing normal and healthy cells. Published studies provide evidence that lupeol modulates the expression or activity of several molecules such as cytokines IL-2, IL4, IL5, IL?, proteases, ?-glucosidase, cFLIP, Bcl-2 and NF?B. This minireview discusses in detail the preclinical studies conducted with lupeol and provides an insight into its mechanisms of action. PMID:21118697

  8. Preclinical studies of indapamide, a new 2-methylindoline antihypertensive diuretic

    SciTech Connect

    Pruss, T.; Wolf, P.S.

    1983-07-01

    Indapamide is a new indoline antihypertensive diuretic agent whose chemical structure differs substantially from those of the thiazides. The hydrophobic indoline moiety of indapamide confers a lipid solubility to the molecule that is 5 to 80 times greater than that of the thiazide diuretics. Thus indapamide accumulates in vascular smooth muscle at a concentration 10 times higher than that of protein-free perfusate. The affinity of indapamide for vascular smooth muscle manifests itself in vitro and in vivo as a decrease in reactivity following various pharmacologic interventions. Moreover, in vitro studies have demonstrated that indapamide decreases the inward calcium current and the transmembrane influx of calcium. The diuretic effect of indapamide is predominantly due to inhibition of sodium reabsorption at the cortical diluting segment of the distal convoluted tubule. In animal studies, intravenous indapamide has no effect on glomerular filtration rate or renal blood flow. Indapamide is well absorbed and extensively metabolized in animals and humans, with biliary excretion being the predominant route of elimination in animals. Most important, repeat administration of indapamide to dogs with both kidneys removed produces no accumulation of intact indapamide or its metabolites. Extensive drug safety studies in animals indicate that indapamide produces no overt toxicity and exhibits a good margin of safety.

  9. Intradermal inactivated poliovirus vaccine: a preclinical dose-finding study.

    PubMed

    Kouiavskaia, Diana; Mirochnitchenko, Olga; Dragunsky, Eugenia; Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Troy, Stephanie; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2015-05-01

    Intradermal delivery of vaccines has been shown to result in dose sparing. We tested the ability of fractional doses of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) delivered intradermally to induce levels of serum poliovirus-neutralizing antibodies similar to immunization through the intramuscular route. Immunogenicity of fractional doses of IPV was studied by comparing intramuscular and intradermal immunization of Wistar rats using NanoPass MicronJet600 microneedles. Intradermal delivery of partial vaccine doses induced antibodies at titers comparable to those after immunization with full human dose delivered intramuscularly. The results suggest that intradermal delivery of IPV may lead to dose-sparing effect and reduction of the vaccination cost. PMID:25391313

  10. Preclinical and Clinical Studies for Sodium Tungstate: Application in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bertinat, Romina; Nualart, Francisco; Li, Xuhang; Yáñez, Alejandro J.; Gomis, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder triggered by the deficient secretion of insulin by the pancreatic ?-cell or the resistance of peripheral tissues to the action of the hormone. Chronic hyperglycemia is the major consequence of this failure, and also the main cause of diabetic problems. Indeed, several clinical trials have agreed in that tight glycemic control is the best way to stop progression of the disease. Many anti-diabetic drugs for treatment of type 2 diabetes are commercially available, but no ideal normoglycemic agent has been developed yet. Moreover, weight gain is the most common side effect of many oral anti-diabetic agents and insulin, and increased weight has been shown to worsen glycemic control and increase the risk of diabetes progression. In this sense, the inorganic salt sodium tungstate (NaW) has been studied in different animal models of metabolic syndrome and diabetes, proving to have a potent effect on normalizing blood glucose levels and reducing body weight, without any hypoglycemic action. Although the liver has been studied as the main site of NaW action, positive effects have been also addressed in muscle, pancreas, brain, adipose tissue and intestine, explaining the effective anti-diabetic action of this salt. Here, we review NaW research to date in these different target organs. We believe that NaW deserves more attention, since all available anti-diabetic treatments remain suboptimal and new therapeutics are urgently needed. PMID:25995968

  11. Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin: preparation and preclinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Vera, D.R.; Stadalnik, R.C.; Krohn, K.A.

    1985-10-01

    Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin ((Tc) NGA), a labeled analog ligand to the hepatocyte-specific receptor, hepatic binding protein (HBP), was prepared and tested for labeling yield, stability, biodistribution, toxicity, and dosimetry. The ligand was synthesized by the covalent coupling of a carbohydrate bifunctional reagent, 2-imino-2-ethyloxymethyl-1-thiogalactose, to human serum albumin. Testing in mice and rabbits revealed the product to be nontoxic and apyrogenic. Biodistribution studies in rabbits demonstrated the liver as the single focus of tracer uptake. Dosimetry was based on kinetic studies in three baboons. Absorbed doses to liver, small intestine, urinary bladder wall, and uterus were 0.089, 0.28, 0.56, and 0.88 rad/mCi, respectively. Total body, lens of the eye, red marrow, ovaries, and testes were less than 0.06 rad/mCi. High liver specificity imparted by receptor binding combined with high labeling yield, stability, acceptable dosimetry, and safety provide (Tc)NGA with the attributes required for routine clinical assessment of hepatocyte function.

  12. Anticancer potential of curcumin: preclinical and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Kumar, Anushree; Bharti, Alok C

    2003-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a polyphenol derived from the plant Curcuma longa, commonly called turmeric. Extensive research over the last 50 years has indicated this polyphenol can both prevent and treat cancer. The anticancer potential of curcumin stems from its ability to suppress proliferation of a wide variety of tumor cells, down-regulate transcription factors NF-kappa B, AP-1 and Egr-1; down-regulate the expression of COX2, LOX, NOS, MMP-9, uPA, TNF, chemokines, cell surface adhesion molecules and cyclin D1; down-regulate growth factor receptors (such as EGFR and HER2); and inhibit the activity of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, protein tyrosine kinases and protein serine/threonine kinases. In several systems, curcumin has been described as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. Evidence has also been presented to suggest that curcumin can suppress tumor initiation, promotion and metastasis. Pharmacologically, curcumin has been found to be safe. Human clinical trials indicated no dose-limiting toxicity when administered at doses up to 10 g/day. All of these studies suggest that curcumin has enormous potential in the prevention and therapy of cancer. The current review describes in detail the data supporting these studies. PMID:12680238

  13. Manpower Development in Toxicology. EURO Reports and Studies, No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This report addresses the widely held view that currently available literature in toxicology is inadequate in that there is a need to identify manpower deficiencies in this field and to suggest means to correct these deficiencies. It contains a list of specific recommendations including the organization of a working group, sponsored by the World…

  14. Improving the Quality of NINDS-Supported Preclinical and Clinical Research through Rigorous Study Design and Transparent Reporting

    E-print Network

    Levin, Judith G.

    Improving the Quality of NINDS-Supported Preclinical and Clinical Research through Rigorous Study Design and Transparent Reporting The mission of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders basic, translational, and clinical research. There is growing recognition that the quality

  15. Analgesic and hypnotic activities of Laghupanchamula: A preclinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ghildiyal, Shivani; Gautam, Manish K.; Joshi, Vinod K.; Goel, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Ayurvedic classics, two types of Laghupanchamula -five plant roots (LP) have been mentioned containing four common plants viz. Kantakari, Brihati, Shalaparni, and Prinshniparni and the fifth plant is either Gokshura (LPG) or Eranda (LPE). LP has been documented to have Shothahara (anti-inflammatory), Shulanashka (analgesic), Jvarahara (antipyretic), and Rasayana (rejuvenator) activities. Aim: To evaluate the acute toxicity (in mice), analgesic and hypnotic activity (in rats) of 50% ethanolic extract of LPG (LPGE) and LPE (LPEE). Materials and Methods: LPEG and LPEE were prepared separately by using 50% ethanol following the standard procedures. A graded dose (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) response study for both LPEE and LPGE was carried out for analgesic activity against rat tail flick response which indicated 500 mg/kg as the optimal effective analgesic dose. Hence, 500 mg/kg dose of LPEE and LPGE was used for hot plate test and acetic acid induced writhing model in analgesic activity and for evaluation of hypnotic activity. Results: Both the extracts did not produce any acute toxicity in mice at single oral dose of 2.0 g/kg. Both LPGE and LPEE (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) showed dose-dependent elevation in pain threshold and peak analgesic effect at 60 min as evidenced by increased latency period in tail-flick method by 25.1-62.4% and 38.2-79.0% respectively. LPGE and LPEE (500 mg/kg) increased reaction time in hot-plate test at peak 60 min analgesic effect by 63.2 and 85.8% and reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhes by 55.9 and 65.8% respectively. Both potentiated pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis as indicated by increased duration of sleep in treated rats. Conclusion: The analgesic and hypnotic effects of LP formulations authenticate their uses in Ayurvedic system of Medicine for painful conditions. PMID:25364205

  16. Attempted and successful compensation in preclinical and early manifest neurodegeneration - a review of task FMRI studies.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Elisa; Minkova, Lora; Leitner, Mathias; Klöppel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Several models of neural compensation in healthy aging have been suggested to explain brain activity that aids to sustain cognitive function. Applying recently suggested criteria of "attempted" and "successful" compensation, we reviewed existing literature on compensatory mechanisms in preclinical Huntington's disease (HD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Both disorders constitute early stages of neurodegeneration ideal for examining compensatory mechanisms and developing targeted interventions. We strived to clarify whether compensation criteria derived from healthy aging populations can be applied to early neurodegeneration. To concentrate on the close coupling of cognitive performance and brain activity, we exclusively addressed task fMRI studies. First, we found evidence for parallels in compensatory mechanisms between healthy aging and neurodegenerative disease. Several studies fulfilled criteria of attempted compensation, while reports of successful compensation were largely absent, which made it difficult to conclude on. Second, comparing working memory studies in preclinical HD and aMCI, we identified similar compensatory patterns across neurodegenerative disorders in lateral and medial prefrontal cortex. Such patterns included an inverted U-shaped relationship of neurodegeneration and compensatory activity spanning from preclinical to manifest disease. Due to the lack of studies systematically targeting all criteria of compensation, we propose an exemplary study design, including the manipulation of compensating brain areas by brain stimulation. Furthermore, we delineate the benefits of targeted interventions by non-invasive brain stimulation, as well as of unspecific interventions such as physical activity or cognitive training. Unambiguously detecting compensation in early neurodegenerative disease will help tailor interventions aiming at sustained overall functioning and delayed clinical disease onset. PMID:25324786

  17. Toxicological screening

    PubMed Central

    Parasuraman, S.

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity testing of new compounds is essential for drug development process. The preclinical toxicity testing on various biological systems reveals the species-, organ- and dose- specific toxic effects of an investigational product. The toxicity of substances can be observed by (a) studying the accidental exposures to a substance (b) in vitro studies using cells/ cell lines (c) in vivo exposure on experimental animals. This review mainly focuses on the various experimental animal models and methods used for toxicity testing of substances. The pre-clinical toxicity testing helps to calculate “No Observed Adverse Effect Level” which is needed to initiate the clinical evaluation of investigational products. PMID:21772764

  18. Nanomaterial synthesis and characterization for toxicological studies: TiO2 case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valsami-Jones, E.; Berhanu, D.; Dybowska, A.; Misra, S.; Boccaccini, A.R.; Tetley, T.D.; Luoma, S.N.; Plant, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years it has become apparent that the novel properties of nanomaterials may predispose them to a hitherto unknown potential for toxicity. A number of recent toxicological studies of nanomaterials exist, but these appear to be fragmented and often contradictory. Such discrepancies may be, at least in part, due to poor description of the nanomaterial or incomplete characterization, including failure to recognise impurities, surface modifications or other important physicochemical aspects of the nanomaterial. Here we make a case for the importance of good quality, well-characterized nanomaterials for future toxicological studies, combined with reliable synthesis protocols, and we present our efforts to generate such materials. The model system for which we present results is TiO2 nanoparticles, currently used in a variety of commercial products. ?? 2008 The Mineralogical Society.

  19. SOCIETY OF TOXICOLOGIC PATHOLOGY POSITION PAPER: BEST PRACTICES FOR REPORTING PATHOLOGY INTERPRETATIONS WITHIN GLP TOXICOLOGY STUDIES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study pathologist provides specialized expertise to the interpretation of the toxicity and safety of pharmaceuticals, biological agents, human and animal food additives, environmental and industrial chemicals, and medical devices in animal studies. The study pathologist's fin...

  20. Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, Part 1: a review of preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Sarris, Jerome; McIntyre, Erica; Camfield, David A

    2013-03-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based anxiolytics has been absent to date. This article (part 1) reviews herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for anxiolytic activity have been performed. In part 2, we review herbal medicines for which there have been clinical investigations for anxiolytic activity. An open-ended, language-restricted (English) search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) using specific search criteria to identify herbal medicines that have been investigated for anxiolytic activity. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, from which 53 herbal medicines were included in the full review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed in part 2), with another 32 having solely preclinical studies (reviewed here in part 1). Preclinical evidence of anxiolytic activity (without human clinical trials) was found for Albizia julibrissin, Sonchus oleraceus, Uncaria rhynchophylla, Stachys lavandulifolia, Cecropia glazioui, Magnolia spp., Eschscholzia californica, Erythrina spp., Annona spp., Rubus brasiliensis, Apocynum venetum, Nauclea latifolia, Equisetum arvense, Tilia spp., Securidaca longepedunculata, Achillea millefolium, Leea indica, Juncus effusus, Coriandrum sativum, Eurycoma longifolia, Turnera diffusa, Euphorbia hirta, Justicia spp., Crocus sativus, Aloysia polystachya, Albies pindrow, Casimiroa edulis, Davilla rugosa, Gastrodia elata, Sphaerathus indicus, Zizyphus jujuba and Panax ginseng. Common mechanisms of action for the majority of botanicals reviewed primarily involve GABA, either via direct receptor binding or ionic channel or cell membrane modulation; GABA transaminase or glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibition; a range of monoaminergic effects; and potential cannabinoid receptor modulation. Future research should focus on conducting human clinical trials on the plants reviewed with promising anxiolytic activity. PMID:23436255

  1. Exploratory study of factors related to educational scores of first preclinical year medical students.

    PubMed

    Sitticharoon, Chantacha; Srisuma, Sorachai; Kanavitoon, Sawita; Summachiwakij, Sarayut

    2014-03-01

    The relationships among the scores of major subjects taught in the first preclinical year of a Thai medical school, previous academic achievements, and daily life activities are rarely explored. We therefore performed an exploratory study identifying various factors possibly related to the educational scores of these medical students. Questionnaires were sent out to all first preclinical year medical students, with 79.8% being returned (245/307 questionnaires). Positive correlations were revealed between the premedical year grade point average (pre-MD GPA) and anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry scores (R = 0.664, 0.521, and 0.653, respectively, P < 0.001 for all) by Pearson's method. Using multiple linear regression analysis, anatomy scores could be predicted by pre-MD GPA, student satisfaction with anatomy, the percentage of expected reading, monthly earnings, reading after class and near exam time, and duration of sleeping periods near exam time (R = 0.773, R(2) = 0.598, P < 0.001). Physiology scores could be estimated by pre-MD GPA, the percentage of expected reading, monthly earnings, and percentage of those who fell asleep during class and near exam time (R = 0.722, R(2) = 0.521, P < 0.001). Biochemistry scores could be calculated by pre-MD GPA, the percentage of expected reading, motivation to study medicine, student satisfaction with biochemistry, and exam performance expectations (R = 0.794, R(2) = 0.630, P < 0.001). In conclusion, pre-MD GPA and the percentage of expected reading are factors involved in producing good academic results in the first preclinical year. Anatomy and biochemistry, but not physiology, scores are influenced by satisfaction. PMID:24585466

  2. Food for Thought Look Back in Anger – What Clinical Studies Tell Us About Preclinical Work

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Summary Misled by animal studies and basic research? Whenever we take a closer look at the outcome of clinical trials in a field such as, most recently, stroke or septic shock, we see how limited the value of our preclinical models was. For all indications, 95% of drugs that enter clinical trials do not make it to the market, despite all promise of the (animal) models used to develop them. Drug development has started already to decrease its reliance on animal models: In Europe, for example, despite increasing R&D expenditure, animal use by pharmaceutical companies dropped by more than 25% from 2005 to 2008. In vitro studies are likewise limited: questionable cell authenticity, over-passaging, mycoplasma infections, and lack of differentiation as well as non-homeostatic and non-physiologic culture conditions endanger the relevance of these models. The standards of statistics and reporting often are poor, further impairing reliability. Alarming studies from industry show miserable reproducibility of landmark studies. This paper discusses factors contributing to the lack of reproducibility and relevance of pre-clinical research. The conclusion: Publish less but of better quality and do not rely on the face value of animal studies. PMID:23861075

  3. Neuropharmacological Aspects of Crocus sativus L.: A Review of Preclinical Studies and Ongoing Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Singh, Damanpreet

    2015-01-01

    Crocus sativus L. (Iridaceae) is an important member of the genus Crocus having high medicinal value. Its dried stigmas, known as "saffron" are being widely used form past many centuries as a food additive, coloring agent, flavoring agent and a potential source of traditional medicine. The stigmas along with other botanical parts of Crocus sativus are being extensively used in ethnomedical treatment of varied central nervous system diseases. In line with its ethnomedical importance, several preclinical studies have been carried out to validate its traditional uses, identify active principle(s), understand pharmacological basis of therapeutic action and explore novel medicinal uses. The bioactive components of Crocus sativus have been found to modulate several synaptic processes via direct/indirect interplay with neurotransmitter receptor functions, interaction with neuronal death/survival pathways and alteration in neuronal proteins expression. Many clinical studies proving beneficial effect of Crocus sativus in depressive disorders, Alzheimer's disease and some other neurological abnormalities have also been carried out. Based on the vast literature reports available, an attempt has been made to comprehend the fragmented information on neuropharmacological aspects, chemistry and safety of Crocus sativus. Although the plant has been well explored, but still a large scope of future preclinical and clinical research exist to explore its potential in neurological diseases, that has been discussed in depth in the present review. PMID:25714974

  4. DTP | Toxicology and Pharmacology Branch (TPB)

    Cancer.gov

    Preclinical toxicology and pharmacology are required for decision making throughout drug discovery and development and for IND filing for clinical trials. Toxicological and pharmacological data can inform clinical trial design, such as determination of maximum tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicities, and starting dose. With appropriate characterization, in most cases, safe operating parameters can be established for human clinical trials.

  5. Safety data on 19 vehicles for use in 1?month oral rodent pre-clinical studies: administration of hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin causes renal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Healing, Guy; Sulemann, Tabassum; Cotton, Peter; Harris, Jayne; Hargreaves, Adam; Finney, Rowena; Kirk, Sarah; Schramm, Carolin; Garner, Clare; Pivette, Perrine; Burdett, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Potential new drugs are assessed in pre-clinical in vivo studies to determine their safety profiles. The drugs are formulated in vehicles suitable for the route of administration and the physicochemical properties of the drug, aiming to achieve optimal exposure in the test species. The availability of safety data on vehicles is often limited (incomplete data, access restricted/private databases). Nineteen potentially useful vehicles that contained new and/or increased concentrations of excipients and for which little safety data have been published were tested. Vehicles were dosed orally once daily to HanWistar rats for a minimum of 28?days and a wide range of toxicological parameters were assessed. Only 30% (w/v) hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin was found unsuitable owing to effects on liver enzymes (AST, ALT and GLDH), urinary volume and the kidneys (tubular vacuolation and tubular pigment). 20% (v/v) oleic acid caused increased salivation and hence this vehicle should be used with caution. As 40% (v/v) tetraethylene glycol affected urinary parameters, its use should be carefully considered, particularly for compounds suspected to impact the renal system and studies longer than 1?month. There were no toxicologically significant findings with 10% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide, 20% (v/v) propylene glycol, 33% (v/v) Miglyol®812, 20% (w/v) Kolliphor®RH40, 10% (w/v) Poloxamer 407, 5% (w/v) polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 or 10% (v/v) Labrafil®M1944. All other vehicles tested caused isolated or low magnitude effects which would not prevent their use. The aim of sharing these data, including adverse findings, is to provide meaningful information for vehicle selection, thereby avoiding repetition of animal experimentation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25959454

  6. Preclinical examination of clofarabine in pediatric ependymoma: intratumoral concentrations insufficient to warrant further study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogesh T; Jacus, Megan O; Boulos, Nidal; Dapper, Jason D; Davis, Abigail D; Vuppala, Pradeep K; Freeman, Burgess B; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Throm, Stacy L; Gilbertson, Richard J; Stewart, Clinton F

    2015-05-01

    Clofarabine, a deoxyadenosine analog, was an active anticancer drug in our in vitro high-throughput screening against mouse ependymoma neurospheres. To characterize the clofarabine disposition in mice for further preclinical efficacy studies, we evaluated the plasma and central nervous system disposition in a mouse model of ependymoma. A plasma pharmacokinetic study of clofarabine (45 mg/kg, IP) was performed in CD1 nude mice bearing ependymoma to obtain initial plasma pharmacokinetic parameters. These estimates were used to derive D-optimal plasma sampling time points for cerebral microdialysis studies. A simulation of clofarabine pharmacokinetics in mice and pediatric patients suggested that a dosage of 30 mg/kg IP in mice would give exposures comparable to that in children at a dosage of 148 mg/m(2). Cerebral microdialysis was performed to study the tumor extracellular fluid (ECF) disposition of clofarabine (30 mg/kg, IP) in the ependymoma cortical allografts. Plasma and tumor ECF concentration-time data were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling approach. The median unbound fraction of clofarabine in mouse plasma was 0.79. The unbound tumor to plasma partition coefficient (K pt,uu: ratio of tumor to plasma AUCu,0-inf) of clofarabine was 0.12 ± 0.05. The model-predicted mean tumor ECF clofarabine concentrations were below the in vitro 1-h IC50 (407 ng/mL) for ependymoma neurospheres. Thus, our results show the clofarabine exposure reached in the tumor ECF was below that associated with an antitumor effect in our in vitro washout study. Therefore, clofarabine was de-prioritized as an agent to treat ependymoma, and further preclinical studies were not pursued. PMID:25724157

  7. SIMPLE, INEXPENSIVE HEART RATE MONITOR AND ARRHYTHMIA DETECTOR FOR USE IN TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many toxic agents have been reported to produce acute, adverse effects on cardiac function. Often these data are neglected in toxicological studies because of the difficulty and expense of monitoring cardiac parameters. We have developed a simple, inexpensive heart rate monitor (...

  8. Size Distributions and Characterization of Native and Ground Samples for Toxicology Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Cooper, Bonnie L.; Taylor, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation shows charts and graphs that review the particle size distribution and characterization of natural and ground samples for toxicology studies. There are graphs which show the volume distribution versus the number distribution for natural occurring dust, jet mill ground dust, and ball mill ground dust.

  9. Contribution of Large Pig for Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion and Transplantation Studies: The Preclinical Model

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, S.; Favreau, F.; Chatauret, N.; Thuillier, R.; Maiga, S.; Hauet, T.

    2011-01-01

    Animal experimentation is necessary to characterize human diseases and design adequate therapeutic interventions. In renal transplantation research, the limited number of in vitro models involves a crucial role for in vivo models and particularly for the porcine model. Pig and human kidneys are anatomically similar (characterized by multilobular structure in contrast to rodent and dog kidneys unilobular). The human proximity of porcine physiology and immune systems provides a basic knowledge of graft recovery and inflammatory physiopathology through in vivo studies. In addition, pig large body size allows surgical procedures similar to humans, repeated collections of peripheral blood or renal biopsies making pigs ideal for medical training and for the assessment of preclinical technologies. However, its size is also its main drawback implying expensive housing. Nevertheless, pig models are relevant alternatives to primate models, offering promising perspectives with developments of transgenic modulation and marginal donor models facilitating data extrapolation to human conditions. PMID:21403881

  10. Preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies using animal model of inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takuji

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described. PMID:24213461

  11. Preclinical animal acute toxicity studies of new developed MRI contrast agent based on gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, I. F.; Zhuk, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    Acute toxicity test of new developed MRI contrast agent based on disodium salt of gadopentetic acid complex were carried out on Mus musculus and Sprague Dawley rats according to guidelines of preclinical studies [1]. Groups of six animals each were selected for experiment. Death and clinical symptoms of animals were recorded during 14 days. As a result the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for female mice is 2.8 mM/kg of body weight, male mice - 1.4 mM/kg, female rats - 2.8 mM/kg, male rats - 5.6 mM/kg of body weight. No Observed Adverse Effect Dose (NOAEL) for female mice is 1.4 mM/kg, male mice - 0.7 mM/kg, male and female rats - 0.7 mM/kg. According to experimental data new developed MRI contrast agent based on Gd-DTPA complex is low-toxic.

  12. Recent trends in preclinical drug-drug interaction studies of flavonoids?-?Review of case studies, issues and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2015-11-01

    Because of health benefits that are manifested across various disease areas, the consumption of herbal products and/or health supplements containing different kinds of flavonoids has been on the rise. While the drug-drug interaction potential between flavonoids and co-ingested drugs still remain an issue, opportunities exist for the combination of flavonoids with suitable anti-cancer drugs to enhance the bioavailability of anti-cancer drugs and thereby reduce the dose size of the anti-cancer drugs and improve its therapeutic index. In recent years, scores of flavonoids have undergone preclinical investigation with variety of drugs encompassing therapeutic areas such as oncology (etoposide, doxorubicin, paclitaxel, tamoxifen etc.), immunosuppression (cyclosporine) and hypertension (losartan, felodipine, nitrendipine etc.). The review provides examples of the recent trends in the preclinical investigation of 14 flavonoids (morin, quercetin, silibinin, kaempferol etc.) with various co-administered drugs. The relevance of combination of flavonoids with anti-cancer drugs and a framework to help design the in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies to gain better mechanistic insights are discussed. Also, concise discussions on the various physiological factors that contribute for the reduced bioavailability of flavonoids along with the significant challenges in the data interpretation are provided. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26343418

  13. Integration of preclinical and clinical knowledge to predict intravenous PK in human: bilastine case study.

    PubMed

    Vozmediano, Valvanera; Ortega, Ignacio; Lukas, John C; Gonzalo, Ana; Rodriguez, Monica; Lucero, Maria Luisa

    2014-03-01

    Modern pharmacometrics can integrate and leverage all prior proprietary and public knowledge. Such methods can be used to scale across species or comparators, perform clinical trial simulation across alternative designs, confirm hypothesis and potentially reduce development burden, time and costs. Crucial yet typically lacking in integration is the pre-clinical stage. Prediction of PK in man, using in vitro and in vivo studies in different animal species, is increasingly well theorized but could still find wider application in drug development. The aim of the present work was to explore methods for bridging pharmacokinetic knowledge from animal species (i.v. and p.o.) and man (p.o.) into i.v. in man using the antihistamine drug bilastine as example. A model, predictive of i.v. PK in man, was developed on data from two pre-clinical species (rat and dog) and p.o. in man bilastine trials performed earlier. In the knowledge application stage, two different approaches were used to predict human plasma concentration after i.v. of bilastine: allometry (several scaling methods) and a semi-physiological method. Both approaches led to successful predictions of key i.v. PK parameters of bilastine in man. The predictive i.v. PK model was validated using later data from a clinical study of i.v. bilastine. Introduction of such knowledge in development permits proper leveraging of all emergent knowledge as well as quantification-based exploration of PK scenario, e.g. in special populations (pediatrics, renal insufficiency, comedication). In addition, the methods permit reduction or elimination and certainly optimization of learning trials, particularly those concerning alternative off-label administration routes. PMID:23619917

  14. Chemical constituents and toxicological studies of leaves from Mimosa caesalpiniifolia Benth., a Brazilian honey plant

    PubMed Central

    Monção, Nayana Bruna Nery; Costa, Luciana Muratori; Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Araújo, Bruno Quirino; Lustosa, Maria do Carmo Gomes; Rodrigues, Klinger Antônio da França; Carvalho, Fernando Aécio de Amorim; Costa, Amilton Paulo Raposo; Lopes Citó, Antônia Maria das Graças

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mimosa caesalpiniifolia Benth. (Leguminosae) is widely found in the Brazilian Northeast region and markedly contributes to production of pollen and honey, being considered an important honey plant in this region. Objective: To investigate the chemical composition of the ethanol extract of leaves from M. caesalpiniifolia by GC-MS after derivatization (silylation), as well as to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo toxicological effects and androgenic activity in rats. Materials and Methods: The ethanol extract of leaves from Mimosa caesalpiniifolia was submitted to derivatization by silylation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identification of chemical constituents. In vitro toxicological evaluation was performed by MTT assay in murine macrophages and by Artemia salina lethality assay, and the in vivo acute oral toxicity and androgenic evaluation in rats. Results: Totally, 32 components were detected: Phytol-TMS (11.66%), lactic acid-2TMS (9.16%), ?-tocopherol-TMS (7.34%) and ?-sitosterol-TMS (6.80%) were the major constituents. At the concentrations analyzed, the ethanol extract showed low cytotoxicity against brine shrimp (Artemia salina) and murine macrophages. In addition, the extract did not exhibit any toxicological effect or androgenic activity in rats. Conclusions: The derivatization by silylation allowed a rapid identification of chemical compounds from the M. caesalpiniifolia leaves extract. Besides, this species presents a good safety profile as observed in toxicological studies, and possess a great potential in the production of herbal medicines or as for food consumption. PMID:25298660

  15. Genetic toxicology: web resources.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert R

    2002-04-25

    Genetic toxicology is the scientific discipline dealing with the effects of chemical, physical and biological agents on the heredity of living organisms. The Internet offers a wide range of online digital resources for the field of Genetic Toxicology. The history of genetic toxicology and electronic data collections are reviewed. Web-based resources at US National Library of Medicine (NLM), including MEDLINE, PUBMED, Gateway, Entrez, and TOXNET, are discussed. Search strategies and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) are reviewed in the context of genetic toxicology. The TOXNET group of databases are discussed with emphasis on those databases with genetic toxicology content including GENE-TOX, TOXLINE, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, Integrated Risk Information System, and Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System. Location of chemical information including chemical structure and linkage to health and regulatory information using CHEMIDPLUS at NLM and other databases is reviewed. Various government agencies have active genetic toxicology research programs or use genetic toxicology data to assist fulfilling the agency's mission. Online resources at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) are outlined. Much of the genetic toxicology for pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals and pesticides that is performed in the world is regulatory-driven. Regulatory web resources are presented for the laws mandating testing, guidelines on study design, Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, and requirements for electronic data collection and reporting. The Internet provides a range of other supporting resources to the field of genetic toxicology. The web links for key professional societies and journals in genetic toxicology are listed. Distance education, educational media resources, and job placement services are also available online in the field of genetic toxicology. As molecular biology and computational tools improve, new areas within genetic toxicology such as structural activity relationship analysis, mutational spectra databases and toxicogenomics, now have resources online as well. PMID:11955688

  16. Examination performances of German and international medical students in the preclinical studying-term – A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Huhn, D.; Resch, F.; Duelli, R.; Möltner, A.; Huber, J.; Karimian Jazi, K.; Amr, A.; Eckart, W.; Herzog, W.; Nikendei, C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students with a migration background face several specific problems during their studies. International surveys show first indications that this group of students performs worse in written, oral or practical exams. However, so far, nothing is known about the performance of international students in written pre-clinical tests as well as in pre-clinical State Examinations for German-speaking countries. Method: A descriptive, retrospective analysis of the exam performances of medical students in the pre-clinical part of their studies was conducted at the Faculty of Medicine of Heidelberg in for the year 2012. Performance in written tests of the final exams in the second (N=276), third (N=292) and fourth semester (N=285) were compared between German students, students from EU countries and students from non-EU countries. Same comparison was drawn for the performance in the oral exam of the First State Examination in the period from 2009 - 2012 (N=1137). Results: German students performed significantly better than students with a non-EU migration background both in all written exams and in the oral State Examination (all p<.05). The performance of students with an EU migration background was significantly better than that of students with a non-EU background in the written exam at the end of the third and fourth semester (p<.05). Furthermore, German students completed the oral exam of the First State Examination significantly earlier than students with a non-EU migration background (<.01). Discussion: Due to its poorer performance in written and oral examinations and its simultaneously longer duration of study, the group of non-German medical students with a country of origin outside of the European Union has to be seen as a high-risk group among students with a migration background. For this group, there is an urgent need for early support to prepare for written and oral examinations. PMID:25228931

  17. Preclinical endodontic teaching

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaraopeta, Udaya; AlShwaimi, Emad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To provide an overview of the general curricula in preclinical endodontic training from 6 established dental schools in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This study was conducted in January 2014 including only schools that had more than 2 groups of student graduates prior to the study. We included 2 dental schools from the Central region, one from Qassim region, one from the Makkah region (west), one from Abha region (south west), and one from the eastern region. An internet-based questionnaire was sent to the course directors of preclinical endodontics department of the 6 schools. The survey comprised 20 questions that examined various aspects of preclinical endodontics. Results: It was demonstrated that a significant number of faculty members had Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees (n=21), Master’s degrees (n=15), and Saudi board certifications (n=8). We determined that the faculty to student ratio varied from 2:1 to 8: 1 among the colleges. The participating dental schools were found to teach the Step Back, as well as the Step Down techniques for root canal preparation. Five of the 6 schools implemented the use of nickel titanium rotary instruments. All dental schools predominantly used radiographs as the means of the working length determination. Conclusion: The curriculum for preclinical endodontics in Saudi Arabia is comparable to that followed in most European countries. A more comprehensive survey is needed that would involve more schools to formulate generalized guidelines for preclinical endodontic training in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25630011

  18. Development and characterization of a Versatile Engineered Nanomaterial Generation System (VENGES) suitable for toxicological studies

    PubMed Central

    Demokritou, Philip; Büchel, Robert; Molina, Ramon M.; Deloid, Glen M.; Brain, Joseph D.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2015-01-01

    A novel system for generation of engineered nanomaterials suitable for in situ toxicological characterization within biological matrices was developed. This Versatile Engineered Nanomaterial Generation System (VENGES) is based on industry-relevant, flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) aerosol reactors that can scaleably produce engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) with controlled primary and aggregate particle size, crystallinity and morphology. ENMs are produced continuously in the gas phase, allowing their continuous transfer to inhalation chambers, without altering their state of agglomeration. Freshly generated ENMs are also collected on Teflon filters for subsequent physico-chemical and morphological characterization and for in vitro toxicological studies. The ability of the VENGES system to generate families of ENMs of pure and selected mixtures of iron oxide, silica and nanosilver with controlled physico-chemical properties was demonstrated using a range of state-of-the-art-techniques. Specific surface area was measured by nitrogen adsorption using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method, and crystallinity was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Particle morphology and size were evaluated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (STEM/TEM). The suitability of the VENGES system for toxicological studies was also shown in both in vivo and in vitro studies involving Sprague-Dawley rats and human alveolar-like monocyte derived macrophages, respectively. We demonstrated linkage between physico-chemical ENM properties and potential toxicity. PMID:20701428

  19. Ularitide for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure: from preclinical to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Anker, Stefan D; Ponikowski, Piotr; Mitrovic, Veselin; Peacock, W Frank; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-03-21

    The short- and long-term morbidity and mortality in acute heart failure is still unacceptably high. There is an unmet need for new therapy options with new drugs with a new mode of action. One of the drugs currently in clinical testing in Phase III is ularitide, which is the chemically synthesized form of the human natriuretic peptide urodilatin. Urodilatin is produced in humans by differential processing of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in distal renal tubule cells. Physiologically, urodilatin appears to be the natriuretic peptide involved in sodium homeostasis. Ularitide exerts its pharmacological actions such as vasodilation, diuresis, and natriuresis through the natriuretic peptide receptor/particulate guanylate cyclase/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway. In animal models of heart failure as well as Phase I and II clinical studies in heart failure patients, ularitide demonstrated beneficial effects such as symptom relief and vasodilation, while still preserving renal function. Subsequently, the pivotal acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) Phase III study, called TRUE-AHF, was started with the objectives to evaluate the effects of ularitide infusion on the clinical status and cardiovascular mortality of patients with ADHF compared with placebo. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical data supporting the potential use of ularitide in the treatment of ADHF. PMID:25670819

  20. Videotaped Feedback Method to Enhance Learning in Preclinical Operative Dentistry: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dipali Yogesh; Dadpe, Ashwini Manish; Kalra, Dheeraj Deepak; Garcha, Vikram P

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if a videotaped feedback method enhanced teaching and learning outcomes in a preclinical operative laboratory setting for novice learners. In 2013, 60 dental students at a dental school in India were randomly assigned to two groups: control (n=30) and experimental (n=30). The control group prepared a Class II tooth preparation for amalgam after receiving a video demonstration of the exercise. The experimental group received the same video demonstration as the control group, but they also participated in a discussion and analysis of the control groups' videotaped performance and then performed the same exercise. The self-evaluation scores (SS) and examiner evaluation scores (ES) of the two groups were compared using the unpaired t-test. The experimental group also used a five-point Likert scale to rate each item on the feedback form. The means of SS (13.65±2.43) and ES (14.75±1.97) of the experimental group were statistically higher than the means of SS (11.55±2.09) and ES (11.60±1.82) of the control group. Most students in the experimental group perceived that this technique enhanced their learning experience. Within the limits of this study, the videotaped feedback using both ideal and non-ideal examples enhanced the students' performance. PMID:26632301

  1. Educational Challenges in Toxicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Robert L.

    1984-01-01

    Issues and topics related to educational challenges in toxicology at all levels are discussed. They include public awareness and understanding, general approach to toxicology, quality structure-activity relationships, epidemiological studies, quantification of risk, and the types of toxicants studied. (JN)

  2. Preclinical systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Julie M; James, Judith A

    2014-11-01

    Preclinical lupus encompasses a spectrum from enhanced SLE risk without clinical symptoms to individuals with autoantibodies and some SLE clinical features without meeting ACR classification. Studies have identified antibody and serological biomarkers years before disease onset. Incomplete lupus and undifferentiated connective tissue disease may occur during preclinical disease periods, but only 10-20% of these individuals transition to SLE and many have a mild disease course. Further studies are warranted to characterize biomarkers of early disease, identify individuals in need of close monitoring or preventive interventions, and elucidate mechanisms of disease pathogenesis without confounding factors of immunosuppressive medications or organ damage. PMID:25437281

  3. Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    ‘Computational toxicology’ is a broad term that encompasses all manner of computer-facilitated informatics, data-mining, and modeling endeavors in relation to toxicology, including exposure modeling, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling, dose-response modeling, ...

  4. COMPUTATIONAL TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last several years, there has been increased pressure to utilize novel technologies derived from computational chemistry, molecular biology and systems biology in toxicological risk assessment. This new area has been referred to as "Computational Toxicology". Our resear...

  5. A Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Parameningeal Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma for Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Jody E.; Cantor, Emma L.; Ehlen, Macgregor S.; Banerjee, Avirup; Malempati, Suman; Stenzel, Peter; Woltjer, Randy L.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Goodwin, Neal C.; Yang, Yan; Kaur, Pali; Bult, Carol J.; Airhart, Susan D.; Keller, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS) is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents. Parameningeal eRMS is a variant that is often more difficult to treat than eRMS occurring at other sites. A 14-year-old female with persistent headaches and rapid weight loss was diagnosed with parameningeal eRMS. She progressed and died despite chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide plus 50.4?Gy radiation therapy to the primary tumor site. Tumor specimens were acquired by rapid autopsy and tumor tissue was transplanted into immunodeficient mice to create a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) animal model. As autopsy specimens had an ALK R1181C mutation, PDX tumor bearing animals were treated with the pan-kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib but demonstrated no decrease in tumor growth, suggesting that single agent kinase inhibitor therapy may be insufficient in similar cases. This unique parameningeal eRMS PDX model is publicly available for preclinical study. PMID:26696773

  6. Computed tomography-based rigidity analysis: a review of the approach in preclinical and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Camacho, Juan C; Iyoha-Bello, Otatade; Behrouzi, Shohreh; Snyder, Brian D; Nazarian, Ara

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of fracture risk in patients afflicted with osseous neoplasms has long presented a problem for orthopedic oncologists. These patients are at risk for developing pathologic fractures through lytic defects in the appendicular and axial skeleton with devastating consequences on their quality of life. Lesions with a high risk of fracture may require prophylactic surgical stabilization, whereas low-risk lesions can be treated conservatively. Therefore, effective prevention of pathologic fractures depends on accurate assessment of fracture risk and is a critical step to avoid debilitating complications. Given the complex nature of osseous neoplasms, treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach; yet, little consensus regarding fracture risk assessment exists among physicians involved in the care of these patients. In order to improve the overall standard of care, specific criteria must be adopted to formulate consistent and accurate fracture risk predictions. However, clinicians make subjective assessments about fracture risk on plain radiographs using guidelines now recognized to be inaccurate. Osseous neoplasms alter both the material and geometric properties of bone; failure to account for changes in both of these parameters limits the accuracy of current fracture risk assessments. Rigidity, the capacity to resist deformation upon loading, is a structural property that integrates both the material and geometric properties of bone. Therefore, rigidity can be used as a mechanical assay of the changes induced by lytic lesions to the structural competency of bone. Using this principle, computed tomography (CT)-based structural rigidity analysis (CTRA) was developed and validated in a series of preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:25396051

  7. A New Mini-External Fixator for Treating Hallux Valgus: A Preclinical, Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Erdil, Mehmet; Ceylan, Hasan Huseyin; Polat, Gokhan; Kara, Deniz; Bozdag, Ergun; Sunbuloglu, Emin

    2016-01-01

    Proximal metatarsal osteotomy is the most effective technique for correcting hallux valgus deformities, especially in metatarsus primus varus. However, these surgeries are technically demanding and prone to complications, such as nonunion, implant failure, and unexpected extension of the osteotomy to the tarsometatarsal joint. In a preclinical study, we evaluated the biomechanical properties of the fixator and compared it with compression screws for treating hallux valgus with a proximal metatarsal osteotomy. Of 18 metatarsal composite bone models proximally osteotomized, 9 were fixed with a headless compression screw and 9 with the mini-external fixator. A dorsal angulation of 10° and displacement of 10 mm were defined as the failure threshold values. Construct stiffness and the amount of interfragmentary angulation were calculated at various load cycles. All screw models failed before completing 1000 load cycles. In the fixator group, only 2 of 9 models (22.2%) failed before 1000 cycles, both between the 600th and 700th load cycles. The stability of fixation differed significantly between the groups (p < .001). The stability provided by the mini-external fixator was superior to that of compression screw fixation. Additional testing of the fixator is indicated. PMID:26190777

  8. Copper-64 Dichloride as Theranostic Agent for Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Cristina; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; Villano, Carlo; Giacobbi, Beatrice; Coccetti, Daniela; Panichelli, Paola; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults with a median survival time less than one year. To date, there are only a limited number of effective agents available for GBM therapy and this does not seem to add much survival advantage over the conventional approach based on surgery and radiotherapy. Therefore, the development of novel therapeutic approaches to GBM is essential and those based on radionuclide therapy could be of significant clinical impact. Experimental evidence has clearly demonstrated that cancer cells have a particularly high fractional content of copper inside the nucleus compared to normal cells. This behavior can be conveniently exploited both for diagnosis and for delivering therapeutic payloads (theranostic) of the radionuclide copper-64 into the nucleus of cancerous cells by intravenous administration of its simplest chemical form as dichloride salt [64Cu]CuCl2. To evaluate the potential theranostic role of [64Cu]CuCl2 in GBM, the present work reports results from a preclinical study carried out in a xenografted GBM tumor mouse model. Biodistribution data of this new agent were collected using a small-animal PET tomograph. Subsequently, groups of tumor implanted nude mice were treated with [64Cu]CuCl2 to simulate single- and multiple-dose therapy protocols, and results were analyzed to estimate therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26649294

  9. Fluorescence detection of tumors: studies on the early diagnosis of microscopic lesions in preclinical and clinical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, Thomas S.; McGinnis, Carolyn; Crean, David H.; Khan, S.; Liebow, Charles

    1991-06-01

    The growth of microscopic tumor lesions at or beyond treatment field lesions poses major problems in the diagnosis and curative treatment of numerous cancers. Early detection techniques which clearly define the extent of condemned or field spread of disease may improve the primary treatment of the disease. In vivo fluorescence photometry is a non-imaging technique which digitally displays relative fluorescence values in volts. The sensitivity of the instrument has allowed the detection of micrometastases in both pre-clinical and clinical studies using drug doses that are 80-90 lower than those used therapeutically. This technique is now being applied in preliminary experiments to the hamster cheek pouch models to (1) discern varying grades of dysplasia; (2) levels of uptake of the drug in normal growing and quiescent tumors. Results will be shown in two models in which this technique has shown to be efficacious preclinically in the Pollard rat adenocarcinoma model in which micrometastases in the lymph node have been detected, and preliminary studies involving the hamster cheek pouch model in which the pouch is painted with 9, 10 dimethyl-1, 2-benzanthracene (DMBA) for initiation and promotion of tumors. Clinically results will be shown in which fluorescence detection, confirmed by biopsy and histopathological examination, was capable of detecting the existence of micrometastatic involvement of less than 100 cells.

  10. Preclinical safety and effectiveness studies of ultrasonic propulsion of kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Jonathan D.; Dunmire, Barbrina; Wang, Yak-Nam; Simon, Julianna C.; Liggitt, H. Denny; Paun, Marla; Cunitz, Bryan W.; Starr, Frank; Bailey, Michael R.; Penniston, Kristina; Lee, Franklin Chong-Ho; Hsi, Ryan S.; Sorensen, Mathew D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide an update on a research device to ultrasonically reposition kidney stones transcutaneously. This paper reports preclinical safety and effectiveness studies, survival data, modifications of the system, and testing in a stone-forming porcine model. These data formed the basis for regulatory approval to test the device in humans. Materials and Methods The ultrasound burst was shortened to 50ms from previous investigations with 1s bursts. Focused ultrasound was used to expel 2–5mm calcium oxalate monohydrate stones placed ureteroscopically in five pigs. Additionally, de novo stones were imaged and repositioned in a stone-forming porcine model. Acute safety studies were performed targeting two kidneys (6 sites) and three pancreases (8 sites). Survival studies followed 10 animals for one week after simulated treatment. Serum and urine analyses were performed and tissues were evaluated histologically. Results All ureteroscopically-implanted stones (6/6) were repositioned out of the kidney in 14 ± 8 minutes with 13 ± 6 bursts. On average, three bursts moved a stone more than 4mm and collectively accounted for the majority of relocation. Stones (3mm) were detected and repositioned in the 200-kg stone-forming model. No injury was detected in the acute or survival studies. Conclusions Ultrasonic propulsion is safe and effective in the porcine model. Stones were expelled from the kidney. De novo stones formed in a large porcine model were repositioned. No adverse effects were identified with the acute studies directly targeting kidney or pancreatic tissue or during the survival studies indicating no evidence of delayed tissue injury. PMID:24975708

  11. Stem Cell Therapies for Knee Cartilage Repair: The Current Status of Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John A.; Little, Dianne; Toth, Alison P.; Moorman, Claude T.; Tucker, Bradford S.; Ciccotti, Michael G.; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Background Articular cartilage damage of the knee is common, causing significant morbidity worldwide. Many adult tissues contain cells that are able to differentiate into multiple cell types, including chondrocytes. These stem cells have gained significant attention over the past decade and may become frontline management for cartilage defects in the very near future. Purpose The role of stem cells in the treatment of knee osteochondral defects was reviewed. Recent animal and clinical studies were reviewed to determine the benefits and potential outcomes of using stem cells for cartilage defects. Study Design Literature review. Methods A PubMed search was undertaken. The key phrase “stem cells and knee” was used. The search included reviews and original articles over an unlimited time period. From this search, articles outlining animal and clinical trials were selected. A search of current clinical trials in progress was performed on the clinicaltrials.gov website, and “stem cells and knee” was used as the search phrase. Results Stem cells have been used in many recent in vitro and animal studies. A number of cell-based approaches for cartilage repair have progressed from preclinical animal studies into clinical trials. Conclusion The use of stem cells for the treatment of cartilage defects is increasing in animal and clinical studies. Methods of delivery of stem cells to the knee’s cartilage vary from direct injection to implantation with scaffolds. While these approaches are highly promising, there is currently limited evidence of a direct clinical benefit, and further research is required to assess the overall outcome of stem cell therapies for knee cartilage repair. PMID:24220016

  12. Alcohols toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Wimer, W.W.; Russell, J.A.; Kaplan, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive reference volume which summarizes literature reports of the known consequences of human and animal contact with alcohols and alcohol-derived substances is presented. Following a discussion of alcohol nomenclature and a brief history of alcohols, the authors have provided detailed chapters on the toxicology of methanol, ethanol, normal and isopropanol, and the butanols. Properties of these alcohols are compared; industrial hygiene and exposure limits are discussed. Additional sections are included covering processing and production technology and exhaust emissions studies. Of particular interest are the section containing abstracts and synopses of principal works and the extensive bibliography of studies dating from the 1800s. 331 references, 26 figures, 56 tables

  13. Pharmacology and Toxicology

    E-print Network

    Pharmacology and Toxicology The science behind drugs 0800 80 80 98 | otago.ac.nz | txt 866 | university@otago.ac.nz Pharmacology is the science of the effects of drugs on biological systems, from the molecular and cellular levels through to patient studies. Toxicology is closely related to pharmacology

  14. Miltefosine Lipid Nanocapsules for Single Dose Oral Treatment of Schistosomiasis Mansoni: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, Maha M.; El-Moslemany, Riham M.; Ramadan, Alyaa A.; Amer, Eglal I.; El-Azzouni, Mervat Z.; El-Khordagui, Labiba K.

    2015-01-01

    Miltefosine (MFS) is an alkylphosphocholine used for the local treatment of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer and oral therapy of visceral leishmaniasis. Recently, the drug was reported in in vitro and preclinical studies to exert significant activity against different developmental stages of schistosomiasis mansoni, a widespread chronic neglected tropical disease (NTD). This justified MFS repurposing as a potential antischistosomal drug. However, five consecutive daily 20 mg/kg doses were needed for the treatment of schistosomiasis mansoni in mice. The present study aims at enhancing MFS efficacy to allow for a single 20mg/kg oral dose therapy using a nanotechnological approach based on lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) as oral nanovectors. MFS was incorporated in LNCs both as membrane-active structural alkylphospholipid component and active antischistosomal agent. MFS-LNC formulations showed high entrapment efficiency (EE%), good colloidal properties, sustained release pattern and physical stability. Further, LNCs generally decreased MFS-induced erythrocyte hemolytic activity used as surrogate indicator of membrane activity. While MFS-free LNCs exerted no antischistosomal effect, statistically significant enhancement was observed with all MFS-LNC formulations. A maximum effect was achieved with MFS-LNCs incorporating CTAB as positive charge imparting agent or oleic acid as membrane permeabilizer. Reduction of worm load, ameliorated liver pathology and extensive damage of the worm tegument provided evidence for formulation-related efficacy enhancement. Non-compartmental analysis of pharmacokinetic data obtained in rats indicated independence of antischistosomal activity on systemic drug exposure, suggesting possible gut uptake of the stable LNCs and targeting of the fluke tegument which was verified by SEM. The study findings put forward MFS-LNCs as unique oral nanovectors combining the bioactivity of MFS and biopharmaceutical advantages of LNCs, allowing targeting via the oral route. From a clinical point of view, data suggest MFS-LNCs as a potential single dose oral nanomedicine for enhanced therapy of schistosomiasis mansoni and possibly other diseases. PMID:26574746

  15. 40 CFR 159.165 - Toxicological and ecological studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... under the criteria of 40 CFR 156.62. (b) Ecological studies. The results of a study of the toxicity of a.... 159.165 Section 159.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... registered pesticide product or any of its ingredients, impurities, metabolites, or degradation...

  16. Proteomics for systems toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Titz, Bjoern; Elamin, Ashraf; Martin, Florian; Schneider, Thomas; Dijon, Sophie; Ivanov, Nikolai V.; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Current toxicology studies frequently lack measurements at molecular resolution to enable a more mechanism-based and predictive toxicological assessment. Recently, a systems toxicology assessment framework has been proposed, which combines conventional toxicological assessment strategies with system-wide measurement methods and computational analysis approaches from the field of systems biology. Proteomic measurements are an integral component of this integrative strategy because protein alterations closely mirror biological effects, such as biological stress responses or global tissue alterations. Here, we provide an overview of the technical foundations and highlight select applications of proteomics for systems toxicology studies. With a focus on mass spectrometry-based proteomics, we summarize the experimental methods for quantitative proteomics and describe the computational approaches used to derive biological/mechanistic insights from these datasets. To illustrate how proteomics has been successfully employed to address mechanistic questions in toxicology, we summarized several case studies. Overall, we provide the technical and conceptual foundation for the integration of proteomic measurements in a more comprehensive systems toxicology assessment framework. We conclude that, owing to the critical importance of protein-level measurements and recent technological advances, proteomics will be an integral part of integrative systems toxicology approaches in the future. PMID:25379146

  17. IN VITRO STUDIES: WHAT IS THEIR ROLE IN TOXICOLOGY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many epidemiology studies have reported associations between inhaled environmental pollutants, especially particles, and mortality or morbidity. Despite these impressive associations, fundamental uncertainties exist as to the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible f...

  18. ISOTOPIC STUDY OF THE INHALATION TOXICOLOGY OF OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of these studies was to develop novel methods to investigate the biological fate of inhaled ozone and other oxygen-containing pollutants in animal and human tissues using the heavy isotope of oxygen, oxygen-18 (18O). Methods were developed which facilitated the conver...

  19. Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of pentachlorophenol in rats.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, R S; Maronpot, R M; Bucher, J R; Haseman, J K; Toft, J D; Hejtmancik, M R

    1999-03-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been used as an herbicide, algaecide, defoliant, wood preservative, germicide, fungicide, and molluscicide. A 28-day toxicity study of PCP in F344/N rats of both sexes was conducted to select dose levels for a carcinogenicity study. Groups of 10 male and 10 female rats were given 0, 200, 400, 800, 1600, or 3200 ppm PCP in feed for 28 days. The incidences of minimal to mild hepatocyte degeneration in males and females exposed to 400 ppm or greater and the incidences of centrilobular hepatocyte hypertrophy in the 3200-ppm groups were increased. For carcinogenicity studies, groups of 50 male and 50 female F344/N rats were fed diets containing 200, 400, or 600 PCP for 2 years. A stop-exposure group of 60 male and 60 female rats received 1000 ppm of PCP in feed for 52 weeks and control feed thereafter for the remainder of the 2-year studies; 10 male and 10 female rats were evaluated at 7 months. Survival of 600-ppm males was significantly greater than that of the controls; survival of all other exposed groups was similar to that of the control groups. Mean body weights of the 400- and 600-ppm groups were generally less than those of the controls throughout the studies. There was no evidence of carcinogenic activity of PCP in male or female rats fed diets containing 200, 400, or 600 ppm for 2 years. Stop-exposure study males and females regained a transitory body weight reduction by the end of the 2 year study, and males had better survival than the controls. At a 7-month interim evaluation, the incidences of centrilobular hypertrophy in stop-exposure males and females exceeded those in the controls. At 2 years, malignant mesothelioma originating from the tunica vaginalis was present in 9 1000-ppm males and 1 control male (p = 0.014). Nasal squamous cell carcinomas were present in five 1000-ppm males and 1 control male. This incidence was not significantly increased but exceeded the historical control range (0-4%). Based on the increased incidences of mesotheliomas and nasal tumors, there was some evidence of carcinogenic activity of PCP in male rats given a diet containing 1000 ppm for 1 year followed by control diet for 1 year. There was no evidence of PCP carcinogenic activity in stop-exposure female rats. PMID:10330679

  20. Pharmacological treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis – preclinical and clinical studies of pirfenidone, nintedanib, and N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Myllärniemi, Marjukka; Kaarteenaho, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    Three recent clinical trials on the pharmacologic treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) mark a new chapter in the management of patients suffering from this very severe fibrotic lung disease. This review article summarizes the published investigations on the preclinical studies of three novel IPF drugs, namely pirfenidone, nintedanib, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). In addition, the study protocols, differences, and the main findings in the recent clinical trials of these pharmacological treatments are reviewed. The strategy for drug development and the timeline from the discovery to the clinical use have been very different in these regimens. Pirfenidone was discovered in 1976 but only recently received approval in most countries, and even now its exact mechanism of action is unknown. On the contrary, nintedanib (BIBF1120) was identified in large drug screening tests as a very specific inhibitor of certain tyrosine kinases, but no published data on preclinical tests existed until 2014. NAC, a mucolytic drug with an antioxidant mechanism of action was claimed to possess distinct antifibrotic properties in several experimental models but proved to be ineffective in a recent randomized placebo-controlled trial. At present, no curative treatment is available for IPF. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of IPF as well as relevant preclinical tests including animal models and in vitro experiments on human lung cells are needed to promote the development of therapeutic drugs. PMID:26557253

  1. Environmental fate and aquatic toxicology studies on phthalate esters.

    PubMed Central

    Group, E F

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive environmental fate and effects testing program, sponsored by the Chemical Manufacturers Association (CMA) Phthalate Esters Program Panel, has been completed. Based on the results, a preliminary safety assessment has shown that all of the 14 commercially important phthalates tested have sufficiently high safety factors to demonstrate low potential for adverse environmental effects. This program comprised acute toxicity studies on nine representative species of aquatic life, chronic reproduction studies on Daphnia magna, biodegradation (fate) testing, and physicochemical property (mobility) determinations on 14 phthalate esters. The objectives of this program were to determine for each test compound: The concentration at which effects on aquatic life might occur, the potential for bioconcentration in aquatic life, and the relative persistence in the environment. These data would provide the basis for an environmental safety assessment and would identify potential effects that might require further investigation. A total of 195 individual studies were carried out. Tests on a wide variety of aquatic organisms representing different food chain levels in both fresh and salt water environments showed that no single test species was unusually sensitive to the test materials. The higher molecular weight (longer side-chain) phthalates exhibited no toxic effects up to their limits of water solubility in the test systems. Even though the lower molecular weight, more water-soluble phthalates produced toxic effects below their limits of water solubility, no product exhibited unusually severe effects of concern.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3709460

  2. Evaluation of nutritional and sub-acute toxicological study of plant based supplement of Achyranthes aspera.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Nudrat; Dar, Nabeela G; Imran, Hina; Sohail, Tehmina; Asghar, Uzma; Yaqeen, Zahra; Syed, Shazia; Jamil, Khalid

    2014-09-01

    The present study was conducted for the nutritional, microbiological and toxicological evaluation of test compound having main ingredient Achyranthes aspera. Nutritional value assessment, microbiological analysis and toxicological studies were conducted according to the standard reported methods which exhibited that A. aspera contains moisture 4.05%, proteins 20.54%, fats 0.903%, ash 20.25%, carbohydrates 54,26% and energy 294 Kcal. Vitamin profile was found to be B(1) 0.27mg/100g, B(2) 0.28mg/100g, B(3) 0.58mg/100g, B(6) 0.27mg/100g and B(9) 39?g/100g. The content of sodium, calcium, magnesium, potassium, chloride and phosphorus was found to be 1119.67, 5385.23, 5446.08, 1343.6, 675880.73 and 1447.5mg/kg respectively and trace metals i.e. iron, copper, zinc, manganese and aluminum were detected as 283.05, 8.062, 48.37, 16.12 and 9.853 mg/kg respectively. The microbiological result indicated that the compound qualifies the international standards of microbial limit and was found free from Salmonella species. The toxicological study was conducted to find safe use of Achyranthes aspera compound in human as a nutritive supplement in blood disorders. The toxicity studies exhibited that the test compound has a good effect on general health as an increase in body weights of animals of test group was noticed as compared to that of control group. Blood parameters before and after the study were monitored which confirms our hypothesis by showing an increase in hemoglobin from 9.133 to 10.96, RBC count from 3.11 to 3.6, WBC count from 5.68 to 5.73 and platelets from 245 to 319. PMID:25176360

  3. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of tetrahydrofuran in mice and rats: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1988-08-01

    Tetrahydrofuran (THF), a four-carbon cyclic ether, is widely used as an industrial solvent. Although it has been used in large quantities for many years, few long-term toxicology studies, and no reproductive or developmental studies, have been conducted on THF. This study addresses the potential for THF to cause developmental toxicity in rodents by exposing Sprague-Dawley rats and Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 600, 1800, or 5000 ppm tetrahydrofuran (THF) vapors, 6 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.33 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6--17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as O dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 27 refs., 6 figs., 23 tabs.

