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  1. Toddler Inhibitory Control, Bold Response to Novelty, and Positive Affect Predict Externalizing Symptoms in Kindergarten

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Kristin A.; Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Morales, Santiago; Robinson, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Poor inhibitory control and bold-approach have been found to predict the development of externalizing behavior problems in young children. Less research has examined how positive affect may influence the development of externalizing behavior in the context of low inhibitory control and high approach. We used a multimethod approach to examine how observed toddler inhibitory control, bold-approach, and positive affect predicted externalizing outcomes (observed, adult- and self-reported) in additive and interactive ways at the beginning of kindergarten. 24-month-olds (N = 110) participated in a laboratory visit and 84 were followed up in kindergarten for externalizing behaviors. Overall, children who were low in inhibitory control, high in bold-approach, and low in positive affect at 24-months of age were at greater risk for externalizing behaviors during kindergarten. PMID:25018589

  2. Hippocampal BOLD response during category learning predicts subsequent performance on transfer generalization.

    PubMed

    Fera, Francesco; Passamonti, Luca; Herzallah, Mohammad M; Myers, Catherine E; Veltri, Pierangelo; Morganti, Giuseppina; Quattrone, Aldo; Gluck, Mark A

    2014-07-01

    To test a prediction of our previous computational model of cortico-hippocampal interaction (Gluck and Myers [1993, 2001]) for characterizing individual differences in category learning, we studied young healthy subjects using an fMRI-adapted category-learning task that has two phases, an initial phase in which associations are learned through trial-and-error feedback followed by a generalization phase in which previously learned rules can be applied to novel associations (Myers et al. [2003]). As expected by our model, we found a negative correlation between learning-related hippocampal responses and accuracy during transfer, demonstrating that hippocampal adaptation during learning is associated with better behavioral scores during transfer generalization. In addition, we found an inverse relationship between Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) activity in the striatum and that in the hippocampal formation and the orbitofrontal cortex during the initial learning phase. Conversely, activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex and parietal lobes dominated over that of the hippocampal formation during the generalization phase. These findings provide evidence in support of theories of the neural substrates of category learning which argue that the hippocampal region plays a critical role during learning for appropriately encoding and representing newly learned information so that that this learning can be successfully applied and generalized to subsequent novel task demands. PMID:24142480

  3. Micro- and macroturbulence predictions from CO5BOLD 3D stellar atmospheres .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, M.; Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.

    We present an overview of the current status of our efforts to derive the microturbulence and macroturbulence parameters (xi_mic and xi_mac) from the CIFIST grid of CO5BOLD 3D model atmospheres as a function of the basic stellar parameters T_{eff}, log g, and [M/H]. The latest results for the Sun and Procyon show that the derived microturbulence parameter depends significantly on the numerical resolution of the underlying 3D simulation, confirming that `low-resolution' models tend to underestimate the true value of xi_mic . Extending the investigation to 12 further simulations with different T_{eff}, log g, and [M/H], we obtain a first impression of the predicted trend of xi_mic over the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram: in agreement with empirical evidence, microturbulence increases towards higher effective temperature and lower gravity. The metallicity dependence of xi_mic must be interpreted with care, since it also reflects the deviation between the 1D and 3D photospheric temperature stratifications that increases systematically towards lower [M/H].

  4. Cortical Network Models of Firing Rates in the Resting and Active States Predict BOLD Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Maxwell R.; Farnell, Les; Gibson, William G.; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals have produced some surprising observations. One is that their amplitude is proportional to the entire activity in a region of interest and not just the fluctuations in this activity. Another is that during sleep and anesthesia the average BOLD correlations between regions of interest decline as the activity declines. Mechanistic explanations of these phenomena are described here using a cortical network model consisting of modules with excitatory and inhibitory neurons, taken as regions of cortical interest, each receiving excitatory inputs from outside the network, taken as subcortical driving inputs in addition to extrinsic (intermodular) connections, such as provided by associational fibers. The model shows that the standard deviation of the firing rate is proportional to the mean frequency of the firing when the extrinsic connections are decreased, so that the mean BOLD signal is proportional to both as is observed experimentally. The model also shows that if these extrinsic connections are decreased or the frequency of firing reaching the network from the subcortical driving inputs is decreased, or both decline, there is a decrease in the mean firing rate in the modules accompanied by decreases in the mean BOLD correlations between the modules, consistent with the observed changes during NREM sleep and under anesthesia. Finally, the model explains why a transient increase in the BOLD signal in a cortical area, due to a transient subcortical input, gives rises to responses throughout the cortex as observed, with these responses mediated by the extrinsic (intermodular) connections. PMID:26659399

  5. High-resolution BOLD fMRI measurements of local orientation-dependent contextual modulation show a mismatch between predicted V1 output and local BOLD response

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jennifer F.; Olman, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI response to suppressive neural activity has not been tested on a fine spatial scale. Using Gabor patches placed in the near periphery, we precisely localized individual regions of interest in primary visual cortex and measured the response at a range of contrasts in two different contexts: with parallel and with orthogonal flanking Gabor patches. Psychophysical measurements confirmed strong suppression of the target Gabor response when flanked by parallel Gabors. However, the BOLD response to the target with parallel flankers decreased as the target contrast increased, which contradicts psychophysical estimates of local neural activity. PMID:20382175

  6. A simple solution for model comparison in bold imaging: the special case of reward prediction error and reward outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Erdeniz, Burak; Rohe, Tim; Done, John; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional neuroimaging techniques provide information about condition-related changes of the BOLD (blood-oxygen-level dependent) signal, indicating only where and when the underlying cognitive processes occur. Recently, with the help of a new approach called “model-based” functional neuroimaging (fMRI), researchers are able to visualize changes in the internal variables of a time varying learning process, such as the reward prediction error or the predicted reward value of a conditional stimulus. However, despite being extremely beneficial to the imaging community in understanding the neural correlates of decision variables, a model-based approach to brain imaging data is also methodologically challenging due to the multicollinearity problem in statistical analysis. There are multiple sources of multicollinearity in functional neuroimaging including investigations of closely related variables and/or experimental designs that do not account for this. The source of multicollinearity discussed in this paper occurs due to correlation between different subjective variables that are calculated very close in time. Here, we review methodological approaches to analyzing such data by discussing the special case of separating the reward prediction error signal from reward outcomes. PMID:23882174

  7. Choice from non-choice: Predicting consumer preferences from BOLD signals obtained during passive viewing

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Ifat; Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Rutledge, Robb B.; Glimcher, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    Decision-making is often viewed as a two-stage process, where subjective values are first assigned to each option and then the option of the highest value is selected. Converging evidence suggests that these subjective values are represented in the striatum and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). A separate line of evidence suggests that activation in the same areas represents the values of rewards even when choice is not required, as in classical conditioning tasks. However, it is unclear whether the same neural mechanism is engaged in both cases. To address this question we measured brain activation with fMRI while human subjects passively viewed individual consumer goods. We then sampled activation from predefined regions of interest and used it to predict subsequent choices between the same items made outside of the scanner. Our results show that activation in the striatum and MPFC in the absence of choice predicts subsequent choices, suggesting that these brain areas represent value in a similar manner whether or not choice is required. PMID:21209196

  8. Emotional Intelligence, Personality, and Task-Induced Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Gerald; Emo, Amanda K.; Funke, Gregory; Zeidner, Moshe; Roberts, Richard D.; Costa, Paul T.; Schulze, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) may predict stress responses and coping strategies in a variety of applied settings. This study compares EI and the personality factors of the Five Factor Model (FFM) as predictors of task-induced stress responses. Participants (N = 200) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 task conditions, 3 of which were designed to be…

  9. Bold Books for Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Don

    2005-01-01

    "Bold Books for Teenagers" provides dynamic, informative viewpoints on important issues in publishing and teaching contemporary literature, especially literature for adolescents. Reviews of young adult literature also appear in this column. This article examines how English teachers can help students explore their interests without promoting any…

  10. BOLD MRI of the Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu-Ping; Halter, Sarah; Prasad, Pottumarthi V.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Oxygenation status plays a major role in renal physiology and pathophysiology and hence has attracted considerable attention in recent years. While much of the early work and a significant amount of present work is based on invasive methods or ex vivo analysis and hence restricted to animal models, BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) MRI has been shown to extend these findings to humans. BOLD MRI is most useful in monitoring effects of physiological or pharmacological maneuvers. Several teams around the world have demonstrated reproducible data and have illustrated several useful applications. Studies supporting the use of renal BOLD MRI in characterizing disease with prognostic value have also been reported. Here, an overview of the current state-of-the art of renal BOLD MRI is provided. PMID:18926426

  11. Task-induced fatigue states and simulated driving performance.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Gerald; Desmond, Paula A

    2002-04-01

    States of fatigue are implicated in driver impairment and motor vehicle accidents. This article reports two studies investigating two possible mechanisms for performance impairment: (1) loss of attentional resources; and (2) active regulation of matching effort to task demands. The first hypothesis predicts that fatigue effects will be accentuated by high task demands, but the second hypothesis predicts that fatigue effects will be strongest in "underload" conditions. In two studies, drivers performed a stimulated driving task, in which task demands were manipulated by varying road curvature. In a "fatigue induction" condition, the early part of the drive was occupied by performance of a demanding secondary task concurrently with driving, after which the concurrent task ceased. Post-induction driving performance was compared with a control condition in which drivers were not exposed to the induction. In both studies, the fatigue induction elicited various subjective fatigue and stress symptoms, and also raised reported workload. Fatigue effects on vehicle control and signal detection were assessed during and after the fatigue induction. The fatigue induction increased heading error, reduced steering activity, and, in the second study, reduced perceptual sensitivity on a secondary detection task. These effects were confined to driving on straight rather than on curved road sections, consistent with the effort regulation hypothesis. The second study showed that fatigue effects were moderated by a motivational manipulation. Results are interpreted within a control model, such that task-induced fatigue may reduce awareness of performance impairment, rather than reluctance or inability to mobilize compensatory effort following detection of impairment. PMID:12047065

  12. Reading Rate, Readability and Variations in Task-Induced Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coke, Esther U.

