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Sample records for predict icu admission

  1. A Nationwide Census of ICU Capacity and Admissions in Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Mendsaikhan, Naranpurev; Begzjav, Tsolmon; Lundeg, Ganbold; Brunauer, Andreas; Dünser, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    In Mongolia, a Central Asian lower-middle income country, intensive care medicine is an under-resourced and–developed medical specialty. The burden of critical illness and capacity of intensive care unit (ICU) services in the country is unknown. In this nationwide census, we collected data on adult and pediatric/neonatal ICU capacities and the number of ICU admissions in 2014. All hospitals registered to run an ICU service in Mongolia were surveyed. Data on the availability of an adult and/or pediatric/neonatal ICU service, the number of available ICU beds, the number of available functional mechanical ventilators, the number of patients admitted to the ICU, and the number of patients admitted to the study hospital were collected. In total, 70 ICUs with 349 ICU beds were counted in Mongolia (11.7 ICU beds/100,000 inhabitants; 1.7 ICU beds/100 hospital beds). Of these, 241 (69%) were adult and 108 (31%) pediatric/neonatal ICU beds. Functional mechanical ventilators were available for approximately half of the ICU beds (5.1 mechanical ventilators/100,000 inhabitants). While all provincial hospitals ran a pediatric/neonatal ICU, only dedicated pediatric hospitals in Ulaanbaatar did so. The number of adult and pediatric/neonatal ICU admissions varied between provinces. The number of adult ICU beds and adult ICU admissions per 100,000 inhabitants correlated (r = 0.5; p = 0.02), while the number of pediatric/neonatal ICU beds and pediatric/neonatal ICU admissions per 100,000 inhabitants did not (r = 0.25; p = 0.26). In conclusion, with 11.7 ICU beds per 100,000 inhabitants the ICU capacity in Mongolia is higher than in other low- and lower-middle-income countries. Substantial heterogeneities in the standardized ICU capacity and ICU admissions exist between Mongolian provinces. Functional mechanical ventilators are available for only half of the ICU beds. Pediatric/neonatal ICU beds make up one third of the national ICU capacity and appear to meet or even exceed the

  2. Triage of Patients Consulted for ICU Admission During Times of ICU-Bed Shortage

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Jose; Blaak, Christa; Yeh, Angela; Fonseca, Xavier; Helm, Tanya; Butala, Ashvin; Morante, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    Background The demand for specialized medical services such as critical care often exceeds availability, thus rationing of intensive care unit (ICU) beds commonly leads to difficult triage decisions. Many factors can play a role in the decision to admit a patient to the ICU, including severity of illness and the need for specific treatments limited to these units. Although triage decisions would be based solely on patient and institutional level factors, it is likely that intensivists make different decisions when there are fewer ICU beds available. The objective of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of patients referred for ICU admission during times of limited beds availability. Methods A single center, prospective, observational study was conducted among consecutive patients in whom an evaluation for ICU admission was requested during times of ICU overcrowding, which comprised the months of April and May 2014. Results A total of 95 patients were evaluated for possible ICU admission during the study period. Their mean APACHE-II score was 16.8 (median 16, range 3 - 36). Sixty-four patients (67.4%) were accepted to ICU, 18 patients (18.9%) were triaged to SDU, and 13 patients (13.7%) were admitted to hospital wards. ICU had no beds available 24 times (39.3%) during the study period, and in 39 opportunities (63.9%) only one bed was available. Twenty-four patients (25.3%) were evaluated when there were no available beds, and eight of those patients (33%) were admitted to ICU. A total of 17 patients (17.9%) died in the hospital, and 15 (23.4%) expired in ICU. Conclusion ICU beds are a scarce resource for which demand periodically exceeds supply, raising concerns about mechanisms for resource allocation during times of limited beds availability. At our institution, triage decisions were not related to the number of available beds in ICU, age, or gender. A linear correlation was observed between severity of illness, expressed by APACHE-II scores, and the

  3. Indicators of the need for ICU admission following suicide bombing attacks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Critical hospital resources, especially the demand for ICU beds, are usually limited following mass casualty incidents such as suicide bombing attacks (SBA). Our primary objective was to identify easily diagnosed external signs of injury that will serve as indicators of the need for ICU admission. Our secondary objective was to analyze under- and over-triage following suicidal bombing attacks. Methods A database was collected prospectively from patients who were admitted to Hadassah University Hospital Level I Trauma Centre, Jerusalem, Israel from August 2001-August 2005 following a SBA. One hundred and sixty four victims of 17 suicide bombing attacks were divided into two groups according to ICU and non-ICU admission. Results There were 86 patients in the ICU group (52.4%) and 78 patients in the non-ICU group (47.6%). Patients in the ICU group required significantly more operating room time compared with patients in the non-ICU group (59.3% vs. 25.6%, respectively, p = 0.0003). For the ICU group, median ICU stay was 4 days (IQR 2 to 8.25 days). On multivariable analysis only the presence of facial fractures (p = 0.014), peripheral vascular injury (p = 0.015), injury ≥ 4 body areas (p = 0.002) and skull fractures (p = 0.017) were found to be independent predictors of the need for ICU admission. Sixteen survivors (19.5%) in the ICU group were admitted to the ICU for one day only (ICU-LOS = 1) and were defined as over-triaged. Median ISS for this group was significantly lower compared with patients who were admitted to the ICU for > 1 day (ICU-LOS > 1). This group of over-triaged patients could not be distinguished from the other ICU patients based on external signs of trauma. None of the patients in the non-ICU group were subsequently transferred to the ICU. Conclusions Our results show that following SBA, injury to ≥ 4 areas, and certain types of injuries such as facial and skull fractures, and peripheral vascular injury, can serve as surrogates of

  4. Malnutrition in Joint Arthroplasty: Prospective Study Indicates Risk of Unplanned ICU Admission

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Atul F.; McAuliffe, Caitlin L.; Kosseim, Laura M.; Pio, Finnah; Hume, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition has been linked to poor outcomes after elective joint arthroplasty, but the risk of unplanned postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) admission in malnourished arthroplasty patients is unknown. Methods: 1098 patients were followed as part of a prospective risk stratification program at a tertiary, high-volume arthroplasty center. Chronic malnutrition was defined as preoperative albumin <3.5 g/dL. Results: The overall incidence of malnutrition was 16.9% (primary and revision arthroplasty patients). Average BMI was highest for patients in albumin category 3.0-3.5 (BMI 35.7). Preoperative albumin <3.0 and <3.5 g/dL translated to 15.4% and 3.8% rates of unplanned ICU admission, respectively, indicating nutritional status to be a factor in postoperative ICU admission. Conclusion: Patients with poor nutritional status must be counseled on the risks of adverse medical complications. PMID:27200389

  5. Patterns of depressive symptoms in caregivers of mechanically ventilated critically ill adults from ICU admission to two months post-ICU discharge: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiYeon; Sherwood, Paula R.; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P.; Given, Barbara; Hoffman, Leslie A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine trajectories of depressive symptoms in caregivers of critically ill adults from ICU admission to 2 months post-ICU discharge and explore patient and caregiver characteristics associated with differing trajectories. Design Longitudinal descriptive Setting Medical ICU in a tertiary university hospital Subjects 50 caregivers and 47 patients on mechanical ventilation for ≥ 4 days Intervention None Measurements and Main Results Caregivers completed measures assessing depressive symptoms (Short version Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale 10-items [shortened CES-D]), burden (Brief Zarit Burden Interview [Zarit-12]) and health risk behaviors (caregiver health behaviors) during ICU admission, at ICU discharge and 2 months post-ICU discharge. Group-based trajectory analysis was used to identify patterns of change in shortened CES-D scores over time. Two trajectory groups emerged: 1) caregivers who had clinically significant depressive symptoms (21.0 ± 4.1) during ICU admission that remained high (13.6 ± 5) at 2 months post-ICU discharge (high trajectory group, 56%) and 2) caregivers who reported scores that were lower (10.6 ± 5.7) during ICU admission and decreased further (5.7 ± 3.6) at 2 months post-ICU discharge (low trajectory group, 44%). Caregivers in the high trajectory group tended to be younger, female, adult child living with financial difficulty and less likely to report a religious background or preference. More caregivers in the high trajectory group reported greater burden and more health risk behaviors at all time points; patients tended to be male with poorer functional ability at ICU discharge. Caregivers’ responses during ICU admission did not differ in regard to number of days patients being on mechanical ventilation prior to enrollment. Conclusion Findings suggest two patterns of depressive symptom response in caregivers of critically ill adults on mechanical ventilation from ICU admission to two months post-ICU

  6. Epidemiology of pertussis-related paediatric intensive care unit (ICU) admissions in Australia, 1997–2013: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Robert S; McEniery, Julie A; Coulthard, Mark G; Lambert, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the epidemiology of pertussis-related intensive care unit (ICU) admissions across Australia, over a 17-year period. Design Retrospective descriptive study. Setting Australian ICUs contributing data to the Australian and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care (ANZPIC) Registry. The number of contributing ICUs increased over the study period, from 8 specialist paediatric ICUs in 1997 to 8 specialist paediatric and 13 general ICUs in 2013. Participants All paediatric (<16 years) ICU admissions, coded as pertussis-related, between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2013. Results A total of 373 pertussis-coded ICU admissions were identified in the ANZPIC Registry over the study period. Of these cases, 52.8% occurred during the 4 years of the recent Australian epidemic (2009–2012). ICU admissions were most likely to occur in infants aged younger than 6 weeks (41.8%, n=156) and aged 6 weeks to 4 months (42.9%, n=160). The median length of stay for pertussis-related ICU admissions was 3.6 days, with 77.5% of cases staying in ICU for <7 days. Approximately half of all admissions (54.8%) required some form of respiratory support, with 32.7% requiring invasive respiratory support. Over the study period, 23 deaths were recorded (6.2% of pertussis-related ICU admissions), of which 20 (87.0%) were infants <4 months old. Conclusions Pertussis-related ICU admissions occur primarily in infants too young to be fully protected from active immunisation. More needs to be done to protect these high-risk infants, such as maternal immunisation. PMID:27053270

  7. Adult community-acquired bacterial meningitis requiring ICU admission: epidemiological data, prognosis factors and adherence to IDSA guidelines.

    PubMed

    Georges, H; Chiche, A; Alfandari, S; Devos, P; Boussekey, N; Leroy, O

    2009-11-01

    Numerous guidelines are available to guide empirical antimicrobial therapy (EAT) in acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) patients. We analysed prognosis factors and compliance to the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines in ABM patients requiring stay in an intensive care unit (ICU). A 10-year retrospective study, using prospectively collected data, in 82 ABM patients admitted to a 16-bed university-affiliated French ICU was undertaken. Seventeen patients (20.7%) died during ICU stay. Multivariate analysis isolated four factors associated with in-ICU death: alcoholism (P = 0.007), acute kidney injury (P = 0.006), age >60 years (P = 0.006) and ICU admission for neurological failure (P = 0.01). Causative pathogens were isolated for 62 (75.6%) patients, including 29 pneumococci, 14/28 of which were non-susceptible to penicillin. No characteristics, particularly recent hospitalisation and/or antibiotic delivery, was associated with penicillin susceptibility. Compliance to IDSA guidelines was 65%. Non-compliance concerned to be essentially the non-delivery or low dosage of vancomycin. Treatment compatible with IDSA guidelines was associated with a decreased ICU mortality in univariate (61.5% survival vs. 35.3%, P = 0.05) but not in multivariate analysis. In-ICU mortality associated with ABM remains high. Prognosis factors are related to the severity of disease or underlying conditions. Penicillin non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae can occur without any of the usual predisposing factors. PMID:19727871

  8. Usefulness of Glycemic Gap to Predict ICU Mortality in Critically Ill Patients With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wen-I.; Wang, Jen-Chun; Chang, Wei-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Chu, Chi-Ming; Tsai, Shih-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Stress-induced hyperglycemia (SIH) has been independently associated with an increased risk of mortality in critically ill patients without diabetes. However, it is also necessary to consider preexisting hyperglycemia when investigating the relationship between SIH and mortality in patients with diabetes. We therefore assessed whether the gap between admission glucose and A1C-derived average glucose (ADAG) levels could be a predictor of mortality in critically ill patients with diabetes. We retrospectively reviewed the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) scores and clinical outcomes of patients with diabetes admitted to our medical intensive care unit (ICU) between 2011 and 2014. The glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels were converted to the ADAG by the equation, ADAG = [(28.7 × HbA1c) − 46.7]. We also used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the optimal cut-off value for the glycemic gap when predicting ICU mortality and used the net reclassification improvement (NRI) to measure the improvement in prediction performance gained by adding the glycemic gap to the APACHE-II score. We enrolled 518 patients, of which 87 (17.0%) died during their ICU stay. Nonsurvivors had significantly higher APACHE-II scores and glycemic gaps than survivors (P < 0.001). Critically ill patients with diabetes and a glycemic gap ≥80 mg/dL had significantly higher ICU mortality and adverse outcomes than those with a glycemic gap <80 mg/dL (P < 0.001). Incorporation of the glycemic gap into the APACHE-II score increased the discriminative performance for predicting ICU mortality by increasing the area under the ROC curve from 0.755 to 0.794 (NRI = 13.6%, P = 0.0013). The glycemic gap can be used to assess the severity and prognosis of critically ill patients with diabetes. The addition of the glycemic gap to the APACHE-II score significantly improved its ability to predict ICU mortality. PMID

  9. Relationship between glycated hemoglobin, Intensive Care Unit admission blood sugar and glucose control with ICU mortality in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Shadvar, Kamran; Beigmohammadi, Mohammadtaghi; Iranpour, Afshin; Sanaie, Sarvin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The association between hyperglycemia and mortality is believed to be influenced by the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM). In this study, we evaluated the effect of preexisting hyperglycemia on the association between acute blood glucose management and mortality in critically ill patients. The primary objective of the study was the relationship between HbA1c and mortality in critically ill patients. Secondary objectives of the study were relationship between Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission blood glucose and glucose control during ICU stay with mortality in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: Five hundred patients admitted to two ICUs were enrolled. Blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations on ICU admission were measured. Age, sex, history of DM, comorbidities, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, sequential organ failure assessment score, hypoglycemic episodes, drug history, mortality, and development of acute kidney injury and liver failure were noted for all patients. Results: Without considering the history of diabetes, nonsurvivors had significantly higher HbA1c values compared to survivors (7.25 ± 1.87 vs. 6.05 ± 1.22, respectively, P < 0.001). Blood glucose levels in ICU admission showed a significant correlation with risk of death (P < 0.006, confidence interval [CI]: 1.004–1.02, relative risk [RR]: 1.01). Logistic regression analysis revealed that HbA1c increased the risk of death; with each increase in HbA1c level, the risk of death doubled. However, this relationship was not statistically significant (P: 0.161, CI: 0.933–1.58, RR: 1.2). Conclusions: Acute hyperglycemia significantly affects mortality in the critically ill patients; this relation is also influenced by chronic hyperglycemia. PMID:27076705

  10. Delayed Recognition of Deterioration of Patients in General Wards Is Mostly Caused by Human Related Monitoring Failures: A Root Cause Analysis of Unplanned ICU Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Driesen, Babiche E. J. M.; Merten, Hanneke; Ludikhuize, Jeroen; van der Spoel, Johannes I.; Kramer, Mark H. H.; Nanayakkara, Prabath W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background An unplanned ICU admission of an inpatient is a serious adverse event (SAE). So far, no in depth-study has been performed to systematically analyse the root causes of unplanned ICU-admissions. The primary aim of this study was to identify the healthcare worker-, organisational-, technical,- disease- and patient- related causes that contribute to acute unplanned ICU admissions from general wards using a Root-Cause Analysis Tool called PRISMA-medical. Although a Track and Trigger System (MEWS) was introduced in our hospital a few years ago, it was implemented without a clear protocol. Therefore, the secondary aim was to assess the adherence to a Track and Trigger system to identify deterioration on general hospital wards in patients eventually transferred to the ICU. Methods Retrospective observational study in 49 consecutive adult patients acutely admitted to the Intensive Care Unit from a general nursing ward. 1. PRISMA-analysis on root causes of unplanned ICU admissions 2. Assessment of protocol adherence to the early warning score system. Results Out of 49 cases, 156 root causes were identified. The most frequent root causes were healthcare worker related (46%), which were mainly failures in monitoring the patient. They were followed by disease-related (45%), patient-related causes (7, 5%), and organisational root causes (3%). In only 40% of the patients vital parameters were monitored as was instructed by the doctor. 477 vital parameter sets were found in the 48 hours before ICU admission, in only 1% a correct MEWS was explicitly documented in the record. Conclusions This in-depth analysis demonstrates that almost half of the unplanned ICU admissions from the general ward had healthcare worker related root causes, mostly due to monitoring failures in clinically deteriorating patients. In order to reduce unplanned ICU admissions, improving the monitoring of patients is therefore warranted. PMID:27537689

  11. Does adding ICU data to the POSSUM score improve the prediction of outcomes following surgery for upper gastrointestinal malignancies?

    PubMed

    Butterfield, R; Stedman, W; Herod, R; Aneman, A

    2015-07-01

    Surgery for upper gastrointestinal malignancy carries a high postoperative mortality and morbidity risk. The importance of preoperative physiological reserve and intraoperative events in determining clinical outcomes is recognised in the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) score that comprises variables relevant to both phases. Whether adding variables linked to ICU admission characteristics improves the predictive capacity of POSSUM is unclear, especially in an Australian/New Zealand healthcare context. This study aimed to evaluate the predictive capacity of the POSSUM score for 30-day mortality and in-hospital morbidity in 80 patients undergoing resection of oesophageal (28%), gastric (26%) or pancreatic (46%) malignancies and admitted to ICU. The 30-day mortality was 8.8% and 65% of patients developed some postoperative complication. Receiver operating characteristics generated an area under the curve (95% CI) to predict mortality by Portsmouth POSSUM of 0.87 (0.77 to 0.93) and morbidity by POSSUM of 0.67 (0.55 to 0.77). Multiple regression analysis including biochemical variables and vital signs on admission to ICU identified renal function parameters, fluid balance and need for cardiorespiratory support beyond the first postoperative day as independent factors associated with mortality and morbidity (in addition to the POSSUM score) but the inclusion of these variables in a logistic regression model did not significantly improve the predictive capacity for mortality (to area under the curve 0.93 [0.85 to 0.97]) or morbidity (to area under the curve 0.67 [0.55 to 0.78]). In conclusion, the POSSUM score provides clinically useful predictive capacity in patients undergoing surgery for upper gastrointestinal malignancies. The incorporation of ICU admission variables to the pre- and intraoperative POSSUM variables did not significantly enhance the precision. PMID:26099762

  12. Fuzzy Modeling to Predict Severely Depressed Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction following Admission to the Intensive Care Unit Using Clinical Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rúben Duarte M. A.; Salgado, Cátia M.; Dejam, Andre; Reti, Shane R.; Vieira, Susana M.; Sousa, João M. C.; Celi, Leo A.; Finkelstein, Stan N.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) constitutes an important physiological parameter for the assessment of cardiac function, particularly in the settings of coronary artery disease and heart failure. This study explores the use of routinely and easily acquired variables in the intensive care unit (ICU) to predict severely depressed LVEF following ICU admission. A retrospective study was conducted. We extracted clinical physiological variables derived from ICU monitoring and available within the MIMIC II database and developed a fuzzy model using sequential feature selection and compared it with the conventional logistic regression (LR) model. Maximum predictive performance was observed using easily acquired ICU variables within 6 hours after admission and satisfactory predictive performance was achieved using variables acquired as early as one hour after admission. The fuzzy model is able to predict LVEF ≤ 25% with an AUC of 0.71 ± 0.07, outperforming the LR model, with an AUC of 0.67 ± 0.07. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study predicting severely impaired LVEF using multivariate analysis of routinely collected data in the ICU. We recommend inclusion of these findings into triaged management plans that balance urgency with resources and clinical status, particularly for reducing the time of echocardiographic examination. PMID:26345130

  13. Predictive Validity of the Dental Admission Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Gene A.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship of Dental Admission Test (DAT) scales and predental grade point averages with freshman and sophomore dental school performance measures and National Board Dental Examination (NBDE) Part I averages were examined. The results indicated that the DAT scales had limited predictive validity. (Author/MLW)

  14. Predicting Academic Success Using Admission Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Soen, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This study, conducted at a tertiary education institution in Israel, following two previous studies, was designed to deal again with a question that is a topic of debate in Israel and worldwide: Is there justification for the approach that considers restrictive university admission policies an efficient tool for predicting students' success at the…

  15. What Should University Admissions Tests Predict?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stemler, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    University admissions tests should predict an applicant's ability to succeed in college, but how should this success be defined and measured? The status quo has been to use 1st-year grade point average (FYGPA) as the key indicator of college success, but a review of documents such as university mission statements reveals that universities expect…

  16. icuARM-II: improving the reliability of personalized risk prediction in pediatric intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chih-Wen; Chanani, Nikhil; Maher, Kevin; Wang

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians in intensive care units (ICUs) rely on standardized scores as risk prediction models to predict a patient’s vulnerability to life-threatening events. Conventional Current scales calculate scores from a fixed set of conditions collected within a specific time window. However, modern monitoring technologies generate complex, temporal, and multimodal patient data that conventional prediction models scales cannot fully utilize. Thus, a more sophisticated model is needed to tailor individual characteristics and incorporate multiple temporal modalities for a personalized risk prediction. Furthermore, most scales models focus on adult patients. To address this needdeficiency, we propose a newly designed ICU risk prediction system, called icuARM-II, using a large-scaled pediatric ICU database from Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. This novel database contains clinical data collected in 5,739 ICU visits from 4,975 patients. We propose a temporal association rule mining framework giving clinicians a potential to perform predict risks prediction based on all available patient conditions without being restricted by a fixed observation window. We also develop a new metric that can rigidly assesses the reliability of all all generated association rules. In addition, the icuARM-II features an interactive user interface. Using the icuARM-II, our results demonstrated showed a use case of short-term mortality prediction using lab testing results, which demonstrated a potential new solution for reliable ICU risk prediction using personalized clinical data in a previously neglected population.

  17. Frailty score on admission predicts outcomes in elderly burn injury.

    PubMed

    Romanowski, Kathleen S; Barsun, Alura; Pamlieri, Tina L; Greenhalgh, David G; Sen, Soman

    2015-01-01

    With longer life expectancy, the number of burn injuries in the elderly continues to increase. Prediction of outcomes for the elderly is complicated by preinjury physical fitness and comorbid illness. The authors hypothesize that admission frailty assessment would be predictive of outcomes in the elderly burn population. Our primary aim was to determine if higher frailty scores were associated with higher risk of mortality for elderly burn patients. The secondary aims were to assess if higher frailty scores were associated with increased length of stay, increased needs for mechanical ventilation and poor discharge disposition. A 2-year retrospective chart review was performed of all admitted acute burn patients 65 years or older. Data collected included: age, gender, %TBSA of burn injury, presence of inhalation injury, in hospital mortality, hospital length of stay, ventilator days, ICU length of stay, surgical procedures, insurance status, and discharge disposition. Frailty scores were assessed from admission data and calculated using the Canadian Study of Health and Aging clinical frailty scale. A total of 89 patients met entry criteria. Mean age was 75.3 ± 8.1 years and consisted of 62 men and 27 women. Mean %TBSA was 9.6 ± 9.1% and mean frailty score (FS) was 4.5 ± 1.2. Eighty patients survived to discharge and nine died. Nonsurvivors had significantly higher FS compared to survivors (5.2 ± 1.2 vs 4.4 ± 1.2). FS were also significantly higher in patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities (SNF) (5.34 ± 0.9) compared to those who were discharged home (4.1 ± 1.2) or to physical rehabilitation facilities (4 ± 1.5). Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that age (B = 0.04) and discharge to SNF (B = 1.2) are independently associated with higher FS. However, survivors were independently associated with a significantly lower FS (B = -1.3). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed high admission FS independently increased the risk of

  18. Non-linear feature extraction from HRV signal for mortality prediction of ICU cardiovascular patient.

    PubMed

    Karimi Moridani, Mohammad; Setarehdan, Seyed Kamaledin; Motie Nasrabadi, Ali; Hajinasrollah, Esmaeil

    2016-04-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) patients are at risk of in-ICU morbidities and mortality, making specific systems for identifying at-risk patients a necessity for improving clinical care. This study presents a new method for predicting in-hospital mortality using heart rate variability (HRV) collected from the times of a patient's ICU stay. In this paper, a HRV time series processing based method is proposed for mortality prediction of ICU cardiovascular patients. HRV signals were obtained measuring R-R time intervals. A novel method, named return map, is then developed that reveals useful information from the HRV time series. This study also proposed several features that can be extracted from the return map, including the angle between two vectors, the area of triangles formed by successive points, shortest distance to 45° line and their various combinations. Finally, a thresholding technique is proposed to extract the risk period and to predict mortality. The data used to evaluate the proposed algorithm obtained from 80 cardiovascular ICU patients, from the first 48 h of the first ICU stay of 40 males and 40 females. This study showed that the angle feature has on average a sensitivity of 87.5% (with 12 false alarms), the area feature has on average a sensitivity of 89.58% (with 10 false alarms), the shortest distance feature has on average a sensitivity of 85.42% (with 14 false alarms) and, finally, the combined feature has on average a sensitivity of 92.71% (with seven false alarms). The results showed that the last half an hour before the patient's death is very informative for diagnosing the patient's condition and to save his/her life. These results confirm that it is possible to predict mortality based on the features introduced in this paper, relying on the variations of the HRV dynamic characteristics. PMID:27028609

  19. Application of Predictive Nursing Reduces Psychiatric Complications in ICU Patients after Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Qiong; ZHU, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to investigate the effects of clinical application of perioperative predictive nursing on reducing psychiatric complications in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients after neurosurgery. Methods: A total of 129 patients who underwent neurosurgery and received intensive care were enrolled in our study from February 2013 to February 2014. These patients were divided into two groups: the experimental group (n=68) receiving predictive nursing before and after operation, and the control group (n=61) with general nursing. Clinical data including length of ICU stay, duration of the patients’ psychiatric symptoms, form and incidence of adverse events, and patient satisfaction ratings were recorded, and their differences between the two groups were analyzed. Results: The duration of psychiatric symptoms and the length of ICU stay for patients in the experimental group were significantly shorter than those in the control group (P<0.05). The incidence of adverse events and psychiatric symptoms, such as sensory and intuition disturbance, thought disturbance, emotional disorder, and consciousness disorder, in the experimental group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). Patient satisfaction ratings were significantly higher in the experimental group than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Application of predictive nursing on ICU patients who undergo neurosurgery could effectively reduce the incidence of psychiatric symptoms as well as other adverse events. Our study provided clinical evidences to encourage predictive nursing in routine settings for patients in critical conditions. PMID:27252916

  20. The Course of Skin and Serum Biomarkers of Advanced Glycation Endproducts and Its Association with Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, Disease Severity, and Mortality during ICU Admission in Critically Ill Patients: Results from a Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Meertens, John H.; Nienhuis, Hans L.; Lefrandt, Joop D.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Nyyssönen, Kristiina; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.; Smit, Andries J.; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Mulder, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been implicated in multiple organ failure, predominantly via their cellular receptor (RAGE) in preclinical studies. Little is known about the time course and prognostic relevance of AGEs in critically ill human patients, including those with severe sepsis. Objective 1) To explore the reliability of Skin Autofluorescence (AF) as an index of tissue AGEs in ICU patients, 2) to compare its levels to healthy controls, 3) to describe the time course of AGEs and influencing factors during ICU admission, and 4) to explore their association with disease severity, outcome, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Methods Skin AF, serum N"-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), N"-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), and soluble RAGE (sRAGE) were serially measured for a maximum of 7 days in critically ill ICU patients with multiple organ failure and compared to age-matched healthy controls. Correlations with (changes in) clinical parameters of disease severity, LDL dienes, and CRP were studied and survival analysis for in-hospital mortality was performed. Results Forty-five ICU patients (age: 59±15 years; 60% male), and 37 healthy controls (59±14; 68%) were included. Skin AF measurements in ICU patients were reproducible (CV right-left arm: 13%, day-to-day: 10%), with confounding effects of skin reflectance and plasma bilirubin levels. Skin AF was higher in ICU patients vs healthy controls (2.7±0.7 vs 1.8±0.3 au; p<0.001). Serum CEL (23±10 vs, 16±3 nmol/gr protein; p<0.001), LDL dienes (19 (15–23) vs. 9 (8–11) μmol/mmol cholesterol; <0.001), and sRAGE (1547 (998–2496) vs. 1042 (824–1388) pg/ml; p = 0.003) were significantly higher in ICU patients compared to healthy controls, while CML was not different (27 (20–39) vs 29 (25–33) nmol/gr protein). While CRP and LDL dienes decreased significantly, Skin AF and serum AGEs and sRAGE did not change significantly during the first 7 days of ICU admission. CML and CEL

  1. Derivation of a Clinical Decision Instrument to Identify Adult Patients with Mild Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage at Low Risk for Requiring ICU Admission

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Daniel K.; Sena, Matthew J.; Galante, Joseph M.; Shahlaie, Kiarash; London, Jason A.; Melnikow, Joy; Holmes, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective The objective of this study was to derive a clinical decision instrument with a sensitivity of at least 95% (with upper and lower bounds of the 95% CIs within a 5% range) to identify adult emergency department patients with mild traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (tICH) who are at low risk for requiring critical care resources during hospitalization and thus may not need admission to the ICU. Methods This was a prospective, observational study of adult patients with mild tICH (initial Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score 13 to 15 with tICH) presenting to a Level 1 trauma center from July 2009 to February 2013. The need for ICU admission was defined as the presence of an acute critical care intervention (intubation, neurosurgical intervention, blood product transfusion, vasopressor or inotrope administration, invasive monitoring for hemodynamic instability, emergent treatment for arrhythmia or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, therapeutic angiography). We derived the clinical decision instrument using binary recursive partitioning (with a misclassification cost of 20 to 1). The accuracy of the decision instrument was compared to the treating physician’s (emergency medicine faculty) clinical impression. Results A total of 600 patients with mild tICH were enrolled; 116 patients (19%) had a critical care intervention. The derived instrument consisted of four predictor variables: admission GCS score less than 15, non-isolated head injury, age 65 years or older, and evidence of swelling or shift on initial cranial computed tomography scan. The decision instrument identified 114 of 116 patients requiring an acute critical care intervention (sensitivity 98.3%; 95% CI 93.9–99.5%) if at least one variable was present, and 192 of 484 patients that did not have an acute critical care intervention (specificity 39.7%; 95% CI 35.4–44.1%) if no variables were present. Physician clinical impression was slightly less sensitive (90.1%; 95% CI 83.1–94.4%) but overall

  2. Clinical utility of urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin measured at admission to predict outcomes in heterogeneous population of critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, N. M.; Madhumitha, S.; Annigeri, R. A.; Venkataraman, R.; Balasubramaian, S.; Seshadri, R.; Vadamalai, V.; Rao, B. S.; Kowdle, P. C.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Mani, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) is a reliable early biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI) in a homogeneous patient population. However, its utility in a heterogeneous population of critically ill, in whom the time of onset of renal insult is often unclear, is not clearly established. We evaluated the ability of a single measurement of uNGAL in a heterogeneous adult population, on admission to intensive care unit (ICU), to predict the occurrence of AKI and hospital mortality. One hundred and two consecutive adult patients had uNGAL measured within 8 h of admission to ICU. The demographic and laboratory data were collected at admission. The diagnosis of AKI was based on AKI Network (AKIN) criteria. The primary outcome was the development of AKI, and the secondary outcome was hospital mortality. The mean age was 54 ± 16.4 years and 65% were males. Urine NGAL (ng/ml) was 69 ± 42 in patients with AKI (n = 42) and 30.4 ± 41.7 in those without AKI (P < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for prediction of AKI was 0.79 and for serum creatinine (SCr) was 0.88. The sensitivity and specificity for a cut-off value of uNGAL of 75 ng/ml to predict AKI were 0.5 and 0.85 respectively. uNGAL > 75 ng/ml was a strong (odd ratio = 5.17, 95% confidence interval: 1.39–19.3) and independent predictor of hospital mortality. A single measurement of uNGAL at admission to ICU exhibited good predictive ability for AKI though the sensitivity was low. The predictive ability of uNGAL was inferior to simultaneously measured SCr at admission, hence limited its clinical utility to predict AKI. However, admission uNGAL was a strong, independent predictor of hospital mortality. PMID:27051136

  3. Individual Organ Failure and Concomitant Risk of Mortality Differs According to the Type of Admission to ICU – A Retrospective Study of SOFA Score of 23,795 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bingold, Tobias M.; Lefering, Rolf; Zacharowski, Kai; Meybohm, Patrick; Waydhas, Christian; Rosenberger, Peter; Scheller, Bertram

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Organ dysfunction or failure after the first days of ICU treatment and subsequent mortality with respect to the type of intensive care unit (ICU) admission is poorly elucidated. Therefore we analyzed the association of ICU mortality and admission for medical (M), scheduled surgery (ScS) or unscheduled surgery (US) patients mirrored by the occurrence of organ dysfunction/failure (OD/OF) after the first 72h of ICU stay. Methods For this retrospective cohort study (23,795 patients; DIVI registry; German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI)) organ dysfunction or failure were derived from the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (excluding the Glasgow Coma Scale). SOFA scores were collected on admission to ICU and 72h later. For patients with a length of stay of at least five days, a multivariate analysis was performed for individual OD/OF on day three. Results M patients had the lowest prevalence of cardiovascular failure (M 31%; ScS 35%; US 38%), and the highest prevalence of respiratory (M 24%; ScS 13%; US 17%) and renal failure (M 10%; ScS 6%; US 7%). Risk of death was highest for M- and ScS-patients in those with respiratory failure (OR; M 2.4; ScS 2.4; US 1.4) and for surgical patients with renal failure (OR; M 1.7; ScS 2.7; US 2.4). Conclusion The dynamic evolution of OD/OF within 72h after ICU admission and mortality differed between patients depending on their types of admission. This has to be considered to exclude a systematic bias during multi-center trials. PMID:26241475

  4. Predicting Admissions Committee Behavior in a Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.

    The decisions made by admissions committee members of the Medical College of Virginia were studied to determine the criteria used to arrive at value judgments and to analyze variations in predicted ratings based on these criteria. All 983 applicants to the 1980-81 entering class of the medical school who underwent file review evaluations (the…

  5. Predicting Inpatient Readmission and Outpatient Admission in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kun-Pei; Chen, Pei-Chun; Huang, Ling-Ya; Mao, Hsiu-Chen; Chan, Ding-Cheng (Derrick)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recognizing potentially avoidable hospital readmission and admissions are important health care quality issues. We develop prediction models for inpatient readmission and outpatient admission to hospitals for older adults In the retrospective cohort study with 2 million sampling file of the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan, older adults (aged ≥65 y/o) with a first admission in 2008 were enrolled in the inpatient cohort (N = 39,156). The outpatient cohort included subjects who had ≥1 outpatient visit in 2008 (N = 178,286). Each cohort was split into derivation (3/4) and validation (1/4) data set. Primary outcome of the inpatient cohort: 30-day readmission from the date of discharge. The outpatient cohort included hospital admissions within the 1-year follow-up period. Candidate risk factors include demographics, comorbidities, and previous health care utilizations. Series of logistic regression models were applied with area under the receiver operating curves (AUCs) to identify the best model. Roughly 1 of 7 (14.6%) of the inpatients was readmitted within 30 days, and 1 of 5 (19.1%) of the outpatient cohort was admitted within 1 year. Age, education, use of home health care, and selected comorbidities (e.g., cancer with metastasis) were included in the final model. The AUC of the inpatient readmission model was 0.655 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.646–0.664) and outpatient admission model was 0.642 (95% CI 0.639–0.646). Predictive performance was maintained in both validation data sets. The goodness-to-fit model demonstrated good calibration in both groups. We developed and validated practical clinical prediction models for inpatient readmission and outpatient admissions for general older adults with indicators easily obtained from an administrative data set. PMID:27100455

  6. ICU Blood Pressure Variability May Predict Nadir of Respiratory Depression After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Anne S. M.; Costa, Paulo H. M.; de Lima, Carlos E. B.; Pádua, Luiz E. M.; Campos, Luciana A.; Baltatu, Ovidiu C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Surgical stress induces alterations on sympathovagal balance that can be determined through assessment of blood pressure variability. Coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) is associated with postoperative respiratory depression. In this study we aimed at investigating ICU blood pressure variability and other perioperative parameters that could predict the nadir of postoperative respiratory function impairment. Methods: This prospective observational study evaluated 44 coronary artery disease patients subjected to coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). At the ICU, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was monitored every 30 min for 3 days. MAP variability was evaluated through: standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (CV), variation independent of mean (VIM), and average successive variability (ASV). Respiratory function was assessed through maximal inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressures and peak expiratory flow (PEF) determined 1 day before surgery and on the postoperative days 3rd to 7th. Intraoperative parameters (volume of cardioplegia, CPB duration, aortic cross-clamp time, number of grafts) were also monitored. Results: Since, we aimed at studying patients without confounding effects of postoperative complications on respiratory function, we had enrolled a cohort of low risk EuroSCORE (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation) with < 2. Respiratory parameters MIP, MEP, and PEF were significantly depressed for 4–5 days postoperatively. Of all MAP variability parameters, the ASV had a significant good positive Spearman correlation (rho coefficients ranging from 0.45 to 0.65, p < 0.01) with the 3-day nadir of PEF after cardiac surgery. Also, CV and VIM of MAP were significantly associated with nadir days of MEP and PEF. None of the intraoperative parameters had any correlation with the postoperative respiratory depression. Conclusions: Variability parameters ASV, CV, and VIM of the MAP