  4. Safety evaluation to support First-In-Man investigations II: toxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Baldrick, Paul

    2008-07-01

    Toxicology (single dose, range-finding, repeat dose and genotoxicity) data available in 34 Investigator's Brochures used to support First-In-Man clinical trials over a 10 year period have been evaluated to give an insight into the types of study designs used and how these have changed over the period analysed (1997-2006). Study packages had single dose toxicity studies in the rodent (although there has been a recent trend to reduce the number of these studies), range-finding toxicity studies in the rodent and non-rodent (with only small numbers of the latter used) and key 2- 4 week repeat dose toxicity studies in rodent (usually rat) and non-rodent (both dog and monkey). The majority of the latter studies established No Observed Adverse Effect Levels, showed the rodent to be generally less sensitive to target organ toxicity than the non-rodent and showed the liver and then the kidney to be the most common target organs. Genotoxicity assessment included 2 in vitro assays (a reverse mutation bacteria and either a chromosome aberration or mouse lymphoma assay) and commonly, an in vivo rodent bone marrow micronucleus test. Considerations for general toxicology and genotoxicity study designs are discussed along with the use of appropriate information to help set the clinical starting dose. PMID:18501490

  5. Antimicrobial and toxicological studies of Ochthochloa compressa plant.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saeed; Bashir, Muhammad Tayyab; Khaliq, Farhan Hameed; Mannan, Abdul; Mukhtar, Muhammad Fahad

    2014-09-01

    The present study demonstrates the biological activity of Ochthochloa compressa, since extensive literature survey has shown no documented biological activity of this plant. Ethanolic extract of whole plant was prepared and evaporated under reduced pressure by rota vapor. The crude extract was further fractionated into n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and n-butanol soluble fractions. These fractions were screened for antifungal, phytotoxic, cytotoxic and antibacterial activities. Dichloromethane soluble fraction showed significant phytotoxicity whereas n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol soluble fractions showed non-significant phytotoxicity. Similarly, ethyl acetate soluble fraction was the only fraction, which showed significant cytotoxic activity. There was no antibacterial but moderate antifungal activity was shown by these fractions against selected strains of bacteria and fungi. This is the first report on the biological activity of O. compressa. PMID:25176377

  6. Trajectories of memory decline in preclinical Alzheimer's disease: results from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Flagship Study of ageing.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Robert H; Lim, Yen Ying; Ames, David; Harrington, Karra; Restrepo, Carolina; Martins, Ralph N; Rembach, Alan; Laws, Simon M; Masters, Colin L; Villemagne, Victor L; Rowe, Christopher C; Maruff, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Memory changes in preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) are often characterized by heterogenous trajectories. However, data regarding the nature and determinants of predominant trajectories of memory changes in preclinical AD are lacking. We analyzed data from 333 cognitively healthy older adults who participated in a multicenter prospective cohort study with baseline and 18-, 36-, and 54-month follow-up assessments. Latent growth mixture modeling revealed 3 predominant trajectories of memory change: a below average, subtly declining memory trajectory (30.9%); a below average, rapidly declining memory trajectory (3.6%); and an above average, stable memory trajectory (65.5%). Compared with the stable memory trajectory, high ?? (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 2.1), and lower Mini-Mental State Examination (RRR = 0.6) and full-scale IQ (RRR = 0.9) scores were independently associated with the subtly declining memory trajectory; and high ?? (RRR = 8.3), APOE ?4 carriage (RRR = 6.1), and greater subjective memory impairment (RRR = 1.2) were independently associated with the rapidly declining memory trajectory. Compared with the subtly declining memory trajectory group, APOE ?4 carriage (RRR = 8.4), and subjective memory complaints (RRR = 1.2) were associated with a rapidly declining memory trajectory. These results suggest that the preclinical phase of AD may be characterized by 2 predominant trajectories of memory decline that have common (e.g., high ??) and unique (e.g., APOE ?4 genotype) determinants. PMID:25585532

  7. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Gallium arsenide in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Greenspan, B.J.; Dill, J.A.; Stoney, K.H.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1990-12-01

    Gallium arsenide is a crystalline compound used extensively in the semiconductor industry. Workers preparing solar cells and gallium arsenide ingots and wafers are potentially at risk from the inhalation of gallium arsenide dust. The potential for gallium arsenide to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague- Dawley rats and CD-1 (Swiss) mice exposed to 0, 10, 37, or 75 mg/m{sup 3} gallium arsenide, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and {approx}30 positively mated rats or {approx}24 positively mated mice. Mice were exposed on 4--17 days of gestation (dg), and rats on 4--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Gallium and arsenic concentrations were determined in the maternal blood and uterine contents of the rats (3/group) at 7, 14, and 20 dg. 37 refs., 11 figs., 30 tabs.

  8. Subchronic Toxicological Study of Two Artemisinin Derivatives in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ji-ye; Wang, He-mei; Wang, Quan-jun; Dong, Yan-sheng; Han, Gang; Guan, Yong-biao; Zhao, Ke-yong; Qu, Wen-sheng; Yuan, Ye; Gao, Xiao-xin; Jing, Shu-fang; Ding, Ri-gao

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our study was to profile and compare the systematic changes between orally administered artesunate and intramuscularly injected artemether at a low dose over a 3-month period (92 consecutive days) in dogs. Intramuscular administration of 6 mg kg-1 artemether induced a decreased red blood cell (RBC) count (anemia), concurrent extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen and inhibition of erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. We also observed a prolonged QT interval and neuropathic changes in the central nervous system, which demonstrated the cortex and motor neuron vulnerability, but no behavioral changes. Following treatment with artesunate, we observed a decreased heart rate, which was most likely due to cardiac conduction system damage, as well as a deceased RBC count, extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen and inhibition of erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. However, in contrast to treatment with artemether, neurotoxicity was not observed following treatment with artesunate. In addition, ultra-structural examination by transmission electron microscopy showed mitochondrial damage following treatment with artesunate. These findings demonstrated the spectrum of toxic changes that result upon treatment with artesunate and artemether and show that the prolonged administration of low doses of these derivatives result in diverse toxicity profiles. PMID:24739881

  9. Ethical implications of using the minipig in regulatory toxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Webster, John; Bollen, Peter; Grimm, Herwig; Jennings, Maggy

    2010-01-01

    Two key questions are addressed in this article. What are the potential harms to minipigs relative to the harms for dogs and non-human primates and can these harms be reduced more easily in minipigs than in other species? Are there potential benefits resulting from the use of minipigs relative to dogs and non-human primates? In considering the answers to these questions, we present an ethical framework which was developed taking into account the viewpoint of all concerned parties. This ethical matrix provides a framework upon which to identify and explore issues raised by the moral imperative to seek a fair compromise between the differing needs of different interest groups, which includes both the moral agents and the moral patients. The moral agents are the different groups of human stakeholders including society at large, regulatory bodies, industrialists and animal care staff. The moral patients are the laboratory animals, both breeding stock held by the animal supplier, and experimental animals in laboratories. In considering these animals it cannot be assumed that dogs, monkeys and minipigs differ with regard to the pain and suffering that they may experience and undergo when treated in studies designed for safety assessment. On this basis we rejected the argument that minipigs are more acceptable experimental animals than dogs or monkeys despite the fact that their use may prove less offensive to some groups within society at large. Species selection must be made on a case-by-case basis where the benefits are assessed by weighing the scientific evidence relating to the predictivity of the animal model, against the harm that may accrue to the animals both from the test procedures and their lifetime experience within the laboratory environment. PMID:20566379

  10. Arsenite cocarcinogenesis: an animal model derived from genetic toxicology studies.

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, Toby G; Uddin, Ahmed N; Burns, Fredric J; Bosland, Maarten C

    2002-01-01

    Although epidemiologic evidence shows an association between inorganic arsenic in drinking water and increased risk of skin, lung, and bladder cancers, no animal model for arsenic carcinogenesis has been successful. This lack has hindered mechanistic studies of arsenic carcinogenesis. Previously, we and others found that low concentrations (< or =5 microm) of arsenite (the likely environmental carcinogen), which are not mutagenic, can enhance the mutagenicity of other agents, including ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and alkylating agents. This enhancing effect appears to result from inhibition of DNA repair by arsenite, but not via inhibition of DNA repair enzymes. Rather, low concentrations of arsenite disrupt p53 function and upregulate cyclin D1. Failure to find an animal model for arsenic carcinogenesis might be because arsenite is not a carcinogen per se but acts as an enhancing agent (cocarcinogen) with a genotoxic partner. We tested this hypothesis with solar UVR in hairless but immunocompetent Skh1 mice. Mice were given 10 mg/L sodium arsenite in drinking water (or not) and irradiated with 1.7 KJ/m(2) solar UVR 3 times weekly. As expected, no tumors appeared in any organs in control mice or in mice given arsenite alone. After 26 weeks irradiated mice given arsenite had a 2.4-fold increase in skin tumor yield compared with mice given UVR alone. The tumors were mostly squamous cell carcinomas, and those occurring in mice given UVR plus arsenite were much larger and more invasive. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that arsenic acts as a cocarcinogen with a second (genotoxic) agent by inhibiting DNA repair and/or enhancing positive growth signaling. Skin cancers in populations drinking water containing arsenic may be caused by the enhancement by arsenic compounds of carcinogenesis induced by UVR (or other environmental agents). It is possible that lung and bladder cancers associated with arsenic in drinking water may also require a carcinogenic partner. PMID:12426125

  11. Acute and chronic toxicological studies of Ajuga iva in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    El Hilaly, Jaouad; Israili, Zafar H; Lyoussi, Badiâa

    2004-03-01

    Ajuga iva (L.) Schreber (AI), is widely used in the Moroccan pharmacopoeia as a panacea (cure-all), and specifically for gastrointestinal disorders and diabetes, and as an anthelmintic. No toxicological investigations have been carried out on this plant. We have previously observed that single oral doses (2-14 g/kg) of a lyophilised aqueous extract of AI (AI-extract) in mice or daily oral administration of 10 mg/kg of AI-extract in rats for 2 weeks did not result in any adverse effects. We have now evaluated AI-extract for its behavioural and pharmaco-toxicological effects after acute and chronic administration by the oral and intraperitoneal routes in rats and mice. No toxicity was observed in mice after single oral doses of as high as 14 g/kg of the AI-extract. However, single intraperitoneal injections of the AI-extract (1500-5500 mg/kg BW) produced a dose-dependent increase in adverse effects in the general behaviour and the mortality rate; the LD50 of acute intraperitoneal dose was 3.6 g/kg. In chronic toxicological studies in rats, the AI-extract (administered orally at daily doses of 100, 300 and 600 mg/kg for 3 months), did not cause any changes in haematological and biochemical parameters, with the exception of a transient rise in platelet counts and a short-term decrease in serum glucose levels. Histopathological examination of the brain, liver and the kidneys at the end of the study (3 months) showed normal architecture suggesting no morphological disturbances. PMID:15036466

  12. TOXICOLOGY OF PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report includes the results of five toxicological studies of pesticide compounds conducted by the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Yugoslavia. In the first study, the reactions of two groups of esterases (cholinesterases and arylesterases) with...

  13. Attempted and Successful Compensation in Preclinical and Early Manifest Neurodegeneration – A Review of Task fMRI Studies

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, Elisa; Minkova, Lora; Leitner, Mathias; Klöppel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Several models of neural compensation in healthy aging have been suggested to explain brain activity that aids to sustain cognitive function. Applying recently suggested criteria of “attempted” and “successful” compensation, we reviewed existing literature on compensatory mechanisms in preclinical Huntington’s disease (HD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Both disorders constitute early stages of neurodegeneration ideal for examining compensatory mechanisms and developing targeted interventions. We strived to clarify whether compensation criteria derived from healthy aging populations can be applied to early neurodegeneration. To concentrate on the close coupling of cognitive performance and brain activity, we exclusively addressed task fMRI studies. First, we found evidence for parallels in compensatory mechanisms between healthy aging and neurodegenerative disease. Several studies fulfilled criteria of attempted compensation, while reports of successful compensation were largely absent, which made it difficult to conclude on. Second, comparing working memory studies in preclinical HD and aMCI, we identified similar compensatory patterns across neurodegenerative disorders in lateral and medial prefrontal cortex. Such patterns included an inverted U-shaped relationship of neurodegeneration and compensatory activity spanning from preclinical to manifest disease. Due to the lack of studies systematically targeting all criteria of compensation, we propose an exemplary study design, including the manipulation of compensating brain areas by brain stimulation. Furthermore, we delineate the benefits of targeted interventions by non-invasive brain stimulation, as well as of unspecific interventions such as physical activity or cognitive training. Unambiguously detecting compensation in early neurodegenerative disease will help tailor interventions aiming at sustained overall functioning and delayed clinical disease onset. PMID:25324786

  14. Threats to Validity in the Design and Conduct of Preclinical Efficacy Studies: A Systematic Review of Guidelines for In Vivo Animal Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Valerie C.; Kimmelman, Jonathan; Fergusson, Dean; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.; Hackam, Dan G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The vast majority of medical interventions introduced into clinical development prove unsafe or ineffective. One prominent explanation for the dismal success rate is flawed preclinical research. We conducted a systematic review of preclinical research guidelines and organized recommendations according to the type of validity threat (internal, construct, or external) or programmatic research activity they primarily address. Methods and Findings We searched MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Google, and the EQUATOR Network website for all preclinical guideline documents published up to April 9, 2013 that addressed the design and conduct of in vivo animal experiments aimed at supporting clinical translation. To be eligible, documents had to provide guidance on the design or execution of preclinical animal experiments and represent the aggregated consensus of four or more investigators. Data from included guidelines were independently extracted by two individuals for discrete recommendations on the design and implementation of preclinical efficacy studies. These recommendations were then organized according to the type of validity threat they addressed. A total of 2,029 citations were identified through our search strategy. From these, we identified 26 guidelines that met our eligibility criteria—most of which were directed at neurological or cerebrovascular drug development. Together, these guidelines offered 55 different recommendations. Some of the most common recommendations included performance of a power calculation to determine sample size, randomized treatment allocation, and characterization of disease phenotype in the animal model prior to experimentation. Conclusions By identifying the most recurrent recommendations among preclinical guidelines, we provide a starting point for developing preclinical guidelines in other disease domains. We also provide a basis for the study and evaluation of preclinical research practice. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23935460

  15. Preclinical and Pilot Clinical Studies of Docetaxel Chemoradiation for Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yuhchyau; Pandya, Kishan J.; Hyrien, Ollivier; Keng, Peter C.; Smudzin, Therese; Anderson, Joy; Qazi, Raman; Smith, Brian; Watson, Thomas J.; Feins, Richard H.; Johnstone, David W.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Local and distant failure rates remain high despite aggressive chemoradiation (CRT) treatment for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. We conducted preclinical studies of docetaxel's cytotoxic and radiosensitizing effects on lung cancer cell lines and designed a pilot study to target distant micrometastasis upfront with one-cycle induction chemotherapy, followed by low-dose radiosensitizing docetaxel CRT. Methods and Materials: A preclinical study was conducted in human lung cancer cell lines NCI 520 and A549. Cells were treated with two concentrations of docetaxel for 3 h and then irradiated immediately or after a 24-h delay. A clonogenic survival assay was conducted and analyzed for cytotoxic effects vs. radiosensitizing effects of docetaxel. A pilot clinical study was designed based on preclinical study findings. Twenty-two patients were enrolled with a median follow-up of 4 years. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 75 mg/m{sup 2} of docetaxel and 75 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin on Day 1 and 150 mg/m{sup 2} of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on Days 2 through 10. Concurrent CRT was started 3 to 6 weeks later with twice-weekly docetaxel at 10 to 12 mg/m{sup 2} and daily delayed radiation in 1.8-Gy fractions to 64.5 Gy for gross disease. Results: The preclinical study showed potent cytotoxic effects of docetaxel and subadditive radiosensitizing effects. Delaying radiation resulted in more cancer cell death. The pilot clinical study resulted in a median survival of 32.6 months for the entire cohort, with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 50% and 19%, respectively, and a distant metastasis-free survival rate of 61% for both 3 and 5 years. A pattern-of-failure analysis showed 75% chest failures and 36% all-distant failures. Therapy was well tolerated with Grade 3 esophagitis observed in 23% of patients. Conclusions: One-cycle full-dose docetaxel/cisplatin induction chemotherapy with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor followed by pulsed low-dose docetaxel CRT is promising with regard to its antitumor activity, low rates of distant failure, and low toxicity, suggesting that this regimen deserves further investigation.

  16. National Toxicology Program

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Initiative Public Health Public Health Impact Report on Carcinogens Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods Health Assessment and ... Tables for Peer Review Reports & Publications Report on Carcinogens Search Substances Studied by NTP Tox21 NTP at ...

  17. The toxicological evaluation of realistic emissions of source aerosols study: statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Coull, Brent A; Wellenius, Gregory A; Gonzalez-Flecha, Beatriz; Diaz, Edgar; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J

    2011-08-01

    The Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic Emissions of Source Aerosols (TERESA) study involved withdrawal, aging, and atmospheric transformation of emissions of three coal-fired power plants. Toxicological evaluations were carried out in rats exposed to different emission scenarios with extensive exposure characterization. Data generated had multiple levels of resolution: exposure, scenario, and constituent chemical composition. Here, we outline a multilayered approach to analyze the associations between exposure and health effects beginning with standard ANOVA models that treat exposure as a categorical variable. The model assessed differences in exposure effects across scenarios (by plant). To assess unadjusted associations between pollutant concentrations and health, univariate analyses were conducted using the difference between the response means under exposed and control conditions and a single constituent concentration as the predictor. Then, a novel multivariate analysis of exposure composition and health was used based on Random Forests(™), a recent extension of classification and regression trees that were applied to the outcome differences. For each exposure constituent, this approach yielded a nonparametric measure of the importance of that constituent in predicting differences in response on a given day, controlling for the other measured constituent concentrations in the model. Finally, an R(2) analysis compared the relative importance of exposure scenario, plant, and constituent concentrations on each outcome. Peak expiratory flow (PEF) is used to demonstrate how the multiple levels of the analysis complement each other to assess constituents most strongly associated with health effects. PMID:21913820

  18. An integrated study on Gammarus elvirae (Crustacea, Amphipoda): perspectives for toxicology of arsenic-contaminated freshwater.

    PubMed

    Davolos, Domenico; Chimenti, Claudio; Ronci, Lucilla; Setini, Andrea; Iannilli, Valentina; Pietrangeli, Biancamaria; De Matthaeis, Elvira

    2015-10-01

    The Italian region Latium is characterized by extensive quaternary volcanic systems that contribute greatly to arsenic (As) contamination of freshwater, including drinking water supplies. However, knowledge of the possible toxic effects in these aquatic environments is, despite being highly relevant to public health, still limited. In this paper, we approach this issue using Gammarus elvirae, an amphipod species that inhabits rivers and streams in central Italy, including Latium. We explored the possibility of using G. elvirae in the toxicology of freshwater by addressing the most relevant issues. First, we tested the usefulness of hemocytes from G. elvirae in determining non-specific DNA damage by means of the Comet assay after exposure (24 h and 7 days) to different river water samples in Latium; second, we provided an interpretative overview of the usefulness of hepatopancreatic epithelial cells of G. elvirae as a means of assessing toxicity after long-term exposure to As and other pollutants; third, the LC (50-240 h) value for G. elvirae was estimated for arsenate, which is usually the dominant arsenic species in surface waters. Our study sheds light on G. elvirae at different levels, providing a background for future toxicological research of freshwater. PMID:26013740

  19. Green toxicology.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Alexandra; Anastas, Nicholas; Spencer, Pamela J; Stephens, Martin; Goldberg, Alan; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Historically, early identification and characterization of adverse effects of industrial chemicals was difficult because conventional toxicological test methods did not meet R&D needs for rapid, relatively inexpensive methods amenable to small amounts of test material. The pharmaceutical industry now front-loads toxicity testing, using in silico, in vitro, and less demanding animal tests at earlier stages of product development to identify and anticipate undesirable toxicological effects and optimize product development. The Green Chemistry movement embraces similar ideas for development of less toxic products, safer processes, and less waste and exposure. Further, the concept of benign design suggests ways to consider possible toxicities before the actual synthesis and to apply some structure/activity rules (SAR) and in silico methods. This requires not only scientific development but also a change in corporate culture in which synthetic chemists work with toxicologists. An emerging discipline called Green Toxicology (Anastas, 2012) provides a framework for integrating the principles of toxicology into the enterprise of designing safer chemicals, thereby minimizing potential toxicity as early in production as possible. Green Toxicology`s novel utility lies in driving innovation by moving safety considerations to the earliest stage in a chemical`s lifecycle, i.e., to molecular design. In principle, this field is no different than other subdisciplines of toxicology that endeavor to focus on a specific area - for example, clinical, environmental or forensic toxicology. We use the same principles and tools to evaluate an existing substance or to design a new one. The unique emphasis is in using 21st century toxicology tools as a preventative strategy to "design out" undesired human health and environmental effects, thereby increasing the likelihood of launching a successful, sustainable product. Starting with the formation of a steering group and a series of workshops, the Green Toxicology concept is currently spreading internationally and is being refined via an iterative process. PMID:25061898

  20. DTP | Toxicology and Pharmacology Branch (TPB)

    Cancer.gov

    As a member of a Drug Development team, the individual serves as a primary resource for pharmacology and toxicity information by providing preclinical pharmacology and toxicology data to other NCI staff investigators and managers as well as to toxicologists, pharmacologists, clinicians and other investigators from drug companies, Cancer Centers, universities, etc.

  1. Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 2: a review of clinical studies with supporting preclinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Sarris, Jerome; McIntyre, Erica; Camfield, David A

    2013-04-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based anxiolytics has been absent to date. Thus, our aim was to provide a comprehensive narrative review of plant-based medicines that have clinical and/or preclinical evidence of anxiolytic activity. We present the article in two parts. In part one, we reviewed herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for anxiolytic activity have been performed. In this current article (part two), we review herbal medicines for which there have been both preclinical and clinical investigations of anxiolytic activity. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) for English language papers using the search terms 'anxiety' OR 'anxiety disorder' OR 'generalized anxiety disorder' OR 'social phobia' OR 'post-traumatic stress disorder' OR 'panic disorder' OR 'agoraphobia' OR 'obsessive compulsive disorder' in combination with the search terms 'Herb*' OR 'Medicinal Plants' OR 'Botanical Medicine' OR 'Chinese herb*', in addition to individual herbal medicines. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, of which 53 plants were included in the review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed here in part two), with the other 32 having solely preclinical evidence (reviewed in part one). Support for efficacy was found for chronic use (i.e. greater than one day) of the following herbs in treating a range of anxiety disorders in human clinical trials: Piper methysticum, Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Scutellaria lateriflora, Silybum marianum, Passiflora incarnata, Withania somniferum, Galphimia glauca, Centella asiatica, Rhodiola rosea, Echinacea spp., Melissa officinalis and Echium amoenum. For several of the plants studied, conclusions need to be tempered due to methodological issues such as small sample sizes, brief intervention durations and non-replication. Current evidence does not support Hypericum perforatum or Valeriana spp. for any anxiety disorder. Acute anxiolytic activity was found for Centella asiatica, Salvia spp., Melissa officinalis, Passiflora incarnata and Citrus aurantium. Bacopa monnieri has shown anxiolytic effects in people with cognitive decline. The therapeutic application of psychotropic plant-based treatments for anxiety disorders is also discussed, specifically Psychotria viridis and Banisteriopsis caarti (ayahuasca), Psilocybe spp. and cannabidiol-enriched (low tetrahydrocannabinol (?(9)-THC)) Cannabis spp. PMID:23653088

  2. The Humanized NOD/SCID Mouse as a Preclinical Model to Study the Fate of Encapsulated Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Vaithilingam, Vijayaganapathy; Oberholzer, Jose; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Tuch, Bernard E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite encouraging results in animal models, the transplantation of microencapsulated islets into humans has not yet reached the therapeutic level. Recent clinical trials using microencapsulated human islets in barium alginate showed the presence of dense fibrotic overgrowth around the microcapsules with no viable islets. The major reason for this is limited understanding of what occurs when encapsulated human islets are allografted. This warrants the need for a suitable small animal model. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of NOD/SCID mice reconstituted with human PBMCs (called humanized NOD/SCID mice) as a preclinical model. In this model, human T cell engraftment could be achieved, and CD45+ cells were observed in the spleen and peripheral blood. Though the engrafted T cells caused a small fibrotic overgrowth around the microencapsulated human islets, this failed to stop the encapsulated islets from functioning in the diabetic recipient mice. The ability of encapsulated islets to survive in this mouse model might partly be attributed to the presence of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-10, which are known to induce graft tolerance. In conclusion, this study showed that the hu-NOD/SCID mouse is not a suitable preclinical model to study the allograft rejection mechanisms of encapsulated human islets. As another result, the maintained viability of transplanted islets on the NOD/SCID background emphasized a critical role of protective mechanisms in autoimmune diabetes transplanted subjects due to specific immunoregulatory effects provided by IL-4 and IL-10. PMID:20703439

  3. Implications of the stability behavior of zinc oxide nanoparticles for toxicological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meißner, Tobias; Oelschlägel, Kathrin; Potthoff, Annegret

    2014-08-01

    The increasing use of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in sunscreens and other cosmetic products demands a risk assessment that has to be done in toxicological studies. Such investigations require profound knowledge of the behavior of ZnO in cell culture media. The current study was performed to get well-dispersed suspensions of a hydrophilic (ZnO-hydro) and a lipophilic coated (ZnO-lipo) ZnO nanomaterial for use in in vitro tests. Therefore, systematic tests were carried out with common dispersants (phosphate, lecithin, proteins) to elucidate chemical and physical changes of ZnO nanoparticles in water and physiological solutions (PBS, DMEM). Non-physiological stock suspensions were prepared using ultrasonication. Time-dependent changes of pH, conductivity, zeta potential, particle size and dissolution were recorded. Secondly, the stock suspensions were added to physiological media with or without albumin (BSA) or serum (FBS), to examine characteristics such as agglomeration and dissolution. Stable stock suspensions were obtained using phosphate as natural and physiological electrostatic stabilizing agent. Lecithin proved to be an effective wetting agent for ZnO-lipo. Although the particle size remained constant, the suspension changed over time. The pH increased as a result of ZnO dissolution and formation of zinc phosphate complexes. The behavior of ZnO in physiological media was found to depend strongly on the additives used. Applying only phosphate as additive, ZnO-hydro agglomerated within minutes. In the presence of lecithin or BSA/serum, agglomeration was inhibited. ZnO dissolution was higher under physiological conditions than in the stock suspension. Serum especially promoted this process. Using body-related dispersants (phosphate, lecithin) non-agglomerating stock suspensions of hydrophilic and lipophilic ZnO were prepared as a prerequisite to perform meaningful toxicological investigation. Both nanomaterials showed a non-negligible dissolution behavior that strongly depended on the surrounding conditions. Agglomeration of ZnO particles in physiological media is a complex function of particle coating, used dispersants and serum proteins if supplemented. The present study gives a clear guideline how to prepare and handle suspensions with ZnO for in vitro testing and allows the correlation between the chemical-physical particles behavior with findings from toxicological tests.

  4. Forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gregory G

    2012-01-01

    Toxicologic analysis is an integral part of death investigation, and the use or abuse of an unsuspected substance belongs in the differential diagnosis of patients who have a sudden, unexpected change in their condition. History and physical findings may alter suspicion that intoxication played a role in a patient's decline or death, but suspicions cannot be confirmed and is performed, analysis unless toxicologic no toxicologic analysis is possible unless someone collects the proper specimens necessary for analysis. In a hospital autopsy the only specimens that can rightfully be collected are those within the restrictions stated in the autopsy permit. Autopsies performed by the medical examiner do not have these restrictions. Sometimes the importance of toxicologic testing in a case is not evident until days or weeks after the change in the patient's status, thus retaining the appropriate specimens until investigation of that case has ended is important. Proper interpretation of toxicologic findings requires integrating the clinical setting and findings with the toxicologic results in a way that makes medical sense. If called upon to testify concerning findings, answer the questions truthfully, politely, and in a way that is understandable to someone who has no special training in toxicology. PMID:22693783

  5. Zebrafish as a model to study the role of DNA methylation in environmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, Jorke H; Aleström, Peter; Kooter, Jan M; Legler, Juliette

    2015-11-01

    Environmental epigenetics is a rapidly growing field which studies the effects of environmental factors such as nutrition, stress, and exposure to compounds on epigenetic gene regulation. Recent studies have shown that exposure to toxicants in vertebrates is associated with changes in DNA methylation, a major epigenetic mechanism affecting gene transcription. Zebra fish, a well-known model in toxicology and developmental biology, are emerging as a model species in environmental epigenetics despite their evolutionary distance to rodents and humans. In this review, recent insights in DNA methylation during zebra fish development are discussed and compared to mammalian models in order to evaluate zebra fish as a model to study the role of DNA methylation in environmental toxicology. Differences exist in DNA methylation reprogramming during early development, whereas in later developmental stages, tissue distribution of both 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine seems more conserved between species, as well as basic DNA (de)methylation mechanisms. All DNA methyl transferases identified so far in mammals are present in zebra fish, as well as a number of major demethylation pathways. However, zebra fish appear to lack some methylation pathways present in mammals, such as parental imprinting. Several studies report effects on DNA methylation in zebra fish following exposure to environmental contaminants, such as arsenic, benzo[a]pyrene, and tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate. Though more research is needed to examine heritable effects of contaminant exposure on DNA methylation, recent data suggests the usefulness of the zebra fish as a model in environmental epigenetics. PMID:25172464

  6. Pre-clinical and clinical walking kinematics in female breeding pigs with lameness: A nested case-control cohort study.

    PubMed

    Stavrakakis, S; Guy, J H; Syranidis, I; Johnson, G R; Edwards, S A

    2015-07-01

    Gait profiles were investigated in a cohort of female pigs experiencing a lameness period prevalence of 29% over 17 months. Gait alterations before and during visually diagnosed lameness were evaluated to identify the best quantitative clinical lameness indicators and early predictors for lameness. Pre-breeding gilts (n=?84) were recruited to the study over a period of 6 months, underwent motion capture every 5 weeks and, depending on their age at entry to the study, were followed for up to three successive gestations. Animals were subject to motion capture in each parity at 8 weeks of gestation and on the day of weaning (28 days postpartum). During kinematic motion capture, the pigs walked on the same concrete walkway and an array of infra-red cameras was used to collect three dimensional coordinate data of reflective skin markers attached to the head, trunk and limb anatomical landmarks. Of 24 pigs diagnosed with lameness, 19 had preclinical gait records, whilst 18 had a motion capture while lame. Depending on availability, data from one or two preclinical motion capture 1-11 months prior to lameness and on the day of lameness were analysed. Lameness was best detected and evaluated using relative spatiotemporal gait parameters, especially vertical head displacement and asymmetric stride phase timing. Irregularity in the step-to-stride length ratio was elevated (deviation? ? 0.03) in young pigs which presented lameness in later life (odds ratio 7.2-10.8). PMID:25986130

  7. Toxicological and epidemiological studies on effects of airborne fibers: coherence and public [corrected] health implications.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, Morton

    2014-09-01

    Airborne fibers, when sufficiently biopersistent, can cause chronic pleural diseases, as well as excess pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancers. Mesothelioma and pleural plaques are caused by biopersistent fibers thinner than ?0.1 ?m and longer than ?5 ?m. Excess lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis are caused by biopersistent fibers that are longer than ?20 ?m. While biopersistence varies with fiber type, all amphibole and erionite fibers are sufficiently biopersistent to cause pathogenic effects, while the greater in vivo solubility of chrysotile fibers makes them somewhat less causal for the lung diseases, and much less causal for the pleural diseases. Most synthetic vitreous fibers are more soluble in vivo than chrysotile, and pose little, if any, health pulmonary or pleural health risk, but some specialty SVFs were sufficiently biopersistent to cause pathogenic effects in animal studies. My conclusions are based on the following: 1) epidemiologic studies that specified the origin of the fibers by type, and especially those that identified their fiber length and diameter distributions; 2) laboratory-based toxicologic studies involving fiber size characterization and/or dissolution rates and long-term observation of biological responses; and 3) the largely coherent findings of the epidemiology and the toxicology. The strong dependence of effects on fiber diameter, length, and biopersistence makes reliable routine quantitative exposure and risk assessment impractical in some cases, since it would require transmission electronic microscopic examination, of representative membrane filter samples, for determining statistically sufficient numbers of fibers longer than 5 and 20 ?m, and those thinner than 0.1 ?m, based on the fiber types. PMID:25168068

  8. Physicochemical and toxicological studies on 4-chloro-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Jorge L; García Einschlag, Fernando S; Rives, Carina V; Villata, Laura S; Capparelli, Alberto L

    2004-05-01

    Physicochemical characterization of hazardous compounds often is required for the development of structure-reactivity correlations. Physical, chemical, and toxicological properties of target pollutants require determination for an efficient application of wastewater treatments. In the present work, we chose a chloro-nitro-aromatic derivative (4-chloro-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid [CDNBA]), as a model compound on which to perform physicochemical and toxicological studies. Several properties of CDNBA are not available in the literature, although many aromatic nitro-compounds are considered hazardous materials. Measurements of solubility in water, acid dissociation constant, and kinetic parameters for the nucleophilic substitution of chlorine atom in alkaline media are reported. We also performed cytotoxicity studies of CDNBA and ultraviolet-irradiated CDNBA solutions. From the analysis of CDNBA solubility in water at different temperatures, an enthalpy of solution of 23.2 +/- 2.5 kJ/mol was found. The study of the acid dissociation constant Kc by using conductivity measurements and the modified Gran's method yielded values for the equilibrium constant Ka of 2.36 x 10(-3) and 2.26 x 10(-3), respectively. The bimolecular rate constant for the reaction of CDNB- and hydroxyl ion (HO) measured at room temperature and 0.1 M of ionic strength was 5.92/M x s, and the activation energy for this process was 70.7 +/- 3.4 kJ/mol. Cytotoxicity assays with aqueous suspensions of Tetrahymena pyriformis showed lethal effects due to the pH change induced by CDNBA. On the other hand, in buffered solutions, a value of 104.47 microM was observed for the median effective concentration, that is, the concentration of CDNBA at which the proliferation was restricted to one half of the blank. Irradiation of CDNBA solutions increased the toxicity, suggesting the formation of intermediate products with higher cytotoxicity effects. PMID:15180363

  9. THE ROLE OF TOXICOLOGY AND RELATED STUDIES IN EVALUATING THE RISK OF MYCOTOXINS: FUMONISIN B1 AS AN EXAMPLE.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins that are found worldwide in corn and in corn-based foods. They are suspected human carcinogens and are the subject of ongoing risk assessments. Rodent feeding studies of fumonisin B1 (FB1) have been important for characterizing the toxicological effects of these mycotoxins...

  10. UNUSUAL FINDINGS IN ZEBRAFISH, DANIO RERIO, FROM TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES AND THE ZEBRAFISH INTERNATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER DIAGNOSTIC SERVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of interesting and unusual lesions have been diagnosed in zebrafish that have been evaluated from toxicological studies or submitted as cases to the Diagnostic Service at Oregon State University. Lesions were observed in various wild-type and mutant lines of zebrafish an...

  11. THE ROLE OF TOXICOLOGY AND RELATED STUDIES IN EVALUATING THE RISK OF MYCOTOXINS: FUMONISIN B1 AS AN EXAMPLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins that are found worldwide in corn and in corn-based foods. They are suspected human carcinogens and are the subject of ongoing risk assessments. Rodent feeding studies of fumonisin B1 (FB1) have been important for characterizing the toxicological effects of these mycotoxins...

  12. Oral toxicological studies of pueraria flower extract: acute toxicity study in mice and subchronic toxicity study in rats.

    PubMed

    Takano, Akira; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Tsubata, Masahito; Ikeguchi, Motoya; Takagaki, Kinya; Kinjo, Junei

    2013-11-01

    Kudzu has been widely used as an herbal medicine in China. The root of the kudzu is also well known as an antipyretic and analgesic in treatment of the common cold, while its flower has been used to treat alcohol intoxication, alcohol abuse, and dysentery. Pueraria flower extract (PFE) is a hot water extract derived from the flower of the kudzu, Pueraria thomsonii Benth. (Fabaceae), oral intake of which exhibits anti-obesity properties in mice and humans. In this study, we conducted acute and subchronic toxicity studies for an evaluation of safety. In the acute study, PFE (5 g/kg body weight) was orally administered to ddY mice. For 14 d after administration, no deaths or abnormal changes were observed in general signs, body weight (BW), or food consumption, and no abnormal findings were observed in the major organs and tissues of either males or females at necropsy. The oral LD50 of PFE was therefore estimated to be higher than 5 g/kg BW. In the subchronic study, PFE was mixed into the diet in place of powdered CRF-1 and administered at concentrations of 0% (control), 0.5%, 1.5%, and 5.0% to male and female Sprague-Dawley rats for 90 d. No mortality or toxicological changes were observed during the experimental period. Blood biochemical, hematological, and urinary parameters revealed no toxicologically significant changes. Furthermore, no anatomical or histopathological changes due to PFE were observed. The no-observed adverse-effect-level of PFE was thus estimated to be 5.0% in the diet (male: 3.0 g/kg BW/d; female: 3.5 g/kg BW/d). PMID:24245900

  13. Evaluation of toxicological properties and photodynamic activity of Photolon ointment: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shliakhtsin, Siarhei V.; Trukhachova, Tatsiana V.; Istomin, Yuriy P.; Dunetz, Ludmila N.; Kuvshinov, Andrey V.; Naumovich, Semen A.

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate toxicological properties and photodynamic activity of a new ready form of the photosensitizer Photolon (Fotolon) - an ointment for topical use. The data obtained show the use of topicaly applied photosensitizer provides sufficient penetration and accumulation of the active compound in tumor tissue as well as in affected periodontal tissues for the effective PDT. There are several advantages of PDT with topical application of the photosensitizer such as absence of systemic toxic and photosensitive reactions, relatively low cost of the treatment and etc. We have shown that PDT of affected periodontal tissues with local application of Photolon/Fotolon ointment provides an ability of local destruction of microbial cell, located as on the gum surface as in the spatium intercellulare what is extremely important for successful treatment of acute and chronic periodontitis.

  14. Toxicological studies on silver nanoparticles: challenges and opportunities in assessment, monitoring and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stensberg, Matthew Charles; Wei, Qingshan; McLamore, Eric Scott; Porterfield, David Marshall; Wei, Alexander; Sepúlveda, Mar?a Soledad

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are becoming increasingly prevalent in consumer products as antibacterial agents. The increased use of Ag NP-enhanced products may lead to an increase in toxic levels of environmental silver, but regulatory control over the use or disposal of such products is lagging due to insufficient assessment on the toxicology of Ag NPs and their rate of release into the environment. In this article we discuss recent research on the transport, activity and fate of Ag NPs at the cellular and organismic level, in conjunction with traditional and recently established methods of nanoparticle characterization. We include several proposed mechanisms of cytotoxicity based on such studies, as well as new opportunities for investigating the uptake and fate of Ag NPs in living systems. PMID:21793678

  15. Spaceflight Toxicology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides a review of NASA Johnson Space Center's Toxicology program. The mission of this program is to protect crews from toxic exposures during spaceflight. The presentation reviews some of the health hazards. A toxicological hazard level chart is presented that reviews the rating of hazard level, irritancy, systemic effects and containability. The program also participates in the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Advisory Group.

  16. Taking Journal Clubs off Autopilot: A Case Study of Teaching Literature Evaluation Skills to Preclinical MD/PhD Students

    PubMed Central

    Currier, Rebecca L.; Schneider, Marguerite Reid; Heubi, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers designed learner-directed journal clubs to develop literature evaluation skills in preclinical students. Sessions balanced student-led discussion with structured objectives and faculty support. During the pilot with preclinical MD/PhD students, self-rated mastery improved over all 17 measured objectives. Six exercises have since been incorporated into the full medical school curriculum. PMID:24634798

  17. Taking Journal Clubs off Autopilot: A Case Study of Teaching Literature Evaluation Skills to Preclinical MD/PhD Students.

    PubMed

    Currier, Rebecca L; Schneider, Marguerite Reid; Heubi, James E

    2013-12-01

    Researchers designed learner-directed journal clubs to develop literature evaluation skills in preclinical students. Sessions balanced student-led discussion with structured objectives and faculty support. During the pilot with preclinical MD/PhD students, self-rated mastery improved over all 17 measured objectives. Six exercises have since been incorporated into the full medical school curriculum. PMID:24634798

  18. Therapeutic vaccination and immunomodulation in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B: preclinical studies in the woodchuck.

    PubMed

    Kosinska, Anna D; Liu, Jia; Lu, Mengji; Roggendorf, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) may lead to subclinical, acute or chronic hepatitis. In the prevaccination era, HBV infections were endemic due to frequent mother to child transmission in large regions of the world. However, there are still estimated 240 million chronic HBV carriers today and ca. 620,000 patients die per year due to HBV-related liver diseases. Recommended treatment of chronic hepatitis B with interferon-? and/or nucleos(t)ide analogues does not lead to satisfactory results. Induction of HBV-specific T cells by therapeutic vaccination or immunomodulation may be an innovative strategy to overcome virus persistence. Vaccination with commercially available HBV vaccines in patients with or without therapeutic reduction of viral load did not result in effective immune control of HBV infection, suggesting that combination of antiviral treatment with new formulations of therapeutic vaccines is needed. The woodchuck (Marmota monax) and its HBV-like woodchuck hepatitis virus are a useful preclinical animal model for developing new therapeutic approaches in chronic hepadnaviral infections. Several innovative approaches combining antiviral treatments using nucleos(t)ide analogues, with prime-boost vaccination using DNA vaccines, new hepadnaviral antigens or recombinant adenoviral vectors were tested in the woodchuck model. In this review, we summarize these encouraging results obtained with these therapeutic vaccines. In addition, we present potential innovations in immunostimulatory strategies by blocking the interaction of the inhibitory programmed death receptor 1 with its ligand in this animal model. PMID:25535101

  19. Targeted toxins for glioblastoma multiforme: pre-clinical studies and clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt M; Xiong, Weidong; Liu, Chunyan; Puntel, Mariana; Yagiz, Kader; Muhammad, Akm Ghulam; Mineharu, Yohei; Foulad, David; Wibowo, Mia; Assi, Hikmat; Baker, Gregory J; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2011-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. GBM is very aggressive due to its poor cellular differentiation and invasiveness, which makes complete surgical resection virtually impossible. Therefore, GBM's invasive nature as well as its intrinsic resistance to current treatment modalities makes it a unique therapeutic challenge. Extensive examination of human GBM specimens has uncovered that these tumors overexpress a variety of receptors that are virtually absent in the surrounding non-neoplastic brain. Human GBMs overexpress receptors for cytokines, growth factors, ephrins, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), and transferrin, which can be targeted with high specificity by linking their ligands with highly cytotoxic molecules, such as Diptheria toxin and Pseudomonas exotoxin A. We review the preclinical development and clinical translation of targeted toxins for GBM. In view of the clinical experience, we conclude that although these are very promising therapeutic modalities for GBM patients, efforts should be focused on improving the delivery systems utilized in order to achieve better distribution of the immuno-toxins in the tumor/resection cavity. Delivery of targeted toxins using viral vectors would also benefit enormously from improved strategies for local delivery. PMID:21707497

  20. NIH initiative to balance sex of animals in preclinical studies: generative questions to guide policy, implementation, and metrics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In May of 2014, the NIH Director together with the Director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health announced plans to take a multi-dimensional approach to address the over reliance on male cells and animals in preclinical research. The NIH is engaging the scientific community in the development of policies to improve the sex balance in research. The present, past, and future presidents of the Organization for the Study of Sex Differences, in order to encourage thoughtful discussion among scientists, pose a series of questions to generate ideas in three areas: 1. research strategies, 2. educational strategies, and 3. strategies to monitor effectiveness of policies to improve the sex balance in research. By promoting discussion within the scientific community, a consensus will evolve that will move science forward in a productive and effective manner. PMID:25780556

  1. Reducing attrition in drug development: smart loading preclinical safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ruth A; Kavanagh, Stefan L; Mellor, Howard R; Pollard, Christopher E; Robinson, Sally; Platz, Stefan J

    2014-03-01

    Entry into the crucial preclinical good laboratory practice (GLP) stage of toxicology testing triggers significant R&D investment yet >20% of AstraZeneca's potential new medicines have been stopped for safety reasons in this GLP phase alone. How could we avoid at least some of these costly failures? An analysis of historical toxicities that caused stopping ('stopping toxicities') showed that >50% were attributable to target organ toxicities emerging within 2 weeks of repeat dosing or to acute cardiovascular risks. By frontloading 2-week repeat-dose toxicity studies and a comprehensive assessment of cardiovascular safety, we anticipate a potential 50% reduction in attrition in the GLP phase. This will reduce animal use overall, save significant R&D costs and improve drug pipeline quality. PMID:24269835

  2. Microminipigs as a new experimental animal model for toxicological studies: comparative pharmacokinetics of perfluoroalkyl acids.

    PubMed

    Guruge, Keerthi S; Noguchi, Michiko; Yoshioka, Koji; Yamazaki, Eriko; Taniyasu, Sachi; Yoshioka, Miyako; Yamanaka, Noriko; Ikezawa, Mitsutaka; Tanimura, Nobuhiko; Sato, Masumi; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of a novel minipig strain, the Microminipig (MMPig), as an animal model for studying the pharmacokinetics of a mixture of 10 perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs). After a single oral dose was given, we found that the blood depuration of PFAAs (blood t1/2 ), which we calculated using first-order elimination curves, ranged from 1.6 to 86.6?days. Among the five body compartments analyzed, the liver was the greatest site of accumulation of perfluorooctanesulfonate and longer chain perfluorinated carboxylates such as perfluorodecanoic acid, perfluoroundecanoic acid and perfluorododecanoic acid. We observed an increasing accumulation trend of perfluorinated carboxylates in the organs associated with the fluorinated carbon chain length. The perfluorononanoic acid burden was the highest among the treated compounds 21?days after a single exposure, as 29% of the given perfluorononanoic acid dose was accumulated in the tissues. The persistence of PFAAs in edible pig tissues even after 21?days post-exposure raises concerns about the safety of swine products. This was the first study to use MMPigs to elucidate the pharmacokinetics of a group of environmental pollutants. We found that MMPigs could be excellent experimental animals for toxicological studies due to their easy handling, cost efficacy for target compounds and ease of waste treatment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25877231

  3. Production, composition and toxicology studies of Enzogenol® Pinus radiata bark extract.

    PubMed

    Frevel, Mathias A E; Pipingas, Andrew; Grigsby, Warren J; Frampton, Chris M; Gilchrist, Nigel L

    2012-12-01

    Enzogenol® pine bark extract is a dietary supplement and food ingredient produced by water extraction of Pinus radiata. We present production method, composition, and safety data from rat and dog toxicological and human clinical studies. The dry powder contains proanthocyanidins (>80%), taxifolin (1-2%), other flavonoids and phenolic acids (up to 8%), and carbohydrates (5-10%). Reverse mutation assays showed lack of mutagenic activity. Single and 14-day repeat dosing in rats and dogs had no influence on body weight, feed consumption, blood chemistry, and haematology at any dose level. There were no treatment related findings on gross and detailed necroscopy, organ weights, organ weight ratios and histology. The only adverse events were emesis and diarrhoea in dogs occurring mainly in un-fed condition and at the highest dose level in a total of 18% of applications. The MTD and NOAEL in the present rat and dog studies were 2500 and 750 mg/kg/day, respectively. Consumption of 480 mg/day for 6 months and 960 mg/day for 5 weeks in two human studies showed Enzogenol® had no adverse influence on liver and kidney function, haematology, and did not cause any adverse events. Our studies indicate lack of toxicity of Enzogenol® and support safe use as a food ingredient. PMID:22982471

  4. Genetic engineering of murine CD8+ and CD4+ T cells for pre-clinical adoptive immunotherapy studies

    PubMed Central

    Kerkar, Sid P; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Yang, Shicheng; Borman, Zachary; Muranski, Pawel; Ji, Yun; Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Kaiser, Andrew DM; Hinrichs, Christian; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Scott, Christopher; Gattinoni, Luca; Morgan, Richard A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2011-01-01

    T-cell-receptor (TCR) gene therapy enables for the rapid creation of antigen-specific T cells from mice of any strain and represents a valuable tool for pre-clinical immunotherapy studies. Here, we describe the superiority of gamma-retroviral vectors compared to lentiviral vectors for transduction of murine T cells and surprisingly illustrate robust gene-transfer into phenotypically naïve/memory-stem cell (CD62Lhi/CD44low) and central memory (CD62Lhi/CD44hi) CD8+ T cells using murine-stem-cell-based gamma-retroviral vectors (MSGV1). We created MSGV1 vectors for a MHC-class I restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) specific for the melanocyte-differentiation antigen, gp100 (MSGV1-pmel-1), and a MHC-class II restricted TCR specific for tyrosinase-related-protein-1 (MSGV1-TRP-1), and found that robust gene expression required codon optimization of TCR sequences for the pmel-1 TCR. To test for functionality, we adoptively transferred TCR-engineered T cells into mice bearing B16 melanomas and observed delayed growth of established tumors with pmel-1TCR engineered CD8+ T cells and significant tumor regression with TRP-1 TCR transduced CD4+ T cells. We simultaneously created lentiviral vectors encoding the pmel-1TCR, but found that these vectors mediated low TCR expression in murine T cells, but robust gene expression in other murine and human cell lines. These results indicate that preclinical murine models of adoptive immunotherapies are more practical using gamma-retroviral rather than lentiviral vectors. PMID:21499127

  5. Metabonomics in toxicology: a review.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Donald G

    2005-06-01

    Metabonomics and its many pseudonyms (metabolomics, metabolic profiling, etc.) have exploded onto the scientific scene in the past 2 to 3 years. Nowhere has the impact been more profound than within the toxicology community. Within this community there exists a great deal of uncertainty about whether metabonomics is something to count on or just the most recent technological flash in the pan. Much of the uncertainty is due to unfamiliarity with analytical and chemometric facets of the technology and the attendant fear of any "black-box." With those fears in mind, metabonomics technology is reviewed with particular emphasis on toxicologic applications in preclinical drug development. The jargon, logistics, and applications of the technology are covered in some detail with emphasis on recent work in the field. PMID:15689416

  6. Aerospace Toxicology and Microbiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Parmet, A. J.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2007-01-01

    Toxicology dates to the very earliest history of humanity with various poisons and venom being recognized as a method of hunting or waging war with the earliest documentation in the Evers papyrus (circa 1500 BCE). The Greeks identified specific poisons such as hemlock, a method of state execution, and the Greek word toxos (arrow) became the root of our modern science. The first scientific approach to the understanding of poisons and toxicology was the work during the late middle ages of Paracelsus. He formulated what were then revolutionary views that a specific toxic agent or "toxicon" caused specific dose-related effects. His principles have established the basis of modern pharmacology and toxicology. In 1700, Bernardo Ramazzini published the book De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (The Diseases of Workers) describing specific illnesses associated with certain labor, particularly metal workers exposed to mercury, lead, arsenic, and rock dust. Modern toxicology dates from development of the modern industrial chemical processes, the earliest involving an analytical method for arsenic by Marsh in 1836. Industrial organic chemicals were synthesized in the late 1800 s along with anesthetics and disinfectants. In 1908, Hamilton began the long study of occupational toxicology issues, and by WW I the scientific use of toxicants saw Haber creating war gases and defining time-dosage relationships that are used even today.

  7. The relationship among microsomal enzyme induction, liver weight, and histological change in cynomolgus monkey toxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Amacher, David E; Schomaker, Shelli J; Boldt, Sherri E; Mirsky, Michael

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the relationship among hepatic microsomal enzyme induction, liver weight, histological evidence of hepatic injury, and serum clinical chemistry markers of hepatic origin in the cynomolgus monkey. We report here the results from independent toxicology studies for 10 investigative drug candidates representing four therapeutic classes. Study conditions were selected to elicit target organ toxicity. We found that six of the 10 compounds altered cytochrome P450-associated activities in both male and female monkeys, two in females only, and one altered similar activities in males only. Frequently, significant treatment-related elevations in NADPH cytochrome c reductase and ethylmorphine N-demethylase were noted. When the results from all 10 studies were pooled, 14 cytochrome P450-associated activities were significantly increased and five were decreased in males compared to 15 significantly increased and three decreased in the females. Treatment-associated liver weight increases were noted in four studies. Except for hepatocellular hypertrophy in one study, no significant treatment-related microscopic changes in liver and no elevations of serum biomarkers commonly associated with liver toxicity were observed in any of the studies that demonstrated significant hepatic enzyme induction. Compared to parallel rat studies, one compound was an inducer only in monkeys and one was an inducer only in rats. Significant elevations of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes in the cynomolgus monkey liver are not accompanied by substantial hepatic changes except for hepatomegaly. These alterations in the hepatic drug-metabolizing enzyme system were benign based the absence of histopathological lesions and serum biomarkers of hepatobiliary toxicity. PMID:16274908

  8. Sauropus androgynus (L.) Merr. Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans: From Botanical Studies to Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Bunawan, Hamidun; Bunawan, Siti Noraini; Baharum, Syarul Nataqain; Noor, Normah Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    Sauropus androgynus L. Merr. is one of the most popular herbs in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and China where it was known as a slimming agent until two outbreaks of pulmonary dysfunction were reported in Taiwan and Japan in 1995 and 2005, respectively. Several studies described that the excessive consumption of Sauropus androgynus could cause drowsiness, constipation, and bronchiolitis obliterans and may lead to respiratory failure. Interestingly, this herb has been used in Malaysia and Indonesia in cooking and is commonly called the “multigreen” or “multivitamin” plant due to its high nutritive value and inexpensive source of dietary protein. The plant is widely used in traditional medicine for wound healing, inducing lactation, relief of urinary disorders, as an antidiabetic cure and also fever reduction. Besides these medicinal uses, the plant can also be used as colouring agent in food. This review will explore and compile the fragmented knowledge available on the botany, ethnobotany, chemical constitutes, pharmacological properties, and toxicological aspects of this plant. This comprehensive review will give readers the fundamental, comprehensive, and current knowledge regarding Sauropus androgynus L. Merr. PMID:26413127

  9. Toxicological studies on a novel phytase expressed from synthetic genes in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, J; Pedersen, P B; Elvig-Joergensen, S G; Skov, L K; Olsen, C L; Glitsoe, L V

    2011-08-01

    Phytases are widely used as feed additives for monogastric animals, which cannot easily utilise the phosphorus bound in phytate (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate). The current study presents a safety evaluation of a 6-phytase produced by an Aspergillus oryzae strain expressing two synthetic genes, both mimicking a phytase gene from a Citrobacter braakii strain. Oral administration of the phytase preparation to rats at a dose level of 0.86 g total organic solids/kg body weight/day for 13 weeks did not cause any adverse effect. The phytase preparation did not exhibit irritative potential when applied locally to the eyes of rabbits or when applied to the skin using the in vitro three-dimensional epidermis model of adult human-derived epidermal keratinocytes. Furthermore, the phytase preparation was found not to represent mutagenic or clastogenic potential in the bacterial reverse mutation assay and in the in vitro micronucleus assays. Based on the toxicological data, the large safety factors calculated under common recommended dose assumptions for broiler chickens and weaned piglets, and the fact that Aspergillus oryzae is considered a safe strain lineage, it is concluded that there are no reasons for safety concerns when using this phytase as a feed additive. PMID:21672596

  10. Optimal designs for discriminating between dose-response models in toxicology studies

    E-print Network

    Dette, Holger; Shpilev, Piter; Wong, Weng Kee; 10.3150/10-BEJ257

    2010-01-01

    We consider design issues for toxicology studies when we have a continuous response and the true mean response is only known to be a member of a class of nested models. This class of non-linear models was proposed by toxicologists who were concerned only with estimation problems. We develop robust and efficient designs for model discrimination and for estimating parameters in the selected model at the same time. In particular, we propose designs that maximize the minimum of $D$- or $D_1$-efficiencies over all models in the given class. We show that our optimal designs are efficient for determining an appropriate model from the postulated class, quite efficient for estimating model parameters in the identified model and also robust with respect to model misspecification. To facilitate the use of optimal design ideas in practice, we have also constructed a website that freely enables practitioners to generate a variety of optimal designs for a range of models and also enables them to evaluate the efficiency of ...

  11. Osteogenic Potential of Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Preclinical Studies: A Systematic Review Using Modified ARRIVE and CONSORT Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthi, Murali; Bakkar, Mohammed; Jordan, Jack; Tran, Simon D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective. Dental stem cell-based tissue engineered constructs are emerging as a promising alternative to autologous bone transfer for treating bone defects. The purpose of this review is to systematically assess the preclinical in vivo and in vitro studies which have evaluated the efficacy of dental stem cells on bone regeneration. Methods. A literature search was conducted in Ovid Medline, Embase, PubMed, and Web of Science up to October 2014. Implantation of dental stem cells in animal models for evaluating bone regeneration and/or in vitro studies demonstrating osteogenic potential of dental stem cells were included. The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were used to ensure the quality of the search. Modified ARRIVE (Animal research: reporting in invivo experiments) and CONSORT (Consolidated reporting of trials) were used to critically analyze the selected studies. Results. From 1914 citations, 207 full-text articles were screened and 137 studies were included in this review. Because of the heterogeneity observed in the studies selected, meta-analysis was not possible. Conclusion. Both in vivo and in vitro studies indicate the potential use of dental stem cells in bone regeneration. However well-designed randomized animal trials are needed before moving into clinical trials. PMID:26106427

  12. A review of inhalation toxicology studies with para-aramid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Warheit, D B

    1995-10-01

    The paper summarizes the results of inhalation toxicology studies associated with para-aramid (p-aramid) fibrils. The review is subdivided into two categories: the results of inhalation toxicity studies and mechanistic inhalation studies. Keratin-associated lesions were observed in the lungs of female rats following chronic exposure to high concentrations of p-aramid. These lesions were originally interpreted as cystic keratinizing squamous cell carcinomas (CKSCC). In recent years, this keratinizing lesion has been observed in the lungs of rats with greater regularity in numerous chronic inhalation studies following exposures to a variety of dusts. In an attempt to reach a consensus on an appropriate diagnosis for this lesion, an international panel of pathologists was convened to evaluate the morphological aspects of this lesion. The panel considered that the most appropriate diagnosis for this lesion was 'proliferative keratin cyst' (PKC), the biological potential of the PKC remains controversial, but it appears to be unique to the rat species and has little relevance for humans. Mechanistic studies with p-aramid have demonstrated that acute inhalation of high concentrations of fibrils produces a potent but transient pulmonary inflammatory and cell labelling response. The inhaled fibrils have low durability in the lungs of rats as evidenced by a progressive decrease in median fibre lengths with increasing residence time in the lung. In contrast, in a comparative study, size-separated chrysotile asbestos produced a sustained increase over controls in cellular proliferation responses of terminal airways, parenchyma, subpleural and mesothelial regions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8526399

  13. A critique of biomarkers in environmental toxicology: A case study in birds

    SciTech Connect

    Bellward, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have been testing the hypothesis that exposure to elevated levels of 2,3,7,8-TCDD and similarly-acting compounds derived from pulp mill effluent adversely affects the reproductive capacity of colonies of great blue herons and double crested cormorants in the local area. Their objectives included developing quantitative TCDD dose-response curves for various toxicologically relevant endpoints in birds, with the goal of finding an appropriate environmental biomarker of dioxin exposure and toxicity. Potential biomarkers studied included ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) as a measure of cytochrome P-450 1-A activity, and various hormonally-relevant end-points as measures of dioxin toxicity. The animal model used was the newly hatched chick, after in ovo exposure either in the laboratory or from the environment. Because the TEQ approach is based to a large extent on the use of in vitro and in vivo biomarkers, this study provides a useful example of one of the simplest in vivo models. The authors were able to construct hepatic EROD dose-response curves from the environmentally exposed heron and cormorant chicks, and from TCDD egg injections both early and late in the incubation period. Domestic chicken and pigeons were used as control species. The EROD induction data from the late injection pigeon study was very helpful for predicting appropriate doses for use in the early injection experiments, and for the wild avian species. However, the data was too limited to use for accurately predicting such endpoints as mortality, or effects at the lower end of the dose-response curves. Using various toxic equivalency factors, TEQs for the environmental data were calculated, and compared to the laboratory derived dose-response curves for TCDD. Using specific examples from this environmental case study, the strengths and weaknesses of the use of biomarkers and the TEQ approach will be discussed.

  14. Preclinical study of using multiphoton microscopy to diagnose liver cancer and differentiate benign and malignant liver lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Gang; Wu, Xiufeng; Zhou, Dong; Xie, Shusen; Jiang, Jiahao; Ying, Mingang; Jia, Fan; Chen, Jianxin; Zhou, Jian

    2012-02-01

    Recently, the miniaturized multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and multiphoton probe allow the clinical use of multiphoton endoscopy for diagnosing cancer via ``optical biopsy''. The purpose of this study was to establish MPM optical diagnostic features for liver cancer and evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MPM optical diagnosis. Firstly, we performed a pilot study to establish the MPM diagnostic features by investigating 60 surgical specimens, and found that high-resolution MPM images clearly demonstrated apparent differences between benign and malignant liver lesions in terms of their tissue architecture and cell morphology. Cancer cells, characterized by irregular size and shape, enlarged nuclei, and increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, were identified by MPM images, which were comparable to hematoxylin-eosin staining images. Secondly, we performed a blinded study to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MPM optical diagnosis by investigating another 164 specimens, and found that the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MPM diagnosis was 96.32%, 96.43%, and 96.34%, respectively. In conclusion, it is feasible to use MPM to diagnose liver cancer and differentiate benign and malignant liver lesions. This preclinical study provides the groundwork for further using multiphoton endoscopy to perform real-time noninvasive ``optical biopsy'' for liver lesions in the near future.

  15. Does Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Directly Depress Myocardial Function? A Review of Clinical Cases and Preclinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Suffredini, Dante A; Sampath-Kumar, Hanish; Li, Yan; Ohanjanian, Lernik; Remy, Kenneth E; Cui, Xizhong; Eichacker, Peter Q

    2015-01-01

    The US outbreak of B.anthracis infection in 2001 and subsequent cases in the US and Europe demonstrate that anthrax is a continuing risk for the developed world. While several bacterial components contribute to the pathogenesis of B. anthracis, production of lethal toxin (LT) is strongly associated with the development of hypotension and lethality. However, the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular instability LT produces are unclear. Some evidence suggests that LT causes shock by impairing the peripheral vasculature, effects consistent with the substantial extravasation of fluid in patients dying with B. anthracis. Other data suggests that LT directly depresses myocardial function. However a clinical correlate for this latter possibility is less evident since functional studies and post-mortem examination in patients demonstrate absent or minimal cardiac changes. The purposes of this review were to first present clinical studies of cardiac functional and histologic pathology with B. anthracis infection and to then examine in vivo, in vitro, and ex vivo preclinical studies of LT's myocardial effects. Together, these data suggest that it is unclear whether that LT directly depresses cardiac function. This question is important for the clinical management and development of new therapies for anthrax and efforts should continue to be made to answer it. PMID:26703730

  16. Does Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Directly Depress Myocardial Function? A Review of Clinical Cases and Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Suffredini, Dante A.; Sampath-Kumar, Hanish; Li, Yan; Ohanjanian, Lernik; Remy, Kenneth E.; Cui, Xizhong; Eichacker, Peter Q.