    This study examined the adaptability of reading rate to passage difficulty under different conditions of task-induced processing. Sixteen experimental passages varying in subject matter and ranging from 85 to 171 words were selected from a set of 32 texts rated for comprehensibility. The eight easiest and eight hardest texts were selected. Another…

  13. Task-Induced Deactivation and the “Resting” State

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Task-induced decreases in blood flow and the widespread use of “resting” baselines produced unexpected and discrepant results in early cognitive imaging studies, especially in language comprehension experiments. Here I describe from a personal perspective some of the events and thought processes leading to the first hypothesis-driven fMRI study of the “resting” state. PMID:21979380

  14. Quantifying the microvascular origin of BOLD-fMRI from first principles with two-photon microscopy and an oxygen-sensitive nanoprobe.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Louis; Sakadžić, Sava; Lesage, Frédéric; Musacchia, Joseph J; Lefebvre, Joël; Fang, Qianqian; Yücel, Meryem A; Evans, Karleyton C; Mandeville, Emiri T; Cohen-Adad, Jülien; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Lo, Eng H; Greve, Douglas N; Buxton, Richard B; Dale, Anders M; Devor, Anna; Boas, David A

    2015-02-25

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast is widely used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies aimed at investigating neuronal activity. However, the BOLD signal reflects changes in blood volume and oxygenation rather than neuronal activity per se. Therefore, understanding the transformation of microscopic vascular behavior into macroscopic BOLD signals is at the foundation of physiologically informed noninvasive neuroimaging. Here, we use oxygen-sensitive two-photon microscopy to measure the BOLD-relevant microvascular physiology occurring within a typical rodent fMRI voxel and predict the BOLD signal from first principles using those measurements. The predictive power of the approach is illustrated by quantifying variations in the BOLD signal induced by the morphological folding of the human cortex. This framework is then used to quantify the contribution of individual vascular compartments and other factors to the BOLD signal for different magnet strengths and pulse sequences. PMID:25716864

  15. From uncertainty to reward: BOLD characteristics differentiate signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Reward value and uncertainty are represented by dopamine neurons in monkeys by distinct phasic and tonic firing rates. Knowledge about the underlying differential dopaminergic pathways is crucial for a better understanding of dopamine-related processes. Using functional magnetic resonance blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging we analyzed brain activation in 15 healthy, male subjects performing a gambling task, upon expectation of potential monetary rewards at different reward values and levels of uncertainty. Results Consistent with previous studies, ventral striatal activation was related to both reward magnitudes and values. Activation in medial and lateral orbitofrontal brain areas was best predicted by reward uncertainty. Moreover, late BOLD responses relative to trial onset were due to expectation of different reward values and likely to represent phasic dopaminergic signaling. Early BOLD responses were due to different levels of reward uncertainty and likely to represent tonic dopaminergic signals. Conclusions We conclude that differential dopaminergic signaling as revealed in animal studies is not only represented locally by involvement of distinct brain regions but also by distinct BOLD signal characteristics. PMID:20028546

  16. "Extreme Bold" in the Faculty Ranks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuusisto, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Boldness, defense, and the necessity of talking back remain as central to life with disability in one's time as in Francis Bacon's age. "Therefore all deformed persons are extreme bold," Bacon wrote, "first, as in their own defence, as being exposed to scorn, but in process of time, by a general habit." Perhaps no word carries more weight in the…

  17. The Relationship between Fearfulness, GABA+, and Fear-Related BOLD Responses in the Insula

    PubMed Central

    Lipp, Ilona; Evans, C. John; Lewis, Caroline; Murphy, Kevin; Wise, Richard G.; Caseras, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA plays a crucial role in anxiety and fear, but its relationship to brain activation during fear reactions is not clear. Previous studies suggest that GABA agonists lead to an attenuation of emotion-processing related BOLD signals in the insula. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between GABA concentration and fear-related BOLD responses in this region. In 44 female participants with different levels of fearfulness, GABA concentration in the left insula was measured using a GABA+ MRS acquisition during rest; additionally, BOLD signals were obtained during performance of a fear provocation paradigm. Fearfulness was not associated with GABA+ in the left insula, but could predict fear-related BOLD responses in a cluster in the left anterior insula. The BOLD signal change in this cluster did not correlate with GABA+ concentration. However, we found a significant positive correlation between GABA+ concentration and fear-related BOLD responses in a different cluster that included parts of the left insula, amygdala and putamen. Our findings indicate that low insular GABA concentration is not a predisposition for fearfulness, and that several factors influence whether a correlation between GABA and BOLD can be found. PMID:25811453

  18. The Need for Bold Thinking.

    PubMed

    Lowi-Young, Mimi; DuBois-Wing, Gwen

    2016-01-01

    Amol Verma and Sacha Bhatia's (2016) paper presents policy recommendations that merit serious consideration on a system-wide level. While they make compelling arguments about why provincial governments are ideally suited to adapt Triple Aim innovation, we are concerned that the current health system climate limits this possibility. In our commentary, we present our thoughts about the authors' admittedly aspirational goals and the realities of the pan-Canadian healthcare system. We commence our commentary by confirming our agreement about the potential inherent within the Triple Aim framework. Second, we argue how important progress can take place that may not reflect a provincial-wide system. Next, we maintain that a learning health system is an essential ingredient to advancing Triple Aim and other health system-wide improvements. Third, we wonder whether the stewardship role of government is real and possible. Finally, we question the concept of our current health system's readiness for system change. While we have raised some questions about Verma and Bhatia's thinking around provincial adoption of the Triple Aim, we applaud their ideas. We believe that transformation in provincial health systems requires bold thinking. PMID:27009585

  19. A hemodynamic model for layered BOLD signals.

    PubMed

    Heinzle, Jakob; Koopmans, Peter J; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Raman, Sudhir; Stephan, Klaas Enno

    2016-01-15

    High-resolution blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at the sub-millimeter scale has become feasible with recent advances in MR technology. In principle, this would enable the study of layered cortical circuits, one of the fundaments of cortical computation. However, the spatial layout of cortical blood supply may become an important confound at such high resolution. In particular, venous blood draining back to the cortical surface perpendicularly to the layered structure is expected to influence the measured responses in different layers. Here, we present an extension of a hemodynamic model commonly used for analyzing fMRI data (in dynamic causal models or biophysical network models) that accounts for such blood draining effects by coupling local hemodynamics across layers. We illustrate the properties of the model and its inversion by a series of simulations and show that it successfully captures layered fMRI data obtained during a simple visual experiment. We conclude that for future studies of the dynamics of layered neuronal circuits with high-resolution fMRI, it will be pivotal to include effects of blood draining, particularly when trying to infer on the layer-specific connections in cortex--a theme of key relevance for brain disorders like schizophrenia and for theories of brain function such as predictive coding. PMID:26484827

  20. Differences in aggression, activity and boldness between native and introduced populations of an invasive crayfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pintor, L.M.; Sih, A.; Bauer, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    Aggressiveness, along with foraging voracity and boldness, are key behavioral mechanisms underlying the competitive displacement and invasion success of exotic species. However, do aggressiveness, voracity and boldness of the invader depend on the presence of an ecologically similar native competitor in the invaded community? We conducted four behavioral assays to compare aggression, foraging voracity, threat response and boldness to forage under predation risk of multiple populations of exotic signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus across its native and invaded range with and without a native congener, the Shasta crayfish P. fortis. We predicted that signal crayfish from the invaded range and sympatric with a native congener (IRS) should be more aggressive to outcompete a close competitor than populations from the native range (NR) or invaded range and allopatric to a native congener (IRA). Furthermore, we predicted that IRS populations of signal crayfish should be more voracious, but less bold to forage under predation risk since native predators and prey likely possess appropriate behavioral responses to the invader. Contrary to our predictions, results indicated that IRA signal crayfish were more aggressive towards conspecifics and more voracious and active foragers, yet also bolder to forage under predation risk in comparison to NR and IRS populations, which did not differ in behavior. Higher aggression/voracity/ boldness was positively correlated with prey consumption rates, and hence potential impacts on prey. We suggest that the positive correlations between aggression/voracity/boldness are the result of an overall aggression syndrome. Results of stream surveys indicated that IRA streams have significantly lower prey biomass than in IRS streams, which may drive invading signal crayfish to be more aggressive/voracious/bold to acquire resources to establish a population. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  1. BOLD and its connection to dopamine release in human striatum: a cross-cohort comparison.

    PubMed

    Lohrenz, Terry; Kishida, Kenneth T; Montague, P Read

    2016-10-01

    Activity in midbrain dopamine neurons modulates the release of dopamine in terminal structures including the striatum, and controls reward-dependent valuation and choice. This fluctuating release of dopamine is thought to encode reward prediction error (RPE) signals and other value-related information crucial to decision-making, and such models have been used to track prediction error signals in the striatum as encoded by BOLD signals. However, until recently there have been no comparisons of BOLD responses and dopamine responses except for one clear correlation of these two signals in rodents. No such comparisons have been made in humans. Here, we report on the connection between the RPE-related BOLD signal recorded in one group of subjects carrying out an investment task, and the corresponding dopamine signal recorded directly using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a separate group of Parkinson's disease patients undergoing DBS surgery while performing the same task. The data display some correspondence between the signal types; however, there is not a one-to-one relationship. Further work is necessary to quantify the relationship between dopamine release, the BOLD signal and the computational models that have guided our understanding of both at the level of the striatum.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574306

  2. Boldness and its relation to psychopathic personality: Prototypicality analyses among forensic mental health, criminal justice, and layperson raters.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Karolina; Edens, John F; Smith, Shannon Toney; Clark, John W; Kristiansson, Marianne; Svensson, Olof

    2016-06-01

    Research on psychopathic personality has been dominated by a focus on criminality and social deviance, but some theoretical models argue that certain putatively adaptive features are important components of this construct. In 3 samples (forensic mental health practitioners, probation officers and a layperson community sample), we investigated adaptive traits as conceptualized in the Triarchic model of psychopathy (Patrick et al., 2009), specifically the relevance of boldness to construals of psychopathic personality. Participants completed prototypicality ratings of psychopathic traits, including 3 items created to tap components of boldness (Socially bold, Adventurous, Emotionally stable), and they also rated a series of attitudinal statements (e.g., perceived correlates of being psychopathic, moral judgments about psychopaths). The composite Boldness scale was rated as moderately to highly prototypical among forensic mental health practitioners and probation officers and positively associated with other theoretically relevant domains of psychopathy. Across samples, higher composite Boldness ratings predicted greater endorsement of adaptive traits (e.g., social skills) as characteristic of psychopathy. For the individual items, Socially bold was rated as highly prototypical and was associated with theoretically relevant correlates. Adventurous also was seen as prototypical, though to a lesser degree. Only forensic mental health practitioners endorsed Emotionally stable as characteristic of psychopathy. Our results provide partial support for the contention that the boldness concept is viewed as an important component of psychopathy, particularly among professionals who work directly with offender populations. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26844911

  3. Sources of systematic error in calibrated BOLD based mapping of baseline oxygen extraction fraction.

    PubMed

    Blockley, Nicholas P; Griffeth, Valerie E M; Stone, Alan J; Hare, Hannah V; Bulte, Daniel P