  7. A Clinical Decision Rule to Predict Adult Patients with Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage Who Do Not Require Intensive Care Unit Admission

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Daniel K.; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Echeverri, Angela; Holmes, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To derive a clinical decision rule to identify adult emergency department (ED) patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (tICH) who are at low risk for requiring critical care resources during hospitalization. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of patients (≥18 years) with tICH presenting to the ED. The need for intensive care unit (ICU) admission was defined as the presence of a critical care intervention including: intubation, neurosurgical intervention, blood product transfusion, vasopressor or inotrope administration, invasive monitoring for hemodynamic instability, emergent treatment for arrhythmia, therapeutic angiography, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The decision rule was derived using binary recursive partitioning. Results A total of 432 patients were identified (median age 48 years) of which 174 patients (40%) had a critical care intervention. We performed binary recursive partitioning with Classification and Regression Trees (CART) software to develop the clinical decision rule. Patients with a normal mental status (Glasgow Coma Score=15), isolated head injury, and age < 65 were considered low risk for a critical care intervention. The derived rule had a sensitivity of 98% (95% confidence interval [CI] 94–99), a specificity of 50% (95% CI 44–56), a positive predictive value of 57% (95% CI 51–62), and a negative predictive value of 97% (95% CI 93–99). The area under the curve for the decision rule was 0.74 (95% CI 0.70–0.77). Conclusions This clinical decision rule identifies low risk adult ED patients with tICH who do not need ICU admission. Further validation and refinement of these findings would allow for more appropriate ICU resource utilization. PMID:21839444

  8. Inclusion of ‘ICU-Day’ in a Logistic Scoring System Improves Mortality Prediction in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Fabian; Heldwein, Matthias B.; Bayer, Ole; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Wahlers, Thorsten; Hekmat, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay is a predictor of mortality. The length of ICU stay has never been considered as a variable in an additive scoring system. How could this variable be integrated into a scoring system? Does this integration improve mortality prediction? Material/Methods The ‘modified CArdiac SUrgery Score’ (CASUS) was generated by implementing the length of stay as a new variable to the ‘additive CASUS’. The ‘logistic CASUS’ already considers this variable. We defined outcome as ICU mortality and statistically compared the three CASUS models. Discrimination, comparison of receiver operating characteristic curves (DeLong’s method), and calibration (observed/expected ratio) were analyzed on days 1–13. Results Between 2007 and 2010, we included 5207 cardiac surgery patients in this prospective study. The mean age was 67.2±10.9 years. The mean length of ICU stay was 4.6±7.0 days and ICU mortality was 5.9%. All scores had good discrimination, with a mean area under the curve of 0.883 for the additive and modified, and 0.895 for the ‘logistic CASUS’. DeLong analysis showed superiority in favor of the logistic model as from day 5. The calibration of the logistic model was good. We identified overestimation (days 1–5) and accurate (days 6–9) calibration for the additive and ‘modified CASUS’. The ‘modified CASUS’ remained accurate but the ‘additive CASUS’ tended to underestimate the risk of mortality (days 10–13). Conclusions The integration of length of ICU stay as a variable improves mortality prediction significantly. An ‘ICU-day’ variable should be included into a logistic but not an additive model. PMID:26137928

  9. How do COPD comorbidities affect ICU outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Ongel, Esra Akkutuk; Karakurt, Zuhal; Salturk, Cuneyt; Takir, Huriye Berk; Burunsuzoglu, Bunyamin; Kargin, Feyza; Ekinci, Gulbanu H; Mocin, Ozlem; Gungor, Gokay; Adiguzel, Nalan; Yilmaz, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) frequently require admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) for application of mechanical ventilation (MV). We aimed to determine whether comorbidities and clinical variables present at ICU admission are predictive of ICU mortality. Methods A retrospective, observational cohort study was performed in a tertiary teaching hospital’s respiratory ICU using data collected between January 2008 and December 2012. Previously diagnosed COPD patients who were admitted to the ICU with ARF were included. Patients’ demographics, comorbidities, body mass index (BMI), ICU admission data, application of noninvasive and invasive MV (NIV and IMV, respectively), cause of ARF, length of ICU and hospital stay, and mortality were recorded from their files. Patients were grouped according to mortality (survival versus non-survival), and all the variables were compared between the two groups. Results During the study period, a total of 1,013 COPD patients (749 male) with a mean age (standard deviation) of 70±10 years met the inclusion criteria. Comorbidities of the non-survival group (female/male, 40/131) were significantly higher compared with the survival group (female/male, 224/618): arrhythmia (24% vs 11%), hypertension (42% vs 34%), coronary artery disease (28% vs 11%), and depression (7% vs 3%) (P<0.001, P<0.035, P<0.001, and P<0.007, respectively). Logistic regression revealed the following mortality risk factors: need of IMV, BMI <20 kg/m2, pneumonia, coronary artery disease, arrhythmia, hypertension, chronic hypoxia, and higher acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores. The respective odds ratios, confidence intervals, and P-values for each of these were as follows: 27.7, 15.7–49.0, P<0.001; 6.6, 3.5–412.7, P<0.001; 5.1, 2.9–8.8, P<0.001; 2.9, 1.5–5.6, P<0.001; 2.7, 1.4–5.2, P<0.003; 2.6, 1.5–4.4, P<0.001; 2.2, 1.2–3.9, P<0

  10. Investigating Postgraduate College Admission Interviews: Generalizability Theory Reliability and Incremental Predictive Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arce-Ferrer, Alvaro J.; Castillo, Irene Borges

    2007-01-01

    The use of face-to-face interviews is controversial for college admissions decisions in light of the lack of availability of validity and reliability evidence for most college admission processes. This study investigated reliability and incremental predictive validity of a face-to-face postgraduate college admission interview with a sample of…

  11. A reappraisal of ICU and long-term outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients and reassessment of prognosis factors: results of a 5-year cohort study (2009-2013).

    PubMed

    Platon, L; Amigues, L; Ceballos, P; Fegueux, N; Daubin, D; Besnard, N; Larcher, R; Landreau, L; Agostini, C; Machado, S; Jonquet, O; Klouche, K

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiology and prognosis of complications related to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients requiring admission to intensive care unit (ICU) have not been reassessed precisely in the past few years. We performed a retrospective single-center study on 318 consecutive HSCT patients (2009-2013), analyzing outcome and factors prognostic of ICU admission. Among these patients, 73 were admitted to the ICU. In all, 32 patients (40.3%) died in ICU, 46 at hospital discharge (63%) and 61 (83.6%) 1 year later. Survivors had a significantly lower sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, serum lactate and bilirubin upon ICU admission. Catecholamine support, mechanical ventilation (MV) and/or renal replacement therapy during ICU stay, a delayed organ support and an active graft versus host disease (GvHD) significantly worsen the outcome. By multivariate analysis, the worsening of SOFA score from days 1 to 3, the need for MV and the occurrence of an active GvHD were predictive of mortality. In conclusion, the incidence of HSCT-related complications requiring an admission to an ICU was at 22%, with an ICU mortality rate of 44%, and 84% 1 year later. A degradation of SOFA score at day 3 of ICU, need of MV and occurrence of an active GvHD are main predictive factors of mortality. PMID:26569092

  12. Validity of the Medical College Admission Test for Predicting MD-PhD Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bills, James L.; VanHouten, Jacob; Grundy, Michelle M.; Chalkley, Roger; Dermody, Terence S.

    2016-01-01

    The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a quantitative metric used by MD and MD-PhD programs to evaluate applicants for admission. This study assessed the validity of the MCAT in predicting training performance measures and career outcomes for MD-PhD students at a single institution. The study population consisted of 153 graduates of the…

  13. Validity of the Optometry Admission Test in Predicting Performance in Schools and Colleges of Optometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Gene A.; Johnston, JoElle

    1997-01-01

    A study examined the relationship between Optometry Admission Test scores and pre-optometry or undergraduate grade point average (GPA) with first and second year performance in optometry schools. The test's predictive validity was limited but significant, and comparable to those reported for other admission tests. In addition, the scores…

  14. Predicting MBA Student Success and Streamlining the Admissions Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Within this study the author examines factors commonly employed as master of business administration applicant evaluation criteria to see if these criteria are important in determining an applicant's potential for success. The findings indicate that the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) is not a significant predictor of student success…

  15. Who Needs to Be Allocated in ICU after Thoracic Surgery? An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Liana; Faresin, Sonia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background. The effective use of ICU care after lung resections has not been completely studied. The aims of this study were to identify predictive factors for effective use of ICU admission after lung resection and to develop a risk composite measure to predict its effective use. Methods. 120 adult patients undergoing elective lung resection were enrolled in an observational prospective cohort study. Preoperative evaluation and intraoperative assessment were recorded. In the postoperative period, patients were stratified into two groups according to the effective and ineffective use of ICU. The use of ICU care was considered effective if a patient experienced one or more of the following: maintenance of controlled ventilation or reintubation; acute respiratory failure; hemodynamic instability or shock; and presence of intraoperative or postanesthesia complications. Results. Thirty patients met the criteria for effective use of ICU care. Logistic regression analysis identified three independent predictors of effective use of ICU care: surgery for bronchiectasis, pneumonectomy, and age ≥ 57 years. In the absence of any predictors the risk of effective need of ICU care was 6%. Risk increased to 25–30%, 66–71%, and 93% with the presence of one, two, or three predictors, respectively. Conclusion. ICU care is not routinely necessary for all patients undergoing lung resection. PMID:27493477

  16. Predicting Appropriate Admission of Bronchiolitis Patients in the Emergency Department: Rationale and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Bryan L; Johnson, Michael D; Nkoy, Flory L

    2016-01-01

    Background In young children, bronchiolitis is the most common illness resulting in hospitalization. For children less than age 2, bronchiolitis incurs an annual total inpatient cost of $1.73 billion. Each year in the United States, 287,000 emergency department (ED) visits occur because of bronchiolitis, with a hospital admission rate of 32%-40%. Due to a lack of evidence and objective criteria for managing bronchiolitis, ED disposition decisions (hospital admission or discharge to home) are often made subjectively, resulting in significant practice variation. Studies reviewing admission need suggest that up to 29% of admissions from the ED are unnecessary. About 6% of ED discharges for bronchiolitis result in ED returns with admission. These inappropriate dispositions waste limited health care resources, increase patient and parental distress, expose patients to iatrogenic risks, and worsen outcomes. Existing clinical guidelines for bronchiolitis offer limited improvement in patient outcomes. Methodological shortcomings include that the guidelines provide no specific thresholds for ED decisions to admit or to discharge, have an insufficient level of detail, and do not account for differences in patient and illness characteristics including co-morbidities. Predictive models are frequently used to complement clinical guidelines, reduce practice variation, and improve clinicians’ decision making. Used in real time, predictive models can present objective criteria supported by historical data for an individualized disease management plan and guide admission decisions. However, existing predictive models for ED patients with bronchiolitis have limitations, including low accuracy and the assumption that the actual ED disposition decision was appropriate. To date, no operational definition of appropriate admission exists. No model has been built based on appropriate admissions, which include both actual admissions that were necessary and actual ED discharges that were

  17. Vital Signs Predict Rapid-Response Team Activation Within Twelve Hours of Emergency Department Admission

    PubMed Central

    Walston, James M.; Cabrera, Daniel; Bellew, Shawna D.; Olive, Marc N.; Lohse, Christine M.; Bellolio, M. Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rapid-response teams (RRTs) are interdisciplinary groups created to rapidly assess and treat patients with unexpected clinical deterioration marked by decline in vital signs. Traditionally emergency department (ED) disposition is partially based on the patients’ vital signs (VS) at the time of hospital admission. We aimed to identify which patients will have RRT activation within 12 hours of admission based on their ED VS, and if their outcomes differed. Methods We conducted a case-control study of patients presenting from January 2009 to December 2012 to a tertiary ED who subsequently had RRT activations within 12 hours of admission (early RRT activations). The medical records of patients 18 years and older admitted to a non-intensive care unit (ICU) setting were reviewed to obtain VS at the time of ED arrival and departure, age, gender and diagnoses. Controls were matched 1:1 on age, gender, and diagnosis. We evaluated VS using cut points (lowest 10%, middle 80% and highest 10%) based on the distribution of VS for all patients. Our study adheres to the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) guidelines for reporting observational studies. Results A total of 948 patients were included (474 cases and 474 controls). Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 95% CI [1.25–3.27]), tachypneic (OR 2.92, 95% CI [1.73–4.92]), and had lower oxygen saturations (OR 2.25, 95% CI [1.42–3.56]) upon arrival to the ED. Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic at the time of disposition from the ED (OR 2.76, 95% CI [1.65–4.60]), more likely to have extremes of systolic blood pressure (BP) (OR 1.72, 95% CI [1.08–2.72] for low BP and OR 1.82, 95% CI [1.19–2.80] for high BP), higher respiratory rate (OR 4.15, 95% CI [2.44–7.07]) and lower oxygen saturation (OR 2.29, 95% CI [1.43–3.67]). Early RRT activation was associated with increased

  18. A simple tool to predict admission at the time of triage

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Allan; Rodgers, Kenneth; Ireland, Alastair; Jamdar, Ravi; McKay, Gerard A

    2015-01-01

    Aim To create and validate a simple clinical score to estimate the probability of admission at the time of triage. Methods This was a multicentre, retrospective, cross-sectional study of triage records for all unscheduled adult attendances in North Glasgow over 2 years. Clinical variables that had significant associations with admission on logistic regression were entered into a mixed-effects multiple logistic model. This provided weightings for the score, which was then simplified and tested on a separate validation group by receiving operator characteristic (ROC) analysis and goodness-of-fit tests. Results 215 231 presentations were used for model derivation and 107 615 for validation. Variables in the final model showing clinically and statistically significant associations with admission were: triage category, age, National Early Warning Score (NEWS), arrival by ambulance, referral source and admission within the last year. The resulting 6-variable score showed excellent admission/discharge discrimination (area under ROC curve 0.8774, 95% CI 0.8752 to 0.8796). Higher scores also predicted early returns for those who were discharged: the odds of subsequent admission within 28 days doubled for every 7-point increase (log odds=+0.0933 per point, p<0.0001). Conclusions This simple, 6-variable score accurately estimates the probability of admission purely from triage information. Most patients could accurately be assigned to ‘admission likely’, ‘admission unlikely’, ‘admission very unlikely’ etc., by setting appropriate cut-offs. This could have uses in patient streaming, bed management and decision support. It also has the potential to control for demographics when comparing performance over time or between departments. PMID:24421344

  19. Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Admitted to Intensive Care Units: Outcome Analysis and Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Braess, Jan; Thudium, Johannes; Schmid, Christoph; Kochanek, Matthias; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Lebiedz, Pia; Görlich, Dennis; Gerth, Hans U.; Rohde, Christian; Kessler, Torsten; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Stelljes, Matthias; Büchner, Thomas; Schlimok, Günter; Hallek, Michael; Waltenberger, Johannes; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Heilmeier, Bernhard; Krug, Utz

    2016-01-01

    Background This retrospective, multicenter study aimed to reveal risk predictors for mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) as well as survival after ICU discharge in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) requiring treatment in the ICU. Methods and Results Multivariate analysis of data for 187 adults with AML treated in the ICU in one institution revealed the following as independent prognostic factors for death in the ICU: arterial oxygen partial pressure below 72 mmHg, active AML and systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon ICU admission, and need for hemodialysis and mechanical ventilation in the ICU. Based on these variables, we developed an ICU mortality score and validated the score in an independent cohort of 264 patients treated in the ICU in three additional tertiary hospitals. Compared with the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, the Logistic Organ Dysfunction (LOD) score, and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, our score yielded a better prediction of ICU mortality in the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis (AUC = 0.913 vs. AUC = 0.710 [SAPS II], AUC = 0.708 [LOD], and 0.770 [SOFA] in the training cohort; AUC = 0.841 for the developed score vs. AUC = 0.730 [SAPSII], AUC = 0.773 [LOD], and 0.783 [SOFA] in the validation cohort). Factors predicting decreased survival after ICU discharge were as follows: relapse or refractory disease, previous allogeneic stem cell transplantation, time between hospital admission and ICU admission, time spent in ICU, impaired diuresis, Glasgow Coma Scale <8 and hematocrit of ≥25% at ICU admission. Based on these factors, an ICU survival score was created and used for risk stratification into three risk groups. This stratification discriminated distinct survival rates after ICU discharge. Conclusions Our data emphasize that although individual risks differ widely depending on the patient and disease status, a substantial portion of critically ill patients with AML benefit

  20. Predicting First-Quarter Test Scores from the New Medical College Admission Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Thomas J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The predictive validity of the new Medical College Admission Test as it relates to end-of-quarter examinations in anatomy, histology, physiology, biochemistry, and "ages of man" is presented. Results indicate that the Science Knowledge assessment areas of chemistry and physics and the Science Problems subtest were most useful in predicting student…

  1. Predicting Persistence and Withdrawal of Open Admissions Students at Virginia State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambe, Joseph T.

    1984-01-01

    A study of persistence/dropout among open admissions college students found: (1) accurate predictions cannot be made for individual students at the time of matriculation; and (2) it is possible to predict that about 80 percent of future groups will fall in the persist category after two semesters, 51 percent after four semesters. (CMG)

  2. Overview: What's Worked and What Hasn't as a Guide towards Predictive Admissions Tool Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siu, Eric; Reiter, Harold I.

    2009-01-01

    Admissions committees and researchers around the globe have used diligence and imagination to develop and implement various screening measures with the ultimate goal of predicting future clinical and professional performance. What works for predicting future job performance in the human resources world and in most of the academic world may not,…

  3. Using Admission Assessments to Predict Final Grades in a College Music Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Andreas C.

    2014-01-01

    Entrance examinations and auditions are common admission procedures for college music programs, yet few researchers have attempted to look at the long-term predictive validity of such selection processes. In this study, archival data from 93 student records of a German music academy were used to predict development of musicianship skills over the…

  4. Depoliticizing Minority Admissions through Predicted Graduation Equations. AIR Forum 1982 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Timothy R.

    The way that the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, has tried to depoliticize minority admissions through the use of predicted graduation equations that are race specific is examined. Multiple regression and discriminant analyses were used with nine independent variables (primarily academic) to predict graduation status of 1974 entering…

  5. From hospital admission to independent living: is prediction possible?

    PubMed

    Lipskaya-Velikovsky, Lena; Kotler, Moshe; Easterbrook, Adam; Jarus, Tal

    2015-04-30

    An integral component of recovery from mental illness is being able to engage in everyday activities. This ability is often restricted among people with schizophrenia. Although functional deficits are addressed during hospitalization, the ability to predict daily functioning based on information gathered during hospitalization has not been well established. This study examines whether measurements completed during hospitalization can be useful for predicting independent living within the community. Inpatients with schizophrenia (N=104) were enrolled in the study and assessed for cognitive functioning, functional capacity and symptoms. They were approached again 6 months after discharge to evaluate their functioning with respect to everyday life Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) and Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Functional capacity during hospitalization predicted 26.8% of ADL functioning and 38.8% of IADL functioning. ADL was best predicted by the severity of negative symptoms, cognitive functioning, and the number of hospitalizations (51.2%), while IADL was best predicted by functional capacity, cognition, and number of hospitalizations (60.1%). This study provides evidence that evaluations during hospitalization can be effective, and demonstrates the advantage of a holistic approach in predicting daily functioning. When a holistic approach is not practical, a functional capacity measurement may serve as an effective predictor. PMID:25747682

  6. The outcome of children requiring admission to an intensive care unit following bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hayes, C; Lush, R J; Cornish, J M; Foot, A M; Henderson, J; Jenkins, I; Murphy, P; Oakhill, A; Pamphilon, D H; Steward, C G; Weir, P; Wolf, A; Marks, D I

    1998-08-01

    We report the results of a retrospective study of the role of intensive care unit (ICU) admission in the management of 367 children who underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT) at a tertiary referral institution. 39 patients (11%) required 44 ICU admissions for a median of 6 d. 70% received marrow from unrelated donors, half of which were mismatched; 80% had leukaemia and two-thirds were considered high-risk transplants. Respiratory failure was the major reason for admission to ICU. 75% of admissions required mechanical ventilation (for a median of 5 d) and 20 patients had lung injury as defined by the criteria of the Seattle group. None of 11 patients with proven viral pneumonitis survived (P = 0.06) and only one of 20 patients with lung injury survived (P < 0.01). Six of seven patients with a primary neurological problem survived (P < 0.001); these appear to represent a good outcome group. Age, the presence of graft-versus-host disease, the use of inotropes, isolated renal or hepatic impairment, and paediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) score were not predictive of outcome. In total, 12 patients (27% of admissions) survived and were discharged from hospital 30d or more after admission and eight (18%) survived >6 months. ICU admission can be beneficial to selected children post-BMT but it may be less useful in proven viral pneumonitis. Where mechanical ventilation is required, the duration of this support should be limited unless there is rapid improvement. PMID:9722291

  7. Sex-Specific Differential Prediction of College Admission Tests: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Franziska T.; Schult, Johannes; Hell, Benedikt

    2013-01-01

    This is the first meta-analysis that investigates the differential prediction of undergraduate and graduate college admission tests for women and men. Findings on 130 independent samples representing 493,048 students are summarized. The underprediction of women's academic performance (d = 0.14) and the overprediction of men's academic performance…

  8. Traditional and Personal Admissions Criteria: Predicting Candidate Performance in US Educational Leadership Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountford, Meredith; Ehlert, Mark; Machell, Jim; Cockrell, Dan

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the predictive validity of traditional academic and personal screening criteria used for admitting students into a Statewide Cooperative Doctoral Programme in Educational Leadership on student performance in the programme. This research examined the relationships among traditional admission criteria which included GRE scores…

  9. Predicting Performance during Clinical Years from the New Medical College Admission Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caroline, Jan D.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The results of a predictive validity study of the new Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) using criteria from the clinical years of undergraduate medical education are discussed. The criteria included course grades and faculty ratings of clerks in internal medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. (Author/MLW)

  10. Same admissions tools, different outcomes: a critical perspective on predictive validity in three undergraduate medical schools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Admission to medical school is one of the most highly competitive entry points in higher education. Considerable investment is made by universities to develop selection processes that aim to identify the most appropriate candidates for their medical programs. This paper explores data from three undergraduate medical schools to offer a critical perspective of predictive validity in medical admissions. Methods This study examined 650 undergraduate medical students from three Australian universities as they progressed through the initial years of medical school (accounting for approximately 25 per cent of all commencing undergraduate medical students in Australia in 2006 and 2007). Admissions criteria (aptitude test score based on UMAT, school result and interview score) were correlated with GPA over four years of study. Standard regression of each of the three admissions variables on GPA, for each institution at each year level was also conducted. Results Overall, the data found positive correlations between performance in medical school, school achievement and UMAT, but not interview. However, there were substantial differences between schools, across year levels, and within sections of UMAT exposed. Despite this, each admission variable was shown to add towards explaining course performance, net of other variables. Conclusion The findings suggest the strength of multiple admissions tools in predicting outcomes of medical students. However, they also highlight the large differences in outcomes achieved by different schools, thus emphasising the pitfalls of generalising results from predictive validity studies without recognising the diverse ways in which they are designed and the variation in the institutional contexts in which they are administered. The assumption that high-positive correlations are desirable (or even expected) in these studies is also problematised. PMID:24373207

  11. Deliberate drug poisoning with slight symptoms on admission: are there predictive factors for intensive care unit referral? A three-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Maignan, Maxime; Pommier, Philippe; Clot, Sandrine; Saviuc, Philippe; Debaty, Guillaume; Briot, Raphaël; Carpentier, Françoise; Danel, Vincent

    2014-03-01

    Deliberate drug poisoning leads to 1% of emergency department (ED) admissions. Even if most patients do not exhibit any significant complication, 5% need to be referred to an intensive care unit (ICU). Emergency physicians should distinguish between low- and high-acuity poisoned patients at an early stage to avoid excess morbidity. Our aim was to identify ICU transfer factors in deliberately self-poisoned patients without life-threatening symptoms on admission. We performed a 3-year retrospective observational study in a university hospital. Patients over 18 years of age with a diagnosis of deliberate drug poisoning were included. Clinical and toxicological data were analysed with univariate tests between groups (ED stay versus ICU transfer). Factors associated with ICU admission were then included in a logistic regression analysis. Two thousand five hundred and sixty-five patients were included. 63.2% were women, and median age was 40 (28-49). 142 patients (5.5%) were transferred to ICU. Cardiac drugs [adjusted OR (aOR) = 19.81; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 7.93-49.50], neuroleptics (aOR = 2.78; 95% CI: 1.55-4.97) and meprobamate (aOR = 2.71; 95% CI: 1.27-5.81) ingestions were significantly linked to ICU admission. A presumed toxic dose ingestion (aOR = 2.27; 95% CI: 1.28-4.02), number of ingested tablets (aOR = 1.01; 95% CI: 1.01-1.02 for each tablet) and delay between ingestion and ED arrival <2 hr (aOR = 2.85; 95%CI: 1.62-5.03) were also factors for ICU referral. The Glasgow Coma Scale was the only clinical feature associated with ICU admission (aOR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.44-1.70 for each point loss). These results suggest that emergency physicians should pay particular attention to toxicological data on ED admission to distinguish between low- and high-acuity self-poisoned patients. PMID:23998644

  12. Assessment and prediction of short term hospital admissions: the case of Athens, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassomenos, P.; Papaloukas, C.; Petrakis, M.; Karakitsios, S.

    The contribution of air pollution on hospital admissions due to respiratory and heart diseases is a major issue in the health-environmental perspective. In the present study, an attempt was made to run down the relationships between air pollution levels and meteorological indexes, and corresponding hospital admissions in Athens, Greece. The available data referred to a period of eight years (1992-2000) including the daily number of hospital admissions due to respiratory and heart diseases, hourly mean concentrations of CO, NO 2, SO 2, O 3 and particulates in several monitoring stations, as well as, meteorological data (temperature, relative humidity, wind speed/direction). The relations among the above data were studied through widely used statistical techniques (multivariate stepwise analyses) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). Both techniques revealed that elevated particulate concentrations are the dominant parameter related to hospital admissions (an increase of 10 μg m -3 leads to an increase of 10.2% in the number of admissions), followed by O 3 and the rest of the pollutants (CO, NO 2 and SO 2). Meteorological parameters also play a decisive role in the formation of air pollutant levels affecting public health. Consequently, increased/decreased daily hospital admissions are related to specific types of meteorological conditions that favor/do not favor the accumulation of pollutants in an urban complex. In general, the role of meteorological factors seems to be underestimated by stepwise analyses, while ANNs attribute to them a more important role. Comparison of the two models revealed that ANN adaptation in complicate environmental issues presents improved modeling results compared to a regression technique. Furthermore, the ANN technique provides a reliable model for the prediction of the daily hospital admissions based on air quality data and meteorological indices, undoubtedly useful for regulatory purposes.

  13. Does Emotional Intelligence at Medical School Admission Predict Future Academic Performance?

    PubMed Central

    Leddy, John J.; Wood, Timothy J.; Puddester, Derek; Moineau, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Medical school admissions committees are increasingly considering noncognitive measures like emotional intelligence (EI) in evaluating potential applicants. This study explored whether scores on an EI abilities test at admissions predicted future academic performance in medical school to determine whether EI could be used in making admissions decisions. Method The authors invited all University of Ottawa medical school applicants offered an interview in 2006 and 2007 to complete the Mayer–Salovey–Caruso EI Test (MSCEIT) at the time of their interview (105 and 101, respectively), then again at matriculation (120 and 106, respectively). To determine predictive validity, they correlated MSCEIT scores to scores on written examinations and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) administered during the four-year program. They also correlated MSCEIT scores to the number of nominations for excellence in clinical performance and failures recorded over the four years. Results The authors found no significant correlations between MSCEIT scores and written examination scores or number of failures. The correlations between MSCEIT scores and total OSCE scores ranged from 0.01 to 0.35; only MSCEIT scores at matriculation and OSCE year 4 scores for the 2007 cohort were significantly correlated. Correlations between MSCEIT scores and clinical nominations were low (range 0.12–0.28); only the correlation between MSCEIT scores at matriculation and number of clinical nominations for the 2007 cohort were statistically significant. Conclusions EI, as measured by an abilities test at admissions, does not appear to reliably predict future academic performance. Future studies should define the role of EI in admissions decisions. PMID:24556771

  14. Using an Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) Model for Prediction of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Outcome and Length of Stay at Hospital in Traumatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour, Changiz; Rahim, Fakher; Fakhree, Abolghasem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Currently applications of artificial neural network (ANN) models in outcome predicting of patients have made considerable strides in clinical medicine. This project aims to use a neural network for predicting survival and length of stay of patients in the ward and the intensive care unit (ICU) of trauma patients and to obtain predictive power of the current method. Materials and Methods We used Neuro-Solution software (NS), a leading-edge neural network software for data mining to create highly accurate and predictive models using advanced preprocessing techniques, intelligent automated neural network topology through cutting-edge distributed computing. This ANN model was used based on back-propagation, feed forward, and fed by Trauma and injury severity score (TRISS) components, biochemical findings, risk factors and outcome of 95 patients. In the next step a trained ANN was used to predict outcome, ICU and ward length of stay for 30 test group patients by processing primary data. Results The sensitivity and specificity of an ANN for predicting the outcome of traumatic patients in this study calculated 75% and 96.26%, respectively. 93.33% of outcome predictions obtained by ANN were correct. In 3.33% of predictions, results of ANN were optimistic and 3.33% of cases predicted ANN results were worse than the actual outcome of patients. Neither difference in average length of stay in the ward and ICU with predicted ANN results, were statistically significant. Correlation coefficient of two variables of ANN prediction and actual length of stay in hospital was equal to 0.643. Conclusion Using ANN model based on clinical and biochemical variables in patients with moderate to severe traumatic injury, resulted in satisfactory outcome prediction when applied to a test set. PMID:26023581

  15. Users' experiences of an emergency department patient admission predictive tool: A qualitative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jessup, Melanie; Crilly, Julia; Boyle, Justin; Wallis, Marianne; Lind, James; Green, David; Fitzgerald, Gerard

    2016-09-01

    Emergency department overcrowding is an increasing issue impacting patients, staff and quality of care, resulting in poor patient and system outcomes. In order to facilitate better management of emergency department resources, a patient admission predictive tool was developed and implemented. Evaluation of the tool's accuracy and efficacy was complemented with a qualitative component that explicated the experiences of users and its impact upon their management strategies, and is the focus of this article. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 pertinent users, including bed managers, after-hours managers, specialty department heads, nurse unit managers and hospital executives. Analysis realised dynamics of accuracy, facilitating communication and enabling group decision-making Users generally welcomed the enhanced potential to predict and plan following the incorporation of the patient admission predictive tool into their daily and weekly decision-making processes. They offered astute feedback with regard to their responses when faced with issues of capacity and communication. Participants reported an growing confidence in making informed decisions in a cultural context that is continually moving from reactive to proactive. This information will inform further patient admission predictive tool development specifically and implementation processes generally. PMID:25916833

  16. Neuro-oncological patients admitted in intensive-care unit: predictive factors and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Tabouret, E; Boucard, C; Devillier, R; Barrie, M; Boussen, S; Autran, D; Chinot, O; Bruder, N

    2016-03-01

    The prognosis of oncology patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) is considered poor. Our objective was to analyze the characteristics and predictive factors of death in the ICU and functional outcome following ICU treatment for neuro-oncology patients. A retrospective study was conducted on all patients with primary brain tumor admitted to our institutional ICU for medical indications. Predictive impact on the risk of death in the ICU was analyzed as well as the functional status was evaluated prior and following ICU discharge. Seventy-one patients were admitted to the ICU. ICU admission indications were refractory seizures (41 %) and septic shock (17 %). On admission, 16 % had multi-organ failure. Ventilation was necessary for 41 % and catecholamines for 13 %. Twenty-two percent of patients died in the ICU. By multivariate analysis, predictive factors associated with an increased risk of ICU death were: non-neurological cause of admission [p = 0.045; odds ratio (OR) 5.405], multiple organ failure (p = 0.021; OR 8.027), respiratory failure (p = 0.006; OR 9.615), and hemodynamic failure (p = 0.008; OR 10.111). In contrast, tumor type (p = 0.678) and disease control status (p = 0.380) were not associated with an increased risk of ICU death. Among the 35 evaluable patients, 77 % presented with a stable or improved Karnofsky performance status following ICU hospitalization compared with the ongoing status before discharge. In patients with primary brain tumor admitted to the ICU, predictive factors of death appear to be similar to those described in non-oncology patients. ICU hospitalization is generally not associated with a subsequent decrease in the functional status. PMID:26608523

  17. The Effectiveness of Traditional Admissions Criteria in Predicting College and Graduate Success for American and International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Yanfei

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of traditional admissions criteria, including prior GPA, SAT, GRE, and TOEFL in predicting undergraduate and graduate academic success for American and international students at a large public university in the southwestern United States. Included are the admissions and enrollment data for 25,017 undergraduate…

  18. Epidemiology of Australian Influenza-Related Paediatric Intensive Care Unit Admissions, 1997-2013

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarek, Marlena C.; Ware, Robert S.; Coulthard, Mark G.; McEniery, Julie; Lambert, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza virus predictably causes an annual epidemic resulting in a considerable burden of illness in Australia. Children are disproportionately affected and can experience severe illness and complications, which occasionally result in death. Methods We conducted a retrospective descriptive study using data collated in the Australian and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care (ANZPIC) Registry of influenza-related intensive care unit (ICU) admissions over a 17-year period (1997–2013, inclusive) in children <16 years old. National laboratory-confirmed influenza notifications were used for comparison. Results Between 1997 and 2013, a total of 704 influenza-related ICU admissions were recorded, at a rate of 6.2 per 1,000 all-cause ICU admissions. Age at admission ranged from 0 days and 15.9 years (median = 2.1 years), with 135 (19.2%) aged <6 months. Pneumonia/pneumonitis and bronchiolitis were the most common primary diagnoses among influenza-related admissions (21.9% and 13.6%, respectively). More than half of total cases (59.2%) were previously healthy (no co-morbidities recorded), and in the remainder, chronic lung disease (16.7%) and asthma (12.5%) were the most common co-morbidities recorded. Pathogen co-detection occurred in 24.7% of cases, most commonly with respiratory syncytial virus or a staphylococcal species. Median length of all ICU admissions was 3.2 days (range 2.0 hours– 107.4 days) and 361 (51.3%) admissions required invasive respiratory support for a median duration of 4.3 days (range 0.2 hours– 107.5 days). There were 27 deaths recorded, 14 (51.9%) in children without a recorded co-morbidity. Conclusion Influenza causes a substantial number of ICU admissions in Australian children each year with the majority occurring in previously healthy children. PMID:27023740

  19. Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation (PMV): When is it Justified in ICU?