    2015-01-01

    The US outbreak of B.anthracis infection in 2001 and subsequent cases in the US and Europe demonstrate that anthrax is a continuing risk for the developed world. While several bacterial components contribute to the pathogenesis of B. anthracis, production of lethal toxin (LT) is strongly associated with the development of hypotension and lethality. However, the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular instability LT produces are unclear. Some evidence suggests that LT causes shock by impairing the peripheral vasculature, effects consistent with the substantial extravasation of fluid in patients dying with B. anthracis. Other data suggests that LT directly depresses myocardial function. However a clinical correlate for this latter possibility is less evident since functional studies and post-mortem examination in patients demonstrate absent or minimal cardiac changes. The purposes of this review were to first present clinical studies of cardiac functional and histologic pathology with B. anthracis infection and to then examine in vivo, in vitro, and ex vivo preclinical studies of LT’s myocardial effects. Together, these data suggest that it is unclear whether that LT directly depresses cardiac function. This question is important for the clinical management and development of new therapies for anthrax and efforts should continue to be made to answer it. PMID:26703730

  17. Photodynamic therapy with the phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4: The case experience with preclinical mechanistic and early clinical-translational studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Janine D.; Scull, Heather

    2007-11-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is emerging as a promising non-invasive treatment for cancers. PDT involves either local or systemic administration of a photosensitizing drug, which preferentially localizes within the tumor, followed by illumination of the involved organ with light, usually from a laser source. Here, we provide a selective overview of our experience with PDT at Case Western Reserve University, specifically with the silicon phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4. We first review our in vitro studies evaluating the mechanism of cell killing by Pc 4-PDT. Then we briefly describe our clinical experience in a Phase I trial of Pc 4-PDT and our preliminary translational studies evaluating the mechanisms behind tumor responses. Preclinical work identified (a) cardiolipin and the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL as targets of Pc 4-PDT, (b) the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, with the key participation of caspase-3, as a central response of many human cancer cells to Pc 4-PDT, (c) signaling pathways that could modify apoptosis, and (d) a formulation by which Pc 4 could be applied topically to human skin and penetrate at least through the basal layer of the epidermis. Clinical-translational studies enabled us to develop an immunohistochemical assay for caspase-3 activation, using biopsies from patients treated with topical Pc 4 in a Phase I PDT trial for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Results suggest that this assay may be used as an early biomarker of clinical response.

  18. Comparative Plasma Exposure and Lung Distribution of Two Human Use Commercial Azithromycin Formulations Assessed in Murine Model: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Rivulgo, Virginia; Sparo, Mónica; Ceci, Mónica; Fumuso, Elida; Confalonieri, Alejandra; Sánchez Bruni, Sergio F.

    2013-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) therapeutic failure and relapses of patients treated with generic formulations have been observed in clinical practice. The main goal of this research was to compare in a preclinical study the serum exposure and lung tissue concentration of two commercial formulations AZM-based in murine model. The current study involved 264 healthy Balb-C. Mice were divided into two groups (n = 44): animals of Group A (reference formulation -R-) were orally treated with AZM suspension at 10?mg/kg of b.w. Experimental animals of Group B (generic formulation -G-) received identical treatment than Group A with a generic formulation AZM-based. The study was repeated twice as Phase II and III. Serum and lung tissue samples were taken 24?h post treatment. Validated microbiological assay was used to determine the serum pharmacokinetic and lung distribution of AZM. After the pharmacokinetic analysis was observed, a similar serum exposure for both formulations of AZM assayed. In contrast, statistical differences (P < 0.001) were obtained after comparing the concentrations of both formulations in lung tissue, being the values obtained for AUC and Cmax (AZM-R-) +1586 and 122%, respectively, than those obtained for AZM-G- in lung. These differences may indicate large differences on the distribution process of both formulations, which may explain the lack of efficacy/therapeutic failure observed on clinical practice. PMID:24073402

  19. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of 1,3-butadiene in mice: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Mast, T.J.; Brown, M.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Clark, M.L.; Decker, J.R.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Rowe, S.E.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1987-11-01

    Maternal toxicity, reproductive performance and developmental toxicology were evaluated in CD-1 mice following whole-body, inhalation exposures to 0, 40, 200 and 1000 ppM of 1,3-butadiene. The female mice, which had mated with unexposed males were exposed to the chemical for 6 hours/day on 6 through 15 dg and sacrificed on 18 dg. Maternal animals were weighed prior to mating and on 0, 6, 11 and 18 dg; the mice were observed for mortality, morbidity and signs of toxicity during exposure and examined for gross tissue abnormalities at necropsy. Live fetuses were weighed and subjected to external, visceral and skeletal examinations to detect growth retardation and morphologic anomalies. Significant concentration-related decreases were detected in a number of maternal body weight measures. There was a significant concentration-related depression of fetal body weights and placental weights. Body weights of male fetuses of all exposed groups were significantly lower than values for control fetuses; weights of female fetuses were significantly depressed in the mice exposed to 200 and 1000 ppM. In the 200- and 1000-ppM exposure groups, weights of placentas of male fetuses were significantly decreased, but placental weights of female fetuses were significantly affected only in litters exposed to the highest 1,3-butadiene concentration. This exposure regimen produced significant signs of maternal toxicity at concentrations of 200 and 1000 ppM 1,3-butadiene.

  20. [Reproduction toxicologic studies on rats following oral administration of benzopyrone preparations].

    PubMed

    Preuss-Ueberschär, C; Ueberschär, S; Grote, W

    1984-01-01

    The influence of the benzopyrone preparation Venalot (active substances: coumarin and troxerutin; in the following briefly called CT) on the fertility and teratogenicity as well as on the perinatal and postnatal development of a total of 3 generations was evaluated in a combined study. The 1-, 8-, 64-, and 128fold of the daily therapeutical doses for humans was suspended in tap water and administered orally by gavage to 95 male and 190 female SPF rats (Wistar) (test groups 2 to 5). 23 male and 46 female rats (test group 1) served as controls and were given tap water alone. The male animals were subjected to a pretreatment of 10, the female animals to one of 3 weeks. The treatment was continued during the phase of mating. The animals scheduled for cesarian section received the test substance until the day of the laparatomy (gestation day 20), those selected for littering throughout lactation (day 24 post partum). With the aid of a stepwise histological technique, the teratological examination could also disclose non lethal malformations of the organs. The treatment resulted in a decreased food consumption in the animals of group 5 and in a reduced gain of body weight as well as pathologic-anatomically and histologically demonstrable, definitely dose related hepatic lesions. The test substance had no effect on either the treated P generation nor the untreated F1 generation. As teratogenic effects could also not be demonstrated and the peri- and postnatal development of the filial generations 1 and 2 was undisturbed, the present study does not indicate a reproduction toxicological risk.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6542792

  1. Docking-based classification models for exploratory toxicology studies on high-quality estrogenic experimental data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Exploratory toxicology is a new emerging research area whose ultimate mission is that of protecting human health and environment from risks posed by chemicals. In this regard, the ethical and practical limitation of animal testing has encouraged the promotion of compu...

  2. Toxicological-hygienic requirements for study, registration, and regulations of pesticides in the USSR.

    PubMed

    Kagan YuS

    1991-01-01

    This review discusses the toxicological and hygienic aspects of the extensive increase in pesticide use, which has resulted in the great majority of people throughout the world being affected by their presence. The need for a broad exchange at an international level of the findings of toxicological and hygienic research is established. Brief information on the development of pesticide toxicological research in the USSR is also presented. Accepted criteria for toxicological and hygienic pesticide assessments in the USSR are also systematically reviewed, with respect to the evaluation of physical and chemical properties, toxicity as defined through acute and subacute experiments, cumulative properties, and effects on skin and mucous membranes. The methodology for establishing threshold and noneffective (harmless) levels is also described, along with the prediction of delayed adverse effects. Other areas discussed include the classification of pesticides by degree of toxicity and danger, the system of research and regulation in the USSR, and the principle of integrated standardization of pesticide content of food, water, and atmospheric air. The review concludes with a look at certain prospective trends in the search for and development of pesticides that have selective action on target organisms but are harmless to human health and the environment. PMID:1994460

  3. INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY-BASED TOXICOLOGY STUDIES ON DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS (DBPS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    DBPs are formed by reactions of chemical disinfectants with natural organic matter in the source water. Although more than 300 DBPs are known, many remain unidentified; for chlorination, known DBPs account for ~50% of the mass of total organic halide. Toxicological evaluation o...

  4. The Sheep as a Model of Preclinical Safety and Pharmacokinetic Evaluations of Candidate Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, David; Dias, Nicola; Holding, Jeremy; Muntendam, Alex; Oostebring, Freddy; Dreier, Peter; Rohan, Lisa; Nuttall, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    When developing novel microbicide products for the prevention of HIV infection, the preclinical safety program must evaluate not only the active pharmaceutical ingredient but also the product itself. To that end, we applied several relatively standard toxicology study methodologies to female sheep, incorporating an assessment of the pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability, and local toxicity of a dapivirine-containing human vaginal ring formulation (Dapivirine Vaginal Ring-004). We performed a 3-month general toxicology study, a preliminary pharmacokinetic study using drug-loaded vaginal gel, and a detailed assessment of the kinetics of dapivirine delivery to plasma, vaginal, and rectal fluid and rectal, vaginal, and cervical tissue over 28 days of exposure and 3 and 7 days after removal of the ring. The findings of the general toxicology study supported the existing data from both preclinical and clinical studies in that there were no signs of toxicity related to dapivirine. In addition, the presence of the physical dapivirine ring did not alter local or systemic toxicity or the pharmacokinetics of dapivirine. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that the dapivirine ring produced significant vaginal tissue levels of dapivirine. However, no dapivirine was detected in cervical tissue samples using the methods described here. Plasma and vaginal fluid levels were lower than those in previous clinical studies, while there were detectable dapivirine levels in the rectal tissue and fluid. All tissue and fluid levels tailed off rapidly to undetectable levels following removal of the ring. The sheep represents a very useful model for the assessment of the safety and pharmacokinetics of microbicide drug delivery devices, such as the vaginal ring. PMID:25845860

  5. Reform in Teaching Preclinical Pathophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yong-Yu; Li, Kun; Yao, Hong; Xu, Xiao-Juan; Cai, Qiao-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Pathophysiology is a scientific discipline that studies the onset and progression of pathological conditions and diseases, and pathophysiology is one of the core courses in most preclinical medical curricula. In China, most medical schools house a Department of Pathophysiology, in contrast to medical schools in many developed countries. The staff…

  6. Curcumin nanoformulations: a review of pharmaceutical properties and preclinical studies and clinical data related to cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Naksuriya, Ornchuma; Okonogi, Siriporn; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Hennink, Wim E

    2014-03-01

    Curcumin, a natural yellow phenolic compound, is present in many kinds of herbs, particularly in Curcuma longa Linn. (turmeric). It is a natural antioxidant and has shown many pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-cancer, and anti-Alzheimer in both preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, curcumin has hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, cardioprotective, neuroprotective, hypoglycemic, antirheumatic, and antidiabetic activities and it also suppresses thrombosis and protects against myocardial infarction. Particularly, curcumin has demonstrated efficacy as an anticancer agent, but a limiting factor is its extremely low aqueous solubility which hampers its use as therapeutic agent. Therefore, many technologies have been developed and applied to overcome this limitation. In this review, we summarize the recent works on the design and development of nano-sized delivery systems for curcumin, including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and micelles, conjugates, peptide carriers, cyclodextrins, solid dispersions, lipid nanoparticles and emulsions. Efficacy studies of curcumin nanoformulations using cancer cell lines and in vivo models as well as up-to-date human clinical trials are also discussed. PMID:24439402

  7. Forensic Toxicology Certificate

    E-print Network

    Saldin, Dilano

    of forensic science that is concerned with the study of toxic substances or poisons. Toxicology encompasses scientists and therefore will have a strong interest in the sciences and math. The work of a forensic.edu/cfs UWMilwLetSci For More Information: Center for Forensic Science 414-229-0510 cfs@uwm.edu This certificate

  8. Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic Emission Source Aerosols (TERESA)-power plant studies: assessment of cellular responses

    PubMed Central

    Godleski, John J.; Diaz, Edgar A.; Lemos, Miriam; Long, Mark; Ruiz, Pablo; Gupta, Tarun; Kang, Choong-Min; Coull, Brent

    2013-01-01

    The Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic Emission Source Aerosols (TERESA) project assessed primary and secondary particulate by simulating the chemical reactions that a plume from a source might undergo during atmospheric transport and added other atmospheric constituents that might interact with it. Three coal-fired power plants with different coal and different emission controls were used. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed for 6 h to either filtered air or aged aerosol from the power plant. Four exposure scenarios were studied: primary particles (P); primary + secondary (oxidized) particles (PO); primary + secondary (oxidized) particles + SOA (POS); and primary + secondary (oxidized) particles neutralized + SOA (PONS). Exposure concentrations varied by scenario to a maximum concentration of 257.1 ± 10.0 µg/m3. Twenty-four hours after exposure, pulmonary cellular responses were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), complete blood count (CBC), and histopathology. Exposure to the PONS and POS scenarios produced significant increases in BAL total cells and macrophage numbers at two plants. The PONS and P scenarios were associated with significant increases in BAL neutrophils and the presence of occasional neutrophils and increased macrophages in the airways and alveoli of exposed animals. Univariate analyses and random forest analyses showed that increases in total cell count and macrophage cell count were significantly associated with neutralized sulfate and several correlated measurements. Increases in neutrophils in BAL were associated with zinc. There were no significant differences in CBC parameters or blood vessel wall thickness by histopathology. The association between neutrophils increases and zinc raises the possibility that metals play a role in this response. PMID:21466245

  9. The underlying toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures: A case study on mixture toxicity of cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes to Photobacterium phosphoreum

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Dayong; Lin, Zhifen; Zhou, Xianghong; Yin, Daqiang

    2013-10-15

    Intracellular chemical reaction of chemical mixtures is one of the main reasons that cause synergistic or antagonistic effects. However, it still remains unclear what the influencing factors on the intracellular chemical reaction are, and how they influence on the toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures. To reveal this underlying toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures, a case study on mixture toxicity of cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes to Photobacterium phosphoreum was employed, and both their joint effects and mixture toxicity were observed. Then series of two-step linear regressions were performed to describe the relationships between joint effects, the expected additive toxicities and descriptors of individual chemicals (including concentrations, binding affinity to receptors, octanol/water partition coefficients). Based on the quantitative relationships, the underlying joint toxicological mechanisms were revealed. The result shows that, for mixtures with their joint effects resulting from intracellular chemical reaction, their underlying toxicological mechanism depends on not only their interaction with target proteins, but also their transmembrane actions and their concentrations. In addition, two generic points of toxicological mechanism were proposed including the influencing factors on intracellular chemical reaction and the difference of the toxicological mechanism between single reactive chemicals and their mixtures. This study provided an insight into the understanding of the underlying toxicological mechanism for chemical mixtures with intracellular chemical reaction. - Highlights: • Joint effects of nitriles and aldehydes at non-equitoxic ratios were determined. • A novel descriptor, ligand–receptor interaction energy (E{sub binding}), was employed. • Quantitative relationships for mixtures were developed based on a novel descriptor. • The underlying toxic mechanism was revealed based on quantitative relationships. • Two generic points of toxicological mechanism were elucidated.

  10. Academic Probation Preclinical or

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Academic Probation 2nd Preclinical or Clinical F 1st Preclinical or Clinical F 3rd Clinical Y 2nd = off probation /continue ---------------------- Fail = 1 F See below Student meets with ADSA & DOSLER Pass = off probation /continue ---------------------- Fail = 1 F See below Student meets with ADSA

  11. Volume cerebral blood flow reduction in pre-clinical stage of Alzheimer disease: evidence from an ultrasonographic study.

    PubMed

    Maalikjy Akkawi, Nabil; Borroni, B; Agosti, C; Magoni, M; Broli, M; Pezzini, A; Padovani, A

    2005-05-01

    The association of decreased cerebral blood flow with the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been a recent target of interest. By using neuroimaging techniques, growing attention has been devoted to the identification of preclinical AD. In this study, color duplex sonography of cervical arteries was used to measure mean cerebral blood flow (CBF) on 55 amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients. Two years after enrollment, excluding patients who progressed to dementia other than AD, two subgroups were identified, patients who developed AD (MCI converters) and patients with preserved cognitive and functional level (MCI non-converters). Examining the mean difference of CBF measured at baseline in the two subgroups obtained, a significant difference was noticed (MCI converters 539.3 +/- 114.3 vs MCI non converters 636.0 +/- 143.9, p < 0.05). MCI patients with CBF higher than median value (558 ml/min) had lower risk of developing AD (specificity 72.2%, sensitivity 68.4%) within a two year follow-up. Ultrasonography of the cervical arteries is a simple, non invasive and widespread technique useful in detecting CBF decline during the MCI stage, thus identifying patients who later will convert to AD. PMID:15726249

  12. Computational Toxicology Research Program

    E-print Network

    . ORD's Computational Toxicology Research Program Implementation Plan (FY 2006 ­ 2008) April 2006...................................................................................................... 1 II. Office of Research and Development Computational Toxicology Program................................................................................................................................... 25 #12;. List of Figures Figure 1 ­ Component of the Computational Toxicology Research Program within

  13. Pasteurization of bone for tumour eradication prior to reimplantation – An in vitro & pre-clinical efficacy study

    PubMed Central

    Kode, Jyoti; Taur, Prasad; Gulia, Ashish; Jambhekar, Nirmala; Agarwal, Manish; Puri, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: In current era of limb-salvage therapy, pasteurization of bone sarcomas is receiving growing attention as a potential extracorporeal treatment and cost-effective alternative to allografts and radiation before surgical reimplantation. Detailed in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical study to evaluate efficacy of pasteurization to eradicate malignant cells has not been reported yet. The present study was carried out to assess the efficacy of pasteurization to kill tumour cells both in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Surgically resected specimens of osteosarcomas (n=4) were cut into equal halves and one section was pasteurized by heating at 60°C to 65°C for 40 min. Paired samples before and after pasteurization were studied in vitro for DNA ploidy, evaluation of histological change and elimination of mitotic activity. These tissues were transplanted in immune-deficient NOD-SCID mice to evaluate effect on tumour-generating ability, presence of human nuclei, osteopontin and cytokine/chemokines released in tumour-transplanted mice. Results: Non-pasteurized tumour samples had viable tumour cells which exhibited significant growth in culture, increased proliferative ability and clonogenic potential while respective pasteurized tumour tissues did not grow in culture and did not exhibit clonogenicity. Flow cytometry revealed that propidium iodide positive dead cells increased significantly (P< 0.01) post pasteurization. Seven of 12 non-pasteurized tumour transplanted mice demonstrated tumour-forming ability as against 0 of 12 in pasteurized tumour transplanted mice. Solid tumour xenografts exhibited strong expression of anti-human nuclei and osteopontin by immunohistochemistry as well as secretary human interluekin-6 (IL-6) while pasteurized mice failed to express these markers. Interpretation & conclusions: This study has provided a basis to establish pasteurization as being efficacious in ensuring tumour eradication from resected bone tumour specimens. Pasteurized tumour bearing bone can thus safely be used to reconstruct large defects after tumour resection. PMID:24927346

  14. The study of forensic toxicology should not be neglected in Japanese universities.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Kenji; Yajima, Daisuke; Abe, Hiroko; Nagasawa, Sayaka; Nara, Akina; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2015-04-01

    Forensic toxicology is aimed at identifying the relationship between drugs or poison and the cause of death or crime. In the authors' toxicology laboratory at Chiba University, the authors analyze almost every body for drugs and poisons. A simple inspection kit was used in an attempt to ascertain drug abuse. A mass spectrometer is used to perform highly accurate screening. When a poison is detected, quantitative analyses are required. A recent topic of interest is new psychoactive substances (NPS). Although NPS-related deaths may be decreasing, use of NPS as a cause of death is difficult to ascertain. Forensic institutes have recently begun to perform drug and poison tests on corpses. However, this approach presents several problems, as are discussed here. The hope is that highly accurate analyses of drugs and poisons will be performed throughout the country. PMID:25994068

  15. Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Rocco, Daniela Marisa; García-Bournissen, Facundo

    2015-11-01

    Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%). Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction. PMID:26587586

  16. Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Rocco, Daniela Marisa; García-Bournissen, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%). Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction. PMID:26587586

  17. Preclinical Studies of the Potent and Selective Nicotinic ?4?2 Receptor Ligand VMY-2-95

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and development of small molecules that antagonize neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors may provide new ligands for evaluation in models of depression or addiction. We discovered a small molecule, VMY-2-95, a nAChR ligand with picomolar affinity and high selectivity for ?4?2 receptors. In this study, we investigated its preclinical profile in regards to solubility, lipophilicity, metabolic stability, intestinal permeability, bioavailability, and drug delivery to the rat brain. Metabolic stability of VMY-2-95·2HCl was monitored on human liver microsomes, and specific activity of VMY-2-95·2HCl on substrate metabolism by CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 was tested in a high-throughput manner. The intestinal transport of VMY-2-95·2HCl was studied through Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability. VMY-2-95·2HCl was soluble in water and chemically stable, and the apparent partition coefficient was 0.682. VMY-2-95·2HCl showed significant inhibition of CYP2C9 and 2C19, but weak or no effect on 1A2, 2D6, and 3A4. The Caco-2 cell model studies revealed that VMY-2-95·2HCl was highly permeable with efflux ratio of 1.11. VMY-2-95·2HCl achieved a maximum serum concentration of 0.56 mg/mL at 0.9 h and was orally available with a half-life of ?9 h. Furthermore, VMY-2-95·2HCl was detected in the rat brain after 3 mg/kg oral administration and achieved a maximal brain tissue concentration of 2.3 ?g/g within 60 min. Overall, the results demonstrate that VMY-2-95·2HCl has good drug like properties and can penetrate the blood–brain barrier with oral administration. PMID:25533629

  18. Pre-Clinical Atherosclerosis due to HIV Infection: Carotid Intima-Medial Thickness Measurements from the FRAM Study

    PubMed Central

    Grunfeld, C.; Delaney, J.A.C.; Wanke, C.; Currier, J.S.; Scherzer, R.; Biggs, M. L.; Tien, P.; Shlipak, M.; Sidney, S.; Polak, J.F.; O'Leary, D.; Bacchetti, P.; Kronmal, R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. However, it is controversial whether HIV infection contributes to accelerated atherosclerosis independent of traditional CVD risk factors. Methods Cross-sectional study of HIV-infected and control subjects without pre-existing CVD from the study of Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Pre-clinical atherosclerosis was assessed by carotid intima-medial thickness (IMT) measurements in the internal/bulb and common regions in HIV-infected and control subjects after adjusting for traditional CVD risk factors. Results For internal carotid, mean IMT was 1.17±0.50mm for HIV-infected participants and 1.06±0.58mm for controls (p<0.0001). After multivariable adjustment for demographic characteristics, the mean difference of HIV-infected vs. controls was +0.188mm (95%CI 0.113-0.263, p<0.0001). Further adjustment for traditional CVD risk factors modestly attenuated the HIV association (+0.148mm, 95%CI 0.072-0.224, p=0.0001). For the common carotid, HIV infection was independently associated with greater IMT (+0.033mm, 95%CI 0.010, 0.056, p=0.005). The association of HIV infection with IMT was similar to that of smoking which was also associated with greater IMT (internal +0.173mm, common +0.020mm). Conclusions Even after adjustment for traditional CVD risk factors, HIV infection was accompanied by more extensive atherosclerosis measured by IMT. The stronger association of HIV infection with IMT in the internal/bulb region compared to the common carotid may explain previous discrepancies in the literature. The association of HIV infection with IMT was similar to that of traditional CVD risk factors, such as smoking. PMID:19455012

  19. Preclinical studies of the potent and selective nicotinic ?4?2 receptor ligand VMY-2-95.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hyesik; Song, Jun-ke; Yenugonda, Venkata Mahidhar; Zhang, Li; Shuo, Tian; Cheema, Amrita K; Kong, Yali; Du, Guan-hua; Brown, Milton L

    2015-02-01

    The discovery and development of small molecules that antagonize neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors may provide new ligands for evaluation in models of depression or addiction. We discovered a small molecule, VMY-2-95, a nAChR ligand with picomolar affinity and high selectivity for ?4?2 receptors. In this study, we investigated its preclinical profile in regards to solubility, lipophilicity, metabolic stability, intestinal permeability, bioavailability, and drug delivery to the rat brain. Metabolic stability of VMY-2-95·2HCl was monitored on human liver microsomes, and specific activity of VMY-2-95·2HCl on substrate metabolism by CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 was tested in a high-throughput manner. The intestinal transport of VMY-2-95·2HCl was studied through Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability. VMY-2-95·2HCl was soluble in water and chemically stable, and the apparent partition coefficient was 0.682. VMY-2-95·2HCl showed significant inhibition of CYP2C9 and 2C19, but weak or no effect on 1A2, 2D6, and 3A4. The Caco-2 cell model studies revealed that VMY-2-95·2HCl was highly permeable with efflux ratio of 1.11. VMY-2-95·2HCl achieved a maximum serum concentration of 0.56 mg/mL at 0.9 h and was orally available with a half-life of ?9 h. Furthermore, VMY-2-95·2HCl was detected in the rat brain after 3 mg/kg oral administration and achieved a maximal brain tissue concentration of 2.3 ?g/g within 60 min. Overall, the results demonstrate that VMY-2-95·2HCl has good drug like properties and can penetrate the blood-brain barrier with oral administration. PMID:25533629

  20. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  1. Preclinical studies identify non-apoptotic low-level caspase-3 as therapeutic target in pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Luyet, Camille; Schulze, Katja; Sayar, Beyza S; Howald, Denise; Müller, Eliane J; Galichet, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    The majority of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) patients suffer from a live-threatening loss of intercellular adhesion between keratinocytes (acantholysis). The disease is caused by auto-antibodies that bind to desmosomal cadherins desmoglein (Dsg) 3 or Dsg3 and Dsg1 in mucous membranes and skin. A currently unresolved controversy in PV is whether apoptosis is involved in the pathogenic process. The objective of this study was to perform preclinical studies to investigate apoptotic pathway activation in PV pathogenesis with the goal to assess its potential for clinical therapy. For this purpose, we investigated mouse and human skin keratinocyte cultures treated with PV antibodies (the experimental Dsg3 monospecific antibody AK23 or PV patients IgG), PV mouse models (passive transfer of AK23 or PVIgG into adult and neonatal mice) as well as PV patients' biopsies (n=6). A combination of TUNEL assay, analyses of membrane integrity, early apoptotic markers such as cleaved poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) and the collapse of actin cytoskeleton failed to provide evidence for apoptosis in PV pathogenesis. However, the in vitro and in vivo PV models, allowing to monitor progression of lesion formation, revealed an early, transient and low-level caspase-3 activation. Pharmacological inhibition confirmed the functional implication of caspase-3 in major events in PV such as shedding of Dsg3, keratin retraction, proliferation including c-Myc induction, p38MAPK activation and acantholysis. Together, these data identify low-level caspase-3 activation downstream of disrupted Dsg3 trans- or cis-adhesion as a major event in PV pathogenesis that is non-synonymous with apoptosis and represents, unlike apoptotic components, a promising target for clinical therapy. At a broader level, these results posit that an impairment of adhesive functions in concert with low-level, non-lethal caspase-3 activation can evoke profound cellular changes which may be of relevance for other diseases including cancer. PMID:25748204

  2. A Preclinical Study Combining the DNA Repair Inhibitor Dbait with Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Melanoma1

    PubMed Central

    Biau, Julian; Devun, Flavien; Jdey, Wael; Kotula, Ewa; Quanz, Maria; Chautard, Emmanuel; Sayarath, Mano; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Verrelle, Pierre; Dutreix, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Melanomas are highly radioresistant tumors, mainly due to efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Dbait (which stands for DNA strand break bait) molecules mimic DSBs and trap DNA repair proteins, thereby inhibiting repair of DNA damage induced by radiation therapy (RT). First, the cytotoxic efficacy of Dbait in combination with RT was evaluated in vitro in SK28 and 501mel human melanoma cell lines. Though the extent of RT-induced damage was not increased by Dbait, it persisted for longer revealing a repair defect. Dbait enhanced RT efficacy independently of RT doses. We further assayed the capacity of DT01 (clinical form of Dbait) to enhance efficacy of “palliative” RT (10 × 3 Gy) or “radical” RT (20 × 3 Gy), in an SK28 xenografted model. Inhibition of repair of RT-induced DSB by DT01 was revealed by the significant increase of micronuclei in tumors treated with combined treatment. Mice treated with DT01 and RT combination had significantly better tumor growth control and longer survival compared to RT alone with the “palliative” protocol [tumor growth delay (TGD) by 5.7-fold; median survival: 119 vs 67 days] or the “radical” protocol (TGD by 3.2-fold; median survival: 221 vs 109 days). Only animals that received the combined treatment showed complete responses. No additional toxicity was observed in any DT01-treated groups. This preclinical study provides encouraging results for a combination of a new DNA repair inhibitor, DT01, with RT, in the absence of toxicity. A first-in-human phase I study is currently under way in the palliative management of melanoma in-transit metastases (DRIIM trial). PMID:25379020

  3. Choosing preclinical study models of diabetic retinopathy: key problems for consideration

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Xue-Song; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Ding, Yong; Zhong, Jing-Xiang; So, Kwok-Fai

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus in the eye. Although the clinical treatment for DR has already developed to a relative high level, there are still many urgent problems that need to be investigated in clinical and basic science. Currently, many in vivo animal models and in vitro culture systems have been applied to solve these problems. Many approaches have also been used to establish different DR models. However, till now, there has not been a single study model that can clearly and exactly mimic the developmental process of the human DR. Choosing the suitable model is important, not only for achieving our research goals smoothly, but also, to better match with different experimental proposals in the study. In this review, key problems for consideration in choosing study models of DR are discussed. These problems relate to clinical relevance, different approaches for establishing models, and choice of different species of animals as well as of the specific in vitro culture systems. Attending to these considerations will deepen the understanding on current study models and optimize the experimental design for the final goal of preventing DR. PMID:25429204

  4. Metabolic phenotyping applied to pre-clinical and clinical studies of acetaminophen metabolism and hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Coen, Muireann

    2015-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) is a widely used analgesic that is safe at therapeutic doses but is a major cause of acute liver failure (ALF) following overdose. APAP-induced hepatotoxicity is related to the formation of an electrophilic reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), which is detoxified through conjugation with reduced glutathione (GSH). One method that has been applied to study APAP metabolism and hepatotoxicity is that of metabolic phenotyping, which involves the study of the small molecule complement of complex biological samples. This approach involves the use of high-resolution analytical platforms such as NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to generate information-rich metabolic profiles that reflect both genetic and environmental influences and capture both endogenous and xenobiotic metabolites. Data modeling and mining and the subsequent identification of panels of candidate biomarkers are typically approached with multivariate statistical tools. We review the application of multi-platform metabolic profiling for the study of APAP metabolism in both in vivo models and humans. We also review the application of metabolic profiling for the study of endogenous metabolic pathway perturbations in response to APAP hepatotoxicity, with a particular focus on metabolites involved in the biosynthesis of GSH and those that reflect mitochondrial function such as long-chain acylcarnitines. Taken together, this body of work sheds much light on the mechanism of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and provides candidate biomarkers that may prove of translational relevance for improved stratification of APAP-induced ALF. PMID:25533740

  5. AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy for Choroideremia: Preclinical Studies in Personalized Models

    PubMed Central

    Vasireddy, Vidyullatha; Kohnke, Monika; Black, Aaron D.; Alexandrov, Krill; Zhou, Shangzhen; Maguire, Albert M.; Chung, Daniel C.; Mac, Helen; Sullivan, Lisa; Gadue, Paul; Bennicelli, Jeannette L.; French, Deborah L.; Bennett, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Choroideremia (CHM) is an X- linked retinal degeneration that is symptomatic in the 1st or 2nd decade of life causing nyctalopia and loss of peripheral vision. The disease progresses through mid-life, when most patients become blind. CHM is a favorable target for gene augmentation therapy, as the disease is due to loss of function of a protein necessary for retinal cell health, Rab Escort Protein 1 (REP1).The CHM cDNA can be packaged in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV), which has an established track record in human gene therapy studies, and, in addition, there are sensitive and quantitative assays to document REP1 activity. An animal model that accurately reflects the human condition is not available. In this study, we tested the ability to restore REP1 function in personalized in vitro models of CHM: lymphoblasts and induced pluripotent stems cells (iPSCs) from human patients. The initial step of evaluating safety of the treatment was carried out by evaluating for acute retinal histopathologic effects in normal-sighted mice and no obvious toxicity was identified. Delivery of the CHM cDNA to affected cells restores REP1 enzymatic activity and also restores proper protein trafficking. The gene transfer is efficient and the preliminary safety data are encouraging. These studies pave the way for a human clinical trial of gene therapy for CHM. PMID:23667438

  6. Preclinical Studies for Cartilage Repair: Recommendations from the International Cartilage Repair Society.

    PubMed

    Hurtig, Mark B; Buschmann, Michael D; Fortier, Lisa A; Hoemann, Caroline D; Hunziker, Ernst B; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; McIlwraith, C Wayne; Sah, Robert L; Whiteside, Robert A

    2011-04-01

    Investigational devices for articular cartilage repair or replacement are considered to be significant risk devices by regulatory bodies. Therefore animal models are needed to provide proof of efficacy and safety prior to clinical testing. The financial commitment and regulatory steps needed to bring a new technology to clinical use can be major obstacles, so the implementation of highly predictive animal models is a pressing issue. Until recently, a reductionist approach using acute chondral defects in immature laboratory species, particularly the rabbit, was considered adequate; however, if successful and timely translation from animal models to regulatory approval and clinical use is the goal, a step-wise development using laboratory animals for screening and early development work followed by larger species such as the goat, sheep and horse for late development and pivotal studies is recommended. Such animals must have fully organized and mature cartilage. Both acute and chronic chondral defects can be used but the later are more like the lesions found in patients and may be more predictive. Quantitative and qualitative outcome measures such as macroscopic appearance, histology, biochemistry, functional imaging, and biomechanical testing of cartilage, provide reliable data to support investment decisions and subsequent applications to regulatory bodies for clinical trials. No one model or species can be considered ideal for pivotal studies, but the larger animal species are recommended for pivotal studies. Larger species such as the horse, goat and pig also allow arthroscopic delivery, and press-fit or sutured implant fixation in thick cartilage as well as second look arthroscopies and biopsy procedures. PMID:26069576

  7. Neural Stem Cell-Mediated Enzyme-Prodrug Therapy for Glioma: Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Aboody, Karen S.; Najbauer, Joseph; Metz, Marianne Z.; D’Apuzzo, Massimo; Gutova, Margarita; Annala, Alexander J.; Synold, Timothy W.; Couture, Larry A.; Blanchard, Suzette; Moats, Rex A.; Garcia, Elizabeth; Aramburo, Soraya; Valenzuela, Valerie V.; Frank, Richard T.; Barish, Michael E.; Brown, Christine E.; Kim, Seung U.; Badie, Behnam; Portnow, Jana

    2013-01-01

    High-grade gliomas are extremely difficult to treat because they are invasive and therefore are not curable by surgical resection; the toxicity of currently chemo- and radiation therapies limits the doses that can be used. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have inherent tumor-tropic properties that enable their use as delivery vehicles that can target enzyme/prodrug therapy selectively to tumors. We have used a cytosine deaminase (CD)-expressing clonal human NSC line, HB1.F3.CD, to home to gliomas in mice and locally convert the tumor-localized prodrug 5-fluorocytosine to the active chemotherapeutic 5-fluorouracil. In vitro studies confirmed that the NSCs have normal karyotype, tumor tropism, and CD expression, indicating that these cells are genetically and functionally stable. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that these NSCs retained tumor tropism, even in mice pre-treated with radiation or dexamethasone to mimic clinically relevant adjuvant therapies. We evaluated safety and toxicity after intracerebral administration of the NSCs in non-tumor bearing, and in orthotopic glioma-bearing, immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice. We detected no difference in toxicity associated with conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil, no NSCs outside the brain, and no histological evidence of pathology or tumorigenesis attributable to the NSCs. The average tumor volume in mice that received HB1.F3.CD NSCs and 5-fluorocytosine was approximately one-third that of the average volume in control mice. On the basis of these results, we conclude that combination therapy with HB1.F3.CD NSCs and 5-fluorocytosine is safe, non-toxic and effective in mice. These data have led to approval of a first-inhuman study of an allogeneic NSC-mediated enzyme/prodrug targeted cancer therapy in patients with recurrent high-grade glioma. PMID:23658244

  8. Pre-clinical study of 21 approved drugs in the mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Carre-Pierrat, Maïté; Lafoux, Aude; Tanniou, Guillaume; Chambonnier, Lucie; Divet, Alexandra; Fougerousse, Francoise; Huchet-Cadiou, Corinne; Ségalat, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genetic disease caused by the absence of functional dystrophin, remains without adequate treatment. Although great hopes are attached to gene and cell therapies, identification of active small molecules remains a valid option for new treatments. We have studied the effect of 20 approved pharmaceutical compounds on the muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx5Cv mice. These compounds were selected as the result of a prior screen of 800 approved molecules on a dystrophin mutant of the invertebrate animal model Cænorhabditis elegans. Drugs were administered to the mice through maternal feeding since 2weeks of life and mixed in their food after the 3rd week of life. The effects of the drugs on mice were evaluated both at 6weeks and 16weeks. Each drug was tested at two concentrations. Prednisone was added to the molecule list as a positive control. To investigate treatment efficiency, more than 30 histological, biochemical and functional parameters were recorded. This extensive study reveals that tricyclics (Imipramine and Amitriptyline) are beneficial to the fast muscles of mdx mice. It also highlights a great variability of responses according to time, muscles and assays. PMID:21392993

  9. Preclinical episodes of orofacial pain symptoms and their association with healthcare behaviors in the OPPERA prospective cohort study.

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Gary D.; Sanders, Anne E.; Bair, Eric; Brownstein, Naomi; Dampier, Dawn; Knott, Charles; Fillingim, Roger; Maixner, William O.; Smith, Shad; Greenspan, Joel; Dubner, Ron; Ohrbach, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The course of preclinical pain symptoms sheds light on the etiology and prognosis of chronic pain. We aimed to quantify rates of developing initial- and recurrent-symptoms of painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and to evaluate associations with health behaviors. In the OPPERA prospective cohort study, 2,719 people aged 18-44 years with lifetime absence of TMD when enrolled completed 25,103 quarterly (three-monthly) questionnaires during amedian 2.3-year follow-up period. Questionnaires documented TMD symptom episodes, headache, other body pain, health care attendance and analgesic usage and. Kaplan-Meier methods for clustered data estimated symptom-free survival time. Multivariable models assessed demographic variation in TMD symptom rates and evaluated associations with healthcare and analgesic use. One third of people developed TMD symptoms and for one quarter of symptomatic episodes, pain intensity was severe. Initial TMD symptoms developed at anannual rate of 18.8 episodes per 100 people. The annual rate more than doubled for first-recurrence and doubled again for second-or-subsequent recurrence such that, one year after first recurrence, 71% of people experienced second recurrence. The overall rate increased with age and was greater in African-Americans and lower in Asians relative to Whites. The probability of TMD symptoms was strongly associated with concurrent episodes of headache and body pain and with past episodes of TMD symptoms. Episodes of TMD symptoms, headache and body pain were associated with increases of ~10% in probability of analgesic usage and healthcare attendance. Yet, even when TMD, headache and body pain occurred concurrently, 27% of people neither attended healthcare nor used analgesics. PMID:23531476

  10. A Cre-conditional MYCN-driven neuroblastoma mouse model as an improved tool for preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Althoff, K; Beckers, A; Bell, E; Nortmeyer, M; Thor, T; Sprüssel, A; Lindner, S; De Preter, K; Florin, A; Heukamp, L C; Klein-Hitpass, L; Astrahantseff, K; Kumps, C; Speleman, F; Eggert, A; Westermann, F; Schramm, A; Schulte, J H

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer that originates from neural crest-derived cells, is the most common deadly solid tumor of infancy. Amplification of the MYCN oncogene, which occurs in approximately 20–25% of human neuroblastomas, is the most prominent genetic marker of high-stage disease. The availability of valid preclinical in vivo models is a prerequisite to develop novel targeted therapies. We here report on the generation of transgenic mice with Cre-conditional induction of MYCN in dopamine ?-hydroxylase-expressing cells, termed LSL-MYCN;Dbh-iCre. These mice develop neuroblastic tumors with an incidence of >75%, regardless of strain background. Molecular profiling of tumors revealed upregulation of the MYCN-dependent miR-17–92 cluster as well as expression of neuroblastoma marker genes, including tyrosine hydroxylase and the neural cell adhesion molecule 1. Gene set enrichment analyses demonstrated significant correlation with MYC-associated expression patterns. Array comparative genome hybridization showed that chromosomal aberrations in LSL-MYCN;Dbh-iCre tumors were syntenic to those observed in human neuroblastomas. Treatment of a cell line established from a tumor derived from a LSL-MYCN;Dbh-iCre mouse with JQ1 or MLN8237 reduced cell viability and demonstrated oncogene addiction to MYCN. Here we report establishment of the first Cre-conditional human MYCN-driven mouse model for neuroblastoma that closely recapitulates the human disease with respect to tumor localization, histology, marker expression and genomic make up. This mouse model is a valuable tool for further functional studies and to assess the effect of targeted therapies. PMID:25174395

  11. Systematic Approach to Remediation in Basic Science Knowledge for Preclinical Students: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amara, Francis

    Remediation of pre-clerkship students for deficits in basic science knowledge should help them overcome their learning deficiencies prior to clerkship. However, very little is known about remediation in basic science knowledge during pre-clerkship. This study utilized the program theory framework to collect and organize mixed methods data of the remediation plan for pre-clerkship students who failed their basic science cognitive examinations in a Canadian medical school. This plan was analyzed using a logic model narrative approach and compared to literature on the learning theories. The analysis showed a remediation plan that was strong on governance and verification of scores, but lacked: clarity and transparency of communication, qualified remedial tutors, individualized diagnosis of learner's deficits, and student centered learning. Participants admitted uncertainty about the efficacy of the remediation process. A remediation framework is proposed that includes student-centered participation, individualized learning plan and activities, deliberate practice, feedback, reflection, and rigorous reassessment.

  12. Irinotecan delivery by microbubble-assisted ultrasound - A pilot preclinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Novell, Anthony; Serrière, Sophie; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2012-11-01

    Irinotecan is conventionally used for the treatment of colorectal cancer. However, its administration is associated with severe side effects. Targeted drug delivery using ultrasound (US) combined with microbubbles offers new opportunities to increase the therapeutic effectiveness of antitumor treatment and to reduce toxic exposure to healthy tissues. The objective of this study is to investigate the safety and efficacy of in-vivo delivery of irinotecan by microbubble-assisted US in human glioblastoma model (U-87 MG). In order to validate the potential of this new method in-vivo, subcutaneous tumors were implanted in the flank of nude mouse and treated when they reached a volume of 100 mm3. In the first study, the measured volumes with caliper and anatomic ultrasound imaging were compared for the monitoring and the quantification of tumor growth during 27 days. Ultrasound imaging measurements were positively correlated to caliper measurements. The tumor treatment consisted of an i.v. injection of irinotecan (20 mg/kg) followed one hour later by i.v. administration of MM1 microbubble and an US insonation using a single-element transducer operating at 1MHz (400 kPa, 10 kHz PRF 40% DC, 3 min). The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated for 39 days by measuring the tumor volume before and after treatment using a caliper and based on ultrasound images using an 18 MHz probe (Vevo 2100). Our results showed that anatomical ultrasound imaging was as efficient as caliper for the monitoring and the quantification of tumor growth. Moreover, irinotecan delivery by sonoporation induced a significant decrease of glioblastoma tumor volume and an increase of tumor-doubling time compared to the tumor treated by irinotecan alone. In conclusion, this novel therapeutic approach has promising features since it can be used to reduce the injected drug dose and to achieve a better therapeutic efficacy.

  13. A Preclinical Study of Laryngeal Motor-Evoked Potentials as a Marker Vagus Nerve Activation.

    PubMed

    Grimonprez, Annelies; Raedt, Robrecht; De Taeye, Leen; Larsen, Lars Emil; Delbeke, Jean; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl

    2015-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a treatment for refractory epilepsy and depression. Previous studies using invasive recording electrodes showed that VNS induces laryngeal motor-evoked potentials (LMEPs) through the co-activation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and subsequent contractions of the laryngeal muscles. The present study investigates the feasibility of recording LMEPs in chronically VNS-implanted rats, using a minimally-invasive technique, to assess effective current delivery to the nerve and to determine optimal VNS output currents for vagal fiber activation. Three weeks after VNS electrode implantation, signals were recorded using an electromyography (EMG) electrode in the proximity of the laryngeal muscles and a reference electrode on the skull. The VNS output current was gradually ramped up from 0.1 to 1.0 mA in 0.1 mA steps. In 13/27 rats, typical LMEPs were recorded at low VNS output currents (median 0.3 mA, IQR 0.2-0.3 mA). In 11/27 rats, significantly higher output currents were required to evoke electrophysiological responses (median 0.7 mA, IQR 0.5-0.7 mA, [Formula: see text]). The latencies of these responses deviated significantly from LMEPs ([Formula: see text]). In 3/27 rats, no electrophysiological responses to simulation were recorded. Minimally invasive LMEP recordings are feasible to assess effective current delivery to the vagus nerve. Furthermore, our results suggest that low output currents are sufficient to activate vagal fibers. PMID:26510476

  14. Preclinical Studies in Support of Defibrotide for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma and Other Neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Rouleau, Cecile; Echart, Cinara; Menon, Krishna; Teicher, Beverly; Distaso, Maria; Palumbo, Antonio; Boccadoro, Mario; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Iacobelli, Massimo; Richardson, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the study Defibrotide (DF), an orally bioavailable polydisperse oligonucleotide has promising activity in hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), a stem cell transplantation-related toxicity, characterized by microangiopathy. The anti-thrombotic properties of DF and its minimal hemorrhagic risk could serve for treatment of cancer-associated thrombotic complications. Given its cytoprotective effect on endothelium, we investigated whether DF protects tumor cells from cytotoxic anti-tumor agents. Further, given its anti-adhesive properties, we evaluated whether DF modulates the protection conferred to multiple myeloma (MM) cells by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Methods-Results DF lacks significant single-agent in vitro cytotoxicity on MM or solid tumor cells and does not attenuate their in vitro response to dexamethasone, bortezomib, immunomodulatory thalidomide derivatives, and conventional chemotherapeutics, including melphalan and cyclophosphamide. Importantly, DF enhances in vivo chemosensitivity of MM and mammary carcinoma xenografts in animal models. In co-cultures of MM cells with BMSCs in vitro, DF enhances the MM cell sensitivity to melphalan and dexamethasone, decreases MM-BMSC adhesion and its sequelae, including NF-?B activation in MM and BMSCs, and associated cytokine production. Moreover, DF inhibits expression and/or function of key mediators of MM interaction with BMSC and endothelium, including heparanase, angiogenic cytokines and adhesion molecules. Conclusion Defibrotide’s in vivo chemosensitizing properties and lack of direct in vitro activity against tumor cells suggest that it favorably modulates antitumor interactions between BMSC and endothelia in the tumor microenvironment. These data support clinical studies of DF in combination with conventional and novel therapies to potentially improve patient outcome in MM and other malignancies. PMID:19228727

  15. Efficacy of screens in removing long fibers from an aerosol stream – sample preparation technique for toxicology studies

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Deye, Gregory J.; Turkevich, Leonid A.

    2015-01-01

    Fiber dimension (especially length) and biopersistence are thought to be important variables in determining the pathogenicity of asbestos and other elongate mineral particles. In order to prepare samples of fibers for toxicology studies, it is necessary to develop and evaluate methods for separating fibers by length in the micrometer size range. In this study, we have filtered an aerosol of fibers through nylon screens to investigate whether such screens can efficiently remove the long fibers (L >20 ?m, a typical macrophage size) from the aerosol stream. Such a sample, deficient in long fibers, could then be used as the control in a toxicology study to investigate the role of length. A well-dispersed aerosol of glass fibers (a surrogate for asbestos) was generated by vortex shaking a Japan Fibrous Material Research Association (JFMRA) glass fiber powder. Fibers were collected on a mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filter, imaged with phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and lengths were measured. Length distributions of the fibers that penetrated through various screens (10, 20 and 60 ?m mesh sizes) were analyzed; additional study was made of fibers that penetrated through double screen and centrally blocked screen configurations. Single screens were not particularly efficient in removing the long fibers; however, the alternative configurations, especially the centrally blocked screen configuration, yielded samples substantially free of the long fibers. PMID:24417374

  16. Efficacy of screens in removing long fibers from an aerosol stream--sample preparation technique for toxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Ku, Bon Ki; Deye, Gregory J; Turkevich, Leonid A

    2014-02-01

    Fiber dimension (especially length) and biopersistence are thought to be important variables in determining the pathogenicity of asbestos and other elongate mineral particles. In order to prepare samples of fibers for toxicology studies, it is necessary to develop and evaluate methods for separating fibers by length in the micrometer size range. In this study, we have filtered an aerosol of fibers through nylon screens to investigate whether such screens can efficiently remove the long fibers (L >20 µm, a typical macrophage size) from the aerosol stream. Such a sample, deficient in long fibers, could then be used as the control in a toxicology study to investigate the role of length. A well-dispersed aerosol of glass fibers (a surrogate for asbestos) was generated by vortex shaking a Japan Fibrous Material Research Association (JFMRA) glass fiber powder. Fibers were collected on a mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filter, imaged with phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and lengths were measured. Length distributions of the fibers that penetrated through various screens (10, 20 and 60?µm mesh sizes) were analyzed; additional study was made of fibers that penetrated through double screen and centrally blocked screen configurations. Single screens were not particularly efficient in removing the long fibers; however, the alternative configurations, especially the centrally blocked screen configuration, yielded samples substantially free of the long fibers. PMID:24417374

  17. Synthesis, characterization and preclinical studies of two-photon-activated targeted PDT therapeutic triads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, C. W.; Starkey, J. R.; Rebane, A.; Meng, F.; Gong, A.; Drobizhev, M.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) continues to evolve into a mature clinical treatment of a variety of cancer types as well as age-related macular degeneration of the eye. However, there are still aspects of PDT that need to be improved in order for greater clinical acceptance. While a number of new PDT photo-sensitizers, sometimes referred to as second- or third- generation therapeutic agents, are currently under clinical investigation, the direct treatment through the skin of subcutaneous tumors deeper than 5 mm remains problematic. Currently approved PDT porphyrin photo-sensitizers, as well as several modified porphyrins (e.g. chlorins, bacteriochlorins, etc.) that are under clinical investigation can be activated at 630-730 nm, but none above 800 nm. It would be highly desirable if new PDT paradigms could be developed that would allow photo-activation deep in the tissue transparency window in the Near-infrared (NIR) above 800 nm to reduce scattering and absorption phenomena that reduce deep tissue PDT efficacy. Rasiris and MPA Technologies have developed new porphyrins that have greatly enhanced two-photon absorption ( P A ) cross-sections and can be activated deep in the NIR (ca. 780-850 nm). These porphyrins can be incorporated into a therapeutic triad that also employs an small molecule targeting agent that directs the triad to over-expressed tumor receptor sites, and a NIR onephoton imaging agent that allows tracking the delivery of the triad to the tumor site, as well as clearance of excess triad from healthy tissue prior to the start of PDT treatment. We are currently using these new triads in efficacy studies with a breast cancer cell line that has been transfected with luciferase genes that allow implanted tumor growth and post- PDT treatment efficacy studies in SCID mouse models by following the rise and decay of the bioluminescence signal. We have also designed highly absorbing and scattering collagen breast cancer phantoms in which we have demonstrated dramatic cell kill to a depth of at least 4 cm. We have also demonstrated that at the wavelength and laser fluences used in the treatment of implanted tumors in the mouse mammary fat pads, there is little, if any, damage to the skin or internal mouse organs. In addition, we have also demonstrated that the implanted tumors can be treated to a depth of more than 1 cm by direct radiation through the dorsal side of the mouse.

  18. Contributions of GABA to alcohol responsivity during adolescence: Insights from preclinical and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Silveri, Marisa M.

    2015-01-01

    There is a considerable body of literature demonstrating that adolescence is a unique age period, which includes rapid and dramatic maturation of behavioral, cognitive, hormonal and neurobiological systems. Most notably, adolescence is also a period of unique responsiveness to alcohol effects, with both hyposensitivity and hypersensitivity observed to the various effects of alcohol. Multiple neurotransmitter systems are undergoing fine-tuning during this critical period of brain development, including those that contribute to the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. The role of developmental maturation of the ?-amino-butyric acid (GABA) system, however, has received less attention in contributing to age-specific alcohol sensitivities. This review integrates GABA findings from human magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies as they may translate to understanding adolescent-specific responsiveness to alcohol effects. Better understanding of the vulnerability of the GABA system both during adolescent development, and in psychiatric conditions that include alcohol dependence, could point to a putative mechanism, boosting brain GABA, that may have increased effectiveness for treating alcohol abuse disorders. PMID:24631274

  19. Khat (Catha edulis F.) and cannabinoids: Parallel and contrasting behavioral effects in preclinical and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Geresu, Berhanu

    2015-11-01

    After a brief outline of Catha edulis F. (khat) and the cannabinoid systems, the interactions between the pharmacological effects of khat and cannabinoids will be reviewed. Khat chewing is a widespread habit that has a deep-rooted sociocultural tradition in Africa and the Middle East. Experimental studies conducted to investigate khat's central and peripheral effects have revealed an amphetamine-like mechanism of action mediated through the dopaminergic system. The endocannabinoid system comprises the receptors, the endogenous agonists and the related biochemical machinery responsible for synthesizing these substances and terminating their actions. Endocannabinoids are synthesized "on demand" from membrane phospholipids and then rapidly cleared by cellular uptake and enzymatic degradation. Khat and cannabinoids produce a body of parallel and contrasting behavioral effects. Concurrent consumption of khat and cannabinoids may increase the risk of getting or precipitating psychosis, has rewarding and motivational effect, increases the threshold of pain perception and impairs learning and memory. On the other hand, the action of cannabis to enhance food intake is likely to reduce khat's appetite suppressant effects. PMID:26469212

  20. Wound healing activity of NOE-aspirin: a pre-clinical study.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Mandeep; Gopalan Kutty, N; Mallikarjuna Rao, C

    2007-02-01

    Aspirin, one of the oldest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, impedes tissue repair by virtue of retarding inflammation. The present study was undertaken to find out if linking of nitrooxyethyl ester to aspirin reverses its healing-depressant propensity. Nitrooxyethyl ester of aspirin (NOE-Asp) was synthesized in our laboratory through well-established synthetic pathway, starting from aspirin through esterification with ethylene glycol and nitration with a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids at 0 degrees C. The effect of NOE-Asp on phases of healing such as collagenation, wound contraction and epithelialization and on scar size of healed wound was evaluated in three wound models-incision, dead space, and excision wounds. To assess its influence on the oxidative stress, the levels of glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbiturate reactive species (TBARS) were also determined in 10-day-old granulation tissue. NOE-Asp was further screened for its anti-inflammatory activity in rat paw edema model. NOE-Asp promoted collagenation (increase in breaking strength, granulation weight, and collagen content), wound contraction, and epithelialization phases of healing. NOE-Asp also showed a significant antioxidant effect in 10-day-old granulation tissue as compared to aspirin. The results vindicate our assumption that the esterification of aspirin with nirooxyethyl group reverses the healing-suppressant effect of aspirin. The compound also showed equipotent anti-inflammatory activity as aspirin. PMID:16978891

  1. HD047703, a New Promising Anti-Diabetic Drug Candidate: In Vivo Preclinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, SoRa; Kim, Dae Hoon; Kim, Young-Seok; Ha, Tae-Young; Yang, Jin; Park, Soo Hyun; Jeong, Kwang Won; Rhee, Jae-Keol

    2014-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptor 119 (GPR119) has emerged as a novel target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. GPR119 is involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from the pancreatic ?-cells and intestinal cells. In this study, we identified a novel small-molecule GPR119 agonist, HD047703, which raises intracellular cAMP concentrations in pancreatic ?-cells and can be expected to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from human GPR119 receptor stably expressing cells (CHO cells). We evaluated the acute efficacy of HD047703 by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in normal C57BL/6J mice. Then, chronic administrations of HD047703 were performed to determine its efficacy in various diabetic rodent models. Single administration of HD047703 caused improved glycemic control during OGTT in a dose-dependent manner in normal mice, and the plasma GLP-1 level was also increased. With respect to chronic efficacy, we observed a decline in blood glucose levels in db/db, ob/ob and DIO mice. These results suggest that HD047703 may be a potentially promising anti-diabetic agent. PMID:25414769

  2. HD047703, a New Promising Anti-Diabetic Drug Candidate: In Vivo Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, SoRa; Kim, Dae Hoon; Kim, Young-Seok; Ha, Tae-Young; Yang, Jin; Park, Soo Hyun; Jeong, Kwang Won; Rhee, Jae-Keol

    2014-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptor 119 (GPR119) has emerged as a novel target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. GPR119 is involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from the pancreatic ?-cells and intestinal cells. In this study, we identified a novel small-molecule GPR119 agonist, HD047703, which raises intracellular cAMP concentrations in pancreatic ?-cells and can be expected to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from human GPR119 receptor stably expressing cells (CHO cells). We evaluated the acute efficacy of HD047703 by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in normal C57BL/6J mice. Then, chronic administrations of HD047703 were performed to determine its efficacy in various diabetic rodent models. Single administration of HD047703 caused improved glycemic control during OGTT in a dose-dependent manner in normal mice, and the plasma GLP-1 level was also increased. With respect to chronic efficacy, we observed a decline in blood glucose levels in db/db, ob/ob and DIO mice. These results suggest that HD047703 may be a potentially promising anti-diabetic agent. PMID:25414769

  3. Development of telmisartan in the therapy of spinal cord injury: pre-clinical study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Min; Tsai, Jo-Ting; Chang, Chen Kuei; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Lin, Jia-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background Decrease of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-? (PPAR?) expression has been observed after spinal cord injury (SCI). Increase of PPAR? may improve the damage in SCI. Telmisartan, the antihypertensive agent, has been mentioned to increase the expression of PPAR?. Thus, we are going to screen the effectiveness of telmisartan in SCI for the development of it in clinical application. Methods In the present study, we used compressive SCI in rats. Telmisartan was then used to evaluate the influence in rats after SCI. Change in PPAR? expression was identified by Western blots. Also, behavioral tests were performed to check the recovery of damage. Results Recovery of damage from SCI was observed in telmisartan-treated rats. Additionally, this action of telmisartan was inhibited by GSK0660 at the dose sufficient to block PPAR?. However, metformin at the dose enough to activate adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase failed to produce similar action as telmisartan. Thus, mediation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in this action of telmisartan can be rule out. Moreover, telmisartan reversed the expressions of PPAR? in rats with SCI. Conclusion The obtained data suggest that telmisartan can improve the damage of SCI in rats through an increase in PPAR? expression. Thus, telmisartan is useful to be developed as an agent in the therapy of SCI. PMID:26316709

  4. High-throughput monitoring of integration site clonality in preclinical and clinical gene therapy studies

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Frank A; Appelt, Jens-Uwe; Link, Barbara; Gerdes, Sebastian; Lehrer, Christina; Scholz, Simone; Paruzynski, Anna; Roeder, Ingo; Wenz, Frederik; Glimm, Hanno; von Kalle, Christof; Grez, Manuel; Schmidt, Manfred; Laufs, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Gene transfer to hematopoietic stem cells with integrating vectors not only allows sustained correction of monogenic diseases but also tracking of individual clones in vivo. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has been shown to be an accurate method to quantify individual stem cell clones, yet due to frequently limited amounts of target material (especially in clinical studies), it is not useful for large-scale analyses. To explore whether vector integration site (IS) recovery techniques may be suitable to describe clonal contributions if combined with next-generation sequencing techniques, we designed artificial ISs of different sizes which were mixed to simulate defined clonal situations in clinical settings. We subjected all mixes to either linear amplification–mediated PCR (LAM-PCR) or nonrestrictive LAM-PCR (nrLAM-PCR), both combined with 454 sequencing. We showed that nrLAM-PCR/454-detected clonality allows estimating qPCR-detected clonality in vitro. We then followed the kinetics of two clones detected in a patient enrolled in a clinical gene therapy trial using both, nrLAM-PCR/454 and qPCR and also saw nrLAM-PCR/454 to correlate to qPCR-measured clonal contributions. The method presented here displays a feasible high-throughput strategy to monitor clonality in clinical gene therapy trials is at hand. PMID:26052530

  5. Photoacoustic spectroscopy in the monitoring of breast tumor development: a pre-clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, Mallika; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Ray, Satadru; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer type and its detection at an early stage can reduce the mortality rate substantially. With the aim to detect breast cancer early, by studying tumor progression in nude mice, a pulsed laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy set up has been designed and developed. MCF-7 cells xenografts were developed using six to eight weeks old female nude mice and tumor tissues were extracted on different days (10th, 15th and 20th Day) post injection and the corresponding photoacoustic spectra were recorded at 281nm excitation. A total of 144 time domain spectra were recorded from 36 animals belonging to the three time points (10th, 15th and 20th day post injection) and converted into frequency domains by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) tools of the MATLAB algorithms and analyzed. The frequency patterns of the tumor masses on 10th, 15th and 20th day of tumor development showed a gradual increase in intensity at certain frequencies, 5.93 x103 Hz, 15.9 x103 Hz, 29.69 x103 Hz and 32.5 x103 Hz in the FFT patterns indicating that these frequencies were more sensitive towards tumor development. Further analysis of the data yielded a clear variation in the spectral parameters with progression of the disease suggesting that the technique may be suitable for early detection of the disease. Thus, we expect that the developed setup may be useful in assessing the different phases of tumor development which may have clinical implications.