    2015-11-15

    Recently a new class of calibrated blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods were introduced to quantitatively measure the baseline oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). These methods rely on two respiratory challenges and a mathematical model of the resultant changes in the BOLD functional MRI signal to estimate the OEF. However, this mathematical model does not include all of the effects that contribute to the BOLD signal, it relies on several physiological assumptions and it may be affected by intersubject physiological variability. The aim of this study was to investigate these sources of systematic error and their effect on estimating the OEF. This was achieved through simulation using a detailed model of the BOLD signal. Large ranges for intersubject variability in baseline physiological parameters such as haematocrit and cerebral blood volume were considered. Despite this the uncertainty in the relationship between the measured BOLD signals and the OEF was relatively low. Investigations of the physiological assumptions that underlie the mathematical model revealed that OEF measurements are likely to be overestimated if oxygen metabolism changes during hypercapnia or cerebral blood flow changes under hyperoxia. Hypoxic hypoxia was predicted to result in an underestimation of the OEF, whilst anaemic hypoxia was found to have only a minimal effect. PMID:26254114

  4. BOLD Subjective Value Signals Exhibit Robust Range Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Karin M.

    2014-01-01

    Many theories of decision making assume that choice options are assessed along a common subjective value (SV) scale. The neural correlates of SV are widespread and reliable, despite the wide variation in the range of values over which decisions are made (e.g., between goods worth a few dollars, in some cases, or hundreds of dollars, in others). According to adaptive coding theories (Barlow, 1961), an efficient value signal should exhibit range adaptation, such that neural activity maintains a fixed dynamic range, and the slope of the value response varies inversely with the range of values within the local context. Although monkey data have demonstrated range adaptation in single-unit correlates of value (Padoa-Schioppa, 2009; Kobayashi et al., 2010), whether BOLD value signals exhibit similar range adaptation is unknown. To test for this possibility, we presented human participants with choices between a fixed immediate and variable delayed payment options. Across two conditions, the delayed options' SVs spanned either a narrow or wide range. SV-tracking activity emerged in the posterior cingulate, ventral striatum, anterior cingulate, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Throughout this network, we observed evidence consistent with the predictions of range adaptation: the SV response slope increased in the narrow versus wide range, with statistically significant slope changes confirmed for the posterior cingulate and ventral striatum. No regions exhibited a reliably increased BOLD activity range in the wide versus narrow condition. Our observations of range adaptation present implications for the interpretation of BOLD SV responses that are measured across different contexts or individuals. PMID:25471589

  5. A protocol for use of medetomidine anesthesia in rats for extended studies using task-induced BOLD contrast and resting-state functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Pawela, Christopher P.; Biswal, Bharat B.; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Schulte, Marie L.; Li, Rupeng; Jones, Seth R.; Cho, Younghoon R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Hyde, James S.

    2009-01-01

    The α2-adrenoreceptor agonist, medetomidine, which exhibits dose-dependent sedative effects and is gaining acceptance in small-animal functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), has been studied. Rats were examined on the bench using the classic tail-pinch method with three infusion sequences: 100 μg/kg/hr, 300 μg/kg/hr, or 100 μg/kg/hr followed by 300 μg/kg/hr. Stepping the infusion rate from 100 to 300 μg/kg/hr after 2.5 hours resulted in a prolonged period of approximately level sedation that cannot be achieved by a constant infusion of either 100 or 300 μg/kg/hr. By stepping the infusion dosage, experiments as long as six hours are possible. Functional MRI experiments were carried out on rats using a frequency dependent electrical stimulation protocol—namely, forepaw stimulation at 3, 5, 7, and 10 Hz. Each rat was studied for a four-hour period, divided into two equal portions. During the first portion, rats were started at a 100 μg/kg/hr constant infusion. During the second portion, four secondary levels of infusion were used: 100, 150, 200, and 300 μg/kg/hr. The fMRI response to stimulation frequency was used as an indirect measure of modulation of neuronal activity through pharmacological manipulation. The frequency response to stimulus was attenuated at the lower secondary infusion dosages 100 or 150 μg/kg/hr but not at the higher secondary infusion dosages 200 or 300 μg/kg/hr. Parallel experiments with the animal at rest were carried out using both electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) methods with consistent results. In the secondary infusion period using 300 μg/kg/hr, resting-state functional connectivity is enhanced. PMID:19285560

  6. Interpreting BOLD: towards a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Hall, Catherine N; Howarth, Clare; Kurth-Nelson, Zebulun; Mishra, Anusha

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive neuroscience depends on the use of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to probe brain function. Although commonly used as a surrogate measure of neuronal activity, BOLD signals actually reflect changes in brain blood oxygenation. Understanding the mechanisms linking neuronal activity to vascular perfusion is, therefore, critical in interpreting BOLD. Advances in cellular neuroscience demonstrating differences in this neurovascular relationship in different brain regions, conditions or pathologies are often not accounted for when interpreting BOLD. Meanwhile, within cognitive neuroscience, the increasing use of high magnetic field strengths and the development of model-based tasks and analyses have broadened the capability of BOLD signals to inform us about the underlying neuronal activity, but these methods are less well understood by cellular neuroscientists. In 2016, a Royal Society Theo Murphy Meeting brought scientists from the two communities together to discuss these issues. Here, we consolidate the main conclusions arising from that meeting. We discuss areas of consensus about what BOLD fMRI can tell us about underlying neuronal activity, and how advanced modelling techniques have improved our ability to use and interpret BOLD. We also highlight areas of controversy in understanding BOLD and suggest research directions required to resolve these issues.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574302

  7. {bold E}{parallel}{bold B} energy-mass spectrograph for measurement of ions and neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Scime, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    Real-time measurement of plasma composition and energy is an important diagnostic in fusion experiments. The Thomson parabola spectrograph described here utilizes an electric field parallel to a magnetic field ({bold E}{parallel}{bold B}) and a two-dimensional imaging detector to uniquely identify the energy-per-charge and mass-per-charge distributions of plasma ions. An ultrathin foil can be inserted in front of the {bold E}{parallel}{bold B} filter to convert neutral atoms to ions, which are subsequently analyzed using the {bold E}{parallel}{bold B} filter. Since helium exiting an ultrathin foil does not form a negative ion and hydrogen isotopes do, this spectrograph allows unique identification of tritium ions and neutrals even in the presence of a large background of {sup 3}He. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Multisite Reliability of Cognitive BOLD Data

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gregory G.; Mathalon, Daniel H.; Stern, Hal; Ford, Judith; Mueller, Bryon; Greve, Douglas N.; McCarthy, Gregory; Voyvodic, Jim; Glover, Gary; Diaz, Michele; Yetter, Elizabeth; Burak Ozyurt, I.; Jorgensen, Kasper W.; Wible, Cynthia G.; Turner, Jessica A.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Potkin, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    Investigators perform multi-site functional magnetic resonance imaging studies to increase statistical power, to enhance generalizability, and to improve the likelihood of sampling relevant subgroups. Yet undesired site variation in imaging methods could off-set these potential advantages. We used variance components analysis to investigate sources of variation in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal across four 3T magnets in voxelwise and region of interest (ROI) analyses. Eighteen participants traveled to four magnet sites to complete eight runs of a working memory task involving emotional or neutral distraction. Person variance was more than 10 times larger than site variance for five of six ROIs studied. Person-by-site interactions, however, contributed sizable unwanted variance to the total. Averaging over runs increased between-site reliability, with many voxels showing good to excellent between-site reliability when eight runs were averaged and regions of interest showing fair to good reliability. Between-site reliability depended on the specific functional contrast analyzed in addition to the number of runs averaged. Although median effect size was correlated with between-site reliability, dissociations were observed for many voxels. Brain regions where the pooled effect size was large but between-site reliability was poor were associated with reduced individual differences. Brain regions where the pooled effect size was small but between-site reliability was excellent were associated with a balance of participants who displayed consistently positive or consistently negative BOLD responses. Although between-site reliability of BOLD data can be good to excellent, acquiring highly reliable data requires robust activation paradigms, ongoing quality assurance, and careful experimental control. PMID:20932915

  9. Antioxidants safeguard telomeres in bold chicks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sin-Yeon; Velando, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are sensitive to damage induced by oxidative stress, and thus it is expected that dietary antioxidants may support the maintenance of telomere length in animals, particularly those with a fast rate of life (e.g. fast metabolism, activity and growth). We tested experimentally the effect of antioxidant supplements on telomere length during early development in wild gull chicks with natural individual variations in behaviour pattern and growth rate. Proactive chicks had shorter telomeres than reactive chicks, but the penalty for the bold behaviour pattern was reduced by antioxidant supplementation. Chicks growing faster had longer telomeres during early growth, suggesting that inherited quality supports a fast life history. PMID:25948570

  10. Antioxidants safeguard telomeres in bold chicks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sin-Yeon; Velando, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    Telomeres are sensitive to damage induced by oxidative stress, and thus it is expected that dietary antioxidants may support the maintenance of telomere length in animals, particularly those with a fast rate of life (e.g. fast metabolism, activity and growth). We tested experimentally the effect of antioxidant supplements on telomere length during early development in wild gull chicks with natural individual variations in behaviour pattern and growth rate. Proactive chicks had shorter telomeres than reactive chicks, but the penalty for the bold behaviour pattern was reduced by antioxidant supplementation. Chicks growing faster had longer telomeres during early growth, suggesting that inherited quality supports a fast life history. PMID:25948570

  11. Event-related dynamics of glutamate and BOLD effects measured using functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (fMRS) at 3T in a repetition suppression paradigm.

    PubMed

    Apšvalka, Dace; Gadie, Andrew; Clemence, Matthew; Mullins, Paul G

    2015-09-01

    Proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) complements other brain research methods by providing measures of neurometabolites noninvasively in a localized brain area. Improvements in MR scanner technologies, and data acquisition and analysis methods should allow functional (1)H-MRS (fMRS) to measure neurometabolite concentration changes during task-induced brain activation. The aim of the current study was to further develop event-related fMRS at 3T to investigate glutamate dynamics in response to repetition suppression. A secondary aim was to investigate the relationship between blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) responses and glutamate dynamics in the same paradigm at the same time. A novel approach of interleaved water-suppressed (metabolite) and unsuppressed (water) fMRS was used to simultaneously detect the event-related dynamics of glutamate and BOLD signal to repetition suppression in the lateral occipital cortex of thirteen (N=13) volunteers. On average, (1)H-MRS-visible glutamate increased after novel visual stimuli presentations by 12% and decreased by 11-13% on repeated compared to novel presentations. The BOLD signal, as measured by water peak amplitude changes, showed significant difference between Task and Rest trials, and, on a GLM based analysis of the time series, demonstrated a significant difference between the novel and repeated trials, however appeared to be decoupled from the glutamate response as no correlation was found between the two. These results are the first demonstration that reductions in neuronal activity typical of repetition suppression effects are reflected by reduced glutamatergic and BOLD measures, that glutamate and BOLD responses may not be coupled as previously thought, and that these changes and relationships can be measured simultaneously using event-related fMRS at 3T. PMID:26072254

  12. 17 CFR 232.307 - Bold face type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bold face type. 232.307 Section 232.307 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION REGULATION S-T... face type. (a) Provisions requiring presentation of information in bold face type shall be satisfied...