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Trupti H

    2015-10-01

    Over years, the number of patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV) in ICU has increased. Trends in the numbers of patients requiring PMV are of interest to health service planners because they consume a disproportionate amount of healthcare resources, and have high illness costs.1 PMV is defined as need of invasive mechanical ventilation for consecutive 21 days for at least 6 hours per day. With improvement in ICU care more patients survive acute respiratory failure and with that number of patients requiring PMV is likely to increase further. In a large multi centric study in United Kingdom the incidence PMV was 4.4 per 100 ICU admissions, and 6.3 per 100 ventilated ICU admissions. Also these patients used 29.1% of all general ICU bed days, had longer hospital stay after ICU discharge than non-PMV patients and had higher hospital mortality (40.3% vs 33.8%, P = 0.02).2. PMID:27608685

  20. Admission variables predictive of academic struggle in a PharmD program.

    PubMed

    Schauner, Stephanie; Hardinger, Karen L; Graham, Maqual R; Garavalia, Linda

    2013-02-12

    Objective. To characterize and describe admission variables predictive of poor grade attainment by students in 2 pathways to a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program.Methods. A retrospective analysis of course grades of PharmD students admitted from 2000 to 2009 (N= 1,019) in the traditional degree pathway ("1 plus 5" degree program) and the provisional pathway (admitted directly from high school) was performed.Results. Four hundred three grades of D or less were earned by 183 (18%) students. There were more grades of D or less in the first pharmacy year. Receipt of an unsatisfactory grade was associated with all Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) subcategory scores, PCAT composite score, cumulative prepharmacy coursework hours, prepharmacy grade point average (GPA), prepharmacy science and math GPA, and interview score for accepted students in the traditional pathway. For students in the provisional pathway, PCAT-quantitative analysis, PCAT composite score, prepharmacy cumulative GPA, prepharmacy science and math GPA, English American College Testing (ACT) score, and composite ACT score predicted poor grades. Conclusion. Admissions committees should heed PCAT scores and GPAs, regardless of program pathway, while progression committees should focus on early program coursework when designing strategies to optimize retention. PMID:23459593

  1. Increased Plasma Levels of Heparin-Binding Protein on Admission to Intensive Care Are Associated with Respiratory and Circulatory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tydén, Jonas; Herwald, Heiko; Sjöberg, Folke; Johansson, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is released by granulocytes and has been shown to increase vascular permeability in experimental investigations. Increased vascular permeability in the lungs can lead to fluid accumulation in alveoli and respiratory failure. A generalized increase in vascular permeability leads to loss of circulating blood volume and circulatory failure. We hypothesized that plasma concentrations of HBP on admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) would be associated with decreased oxygenation or circulatory failure. Methods This is a prospective, observational study in a mixed 8-bed ICU. We investigated concentrations of HBP in plasma at admission to the ICU from 278 patients. Simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) 3 was recorded on admission. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were recorded daily for three days. Results Median SAPS 3 was 58.8 (48–70) and 30-day mortality 64/278 (23%). There was an association between high plasma concentrations of HBP on admission with decreased oxygenation (p<0.001) as well as with circulatory failure (p<0.001), after 48–72 hours in the ICU. There was an association between concentrations of HBP on admission and 30-day mortality (p = 0.002). ROC curves showed areas under the curve of 0,62 for decreased oxygenation, 0,65 for circulatory failure and 0,64 for mortality. Conclusions A high concentration of HBP in plasma on admission to the ICU is associated with respiratory and circulatory failure later during the ICU care period. It is also associated with increased 30-day mortality. Despite being an interesting biomarker for the composite ICU population it´s predictive value at the individual patient level is low. PMID:27007333

  2. Overview: what's worked and what hasn't as a guide towards predictive admissions tool development.

    PubMed

    Siu, Eric; Reiter, Harold I

    2009-12-01

    Admissions committees and researchers around the globe have used diligence and imagination to develop and implement various screening measures with the ultimate goal of predicting future clinical and professional performance. What works for predicting future job performance in the human resources world and in most of the academic world may not, however, work for the highly competitive world of medical school applicants. For the job of differentiating within the highly range-restricted pool of medical school aspirants, only the most reliable assessment tools need apply. The tools that have generally shown predictive validity in future performance include academic scores like grade point average, aptitude tests like the Medical College Admissions Test, and non-cognitive testing like the multiple mini-interview. The list of assessment tools that have not robustly met that mark is longer, including personal interview, personal statement, letters of reference, personality testing, emotional intelligence and (so far) situational judgment tests. When seen purely from the standpoint of predictive validity, the trends over time towards success or failure of these measures provide insight into future tool development. PMID:19340597

  3. Disaggregating Activities of Daily Living Limitations for Predicting Nursing Home Admission

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Joelle H; Mitchell, Olivia S; Koh, Benedict S K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether disaggregated activities of daily living (ADL) limitations better predict the risk of nursing home admission compared to conventionally used ADL disability counts. Data Sources We used panel data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) for years 1998–2010. The HRS is a nationally representative survey of adults older than 50 years (n = 18,801). Study Design We fitted Cox regressions in a continuous time survival model with age at first nursing home admission as the outcome. Time-varying ADL disability types were the key explanatory variables. Principal Findings Of the six ADL limitations, bathing difficulty emerged as the strongest predictor of subsequent nursing home placement across cohorts. Eating and dressing limitations were also influential in driving admissions among more recent cohorts. Using simple ADL counts for analysis yielded similar adjusted R2s; however, the amount of explained variance doubled when we allowed the ADL disability measures to time-vary rather than remain static. Conclusions Looking beyond simple ADL counts can provide health professionals insights into which specific disability types trigger long-term nursing home use. Functional disabilities measured closer in time carry more prognostic power than static measures. PMID:25256014

  4. Severity assessment tools in ICU patients with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Pereira, J M; Moreno, R P; Matos, R; Rhodes, A; Martin-Loeches, I; Cecconi, M; Lisboa, T; Rello, J

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if severity assessment tools (general severity of illness and community-acquired pneumonia specific scores) can be used to guide decisions for patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to pandemic influenza A pneumonia. A prospective, observational, multicentre study included 265 patients with a mean age of 42 (±16.1) years and an ICU mortality of 31.7%. On admission to the ICU, the mean pneumonia severity index (PSI) score was 103.2 ± 43.2 points, the CURB-65 score was 1.7 ± 1.1 points and the PIRO-CAP score was 3.2 ± 1.5 points. None of the scores had a good predictive ability: area under the ROC for PSI, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.65-0.78); CURB-65, 0.67 (95% CI, 0.59-0.74); and PIRO-CAP, 0.64 (95% CI, 0.56-0.71). The PSI score (OR, 1.022 (1.009-1.034), p 0.001) was independently associated with ICU mortality; however, none of the three scores, when used at ICU admission, were able to reliably detect a low-risk group of patients. Low risk for mortality was identified in 27.5% of patients using PIRO-CAP, but above 40% when using PSI (I-III) or CURB65 (<2). Observed mortality was 13.7%, 13.5% and 19.4%, respectively. Pneumonia-specific scores undervalued severity and should not be used as instruments to guide decisions in the ICU. PMID:22264290

  5. Circulating Mitochondrial DNA in Patients in the ICU as a Marker of Mortality: Derivation and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Angela J.; Gazourian, Lee; Youn, Sojung; Massaro, Anthony F.; Quintana, Carolina; Osorio, Juan C.; Wang, Zhaoxi; Zhao, Yang; Lawler, Laurie A.; Christie, Jason D.; Meyer, Nuala J.; Causland, Finnian R. Mc.; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Waxman, Aaron B.; Chung, Raymond T.; Bueno, Raphael; Rosas, Ivan O.; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Baron, Rebecca M.; Christiani, David C.; Hunninghake, Gary M.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a critical activator of inflammation and the innate immune system. However, mtDNA level has not been tested for its role as a biomarker in the intensive care unit (ICU). We hypothesized that circulating cell-free mtDNA levels would be associated with mortality and improve risk prediction in ICU patients. Methods and Findings Analyses of mtDNA levels were performed on blood samples obtained from two prospective observational cohort studies of ICU patients (the Brigham and Women's Hospital Registry of Critical Illness [BWH RoCI, n = 200] and Molecular Epidemiology of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome [ME ARDS, n = 243]). mtDNA levels in plasma were assessed by measuring the copy number of the NADH dehydrogenase 1 gene using quantitative real-time PCR. Medical ICU patients with an elevated mtDNA level (≥3,200 copies/µl plasma) had increased odds of dying within 28 d of ICU admission in both the BWH RoCI (odds ratio [OR] 7.5, 95% CI 3.6–15.8, p = 1×10−7) and ME ARDS (OR 8.4, 95% CI 2.9–24.2, p = 9×10−5) cohorts, while no evidence for association was noted in non-medical ICU patients. The addition of an elevated mtDNA level improved the net reclassification index (NRI) of 28-d mortality among medical ICU patients when added to clinical models in both the BWH RoCI (NRI 79%, standard error 14%, p<1×10−4) and ME ARDS (NRI 55%, standard error 20%, p = 0.007) cohorts. In the BWH RoCI cohort, those with an elevated mtDNA level had an increased risk of death, even in analyses limited to patients with sepsis or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Study limitations include the lack of data elucidating the concise pathological roles of mtDNA in the patients, and the limited numbers of measurements for some of biomarkers. Conclusions Increased mtDNA levels are associated with ICU mortality, and inclusion of mtDNA level improves risk prediction in medical ICU patients. Our data suggest that mtDNA could

  6. Differential Validity, Differential Prediction, and College Admission Testing: A Comprehensive Review and Analysis. Research Report No. 2001-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, John W.

    2001-01-01

    This research report is a review and analysis of all of the published studies during the past 25+ years (since 1974) in the area of differential validity/prediction and college admission testing. More specifically, this report includes 49 separate studies of differences in validity and/or prediction for different racial/ethnic groups and/or for…

  7. Length of Hospital Stay Prediction at the Admission Stage for Cardiology Patients Using Artificial Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Fang Jennifer; Chen, Po-Chia; Chen, Yen-You; Song, Hao-Yuan; Lin, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Fu-Man; Huang, Qiou-Pieng

    2016-01-01

    For hospitals' admission management, the ability to predict length of stay (LOS) as early as in the preadmission stage might be helpful to monitor the quality of inpatient care. This study is to develop artificial neural network (ANN) models to predict LOS for inpatients with one of the three primary diagnoses: coronary atherosclerosis (CAS), heart failure (HF), and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a cardiovascular unit in a Christian hospital in Taipei, Taiwan. A total of 2,377 cardiology patients discharged between October 1, 2010, and December 31, 2011, were analyzed. Using ANN or linear regression model was able to predict correctly for 88.07% to 89.95% CAS patients at the predischarge stage and for 88.31% to 91.53% at the preadmission stage. For AMI or HF patients, the accuracy ranged from 64.12% to 66.78% at the predischarge stage and 63.69% to 67.47% at the preadmission stage when a tolerance of 2 days was allowed. PMID:27195660

  8. Patients with detectable cocaethylene are more likely to require intensive care unit admission after trauma.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Sage E; Sutijono, Darrell; Moon, Cynthia H; Subramanian, Ramanand A; Calaycay, Jim; Rushbrook, Julie I; Zehtabchi, Shahriar

    2010-11-01

    Cocaethylene (CE) is a toxic metabolite that is formed after simultaneous consumption of cocaine and ethanol. This potent stimulant is more toxic than cocaine and has a longer half-life. The deleterious hemodynamic and cardiovascular effects of CE have been proven in animal models. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of CE on clinical outcomes after trauma. We prospectively enrolled adult (≥13 years) trauma patients requiring admission. Predictor variables were age, sex, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score, base deficit, and toxicology groups (ethanol alone, cocaine alone, CE, and none). The outcomes examined were mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and length of hospital stay (LOS). We used nonparametric tests to compare continuous variables and χ² test to compare categorical data. We constructed a logistic regression to identify variables that could predict mortality and ICU admission. We enrolled 417 patients (74% male; 70% blunt injury; median age, 40 [range, 13-95]; overall mortality, 2.2%). Urine toxicology and serum ethanol level screens classified patients into the following groups: 13.4% ethanol only, 4.1% cocaine only, 8.9% CE, and 46% none. Mortality and LOS were not statistically different among the groups. In logistic regression analysis, none of the variables were statistically significant in predicting mortality. However, the presence of CE significantly increased the likelihood of ICU admission (odds ratio, 5.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-22). The presence of detectable CE in the urine does not increase the mortality or LOS in trauma patients requiring admission but does increase the likelihood of ICU admission. PMID:20825763

  9. How Useful Are Traditional Admission Measures in Predicting Graduation within Four Years? Research Report 2013-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattern, Krista D.; Patterson, Brian F.; Wyatt, Jeffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Research has consistently shown that traditional admission measures--SAT® scores and high school grade point average (HSGPA)--are valid predictors of early college performance such as first-year grades; however, their usefulness to predict later college outcomes has been questioned, especially for the SAT. This study builds on previous research…

  10. Predicting the Risk of Clostridium difficile Infection upon Admission: A Score to Identify Patients for Antimicrobial Stewardship Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, Jennifer L; Smith, David H; Petrik, Amanda F; Yang, Xiuhai; Thorp, Micah L; Barton, Tracy; Barton, Karen; Labreche, Matthew; Spindel, Steven J; Johnson, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing morbidity and health care costs related to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have heightened interest in methods to identify patients who would most benefit from interventions to mitigate the likelihood of CDI. Objective: To develop a risk score that can be calculated upon hospital admission and used by antimicrobial stewards, including pharmacists and clinicians, to identify patients at risk for CDI who would benefit from enhanced antibiotic review and patient education. Methods: We assembled a cohort of Kaiser Permanente Northwest patients with a hospital admission from July 1, 2005, through December 30, 2012, and identified CDI in the six months following hospital admission. Using Cox regression, we constructed a score to identify patients at high risk for CDI on the basis of preadmission characteristics. We calculated and plotted the observed six-month CDI risk for each decile of predicted risk. Results: We identified 721 CDIs following 54,186 hospital admissions—a 6-month incidence of 13.3 CDIs/1000 patient admissions. Patients with the highest predicted risk of CDI had an observed incidence of 53 CDIs/1000 patient admissions. The score differentiated between patients who do and do not develop CDI, with values for the extended C-statistic of 0.75. Predicted risk for CDI agreed closely with observed risk. Conclusion: Our risk score accurately predicted six-month risk for CDI using preadmission characteristics. Accurate predictions among the highest-risk patient subgroups allow for the identification of patients who could be targeted for and who would likely benefit from review of inpatient antibiotic use or enhanced educational efforts at the time of discharge planning. PMID:26845084

  11. Use of admissions data to predict student success in postsecondary freshman science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Amie K.

    The purpose of this study was to determine if significant relationships exist for any of the variables, age, gender, previous GPA, test scores (ACT, Compass), number of accumulated credits, and student success in Biology. This study strived to determine what academic/admissions data can be used to determine the likelihood of student success in Biology. A quantitative correlational study using stepwise multiple regression analysis was used for this study. The study was a retrospective study. Data was composed of a convenience archival sample from the institutional database. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine the effect each independent variable has on the dependent variable of student success. For the data set ACT, the variables math score, prealg score, writing score, reading score, and previous GPA were all significant. For data set CMP the variable of student's age was not significant, but the other variables were significant. For the Blanks data set, the only variable of significance was gender. Using stepwise multiple regression analysis the data sets produced regression models showing predictability based on stepwise significance. For Blanks data set, the variables previous hours earned, gender, age, and previous GPA were used. For the ACT data set, math score and reading score were used. For the CMP data set the variables included math score, writing score, previous GPA, gender, reading score, and previous hours earned. The level of predictability of the regression equation for the ACT data set and Blank data set was low. However, the predictability for the CMP data set was moderate. The highest percent of variance explained by the regression models was 11.6% of the CMP data set.

  12. Beyond the Intensive Care Unit (ICU): Countywide Impact of Universal ICU Staphylococcus aureus Decolonization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bruce Y; Bartsch, Sarah M; Wong, Kim F; McKinnell, James A; Cui, Eric; Cao, Chenghua; Kim, Diane S; Miller, Loren G; Huang, Susan S

    2016-03-01

    A recent trial showed that universal decolonization in adult intensive care units (ICUs) resulted in greater reductions in all bloodstream infections and clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) than either targeted decolonization or screening and isolation. Since regional health-care facilities are highly interconnected through patient-sharing, focusing on individual ICUs may miss the broader impact of decolonization. Using our Regional Healthcare Ecosystem Analyst simulation model of all health-care facilities in Orange County, California, we evaluated the impact of chlorhexidine baths and mupirocin on all ICU admissions when universal decolonization was implemented for 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of ICU beds countywide (compared with screening and contact precautions). Direct benefits were substantial in ICUs implementing decolonization (a median 60% relative reduction in MRSA prevalence). When 100% of countywide ICU beds were decolonized, there were spillover effects in general wards, long-term acute-care facilities, and nursing homes resulting in median 8.0%, 3.0%, and 1.9% relative MRSA reductions at 1 year, respectively. MRSA prevalence decreased by a relative 3.2% countywide, with similar effects for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. We showed that a large proportion of decolonization's benefits are missed when accounting only for ICU impact. Approximately 70% of the countywide cases of MRSA carriage averted after 1 year of universal ICU decolonization were outside the ICU. PMID:26872710

  13. Beyond the Intensive Care Unit (ICU): Countywide Impact of Universal ICU Staphylococcus aureus Decolonization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Bartsch, Sarah M.; Wong, Kim F.; McKinnell, James A.; Cui, Eric; Cao, Chenghua; Kim, Diane S.; Miller, Loren G.; Huang, Susan S.

    2016-01-01

    A recent trial showed that universal decolonization in adult intensive care units (ICUs) resulted in greater reductions in all bloodstream infections and clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) than either targeted decolonization or screening and isolation. Since regional health-care facilities are highly interconnected through patient-sharing, focusing on individual ICUs may miss the broader impact of decolonization. Using our Regional Healthcare Ecosystem Analyst simulation model of all health-care facilities in Orange County, California, we evaluated the impact of chlorhexidine baths and mupirocin on all ICU admissions when universal decolonization was implemented for 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of ICU beds countywide (compared with screening and contact precautions). Direct benefits were substantial in ICUs implementing decolonization (a median 60% relative reduction in MRSA prevalence). When 100% of countywide ICU beds were decolonized, there were spillover effects in general wards, long-term acute-care facilities, and nursing homes resulting in median 8.0%, 3.0%, and 1.9% relative MRSA reductions at 1 year, respectively. MRSA prevalence decreased by a relative 3.2% countywide, with similar effects for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. We showed that a large proportion of decolonization's benefits are missed when accounting only for ICU impact. Approximately 70% of the countywide cases of MRSA carriage averted after 1 year of universal ICU decolonization were outside the ICU. PMID:26872710

  14. Evacuation of the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Alexander S.; Beninati, William; Fang, Ray; Einav, Sharon; Rubinson, Lewis; Kissoon, Niranjan; Devereaux, Asha V.; Christian, Michael D.; Grissom, Colin K.; Christian, Michael D.; Devereaux, Asha V.; Dichter, Jeffrey R.; Kissoon, Niranjan; Rubinson, Lewis; Amundson, Dennis; Anderson, Michael R.; Balk, Robert; Barfield, Wanda D.; Bartz, Martha; Benditt, Josh; Beninati, William; Berkowitz, Kenneth A.; Daugherty Biddison, Lee; Braner, Dana; Branson, Richard D; Burkle, Frederick M.; Cairns, Bruce A.; Carr, Brendan G.; Courtney, Brooke; DeDecker, Lisa D.; De Jong, Marla J.; Dominguez-Cherit, Guillermo; Dries, David; Einav, Sharon; Erstad, Brian L.; Etienne, Mill; Fagbuyi, Daniel B.; Fang, Ray; Feldman, Henry; Garzon, Hernando; Geiling, James; Gomersall, Charles D.; Grissom, Colin K.; Hanfling, Dan; Hick, John L.; Hodge, James G.; Hupert, Nathaniel; Ingbar, David; Kanter, Robert K.; King, Mary A.; Kuhnley, Robert N.; Lawler, James; Leung, Sharon; Levy, Deborah A.; Lim, Matthew L.; Livinski, Alicia; Luyckx, Valerie; Marcozzi, David; Medina, Justine; Miramontes, David A.; Mutter, Ryan; Niven, Alexander S.; Penn, Matthew S.; Pepe, Paul E.; Powell, Tia; Prezant, David; Reed, Mary Jane; Rich, Preston; Rodriquez, Dario; Roxland, Beth E.; Sarani, Babak; Shah, Umair A.; Skippen, Peter; Sprung, Charles L.; Subbarao, Italo; Talmor, Daniel; Toner, Eric S.; Tosh, Pritish K.; Upperman, Jeffrey S.; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Weireter, Leonard J.; West, T. Eoin; Wilgis, John; Ornelas, Joe; McBride, Deborah; Reid, David; Baez, Amado; Baldisseri, Marie; Blumenstock, James S.; Cooper, Art; Ellender, Tim; Helminiak, Clare; Jimenez, Edgar; Krug, Steve; Lamana, Joe; Masur, Henry; Mathivha, L. Rudo; Osterholm, Michael T.; Reynolds, H. Neal; Sandrock, Christian; Sprecher, Armand; Tillyard, Andrew; White, Douglas; Wise, Robert; Yeskey, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the high risk for patient harm during unanticipated ICU evacuations, critical care providers receive little to no training on how to perform safe and effective ICU evacuations. We reviewed the pertinent published literature and offer suggestions for the critical care provider regarding ICU evacuation. The suggestions in this article are important for all who are involved in pandemics or disasters with multiple critically ill or injured patients, including front-line clinicians, hospital administrators, and public health or government officials. METHODS: The Evacuation and Mobilization topic panel used the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) Guidelines Oversight Committee’s methodology to develop seven key questions for which specific literature searches were conducted to identify studies upon which evidence-based recommendations could be made. No studies of sufficient quality were identified. Therefore, the panel developed expert opinion-based suggestions using a modified Delphi process. RESULTS: Based on current best evidence, we provide 13 suggestions outlining a systematic approach to prepare for and execute an effective ICU evacuation during a disaster. Interhospital and intrahospital collaboration and functional ICU communication are critical for success. Pre-event planning and preparation are required for a no-notice evacuation. A Critical Care Team Leader must be designated within the Hospital Incident Command System. A three-stage ICU Evacuation Timeline, including (1) no immediate threat, (2) evacuation threat, and (3) evacuation implementation, should be used. Detailed suggestions on ICU evacuation, including regional planning, evacuation drills, patient transport preparation and equipment, patient prioritization and distribution for evacuation, patient information and tracking, and federal and international evacuation assistance systems, are also provided. CONCLUSIONS: Successful ICU evacuation during a disaster requires

  15. Previous hospital admissions and disease severity predict the use of antipsychotic combination treatment in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although not recommended in treatment guidelines, previous studies have shown a frequent use of more than one antipsychotic agent among patients with schizophrenia. The main aims of the present study were to explore the antipsychotic treatment regimen among patients with schizophrenia in a catchment area-based sample and to investigate clinical characteristics associated with antipsychotic combination treatment. Methods The study included 329 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia using antipsychotic medication. Patients were recruited from all psychiatric hospitals in Oslo. Diagnoses were obtained by use of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Additionally, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and number of hospitalisations and pharmacological treatment were assessed. Results Multiple hospital admissions, low GAF scores and high PANSS scores, were significantly associated with the prescription of combination treatment with two or more antipsychotics. The use of combination treatment increased significantly from the second hospital admission. Combination therapy was not significantly associated with age or gender. Regression models confirmed that an increasing number of hospital admission was the strongest predictor of the use of two or more antipsychotics. Conclusions Previous hospital admissions and disease severity measured by high PANSS scores and low GAF scores, predict the use of antipsychotic combination treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Future studies should further explore the use of antipsychotic drug treatment in clinical practice and partly based on such data establish more robust treatment guidelines for patients with persistently high symptom load. PMID:21812996

  16. Limited Predictive Utility of Admissions Scores and Objective Structured Clinical Examinations for APPE Performance

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline E.; Khanova, Julia; Scolaro, Kelly; Rodgers, Philip T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine the relationship between admissions, objective structured clinical examination (OSCE), and advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) scores. Methods. Admissions, OSCE, and APPE scores were collected for students who graduated from the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program in spring of 2012 and spring of 2013 (n=289). Pearson correlation was used to examine relationships between variables, and independent t test was used to compare mean scores between groups. Results. All relationships among admissions data (undergraduate grade point average, composite PCAT scores, and interview scores) and OSCE and APPE scores were weak, with the strongest association found between the final OSCE and ambulatory care APPEs. Students with low scores on the final OSCE performed lower than others on the acute care, ambulatory care, and community APPEs. Conclusion. This study highlights the complexities of assessing student development of noncognitive professional skills over the course of a curriculum. PMID:26430271

  17. Economic implications of end-of-life care in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Nita; Curtis, J. Randall

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Advance care planning and palliative care interventions can improve the quality of end-of-life care by reducing unwanted high intensity care at the end of life. This may have important economic implications and may reduce financial burden of patients' families. We review the literature to examine the impact advance care planning and palliative care have on ICU utilization, specifically ICU admissions and ICU LOS, to provide insight into ways to reduce costs and financial burden of care while simultaneously improving quality of care. Recent findings We identified 3 studies assessing the impact of palliative care consultation on ICU admissions for patients with life-limiting illness; all 3 demonstrate reduced ICU admissions for patients receiving palliative care consultation. Among 16 studies evaluating ICU LOS as an outcome, 5 report no change and 11 report decrease in LOS for patients receiving advance care planning or palliative care. These studies are heterogeneous in design and target population; however, a trend towards reduced ICU utilization exists. Summary Advance care planning and palliative care can reduce ICU utilization at the end of life. The degree to which reducing ICU utilization decreases emotional and financial burden of end-of-life care for patients and families is unknown. PMID:25222642

  18. ICU Director Data

    PubMed Central

    Ogbu, Ogbonna C.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    Improving value within critical care remains a priority because it represents a significant portion of health-care spending, faces high rates of adverse events, and inconsistently delivers evidence-based practices. ICU directors are increasingly required to understand all aspects of the value provided by their units to inform local improvement efforts and relate effectively to external parties. A clear understanding of the overall process of measuring quality and value as well as the strengths, limitations, and potential application of individual metrics is critical to supporting this charge. In this review, we provide a conceptual framework for understanding value metrics, describe an approach to developing a value measurement program, and summarize common metrics to characterize ICU value. We first summarize how ICU value can be represented as a function of outcomes and costs. We expand this equation and relate it to both the classic structure-process-outcome framework for quality assessment and the Institute of Medicine’s six aims of health care. We then describe how ICU leaders can develop their own value measurement process by identifying target areas, selecting appropriate measures, acquiring the necessary data, analyzing the data, and disseminating the findings. Within this measurement process, we summarize common metrics that can be used to characterize ICU value. As health care, in general, and critical care, in particular, changes and data become more available, it is increasingly important for ICU leaders to understand how to effectively acquire, evaluate, and apply data to improve the value of care provided to patients. PMID:25846533

  19. The Predictive Power of Personal Statements in Admissions: A Meta-Analysis and Cautionary Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Sara C.; Klieger, David M.; Borneman, Matthew J.; Kuncel, Nathan R.

    2009-01-01

    Personal statements are a widely used and popular predictor in academic admissions; however, relatively little is known about their effectiveness as a predictor of student performance. This study involved a meta-analysis of the relationships of personal statements to measures of student performance (e.g., GPA) and other predictors. An initial…

  20. Characteristics Predicting Nursing Home Admission in the Program of All-Inclusive Care for Elderly People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Susan M.; Steinwachs, Donald M.; Rathouz, Paul J.; Burton, Lynda C.; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2005-01-01

    Long term care in a nursing home prior to enrollment in PACE remain at high risk of readmission, despite the availability of comprehensive services. This study determined overall risk and predictors of long-term nursing home admission within the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). Design and Methods: Data PACE records for 4,646…

  1. Predicting Nursing Home Admissions among Incontinent Older Adults: A Comparison of Residential Differences across Six Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coward, Raymond T.

    1995-01-01

    Uses data from the Longitudinal Studies on Aging (1984-90) to examine a sample who at baseline lived in community settings and reported problems with urinary incontinence (n=719). Analyses indicate that residents of less urbanized and more thinly populated nonmetropolitan counties were more likely to have a nursing home admission than others. (JPS)

  2. Use of Admissions Data to Predict Student Success in Postsecondary Freshman Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Amie K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if significant relationships exist for any of the variables, age, gender, previous GPA, test scores (ACT, Compass), number of accumulated credits, and student success in Biology. This study strived to determine what academic/admissions data can be used to determine the likelihood of student success in…

  3. Outcome of ICU patients with Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction As data from Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in intensive care unit (ICU) are still scarce, our objectives were to assess the morbidity and mortality of ICU-acquired CDI. Methods We compared patients with ICU-acquired CDI (watery or unformed stools occurring ≥ 72 hours after ICU admission with a stool sample positive for C. difficile toxin A or B) with two groups of controls hospitalized at the same time in the same unit. The first control group comprised patients with ICU-acquired diarrhea occurring ≥ 72 hours after ICU admission with a stool sample negative for C. difficile and for toxin A or B. The second group comprised patients without any diarrhea. Results Among 5,260 patients, 512 patients developed one episode of diarrhea. Among them, 69 (13.5%) had a CDI; 10 (14.5%) of them were community-acquired, contrasting with 12 (17.4%) that were hospital-acquired and 47 (68%) that were ICU-acquired. A pseudomembranous colitis was associated in 24/47 (51%) ICU patients. The median delay between diagnosis and metronidazole administration was one day (25th Quartile; 75th Quartile (0; 2) days). The case-fatality rate for patients with ICU-acquired CDI was 10/47 (21.5%), as compared to 112/443 (25.3%) for patients with negative tests. Neither the crude mortality (cause specific hazard ratio; CSHR = 0.70, 95% confidence interval; CI 0.36 to 1.35, P = 0.3) nor the adjusted mortality to confounding variables (CSHR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.64, P = 0.6) were significantly different between CDI patients and diarrheic patients without CDI. Compared to the general ICU population, neither the crude mortality (SHR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.34 to 1.21, P = 0.17), nor the mortality adjusted to confounding variables (CSHR = 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38 to 1.35, P = 0.3), were significantly different between the two groups. The estimated increase in the duration of stay due to CDI was 8.0 days ± 9.3 days, (P = 0.4) in comparison to the diarrheic population

  4. Intrahospital teleradiology: ER to the ICU connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattner, Stefanie; Herron, John M.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Towers, Jeffrey D.; Thaete, F. Leland; Gur, David

    1994-05-01

    Availability of initial radiographic images acquired in the Emergency Department (ED) for patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) has been a problem in our operations. It is not uncommon that images from the ED are delivered to the appropriate ICU several hours after admission, and this problem is typically magnified `off hours'. We installed a film digitizer in the ED and required technologists to digitize all chest radiographs as they came out of the film processor. These images are archived and transmitted to a workstation located near one of our busier medical ICUs. The system has been operational for eight months, and it provides reliable timely access to such images. Careful review of a large number of cases clearly demonstrated that such a system is not only feasible, but extremely effective in improving both perceptions and actual quality of radiology services in this difficult environment. Image quality was found to be acceptable for this purpose.

  5. [Pain and fear in the ICU].

    PubMed

    Chamorro, C; Romera, M A

    2015-10-01

    Pain and fear are still the most common memories that refer patients after ICU admission. Recently an important politician named the UCI as the branch of the hell. It is necessary to carry out profound changes in terms of direct relationships with patients and their relatives, as well as changes in environmental design and work and visit organization, to banish the vision that our society about the UCI. In a step which advocates for early mobilization of critical patients is necessary to improve analgesia and sedation strategies. The ICU is the best place for administering and monitoring analgesic drugs. The correct analgesia should not be a pending matter of the intensivist but a mandatory course. PMID:26096153

  6. Going beyond standardized exam scores in graduate admissions: Enhancing diversity and predicting success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassun, Keivan

    2014-01-01

    We present the approach to graduate admissions developed by the Fisk-Vanderbilt Masters-to-PhD Bridge Program. The approach emphasizes a careful examination of applicants' basic academic preparedness together with noncognitive tracers of future success -- so-called "grit" or "performance character" -- and does not rely upon standardized exam scores such as GREs. This approach has enabled the Fisk-Vanderbilt program to identify and select large numbers of underrepresented minority students who are succeeding at the PhD level, making the program the nation's top producer of underrepresented minority PhDs in astronomy. We highlight outcomes of the program utilizing this "enlightened approach" to admissions, and share tools developed by the program for use by others.

  7. Predictive Value of the School-leaving Grade and Prognosis of Different Admission Groups for Academic Performance and Continuity in the Medical Course – a Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Kadmon, Guni; Resch, Franz; Duelli, Roman; Kadmon, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Background: The school-leaving GPA and the time since completion of secondary education are the major criteria for admission to German medical schools. However, the predictive value of the school-leaving grade and the admission delay have not been thoroughly examined since the amendment of the Medical Licensing Regulations and the introduction of reformed curricula in 2002. Detailed information on the prognosis of the different admission groups is also missing. Aim: To examine the predictive values of the school-leaving grade and the age at enrolment for academic performance and continuity throughout the reformed medical course. Methods: The study includes the central admission groups “GPA-best” and “delayed admission” as well as the primary and secondary local admission groups of three consecutive cohorts. The relationship between the criteria academic performance and continuity and the predictors school-leaving GPA, enrolment age, and admission group affiliation were examined up to the beginning of the final clerkship year. Results: The academic performance and the prolongation of the pre-clinical part of undergraduate training were significantly related to the school-leaving GPA. Conversely, the dropout rate was related to age at enrolment. The students of the GPA-best group and the primary local admission group performed best and had the lowest dropout rates. The students of the delayed admission group and secondary local admission group performed significantly worse. More than 20% of these students dropped out within the pre-clinical course, half of them due to poor academic performance. However, the academic performance of all of the admission groups was highly variable and only about 35% of the students of each group reached the final clerkship year within the regular time. Discussion: The school-leaving grade and age appear to have different prognostic implications for academic performance and continuity. Both factors have consequences for the

  8. Association of Intensive Care Unit Admission With Mortality Among Older Patients With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Thomas S.; Sjoding, Michael W.; Ryan, Andrew M.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.; Cooke, Colin R.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Among patients whose need for intensive care is uncertain, the relationship of intensive care unit (ICU) admission with mortality and costs is unknown. OBJECTIVE To estimate the relationship between ICU admission and outcomes for elderly patients with pneumonia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries (aged >64 years) admitted to 2988 acute care hospitals in the United States with pneumonia from 2010 to 2012. EXPOSURES ICU admission vs general ward admission. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was 30-day all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included Medicare spending and hospital costs. Patient and hospital characteristics were adjusted to account for differences between patients with and without ICU admission. To account for unmeasured confounding, an instrumental variable was used—the differential distance to a hospital with high ICU admission (defined as any hospital in the upper 2 quintiles of ICU use). RESULTS Among 1 112 394 Medicare beneficiaries with pneumonia, 328 404 (30%) were admitted to the ICU. In unadjusted analyses, patients admitted to the ICU had significantly higher 30-day mortality, Medicare spending, and hospital costs than patients admitted to a general hospital ward. Patients (n = 553 597) living closer than the median differential distance (<3.3 miles) to a hospital with high ICU admission were significantly more likely to be admitted to the ICU than patients living farther away (n = 558 797) (36%for patients living closer vs 23%for patients living farther, P < .001). In adjusted analyses, for the 13%of patients whose ICU admission decision appeared to be discretionary (dependent only on distance), ICU admission was associated with a significantly lower adjusted 30-day mortality (14.8%for ICU admission vs 20.5%for general ward admission, P = .02; absolute decrease, −5.7%[95%CI, −10.6%, −0.9%]), yet there were no significant differences in Medicare spending or hospital

  9. ICU Telemedicine Solutions.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, Steven A; Lilly, Craig M

    2015-09-01

    During the last 15 years, critical care services provided via telemedicine have expanded to now be incorporated into the care of 13% of patients in intensive care units (ICUs) in the United States. A response to shortfalls in the availability of critical care-trained providers has evolved into integrated programs of ICU care with contributions to improved outcomes through proactive management, population oversight, and standardization of care processes. The most impactful characteristics of successful ICU telemedicine programs are now better understood with more than a decade of national experience and the accrued benefits to health care systems. PMID:26304277

  10. Mortality and functional disability after spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage: the predictive impact of overall admission factors.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Behnam; Heidari, Kamran; Asadollahi, Shadi; Nazari, Maryam; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Amini, Afshin

    2013-11-01

    To determine the effects of different prognostic factors, including previous antiplatelet therapy, admission data, and radiographic findings on discharge and 3-month neurological condition using modified Rankin scale (mRS) and mortality at 30 days and 3-month follow-up in patients presenting to the emergency department with spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (sICH). Between January and July 2012, 120 consecutive patients (males 62%, females 38%), who were admitted within 48 h of symptoms onset, were included. We recorded the following data on admission: demographics; functional scores of ICH, Glasgow Coma Scale, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale; vital signs; smoking status; use of illicit drug; preadmission antiplatelet treatment; results of laboratory tests (platelet count, serum glucose, sodium and creatinine levels, and prothrombin time); and primary neuroimaging findings [intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), midline shift, and hydrocephalus]. In multivariate analysis using adjusted model for demographics and prior antiplatelet therapy; functional scores, laboratory results, and diabetes history correlated with mortality during 30 days after the event. Moreover, the parameters on the initial computed tomography scan significantly increased 30-day fatality rate and was correlated with increase in the discharge mRS score of survivors. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of early mortality associated with IVH presentation was 2.34 (CI 1.76-3.02, p = 0.003). The corresponding ORs in those with midline shift displacement and hydrocephalus were 2.18 (95% CI 2.08-3.80, p = 0.01) and 1.62 (95% CI 1.01-2.63, p = 0.02), respectively. In patients with ICH, prognostic factors, include various clinical parameters and paraclinical findings of admission time. PMID:23543380

  11. Factors That Predict Short-term Intensive Care Unit Mortality in Patients With Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    BAHIRWANI, RANJEETA; GHABRIL, MARWAN; FORDE, KIMBERLY A.; CHATRATH, HEMANT; WOLF, KAREN M.; URIBE, LINDSAY; REDDY, K. RAJENDER; FUCHS, BARRY; CHALASANI, NAGA

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Despite advances in critical care medicine, the mortality rate is high among critically ill patients with cirrhosis. We aimed to identify factors that predict early (7 d) mortality among patients with cirrhosis admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and to develop a risk-stratification model. METHODS We collected data from patients with cirrhosis admitted to the ICU at Indiana University (IU–ICU) from December 1, 2006, through December 31, 2009 (n = 185), or at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn–ICU) from May 1, 2005, through December 31, 2010 (n = 206). Factors associated with mortality within 7 days of admission (7-d mortality) were determined by logistic regression analyses. A model was constructed based on the predictive parameters available on the first day of ICU admission in the IU–ICU cohort and then validated in the Penn–ICU cohort. RESULTS Median Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores at ICU admission were 25 in the IU–ICU cohort (interquartile range, 23–34) and 32 in the Penn–ICU cohort (interquartile range, 26–41); corresponding 7-day mortalities were 28.3% and 53.6%, respectively. MELD score (odds ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07–1.2) and mechanical ventilation (odds ratio, 5.7; 95% CI, 2.3–14.1) were associated independently with 7-day mortality in the IU–ICU. A model based on these 2 variables separated IU–ICU patients into low-, medium-, and high-risk groups; these groups had 7-day mortalities of 9%, 27%, and 74%, respectively (concordance index, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.72– 0.87; P < 10−8). The model was applied to the Penn–ICU cohort; the low-, medium-, and high-risk groups had 7-day mortalities of 33%, 56%, and 71%, respectively (concordance index, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.59–0.74; P < 10−4). CONCLUSIONS A model based on MELD score and mechanical ventilation on day 1 can stratify risk of early mortality in patients with cirrhosis admitted to the ICU. More studies are needed to

  12. Utile or futile: biomarkers in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Balmelli, Cathrin; Drexler, Beatrice; Mueller, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Biomarkers complement other clinical information by proving quantitative data regarding a pathophysiological mechanism that can be used for the early diagnosis of a specific disease, to monitor and guide treatment, and to predict the risk of death or other adverse events. The stronger the link between the information provided by the biomarker and the immediate clinical course of action that we physicians take in response, the higher the clinical utility of the biomarker. This link is weakest for prognostic biomarkers applied in patients with a wide variety of diseases, such as in unselected intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Although the added value on top of current ICU mortality scores seems to be too low to justify clinical use, the observation that hemodynamic cardiac stress and inflammation are present in multiple conditions provides important insights into the pathophysiology of common disorders in the ICU. PMID:21457515

  13. Estimating the Effect of Palliative Care Interventions and Advance Care Planning on ICU Utilization: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Nita; Kross, Erin K.; Engelberg, Ruth A.; Coe, Norma B.; Long, Ann C.; Curtis, J. Randall

    2015-01-01

    Objective We conducted a systematic review to answer three questions: 1) Do advance care planning and palliative care interventions lead to a reduction in ICU admissions for adult patients with life-limiting illnesses? 2) Do these interventions reduce ICU length of stay? and 3) Is it possible to provide estimates of the magnitude of these effects? Data Sources We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases from 1995 through March 2014. Study Selection We included studies that reported controlled trials (randomized and nonrandomized) assessing the impact of advance care planning and both primary and specialty palliative care interventions on ICU admissions and ICU length of stay for critically ill adult patients. Data Extraction Nine randomized controlled trials and 13 nonrandomized controlled trials were selected from 216 references. Data Synthesis Nineteen of these studies were used to provide estimates of the magnitude of effect of palliative care interventions and advance care planning on ICU admission and length of stay. Three studies reporting on ICU admissions suggest that advance care planning interventions reduce the relative risk of ICU admission for patients at high risk of death by 37% (sd, 23%). For trials evaluating palliative care interventions in the ICU setting, we found a 26% (sd, 23%) relative risk reduction in length of stay with these interventions. Conclusions Despite wide variation in study type and quality, patients who received advance care planning or palliative care interventions consistently showed a pattern toward decreased ICU admissions and reduced ICU length of stay. Although sds are wide and study quality varied, the magnitude of the effect is possible to estimate and provides a basis for modeling impact on healthcare costs. PMID:25574794

  14. [ICU acquired neuromyopathy].