  6. Chronic Electrical Stimulation with a Suprachoroidal Retinal Prosthesis: A Preclinical Safety and Efficacy Study

    PubMed Central

    Nayagam, David A. X.; Williams, Richard A.; Allen, Penelope J.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Luu, Chi D.; Salinas-LaRosa, Cesar M.; Finch, Sue; Ayton, Lauren N.; Saunders, Alexia L.; McPhedran, Michelle; McGowan, Ceara; Villalobos, Joel; Fallon, James B.; Wise, Andrew K.; Yeoh, Jonathan; Xu, Jin; Feng, Helen; Millard, Rodney; McWade, Melanie; Thien, Patrick C.; Williams, Chris E.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the safety and efficacy of chronic electrical stimulation of the retina with a suprachoroidal visual prosthesis. Methods Seven normally-sighted feline subjects were implanted for 96–143 days with a suprachoroidal electrode array and six were chronically stimulated for 70–105 days at levels that activated the visual cortex. Charge balanced, biphasic, current pulses were delivered to platinum electrodes in a monopolar stimulation mode. Retinal integrity/function and the mechanical stability of the implant were assessed monthly using electroretinography (ERG), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus photography. Electrode impedances were measured weekly and electrically-evoked visual cortex potentials (eEVCPs) were measured monthly to verify that chronic stimuli were suprathreshold. At the end of the chronic stimulation period, thresholds were confirmed with multi-unit recordings from the visual cortex. Randomized, blinded histological assessments were performed by two pathologists to compare the stimulated and non-stimulated retina and adjacent tissue. Results All subjects tolerated the surgical and stimulation procedure with no evidence of discomfort or unexpected adverse outcomes. After an initial post-operative settling period, electrode arrays were mechanically stable. Mean electrode impedances were stable between 11–15 k? during the implantation period. Visually-evoked ERGs & OCT were normal, and mean eEVCP thresholds did not substantially differ over time. In 81 of 84 electrode-adjacent tissue samples examined, there were no discernible histopathological differences between stimulated and unstimulated tissue. In the remaining three tissue samples there were minor focal fibroblastic and acute inflammatory responses. Conclusions Chronic suprathreshold electrical stimulation of the retina using a suprachoroidal electrode array evoked a minimal tissue response and no adverse clinical or histological findings. Moreover, thresholds and electrode impedance remained stable for stimulation durations of up to 15 weeks. This study has demonstrated the safety and efficacy of suprachoroidal stimulation with charge balanced stimulus currents. PMID:24853376

  7. Molecular actions and therapeutic potential of lithium in preclinical and clinical studies of CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Tso; Chuang, De-Maw

    2011-01-01

    Lithium has been used clinically to treat bipolar disorder for over half a century, and remains a fundamental pharmacological therapy for patients with this illness. Although lithium’s therapeutic mechanisms are not fully understood, substantial in vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that it has neuroprotective/neurotrophic properties against various insults, and considerable clinical potential for the treatment of several neurodegenerative conditions. Evidence from pharmacological and gene manipulation studies support the notion that glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition and induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated signaling are lithium’s main mechanisms of action, leading to enhanced cell survival pathways and alteration of a wide variety of downstream effectors. By inhibiting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated calcium influx, lithium also contributes to calcium homeostasis and suppresses calcium-dependent activation of pro-apoptotic signaling pathways. In addition, lithium decreases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate by inhibiting phosphoinositol phosphatases, a process recently identified as a novel mechanism for inducing autophagy. Through these mechanisms, therapeutic doses of lithium have been demonstrated to defend neuronal cells against diverse forms of death insults and to improve behavioral as well as cognitive deficits in various animal models of neurodegenerative diseases, including stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, fragile X syndrome, as well as Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s diseases, among others. Several clinical trials are also underway to assess the therapeutic effects of lithium for treating these disorders. This article reviews the most recent findings regarding the potential targets involved in lithium’s neuroprotective effects, and the implication of these findings for the treatment of a variety of diseases. PMID:20705090

  8. Efficacy of Pimobendan in the Prevention of Congestive Heart Failure or Sudden Death in Doberman Pinschers with Preclinical Dilated Cardiomyopathy (The PROTECT Study)

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, NJ; Boswood, A; O'Grady, MR; Gordon, SG; Dukes-McEwan, J; Oyama, MA; Smith, S; Patteson, M; French, AT; Culshaw, GJ; Braz-Ruivo, L; Estrada, A; O'Sullivan, ML; Loureiro, J; Willis, R; Watson, P

    2012-01-01

    Background The benefit of pimobendan in delaying the progression of preclinical dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in Dobermans is not reported. Hypothesis That chronic oral administration of pimobendan to Dobermans with preclinical DCM will delay the onset of CHF or sudden death and improve survival. Animals Seventy-six client-owned Dobermans recruited at 10 centers in the UK and North America. Methods The trial was a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel group multicenter study. Dogs were allocated in a 1:1 ratio to receive pimobendan (Vetmedin capsules) or visually identical placebo. The composite primary endpoint was prospectively defined as either onset of CHF or sudden death. Time to death from all causes was a secondary endpoint. Results The proportion of dogs reaching the primary endpoint was not significantly different between groups (P = .1). The median time to the primary endpoint (onset of CHF or sudden death) was significantly longer in the pimobendan (718 days, IQR 441–1152 days) versus the placebo group (441 days, IQR 151–641 days) (log-rank P = 0.0088). The median survival time was significantly longer in the pimobendan (623 days, IQR 491–1531 days) versus the placebo group (466 days, IQR 236–710 days) (log-rank P = .034). Conclusion and Clinical Importance The administration of pimobendan to Dobermans with preclinical DCM prolongs the time to the onset of clinical signs and extends survival. Treatment of dogs in the preclinical phase of this common cardiovascular disorder with pimobendan can lead to improved outcome. PMID:23078651

  9. Bone metastasis imaging with SPECT/CT/MRI: a preclinical toolbox for therapy studies.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Pedro Gomes; Peters, Steffie; Rossin, Raffaella; Kaijzel, Eric L; Que, Ivo; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Grüll, Holger

    2015-06-01

    Bone is one of the most common metastatic target sites in breast cancer, with more than 200 thousand new cases of invasive cancer diagnosed in the US alone in 2011. We set out to establish a multimodality imaging platform for bone metastases in small animals as a tool to non-invasively quantify metastasis growth, imaging the ensuing bone lesions and possibly the response to treatment. To this end, a mouse model of osteolytic metastatic bone tumors was characterized with SPECT/CT and MRI over time. A cell line capable of forming bone metastases, MDA-MB-231, was genetically modified to stably express the reporter gene herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (hsv-1 tk). The intracellular accumulation of the radiolabeled tracer [(123)I]FIAU promoted by HSV-1 TK specifically pinpoints the location of tumor cells which can be imaged in vivo by SPECT. First, a study using tumors implanted subcutaneously was performed. The SPECT/MRI overlays and the ex vivo ?-counting showed a linear correlation in terms of %ID/cm(3) (R(2)=0.93) and %ID/g (R(2)=0.77), respectively. Then, bone metastasis growth was imaged weekly by SPECT/CT and T2-weighted MRI over a maximum of 40 days post-intracardiac injection of tumor cells. The first activity spots detectable with SPECT, around day 20 post-cell injection, were smaller than 2mm(3) and not yet visible by MRI and increased in volume and in %ID over the weeks. Osteolytic bone lesions were visible by CT (in vivo) and ?CT (ex vivo). The SPECT/MRI overlays also showed a linear correlation in terms of %ID/cm(3) (R(2)=0.86). In conclusion, a new multimodality imaging platform has been established that non-invasively combines images of active tumor areas (SPECT), tumor volume (MRI) and the corresponding bone lesions (CT and ?CT). To our knowledge this is the first report where the combination of soft tissue information from MRI, bone lesions by CT, and reporter gene imaging by SPECT is used to non-invasively follow metastatic bone lesions. PMID:25680341

  10. GRADUATE GROUP MOLECULAR TOXICOLOGY

    E-print Network

    , Plant and Microbial Biology, Chemistry, Public Health, Environmental Science and Policy Management Chemistry: General Chemistry (Chem 1A, 1B or 4A, 4B) 2 Semesters Organic Chemistry Lecture and Lab (Chem 3A toxicology § Environmental toxicology § Food/Nutritional toxicology § Genetic toxicology § Immunological

  11. Space Toxicology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Safe breathing air for space faring crews is essential whether they are inside an Extravehicular Mobility Suit (EMU), a small capsule such as Soyuz, or the expansive International Space Station (ISS). Sources of air pollution can include entry of propellants, excess offgassing from polymeric materials, leakage of systems compounds, escape of payload compounds, over-use of utility compounds, microbial metabolism, and human metabolism. The toxicological risk posed by a compound is comprised of the probability of escaping to cause air pollution and the magnitude of adverse effects on human health if escape occurs. The risk from highly toxic compounds is controlled by requiring multiple levels of containment to greatly reduce the probability of escape; whereas compounds that are virtually non-toxic may require little or no containment. The potential for toxicity is determined by the inherent toxicity of the compound and the amount that could potentially escape into the breathing air.

  12. Preclinical models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chang-Il; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most difficult human malignancies to treat. The 5-year survival rate of PDA patients is 7% and PDA is predicted to become the second leading cancer-related cause of death in the USA. Despite intensive efforts, the translation of findings in preclinical studies has been ineffective, due partially to the lack of preclinical models that faithfully recapitulate features of human PDA. Here, we review current preclinical models for human PDA (eg human PDA cell lines, cell line-based xenografts and patient-derived tumour xenografts). In addition, we discuss potential applications of the recently developed pancreatic ductal organoids, three-dimensional culture systems and organoid-based xenografts as new preclinical models for PDA. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26419819

  13. Characterisation of an in vivo Pig-a gene mutation assay for use in regulatory toxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Godin-Ethier, Jessica; Leroux, Francis; Wang, Nan; Thébaud, Sybil; Merah, Farida; Nelson, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Integration of in vivo genotoxicity testing into standard toxicology studies presents multiple advantages as it reduces animal use and costs, accelerates data generation and provides concurrent data that are useful for interpreting results. The in vivo Pig-a assay is a mammalian gene mutation assay that utilises peripheral blood and thus has a high integration potential. Although inter-laboratory reproducibility has been well demonstrated, further characterisation is required for this assay. In this study, we evaluated intra-laboratory reproducibility of the in vivo Pig-a gene mutation assay (MutaFlow® kit) in rats through the conduct of an assay characterisation prior to subsequent use in Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) toxicology studies. To evaluate intra-laboratory reproducibility, intra-assay and inter-assay variability, ruggedness, robustness and blood storage stability were assessed. These assessments were performed using blood obtained from male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 20 or 40mg/kg/day N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea via oral gavage for three consecutive days. Blood was collected from these rats on multiple occasions from Day 29 to Day 71 and samples were analysed for Pig-a mutation using the rat MutaFlow kit. Frequencies of reticulocytes (RET), mutant phenotype erythrocytes (RBC(CD59-)) and mutant phenotype RET (RET(CD59-)) were determined. Overall, the proportion of RET and frequencies of RBC(CD59-) and of RET(CD59-) were consistent throughout the different assessments. The assay demonstrated acceptable intra-run and inter-run variability with coefficients of variation of ?4.8 and 20.6%, respectively. The method was shown to be independent of the analyst performing the assay and unaffected by small changes in assay conditions. Comparable results were obtained from freshly collected samples and samples refrigerated for up to 4 days. Although technically challenging, the rat Pig-a gene mutation assay using a high-throughput automated method was shown to be reliable. The different assay parameters evaluated during the conduct of this study yielded acceptable results. Thus, the method was considered suitable for use in GLP toxicology studies. PMID:25680869

  14. Toxicological approaches to complex mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of toxicological studies in understanding the health effects of environmental exposures to mixtures. The approach taken is to review mixtures that have received the greatest emphasis from toxicology; major mixtures research programs; the toxicologist's view of mixtures and approaches to their study; and the complementary roles of toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Studies of tobacco smoke, engine exhaust, combustion products, and air pollutants comprise most of the past research on mixtures. Because of their great experimental control over subjects, exposures, and endpoints, toxicologists tend to consider a wider range of toxic interactions among mixture components and sequential exposures than is practical for human studies. The three fundamental experimental approaches used by toxicologists are integrative (studying the mixture as a whole), dissective (dissecting a mixture to determine causative constituents), and synthetic (studying interactions between agents in simple combinations). Toxicology provides information on potential hazards, mechanisms by which mixture constituents interact to cause effects, and exposure dose-effect relationships; but extrapolation from laboratory data to quantitative human health risks is problematic. Toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological approaches are complementary but are seldom coordinated. Fostering synergistic interactions among the disciplines in studying the risks from mixtures could be advantageous. PMID:7515806

  15. Preclinical investigations with mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extract Iscador.

    PubMed

    Maldacker, Juliane

    2006-06-01

    The mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extract Iscador has been shown to be an effective complementary drug in the treatment of cancer patients after surgical removal of the primary tumor. It improved survival, recovery from damage caused by irradiation or cytostatic therapy, and quality of life. Beneficial effects were seen especially as reduction of the side effects caused by basic oncological therapy. In animal tests, clear anti-carcinogenic effects of Iscador were demonstrated as reduction of tumor growth in preformed tumors and as prevention of tumor growth in newly induced tumors. Mainly immune stimulation but also direct cytotoxic activity are believed to be responsible for the anti-carcinogenic activity of Iscador. Other effects seen in patients, such as improved quality of life and improved psychic conditions, are not possible to be tested in animals. Recently, toxicological investigations were performed with Iscador to get more information on possible toxicological effects which can only be evaluated in preclinical studies. Tests examining the acute toxicity, genotoxic effects as well as effects on reproduction were performed. In these studies, no adverse effects of Iscador preparations were detected thus confirming the information on the safety of the extract which has been gained in clinical trials and during more than 80 years of use in human therapy. Iscador has been shown to be essentially safe. No severe adverse events have been reported during many years of use by thousands of patients. Genotoxic effects and effects on reproduction, which cannot be evaluated in clinical use, have been cleared up in animal tests. Iscador was shown to be clearly non-genotoxic and free of relevant toxic effects on reproduction in vivo. In summary, no risk of adverse effects of Iscador during human use is expected. PMID:16927531

  16. THE BENEFITS OF A QUALITY ASSURANCE REVIEW OF A RESEARCH STUDY ON THE PHYSICOCHEMISTRY AND PULMONARY TOXICOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF ORIMULSION FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE BENEFITS OF A QUALITY ASSURANCE REVIEW OF A RESEARCH STUDY ON THE PHYSICOCHEMISTRY AND PULMONARY TOXICOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF ORIMULSION FLY ASH. K Dreher', J. Richards', J. McGee', J. Lehmann', T. Hughes', A. Miller, W. Linak2, and A. Mallett3.'National Health and Environment...

  17. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of isoprene in mice and rats: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Isoprene, a reactive, branched diene, is used in large quantities in the manufacture of polyisoprene and as a copolymer in the synthesis of butyl rubber. The potential for isoprene to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in rodents, by exposing four groups each of Sprague-Dawley rats and Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 280, 1400, or 7000 ppM isoprene vapors, 6 h/day, 7 day/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.30 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 31 refs., 6 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of methyl ethyl ketone in mice: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Dill, J.A.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1989-02-01

    Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is a widely used industrial solvent which results in considerable human exposure. In order to assess the potential for MEK to cause developmental toxicity in rodents, four groups of Swiss (CD-1) mice were exposed to 0, 400, 1000 or 3000 ppM MEK vapors, 7 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Ten virgin females and approx.30 plug-positive females per group were exposed concurrently for 10 consecutive days (6--15 dg for mated mice). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 18 dg. Uterine implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Exposure of pregnant mice to these concentrations of MEK did not result in apparent maternal toxicity, although there was a slight, treatment-correlated increase in liver to body weight ratios which was significant for the 3000-ppM group. Mild developmental toxicity was evident at 3000-ppM as a reduction in mean fetal body weight. This reduction was statistically significant for the males only, although the relative decrease in mean fetal body weight was the same for both sexes. 17 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of n-hexane in rats: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.

    1987-12-01

    The straight chain hydrocarbon, n-hexane, is a volatile, ubiquitous solvent used in industrial, academic, and smaller commercial environments. The significant opportunity for women of child-bearing age to be exposed to this chemical prompted the undertaking of a study to assess the developmental toxicity of n-hexane in an animal model. Timed-pregnant (30 animals per group) and virgin (10 animals per group) Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0 (filtered air), 200, 1000, and 5000 ppM n-hexane (99.9% purity) vapor in inhalation chambers for 20 h/day for a period of 14 consecutive days. Sperm-positive females were exposed for 6 to 19 days of gestation (dg) and virgins were exposed concurrently for 14 consecutive days. The day of sperm detection was designated as 0 dg for mated females. Adult female body weights were monitored prior to, throughout the exposure period, and at sacrifice. Uterine, placental, and fetal body weights were obtained for gravid females at sacrifice. Implants were enumerated and their status recorded as live fetus, early or late resorption, or dead. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 16 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of acetone in mice and rats: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1988-11-01

    Acetone, an aliphatic ketone, is a ubiquitous industrial solvent and chemical intermediate; consequently, the opportunity for human exposure is high. The potential for acetone to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 440, 2200, or 11000 ppm, and in Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed to 0, 440, 2200, and 6600 ppm acetone vapors, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.32 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 46 refs., 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  1. Recent Advances in Particulate Matter and Nanoparticle Toxicology: A Review of the In Vivo and In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Holme, Jørn A.; Rosas, Irma; Schwarze, Per E.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have linked exposure to particulate matter (PM) to adverse health effects, which may be registered as increased mortality and morbidity from various cardiopulmonary diseases. Despite the evidence relating PM to health effects, the physiological, cellular, and molecular mechanisms causing such effects are still not fully characterized. Two main approaches are used to elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity. One is the use of in vivo experimental models, where various effects of PM on respiratory, cardiovascular, and nervous systems can be evaluated. To more closely examine the molecular and cellular mechanisms behind the different physiological effects, the use of various in vitro models has proven to be valuable. In the present review, we discuss the current advances on the toxicology of particulate matter and nanoparticles based on these techniques. PMID:23865044

  2. TOXLINE (TOXICOLOGY INFORMATION ONLINE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    TOXLINE? (TOXicology information onLINE) are the National Library of Medicines extensive collection of online bibliographic information covering the pharmacological, biochemical, physiological, and toxicological effects of drugs and other chemicals. TOXLINE and TOXLINE65 together...

  3. Biomarkers in Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomarkers are a means to evaluate chemical exposure and/or the subsequent impacts on toxicity pathways that lead to adverse health outcomes. Computational toxicology can integrate biomarker data with knowledge of exposure, chemistry, biology, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, and e...

  4. OPTIMIZATION PRE-CLINICAL

    E-print Network

    Prostate Glycosides for Cancer Treatment PeptideVaccine Against Lupus Medical Food For GI Diseases AntiLEAD OPTIMIZATION PRE-CLINICAL DEVELOPMENT THERAPEUTICS CLINICAL TRIALSHIT TO LEADNEW DRUGS Drugs b Lactamase Inhibitors: Antibiotics II Small Molecules for Parkinson's Disease Triggered Release

  5. Identification of Prenatal Amphetamines Exposure by Maternal Interview and Meconium Toxicology in the Infant Development, Environment and Lifestyle (IDEAL) Study

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Teresa R.; LaGasse, Linda L.; Smith, Lynne M.; Derauf, Chris; Grant, Penny; Shah, Rizwan; Arria, Amelia M.; Della Grotta, Sheri A.; Strauss, Arthur; Haning, William F.; Lester, Barry M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2009-01-01

    The Infant Development Environment and Lifestyle (IDEAL) study is investigating the effects of prenatal methamphetamine (MAMP) exposure on infant and child development; potential concurrent exposure to cannabis and tobacco also are evaluated. Maternal self-reported drug use and/or meconium toxicology results defined drug exposure status. It is unclear how the frequency, duration and magnitude of maternal MAMP exposure affect qualitative and quantitative meconium results. Materials and Methods Interviews regarding maternal drug use were collected shortly after birth; meconium specimens were screened for amphetamines, cannabis and cotinine by immunoassay and confirmed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). Results The majority of MAMP- and cannabis-exposed infants were identified by maternal interview alone. Meconium tests were more likely to be positive if the mother reported MAMP and cannabis use, particularly in the third trimester. Less than half of immunoassay-positive amphetamines (31.0%) and cannabis (17.9%) meconium results were confirmed by GCMS. Tobacco exposure was equally detected by immunoassay cotinine screen and maternal report. Meconium concentrations did not correlate with maternal self-report status or trimester of use, frequency or route of MAMP use. Discussion Maternal self-report was more sensitive than meconium testing for identifying MAMP and cannabis-exposed neonates; however, the timing of drug exposure may influence meconium toxicology results. Most women ceased MAMP and cannabis use before the third trimester. In the first trimester, meconium has not yet formed, and based on our recent results for opiates and cocaine, drug use in the second trimester appears to be poorly reflected in meconium. Conclusion Low confirmation rates in meconium reinforce the need for confirmatory testing following positive screening results and additional research to identify alternative biomarkers. PMID:19935364

  6. TOXNET (TOXICOLOGY DATA NETWORK)

    EPA Science Inventory

    TOXNET (Toxicology Data Network) is a computerized system of files oriented to toxicology and related areas. It is managed by the National Library of Medicines Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP) and runs on a series of microcomputers in a networked cl...

  7. Graduate Program Environmental Toxicology

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    1 Graduate Program in Environmental Toxicology Graduate Student Guidelines Updated December 7, 2011 for Ph.D. Students 3. ENTOX Form 2 ­ Graduate Research Proposal #12;3 PROGRAM OF ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENT GUIDELINES A. Introduction The Faculty of Environmental Toxicology welcomes you

  8. Development of novel combined anticalcification protocols including immunologic modification for prolonged durability of cardiac xenograft: preclinical study using large-animal long-term circulatory models.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hong-Gook; Jeong, Saeromi; Shin, Jun-Seop; Park, Chung-Gyu; Kim, Yong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac xenografts are conventionally cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GA) to impart tissue stability, reduce antigenicity, and maintain tissue sterility. However, GA-fixed xenografts are prone to calcification after long-term implantation in humans, because of phospholipids, free aldehyde groups, and residual antigenicity. We evaluated preclinical safety and efficacy using large-animal long-term circulatory models for our novel combined anticalcification protocol including immunological modification, which had been proven effective in small animal experiments. Bovine/porcine xenografts were treated with decellularization, immunological modification with ?-galactosidase, GA fixation with organic solvent, and detoxification with glycine. Valve conduits made of these xenografts were transplanted into the pulmonary root of goats, and hemodynamic, radiological, immunohistopathological, and biochemical results were obtained for 12 months after implantation. Evaluation of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization demonstrated good hemodynamic status and function of the pulmonary xenograft valves. Durability of the xenografts was well preserved without calcification by specimen radiography and immunohistopathological examination. The calcium concentrations of the explanted xenografts were lower than the control xenografts. This preclinical study using large-animal long-term circulatory models demonstrated that our synergistic and simultaneous employment of multiple anticalcification therapies and novel tissue treatments, including immunological modifications, have promising safety and efficacy and should be examined further in future clinical studies. PMID:25303800

  9. Timing of Decompressive Surgery of Spinal Cord after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: An Evidence-Based Examination of Pre-Clinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Julio C.; Noonan, Vanessa; Cadotte, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract While the recommendations for spine surgery in specific cases of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) are well recognized, there is considerable uncertainty regarding the role of the timing of surgical decompression of the spinal cord in the management of patients with SCI. Given this, we sought to critically review the literature regarding the pre-clinical and clinical evidence on the potential impact of timing of surgical decompression of the spinal cord on outcomes after traumatic SCI. The primary literature search was performed using MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. A secondary search strategy incorporated articles referenced in prior meta-analyses and systematic and nonsystematic review articles. Two reviewers independently assessed every study with regard to eligibility, level of evidence, and study quality. Of 198 abstracts of pre-clinical studies, 19 experimental studies using animal SCI models fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria. Despite some discrepancies in the results of those pre-clinical studies, there is evidence for a biological rationale to support early decompression of the spinal cord. Of 153 abstracts of clinical studies, 22 fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. While the vast majority of the clinical studies were level-4 evidence, there were two studies of level-2b evidence. The quality assessment scores varied from 7 to 25 with a mean value of 12.41. While 2 of 22 clinical studies assessed feasibility and safety, 20 clinical studies examined efficacy of early surgical intervention to stabilize and align the spine and to decompress the spinal cord; the most common definitions of early operation used 24 and 72?h after SCI as timelines. A number of studies indicated that patients who undergo early surgical decompression can have similar outcomes to patients who received a delayed decompressive operation. However, there is evidence to suggest that early surgical intervention is safe and feasible and that it can improve clinical and neurological outcomes and reduce health care costs. Based on the current clinical evidence using a Delphi process, an expert panel recommended that early surgical intervention should be considered in all patients from 8 to 24?h following acute traumatic SCI. PMID:20001726

  10. Performance characterization of a new CZT-based preclinical SPECT system: a comparative study of different collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, A. R.; Park, S.-J.; Choi, Y. Y.; Kim, K. M.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-09-01

    Triumph X-SPECT is a newly released CZT-based preclinical small-animal SPECT system with interchangeable collimators. The purpose of this work was to evaluate and systematically compare the imaging performances of three different collimators in the CZT-based preclinical small-animal system: a single-pinhole collimator (SPH), a multi-pinhole collimator (MPH) and a parallel-hole collimator. We measured the spatial resolutions and sensitivities of the three collimators with 99mTc sources, considering three distinct energy window widths (5, 10, and 20%), and used the NEMA NU4-2008 Image Quality phantom to test the imaging performance of the three collimators in terms of uniformity and spill-over ratio (SOR) for each energy window. With a 10% energy window width at a radius of rotation (ROR) of 30 mm, the system resolution of the SPH, MPH and parallel-hole collimators was 0.715, 0.855 and 3.270 mm FWHM, respectively. For the same energy window, the sensitivity of the system with SPH, MPH and parallel-hole collimators was 32.860, 152.514 and 49.205 counts/sec/MBq at a 100 mm source-to-detector distance and 6.790, 33.376 and 49.038 counts/sec/MBq at a 130 mm source-to-detector distance, respectively. The image noise and SORair for the three collimators were 20.137, 12.278 and 11.232 (%STDunif) and 0.106, 0.140 and 0.161, respectively. Overall, the results show that the SPH had better spatial resolution than the other collimators. The MPH had the highest sensitivity at 100 mm source-to-collimator distance, and the parallel-hole collimator had the highest sensitivity at 130 mm-source-to-detector distance. Therefore, the proper collimator for Triumph X-SPECT system must be determined by the task. These results provide valuable reference data and insight into the imaging performance of various collimators in CZT-based preclinical small-animal SPECT.

  11. Applications of Proteomic Technologies to Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proteomics is the large-scale study of gene expression at the protein level. This cutting edge technology has been extensively applied to toxicology research recently. The up-to-date development of proteomics has presented the toxicology community with an unprecedented opportunit...

  12. Nanomedicines for cancer therapy: state-of-the-art and limitations to pre-clinical studies that hinder future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidczyk, Charlene; Russell, Luisa; Searson, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The ability to efficiently deliver a drug or gene to a tumor site is dependent on a wide range of factors including circulation time, interactions with the mononuclear phagocyte system, extravasation from circulation at the tumor site, targeting strategy, release from the delivery vehicle, and uptake in cancer cells. Nanotechnology provides the possibility of creating delivery systems where the design constraints are decoupled, allowing new approaches for reducing the unwanted side effects of systemic delivery, increasing tumor accumulation, and improving efficacy. The physico-chemical properties of nanoparticle-based delivery platforms introduce additional complexity associated with pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation. To assess the impact of nanoparticle-based delivery systems, we first review the design strategies and pharmacokinetics of FDA-approved nanomedicines. Next we review nanomedicines under development, summarizing the range of nanoparticle platforms, strategies for targeting, and pharmacokinetics. We show how the lack of uniformity in preclinical trials prevents systematic comparison and hence limits advances in the field.

  13. Human B-cell cancer cell lines as a preclinical model for studies of drug effect in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Maria Bach; Falgreen, Steffen; Bødker, Julie Støve; Schmitz, Alexander; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Sørensen, Suzette; Madsen, Jakob; El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen; Johnsen, Hans Erik

    2014-11-01

    Drug resistance in cancer refers to recurrent or primary refractory disease following drug therapy. At the cellular level, it is a consequence of molecular functions that ultimately enable the cell to resist cell death-one of the classical hallmarks of cancer. Thus, drug resistance is a fundamental aspect of the cancer cell phenotype, in parallel with sustained proliferation, immortality, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Here we present a preclinical model of human B-cell cancer cell lines used to identify genes involved in specific drug resistance. This process includes a standardized technical setup for specific drug screening, analysis of global gene expression, and the statistical considerations required to develop resistance gene signatures. The state of the art is illustrated by the first-step classical drug screen (including the CD20 antibody rituximab, the DNA intercalating topoisomerase II inhibitor doxorubicin, the mitotic inhibitor vincristine, and the alkylating agents cyclophosphamide and melphalan) along with the generation of gene lists predicting the chemotherapeutic outcome as validated retrospectively in clinical trial datasets. This B-cell lineage-specific preclinical model will allow us to initiate a range of laboratory studies, with focus on specific gene functions involved in molecular resistance mechanisms. PMID:25072621

  14. White matter changes in preclinical Alzheimer's disease: a magnetic resonance imaging-diffusion tensor imaging study on cognitively normal older people with positive amyloid ? protein 42 levels.

    PubMed

    Molinuevo, José Luis; Ripolles, Pablo; Simó, Marta; Lladó, Albert; Olives, Jaume; Balasa, Mircea; Antonell, Anna; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; Rami, Lorena

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use diffusion tensor imaging measures to determine the existence of white matter microstructural differences in the preclinical phases of Alzheimer's disease, assessing cognitively normal older individuals with positive amyloid ? protein (A?42) levels (CN_A?42+) on the basis of normal cognition and cerebrospinal fluid A?42 levels below 500 pg/mL. Nineteen CN_A?42+ and 19 subjects with A?42 levels above 500 pg/mL (CN_A?42-) were included. We encountered increases in axial diffusivity (AxD) in CN_A?42+ relative to CN_A?42- in the corpus callosum, corona radiata, internal capsule, and superior longitudinal fasciculus bilaterally, and also in the left fornix, left uncinate fasciculus, and left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. However, no differences were found in other diffusion tensor imaging indexes. Cognitive reserve scores were positively associated with AxD exclusively in the CN_A?42+ group. The finding of AxD alteration together with preserved fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and radial diffusivity indexes in the CN_A?42+ group may indicate that, subtle axonal changes may be happening in the preclinical phases of Alzheimer's disease, whereas white matter integrity is still widely preserved. PMID:25002037

  15. Gold(III) Complexes in the Oncological Preclinical Arena: From Aminoderivatives to Peptidomimetics.

    PubMed

    Nardon, Chiara; Fregona, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, we have been developing some gold(III) derivatives showing interesting antitumor properties and reduced systemic and renal toxicity, compared to the clinically-established reference drug cisplatin. Starting from the rationale at the base of our investigations, this review has been divided into two sections, with respect to our patented first- (aminoderivatives) and secondgeneration (peptidomimetics) potential drugs. Every section describes the in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity of the compounds, chosen as models, towards different types of tumor. In particular, we summarize the results achieved so far, in particular taking into account the latest in-depth studies related to their activity, mechanism of action and toxicological profile. Taken together, our data could open up new prospects for further advanced preclinical pharmacological testing. PMID:26311430

  16. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies of 1,3-butadiene in the rat: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Mast, T.J.; Brown, M.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Clark, M.L.; Decker, J.R.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Rowe, S.E.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1987-11-01

    Maternal toxicity, reproductive performance and developmental toxicology were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley-derived rats during and following 6 hours/day, whole-body, inhalation exposures to 0, 40, 200, and 1000 ppM of 1,3-butadiene. The female rats (Ns = 24 to 28), which had mated with unexposed males, were exposed to the chemical from 6 through 15 dg and sacrificed on 20 dg. Maternal animals were weighed prior to mating and on 0, 6, 11, 16 and 20 dg; the rats were observed for mortality, morbidity and signs of toxicity during exposure and examined for gross tissue abnormalities at necropsy. Live fetuses were weighed and subjected to external, visceral and skeletal examinations to detect growth retardation and morphologic anomalies. There were no significant differences among treatment groups in maternal body weights or extragestational weights of rats exposed to 1,3-butadiene concentrations of 40 or 200 ppM, but, in animals exposed to 1000 ppM, significantly depressed body weight gains were observed during the first 5 days of exposure and extragestational weight gains tended to be lower than control values. These results, and the absence of clinical signs of toxicity, were considered to indicate that there was no maternal toxicity at exposure levels of 200 ppM or lower. The percentage of pregnant animals and the number of litters with live fetuses were unaffected by treatment. Under the conditions of this exposure regimen, there was no evidence for a teratogenic response to 1,3-butadiene exposure.

  17. [Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies]. DOE annual report, 1994--95

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The authors describe results which have not yet been published from their associated studies listed in the title. For the first, they discuss Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules, analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response, and human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals. Studies in phantoms includes a discussion of planar image quantitation, counts coincidence correction, organ studies, tumor studies, and {sup 90}Y quantitation with Bremsstrahlung imaging. The study on SPECT discusses attenuation correction and scatter correction. Preclinical studies investigated uptake of {sup 90}Y-BrE-3 in mice using autoradiography. Clinical studies discuss image quantitation verses counts from biopsy samples, S factors for radiation dose calculation, {sup 67}Cu imaging studies for lymphoma cancer, and {sup 111}In MoAb imaging studies for breast cancer to predict {sup 90}Y MoAb therapy.

  18. Preclinical Rheumatoid Arthritis (Autoantibodies): An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies demonstrate that there is a period of development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during which there are elevations of disease-related biomarkers, including autoantibodies, in the absence of and prior to the development of RA; this period can be termed ‘preclinical RA’. These ‘preclinical’ autoantibodies including rheumatoid factor and antibodies to citrullinated protein antigens, and more recent studies have also identified a wider variety of autoantibodies and a wide range of inflammatory biomarkers. These findings in conjunction with established and emerging data about genetic and environmental risk factors for RA support a model of disease development where certain factors lead to an initial triggering of RA-related autoimmunity that expands over time to the point where symptomatic arthritis classifiable as RA develops. Herein will be reviewed updates in the field, as well as a discussion of current limitations of our understanding of preclinical RA, and potential future directions for study. PMID:24643396

  19. Adaptation of the ToxRTool to assess the reliability of toxicology studies conducted with genetically modified crops and implications for future safety testing.

    PubMed

    Koch, Michael S; DeSesso, John M; Williams, Amy Lavin; Michalek, Suzanne; Hammond, Bruce

    2014-09-10

    Abstract To determine the reliability of food safety studies carried out in rodents with genetically modified (GM) crops, a Food Safety Study Reliability Tool (FSSRTool) was adapted from the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods' ToxRTool. Reliability was defined as the inherent quality of the study with regard to use of standardized testing methodology, full documentation of experimental procedures and results, and the plausibility of the findings. Codex guidelines for GM crop safety evaluations indicate toxicology studies are not needed when comparability of the GM crop to its conventional counterpart has been demonstrated. This guidance notwithstanding, animal feeding studies have routinely been conducted with GM crops, but their conclusions on safety are not always consistent. To accurately evaluate potential risks from GM crops, risk assessors need clearly interpretable results from reliable studies. The development of the FSSRTool, which provides the user with a means of assessing the reliability of a toxicology study to inform risk assessment, is discussed. Its application to the body of literature on GM crop food safety studies demonstrates that reliable studies report no toxicologically relevant differences between rodents fed GM crops or their non-GM comparators. PMID:25208336

  20. Monitoring of anti-cancer treatment with 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET: a comprehensive review of pre-clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging of solid tumors with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is an evolving field with continuous development of new PET tracers and discovery of new applications for already implemented PET tracers. During treatment of cancer patients, a general challenge is to measure treatment effect early in a treatment course and by that to stratify patients into responders and non-responders. With 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) and 3’-deoxy-3’-[18F]fluorothymidine(18F-FLT) two of the cancer hallmarks, altered energy metabolism and increased cell proliferation, can be visualized and quantified non-invasively by PET. With 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET changes in energy metabolism and cell proliferation can thereby be determined after initiation of cancer treatment in both clinical and pre-clinical studies in order to predict, at an early time-point, treatment response. It is hypothesized that decreases in glycolysis and cell proliferation may occur in tumors that are sensitive to the applied cancer therapeutics and that tumors that are resistant to treatment will show unchanged glucose metabolism and cell proliferation. Whether 18F-FDG and/or 18F-FLT PET can be used for prediction of treatment response has been analyzed in many studies both following treatment with conventional chemotherapeutic agents but also following treatment with different targeted therapies, e.g. monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors. The results from these studies have been most variable; in some studies early changes in 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT uptake predicted later tumor regression whereas in other studies no change in tracer uptake was observed despite the treatment being effective. The present review gives an overview of pre-clinical studies that have used 18F-FDG and/or 18F-FLT PET for response monitoring of cancer therapeutics. PMID:26550536

  1. Reproductive Toxicology Testing with EDCS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An introduction to reproductive toxicology: the basic approaches to testing chemicals for adverse effects using multigenerational studies with rats and how the regulatory agencies used the data in risk assessments. Case studies were presented of how endocrine or genomic data were...

  2. Toxicological Assessment of Inhaled Nanoparticles: Role of in Vivo, ex Vivo, in Vitro, and in Silico Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Eleonore; Salar-Behzadi, Sharareh

    2014-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium of the lung is by far the most permeable epithelial barrier of the human body. The risk for adverse effects by inhaled nanoparticles (NPs) depends on their hazard (negative action on cells and organism) and on exposure (concentration in the inhaled air and pattern of deposition in the lung). With the development of advanced in vitro models, not only in vivo, but also cellular studies can be used for toxicological testing. Advanced in vitro studies use combinations of cells cultured in the air-liquid interface. These cultures are useful for particle uptake and mechanistic studies. Whole-body, nose-only, and lung-only exposures of animals could help to determine retention of NPs in the body. Both approaches also have their limitations; cellular studies cannot mimic the entire organism and data obtained by inhalation exposure of rodents have limitations due to differences in the respiratory system from that of humans. Simulation programs for lung deposition in humans could help to determine the relevance of the biological findings. Combination of biological data generated in different biological models and in silico modeling appears suitable for a realistic estimation of potential risks by inhalation exposure to NPs. PMID:24646916

  3. Toxicological assessment of ?-(1-->6)-glucan (lasiodiplodan) in mice during a 28-day feeding study by gavage.

    PubMed

    Túrmina, Janaína A; Carraro, Emerson; Alves da Cunha, Mário A; Dekker, Robert F H; Barbosa, Aneli M; Dos Santos, Fábio Seidel; Silva, Luiz A; Malfatti, Carlos R M

    2012-01-01

    Studies evaluating the toxicity caused by fungal exopolysaccharides of the ?-(1-->6)-D-glucan type are rare. In this study, the toxicological effects of sub-chronic treatments with lasiodiplodan (?-(1-->6)-D-glucan from Lasiodiplodia theobromae MMPI) were evaluated in mice through the assessment of biochemical, hematological, and histopathological alterations. Thirty-two mice (16 male, 16 female) were used in this study divided in two groups; one group received lasiodiplodan (50 mg/kg body weight) daily for 28 days via gavage, and another (control group) received saline during the same period. Blood samples were collected via cardiac puncture for hematological and biochemical analyses. Liver, heart, kidney, and spleen were collected for histopathological analysis. Statistical analysis was performed through one-way analysis of variance and only p < 0.05 F-values were presented. Significant reduction in blood glucose in the male group (35%; p < 0.01), transaminases activity in both sexes (AST and ALT; ~35%; p < 0.05), and urea (20%; p < 0.01) in the female group was observed with the lasiodiplodan treatment. The results showed that sub-chronic treatments with lasiodiplodan did not generate hematological and histopathological alterations leading to signs of toxicity in healthy mice, independent of gender. PMID:23208465

  4. Aquatic toxicology: fact or fiction

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, K.J.

    1980-02-01

    The science of aquatic toxicology is a relatively new science. The development of the field of aquatic toxicology since 1930 is traced. The state of the art of aquatic toxicology compared with that of classical toxicology is evaluated. The science of aquatic toxicology is expected to undergo a significant period of rapid growth and development, leading ultimately to the formation of a mature science.

  5. S 17092: a prolyl endopeptidase inhibitor as a potential therapeutic drug for memory impairment. Preclinical and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Morain, Philippe; Lestage, Pierre; De Nanteuil, Guillaume; Jochemsen, Roeline; Robin, Jean-Loïc; Guez, David; Boyer, Pierre-Alain

    2002-01-01

    Any treatment that could positively modulate central neuropeptides levels would provide a promising therapeutic approach to the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with aging and/or neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, based on the activity in rodents, S 17092 (2S,3aS,7aS)-1][(R,R)-2-phenylcyclopropyl]carbonyl]-2-[(thiazolidin-3-yl)carbonyl]octahydro-1H-indole) has been selected as a potent inhibitor of cerebral prolyl-endopeptidase (PEP). By retarding the degradation of neuroactive peptides, S 17092 was successfully used in a variety of memory tasks. These tasks explored short-term, long-term, reference and working memory in aged mice, as well as in rodents and monkeys with chemically induced amnesia or spontaneous memory deficits. S 17092 has also been safely administered to humans, and showed a clear peripheral expression of its mechanism of action through its inhibitory effect upon PEP activity in plasma. S 17092 exhibited central effects, as evidenced by EEG recording in healthy volunteers, and could improve a delayed verbal memory task. Collectively, the preclinical and clinical effects of S 17092 have suggested a promising role for this compound as an agent for the treatment of cognitive disorders associated with cerebral aging. PMID:12070525

  6. The role of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and addiction: combining preclinical evidence with human Positron Emission Tomography (PET) studies

    PubMed Central

    Terbeck, Sylvia; Akkus, Funda; Chesterman, Laurence P.; Hasler, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    In the present review, we deliver an overview of the involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) activity and density in pathological anxiety, mood disorders and addiction. Specifically, we will describe mGluR5 studies in humans that employed Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and combined the findings with preclinical animal research. This combined view of different methodological approaches—from basic neurobiological approaches to human studies—might give a more comprehensive and clinically relevant view of mGluR5 function in mental health than the view on preclinical data alone. We will also review the current research data on mGluR5 along the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC). Firstly, we found evidence of abnormal glutamate activity related to the positive and negative valence systems, which would suggest that antagonistic mGluR5 intervention has prominent anti-addictive, anti-depressive and anxiolytic effects. Secondly, there is evidence that mGluR5 plays an important role in systems for social functioning and the response to social stress. Finally, mGluR5's important role in sleep homeostasis suggests that this glutamate receptor may play an important role in RDoC's arousal and modulatory systems domain. Glutamate was previously mostly investigated in non-human studies, however initial human clinical PET research now also supports the hypothesis that, by mediating brain excitability, neuroplasticity and social cognition, abnormal metabotropic glutamate activity might predispose individuals to a broad range of psychiatric problems. PMID:25852460

  7. Pre-clinical studies of toxin-specific Nanobodies: Evidence of in vivo efficacy to prevent fatal disturbances provoked by scorpion envenoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hmila, Issam; Cosyns, Bernard; Tounsi, Hayfa; Roosens, Bram; Caveliers, Vicky; Abderrazek, Rahma Ben; Boubaker, Samir; Muyldermans, Serge; Department of Structural Biology, VIB, Brussels ; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Bouhaouala-Zahar, Balkiss; Faculté de Médecine de Tunis, Université de Tunis-El Manar ; Lahoutte, Tony

    2012-10-15

    Scorpions represent a significant threat to humans and animals in various countries throughout the world. Recently, we introduced Nanobodies (Nbs) to combat more efficiently scorpion envenoming and demonstrated the performance of NbAahIF12 and NbAahII10 to neutralize scorpion toxins of Androctonus australis hector venom. A bispecific Nb construct (NbF12-10) comprising these two Nbs is far more protective than the classic Fab?{sub 2} based therapy and is the most efficient antivenom therapy against scorpion sting in preclinical studies. Now we investigate the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of {sup 99m}Tc labeled Nbs by in vivo imaging in rodents and compared these data with those of the Fab?{sub 2} product (PAS). The pharmacodynamics of the Nbs was investigated in rats by in vivo echocardiography and it is shown that NbF12-10 prevents effectively the hemodynamic disturbances induced by a lethal dose of venom. Moreover, even a late injection of NbF12-10 restores the heart rate and brings the blood pressure to baseline values. Histology confirms that NbF12-10 prevents lung and heart lesions of treated mice after envenoming. In conjunction, in this preclinical study, we provide proof of concept that NbF12-10 prevents effectively the fatal disturbances induced by Androctonus venom, and that the Nanobody based therapeutic has a potential to substitute the classic Fab?{sub 2} based product as immunotherapeutic in scorpion envenoming. Further clinical study using larger cohorts of animals should be considered to confirm the full protecting potential of our NbF12-10. -- Highlights: ? Nanobody therapy prevents the hemodynamic disturbances induced by a lethal dose. ? Late injection of Nanobody restores hemodynamic parameters to baseline values. ? Nanobody therapy prevents lung and heart lesions of treated mice after envenoming. ? Labeled Nanobody and Fab’2 pharmacokinetics curves reach plateau in favour of Nanobody.

  8. The application of selective reaction monitoring shows dysregulation of glycolysis in a preclinical model of schizophrenia

    E-print Network

    Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Alsaif, Murtada; Ernst, Agnes; Harris, Laura W.; Aerts, Nancy; Lenaerts, Ilse; Peeters, Pieter J.; Amess, Bob; Rahmoune, Hassan; Bahn, Sabine; Guest, Paul C.

    2012-03-15

    to the symptoms of the human disease. Therefore, there is a necessity of characterizing the preclinical models from a molecular point of view. Selective reaction monitoring (SRM) has already shown promise in preclinical and clinical studies for multiplex...

  9. Generation of genetically-modified human differentiated cells for toxicological tests and the study of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Schildknecht, Stefan; Karreman, Christiaan; Pöltl, Dominik; Efrémova, Liudmila; Kullmann, Cornelius; Gutbier, Simon; Krug, Anne; Scholz, Diana; Gerding, Hanne R; Leist, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Human differentiated cell types, such as neurons or hepatocytes, are of limited availability, and their use for experiments requiring ectopic gene expression is challenging. Using the human conditionally-immortalized neuronal precursor line LUHMES, we explored whether genetic modification in the proliferating state could be used for experiments in the differentiated post-mitotic neurons. First, alpha-synuclein (ASYN), a gene associated with the pathology of Parkinson's disease, was overexpressed. Increased amounts of the protein were tolerated without change of phenotype, and this approach now allows further studies on protein variants. Knockdown of ASYN attenuated the toxicity of the parkinsonian toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). Different lentiviral constructs then were tested: cells labeled ubiquitously with green (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP) allowed the quantification of neurite growth and of its disturbance by toxicants; expression of proteins of interest could be targeted to different organelles; production of two different proteins from a single read-through construct was achieved successfully by an expression strategy using a linker peptide between the two proteins, which is cleaved by deubiquitinases; LUHMES, labeled with GFP in the cytosol and RFP in the mitochondria, were used to quantify mitochondrial mobility along the neurites. MPP+ reduced such organelle movement before any other detectable cellular change, and this toxicity was prevented by simultaneous treatment with the antioxidant ascorbic acid. Thus, a strategy has been outlined here to study new functional endpoints, and subtle changes of structure and proteostasis relevant in toxicology and biomedicine in post-mitotic human cells. PMID:24173167

  10. Determination of GDC-0980 (apitolisib), a small molecule dual phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor in dog plasma by LC-MS/MS to support a GLP toxicology study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao; Salphati, Laurent; Kim, Amy; Morinello, Eric; Wong, Lisa; Pang, Jodie; Percey, Shaundel; Meng, Min; Reuschel, Scott; Dean, Brian

    2015-08-01

    An LC-MS/MS method for the determination of GDC-0980 (apitolisib) concentrations in dog plasma has been developed and validated for the first time to support pre-clinical drug development. Following protein precipitation with acetonitrile, the resulting samples were analyzed using reverse-phase chromatography on a Metasil AQ column. The mass analysis was performed on a triple quadruple mass spectrometer coupled with an electrospray interface in positive ionization mode. The selected reaction monitoring transitions monitored were m/z 499.3???341.1 for GDC-0980 and m/z 507.3???341.1 for IS. The method was validated over the calibration curve range 0.250-250?ng/mL with linear regression and 1/x(2) weighting. Relative standard deviation (RSD) ranged from 0.0 to 10.9% and accuracy ranged from 93.4 to 113.6% of nominal. Stable-labeled internal standard GDC-0980-d8 was used to minimize matrix effects. This assay was used for the measurement of GDC-0980 dog plasma concentrations to determine toxicokinetic parameters after oral administration of GDC-0980 (0.03, 0.1 and 0.3?mg/kg) to beagle dogs in a GLP toxicology study. Peak concentration ranged from 3.23 to 84.9?ng/mL. GDC-0980 was rapidly absorbed with a mean time to peak concentration ranging from 1.3 to 2.4?h. Mean area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24?hours ranged from 54.4 to 542?ng?h/mL. PMID:25677784

  11. Contrasting gray and white matter changes in preclinical Huntington disease

    E-print Network

    Aron, Adam

    Contrasting gray and white matter changes in preclinical Huntington disease An MRI study DD ABSTRACT Background: In Huntington disease (HD), substantial striatal atrophy precedes clinical motor of view; GM gray matter; HD Huntington disease; MRI magnetic resonance imaging; pre-HD preclinical HD

  12. The Economics of Reproducibility in Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Leonard P.; Cockburn, Iain M.; Simcoe, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Low reproducibility rates within life science research undermine cumulative knowledge production and contribute to both delays and costs of therapeutic drug development. An analysis of past studies indicates that the cumulative (total) prevalence of irreproducible preclinical research exceeds 50%, resulting in approximately US$28,000,000,000 (US$28B)/year spent on preclinical research that is not reproducible—in the United States alone. We outline a framework for solutions and a plan for long-term improvements in reproducibility rates that will help to accelerate the discovery of life-saving therapies and cures. PMID:26057340

  13. Porcine adipose-derived stem cells from buccal fat pad and subcutaneous adipose tissue for future preclinical studies in oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are progenitor cells used in bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Despite subcutaneous adipose tissue being more abundant, the buccal fat pad (BFP) is easily accessible for dentists and maxillofacial surgeons. For this reason, considering the need for preclinical study and the swine as an optimal animal model in tissue engineering applications, we compared the features of porcine ASCs (pASCs) from both tissue-harvesting sites. Methods ASCs were isolated from interscapular subcutaneous adipose tissue (ScI) and buccal fat pads of six swine. Cells were characterized for their stemness and multipotent features. Moreover, their osteogenic ability when cultured on titanium disks and silicon carbide-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposition fragments, and their growth in the presence of autologous and heterologous serum were also assessed. Results Independent of the harvesting site, no differences in proliferation, viability, and clonogenicity were observed among all the pASC populations. Furthermore, when induced toward osteogenic differentiation, both ScI- and BFP-pASCs showed an increase of collagen and calcified extracellular matrix (ECM) production, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteonectin expression, indicating their ability to differentiate toward osteoblast-like cells. In addition, they differentiated toward adipocyte-like cells, and chondrogenic induced pASCs were able to increase glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) production over time. When cells were osteoinduced on synthetic biomaterials, they significantly increased the amount of calcified ECM compared with control cells; moreover, titanium showed the osteoinductive effect on pASCs, also without chemical stimuli. Finally, these cells grew nicely in 10% FBS, and no benefits were produced by substitution with swine serum. Conclusions Swine buccal fat pad contains progenitor cells with mesenchymal features, and they also osteo-differentiate nicely in association with synthetic supports. We suggest that porcine BFP-ASCs may be applied in preclinical studies of periodontal and bone-defect regeneration. PMID:24330736

  14. Toxicology: recommended sequence of required courses www.toxicology.psu.edu Toxicology Program Coordinator

    E-print Network

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Toxicology: recommended sequence of required courses www.toxicology.psu.edu Toxicology Program Coordinator: Dr. James Endres Howell 814 867 0194 toxicology@psu.edu Year 1 VB SC 050S(3) First Year Seminar* SPRING AT UNIVERSITY PARK ONLY Year 4 VB SC 430(3) Principles of Toxicology* FALL AT UNIVERSITY PARK ONLY

  15. Toxicology of brotizolam

    PubMed Central

    Hewett, C.; Kreuzer, H.; Köllmer, H.; Niggeschulze, A.; Stötzer, H.

    1983-01-01

    1 Acute studies. Following oral or intraperitoneal administration, toxicity was very low (LD50 in rodents > 10,000 and > 900 mg/kg, respectively). 2 Subacute and chronic studies in rodents. Signs of toxicity were seen only at doses of 400 mg/kg or more. Histopathological changes were found only in the 78-week study. 3 Subacute studies in dogs (intravenous) and primates (oral). In dogs, doses of 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg produced ataxia, salivation, and diarrhoea. In monkeys doses of 7 mg/kg or higher produced ataxia, increased appetite, hyperreflexive muscular spasms, increase in liver weight, and lipid depletion of the adrenal cortex. 4 Reproductive studies in the rat and rabbit. Repeated doses of up to 30 mg/kg were not associated with any disturbance in fertility; nor were any embryotoxic or teratogenic effects observed. When dams were treated with 400 mg/kg, litter mortality was markedly increased. 5 Mutagenicity studies. The four different tests performed gave no indication of any mutagenic effect. 6 Local tolerance tests in the rabbit. Brotizolam was well tolerated when administered intramuscularly, intra-arterially, or intravenously. 7 Carcinogenicity studies in rodents. The mouse study showed no evidence of a tumourigenic effect. The rat study is still being evaluated. 8 The toxicological studies demonstrate that brotizolam has an unusually wide therapeutic range. Findings of toxicological significance, most of which were reversible, were first recorded at doses of 7-10 mg/kg, i.e. at more than 100-times the intended human therapeutic dose. PMID:6686462

  16. Nanotechnology: toxicologic pathology.

    PubMed

    Hubbs, Ann F; Sargent, Linda M; Porter, Dale W; Sager, Tina M; Chen, Bean T; Frazer, David G; Castranova, Vincent; Sriram, Krishnan; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R; Reynolds, Steven H; Battelli, Lori A; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Fluharty, Kara L; Mercer, Robert R

    2013-02-01

    Nanotechnology involves technology, science, and engineering in dimensions less than 100 nm. A virtually infinite number of potential nanoscale products can be produced from many different molecules and their combinations. The exponentially increasing number of nanoscale products will solve critical needs in engineering, science, and medicine. However, the virtually infinite number of potential nanotechnology products is a challenge for toxicologic pathologists. Because of their size, nanoparticulates can have therapeutic and toxic effects distinct from micron-sized particulates of the same composition. In the nanoscale, distinct intercellular and intracellular translocation pathways may provide a different distribution than that obtained by micron-sized particulates. Nanoparticulates interact with subcellular structures including microtubules, actin filaments, centrosomes, and chromatin; interactions that may be facilitated in the nanoscale. Features that distinguish nanoparticulates from fine particulates include increased surface area per unit mass and quantum effects. In addition, some nanotechnology products, including the fullerenes, have a novel and reactive surface. Augmented microscopic procedures including enhanced dark-field imaging, immunofluorescence, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy are useful when evaluating nanoparticulate toxicologic pathology. Thus, the pathology assessment is facilitated by understanding the unique features at the nanoscale and the tools that can assist in evaluating nanotoxicology studies. PMID:23389777

  17. Nanotechnology: Toxicologic Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hubbs, Ann F.; Sargent, Linda M.; Porter, Dale W.; Sager, Tina M.; Chen, Bean T.; Frazer, David G.; Castranova, Vincent; Sriram, Krishnan; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Reynolds, Steven H.; Battelli, Lori A.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Fluharty, Kara L.; Mercer, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves technology, science, and engineering in dimensions less than 100 nm. A virtually infinite number of potential nanoscale products can be produced from many different molecules and their combinations. The exponentially increasing number of nanoscale products will solve critical needs in engineering, science, and medicine. However, the virtually infinite number of potential nanotechnology products is a challenge for toxicologic pathologists. Because of their size, nanoparticulates can have therapeutic and toxic effects distinct from micron-sized particulates of the same composition. In the nanoscale, distinct intercellular and intracellular translocation pathways may provide a different distribution than that obtained by micron-sized particulates. Nanoparticulates interact with subcellular structures including microtubules, actin filaments, centrosomes, and chromatin; interactions that may be facilitated in the nanoscale. Features that distinguish nanoparticulates from fine particulates include increased surface area per unit mass and quantum effects. In addition, some nanotechnology products, including the fullerenes, have a novel and reactive surface. Augmented microscopic procedures including enhanced dark-field imaging, immunofluorescence, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy are useful when evaluating nanoparticulate toxicologic pathology. Thus, the pathology assessment is facilitated by understanding the unique features at the nanoscale and the tools that can assist in evaluating nanotoxicology studies. PMID:23389777

  18. Efficacy of multiple exposure with low level He-Ne laser dose on acute wound healing: a pre-clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-02-01

    Investigations on the use of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for wound healing especially with the red laser light have demonstrated its pro-healing potential on a variety of pre-clinical and surgical wounds. However, until now, in LLLT the effect of multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation on acute wound healing on well-designed pre-clinical model is not much explored. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of multiple exposure of low dose Helium Neon laser on healing progression of full thickness excision wounds in Swiss albino mice. Further, the efficacy of the multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation was compared with the single exposure of optimum dose. Full thickness excision wounds (circular) of 15 mm diameter were created, and subsequently illuminated with the multiple exposures (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 exposure/ week until healing) of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 4.02 mWcm-2) laser at 0.5 Jcm-2 along with single exposure of optimum laser dose (2 J/cm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Classical biophysical parameters such as contraction kinetics, area under the curve and the mean healing time were documented as the assessment parameters to examine the efficacy of multiple exposures with low level laser dose. Experimental findings substantiated that either single or multiple exposures of 0.5 J/cm2 failed to produce any detectable alterations on wound contraction, area under the curve and mean healing time compared to single exposure of optimum dose (2 Jcm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Single exposure of optimum, laser dose was found to be ideal for acute wound healing.

  19. Comparative Effectiveness of 3-Dimensional vs 2-Dimensional and High-Definition vs Standard-Definition Neuroendoscopy: A Preclinical Randomized Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Cundy, Thomas P.; Di Marco, Aimee; Pratt, Philip; Nandi, Dipankar; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the potential benefits of 3-dimensional (3-D) vs 2-dimensional (2-D) and high-definition (HD) vs standard-definition (SD) endoscopic visualization have long been recognized in other surgical fields, such endoscopes are generally considered too large and bulky for use within the brain. The recent development of 3-D and HD neuroendoscopes may therefore herald improved depth perception, better appreciation of anatomic details, and improved overall surgical performance. OBJECTIVE: To compare simultaneously the effectiveness of 3-D vs 2-D and HD vs SD neuroendoscopy. METHODS: Ten novice neuroendoscopic surgeons were recruited from a university hospital. A preclinical randomized crossover study design was adopted to compare 3-D vs 2-D and HD vs SD neuroendoscopy. The primary outcomes were time to task completion and accuracy. The secondary outcomes were perceived task workload using the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Task Load Index and subjective impressions of the endoscopes using a 5-point Likert scale. RESULTS: Time to task completion was significantly shorter when using the 3-D vs the 2-D neuroendoscopy (P = .001), and accuracy of probe placement was significantly greater when using the HD vs the SD neuroendoscopy (P = .009). We found that 3-D endoscopy significantly improved perceived depth perception (P < .001), HD endoscopy significantly improved perceived image quality (P < .001), and both improved participants’ overall impression (P < .001). CONCLUSION: Three-dimensional neuroendoscopy and HD neuroendoscopy have differing but complementary effects on surgical performance, suggesting that neither alone can completely compensate for the lack of the other. There is therefore strong preclinical evidence to justify 3-D HD neuroendoscopy. ABBREVIATIONS: HD, high definition SD, standard definition PMID:24220007

  20. Systems toxicology: modelling biomarkers of glutathione homeostasis and paracetamol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Simone H; Yates, James W; Nicholls, Andrew W; Kenna, J Gerry; Coen, Muireann; Ortega, Fernando; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Wilson, Ian D

    2015-08-01

    One aim of systems toxicology is to deliver mechanistic, mathematically rigorous, models integrating biochemical and pharmacological processes that result in toxicity to enhance the assessment of the risk posed to humans by drugs and other xenobiotics. The benefits of such 'in silico' models would be in enabling the rapid and robust prediction of the effects of compounds over a range of exposures, improving in vitro-in vivo correlations and the translation from preclinical species to humans. Systems toxicology models of organ toxicities that result in high attrition rates during drug discovery and development, or post-marketing withdrawals (e.g., drug-induced liver injury (DILI)) should facilitate the discovery of safe new drugs. Here, systems toxicology as applied to the effects of paracetamol (acetaminophen, N-acetyl-para-aminophenol (APAP)) is used to exemplify the potential of the approach. PMID:26464084

  1. Pre-clinical Models for Oral and Periodontal Reconstructive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, G.; Seol, Y.J.; Gruber, R.; Giannobile, W.V.

    2009-01-01

    The development of new medical formulations (NMF) for reconstructive therapies has considerably improved the available treatment options for individuals requiring periodontal repair or oral implant rehabilitation. Progress in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine modalities strongly depends on validated pre-clinical research. Pre-clinical testing has contributed to the recent approval of NMF such as GEM 21S® and INFUSE® bone grafts for periodontal and oral regenerative therapies. However, the selection of a suitable pre-clinical model for evaluation of the safety and efficacy of a NMF remains a challenge. This review is designed to serve as a primer to choose the appropriate pre-clinical models for the evaluation of NMF in situations requiring periodontal or oral reconstruction. Here, we summarize commonly used pre-clinical models and provide examples of screening and functional studies of NMF that can be translated into clinical use. PMID:19887682

  2. MINING ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY INFORMATION WEB RESOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental toxicology is the study of the ecological effects of anthropogenic substances released into the environment. It is a relatively diverse field addressing impacts to aquatic and terrestrial organisms and communities. The determination of potential risk associated with...