  13. 17 CFR 232.307 - Bold face type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bold face type. 232.307 Section 232.307 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION REGULATION S-T... face type. (a) Provisions requiring presentation of information in bold face type shall be satisfied...

  14. 17 CFR 232.307 - Bold face type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bold face type. 232.307 Section 232.307 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION REGULATION S-T... face type. (a) Provisions requiring presentation of information in bold face type shall be satisfied...

  15. 17 CFR 232.307 - Bold face type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bold face type. 232.307 Section 232.307 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION REGULATION S-T... face type. (a) Provisions requiring presentation of information in bold face type shall be satisfied...

  16. 17 CFR 232.307 - Bold face type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bold face type. 232.307 Section 232.307 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION REGULATION S-T-GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR ELECTRONIC FILINGS Preparation of Electronic Submissions § 232.307 Bold face type. (a) Provisions requiring...

  17. Abnormal Striatal BOLD Responses to Reward Anticipation and Reward Delivery in ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Emi; Bado, Patricia; Tripp, Gail; Mattos, Paulo; Wickens, Jeff R.; Bramati, Ivanei E.; Alsop, Brent; Ferreira, Fernanda Meireles; Lima, Debora; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Moll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Altered reward processing has been proposed to contribute to the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The neurobiological mechanism underlying this alteration remains unclear. We hypothesize that the transfer of dopamine release from reward to reward-predicting cues, as normally observed in animal studies, may be deficient in ADHD. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate striatal responses to reward-predicting cues and reward delivery in a classical conditioning paradigm. Data from 14 high-functioning and stimulant-naïve young adults with elevated lifetime symptoms of ADHD (8 males, 6 females) and 15 well-matched controls (8 males, 7 females) were included in the analyses. During reward anticipation, increased blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) responses in the right ventral and left dorsal striatum were observed in controls, but not in the ADHD group. The opposite pattern was observed in response to reward delivery; the ADHD group demonstrated significantly greater BOLD responses in the ventral striatum bilaterally and the left dorsal striatum relative to controls. In the ADHD group, the number of current hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms was inversely related to ventral striatal responses during reward anticipation and positively associated with responses to reward. The BOLD response patterns observed in the striatum are consistent with impaired predictive dopamine signaling in ADHD, which may explain altered reward-contingent behaviors and symptoms of ADHD. PMID:24586543

  18. Identifying Childhood Characteristics that Underlie Pre-Morbid Risk for Substance Use Disorders: Socialization and Boldness

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Brian M.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing a longitudinal twin study (N = 2510), we identified the child characteristics present prior to initiation of substance use that best predicted later substance use disorders. Two independent traits accounted for the majority of pre-morbid risk: socialization (conformity to rules and conventional values) and boldness (sociability and social assurance, stress resilience, and thrill seeking). Low socialization was associated with disruptive behavior disorders, parental externalizing disorders, and environmental adversity, and exhibited moderate genetic (.45) and shared environmental influences (.30). Boldness was highly heritable (.71) and associated with less internalizing distress and environmental adversity. Together, these traits exhibited robust associations with adolescent and young adult substance use disorders (R = .48 and .50, respectively), and incremental prediction over disruptive behavior disorders, parental externalizing disorders, and environmental adversity. Results were replicated in an independent sample. Socialization and boldness offer a novel conceptualization of underlying risk for substance use disorders that has the potential to improve prediction and theory with implications for basic research, prevention, and intervention. PMID:24280373

  19. Luminance contrast of a visual stimulus modulates the BOLD response more than the cerebral blood flow response in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Christine L; Ances, Beau M; Perthen, Joanna E; Moradi, Farshad; Liau, Joy; Buracas, Giedrius T; Hopkins, Susan R; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) depends on the evoked changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) in response to changes in neural activity. This response is strongly modulated by the CBF/CMRO(2) coupling relationship with activation, defined as n, the ratio of the fractional changes. The reliability of the BOLD signal as a quantitative reflection of underlying physiological changes depends on the stability of n in response to different stimuli. The effect of visual stimulus contrast on this coupling ratio was tested in 9 healthy human subjects, measuring CBF and BOLD responses to a flickering checkerboard at four visual contrast levels. The theory of the BOLD effect makes a robust prediction-independent of details of the model-that if the CBF/CMRO(2) coupling ratio n remains constant, then the response ratio between the lowest and highest contrast levels should be higher for the BOLD response than the CBF response because of the ceiling effect on the BOLD response. Instead, this response ratio was significantly lower for the BOLD response (BOLD response: 0.23 ± 0.13, mean ± SD; CBF response: 0.42 ± 0.18; p=0.0054). This data is consistent with a reduced dynamic range (strongest/weakest response ratio) of the CMRO(2) response (~1.7-fold) compared to that of the CBF response (~2.4-fold) as luminance contrast increases, corresponding to an increase of n from 1.7 at the lowest contrast level to 2.3 at the highest contrast level. The implication of these results for fMRI studies is that the magnitude of the BOLD response does not accurately reflect the magnitude of underlying physiological processes. PMID:22963855

  20. Anatomical and functional assemblies of brain BOLD oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Baria, Alexis T.; Baliki, Marwan N.; Parrish, Todd; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2011-01-01

    Brain oscillatory activity has long been thought to have spatial properties, the details of which are unresolved. Here we examine spatial organizational rules for the human brain oscillatory activity as measured by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD). Resting state BOLD signal was transformed into frequency space (Welch’s method), averaged across subjects, and its spatial distribution studied as a function of four frequency bands, spanning the full bandwidth of BOLD. The brain showed anatomically constrained distribution of power for each frequency band. This result was replicated on a repository dataset of 195 subjects. Next, we examined larger-scale organization by parceling the neocortex into regions approximating Brodmann Areas (BAs). This indicated that BAs of simple function/connectivity (unimodal), vs. complex properties (transmodal), are dominated by low frequency BOLD oscillations, and within the visual ventral stream we observe a graded shift of power to higher frequency bands for BAs further removed from the primary visual cortex (increased complexity), linking frequency properties of BOLD to hodology. Additionally, BOLD oscillation properties for the default mode network demonstrated that it is composed of distinct frequency dependent regions. When the same analysis was performed on a visual-motor task, frequency-dependent global and voxel-wise shifts in BOLD oscillations could be detected at brain sites mostly outside those identified with general linear modeling. Thus, analysis of BOLD oscillations in full bandwidth uncovers novel brain organizational rules, linking anatomical structures and functional networks to characteristic BOLD oscillations. The approach also identifies changes in brain intrinsic properties in relation to responses to external inputs. PMID:21613505

  1. Bold, Sedentary Fathead Minnows Have More Parasites.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tiffany; Gladen, Kelsey; Duncan, Elizabeth C; Cotner, Sehoya; Cotner, James B; McEwen, Daniel C; Wisenden, Brian D

    2016-08-01

    Parasites that rely on trophic transmission can manipulate the behavior of an intermediate host to compromise the host's antipredator competence and increase the probability of reaching the next host. Selection for parasite manipulation is diminished when there is significant risk of host death to causes other than consumption by a suitable definitive host for the parasite. Consequently, behavioral manipulation by parasites can be expected to be subtle. Ornithodiplostomum ptychocheilus (Op) is a trematode parasite that has a bird-snail-fish host life cycle. Fathead minnows are a common intermediate host of Op, where metacercariae encyst in the minnow brain. In this study, we report a link between metacercarial intensity and behavior in fathead minnows. In the field, we found that roaming distance by free-living minnows over 24 h was negatively correlated with parasite intensity. In the laboratory, we found that boldness in an open field test was positively correlated with parasite intensity. These parasite-induced behavioral changes may render infected minnows more susceptible to predators, which would serve to facilitate trophic transmission of parasites to the bird host. PMID:27093037

  2. Age, sex and reproductive status affect boldness in dogs.

    PubMed

    Starling, Melissa J; Branson, Nicholas; Thomson, Peter C; McGreevy, Paul D

    2013-09-01

    Boldness in dogs is believed to be one end of the shy-bold axis, representing a super-trait. Several personality traits fall under the influence of this super-trait. Previous studies have found that boldness is affected by breed and breed groups, influences performance in sporting dogs, and is affected in some cases by the sex of the dogs. This study investigated the effects of dog age, sex and reproductive status on boldness in dogs by way of a dog personality survey circulated amongst Australian dog owners. Age had a significant effect on boldness (F=4.476; DF=16,758; P<0.001), with boldness decreasing with age in years. Males were bolder than females (F=19.219; DF=1,758; P<0.001) and entire dogs were bolder than neutered dogs (F=4.330; DF=1,758; P<0.038). The study indicates how behaviour may change in adult dogs as they age and adds to the literature on how sex and reproductive status may affect personality in dogs. PMID:23778256

  3. Sex and boldness explain individual differences in spatial learning in a lizard

    PubMed Central

    Carazo, Pau; Noble, Daniel W. A.; Chandrasoma, Dani; Whiting, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding individual differences in cognitive performance is a major challenge to animal behaviour and cognition studies. We used the Eastern water skink (Eulamprus quoyii) to examine associations between exploration, boldness and individual variability in spatial learning, a dimension of lizard cognition with important bearing on fitness. We show that males perform better than females in a biologically relevant spatial learning task. This is the first evidence for sex differences in learning in a reptile, and we argue that it is probably owing to sex-specific selective pressures that may be widespread in lizards. Across the sexes, we found a clear association between boldness after a simulated predatory attack and the probability of learning the spatial task. In contrast to previous studies, we found a nonlinear association between boldness and learning: both ‘bold’ and ‘shy’ behavioural types were more successful learners than intermediate males. Our results do not fit with recent predictions suggesting that individual differences in learning may be linked with behavioural types via high–low-risk/reward trade-offs. We suggest the possibility that differences in spatial cognitive performance may arise in lizards as a consequence of the distinct environmental variability and complexity experienced by individuals as a result of their sex and social tactics. PMID:24619443