    PubMed

    Gueret, G; Guillouet, M; Vermeersch, V; Guillard, E; Talarmin, H; Nguyen, B-V; Rannou, F; Giroux-Metges, M-A; Pennec, J-P; Ozier, Y

    2013-09-01

    ICU acquired neuromyopathy (IANM) is the most frequent neurological pathology observed in ICU. Nerve and muscle defects are merged with neuromuscular junction abnormalities. Its physiopathology is complex. The aim is probably the redistribution of nutriments and metabolism towards defense against sepsis. The main risk factors are sepsis, its severity and its duration of evolution. IANM is usually diagnosed in view of difficulties in weaning from mechanical ventilation, but electrophysiology may allow an earlier diagnosis. There is no curative therapy, but early treatment of sepsis, glycemic control as well as early physiotherapy may decrease its incidence. The outcomes of IANM are an increase in morbi-mortality and possibly long-lasting neuromuscular abnormalities as far as tetraplegia. PMID:23958176

  15. Variable cost of ICU care, a micro-costing analysis.

    PubMed

    Karabatsou, Dimitra; Tsironi, Maria; Tsigou, Evdoxia; Boutzouka, Eleni; Katsoulas, Theodoros; Baltopoulos, George

    2016-08-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) costs account for a great part of a hospital's expenses. The objective of the present study was to measure the patient-specific cost of ICU treatment, to identify the most important cost drivers in ICU and to examine the role of various contributing factors in cost configuration. A retrospective cost analysis of all ICU patients who were admitted during 2011 in a Greek General, seven-bed ICU and stayed for at least 24hours was performed, by applying bottom-up analysis. Data collected included demographics and the exact cost of every single material used for patients' care. Prices were yielded from the hospital's purchasing costs and from the national price list of the imaging and laboratory tests, which was provided by the Ministry of Health. A total of 138 patients were included. Variable cost per ICU day was €573.18. A substantial cost variation was found in the total costs obtained for individual patients (median: €3443, range: €243.70-€116,355). Medicines were responsible for more than half of the cost and antibiotics accounted for the largest part of it, followed by blood products and cardiovascular drugs. Medical cause of admission, severe illness and increased length of stay, mechanical ventilation and dialysis were the factors associated with cost escalation. ICU variable cost is patient-specific, varies according to each patient's needs and is influenced by several factors. The exact estimation of variable cost is a pre-requisite in order to control ICU expenses. PMID:27080569

  16. Predicting Academic Success in the Admissions Process: Placing an Empirical Approach in a Larger Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perfetto, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Uses the example of Vanderbilt University's predicted grade point average model to discuss the use of empirical criteria (such as high school grades and standardized test scores) within a comprehensive approach when predicting the future academic success of college applicants. (EV)

  17. Telemedicine Intervention Improves ICU Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sadaka, Farid; Palagiri, Ashok; Trottier, Steven; Deibert, Wendy; Gudmestad, Donna; Sommer, Steven E.; Veremakis, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Telemedicine for the intensive care unit (Tele-ICU) was founded as a means of delivering the clinical expertise of intensivists located remotely to hospitals with inadequate access to intensive care specialists. This was a retrospective pre- and postintervention study of adult patients admitted to a community hospital ICU. The patients in the preintervention period (n = 630) and during the Tele-ICU period (n = 2193) were controlled for baseline characteristics, acute physiologic scores (APS), and acute physiologic and health evaluation (APACHE IV) scores. Mean APS scores were 37.1 (SD, 22.8) and 37.7 (SD, 19.4) (P = 0.56), and mean APACHE IV scores were 49.7 (SD, 24.8) and 50.4 (SD, 21.0) (P = 0.53), respectively. ICU mortality was 7.9% during the preintervention period compared with 3.8% during the Tele-ICU period (odds ratio (OR) = 0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.32–0.66, P < 0.0001). ICU LOS in days was 2.7 (SD, 4.1) compared with 2.2 (SD, 3.4), respectively (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI, 1.00–1.40, P = 0.01). Implementation of Tele-ICU intervention was associated with reduced ICU mortality and ICU LOS. This suggests that there are benefits of a closed Tele-ICU intervention beyond what is provided by daytime bedside physicians. PMID:23365729

  18. The Use of the Addiction Severity Index Psychiatric Composite Scores to Predict Psychiatric Inpatient Admissions.

    PubMed

    Drymalski, Walter M; Nunley, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence of co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders indicates a need for integrated behavioral health treatment that addresses both types of disorder simultaneously. One component of this integrated treatment is the use of an assessment process that can concurrently identify the presence of each class of disorder. The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) has been extensively used and researched in the field of substance use disorders for over 30 years. The ASI has seven sections, including a section on substance use disorders and a section on psychiatric symptoms, making it a potential candidate for a co-occurring screen during intake. The following study utilized a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to determine an optimal cutoff score on the ASI psychiatric composite score to identify which individuals seeking substance use disorder treatment were admitted to the Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division's psychiatric hospital in the year subsequent to their ASI administration. Of the 19,320 individuals who completed an initial ASI in our system, 343 had an inpatient admission. The receiver operating characteristic curve was statistically significant, with an area under the curve of 0.75. A cutoff of 0.27 had a sensitivity of 0.77 and a specificity of 0.61, such that over 60% (11,963/19,320) of the sample was excluded. These results suggest that the ASI psychiatric composite score may be a useful initial screen to identify those with potential mental health problems/needs in a behavioral health system attempting to integrate addiction and mental health services. PMID:27580192

  19. Patient Admission Preferences and Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Clayton; Melnikow, Joy; Dinh, Tu; Holmes, James F.; Gaona, Samuel D.; Bottyan, Thomas; Paterniti, Debora; Nishijima, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Understanding patient perceptions and preferences of hospital care is important to improve patients’ hospitalization experiences and satisfaction. The objective of this study was to investigate patient preferences and perceptions of hospital care, specifically differences between intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital floor admissions. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey of emergency department (ED) patients who were presented with a hypothetical scenario of a patient with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). We surveyed their preferences and perceptions of hospital care related to this scenario. A closed-ended questionnaire provided quantitative data on patient preferences and perceptions of hospital care and an open-ended questionnaire evaluated factors that may not have been captured with the closed-ended questionnaire. Results Out of 302 study patients, the ability for family and friends to visit (83%), nurse availability (80%), and physician availability (79%) were the factors most commonly rated “very important,” while the cost of hospitalization (62%) and length of hospitalization (59%) were the factors least commonly rated “very important.” When asked to choose between the ICU and the floor if they were the patient in the scenario, 33 patients (10.9%) choose the ICU, 133 chose the floor (44.0%), and 136 (45.0%) had no preference. Conclusion Based on a hypothetical scenario of mild TBI, the majority of patients preferred admission to the floor or had no preference compared to admission to the ICU. Humanistic factors such as the availability of doctors and nurses and the ability to interact with family appear to have a greater priority than systematic factors of hospitalization, such as length and cost of hospitalization or length of time in the ED waiting for an in-patient bed. PMID:26587095

  20. Variability of ICU Use in Adult Patients With Minor Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Daniel K.; Haukoos, Jason S.; Newgard, Craig D.; Staudenmayer, Kristan; White, Nathan; Slattery, David; Maxim, Preston C.; Gee, Christopher A.; Hsia, Renee Y.; Melnikow, Joy A.; Holmes, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Study objective Patients with minor traumatic intracranial hemorrhage are frequently admitted to the ICU, although many never require critical care interventions. To describe ICU resource use in minor traumatic intracranial hemorrhage, we assess (1) the variability of ICU use in a cohort of patients with minor traumatic intracranial hemorrhage across multiple trauma centers, and (2) the proportion of adult patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage who are admitted to the ICU and never receive a critical care intervention during hospitalization. In addition, we evaluate the association between ICU admission and key independent variables. Methods A structured, historical cohort study of adult patients (aged 18 years and older) with minor traumatic intracranial hemorrhage was conducted within a consortium of 8 Level I trauma centers in the western United States from January 2005 to June 2010. The study population included patients with minor traumatic intracranial hemorrhage, defined as an emergency department (ED) Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 15 (normal mental status) and an Injury Severity Score less than 16 (no other major organ injury). The primary outcome measure was initial ICU admission. The secondary outcome measure was a critical care intervention during hospitalization. Critical care interventions included mechanical ventilation, neurosurgical intervention, transfusion of blood products, vasopressor or inotrope administration, and invasive hemodynamic monitoring. ED disposition and the proportion of ICU patients not receiving a critical care intervention were compared across sites with descriptive statistics. The association between ICU admission and predetermined independent variables was analyzed with multivariable regression. Results Among 11,240 adult patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage, 1,412 (13%) had minor traumatic intracranial hemorrhage and complete ED disposition data (mean age 48 years; SD 20 years). ICU use within this

  1. Derivation of baseline lung impedance in chronic heart failure patients: use for monitoring pulmonary congestion and predicting admissions for decompensation.

    PubMed

    Shochat, Michael; Shotan, Avraham; Blondheim, David S; Kazatsker, Mark; Dahan, Iris; Asif, Aya; Shochat, Ilia; Frimerman, Aaron; Rozenman, Yoseph; Meisel, Simcha R

    2015-06-01

    The instantaneous lung impedance (ILI) is one of the methods to assess pulmonary congestion or edema (PCE) in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients. Due to usually existing PCE in CHF patients when evaluated, baseline lung impedance (BLI) is unknown. Therefore, the relation of ILI to BLI is unknown. Our aim was to evaluate methods to calculate and appraise BLI or its derivative as reflecting the clinical status of CHF patients. ILI and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class were assessed in 222 patients (67 ± 11 years, LVEF <35 %) during 32 months of frequent outpatient clinic visits. ILI, measured in 120 asymptomatic patients at NYHA class I, with no congestion on the chest X-ray and a low-normal 6-min walk, was defined as BLI. Using measured BLI and ILI values in these patients, formulas for BLI calculation were derived based on logistic regression analysis or on the disparity between BLI and ILI values at different NYHA stages. Both models were equally reliable with <3 % difference between measured and calculated BLI (p = NS). ΔLIR = (ILI/BLI - 1) × 100 % reflected the degree of PCE, or deviation from baseline, correlated with NYHA class (r = -0.9, p < 0.001) and could serve for monitoring. Of study patients, 123 were re-hospitalized for PCE during follow up. Their ΔLIR decreased gradually from -21.7 ± 8.2 % 4 weeks pre-admission to -37.8 ± 9.3 % on admission (p < 0.001). Patients improved during hospital stay (NYHA 3.7 ± 0.5 to 2.9 ± 0.8, p < 0.0001) with ΔLIR increasing to -29.1 ± 12.0 % (p < 0.001). ΔLIR based on calculated BLI correlated with the clinical status of CHF patients and allowed the prediction of hospitalizations for PCE. PMID:25193676

  2. Costs, effects and implementation of routine data emergency admission risk prediction models in primary care for patients with, or at risk of, chronic conditions: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, Mark Rhys; Evans, Bridie Angela; Nelson, Kayleigh; Hutchings, Hayley; Russell, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Emergency admission risk prediction models are increasingly used to identify patients, typically with one or more chronic conditions, for proactive management in primary care to avoid admissions, save costs and improve patient experience. Aim To identify and review the published evidence on the costs, effects and implementation of emergency admission risk prediction models in primary care for patients with, or at risk of, chronic conditions. Methods We shall search for studies of healthcare interventions using routine data-generated emergency admission risk models. We shall report: the effects on emergency admissions and health costs; clinician and patient views; and implementation findings. We shall search ASSIA, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, HMIC, ISI Web of Science, MEDLINE and Scopus from 2005, review references in and citations of included articles, search key journals and contact experts. Study selection, data extraction and quality assessment will be performed by two independent reviewers. Ethics and dissemination No ethical permissions are required for this study using published data. Findings will be disseminated widely, including publication in a peer-reviewed journal and through conferences in primary and emergency care and chronic conditions. We judge our results will help a wide audience including primary care practitioners and commissioners, and policymakers. Trial registration number CRD42015016874; Pre-results. PMID:26932140

  3. Semistructured black-box prediction: proposed approach for asthma admissions in London.

    PubMed

    Soyiri, Ireneous N; Reidpath, Daniel D

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is a global public health problem and the most common chronic disease among children. The factors associated with the condition are diverse, and environmental factors appear to be the leading cause of asthma exacerbation and its worsening disease burden. However, it remains unknown how changes in the environment affect asthma over time, and how temporal or environmental factors predict asthma events. The methodologies for forecasting asthma and other similar chronic conditions are not comprehensively documented anywhere to account for semistructured noncausal forecasting approaches. This paper highlights and discusses practical issues associated with asthma and the environment, and suggests possible approaches for developing decision-making tools in the form of semistructured black-box models, which is relatively new for asthma. Two statistical methods which can potentially be used in predictive modeling and health forecasting for both anticipated and peak events are suggested. Importantly, this paper attempts to bridge the areas of epidemiology, environmental medicine and exposure risks, and health services provision. The ideas discussed herein will support the development and implementation of early warning systems for chronic respiratory conditions in large populations, and ultimately lead to better decision-making tools for improving health service delivery. PMID:22973117

  4. Depression Common After Time Spent in ICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160482.html Depression Common After Time Spent in ICU About one-third of ICU ... among former ICU patients are three to four times higher than in the general population, according to ...

  5. Vitamin D deficiency at admission is not associated with 90-day mortality in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock: Observational FINNAKI cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ala-Kokko, Tero I; Mutt, Shivaprakash J; Nisula, Sara; Koskenkari, Juha; Liisanantti, Janne; Ohtonen, Pasi; Poukkanen, Meri; Laurila, Jouko J; Pettilä, Ville; Herzig, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with increased mortality in patients that are critically ill. This study explored whether vitamin D levels were associated with 90-day mortality in severe sepsis or septic shock. Methods Plasma vitamin D levels were measured on admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) in a prospective multicentre observational study. Results 610 patients with severe sepsis were included; of these, 178 (29%) had septic shock. Vitamin D deficiency (<50 nmol/L) was present in 333 (55%) patients. The 90-day mortality did not differ among patients with or without vitamin D deficiency (28.3% vs. 28.5%, p = 0.789). Diabetes was more common among patients deficient compared to those not deficient in vitamin D (30% vs. 18%, p < 0.001). Hospital-acquired infections at admission were more prevalent in patients with a vitamin D deficiency (31% vs. 16%, p < 0.001). A multivariable adjusted Cox regression model showed that low vitamin D levels could not predict 90-day mortality (<50 nmol/L: hazard ratio (HR) 0.99 (95% CI: 0.72-1.36), p > 0.9; and <25 nmol/L: HR 0.44 (95% CI: 0.22-0.87), p = 0.018). Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency detected upon ICU admission was not associated with 90-day mortality in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Key messages In severe sepsis and septic shock, a vitamin D deficiency upon ICU admission was not associated with increased mortality. Compared to patients with sufficient vitamin D, patients with deficient vitamin D more frequently exhibited diabetes, elevated C-reactive protein levels, and hospital-acquired infections upon ICU admission, and they more frequently developed acute kidney injury. PMID:26800186

  6. Predicting Mortality in Low-Income Country ICUs: The Rwanda Mortality Probability Model (R-MPM)

    PubMed Central

    Kiviri, Willy; Fowler, Robert A.; Mueller, Ariel; Novack, Victor; Banner-Goodspeed, Valerie M.; Weinkauf, Julia L.; Talmor, Daniel S.; Twagirumugabe, Theogene

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intensive Care Unit (ICU) risk prediction models are used to compare outcomes for quality improvement initiatives, benchmarking, and research. While such models provide robust tools in high-income countries, an ICU risk prediction model has not been validated in a low-income country where ICU population characteristics are different from those in high-income countries, and where laboratory-based patient data are often unavailable. We sought to validate the Mortality Probability Admission Model, version III (MPM0-III) in two public ICUs in Rwanda and to develop a new Rwanda Mortality Probability Model (R-MPM) for use in low-income countries. Methods We prospectively collected data on all adult patients admitted to Rwanda’s two public ICUs between August 19, 2013 and October 6, 2014. We described demographic and presenting characteristics and outcomes. We assessed the discrimination and calibration of the MPM0-III model. Using stepwise selection, we developed a new logistic model for risk prediction, the R-MPM, and used bootstrapping techniques to test for optimism in the model. Results Among 427 consecutive adults, the median age was 34 (IQR 25–47) years and mortality was 48.7%. Mechanical ventilation was initiated for 85.3%, and 41.9% received vasopressors. The MPM0-III predicted mortality with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.72 and Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square statistic p = 0.024. We developed a new model using five variables: age, suspected or confirmed infection within 24 hours of ICU admission, hypotension or shock as a reason for ICU admission, Glasgow Coma Scale score at ICU admission, and heart rate at ICU admission. Using these five variables, the R-MPM predicted outcomes with area under the ROC curve of 0.81 with 95% confidence interval of (0.77, 0.86), and Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square statistic p = 0.154. Conclusions The MPM0-III has modest ability to predict mortality in a population of Rwandan ICU patients. The R

  7. Intensive care unit admission in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: patient information and the physician’s decision-making process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction ICU admission is required in more than 25% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at some time during the course of the disease. However, only limited information is available on how physicians communicate with COPD patients about ICU admission. Methods COPD patients and relatives from 19 French ICUs were interviewed at ICU discharge about their knowledge of COPD. French pulmonologists self-reported their practices for informing and discussing intensive care treatment preferences with COPD patients. Finally, pulmonologists and ICU physicians reported barriers and facilitators for transfer of COPD patients to the ICU and to propose invasive mechanical ventilation. Results Self-report questionnaires were filled in by 126 COPD patients and 102 relatives, and 173 pulmonologists and 135 ICU physicians were interviewed. For 41% (n = 39) of patients and 54% (n = 51) of relatives, ICU admission had never been expected prior to admission. One half of patients were not routinely informed by their pulmonologist about possible ICU admission at some time during the course of COPD. Moreover, treatment options (that is, non-invasive ventilation, intubation and mechanical ventilation or tracheotomy) were not explained to COPD patients during regular pulmonologist visits. Pulmonologists and ICU physician have different perceptions of the decision-making process pertaining to ICU admission and intubation. Conclusions The information provided by pulmonologists to patients and families concerning the prognosis of COPD, the risks of ICU admission and specific care could be improved in order to deliver ICU care in accordance with the patient’s personal values and preferences. Given the discrepancies in the decision-making process between pulmonologists and intensivists, a more collaborative approach should probably be discussed. PMID:24898342

  8. Shocking Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric; Millman, Sierra

    2007-01-01

    Marilee Jones's career had been a remarkable success. She joined Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT's) admissions office in 1979, landing a job in Cambridge at a time when boys ruled the sandbox of the admissions profession. Her job was to help MIT recruit more women, who then made up less than one-fifth of the institute's students. She…

  9. Building a Decision Support System for Inpatient Admission Prediction With the Manchester Triage System and Administrative Check-in Variables.

    PubMed

    Zlotnik, Alexander; Alfaro, Miguel Cuchí; Pérez, María Carmen Pérez; Gallardo-Antolín, Ascensión; Martínez, Juan Manuel Montero

    2016-05-01

    The usage of decision support tools in emergency departments, based on predictive models, capable of estimating the probability of admission for patients in the emergency department may give nursing staff the possibility of allocating resources in advance. We present a methodology for developing and building one such system for a large specialized care hospital using a logistic regression and an artificial neural network model using nine routinely collected variables available right at the end of the triage process.A database of 255.668 triaged nonobstetric emergency department presentations from the Ramon y Cajal University Hospital of Madrid, from January 2011 to December 2012, was used to develop and test the models, with 66% of the data used for derivation and 34% for validation, with an ordered nonrandom partition. On the validation dataset areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were 0.8568 (95% confidence interval, 0.8508-0.8583) for the logistic regression model and 0.8575 (95% confidence interval, 0.8540-0. 8610) for the artificial neural network model. χ Values for Hosmer-Lemeshow fixed "deciles of risk" were 65.32 for the logistic regression model and 17.28 for the artificial neural network model. A nomogram was generated upon the logistic regression model and an automated software decision support system with a Web interface was built based on the artificial neural network model. PMID:26974710

  10. External validation of the Hospital-patient One-year Mortality Risk (HOMR) model for predicting death within 1 year after hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    van Walraven, Carl; McAlister, Finlay A.; Bakal, Jeffrey A.; Hawken, Steven; Donzé, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background: Predicting long-term survival after admission to hospital is helpful for clinical, administrative and research purposes. The Hospital-patient One-year Mortality Risk (HOMR) model was derived and internally validated to predict the risk of death within 1 year after admission. We conducted an external validation of the model in a large multicentre study. Methods: We used administrative data for all nonpsychiatric admissions of adult patients to hospitals in the provinces of Ontario (2003–2010) and Alberta (2011–2012), and to the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston (2010–2012) to calculate each patient’s HOMR score at admission. The HOMR score is based on a set of parameters that captures patient demographics, health burden and severity of acute illness. We determined patient status (alive or dead) 1 year after admission using population-based registries. Results: The 3 validation cohorts (n = 2 862 996 in Ontario, 210 595 in Alberta and 66 683 in Boston) were distinct from each other and from the derivation cohort. The overall risk of death within 1 year after admission was 8.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.7% to 8.8%). The HOMR score was strongly and significantly associated with risk of death in all populations and was highly discriminative, with a C statistic ranging from 0.89 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.91) to 0.92 (95% CI 0.91 to 0.92). Observed and expected outcome risks were similar (median absolute difference in percent dying in 1 yr 0.3%, interquartile range 0.05%–2.5%). Interpretation: The HOMR score, calculated using routinely collected administrative data, accurately predicted the risk of death among adult patients within 1 year after admission to hospital for nonpsychiatric indications. Similar performance was seen when the score was used in geographically and temporally diverse populations. The HOMR model can be used for risk adjustment in analyses of health administrative data to predict long-term survival among hospital patients

  11. A predictive instrument to improve coronary-care-unit admission practices in acute ischemic heart disease. A prospective multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pozen, M W; D'Agostino, R B; Selker, H P; Sytkowski, P A; Hood, W B

    1984-05-17

    Each year 1.5 million patients are admitted to coronary-care units (CCUs) for suspected acute ischemic heart disease; for half of these, the diagnosis is ultimately "ruled out." In this study, conducted in the emergency rooms of six New England hospitals ranging in type from urban teaching centers to rural nonteaching hospitals, we sought to develop a diagnostic aid to help emergency room physicians reduce the number of their CCU admissions of patients without acute cardiac ischemia. From data on 2801 patients, we developed a predictive instrument for use in a hand-held programmable calculator, which requires only 20 seconds to compute a patient's probability of having acute cardiac ischemia. In a prospective trial that included 2320 patients in the six hospitals, physicians' diagnostic specificity for acute ischemia increased when the probability value determined by the instrument was made available to them. Rates of false-positive diagnosis decreased without any increase in rates of false-negative diagnosis. Among study patients with a final diagnosis of "not acute ischemia," the number of CCU admissions decreased 30 per cent, without any increase in missed diagnoses of ischemia. The proportion of CCU admissions that represented patients without acute ischemia dropped from 44 to 33 per cent. Widespread use of this predictive instrument could reduce the number of CCU admissions in this country by more than 250,000 per year. PMID:6371525

  12. Ability of admissions criteria to predict early academic performance among students of health science colleges at King Saud University, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alhadlaq, Adel M; Alshammari, Osama F; Alsager, Saleh M; Neel, Khalid A Fouda; Mohamed, Ashry G

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of admissions criteria at King Saud University (KSU), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, to predict students' early academic performance at three health science colleges (medicine, dentistry, and pharmacy). A retrospective cohort study was conducted with data from the records of students enrolled in the three colleges from the 2008-09 to 2010-11 academic years. The admissions criteria-high school grade average (HSGA), aptitude test (APT) score, and achievement test (ACT) score-were the independent variables. The dependent variable was the average of students' first- and second-year grade point average (GPA). The results showed that the ACT was a better predictor of the students' early academic performance than the HSGA (β=0.368, β=0.254, respectively). No significant relationship was found between the APT and students' early academic performance (β=-0.019, p>0.01). The ACT was most predictive for pharmacy students (β=0.405), followed by dental students (β =0.392) and medical students (β=0.195). Overall, the current admissions criteria explained only 25.5% of the variance in the students' early academic performance. While the ACT and HSGA were found to be predictive of students' early academic performance in health colleges at KSU, the APT was not a strong predictor. Since the combined current admissions criteria for the health science colleges at KSU were weak predictors of the variance in early academic performance, it may be necessary to consider noncognitive evaluation methods during the admission process. PMID:26034031

  13. Predictive power of UKCAT and other pre-admission measures for performance in a medical school in Glasgow: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) and its four subtests are currently used by 24 Medical and Dental Schools in the UK for admissions. This longitudinal study examines the predictive validity of UKCAT for final performance in the undergraduate medical degree programme at one Medical School and compares this with the predictive validity of the selection measures available pre-UKCAT. Methods This was a retrospective observational study of one cohort of students, admitted to Glasgow Medical School in 2007. We examined the associations which UKCAT scores, school science grades and pre-admissions interview scores had with performance indicators, particularly final composite scores that determine students’ postgraduate training opportunities and overall ranking (Educational Performance Measure - EPM, and Honours and Commendation – H&C). Analyses were conducted both with and without adjustment for potential socio-demographic confounders (gender, age, ethnicity and area deprivation). Results Despite its predictive value declining as students progress through the course, UKCAT was associated with the final composite scores. In mutually adjusted analyses (also adjusted for socio-demographic confounders), only UKCAT total showed independent relationships with both EPM (p = 0.005) and H&C (p = 0.004), school science achievements predicted EPM (p = 0.009), and pre-admissions interview score predicted neither. UKCAT showed less socio-demographic variation than did TSS. Conclusion UKCAT has a modest predictive power for overall course performance at the University of Glasgow Medical School over and above that of school science achievements or pre-admission interview score and we conclude that UKCAT is the most useful predictor of final ranking. PMID:24919950

  14. Innovative designs for the smart ICU: Part 2: The ICU.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Neil A

    2014-03-01

    Successfully designing a new ICU requires clarity of vision and purpose and the recognition that the patient room is the core of the ICU experience for patients, staff, and visitors. The ICU can be conceptualized into three components: the patient room, central areas, and universal support services. Each patient room should be designed for single patient use and be similarly configured and equipped. The design of the room should focus upon functionality, ease of use, healing, safety, infection control, communications, and connectivity. All aspects of the room, including its infrastructure; zones for work, care, and visiting; environment, medical devices, and approaches to privacy; logistics; and waste management, are important elements in the design process. Since most medical devices used at the ICU bedside are really sophisticated computers, the ICU needs to be capable of supporting the full scope of medical informatics. The patient rooms, the central ICU areas (central stations, corridors, supply rooms, pharmacy, laboratory, staff lounge, visitor waiting room, on-call suite, conference rooms, and offices), and the universal support services (infection prevention, finishings and flooring, staff communications, signage and wayfinding, security, and fire and safety) work best when fully interwoven. This coordination helps establish efficient and safe patient throughput and care and fosters physical and social cohesiveness within the ICU. A balanced approach to centralized and decentralized monitoring and logistics also offers great flexibility. Synchronization of the universal support services in the ICU with the hospital's existing systems maintains unity of purpose and continuity across the enterprise and avoids unnecessary duplication of efforts. PMID:24590027

  15. The Changing Role of Palliative Care in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Aslakson, Rebecca A.; Curtis, J. Randall; Nelson, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Palliative care is an interprofessional specialty as well as an approach to care by all clinicians caring for patients with serious and complex illness. Unlike hospice, palliative care is based not on prognosis but on need and is an essential component of comprehensive care for critically ill patients from the time of ICU admission. In this clinically focused article, we review evidence of opportunities to improve palliative care for critically ill adults, summarize strategies for ICU palliative care improvement, and identify resources to support implementation. Data Sources We searched the MEDLINE database from inception through January 2014. We also searched the Reference Library of The Improving Palliative Care in the ICU Project website sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Center to Advance Palliative Care, which is updated monthly. We hand-searched reference lists and author files. Study Selection Selected studies included all English-language articles concerning adult patients using the search terms "intensive care" or "critical care" with "palliative care," "supportive care," "end-of-life care," or "ethics." Data Extraction After examination of peer-reviewed original scientific articles, consensus statements, guidelines, and reviews resulting from our literature search, we made final selections based on author consensus. Data Synthesis Existing evidence is organized to address: 1) opportunities to alleviate physical and emotional symptoms, improve communication, and provide support for patients and families; 2) models and specific interventions for improving ICU palliative care; 3) available resources for ICU palliative care improvement; and 4) ongoing challenges and targets for future research. Key domains of ICU palliative care have been defined and operationalized as measures of quality. There is increasing recognition that effective integration of palliative care during acute and chronic critical illness may help patients and

  16. Predicting admissions and time spent in hospital over a decade in a population-based record linkage study: the EPIC-Norfolk cohort

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shabina; Khaw, K T

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify hospital use in a general population over 10 years follow-up and to examine related factors in a general population-based cohort. Design A prospective population-based study of men and women. Setting Norfolk, UK. Participants 11 228 men and 13 786 women aged 40–79 years in 1993–1997 followed between 1999 and 2009. Main outcomes measures Number of hospital admissions and total bed days for individuals over a 10-year follow-up period identified using record linkage; five categories for admissions (from zero to highest ≥7) and hospital bed days (from zero to highest ≥20 nights). Results Over a period of 10 years, 18 179 (72.7%) study participants had at least one admission to hospital, 13.8% with 7 or more admissions and 19.9% with 20 or more nights in hospital. In logistic regression models with outcome ≥7 admissions, low education level OR 1.14 (1.05 to 1.24), age OR per 10-year increase 1.75 (1.67 to 1.82), male sex OR 1.32 (1.22 to 1.42), manual social class 1.22 (1.13 to 1.32), current cigarette smoker OR 1.53 (1.37 to 1.71) and body mass index >30 kg/m² OR 1.41 (1.28 to 1.56) all independently predicted the outcome with p<0.0001. Results were similar for those with ≥20 hospital bed days. A risk score constructed using male sex, manual social class, no educational qualifications; current smoker and body mass index >30 kg/m², estimated percentages of the cohort in the categories of admission numbers and hospital bed days in stratified age bands with twofold to threefold differences in future hospital use between those with high-risk and low-risk scores. Conclusions The future probability of cumulative hospital admissions and bed days appears independently related to a range of simple demographic and behavioural indicators. The strongest of these is increasing age with high body mass index and smoking having similar magnitudes for predicting risk of future hospital usage. PMID:26792216

  17. Hospital Admissions, Transfers and Costs of Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Nikki; Lingsma, Hester F.; Vanrolleghem, Ann M.; Sturkenboom, Miriam C. J. M.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Jacobs, Bart C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has a highly variable clinical course, leading to frequent transfers within and between hospitals and high associated costs. We defined the current admissions, transfers and costs in relation to disease severity of GBS. Methods Dutch neurologists were requested to report patients diagnosed with GBS between November 2009 and November 2010. Information regarding clinical course and transfers was obtained via neurologists and general practitioners. Results 87 GBS patients were included with maximal GBS disability score of 1 or 2 (28%), 3 or 4 (53%), 5 (18%) and 6 (1%). Four mildly affected GBS patients were not hospital admitted. Of the 83 hospitalized patients 68 (82%) were initially admitted at a neurology department, 4 (5%) at an ICU, 4 (5%) at pediatrics, 4 (5%) at pediatrics neurology and 3 (4%) at internal medicine. Median hospital stay was 17 days (IQR 11–26 days, absolute range 1–133 days). Transfers between departments or hospitals occurred in 33 (40%) patients and 25 (30%) were transferred 2 times or more. From a cost-effectiveness perspective 21 (25%) of the admissions was suboptimal. Median costs for hospital admission of GBS patients were 15,060 Euro (IQR 11,226–23,683). Maximal GBS disability score was significantly correlated with total length of stay, number of transfers, ICU admission and costs. Conclusions Hospital admissions for GBS patients are highly heterogeneous, with frequent transfers and higher costs for those with more severe disease. Future research should aim to develop prediction models to early identify the most cost-effective allocation in individual patients. PMID:26859880

  18. The implementation of an Intensive Care Information System allows shortening the ICU length of stay.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Eric; Hoti, Emir; Azoulay, Daniel; Ichai, Philippe; Samuel, Didier; Saliba, Faouzi

    2015-04-01

    Intensive care information systems (ICIS) implemented in intensive care unit (ICU) were shown to improve patient safety, reduce medical errors and increase the time devolved by medical/nursing staff to patients care. Data on the real impact of ICIS on patient outcome are scarce. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of ICIS on the outcome of critically-ill patients. From January 2004 to August 2006, 1,397 patients admitted to our ICU were enrolled in this observational study. This period was divided in two phases: before the implementation of ICIS (BEFORE) and after implementation of ICIS (AFTER). We compared standard ICU patient's outcomes: mortality, length of stay in ICU, hospital stay, and the re-admission rate depending upon BEFORE and AFTER. Although patients admitted AFTER were more severely ill than those of BEFORE (SAPS II: 32.1±17.5 vs. 30.5±18.5, p=0.014, respectively), their ICU length of stay was significantly shorter (8.4±15.2 vs. 6.8±12.9 days; p=0.048) while the re-admission rate and mortality rate were similar (4.4 vs. 4.2%; p=0.86, and 9.6 vs 11.2% p=0.35, respectively) in patients admitted AFTER. We observed that the implementation of ICIS allowed shortening of ICU length of stay without altering other patient outcomes. PMID:24973014

  19. Predicting Different Grades in Different Ways for Selective Admission: Disentangling the First-Year Grade Point Average

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenman, Sebastiaan C.; Bakker, Wieger E.; van Tartwijk, Jan W. F.