  3. IMPAIRED GAMETE FUNCTION: IMPLICATIONS FOR REPRODUCTIVE TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The invited symposium chapter reviews methods for evaluating sperm function in laboratory rodents and humans, and presents strategies for incorporating both in vivo and in vitro fertilization assessments into reproductive toxicology studies. The EPA Program Offices may encounter ...

  4. GENOMIC ADAPTATION OF THE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL TEST (EST) FOR A TOXICOLOGICAL STUDY OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Among the many promised and potential applications of embryonic stem cells, in vitro toxicology is one area in which ES cells have already proven their utility. In 2003, the Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) protocol was validated in Europe as an in vitro alternative to live animal...

  5. Reform in teaching preclinical pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Yu; Li, Kun; Yao, Hong; Xu, Xiao-Juan; Cai, Qiao-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Pathophysiology is a scientific discipline that studies the onset and progression of pathological conditions and diseases, and pathophysiology is one of the core courses in most preclinical medical curricula. In China, most medical schools house a Department of Pathophysiology, in contrast to medical schools in many developed countries. The staff in Chinese Departments of Pathophysiology generally consists of full-time instructors or lecturers who teach medical students. These lecturers are sometimes lacking in clinic knowledge and experiences. To overcome this, in recent years, we have been trying to bring new trends in teaching pathophysiology into our curriculum. Our purpose in writing this article was to share our experiences with our colleagues and peers worldwide in the hope that the insights we have gained in pathophysiology teaching will be of some value to educators who advocate teaching reform in medical schools. PMID:26628645

  6. Use of genetic toxicology data in U.S. EPA risk assessment: the mercury study report as an example.

    PubMed Central

    Schoeny, R

    1996-01-01

    Assessment of human health risks of environmental agents has often been limited to consideration of the potential for the agent to cause cancer or general systemic toxicity after long-term exposure. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) is increasingly moving toward the development of integrated assessments, which consider all potential health end points including developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, reproductive effects, and germ cell mutagenicity. The U.S. EPA has a responsibility to assess risks to nonhuman species or ecosystems when appropriate data are available. An example of a recent integrated human health and ecological risk assessment can be found in the U.S. EPA Mercury Study Report to Congress. This report covers the following topics in separate volumes: an inventory of anthropogenic mercury emissions in the United States; an exposure assessment using measured and predicted values and including indirect dietary exposure; an evaluation of human health risks; an assessment of ecologic risk wherein water criteria are presented for several wildlife species; an overall integrated characterization of human and nonhuman risk; and a discussion of risk management considerations. In the evaluation of human health risk, genetic toxicology data were considered for three forms of mercury: elemental, inorganic (divalent), and methylmercury. These data were used in judgments of two types of potential health effects (carcinogenicity and germ cell mutagenicity). In assessment of potential carcinogenicity of inorganic and methylmercury, genetic toxicity data were key. Data for clastogenicity in the absence of mutagenicity supported the characterization of inorganic and methylmercury as materials that produce carcinogenic effects only at high, toxic doses. The evidence for clastogenicity, coupled with information on metabolism and distribution, resulted in a judgment of a moderate degree of concern (or weight of evidence) that inorganic mercury can act as a human germ cell mutagen. For methylmercury, the degree of concern for germ cell mutagenicity is high. PMID:8781402

  7. Metabolic profiling studies on the toxicological effects of realgar in rats by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Lai; Liao Peiqiu; Wu Huifeng; Li Xiaojing Pei Fengkui Li Weisheng; Wu Yijie

    2009-02-01

    The toxicological effects of realgar after intragastrical administration (1 g/kg body weight) were investigated over a 21 day period in male Wistar rats using metabonomic analysis of {sup 1}H NMR spectra of urine, serum and liver tissue aqueous extracts. Liver and kidney histopathology examination and serum clinical chemistry analyses were also performed. {sup 1}H NMR spectra and pattern recognition analyses from realgar treated animals showed increased excretion of urinary Kreb's cycle intermediates, increased levels of ketone bodies in urine and serum, and decreased levels of hepatic glucose and glycogen, as well as hypoglycemia and hyperlipoidemia, suggesting the perturbation of energy metabolism. Elevated levels of choline containing metabolites and betaine in serum and liver tissue aqueous extracts and increased serum creatine indicated altered transmethylation. Decreased urinary levels of trimethylamine-N-oxide, phenylacetylglycine and hippurate suggested the effects on the gut microflora environment by realgar. Signs of impairment of amino acid metabolism were supported by increased hepatic glutamate levels, increased methionine and decreased alanine levels in serum, and hypertaurinuria. The observed increase in glutathione in liver tissue aqueous extracts could be a biomarker of realgar induced oxidative injury. Serum clinical chemistry analyses showed increased levels of lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase as well as increased levels of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, indicating slight liver and kidney injury. The time-dependent biochemical variations induced by realgar were achieved using pattern recognition methods. This work illustrated the high reliability of NMR-based metabonomic approach on the study of the biochemical effects induced by traditional Chinese medicine.

  8. Preclinical profile of cabazitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Vrignaud, Patricia; Semiond, Dorothée; Benning, Veronique; Beys, Eric; Bouchard, Hervé; Gupta, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    First-generation taxanes have changed the treatment paradigm for a wide variety of cancers, but innate or acquired resistance frequently limits their use. Cabazitaxel is a novel second-generation taxane developed to overcome such resistance. In vitro, cabazitaxel showed similar antiproliferative activity to docetaxel in taxane-sensitive cell lines and markedly greater activity in cell lines resistant to taxanes. In vivo, cabazitaxel demonstrated excellent antitumor activity in a broad spectrum of docetaxel-sensitive tumor xenografts, including a castration-resistant prostate tumor xenograft, HID28, where cabazitaxel exhibited greater efficacy than docetaxel. Importantly, cabazitaxel was also active against tumors with innate or acquired resistance to docetaxel, suggesting therapeutic potential for patients progressing following taxane treatment and those with docetaxel-refractory tumors. In patients with tumors of the central nervous system (CNS), and in patients with pediatric tumors, therapeutic success with first-generation taxanes has been limited. Cabazitaxel demonstrated greater antitumor activity than docetaxel in xenograft models of CNS disease and pediatric tumors, suggesting potential clinical utility in these special patient populations. Based on therapeutic synergism observed in an in vivo tumor model, cabazitaxel is also being investigated clinically in combination with cisplatin. Nonclinical evaluation of the safety of cabazitaxel in a range of animal species showed largely reversible changes in the bone marrow, lymphoid system, gastrointestinal tract, and male reproductive system. Preclinical safety signals of cabazitaxel were consistent with the previously reported safety profiles of paclitaxel and docetaxel. Clinical observations with cabazitaxel were consistent with preclinical results, and cabazitaxel is indicated, in combination with prednisone, for the treatment of patients with hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel. In conclusion, the demonstrated activity of cabazitaxel in tumors with innate or acquired resistance to docetaxel, CNS tumors, and pediatric tumors made this agent a candidate for further clinical evaluation in a broader range of patient populations compared with first-generation taxanes. PMID:25378905

  9. Cannabinoids in postmortem toxicology.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Nikolas P; Ingle, Eric A

    2011-09-01

    Cannabinoids are often excluded from postmortem toxicology screens due to their ubiquitous nature, interpretative difficulties and unanswered questions regarding their postmortem redistribution. In this study, we review 30 postmortem cases where a drug screen gave a positive cannabinoids result and a confirmation identified ??-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-??-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC), and/or 11-nor-9-carboxy-??-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in peripheral (BL-P) or cardiac/central blood (BL-C) and/or urine (UR). Had cannabinoids not been included in these toxicologic evaluations, incomplete or erroneous inferences would have been drawn in a substantial number of cases regarding cause/manner of death. THC was detected in 28 BL-C and in all 30 BL-P. THC and THC-COOH were confirmed present in 2 and 23 UR, respectively. 11-OH-THC was detected in 4 BL-C, 6 BL-P, and 0 UR. The mean THC concentrations in BL-C and BL-P were 8.0 and 15.8 ng/mL, respectively. The mean THC-COOH concentrations in BL-C and BL-P were 55.2 and 60.6 ng/mL, respectively. The mean 11-OH-THC concentrations in BL-C and BL-P were 17.0 and 12.5 ng/mL, respectively. Postmortem interval (PMI) for each case was determined and evaluated in relation to BL-C/BL-P concentration ratios with THC-COOH exhibiting a possible trend. This study is the first of its kind and demonstrates the usefulness of cannabinoid analyses as part of death investigations. Furthermore, it provides distribution data that will improve the ability of toxicologists and pathologists to evaluate cannabinoid concentrations in human postmortem specimens. PMID:21871147

  10. Ultrasound guided fluorescence molecular tomography with improved quantification by an attenuation compensated born-normalization and in vivo preclinical study of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Baoqiang; Berti, Romain; Abran, Maxime; Lesage, Frédéric; Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Quebec H1T 1C8

    2014-05-15

    Ultrasound imaging, having the advantages of low-cost and non-invasiveness over MRI and X-ray CT, was reported by several studies as an adequate complement to fluorescence molecular tomography with the perspective of improving localization and quantification of fluorescent molecular targets in vivo. Based on the previous work, an improved dual-modality Fluorescence-Ultrasound imaging system was developed and then validated in imaging study with preclinical tumor model. Ultrasound imaging and a profilometer were used to obtain the anatomical prior information and 3D surface, separately, to precisely extract the tissue boundary on both sides of sample in order to achieve improved fluorescence reconstruction. Furthermore, a pattern-based fluorescence reconstruction on the detection side was incorporated to enable dimensional reduction of the dataset while keeping the useful information for reconstruction. Due to its putative role in the current imaging geometry and the chosen reconstruction technique, we developed an attenuation compensated Born-normalization method to reduce the attenuation effects and cancel off experimental factors when collecting quantitative fluorescence datasets over large area. Results of both simulation and phantom study demonstrated that fluorescent targets could be recovered accurately and quantitatively using this reconstruction mechanism. Finally, in vivo experiment confirms that the imaging system associated with the proposed image reconstruction approach was able to extract both functional and anatomical information, thereby improving quantification and localization of molecular targets.

  11. Preclinical study of SZ2080 material 3D microstructured scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering made by femtosecond direct laser writing lithography.

    PubMed

    Ma?iulaitis, Justinas; Deveikyt?, Milda; Rekštyt?, Sima; Bratchikov, Maksim; Darinskas, Adas; Šimbelyt?, Agn?; Daunoras, Gintaras; Laurinavi?ien?, Aida; Laurinavi?ius, Arvydas; Gudas, Rimtautas; Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Ma?iulaitis, Romaldas

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade DLW employing ultrafast pulsed lasers has become a well-established technique for the creation of custom-made free-form three-dimensional (3D) microscaffolds out of a variety of materials ranging from proteins to biocompatible glasses. Its potential applications for manufacturing a patient's specific scaffold seem unlimited in terms of spatial resolution and geometry complexity. However, despite few exceptions in which live cells or primitive organisms were encapsulated into a polymer matrix, no demonstration of an in vivo study case of scaffolds generated with the use of such a method was performed. Here, we report a preclinical study of 3D artificial microstructured scaffolds out of hybrid organic-inorganic (HOI) material SZ2080 fabricated using the DLW technique. The created 2.1 × 2.1 × 0.21 mm(3) membrane constructs are tested both in vitro by growing isolated allogeneic rabbit chondrocytes (Cho) and in vivo by implanting them into rabbit organisms for one, three and six months. An ex vivo histological examination shows that certain pore geometry and the pre-growing of Cho prior to implantation significantly improves the performance of the created 3D scaffolds. The achieved biocompatibility is comparable to the commercially available collagen membranes. The successful outcome of this study supports the idea that hexagonal-pore-shaped HOI microstructured scaffolds in combination with Cho seeding may be successfully implemented for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25797444

  12. Preliminary toxicology study of 3,6-diamino-1,2,4,5-tetrazine

    SciTech Connect

    London, J.E.

    1993-03-01

    The calculated acute oral LD 30/50 (lethal dose for 50% of the animals occurring within 30 days after compound administration) value for 3,6-diamino-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (DATZ) was 863 mg/kg in rats. According to classical guidelines, DATZ would be considered slightly to moderately toxic for rats. The calculated acute oral LD {sub 30/50} value was 2,288 mg/kg in mice and would be considered slightly to moderately toxic for mice. Skin application studies using rabbits demonstrated DATZ to be a nonirritant. The eye study using rabbits disclosed DATZ to be a very mild irritant. The sensitization study using guinea pigs did not show DATZ to have potential sensitizing properties.

  13. Preliminary toxicology study of 3,6-diamino-1,2,4,5-tetrazine

    SciTech Connect

    London, J.E.

    1993-03-01

    The calculated acute oral LD 30/50 (lethal dose for 50% of the animals occurring within 30 days after compound administration) value for 3,6-diamino-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (DATZ) was 863 mg/kg in rats. According to classical guidelines, DATZ would be considered slightly to moderately toxic for rats. The calculated acute oral LD [sub 30/50] value was 2,288 mg/kg in mice and would be considered slightly to moderately toxic for mice. Skin application studies using rabbits demonstrated DATZ to be a nonirritant. The eye study using rabbits disclosed DATZ to be a very mild irritant. The sensitization study using guinea pigs did not show DATZ to have potential sensitizing properties.

  14. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Developmental toxicity of chloroprene vapors in New Zealand white rabbits. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1994-04-01

    Chloroprene, 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene, is a colorless liquid with a pungent ethereal odor that is primarily used as an intermediate in the manufacture of neoprene rubber, and has been used as such since about 1930. This study addressed the potential for chloroprene to cause developmental toxicity in New Zealand white rabbits following gestational exposure to 0, 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene vapors, 6h/dy, 7dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 15 artificially inseminated females exposed on 6 through 28 days of gestation (dg). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 29 dg. Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. There were no overt signs of maternal toxicity and the change in maternal body weight over the course of the study was not affected. Exposure of pregnant rabbits to chloroprene vapors on 6-28 dg had no effect on the number of implantation, the mean percent of live pups per litter, or on the incidence of resorptions per litter. The incidence of fetal malformations was not increased by exposure to chloroprene. Results of this study indicate that gestational exposure of New Zealand white rabbits to 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene did not result in observable toxicity to either the dam or the offspring.

  15. APPLICATION OF CDNA MICROARRAY TO THE STUDY OF ARSENIC TOXICOLOGY AND CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (As) is a common environmental toxicant and known human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies link As exposure to various disorders and cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms for As toxicity and carcinogenicity are not completely known. The cDNA microarray, a high-th...

  16. Toward a Checklist for Exchange and Interpretation of Data froma Toxicology Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the advent of toxicogenomics came the need to share data across interdisciplinary teams and to deposit data associated with publications into public data repositories. Within a single institution, many variables associated with a study are standardized, for instance diet, an...

  17. HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN RODENTS — USES AND CAVEATS IN TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of cardiac pacing dynamics that has recently garnered a great deal of interest in environmental health studies. While the use of these measures has become popular, much uncertainty remains in the interpretation of results, both in terms ...

  18. The rodent estrous cycle: Characterization of vaginal cytology and its utility in toxicological studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    An evaluation of the estrous cycle in laboratory rodents can be a useful measure of the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian reproductive axis. It can also serve as a way of insuring that animals exhibiting abnormal cycling patterns are disincluded from a study prior t...

  19. STUDY OF THE CHEMICAL AND BEHAVIORAL TOXICOLOGY OF SUBSTITUTE CHEMICALS IN MICROTINE RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute oral LD50 and 30-day dietary subacute LC50 studies of 10 selected pesticides were evaluated in microtine rodents. As a means to developing new animal model systems, four species of microtine rodents including Microtus ochrogaster (MO), Microtus canicaudus (MC), Microtus pen...

  20. Eco-toxicological studies of diesel and biodiesel fuels in aerated soil.

    PubMed

    Lapinskiene, Asta; Martinkus, Povilas; Rebzdaite, Vilija

    2006-08-01

    The goal of this study was to compare diesel fuel to biodiesel fuel by determining the toxicity of analyzed materials and by quantitatively evaluating the microbial transformation of these materials in non-adapted aerated soil. The toxicity levels were determined by measuring the respiration of soil microorganisms as well as the activity of soil dehydrogenases. The quantitative evaluation of biotransformation of analyzed materials was based on the principle of balancing carbon in the following final products: (a) carbon dioxide; (b) humus compounds; (c) the remainder of non-biodegraded analyzed material; and (d) intermediate biodegradation products and the biomass of microorganisms. The results of these studies indicate that diesel fuel has toxic properties at concentrations above 3% (w/w), while biodiesel fuel has none up to a concentration of 12% (w/w). The diesel fuel is more resistant to biodegradation and produces more humus products. The biodiesel is easily biotransformed. PMID:16338045

  1. Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic Emission Source Aerosols (TERESA)—Power plant studies: assessment of breathing pattern

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Edgar A.; Lemos, Miriam; Coull, Brent; Long, Mark S.; Rohr, Annette C.; Ruiz, Pablo; Gupta, Tarun; Kang, Choong-Min; Godleski, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Our approach to study multi-pollutant aerosols isolates a single emissions source, evaluates the toxicity of primary and secondary particles derived from this source, and simulates chemical reactions that occur in the atmosphere after emission. Three U.S. coal-fired power plants utilizing different coals and with different emission controls were evaluated. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) derived from ?-pinene and/or ammonia was added in some experiments. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed for 6 h to filtered air or different atmospheric mixtures. Scenarios studied at each plant included the following: primary particles (P); secondary (oxidized) particles (PO); oxidized particles + SOA (POS); and oxidized and neutralized particles + SOA (PONS); additional control scenarios were also studied. Continuous respiratory data were obtained during exposures using whole body plethysmography chambers. Of the 12 respiratory outcomes assessed, each had statistically significant changes at some plant and with some of the 4 scenarios. The most robust outcomes were found with exposure to the PO scenario (increased respiratory frequency with decreases in inspiratory and expiratory time); and the PONS scenario (decreased peak expiratory flow and expiratory flow at 50%). PONS findings were most strongly associated with ammonium, neutralized sulfate, and elemental carbon (EC) in univariate analyses, but only with EC in multivariate analyses. Control scenario O (oxidized without primary particles) had similar changes to PO. Adjusted R2 analyses showed that scenario was a better predictor of respiratory responses than individual components, suggesting that the complex atmospheric mixture was responsible for respiratory effects. PMID:21639693

  2. A rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS assay for the quantitation of deacetyl mycoepoxydiene in rat plasma with application to preclinical pharmacokinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanhui; Xu, Jiangbo; Xu, Jiaxing; Huang, Yaojian; Shen, Yuemao; Liu, ZhaoPing

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a high-performance liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for analysis of the deacetyl mycoepoxydiene in rat plasma. The analyte and internal standard (I.S.), benorilate, were extracted from rat plasma by precipitation protein and separated on a C(18) column using acetonitrile-0.5% formic acid as mobile phase. Detection was performed using a turbo-spray ionization source and mass spectrometric positive multi-reaction-monitoring-mode (+MRM) at an ion voltage of +4800 V. The assay was linear over the concentration range 5-5000 ng/mL with the lowest limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 5 ng/mL. The method also afforded satisfactory results in terms of the sensitivity, specificity, precision (intra- and inter-day, RSD<5.8%), accuracy, recovery as well as the stability of the analyte under various conditions. The method was successfully applied to a preclinical pharmacokinetic study in rats after a single intravenous administration of deacetyl mycoepoxydiene 10 mg/kg. PMID:22169059

  3. HILIC-UPLC-MS for exploratory urinary metabolic profiling in toxicological studies.

    PubMed

    Spagou, Konstantina; Wilson, Ian D; Masson, Perrine; Theodoridis, Georgios; Raikos, Nikolaos; Coen, Muireann; Holmes, Elaine; Lindon, John C; Plumb, Robert S; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Want, Elizabeth J

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophilic interaction ultra performance liquid chromatography (HILIC-UPLC) permits the analysis of highly polar metabolites, providing complementary information to reversed-phase (RP) chromatography. HILIC-UPLC-TOF-MS was investigated for the global metabolic profiling of rat urine samples generated in an experimental hepatotoxicity study of galactosamine (galN) and the concomitant investigation of the protective effect of glycine. Within-run repeatability and stability over a large sample batch (>200 samples, 60 h run-time) was assessed through the repeat analysis of a quality control sample. Following system equilibration, excellent repeatability was observed in terms of retention time (CV < 1.7%), signal intensity (CV < 14%), and mass variability (<0.005 amu), providing a good measure of reproducibility. Classification of urinary metabolic profiles according to treatment was observed, with significant changes in specific metabolites after galN exposure, including increased urocanic acid, N-acetylglucosamine, and decreased 2-oxoglutarate. A novel finding from this HILIC-UPLC-MS approach was elevated urinary tyramine in galN-treated rats, reflecting disturbed amino acid metabolism. These results show HILIC-UPLC-MS to be a promising method for global metabolic profiling, demonstrating high within-run repeatability, even over an extended run time. Retention of polar endogenous analytes and xenobiotic metabolites was improved compared with RP studies, including galN, N-acetylglucosamine, oxoglutarate, and urocanic acid, enhancing metabolome coverage and potentially improving biomarker discovery. PMID:21142126

  4. [A retrospective study analysis of urinary hippuric acid levels in occupational toxicology exams].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Kelly Cristina; Sagebin, Fernando Rodrigues; Oliveira, Paola Garcia; Glock, Luiz; Thiesen, Flavia Valladão

    2010-06-01

    Hippuric acid is the primary metabolite of toluene, a solvent widely used in industrial processes with considerable toxic effects, a fact which justifies regularly monitoring individuals with occupational exposure to this solvent. This work aims at evaluating urinary hippuric acid levels found in workers subject to biological monitoring. A retrospective study was carried out with data referring from 2002 to 2005, in which exams results and employment status were analyzed (periodic, post-employment, and pre-employment exams). Results indicate a significant reduction in hippuric acid levels for 2005. Periodic exams presented higher results than pre-employment and post-employment exams. No significant difference was found in individuals grouped according to their status in each of the established intervals, their reference numbers, and maximum biological levels allowed. Hippuric acid levels detected indicate low risk of toluene exposure for the population under evaluation, probably due to a growing concern with the deployment of measures regarding occupational hygiene. PMID:20640325

  5. [Animal experimento-toxicologic studies of protein isolates in sunflower seeds].

    PubMed

    Hoernicke, E; Lewerenz, H J; Mieth, G

    1988-01-01

    Safety evaluations of sunflower protein isolates (SPI) obtained by various processes were performed in subchronic (90-day) feeding studies using male and female rats as experimental animals. General appearance, food consumption and efficiency, haematology, kidney function and urine analysis, serum chemistry including determinations of enzyme activities, organ weights and macro- and microscopic pathology were used as criteria to disclose adverse effects. Feeding graded levels of SPI as supplements up to 75% of the total protein of the diet revealed no morphologic and functional changes attributable to toxic effects of the test product at daily intakes up to 13 g/kg body weight. The evaluations of the SPI-variants tested were similar. PMID:3231256

  6. Toxicological study of the Anam River in Otuocha, Anambra State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Igwilo, Innocent O; Afonne, Onyenmechi Johnson; Maduabuchi, Ugwuona John-Moses; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere

    2006-01-01

    The authors studied the quality of water and soil samples from the Anam River in Nigeria. Using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, they analyzed levels of lead, cadmium, copper, and nickel. They also analyzed sulfates, nitrates, biological oxygen demand, total hardness, total dissolved solids, pH values, electrical conductivity, chloride, and salinity. The ranges of detected metals were 0.002-0.005 mg/L for cadmium, 0.008-0.016 mg/L for lead, and 0.580-1.345 mg/L for copper. In the soil samples, the authors detected cadmium (0.07-3.45 ppm), copper (4.38-13.54 ppm), lead (0.59-7.34 ppm), and nickel (0.36-5.64 ppm). The mean values of the chemical parameters were 11.34 +/- 1.20 mg/L for total hardness, 4.43 +/- 1.54 mg/L for biological oxygen demand, 20.00 +/- 0.00 mg/L for total dissolved solids, and 0.22 +/- 0.05 mg/L for nitrates. Chloride, salinity, electrical conductivity, and pH values were 8.00 +/- 1.73 mg/L, 14.44 +/- 3.13 mg/L, 19.33 +/- 0.67 ps cm-L, and 7.09 +/- 0.05, respectively. The World Health Organization guidelines for the parameters in soil were exceeded. PMID:17891888

  7. Toxicological Studies of 212Pb Intravenously or Intraperitoneally Injected into Mice for a Phase 1 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Milenic, Diane E.; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Solivella, María S.; Banaga, Eileen; Torgue, Julien; Besnainou, Sarah; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.

    2015-01-01

    Faced with the novelty of a 212Pb-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) for clinical translation, concerns were expressed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding 212Pb prematurely released from the mAb-chelate conjugate. The objective of this study was to simulate the worst case scenario of such a failure. Groups of Balb/c mice (n = 9–20) were administered 212Pb by intraperitoneal (0.0925–1.85 MBq) or intravenous (0.0925–1.11 MBq) injection and then euthanized at 7 or 90 days to assess acute or chronic effects. Weights were recorded prior to injection of the 212Pb and at the end of the observation periods. Blood samples were collected for clinical chemistry and blood cell analysis. Thirty tissues were harvested and formalin fixed for histopathological examination. Treatment related effects of the 212Pb were observed in the bone marrow, spleen, kidneys and the liver. Histological alterations in these organs were considered mild to moderate, indicating low grade toxicity, and not considered severe enough to affect function. This data was presented to the FDA and determined to be acceptable. The clinical trial with 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab was approved in January 2011 and the trial opened at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) in July. PMID:26213947

  8. Toxicological studies for some agricultural waste extracts on mosquito larvae and experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    El-Maghraby, Somia; Nawwar, Galal A; Bakr, Reda FA; Helmy, Nadia; Kamel, Omnia MHM

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate some agricultural waste extracts as insecticide and their effects on enzyme activities in liver and kidney of male mice. Methods The insecticidal activity of five tested compounds (one crude extract and 4 waste compounds) was bioassay against the 3rd instars of the Culex pipiens (Cx. pipiens) larvae in the laboratory. The LC50 values of eucalyptol, apricot kernel, Rice bran, corn, black liquor and white liquor are 91.45, 1 166.1, 1 203.3, 21 449.65, 4 025.78 and 6 343.18 ppm, respectively. Selection of the compounds for the subsequent studies was not only dependent on LC50 values but also on the persistence of these wastes products on large scale. Results White and black liquor did not produce any gross effect at 200 mg/Kg body weight. No apparent toxic symptoms were observed in tested animals during the whole period of the experiment which run out for 14 days. No statistically significance was observed in the enzyme cholinesterase activity, the activities of liver enzymes and kidney function in treated mice with black and white liquors. While, no and slight inhibition was observed after the 2 weeks of treatment period with deltamethrin and fenitrothion reached to about 24% in plasma cholinesterase enzyme activity. Significantly increase in the activities of liver enzymes and kidney function in treated mice with deltamethrin and fenitrothion. Conclusions Black liquor can be used efficiently to control Cx. pipiens larvae under laboratory condition. Environmental problem caused by rice straw can be solved by converting the waste material to beneficial natural selective insecticide. PMID:23569971

  9. Toxicology update isoparaffinic hydrocarbons: a summary of physical properties, toxicity studies and human exposure data.

    PubMed

    Mullin, L S; Ader, A W; Daughtrey, W C; Frost, D Z; Greenwood, M R

    1990-04-01

    The Isoparaffins covered in this manuscript are branched aliphatic hydrocarbons with a carbon skeleton length ranging from approximately C10 to C15. They are used in the manufacture of liquid imaging toners, paint formulations, charcoal lighter fluid, furniture polishes and floor clearners. Potential exposure exists in the petroleum, printing and paint industries. Isoparaffins have a very low order of acute toxicity, being practically non-toxic by oral, dermal and inhalation routes. However, aspiration of liquid isoparaffins into the lungs during oral ingestion could result in severe pulmonary injury. Dermally, isoparaffins have produced slight to moderate irritation in animals and humans under occluded patch conditions where evaporation cannot freely occur. However, they are not irritating in non-occluded tests, which are a more realistic simulation of human exposure. They have not been found to be sensitizers in guinea pig or human patch testing. However, occasional rare idiosyncratic sensitization reactions in humans have been reported. Instillation of isoparaffins into rabbit eyes produces only slight irritation. Several studies have evaluated sensory irritation in laboratory animals or odor or sensory response in humans. When evaluated by a standard procedure to assess upper airway irritation, isoparaffins did not produce sensory irritation in mice exposed to up to 400 ppm isoparaffin in air. Human volunteers were exposed for six hours to 100 ppm isoparaffin. The subjects were given a self-administered questionnaire to evaluate symptoms, which included dryness of the mucous membranes, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, headache, dizziness, feeling of inebriation, visual disturbances, tremor, muscular weakness, impairment of coordination or paresthesia. No symptoms associated with solvent exposure were observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2193978

  10. Autofluorescence imaging device for real-time detection and tracking of pathogenic bacteria in a mouse skin wound model: preclinical feasibility studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yichao Charlie; Kulbatski, Iris; Medeiros, Philip J.; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; Xu, Lizhen; Chen, Yonghong; DaCosta, Ralph S.

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infection significantly impedes wound healing. Clinical diagnosis of wound infections is subjective and suboptimal, in part because bacteria are invisible to the naked eye during clinical examination. Moreover, bacterial infection can be present in asymptomatic patients, leading to missed opportunities for diagnosis and treatment. We developed a prototype handheld autofluorescence (AF) imaging device (Portable Real-time Optical Detection, Identification and Guidance for Intervention-PRODIGI) to noninvasively visualize and measure bacterial load in wounds in real time. We conducted preclinical pilot studies in an established nude mouse skin wound model inoculated with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. We tested the feasibility of longitudinal AF imaging for in vivo visualization of bacterial load in skin wounds, validated by bioluminescence imaging. We showed that bacteria (S. aureus), occult to standard examination, can be visualized in wounds using PRODIGI. We also detected quantitative changes in wound bacterial load over time based on the antibiotic treatment and the correlation of bacterial AF intensity with bacterial load. AF imaging of wounds offers a safe, noninvasive method for visualizing the presence, location, and extent of bacteria as well as measuring relative changes in bacterial load in wounds in real time.

  11. Preclinical Dose-Finding Study With a Liver-Tropic, Recombinant AAV-2/8 Vector in the Mouse Model of Galactosialidosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Huimin; Gomero, Elida; Bonten, Erik; Gray, John T; Allay, Jim; Wu, Yanan; Wu, Jianrong; Calabrese, Christopher; Nienhuis, Arthur; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Galactosialidosis (GS) is a lysosomal storage disease linked to deficiency of the protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). Similarly to GS patients, Ppca-null mice develop a systemic disease of the reticuloendothelial system, affecting most visceral organs and the nervous system. Symptoms include severe nephropathy, visceromegaly, infertility, progressive ataxia, and shortened life span. Here, we have conducted a preclinical, dose-finding study on a large cohort of GS mice injected intravenously at 1 month of age with increasing doses of a GMP-grade rAAV2/8 vector, expressing PPCA under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Treated mice, monitored for 16 weeks post-treatment, had normal physical appearance and behavior without discernable side effects. Despite the restricted expression of the transgene in the liver, immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses of other systemic organs, serum, and urine showed a dose-dependent, widespread correction of the disease phenotype, suggestive of a protein-mediated mechanism of cross-correction. A notable finding was that rAAV-treated GS mice showed high expression of PPCA in the reproductive organs, which resulted in reversal of their infertility. Together these results support the use of this rAAV-PPCA vector as a viable and safe method of gene delivery for the treatment of systemic disease in non-neuropathic GS patients. PMID:22008912

  12. Preclinical Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Properties of Cardiac Adipose Tissue Progenitor Cells Using Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Direct Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Perea-Gil, Isaac; Monguió-Tortajada, Marta; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Borràs, Francesc E.; Roura, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based strategies to regenerate injured myocardial tissue have emerged over the past decade, but the optimum cell type is still under scrutiny. In this context, human adult epicardial fat surrounding the heart has been characterized as a reservoir of mesenchymal-like progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs) with potential clinical benefits. However, additional data on the possibility that these cells could trigger a deleterious immune response following implantation are needed. Thus, in the presented study, we took advantage of the well-established low immunogenicity of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to comparatively assess the immunomodulatory properties of cardiac ATDPCs in an in vitro allostimulatory assay using allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). Similar to UCBMSCs, increasing amounts of seeded cardiac ATDPCs suppressed the alloproliferation of T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6, TNF?, and IFN?) was also specifically modulated by the different numbers of cardiac ATDPCs cocultured. In summary, we show that cardiac ATDPCs abrogate T cell alloproliferation upon stimulation with allogeneic mature MDDCs, suggesting that they could further regulate a possible harmful immune response in vivo. Additionally, UCBMSCs can be considered as valuable tools to preclinically predict the immunogenicity of prospective regenerative cells. PMID:25861626

  13. Preclinical Study of Novel Gene Silencer Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamide Targeting Human TGF-?1 Promoter for Hypertrophic Scars in a Common Marmoset Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Jun; Fukuda, Noboru; Inoue, Takashi; Nakai, Shigeki; Saito, Kosuke; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Nagase, Hiroki; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Itoh, Toshio; Soma, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report a preclinical study of a pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide that targets the human transforming growth factor (hTGF)-?1 gene as a novel transcriptional gene silencer in a common marmoset primate model. We designed and then synthesized PI polyamides to target the hTGF-?1 promoter. We examined effects of seven PI polyamides (GB1101-1107) on the expression of hTGF-?1 mRNA stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in human vascular smooth muscle cells. GB1101, GB1105 and GB1106 significantly inhibited hTGF-?1 mRNA expression. We examined GB1101 as a PI polyamide to hTGF-?1 for hypertrophic scars in marmosets in vivo. Injection of GB1101 completely inhibited hypertrophic scar formation at 35 days post-incision and inhibited cellular infiltration, TGF-?1 and vimentin staining, and epidermal thickness. Mismatch polyamide did not affect hypertrophic scarring or histological changes. Epidermis was significantly thinner with GB1101 than with water and mismatch PI polyamides. We developed the PI polyamides for practical ointment medicines for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. FITC-labeled GB1101 with solbase most efficiently distributed in the nuclei of epidermal keratinocytes, completely suppressed hypertropic scarring at 42 days after incision, and considerably inhibited epidermal thickness and vimentin-positive fibroblasts. PI polyamides targeting hTGF-?1 promoter with solbase ointment will be practical medicines for treating hypertrophic scars after surgical operations and skin burns. PMID:25938472

  14. Relationship between Critical Thinking Skills and Success in Preclinical Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jane N.; Markert, Ronald J.

    1994-01-01

    A study of 92 medical students found that critical thinking skills, as measured by the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal, were moderately predictive of academic success during the preclinical years of medical education. (Author/MSE)

  15. Preclinical safety evaluation of low molecular weight heparin-deoxycholate conjugates as an oral anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Young; Jeon, Ok-Cheol; Moon, Hyun Tae; Hwang, Seung Rim; Byun, Youngro

    2016-01-01

    The preclinical safety of a newly developed oral anticoagulant, the low molecular weight heparin-deoxycholate conjugate (OH09208), was evaluated by a comprehensive evaluating program in compliance with standard guidelines. The single dose oral toxicity study in rats receiving 2000 and 5000 mg kg(-1) of OH09208 did not reveal any mortality, unusual body weight changes or necropsy findings. The results of the 4-week oral toxicity study with a 4-week recovery program in rats receiving OH09208 in doses of 100, 300 and 1000 mg kg(-1) day(-1) did not reveal any mortality, or indicate any unusual clinical signs, or show any toxicokinetic relationships to the administration of OH09208. Although the increase in liver enzymes in one male dog treated with 300 mg kg(-1) day(-1) and one female dog treated with 1000 mg kg(-1) day(-1) could not be excluded from the effect of the test substance, no other toxicologically significant changes were observed in the 4-week oral toxicity study with a 4-week recovery in beagle dogs. Thus, while the no-observed-adverse-effect level value from the 4-week study in both male and female rats was 1000 mg kg(-1) day(-1) , those from the 4-week study in male and female beagle dogs were 300 and 1000 mg kg(-1) day(-1) , respectively. Furthermore, OH09208 did not induce anaphylactic reactions in guinea pigs, micronucleated bone marrow cells in male ICR mice, chromosomal aberration in Chinese hamster lung cell lines, bacterial reverse mutation, and any abnormalities in hERG current assay, mouse central nervous system and dog cardiovascular studies. Overall, there were no unexpected toxicities in this preclinical study that might have precluded the safe administration of OH09208 to humans. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25900269

  16. Optimization of Preclinical Animal Models

    E-print Network

    No biodistribution or target engagement data No tolerability data Underpowered single dose efficacy Limited PD data No biodistribution or target engagement data No tolerability data Underpowered single dose efficacy Limited PD data Preclinical Testing Pharmacokinetics Biodistribution and target engagem

  17. Computational Toxicology (S)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emerging field of computational toxicology applies mathematical and computer models and molecular biological and chemical approaches to explore both qualitative and quantitative relationships between sources of environmental pollutant exposure and adverse health outcomes. Th...

  18. Toxicology Education Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to our website View more topics 24 Nov Pesticides: The Challenge of Controlling Pests When Balancing Safety ... Chemistry History In the Classroom Nanotechnology Occupational Toxicology Pesticides Product Safety Program Reproduction Risk Tox Topic Toxic ...

  19. Quantile Regression with a Change-point Model for Longitudinal Data: An Application to the Study of Cognitive Changes in Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenxi; Dowling, N. Maritza; Chappell, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Summary Progressive and insidious cognitive decline that interferes with daily life is the defining characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Epidemiological studies have found that the pathological process of AD begins years before a clinical diagnosis is made and can be highly variable within a given population. Characterizing cognitive decline in the preclinical phase of AD is critical for the development of early intervention strategies when disease-modifying therapies may be most effective. In the last decade, there has been an increased interest in the application of change-point models to longitudinal cognitive outcomes prior to and after diagnosis. Most of the proposed statistical methodology for describing decline relies upon distributional assumptions that may not hold. In this paper, we introduce a quantile regression with a change-point model for longitudinal data of cognitive function in persons bound to develop AD. A change-point in our model reflects the transition from the cognitive decline due to normal aging to the accelerated decline due to disease progression. Quantile regression avoids common distributional assumptions on cognitive outcomes and allows the covariate effects and the change-point to vary for different quantiles of the response. We provided an approach for estimating the model parameters, including the change-point, and presented inferential procedures based on the asymptotic properties of the estimators. A simulation study showed that the estimation and inferential procedures perform reasonably well in finite samples. The practical use of our model was illustrated by an application to longitudinal episodic memory outcomes from two cohort studies of aging and AD. PMID:25892034

  20. A Preclinical Murine Model of Hepatic Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Kevin C.; Foley, Kelly; Olino, Kelly; Leubner, Ashley; Mayo, Skye C.; Jain, Ajay; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Schulick, Richard D.; Yoshimura, Kiyoshi; Edil, Barish; Zheng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Numerous murine models have been developed to study human cancers and advance the understanding of cancer treatment and development. Here, a preclinical, murine pancreatic tumor model of hepatic metastases via a hemispleen injection of syngeneic murine pancreatic tumor cells is described. This model mimics many of the clinical conditions in patients with metastatic disease to the liver. Mice consistently develop metastases in the liver allowing for investigation of the metastatic process, experimental therapy testing, and tumor immunology research. PMID:25285458

  1. Reproduction and juvenile animal toxicology studies in the rat with a new allergy vaccine adjuvanted with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL(®)) for the treatment of grass pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    Baldrick, Paul; Hewings, Simon; Skinner, Murray

    2011-11-01

    Pollinex(®) Quattro Grass has been developed for the prevention or relief of allergic symptoms caused by pollen in both adults and children. Reproduction and juvenile animal toxicology studies have been performed. Subcutaneous injection on Day 14 prior to pairing and on Days 6 and 13 of gestation to pregnant rats at 2000SU/0.5 mL elicited no signs of maternal or embryo-foetal toxicity. Mating, fertility, fecundity and pup parameters were all unaffected by treatment. Once-weekly subcutaneous administration at ascending doses of 300, 800, 2000 and 2000SU/0.5 mL followed by a 4 week non-dose period to juvenile rats from 3 weeks of age showed no signs of obvious toxicity. As in a previously performed adult animal toxicology study with the vaccine, not unexpected, but relatively minor, immuno-stimulatory effects were seen in this study along with injection site reaction which can largely be attributed to the presence of tyrosine in the formulation. PMID:21782016

  2. From quantal counts to mechanisms and systems: the past, present, and future of biometrics in environmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Bailer, A J; Piegorsch, W W

    2000-06-01

    As appreciation for human impact on the environment has developed, so have the experimental systems and associated statistical tools that quantify this impact. Toxicological study in particular has grown in its complexity and its need for advanced statistical support. Within this perspective, we describe statistical practice in environmental toxicology and risk assessment. We present two case studies, one from mammalian toxicology and one from aquatic toxicology, that highlight the evolution of statistical practice in environmental toxicology. PMID:10877286

  3. Studies on the human metabolism and the toxicologic detection of the cough suppressant dropropizine in urine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Staack, Roland F; Theobald, Denis S; Maurer, Hans H

    2004-08-01

    Studies are described on the metabolism and the toxicologic analysis of the nonopioid cough suppressant dropropizine [R,S-3-(4-phenyl-1-piperazinyl)1,2-propandiol, DRO] in human urine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The metabolism studies showed that DRO was metabolized in humans mainly by hydroxylation of the aromatic ring, by N-dealkylation of the parent drug and of the hydroxyl-metabolite to the corresponding N-phenylpiperazines, and by degradation of the piperazine moiety. The authors' systematic toxicologic analysis (STA) procedure using full-scan GC-MS after acid hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, and microwave-assisted acetylation allowed the unambiguous detection of DRO and its above-mentioned metabolites in human urine up to about 32 hours after intake of a single common therapeutic dose. The target analytes were found to be the parent compound DRO (earlier phase of excretion) and the hydroxylated metabolite para-hydroxy-DRO (later phase of excretion). Both allowed unambiguous detection of an intake of DRO and also differentiation from other phenylpiperazine derivatives. PMID:15257075

  4. Adjuvant anticholinesterase therapy for the management of epilepsy-induced memory deficit: a critical pre-clinical study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Awanish; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy is one of the major neurological disorders still awaiting safer drugs with improved antiepileptic effect and lesser side effects. Apart from epilepsy itself, AEDs also have been shown to induce cognitive impairment in patients with epilepsy. There are limited data for the treatment of this menace. As cholinergic approach has widely been practiced for the restoration of memory in various neurodegenerative disorders, this study was envisaged to evaluate add on effect of acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (tacrine) with phenytoin in pentylenetetrazole-kindling-induced learning and memory deficit in mice. In this study, mice were kindled using subconvulsive dose of pentylenetetrazole (35 mg/kg, i.p.; at interval of 48 ± 2 hr) and successfully kindled animals were divided into different groups and treated with vehicle, phenytoin and phenytoinin in combination with tacrine (0.3 mg/kg), atropine (1 mg/kg) and tacrine + atropine. Effect of different interventions on learning and memory was evaluated using elevated plus maze and passive shock avoidance on days 5, 10, 15 and 20. Phenytoin-treated kindled animals were associated with learning and memory deficit, while tacrine supplementation improved memory deficit with increased seizure severity score. Atropine treatment significantly reversed the protective effect of tacrine. Neurochemical findings also support the behavioural finding of the study. Our results suggest the use of anticholinesterases, with better seizure tolerance, for the management of cognitive impairment of epilepsy, as adjunct therapy. PMID:24890882

  5. Aviation combustion toxicology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Arvind K

    2010-01-01

    Aviation combustion toxicology is a subspecialty of the field of aerospace toxicology, which is composed of aerospace and toxicology. The term aerospace, that is, the environment extending above and beyond the surface of the Earth, is also used to represent the combined fields of aeronautics and astronautics. Aviation is another term interchangeably used with aerospace and aeronautics and is explained as the science and art of operating powered aircraft. Toxicology deals with the adverse effects of substances on living organisms. Although toxicology borrows knowledge from biology, chemistry, immunology, pathology, physiology, and public health, the most closely related field to toxicology is pharmacology. Economic toxicology, environmental toxicology, and forensic toxicology, including combustion toxicology, are the three main branches of toxicology. In this overview, a literature search for the period of 1960-2007 was performed and information related to aviation combustion toxicology collected. The overview included introduction; combustion, fire, and smoke; smoke gas toxicity; aircraft material testing; fire gases and their interactive effects; result interpretation; carboxyhemoglobin and blood cyanide ion levels; pyrolytic products of aircraft engine oils, fluids, and lubricants; and references. This review is anticipated to be an informative resource for aviation combustion toxicology and fire-related casualties. PMID:20109297

  6. Preclinical Evaluation of DMA, a Bisbenzimidazole, as Radioprotector: Toxicity, Pharmacokinetics, and Biodistribution Studies in Balb/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Nimesh, Hemlata; Tiwari, Vinod; Yang, Chunhua; Gundala, Sushma R; Chuttani, Krishna; Hazari, Puja P; Mishra, Anil K; Sharma, Abhisheak; Lal, Jawahar; Katyal, Anju; Aneja, Ritu; Tandon, Vibha

    2015-10-01

    Radiotherapy, a therapeutic modality of cancer treatment, nonselectively damages normal tissues as well as tumor tissues. The search is ongoing for therapeutic agents that selectively reduce radiation-induced normal tissue injury without reducing tumoricidal effect, thereby increasing the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy. Our laboratory established 5-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-2-[2'-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5'benzimidazolyl] benzimidazole (DMA) as noncytotoxic radioprotector in mammalian cells. DMA showed an excellent radioprotection in mice at single nontoxic oral dose by a dose-reduction factor of 1.28. An oxygen radical absorbing capacity assay confirmed its free-radical quenching ability. Single bolus dose and 28-days of repeated administration of DMA in mice for toxicity studies determined an LD50 of >2000 mg/kg body weight (bw) and 225 mg/kg bw, respectively, suggesting DMA is safe. Histopathology, biochemical parameters, and relative organ weight analysis revealed insignificant changes in the DMA-treated animals. The pharmacokinetic study of DMA at oral and intravenous doses showed its C(max) = 1 hour, bioavailability of 8.84%, elimination half-life of 4 hours, and an enterohepatic recirculation. Biodistribution study in mice with Ehrlich ascites tumors showed that (99m)Tc-DMA achieved its highest concentration in 1 hour and was retained up to 4 hours in the lungs, liver, kidneys, and spleen, and in a low concentration in the tumor, a solicited property of any radioprotector to protect normal cells over cancerous cells. We observed that the single-dose treatment of tumor-bearing mice with DMA 2 hours before 8 Gy total body irradiation showed an impressive rescue of radiation-induced morbidity in terms of weight loss and mortality without a change in tumor response. PMID:26240287

  7. Orazipone, a locally acting immunomodulator, ameliorates intestinal radiation injury: A preclinical study in a novel rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Boerma, Marjan; Wang, Junru; Richter, Konrad K.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Intestinal radiation injury (radiation enteropathy) is relevant to cancer treatment, as well as to radiation accidents and radiation terrorism scenarios. This study assessed the protective efficacy of orazipone, a locally-acting small molecule immunomodulator. Methods and Materials: Male rats were orchiectomized, a 4-cm segment of small bowel was sutured to the inside of the scrotum, a proximal anteperistaltic ileostomy was created for intraluminal drug administration, and intestinal continuity was re-established by end-to-side anastomosis. After three weeks postoperative recovery, the intestine in the 'scrotal hernia' was exposed locally to single-dose or fractionated X-radiation. Orazipone (30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was administered daily through the ileostomy, either during and after irradiation, or only after irradiation. Structural, cellular, and molecular aspects of intestinal radiation toxicity were assessed two weeks after irradiation. Results: Orazipone significantly ameliorated histologic injury and transforming growth factor-{beta} immunoreactivity levels, both after single-dose and fractionated irradiation. Intestinal wall thickness was significantly reduced after single-dose and nonsignificantly after fractionated irradiation. Mucosal surface area and numbers of mast cells were partially restored by orazipone after single-dose irradiation. Conclusions: This work (1) demonstrates the utility of the ileostomy rat model for intraluminal administration of response modifiers in single-dose and fractionated radiation studies; (2) shows that mucosal immunomodulation during and/or after irradiation ameliorates intestinal toxicity; and (3) highlights important differences between single-dose and fractionated radiation regimens.

  8. Development of Allogeneic NK Cell Adoptive Transfer Therapy in Metastatic Melanoma Patients: In Vitro Preclinical Optimization Studies

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Michal J.; Shoham, Tsipi; Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Zabari, Naama; Ortenberg, Rona; Yakirevitch, Arkadi; Nagler, Arnon; Loewenthal, Ron; Schachter, Jacob; Markel, Gal

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have long been considered as potential agents for adoptive cell therapy for solid cancer patients. Until today most studies utilized autologous NK cells and yielded disappointing results. Here we analyze various modular strategies to employ allogeneic NK cells for adoptive cell transfer, including donor-recipient HLA-C mismatching, selective activation and induction of melanoma-recognizing lysis receptors, and co-administration of antibodies to elicit antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC). We show that NK cell activation and induction of the relevant lysis receptors, as well as co-administration of antibodies yield substantial anti-cancer effects, which are functionally superior to HLA-C mismatching. Combination of the various strategies yielded improved effects. In addition, we developed various clinically-compatible ex vivo expansion protocols that were optimized according to fold expansion, purity and expression of lysis receptors. The main advantages of employing allogeneic NK cells are accessibility, the ability to use a single donor for many patients, combination with various strategies associated with the mechanism of action, e.g. antibodies and specific activation, as well as donor selection according to HLA or CD16 genotypes. This study rationalizes a clinical trial that combines adoptive transfer of highly potent allogeneic NK cells and antibody therapy. PMID:23483943

  9. A Preclinical Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Occlusin Trade-Mark-Sign 500 Artificial Embolization Device in Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Richard J.; Nation, Patrick N.; Polakowski, Robert; Biliske, Jennifer A.; Tiege, Paul B.

    2012-06-15

    Introduction: This study evaluated the safety, effectiveness, and biodegradation of a new embolic agent, Occlusin Trade-Mark-Sign 503 Artificial Embolization Device (OCL 503). The agent consists of biodegradable poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres (150-212 {mu}m) coated with type I bovine collagen and was compared with Embosphere{sup Registered-Sign} Microspheres (300-500 {mu}m) in this controlled study of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in sheep. Methods: Unilateral UAE was performed in 32 adult ewes randomly assigned. Vessels were embolized to effective stasis. The cohort was divided into four groups, which were sacrificed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: Both agents were 100% effective in achieving stasis. At 6 months, all OCL 503-treated arteries were occluded, the microspheres degraded with time, and at 12 months all four animals examined demonstrated recanalization. OCL 503 was found in the untreated uterine artery in one animal with no other evidence of non target embolization. In the Embosphere-treated group, all vessels remained occluded and microspheres were detected in the contralateral uterine artery in 6 of 15 examined vessels and in 10 vaginal, 2 ovarian, and 1 vesical artery. No procedural-related complications were seen in either group. Conclusions: OCL 503 is as effective an embolic agent as Embosphere{sup Registered-Sign} Microspheres when embolizing ovine uterine arteries and resorbs with time, allowing recanalization of the treated arteries. No device-related issues or adverse events were observed.

  10. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Yvonne; He, Pengfei; Chilla, Geetha Soujanya V. N.; Poh, Chueh Loo; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG at endpoint. Microscopic inspection revealed that LhCG engraftment restored cartilage thickness, promoted integration with surrounding native cartilage, produced abundant cartilage-specific matrix molecules, and re-established an intact superficial tangential zone. Importantly, the repair efficacy of LhCG was quantitatively shown to be comparable to native, unaffected cartilage in terms of biochemical composition and biomechanical properties. There were no complications related to the donor site of cartilage biopsy. Collectively, these results imply that LhCG engraftment may be a viable approach for articular cartilage repair. PMID:26549401

  11. A Novel Pre-Clinical Murine Model to Study the Life Cycle and Progression of Cervical and Anal Papillomavirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn R.; Balogh, Karla K.; Cooper, Timothy K.; Hu, Jiafen; Christensen, Neil D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Papillomavirus disease and associated cancers remain a significant health burden in much of the world. The current protective vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix, are expensive and not readily available to the underprivileged. In addition, the vaccines have not gained wide acceptance in the United States nor do they provide therapeutic value. Papillomaviruses are strictly species specific and thus human viruses cannot be studied in an animal host. An appropriate model for mucosal disease has long been sought. We chose to investigate whether the newly discovered mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1, could infect mucosal tissues in Foxn1nu/Foxn1nu mice. Methods The vaginal and anal canals of Foxn1nu/Foxn1nu mice were gently abraded using Nonoxynol-9 and “Doctor’s BrushPicks” and MmuPV1 was delivered into the vaginal tract or the anal canal. Results Productive vaginal, cervical and anal infections developed in all mice. Vaginal/cervical infections could be monitored by vaginal lavage. Dysplasias were evident in all animals. Conclusions Anogenital tissues of a common laboratory mouse can be infected with a papillomavirus unique to that animal. This observation will pave the way for fundamental virological and immunological studies that have been challenging to carry out heretofore due to lack of a suitable model system. PMID:25803616

  12. Preclinical Safety of the Root Extract of Polygala tenuifolia Willdenow in Sprague-Dawley Rats and Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ki Young; Won, Beom Young; Ha, Hyun Jee; Yun, Yeo Sang; Lee, Hyung Gun

    2014-01-01

    The root of Polygala tenuifolia Willdenow has been used for the treatment of insomnia, depression, and amnesia. However, the toxicological properties of the herb have been overlooked, because it has been used for a long time for various purposes. In this study, we evaluated the preclinical safety of the root extract in rats and beagle dogs. First, the acute oral toxicity was tested in both rats and dogs. In the rats, only one female of 2?g/kg died, but no treatment-related death or clinical and gross findings were observed after the administration. No toxicological changes or mortalities related to the test substance were also observed after the administration in the dogs. Although vomiting, discoloration, or hemorrhage was found in some dogs, there were no serious abnormalities. Second, the subchronic toxicity was investigated in the rats. Two animals were found dead in the female group of 1,000?mg/kg/day, but there were no abnormal findings associated with the test substance. There also were no adverse effects on the clinical signs, body weight, and hematological and biochemical findings. Therefore, our results showed that the acute or subchronic toxicity of the root extract of Polygala tenuifolia might not be toxic to rats and dogs. PMID:25431613

  13. Aquatic Toxicology 82 (2007) 242250 The effect of maternal exposure to contaminated sediment on

    E-print Network

    Miller, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Aquatic Toxicology 82 (2007) 242­250 The effect of maternal exposure to contaminated sediment,hereaftertermedcondition(Reznick, 1991; Yaragina and Marshall, 2000). In toxicology studies for example, fish exposed to sublethal levels

  14. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 21, No. 4, pp. 807815, 2002 Printed in the USA

    E-print Network

    807 Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 21, No. 4, pp. 807­815, 2002 2002 SETAC Printed- toxicological effects of TPT [1]. This is important because comparative studies suggest that TPT can be more

  15. In-Vivo Efficacy of Compliant 3D Nano-Composite in Critical-Size Bone Defect Repair: a Six Month Preclinical Study in Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Nitin; Pandey, Alok K.; Gurbani, Deepak; Khan, Kainat; Singh, Dhirendra; Chaudhari, Bhushan P.; Soni, Vivek P.; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Dhawan, Alok; Bellare, Jayesh R.

    2013-01-01

    Bone defects above critical size do not heal completely by itself and thus represent major clinical challenge to reconstructive surgery. Numerous bone substitutes have already been used to promote bone regeneration, however their use, particularly for critical-sized bone defects along with their long term in vivo safety and efficacy remains a concern. The present study was designed to obtain a complete healing of critical-size defect made in the proximal tibia of New Zealand White rabbit, using nano-hydroxyapatite/gelatin and chemically carboxymethylated chitin (n-HA/gel/CMC) scaffold construct. The bone-implant interfaces and defect site healing was evaluated for a period up to 25 weeks using radiography, micro-computed tomography, fluorescence labeling, and histology and compared with respective SHAM (empty contra lateral control). The viscoelastic porous scaffold construct allows easy surgical insertion and post-operatively facilitate oxygenation and angiogenesis. Radiography of defect treated with scaffold construct suggested expedited healing at defect edges and within the defect site, unlike confined healing at edges of the SHAM sites. The architecture indices analyzed by micro-computed tomography showed a significant increase in percentage of bone volume fraction, resulted in reconciled cortico-trabecular bone formation at n-HA/gel/CMC constructs treated site (15.2% to 52.7%) when compared with respective SHAM (10.2% to 31.8%). Histological examination and fluorescence labeling revealed that the uniformly interconnected porous surface of scaffold construct enhanced osteoblasts’ activity and mineralization. These preclinical data suggest that, n-HA/gel/CMC construct exhibit stimulation of bone's innate regenerative capacity, thus underscoring their use in guided bone regeneration. PMID:24204879

  16. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxygglucose-guided breast cancer surgery with a positron-sensitive probe: Validation in preclinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Raylman, R.R.; Fisher, S.J.; Brown, R.S.; Ethier, S.P.; Wahl, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, the feasibility of utilizing 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) in conjunction with a positron-sensitive intraoperative probe to guide breast tumor excision was investigated. The probe was constructed with a plastic scintillator tip coupled to a photomultiplier tube with fiber optic cable. Anticipated resolution degradation was evaluated by measurement of line spread functions in the presence of background radiation. Realistic photon background distributions were simulated with a human torso phantom and a cardiac insert. The relationship between resolution and energy threshold was measured to find the optimal discriminator settings. In addition, probe sensitivity as a function of energy threshold was determined for various size-simulated tumors. Finally, the ability to localize breast cancers in vivo was tested in a rodent model. Mammary rat tumors implanted in Lewis rats were examined after injection with FDG; these results were correlated with those of histologic analyses. Measurements of line spread functions indicated that resolution could be maximized in a realistic background photon environment by increasing the energy threshold to levels at or above the Compton continuum edge (340 keV). At this setting, the probe`s sensitivity was determined to be 58 and 11 cps/{mu}Ci for 3.18- and 6.35-mm diameter simulated tumors, respectively. Probe readings correlated well with histologic results; the probe was generally able to discriminate between tumor and normal tissue. This study indicates that breast cancer surgery guided by a positron-sensitive probe warrants future evaluation in breast-conserving surgery of patients with breast cancer. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Resilience to the effects of social stress: evidence from clinical and preclinical studies on the role of coping strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Susan K.; Bhatnagar, Seema

    2014-01-01

    The most common form of stress encountered by people stems from one’s social environment and is perceived as more intense than other types of stressors. One feature that may be related to differential resilience or vulnerability to stress is the type of strategy used to cope with the stressor, either active or passive coping. This review focuses on models of social stress in which individual differences in coping strategies produce resilience or vulnerability to the effects of stress. Neurobiological mechanisms underlying these individual differences are discussed. Overall, the literature suggests that there are multiple neural mechanisms that underlie individual differences in stress-induced resilience and vulnerability. How these mechanisms interact with one another to produce a resilient or vulnerable phenotype is not understood and such mechanisms have been poorly studied in females and in early developmental periods. Finally, we propose that resilience may be stress context specific and resilience phenotypes may need to be fine-tuned to suit a shifting environment. PMID:25580450

  18. Preclinical safety and efficacy studies with an affinity-enhanced epithelial junction opener and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Wang, Hongjie; Saydaminova, Kamola; Ho, Martin; May, Drew; Baldessari, Audrey; Gough, Michael; Drescher, Charles; Urban, Nicole; Roffler, Steve; Zubieta, Chloé; Carter, Darrick; Fender, Pascal; Lieber, André

    2015-01-01

    A central treatment resistance mechanism in solid tumors is the maintenance of epithelial junctions between malignant cells that prevent drug penetration into the tumor. We have developed a small recombinant protein (JO-1) that triggers the transient opening of intercellular junctions and thus increases the efficacy of monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapeutic drugs without causing toxicity in mouse tumor models. Here, we provide data toward the clinical translation of an affinity-enhanced version of JO-1, which we call JO-4, in combination with PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD)/Doxil for ovarian cancer therapy. We have presented X-ray crystallography data suggesting a structural basis for the higher affinity of JO-4 to DSG2. We also confirmed JO-4 efficacy in a xenograft model with primary ovarian cancer cells showing that JO-4 can salvage Doxil therapy when given at a dose that was threefold lower than the therapeutic dose. Furthermore, we tested the safety of intravenous JO-4 alone and in combination with Doxil in Macaca fascicularis, an adequate animal model for predicting toxicity in humans. Our studies did not show critical JO-4-related toxicity or an increase of Doxil-related side effects. Our efficacy and safety data will help to support an Investigational new drug-filing for a JO-4/Doxil combination treatment. PMID:26029716

  19. In silico toxicology for the pharmaceutical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio, Luis G.

    2009-12-15

    The applied use of in silico technologies (a.k.a. computational toxicology, in silico toxicology, computer-assisted tox, e-tox, i-drug discovery, predictive ADME, etc.) for predicting preclinical toxicological endpoints, clinical adverse effects, and metabolism of pharmaceutical substances has become of high interest to the scientific community and the public. The increased accessibility of these technologies for scientists and recent regulations permitting their use for chemical risk assessment supports this notion. The scientific community is interested in the appropriate use of such technologies as a tool to enhance product development and safety of pharmaceuticals and other xenobiotics, while ensuring the reliability and accuracy of in silico approaches for the toxicological and pharmacological sciences. For pharmaceutical substances, this means active and impurity chemicals in the drug product may be screened using specialized software and databases designed to cover these substances through a chemical structure-based screening process and algorithm specific to a given software program. A major goal for use of these software programs is to enable industry scientists not only to enhance the discovery process but also to ensure the judicious use of in silico tools to support risk assessments of drug-induced toxicities and in safety evaluations. However, a great amount of applied research is still needed, and there are many limitations with these approaches which are described in this review. Currently, there is a wide range of endpoints available from predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models driven by many different computational software programs and data sources, and this is only expected to grow. For example, there are models based on non-proprietary and/or proprietary information specific to assessing potential rodent carcinogenicity, in silico screens for ICH genetic toxicity assays, reproductive and developmental toxicity, theoretical prediction of human drug metabolism, mechanisms of action for pharmaceuticals, and newer models for predicting human adverse effects. How accurate are these approaches is both a statistical issue and challenge in toxicology. In this review, fundamental concepts and the current capabilities and limitations of this technology will be critically addressed.