  4. Predictors of dyspnea prevalence: Results from the BOLD study

    PubMed Central

    Grønseth, Rune; Vollmer, William M.; Hardie, Jon A.; Ólafsdóttir, Inga Sif; Lamprecht, Bernd; Buist, A. Sonia; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Gulsvik, Amund; Johannessen, Ane; Enright, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Dyspnea is a cardinal symptom for cardiorespiratory diseases. No study has assessed worldwide variation in dyspnea prevalence or predictors of dyspnea. We used cross-sectional data from population-based samples in 15 countries of the BOLD study to estimate prevalence of dyspnea in the full sample as well as in an a priori defined low-risk group (few risk factors or dyspnea-associated diseases). Dyspnea was defined by the modified Medical Research Council questions. We used ordered logistic regression analysis to study the association of dyspnea with site, sex, age, education, smoking habits, low/high BMI, self-reported disease, and spirometry results. Of the 9,484 participants, 27% reported any dyspnea. In the low-risk subsample (N=4,329), 16% reported some dyspnea. In multivariate analyses, all covariates were correlated to dyspnea, but only 13% of dyspnea variation was explained. Women reported more dyspnea than men (odds ratio ≈ 2.1). When forced vital capacity (FVC) fell below 60% of predicted, dyspnea was much more likely. There was considerable geographical variation in dyspnea, even when we adjusted for known risk factors and spirometry results. We were only able to explain 13% of dyspnea variation. PMID:24176991

  5. Hemodynamic Nonlinearities Affect BOLD fMRI Response Timing and Amplitude

    PubMed Central

    de Zwart, Jacco A; van Gelderen, Peter; Jansma, J Martijn; Fukunaga, Masaki; Bianciardi, Marta; Duyn, Jeff H

    2009-01-01

    The interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies based on Blood Oxygen-Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast generally relies on the assumption of a linear relationship between evoked neuronal activity and fMRI response. While nonlinearities in this relationship have been suggested by a number of studies, it remains unclear to what extent they relate to the neurovascular response and are therefore inherent to BOLD-fMRI. Full characterization of potential vascular nonlinearities is required for accurate inferences about the neuronal system under study. To investigate the extent of vascular nonlinearities, evoked activity was studied in humans with BOLD-fMRI (n=28) and Magnetoencephalography (MEG) (n=5). Brief (600-800 ms) rapidly repeated (1 Hz) visual stimuli were delivered using a stimulation paradigm that minimized neuronal nonlinearities. Nevertheless, BOLD-fMRI experiments showed substantial remaining nonlinearities. The smallest stimulus separation (200-400 ms) resulted in significant response broadening (15-20% amplitude decrease; 10-12% latency increase; 6-14% duration increase) with respect to a linear prediction. The substantial slowing and widening of the response in the presence of preceding stimuli suggests a vascular rather than neuronal origin to the observed non-linearity. This was confirmed by the MEG data, which showed no significant neuro-electric nonlinear interactions between stimuli as little as 200 ms apart. The presence of substantial vascular nonlinearities has important implications for rapid event-related studies by fMRI and other imaging modalities that infer neuronal activity from hemodynamic parameters. PMID:19520175

  6. Biophysical Modeling of Phase Changes in BOLD fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhaomei; Caprihan, Arvind; Blagoev, Krastan B.; Calhoun, Vince D

    2009-01-01

    In BOLD fMRI, stimulus related phase changes have been repeatedly observed in humans. However, virtually all fMRI processing utilizes the magnitude information only, while ignoring the phase. This results in an unnecessary loss of physiological information and signal-to-noise efficiency. A widely held view is that the BOLD phase change is zero for a voxel containing randomly orientated blood vessels and that phase changes are only due to the presence of large vessels. Based on a previously developed theoretical model, we show through simulations and experimental human BOLD fMRI data that a non-zero phase change can be present in a region with randomly oriented vessels. Using simulations of the model, we first demonstrate that a spatially distributed susceptibility results in a non-zero phase distribution. Next, experimental data in a finger-tapping experiment show consistent bipolar phase distribution across multiple subjects. This model is then used to show that in theory a bipolar phase distribution can also be produced by the model. Finally, we show that the model can produce a bipolar phase pattern consistent with that observed in the experimental data. Understanding of the mechanisms behind the experimentally observed phase changes in BOLD fMRI would be an important step forward and will enable biophysical model based methods for integrating the phase and magnitude information in BOLD fMRI experiments. PMID:19426815

  7. Magnitude and phase behavior of multiresolution BOLD signal

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2010-01-01

    High spatial resolution fMRI provides a more precise estimate of brain activity than low resolution fMRI. The magnitude and phase parts of the BOLD signals are impacted differently by changes in the scan resolution. In this paper, we report on a numerical simulation to show the impact of spatial resolution upon the complex-valued BOLD signal in terms of magnitude and phase variation. We generate realistic capillary networks in cortex voxels, calculate the BOLD-induced magnetic field disturbance and the complex BOLD signals for the voxel and its subvoxels, and thereby characterize the magnitude and phase behaviors across multiple grid resolutions. Our results show that: 1) at higher spatial resolution there is greater spatial variation in the phase of the BOLD signal as compared to its magnitude; 2) the spatial variation of the phase signal monotonically increases with respect to spatial resolution while for the magnitude the spatial variation may reach a maximum at some resolution level; 3) voxels containing large capillaries have higher phase spatial variation than those with smaller capillaries; 4) the amplitude spatial variation at a resolution level increases with respect to relaxation time whereas the phase variation is generally unaffected. PMID:20890375

  8. BOLD Variability is Related to Dopaminergic Neurotransmission and Cognitive Aging.

    PubMed

    Guitart-Masip, Marc; Salami, Alireza; Garrett, Douglas; Rieckmann, Anna; Lindenberger, Ulman; Bäckman, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Dopamine (DA) losses are associated with various aging-related cognitive deficits. Typically, higher moment-to-moment brain signal variability in large-scale patterns of voxels in neocortical regions is linked to better cognitive performance and younger adult age, yet the physiological mechanisms regulating brain signal variability are unknown. We explored the relationship among adult age, DA availability, and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal variability, while younger and older participants performed a spatial working memory (SWM) task. We quantified striatal and extrastriatal DA D1 receptor density with [(11)C]SCH23390 and positron emission tomography in all participants. We found that BOLD variability in a neocortical region was negatively related to age and positively related to SWM performance. In contrast, BOLD variability in subcortical regions and bilateral hippocampus was positively related to age and slower responses, and negatively related to D1 density in caudate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, BOLD variability in neocortical regions was positively associated with task-related disengagement of the default-mode network, a network whose activation needs to be suppressed for efficient SWM processing. Our results show that age-related DA losses contribute to changes in brain signal variability in subcortical regions and suggest a potential mechanism, by which neocortical BOLD variability supports cognitive performance. PMID:25750252

  9. Hypoxia in Prostate Cancer: Correlation of BOLD-MRI With Pimonidazole Immunohistochemistry-Initial Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskin, Peter J. . E-mail: peterhoskin@nhs.net; Carnell, Dawn M.; Taylor, N. Jane; Smith, Rowena E.; Stirling, J. James; Daley, Frances M.; Saunders, Michele I.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Collins, David J.; D'Arcy, James A.; Padhani, Anwar P.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the ability of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI to depict clinically significant prostate tumor hypoxia. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with prostate carcinoma undergoing radical prostatectomy were studied preoperatively, using gradient echo sequences without and with contrast medium enhancement, to map relative tissue oxygenation according to relaxivity rates and relative blood volume (rBV). Pimonidazole was administered preoperatively, and whole-mount sections of selected tumor-bearing slices were stained for pimonidazole fixation and tumor and nontumor localization. Histologic and imaging parameters were independently mapped onto patient prostate outlines. Using 5-mm grids, 861 nontumor grid locations were compared with 237 tumor grids (with >50% tumor per location) using contingency table analysis with respect to the ability of imaging to predict pimonidazole staining. Results: Twenty patients completed the imaging and histologic protocols. Pimonidazole staining was found in 33% of nontumor and in 70% of tumor grids. The sensitivity of the MR relaxivity parameter R{sub 2}* in depicting tumor hypoxia was high (88%), improving with the addition of low rBV information (95%) without changing specificity (36% and 29%, respectively). High R{sub 2}* increased the positive predictive value for hypoxia by 6% (70% to 76%); conversely, low R{sub 2}* decreased the likelihood of hypoxia being present by 26% (70% to 44%) and by 41% (71% to 30%) when combined with rBV information. Conclusion: R{sub 2}* maps from BOLD-MRI have high sensitivity but low specificity for defining intraprostatic tumor hypoxia. This together with the negative predictive value of 70% when combined with blood volume information makes BOLD-MRI a potential noninvasive technique for mapping prostatic tumor hypoxia.

  10. Relationship between BOLD amplitude and pattern classification of orientation-selective activity in the human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Tong, Frank; Harrison, Stephenie A; Dewey, John A; Kamitani, Yukiyasu

    2012-11-15

    Orientation-selective responses can be decoded from fMRI activity patterns in the human visual cortex, using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA). To what extent do these feature-selective activity patterns depend on the strength and quality of the sensory input, and might the reliability of these activity patterns be predicted by the gross amplitude of the stimulus-driven BOLD response? Observers viewed oriented gratings that varied in luminance contrast (4, 20 or 100%) or spatial frequency (0.25, 1.0 or 4.0 cpd). As predicted, activity patterns in early visual areas led to better discrimination of orientations presented at high than low contrast, with greater effects of contrast found in area V1 than in V3. A second experiment revealed generally better decoding of orientations at low or moderate as compared to high spatial frequencies. Interestingly however, V1 exhibited a relative advantage at discriminating high spatial frequency orientations, consistent with the finer scale of representation in the primary visual cortex. In both experiments, the reliability of these orientation-selective activity patterns was well predicted by the average BOLD amplitude in each region of interest, as indicated by correlation analyses, as well as decoding applied to a simple model of voxel responses to simulated orientation columns. Moreover, individual differences in decoding accuracy could be predicted by the signal-to-noise ratio of an individual's BOLD response. Our results indicate that decoding accuracy can be well predicted by incorporating the amplitude of the BOLD response into simple simulation models of cortical selectivity; such models could prove useful in future applications of fMRI pattern classification. PMID:22917989

  11. Bold Diagrammatic Monte Carlo for Fermionic and Fermionized Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svistunov, Boris

    2013-03-01

    In three different fermionic cases--repulsive Hubbard model, resonant fermions, and fermionized spins-1/2 (on triangular lattice)--we observe the phenomenon of sign blessing: Feynman diagrammatic series features finite convergence radius despite factorial growth of the number of diagrams with diagram order. Bold diagrammatic Monte Carlo technique allows us to sample millions of skeleton Feynman diagrams. With the universal fermionization trick we can fermionize essentially any (bosonic, spin, mixed, etc.) lattice system. The combination of fermionization and Bold diagrammatic Monte Carlo yields a universal first-principle approach to strongly correlated lattice systems, provided the sign blessing is a generic fermionic phenomenon. Supported by NSF and DARPA

  12. Opposing relationships of BMI with BOLD and dopamine D2/3 receptor binding potential in the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Kelly P; Veldhuizen, Maria G; Sandiego, Christine M; Morris, Evan D; Small, Dana M