    2016-01-01

    The first-year grade point average (FYGPA) is the predominant measure of student success in most studies on university admission. Previous cognitive achievements measured with high school grades or standardized tests have been found to be the strongest predictors of FYGPA. For this reason, standardized tests measuring cognitive achievement are…

  20. The Predictive Validity of the Pharmacy College Admission Test as Compared with that of the Other Academic Predictors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisson, Harriet E.; Dizney, Henry F.

    1980-01-01

    A regression equation incorporating grade point average (GPA), calculus grade, and grades in two sections of the Pharmacy College Admission Test was significantly more useful than using GPA alone. A minimum sum of scores in three PCAT sections was most effective. Cross-validation with new samples was recommended. (Author/CP)

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

    PubMed

    Mellesdal, Liv; Gjestad, Rolf; Johnsen, Erik; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Kroken, Rune A; Mehlum, Lars

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (β = .21, p < .001) and BPD (β = .27, p < .001). A structural model comprising two latent BPD factors, dysregulation and relationship problems, as well as PTSD and several other variables, demonstrated that PTSD was an important correlate of the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals (B = 1.52, p < .01). Dysregulation was associated directly with self-harm (B = 0.28, p < .05), and also through PTSD. These results suggested that PTSD and related dysregulation problems could be important treatment targets for a reduction in the risk of severe self-harm in high-risk psychiatric patients. PMID:26581019

  2. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit admission criteria for haemato-oncological patients: a basis for clinical guidelines implementation.

    PubMed

    Piastra, Marco; Fognani, Giuliana; Franceschi, Alessia

    2011-06-16

    Recent advances in supportive care and progress in the development and use of chemotherapy have considerably improved the prognosis of many children with malignancy, thus the need for intensive care admission and management is increasing, reaching about 40% of patients throughout the disease course. Cancer remains a major death cause in children, though outcomes have considerably improved over the past decades. Prediction of outcome for children with cancer in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) obviously requires clinical guidelines, and these are not well defined, as well as admission criteria. Major determinants of negative outcomes remain severe sepsis/septic shock association and respiratory failure, deserving specific approach in children with cancer, particularly those receiving a bone marrow transplantation. A nationwide consensus should be achieved among pediatric intensivists and oncologists regarding the threshold clinical conditions requiring Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission as well as specific critical care protocols. As demonstrated for the critically ill non-oncologic child, it appears unreasonable that pediatric patients with malignancy can be admitted to an adult Intensive Care Unit ICU. On a national basis a pool of refecence institutions should be identified and early referral to an oncologic PICU is warranted. PMID:21772950

  3. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit admission criteria for haemato-oncological patients: a basis for clinical guidelines implementation

    PubMed Central

    Piastra, Marco; Fognani, Giuliana; Franceschi, Alessia

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in supportive care and progress in the development and use of chemotherapy have considerably improved the prognosis of many children with malignancy, thus the need for intensive care admission and management is increasing, reaching about 40% of patients throughout the disease course. Cancer remains a major death cause in children, though outcomes have considerably improved over the past decades. Prediction of outcome for children with cancer in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) obviously requires clinical guidelines, and these are not well defined, as well as admission criteria. Major determinants of negative outcomes remain severe sepsis/septic shock association and respiratory failure, deserving specific approach in children with cancer, particularly those receiving a bone marrow transplantation. A nationwide consensus should be achieved among pediatric intensivists and oncologists regarding the threshold clinical conditions requiring Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission as well as specific critical care protocols. As demonstrated for the critically ill non-oncologic child, it appears unreasonable that pediatric patients with malignancy can be admitted to an adult Intensive Care Unit ICU. On a national basis a pool of refecence institutions should be identified and early referral to an oncologic PICU is warranted. PMID:21772950

  4. Delirium transitions in the medical ICU: exploring the role of sleep quality and other factors

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; King, Lauren M.; Neufeld, Karin J.; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Rowden, Annette M.; Collop, Nancy A.; Needham, Dale M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Disrupted sleep is a common and potentially modifiable risk factor for delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU). As part of a quality improvement (QI) project to promote sleep in the ICU, we examined the association of perceived sleep quality ratings and other patient and ICU risk factors with daily transition to delirium. Design Secondary analysis of prospective observational study. Setting Medical ICU (MICU) over a 201-day period. Patients 223 patients with ≥1 night in the MICU in between two consecutive days of delirium assessment. Interventions None Measurements Daily perceived sleep quality ratings were measured using the Richards Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (RCSQ). Delirium was measured twice-daily using the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU (CAM-ICU). Other covariates evaluated included: age, sex, race, ICU admission diagnosis, nighttime mechanical ventilation status, prior day’s delirium status, and daily sedation using benzodiazepines and opioids, via both bolus and continuous infusion. Main Results Perceived sleep quality was similar in patients who were ever versus never delirious in the ICU (median [IQR] ratings 58 [35-76] vs. 57 [33-78], respectively p=0.71), and perceived sleep quality was unrelated to delirium transition (adjusted OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.99-1.00). In mechanically ventilated patients, receipt of a continuous benzodiazepine and/or opioid infusion was associated with delirium transition (adjusted OR 4.02, 95% CI 2.19-7.38, p<0.001) and patients reporting use of pharmacological sleep aids at home were less likely to transition to delirium (adjusted OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.20-0.80, p=0.01). Conclusions We found no association between daily perceived sleep quality ratings and transition to delirium. Infusion of benzodiazepine and/or opioid medications was strongly associated with transition to delirium in the ICU in mechanically ventilated patients and is an important, modifiable risk factor for delirium in critically ill

  5. Retrospective study on prognostic importance of serum procalcitonin and amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels as compared to Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV Score on Intensive Care Unit admission, in a mixed Intensive Care Unit population

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Chitra; Dara, Babita; Mehta, Yatin; Tariq, Ali M.; Joby, George V.; Singh, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Timely decision making in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is very essential to improve the outcome of critically sick patients. Conventional scores like Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE IV) are quite cumbersome with calculations and take minimum 24 hours. Procalcitonin has shown to have prognostic value in ICU/Emergency department (ED) in disease states like pneumonia, sepsis etc. NTproBNP has demonstrated excellent diagnostic and prognostic importance in cardiac diseases. It has also been found elevated in non-cardiac diseases. We chose to study the prognostic utility of these markers on ICU admission. Settings and Design: Retrospective observational study. Materials and Methods: A Retrospective analysis of 100 eligible patients was done who had undergone PCT and NTproBNP measurements on ICU admission. Their correlations with all cause mortality, length of hospital stay, need for ventilator support, need for vasopressors were performed. Results: Among 100 randomly selected ICU patients, 28 were non-survivors. NTproBNP values on admission significantly correlated with all cause mortality (P = 0.036, AUC = 0.643) and morbidity (P = 0.000, AUC = 0.763), comparable to that of APACHE-IV score. PCT values on admission did not show significant association with mortality, but correlated well with morbidity and prolonged hospital length of stay (AUC = 0.616, P = 0.045). Conclusion: The current study demonstrated a good predictive value of NTproBNP, in terms of mortality and morbidity comparable to that of APACHE-IV score. Procalcitonin, however, was found to have doubtful prognostic importance. These findings need to be confirmed in a prospective larger study. PMID:27052066

  6. A predictive instrument for acute ischemic heart disease to improve coronary care unit admission practices: a potential on-line tool in a computerized electrocardiograph.

    PubMed

    Selker, H P; D'Agostino, R B; Laks, M M

    1988-01-01

    Each year, 1.5 million patients are admitted to coronary care units (CCUs) for suspected acute ischemic heart disease, but for half of these, the diagnosis is ultimately ruled out. In this study, conducted in the emergency rooms (ERs) of six New England hospitals, the authors sought to develop a diagnostic aid to help ER physicians reduce the numbers of CCU admissions for patients without true acute cardiac ischemia. In phase 1, from data on 2,801 patients, they developed a predictive instrument for use in a handheld programmable calculator, which, based on a mathematical logistic regression formula, computes a patient's probability of having acute cardiac ischemia. In phase 2, a 1-year prospective trial including 2,320 ER patients at the six hospitals, physicians' diagnostic specificity for acute ischemia increased when the probability value determined by the instrument was made available to them (p = 0.002), without a drop in sensitivity. Among patients without acute ischemia, the number of CCU admissions decreased 30% (p = 0.003), without an increase in missed diagnoses of ischemia. The proportion of patients in the CCU without acute ischemia dropped from 44% to 33%. If similar findings were widespread, the use of this predictive instrument could reduce the number of CCU admissions in the United States by more than 250,000 per year. As originally envisioned, the physician could use a pocket-sized programmable calculator to allow quick access to the instrument's probability value, or an ER triage nurse might compute the probability value and write it on the clinical record for the physician's use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3063767

  7. Blood Leukocyte Count on Admission Predicts Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Dharma, Surya; Hapsari, Rosmarini; Siswanto, Bambang B; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Jukema, J Wouter

    2015-06-01

    We aim to test the hypothesis that blood leukocyte count adds prognostic information in patients with acute non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (non-STEMI). A total of 585 patients with acute non-STEMI (thrombolysis in myocardial infarction risk score ≥ 3) were enrolled in this cohort retrospective study. Blood leukocyte count was measured immediately after admission in the emergency department. The composite of death, reinfarction, urgent revascularization, and stroke during hospitalization were defined as the primary end point of the study. The mean age of the patients was 61 ± 9.6 years and most of them were male (79%). Using multivariate Cox regression analysis involving seven variables (history of smoking, hypertension, heart rate > 100 beats/minute, serum creatinine level > 1.5 mg/dL, blood leukocyte count > 11,000/µL, use of β-blocker, and use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor), leukocyte count > 11,000/µL demonstrated to be a strong predictor of the primary end point (hazard ratio = 3.028; 95% confidence interval = 1.69-5.40, p < 0.001). The high blood leukocyte count on admission is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with acute non-STEMI. PMID:26060384

  8. Why women perform better in college than admission scores would predict: Exploring the roles of conscientiousness and course-taking patterns.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Heidi N; Sackett, Paul R; Kuncel, Nathan R; Brothen, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Women typically obtain higher subsequent college GPAs than men with the same admissions test score. A common reaction is to attribute this to a flaw in the admissions test. We explore the possibility that this underprediction of women's performance reflects gender differences in conscientiousness and college course-taking patterns. In Study 1, we focus on using the ACT to predict performance in a single, large course where performance is decomposed into cognitive (exam and quiz scores) and less cognitive, discretionary components (discussion and extra credit points). The ACT does not underpredict female's cognitive performance, but it does underpredict female performance on the less cognitive, discretionary components of academic performance, because it fails to measure and account for the personality trait of conscientiousness. In Study 2, we create 2 course-difficulty indices (Course Challenge and Mean Aptitude in Course) and add them to an HLM regression model to see if they reduce the degree to which SAT scores underpredict female performance. Including Course Challenge does result in a modest reduction of the gender coefficient; however, including Mean Aptitude in Course does not. Thus, differences in course-taking patterns is a partial (albeit small) explanation for the common finding of differential prediction by gender. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26653526

  9. Characterisation of Candida within the Mycobiome/Microbiome of the Lower Respiratory Tract of ICU Patients

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Robert; Halwachs, Bettina; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Klymiuk, Ingeborg; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Hoenigl, Martin; Prattes, Jürgen; Valentin, Thomas; Heidrich, Katharina; Buzina, Walter; Salzer, Helmut J. F.; Rabensteiner, Jasmin; Prüller, Florian; Raggam, Reinhard B.; Meinitzer, Andreas; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Högenauer, Christoph; Quehenberger, Franz; Kashofer, Karl; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Whether the presence of Candida spp. in lower respiratory tract (LRT) secretions is a marker of underlying disease, intensive care unit (ICU) treatment and antibiotic therapy or contributes to poor clinical outcome is unclear. We investigated healthy controls, patients with proposed risk factors for Candida growth in LRT (antibiotic therapy, ICU treatment with and without antibiotic therapy), ICU patients with pneumonia and antibiotic therapy and candidemic patients (for comparison of truly invasive and colonizing Candida spp.). Fungal patterns were determined by conventional culture based microbiology combined with molecular approaches (next generation sequencing, multilocus sequence typing) for description of fungal and concommitant bacterial microbiota in LRT, and host and fungal biomarkes were investigated. Admission to and treatment on ICUs shifted LRT fungal microbiota to Candida spp. dominated fungal profiles but antibiotic therapy did not. Compared to controls, Candida was part of fungal microbiota in LRT of ICU patients without pneumonia with and without antibiotic therapy (63% and 50% of total fungal genera) and of ICU patients with pneumonia with antibiotic therapy (73%) (p<0.05). No case of invasive candidiasis originating from Candida in the LRT was detected. There was no common bacterial microbiota profile associated or dissociated with Candida spp. in LRT. Colonizing and invasive Candida strains (from candidemic patients) did not match to certain clades withdrawing the presence of a particular pathogenic and invasive clade. The presence of Candida spp. in the LRT rather reflected rapidly occurring LRT dysbiosis driven by ICU related factors than was associated with invasive candidiasis. PMID:27206014

  10. Trauma admissions to the Intensive care unit at a reference hospital in Northwestern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Major trauma has been reported to be a major cause of hospitalization and intensive care utilization worldwide and consumes a significant amount of the health care budget. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics and treatment outcome of major trauma patients admitted into our ICU and to identify predictors of outcome. Methods Between January 2008 and December 2010, a descriptive prospective study of all trauma admissions to a multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) of Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania was conducted. Results A total of 312 cases of major trauma were admitted in the ICU, representing 37.1% of the total ICU admissions. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 5.5:1. Their median age was 27 years. Trauma admissions were almost exclusively emergencies (95.2%) and came mainly from the Accident and Emergency (60.6%) and Operating room (23.4%). Road traffic crash (RTC) was the most common cause of injuries affecting 70.8% of patients. Two hundred fourteen patients (68.6%) required surgical intervention. The overall ICU length of stay (LOS) for all trauma patients ranged from 1 to 59 days (median = 8 days). The median ICU length of hospital stay (LOS) for survivors and non-survivors were 8 and 5 days respectively. (P = 0.002). Mortality rate was 32.7%. Mortality rate of trauma patients was significantly higher than that of all ICU admissions (32.7% vs. 18.8%, P = 0.0012). According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, multiple injuries, severe head injuries and burns were responsible for a longer mean ICU stay (P < 0.001) whereas admission Glasgow Coma Score < 9, systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg, injury severity core >16, prolonged duration of loss of consciousness, delayed ICU admission (0.028), the need for ventilatory support and finding of space occupying lesion on computed tomography scan significantly influenced mortality (P < 0.001). Conclusion Trauma resulting from road traffic crashes is a

  11. Hospital-wide infection control practice and Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the intensive care unit (ICU): an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Rella

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To estimate trends in infection/colonisation with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in an intensive care unit (ICU). Design Observational study of results of ICU admission and weekly screens for MRSA. Setting and Participants All ICU admissions in 2001–2012. Interventions ICU admissions were screened for MRSA throughout. In late 2006, screening was extended to the whole hospital and extra measures taken in ICU. Main outcome measures Prevalence of MRSA in ICU admissions and number acquiring MRSA therein. Results In all, 366 of 6565 admissions to ICU were MRSA positive, including 270 of 4466 coming from within the hospital in which prevalence increased with time prior to transfer to ICU. Prevalence in this group was 9.4% (8.2–10.6) in 2001–2006, decreasing to 3.4% (2.3–4.5) in 2007–2009 and 1.3% (0.6–2.0) in 2010–2012, p < 0.001, due to decreased prevalence in those spending >5 days on wards before ICU admission: 18.9% (15.6–22.2) in 2001–2006, 7.1% (4.0–10.2) in 2007–2009 and 1.6% (0.1–3.1) in 2010–2012, p < 0.001. In addition, 201 patients acquired MRSA within ICU, the relative risk being greater when known positives present: 4.34 (3.98–4.70), p < 0.001. Acquisition rate/1000 bed days decreased from 13.3 (11.2–15.4) in 2001–2006 to 3.6 (2.6–4.6) in 2007–2012, p < 0.0001. Of 41 ICU-acquired MRSA bacteraemias, 38 were in 2001–2006. The risk of bacteraemia in those acquiring MRSA decreased from 25% (18.1–31.9) in 2001–2006 to 6.1% (0–12.8) thereafter, p = 0.022. Conclusions Following better hospital-wide infection control, fewer MRSA-positive patients were admitted to ICU with a parallel decrease in acquisition therein. Better practice there reduced the risk of bacteraemia. PMID:25383196

  12. icuARM-An ICU Clinical Decision Support System Using Association Rule Mining

    PubMed Central

    Chanani, Nikhil; Venugopalan, Janani; Maher, Kevin; Wang, May Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development of biomedical monitoring technologies has enabled modern intensive care units (ICUs) to gather vast amounts of multimodal measurement data about their patients. However, processing large volumes of complex data in real-time has become a big challenge. Together with ICU physicians, we have designed and developed an ICU clinical decision support system icuARM based on associate rule mining (ARM), and a publicly available research database MIMIC-II (Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II) that contains more than 40,000 ICU records for 30,000+patients. icuARM is constructed with multiple association rules and an easy-to-use graphical user interface (GUI) for care providers to perform real-time data and information mining in the ICU setting. To validate icuARM, we have investigated the associations between patients' conditions such as comorbidities, demographics, and medications and their ICU outcomes such as ICU length of stay. Coagulopathy surfaced as the most dangerous co-morbidity that leads to the highest possibility (54.1%) of prolonged ICU stay. In addition, women who are older than 50 years have the highest possibility (38.8%) of prolonged ICU stay. For clinical conditions treatable with multiple drugs, icuARM suggests that medication choice can be optimized based on patient-specific characteristics. Overall, icuARM can provide valuable insights for ICU physicians to tailor a patient's treatment based on his or her clinical status in real time. PMID:27170860

  13. icuARM-An ICU Clinical Decision Support System Using Association Rule Mining.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Wen; Chanani, Nikhil; Venugopalan, Janani; Maher, Kevin; Wang, May Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development of biomedical monitoring technologies has enabled modern intensive care units (ICUs) to gather vast amounts of multimodal measurement data about their patients. However, processing large volumes of complex data in real-time has become a big challenge. Together with ICU physicians, we have designed and developed an ICU clinical decision support system icuARM based on associate rule mining (ARM), and a publicly available research database MIMIC-II (Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II) that contains more than 40,000 ICU records for 30,000+patients. icuARM is constructed with multiple association rules and an easy-to-use graphical user interface (GUI) for care providers to perform real-time data and information mining in the ICU setting. To validate icuARM, we have investigated the associations between patients' conditions such as comorbidities, demographics, and medications and their ICU outcomes such as ICU length of stay. Coagulopathy surfaced as the most dangerous co-morbidity that leads to the highest possibility (54.1%) of prolonged ICU stay. In addition, women who are older than 50 years have the highest possibility (38.8%) of prolonged ICU stay. For clinical conditions treatable with multiple drugs, icuARM suggests that medication choice can be optimized based on patient-specific characteristics. Overall, icuARM can provide valuable insights for ICU physicians to tailor a patient's treatment based on his or her clinical status in real time. PMID:27170860

  14. To what extent does the Health Professions Admission Test-Ireland predict performance in early undergraduate tests of communication and clinical skills? – An observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Internationally, tests of general mental ability are used in the selection of medical students. Examples include the Medical College Admission Test, Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test and the UK Clinical Aptitude Test. The most widely used measure of their efficacy is predictive validity. A new tool, the Health Professions Admission Test- Ireland (HPAT-Ireland), was introduced in 2009. Traditionally, selection to Irish undergraduate medical schools relied on academic achievement. Since 2009, Irish and EU applicants are selected on a combination of their secondary school academic record (measured predominately by the Leaving Certificate Examination) and HPAT-Ireland score. This is the first study to report on the predictive validity of the HPAT-Ireland for early undergraduate assessments of communication and clinical skills. Method Students enrolled at two Irish medical schools in 2009 were followed up for two years. Data collected were gender, HPAT-Ireland total and subsection scores; Leaving Certificate Examination plus HPAT-Ireland combined score, Year 1 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) scores (Total score, communication and clinical subtest scores), Year 1 Multiple Choice Questions and Year 2 OSCE and subset scores. We report descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficients and Multiple linear regression models. Results Data were available for 312 students. In Year 1 none of the selection criteria were significantly related to student OSCE performance. The Leaving Certificate Examination and Leaving Certificate plus HPAT-Ireland combined scores correlated with MCQ marks. In Year 2 a series of significant correlations emerged between the HPAT-Ireland and subsections thereof with OSCE Communication Z-scores; OSCE Clinical Z-scores; and Total OSCE Z-scores. However on multiple regression only the relationship between Total OSCE Score and the Total HPAT-Ireland score remained significant; albeit the

  15. The effects of preparatory sensory information on ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shu-Feng; Munjas, Barbara A; Wan, Thomas T H; Cowling, W Richard; Grap, Mary Jo; Wang, Bill B L

    2003-04-01

    Preparatory sensory information (PSI) has been found to have significant effects in reducing distress, tension, restlessness, negative moods, and anxiety, and also in reducing length of postoperative hospitalization during various threatening medical events, but no evidence has demonstrated the effect of PSI on a patient during ICU hospitalization. On the basis of Lazarus' theory, a structural equation model was developed to examine the role of the nursing intervention, PSI, as a significant factor influencing patients' processes of cognitive appraisals and coping, adaptational responses, and patient care outcomes during ICU hospitalization. The analytical model examined the net effect of PSI on outcomes, controlling for the effects of mastery, interpersonal trust, social support, socioeconomic status, severity of illness, age, and gender. A quasi-experiment was executed in four large acute care hospitals. Data were collected from 41 subjects in the control group and from 42 in the treatment group receiving PSI before ICU admission. Structural equation modeling was employed to test the proposed analytic model. The initial tests of model fit indicate that the original model did not fit the data well with GFI = 0.85, AGFI = 0.76, RMSEA = 0.059, p_close = 0.28, and critical N = 78. A revised model was developed, and the fit indices suggested an adequate fit with GFI = 0.90, AGFI = 0.84, RMSEA = 0.00, p_close = 0.89, and critical N = 109. These findings provide empirical support for Lazarus' theory on stress, appraisal, and coping. The findings also verify the beneficial effects of the nursing intervention of PSI on ICU patients. PMID:12617360

  16. Management of invasive candidiasis in nonneutropenic ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis (IC) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among nonneutropenic ICU patients and these life-threatening nosocomial infections require early diagnosis and prompt treatment. However, none of the predictive tools are sufficiently accurate to identify high-risk patients and the potential interest of IC prophylactic, empirical and preemptive treatment in the nonneutropenic ICU population has not yet been demonstrated. In the case of nosocomial severe sepsis after necrotizing pancreatitis or upper digestive anastomotic leakage, early probabilistic antifungals are probably indicated. In the remaining ICU surgical and medical patients, prophylactic and empirical strategies are highly debated because they may promote antifungal selective pressure through an overuse of these molecules. In this context, non-culture-based methods such as mannan or β-D glucan or polymerase chain reaction tests are promising. However, none of these tests used alone in ICU patients is sufficiently accurate to avoid overuse of empirical/preemptive treatment. The interest of strategies associating predictive clinical scores and non-culture-based methods still needs to be demonstrated by well-conducted randomized, controlled trials. While awaiting these studies, we consider that probabilist treatment should be stopped earlier if IC is not proven. PMID:25745560

  17. Utilizing findings from the APACHE III research to develop operational information system for the ICU--the APACHE III ICU Management System.

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, W. A.; Draper, E. A.; Wagner, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    The APACHE III data base reflects the disease, physiologic status, and outcome data from 17,400 ICU patients at 40 hospitals, 26 of which were randomly selected from representative geographic regions, bed size, and teaching status. This provides a nationally representative standard for measuring several important aspects of ICU performance. Results from the study have now been used to develop an automated information system to provide real time information about expected ICU patient outcome, length of stay, production cost, and ICU performance. The information system provides several new capabilities to ICU clinicians, clinic, and hospital administrators. Among the system's capabilities are: the ability to compare local ICU performance against predetermined criteria; the ability to forecast nursing requirements; and, the ability to make both individual and group patient outcome predictions. The system also provides improved administrative support by tracking ICU charges at the point of origin and reduces staff workload eliminating the requirement for several manually maintained logs and patient lists. APACHE III has the capability to electronically interface with and utilize data already captured in existing hospital information systems, automated laboratory information systems, and patient monitoring systems. APACHE III will also be completely integrated with several CIS vendors' products. PMID:1807779

  18. Small subdural hemorrhages: is routine intensive care unit admission necessary?

    PubMed

    Albertine, Paul; Borofsky, Samuel; Brown, Derek; Patel, Smita; Lee, Woojin; Caputy, Anthony; Taheri, M Reza

    2016-03-01

    With advancing technology, the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) for the detection of subdural hematoma (SDH) continues to improve. In some cases, the finding is limited to one or 2 images of the CT examination. At our institution, all patients with an SDH require intensive care unit (ICU) admission, regardless of size. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that patients with a small traumatic SDH on their presenting CT examination do not require the intensive monitoring offered in the ICU and can instead be managed on a hospital unit with a lower level of monitoring. This is a retrospective study of patients evaluated and treated at a level I trauma center for acute traumatic intracranial hemorrhage between 2011 and 2014. The clinical and imaging profile of 87 patients with traumatic SDH were studied. Patients with small isolated traumatic subdural hemorrhage (tSDH) (<10cm(3) blood volume) spent less time in the ICU, demonstrated neurologic and medical stability during hospitalization, and did not require any neurosurgical intervention. It is our recommendation that patients with isolated tSDH (<10cm(3)) do not require ICU monitoring. Patients with small tSDH and additional intracranial hemorrhages overall show low rates of medical decline (4%) and neurologic decline (4%) but may still benefit from ICU observation. Patients with tSDH greater than 10cm(3) overall demonstrated poor clinical courses and outcome and would benefit ICU monitoring. PMID:26795895

  19. Serum creatinine level, a surrogate of muscle mass, predicts mortality in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Kashani, Kianoush

    2016-05-01

    Serum creatinine (SCr) has been widely used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Creatinine generation could be reduced in the setting of low skeletal muscle mass. Thus, SCr has also been used as a surrogate of muscle mass. Low muscle mass is associated with reduced survival in hospitalized patients, especially in the intensive care unit (ICU) settings. Recently, studies have demonstrated high mortality in ICU patients with low admission SCr levels, reflecting that low muscle mass or malnutrition, are associated with increased mortality. However, SCr levels can also be influenced by multiple GFR- and non-GFR-related factors including age, diet, exercise, stress, pregnancy, and kidney disease. Imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound, have recently been studied for muscle mass assessment and demonstrated promising data. This article aims to present the perspectives of the uses of SCr and other methods for prediction of muscle mass and outcomes of ICU patients. PMID:27162688

  20. Serum creatinine level, a surrogate of muscle mass, predicts mortality in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit

    2016-01-01

    Serum creatinine (SCr) has been widely used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Creatinine generation could be reduced in the setting of low skeletal muscle mass. Thus, SCr has also been used as a surrogate of muscle mass. Low muscle mass is associated with reduced survival in hospitalized patients, especially in the intensive care unit (ICU) settings. Recently, studies have demonstrated high mortality in ICU patients with low admission SCr levels, reflecting that low muscle mass or malnutrition, are associated with increased mortality. However, SCr levels can also be influenced by multiple GFR- and non-GFR-related factors including age, diet, exercise, stress, pregnancy, and kidney disease. Imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound, have recently been studied for muscle mass assessment and demonstrated promising data. This article aims to present the perspectives of the uses of SCr and other methods for prediction of muscle mass and outcomes of ICU patients. PMID:27162688

  1. Perceptions of ICU Diary Utility and Feasibility in a Combat ICU.

    PubMed

    Hester, Marisa; Ingalls, Nichole K; Hatzfeld, Jennifer J

    2016-08-01

    Severely injured patients have difficulty recalling their intensive care unit (ICU) experience which may contribute to emotional trauma. An ICU patient journal contains a short summary of key events during the ICU stay, and has been shown to improve emotional well-being. This project evaluated the feasibility and perceptions of ICU journals in a combat ICU. A one-page survey was distributed to ICU nursing staff at Craig Joint Theater Hospital before and after the use of ICU journals as a process improvement initiative. 16 preimplementation and 10 postimplementation surveys were collected to determine the perception of the utility and feasibility of ICU journals, as well as changes to nursing job satisfaction. Overall, nurses had positive perceptions of ICU journaling; after implementation they felt it could also benefit nurses (31% vs. 80%, p = 0.002). ICU nurses that used journals were also more likely to feel their work makes a difference (90%, p = 0.012) and they could connect with their patient on a personal level (50%, p = 0.037). Primary barriers were time to journal and legal concerns. This study demonstrates with the right guidance, ICU journals can be incorporated into an ICU in a deployed environment and nursing staff feel they benefit the patient, family, unit, and staff. PMID:27483530

  2. Cost and Effects of Different Admission Screening Strategies to Control the Spread of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Gurieva, Tanya; Bootsma, Martin C. J.; Bonten, Marc J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Nosocomial infection rates due to antibiotic-resistant bacteriae, e.g., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remain high in most countries. Screening for MRSA carriage followed by barrier precautions for documented carriers (so-called screen and isolate (S&I)) has been successful in some, but not all settings. Moreover, different strategies have been proposed, but comparative studies determining their relative effects and costs are not available. We, therefore, used a mathematical model to evaluate the effect and costs of different S&I strategies and to identify the critical parameters for this outcome. The dynamic stochastic simulation model consists of 3 hospitals with general wards and intensive care units (ICUs) and incorporates readmission of carriers of MRSA. Patient flow between ICUs and wards was based on real observations. Baseline prevalence of MRSA was set at 20% in ICUs and hospital-wide at 5%; ranges of costs and infection rates were based on published data. Four S&I strategies were compared to a do-nothing scenario: S&I of previously documented carriers (“flagged” patients); S&I of flagged patients and ICU admissions; S&I of flagged and group of “frequent” patients; S&I of all hospital admissions (universal screening). Evaluated levels of efficacy of S&I were 10%, 25%, 50% and 100%. Our model predicts that S&I of flagged and S&I of flagged and ICU patients are the most cost-saving strategies with fastest return of investment. For low isolation efficacy universal screening and S&I of flagged and “frequent” patients may never become cost-saving. Universal screening is predicted to prevent hardly more infections than S&I of flagged and “frequent” patients, albeit at higher costs. Whether an intervention becomes cost-saving within 10 years critically depends on costs per infection in ICU, costs of screening and isolation efficacy. PMID:23436984

  3. Predicting Healthcare Utilization by Patients Admitted for COPD Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Kaza, Anupama Murthy; Balasubramanian, Nithilavalli; Chandrasekaran, Siddhuraj

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthcare utilization, especially length of hospital stay and ICU admission, for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) determine overall outcomes in terms of morbidity, mortality and cost burden. Predicting prolonged hospital stay (PHS) and prolonged intensive care (PIC) for AECOPD is useful for rational allocation of resources in healthcare centres. Aim To characterize the pattern of healthcare utilization by COPD patients hospitalized for acute exacerbation, and to identify clinical and laboratory predictors of ‘prolonged hospital stay’ (PHS) and ‘prolonged intensive care’(PIC) Materials and Methods This study attempted through retrospective data analysis, to identify risk factors and evolve prediction models for increased healthcare utilization namely PHS and PIC for AECOPD. The data were extracted from 255 eligible admissions for AECOPD by 166 patients from Aug 2012 to July 2013. Logistic regression analysis was used for identifying predictors and models were tested with area under receiver operating characteristic curve. Results Independent predictors of prolonged hospital stay (≥ 6 days) were chronic respiratory failure at baseline, low saturation at admission, high HbA1c level and positive isolates in sputum culture. Independent predictors of prolonged intensive care (for ≥ 48 hours) were past history of pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic respiratory failure at baseline, low saturation at admission, high leukocyte count and positive culture isolates in sputum. Prediction models evolved from variables available at admission showed AUC 0.805 (95% CI 0.729 – 0.881) and 0.825 (95% CI 0.75 – 0.90) for PHS and ICU admissions respectively. Conclusion Our prediction models derived from simple and easily available variables show good discriminative properties in predicting PHS and PIC for AECOPD. When prospectively validated, these models are useful for rational allocation of services especially in resource

  4. Winning the war against ICU-acquired weakness: new innovations in nutrition and exercise physiology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10 years we have significantly reduced hospital mortality from sepsis and critical illness. However, the evidence reveals that over the same period we have tripled the number of patients being sent to rehabilitation settings. Further, given that as many as half of the deaths in the first year following ICU admission occur post ICU discharge, it is unclear how many of these patients ever returned home. For those who do survive, the latest data indicate that 50-70% of ICU "survivors" will suffer cognitive impairment and 60-80% of "survivors" will suffer functional impairment or ICU-acquired weakness (ICU-AW). These observations demand that we as intensive care providers ask the following questions: "Are we creating survivors ... or are we creating victims?" and "Do we accomplish 'Pyrrhic Victories' in the ICU?" Interventions to address ICU-AW must have a renewed focus on optimal nutrition, anabolic/anticatabolic strategies, and in the future employ the personalized muscle and exercise evaluation techniques utilized by elite athletes to optimize performance. Specifically, strategies must include optimal protein delivery (1.2-2.0 g/kg/day), as an athlete would routinely employ. However, as is clear in elite sports performance, optimal nutrition is fundamental but alone is often not enough. We know burn patients can remain catabolic for 2 years post burn; thus, anticatabolic agents (i.e., beta-blockers) and anabolic agents (i.e., oxandrolone) will probably also be essential. In the near future, evaluation techniques such as assessing lean body mass at the bedside using ultrasound to determine nutritional status and ultrasound-measured muscle glycogen as a marker of muscle injury and recovery could be utilized to help find the transition from the acute phase of critical illness to the recovery phase. Finally, exercise physiology testing that evaluates muscle substrate utilization during exercise can be used to diagnose muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and

  5. Winning the war against ICU-acquired weakness: new innovations in nutrition and exercise physiology.

    PubMed

    Wischmeyer, Paul E; San-Millan, Inigo

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10 years we have significantly reduced hospital mortality from sepsis and critical illness. However, the evidence reveals that over the same period we have tripled the number of patients being sent to rehabilitation settings. Further, given that as many as half of the deaths in the first year following ICU admission occur post ICU discharge, it is unclear how many of these patients ever returned home. For those who do survive, the latest data indicate that 50-70% of ICU "survivors" will suffer cognitive impairment and 60-80% of "survivors" will suffer functional impairment or ICU-acquired weakness (ICU-AW). These observations demand that we as intensive care providers ask the following questions: "Are we creating survivors ... or are we creating victims?" and "Do we accomplish 'Pyrrhic Victories' in the ICU?" Interventions to address ICU-AW must have a renewed focus on optimal nutrition, anabolic/anticatabolic strategies, and in the future employ the personalized muscle and exercise evaluation techniques utilized by elite athletes to optimize performance. Specifically, strategies must include optimal protein delivery (1.2-2.0 g/kg/day), as an athlete would routinely employ. However, as is clear in elite sports performance, optimal nutrition is fundamental but alone is often not enough. We know burn patients can remain catabolic for 2 years post burn; thus, anticatabolic agents (i.e., beta-blockers) and anabolic agents (i.e., oxandrolone) will probably also be essential. In the near future, evaluation techniques such as assessing lean body mass at the bedside using ultrasound to determine nutritional status and ultrasound-measured muscle glycogen as a marker of muscle injury and recovery could be utilized to help find the transition from the acute phase of critical illness to the recovery phase. Finally, exercise physiology testing that evaluates muscle substrate utilization during exercise can be used to diagnose muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and

  6. Can Computers Simplify Admissions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruker, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    Based on experience with a simplified admissions concept, Southern Illinois University is satisfied that the admissions process has been made easier for prospective students, high school counselors, and admissions staff. The computer does not make decisions regarding admission of a student, but reduced work loads for everyone concerned. (Author)

  7. Dimensionality and predictive validity of the HAM-Nat, a test of natural sciences for medical school admission

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Knowledge in natural sciences generally predicts study performance in the first two years of the medical curriculum. In order to reduce delay and dropout in the preclinical years, Hamburg Medical School decided to develop a natural science test (HAM-Nat) for student selection. In the present study, two different approaches to scale construction are presented: a unidimensional scale and a scale composed of three subject specific dimensions. Their psychometric properties and relations to academic success are compared. Methods 334 first year medical students of the 2006 cohort responded to 52 multiple choice items from biology, physics, and chemistry. For the construction of scales we generated two random subsamples, one for development and one for validation. In the development sample, unidimensional item sets were extracted from the item pool by means of weighted least squares (WLS) factor analysis, and subsequently fitted to the Rasch model. In the validation sample, the scales were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis and, again, Rasch modelling. The outcome measure was academic success after two years. Results Although the correlational structure within the item set is weak, a unidimensional scale could be fitted to the Rasch model. However, psychometric properties of this scale deteriorated in the validation sample. A model with three highly correlated subject specific factors performed better. All summary scales predicted academic success with an odds ratio of about 2.0. Prediction was independent of high school grades and there was a slight tendency for prediction to be better in females than in males. Conclusions A model separating biology, physics, and chemistry into different Rasch scales seems to be more suitable for item bank development than a unidimensional model, even when these scales are highly correlated and enter into a global score. When such a combination scale is used to select the upper quartile of applicants, the proportion of