  20. Toxicology and Biodistribution Studies for MGH2.1, an Oncolytic Virus that Expresses Two Prodrug-activating Genes, in Combination with Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Kazue; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Liu, Fang; Kerr, Samantha; Wang, Jiang; Phelps, Mitch; Potter, Philip M; Goins, William B; Fernandez, Soledad A; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2013-01-01

    MGH2.1 is a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) oncolytic virus that expresses two prodrug-activating transgenes: the cyclophosphamide (CPA)-activating cytochrome P4502B1 (CYP2B1) and the CPT11-activating secreted human intestinal carboxylesterase (shiCE). Toxicology and biodistribution of MGH2.1 in the presence/absence of prodrugs was evaluated in mice. MGH2.1 ± prodrugs was cytotoxic to human glioma cells, but not to normal cells. Pharmacokinetically, intracranial MGH2.1 did not significantly alter the metabolism of intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered prodrugs in mouse plasma, brain, or liver. MGH2.1 did not induce an acute inflammatory reaction. MGH2.1 DNA was detected in brains of mice inoculated with 108 pfus for up to 60 days. However, only one animal showed evidence of viral gene expression at this time. Expression of virally encoded genes was restricted to brain. Intracranial inoculation of MGH2.1 did not induce lethality at 108 pfus in the absence of prodrugs and at 106 pfus in the presence of prodrugs. This study provides safety and toxicology data justifying a possible clinical trial of intratumoral injection of MGH2.1 with peripheral administration of CPA and/or CPT11 prodrugs in humans with malignant gliomas. PMID:23922029

  1. Preclinical assessment of infant formula.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Infant formulas are the sole or predominant source of nutrition for many infants and are fed during a sensitive period of development and may therefore have short- and long-term consequences for infant health. Preclinical safety assessment therefore needs to include both short-term and long-term studies in animals. It is recommended that procedures are instituted by which experts may serve as independent scientists for companies developing novel products, without having their integrity compromised, and later serve the legislative institutions. A two-level assessment approach to determine the potential toxicity of a novel ingredient, its metabolites, and their effects in the matrix on developing organ systems has been suggested by IOM. This appears reasonable, as novel ingredients can be of different levels of concern. The use of modern methods in genomics and proteomics should be considered in these evaluation processes as well as novel methods to evaluate outcomes, including metabolomics and molecular techniques to assess the microbiome. PMID:22699767

  2. Toxicology of mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Robert R M; Lima, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Humans are exposed to mycotoxins via ingestion, contact and inhalation. This must have occurred throughout human history and led to severe outbreaks. Potential diseases range from akakabio-byo to stachybotryotoxicosis and cancer. The known molecular bases of toxicology run the gamut of 23 compounds, from aflatoxins (AFs) to zearalenone, ochratoxin A and deoxynivalenol. Ergotism is one of the oldest recognized mycotoxicosis, although mycotoxin science only commenced in the 1960s with the discovery of AFs in turkey feed. AFs are carcinogenic. Some others are suspected carcinogens. The effects of mycotoxins are acute or chronic in nature. Mycotoxins are well known in the scientific community, although they have a low profile in the general population. An incongruous situation occurs in United States where mycotoxins from "moldy homes" are considered to be a significant problem, although there is a general debate about seriousness. This contrasts with the thousands of deaths from mycotoxins that occur, even now, in the technologically less developed countries (e.g., Indonesia, China, and Africa). Mycotoxins are more toxic than pesticides. Studies are moving from whole animal work to investigating the biochemical mechanisms in isolated cells, and the mechanisms of toxicity at the molecular level are being elucidated. The stereochemical nature of AFs has been shown to be important. In addition, the effect of multiple mycotoxins is being increasingly investigated, which will more accurately represent the situation in nature. It is anticipated that more fungal metabolites will be recognized as dangerous toxins and permitted statutory levels will decrease in the future. PMID:20358681

  3. A Novel Inherently Radiopaque Bead for Transarterial Embolization to Treat Liver Cancer - A Pre-clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Rafael; Sharma, Karun; Dreher, Matthew R.; Ashrafi, Koorosh; Mirpour, Sahar; Lin, MingDe; Schernthaner, Ruediger E.; Schlachter, Todd R.; Tacher, Vania; Lewis, Andrew L.; Willis, Sean; den Hartog, Mark; Radaelli, Alessandro; Negussie, Ayele H.; Wood, Bradford J.; Geschwind, Jean-François H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Embolotherapy using microshperes is currently performed with soluble contrast to aid in visualization. However, administered payload visibility dimishes soon after delivery due to soluble contrast washout, leaving the radiolucent bead's location unknown. The objective of our study was to characterize inherently radiopaque beads (RO Beads) in terms of physicomechanical properties, deliverability and imaging visibility in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. Materials and Methods: RO Beads, which are based on LC Bead® platform, were compared to LC Bead. Bead size (light microscopy), equilibrium water content (EWC), density, X-ray attenuation and iodine distribution (micro-CT), suspension (settling times), deliverability and in vitro penetration were investigated. Fifteen rabbits were embolized with either LC Bead or RO Beads + soluble contrast (iodixanol-320), or RO Beads+dextrose. Appearance was evaluated with fluoroscopy, X-ray single shot, cone-beam CT (CBCT). Results: Both bead types had a similar size distribution. RO Beads had lower EWC (60-72%) and higher density (1.21-1.36 g/cc) with a homogeneous iodine distribution within the bead's interior. RO Beads suspension time was shorter than LC Bead, with durable suspension (>5 min) in 100% iodixanol. RO Beads ?300 µm were deliverable through a 2.3-Fr microcatheter. Both bead types showed similar penetration. Soluble contrast could identify target and non-target embolization on fluoroscopy during administration. However, the imaging appearance vanished quickly for LC Bead as contrast washed-out. RO Beads+contrast significantly increased visibility on X-ray single shot compared to LC Bead+contrast in target and non-target arteries (P=0.0043). Similarly, RO beads demonstrated better visibility on CBCT in target arteries (P=0.0238) with a trend in non-target arteries (P=0.0519). RO Beads+dextrose were not sufficiently visible to monitor embolization using fluoroscopy. Conclusion: RO Beads provide better conspicuity to determine target and non-target embolization compared to LC Bead which may improve intra-procedural monitoring and post-procedural evaluation of transarterial embolization. PMID:26722371

  4. SU-E-J-156: Preclinical Inverstigation of Dynamic Tumor Tracking Using Vero SBRT Linear Accelerator: Motion Phantom Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mamalui-Hunter, M; Wu, J; Li, Z; Su, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Following the ‘end-to-end testing’ paradigm of Dynamic Target Tracking option in our Image-Guided dedicated SBRT VeroTM linac, we verify the capability of the system to deliver planned dose to moving targets in the heterogeneous thorax phantom (CIRSTM). The system includes gimbaled C-band linac head, robotic 6 degree of freedom couch and a tumor tracking method based on predictive modeling of target position using fluoroscopically tracked implanted markers and optically tracked infrared reflecting external markers. Methods: 4DCT scan of the motion phantom with the VisicoilTM implanted marker in the close vicinity of the target was acquired, the ‘exhale’=most prevalent phase was used for planning (iPlan by BrainLabTM). Typical 3D conformal SBRT treatment plans aimed to deliver 6-8Gy/fx to two types of targets: a)solid water-equivalent target 3cm in diameter; b)single VisicoilTM marker inserted within lung equivalent material. The planning GTV/CTV-to-PTV margins were 2mm, the block margins were 3 mm. The dose calculated by MonteCarlo algorithm with 1% variance using option Dose-to-water was compared to the ion chamber (CC01 by IBA Dosimetry) measurements in case (a) and GafchromicTM EBT3 film measurements in case (b). During delivery, the target 6 motion patterns available as a standard on CIRSTM motion phantom were investigated: in case (a), the target was moving along the designated sine or cosine4 3D trajectory; in case (b), the inserted marker was moving sinusoidally in 1D. Results: The ion chamber measurements have shown the agreement with the planned dose within 1% under all the studied motion conditions. The film measurements show 98.1% agreement with the planar calculated dose (gamma criteria: 3%/3mm). Conclusion: We successfully verified the capability of the SBRT VeroTM linac to perform real-time tumor tracking and accurate dose delivery to the target, based on predictive modeling of the correlation between implanted marker motion and external surrogate of breathing motion.

  5. Allopregnanolone Preclinical Acute Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Studies to Predict Tolerability and Efficacy for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Ronald W.; Solinsky, Christine M.; Loya, Carlos M.; Salituro, Francesco G.; Rodgers, Kathleen E.; Bauer, Gerhard; Rogawski, Michael A.; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-01-01

    To develop allopregnanolone as a therapeutic for Alzheimer’s disease, we investigated multiple formulations and routes of administration in translationally relevant animal models of both sexes. Subcutaneous, topical (transdermal and intranasal), intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone were bolus-administered. Pharmacokinetic analyses of intravenous allopregnanolone in rabbit and mouse indicated that peak plasma and brain levels (3-fold brain/plasma ratios) at 5min were sufficient to activate neuroregenerative responses at sub-sedative doses. Slow-release subcutaneous suspension of allopregnanolone displayed 5-fold brain/plasma ratio at Cmax at 30min. At therapeutic doses by either subcutaneous or intravenous routes, allopregnanolone mouse plasma levels ranged between 34-51ng/ml by 30min, comparable to published endogenous human level in the third trimester of pregnancy. Exposure to subcutaneous, topical, intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone, at safe and tolerable doses, increased hippocampal markers of neurogenesis including BrdU and PCNA in young 3xTgAD and aged wildtype mice. Intravenous allopregnanolone transiently and robustly phosphorylated CREB within 5min and increased levels of neuronal differentiation transcription factor NeuroD within 4h. Neurogenic efficacy was achieved with allopregnanolone brain exposure of 300-500hr*ng/g. Formulations were tested to determine the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) and maximally tolerated doses (MTD) in male and female rats by sedation behavior time course. Sex differences were apparent, males exhibited ?40% more sedation time compared to females. Allopregnanolone formulated in sulfobutyl-ether-beta-cyclodextrin at optimized complexation ratio maximized allopregnanolone delivery and neurogenic efficacy. To establish the NOAEL and MTD for Allo-induced sedation using a once-per-week intravenous regenerative treatment regimen: In female rats the NOAEL was 0.5mg/kg and MTD 2mg/kg. The predicted MTD in human female is 0.37mg/kg. In male rats the NOAEL and MTD were less than those determined for female. Outcomes of these PK/PD studies predict a safe and efficacious dose range for initial clinical trials of allopregnanolone for Alzheimer’s disease. These findings have translational relevance to multiple neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:26039057

  6. Preclinical evaluation of 89Zr-labeled anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody RG7356 in mice and cynomolgus monkeys: Prelude to Phase 1 clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Vugts, Danielle J; Heuveling, Derrek A; Stigter-van Walsum, Marijke; Weigand, Stefan; Bergstrom, Mats; van Dongen, Guus A M S; Nayak, Tapan K

    2014-01-01

    RG7356 is a humanized antibody targeting the constant region of CD44. RG7356 was radiolabeled with (89)Zr for preclinical evaluations in tumor xenograft-bearing mice and normal cynomolgus monkeys to enable study of its biodistribution and the role of CD44 expression on RG7356 uptake.   Studies with (89)Zr-RG7356 were performed in mice bearing tumor xenografts that differ in the level of CD44 expression (CD44(+) or CD44(-)) and RG7356 responsiveness (resp or non-resp): MDA-MB-231 (CD44(+), resp), PL45 (CD44(+), non-resp) and HepG2 (CD44(-), non-resp). Immuno-PET whole body biodistribution studies were performed in normal cynomolgus monkeys to determine normal organ uptake after administration of a single dose. At 1, 2, 3, and 6 days after injection, (89)Zr-RG7356 uptake in MDA-MB-231 (CD44(+), resp) xenografts was nearly constant and about 9 times higher than in HepG2 (CD44(-), non-resp) xenografts (range 27.44 ± 12.93 to 33.13 ± 7.42% ID/g vs. 3.25 ± 0.38 to 3.90 ± 0.58% ID/g). Uptake of (89)Zr-RG7356 was similar in MDA-MB-231 (CD44(+), resp) and PL45 (CD44(+), non-resp) xenografts. Studies in monkeys revealed antibody uptake in spleen, salivary glands and bone marrow, which might be related to the level of CD44 expression. (89)Zr-RG7356 uptake in these normal organs decreased with increasing dose levels of unlabeled RG7356. (89)Zr-RG7356 selectively targets CD44(+) responsive and non-responsive tumors in mice and CD44(+) tissues in monkeys. These studies indicate the importance of accurate antibody dosing in humans to obtain optimal tumor targeting. Moreover, efficient binding of RG7356 to CD44(+) tumors may not be sufficient in itself to drive an anti-tumor response. PMID:24492295

  7. ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References

    E-print Network

    Post, Wilfred M.

    1 ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References Application Category Literature citation.2: 205-230. #12;ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References cont'd 2 Pure-chemical testing: 6th ASTM Symp. on Aquatic Toxicology. Amer. Soc. Testing and Materials. pp 445-459. Milleman, R. E

  8. TOXICOLOGY OF METALS. VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report on metal toxicology contains reviews on twenty-three metals. These have been written for inclusion in a Handbook on the Toxicology of Metals: Environmental and Occupational Aspects which is being prepared by the Scientific Committee on the Toxicology of Metals of the P...

  9. Shuttle Lesson Learned - Toxicology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    This is a script for a video about toxicology and the space shuttle. The first segment is deals with dust in the space vehicle. The next segment will be about archival samples. Then we'll look at real time on-board analyzers that give us a lot of capability in terms of monitoring for combustion products and the ability to monitor volatile organics on the station. Finally we will look at other issues that are about setting limits and dealing with ground based lessons that pertain to toxicology.

  10. Oral-toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, B. K. Charan; Sundharam, B. Sivapatha; Mahadesh, Jyothi; Mukund

    2014-01-01

    Forensic toxicology deals with the investigation of toxic substances, poisonous products or with the environmental chemicals. This field of science helps to identify poison substance and hazardous chemicals. Forensic toxicology deals with the way that substances are absorbed, distributed or eliminated in the body – the metabolism of substances. This paper reviews the manifestations that each poisonous substance presents concentrating toward the commonly used poisonous substance especially in India. It also explains the Indian Penal Code, which is main criminal code intended to cover all substantive aspects of criminal law regarding poison. PMID:24696586

  11. TOXICOLOGICAL RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMANS: ETHICAL AND REGULATORY CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the need for the Society of Toxicology (SOT) to develop a policy for ethical research in humans, and a review for publication of these studies. Observations on human beings have been the foundation upon which toxicologic knowledge has been built since the in...

  12. Toxicological characterization of the landfill leachate prior/after chemical and electrochemical treatment: a study on human and plant cells.

    PubMed

    Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Oreš?anin, Višnja; Gajski, Goran; Geri?, Marko; Ruk, Damir; Kollar, Robert; Radi? Brkanac, Sandra; Cvjetko, Petra

    2013-10-01

    In this research, toxicological safety of two newly developed methods for the treatment of landfill leachate from the Piškornica (Croatia) sanitary landfill was investigated. Chemical treatment procedure combined chemical precipitation with CaO followed by coagulation with ferric chloride and final adsorption by clinoptilolite. Electrochemical treatment approach included pretreatment with ozone followed by electrooxidation/electrocoagulation and final polishing by microwave irradiation. Cell viability of untreated/treated landfill leachate was examined using fluorescence microscopy. Cytotoxic effect of the original leachate was obtained for both exposure periods (4 and 24 h) while treated samples showed no cytotoxic effect even after prolonged exposure time. The potential DNA damage of the untreated/treated landfill leachate was evaluated by the comet assay and cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay using either human or plant cells. The original leachate exhibited significantly higher comet assay parameters compared to negative control after 24 h exposure. On the contrary, there was no significant difference between negative control and chemically/electrochemically treated leachate for any of the parameters tested. There was also no significant increase in either CBMN assay parameter compared to the negative control following the exposure of the lymphocytes to the chemically or electrochemically treated landfill leachate for both exposure periods while the original sample showed significantly higher number of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds for both exposure times. Results suggest that both methods are suitable for the treatment of such complex waste effluent due to high removal efficiency of all measured parameters and toxicological safety of the treated effluent. PMID:23790829

  13. Subsite Awareness in Neuropathology Evaluation of National Toxicology Program (NTP) Studies: A Review of Select Neuroanatomical Structures with their Functional Significance in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Deepa B.; Little, Peter B.; Sills, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This review manuscript is designed to serve as an introductory guide in neuroanatomy for toxicologic pathologists evaluating general toxicity studies. The manuscript provides an overview of approximately 50 neuroanatomical subsites and their functional significance across seven coronal sections of the brain. Also reviewed are three sections of the spinal cord, cranial and peripheral nerves (trigeminal and sciatic respectively), and intestinal autonomic ganglia. The review is limited to the evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections, as light microscopic evaluation of these sections is an integral part of the first-tier toxicity screening of environmental chemicals, drugs, and other agents. Prominent neuroanatomical sites associated with major neurological disorders are noted. This guide, when used in conjunction with detailed neuroanatomic atlases may aid in an understanding of the significance of functional neuroanatomy, thereby improving the characterization of neurotoxicity in general toxicity and safety evaluation studies. PMID:24135464

  14. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 20, No. 8, pp. 16981703, 2001 Printed in the USA

    E-print Network

    Hopkins, William A.

    1698 Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 20, No. 8, pp. 1698­1703, 2001 2001 SETAC Printed in the USA 0730-7268/01 $9.00 .00 Environmental Toxicology RESOURCE ALLOCATION-BASED LIFE HISTORIES: A CONCEPTUAL BASIS FOR STUDIES OF ECOLOGICAL TOXICOLOGY JUSTIN D. CONGDON,* ARTHUR E. DUNHAM, WILLIAM A

  15. Toxicology and Chemical Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Stephen K.

    1983-01-01

    Topics addressed in this discussion of toxicology and chemical safety include routes of exposure, dose/response relationships, action of toxic substances, and effects of exposure to chemicals. Specific examples are used to illustrate the principles discussed. Suggests prudence in handling any chemicals, whether or not toxicity is known. (JN)

  16. Toxicology, an STS Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Presented are activities suggested through Project L.A.B.S. that involve the topic of toxicology. Activities include suggested research, the risk benefit seesaw, human-made compounds, legislation, a historical perspective, and health. A suggested readings list is provided. (KR)

  17. Comparative study of the neurotrophic effects elicited by VEGF-B and GDNF in preclinical in vivo models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yue, X; Hariri, D J; Caballero, B; Zhang, S; Bartlett, M J; Kaut, O; Mount, D W; Wüllner, U; Sherman, S J; Falk, T

    2014-01-31

    Vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGF-B) has recently been shown to be a promising novel neuroprotective agent for several neurodegenerative conditions. In the current study we extended previous work on neuroprotective potential for Parkinson's disease (PD) by testing an expanded dose range of VEGF-B (1 and 10 ?g) and directly comparing both neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects of VEGF-B in progressive unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) PD models to a single dose of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, 10 ?g), that has been established by several groups as a standard in both preclinical PD models. In the amphetamine-induced rotational tests the treatment with 1 and 10 ?g VEGF-B resulted in significantly improved motor function of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats compared to vehicle-treated 6-OHDA-lesioned rats in the neuroprotection paradigm. Both doses of VEGF-B caused an increase in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cell and fiber count in the substantia nigra (SN) and striatum in the neuroprotective experiment. The effect size was comparable to the effects seen with GDNF. In the neurorestoration paradigm, VEGF-B injection had no significant effect in either the behavioral or the immunohistochemical analyses, whereas GDNF injection significantly improved the amphetamine-induced rotational behavior and reduced TH-positive neuronal cell loss in the SN. We also present a strong positive correlation (p=1.9e-50) of the expression of VEGF-B with nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes involved in fatty acid metabolism in rat midbrain, pointing to the mitochondria as a site of action of VEGF-B. GDNF showed a positive correlation with nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes that was not nearly as strong (p=0.018). VEGF-B counteracted rotenone-induced reduction of (a) fatty acid transport protein 1 and 4 levels and (b) both Akt protein and phosphorylation levels in SH-SY5Y cells. We further verified VEGF-B expression in the human SN pars compacta of healthy controls and PD patients, in neuronal cells that show co-expression with neuromelanin. These results have demonstrated that VEGF-B has potential as a neuroprotective agent for PD therapy and should be further investigated. PMID:24291725

  18. Toxicologic methods: controlled human exposures.

    PubMed Central

    Utell, M J; Frampton, M W

    2000-01-01

    The assessment of risk from exposure to environmental air pollutants is complex, and involves the disciplines of epidemiology, animal toxicology, and human inhalation studies. Controlled, quantitative studies of exposed humans help determine health-related effects that result from breathing the atmosphere. The major unique feature of the clinical study is the ability to select, control, and quantify pollutant exposures of subjects of known clinical status, and determine their effects under ideal experimental conditions. The choice of outcomes to be assessed in human clinical studies can be guided by both scientific and practical considerations, but the diversity of human responses and responsiveness must be considered. Subjects considered to be among the most susceptible include those with asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, and cardiovascular disease. New experimental approaches include exposures to concentrated ambient air particles, diesel engine exhaust, combustion products from smoking machines, and experimental model particles. Future investigations of the health effects of air pollution will benefit from collaborative efforts among the disciplines of epidemiology, animal toxicology, and human clinical studies. PMID:10931779

  19. Evaluation Of Microdosing Strategies For Studies In Preclinical Drug Development: Demonstration Of Linear Pharmacokinetics In Dogs Of A Nucleoside Analogue Over A 50-Fold Dose Range

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, P; Vogel, J S; Rose, M J; Ubick, E A; Brunner, J E; Wallace, M A; Adelsberger, J K; Baker, M P; Henderson, P T; Pearson, P G; Baillie, T A

    2004-04-22

    The technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was validated successfully and utilized to study the pharmacokinetics and disposition in dogs of a preclinical drug candidate (Compound A), after oral and intravenous administration. The primary objective of this study was to examine whether Compound A displayed linear kinetics across sub-pharmacological (microdose) and pharmacological dose ranges in an animal model, prior to initiation of a human microdose study. The AMS-derived disposition properties of Compound A were comparable to data obtained via conventional techniques such as LC-MS/MS and liquid scintillation counting analyses. Thus, Compound A displayed multiphasic kinetics and possessed low plasma clearance (4.4 mL/min/kg), a long terminal elimination half-life (19.4 hr) and high oral bioavailability (82%). Currently there are no published comparisons of the kinetics of a pharmaceutical compound at pharmacological versus sub-pharmacological doses employing microdosing strategies. The present study thus provides the first description of the pharmacokinetics of a drug candidate assessed under these two dosing regimens. The data demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic properties of Compound A were similar following dosing at 0.02 mg/kg as at 1 mg/kg, indicating that in the case of Compound A, the kinetics of absorption, distribution and elimination in the dog appear to be linear across this 50-fold dose range. Moreover, the exceptional sensitivity of AMS provided a pharmacokinetic profile of Compound A, even following a microdose, which revealed aspects of the disposition of this agent that were inaccessible by conventional techniques. The applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are broad ranging and vary from studying environmental and ecological issues such as the isotopic composition of the atmosphere, soil and water (Hughen et al., 2000; Beck et al., 2001; Keith-Roach et al., 2001; Mironov et al., 2002), to archaeology and volcanology (Stafford et al., 1984; Vogel et al., 1990; Smith et al., 1999) to its use as a bioanalytical tool for nutritional research (Buchholz et al., 1999; Deuker et al., 2000; Weaver and Liebman, 2002). Biomedical applications of AMS and its use in the arena of pharmaceutical research also have been detailed in review articles (Barker and Garner, 1999; Garner, 2000; Turteltaub and Vogel, 2000). To date, most studies on the metabolism and disposition of xenobiotics by AMS have focused on how carcinogens bind to DNA and proteins to form adducts (Turteltaub et al., 1990, 1997; Frantz et al., 1995; Dingley et al., 1999; Li et al., 2003). Its application to the field of pharmaceutical sciences has been limited to a few studies (Kaye et al., 1997; Young et al., 2001; Garner et al., 2002). However, the pharmaceutical industry is becoming increasingly aware of the potential benefits that may accrue from the ultra high sensitivity afforded by AMS in terms of evaluating the pharmacokinetics of lead drug candidates in early development. Specifically, AMS allows administration of sub-pharmacological doses (microdoses) of carbon-14 or tritium-labeled investigational drugs to animals or humans at radiologically insignificant levels with the goal of obtaining preliminary information regarding the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of test compounds (Turteltaub and Vogel, 2000). An unresolved issue, however, is whether the pharmacokinetics determined following a microdose are representative of those following a conventional (pharmacological) dose (Lappin and Garner, 2003). This paper examines the linearity of kinetics of an antiviral nucleoside analogue, Compound A, across sub-pharmacological and pharmacological dose ranges in the dog prior to initiation of a human microdose study. The specific objectives of this study, therefore, were (1) to assess the pharmacokinetics of Compound A in dogs by a conventional dosing approach utilizing LC-MS/MS for sample analysis, (2) to assess the pharmacokinetics of Compound A in dogs by the microdose approach utilizing AMS for sample ana

  20. Challenges for Preclinical Investigations of Human Biofield Modalities.

    PubMed

    Gronowicz, Gloria; Bengston, William; Yount, Garret

    2015-11-01

    Preclinical models for studying the effects of the human biofield have great potential to advance our understanding of human biofield modalities, which include external qigong, Johrei, Reiki, therapeutic touch, healing touch, polarity therapy, pranic healing, and other practices. A short history of Western biofield studies using preclinical models is presented and demonstrates numerous and consistent examples of human biofields significantly affecting biological systems both in vitro and in vivo. Methodological issues arising from these studies and practical solutions in experimental design are presented. Important questions still left unanswered with preclinical models include variable reproducibility, dosing, intentionality of the practitioner, best preclinical systems, and mechanisms. Input from the biofield practitioners in the experimental design is critical to improving experimental outcomes; however, the development of standard criteria for uniformity of practice and for inclusion of multiple practitioners is needed. Research in human biofield studies involving preclinical models promises a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of biofield therapies and will be important in guiding clinical protocols and integrating treatments with conventional medical therapies. PMID:26665042

  1. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Two-Generation Reproduction Study of Lewisite in Rats Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sasser, L. B.; Cushing, J. A.; Kalkwarf, D. R.; Mellick, P. W.; Buschbom, R. L.

    1989-07-15

    Occupational health standards have not been established for Lewisite [bis(2-chlorethyl)arsine], a potent toxic vesicant which reacts with the sulfhydryl groups of proteins through its arsenic group. The purposes of this study were to determine the reproductive consequences and dose~response of continuing Lewisite exposure of parental males and females and their offspring in a 42-week two-generation study. Solutions of Lewisite were prepared for administration by diluting the neat agent with sesame oil. Rats were administered Lewisite (0, 0.10, 0.25 or 0.60 mg/kg/day for 5 days a week) via intragastric intubation prior to mating, during mating and after mating until the birth of their offspring. The dams continued to receive Lewisite during lactation. At weaning, male and female offspring of each group were selected to continue on the study; rece1v1ng Lewisite during adolescence, mating and throughout gestation. Again, the dams continued to receive Lewisite until weaning of the offspring. Lewisite had no adverse effect on reproduction performance, fertility or reproductive organ weights of male or female rats through two consecutive generations. No adverse effect to offspring were attributed to Lewisite exposure. Minor changes in growth was the only maternal effect observed. Lewisite exposure of parental rats caused no gross or microscopic lesions in testes, epididymis, prostrate, seminal vesicles, ovaries, uterus or vagina. Severe inflammation of the lung was observed at necropsy in cases in which Lewisite gained access to the respiratory system from accidental dosing or reflux and aspiration; this usually caused early death of the animal. The NOEL for reproductive effects in this study was greater than 0.60 mg/kg/day.

  2. Inhalation reproductive toxicology studies: Male dominant lethal study of n-hexane in Swiss (CD-1) mice: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Evanoff, J.J.; Sasser, L.B.; Decker, J.R.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1988-08-01

    The straight-chain hydrocarbon, n-hexane, is a volatile, ubiquitous solvent routinely used in industrial environments; consequently, the opportunity for industrial, environmental or accidental exposure to hexane vapors is significant. Although myelinated nerve tissue is the primary target organ of hexane, the testes have also been identified as being sensitive to hexacarbon exposure. The objective of this study was to evaluate male dominant lethal effects in Swiss (CD-1) mice after exposure to 0, 200, 1000, or 5000 ppM n-hexane, 20 h/day for 5 consecutive days. Each exposure concentration consisted of 30 randomly selected, proven male breeders; 4 groups. The mice were weighed just prior to the first day of exposure and at weekly intervals until sacrifice. Ten males in each dose group were sacrificed one day after the cessation of exposure, and their testes and epididymides were removed for evaluation of the germinal epithelium. The remaining male mice, 20 per group, were individually housed in hanging wire-mesh breeding cages where they were mated with unexposed, virgin females for eight weekly intervals; new females were provided each week. The mated females were sacrificed 12 days after the last day of cohabitation and their reproductive status and the number and viability of the implants were recorded. The appearance and behavior of the male mice were unremarkable throughout the study period and no evidence of n-hexane toxicity was observed. 18 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Modified Dominant Lethal Study of Sulfur Mustard in Rats Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sasser, L. B.; Cushing, J. A.; Kalkwarf, D. R.; Buschbom, R. L.

    1989-05-01

    Occupational health standards have not been established for sulfur mustard (HD) [bis{2-chloroethyl)-sulfide) ' a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic properties. Little, however, is known about the mutagenic activity of HD in mammalian species and data regarding the dominant lethal effects of HD are ambiguous. The purpose of this study was to determine the dominant lethal effect in male and female rats orally exposed to HD. The study was conducted in two phases; a female dominant lethal phase and a male dominant lethal phase. Sprague-Dawley rats of each sex were administered 0.08, 0.20, or 0.50 mg/kg HD in sesame oil 5 days/week for 10 weeks. For the female phase, treated or untreated males were mated with treated females and their fetuses were evaluated at approximately 14 days after copulation. For the male dominant lethal phase, treated males cohabited with untreated femal (during 5 days of each week for 10 weeks) and females were sacrificed for fetal evaluation 14 days after the midweek of cohabitation during each of the 10 weeks. The appearance and behavior of the rats were unremarkable throughout the experiment and there were no treatment-related deaths. Growth rates were reduced in both female and male rats treated with 0.50 mg/kg HD. Indicators of reproductive performance did not demonstrate significant female dominant lethal effects, although significant male dominant lethal effects were observed at 2 and 3 week post-exposure. These effects included increases of early fetal resorptions and preimplantation losses and decreases of total live embryo implants. These effects were most consistently observed at a dose of 0.50 mg/kg, but frequently occurred at the lower doses. Although no treatment-related effects on male reproductive organ weights or sperm motility were found, a significant increase in the percentage of abnormal sperm was detected in males exposed to 0. 50 mg/kg HD. The timing of these effects is consistent with an effect during the postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis, possibly involving the generally sensitive spermatids.

  4. Progress in nickel toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.S.; Sunderman, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Third International Conference on Nickel Metabolism and Toxicology was held at the PLM St Jacques Hotel in Paris in September 1984, under the joint sponsorship of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), the Association of Clinical Scientists, and the Nickel Producers Environmental Research Association (NiPERA). The Paris Conference was attended by 150 participants from 19 countries, including many of the world's authorities on nickel in the areas of trace analysis, biochemistry, radiochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, pathology, immunology, industrial hygiene, epidemiology, occupational health and clinical medicine. The text of the Richard T. Barton memorial lecture and synopses of the scientific papers that were presented at the Conference are published in this volume.

  5. Locust bean gum safety in neonates and young infants: an integrated review of the toxicological database and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Leo; Garthoff, Jossie A; Schaafsma, Anne; Krul, Lisette; Schrijver, Jaap; van Goudoever, Johannes B; Speijers, Gerrit; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2014-10-01

    Locust bean gum (LBG) is a galactomannan polysaccharide used as thickener in infant formulas with the therapeutic aim to treat uncomplicated gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Since its use in young infants below 12weeks of age is not explicitly covered by the current scientific concept of the derivation of health based guidance values, the present integrated safety review aimed to compile all the relevant preclinical toxicological studies and to combine them with substantial evidence gathered from the clinical paediatric use as part of the weight of evidence supporting the safety in young infants below 12weeks of age. LBG was demonstrated to have very low toxicity in preclinical studies mainly resulting from its indigestible nature leading to negligible systemic bioavailability and only possibly influencing tolerance. A standard therapeutic level of 0.5g/100mL in thickened infant formula is shown to confer a sufficiently protective Margin of Safety. LBG was not associated with any adverse toxic or nutritional effects in healthy term infants, while there are limited case-reports of possible adverse effects in preterms receiving the thickener inappropriately. Altogether, it can be concluded that LBG is safe for its intended therapeutic use in term-born infants to treat uncomplicated regurgitation from birth onwards. PMID:24997231

  6. TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF SELECTED CHLORINATED PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicology studies were conducted with the mono-, di-, and pentachlorophenols (CP). Chlorophenols (except PC) demonstrate a relatively low order of toxicity. The order of toxicity in mice and rats (most to least) is: PCP > tetra CPs > mono CPs > tri CPs > di CPs. Short-term (14 d...

  7. Research Models in Developmental Behavioral Toxicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Kim N.; Pearson, Douglas T.

    Developmental models currently used by child behavioral toxicologists and teratologists are inadequate to address current issues in these fields. Both child behavioral teratology and toxicology scientifically study the impact of exposure to toxic agents on behavior development: teratology focuses on prenatal exposure and postnatal behavior…

  8. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red-tailed hawk, osprey) (scientific names for both the mammalian and avian species are presented in Appendix B). [In this document, NOAEL refers to both dose (mg contaminant per kg animal body weight per day) and concentration (mg contaminant per kg of food or L of drinking water)]. The 20 wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. The chemicals are some of those that occur at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. The NOAEL-based benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species; LOAEL-based benchmarks represent threshold levels at which adverse effects are likely to become evident. These benchmarks consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media only. Exposure through inhalation and/or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report.

  9. Matthew Banks Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology

    E-print Network

    Hammack, Richard

    Matthew Banks Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology Cognitive consequences of drug dependence awardees 2011 VCU continued on back #12;Katherine Nicholson Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology Keith Shelton Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology Douglas Sweet Department of Pharmaceutics Biochemical

  10. 42 CFR 493.1213 - Condition: Toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Toxicology. 493.1213 Section 493.1213...Testing § 493.1213 Condition: Toxicology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Toxicology, the laboratory must meet the...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1213 - Condition: Toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Toxicology. 493.1213 Section 493.1213...Testing § 493.1213 Condition: Toxicology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Toxicology, the laboratory must meet the...

  12. 42 CFR 493.1213 - Condition: Toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Toxicology. 493.1213 Section 493.1213...Testing § 493.1213 Condition: Toxicology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Toxicology, the laboratory must meet the...

  13. 42 CFR 493.1213 - Condition: Toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Toxicology. 493.1213 Section 493.1213...Testing § 493.1213 Condition: Toxicology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Toxicology, the laboratory must meet the...

  14. 42 CFR 493.1213 - Condition: Toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Toxicology. 493.1213 Section 493.1213...Testing § 493.1213 Condition: Toxicology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Toxicology, the laboratory must meet the...

  15. Global Recognition of Qualified Toxicologic Pathologists: Credential Review as a Potential Route for Recognizing the Proficiency of Pathologists Involved in Regulatory-type Nonclinical Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Ettlin, Robert A.; Bolon, Brad; Pyrah, Ian; Konishi, Yoichi; Black, Hugh E.

    2009-01-01

    Recent international summits of the International Federation of Societies of Toxicologic Pathologists (IFSTP) have debated the desirability and potential means by which the proficiency of an individual toxicologic pathologist might be recognized and communicated throughout the world. The present document describes the advantages and disadvantages of implementing such a global recognition system by any means, and provides a proposal whereby recognition might be accorded via rigorous credential review of a practitioner’s education and experience. PMID:22271988

  16. Application of a compact magnetic resonance imaging system for toxicologic pathology: evaluation of lithium-pilocarpine-induced rat brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Taketa, Yoshikazu; Shiotani, Motohiro; Tsuru, Yoshiharu; Kotani, Sadaharu; Osada, Yoshihide; Fukushima, Tatsuto; Inomata, Akira; Hosokawa, Satoru

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful noninvasive tool used to detect lesions in clinical and veterinary medicine. The present study evaluated the suitability of a new easy-to-use compact MRI platform (M2 permanent magnet system, Aspect Imaging, Shoham, Israel) for assisting with preclinical toxicologic pathology examination of lesions in the rat brain. In order to induce brain lesions, male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once with lithium chloride (127 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]) followed by pilocarpine (30 mg/kg, i.p.). One week after dosing, the perfused, fixed brains were collected, analyzed by the MRI system and examined histopathologically. MRI of the brain of treated rats revealed areas of high T1 and middle to low T2 signals, when compared with the controls, in the piriform cortex, lateral thalamic nucleus, posterior paraventricular thalamic nucleus and posterior hypothalamic nucleus of the cerebrum. The altered MRI signal areas were consistent with well-circumscribed foci of neuronal cell degeneration/necrosis accompanied by glial cell proliferation. The present data demonstrated that quick analysis of fixed organs by the MRI system can detect the presence and location of toxicologic lesions and provide useful temporal information for selection of appropriate sections for histopathologic examination before routine slide preparation, especially in complex and functionally heterogeneous organs such as the brain. PMID:26538811

  17. Application of a compact magnetic resonance imaging system for toxicologic pathology: evaluation of lithium-pilocarpine-induced rat brain lesions

    PubMed Central

    Taketa, Yoshikazu; Shiotani, Motohiro; Tsuru, Yoshiharu; Kotani, Sadaharu; Osada, Yoshihide; Fukushima, Tatsuto; Inomata, Akira; Hosokawa, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful noninvasive tool used to detect lesions in clinical and veterinary medicine. The present study evaluated the suitability of a new easy-to-use compact MRI platform (M2 permanent magnet system, Aspect Imaging, Shoham, Israel) for assisting with preclinical toxicologic pathology examination of lesions in the rat brain. In order to induce brain lesions, male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once with lithium chloride (127 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]) followed by pilocarpine (30 mg/kg, i.p.). One week after dosing, the perfused, fixed brains were collected, analyzed by the MRI system and examined histopathologically. MRI of the brain of treated rats revealed areas of high T1 and middle to low T2 signals, when compared with the controls, in the piriform cortex, lateral thalamic nucleus, posterior paraventricular thalamic nucleus and posterior hypothalamic nucleus of the cerebrum. The altered MRI signal areas were consistent with well-circumscribed foci of neuronal cell degeneration/necrosis accompanied by glial cell proliferation. The present data demonstrated that quick analysis of fixed organs by the MRI system can detect the presence and location of toxicologic lesions and provide useful temporal information for selection of appropriate sections for histopathologic examination before routine slide preparation, especially in complex and functionally heterogeneous organs such as the brain. PMID:26538811

  18. Reprint Library for Toxicology Data Bank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, S. N.; Khan, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The Industrial Toxicology Research Center, Lucknow, India, maintains a register of toxicology and provides its research workers with current information mainly through its collection of reprints. (Author)

  19. Key considerations in the preclinical development of biosimilars.

    PubMed

    Bui, Lynne A; Hurst, Susan; Finch, Gregory L; Ingram, Beverly; Jacobs, Ira A; Kirchhoff, Carol F; Ng, Chee-Keng; Ryan, Anne M

    2015-05-01

    Biosimilar development requires several steps: selection of an appropriate reference biologic, understanding the key molecular attributes of that reference biologic and development of a manufacturing process to match these attributes of the reference biologic product. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the FDA guidance documents state that, in lieu of conducting extensive preclinical and clinical studies typically required for approval of novel biologics, biosimilars must undergo a rigorous similarity evaluation. The aim of this article is to increase understanding of the preclinical development and evaluation process for biosimilars, as required by the regulatory agencies, that precedes the clinical testing of biosimilars in humans. PMID:25912284

  20. Prediction of preclinical operative dentistry performance in two instructional methods.

    PubMed

    Boyd, M A; Wood, W W; Conry, R F

    1980-06-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of manual and academic variables in predicting preclinical operative technique performance. In addition, it tested and compared two teaching methods and their effects on performance outcomes. Simple correlations and stepwise multiple regression analysis were used. Although correlations were low, they were significant for predicting performance using the Perceptual Motor Ability Test (PMAT) of the Dental Admission Test (DAT). The treatment of the two groups showed that students with low or average two dimension (2D) scores on the PMAT benefited from an alternate teaching method in the preclinical operative technique course. PMID:6929307

  1. Africa's present and future needs in toxicology education: Southern African perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Gulumian, Mary . E-mail: mary.gulumian@nioh.nhls.co.za; Ginsburg, Carren; Stewart, Michael J.

    2005-09-01

    Degrees and diplomas as well as certificates that are granted by universities and technikons in South Africa in scientific disciplines, such as forensic medicine, pharmacology, marine and veterinary sciences, environmental health, and occupational hygiene, include toxicology as one of the subjects in their overall syllabus. However, aspects of toxicology included in each of these courses are biased towards that particular subdiscipline and basic level of toxicology may be taught. Educational needs in toxicology in South Africa can be summarized as follows: (a) recognition of toxicology as a discipline in its own right at these tertiary education institutions and (b) creation of opportunities to study and obtain higher degrees in one or more of the many subdisciplines of toxicology. The results from a survey conducted on the toxicology syllabi offered at these tertiary education institutions are used to substantiate these needs.

  2. Micro-ultrasound for preclinical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Foster, F. Stuart; Hossack, John; Adamson, S. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, non-invasive preclinical imaging has emerged as an important tool to facilitate biomedical discovery. Not only have the markets for these tools accelerated, but the numbers of peer-reviewed papers in which imaging end points and biomarkers have been used have grown dramatically. High frequency ‘micro-ultrasound’ has steadily evolved in the post-genomic era as a rapid, comparatively inexpensive imaging tool for studying normal development and models of human disease in small animals. One of the fundamental barriers to this development was the technological hurdle associated with high-frequency array transducers. Recently, new approaches have enabled the upper limits of linear and phased arrays to be pushed from about 20 to over 50 MHz enabling a broad range of new applications. The innovations leading to the new transducer technology and scanner architecture are reviewed. Applications of preclinical micro-ultrasound are explored for developmental biology, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. With respect to the future, the latest developments in high-frequency ultrasound imaging are described. PMID:22866232

  3. NEW PUBLIC DATA AND INTERNET RESOURCES IMPACTING PREDICTIVE TOXICOLOGY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) technologies, along with efforts to improve public access to chemical toxicity information resources and to systematize older toxicity studies, have the potential to significantly improve predictive capabilities in toxicology.

  4. Mitigating risk in academic preclinical drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Inglese, James; Walters, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    The number of academic drug discovery centres has grown considerably in recent years, providing new opportunities to couple the curiosity-driven research culture in academia with rigorous preclinical drug discovery practices used in industry. To fully realize the potential of these opportunities, it is important that academic researchers understand the risks inherent in preclinical drug discovery, and that translational research programmes are effectively organized and supported at an institutional level. In this article, we discuss strategies to mitigate risks in several key aspects of preclinical drug discovery at academic drug discovery centres, including organization, target selection, assay design, medicinal chemistry and preclinical pharmacology. PMID:25829283

  5. Toxicology: Old Art, New Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timbrell, John A.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the need for a science of toxicology and training at both the undergraduate and graduate levels in response to legislation controlling drugs, food additives and toxic substances in the work environment, and concern about effects on man. Stresses need for putting toxicology on a scientific base with adequate funding. (JM)

  6. A CHRONIC INHALATION STUDY OF METHYL BROMIDE TOXICITY IN B6C3F1 MICE. (FINAL REPORT TO THE NATIONAL TOXICOLOGY PROGRAM)

    SciTech Connect

    HABER, S.B.

    1987-06-26

    This report provides a detailed account of a two year chronic inhalation study of methyl bromide toxicity in B6C3Fl mice conducted for the National Toxicology Program. Mice were randomized into three dose groups (10, 33 and 100 ppm methyl bromide) and one control group (0 ppm) per sex and exposed 5 days/week, 6 hours/day, for a total of 103 weeks. Endpoints included body weight; clinical signs and mortality, and at 6, 15 and 24 months of exposure, animals were sacrificed for organ weights, hematology and histopathology. In addition, a subgroup of animals in each dosage group was monitored for neurobehavioral and neuropathological changes. After only 20 weeks of exposure, 48% of the males and 12% of the females in the 100 ppm group had died. Exposures were terminated in that group and the surviving mice were observed for the duration of the study. Exposure of B6C3Fl mice to methyl bromide, even for only 20 weeks, produced significant changes in growth rate, mortality, organ weights and neurobehavioral functioning. These changes occurred in both males and females, but were more pronounced in males.

  7. Translational toxicology: a developmental focus for integrated research strategies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Given that toxicology studies the potential adverse effects of environmental exposures on various forms of life and that clinical toxicology typically focuses on human health effects, what can and should the relatively new term of "translational toxicology" be taken to mean? Discussion Our assertion is that the core concept of translational toxicology must incorporate existing principles of toxicology and epidemiology, but be driven by the aim of developing safe and effective interventions beyond simple reduction or avoidance of exposure to prevent, mitigate or reverse adverse human health effects of exposures. The field of toxicology has now reached a point where advances in multiple areas of biomedical research and information technologies empower us to make fundamental transitions in directly impacting human health. Translational toxicology must encompass four action elements as follows: 1) Assessing human exposures in critical windows across the lifespan 2) Defining modes of action and relevance of data from animal models 3) Use of mathematical models to develop plausible predictions as the basis for 4) Protective and restorative human health interventions. The discussion focuses on the critical window of in-utero development. Summary Exposure assessment, basic toxicology and development of certain categories of mathematical models are not new areas of research; however overtly integrating these in order to conceive, assess and validate effective interventions to mitigate or reverse adverse effects of environmental exposures is our novel opportunity. This is what we should do in translational toxicology so that we have a portfolio of interventional options to improve human health that include both minimizing exposures and specific preventative/restorative/mitigative therapeutics. PMID:24079609

  8. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-05: Internal Dosimetric Calculations for Several Imaging Radiopharmaceuticals in Preclinical Studies and Quantitative Assessment of the Mouse Size Impact On Them. Realistic Monte Carlo Simulations Based On the 4D-MOBY Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kostou, T; Papadimitroulas, P; Kagadis, GC; Loudos, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Commonly used radiopharmaceuticals were tested to define the most important dosimetric factors in preclinical studies. Dosimetric calculations were applied in two different whole-body mouse models, with varying organ size, so as to determine their impact on absorbed doses and S-values. Organ mass influence was evaluated with computational models and Monte Carlo(MC) simulations. Methods: MC simulations were executed on GATE to determine dose distribution in the 4D digital MOBY mouse phantom. Two mouse models, 28 and 34 g respectively, were constructed based on realistic preclinical exams to calculate the absorbed doses and S-values of five commonly used radionuclides in SPECT/PET studies (18F, 68Ga, 177Lu, 111In and 99mTc).Radionuclide biodistributions were obtained from literature. Realistic statistics (uncertainty lower than 4.5%) were acquired using the standard physical model in Geant4. Comparisons of the dosimetric calculations on the two different phantoms for each radiopharmaceutical are presented. Results: Dose per organ in mGy was calculated for all radiopharmaceuticals. The two models introduced a difference of 0.69% in their brain masses, while the largest differences were observed in the marrow 18.98% and in the thyroid 18.65% masses.Furthermore, S-values of the most important target-organs were calculated for each isotope. Source-organ was selected to be the whole mouse body.Differences on the S-factors were observed in the 6.0–30.0% range. Tables with all the calculations as reference dosimetric data were developed. Conclusion: Accurate dose per organ and the most appropriate S-values are derived for specific preclinical studies. The impact of the mouse model size is rather high (up to 30% for a 17.65% difference in the total mass), and thus accurate definition of the organ mass is a crucial parameter for self-absorbed S values calculation.Our goal is to extent the study for accurate estimations in small animal imaging, whereas it is known that there is a large variety in the anatomy of the organs.

  9. Toxicological evaluation of expanded shredded tobacco stems.

    PubMed

    Theophilus, Eugenia H; Pence, Deborah H; Meckley, Daniel R; Higuchi, Mark A; Bombick, Betsy R; Borgerding, Michael F; Ayres, Paul H; Swauger, James E

    2004-04-01

    A tiered testing strategy has been developed to evaluate the potential of tobacco processes, ingredients, or technological developments to change the biological activity resulting from burning tobacco. The strategy is based on comparative chemical and biological testing. Expanded shredded tobacco stems (ESS) constitute an example of a common tobacco components expansion process currently used in the manufacture of cigarettes to increase the tobacco blend filling capacity. As part of the toxicological evaluation of ESS, test cigarettes containing 9.5%, 18.5%, and 25% ESS were compared to control cigarettes containing 0% ESS. Testing included mainstream cigarette smoke chemistry studies, genotoxicity studies (Ames and sister chromatid exchange), a 13-week inhalation study in Sprague-Dawley rats, and a 30-week dermal tumor promotion study in SENCAR mice. Collectively, data indicated that cigarettes with and without ESS had a similar toxicological profile in this test battery. PMID:15019188

  10. Pre-clinical versus clinical medical students’ attitudes towards the poor in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the poverty-related attitudes of pre-clinical medical students (first and second years) versus clinical medical students (third and fourth years). First through fourth year medical students voluntarily completed the Attitude Towards Poverty scale. First and second year students were classified together in the preclinical group and third and fourth year students together in the clinical group. A total of 297 students participated (67% response rate). Statistically significant differences were noted between pre-clinical and clinical students for scores on the subscales personal deficiency (P<0.001), stigma (P=0.023), and for total scores (P=0.016). Scores across these subscales and for total scores were all higher in the clinical group. The only subscale which did not show statistical significance between pre-clinical and clinical students was the structural perspective. Medical students in their clinical training have a less favorable attitude towards the poor than their preclinical counterparts. PMID:26582628

  11. Developing Potential Candidates of Preclinical Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Founds, Sandra; Zeng, Xuemei; Lykins, David; Roberts, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for developing molecules of interest in preclinical preeclampsia from candidate genes that were discovered on gene expression microarray analysis has been challenged by limited access to additional first trimester trophoblast and decidual tissues. The question of whether these candidates encode secreted proteins that may be detected in maternal circulation early in pregnancy has been investigated using various proteomic methods. Pilot studies utilizing mass spectrometry based proteomic assays, along with enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), and Western immunoblotting in first trimester samples are reported. The novel targeted mass spectrometry methods led to robust multiple reaction monitoring assays. Despite detection of several candidates in early gestation, challenges persist. Future antibody-based studies may lead to a novel multiplex protein panel for screening or detection to prevent or mitigate preeclampsia. PMID:26580600

  12. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A, 69:16031612, 2006 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

    E-print Network

    Bortolotti, Gary R.

    1603 Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A, 69:1603­1612, 2006 Copyright© Taylor failure observed in birds in toxicological studies. Exposure to PCBs altered the size of brood patches. Bortolotti and J. E. Smits) and the Canadian Network of Toxicology Centres (to G. R. Bortolotti and J. E

  13. Analysis of Statistical Methods Currently used in Toxicology Journals

    PubMed Central

    Na, Jihye; Yang, Hyeri

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods are frequently used in toxicology, yet it is not clear whether the methods employed by the studies are used consistently and conducted based on sound statistical grounds. The purpose of this paper is to describe statistical methods used in top toxicology journals. More specifically, we sampled 30 papers published in 2014 from Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, Archives of Toxicology, and Toxicological Science and described methodologies used to provide descriptive and inferential statistics. One hundred thirteen endpoints were observed in those 30 papers, and most studies had sample size less than 10, with the median and the mode being 6 and 3 & 6, respectively. Mean (105/113, 93%) was dominantly used to measure central tendency, and standard error of the mean (64/113, 57%) and standard deviation (39/113, 34%) were used to measure dispersion, while few studies provide justifications regarding why the methods being selected. Inferential statistics were frequently conducted (93/113, 82%), with one-way ANOVA being most popular (52/93, 56%), yet few studies conducted either normality or equal variance test. These results suggest that more consistent and appropriate use of statistical method is necessary which may enhance the role of toxicology in public health. PMID:25343012

  14. 76 FR 28785 - Meeting of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Board of Scientific Counselors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ...Environmental Chemicals in the Development of Diabetes and Obesity Collaborative Transgenerational Studies Project Update...assessment, carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, molecular biology, behavioral toxicology, neurotoxicology, immunotoxicology,...

  15. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Study of Senna in the C3B6.129F1-Trp53tm1Brd N12 haploinsufficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Surh, Inok; Brix, Amy; French, John E.; Collins, Bradley J.; Sanders, J. Michael; Vallant, Molly; Dunnick, June K.

    2013-01-01

    Senna is a pod or leaf of Senna alexandrina P. Mill and is used as a stimulant laxative. In the large intestine, bacterial enzymes break sennosides and release rhein-9-anthrone, the active form for the laxative effect. To determine potential toxic effects of senna, a 5-week dose range finding study in the C57BL/6N mouse and a 40-week toxicology and carcinogenesis study in the C3B6.129F1-Trp53tm1Brd N12 haploinsufficient (p53+/?) mouse were conducted. In the 5-week study, C57BL/6N mice were exposed up to 10,000 ppm senna in feed. Increased incidences of epithelial hyperplasia of the cecum and colon were observed in males and females exposed to 5,000 or 10,000 ppm senna. These intestinal lesions were not considered to be of sufficient severity to cause mortality and, thus, in the p53+/? mouse 40-week study, the high dose of 10,000 ppm was selected. Significant increases in the incidences of epithelial hyperplasia of the colon and cecum were observed at 10,000 ppm in p53(+/?) males and females, and the incidence of hyperplasia of the colon was significantly increased at 3,000 ppm in females. In conclusion, the large intestine was the major target of senna-induced toxicity in both wild-type and the p53+/? mouse model. There was no neoplastic change, when senna was administered to p53 +/? mouse. PMID:23125117

  16. Novel piperine-loaded Tween-integrated monoolein cubosomes as brain-targeted oral nanomedicine in Alzheimer’s disease: pharmaceutical, biological, and toxicological studies

    PubMed Central

    Elnaggar, Yosra SR; Etman, Samar M; Abdelmonsif, Doaa A; Abdallah, Ossama Y

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one of the most patient devastating central nervous system diseases with no curative therapy. An effective oral therapy with brain-targeting potential is required that is hampered by blood–brain barrier. Piperine (PIP) is a natural alkaloid with memory enhancing potentials. Oral PIP delivery suffers from its hydrophobicity and first-pass metabolism. In this study, novel Tween-modified monoolein cubosomes (T-cubs) were elaborated as bioactive nanocarriers for brain-targeted oral delivery of PIP. Seven liquid crystalline nanoparticles (cubosomes) were prepared testing different bioactive surfactants (Tween 80, poloxamer, and Cremophor). Full in vitro characterization was carried out based on particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, entrapment efficiency, and in vitro release. Morphological examination and structure elucidation were performed using transmission and polarizing microscopes. Sporadic dementia of Alzheimer’s type was induced in 42 male Wistar rats on which full behavioral and biochemical testing was conducted. Brain toxicity was assessed based on Caspase-3 assay for apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor-? for inflammation. Liver and kidney toxicity studies were conducted as well. Among others, T-cubs exhibited optimum particle size (167.00±10.49 nm), polydispersity index (0.18±0.01), and zeta potential (?34.60±0.47 mv) with high entrapment efficiency (86.67%±0.62%). Cubs could significantly sustain PIP in vitro release. In vivo studies revealed T-cubs potential to significantly enhance PIP cognitive effect and even restore cognitive function to the normal level. Superiority of T-cubs over others suggested brain-targeting effect of Tween. Toxicological studies contended safety of cubs on kidney, liver, and even brain. T-cubs exhibited potential anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activity of loaded PIP, indicating potential to stop AD progression that was first suggested in this article. Novel oral nanoparticles elaborated possess promising in vitro and in vivo characteristics with high safety for effective chronic treatment of AD. PMID:26346130

  17. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of EMODIN (CAS NO. 518-82-1) Feed Studies in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice.

    PubMed

    2001-06-01

    Emodin is a naturally occurring anthraquinone present in the roots and bark of numerous plants of the genus Rhamnus. Extracts from the roots, bark, and/or dried leaves of buckthorn, senna, cascara, aloe, frangula, and rhubarb have been used as laxatives since ancient times and currently are widely used in the preparation of herbal laxative preparations. Anthraquinone glycosides are poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract but are cleaved by gut bacteria to produce aglycones (such as emodin) that are more readily absorbed and are responsible for the purgative properties of these preparations. There is extensive exposure to emodin and other anthraquinones resulting from the use of herb-based stimulant laxatives. Reports that 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone, a commonly used laxative ingredient, caused tumors in the gastrointestinal tract of rats raised the possibility of an association between colorectal cancer and the use of laxatives containing anthraquinones. Because emodin is a hydroxyanthraquinone structurally similar to 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone, is present in herbal laxatives, and was reported to be mutagenic in bacteria, it was considered a potential carcinogen and was selected for in-depth evaluation. Male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to emodin (at least 94% pure) in feed for 16 days, 14 weeks, or 2 years. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium, cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, rat and mouse bone marrow cells, and mouse peripheral blood erythrocytes. 16-DAY STUDY IN RATS: Groups of five male and five female rats were fed diets containing 0, 600, 2,000, 5,500, 17,000, or 50,000 ppm emodin (equivalent to average daily doses of approximately 50, 170, 480, 1,400, or 3,700 mg emodin/kg body weight to males and 50, 160, 460, 1,250, or 2,000 mg/kg to females) for 15 (males) or 16 (females) days. Three female rats died before the end of the study. Mean body weights of males and females exposed to 5,500 ppm or greater were significantly less than those of the controls. Feed consumption by males and females receiving 17,000 or 50,000 ppm was decreased throughout the study. Macroscopic lesions were present in the kidney of rats exposed to 17,000 or 50,000 ppm. 16-DAY STUDY IN MICE: Groups of five male and five female mice were fed diets containing 0, 600, 2,000, 5,500, 17,000, or 50,000 ppm emodin (equivalent to average daily doses of approximately 120, 400, 1,200, or 3,800 mg/kg to males and 140, 530, 1,600, or 5,000 mg/kg to females; 50,000 ppm equivalents were not calculated due to high mortality) for 15 (males) or 16 (females) days. All mice exposed to 50,000 ppm died before the end of the study. Mice in the 17,000 ppm groups lost weight during the study. Feed consumption by 5,500 ppm females was greater than that by the controls throughout the study. Macroscopic lesions were present in the gallbladder and kidney of mice exposed to 17,000 ppm. 14-WEEK STUDY IN RATS: Groups of 10 male and 10 female rats were fed diets containing 0, 312.5, 625, 1,250, 2,500, or 5,000 ppm emodin (equivalent to average daily doses of approximately 20, 40, 80, 170, or 300 mg/kg to males and females) for 14 weeks. Mean body weights of males exposed to 2,500 ppm or greater and females exposed to 1,250 ppm or greater were significantly less than those of the controls. During the first week of the study, feed consumption by males exposed to 2,500 or 5,000 ppm and females exposed to 5,000 ppm was less than that by the controls. Feed consumption by these groups was similar to that by the controls for the remainder of the study. In rats exposed to 2,500 or 5,000 ppm, there were increases in platelet counts in males and females and segmented neutrophil counts in females. Total serum protein and albumin concentrations were decreased in females exposed to 2,500 or 5,000 ppm. Relative kidney weights of rats exposed to 1,250 ppm or greater and relative lung weights of rats exposed to 625 ppm or greater were significantly increased compared to the control groups. Relative liver weights were incree

  18. Use of toxicological information in drug design.

    PubMed

    Matthews, E J; Benz, R D; Contrera, J F

    2000-12-01

    This paper is an extension of the keynote address and another talk at the Symposium on the Use of Toxiciological Information in Drug Design. The symposium was organized by American Chemical Society's Chemical Information Division at the 220th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Washington, DC, August 20-24, 2000. We outline an approach for meeting the scientific information needs of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Ready access to scientific information is critical to support safety-related regulatory decisions and is especially valuable in situations where available experimental information from in vivo/in vitro studies are inadequate or unavailable. This approach also has applications for lead selection in drug discovery. A pilot electronic toxicology/safety knowledge base and computational toxicology initiative is underway in the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) that may be a prototype for an FDA knowledge base. The objectives of this effort are: (i) to strengthen and broaden the scientific basis of regulatory decisions, (ii) to provide the Agency with an electronic scientific institutional memory, (iii) to create a scientific resource for regulatory and applied research, and (iv) to establish an internal Web-based support service that can provide decision support information for regulators that will facilitate the review process and improve consistency and uniformity. An essential component of this scientific knowledge base is the creation of a comprehensive electronic inventory of CDER-regulated substances that permit identification of clusters of substances having similar chemical, pharmacological or toxicological activities, and molecular structure/substructures. Furthermore, the inventory acts as a pointer and link to other databases and critical non-clinical and clinical pharmacology/toxicology studies and reviews in FDA archives. Clusters of related substances are identified through the use of: (i) an extensive index of alternative names for each substance, (ii) a molecular structure key field consisting of a rudimentary or core structure represented as an ISIS.mol-file, (iii) global search terms (molecular group, chemical class, clinical indication, or pharmacologic activity), and (iv) molecular clustering using structure/sub-structure similarity indices. The information contained in a toxicology knowledge database has limited value unless means are available to extract information, identify relationships, and create and test hypotheses. One such means is computational toxicology, also called in silico toxicology, ComTox, or e-TOX. Computational toxicology is the application of computer technology and information processing (informatics) to analyze, model, and estimate chemical toxicity based upon structure activity relationships (SAR). A computational toxicology software package, MCASE, has been evaluated and successfully improved by CDER through the incorporation of data from FDA archives and concomitant alterations of the logic used in the interpretation of the results to reflect the data analysis and hazard identification practices and priorities of the Center. Our modifications and uses of the MCASE program are discussed in detail. PMID:11155316

  19. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Furfuryl Alcohol (CAS No. 98-00-0) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies).