    2015-04-01

    Findings from clinical and preclinical studies converge to suggest that increased adiposity and/or exposure to a high fat diet are associated with alterations in dorsal striatal (DS) circuitry. In humans there is a reliable inverse relationship between body mass index (BMI) and response to palatable food consumption in the dorsal striatum (DS). Positron emission tomography (PET) studies also suggest altered DS dopamine type 2/3 receptor (D2R/D3R) availability in obesity; however, the direction of the association is unclear. It is also not clear whether dopamine receptor levels contribute to the lower blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response because PET studies have targeted the morbidly obese and, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies rarely include individuals with BMIs in this range. Therefore we examined whether the fMRI BOLD response in the DS to milkshake is associated with D2R/D3R availability measured with [(11) C]PHNO and PET in individuals with BMI ranging from healthy weight to moderately obese. Twenty-nine subjects participated in the fMRI study, 12 in the [(11) C]PHNO PET study, 8 of whom also completed the fMRI study. As predicted there was a significant negative association between DS BOLD response to milkshake and BMI. In contrast, BMI was positively associated with D2R/D3R availability. Dorsal striatal BOLD response was unrelated to D2R/D3R availability. Considered in the context of the larger literature our results suggest the existence of a non-linear relationship between D2R/D3R availability and BMI. Additionally, the altered BOLD responses to palatable food consumption observed in obesity are not clearly related to D2R/D3R receptor availability. Using [(11) C]PHNO and PET brain imaging techniques we show that body mass index was positively associated with D2R/D3R availability in the dorsal striatum, but that functional MR BOLD response was unrelated to D2R/D3R availability. These results suggest the existence of a nonlinear

  13. Opposing relationships of BMI with BOLD and dopamine D2/3 receptor binding potential in the dorsal striatum

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Kelly P.; Veldhuizen, Maria G.; Sandiego, Christine M.; Morris, Evan D.; Small, Dana M.

    2015-01-01

    Findings from clinical and preclinical studies converge to suggest that increased adiposity and/or exposure to a high fat diet are associated with alterations in dorsal striatal (DS) circuitry. In humans there is a reliable inverse relationship between body mass index (BMI) and response to palatable food consumption in the dorsal striatum (DS). Positron emission tomography (PET) studies also suggest altered DS dopamine type 2/3 receptor (D2R/D3R) availability in obesity; however, the direction of the association is unclear. It is also not clear whether dopamine receptor levels contribute to the lower blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response because PET studies have targeted the morbidly obese and, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies rarely include individuals with BMIs in this range. Therefore we examined whether the fMRI BOLD response in the DS to milkshake is associated with D2R/D3R availability measured with [11C]PHNO and PET in individuals with BMI ranging from healthy weight to moderately obese. Twenty-nine subjects participated in the fMRI study, twelve in the [11C]PHNO PET study, eight of whom also completed the fMRI study. As predicted there was a significant negative association between DS BOLD response to milkshake and BMI. In contrast, BMI was positively associated with D2R/D3R availability. Dorsal striatal BOLD response was unrelated to D2R/D3R availability. Considered in the context of the larger literature our results suggest the existence of a non-linear relationship between D2R/D3R availability and BMI. Additionally, the altered BOLD responses to palatable food consumption observed in obesity are not clearly related to D2R/D3R receptor availability. PMID:25664726

  14. Neurophysiological investigation of spontaneous correlated and anticorrelated fluctuations of the BOLD signal

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Corey J.; Bickel, Stephan; Honey, Christopher J.; Groppe, David M.; Entz, Laszlo; Craddock, R. Cameron; Lado, Fred A.; Kelly, Clare; Milham, Michael; Mehta, Ashesh D.

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of intrinsic fMRI BOLD signal fluctuations reliably reveal correlated and anticorrelated functional networks in the brain. Since the BOLD signal is an indirect measure of neuronal activity, and anticorrelations can be introduced by preprocessing steps such as global signal regression (GSR), the neurophysiological significance of correlated and anticorrelated BOLD fluctuations is a source of debate. Here, we address this question by examining the correspondence between the spatial organization of correlated BOLD fluctuations and correlated fluctuations in electrophysiological high gamma power (HGP) signals recorded directly from the cortical surface of 5 patients. We demonstrate that both positive and negative BOLD correlations have neurophysiological correlates reflected in fluctuations of spontaneous neuronal activity. Although applying GSR to BOLD signals results in some BOLD anticorrelations that are not apparent in the ECoG data, it enhances the neuronal-hemodynamic correspondence overall. Together, these findings provide support for the neurophysiological fidelity of BOLD correlations and anticorrelations. PMID:23575832

  15. Evidence that the negative BOLD response is neuronal in origin: a simultaneous EEG-BOLD-CBF study in humans.

    PubMed

    Mullinger, K J; Mayhew, S D; Bagshaw, A P; Bowtell, R; Francis, S T

    2014-07-01

    Unambiguous interpretation of changes in the BOLD signal is challenging because of the complex neurovascular coupling that translates changes in neuronal activity into the subsequent haemodynamic response. In particular, the neurophysiological origin of the negative BOLD response (NBR) remains incompletely understood. Here, we simultaneously recorded BOLD, EEG and cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses to 10 s blocks of unilateral median nerve stimulation (MNS) in order to interrogate the NBR. Both negative BOLD and negative CBF responses to MNS were observed in the same region of the ipsilateral primary sensorimotor cortex (S1/M1) and calculations showed that MNS induced a decrease in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) in this NBR region. The ∆CMRO2/∆CBF coupling ratio (n) was found to be significantly larger in this ipsilateral S1/M1 region (n=0.91±0.04, M=10.45%) than in the contralateral S1/M1 (n=0.65±0.03, M=10.45%) region that exhibited a positive BOLD response (PBR) and positive CBF response, and a consequent increase in CMRO2 during MNS. The fMRI response amplitude in ipsilateral S1/M1 was negatively correlated with both the power of the 8-13 Hz EEG mu oscillation and somatosensory evoked potential amplitude. Blocks in which the largest magnitude of negative BOLD and CBF responses occurred therefore showed greatest mu power, an electrophysiological index of cortical inhibition, and largest somatosensory evoked potentials. Taken together, our results suggest that a neuronal mechanism underlies the NBR, but that the NBR may originate from a different neurovascular coupling mechanism to the PBR, suggesting that caution should be taken in assuming the NBR simply represents the neurophysiological inverse of the PBR. PMID:24632092

  16. Task effects on BOLD signal correlates of implicit syntactic processing.

    PubMed

    Caplan, David

    2010-07-01

    BOLD signal was measured in sixteen participants who made timed font change detection judgments in visually presented sentences that varied in syntactic structure and the order of animate and inanimate nouns. Behavioral data indicated that sentences were processed to the level of syntactic structure. BOLD signal increased in visual association areas bilaterally and left supramarginal gyrus in the contrast of sentences with object- and subject-extracted relative clauses without font changes in which the animacy order of the nouns biased against the syntactically determined meaning of the sentence. This result differs from the findings in a non-word detection task (Caplan et al, 2008a), in which the same contrast led to increased BOLD signal in the left inferior frontal gyrus. The difference in areas of activation indicates that the sentences were processed differently in the two tasks. These differences were further explored in an eye tracking study using the materials in the two tasks. Issues pertaining to how parsing and interpretive operations are affected by a task that is being performed, and how this might affect BOLD signal correlates of syntactic contrasts, are discussed. PMID:20671983

  17. FY 2011 Federal Budget Process Begins with Bold Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolak, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The federal government's annual budget process was kick-started this year with a bold proposal that has implications for anyone who provides child care. But keeping child care front and center in Washington will take a lot of effort in 2010. On February 1, the Administration released the Budget Proposal for Federal Fiscal Year 2011. It calls for…

  18. The Boldest New Idea? An End to Bold Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The past two decades have proven that bold, single-factor reform ideas have little power to change the face of education. Pundits and policymakers would have schools and school systems make grand changes to accommodate the reform idea du jour--and then profess the incompetence of schools and teachers when those changes prove less than effective.…

  19. Task effects on BOLD signal correlates of implicit syntactic processing

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, David

    2010-01-01

    BOLD signal was measured in sixteen participants who made timed font change detection judgments in visually presented sentences that varied in syntactic structure and the order of animate and inanimate nouns. Behavioral data indicated that sentences were processed to the level of syntactic structure. BOLD signal increased in visual association areas bilaterally and left supramarginal gyrus in the contrast of sentences with object- and subject-extracted relative clauses without font changes in which the animacy order of the nouns biased against the syntactically determined meaning of the sentence. This result differs from the findings in a non-word detection task (Caplan et al, 2008a), in which the same contrast led to increased BOLD signal in the left inferior frontal gyrus. The difference in areas of activation indicates that the sentences were processed differently in the two tasks. These differences were further explored in an eye tracking study using the materials in the two tasks. Issues pertaining to how parsing and interpretive operations are affected by a task that is being performed, and how this might affect BOLD signal correlates of syntactic contrasts, are discussed. PMID:20671983

  20. A Novel Method for Integrating MEG and BOLD fMRI Signals With the Linear Convolution Model in Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nangini, Cathy; Tam, Fred; Graham, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the neurovascular coupling between hemodynamic signals and their neural origins is crucial to functional neuroimaging research, even more so as new methods become available for integrating results from different functional neuroimaging modalities. We present a novel method to relate magnetoencephalography (MEG) and BOLD fMRI data from primary somatosensory cortex within the context of the linear convolution model. This model, which relates neural activity to BOLD signal change, has been widely used to predict BOLD signals but typically lacks experimentally derived measurements of neural activity. In this study, an fMRI experiment is performed using variable-duration (≤1 s) vibrotactile stimuli applied at 22 Hz, analogous to a previously published MEG study (Nangini et al., [2006]: Neuroimage 33:252–262), testing whether MEG source waveforms from the previous study can inform the convolution model and improve BOLD signal estimates across all stimulus durations. The typical formulation of the convolution model in which the input is given by the stimulus profile is referred to as Model 1. Model 2 is based on an energy argument relating metabolic demand to the postsynaptic currents largely responsible for the MEG current dipoles, and uses the energy density of the estimated MEG source waveforms as input to the convolution model. It is shown that Model 2 improves the BOLD signal estimates compared to Model 1 under the experimental conditions implemented, suggesting that MEG energy density can be a useful index of hemodynamic activity. PMID:17290370

  1. BOLD sensitivity and SNR characteristics of parallel imaging-accelerated single-shot multi-echo EPI for fMRI.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Saurabh; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Mathiak, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) is a standard procedure in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for measuring changes in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal associated with neuronal activity. The images obtained from fMRI with EPI, however, exhibit signal dropouts and geometric distortions. Parallel imaging (PI), due to its short readout, accelerates image acquisition and might reduce dephasing in phase-encoding direction. The concomitant loss of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) might be compensated through single-shot multi-echo EPI (mEPI). We systematically compared the temporal SNR and BOLD sensitivity of single echoes (TE=15, 45, and 75ms) and contrast-optimized mEPI with and without PI and mEPI-based denoising. Audio-visual stimulation under natural viewing conditions activated distributed neural networks. Heterogeneous SNR, noise gain, and sensitivity maps emerged. In single echoes, SNR and BOLD sensitivity followed the predicted dependency on echo time (TE) and were reduced under PI. However, the combination of echoes with mEPI recovered the quality parameters and increased BOLD signal changes at circumscribed fronto-polar and deep brain structures. We suggest applying PI only in combination with mEPI to reduce imaging artifacts and conserve BOLD sensitivity. PMID:23954488