  8. Effectiveness of pre-admission data and letters of recommendation to predict students who will need professional behavior intervention during clinical rotations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Engelhard, Chalee; Leugers, Rebecca; Stephan, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at finding the value of letters of recommendation in predicting professional behavior problems in the clinical portion of a Doctor of Physical Therapy program learning cohorts from 2009-2014 in the United States. De-identified records of 137 Doctor of Physical Therapy graduates were examined by the descriptive statistics and comparison analysis. Thirty letters of recommendation were investigated based on grounded theory from 10 student applications with 5 randomly selected students of interest and 5 non-students of interest. Critical thinking, organizational skills, and judgement were statistically significant and quantitative differentiating characteristics. Qualitatively, significant characteristics of the student of interest included effective communication and cultural competency. Meanwhile, those of nonstudents of interest included conflicting personality descriptor, commitment to learning, balance, teamwork skills, potential future success, compatible learning skills, effective leadership skills, and emotional intelligence. Emerged significant characteristics did not consistently match common non-professional behavior issues encountered in clinic. Pre-admission data and letters of recommendation appear of limited value in predicting professional behavior performance in clinic. PMID:27378011

  9. Effectiveness of pre-admission data and letters of recommendation to predict students who will need professional behavior intervention during clinical rotations in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at finding the value of letters of recommendation in predicting professional behavior problems in the clinical portion of a Doctor of Physical Therapy program learning cohorts from 2009-2014 in the United States. De-identified records of 137 Doctor of Physical Therapy graduates were examined by the descriptive statistics and comparison analysis. Thirty letters of recommendation were investigated based on grounded theory from 10 student applications with 5 randomly selected students of interest and 5 non-students of interest. Critical thinking, organizational skills, and judgement were statistically significant and quantitative differentiating characteristics. Qualitatively, significant characteristics of the student of interest included effective communication and cultural competency. Meanwhile, those of nonstudents of interest included conflicting personality descriptor, commitment to learning, balance, teamwork skills, potential future success, compatible learning skills, effective leadership skills, and emotional intelligence. Emerged significant characteristics did not consistently match common non-professional behavior issues encountered in clinic. Pre-admission data and letters of recommendation appear of limited value in predicting professional behavior performance in clinic. PMID:27378011

  10. The relationship between coagulation abnormality and mortality in ICU patients: a prospective, observational study

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Aihua; Lin, Qiang; Liu, Jiafu; Wang, Feilong; Wang, Hairong; Pan, Shuming

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, observational study to assess the prognostic value of hemostasis-related parameters in unselected ICU patients. We collected baseline characteristics from 497 consecutive unselected medical and trauma patients during their ICU stay. Each hemostasis-related parameter was analyzed alone or combined with APACHE II scores for any association with ICU mortality by calculating the under the curve (AUC) of the ROC curve, the net reclassification improvement (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) indices. Of all hemostasis-related indicators examined, the AUC for fibrin degradation products (FDPs) was less than that for APACHE II scores, but larger than that for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) scores. The prediction power of FDPs is relatively low. Multiple regression analysis revealed that FDPs and APACHE II scores significantly predicted primary outcome. The combined use of FDPs level and APACHE II scores generated an NRI of 9.94% and an IDI of 3.54%. In conclusion, FDP is the best independent indicator of ICU mortality among all hemostasis-related indicators examined. The use of FDP level and APACHE II scores in parallel significantly improves the ability to predict ICU mortality, suggesting the application of these parameters could be used to improve patient care and management in the ICU. PMID:25797521

  11. Short and long term predictive value of admission wall motion score in acute myocardial infarction. A cross sectional echocardiographic study of 345 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kan, G; Visser, C A; Koolen, J J; Dunning, A J

    1986-01-01

    A score of left ventricular segmental wall motion was used as a convenient rapid way to assess overall left ventricular function in acute myocardial infarction. Its success in risk stratification at admission was assessed by a blind review of cross sectional echocardiographic tape recordings from multiple acoustic windows. Sixty nine (20%) of the 345 patients died during hospital stay or within a one year follow up. The mean (SD) wall motion score in those who died was significantly higher than in those who survived (16.2 (5.9) vs 5.7 (3.9)). There were no differences between the group that died in hospital within three months of discharge and the group that died between three months and one year after discharge. Among the 31 patients who died in hospital, however, wall motion score was highest in 15 patients dying of cardiogenic shock (19.2 (4.2)). In 16 patients with lethal ruptures it was 13.5 (6.1). The nine patients with free wall ruptures had higher wall motion scores than those with ventricular septal rupture or papillary muscle rupture (15.7 (6.9) vs 8.5 (5.3)). Eight (3.3%) of 245 patients with a score less than 10 died, compared with 61 (61%) of 100 scoring greater than or equal to 10. The sensitivity of a score of greater than or equal to 10 in predicting death within one year was 88%, the specificity was 86%, the positive predictive value was 61%, and the negative predictive value was 97%. PMID:3790378

  12. Gender Differences in Prediction of Graduate Course Performance from Admissions Test Scores: An Empirical Example of Statistical Methods for Investigating Prediction Bias. AIR 1998 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, J. Daniel

    This study focused on gender differences in examining the extent to which Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores predicted subsequent achievement. Data on 275 graduate students in professional psychology programs at a large midwestern university were collected and analyzed. Two methods for the identification of prediction bias were used and…

  13. Coping Strategies and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Post-ICU Family Decision Makers

    PubMed Central

    Petrinec, Amy B.; Mazanec, Polly M.; Burant, Christopher J.; Hoffer, Alan; Daly, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the coping strategies used by family decision makers of adult critical care patients during and after the critical care experience and the relationship of coping strategies to posttraumatic stress symptoms experienced 60 days after hospitalization. Design A single-group descriptive longitudinal correlational study. Setting Medical, surgical, and neurological ICUs in a large tertiary care university hospital. Patients Consecutive family decision makers of adult critical care patients from August 2012 to November 2013. Study inclusion occurred after the patient's fifth day in the ICU. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Family decision makers of incapacitated adult ICU patients completed the Brief COPE instrument assessing coping strategy use 5 days after ICU admission and 30 days after hospital discharge or death of the patient and completed the Impact of Event Scale-Revised assessing post-traumatic stress symptoms 60 days after hospital discharge. Seventy-seven family decision makers of the eligible 176 completed all data collection time points of this study. The use of problem-focused (p = 0.01) and emotion-focused (p < 0.01) coping decreased over time while avoidant coping (p = 0.20) use remained stable. Coping strategies 30 days after hospitalization (R2 = 0.50, p < 0.001) were better predictors of later posttraumatic stress symptoms than coping strategies 5 days after ICU admission (R2 = 0.30, p = 0.001) controlling for patient and decision-maker characteristics. The role of decision maker for a parent and patient death were the only noncoping predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Avoidant coping use 30 days after hospitalization mediated the relationship between patient death and later posttraumatic stress symptom severity. Conclusions Coping strategy use is a significant predictor of posttraumatic stress symptom severity 60 days after hospitalization in family decision makers of ICU patients. PMID:25785520

  14. Serum bilirubin value predicts hospital admission in carbon monoxide-poisoned patients. Active player or simple bystander?

    PubMed Central

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Comelli, Ivan; Buonocore, Ruggero; Picanza, Alessandra; Rastelli, Gianni; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Although carbon monoxide poisoning is a major medical emergency, the armamentarium of recognized prognostic biomarkers displays unsatisfactory diagnostic performance for predicting cumulative endpoints. METHODS: We performed a retrospective and observational study to identify all patients admitted for carbon monoxide poisoning during a 2-year period. Complete demographical and clinical information, along with the laboratory data regarding arterial carboxyhemoglobin, hemoglobin, blood lactate and total serum bilirubin, was retrieved. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 38 poisoned patients (23 females and 15 males; mean age 39±21 years). Compared with discharged subjects, hospitalized patients displayed significantly higher values for blood lactate and total serum bilirubin, whereas arterial carboxyhemoglobin and hemoglobin did not differ. In a univariate analysis, hospitalization was significantly associated with blood lactate and total serum bilirubin, but not with age, sex, hemoglobin or carboxyhemoglobin. The diagnostic performance obtained after combining the blood lactate and total serum bilirubin results (area under the curve, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.81-0.99; p<0.001) was better than that obtained for either parameter alone. CONCLUSION: Although it remains unclear whether total serum bilirubin acts as an active player or a bystander, we conclude that the systematic assessment of bilirubin may, alongside lactate levels, provide useful information for clinical decision making regarding carbon monoxide poisoning. PMID:26375565

  15. Waterlow score as a surrogate marker for predicting adverse outcome in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gillick, K; Elbeltagi, H; Bhattacharya, S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Introduced originally to stratify risk for developing decubitus ulcers, the Waterlow scoring system is recorded routinely for surgical admissions. It is a composite score, reflecting patients' general condition and co-morbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the Waterlow score can be used as an independent surrogate marker to predict severity and adverse outcome in acute pancreatitis. Methods In this retrospective analysis, a consecutive cohort was studied of 250 patients presenting with acute pancreatitis, all of whom had their Waterlow score calculated on admission. Primary outcome measures were length of hospital stay and mortality. Secondary outcome measures included rate of intensive care unit (ICU) admission and development of complications such as peripancreatic free fluid, pancreatic necrosis and pseudocyst formation. Correlation of the Waterlow score with some known markers of disease severity and outcomes was also analysed. Results The Waterlow score correlated strongly with the most commonly used marker of disease severity, the Glasgow score (analysis of variance, p=0.0012). Inpatient mortality, rate of ICU admission and length of hospital stay increased with a higher Waterlow score (Mann-Whitney U test, p=0.0007, p=0.049 and p=0.0002 respectively). There was, however, no significant association between the Waterlow score and the incidence of three known complications of pancreatitis: presence of peripancreatic fluid, pancreatic pseudocyst formation and pancreatic necrosis. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated good predictive power of the Waterlow score for mortality (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.73), ICU admission (AUC: 0.65) and length of stay >7 days (AUC: 0.64). This is comparable with the predictive power of the Glasgow score and C-reactive protein. Conclusions The Waterlow score for patients admitted with acute pancreatitis could provide a useful tool in prospective assessment of disease

  16. Statistical Analysis Aiming at Predicting Respiratory Tract Disease Hospital Admissions from Environmental Variables in the City of São Paulo

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio Coêlho, Micheline; Luiz Teixeira Gonçalves, Fabio; do Rosário Dias de Oliveira Latorre, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study is aimed at creating a stochastic model, named Brazilian Climate and Health Model (BCHM), through Poisson regression, in order to predict the occurrence of hospital respiratory admissions (for children under thirteen years of age) as a function of air pollutants, meteorological variables, and thermal comfort indices (effective temperatures, ET). The data used in this study were obtained from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, between 1997 and 2000. The respiratory tract diseases were divided into three categories: URI (Upper Respiratory tract diseases), LRI (Lower Respiratory tract diseases), and IP (Influenza and Pneumonia). The overall results of URI, LRI, and IP show clear correlation with SO2 and CO, PM10 and O3, and PM10, respectively, and the ETw4 (Effective Temperature) for all the three disease groups. It is extremely important to warn the government of the most populated city in Brazil about the outcome of this study, providing it with valuable information in order to help it better manage its resources on behalf of the whole population of the city of Sao Paulo, especially those with low incomes. PMID:20706674

  17. Epidemiology and Outcome of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in a Heterogeneous ICU Population in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fahmi Yousef; George, Saibu; Shaikh, Nissar; Al-Ajmi, Jameela

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study is to collect data on epidemiology, microbiology, and outcome of VAP in our ICUs for reevaluation of the therapeutic strategies. Methods. This retrospective study involved all adult patients, 15 years of age or older, diagnosed with VAP in multidisciplinary ICUs at Hamad General Hospital between January 2010 and December 2012. Results. A total of 106 patients were enrolled. The mean incidence of VAP was 5.0 per 1000 ventilator-days. It was predominant among younger age group (<60 years), male patients (80.2%), and trauma ICU admissions (49.0%). The most common comorbidity was hypertension (34%) and polytrauma (36.8%) was the most frequent admission diagnosis. 30-day mortality was 23.6% and it was significantly higher in ≥60 years age group, female gender, patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic respiratory disease, ≥1 comorbidity, and poor functional status, smokers, medical and surgical ICU admissions, and patients with previous stay in medical/surgical wards, inappropriate empirical therapy, and admission diagnosis of respiratory failure. Gram-negative bacilli were the most frequent respiratory specimen isolates, Pseudomonas spp. being the most common. Majority of our Acinetobacter isolates were multidrug resistant. Conclusion. The incidence of VAP in our ICUs was low. Higher mortality rates were observed in certain subgroup of patients. Resistance to commonly used antimicrobials is likely to require reevaluation of the therapeutic strategies at our institution. PMID:27382571

  18. Questioning the need for ICU level of care in pediatric patients following elective uncomplicated craniotomy for brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Brandon C; Martin, Joel; Crawford, John R; Levy, Michael

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The object of this study is to address what factors may necessitate the need for intensive care monitoring after elective uncomplicated craniotomy in pediatric patients who are initially managed in a non-intensive care unit setting postoperatively. METHODS A retrospective chart review was undertaken for all patients who underwent elective craniotomy for brain tumor between April of 2007 and April of 2012 and who were directly admitted to the floor postoperatively. Factors such as age, tumor type, craniotomy location, neurological comorbidities, reason for transfer to intensive care unit (ICU) level of care (if applicable), time between admittance to floor and transfer to ICU level of care, and reason for transfer to ICU level of care were assessed. RESULTS Adjusted logistic regression found 2 significant positive predictors of postoperative transfer to the ICU after initial admission to the floor: primitive neuroectodermal tumor pathology (OR 44.10, 95% CI 1.24-1572.16, p = 0.04), and repeat craniotomy during the same hospitalization (OR 13.97, 95% CI 1.21-160.66, p = 0.03). Conversely, 1 negative factor was found: low-grade glioma pathology (OR 0.05, 95% CI 0.00-0.87, p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS Select pediatric patients may not require ICU level of care after elective uncomplicated pediatric craniotomy. Additional studies are needed to adequately address which patients would benefit from initial ICU admittance following elective craniotomies for brain tumors. PMID:26722960

  19. Feasibility and Safety of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Performed Without Intensive Care Unit Admission.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Florence; Iemmi, Anais; Lattuca, Benoit; Macia, Jean-Christophe; Gervasoni, Richard; Roubille, Francois; Gandet, Thomas; Schmutz, Laurent; Akodad, Mariama; Agullo, Audrey; Verges, Marine; Nogue, Erika; Marin, Gregory; Nagot, Nicolas; Rivalland, Francois; Durrleman, Nicolas; Robert, Gabriel; Delseny, Delphine; Albat, Bernard; Cayla, Guillaume

    2016-07-01

    Admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) is a standard of care after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI); however, the improvement of the procedure and the need to minimize the unnecessary use of medical resources call into question this strategy. We evaluated prospectively 177 consecutive patients who underwent TAVI. Low-risk patients, admitted to conventional cardiology units, had stable clinical state, transfemoral access, no right bundle branch block, permanent pacing with a self-expandable valve, and no complication occurring during the procedure. High-risk patients included all the others transferred to ICU. In-hospital events were the primary end point (Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 criteria). The mean age of patients was 83.5 ± 6.5 years, and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 14.6 ± 9.7%. The balloon-expandable SAPIEN 3 valve was mainly used (n = 148; 83.6%), mostly with transfemoral access (n = 167; 94.4%). Among the 61 patients (34.5%) included in the low-risk group, only 1 (1.6%) had a minor complication (negative predictive value 98.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91 to 0.99). Conversely, 31 patients (26.7%) from the high-risk group had clinical events (positive predictive value 26.7%, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.35), mainly conductive disorders requiring pacemaker (n = 26; 14.7%). In multivariate analysis, right bundle branch block (odds ratio [OR] 14.1, 95% CI 3.5 to 56.3), use of the self-expandable valve without a pacemaker (OR 5.5, 95% CI 2 to 16.3), vitamin K antagonist treatment (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.1 to 12.6), and female gender (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.003 to 6.9) were preprocedural predictive factors of adverse events. In conclusion, our results suggested that TAVI can be performed safely without ICU admission in selected patients. This strategy may optimize efficiency and cost-effectiveness of procedures. PMID:27184173

  20. Outcomes of Older Adults With Sepsis at Admission to an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Theresa; Araujo, Katy L. B.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Pisani, Margaret A.; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among older adults. The main goals of this study were to assess the association of sepsis at intensive care unit (ICU) admission with mortality and to identify predictors associated with increased mortality in older adults. Methods. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 309 participants ≥60 years admitted to an ICU. Sepsis was defined as 2 of 4 systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria plus a documented infection within 2 calendar days before or after admission. The main outcome measure was time to death within 1 year of ICU admission. Sepsis was evaluated as a predictor for mortality in a Cox proportional hazards model. Results. Of 309 participants, 196 (63%) met the definition of sepsis. Among those admitted with and without sepsis, 75 (38%) vs 20 (18%) died within 1 month of ICU admission (P < .001) and 117 (60%) vs 48 (42%) died within 1 year (P < .001). When adjusting for baseline characteristics, sepsis had a significant impact on mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28–2.52; P < .001); however, after adjusting for baseline characteristics and process covariates (antimicrobials and vasopressor use within 48 hours of admission), the impact of sepsis on mortality became nonsignificant (HR = 1.26; 95% CI, .87–1.84; P = .22). Conclusions. The diagnosis of sepsis in older adults upon ICU admission was associated with an increase in mortality compared with those admitted without sepsis. After controlling for early use of antimicrobials and vasopressors for treatment, the association of sepsis with mortality was reduced. PMID:26925430

  1. Seeking the Admission Hybrid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucido, Jerome A.

    2012-01-01

    When one thinks of seminal publications in college admission, the first piece that comes to mind is B. Alden Thresher's "College Admissions in the Public Interest" (1966). Thresher's work, relevant to this day, is credited with being the foundational document of the admission profession. McDonough and Robertson's 1995 study, commissioned by NACAC,…

  2. Computers in the ICU: panacea or plague?

    PubMed

    East, T D

    1992-02-01

    The introduction of the intensive care unit (ICU) in the 1960s with its demands for management of large volumes of patient data drove the initial introduction of computers into the ICU. Since the mid-1960s computer systems for the ICU have evolved into the highly sophisticated bedside workstations commercially available today. Despite all of the technologic advances in computers, their application in ICUs in the United States continues to spread very slowly. One of the largest problems is justifying the cost of systems primarily designed to automate data charting and generation of care plans. Although the existing commercial systems do an excellent job, few conclusive studies prove that these systems have a favorable cost-to-benefit ratio. Research systems have demonstrated that if one extends these systems to incorporate a fully integrated database, decision-support tools, automation of data acquisition, and more sophisticated display and user-interface technology, then these ICU computer systems can have a significant impact on improving the quality and reducing the costs of patient care. For computers to be embraced in the ICU environment, commercial systems of the future must move beyond merely gathering and displaying information. They must help the clinician at the bedside assimilate the vast array of ICU data and help him to make more effective decisions. PMID:10145618

  3. Does "ICU psychosis" really exist?

    PubMed

    Justic, M

    2000-06-01

    In summary, ICU psychosis does not develop in all patients. Instead, many patients are at risk for hypoactive, hyperactive, or mixed hypoactive and hyperactive delirium. Prevention of delirium should always be foremost, including recognition of patients at high risk, minimal use of causative medications, and treatment of physiological conditions that are often unrelated to a patient's admitting diagnosis. When prevention fails, early diagnosis and treatment can make a marked difference in patients' outcomes. The potential adverse outcomes of delirium are well documented. These include increased mortality; increased length of stay; reduced level of functioning in the elderly, which often leads to placement in a nursing home; and stress response syndrome after hospitalization. The value of nursing in preventing delirium is evident when nurses apply their knowledge of potential causes and develop strategies to avoid these causes in their patients. Nurses provide early detection and coordinate with other members of the healthcare team to initiate a plan of care that includes prompt treatment of delirium to reduce the signs and symptoms, duration, and potential adverse sequelae of this disorder. Nursing interventions are designed to enhance patients' cognitive status, sense of security, safety, and comfort. Nurses are instrumental in providing appropriate choices, doses, and administration of medications and in recognizing side effects. Use of medications ordered to treat delirium is often left to nurses' discretion because the orders specify that the drugs should be given as needed. Finally, nurses are the ones who recognize the need for additional assistance via psychiatric consultations or for more intensive observation and management of patients to ensure quality care. PMID:11876211

  4. Frequency of Intensive Care Unit admission after elective interventional neuroradiological procedures under general anesthesia in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Faisal; Asghar, Ali; Karam, Karima

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) after elective interventional neuroradiology (INR) procedures under general anesthesia. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 121 patients underwent INR procedures performed with general anesthesia within a 5-year period. Information including demographics, aneurysm/arteriovenous malformations pathology (ruptured or un-ruptured), preoperative neurological status, co-morbidities, complications during procedure and postoperative admission in ICU were recorded on a predesigned form. Results: Elective INR procedure for both ruptured (n = 29, 24%) and un-ruptured (n = 85, 70.25%) aneurysms was performed. Rate of postoperative admission in ICU was significantly high in patients with preoperative ruptured aneurysm (P < 0.01). High rate of neurological deficit, sub-arachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and hypertension in patients were significant factors of postoperative admission in ICU (P < 0.05). Out of 24 patients, 12 were admitted to ICU postoperatively because of procedure-related complications and 11 were sent due to preexisting significant co-morbidities with added complication of SAH. Conclusion: The authors conclude that patients without major co-morbidities, intraoperative complications, or complex aneurysm morphology can be safely observed in a regular ward rather than being admitted to the ICU. PMID:25558194

  5. Staff Acceptance of Tele-ICU Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul S.; Cram, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Remote coverage of ICUs is increasing, but staff acceptance of this new technology is incompletely characterized. We conducted a systematic review to summarize existing research on acceptance of tele-ICU coverage among ICU staff. Methods: We searched for published articles pertaining to critical care telemedicine systems (aka, tele-ICU) between January 1950 and March 2010 using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Global Health, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library and abstracts and presentations delivered at national conferences. Studies were included if they provided original qualitative or quantitative data on staff perceptions of tele-ICU coverage. Studies were imported into content analysis software and coded by tele-ICU configuration, methodology, participants, and findings (eg, positive and negative staff evaluations). Results: Review of 3,086 citations yielded 23 eligible studies. Findings were grouped into four categories of staff evaluation: overall acceptance level of tele-ICU coverage (measured in 70% of studies), impact on patient care (measured in 96%), impact on staff (measured in 100%), and organizational impact (measured in 48%). Overall acceptance was high, despite initial ambivalence. Favorable impact on patient care was perceived by > 82% of participants. Staff impact referenced enhanced collaboration, autonomy, and training, although scrutiny, malfunctions, and contradictory advice were cited as potential barriers. Staff perceived the organizational impact to vary. An important limitation of available studies was a lack of rigorous methodology and validated survey instruments in many studies. Conclusions: Initial reports suggest high levels of staff acceptance of tele-ICU coverage, but more rigorous methodologic study is required. PMID:21051386

  6. Delirium and other clinical factors with Clostridium difficile infection that predict mortality in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Archbald-Pannone, Laurie R.; McMurry, Timothy L.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Warren, Cirle A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) severity has increased, especially among hospitalized elderly. We evaluated clinical factors to predict mortality following CDI. Methods We collected data from inpatients diagnosed with CDI at US academic medical center (HSR-IRB# 13630). We evaluated age, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), admission from a long-term care facility (LTCF), intensive care unit (ICU) at time of diagnosis, white blood cell count (WBC), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), low body mass index (BMI), and delirium as possible predictors. A parsimonious predictive model was chosen using Akaike information criterion (AIC) and a best subsets model selection algorithm. Area under the ROC curve was used to assess the model’s comparative; with AIC as selection criterion for all subsets to measure fit and control for over-fitting. Results From 362 subjects, the selected model included CCI, WBC, BUN, ICU, and delirium. The logistic regression coefficients were converted to a points scale and calibrated so that each unit on the CCI contributed 2 points, ICU contributed 5, unit of WBC (natural log scale) contributed 3, unit of BUN contributed 5, and delirium contributed 11. Discussion Our model shows substantial ability to predict short term mortality in patients hospitalized with CDI. Conclusion Patients who were diagnosed in the ICU and developed delirium are at highest risk for dying within 30 days of CDI diagnosis. PMID:25920706

  7. Obstetric admissions to ICUs in Finland: A multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Seppänen, Pia; Sund, Reijo; Roos, Mervi; Unkila, Riitta; Meriläinen, Merja; Helminen, Mika; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Suominen, Tarja

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the objective was to describe and analyse reasons for obstetric admissions to the ICU, severity of illness, level and types of interventions, adverse events and patient outcomes. In a retrospective database study, we identified 291 obstetric patients during pregnancy and puerperium from four Finnish university hospitals. Most were admitted in the post-partum period and hypertensive disorders were the main indications for admissions, followed by obstetric haemorrhage. The median length of stay was 21hours. The most common intervention was blood transfusion and mechanical ventilation was required in nearly one fifth of the patients. Three patients had a prolonged stay and nine had re-admissions. One maternal death was recorded. This study found that severity of illness and organ failure scores describe the obstetric patient as having a good probability of recovery and a short length of stay. However, the obstetric patients reason for admission and their type of delivery were associated with both the severity of illness scores and level of intervention required. Those admitted for non-obstetric reasons and having had a vaginal delivery demonstrated higher severity of illness scores, organ failure scores, and levels of intervention when compared to those admitted for obstetric reasons or those who had delivered by caesarean section. In conclusion, care of these patients can be improved by understanding the severity of illness scores, common ICU interventions and patient outcomes. PMID:27209560

  8. The adductor pollicis muscle: a poor predictor of clinical outcome in ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Leong Shu-Fen, Claudia; Ong, Venetia; Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Ling, Teh Ai; Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Henry, Jeya

    2015-01-01

    No nutrition assessment tools specifically tailored for intensive care unit (ICU) patients have been developed and validated in Singapore. Studies conducted in Brazilian populations suggest that the thickness of the adductor pollicis muscle (TAPM) may be used to assess nutritional status and predict mortality of critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to determine if TAPM can be used as a predictive indicator of mortality in Singapore ICU patients. TAPM values were obtained using skinfold calipers in 229 patients admitted to the medical ICU. TAPM measured in both hands showed no significant correlation with either the primary outcome (28-day mortality) or secondary outcomes (hospital outcome and hospital length of stay). This study demonstrated that TAPM does not predict 28-day mortality and hospital outcome, and is not correlated to length of stay in Singapore ICU patients. More studies are necessary to validate the use of TAPM as an anthropometric indicator of ICU outcome in other regions of the world. PMID:26693744

  9. Direct stroke unit admission of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator: safety, clinical outcome, and hospital cost savings

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Anne W.; Coleman, Kisha C.; Palazzo, Paola; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Alexandrov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the USA, stable intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) patients have traditionally been cared for in an intensive care unit (ICU). We examined the safety of using an acuity-adaptable stroke unit (SU) to manage IV tPA patients. Methods: We conducted an observational study of consecutive patients admitted to our acuity-adaptable SU over the first 3 years of operation. Safety was assessed by symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) rates, systemic hemorrhage (SH) rates, tPA-related deaths, and transfers from SU to ICU; cost savings and length of stay (LOS) were determined. Results: We admitted 333 IV tPA patients, of which 302 were admitted directly to the SU. A total of 31 (10%) patients had concurrent systemic hemodynamic or pulmonary compromise warranting direct ICU admission. There were no differences in admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores between SU and ICU patients (9.0 versus 9.5, respectively). Overall sICH rate was 3.3% (n = 10) and SH rate was 2.9 (n = 9), with no difference between SU and ICU patients. No tPA-related deaths occurred, and no SU patients required transfer to the ICU. Estimated hospital cost savings were US$362,400 for ‘avoided’ ICU days, and hospital LOS decreased significantly (p = 0.001) from 9.8 ± 15.6 days (median 5) in year 1, to 5.2 ± 4.8 days (median 3) by year 3. Conclusions: IV tPA patients may be safely cared for in a SU when nurses undergo extensive education to ensure clinical competence. Use of the ICU solely for monitoring may constitute significant overuse of system resources at an expense that is not associated with additional safety benefit. PMID:27366237

  10. Predicting the Length of Stay of Patients Admitted for Intensive Care Using a First Step Analysis

    PubMed Central

    PEREZ, ADRIANA; CHAN, WENYAW; DENNIS, RODOLFO J.

    2006-01-01

    Predicting the Length of Stay of Patients Admitted for Intensive Care Using a First Step Analysis For patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU), the length of stay in different destinations after the first day of ICU admission, has not been systematically studied. We aimed to estimate the average length of stay (LOS) of such patients in Colombia, using a discrete time Markov process. We used the maximum likelihood method and Markov chain modeling to estimate the average LOS in the ICU and at each destination after discharge from intensive care. Six Markov models were estimated, describing the LOS in each one of the Cardiovascular, Neurological, Respiratory, Gastrointestinal, Trauma and Other diagnostic groups from the ultimate primary reason for admission to ICU. Possible destinations were: the intensive care unit, ward in the same hospital, the high dependency unit/intermediate care area in the same hospital, ward in other hospital, intensive care unit in other hospital, other hospital, other location same hospital, discharge from same hospital and death. The stationary property was tested and using a split-sample analysis, we provide indirect evidence about the appropriateness of the Markov property. It is not possible to use a unique Markov chain model for each diagnostic group. The length of stay varies across the ultimate primary reason for admission to intensive care. Although our Markov models shown to be predictive, the fact that current available statistical methods do not allow us to verify the Markov property test is a limitation. Clinicians may be able to provide information about the hospital LOS by diagnostic groups for different hospital destinations. PMID:18059977

  11. Assessing Practical Intelligence in Business School Admissions: A Supplement to the Graduate Management Admissions Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedlund, Jennifer; Wilt, Jeanne M.; Nebel, Kristina L.; Ashford, Susan J.; Sternberg, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is the most widely used measure of managerial potential in MBA admissions. GMAT scores, although predictive of grades in business school, leave much of the variance in graduate school performance unexplained. The GMAT also produces disparities in test scores between groups, generating the potential for…

  12. Nonrespiratory sleep disorders found in ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lee K; Arora, Madhu

    2008-07-01

    Intensive care subjects the critically ill patient to a multitude of stressors caused by the severity of illness and the use of invasive treatment modalities and medications. The ICU environment contributes significant stress of its own related to noise, light, 24-hour patient care, and other factors that disturb sleep. Consequently, various sleep pathologies may emerge or worsen in the ICU patient. Some sleep disorder symptomatology may be confused with serious neurologic complications of critical illness and lead to inappropriate testing or treatment, particularly in the patient who has narcolepsy. Given the high prevalence of sleep disorders in the general population, it is essential that the ICU practitioner attain an adequate knowledge of sleep and its disorders. PMID:18538202

  13. Admission Factors Predicting Family Medicine Specialty Choice: A Literature Review and Exploratory Study among Students in the Rural Medical Scholars Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Daniel M., Jr.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; McKnight, Jerry T.; Ballard, Brent G.; Chen, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The Rural Medical Scholars Program (RMSP) was created to increase production of rural family physicians in Alabama. Literature review reveals reasons medical students choose careers in family medicine, and these reasons can be categorized into domains that medical schools can address through admission, curriculum, and structural…

  14. Involvement of ICU families in decisions: fine-tuning the partnership

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Families of patients are not simple visitors to the ICU. They have just been separated from a loved one, often someone they live with, either abruptly or, in nearly half the cases, because a chronic condition has suddenly worsened. They must cope with a serious illness of a loved one, while having to adapt to the unfamiliar and intimidating ICU environment. In many cases, the outcome of the critical illness is uncertain, a situation that causes considerable distress to the relatives. As shown by our research group and others, families exhibit symptoms of anxiety (70%) and depression (35%) in the first few days after admission, as well as symptoms of stress (33%) and difficulty understanding the information delivered by the healthcare staff (50%). Furthermore, relatives of patients who die in the ICU are at risk for psychiatric syndromes such as generalized anxiety, panic attacks, depression, and posttraumatic stress syndrome. In this setting of psychological distress, families are asked to consider sharing in healthcare decisions about their loved one in the ICU. This article aims to foster the debate about the shared decision-making process. We have three objectives: to transcend the overly simplistic position that opposes paternalism and autonomy, to build a view founded only on an evaluation of actual practice and experience in the field, and to keep the focus squarely on the patient. Families want information and communication time from the staff. Nurses and physicians need to understand that families can share in decisions only if the entire ICU staff actively promotes family involvement and, of course, if the family wants to participate in all or part of the decision-making process. PMID:25593753

  15. Psychiatric complications in a surgical ICU.

    PubMed

    Hale, M; Koss, N; Kerstein, M; Camp, K; Barash, P

    1977-01-01

    Pathological behavior patterns are often observed in patients in the ICU. In a Surgical ICU (SICU), 7% (22/322) of a patient population required psychiatric consultation during a 6-month period. As a group, these patients had more prolonged stays, more frequent requirements for mechanical ventilation, a higher incidence of cardiac arrest and a higher mortality rate than the entire SICU population. The psychiatrist was asked to evaluate multiple behavioral syndromes, some of which were irreversible concomitants of grave illnesses. However, with certain syndromes, psychiatric assistance greatly facilitated the resolution of problems that hampered pre- and postoperative management and the patient's eventual recovery. PMID:872605

  16. What Admissions Officials Think

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Over the past two decades, college admissions has become a prime-time preoccupation. Most people know at least something about the process, especially if they have a teenager in high school and a college guide on their coffee table. Nonetheless, widespread public misconceptions persist about admissions requirements, the selection process, and the…

  17. Technology in International Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In a relatively short time, technology applications have become an essential feature of the admissions business. They make the jobs of international admissions professionals easier in many ways, allowing for more robust communication with applicants and counselors, a streamlined application process, and quicker access to information about…

  18. An Admissions Officer's Credentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Marilee Jones has resigned as a dean of admissions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology after admitting that she had misrepresented her academic degrees when first applying to work at the university in 1979. As one of the nation's most prominent admissions officers--and a leader in the movement to make the application process less…

  19. Continuous Exhaled Breath Analysis on the Icu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Lieuwe D. J.; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2011-09-01

    During admittance to the ICU, critically ill patients frequently develop secondary infections and/or multiple organ failure. Continuous monitoring of biological markers is very much needed. This study describes a new method to continuously monitor biomarkers in exhaled breath with an electronic nose.