    PubMed

    1999-02-01

    Furfuryl alcohol-based resins are used as binding agents in foundry sand and as corrosion inhibitors in mortar, grout, and cement. Because of their heat resistance, furan resins are used in the manufacture of fiberglass-reinforced plastic equipment. Furfuryl alcohol was selected for evaluation because of the absence of data on its carcinogenic potential and its large production volume, widespread use in manufacturing, and ubiquitous presence in consumer goods. Male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to furfuryl alcohol (greater than 98% pure) by inhalation for 16 days, 14 weeks, or 2 years. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium, cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, and mouse bone marrow cells. 16-DAY STUDY IN RATS: Groups of five male and five female rats were exposed to concentrations of 0, 16, 31, 63, 125, or 250 ppm furfuryl alcohol by inhalation, 6 hours per day, 5 days per week for 16 days. All male and female rats exposed to 250 ppm died by day 2 of the study, and one male rat exposed to 125 ppm died on day 5. Final mean body weights of male and female rats exposed to 125 ppm were significantly less than those of the chamber control groups. Male rats exposed to 31, 63, or 125 ppm and female rats exposed to 125 ppm gained less weight than the chamber control groups. Clinical findings included dyspnea, hypoactivity, and nasal and ocular discharge in males and females exposed to 63, 125, or 250 ppm. All exposed animals developed lesions in the nasal respiratory epithelium and olfactory epithelium, and the severities of these lesions generally increased with increasing exposure concentration. 16-DAY STUDY IN MICE: Groups of five male and five female mice were exposed to concentrations of 0, 16, 31, 63, 125, or 250 ppm furfuryl alcohol by inhalation, 6 hours per day, 5 days per week for 16 days. All male and female mice exposed to 250 ppm died by day 4 of the study, and one female mouse exposed to 125 ppm died on day 14. Mean body weights of male and female mice exposed to 63 or 125 ppm were significantly less than those of the chamber control groups. All exposed animals except one 16 ppm male developed lesions in the nasal respiratory epithelium and/or olfactory epithelium, and the severities of these lesions generally increased with increasing exposure concentration. 14-WEEK STUDY IN RATS: Groups of 10 male and 10 female rats were exposed to furfuryl alcohol at concentrations of 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, or 32 ppm, 6 hours per day, 5 days per week for 14 weeks. All rats survived to the end of the study. The mean body weight gain of females exposed to 32 ppm was less than that of the chamber control group. Exposure-related increases in the incidences of squamous metaplasia of the respiratory and transitional epithelium, goblet cell hyperplasia of the respiratory epithelium, and hypertrophy of the respiratory epithelium lining the nasopharyngeal duct were observed in the nose of male and female rats. The incidences of degeneration, hyperplasia, metaplasia, and surface exudate of the olfactory epithelium generally increased with increasing exposure concentration in males and females. 14-WEEK STUDY IN MICE: Groups of 10 male and 10 female mice were exposed to furfuryl alcohol at concentrations of 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, or 32 ppm, 6 hours per day, 5 days per week for 14 weeks. All mice survived to the end of the study. Heart weights of 32 ppm males were significantly less than those of the chamber controls. Exposure-related histologic changes included degeneration, metaplasia, and chronic inflammation of the olfactory epithelium; hyaline droplets of the respiratory epithelium; and squamous metaplasia of the submucosal gland of the cuboidal epithelium in males and females. 2-YEAR STUDY IN RATS: Groups of 50 male and 50 female rats were exposed to furfuryl alcohol by inhalation, 6 hours per day, 5 days per week for 105 weeks, at concentrations of 0, 2, 8, or 32 ppm. Survival and Body Weights All male rats exposed to 32 ppm died by week 99; survival of all other exposed groups of male and femald

  20. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Nitromethane (CAS No. 75-52-5) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies).

    PubMed

    1997-02-01

    Nitromethane is used as a rocket and engine fuel; as a synthesis intermediate for agricultural fumigants, biocides, and other products; as a solvent; and as an explosive in mining, oil-well drilling, and seismic exploration. It has been detected in air, in surface and drinking water, and in cigarette smoke. Nitromethane was studied because of the potential for widespread human exposure and because it is structurally related to the carcinogens 2-nitropropane and tetranitromethane. Male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice received nitromethane (purity 98% or greater) by inhalation for 16 days, 13 weeks, or 2 years. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium, cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, and peripheral blood erythrocytes of mice. 16-DAY STUDY IN RATS: Groups of five male and five female rats were exposed to 0, 94, 188, 375, 750, or 1,500 ppm nitromethane by inhalation, 6 hours per day, 5 days per week, for 16 days. All rats survived until the end of the study. The mean body weight gain of male rats in the 1,500 ppm group was slightly but significantly less than that of the controls; the final mean body weights and mean body weight gains of exposed females were similar to those of the controls. Clinical findings in all male and female rats in the 1,500 ppm groups included increased preening, rapid breathing, hyperactivity early in the study, and hypoactivity and loss of coordination in the hindlimbs near the end of the study. The relative liver weights of all exposed groups of male rats and the absolute and relative liver weights of females exposed to 375 ppm or greater were significantly greater than those of the controls. Minimal to mild degeneration of the olfactory epithelium was observed in the nose of males and females exposed to 375 ppm or greater. Sciatic nerve degeneration was present in all male and female rats exposed to 375 ppm or greater; rats exposed to 750 or 1,500 ppm also had reduced myelin around sciatic axons. 16-DAY STUDY IN MICE: Groups of five male and five female mice were exposed to 0, 94, 188, 375, 750, or 1,500 ppm nitromethane by inhalation, 6 hours per day, 5 days per week, for 16 days. All mice survived to the end of the study. The final mean body weights and weight gains of exposed males and females were similar to those of the controls. Clinical findings included hypoactivity and tachypnea in male and female mice in the 1,500 ppm groups. Absolute and relative liver weights of male mice in the 750 and 1,500 ppm groups and female mice in all exposed groups and the relative liver weight of males in the 375 ppm group were significantly greater than those of the controls. Degeneration of the olfactory epithelium of the nose was observed microscopically in all males and females exposed to 375 ppm or greater; this lesion was of minimal severity in males and minimal to mild severity in females. 13-WEEK STUDY IN RATS: Groups of 10 male and 10 female rats were exposed to 0, 94, 188, 375, 750, or 1,500 ppm nitromethane by inhalation, 6 hours per day, 5 days per week, for 13 weeks. All rats survived to the end of the study. The final mean body weight and weight gain of male rats in the 1,500 ppm group were significantly less than those of the controls. Clinical findings included hindlimb paralysis in rats in the 750 and 1,500 ppm groups. Inhalation exposure of rats to nitromethane resulted in an exposure concentration-dependent, microcytic, responsive anemia; anemia was most pronounced in males and females exposed to 375 ppm or greater. The presence of schistocytes, Heinz bodies, and spherocytes and increased mean cell hemoglobin concentration and methemoglobin concentration were evidence that a hemolytic process was occurring; this hemolytic process could have accounted, in part, for the anemia. Thrombocytosis accompanied the anemia and would be consistent with a reactive bone marrow or could have been due to the erroneous inclusion of small erythrocyte fragments as part of the platelet count. On day 23, transient decreases in serum triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and fr

  1. Caenorhabditis elegans: an emerging model in biomedical and environmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Leung, Maxwell C K; Williams, Phillip L; Benedetto, Alexandre; Au, Catherine; Helmcke, Kirsten J; Aschner, Michael; Meyer, Joel N

    2008-11-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as an important animal model in various fields including neurobiology, developmental biology, and genetics. Characteristics of this animal model that have contributed to its success include its genetic manipulability, invariant and fully described developmental program, well-characterized genome, ease of maintenance, short and prolific life cycle, and small body size. These same features have led to an increasing use of C. elegans in toxicology, both for mechanistic studies and high-throughput screening approaches. We describe some of the research that has been carried out in the areas of neurotoxicology, genetic toxicology, and environmental toxicology, as well as high-throughput experiments with C. elegans including genome-wide screening for molecular targets of toxicity and rapid toxicity assessment for new chemicals. We argue for an increased role for C. elegans in complementing other model systems in toxicological research. PMID:18566021

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans: An Emerging Model in Biomedical and Environmental Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Maxwell C. K.; Williams, Phillip L.; Benedetto, Alexandre; Au, Catherine; Helmcke, Kirsten J.; Aschner, Michael; Meyer, Joel N.

    2008-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as an important animal model in various fields including neurobiology, developmental biology, and genetics. Characteristics of this animal model that have contributed to its success include its genetic manipulability, invariant and fully described developmental program, well-characterized genome, ease of maintenance, short and prolific life cycle, and small body size. These same features have led to an increasing use of C. elegans in toxicology, both for mechanistic studies and high-throughput screening approaches. We describe some of the research that has been carried out in the areas of neurotoxicology, genetic toxicology, and environmental toxicology, as well as high-throughput experiments with C. elegans including genome-wide screening for molecular targets of toxicity and rapid toxicity assessment for new chemicals. We argue for an increased role for C. elegans in complementing other model systems in toxicological research. PMID:18566021

  3. Postmortem forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Levine, B S; Smith, M L; Froede, R C

    1990-09-01

    After all of the analytic data have been accumulated, the final step in the toxicologic process is to assess the meaning of the results. In suspected drug intoxications, one must determine if the amount of toxicant or toxicants present in the appropriate specimens is consistent with producing lethality. This decision ultimately must be made by the medical examiner or coroner, who must also consider the history, scene investigation, and gross and microscopic autopsy findings in reaching this decision. Once the cause of death has been determined, the manner of death needs to be decided. This can produce another group of questions to be addressed by the toxicologist. Items such as route of administration, acute versus chronic dose, and consistency between drug concentrations and behavioral effects may be critical factors in assessing the manner of death. These questions may arise even if the cause of death is ruled not to be drug related. PMID:2253451

  4. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a long preclinical period?

    PubMed

    Eisen, Andrew; Kiernan, Matthew; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Swash, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is conventionally considered as commencing with the recognition of clinical symptoms. We propose that, in common with other neurodegenerations, the pathogenic mechanisms culminating in ALS phenotypes begin much earlier in life. Animal models of genetically determined ALS exhibit pathological abnormalities long predating clinical deficits. The overt clinical ALS phenotype may develop when safety margins are exceeded subsequent to years of mitochondrial dysfunction, neuroinflammation or an imbalanced environment of excitation and inhibition in the neuropil. Somatic mutations, the epigenome and external environmental influences may interact to trigger a metabolic cascade that in the adult eventually exceeds functional threshold. A long preclinical and subsequent presymptomatic period pose a challenge for recognition, since it offers an opportunity for protective and perhaps even preventive therapeutic intervention to rescue dysfunctional neurons. We suggest, by analogy with other neurodegenerations and from SOD1 ALS mouse studies, that vulnerability might be induced in the perinatal period. PMID:24648037

  5. A GLP-Compliant Toxicology and Biodistribution Study: Systemic Delivery of an rAAV9 Vector for the Treatment of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Aaron S; Duncan, F Jason; Camboni, Marybeth; Waligura, Kathryn; Montgomery, Chrystal; Zaraspe, Kimberly; Naughton, Bartholomew J; Bremer, William G; Shilling, Christopher; Walker, Christopher M; Bolon, Brad; Flanigan, Kevin M; McBride, Kim L; McCarty, Douglas M; Fu, Haiyan

    2015-12-01

    No treatment is currently available for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB, a neuropathic lysosomal storage disease due to defect in ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). In preparation for a clinical trial, we performed an IND-enabling GLP-toxicology study to assess systemic rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU gene delivery in WT C57BL/6 mice at 1?×?10(14) vg/kg and 2?×?10(14) vg/kg (n?=?30/group, M:F?=?1:1), and non-GLP testing in MPS IIIB mice at 2?×?10(14) vg/kg. Importantly, no adverse clinical signs or chronic toxicity were observed through the 6 month study duration. The rAAV9-mediated rNAGLU expression was rapid and persistent in virtually all tested CNS and somatic tissues. However, acute liver toxicity occurred in 33% (5/15) WT males in the 2?×?10(14) vg/kg cohort, which was dose-dependent, sex-associated, and genotype-specific, likely due to hepatic rNAGLU overexpression. Interestingly, a significant dose response was observed only in the brain and spinal cord, whereas in the liver at 24 weeks postinfection (pi), NAGLU activity was reduced to endogenous levels in the high dose cohort but remained at supranormal levels in the low dose group. The possibility of rAAV9 germline transmission appears to be minimal. The vector delivery resulted in transient T-cell responses and characteristic acute antibody responses to both AAV9 and rNAGLU in all rAAV9-treated animals, with no detectable impacts on tissue transgene expression. This study demonstrates a generally safe and effective profile, and may have identified the upper dosing limit of rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU via systemic delivery for the treatment of MPS IIIB. PMID:26684447

  6. Avian Models in Teratology and Developmental Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Susan M.; Flentke, George R.; Garic, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The avian embryo is a long-standing model for developmental biology research. It also has proven utility for toxicology research both in ovo and in explant culture. Like mammals, avian embryos have an allantois and their developmental pathways are highly conserved with those of mammals, thus avian models have biomedical relevance. Fertile eggs are inexpensive and the embryo develops rapidly, allowing for high throughput. The chick genome is sequenced and significant molecular resources are available for study including the ability for genetic manipulation. The absence of a placenta permits the direct study of an agent’s embryotoxic effects. Here we present protocols for using avian embryos in toxicology research including egg husbandry and hatch, toxicant delivery, and assessment of proliferation, apoptosis, and cardiac structure and function. PMID:22669661

  7. Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of tetralin (CAS No. 119-64-2) in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice (inhalation studies).

    PubMed

    2011-04-01

    Tetralin is used as an industrial solvent primarily for naphthalene, fats, resins, oils, and waxes; as a solvent and stabilizer for shoe polishes and floor waxes; as a solvent for pesticides, rubber, asphalt, and aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g., anthracene); as a dye solvent carrier in the textile industry; as a substitute for turpentine in lacquers, paints, and varnishes; in paint thinners and as a paint remover; in alkali-resistant lacquers for cleaning printing ink from rollers and type; as a constituent of motor fuels and lubricants; for the removal of naphthalene in gas distribution systems; and as an insecticide for clothes moths. Tetralin was nominated by the National Cancer Institute for carcinogenicity and disposition studies because of its structure, high production volume, and high potential for worker and consumer exposure. Male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to tetralin (at least 97% pure) by inhalation for 2 weeks, 3 months, or 2 years; male NCI Black Reiter (NBR) rats were exposed to tetralin by inhalation for 2 weeks. Male NBR rats do not produce 2u-globulin; the NBR rats were included to study the relationship of 2u-globulin and renal lesion induction. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, and mouse peripheral blood erythrocytes. 2-WEEK STUDY IN RATS: Groups of five male (F344/N and NBR) and five female (F344/N) rats were exposed to tetralin at air concentrations of 0, 7.5, 15, 30, 60, or 120 ppm, 6 hours plus T90 (12 minutes) per day, 5 days per week for 12 exposures. All rats survived to the end of the studies. The final mean body weight of female rats exposed to 120 ppm and mean body weight gains of female rats exposed to 30 ppm or greater were significantly less than those of the chamber controls. Final mean body weights of exposed groups of male NBR rats and mean body weight gains of all exposed groups of male rats were significantly less than those of the chamber controls. Dark-stained urine was observed in all 120 ppm rats. Squinting, weeping, or matted fur around the eyes were noted in the majority of F344/N rats exposed to 120 ppm. The 2u-globulin concentrations in the kidney of male F344/N rats were significantly greater in all exposed groups than in the chamber control group. The absolute kidney weight of 60 ppm females and the relative kidney weights of male F344/N rats exposed to 30 ppm or greater and female rats exposed to 15 ppm or greater were significantly increased. The absolute liver weight of 120 ppm NBR male rats and the relative liver weights of male and female rats exposed to 60 or 120 ppm were significantly increased. In the nose, the incidences of mononuclear cell cellular infiltration were generally significantly increased in all exposed groups of rats, and incidences of olfactory epithelium degeneration and glandular hypertrophy occurred in all male F344/N rats exposed to 120 ppm. 2-WEEK STUDY IN MICE: Groups of five male and five female mice were exposed to tetralin at air concentrations of 0, 7.5, 15, 30, 60, or 120 ppm, 6 hours plus T90 (12 minutes) per day, 5 days per week for 13 exposures. All mice survived to the end of the study. Mean body weights of male and female mice were similar to those of the chamber controls. Dark-stained urine was observed in most of the exposed mice. The absolute and relative liver weights of 60 and 120 ppm males and 30 and 120 ppm females and the relative liver weights of 60 ppm females were significantly greater than those of the chamber controls. In the nose, the incidences of olfactory epithelium atrophy were significantly increased in 60 and 120 ppm males and females. Glandular dilatation occurred in all 120 ppm females, and glandular hyperplasia occurred in all 120 ppm males and females. 3-MONTH STUDY IN RATS: Groups of 10 male and 10 female rats were exposed to tetralin at air concentrations of 0, 7.5, 15, 30, 60, or 120 ppm, 6 hours plus T90 (12 minutes) per day, 5 days per week for 14 weeks. The same exposure concentrations were given to additional groups of 10 male and

  8. CHEMINFORMATIC APPROACHES IN PREDICTIVE TOXICOLOGY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cheminformatics and data models, are providing the underpinning for the large public HTS efforts of the NIH Molecular Libraries Initiative, as well as new toxicity-targeted HTS programs within the EPA and the NIEHS National Toxicology Program.

  9. BEHAVIORAL TOXICOLOGY: AN EMERGING DISCIPLINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The book contains the proceedings of a symposium entitled Behavioral Toxicology: An Emerging Discipline, held in conjunction with the Southwest Psychological Association meetings, April 30, 1976 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Authors of formal presentations later reviewed and enlarg...

  10. Predictive Models and Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the potential health risks posed by environmental chemicals is a significant challenge elevated by the large number of diverse chemicals with generally uncharacterized exposures, mechanisms, and toxicities. The ToxCast computational toxicology research program was l...

  11. American College of Medical Toxicology

    MedlinePLUS

    ... TICs and TIMs Seminars in Forensic Toxicology Clandestine Meth Labs Courses Opioid Academy International Conferences Online Education ... Hilton Baltimore Reservations 2015 Forensic Course Faculty Clandestine Meth Labs Courses 2014 Albuquerque NM 2014 Oklahoma City ...

  12. Toxicological evaluation of ammonium perfluorobutyrate in rats: Twenty-eight-day and ninety-day oral gavage studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequential 28-day and 90-day oral toxicity studies were performed in male and female rats with ammonium perfluorobutyrate (NH4+PFBA) at doses up to 150 and 30 mg/kg/d, respectively. Ammonium perfluorooctanoate was used as a comparator at a dose of 30 mg/kg/d in the 28-d study. Fe...

  13. Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of benzyl alcohol (CAS No. 100-51-6) in F344/N rats and B6C3f1 mice (gavage studies). Technical report series

    SciTech Connect

    Dieter, M.P.

    1989-06-01

    Two-year toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of benzyl alcohol were conducted by administering the chemical in corn oil by gavage to groups of 50 rats of each sex at doses of 0, 200, or 400 mg/kg. Groups of 50 mice of each sex were administered 0, 100, or 200 mg/kg according to the same schedule. Under the conditions of these 2-year gavage studies, there was no evidence of carcinogenic activity of benzyl alcohol for male or female F344/N rats dosed with 200 or 400 mg/kg. Survival in both dose groups of female rats was 50% that of vehicle controls, primarily due to an increased number of gavage-related deaths. There was no evidence of carcinogenic activity of benzyl alcohol for male or female B6C3F1 mice dosed with 100 or 200 mg/kg for 2 years.

  14. Multiscale Toxicology- Building the Next Generation Tools for Toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Retterer, S. T.; Holsapple, M. P.

    2013-10-31

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was established between Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with the goal of combining the analytical and synthetic strengths of the National Laboratories with BMI?s expertise in basic and translational medical research to develop a collaborative pipeline and suite of high throughput and imaging technologies that could be used to provide a more comprehensive understanding of material and drug toxicology in humans. The Multi-Scale Toxicity Initiative (MSTI), consisting of the team members above, was established to coordinate cellular scale, high-throughput in vitro testing, computational modeling and whole animal in vivo toxicology studies between MSTI team members. Development of a common, well-characterized set of materials for testing was identified as a crucial need for the initiative. Two research tracks were established by BMI during the course of the CRADA. The first research track focused on the development of tools and techniques for understanding the toxicity of nanomaterials, specifically inorganic nanoparticles (NPs). ORNL?s work focused primarily on the synthesis, functionalization and characterization of a common set of NPs for dissemination to the participating laboratories. These particles were synthesized to retain the same surface characteristics and size, but to allow visualization using the variety of imaging technologies present across the team. Characterization included the quantitative analysis of physical and chemical properties of the materials as well as the preliminary assessment of NP toxicity using commercially available toxicity screens and emerging optical imaging strategies. Additional efforts examined the development of high-throughput microfluidic and imaging assays for measuring NP uptake, localization, and toxicity in vitro. The second research track within the MSTI CRADA focused on the development of ex vivo animal models for examining druginduced cardiotoxicity. ORNL's role in the second track was limited initially, but was later expanded to include the development of microfluidic platforms that might facilitate the translation of Cardiac 'Microwire' technologies developed at the University of Toronto into a functional platform for drug screening and predictive assessment of cardiotoxicity via highthroughput measurements of contractility. This work was coordinated by BMI with the Centre for the Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine (CCRM) and the University of Toronto (U Toronto). This partnership was expanded and culminated in the submission of proposal to Work for Others (WFO) agencies to explore the development of a broader set of microphysiological systems, a so call human-on-a-chip, that could be used for toxicity screening and the evaluation of bio-threat countermeasures.

  15. National Particle Component Toxicity (NPACT) Initiative: integrated epidemiologic and toxicologic studies of the health effects of particulate matter components.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, Morton; Chen, Lung-Chi; Gordon, Terry; Ito, Kazuhiko; Thurston, George D

    2013-10-01

    Particulate matter (PM*), an ambient air criteria pollutant, is a complex mixture of chemical components; particle sizes range from nanometer-sized molecular clusters to dust particles that are too large to be aspirated into the lungs. Although particle composition is believed to affect health risks from PM exposure, our current health-based air quality standards for PM are limited to (1) the mass concentrations of PM2.5 (particles 2.5 microm or smaller in aerodynamic diameter), which are largely attributable to combustion products; and (2) PM10 (10 microm or smaller), which includes larger-sized mechanically generated dusts. Both of these particle size fractions are regulated under the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and both have been associated with excess mortality and morbidity. We conducted four studies as part of HEI's integrated National Particle Component Toxicity (NPACT) Initiative research program. Since 1999, the Chemical Speciation Network (CSN), managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S; EPA), has routinely gathered air monitoring data every third or sixth day for the concentrations of numerous components of PM2.5. Data from the CSN enabled us to conduct a limited time-series epidemiologic study of short-term morbidity and mortality (Ito study); and a study of the associations between long-term average pollutant concentrations and annual mortality (Thurston study). Both have illuminated the roles of PM2.5 chemical components and source-related mixtures as potentially causal agents. We also conducted a series of 6-month subchronic inhalation exposure studies (6 hours/day, 5 days/week) of PM2.5 concentrated (nominally) 10 x from ambient air (CAPs) with apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice (a mouse model of atherosclerosis) (Chen study). The CAPs studies were conducted in five different U.S. airsheds; we measured the daily mass concentrations of PM2.5, black carbon (BC), and 16 elemental components in order to identify their sources and their roles in eliciting both short- and long-term health-related responses. In addition, from the same five air-sheds we collected samples of coarse (PM10-2.5), fine (PM2.5-0.2), and ultrafine (PM0.2) particles. Aliquots of these samples were administered to cells in vitro and to mouse lungs in vivo (by aspiration) in order to determine their comparative acute effects (Gordon Study). The results of these four complementary studies, and the overall integrative analyses, provide a basis for guiding future research and for helping to determine more targeted emission controls for the PM components most hazardous to acute and chronic health. Application of the knowledge gained in this work may therefore contribute to an optimization of the public health benefits of future PM emission controls. The design of each NPACT study conducted at NYU was guided by our scientific hypotheses, which were based on our reviews of the background literature and our experience in conducting studies of associations between ambient PM and health-related responses. These hypotheses guided the development and conduct of the four studies. Hypothesis 1. Coarse, fine, and ultrafine PM are each capable of producing acute health effects of public health concern, but the effects may differ according to particle size and composition. (Applies to all studies.) Hypothesis 2. Long-term PM2.5 exposures are closely associated with chronic health effects. (Applies to studies 1 and 4.) Hypothesis 3. The source-apportionment techniques that we have developed and refined in recent years provide a useful basis for identifying major categories of sources of PM in ambient air and specific chemical components that have the greatest impacts on a variety of acute and chronic health effects. (Applies to all studies.) Hypothesis 4. The health effects due to ambient PM exposures can best be seen in sensitive subgroups within overall human populations and in animal models of such populations. (Applies to studies 1, 3, and 4.) Overall, the studies have demonstrated that the toxicity of PM is d

  16. Combining Mass Spectrometry and Toxicology for a Multi-Country European Epidemiologic Study on Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HiWATE (Health Impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking WATEr) project is the first systematic analysis that combines the epidemiology on adverse pregnancy outcomes with analytical chemistry and analytical biology in the European Union. This study...

  17. Combining Mass Spectrometry and Toxicology for a Multi-Country European Epidemiologic Study on Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HiWATE (Health Impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking WATEr) project is the first systematic analysis that combines the epidemiology on adverse pregnancy outcomes with analytical chemistry and analytical biology in the European Union. This study...

  18. IPCS COLLABORATIVE STUDY ON THE UTILITY OF PLANT TEST SYSTEMS IN GENETIC TOXICOLOGY: ARABIDOPSIS ASSAY FOR MUTAGENICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four laboratories, two in Czechoslovakia (Brno and Prague) and two in USSR (Moscow and Duschanbe), participated in the International Program On Chemical Safety's (IPCS) Collaborative Study to evaluate the utility of the most commonly used plant test systems, including the Arabido...

  19. TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES IN TROPICAL ECOSYSTEMS: AN ECOTOXICOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF PESTICIDE RUNOFF IN SOUTH FLORIDA ESTUARINE ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multi-year study in the C-111 canal and associated sites in Florida Bay was undertaken in order to determine the potential contaminant risk that exists in South Florida. After examining extensive surface water data, as well as sediment, tissue, and semi-permeable membrane devic...

  20. Evaluation of potential health effects of 10 kHz magnetic fields: A short-term mouse toxicology study

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, I.G.C.; Wilson, W.R.; Dawson, B.V.; Zwi, L.J.; Green, A.W.; Boys, J.T.

    1996-05-01

    A high-frequency inductive power distribution (HID) technology has been developed that generates sinusoidal magnetic fields at a frequency of 10 kHz. In typical industrial applications, field intensities in the order of 0.2 mT can be expected between the current-carrying coils. Because the possible health effects of 10 kHz sinusoidal magnetic fields of this type had never been investigated, a broad evaluation of possible effects on animal health was made in a preliminary 14 day acute study and in a 90 day subchromic study using male and female B6C3F1 mice. Exposures were at 0.08, 0.28, and 1.0 mT vs a background exposure of 3.7 {micro}T and were essentially continuous. These studies failed to demonstrate any health effects that can be clearly related to the magnetic field exposure. No changes in animal behavior or indications of morbidity were detected during the initial exposure to the fields. There were no significant differences in body weight between exposed and unexposed (control) mice at any time int h study, and the clinical chemistry and hematology parameters were essentially unchanged. Although minor differences in some clinical chemistry and hematology parameters were seen between control and exposure groups, the lack of exposure dependence, the lack of consistency between sexes, and the lack of correspondence with the results of the two studies all suggest that these were chance associations. Even if the changes were real, the magnitude of the changes was very small and does not indicate serious biological effects. Finally, all organs were macroscopically and microscopically normal except for isolated, generally mild, histological lesions and lesions that were ascribed to fighting among males. There was no obvious association with field intensity.

  1. FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICOLOGY: OVERVIEW AND CURRENT APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current approaches in Reproductive Toxicology encompass a broad spectrum. This review article summarizes several of these approaches, based on presentations at the Symposium on Reproductive ToxicologY in Michigan. here are multiple targets for toxicological injury in the developi...

  2. Arsenic Exposure and Toxicology: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael F.; Beck, Barbara D.; Chen, Yu; Lewis, Ari S.; Thomas, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed in food, water, air, and soil. Arsenic has a long history of use as a homicidal agent, but in the past 100 years arsenic, has been used as a pesticide, a chemotherapeutic agent and a constituent of consumer products. In some areas of the world, high levels of arsenic are naturally present in drinking water and are a toxicological concern. There are several structural forms and oxidation states of arsenic because it forms alloys with metals and covalent bonds with hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, and other elements. Environmentally relevant forms of arsenic are inorganic and organic existing in the trivalent or pentavalent state. Metabolism of arsenic, catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase, is a sequential process of reduction from pentavalency to trivalency followed by oxidative methylation back to pentavalency. Trivalent arsenic is generally more toxicologically potent than pentavalent arsenic. Acute effects of arsenic range from gastrointestinal distress to death. Depending on the dose, chronic arsenic exposure may affect several major organ systems. A major concern of ingested arsenic is cancer, primarily of skin, bladder, and lung. The mode of action of arsenic for its disease endpoints is currently under study. Two key areas are the interaction of trivalent arsenicals with sulfur in proteins and the ability of arsenic to generate oxidative stress. With advances in technology and the recent development of animal models for arsenic carcinogenicity, understanding of the toxicology of arsenic will continue to improve. PMID:21750349

  3. Various aspects of piscine toxicology.

    PubMed

    Wlasow, Teresa; Demska-Zakes, Krystyna; Gomulka, Piotr; Jarmolowicz, Sylwia

    2010-09-01

    In opposition to toxicology of mammals piscine toxicology is closely connected with the conditions of external environment. The aquatic environment is necessary for embryonic development and after hatching during short or long-lasting larval period of most fish species. An aquatic environment is polluted by many industrial and agricultural wastes. Ammonia as a toxic and common compound in water have negative influence for aquaculture especially in intensive fish culture, recirculation system and hatchery facilities. Acute toxicity of ammonia was investigated in carp Cyprinus carpio L. and developmental stages of chub Squalius cephalus L. Changes in the peripheral blood characteristics and hemopoietic tissues of carp occurred after exposition to ammonia in acute tests and 3, 5 and 10 weeks sublethal concetration. The observed increase of the concentration of most amino acids in fish intoxicated with amonia suggests that the process reflects detoxication of ammonia which takes place both in the brain and muscles after 3 weeks of exposition. Phenol intoxication tests induced considerable unfavorable changes in the blood and dystrophic and necrobiotic lesions in tissues of fish leading to dysfunction both hemopoietic and reproductive processes.In study on fish reproduction disruptors the influence of oxygenated polycyclic hydrocarbons (17-?-estradiol, 4,7-dihydroxyisoflavone, 1,6-dihydroxynaphthalene and 1,5-dihydroxynaphthalene) and oxygenated monocyclic hydrocarbons (phenol, 4-n-heptylphenol, 4-n-buthylphenol, 4-sec-buthylphenol; 4-tert-buthylphenol) was assessed using histopathological methods. It was established that examined oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbons both natural (17-?-estradiol and 4,7-dihydroxyisoflavone) and synthetic can disrupt the differentiation of primary and secondary sex traits in pikeperch Sander lucioperca L. The chronic activity of these "biomimetics of estrogen" can lead to the disappearance of natural fish population. In vivo and in vitro tests were used to exam dibutyl phthalate and butyl benzyl phthalate impact on the development of the reproductive system of pikeperch. Additional as multigenerational studies are needed to clarify influence long term exposure of fish to environmental concentrations of endocrine disrupting chemicals.Hydrogen peroxide used in fish therapy is known to be toxic for sensitive species. In our work safe concentrations and exposure times was evaluated for ide Leuciscus idus L. and pike Esox lucius L. fry. The intensity of lesions in gills, skin, pseudobranch and thymus of exposed fish were connected with the time of bath.Actually anesthetics are routinely required during stressful procedures with fish, but data regarding the safety of individual anesthetics to different fish species are still few and insufficient. The influence of clove oil, MS-222 and 2-phenoxyaethanol anesthesia on fish organism was investigated in our faculty with cooperation with Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology, Vodnany, Czech Republic. PMID:21217882

  4. Avian toxicologic diagnosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigurdson, C.J.; Franson, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    This chapter describes the sources and pathophysiology of some potential poisons that affect birds and summarizes useful laboratory tests. The diagnosis of poisoning in birds, as in mammals, requires a complete and accurate history, careful observation of clinical signs, and a thorough necropsy evaluation. Appropriate sample handling and analysis, based on consultation with the diagnostic toxicologist, are critical (Table 19--1). Veterinary toxicology laboratories are becoming increasingly specialized, with only certain laboratories capable of analyzing for drug residues or anticoagulants, for example. Although a local laboratory may not be able to fulfill a specific test request, they may recommend an alternative laboratory or may be willing to forward the sample. As a general rule in suspect poisoning cases, large tissue samples of liver, kidney, brain, and subcutaneous fat and of crop, proventriculus, and ventriculus contents should be collected at necropsy and frozen. Appropriate samples should be submitted frozen, with the remainder held in the freezer for possible later testing. A second set of tissues should be placed in 10% formalin for histopathologic examination.

  5. The toxicology of chemosterilants

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Wayland J.

    1964-01-01

    Sterilization of males can in certain circumstances be more efficient than killing as a method for control of insects and perhaps other pests. A number of chemicals (chemosterilants) show promise of producing sexual sterility in insects without some of the practical limitations of radiation. The most important compounds are alkylating agents. These have little immediate pharmacological action, but are notable for their selective action against haematopoietic and some other proliferating tissues. A number of alkylating agents have been shown to be mutagens in insects, bacteria, fungi, and higher plants; carcinogens in mammals; and teratogens in insects, birds, and mammals. Some produce sexual sterility, possibly in mammals as well as in insects, at doses too low to produce the other effects. Some have an established reputation as drugs for palliative treatment of leukaemia and other neoplasms. The development of insect sterilization as a vector control technique has been handicapped in part by lack of scientific information on the acute and long-term hazards that might be associated with the use of chemosterilants. In this paper the author brings together the available knowledge on the toxicology of the alkylating agents. PMID:14278008

  6. Gordon Research Conference on Genetic Toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Project Director Penelope Jeggo

    2003-02-15

    Genetic toxicology represents a study of the genetic damage that a cell can incur, the agents that induce such damage, the damage response mechanisms available to cells and organisms, and the potential consequences of such damage. Genotoxic agents are abundant in the environment and are also induced endogenously. The consequences of such damage can include carcinogenesis and teratogenesis. An understanding of genetic toxicology is essential to carry out risk evaluations of the impact of genotoxic agents and to assess how individual genetic differences influence the response to genotoxic damage. In recent years, the importance of maintaining genomic stability has become increasingly recognized, in part by the realization that failure of the damage response mechanisms underlies many, if not all, cancer incidence. The importance of these mechanisms is also underscored by their remarkable conservation between species, allowing the study of simple organisms to provide significant input into our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. It has also become clear that the damage response mechanisms interface closely with other aspects of cellular metabolism including replication, transcription and cell cycle regulation. Moreover, defects in many of these mechanisms, as observed for example in ataxia telangiectasia patients, confer disorders with associated developmental abnormalities demonstrating their essential roles during growth and development. In short, while a decade ago, a study of the impact of DNA damage was seen as a compartmentalized area of cellular research, it is now appreciated to lie at the centre of an array of cellular responses of crucial importance to human health. Consequently, this has become a dynamic and rapidly advancing area of research. The Genetic Toxicology Gordon Research Conference is biannual with an evolving change in the emphasis of the meetings. From evaluating the nature of genotoxic chemicals, which lay at the centre of the early conferences, the emphasis has moved to understanding how cells and organisms respond to the different forms of genotoxic damage incurred. By understanding these mechanisms, the risk to humans can be more rationally assessed and evaluated. More recently, the format of the meetings have aimed to facilitate input from the range of disciplines that can now provide insight into the field. This evolution in emphasis has been continued in the format of the proposed 2003 meeting. In the last Genetic Toxicology Gordon Conference (2001), the aim was to integrate studies on genetic toxicology at the structural, molecular and cellular level with those involving mice and humans (2 micron to Man). In the 2003 conference, we aim to integrate the approaches from 2 micron to man together with approaches where our basic knowledge has been exploited in an applied context (2 micron to Man to manipulation).

  7. The discovery of rivaroxaban: translating preclinical assessments into clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Kubitza, Dagmar; Perzborn, Elisabeth; Berkowitz, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants that target a single coagulation factor (such as factor Xa or thrombin) have been developed in recent years in an attempt to address some of the limitations of traditional anticoagulants. Rivaroxaban is an oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor that inhibits free and clot-bound factor Xa and factor Xa in the prothrombinase complex. Preclinical studies demonstrated a potent anticoagulant effect of rivaroxaban in plasma as well as the ability of this agent to prevent and treat venous and arterial thrombosis in animal models. These studies led to an extensive phase I clinical development program that investigated the pharmacological properties of rivaroxaban in humans. In these studies, rivaroxaban was shown to exhibit predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and to have no clinically relevant interactions with many commonly prescribed co-medications. The pharmacodynamic effects of rivaroxaban (for example, inhibition of factor Xa and prolongation of prothrombin time) were closely correlated with rivaroxaban concentrations in plasma. The encouraging findings from preclinical and early clinical studies were expanded upon in large, randomized phase III studies, which demonstrated the clinical efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban in a broad spectrum of patients. This article provides an overview of the discovery and development of rivaroxaban, describing the pharmacodynamic profile established in preclinical studies and the optimal translation to clinical studies in healthy subjects and patient populations. PMID:24324436

  8. Toxicological assessment of enzyme-treated asparagus extract in rat acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies and genotoxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomohiro; Ono, Tomoko; Sato, Atsuya; Goto, Kazunori; Miura, Takehito; Wakame, Koji; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Maeda, Takahiro

    2014-03-01

    The safety of enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) developed as a novel anti-stress functional material was assessed in acute and subchronic studies and genotoxicity assays. In the acute oral dose toxicity study, all rats survived during the test period and ETAS did not influence clinical appearance, body weight gain and necropsy findings at a dosage of 2000mg/kg body weight. Thus, the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of ETAS was determined to be greater than 2000mg/kg. The 90-day subchronic study (500, 1000 and 2000mg/kg body weight, delivered by gavage) in rats reported no significant adverse effects in food consumption, body weight, mortality, urinalysis, hematology, biochemistry, necropsy, organ weight and histopathology. In the micronucleus test of mice, the incidence of micronuclei in ETAS-administered groups (500, 1000 and 2000mg/kg/day, injected twice) was equivalent to that of the negative control group, while the positive control group receiving mitomycin C showed a high incidence. The potential of ETAS to induce gene mutation was tested using four Salmonella typhimurium strains and Escherichia coli WP2uvrA. The test sample was not mutagenic to the test strains. These results support the safety of ETAS as food and dietary supplement. PMID:24389363

  9. Toxicological and biochemical studies on Schinus terebinthifolius concerning its curative and hepatoprotective effects against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Rania H.; Saleh, Sherif Y.; Khalil, Waleed F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, many efforts have been made to discover new products of natural origin which can limit the xenobiotic-induced hepatic injury. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is a highly toxic chemical that is widely used to study hepatotoxicity in animal models. Objective: The present study was conducted to investigate the curative and protective effects of Schinus terbenthifolius ethanolic extract against CCl4 -induced acute hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: S. terbenthifolius extract was orally administered in a dose of 350 mg dried extract/kg b.wt. before and after intoxication with CCl4 for curative and protective experiments, respectively. A group of hepatotoxicity indicative enzymes, oxidant-antioxidant capacity, DNA oxidation, and apoptosis markers were measured. Results: CCl4 increased liver enzyme leakage, oxidative stress, hepatic apoptosis, DNA oxidation, and inflammatory markers. Administration of S. terebinthifolius, either before or after CCl4 intoxication, significantly decreased elevated serum liver enzymes and reinstated the antioxidant capacity. Interestingly, S. terebinthifolius extract inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis as revealed by approximately 20 times down-regulation in caspase-3 expression when compared to CCl4 untreated group. On the other hand, there was neither protective nor curative effect of S. terebinthifolius against DNA damage caused by CCl4. Conclusion: The present study suggests that S. terebinthifolius extract could be a substantially promising hepatoprotective agent against CCl4 toxic effects and may be against other hepatotoxic chemical or drugs. PMID:26109780

  10. Recovery of contaminated wetland soils at the Savannah River Site by natural rainfall: An experimental, toxicological study

    SciTech Connect

    Loehle, C.

    1990-08-01

    This study was conducted at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Seepage basins at the SRS F-Area received liquid effluent from the 1950s to 1988. This effluent was typically acidic, containing high amounts of total dissolved ions, low levels of tritium and other radioactive elements, and trace levels of various heavy metals. Sodium (from NaOH), and aluminum (from soil matrix reduction due to acid leachate) were at particularly high levels in the outcropping water. The effluent gradually seeped down to the water table and subsequently outcropped along the edge of a forested wetland bordering Four Mile Creek. A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the potential for natural remediation of contaminated wetland soils by rainfall. Contaminated soils were collected and leached repeatedly with rainwater. After 6 leachings the leachate was observed to be non-toxic to lettuce seedlings, whereas the initial leachate was very toxic. These results suggest that more detailed studies on leaching as a remediation technique would be beneficial. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Acute toxicological studies of the main organosulfur compound derived from Allium sp. intended to be used in active food packaging.

    PubMed

    Llana-Ruiz-Cabello, María; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Puerto, María; Pichardo, Silvia; Moreno, F Javier; Baños, Alberto; Nuñez, Cristina; Guillamón, Enrique; Cameán, Ana María

    2015-08-01

    Some plant extracts have been proposed as potential alternative to the use of synthetic preservatives in the food industry. Among those, extracts from Allium species exhibit interesting antimicrobial and antioxidant properties for the food packaging industry. The present work aims to assess the usefulness and potential safety of the major organosulfur compound present in a commercial Allium sp. extract (PROALLIUM AP®), namely propyl thiosulfinate oxide (PTSO). For this purpose, its antimicrobial activity was studied in a wide range of microorganisms. Moreover, cytotoxicity and ultrastructural cellular damages caused by PTSO were studied in two human cell lines, Caco-2 and HepG2, being the colonic cells more sensitive to this compound. Finally, the protective role of PTSO against an induced oxidative situation was evaluated in the human intestinal Caco-2 cells. The results revealed damage at high concentration, although no significant adverse effects were recorded for the concentration to be used in food packaging. Moreover, the in vivo study also revealed the potential safety use at the established concentrations. In addition, the antimicrobial properties and the antioxidant role of PTSO were confirmed. Therefore, this compound could be considered as a good natural alternative to synthetic preservatives used in the food packaging industry. PMID:25957743

  12. Preclinical hyperthyroidism in multinodular goiter.

    PubMed

    Gemsenjäger, E; Staub, J J; Girard, J; Heitz, P

    1976-10-01

    The thyrotropin (TSH) response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone(TRH) (200 mug iv) was determined in 80 surgical patients with nontoxic multinodular goiter. The TSH reserve was normal in multinodular goiter. The TSH reserve was normal in 55 and elavated in 8 patients. No TSH response to TRH (deltaTSH less than or equal to 1 muU/ml) was detectable in 17 patients (21%). Individual and mean serum T4, FT4I and serum T3 values did not differ from normal in 13 of the TRH unresponsive patients; in 4 patients FT4I or serum T3 was marginally elevated. No statistical differences were noted for I131-uptake, PBI131 and conversion rate between controls and TRH unresponsive patients. All patients who failed to respond to TRH were euthyroid on clinical evaluation. Goiters were large multinodular and long-standing in most instances. In 12 tested subjects TRH responsiveness recovered following partial thyroidectomy. In 3 of 7 TRH unresponsive euthyroid patients tested 9-12 days post surgery a transient lack of TSH to respond to TRH was observed. Recovery of TRH responsiveness was accompanied by a significant (P IS LESS THAN 0, 02) decrease in serum T4and FT4I in the euthyroid range, whereas no change in serum T3 occurred. It is suggested that TRH unresponsiveness represents a state of preclinical hyperthyroidism maintained by autonomously functioning goiter compartments. PMID:61970

  13. Linking mechanistic toxicology to population models in forecasting recovery from chemical stress: A case study from Jackfish Bay, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Miller, David H; Tietge, Joseph E; McMaster, Mark E; Munkittrick, Kelly R; Xia, Xiangsheng; Griesmer, David A; Ankley, Gerald T

    2015-07-01

    Recovery of fish and wildlife populations after stressor mitigation serves as a basis for evaluating remediation success. Unfortunately, effectively monitoring population status on a routine basis can be difficult and costly. In the present study, the authors describe a framework that can be applied in conjunction with field monitoring efforts (e.g., through effects-based monitoring programs) to link chemically induced alterations in molecular and biochemical endpoints to adverse outcomes in whole organisms and populations. The approach employs a simple density-dependent logistic matrix model linked to adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for reproductive effects in fish. Application of this framework requires a life table for the organism of interest, a measure of carrying capacity for the population of interest, and estimation of the effect of stressors on vital rates of organisms within the study population. The authors demonstrate the framework using linked AOPs and population models parameterized with long-term monitoring data for white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) collected from a study site at Jackfish Bay, Lake Superior, Canada. Individual responses of fish exposed to pulp mill effluent were used to demonstrate the framework's capability to project alterations in population status, both in terms of ongoing impact and subsequent recovery after stressor mitigation associated with process changes at the mill. The general approach demonstrated at the Jackfish Bay site can be applied to characterize population statuses of other species at a variety of impacted sites and can account for effects of multiple stressors (both chemical and nonchemical) and dynamics within complex landscapes (i.e., meta-populations including emigration and immigration processes). PMID:25943079

  14. A 90-Day Toxicology Study of Meat from Genetically Modified Sheep Overexpressing TLR4 in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rui; Kan, Tongtong; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Jinlong; Lian, Ling; Han, Hongbing; Lian, Zhengxing

    2015-01-01

    Genetic modification offers alternative strategies to traditional animal breeding. However, the food safety of genetically modified (GM) animals has attracted increasing levels of concern. In this study, we produced GM sheep overexpressing TLR4, and the transgene-positive offsprings (F1) were confirmed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot. The expression of TLR4 was 2.5-fold compared with that of the wild-type (WT) sheep samples. During the 90-day safety study, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with three different dietary concentrations (3.75%, 7.5%, and 15% wt/wt) of GM sheep meat, WT sheep meat or a commercial diet (CD). Blood samples from the rats were collected and analyzed for hematological and biochemical parameters, and then compared with hematological and biochemical reference ranges. Despite a few significant differences among the three groups in some parameters, all other values remained within the normal reference intervals and thus were not considered to be affected by the treatment. No adverse diet-related differences in body weights or relative organ weights were observed. Furthermore, no differences were observed in the gross necropsy findings or microscopic pathology of the rats whose diets contained the GM sheep meat compared with rats whose diets contained the WT sheep meat. Therefore, the present 90-day rat feeding study suggested that the meat of GM sheep overexpressing TLR4 had no adverse effect on Sprague-Dawley rats in comparison with WT sheep meat. These results provide valuable information regarding the safety assessment of meat derived from GM animals. PMID:25874566

  15. A 90-day toxicology study of meat from genetically modified sheep overexpressing TLR4 in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hai; Wang, Zhixian; Hu, Rui; Kan, Tongtong; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Jinlong; Lian, Ling; Han, Hongbing; Lian, Zhengxing

    2015-01-01

    Genetic modification offers alternative strategies to traditional animal breeding. However, the food safety of genetically modified (GM) animals has attracted increasing levels of concern. In this study, we produced GM sheep overexpressing TLR4, and the transgene-positive offsprings (F1) were confirmed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot. The expression of TLR4 was 2.5-fold compared with that of the wild-type (WT) sheep samples. During the 90-day safety study, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with three different dietary concentrations (3.75%, 7.5%, and 15% wt/wt) of GM sheep meat, WT sheep meat or a commercial diet (CD). Blood samples from the rats were collected and analyzed for hematological and biochemical parameters, and then compared with hematological and biochemical reference ranges. Despite a few significant differences among the three groups in some parameters, all other values remained within the normal reference intervals and thus were not considered to be affected by the treatment. No adverse diet-related differences in body weights or relative organ weights were observed. Furthermore, no differences were observed in the gross necropsy findings or microscopic pathology of the rats whose diets contained the GM sheep meat compared with rats whose diets contained the WT sheep meat. Therefore, the present 90-day rat feeding study suggested that the meat of GM sheep overexpressing TLR4 had no adverse effect on Sprague-Dawley rats in comparison with WT sheep meat. These results provide valuable information regarding the safety assessment of meat derived from GM animals. PMID:25874566

  16. Multiscale Toxicology - Building the Next Generation Tools for Toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Thrall, Brian D.; Minard, Kevin R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2012-09-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was sponsored by Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle, Columbus), to initiate a collaborative research program across multiple Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories aimed at developing a suite of new capabilities for predictive toxicology. Predicting the potential toxicity of emerging classes of engineered nanomaterials was chosen as one of two focusing problems for this program. PNNL’s focus toward this broader goal was to refine and apply experimental and computational tools needed to provide quantitative understanding of nanoparticle dosimetry for in vitro cell culture systems, which is necessary for comparative risk estimates for different nanomaterials or biological systems. Research conducted using lung epithelial and macrophage cell models successfully adapted magnetic particle detection and fluorescent microscopy technologies to quantify uptake of various forms of engineered nanoparticles, and provided experimental constraints and test datasets for benchmark comparison against results obtained using an in vitro computational dosimetry model, termed the ISSD model. The experimental and computational approaches developed were used to demonstrate how cell dosimetry is applied to aid in interpretation of genomic studies of nanoparticle-mediated biological responses in model cell culture systems. The combined experimental and theoretical approach provides a highly quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their physical form in a controlled manner.

  17. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Subchronic Toxicity of Sulfur Mustard (HD) In Rats Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sasser, L. B.; Miller, R. A.; Kalkwarf, D, R.; Buschbom, R. L.; Cushing, J. A.

    1989-06-30

    Occupational health standards have not been established for sulfur mustard [bis(2- chlorethyl)-sulfide], a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic properties. Seventytwo Sprague-Dawley rats of each sex, 6-7 weeks old, were divided into six groups (12/group/ sex) and gavaged with either 0, 0.003 , 0.01 , 0.03 , 0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg of sulfur mustard in sesame oil 5 days/week for 13 weeks. No dose-related mortality was observed. A significant decrease (P ( 0.05) in body weight was observed in both sexes of rats only in the 0.3 mg/kg group. Hematological evaluations and clinical chemistry measurements found no consistent treatment-related effects at the doses studied. The only treatment-related lesion associated with gavage exposure upon histopathologic evaluation was epithelial hyperplasia of the forestomach of both sexes at 0.3 mg/kg and males at 0.1 mg/kg. The hyperplastic change was minimal and characterized by cellular disorganization of the basilar layer, an apparent increase in mitotic activity of the basilar epithelial cells, and thickening of the epithelial layer due to the apparent increase in cellularity. The estimated NOEL for HD in this 90-day study is 0.1 mg/kg/day when administered orally.

  18. [Toxicologic evaluation of sucrose carbonic acid esters in basic subchronic feeding studies in rats. 2. Effect of sucroacetoglycerides].

    PubMed

    Lewerenz, H J; Mieth, G; Bleyl, D W; Plass, R; Elsner, A

    1991-01-01

    Groups of male and female rats received a sucroacetoglycerides containing product (SAG) for 3 months at dietary levels of 0, 2.5, 5 and 10%. Food consumption was initially increased in females at all SAG-levels. After two weeks significant increases in food intake were observed in males and females fed 10% SAG throughout the feeding period. The serum analysis revealed significantly elevated activity in serum alkaline phosphatase at the highest SAG-level in males and females after 6 weeks and in females after 13 weeks. Histological changes related to the SAG-feeding were noted in the intestinal lymph nodes of male and female animals fed 10% SAG. The no-adverse effect level established in this subchronic feeding study was 5% SAG in the diet of rats, equivalent to a daily intake of 3.6 g/kg body weight in males and 4.0 g/kg in females. PMID:1787849

  19. Designed Synthesis of CeO2 Nanorods and Nanowires for Studying Toxicological Effects of High Aspect Ratio Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhaoxia; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Haiyuan; Lin, Sijie; Meng, Huan; Sun, Bingbing; George, Saji; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E.; Zink, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    While it has been shown that high aspect ratio nanomaterials like carbon nanotubes and TiO2 nanowires can induce toxicity by acting as fiber-like substances that damage the lysosome, it is not clear what the critical lengths and aspect ratios are that induce this type of toxicity. To answer this question, we synthesized a series of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanorods and nanowires with precisely controlled lengths and aspect ratios. Both phosphate and chloride ions were shown to play critical roles in obtaining these high aspect ratio nanostructures. High resolution TEM analysis shows that single crystalline CeO2 nanorods/nanowires were formed along the [211] direction by an “oriented attachment” mechanism, followed by Ostwald ripening. The successful creation of a comprehensive CeO2 nanorod/nanowire combinatorial library allows, for the first time, the systematic study of the effect of aspect ratio on lysosomal damage, cytoxicity and IL-1? production by the human myeloid cell line (THP-1). This in vitro toxicity study demonstrated that at lengths ?200 nm and aspect ratios ? 22, CeO2 nanorods induced progressive cytotoxicity and pro-inflammatory effects. The relatively low “critical” length and aspect ratio were associated with small nanorod/nanowire diameters (6–10 nm), which facilitates the formation of stacking bundles due to strong van der Waals and dipole-dipole attractions. Our results suggest that both length and diameter components of aspect ratio should be considered when addressing the cytotoxic effects of long aspect ratio materials. PMID:22564147

  20. Practical method for preparing nanosuspension formulations for toxicology studies in the discovery stage: formulation optimization and in vitro/in vivo evaluation of nanosized poorly water-soluble compounds.

    PubMed

    Komasaka, Takao; Fujimura, Hisako; Tagawa, Toshiaki; Sugiyama, Akio; Kitano, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to develop a practical method for preparing nanosuspension formulations of poorly water-soluble compounds for enhancing oral absorption in toxicology studies in the discovery stage. To obtain a suitable nanosuspension formulation for the intended purpose, formulations were optimized with a focus on the following characteristics: i) containing a high drug concentration, ii) consisting of commonly used excipient types in proper quantities for toxicology studies, iii) having long-term stability, and iv) having versatility for use with diverse compounds. Test compounds were milled with various excipients by wet media milling methods using a mixer mill (10 mg/batch) and a rotation/revolution mixer (0.5 g/batch). As a result, 100 mg/mL nanosuspensions of all 11 test compounds could be prepared with an optimized dispersing agent, 0.5% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) (3 cP)-0.5% Tween 80. Notably, it was found that the molecular weight of HPMC influenced not only particle size but also the stability of nanosuspensions and they were stable for 4 weeks at 5°C. The nanosuspensions increased in vitro dissolution rates and provided 3.9 and 3.0 times higher Cmax and 4.4 and 1.6 times higher area under the concentration-time curve from 0-24 h (AUC0-24 h) in rats (oral dose of 300 mg/kg) for cilostazol and danazol, respectively. In conclusion, applying a wet media milling method with the combination of HPMC of a small molecular weight and Tween 80 as a dispersing agent, nanosuspensions can be practically prepared and conveniently utilized for enhancing the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble compounds in toxicology studies in the discovery stage. PMID:25366311

  1. A toxicological study of inhalable particulates in an industrial region of Lanzhou City, northwestern China: Results from plasmid scission assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhenghui; Shao, Longyi; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Jing; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Deng, Zhenzhen; Wang, Zhen; BéruBé, Kelly

    2014-09-01

    The city of Lanzhou in northwestern China experiences serious air pollution episodes in the form of PM10 that is characterized by having high levels of heavy metals. The Xigu District represents the industrial core area of Lanzhou City and is denoted by having the largest petrochemical bases in western China. This study investigates heavy metal compositions and oxidative potential of airborne PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of 10 ?m or less) collected in Xigu District in the summer and winter of 2010. An in vitro plasmid scission assay (PSA) was employed to study the oxidative potential of airborne PM10 and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to examine heavy metal compositions. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (TEM/EDX) was used to investigate elemental compositions and mixing states of PM10. The average mass concentrations of PM10 collected in Xigu District were generally higher than the national standard for daily PM10 (150 ?g/m3). Cr, Zn, Pb and Mn were the most abundant metals in the intact whole particles of PM10. Zn, Mn and As was the most abundant metal in the water-soluble fraction, while Cr, Pb, and V existed primarily in insoluble forms. TD20 values (i.e. toxic dosage of PM10 causing 20% of plasmid DNA damage) varied considerably in both winter and summer (from 19 ?g/mL to >1000 ?g/mL) but were typically higher in summer, suggesting that the winter PM10 exhibited greater bioreactivity. In addition, the PM10 collected during a dust storm episode had a highest TD20 value and thus the least oxidative damage to supercoiled plasmid DNA, while the particles collected on a hazy day had a lowest TD20 value and thus the highest oxidative damage to supercoiled plasmid DNA. The particles collected on the first day after snow fall and on a day of cold air intrusion exhibited minor oxidative potential (i.e. caused limited DNA damage). The water-soluble Zn, Mn, As, and Cu displayed a significant negative correlation with TD20 values, suggesting that these heavy metals were responsible for the increase of oxidative potential. The high mass concentration of PM10 and resulting high oxidative potential in Xigu District may be due to the constant low wind speed and high relative humidity, particularly in winter. Finally, TEM analysis suggested that the oxidative potential of PM10 may be associated with its degree of internal mixing, whereby the heterogeneous assortment of soot, mineral and metals created a highly reactive moiety.

  2. Cationic surfactants in the form of nanoparticles and micelles elicit different human neutrophil responses: a toxicological study.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Sung, Calvin T; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Chang, Yuan-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-02-01

    Cationic surfactants are an ingredient commonly incorporated into nanoparticles for clinical practicability; however, the toxicity of cationic surfactants in nanoparticles is not fully elucidated. We aimed to evaluate the inflammatory responses of cationic nanobubbles and micelles in human neutrophils. Soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate (SME) and hexadecyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) are the two cationic surfactants employed in this study. The zeta potential of CTAB nanobubbles was 80 mV, which was the highest among all formulations. Nanobubbles, without cationic surfactants, showed no cytotoxic effects on neutrophils in terms of inflammatory responses. Cationic nanobubbles caused a concentration-dependent cytotoxicity of degranulation (elastase release) and membrane damage (release of lactate dehydrogenase, LDH). Among all nanoparticles and micelles, CTAB-containing nanosystems showed the greatest inflammatory responses. A CTAB nanobubble diluent (1/150) increased the LDH release 80-fold. Propidium iodide staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) verified cell death and morphological change of neutrophils treated by CTAB nanobubbles. SME, in a micelle form, strengthened the inflammatory response more than SME-loaded nanobubbles. Membrane interaction and subsequent Ca(2+) influx were the mechanisms that triggered inflammation. The information obtained from this work is beneficial in designing nanoparticulate formulations for balancing clinical activity and toxicity. PMID:24246197

  3. Selective exposure and analysis of the sheep tracheal lobe as a model for toxicological studies of respirable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Begin, R.; Masse, S.; Rola-Pleszczynski, M.; Drapeau, G.; Dalle, D.

    1985-04-01

    A conscious sheep model, recently developed to study sequentially the bronchoalveolar milieu, was further refined to use in the rapid in vivo assessment of the biological effects of respirable particles. In this model, the anatomically isolated tracheal lobe was selectively exposed to either 100 ml phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (control group of 12 sheep), 100 mg of 0.1-..mu..m latex beads in 100 ml PBS (latex group of 12 sheep), or 100 mg of UICC Canadian chrysotile fibers in 100 ml PBS (asbestos group of 12 sheep). Bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) of the tracheal lobe were obtained prior to exposure and at Days 1, 8, 15, 21, 29, 45, and 60 after exposure. Whole-lung detailed pulmonary function tests (PFT) were performed at the same times and the histopathology of the lobe was examined in six sheep in each group at Days 29 and 60. In the latex group, there was no significant change in PFT, the BAL analyses documented early transient increase in cellularity (macrophages and neutrophils at Day 1) and only macrophages after; lung histology documented an early macrophagic alveolitis which decreased to less than 10% of the initial inflammatory reaction at Day 60, without other distortion of the lung and airway architecture. In the asbestos sheep, the only change in whole-lung PFT was a 10-torr fall in arterial O/sub 2/ pressure. BAL analyses documented persistent increases in macrophages, neutrophils, and lactate dehydrogenase as well as increasing ..gamma..-globulins. Lung histology revealed a macrophagic and neutrophilic peribronchiolar alveolitis, early fibrosis, and severe distortion of the small airways, lesions comparable to those of early asbestosis in sheep or humans.