  2. Boldness by habituation and social interactions: a model.

    PubMed

    Oosten, Johanneke E; Magnhagen, Carin; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K

    2010-04-01

    Most studies of animal personality attribute personality to genetic traits. But a recent study by Magnhagen and Staffan (Behav Ecol Sociobiol 57:295-303, 2005) on young perch in small groups showed that boldness, a central personality trait, is also shaped by social interactions and by previous experience. The authors measured boldness by recording the duration that an individual spent near a predator and the speed with which it fed there. They found that duration near the predator increased over time and was higher the higher the average boldness of other group members. In addition, the feeding rate of shy individuals was reduced if other members of the same group were bold. The authors supposed that these behavioral dynamics were caused by genetic differences, social interactions, and habituation to the predator. However, they did not quantify exactly how this could happen. In the present study, we therefore use an agent-based model to investigate whether these three factors may explain the empirical findings. We choose an agent-based model because this type of model is especially suited to study the relation between behavior at an individual level and behavioral dynamics at a group level. In our model, individuals were either hiding in vegetation or feeding near a predator, whereby their behavior was affected by habituation and by two social mechanisms: social facilitation to approach the predator and competition over food. We show that even if we start the model with identical individuals, these three mechanisms were sufficient to reproduce the behavioral dynamics of the empirical study, including the consistent differences among individuals. Moreover, if we start the model with individuals that already differ in boldness, the behavioral dynamics produced remained the same. Our results indicate the importance of previous experience and social interactions when studying animal personality empirically. PMID:20351762

  3. BOLD delay times using group delay in sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloigner, Julie; Vu, Chau; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2016-03-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder that effects red blood cells, which can lead to vasoocclusion, ischemia and infarct. This disease often results in neurological damage and strokes, leading to morbidity and mortality. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique for measuring and mapping the brain activity. Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD) signals contain also information about the neurovascular coupling, vascular reactivity, oxygenation and blood propagation. Temporal relationship between BOLD fluctuations in different parts of the brain provides also a mean to investigate the blood delay information. We used the induced desaturation as a label to profile transit times through different brain areas, reflecting oxygen utilization of tissue. In this study, we aimed to compare blood flow propagation delay times between these patients and healthy subjects in areas vascularized by anterior, middle and posterior cerebral arteries. In a group comparison analysis with control subjects, BOLD changes in these areas were found to be almost simultaneous and shorter in the SCD patients, because of their increased brain blood flow. Secondly, the analysis of a patient with a stenosis on the anterior cerebral artery indicated that signal of the area vascularized by this artery lagged the MCA signal. These findings suggest that sickle cell disease causes blood propagation modifications, and that these changes could be used as a biomarker of vascular damage.

  4. Matched-filter acquisition for BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lars; Haeberlin, Maximilian; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Wilm, Bertram J; Vannesjo, S Johanna; Brunner, David O; Ruff, Christian C; Stephan, Klaas E; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2014-10-15

    We introduce matched-filter fMRI, which improves BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) sensitivity by variable-density image acquisition tailored to subsequent image smoothing. Image smoothing is an established post-processing technique used in the vast majority of fMRI studies. Here we show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the resulting smoothed data can be substantially increased by acquisition weighting with a weighting function that matches the k-space filter imposed by the smoothing operation. We derive the theoretical SNR advantage of this strategy and propose a practical implementation of 2D echo-planar acquisition matched to common Gaussian smoothing. To reliably perform the involved variable-speed trajectories, concurrent magnetic field monitoring with NMR probes is used. Using this technique, phantom and in vivo measurements confirm reliable SNR improvement in the order of 30% in a "resting-state" condition and prove robust in different regimes of physiological noise. Furthermore, a preliminary task-based visual fMRI experiment equally suggests a consistent BOLD sensitivity increase in terms of statistical sensitivity (average t-value increase of about 35%). In summary, our study suggests that matched-filter acquisition is an effective means of improving BOLD SNR in studies that rely on image smoothing at the post-processing level. PMID:24844745

  5. Recent social conditions affect boldness repeatability in individual sticklebacks

    PubMed Central

    Jolles, Jolle Wolter; Aaron Taylor, Benjamin; Manica, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Animal personalities are ubiquitous across the animal kingdom and have been shown both to influence individual behaviour in the social context and to be affected by it. However, little attention has been paid to possible carryover effects of social conditions on personality expression, especially when individuals are alone. Here we investigated how the recent social context affected the boldness and repeatability of three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, during individual assays. We housed fish either solitarily, solitarily part of the time or socially in groups of four, and subjected them twice to a risk-taking task. The social conditions had a large effect on boldness repeatability, with fish housed solitarily before the trials showing much higher behavioural repeatability than fish housed socially, for which repeatability was not significant. Social conditions also had a temporal effect on the boldness of the fish, with only fish housed solitarily taking more risks during the first than the second trial. These results show that recent social conditions can thus affect the short-term repeatability of behaviour and obfuscate the expression of personality even in later contexts when individuals are alone. This finding highlights the need to consider social housing conditions when designing personality studies and emphasizes the important link between animal personality and the social context by showing the potential role of social carryover effects. PMID:26949265

  6. Positive Allosteric Modulator of GABA Lowers BOLD Responses in the Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Susanna A.; Forsgren, Mikael; Lundengård, Karin; Simon, Rozalyn; Torkildsen Nilsson, Maritha; Söderfeldt, Birgitta; Lundberg, Peter; Engström, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about the neural underpinnings of the negative blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is still limited. We hypothesized that pharmacological GABAergic modulation attenuates BOLD responses, and that blood concentrations of a positive allosteric modulator of GABA correlate inversely with BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex. We investigated whether or not pure task-related negative BOLD responses were co-localized with pharmacologically modulated BOLD responses. Twenty healthy adults received either 5 mg diazepam or placebo in a double blind, randomized design. During fMRI the subjects performed a working memory task. Results showed that BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex were inversely correlated with diazepam blood concentrations; that is, the higher the blood diazepam concentration, the lower the BOLD response. This inverse correlation was most pronounced in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and the anterior mid-cingulate cortex. For subjects with diazepam plasma concentration > 0.1 mg/L we observed negative BOLD responses with respect to fixation baseline. There was minor overlap between cingulate regions with task-related negative BOLD responses and regions where the BOLD responses were inversely correlated with diazepam concentration. We interpret that the inverse correlation between the BOLD response and diazepam was caused by GABA-related neural inhibition. Thus, this study supports the hypothesis that GABA attenuates BOLD responses in fMRI. The minimal overlap between task-related negative BOLD responses and responses attenuated by diazepam suggests that these responses might be caused by different mechanisms. PMID:26930498

  7. Positive Allosteric Modulator of GABA Lowers BOLD Responses in the Cingulate Cortex.

    PubMed

    Walter, Susanna A; Forsgren, Mikael; Lundengård, Karin; Simon, Rozalyn; Torkildsen Nilsson, Maritha; Söderfeldt, Birgitta; Lundberg, Peter; Engström, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about the neural underpinnings of the negative blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is still limited. We hypothesized that pharmacological GABAergic modulation attenuates BOLD responses, and that blood concentrations of a positive allosteric modulator of GABA correlate inversely with BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex. We investigated whether or not pure task-related negative BOLD responses were co-localized with pharmacologically modulated BOLD responses. Twenty healthy adults received either 5 mg diazepam or placebo in a double blind, randomized design. During fMRI the subjects performed a working memory task. Results showed that BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex were inversely correlated with diazepam blood concentrations; that is, the higher the blood diazepam concentration, the lower the BOLD response. This inverse correlation was most pronounced in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and the anterior mid-cingulate cortex. For subjects with diazepam plasma concentration > 0.1 mg/L we observed negative BOLD responses with respect to fixation baseline. There was minor overlap between cingulate regions with task-related negative BOLD responses and regions where the BOLD responses were inversely correlated with diazepam concentration. We interpret that the inverse correlation between the BOLD response and diazepam was caused by GABA-related neural inhibition. Thus, this study supports the hypothesis that GABA attenuates BOLD responses in fMRI. The minimal overlap between task-related negative BOLD responses and responses attenuated by diazepam suggests that these responses might be caused by different mechanisms. PMID:26930498

  8. Investigating the source of BOLD nonlinearity in human visual cortex in response to paired visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nanyin; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Wei

    2008-11-01

    Several studies have demonstrated significant nonlinearity in the blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signal. Completely understanding the nature of this nonlinear behavior is important in the interpretation of the BOLD signal. However, this task is hindered by the uncertainty of the source of BOLD nonlinearity which could come from neuronal and/or vascular origin. The obscurity of this issue not only impedes accurate modeling of BOLD nonlinearity, but also limits generalization of the conclusions regarding BOLD nonlinearity. To examine this issue, we eliminated nonlinear contributions from the neuronal response and selectively study BOLD nonlinearity under only the vascular effect by employing a paired-stimulus paradigm composed of two ultra-short visual stimuli separated by a variable inter-stimulus interval (ISI). ISIs chosen were long enough (> or = 1s) to ensure invariant neuronal activity to all stimuli. Under this circumstance, we still observed significant nonlinearity in the BOLD signal reflected by a progressive recovery of BOLD response to the second stimuli as ISI gets longer and delayed BOLD onset latency. These nonlinear behaviors identified in the BOLD signal originate entirely from the vascular responses as the neuronal responses to all stimuli are identical. More importantly, we found that BOLD nonlinearity became much less significant after we removed activated pixels from large vessels. These finds reveal that the dominant component, if not all, of the source of BOLD nonlinearity comes from large-vessel hemodynamic response. They also suggest a possible mechanism to improve the spatial specificity of gradient-echo BOLD signal for fMRI mapping based on the characteristics of vascular refractoriness. PMID:18657623

  9. LTE Model Atmospheres: MARCS, ATLAS and CO5BOLD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, P.; Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Steffen, M.

    2012-04-01

    In this talk, we review the basic assumptions and physics covered by classical 1D LTE model atmospheres. We will focus on ATLAS and MARCS models of F-G-K stars and describe what resources are available through the web, both in terms of codes and model-atmosphere grids. We describe the advances made in hydrodynamical simulations of convective stellar atmospheres with the CO5BOLD code and what grids and resources are available, with a prospect of what will be available in the near future.