  20. Interactivity Centered Usability Evaluation (ICUE) for Course Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Sangil

    2010-01-01

    ICUE (Interactivity Centered Usability Evaluation) is an enhanced usability testing protocol created by the researcher. ICUE augments the facilitator's role for usability testing, and offers strategies in developing and presenting usability tasks during a testing session. ICUE was designed to address weaknesses found in the usability evaluation of…

  1. The predicting ability of serum potassium to assess the duration of mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Javdan, Zahra; Talakoub, Reihanak; Honarmand, Azim; Golparvar, Mohammad; Farsani, Enayatolah Yadollahi

    2015-01-01

    Background: No previous study has been done to evaluate the admission serum potassium level as a predictor of morbidity or need for mechanical ventilation. The aim of this study is to determine the predictive ability of serum potassium on admission, in critically ill trauma patients, and to evaluate the relation of the potassium level to organ failure, length of stay, ventilator need, and duration of mechanical ventilation. Materials and Methods: A prospective, observational study was done on 100 patients >16 years old, admitted to the Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Units (ICU), for over one year. Patients were classified into Group A: Patients who required equal or less than five days of mechanical ventilation and Group B: Patients who required more than five days of mechanical ventilation. The total serum potassium concentrations were measured and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score was recorded at the time of admission to the ICU, when connected to the ventilator, and then at the time of weaning from the ventilator. Results: There was no significant difference between the Serum K concentrations between the two groups, on admission. However, there were significant difference between the Serum K concentrations at times of receiving and weaning from mechanical ventilation (MV) between the two groups. We found the best cut-off point of 3.45 for serum potassium concentration, to predict the need for longer duration of MV. Conclusion: Development of hypokalemia during an ICU stay is associated with the need for mechanical ventilation. Monitoring of the serum potassium levels may be a good prognostic factor for the requirement of mechanical ventilation. PMID:26322281

  2. Psychiatric Symptoms and Acute Care Service Utilization over the Course of the Year Following Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit Admission: A Longitudinal Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Davydow, Dimitry S.; Hough, Catherine L.; Zatzick, Douglas; Katon, Wayne J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if the presence of in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms, as well as substantial depressive or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms at 3-months post-intensive care unit (ICU), are associated with increased acute care service utilization over the course of the year following medical-surgical ICU admission. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Setting Academic medical center. Patients 150 patients ≥ 18 years old admitted to medical-surgical ICUs for over 24 hours. Measurements and Main Results Participants were interviewed in-hospital to ascertain substantial acute stress symptoms using the PTSD Checklist-civilian version (PCL-C). Substantial depressive and PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the PCL-C respectively at 3 months post-ICU. The number of rehospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits were ascertained at 3 and 12 months post-ICU using the Cornell Services Index. After adjusting for participant and clinical characteristics, in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms were independently associated with greater risk of an additional hospitalization (Relative Risk [RR]: 3.00, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.80, 4.99) over the year post-ICU. Substantial PTSD symptoms at 3 months post-ICU were independently associated with greater risk of an additional ER visit during the subsequent 9 months (RR: 2.29, 95%CI: 1.09, 4.84) even after adjusting for both rehospitalizations and ER visits between the index hospitalization and 3 months post-ICU. Conclusions Post-ICU psychiatric morbidity is associated with increased acute care service utilization during the year after a medical-surgical ICU admission. Early interventions for at-risk ICU survivors may improve longer-term outcomes and reduce subsequent acute care utilization. PMID:25083985

  3. Advance Care Planning Norms May Contribute to Hospital Variation in End-of-life ICU Use: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Barnato, Amber E.; Mohan, Deepika; Lane, Rondall K.; Huang, Yue Ming; Angus, Derek C.; Farris, Coreen; Arnold, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is wide variation in end-of-life (EOL) intensive care unit (ICU) use among academic medical centers (AMCs). Objective To develop hypotheses regarding medical decision-making factors underlying this variation. Design High-fidelity simulation experiment involving a critically and terminally ill elder, followed by a survey and debriefing cognitive interview and evaluated using triangulated quantitative-qualitative comparative analysis. Setting 2 AMCs in the same state and health care system with disparate EOL ICU use. Subjects Hospital-based physicians responsible for ICU admission decisions. Measurements Treatment plan, prognosis, diagnosis, qualitative case perceptions and clinical reasoning. Main Results Sixty-seven of 111 (60%) eligible physicians agreed to participate; 48 (72%) could be scheduled. There were no significant between-AMC differences in 3-month prognosis or treatment plan, but there were systematic differences in perceptions of the case. Case perceptions at the low-intensity AMC seemed to be influenced by the absence of a DNR order in the context of norms of universal code status discussion and documentation upon admission, whereas case perceptions at the high-intensity AMC seemed to be influenced by the patient’s known metastatic gastric cancer in the context of norms of oncologists’ avoiding code status discussions. Conclusions In this simulation study of 2 AMCs, hospital-based physicians had different perceptions of an identical case. We hypothesize that different advance care planning norms may have influenced their decision-making heuristics. PMID:24615275

  4. Assessing the Utility of ICU Readmissions as a Quality Metric

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Halpern, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ICU readmissions are associated with increased mortality and costs; however, it is unclear whether these outcomes are caused by readmissions or by residual confounding by illness severity. An assessment of temporal changes in ICU readmission in response to a specific policy change could help disentangle these possibilities. We sought to determine whether ICU readmission rates changed after 2003 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Resident Duty Hours reform (“reform”) and whether there were temporally corresponding changes in other ICU outcomes. METHODS: We used a difference-in-differences approach using Project IMPACT (Improved Methods of Patient Information Access of Core Clinical Tasks). Piecewise regression models estimated changes in outcomes immediately before and after reform in 274,491 critically ill medical and surgical patients in 151 community and academic US ICUs. Outcome measures included ICU readmission, ICU mortality, and in-hospital post-ICU-discharge mortality. RESULTS: In ICUs with residents, ICU readmissions increased before reform (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.22-1.84; P < .01), and decreased after (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.73-0.98; P = .03). This abrupt decline in ICU readmissions after reform differed significantly from an increase in readmissions observed in ICUs without residents at this time (difference-in-differences P < .01). No comparable changes in mortality were observed between ICUs with vs without residents. CONCLUSIONS: The changes in ICU readmission rates after reform, without corresponding changes in mortality, suggest that ICU readmissions are not causally related to other untoward patient outcomes. Instead, ICU readmission rates likely reflect operational aspects of care that are not patient-centered, making them less useful indicators of ICU quality. PMID:25393027

  5. Personalized Mortality Prediction Driven by Electronic Medical Data and a Patient Similarity Metric

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joon; Maslove, David M.; Dubin, Joel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical outcome prediction normally employs static, one-size-fits-all models that perform well for the average patient but are sub-optimal for individual patients with unique characteristics. In the era of digital healthcare, it is feasible to dynamically personalize decision support by identifying and analyzing similar past patients, in a way that is analogous to personalized product recommendation in e-commerce. Our objectives were: 1) to prove that analyzing only similar patients leads to better outcome prediction performance than analyzing all available patients, and 2) to characterize the trade-off between training data size and the degree of similarity between the training data and the index patient for whom prediction is to be made. Methods and Findings We deployed a cosine-similarity-based patient similarity metric (PSM) to an intensive care unit (ICU) database to identify patients that are most similar to each patient and subsequently to custom-build 30-day mortality prediction models. Rich clinical and administrative data from the first day in the ICU from 17,152 adult ICU admissions were analyzed. The results confirmed that using data from only a small subset of most similar patients for training improves predictive performance in comparison with using data from all available patients. The results also showed that when too few similar patients are used for training, predictive performance degrades due to the effects of small sample sizes. Our PSM-based approach outperformed well-known ICU severity of illness scores. Although the improved prediction performance is achieved at the cost of increased computational burden, Big Data technologies can help realize personalized data-driven decision support at the point of care. Conclusions The present study provides crucial empirical evidence for the promising potential of personalized data-driven decision support systems. With the increasing adoption of electronic medical record (EMR) systems, our

  6. Accuracy of ‘My Gut Feeling:’ Comparing System 1 to System 2 Decision-Making for Acuity Prediction, Disposition and Diagnosis in an Academic Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Daniel; Thomas, Jonathan F.; Wiswell, Jeffrey L.; Walston, James M.; Anderson, Joel R.; Hess, Erik P.; Bellolio, M. Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current cognitive sciences describe decision-making using the dual-process theory, where a System 1 is intuitive and a System 2 decision is hypothetico-deductive. We aim to compare the performance of these systems in determining patient acuity, disposition and diagnosis. Methods Prospective observational study of emergency physicians assessing patients in the emergency department of an academic center. Physicians were provided the patient’s chief complaint and vital signs and allowed to observe the patient briefly. They were then asked to predict acuity, final disposition (home, intensive care unit (ICU), non-ICU bed) and diagnosis. A patient was classified as sick by the investigators using previously published objective criteria. Results We obtained 662 observations from 289 patients. For acuity, the observers had a sensitivity of 73.9% (95% CI [67.7–79.5%]), specificity 83.3% (95% CI [79.5–86.7%]), positive predictive value 70.3% (95% CI [64.1–75.9%]) and negative predictive value 85.7% (95% CI [82.0–88.9%]). For final disposition, the observers made a correct prediction in 80.8% (95% CI [76.1–85.0%]) of the cases. For ICU admission, emergency physicians had a sensitivity of 33.9% (95% CI [22.1–47.4%]) and a specificity of 96.9% (95% CI [94.0–98.7%]). The correct diagnosis was made 54% of the time with the limited data available. Conclusion System 1 decision-making based on limited information had a sensitivity close to 80% for acuity and disposition prediction, but the performance was lower for predicting ICU admission and diagnosis. System 1 decision-making appears insufficient for final decisions in these domains but likely provides a cognitive framework for System 2 decision-making. PMID:26587086

  7. Factors Influencing Prolonged ICU Stay After Open Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Azarfarin, Rasoul; Ashouri, Nasibeh; Totonchi, Ziae; Bakhshandeh, Hooman; Yaghoubi, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are different risk factors that affect the intensive care unit (ICU) stay after cardiac surgery. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate possible risk factors influencing prolonged ICU stay in a large referral hospital. Patients and Methods: We conducted a case-control study to determinate causes of prolonged ICU stay in 280 adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in a tertiary care center for cardiovascular patients, Tehran, Iran. These patients were divided into two groups according to ICU stay ≤ 96 and > 96 hours. We evaluated perioperative risk factors of ICU stay > 96 hours. Results: Among the 280 patients studied, 184 (65.7%) had stayed ≤ 96 hours and 96 (34.3%) had stayed > 96 hours in ICU. Frequency of prolonged ICU stay was 34.2% in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), 30.8% in patients with valve surgery, and 44.8% in patients with CABG plus valve surgery. Patients with > 96 hours of ICU stay received more blood transfusion and intravenous inotropes. They also had longer anesthesia, cardiopulmonary bypass, and postoperative intubation time. There were higher incidence of postoperative tamponade, re-exploration, re-intubation, hemodialysis, and hypotension in this group (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusions: In this study, about one-third of patients had prolonged ICU stay. Factors influencing prolonged ICU stay were medical and some non-medical factors. In the present study, up to 30% of the patients had a prolonged ICU stay of > 96 hours. Additional data from well-designed investigations are needed for further assessment of the factors influencing prolonged ICU stay after cardiac surgery. PMID:25785249

  8. The Atkins Diet as a possible trigger for an ICU admission: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fraser, J F; Long Den, P

    2003-09-01

    A case of initial presentation and diagnosis of hereditary coproporphyria is described, following a patient's first seizure in the surgical ward, where she had been admitted for investigation of abdominal pains. The frequency of seizures, motor neuropathy and florid visual hallucinations worsened over the subsequent days, until the definitive investigations revealed the diagnosis and specific therapies were instituted. The acute porphyrias, a rare group of conditions caused by deficiencies in enzymes involved in haem biosynthesis, are associated with significant morbidity and occasional mortality. Consideration of the diagnosis, combined with appropriate supportive and specific therapies can reduce the duration of the crisis and lessen the rates of morbidity and mortality associated with these conditions. PMID:16573483

  9. Emergency re-admissions to hospital due to adverse drug reactions within 1 year of the index admission

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Emma C; Green, Christopher F; Mottram, David R; Rowe, Philip H; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2010-01-01

    AIM The proportion of re-admissions to hospital caused by ADRs is poorly documented in the UK. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of ADRs on re-admission to hospital after a period as an inpatient. METHODS One thousand patients consecutively admitted to 12 wards were included. All subsequent admissions for this cohort within 1 year of discharge from the index admission were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS Of the 1000 patients included, 403 (40.3%, 95% CI 39.1, 45.4%) were re-admitted within 1 year. Complete data were available for 290 (70.2%) re-admitted patients, with an ADR contributing to admission in 60 (20.8%, 95% CI 16.4, 25.6%) patients. Presence of an ADR in the index admission did not predict for an ADR-related re-admission (10.5% vs. 7.2%, P = 0.25), or re-admission overall (47.2% vs. 41.2%, P = 0.15). The implicated drug was commenced in the index admission in 33/148 (22.3%) instances, with 37/148 (25%) commenced elsewhere since the index admission. Increasing age and an index admission in a medical ward were associated with a higher incidence of re-admission ADR. The most frequent causative drugs were anti-platelets and loop diuretics, with bleeding and renal impairment the most frequent ADRs. Over half (52/91, 57.1%) of the ADRs were judged to be definitely or possibly avoidable. CONCLUSIONS One fifth of patients re-admitted to hospital within 1 year of discharge from their index admission are re-admitted due to an ADR. Our data highlight drug and patient groups where interventions are needed to reduce the incidence of ADRs leading to re-admission. PMID:21039769

  10. Symptoms of depression in ICU physicians

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Work and family are the two domains from which most adults develop satisfaction in life. They also are responsible for stressful experiences. There is a perception in the community that work is increasingly the source of much of our stress and distress. Depressive symptoms may be related to repeated stressful experiences. Intensive care unit (ICU) physicians are exposed to major stressors. However, the existence of depressive symptoms in these doctors has been poorly studied. This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence and associated risk factors of depressive symptoms in junior and senior ICU physicians. Method A one-day national survey was conducted in adult intensive care units (ICU) in French public hospitals. Symptoms of depression were assessed using the Centers of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Results A total of 189 ICUs participated, and 901 surveys were returned (75.8% response rate). Symptoms of depression were found in 23.8% of the respondents using the CES-D scale. Fifty-eight percent of these intensivists presenting symptoms of depression wished to leave their job compared with only 33% of those who did not exhibit signs of depression as assessed by the CES-D scale (p < 0.0001). Multiple logistic regression showed that organizational factors were associated with the presence of depressive symptoms. Workload (long interval since the last nonworking weekend, absence of relief of service until the next working day after a night shift) and impaired relationships with other intensivists were independently associated with the presence of depressive symptoms. A high level of burnout also was related to the presence of depressive symptoms. In contrast, no demographic factors regarding ICU physicians and no factor related to the severity of illness of patients were retained by the model. The quality of relationships with other physicians (from other departments) was associated with the absence of depressive symptoms

  11. An Integrative Literature Review of Organisational Factors Associated with Admission and Discharge Delays in Critical Care

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; McCallum, Louise; Siirala, Eriikka; Haataja, Marjaana; Lundgrén-Laine, Heljä; Salanterä, Sanna; Lin, Frances

    2015-01-01

    The literature shows that delayed admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and discharge delays from the ICU are associated with increased adverse events and higher costs. Identifying factors related to delays will provide information to practice improvements, which contribute to better patient outcomes. The aim of this integrative review was to explore the incidence of patients' admission and discharge delays in critical care and to identify organisational factors associated with these delays. Seven studies were included. The major findings are as follows: (1) explanatory research about discharge delays is scarce and one study on admission delays was found, (2) delays are a common problem mostly due to organisational factors, occurring in 38% of admissions and 22–67% of discharges, and (3) redesigning care processes by improving information management and coordination between units and interdisciplinary teams could reduce discharge delays. In conclusion, patient outcomes can be improved through efficient and safe care processes. More exploratory research is needed to identify factors that contribute to admission and discharge delays to provide evidence for clinical practice improvements. Shortening delays requires an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the whole patient flow process. Conclusions should be made with caution due to the limited number of articles included in this review. PMID:26558286

  12. An Integrative Literature Review of Organisational Factors Associated with Admission and Discharge Delays in Critical Care.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; McCallum, Louise; Siirala, Eriikka; Haataja, Marjaana; Lundgrén-Laine, Heljä; Salanterä, Sanna; Lin, Frances

    2015-01-01

    The literature shows that delayed admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and discharge delays from the ICU are associated with increased adverse events and higher costs. Identifying factors related to delays will provide information to practice improvements, which contribute to better patient outcomes. The aim of this integrative review was to explore the incidence of patients' admission and discharge delays in critical care and to identify organisational factors associated with these delays. Seven studies were included. The major findings are as follows: (1) explanatory research about discharge delays is scarce and one study on admission delays was found, (2) delays are a common problem mostly due to organisational factors, occurring in 38% of admissions and 22-67% of discharges, and (3) redesigning care processes by improving information management and coordination between units and interdisciplinary teams could reduce discharge delays. In conclusion, patient outcomes can be improved through efficient and safe care processes. More exploratory research is needed to identify factors that contribute to admission and discharge delays to provide evidence for clinical practice improvements. Shortening delays requires an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the whole patient flow process. Conclusions should be made with caution due to the limited number of articles included in this review. PMID:26558286

  13. The Admissions Equity Struggle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Eric

    2012-01-01

    It has been a long, litigious road from Heman Sweatt, an African-American mail carrier who wanted to attend the prestigious, all-White law school at the University of Texas at Austin in 1946, to Abigail Fisher, a White high school student who failed to win undergraduate admission to the same university a half-century later. Depending on what the…

  14. A Revised Admissions Standard for One Community College Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lown, Maris A.

    2010-01-01

    Predicting success on the NCLEX-RN is of paramount importance to nursing programs as they are held accountable for this outcome by accrediting agencies and by boards of nursing. This action research study examined the relationship between the NET admission test, anatomy and physiology grades, grade point average (GPA) on admission to the program…

  15. Writing In and Reading ICU Diaries: Qualitative Study of Families' Experience in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Périer, Antoine; Mouricou, Philippe; Grégoire, Charles; Bruel, Cédric; Brochon, Sandie; Philippart, François; Max, Adeline; Misset, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Keeping an ICU patient diary has been reported to benefit the patient's recovery. Here, we investigated the families' experience with reading and writing in patient ICU diaries kept by both the family and the staff. Methods We conducted a qualitative study involving 32 semi-structured in-depth interviews of relatives of 26 patients (34% of all family members who visited patients) who met our ICU-diary criterion, i.e., ventilation for longer than 48 hours. Grounded theory was used to conceptualise the interview data via a three-step coding process (open coding, axial coding, and selective coding). Results Communicative, emotional, and humanising experiences emerged from our data. First, family members used the diaries to access, understand, and assimilate the medical information written in the diaries by staff members, and then to share this information with other family members. Second, the diaries enabled family members to maintain a connection with the patient by documenting their presence and expressing their love and affection. Additionally, families confided in the diaries to maintain hope. Finally, family members felt the diaries humanized the medical staff and patient. Conclusions Our findings indicate positive effects of diaries on family members. The diaries served as a powerful tool to deliver holistic patient- and family-centered care despite the potentially dehumanising ICU environment. The diaries made the family members aware of their valuable role in caring for the patient and enhanced their access to and comprehension of medical information. Diaries may play a major role in improving the well-being of ICU-patient families. PMID:25329581

  16. Full and Partial Admission Performance of the Simplex Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, D. J.; Griffin, L. W.; Sondak, D. L.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The turbines used in rocket-engine applications are often partial-admission turbines, meaning that the flow enters the rotor over only a portion of the annulus. These turbines have been traditionally analyzed, however, assuming full-admission characteristics. This assumption enables the simulation of only a portion of the 360-degree annulus, with periodic boundary conditions applied in the circumferential direction. While this traditional approach to the simulating the flow in partial-admission turbines significantly reduces the computational requirements, the accuracy of the solutions has rarely been evaluated. In the current investigation, both full- and partial-admission three dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes simulations were performed for a partial-admission turbine designed and tested at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The results indicate that the partial-admission nature of the turbine must be included in simulations to properly predict the performance and flow unsteadiness of the turbine.

  17. Prediction of Clinical Deterioration in Hospitalized Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Using a Neural Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Scott B.; Wong, Deborah J. L.; Correa, Aditi; Li, Ning; Deng, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical deterioration (ICU transfer and cardiac arrest) occurs during approximately 5–10% of hospital admissions. Existing prediction models have a high false positive rate, leading to multiple false alarms and alarm fatigue. We used routine vital signs and laboratory values obtained from the electronic medical record (EMR) along with a machine learning algorithm called a neural network to develop a prediction model that would increase the predictive accuracy and decrease false alarm rates. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting The hematologic malignancy unit in an academic medical center in the United States. Patient Population Adult patients admitted to the hematologic malignancy unit from 2009 to 2010. Intervention None. Measurements and Main Results Vital signs and laboratory values were obtained from the electronic medical record system and then used as predictors (features). A neural network was used to build a model to predict clinical deterioration events (ICU transfer and cardiac arrest). The performance of the neural network model was compared to the VitalPac Early Warning Score (ViEWS). Five hundred sixty five consecutive total admissions were available with 43 admissions resulting in clinical deterioration. Using simulation, the neural network outperformed the ViEWS model with a positive predictive value of 82% compared to 24%, respectively. Conclusion We developed and tested a neural network-based prediction model for clinical deterioration in patients hospitalized in the hematologic malignancy unit. Our neural network model outperformed an existing model, substantially increasing the positive predictive value, allowing the clinician to be confident in the alarm raised. This system can be readily implemented in a real-time fashion in existing EMR systems. PMID:27532679

  18. Requirements analysis for pediatric ICU softcopy display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    1995-04-01

    To make the transition from film to CRT viewing of radiologic images, it is necessary to fully understand what the viewer requires in order to make a confident diagnostic decision. As a preliminary step to installing an image display workstation in our neonatal (NICU) and pediatric (PICU) ICU areas, a requirements analysis was conducted. Interviews were conducted to determine what would be desired in a display workstation, and detailed observations were made of daily procedures in the pediatric and neonatal ICUs. Portable diagnostics (i.e., CR images) constitute the greatest number of images taken. Very few images from other modalities are taken on a regular basis, although traditional film images are taken somewhat frequently. The data indicate that the majority of PICU and NICU images which are of concern to the attending ICU clinicians (i.e., CR) would be available directly for softcopy display on a workstation. A workstation in the radiology reading room would, however, require access to all possible types of images.

  19. Sleep disturbance in older ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Sterniczuk, Roxanne; Rusak, Benjamin; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining a stable and adequate sleeping pattern is associated with good health and disease prevention. As a restorative process, sleep is important for supporting immune function and aiding the body in healing and recovery. Aging is associated with characteristic changes to sleep quantity and quality, which make it more difficult to adjust sleep-wake rhythms to changing environmental conditions. Sleep disturbance and abnormal sleep-wake cycles are commonly reported in seriously ill older patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). A combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors appears to contribute to these disruptions. Little is known regarding the effect that sleep disturbance has on health status in the oldest of old (80+), a group, who with diminishing physiological reserve and increasing prevalence of frailty, is at a greater risk of adverse health outcomes, such as cognitive decline and mortality. Here we review how sleep is altered in the ICU, with particular attention to older patients, especially those aged ≥80 years. Further work is required to understand what impact sleep disturbance has on frailty levels and poor outcomes in older critically ill patients. PMID:25018625

  20. Prediction of Mobility Limitations after Hospitalization in Older Medical Patients by Simple Measures of Physical Performance Obtained at Admission to the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Petersen, Janne; Beyer, Nina; Andersen, Ove; Jørgensen, Lillian Mørch; Juul-Larsen, Helle Gybel; Bandholm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mobility limitations relate to dependency in older adults. Identification of older patients with mobility limitations after hospital discharge may help stratify treatment and could potentially counteract dependency seen in older adults after hospitalization. We investigated the ability of four physical performance measures administered at hospital admission to identify older medical patients who manifest mobility limitations 30 days after discharge. Design Prospective cohort study of patients (≥65 years) admitted to the emergency department for acute medical illness. During the first 24 hours, we assessed: handgrip strength, 4-meter gait speed, the ability to rise from a chair (chair-stand), and the Cumulated Ambulation Score. The mobility level 30 days after discharge was evaluated using the de Morton Mobility Index. Results A total of 369 patients (77.9 years, 62% women) were included. Of those, 128 (40%) patients had mobility limitations at follow-up. Univariate analyzes showed that each of the physical performance measures was strongly associated with mobility limitations at follow-up (handgrip strength(women), OR 0.86 (0.81–0.91), handgrip strength(men), OR 0.90 (0.86–0.95), gait speed, OR 0.35 (0.26–0.46), chair-stand, OR 0.04 (0.02–0.08) and Cumulated Ambulation Score OR 0.49 (0.38–0.64). Adjustment for potential confounders did not change the results and the associations were not modified by any of the covariates: age, gender, cognitive status, the severity of the acute medical illness, and the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Based on prespecified cut-offs the prognostic accuracy of the four measures for mobility limitation at follow-up was calculated. The sensitivity and specificity were: handgrip strength(women), 56.8 (45.8–67.3), 75.7 (66.8–83.2), handgrip strength(men), 50.0 (33.8–66.2), 80.8 (69.9–89.1), gait speed, 68.4 (58.2–77.4), 81.4 (75.0–86.8), chair-stand 67.8 (58.6–76.1), 91.8 (86.8–95.3), and Cumulated

  1. Procalcitonin levels in acute exacerbation of COPD admitted in ICU: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Daubin, Cédric; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Vabret, Astrid; Ramakers, Michel; Fradin, Sabine; Terzi, Nicolas; Freymuth, François; Charbonneau, Pierre; du Cheyron, Damien

    2008-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are recommended for severe acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) admitted to intensive care units (ICU). Serum procalcitonin (PCT) could be a useful tool for selecting patients with a lower probability of developing bacterial infection, but its measurement has not been investigated in this population. Methods We conducted a single center prospective cohort study in consecutive COPD patients admitted to the ICU for AECOPD between September 2005 and September 2006. Sputum samples or tracheal aspirates were tested for the presence of bacteria and viruses. PCT levels were measured at the time of admittance, six hours, and 24 hours using a sensitive immunoassay. Results Thirty nine AECOPD patients were included, 31 of which (79%) required a ventilator support at admission. The median [25%–75% interquartile range] PCT level, assessed in 35/39 patients, was: 0.096 μg/L [IQR, 0.065 to 0.178] at the time of admission, 0.113 μg/L [IQR, 0.074 to 0.548] at six hours, and 0.137 μg/L [IQR, 0.088 to 0.252] at 24 hours. The highest PCT (PCTmax) levels were less than 0.1 μg/L in 14/35 (40%) patients and more than 0.25 μg/L in 10/35 (29%) patients, suggesting low and high probability of bacterial infection, respectively. Five species of bacteria and nine species of viruses were detected in 12/39 (31%) patients. Among the four patients positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one had a PCTmax less than 0.25 μg/L and three had a PCTmax less than 0.1 μg/L. The one patient positive for Haemophilus influenzae had a PCTmax more than 0.25 μg/L. The presence or absence of viruses did not influence PCT at time of admission (0.068 vs 0.098 μg/L respectively, P = 0.80). Conclusion The likelihood of bacterial infection is low among COPD patients admitted to ICU for AECOPD (40% with PCT < 0.1 μg/L) suggesting a possible inappropriate use of antibiotics. Further studies are necessary to assess the impact of a procalcitonin

  2. Prognostic value of ICU-acquired hypernatremia in patients with neurological dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bei; Han, Qianpeng; Mengke, Nashun; He, Kairan; Zhang, Yiqin; Nie, Zhiqiang; Zeng, Hongke

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many studies have indicated that hypernatremia is associated with increased mortality. In this study, we aimed to explore the relationship between intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired hypernatremia and the prognosis of critically neurological patients. Based on serum sodium level in the ICU, 450 patients were divided into 3 groups: 222 had normal serum sodium, 142 had mild hypernatremia, and 86 had severe hypernatremia. Kaplan–Meier and multivariable binary logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the prognostic value of hypernatremia in critically neurological patients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed for serum sodium levels to determine their roles in predicting ICU mortality. Hypernatremia was significantly related with age, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, serum sodium, APACHE II score, and serum creatinine. Moreover, the different treatment outcome including mechanical ventilation, the days of stayed in ICU, and Glasgow Outcome Scale score had correlation with serum sodium levels. Old ages, GCS score, therapeutic intervention scoring system (TISS) score, APACHE II score, serum sodium peak, and so on were all associated with the mortality. In addition, hypernatremia was an independent prognostic factor for critically neurological patients by logistic regression analysis (odds ratio = 1.192, 95% confidence interval = 1.135–1.252, P = 0.000). Moreover, we got the sensitivity of 79.4% and specificity of 74.5% in the ROC analysis between peak serum sodium and the mortality. The area under the ROC curve was 0.844, and the optimal cutoff value was 147.55. Our results showed that ICU-acquired hypernatremia may be a potential prognosis marker for critically neurological patients. PMID:27583842

  3. Self-Reported Physical Symptoms in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Survivors: Pilot Exploration Over Four Months Post-ICU Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiYeon; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Schulz, Richard; Tate, Judith A.; Donahoe, Michael P.; Ren, Dianxu; Given, Barbara A.; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2013-01-01

    Context Survivors of critical illness must overcome persistent physical and psychological challenges. Few studies have longitudinally examined self-reported physical symptoms in ICU survivors. Objectives To describe prevalence and severity of self-reported symptoms in 28 adult medical ICU survivors during the first 4 months post-ICU discharge and their associations with family caregiver responses. Methods Patients completed the Modified Given Symptom Assessment Scale. Caregivers completed Shortened 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Brief Zarit Burden Score, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Caregiver Health Behavior. Data at ICU discharge (≤ 2 weeks), and 2 and 4 months post-ICU discharge were analyzed. Results Across the time points, the majority of patients reported one or more symptoms (88.5 – 97%), with sleep disturbance, fatigue, weakness and pain the most prevalent. For these four highest prevalent symptoms, there were: 1) moderate correlations among symptom severity at 2 and 4 months post-ICU discharge; 2) no difference in prevalence or severity by patients’ disposition (home vs. institution), except worse fatigue in patients at home ≤ 2 weeks post-ICU discharge. Patients’ overall symptom burden showed significant correlation with caregivers’ depressive symptoms ≤ 2 weeks post-ICU discharge. There were trends of moderate correlations between patients’ overall symptom burden and caregivers’ health risk behaviors and sleep quality at 2 and 4 months post-ICU discharge. Conclusion In our sample, sleep disturbance, fatigue, weakness, and pain were the four key symptoms during first 4 months post-ICU discharge. Future studies focusing on these four symptoms are necessary to promote quality in post-ICU symptom management. PMID:23856099

  4. Review of a large clinical series: Predicting death for patients with abdominal septic shock.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Ernst; Brause, Rüdiger; Paetz, Jürgen; Arlt, Björn

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the result of the MEDAN project that analyzes a multicenter septic shock patient data collection. The mortality prognosis based on 4 scores that are often used is compared with the prognosis of a trained neural network. We built an alarm system using the network classification results. Method. We analyzed the data of 382 patients with abdominal septic shock who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) from 1998 to 2002. The analysis includes the calculation of daily sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA), Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II, multiple-organ dysfunction score (MODS) scores for each patient and the training and testing of an appropriate neural network. Results. For our patients with abdominal septic shock, the analysis shows that it is not possible to predict their individual fate correctly on the day of admission to the ICU on the basis of any current score. However, when the trained network computes a score value below the threshold during the ICU stay, there is a high probability that the patient will die within 3 days. The trained neural network obtains the same outcome prediction performance as the best score, the SOFA score, using narrower confidence intervals and considering three variables only: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and the number of thrombocytes. We conclude that the currently best available score for abdominal septic shock may be replaced by the output of a trained neural network with only 3 input variables. PMID:21262751

  5. Patient-Specific, Time-Varying Predictors of Post-ICU Informal Caregiver Burden

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Richard; Chelluri, Lakshmipathi; Pinsky, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The outcomes of informal caregivers of survivors of critical illness likely depend on patient characteristics, which may change over time. To date, few studies have examined patient-specific predictors of post-ICU informal caregiver burden, and none has tested whether predictors vary after hospital discharge. Methods: We designed a prospective, longitudinal observational study, enrolling 48 patient-caregiver dyads from four ICUs in a university hospital. Informal caregiver depression symptoms were measured with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale. Lifestyle disruption was measured with the Activity Restriction Scale. Linear regression models were built to test for patient- and caregiver-specific predictors of depression symptoms and lifestyle disruption 2, 6, and 12 months after ICU admission. Results: Patients had a mean (SD) age of 52.5 (19.7) years, 67% were men, median (interquartile range) Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score was 52 (38.5, 65). The caregivers had a mean (SD) age of 52.8 (12.8) years, 91.2% were women, and 48% were spouses. Predictors of caregiver depression symptoms were patient gender (men) at 2 and 12 months and tracheostomy at 12 months. Predictors of lifestyle disruption were patient education (more common among high school graduates) and patient gender (men) at 2 months, and tracheostomy, functional dependency, and patient gender (men) at 12 months. Conclusions: The determinants of post-ICU informal caregiver burden likely depend on characteristics of the patient as well as the caregiver and may vary over time. Further research is necessary to better understand the longitudinal determinants of burden in order to develop more effective caregiver interventions. PMID:19762552

  6. Predictive Validity of Grade Point Averages and of the Miller Analogies Test for Admission to a Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, I. Phillip

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript evaluates the predictive validity of several predictors used to delimit an initial applicant pool of doctoral candidates at the department/program level. Particular predictors addressed in this manuscript are measures of past academic performance and of future academic potential. Past academic performance is assessed by grade point…

  7. Occupational Health Hazards in ICU Nursing Staff

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Helena Eri; Couto, Djalma Ticiani; Merchán-Hamann, Edgar; Branco, Anadergh Barbosa

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed occupational health hazards for Intensive Care Unit (ICU) nurses and nursing technicians, comparing differences in the number and types of hazards which occur at the beginning and end of their careers. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out with 26 nurses and 96 nursing technicians from a public hospital in the Federal District, Brazil. A Likert-type work-related symptom scale (WRSS) was used to evaluate the presence of physical, psychological, and social risks. Data were analyzed with the use of the SPSS, version 12.0, and the Kruskal-Wallis test for statistical significance and differences in occupational health hazards at the beginning and at the end of the workers' careers. As a workplace, ICUs can cause work health hazards, mostly physical, to nurses and nursing technicians due to the frequent use of physical energy and strength to provide care, while psychological and social hazards occur to a lesser degree. PMID:21994814

  8. Admissions Variables as Predictors of Performance in Basic Science Coursework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, D. Lisa; Niebuhr, Bruce R.

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the relative contribution of several types of admissions data in predicting the success of junior occupational therapy students in the first term of a human anatomy and physiology course. (Author/CT)

  9. The impact of delays to admission from the emergency department on inpatient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We sought to determine the impact of delays to admission from the Emergency Department (ED) on inpatient length of stay (LOS), and IP cost. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 13,460 adult (≥ 18 yrs) ED visits between April 1 2006 and March 30 2007 at a tertiary care teaching hospital with two ED sites in which the mode of disposition was admission to ICU, surgery or inpatient wards. We defined ED Admission Delay as ED time to decision to admit > 12 hours. The primary outcomes were IP LOS, and total IP cost. Results Approximately 11.6% (n = 1558) of admitted patients experienced admission delay. In multivariate analysis we found that admission delay was associated with 12.4% longer IP LOS (95% CI 6.6% - 18.5%) and 11.0% greater total IP cost (6.0% - 16.4%). We estimated the cumulative impact of delay on all delayed patients as an additional 2,183 inpatient days and an increase in IP cost of $2,109,173 at the study institution. Conclusions Delays to admission from the ED are associated with increased IP LOS and IP cost. Improving patient flow through the ED may reduce hospital costs and improve quality of care. There may be a business case for investments to reduce emergency department admission delays. PMID:20618934

  10. At Admissions Conference, Talk of Standardized Tests, Early Decisions, and Swag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Elizabeth F.; Hoover, Eric

    2007-01-01

    At the annual conference of the National Association for College Admission Counseling (Nacac), admissions deans and high-school counselors gathered in September 2007 to grapple with questions such as: (1) Rethinking the role of standardized tests in admissions (many attendees predict that psychometric giants ACT and SAT, will not always dominate…

  11. Indications and outcome for obstetric patients' admission to intensive care unit: a 7-year review.

    PubMed

    Lataifeh, I; Amarin, Z; Zayed, F; Al-Mehaisen, L; Alchalabi, H; Khader, Y

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to investigate the indications, interventions and clinical outcome of pregnant and newly delivered women admitted to the multidisciplinary intensive care unit at the King Abdullah University Hospital in Jordan over a 7-year period from January 2002 to December 2008. The collected data included demographic characteristics of the patients, mode of delivery, pre-existing medical conditions, reason for admission, specific intervention, length of stay and maternal outcome. A total of 43 women required admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), which represented 0.37% of all deliveries. The majority (95.3%) of patients were admitted to the ICU postpartum. The most common reasons for admissions were (pre)eclampsia (48.8%) and obstetric haemorrhage (37.2). The remainder included adult respiratory distress syndrome (6.9%), pulmonary embolism (2.3%) and neurological disorders (4.6%). Mechanical ventilation was required to support 18.6% of patients and transfusion of red blood cells was needed for 48.8% of patients. There were three maternal deaths (6.9%). A multidisciplinary team approach is essential to improve the management of hypertensive disorders and postpartum haemorrhage to achieve significant improvements in maternal outcome. A large, prospective study to know which women are at high risk of admission to the intensive care units and to prevent serious maternal morbidity and mortality is warranted. PMID:20455722

  12. An Evaluation of the Pharmacy College Admissions Test as a Tool for Pharmacy College Admissions Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Katherine A.; Secnik, Kristina; Boye, Mark E.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the capacity of the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) to predict success in pharmacy school. Found demographic differences in PCAT scores, and that the PCAT used in combination with pre-pharmacy grade point average is meaningful in assessing applicants to pharmacy school; applicants with PCAT composite percentile scores below 40…

  13. Persistent Critical Illness May Keep Patients from Leaving ICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... one million ICU patients in Australia and New Zealand, and found that just 5 percent of them ... treated in 182 ICUs across Australia and New Zealand between 2000 and 2014. Of these patients, about ...