  4. Comparison of a newly-designed stack-up collimator with conventional parallel-hole collimators in pre-clinical CZT gamma camera systems: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-10-01

    Recently, many studies have been conducted with pixelated semiconductor detectors that use cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) because these detectors have many advantages in pre-clinical gamma imaging. Collimators play an extremely important role in the imaging performance of pixelated semiconductor gamma cameras. In our previous study, based on the pixelated semiconductor gamma camera system we recommended the use of a pixelated parallel-hole collimator with equal hole and pixel sizes; this approach improved both the sensitivity and the spatial resolution. However, the pixelated parallel-hole collimator had two major limitations: (a) Although its sensitivity was higher than that of pinhole systems, the pixelated parallel-hole collimator may have still resulted in a partial loss of sensitivity due to its small collimator hole size. (b) The pixelated parallel-hole collimator with an adequate septal height was difficult to manufacture due to its small holes. Here, we present a new design for a parallel-hole collimator, which uses the stack-up method and a CZT pixelated semiconductor gamma camera system. The purpose of this study was to compare the performances of various geometric designs of our newly-designed parallel-hole collimator with those of conventional parallel-hole collimators [low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) and low-energy high-sensitivity (LEHS)]. The detector was modeled as an eValuator-2500 (eV Microelectronics Inc., Saxonburg, PA, USA) (3-mm thick, 0.5-mm pixel size) by using a Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation. The proposed parallel-hole collimator consisted of two overlapping parallel-hole collimators. The size of each hole in the proposed parallel-hole collimator was four times that of the hole in the pixelated parallel-hole collimator. The overlap ratios of these collimators were 1 : 1, 1 : 2, 2 : 1, 1 : 5, and 5 : 1. To evaluate and compare the performances of these systems, we evaluated the sensitivity and the spatial resolution of each system. The average sensitivities of the proposed parallel-hole collimators with overlap ratios of 1 : 1, 1 : 2 or 2 : 1, and 1 : 5 or 5 : 1 and of the LEHS conventional parallel-hole collimator were 2.17, 3.45, 13.90, and 3.68 times higher than the average sensitivities of the LEHR conventional parallel-hole collimator, respectively. The average spatial resolution also varied depending on the distance from the collimator. In conclusion, we successfully designed a novel parallel-hole collimator for pre-clinical imaging; this novel collimator employs the stack-up method with a CZT pixelated semiconductor gamma camera.

  5. The New Toxicology of Sophisticated Materials: Nanotoxicology and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Andrew D.; Warheit, David B.; Philbert, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the physical form of materials can mediate their toxicity—the health impacts of asbestiform materials, industrial aerosols, and ambient particulate matter are prime examples. Yet over the past 20 years, toxicology research has suggested complex and previously unrecognized associations between material physicochemistry at the nanoscale and biological interactions. With the rapid rise of the field of nanotechnology and the design and production of increasingly complex nanoscale materials, it has become ever more important to understand how the physical form and chemical composition of these materials interact synergistically to determine toxicity. As a result, a new field of research has emerged—nanotoxicology. Research within this field is highlighting the importance of material physicochemical properties in how dose is understood, how materials are characterized in a manner that enables quantitative data interpretation and comparison, and how materials move within, interact with, and are transformed by biological systems. Yet many of the substances that are the focus of current nanotoxicology studies are relatively simple materials that are at the vanguard of a new era of complex materials. Over the next 50 years, there will be a need to understand the toxicology of increasingly sophisticated materials that exhibit novel, dynamic and multifaceted functionality. If the toxicology community is to meet the challenge of ensuring the safe use of this new generation of substances, it will need to move beyond “nano” toxicology and toward a new toxicology of sophisticated materials. Here, we present a brief overview of the current state of the science on the toxicology of nanoscale materials and focus on three emerging toxicology-based challenges presented by sophisticated materials that will become increasingly important over the next 50 years: identifying relevant materials for study, physicochemical characterization, and biointeractions. PMID:21177774

  6. Toxicology Letters 120 (2001) 161164 Gene imprinting in developmental toxicology: a possible

    E-print Network

    McLachlan, John

    2001-01-01

    Toxicology Letters 120 (2001) 161­164 Gene imprinting in developmental toxicology: a possible the implications of this and other findings for non-mutagenic aspects of developmental toxicology, and suggest ways Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Developmental toxicology; Gene imprinting; Endocrine

  7. DTP | Toxicology and Pharmacology Branch (TPB)

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Content Search this site Toxicology and Pharmacology Branch (TPB) TPB Home TPB Specific Functions TPB Organization Drug Development Philosophy and Procedures Drug Development Bibliography Toxicology and Pharmacology Primer TPB Publications List

  8. Preclinical safety testing for cell-based products using animals.

    PubMed

    McBlane, James W

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of preclinical testing include to show why there might be therapeutic benefit in patients and to provide information on the product's toxicity. For cell-based products, given even once, there may be long term exposure and this could imply, unlike for conventional drugs, that all preclinical studies may be needed prior to first human use. The duration of exposure to cells should be studied in animals to guide toxicity assessments. Distribution of cells after administration by a route resembling that intended in humans should be studied to understand potential risks. Risk of tumour formation with the product may also need to be characterised. To the extent that this information can be generated by in vitro testing, studies in animals may not be needed and limitations on the capability of preclinical data to predict human toxicity are recognised: species-specificity make some cell products act only in humans and a human cell-product might be expected to be rejected by immunocompetent animals. Does this suggest testing in immunosuppressed animals or of development of an animal-cell product supposedly similar to the human cell product? No single answer seems to fit every situation. PMID:26026578

  9. A Flexible, Preclinical, Medical School Curriculum Increases Student Academic Productivity and the Desire to Conduct Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Justin G.; Grande, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, small blocks of flexible curriculum time, termed selectives, were implemented in the Mayo Medical School preclinical curriculum. Selectives permitted students to pursue professional endeavors, such as research, service, and career exploration, in the preclinical years. The purpose of this study was to survey current and former Mayo…

  10. Postmortem diagnosis and toxicological validation of illicit substance use

    PubMed Central

    Lehrmann, E; Afanador, ZR; Deep-Soboslay, A; Gallegos, G; Darwin, WD; Lowe, RH; Barnes, AJ; Huestis, MA; Cadet, JL; Herman, MM; Hyde, TM; Kleinman, JE; Freed, WJ

    2008-01-01

    The present study examines the diagnostic challenges of identifying ante-mortem illicit substance use in human postmortem cases. Substance use, assessed by clinical case history reviews, structured next-of-kin interviews, by general toxicology of blood, urine, and/or brain, and by scalp hair testing, identified 33 cocaine, 29 cannabis, 10 phencyclidine and 9 opioid cases. Case history identified 42% cocaine, 76% cannabis, 10% phencyclidine, and 33% opioid cases. Next-of-kin interviews identified almost twice as many cocaine and cannabis cases as Medical Examiner (ME) case histories, and were crucial in establishing a detailed lifetime substance use history. Toxicology identified 91% cocaine, 68% cannabis, 80% phencyclidine, and 100% opioid cases, with hair testing increasing detection for all drug classes. A cocaine or cannabis use history was corroborated by general toxicology with 50% and 32% sensitivity, respectively, and with 82% and 64% sensitivity by hair testing. Hair testing corroborated a positive general toxicology for cocaine and cannabis with 91% and 100% sensitivity, respectively. Case history corroborated hair toxicology with 38% sensitivity for cocaine and 79% sensitivity for cannabis, suggesting that both case history and general toxicology underestimated cocaine use. Identifying ante-mortem substance use in human postmortem cases are key considerations in case diagnosis and for characterization of disorder-specific changes in neurobiology. The sensitivity and specificity of substance use assessments increased when ME case history was supplemented with structured next-of-kin interviews to establish a detailed lifetime substance use history, while comprehensive toxicology, and hair testing in particular, increased detection of recent illicit substance use. PMID:18201295

  11. Fish and Wildlife Toxicology Lecture Syllabus

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Fish and Wildlife Toxicology Lecture Syllabus Lecture Home Page Lab Home Page Lecture Schedule Lab Lab Syllabus Fish 455 ESRM 457, Winter 10 Fish and Wildlife Toxicology Course description students a basic understanding of toxicology. Topics include: the history/development of the field

  12. Science: Aquatic Toxicology Matures, Gains Importance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagani, Ron

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent advances in aquatic toxicology, whose major goal is to protect diverse aquatic organisms and whole ecological communities from the dire effects of man-made chemicals. Current legislation is reviewed. Differences in mammalian and aquatic toxicology are listed, and examples of research in aquatic toxicology are discussed. (CS)

  13. Metabolomics in Toxicology and Preclinical Research, a t4 Workshop Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics, the comprehensive analysis of metabolites in a biological system, provides detailed information about the biochemical/physiological condition of the test system, and of changes affected by anthropogenic chemicals. Metabolomic analysis is used in many fields, ranging...

  14. Ecological and toxicological responses in a multistressor scenario: Are monitoring programs showing the stressors or just showing stress? A case study in Brazil.

    PubMed

    López-Doval, Julio C; Meirelles, Sergio Tadeu; Cardoso-Silva, Sheila; Moschini-Carlos, Viviane; Pompêo, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The Metropolitan Region of São Paulo (MRSP) is located in the Brazilian State of São Paulo and reservoirs in this region are vital for water supply and energy production. Changes in economic, social, and demographic trends produced pollution of water bodies, decreasing water quality for human uses and affecting freshwater populations. The presence of emerging pollutants, classical priority substances, nutrient excess and the interaction with tropical-climate conditions require periodic reviews of water policies and monitoring programs in order to detect and manage these threats in a global change scenario. The objective of this work is to determine whether the monitoring program of the São Paulo's Environmental Agency, is sufficient to explain the toxicological and biological responses observed in organisms in reservoirs of the MRSP, and whether it can identify the possible agents causing these responses. For that, we used publicly available data on water quality compiled by this agency in their routine monitoring program. A general overview of these data and a chemometric approach to analyze the responses of biotic indexes and toxicological bioassays, as a function of the physical and chemical parameters monitored, were performed. Data compiled showed temporal and geographical information gaps on variables measured. Toxicological responses have been observed in the reservoirs of the MRSP, together with a high incidence of impairments of the zooplankton community. This demonstrates the presence of stressors that affect the viability of organisms and populations. The statistical approach showed that the data compiled by the environmental agency are insufficient to identify and explain the factors causing the observed ecotoxicological responses and impairments in the zooplankton community, and are therefore insufficient to identify clear cause-effect relationships. Stressors different from those analyzed could be responsible for the observed responses. PMID:26094799

  15. Preclinical and Translational PET/MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wehrl, Hans F; Wiehr, Stefan; Divine, Mathew R; Gatidis, Sergios; Gullberg, Grant T; Maier, Florian C; Rolle, Anna-Maria; Schwenck, Johannes; Thaiss, Wolfgang M; Pichler, Bernd J

    2014-05-15

    Combined PET and MR imaging (PET/MR imaging) has progressed tremendously in recent years. The focus of current research has shifted from technologic challenges to the application of this new multimodal imaging technology in the areas of oncology, cardiology, neurology, and infectious diseases. This article reviews studies in preclinical and clinical translation. The common theme of these initial results is the complementary nature of combined PET/MR imaging that often provides additional insights into biologic systems that were not clearly feasible with just one modality alone. However, in vivo findings require ex vivo validation. Combined PET/MR imaging also triggers a multitude of new developments in image analysis that are aimed at merging and using multimodal information that ranges from better tumor characterization to analysis of metabolic brain networks. The combination of connectomics information that maps brain networks derived from multiparametric MR data with metabolic information from PET can even lead to the formation of a new research field that we would call cometomics that would map functional and metabolic brain networks. These new methodologic developments also call for more multidisciplinarity in the field of molecular imaging, in which close interaction and training among clinicians and a variety of scientists is needed. PMID:24833493

  16. Aquatic Toxicology 58 (2002) 137149 www.elsevier.com/locate/aquatox The influence of sediment and feeding on the elimination of

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    Aquatic Toxicology 58 (2002) 137­149 www.elsevier.com/locate/aquatox The influence of sediment. Introduction In aquatic toxicology, the focus of most mecha- nistic kinetics studies have been on the accumula.F. Landrum / Aquatic Toxicology 58 (2002) 137­149138 pounds) across the gill (Hayton and Schultz, 1991). When

  17. [Significance and importance of enzyme diagnosis in the framework of toxicological studies of plant protectives, pesticides and agents for biological process control].

    PubMed

    Plass, R; Lewerenz, H J

    1981-01-01

    In toxicological experimentation, clinico-chemical and biochemical data are increasingly involved in the comprehensive evaluation of adverse effects of plant protectives, pesticides and agents for the biological process control on the mammalian organism. Blood serum and urine or organic homogenates from experimental animals kept under standardized conditions are chiefly used for enzymodiagnostic analyses. Changes in enzyme activity occurring under the influence of the bioactive test substances must be regarded as indicative of direct effects on the biocatalyst, metabolic changes or impairments of certain organs. PMID:7278945

  18. CAROLINA CENTER FOR COMPUTATIONAL TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Center will advance the field of computational toxicology through the development of new methods and tools, as well as through collaborative efforts. In each Project, new computer-based models will be developed and published that represent the state-of-the-art. The tools p...

  19. Public Databases Supporting Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major goal of the emerging field of computational toxicology is the development of screening-level models that predict potential toxicity of chemicals from a combination of mechanistic in vitro assay data and chemical structure descriptors. In order to build these models, resea...

  20. QUANTITATIVE TOXICOLOGIC PATHOLOGY-METHODS AND INTERPRETATION' SESSION AT THE JOINT MEETING OF SOCIETY OF TOXICOLOGIC PATHOLOGISTS AND THE INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF SOCIETIES OF TOXICOLOGIC PATHOLOGISTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Report of the 'Quantitative Toxicologic Pathology - Methods and Interpretation' session at the Joint meeting of Society of Toxicologic Pathologists and the International Federation of Societies of Toxicologic Pathologists, Orlando, Florida, USA, June 24-28, 2001. Douglas C. Wolf,...

  1. A proposed approach to study the toxicology of complex mixtures of petroleum products: the integrated use of QSAR, lumping analysis and PBPK/PD modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Verhaar, H J; Morroni, J R; Reardon, K F; Hays, S M; Gaver, D P; Carpenter, R L; Yang, R S

    1997-01-01

    Mixture toxicity is a topic that has become a matter of concern during the last two decades. One of the major problems with assessing the toxicity of mixtures and the associated human and environmental risk is the large number of possible mixtures, as well as the fact that the actual mixture effect for a given set of constituents might strongly depend on the actual composition of the mixture, i.e., the ratios of the constituent, as well as their nature. This paper presents a possible approach to describe and thereby better understand the pharmacokinetics and dynamics of complex mixtures by combining quantitative structure-activity relationships to predict needed parameters, lumping to reduce the complexity of the problem, and physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling to integrate all this information into a complete toxicological description of the mixture. It is our hope that by presenting this conceptual approach we might be able to stimulate some criticisms and discussions in the toxicology community regarding this complex and yet very important area of research. PMID:9114286

  2. Juvenile Toxicology: Relevance and Challenges for Toxicologists and Pathologists.

    PubMed

    Remick, Amera K; Catlin, Natasha R; Quist, Erin M; Steinbach, Thomas J; Dixon, Darlene

    2015-12-01

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) Education Committee and the STP Reproductive Special Interest Group held a North Carolina regional meeting entitled, "Juvenile Toxicology: Relevance and Challenges for Toxicologists and Pathologists" on March 13, 2015, at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/National Toxicology Program in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The purpose of this regional meeting was to familiarize attendees with the topic of juvenile toxicity testing and discuss its relevance to clinical pediatric medicine, regulatory perspectives, challenges of appropriate study design confronted by toxicologists, and challenges of histopathologic examination and interpretation of juvenile tissues faced by pathologists. The 1-day meeting was a success with over 60 attendees representing industry, government, research organizations, and academia. PMID:26220944

  3. A short history of the toxicology of inhaled particles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Particle toxicology arose in order to understand the mechanisms of adverse effects of 3 major particle types that had historically exerted the greatest toll of ill-health—quartz, coal and asbestos. By the middle of the last century rat inhalation studies had been carried out and the pathology documented, but true mechanistic particle toxicology did not really take off until the 1970s when cell culture techniques became available. By the 1980s glass fibres were a major focus of interest and attempts to develop a structure-toxicity paradigm centred on biopersistence. In the 1990s environmental particles dominated the particle toxicology agenda and the cardiovascular system emerged as a target for inhaled particles, raising new challenges for particle toxicologists. We are currently in the era of nanotoxicology where a large and diverse range of new nanoparticles types are under scrutiny. PMID:22559156

  4. The preclinical data forum network: A new ECNP initiative to improve data quality and robustness for (preclinical) neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Steckler, Thomas; Brose, Katja; Haas, Magali; Kas, Martien J; Koustova, Elena; Bespalov, Anton

    2015-10-01

    Current limitations impeding on data reproducibility are often poor statistical design, underpowered studies, lack of robust data, lack of methodological detail, biased reporting and lack of open data sharing, coupled with wrong research incentives. To improve data reproducibility, robustness and quality for brain disease research, a Preclinical Data Forum Network was formed under the umbrella of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP). The goal of this network, members of which met for the first time in October 2014, is to establish a forum to collaborate in precompetitive space, to exchange and develop best practices, and to bring together the members from academia, pharmaceutical industry, publishers, journal editors, funding organizations, public/private partnerships and non-profit advocacy organizations. To address the most pertinent issues identified by the Network, it was decided to establish a data sharing platform that allows open exchange of information in the area of preclinical neuroscience and to develop an educational scientific program. It is also planned to reach out to other organizations to align initiatives to enhance efficiency, and to initiate activities to improve the clinical relevance of preclinical data. Those Network activities should contribute to scientific rigor and lead to robust and relevant translational data. Here we provide a synopsis of the proceedings from the inaugural meeting. PMID:26073278

  5. Toxicology Testing in Fatally Injured Workers: A Review of Five Years of Iowa FACE Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Marizen; Bedford, Ronald; Sullivan, Ryan; Anthony, T. Renee; Kraemer, John; Faine, Brett; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    Toxicology testing of fatally injured workers is not routinely conducted. We completed a case-series study of 2005–2009 occupational fatalities captured by Iowa’s Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Program. The goals of our research were to: (1) measure the proportion of FACE cases that undergo toxicology testing, and describe the factors associated with being tested, and (2) measure the rate of positive toxicology tests, the substances identified and the demographics and occupations of victims who tested positive. Case documents and toxicology laboratory reports were reviewed. There were 427 occupational deaths from 2005 to 2009. Only 69% underwent toxicology testing. Younger workers had greater odds of being tested. Among occupational groups, workers in farming, fishing and forestry had half the odds of being tested compared to other occupational groups. Of the 280 cases with toxicology tests completed, 22% (n = 61) were found to have positive toxicology testing. Commonly identified drug classes included cannabinoids and alcohols. Based on the small number of positive tests, older victims (65+ years) tested positive more frequently than younger workers. Management, business, science, arts, service and sales/office workers had proportionately more positive toxicology tests (almost 30%) compared with other workers (18–22%). These results identify an area in need of further research efforts and a potential target for injury prevention strategies. PMID:24240727

  6. Prenatal Antidepressant Exposure: Clinical and Preclinical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, Chase H.; Stowe, Zachary N.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of any maternal illness during pregnancy warrants consideration of the consequences of the illness and/or medication for both the mother and unborn child. In the case of major depressive disorder, which affects up to 10–20% of pregnant women, the deleterious effects of untreated depression on the offspring can be profound and long lasting. Progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanism(s) of action of antidepressants, fetal exposure to these medications, and serotonin’s role in development. New technologies and careful study designs have enabled the accurate sampling of maternal serum, breast milk, umbilical cord serum, and infant serum psychotropic medication concentrations to characterize the magnitude of placental transfer and exposure through human breast milk. Despite this progress, the extant clinical literature is largely composed of case series, population-based patient registry data that are reliant on nonobjective means and retrospective recall to determine both medication and maternal depression exposure, and limited inclusion of suitable control groups for maternal depression. Conclusions drawn from such studies often fail to incorporate embryology/neurotransmitter ontogeny, appropriate gestational windows, or a critical discussion of statistically versus clinically significant. Similarly, preclinical studies have predominantly relied on dosing models, leading to exposures that may not be clinically relevant. The elucidation of a defined teratological effect or mechanism, if any, has yet to be conclusively demonstrated. The extant literature indicates that, in many cases, the benefits of antidepressant use during pregnancy for a depressed pregnant woman may outweigh potential risks. PMID:24567054

  7. Preclinical stroke research – advantages and disadvantages of the most common rodent models of focal ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Macrae, IM

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the most commonly used rodent models and outcome measures in preclinical stroke research and discusses their strengths and limitations. Most models involve permanent or transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with therapeutic agents tested for their ability to reduce stroke-induced infarcts and improve neurological deficits. Many drugs have demonstrated preclinical efficacy but, other than thrombolytics, which restore blood flow, none have demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials. This failure to translate efficacy from bench to bedside is discussed alongside achievable steps to improve the ability of preclinical research to predict clinical efficacy: (i) Improvements in study quality and reporting. Study design must include randomization, blinding and predefined inclusion/exclusion criteria, and journal editors have the power to ensure statements on these and mortality data are included in preclinical publications. (ii) Negative and neutral studies must be published to enable preclinical meta-analyses and systematic reviews to more accurately predict drug efficacy in man. (iii) Preclinical groups should work within networks and agree on standardized procedures for assessing final infarct and functional outcome. This will improve research quality, timeliness and translational capacity. (iv) Greater uptake and improvements in non-invasive diagnostic imaging to detect and study potentially salvageable penumbral tissue, the target for acute neuroprotection. Drug effects on penumbra lifespan studied serially, followed by assessment of behavioural outcome and infarct within in the same animal group, will increase the power to detect drug efficacy preclinically. Similar progress in detecting drug efficacy clinically will follow from patient recruitment into acute stroke trials based on evidence of remaining penumbra. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-4 PMID:21457227

  8. 21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3280 Clinical toxicology control material. (a) Identification. A clinical toxicology...

  9. 21 CFR 862.3200 - Clinical toxicology calibrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clinical toxicology calibrator. 862.3200 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3200 Clinical toxicology calibrator. (a) Identification. A clinical toxicology calibrator...

  10. Resource Guide to Careers in Toxicology, 3rd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society of Toxicology, Reston, VA.

    This resource guide was prepared by the Tox 90's Educational Issues Task Force of the Society of Toxicology. The introduction provides information on the Society of Toxicology and financial support for graduate students in toxicology. Other sections include career opportunities in toxicology, academic and postdoctoral programs in toxicology, and…

  11. Stem cell-derived systems in toxicology assessment.

    PubMed

    Suter-Dick, Laura; Alves, Paula M; Blaauboer, Bas J; Bremm, Klaus-Dieter; Brito, Catarina; Coecke, Sandra; Flick, Burkhard; Fowler, Paul; Hescheler, Jürgen; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Jennings, Paul; Kelm, Jens M; Manou, Irene; Mistry, Pratibha; Moretto, Angelo; Roth, Adrian; Stedman, Donald; van de Water, Bob; Beilmann, Mario

    2015-06-01

    Industrial sectors perform toxicological assessments of their potential products to ensure human safety and to fulfill regulatory requirements. These assessments often involve animal testing, but ethical, cost, and time concerns, together with a ban on it in specific sectors, make appropriate in vitro systems indispensable in toxicology. In this study, we summarize the outcome of an EPAA (European Partnership of Alternatives to Animal Testing)-organized workshop on the use of stem cell-derived (SCD) systems in toxicology, with a focus on industrial applications. SCD systems, in particular, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived, provide physiological cell culture systems of easy access and amenable to a variety of assays. They also present the opportunity to apply the vast repository of existing nonclinical data for the understanding of in vitro to in vivo translation. SCD systems from several toxicologically relevant tissues exist; they generally recapitulate many aspects of physiology and respond to toxicological and pharmacological interventions. However, focused research is necessary to accelerate implementation of SCD systems in an industrial setting and subsequent use of such systems by regulatory authorities. Research is required into the phenotypic characterization of the systems, since methods and protocols for generating terminally differentiated SCD cells are still lacking. Organotypical 3D culture systems in bioreactors and microscale tissue engineering technologies should be fostered, as they promote and maintain differentiation and support coculture systems. They need further development and validation for their successful implementation in toxicity testing in industry. Analytical measures also need to be implemented to enable compound exposure and metabolism measurements for in vitro to in vivo extrapolation. The future of SCD toxicological tests will combine advanced cell culture technologies and biokinetic measurements to support regulatory and research applications. However, scientific and technical hurdles must be overcome before SCD in vitro methods undergo appropriate validation and become accepted in the regulatory arena. PMID:25675366

  12. Toxicological Effects of Fullerenes on Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomaker, Justin; Snook, Renee; Howell, Carina

    2014-03-01

    The nematode species Caenorhabditis elegans is a useful genetic model organism due to its simplicity and the substantial molecular, genetic, and developmental knowledge about the species. In this study, this species was used to test the toxicological effects of C60 fullerene nanoparticles. In previous studies using rats, a solution of C60 fullerenes in olive oil proved to extend the life of the subjects. The purpose of this experiment was to subject C. elegans to varying concentrations of C60 fullerenes and observe their toxicological effects. Initial findings indicate a link between fullerene exposure and enlargement of the vulva as well as the formation of a small nodule at the base of the tail in some individuals. While the fullerenes are not lethally toxic in C. elegans, results will be presented that pertain to changes in life span and progeny of the nematodes exposed to varying concentrations of fullerenes as well as the mechanisms of toxicity. High magnification imaging via SEM and/or AFM will be used to characterize the fullerene nanoparticles. Testing the toxicity of fullerenes in a wide variety of organisms will lead to a more complete understanding of the effects of fullerenes on living organisms to ultimately understand their effects in humans. This work was supported by National Science Foundation grants DUE-1058829, DMR-0923047, DUE-0806660 and Lock Haven FPDC grants.

  13. Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel, Orally Bioavailable Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) KPT-335 in Spontaneous Canine Cancer: Results of a Phase I Study

    PubMed Central

    London, Cheryl A.; Bernabe, Luis Feo; Barnard, Sandra; Kisseberth, William C.; Borgatti, Antonella; Henson, Mike; Wilson, Heather; Jensen, Kiersten; Ito, Daisuke; Modiano, Jaime F.; Bear, Misty D.; Pennell, Michael L.; Saint-Martin, Jean-Richard; McCauley, Dilara; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the activity of Selective Inhibitors of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds that inhibit the function of the nuclear export protein Exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) against canine tumor cell lines and perform a Phase I clinical trial of KPT-335 in dogs with spontaneous cancer to provide a preliminary assessment of biologic activity and tolerability. Methods and Findings Canine tumor cell lines derived from non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), mast cell tumor, melanoma and osteosarcoma exhibited growth inhibition and apoptosis in response to nanomolar concentrations of SINE compounds; NHL cells were particularly sensitive with IC50 concentrations ranging from 2–42 nM. A Phase I clinical trial of KPT-335 was performed in 17 dogs with NHL (naive or relapsed), mast cell tumor or osteosarcoma. The maximum tolerated dose was 1.75 mg/kg given orally twice/week (Monday/Thursday) although biologic activity was observed at 1 mg/kg. Clinical benefit (CB) including partial response to therapy (PR, n?=?2) and stable disease (SD, n?=?7) was observed in 9/14 dogs with NHL with a median time to progression (TTP) for responders of 66 days (range 35–256 days). A dose expansion study was performed in 6 dogs with NHL given 1.5 mg/kg KPT-335 Monday/Wednesday/Friday; CB was observed in 4/6 dogs with a median TTP for responders of 83 days (range 35–354 days). Toxicities were primarily gastrointestinal consisting of anorexia, weight loss, vomiting and diarrhea and were manageable with supportive care, dose modulation and administration of low dose prednisone; hepatotoxicity, anorexia and weight loss were the dose limiting toxicities. Conclusions This study provides evidence that the novel orally bioavailable XPO1 inhibitor KPT-335 is safe and exhibits activity in a relevant, spontaneous large animal model of cancer. Data from this study provides critical new information that lays the groundwork for evaluation of SINE compounds in human cancer. PMID:24503695

  14. Preclinical study of a novel hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal pump for long-term cardiopulmonary support : In vivo performance during percutaneous cardiopulmonary support.

    PubMed

    Tsukiya, Tomonori; Mizuno, Toshihide; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2015-12-01

    An extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump with a hydrodynamically levitated impeller was developed for use in a durable extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) system. The present study examined the biocompatibility of the blood pump during long-term use by conducting a series of 30-day chronic animal experiments. The ECMO system was used to produce a percutaneous venoarterial bypass between the venae cavae and carotid artery in adult goats. No anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy was administered during the experiments. Three out of four animals survived for the scheduled 30-day period, and the blood pumps and membrane oxygenators both exhibited sufficient hydrodynamic performance and good antithrombogenicity, while one animal died of massive bleeding from the outflow cannulation site. The animals' plasma free hemoglobin had returned to within the normal range by 1 week after the surgical intervention, and their hemodynamic and biochemistry parameters remained within their normal ranges throughout the experiment. The explanted centrifugal blood pumps did not display any trace of thrombus formation. Based on the biocompatibility demonstrated in this study, the examined centrifugal blood pump, which includes a hydrodynamically levitated impeller, is suitable for use in durable ECMO systems. PMID:25975380

  15. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  16. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-12-31

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  17. Preclinical Mouse Models To Study Human OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Selvi; Lozano-Mena, Gloria; van Esch, Anita; Wagenaar, Els; van Tellingen, Olaf; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2015-12-01

    The impact of OATP drug uptake transporters in drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is increasingly recognized. OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 are human hepatic uptake transporters that can mediate liver uptake of a wide variety of drugs. Recently, we generated transgenic mice with liver-specific expression of human OATP1B1 or OATP1B3 in a mouse Oatp1a/1b knockout background. Here, we investigated the applicability of these mice in OATP-mediated drug-drug interaction studies using the prototypic OATP inhibitor rifampicin and a good OATP substrate, the anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX). We next assessed the possibility of OATP-mediated interactions between telmisartan and MTX, a clinically relevant drug combination. Using HEK293 cells overexpressing OATP1B1 or OATP1B3, we estimated IC50 values for both rifampicin (0.9 or 0.3 ?M) and telmisartan (6.7 or 7.9 ?M) in inhibiting OATP-mediated MTX uptake in vitro. Using wild-type, Oatp1a/1b-/-, and OATP1B1- or OATP1B3-humanized transgenic mice, we found that rifampicin inhibits hepatic uptake of MTX mediated by the mouse Oatp1a/1b and human OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 transporters at clinically relevant concentrations. This highlights the applicability of these mouse models for DDI studies and may be exploited in the clinic to reduce the dose and thus methotrexate-mediated toxicity. On the other hand, telmisartan inhibited only human OATP1B1-mediated hepatic uptake of MTX at concentrations higher than those used in the clinic; therefore risks for OATP-mediated clinical DDIs for this drug combination are likely to be low. Overall, we show here that OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-humanized mice can be used as in vivo tools to assess and possibly predict clinically relevant DDIs. PMID:26474710

  18. Chemoprevention of Head and Neck Cancer by Simultaneous Blocking of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Cyclooxygenase-2 Signaling Pathways: Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong M.; Zhang, Hongzheng; Saba, Nabil; Chen, Amy; Nannapaneni, Sreenivas; Amin, A.R.M. Ruhul; Müller, Susan; Lewis, Melinda; Sica, Gabriel; Kono, Scott; Brandes, Johann C.; Grist, William; Moreno-Williams, Rachel; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Thomas, Sufi M.; Chen, Zhengjia; Shin, Hyung Ju C.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Chen, Zhuo Georgia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the efficacy and underlying molecular mechanism of a novel chemopreventive strategy combining epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (COX-2I). Experimental Design We examined the inhibition of tumor cell growth by combined EGFR-TKI (erlotinib) and COX-2I (celecoxib) treatment using head and neck cancer (HNC) cell lines and a preventive xenograft model. We studied the antiangiogenic activity of these agents and examined the affected signaling pathways by immunoblotting analysis in tumor cell lysates and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) analyses on the mouse xenograft tissues and blood, respectively. Biomarkers in these signaling pathways were studied by IHC, EIA, and an antibody array analysis in samples collected from participants in a phase I chemoprevention trial of erlotinib and celecoxib. Results The combined treatment inhibited HNC cell growth significantly more potently than either single agent alone in cell line and xenograft models, and resulted in greater inhibition of cell cycle progression at G1 phase than either single drug. The combined treatment modulated the EGFR and mTOR signaling pathways. A phase I chemoprevention trial of combined erlotinib and celecoxib revealed an overall pathologic response rate of 71% at time of data analysis. Analysis of tissue samples from participants consistently showed downregulation of EGFR, pERK and pS6 levels after treatment, which correlated with clinical response. Conclusion Treatment with erlotinib combined with celecoxib offers an effective chemopreventive approach through inhibition of EGFR and mTOR pathways, which may serve as potential biomarkers to monitor the intervention of this combination in the clinic. PMID:23422093

  19. Key Findings from Preclinical and Clinical Drug Interaction Studies Presented in New Drug and Biological License Applications Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2014.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingjing; Ritchie, Tasha K; Zhou, Zhu; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory approval documents contain valuable information, often not published, to assess the drug-drug interaction (DDI) profile of newly marketed drugs. This analysis aimed to systematically review all drug metabolism, transport, pharmacokinetics, and DDI data available in the new drug applications and biologic license applications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2014, using the University of Washington Drug Interaction Database, and to highlight the significant findings. Among the 30 new drug applications and 11 biologic license applications reviewed, 35 new molecular entities (NMEs) were well characterized with regard to drug metabolism, transport, and/or organ impairment and were fully analyzed in this review. In vitro, a majority of the NMEs were found to be substrates or inhibitors/inducers of at least one drug metabolizing enzyme or transporter. In vivo, when NMEs were considered as victim drugs, 16 NMEs had at least one in vivo DDI study with a clinically significant change in exposure (area under the time-plasma concentration curve or Cmax ratio ?2 or ?0.5), with 6 NMEs shown to be sensitive substrates of cytochrome P450 enzymes (area under the time-plasma concentration curve ratio ?5 when coadministered with potent inhibitors): paritaprevir and naloxegol (CYP3A), eliglustat (CYP2D6), dasabuvir (CYP2C8), and tasimelteon and pirfenidone (CYP1A2). As perpetrators, seven NMEs showed clinically significant inhibition involving both enzymes and transporters, although no clinically significant induction was observed. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and pharmacogenetics studies were used for six and four NMEs, respectively, to optimize dosing recommendations in special populations and/or multiple impairment situations. In addition, the pharmacokinetic evaluations in patients with hepatic or renal impairment provided useful quantitative information to support drug administration in these fragile populations. PMID:26424199

  20. TOXICOLOGY OF 1,1,2-TRICHLOROETHANE IN THE MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    1,1,2-Trichloroethane (TCE) was administered to male and female CD-1 mice to evaluate its effect on standard toxicological parameters. Following determination of the acute LD50 (378 mg/kg in males and 491 mg/kg in females), and a 14-day range-finding study, a 90-day drinking wate...

  1. ACCELERATED COMMUNICATION Identification of toxicologically predictive gene sets using

    E-print Network

    Bradfield, Christopher A.

    testing. Toxicologists employ a battery of tests to identify chemicals with potential for human toxicity of chemicals currently tested by the NTP stands at 505 in long-term studies, 66 in short-term tests, and one in commerce today (Nation- al Toxicology Program, 1996), it is clearly impossible to apply current testing

  2. Preclinical Pharmacokinetic Studies of the Tritium Labelled D-Enantiomeric Peptide D3 Developed for the Treatment of Alzheimer´s Disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Leithold, Leonie H E; Post, Julia; Ziehm, Tamar; Mauler, Jörg; Gremer, Lothar; Cremer, Markus; Schartmann, Elena; Shah, N Jon; Kutzsche, Janine; Langen, Karl-Josef; Breitkreutz, Jörg; Willbold, Dieter; Willuweit, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Targeting toxic amyloid beta (A?) oligomers is currently a very attractive drug development strategy for treatment of Alzheimer´s disease. Using mirror-image phage display against A?1-42, we have previously identified the fully D-enantiomeric peptide D3, which is able to eliminate A? oligomers and has proven therapeutic potential in transgenic Alzheimer´s disease animal models. However, there is little information on the pharmacokinetic behaviour of D-enantiomeric peptides in general. Therefore, we conducted experiments with the tritium labelled D-peptide D3 (3H-D3) in mice with different administration routes to study its distribution in liver, kidney, brain, plasma and gastrointestinal tract, as well as its bioavailability by i.p. and p.o. administration. In addition, we investigated the metabolic stability in liver microsomes, mouse plasma, brain, liver and kidney homogenates, and estimated the plasma protein binding. Based on its high stability and long biological half-life, our pharmacokinetic results support the therapeutic potential of D-peptides in general, with D3 being a new promising drug candidate for Alzheimer´s disease treatment. PMID:26046986

  3. Determination of lansoprazole enantiomers in dog plasma by column-switching liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and its application to a preclinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Sun, Yantong; Meng, Xiangjun; Yang, Bo; Wang, Jian; Yang, Yan; Gu, Jingkai

    2015-09-01

    Lansoprazole, a selective proton pump inhibitor, has a chiral benzimidazole sulfoxide structure and is used for the treatment of gastric acid hypersecretory related diseases. To investigate its stereoselective pharmacokinetics, a column-switching liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of lansoprazole enantiomers in dog plasma using (+)-pantoprazole as an internal standard. After a simple protein precipitation procedure with acetonitrile, matrix components left behind after sample preparation were further eliminated from the sample by reversed-phase chromatography on a C18 column. The fluent was fed to a chiral column for the separation of lansoprazole enantiomers. Baseline separation of lansoprazole enantiomers was achieved on a Chiralcel OZ-RH column using acetonitrile/0.1% formic acid in water (35:65, v/v) as the mobile phase at 40°C. The linearity of the calibration curves ranged from 3 to 800 ng/mL for each enantiomer. Intra- and inter-day precisions ranged from 2.1 to 7.3% with an accuracy of ±1.7% for (+)-lansoprazole, and from 1.6 to 6.9% with an accuracy of ±3.5% for (-)-lansoprazole, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied for the stereoselective pharmacokinetic study of lansoprazole in beagle dog after intravenous infusion. PMID:26081874

  4. Preclinical Pharmacokinetic Studies of the Tritium Labelled D-Enantiomeric Peptide D3 Developed for the Treatment of Alzheimer´s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Leithold, Leonie H. E.; Post, Julia; Ziehm, Tamar; Mauler, Jörg; Gremer, Lothar; Cremer, Markus; Schartmann, Elena; Shah, N. Jon; Kutzsche, Janine; Langen, Karl-Josef; Breitkreutz, Jörg; Willbold, Dieter; Willuweit, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Targeting toxic amyloid beta (A?) oligomers is currently a very attractive drug development strategy for treatment of Alzheimer´s disease. Using mirror-image phage display against A?1-42, we have previously identified the fully D-enantiomeric peptide D3, which is able to eliminate A? oligomers and has proven therapeutic potential in transgenic Alzheimer´s disease animal models. However, there is little information on the pharmacokinetic behaviour of D-enantiomeric peptides in general. Therefore, we conducted experiments with the tritium labelled D-peptide D3 (3H-D3) in mice with different administration routes to study its distribution in liver, kidney, brain, plasma and gastrointestinal tract, as well as its bioavailability by i.p. and p.o. administration. In addition, we investigated the metabolic stability in liver microsomes, mouse plasma, brain, liver and kidney homogenates, and estimated the plasma protein binding. Based on its high stability and long biological half-life, our pharmacokinetic results support the therapeutic potential of D-peptides in general, with D3 being a new promising drug candidate for Alzheimer´s disease treatment. PMID:26046986

  5. A Preclinical Model of Inflammatory Breast Cancer to Study the Involvement of CXCR4 and ACKR3 in the Metastatic Process

    PubMed Central

    Wurth, Roberto; Tarn, Kevin; Jernigan, Danielle; Fernandez, Sandra V.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Fatatis, Alessandro; Meucci, Olimpia

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive and invasive tumor, accounting for 2.5% of all breast cancer cases, and characterized by rapid progression, regional and distant metastases, younger age of onset, and lower overall survival. Presently, there are no effective therapies against IBC and a paucity of model systems. Our aim was to develop a clinically relevant IBC model that would allow investigations on the role of chemokine receptors in IBC metastasis. Primary cultures of tumor cells were isolated from pleural exudates of an IBC patient and grown as spheres or monolayers. We developed a human xenograft model where patient-derived IBC cells, stably transduced with lentiviral vectors expressing fluorescent and bioluminescent markers, were inoculated directly into the left ventricle of mice. Our in vivo data show that these IBC cells (FC-IBC02A) are able to seed and proliferate into various organs, including brain, lungs, lymph nodes, and bone, closely replicating the metastatic spread observed in IBC patients. Moreover, cells were able to generate tumors when grafted in the mammary fat pad of mice. RT-PCR and microscopy studies revealed expression of both CXCR4 and ACKR3 receptors in FC-IBC02A cells. Furthermore, CXCL12 (the endogenous chemokine ligand of these receptors) induced transendothelial migration of these cells and stimulated signaling pathways involved in cell survival and migration - an effect reduced by CXCR4 or ACKR3 antagonists. This new model can be used to develop chemokine-based pharmacological approaches against the IBC metastatic process. This work also provides the first evidence of ACKR3 expression in IBC cells. PMID:26500026

  6. Preclinical Studies of Amixicile, a Systemic Therapeutic Developed for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infections That Also Shows Efficacy against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Alexandra M.; Olekhnovich, Igor; Warren, Cirle A.; Burgess, Stacey L.; Hontecillas, Raquel; Viladomiu, Monica; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guerrant, Richard L.; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Amixicile shows efficacy in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in a mouse model, with no recurrence of CDI. Since amixicile selectively inhibits the action of a B vitamin (thiamine pyrophosphate) cofactor of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), it may both escape mutation-based drug resistance and spare beneficial probiotic gut bacteria that do not express this enzyme. Amixicile is a water-soluble derivative of nitazoxanide (NTZ), an antiparasitic therapeutic that also shows efficacy against CDI in humans. In comparative studies, amixicile showed no toxicity to hepatocytes at 200 ?M (NTZ was toxic above 10 ?M); was not metabolized by human, dog, or rat liver microsomes; showed equivalence or superiority to NTZ in cytochrome P450 assays; and did not activate efflux pumps (breast cancer resistance protein, P glycoprotein). A maximum dose (300 mg/kg) of amixicile given by the oral or intraperitoneal route was well tolerated by mice and rats. Plasma exposure (rats) based on the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was 79.3 h · ?g/ml (30 mg/kg dose) to 328 h · ?g/ml (100 mg/kg dose), the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 20 ?g/ml, the time to the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 0.5 to 1 h, and the half-life was 5.6 h. Amixicile did not concentrate in mouse feces or adversely affect gut populations of Bacteroides species, Firmicutes, segmented filamentous bacteria, or Lactobacillus species. Systemic bioavailability was demonstrated through eradication of Helicobacter pylori in a mouse infection model. In summary, the efficacy of amixicile in treating CDI and other infections, together with low toxicity, an absence of mutation-based drug resistance, and excellent drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic metrics, suggests a potential for broad application in the treatment of infections caused by PFOR-expressing microbial pathogens in addition to CDI. PMID:24890599

  7. Preclinical studies of amixicile, a systemic therapeutic developed for treatment of Clostridium difficile infections that also shows efficacy against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Paul S; Bruce, Alexandra M; Olekhnovich, Igor; Warren, Cirle A; Burgess, Stacey L; Hontecillas, Raquel; Viladomiu, Monica; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guerrant, Richard L; Macdonald, Timothy L

    2014-08-01

    Amixicile shows efficacy in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in a mouse model, with no recurrence of CDI. Since amixicile selectively inhibits the action of a B vitamin (thiamine pyrophosphate) cofactor of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), it may both escape mutation-based drug resistance and spare beneficial probiotic gut bacteria that do not express this enzyme. Amixicile is a water-soluble derivative of nitazoxanide (NTZ), an antiparasitic therapeutic that also shows efficacy against CDI in humans. In comparative studies, amixicile showed no toxicity to hepatocytes at 200 ?M (NTZ was toxic above 10 ?M); was not metabolized by human, dog, or rat liver microsomes; showed equivalence or superiority to NTZ in cytochrome P450 assays; and did not activate efflux pumps (breast cancer resistance protein, P glycoprotein). A maximum dose (300 mg/kg) of amixicile given by the oral or intraperitoneal route was well tolerated by mice and rats. Plasma exposure (rats) based on the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was 79.3 h · ?g/ml (30 mg/kg dose) to 328 h · ?g/ml (100 mg/kg dose), the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 20 ?g/ml, the time to the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 0.5 to 1 h, and the half-life was 5.6 h. Amixicile did not concentrate in mouse feces or adversely affect gut populations of Bacteroides species, Firmicutes, segmented filamentous bacteria, or Lactobacillus species. Systemic bioavailability was demonstrated through eradication of Helicobacter pylori in a mouse infection model. In summary, the efficacy of amixicile in treating CDI and other infections, together with low toxicity, an absence of mutation-based drug resistance, and excellent drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic metrics, suggests a potential for broad application in the treatment of infections caused by PFOR-expressing microbial pathogens in addition to CDI. PMID:24890599

  8. RPF151, a novel capsaicin-like analogue: in vitro studies and in vivo preclinical antitumor evaluation in a breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adilson Kleber; Tavares, Maurício Temotheo; Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda Mesquita; de Azevedo, Ricardo Alexandre; Teixeira, Sarah Fernandes; Ferreira-Junior, Wilson Alves; Bertin, Ariane Matiello; de-Sá-Junior, Paulo Luiz; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; Figueiredo, Carlos Rogério; Cury, Yara; Damião, Mariana Celestina Frojuello Costa Bernstorff; Parise-Filho, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Capsaicin, the primary pungent component of the chili pepper, has antitumor activity. Herein, we describe the activity of RPF151, an alkyl sulfonamide analogue of capsaicin, against MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. RPF151 was synthetized, and molecular modeling was used to compare capsaicin and RPF151. Cytotoxicity of RPF151 on MDA-MB-231 was also evaluated by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell cycle analysis, by flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis of cycle-related proteins were used to evaluate the antiproliferative mechanisms. Apoptosis was evaluated by phosphatidyl-serine externalization, cleavage of Ac-YVAD-AMC, and Bcl-2 expression. The production of reactive oxygen species was evaluated by flow cytometry. RPF151 in vivo antitumor effects were investigated in murine MDA-MB-231 model. This study shows that RPF151 downregulated p21 and cyclins A, D1, and D3, leading to S-phase arrest and apoptosis. Although RPF151 has induced the activation of TRPV-1 and TRAIL-R1/DR4 and TRAIL-2/DR5 on the surface of MDA-MB-231 cells, its in vivo antitumor activity was TRPV-1-independent, thus suggesting that RPF151 should not have the same pungency-based limitation of capsaicin. In silico analysis corroborated the biological findings, showing that RPF151 has physicochemical improvements over capsaicin. Overall, the activity of RPF151 against MDA-MB-231 and its lower pungency suggest that it may have a relevant role in cancer therapy. PMID:25894379

  9. A Preclinical Model of Inflammatory Breast Cancer to Study the Involvement of CXCR4 and ACKR3 in the Metastatic Process.

    PubMed

    Wurth, Roberto; Tarn, Kevin; Jernigan, Danielle; Fernandez, Sandra V; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Fatatis, Alessandro; Meucci, Olimpia

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive and invasive tumor, accounting for 2.5% of all breast cancer cases, and characterized by rapid progression, regional and distant metastases, younger age of onset, and lower overall survival. Presently, there are no effective therapies against IBC and a paucity of model systems. Our aim was to develop a clinically relevant IBC model that would allow investigations on the role of chemokine receptors in IBC metastasis. Primary cultures of tumor cells were isolated from pleural exudates of an IBC patient and grown as spheres or monolayers. We developed a human xenograft model where patient-derived IBC cells, stably transduced with lentiviral vectors expressing fluorescent and bioluminescent markers, were inoculated directly into the left ventricle of mice. Our in vivo data show that these IBC cells (FC-IBC02A) are able to seed and proliferate into various organs, including brain, lungs, lymph nodes, and bone, closely replicating the metastatic spread observed in IBC patients. Moreover, cells were able to generate tumors when grafted in the mammary fat pad of mice. RT-PCR and microscopy studies revealed expression of both CXCR4 and ACKR3 receptors in FC-IBC02A cells. Furthermore, CXCL12 (the endogenous chemokine ligand of these receptors) induced transendothelial migration of these cells and stimulated signaling pathways involved in cell survival and migration - an effect reduced by CXCR4 or ACKR3 antagonists. This new model can be used to develop chemokine-based pharmacological approaches against the IBC metastatic process. This work also provides the first evidence of ACKR3 expression in IBC cells. PMID:26500026

  10. Preclinical Bioassay of a Polypropylene Mesh for Hernia Repair Pretreated with Antibacterial Solutions of Chlorhexidine and Allicin: An In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Köhler, Bárbara; García-Moreno, Francisca; Brune, Thierry; Pascual, Gemma; Bellón, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic mesh infection constitutes one of the major complications following hernia repair. Antimicrobial, non-antibiotic biomaterials have the potential to reduce bacterial adhesion to the mesh surface and adjacent tissues while avoiding the development of novel antibiotic resistance. This study assesses the efficacy of presoaking reticular polypropylene meshes in chlorhexidine or a chlorhexidine and allicin combination (a natural antibacterial agent) for preventing bacterial infection in a short-time hernia-repair rabbit model. Methods Partial hernia defects (5 x 2 cm) were created on the lateral right side of the abdominal wall of New Zealand White rabbits (n = 21). The defects were inoculated with 0.5 mL of a 106 CFU/mL Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 strain and repaired with a DualMesh Plus antimicrobial mesh or a Surgipro mesh presoaked in either chlorhexidine (0.05%) or allicin-chlorhexidine (900 ?g/mL-0.05%). Fourteen days post-implant, mesh contraction was measured and tissue specimens were harvested to evaluate bacterial adhesion to the implant surface (via sonication, S. aureus immunolabeling), host-tissue incorporation (via staining, scanning electron microscopy) and macrophage response (via RAM-11 immunolabeling). Results The polypropylene mesh showed improved tissue integration relative to the DualMesh Plus. Both the DualMesh Plus and the chlorhexidine-soaked polypropylene meshes exhibited high bacterial clearance, with the latter material showing lower bacterial yields. The implants from the allicin-chlorhexidine group displayed a neoformed tissue containing differently sized abscesses and living bacteria, as well as a diminished macrophage response. The allicin-chlorhexidine coated implants exhibited the highest contraction. Conclusions The presoaking of reticular polypropylene materials with a low concentration of chlorhexidine provides the mesh with antibacterial activity without disrupting tissue integration. Due to the similarities found with the antimicrobial DualMesh Plus material, the chlorhexidine concentration tested could be utilized as a prophylactic treatment to resist infection by prosthetic mesh during hernia repair. PMID:26556805

  11. Mining environmental toxicology information: web resources.

    PubMed

    Russom, Christine L

    2002-04-25

    Environmental toxicology is the study of the ecological effects of anthropogenic substances released into the environment. It is a relatively diverse field addressing impacts to aquatic and terrestrial organisms and communities. The determination of potential risk associated with toxic agents is of interest to government regulators, industry, researchers, private organizations and citizen groups. In assessing the ecological risk associated with a chemical stressor, it is important to establish linkages between likely exposure concentrations and adverse effects to ecological receptors. To do so requires access to reliable information resources. The proper application of such data requires familiarity with the scientific literature and keeping abreast of new and emerging issues as well as state-of-the-art research findings and methods. In addition, an understanding of government regulations as they relate to environmental issues is also of primary interest. The advent of the Web has made these tools accessible at computer desktops. This review focuses on currently available free Web resources related to environmental toxicology, specifically those which address available empirical data sources, predictive tools and publications of interest such as standard test methods, guidance documents and governmental regulations. PMID:11955685

  12. 21 CFR 862.3200 - Clinical toxicology calibrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clinical toxicology calibrator. 862.3200 Section...HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test...

  13. 21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280 Section...HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test...

  14. A NOVEL APPROACH TO TOXICOLOGY SIMULATION BASED ON AUTONOMOUS OBJECTS

    E-print Network

    Dillencourt, Michael

    A NOVEL APPROACH TO TOXICOLOGY SIMULATION BASED ON AUTONOMOUS OBJECTS Munehiro Fukuda, Katherine L, distributed simula­ tion, cooperative work. ABSTRACT Toxicology simulation is a computationally inten­ sive such distributed, cooperative, interactive toxicology simulations. 1 MOTIVATION Historically, decisions on toxic

  15. 21 CFR 862.3200 - Clinical toxicology calibrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clinical toxicology calibrator. 862.3200 Section 862.3200...MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3200 Clinical...

  16. 21 CFR 862.3200 - Clinical toxicology calibrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Clinical toxicology calibrator. 862.3200 Section 862.3200...MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3200 Clinical...

  17. 21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280 Section 862...MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3280 Clinical...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280 Section 862...MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3280 Clinical...

  19. 21 CFR 862.3200 - Clinical toxicology calibrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Clinical toxicology calibrator. 862.3200 Section 862.3200...MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3200 Clinical...

  20. 21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280 Section 862...MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3280 Clinical...

  1. 21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280 Section 862...MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3280 Clinical...

  2. 21 CFR 862.3200 - Clinical toxicology calibrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clinical toxicology calibrator. 862.3200 Section 862.3200...MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3200 Clinical...

  3. Graduate Training in Toxicology in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robens, J. F.; Buck, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are an American Board of Veterinary Toxicology survey and evaluation of the training resources available in graduate programs in toxicology located in colleges of veterinary medicine. Regulatory toxicology, number of toxicologists needed, and curriculum are also discussed. (JMD)

  4. Electrocardiographic and Respiratory Responses to Coal-Fired Power Plant Emissions in a Rat Model of Acute Myocardial Infarction: Results from the Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic Emissions of Source Aerosols (TERESA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Wellenius, Gregory A.; Diaz, Edgar A.; Gupta, Tarun; Ruiz, Pablo A.; Long, Mark; Kang, Choong Min; Coull, Brent A.; Godleski, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ambient particulate matter (PM) derived from coal-fired power plants may have important cardiovascular effects, but existing toxicological studies are inadequate for understanding these effects. The Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic Emissions of Source Aerosols (TERESA) study aims to evaluate the toxicity of primary and secondary PM derived from coal-fired power plants. As part of this effort, we evaluated in susceptible animals the effect of stack emissions on cardiac electrophysiology and respiratory function under exposure conditions intended to simulate an aged plume with unneutralized acidity and secondary organic aerosols (POS exposure scenario). Methods Rats with acute myocardial infarction were exposed to either stack emissions (n=15) or filtered air (n=14) for 5 hours at a single power plant. Respiration and electrocardiograms were continuously monitored via telemetry and heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV), premature ventricular beat (PVB) frequency, electrocardiographic intervals, and respiratory intervals and volumes were evaluated. Similar experiments at another power plant were attempted but were unsuccessful. Results POS exposure (fine particle mass = 219.1 ?g/m3; total sulfate = 172.5 ?g/m3; acidic sulfate = 132.5 ?g/m3; organic carbon = 50.9 ?g/m3) was associated with increased PVB frequency and decreased respiratory expiratory time and end-inspiratory pause, but not with changes in heart rate, HRV, or electrocardiographic intervals. Results from a second power plant were uninterpretable. Conclusions Short-term exposure to primary and unneutralized secondary particulate matter formed from aged emissions from a coal-fired power plant, as simulated by the POS scenario, may be associated with increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias in susceptible animals. PMID:21401387

  5. Overview status of preclinical safety assessment for immunomodulatory biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Green, J D; Black, L E

    2000-04-01

    Scientists from academia, industry, FDA, European and Japanese regulatory groups met to discuss key considerations that are central to the safe and expeditious development of novel biologic agents that are thought to act by modulation of the host immune system. In the presentations and case studies, particular attention was given to the current clinical experience with immunosuppressant agents. Many new biologic agents (such as humanized monoclonal antibodies) have been developed to interact in a highly specific manner with their target. However, their pharmacologic properties may be more complex than originally appreciated, impacting on clinical trial designs. The goal of preclinical safety assessment should be to provide some assurance that patients will be protected from any unacceptable risks by defining "safe" and "active" doses. For immunomodulatory molecules, particular attention is paid to defining potential for increased risks of lymphoproliferative disorders, opportunistic infections, and immune impairment. To address these issues, a wide variety of preclinical studies, mainly in non-human primates, have been performed for the purpose of assessing the potential risk of drug-induced, human immunotoxicity. Case studies presented at this symposium showed the feasibility of assessing humoral and cell-mediated aspects of the immune system, using antigen and neoantigen challenges, immunohistochemical, and flow cytometric (FACS) methods. In some cases, homologous forms of the biologic agent and "humanized" transgenic models have been used to assess potential clinical risks. These data have been useful in providing some assurance that severe adverse effects would not be induced in patients. Despite these limitations, it is important that industry sponsors provide information to regulatory authorities, the clinical investigator, and patients that provides the best feasible basis for risk assessment, safe clinical trial design, informed consent, and eventually, appropriate labeling. It is recognized that existing preclinical models often have significant limitations. Consequently, the sponsor's and regulatory authority's experienced judgement has determined whether or not the purported benefits of the novel therapeutic agent are balanced by the potential short- and long-term risks. In this field of development, preclinical models often need to reflect recent technology innovations; therefore, these models are not always "validated" in a conventional sense. Experience to date suggests that improved methods and approaches are needed as these agents are developed for use in lower or moderate risk patient populations. Consequently, there is an increased need for an industry/regulatory partnership in order to achieve progress in these risk assessment areas. PMID:10918509

  6. TOXICOLOGY OF ANTICHOLESTERASE PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of pesticides was studied in humans and animal models, and on enzymes in order to develop a better understanding of their mechanism of action, and thus provide guidance for their safe use. It was shown that reduction of human blood cholinesterase activity is a good ind...

  7. The Toxicology Education Summit: Building the Future of Toxicology Through Education

    PubMed Central

    Barchowsky, Aaron; Buckley, Lorrene A.; Carlson, Gary P.; Fitsanakis, Vanessa A.; Ford, Sue M.; Genter, Mary Beth; Germolec, Dori R.; Leavens, Teresa L.; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Safe, Stephen H.; Sulentic, Courtney E. W.; Eidemiller, Betty J.

    2012-01-01

    Toxicology and careers in toxicology, as well as many other scientific disciplines, are undergoing rapid and dramatic changes as new discoveries, technologies, and hazards advance at a blinding rate. There are new and ever increasing demands on toxicologists to keep pace with expanding global economies, highly fluid policy debates, and increasingly complex global threats to public health. These demands must be met with new paradigms for multidisciplinary, technologically complex, and collaborative approaches that require advanced and continuing education in toxicology and associated disciplines. This requires paradigm shifts in educational programs that support recruitment, development, and training of the modern toxicologist, as well as continued education and retraining of the midcareer professional to keep pace and sustain careers in industry, government, and academia. The Society of Toxicology convened the Toxicology Educational Summit to discuss the state of toxicology education and to strategically address educational needs and the sustained advancement of toxicology as a profession. The Summit focused on core issues of: building for the future of toxicology through educational programs; defining education and training needs; developing the “Total Toxicologist”; continued training and retraining toxicologists to sustain their careers; and, finally, supporting toxicology education and professional development. This report summarizes the outcomes of the Summit, presents examples of successful programs that advance toxicology education, and concludes with strategies that will insure the future of toxicology through advanced educational initiatives. PMID:22461448

  8. Advances in Pediatric Pharmacology, Therapeutics, and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Paul, Ian M.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Significant advancements have been made in pediatric therapeutics and pharmacology over the last two years. In the United States, passage of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act has made the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act and Pediatric Research Equity Act permanent, and ensured that studies will be conducted in neonates. In Europe, the Pediatric Regulation, which went into effect in early 2007, has also provided a framework encouraging an expansion of pediatric research. Because of such regulatory involvement, a greater number of studies are being performed, and more pediatric dosing, efficacy, and safety information is being incorporated into product labels. The goal of this publication is to highlight important advancements made in the field of pediatric pharmacology, toxicology, and therapeutics from January 2012 to December 2013. PMID:25037123

  9. The hepatocarcinogenic conazoles: cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, and propiconazole induce a common set of toxicological and transcriptional responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used as agricultural pesticides and pharmaceutical products. The mechanism of conazole-induced liver carcinogenesis in mice has been the subject of intensive investigations. The goals of this study were to apply toxicological and transcriptomic approaches...

  10. Recent Developments in Toxico-Cheminformatics: A New Frontier for Predictive Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts to improve public access to chemical toxicity information resources, coupled with new high-throughput screening (HTS) data and efforts to systematize legacy toxicity studies, have the potential to significantly improve predictive capabilities in toxicology. Important rec...

  11. APPLICATION OF GENOMICS TO REPRODUCTIVE TOXICOLOGY: WORKING FROM RESEARCH TOWARDS RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic technologies are available to examine the expression of thousands of genes simultaneously. These technologies represent a paradigm shift from single-gene approaches fundamentally altering the practice of toxicology. The goal of toxicogenomic studies is to improve human ...

  12. Physicochemical comparison of commercially available metal oxide nanoparticles: implications for engineered nanoparticle toxicology and risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate and affordable physicochemical characterization of commercial engineered nanomaterials is required for toxicology studies to ultimately determine nanomaterial: hazard identification; dose to response metric(s); and mechanism(s) of injury. A minimal physical and chemica...