  14. Sleepless nights in the ICU: the awaken family.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Matthieu; Azoulay, Elie

    2013-01-01

    Having a loved-one in the ICU is a traumatic experience for family members that can lead to a cluster of psychological complications, recently defined as post-intensive care family syndrome. In a previous issue of Critical Care, Day and colleagues stressed the severe sleep disturbance and fatigue experienced by a majority of ICU patient family members. However, despite this burden being well characterised, the best preventive coping strategy remains undetermined. PMID:24099493

  15. ABCDEs of ICU: Choice of sedative.

    PubMed

    Maraboto, Eddie

    2013-01-01

    When the clinical picture of a patient in the intensive care unit necessitates placement of an artificial airway supported by mechanical ventilation, a regimen of sedation and analgesia is initiated with the goal of providing anxiolysis and pain control to facilitate ventilation and therapeutic and diagnostic intervention. However, some of the most commonly used sedative agents, such as benzodiazepines, may have profound long-term effects on patients' health, including neuropsychological functioning. With more patients now surviving intensive care, more patients are suffering from these negative health consequences. A review of recent research on the subject suggests that more novel, non-benzodiazepine agents such as dexmedetomidine, fluorinated ether gases, and remifentanil function effectively as sedative agents in intubated patients in the intensive care unit, and are less likely to lead to delirium, agitation, aggression, psychosis, and other complications; in addition, use of these alternatives is associated with shorter times to awakening, extubation, and ICU discharge, as well as shorter overall length of stay and decreased cost of care. PMID:23470700

  16. Predictive value of grade point average (GPA), Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), internal examinations (Block) and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) scores on Medical Council of Canada qualifying examination part I (MCCQE-1) scores

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Banibrata; Ripstein, Ira; Perry, Kyle; Cohen, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Background To determine whether the pre-medical Grade Point Average (GPA), Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), Internal examinations (Block) and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) scores are correlated with and predict the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQE-1) scores. Methods Data from 392 admitted students in the graduating classes of 2010–2013 at University of Manitoba (UofM), College of Medicine was considered. Pearson’s correlation to assess the strength of the relationship, multiple linear regression to estimate MCCQE-1 score and stepwise linear regression to investigate the amount of variance were employed. Results Complete data from 367 (94%) students were studied. The MCCQE-1 had a moderate-to-large positive correlation with NBME scores and Block scores but a low correlation with GPA and MCAT scores. The multiple linear regression model gives a good estimate of the MCCQE-1 (R2 =0.604). Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that 59.2% of the variation in the MCCQE-1 was accounted for by the NBME, but only 1.9% by the Block exams, and negligible variation came from the GPA and the MCAT. Conclusions Amongst all the examinations used at UofM, the NBME is most closely correlated with MCCQE-1. PMID:27103953

  17. A Software Communication Tool for the Tele-ICU

    PubMed Central

    Pimintel, Denise M.; Wei, Shang Heng; Odor, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The Tele Intensive Care Unit (tele-ICU) supports a high volume, high acuity population of patients. There is a high-volume of incoming and outgoing calls, especially during the evening and night hours, through the tele-ICU hubs. The tele-ICU clinicians must be able to communicate effectively to team members in order to support the care of complex and critically ill patients while supporting and maintaining a standard to improve time to intervention. This study describes a software communication tool that will improve the time to intervention, over the paper-driven communication format presently used in the tele-ICU. The software provides a multi-relational database of message instances to mine information for evaluation and quality improvement for all entities that touch the tele-ICU. The software design incorporates years of critical care and software design experience combined with new skills acquired in an applied Health Informatics program. This software tool will function in the tele-ICU environment and perform as a front-end application that gathers, routes, and displays internal communication messages for intervention by priority and provider. PMID:24551398

  18. Beyond Correlations: Usefulness of High School GPA and Test Scores in Making College Admissions Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Correlational evidence suggests that high school GPA is better than admission test scores in predicting first-year college GPA, although test scores have incremental predictive validity. The usefulness of a selection variable in making admission decisions depends in part on its predictive validity, but also on institutions' selectivity and…

  19. Molecular biology on the ICU. From understanding to treating sepsis.

    PubMed

    Winning, J; Claus, R A; Huse, K; Bauer, M

    2006-05-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that beside well established factors, such as virulence of pathogens or site of infection, individual differences in disease manifestation are a result of the genetic predisposition of the patient on an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Specific genetic factors might not only predict the risk to acquire severe infections but also to develop organ dysfunction or ultimately to die. Thus, the advent of molecular techniques allowing screening for a wide variety of genetic factors, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes controlling expression of important mediator systems in patients as well as their purposeful targeting in animal models of sepsis, are revolutionizing understanding of pathophysiology in the critically ill. Molecular tools are about to challenge ''state-of-the-art'' diagnostic tests such as blood culture as they not only increase sensitivity but dramatically reduce time requirements to identify pathogens and their resistance patterns. Similarly, knowledge of genetic factors might in the near future help to identify ''patients at risk'', i.e. those with a high likelihood to develop organ dysfunction or to guide therapeutic interventions in particular regarding resource-consuming and/or expensive therapies (''theragnostics''). While therapeutic options in molecular intensive care medicine, such as stem cells in the treatment of organ failure or therapeutic gene transfer are possible along the road and might become an option in the future, recombinant DNA technology has already a well defined role in the production of recombinant human proteins from insulin to activated protein C. PMID:16675935

  20. Emergency department Modified Early Warning Score association with admission, admission disposition, mortality, and length of stay

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Hurtado, Juan J.; Berger, Andrea; Bansal, Amit B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Geisinger Health System implemented the Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) in 2011 and is fully integrated to the Electronic Medical Record (EMR). Our objective was to assess whether the emergency department (ED) MEWS (auto-calculated by EMR) is associated with admission to the hospital, admission disposition, inpatient mortality, and length of stay (LOS) 4 years after its implementation. Methods A random sample of 3,000 patients’ first encounter in the ED was extracted in the study period (between January 1, 2014 and May 31, 2015). Logistic regression was done to analyze whether mean, maximum, and median ED MEWS is associated with admission disposition, mortality, and LOS. Results Mean, maximum, and median ED MEWS is associated with admission to the hospital, admission disposition, and mortality. It correlates weakly with LOS. Conclusion MEWS can be integrated to the EMR, and the score automatically generated still helps predict catastrophic events. MEWS can be used as a triage tool when deciding whether and where patients should be admitted. PMID:27124174

  1. Levels of cytokines in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid, but not in plasma, are associated with levels of markers of lipid peroxidation in breath of ventilated ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Boshuizen, Margit; Leopold, Jan Hendrik; Zakharkina, Tetyana; Knobel, Hugo H; Weda, Hans; Nijsen, Tamara M E; Vink, Teunis J; Sterk, Peter J; Schultz, Marcus J; Bos, Lieuwe D J

    2015-09-01

    Alkanes and alkenes in the breath are produced through fatty acid peroxidation, which is initialized by reactive oxygen species. Inflammation is an important cause and effect of reactive oxygen species. We aimed to evaluate the association between fatty acid peroxidation products and inflammation of the alveolar and systemic compartment in ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients.Volatile organic compounds were measured by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry in the breath of newly ventilated ICU patients within 24 h after ICU admission. Cytokines were measured in non-directed bronchial lavage fluid (NBL) and plasma by cytometric bead array. Correlation coefficients were calculated and presented in heatmaps.93 patients were included. Peroxidation products in exhaled breath were not associated with markers of inflammation in plasma, but were correlated with those in NBL. IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α concentration in NBL showed inverse correlation coefficients with the peroxidation products of fatty acids. Furthermore, NBL IL-10, IL-13, GM-CSF and IFNγ demonstrated positive associations with breath alkanes and alkenes. Correlation coefficients for NBL cytokines were high regarding peroxidation products of n-6, n-7 and particularly in n-9 fatty acids.Levels of lipid peroxidation products in the breath of ventilated ICU patients are associated with levels of inflammatory markers in NBL, but not in plasma. Alkanes and alkenes in breath seems to be associated with an anti-inflammatory, rather than a pro-inflammatory state in the alveoli. PMID:26333527

  2. Acinetobacter baumannii Infection in Prior ICU Bed Occupants Is an Independent Risk Factor for Subsequent Cases of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiridou, Eirini; Makris, Demosthenes; Daniil, Zoe; Manoulakas, Efstratios; Chatzipantazi, Vasiliki; Vlachos, Odysseas; Xidopoulos, Grigorios; Charalampidou, Olympia; Zakynthinos, Epaminondas

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to evaluate risk factors for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) due to Acinetobacter baumannii (AbVAP) in critically ill patients. Methods. This was a prospective observational study conducted in an intensive care unit (ICU) of a district hospital (6 beds). Consecutive patients were eligible for enrolment if they required mechanical ventilation for >48 hours and hospitalization for >72 hours. Clinical, microbiological, and laboratory parameters were assessed as risk factors for AbVAP by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results. 193 patients were included in the study. Overall, VAP incidence was 23.8% and AbVAP, 11.4%. Previous hospitalization of another patient with Acinetobacter baumannii infection was the only independent risk factor for AbVAP (OR (95% CI) 12.016 (2.282–19.521) P < 0.001). ICU stay (25 ± 17 versus 12 ± 9  P < 0.001), the incidence of other infections (OR (95% CI) 9.485 (1.640–10.466) P = 0.002) (urinary tract infection, catheter related infection, and bacteremia), or sepsis (OR (95% CI) 10.400 (3.749–10.466) P < 0.001) were significantly increased in patients with AbVAP compared to patients without VAP; no difference was found with respect to ICU mortality. Conclusion. ICU admission or the hospitalization of patients infected by Acinetobacter baumannii increases the risk of AbVAP by subsequent patients. PMID:25101265

  3. Issues in College Admissions Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Julie P.; Camara, Wayne J.

    College admissions tests provide a standardized and objective measure of student achievement and generalized skills. Unlike high school grades or rank, admission tests are a common measure for comparing students who have attended different high schools, completed different courses, received different grades in courses taught by different teachers,…

  4. The Changing College Admissions Scene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjogren, Cliff

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the status of college admissions and some of the forces that influenced college admissions policies during each of four three-year periods: the Sputnik Era (1957-60), the Postwar Baby Boom Era (1964-67), the "New Groups" Era (1971-74), and the Stable Enrollment Era (1978-81). (PGD)

  5. Toward More Effective Admissions Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maly, Nancy J.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests ways to improve college admissions interviews. Discusses the purpose, format, technique, and content, of the interview as well as selling the college, concluding the interview, and writing the final interview report. Emphasizes the benefits of good interviewing skills to admissions officers. (WAS)

  6. Assessment of Cell-Cycle Arrest Biomarkers to Predict Early and Delayed Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Max; Larsson, Anders; Venge, Per; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Mårtensson, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess urinary tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 ([TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7]), urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and urinary cystatin-C as acute kidney injury predictors (AKI) exploring the association of nonrenal factors with elevated biomarker levels. Methods. We studied 94 patients with urine collected within 48 hours of ICU admission and no AKI at sampling. AKI was defined by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Predictive performance was assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. Associations between biomarkers and clinical factors were assessed by multivariate linear regression. Results. Overall, 19 patients (20%) developed AKI within 48 hours. [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, or cystatin-C admission levels did not differ between patients without AKI and patients developing AKI. [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, and cystatin-C were poor AKI predictors (ROC areas 0.34–0.51). Diabetes was independently associated with higher [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7] levels (P = 0.02) but AKI was not (P = 0.24). Sepsis was independently associated with higher NGAL (P < 0.001) and cystatin-C (P = 0.003) levels. Conclusions. Urinary [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, and cystatin-C should be used cautiously as AKI predictors in general ICU patients since urine levels of these biomarkers are affected by factors other than AKI and their performance can be poor. PMID:25866432

  7. SAT Wars: The Case for Test-Optional College Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Joseph A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    What can a college admissions officer safely predict about the future of a 17-year-old? Are the best and the brightest students the ones who can check off the most correct boxes on a multiple-choice exam? Or are there better ways of measuring ability and promise? In this penetrating and revealing look at high-stakes standardized admissions tests,…

  8. There′s no place like home: Boarding surgical ICU patients in other ICUs and the effect of distances from the home unit

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Jose L.; Blank, Nicholas W.; Holena, Daniel N.; Robertson, Matthew P.; Diop, Mouhamed; Allen, Steve R.; Martin, Niels D.; Kohl, Benjamin A.; Sims, Carrie A.; Schwab, C. William; Reilly, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intensive care units (ICUs) function frequently at capacity, requiring incoming critically ill patients to be placed in alternate geographically distinct ICUs. In some medical ICU populations, “boarding” in an overflow ICU has been associated with increased mortality. We hypothesized that surgical ICU patients experience more complications when boarding in an overflow ICU and that the frequency of these complications are greatest in boarders farthest from the home unit (HU). METHODS A 5-year (June 2005 to June 2010) retrospective review of a prospectively maintained ICU database was performed, and demographics, severity of illness, length of stay, and incidence of ICU complications were extracted. Distances between boarding patients’ rooms and the HU were measured. Complications occurring in patients located in the same floor (BUSF) and different floor (BUDF) boarding units were compared and stratified by distance from HU to the patient room. Logistic regression was used to develop control for known confounders. RESULTS A total of 7,793 patients were admitted to the HU and 833 to a boarding unit (BUSF, n = 712; BUDF, n = 121). Boarders were younger, had a lower length of stay, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and were more of tentrauma/emergency surgery patients. Compared with in-HU patients, the incidence of aspiration pneumonia (2.2% vs. 3.6%, p < 0.01) was greater in BUSF patients and highest in those farthest from the HU (odds ratio [OR],2.39;p =0.01). Delirium occurred less often in HU than in BUDF patients (3.3% vs. 8.3 %, p < 0.01), and both delirium (OR, 6.09, p < 0.01) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (OR, 4.49, p < 0.05) were more frequent in patients farther from the HU. CONCLUSION Certain ICU complications occur more frequently in boarding patients particularly if they are located on a different floor or far from the HU. When surgical ICU bed availability forces overflow admissions to non–home ICUs, greater

  9. The Association Between Colonization With Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Overall ICU Mortality: An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wekesa, Ann N.; Gniadkowski, Marek; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Giamarellou, Helen; Petrikkos, George L.; Skiada, Anna; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Derde, Lennie P. G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae are increasing worldwide, especially in ICUs, and have been associated with high mortality rates. However, unequivocally demonstrating causality of such infections to death is difficult in critically ill patients because of potential confounding and competing events. Here, we quantified the effects of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae carriage on patient outcome in two Greek ICUs with carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae endemicity. Design: Observational cohort study. Setting: Two ICUs with carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae endemicity. Patients: Patients admitted to the ICU with an expected length of ICU stay of at least 3 days were included. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae colonization was established through screening in perineum swabs obtained at admission and twice weekly and inoculated on chromogenic plates. Detection of carbapenemases was performed phenotypically, with confirmation by polymerase chain reaction. Risk factors for ICU mortality were evaluated using cause-specific hazard ratios and subdistribution hazard ratios, with carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae colonization as time-varying covariate. One thousand seven patients were included, 36 (3.6%) were colonized at admission, and 96 (9.5%) acquired carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae colonization during ICU stay, and 301 (29.9%) died in ICU. Of 132 carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates, 125 (94.7%) were Klebsiella pneumoniae and 74 harbored K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (56.1%), 54 metallo-β-lactamase (40.9%), and four both (3.0%). Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae colonization was associated with a statistically significant increase of the subdistribution hazard ratio for ICU mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio = 1.79; 95% CI, 1.31–2.43), not explained by an increased daily hazard of dying (cause

  10. Early Standard Electroencephalogram Abnormalities Predict Mortality in Septic Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Azabou, Eric; Magalhaes, Eric; Braconnier, Antoine; Yahiaoui, Lyria; Moneger, Guy; Heming, Nicholas; Annane, Djillali; Mantz, Jean; Chrétien, Fabrice; Durand, Marie-Christine; Lofaso, Frédéric; Porcher, Raphael; Sharshar, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is associated with increased mortality, delirium and long-term cognitive impairment in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities occurring at the acute stage of sepsis may correlate with severity of brain dysfunction. Predictive value of early standard EEG abnormalities for mortality in ICU septic patients remains to be assessed. Methods In this prospective, single center, observational study, standard EEG was performed, analyzed and classified according to both Synek and Young EEG scales, in consecutive patients acutely admitted in ICU for sepsis. Delirium, coma and the level of sedation were assessed at the time of EEG recording; and duration of sedation, occurrence of in-ICU delirium or death were assessed during follow-up. Adjusted analyses were carried out using multiple logistic regression. Results One hundred ten patients were included, mean age 63.8 (±18.1) years, median SAPS-II score 38 (29–55). At the time of EEG recording, 46 patients (42%) were sedated and 22 (20%) suffered from delirium. Overall, 54 patients (49%) developed delirium, of which 32 (29%) in the days after EEG recording. 23 (21%) patients died in the ICU. Absence of EEG reactivity was observed in 27 patients (25%), periodic discharges (PDs) in 21 (19%) and electrographic seizures (ESZ) in 17 (15%). ICU mortality was independently associated with a delta-predominant background (OR: 3.36; 95% CI [1.08 to 10.4]), absence of EEG reactivity (OR: 4.44; 95% CI [1.37–14.3], PDs (OR: 3.24; 95% CI [1.03 to 10.2]), Synek grade ≥ 3 (OR: 5.35; 95% CI [1.66–17.2]) and Young grade > 1 (OR: 3.44; 95% CI [1.09–10.8]) after adjustment to Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS-II) at admission and level of sedation. Delirium at the time of EEG was associated with ESZ in non-sedated patients (32% vs 10%, p = 0.037); with Synek grade ≥ 3 (36% vs 7%, p< 0.05) and Young grade > 1 (36% vs 17%, p< 0.001). Occurrence of delirium in the days after

  11. Procalcitonin levels and bacterial aetiology among COPD patients admitted to the ICU with severe pneumonia: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Serum procalcitonin (PCT) is considered useful in predicting the likeliness of developing bacterial infections in emergency setting. In this study, we describe PCT levels overtime and their relationship with bacterial infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) critically ill patients with pneumonia. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study in an ICU of a University Hospital. All consecutive COPD patients admitted for pneumonia between September 2005 and September 2006 were included. Respiratory samples were tested for the presence of bacteria and viruses. Procalcitonin was sequentially assessed and patients classified according to the probability of the presence of a bacterial infection. Results Thirty four patients were included. The PCT levels were assessed in 32/34 patients, median values were: 0.493 μg/L [IQR, 0.131 to 1.471] at the time of admission, 0.724 μg/L [IQR, 0.167 to 2.646] at six hours, and 0.557 μg/L [IQR, 0.123 to 3.4] at 24 hours. The highest PCT (PCTmax) levels were less than 0.1 μg/L in 3/32 (9%) patients and greater than 0.25 μg/L in 22/32 (69%) patients, suggesting low and high probability of bacterial infection, respectively. Fifteen bacteria and five viruses were detected in 15/34 (44%) patients. Bacteria were not detected in patients with PCTmax levels < 0.1 μg/L. In contrast, bacteria were detected in 4/7 (57%) patients estimated unlikely to have a bacterial infection by PCT levels (PCTmax > 0.1 and < 0.25 μg/L). Conclusion Based on these results we suggest that a PCT level cut off > 0.1 μg/L may be more appropriate than 0.25 μg/L (previously proposed for non severe lower respiratory tract infection) to predict the probability of a bacterial infection in severe COPD patients with pneumonia. Further studies testing procalcitonin-based antibiotic strategies are needed in COPD patients with severe pneumonia. PMID:19772586

  12. Clinical Prediction Rule for Patient Outcome after In-Hospital CPR: A New Model, Using Characteristics Present at Hospital Admission, to Identify Patients Unlikely to Benefit from CPR after In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Merja, Satyam; Lilien, Ryan H; Ryder, Hilary F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Physicians and patients frequently overestimate likelihood of survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Discussions and decisions around resuscitation after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest often take place without adequate or accurate information. METHODS We conducted a retrospective chart review of 470 instances of resuscitation after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. Individuals were randomly assigned to a derivation cohort and a validation cohort. Logistic Regression and Linear Discriminant Analysis were used to perform multivariate analysis of the data. The resultant best performing rule was converted to a weighted integer tool, and thresholds of survival and nonsurvival were determined with an attempt to optimize sensitivity and specificity for survival. RESULTS A 10-feature rule, using thresholds for survival and nonsurvival, was created; the sensitivity of the rule on the validation cohort was 42.7% and specificity was 82.4%. In the Dartmouth Score (DS), the features of age (greater than 70 years of age), history of cancer, previous cardiovascular accident, and presence of coma, hypotension, abnormal PaO2, and abnormal bicarbonate were identified as the best predictors of nonsurvival. Angina, dementia, and chronic respiratory insufficiency were selected as protective features. CONCLUSIONS Utilizing information easily obtainable on admission, our clinical prediction tool, the DS, provides physicians individualized information about their patients’ probability of survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. The DS may become a useful addition to medical expertise and clinical judgment in evaluating and communicating an individual’s probability of survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest after it is validated by other cohorts. PMID:26448686

  13. Metabolic Management during Critical Illness: Glycemic Control in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Honiden, Shyoko; Inzucchi, Silvio E

    2015-12-01

    Hyperglycemia is a commonly encountered metabolic derangement in the ICU. Important cellular pathways, such as those related to oxidant stress, immunity, and cellular homeostasis, can become deranged with prolonged and uncontrolled hyperglycemia. There is additionally a complex interplay between nutritional status, ambient glucose concentrations, and protein catabolism. While the nuances of glucose management in the ICU have been debated, results from landmark studies support the notion that for most critically ill patients moderate glycemic control is appropriate, as reflected by recent guidelines. Beyond the target population and optimal glucose range, additional factors such as hypoglycemia and glucose variability are important metrics to follow. In this regard, new technologies such as continuous glucose sensors may help alleviate the risks associated with such glucose fluctuations in the ICU. In this review, we will explore the impact of hyperglycemia upon critical cellular pathways and how nutrition provided in the ICU affects blood glucose. Additionally, important clinical trials to date will be summarized. A practical and comprehensive approach to glucose management in the ICU will be outlined, touching upon important issues such as glucose variability, target population, and hypoglycemia. PMID:26595046

  14. [Psychiatric issues during and after intensive care (ICU) stays].

    PubMed

    Pochard, Frédéric

    2011-02-01

    Stays in intensive care units (ICUs) are a source of psychological and physical stress, sometimes resulting in psychological disorders that may persist after ICU discharge. ICU stressors include exhaustion, drug-induced sleep privation, intubation, pain, noise, and a disrupted light-dark cycle. Patients remember traumatic experiences, such as a fear of being killed or abandoned, nightmares, and panic attacks. Depression is frequent but difficult to detect. Psychiatric disorders such as delirium and confusion (hallucinations, agitation, stupor) occur in almost half of all ICU patients. Simple measures can reduce the risk of such disorders, including noise reduction, less intense lighting (especially at night), individual rooms, visible clocks to reduce confusion, frequent family visits, verbal contact, reassurance, and anxiolytics. Anxiety and depression are frequent after ICU stays, and may be mixed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which can include fear, feelings of horror, helplessness, avoidance, neurovegetative symptoms, and intrusive thoughts. New techniques are being tested to prevent these disorders, such as logbooksfor families and team members to note events during and after the ICU stay, and end-of-stay psychological OK? consultations for both the patient and the family. PMID:22096876

  15. What Is the Best Pulmonary Physiotherapy Method in ICU?

    PubMed Central

    Kuyrukluyildiz, Ufuk; Binici, Orhan; Kupeli, İlke; Erturk, Nurel; Gulhan, Barış; Akyol, Fethi; Ozcicek, Adalet; Onk, Didem; Karabakan, Guldane

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Effects of high frequency chest wall oscillation technique were investigated on intubated ICU patients. Background. Thirty intubated patients were included in the study. The control group (n = 15) received routine pulmonary rehabilitation technique. In addition to the pulmonary rehabilitation technique, the study group (n = 15) was given high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). APACHE II, dry sputum weight, lung collapse index, and blood gas values were measured at 24th, 48th, and 72nd hours and endotracheal aspirate culture was studied at initial and 72nd hour. The days of ventilation and days in ICU were evaluated. Results. There is no significant difference between APACHE II scores of groups. The dry sputum weights increased in the study group at 72nd hour (p = 0.001). The lung collapse index decreased in study group at 48th (p = 0.003) and 72nd hours (p < 0.001). The PO2 levels increased in the study group at 72nd hour (p = 0.015). The culture positivity at 72nd hour was decreased to 20%. The days of ventilation and staying in ICU did not differ between the groups. Conclusions. Although HFCWO is very expensive equipment, combined technique may prevent the development of lung atelectasis or hospital-acquired pneumonia more than routine pulmonary rehabilitation. It does not change intubated period and length of stay in ICU. However, more further controlled clinical studies are needed to use it in ICU.

  16. What Is the Best Pulmonary Physiotherapy Method in ICU?

    PubMed

    Kuyrukluyildiz, Ufuk; Binici, Orhan; Kupeli, İlke; Erturk, Nurel; Gulhan, Barış; Akyol, Fethi; Ozcicek, Adalet; Onk, Didem; Karabakan, Guldane

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Effects of high frequency chest wall oscillation technique were investigated on intubated ICU patients. Background. Thirty intubated patients were included in the study. The control group (n = 15) received routine pulmonary rehabilitation technique. In addition to the pulmonary rehabilitation technique, the study group (n = 15) was given high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). APACHE II, dry sputum weight, lung collapse index, and blood gas values were measured at 24th, 48th, and 72nd hours and endotracheal aspirate culture was studied at initial and 72nd hour. The days of ventilation and days in ICU were evaluated. Results. There is no significant difference between APACHE II scores of groups. The dry sputum weights increased in the study group at 72nd hour (p = 0.001). The lung collapse index decreased in study group at 48th (p = 0.003) and 72nd hours (p < 0.001). The PO2 levels increased in the study group at 72nd hour (p = 0.015). The culture positivity at 72nd hour was decreased to 20%. The days of ventilation and staying in ICU did not differ between the groups. Conclusions. Although HFCWO is very expensive equipment, combined technique may prevent the development of lung atelectasis or hospital-acquired pneumonia more than routine pulmonary rehabilitation. It does not change intubated period and length of stay in ICU. However, more further controlled clinical studies are needed to use it in ICU. PMID:27445542

  17. Family Meetings Made Simpler: A Toolkit for the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Judith E.; Walker, Amy S.; Luhrs, Carol M.; Cortez, Therese B.; Pronovost, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Although a growing body of evidence has associated the ICU family meeting with important, favorable outcomes for critically ill patients, their families, and health care systems, these meetings often fail to occur in a timely, effective, and reliable way. In this article, we describe three specific tools that we have developed as prototypes to promote more successful implementation of family meetings in the ICU: 1) A Family Meeting Planner; 2) A Meeting Guide for Families; and 3) A Family Meeting Documentation Template. We describe the essential features of these tools and ways that they might be adapted to meet the local needs of individual ICUs and to maximize acceptability and use. We also discuss the role of such tools in structuring a performance improvement initiative. Just as simple tools have helped to reduce bloodstream infections, our hope is that the toolkit presented here will help critical care teams to meet the important communication needs of ICU families. PMID:19427757

  18. Improving Efficiency and Quality in a Computerized ICU

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Karen E.; Sittig, Dean F.; Gardner, Reed M.; Pryor, T. Allan; Budd, Marge

    1988-01-01

    Ongoing efforts have been made to improve the efficiency and quality of care available in ICU's at LDS Hospital. ICU's have been computerized, and patient data collection, storage and presentation have been improved. Nurse care plans and charting have been computerized, and effects of these changes have been evaluated. Work sampling studies showed a decrease in direct patient care (49.1% to 43.2%) and an increase in nurse charting (18.2% to 24.2%) after implementation of computerized nurse charting. These changes were accounted for by a decrease in patient severity of illness. Implementation of the computerized nurse charting system had no significant impact on daily ICU nursing activities. Time savings are not automatic, but could be realized through management practices designed to maximize benefits of the nurse charting system and to make best use of available nursing resources.

  19. Differential Freshman Admission by Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suddick, David E.; McBee, M. Louise

    1974-01-01

    The authors report on a study whose purpose was to determine if, after adjusting for initial differences in high school averages and SAT scores via separate regression equations, differential admissions criterion by sex is justifiable. No justification is found. (RP)

  20. ED navigators prevent unnecessary admissions.

    PubMed

    2012-02-01

    RN Navigators in the emergency department at Montefiore Medical Center work with social workers to prevent unnecessary admissions. Program targets the homeless and patients with tenuous living situations. CMs work with the emergency department staff to identify patients who don't meet admission criteria but can't be safely discharged. The hospital collaborates with a local housing assistance agency which sends a van to transport appropriate patients to a shelter. PMID:22299178

  1. Web-based integrated alarm monitoring system in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akitsugu; Kinouchi, Yohsuke; Akutagawa, Masatake; Ohnishi, Yoshiaki; Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    2005-01-01

    A web-based monitoring system for the alarm of equipment has developed for the conventional environment of Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The system communicates with equipment using Data Collection Interface (DCI) that converts the protocol of the output of equipment from RS-232C to TCP/IP. The system creates a web-document that can be referred from any internet-connected personal computer in the hospital. Using the system, a staff can easily monitor the state of the patient and the equipment. If the system is installed in the ICU, monitoring and management for the equipment will be highly improved. PMID:17281636

  2. Tight glycemic control in the ICU - is the earth flat?

    PubMed

    Steil, Garry M; Agus, Michael S D

    2014-01-01

    Tight glycemic control in the ICU has been shown to reduce mortality in some but not all prospective randomized control trials. Confounding the interpretation of these studies are differences in how the control was achieved and underlying incidence of hypoglycemia, which can be expected to be affected by the introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). In this issue of Critical Care, a consensus panel provides a list of the research priorities they believe are needed for CGM to become routine practice in the ICU. We reflect on these recommendations and consider the implications for using CGM today. PMID:25041720

  3. 45 CFR 618.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 618.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by...

  4. 44 CFR 68.9 - Admissible evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admissible evidence. 68.9 Section 68.9 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... admissible. (b) Documentary and oral evidence shall be admissible. (c) Admissibility of non-expert...

  5. Temporal Trends of the Clinical, Resource Use and Outcome Attributes of ICU-Managed Candidemia Hospitalizations: A Population-Level Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oud, Lavi

    2016-01-01

    Background There are mixed findings on the longitudinal patterns of the incidence of intensive care unit (ICU)-managed candidemia, with scarcity of reports on the corresponding evolving patterns of patients’ clinical characteristics and outcomes. No population-level data were reported on the temporal trends of the attributes, care and outcomes of ICU-managed adults with candidemia. Methods The Texas Inpatient Public Use Data File was used to identify hospitalizations aged 18 years or older with a diagnosis of candidemia and ICU admission (C-ICU hospitalizations) between 2001 and 2010. Temporal trends of the demographics, clinical features, use of healthcare resources, and short-term outcomes were examined. Average annual percent changes (AAPCs) were derived. Results C-ICU hospitalizations (n = 7,552) became (AAPC) increasingly younger (age ≥ 65 years: -1.0%/year). The Charslon comorbidity index rose 4.2%/year, while the mean number of organ failures (OFs) increased by 8.2%/year, with a fast rise in the rate of those developing ≥ 3 OFs (+15.5%/year). Between 2001 and 2010, there was no significant change in utilization of mechanical ventilation and new hemodialysis among C-ICU hospitalizations with reported respiratory and renal failures (68.9% vs. 73.3%, P = 0.3653 and 15.5% vs. 21.8%, P = 0.8589, respectively). Hospital length of stay or total hospital charges remained unchanged during study period. Hospital mortality decreased between 2001 and 2010 from 39.3% to 23.8% (-5.2%/year). The majority of hospital survivors (61.6%) were discharged to another facility, and increasingly to long-term acute care hospitals, with routine home discharge decreasing to 11% by 2010. Conclusions C-ICU hospitalizations demonstrated increasing comorbidity burden and rising development of OF, and matching rise in use of selected life-support interventions, though with unchanged in-hospital fiscal impact. There has been marked decrease in hospital mortality, but survivors had

  6. Forecasting paediatric malaria admissions on the Kenya Coast using rainfall

    PubMed Central

    Karuri, Stella Wanjugu; Snow, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Malaria is a vector-borne disease which, despite recent scaled-up efforts to achieve control in Africa, continues to pose a major threat to child survival. The disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium and requires mosquitoes and humans for transmission. Rainfall is a major factor in seasonal and secular patterns of malaria transmission along the East African coast. Objective The goal of the study was to develop a model to reliably forecast incidences of paediatric malaria admissions to Kilifi District Hospital (KDH). Design In this article, we apply several statistical models to look at the temporal association between monthly paediatric malaria hospital admissions, rainfall, and Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures. Trend and seasonally adjusted, marginal and multivariate, time-series models for hospital admissions were applied to a unique data set to examine the role of climate, seasonality, and long-term anomalies in predicting malaria hospital admission rates and whether these might become more or less predictable with increasing vector control. Results The proportion of paediatric admissions to KDH that have malaria as a cause of admission can be forecast by a model which depends on the proportion of malaria admissions in the previous 2 months. This model is improved by incorporating either the previous month's Indian Ocean Dipole information or the previous 2 months’ rainfall. Conclusions Surveillance data can help build time-series prediction models which can be used to anticipate seasonal variations in clinical burdens of malaria in stable transmission areas and aid the timing of malaria vector control. PMID:26842613

  7. Critical illness in pregnancy: part I: an approach to a pregnant patient in the ICU and common obstetric disorders.

    PubMed

    Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K; Hall, Nicole; Karnad, Dilip R; Bandi, Venkata; Belfort, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Managing critically ill obstetric patients in the ICU is a challenge because of their altered physiology, different normal ranges for laboratory and clinical parameters in pregnancy, and potentially harmful effects of drugs and interventions on the fetus. About 200 to 700 women per 100,000 deliveries require ICU admission. A systematic five-step approach is recommended to enhance maternal and fetal outcomes: (1) differentiate between medical and obstetric disorders with similar manifestations, (2) identify and treat organ dysfunction, (3) assess maternal and fetal risk from continuing pregnancy and decide if delivery/termination of pregnancy will improve outcome, (4) choose an appropriate mode of delivery if necessary, and (5) optimize organ functions for safe delivery. A multidisciplinary team including the intensivist, obstetrician, maternal-fetal medicine specialist, anesthesiologist, neonatologist, nursing specialist, and transfusion medicine expert is key to optimize outcomes. Severe preeclampsia and its complications, HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) syndrome, and amniotic fluid embolism, which cause significant organ failure, are reviewed. Obstetric conditions that were not so common in the past are increasingly seen in the ICU. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura of pregnancy is being diagnosed more frequently. Massive hemorrhage from adherent placenta is increasing because of the large number of pregnant women with scars from previous cesarean section. With more complex fetal surgical interventions being performed for congenital disorders, maternal complications are increasing. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is also becoming common because of treatment of infertility with assisted reproduction techniques. Part II will deal with common medical disorders and their management in critically ill pregnant women. PMID:26020613

  8. Accept or divert ICU patients? A heated ethical debate.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, P A

    2000-01-01

    Stretching scarce resources is more than a managerial issue. Should an understaffed ICU accept the patient or divert him to another facility? The intense "medical utility" controversy focuses on a situation that critical care nurses now face every day. PMID:11998065

  9. [What lipid emulsion should be administered to ICU patients?].

    PubMed

    Kreymann, G

    2014-01-01

    The review deals with a question what lipid emulsion should be administered to ICU patients according to recently published official parenteral and enteral nutrition guidelines. Classic lipid emulsions based on omega-6 fatty acids are immunosuppressive and should not be used with ICU patients. The olive/soy emulsion is immunoneutral and can be used for most patients. Many ICU patients are in an inflammatory state (e.g. sepsis, ARDS, pancreatitis). A common belief is that this "hyperinflammed patient population" would profit from an anti-inflammatory lipid component of their parenteral nutrition solution, such as fish oil. On the other hand, every anti-inflammatory therapy has the disadvantage of also being immunosuppressive. Inflammation is a necessary part of the host defense against infection and any correct anti-inflammatory medication presupposes the exact immunologic knowledge that there is too much inflammation for a given situation. This "too much" is certainly not fulfilled in every patient with sepsis, ARDS or pancreatitis. At the bedside it is nearly impossible to determine the degree of "hyper" inflammation. In reality, a number of these patients may be adequately inflamed or, in fact, even hypoinflammed. Specific emulsions which can be used in hyper- or hypoinflammation should be developed in the future. As long as these difficulties in the immunologic diagnosis prevail, the clinician might be best advised to use an immunoneutral lipid emulsion when choosing a lipid preparation for the ICU patients. PMID:25306684

  10. A knowledge-based care protocol system for ICU.

    PubMed

    Lau, F; Vincent, D D

    1995-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using care maps in ICU. So far, the emphasis has been on developing the critical path, problem/outcome, and variance reporting for specific diagnoses. This paper presents a conceptual knowledge-based care protocol system design for the ICU. It is based on the manual care map currently in use for managing myocardial infarction in the ICU of the Sturgeon General Hospital in Alberta. The proposed design uses expert rules, object schemas, case-based reasoning, and quantitative models as sources of its knowledge. Also being developed is a decision model with explicit linkages for outcome-process-measure from the care map. The resulting system is intended as a bedside charting and decision-support tool for caregivers. Proposed usage includes charting by acknowledgment, generation of alerts, and critiques on variances/events recorded, recommendations for planned interventions, and comparison with historical cases. Currently, a prototype is being developed on a PC-based network with Visual Basic, Level-Expert Object, and xBase. A clinical trial is also planned to evaluate whether this knowledge-based care protocol can reduce the length of stay of patients with myocardial infarction in the ICU. PMID:8591604