  10. Crossing the Implementation Chasm: A Proposal for Bold Action

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Nancy M.; Novak, Laurie L.; Weiss, Jacob B.; Gadd, Cynthia S.; Unertl, Kim M.

    2008-01-01

    As health care organizations dramatically increase investment in information technology (IT) and the scope of their IT projects, implementation failures become critical events. Implementation failures cause stress on clinical units, increase risk to patients, and result in massive costs that are often not recoverable. At an estimated 28% success rate, the current level of investment defies management logic. This paper asserts that there are “chasms” in IT implementations that represent risky stages in the process. Contributors to the chasms are classified into four categories: design, management, organization, and assessment. The American College of Medical Informatics symposium participants recommend bold action to better understand problems and challenges in implementation and to improve the ability of organizations to bridge these implementation chasms. The bold action includes the creation of a Team Science for Implementation strategy that allows for participation from multiple institutions to address the long standing and costly implementation issues. The outcomes of this endeavor will include a new focus on interdisciplinary research and an inter-organizational knowledge base of strategies and methods to optimize implementations and subsequent achievement of organizational objectives. PMID:18308985

  11. The relationship between time to peak of fMRI-BOLD responses and difficulty of a task suggests neuronal origins to the BOLD contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Benito De Celis

    2012-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and its blood oxygen level contrast (BOLD) was used to study the response of the vibrissa system of rodents to different combinations of bilateral stimulations. We found that difficult tasks to perform, associated with longer neuronal periods, were correlated with larger times to peak (ttp) for the BOLD signal. This delay depended on number of vibrissa stimulated and the region of brain studied. By contrast, delay was not affected by which hemisphere was stimulated.

  12. BOLD fMRI Correlation Reflects Frequency-Specific Neuronal Correlation.

    PubMed

    Hipp, Joerg F; Siegel, Markus

    2015-05-18

    The brain-wide correlation of hemodynamic signals as measured with BOLD fMRI is widely studied as a proxy for integrative brain processes. However, the relationship between hemodynamic correlation structure and neuronal correlation structure remains elusive. We investigated this relation using BOLD fMRI and spatially co-registered, source-localized MEG in resting humans. We found that across the entire cortex BOLD correlation reflected the co-variation of frequency-specific neuronal activity. Resolving the relation between electrophysiological and hemodynamic correlation structures locally in cortico-cortical connection space, we found that this relation was subject specific and even persisted on the centimeter scale. At first sight, this relation was strongest in the alpha to beta frequency range (8-32 Hz). However, correcting for differences in signal-to-noise ratios across electrophysiological frequencies, we found that the relation extended over a broad frequency range from 2 to 128 Hz. Moreover, we found that the frequency with the tightest link to BOLD correlation varied across cortico-cortical space. For every cortico-cortical connection, we show which specific correlated oscillations were most related to BOLD correlations. Our work provides direct evidence for the neuronal origin of BOLD correlation structure. Moreover, our work suggests that, across the brain, BOLD correlation reflects correlation of different types of neuronal network processes and that frequency-specific electrophysiological correlation provides information about large-scale neuronal interactions complementary to BOLD fMRI. PMID:25936551

  13. Frontal cortex BOLD signal changes in premanifest Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Stefania; Piacentini, Sylvie; Mandelli, Maria L.; Bertolino, Nicola; Ghielmetti, Francesco; Epifani, Francesca; Nigri, Anna; Taroni, Franco; Bruzzone, Maria G.; Donato, Stefano Di; Savoiardo, Mario; Mariotti, Caterina; Grisoli, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify a possible functional imaging biomarker sensitive to the earliest neural changes in premanifest Huntington disease (preHD), allowing early therapeutic approaches aimed at preventing or delaying clinical onset. Methods: Sixteen preHD and 18 healthy participants were submitted to anatomical acquisitions and functional MRI (fMRI) acquisitions during the execution of the exogenous covert orienting of attention task. Due to strong a priori hypothesis, all fMRI correlation analyses were restricted to the following: (1) the frontal oculomotor cortex identified by the means of a prosaccadic task, comprising frontal eye fields and supplementary frontal eye fields; and (2) the data collected during inhibition of return, a phenomenon occurring during the executed task. In preHD, multiple regression analysis was performed between fMRI data and the probability to develop the disease in the next 5 years (p5HD). Moreover, mean blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) signal changes in the frontal oculomotor cortex and striatal volumes were linearly correlated with p5HD. Results: In preHD, multiple regression analysis showed that clusters of activity strongly correlated with p5HD in the right frontal oculomotor cortex. Importantly, mean BOLD signal changes of this region correlated with p5HD (r2 = 0.52). Among the considered striatal volumes, a modest correlation (r2 = 0.29) was observed in the right putamen and p5HD. Conclusion: fMRI activations in the right-frontal oculomotor cortex during inhibition of return can be considered a possible functional imaging biomarker in preHD. PMID:24898924

  14. BOLD signal and functional connectivity associated with loving kindness meditation.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R Todd; Brewer, Judson A

    2014-05-01

    Loving kindness is a form of meditation involving directed well-wishing, typically supported by the silent repetition of phrases such as "may all beings be happy," to foster a feeling of selfless love. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the neural substrate of loving kindness meditation in experienced meditators and novices. We first assessed group differences in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal during loving kindness meditation. We next used a relatively novel approach, the intrinsic connectivity distribution of functional connectivity, to identify regions that differ in intrinsic connectivity between groups, and then used a data-driven approach to seed-based connectivity analysis to identify which connections differ between groups. Our findings suggest group differences in brain regions involved in self-related processing and mind wandering, emotional processing, inner speech, and memory. Meditators showed overall reduced BOLD signal and intrinsic connectivity during loving kindness as compared to novices, more specifically in the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PCu), a finding that is consistent with our prior work and other recent neuroimaging studies of meditation. Furthermore, meditators showed greater functional connectivity during loving kindness between the PCC/PCu and the left inferior frontal gyrus, whereas novices showed greater functional connectivity during loving kindness between the PCC/PCu and other cortical midline regions of the default mode network, the bilateral posterior insula lobe, and the bilateral parahippocampus/hippocampus. These novel findings suggest that loving kindness meditation involves a present-centered, selfless focus for meditators as compared to novices. PMID:24944863

  15. Data-driven optimization and evaluation of 2D EPI and 3D PRESTO for BOLD fMRI at 7 Tesla: I. Focal coverage.

    PubMed

    Barry, Robert L; Strother, Stephen C; Gatenby, J Christopher; Gore, John C

    2011-04-01

    Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is commonly performed using 2D single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI). However, single-shot EPI at 7 Tesla (T) often suffers from significant geometric distortions (due to low bandwidth (BW) in the phase-encode (PE) direction) and amplified physiological noise. Recent studies have suggested that 3D multi-shot sequences such as PRESTO may offer comparable BOLD contrast-to-noise ratio with increased volume coverage and decreased geometric distortions. Thus, a four-way group-level comparison was performed between 2D and 3D acquisition sequences at two in-plane resolutions. The quality of fMRI data was evaluated via metrics of prediction and reproducibility using NPAIRS (Non-parametric Prediction, Activation, Influence and Reproducibility re-Sampling). Group activation maps were optimized for each acquisition strategy by selecting the number of principal components that jointly maximized prediction and reproducibility, and showed good agreement in sensitivity and specificity for positive BOLD changes. High-resolution EPI exhibited the highest z-scores of the four acquisition sequences; however, it suffered from the lowest BW in the PE direction (resulting in the worst geometric distortions) and limited spatial coverage, and also caused some subject discomfort through peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS). In comparison, PRESTO also had high z-scores (higher than EPI for a matched in-plane resolution), the highest BW in the PE direction (producing images with superior geometric fidelity), the potential for whole-brain coverage, and no reported PNS. This study provides evidence to support the use of 3D multi-shot acquisition sequences in lieu of single-shot EPI for ultra high field BOLD fMRI at 7T. PMID:21232613

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality and prevalence: the associations with smoking and poverty—a BOLD analysis

    PubMed Central

    Burney, Peter; Jithoo, Anamika; Kato, Bernet; Janson, Christer; Mannino, David; Niżankowska-Mogilnicka, Ewa; Studnicka, Michael; Tan, Wan; Bateman, Eric; Koçabas, Ali; Vollmer, William M; Gislason, Thorarrin; Marks, Guy; Koul, Parvaiz A; Harrabi, Imed; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Buist, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a commonly reported cause of death and associated with smoking. However, COPD mortality is high in poor countries with low smoking rates. Spirometric restriction predicts mortality better than airflow obstruction, suggesting that the prevalence of restriction could explain mortality rates attributed to COPD. We have studied associations between mortality from COPD and low lung function, and between both lung function and death rates and cigarette consumption and gross national income per capita (GNI). Methods National COPD mortality rates were regressed against the prevalence of airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction in 22 Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study sites and against GNI, and national smoking prevalence. The prevalence of airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction in the BOLD sites were regressed against GNI and mean pack years smoked. Results National COPD mortality rates were more strongly associated with spirometric restriction in the BOLD sites (<60 years: men rs=0.73, p=0.0001; women rs=0.90, p<0.0001; 60+ years: men rs=0.63, p=0.0022; women rs=0.37, p=0.1) than obstruction (<60 years: men rs=0.28, p=0.20; women rs=0.17, p<0.46; 60+ years: men rs=0.28, p=0.23; women rs=0.22, p=0.33). Obstruction increased with mean pack years smoked, but COPD mortality fell with increased cigarette consumption and rose rapidly as GNI fell below US$15 000. Prevalence of restriction was not associated with smoking but also increased rapidly as GNI fell below US$15 000. Conclusions Smoking remains the single most important cause of obstruction but a high prevalence of restriction associated with poverty could explain the high ‘COPD’ mortality in poor countries. PMID:24353008

  17. The importance of the negative blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) response in the somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Klingner, Carsten M; Brodoehl, Stefan; Witte, Otto W

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, multiple studies have shown task-induced negative blood-oxygenation-level-dependent responses (NBRs) in multiple brain regions in humans and animals. Converging evidence suggests that task-induced NBRs can be interpreted in terms of decreased neuronal activity. However, the vascular and metabolic dynamics and functional importance of the NBR are highly debated. Here, we review studies investigating the origin and functional importance of the NBR, with special attention to the somatosensory cortex. PMID:26057216

  18. The role of social attraction and its link with boldness in the collective movements of three-spined sticklebacks

    PubMed Central

    Jolles, Jolle W.; Fleetwood-Wilson, Adeline; Nakayama, Shinnosuke; Stumpe, Martin C.; Johnstone, Rufus A.; Manica, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Social animals must time and coordinate their behaviour to ensure the benefits of grouping, resulting in collective movements and the potential emergence of leaders and followers. However, individuals often differ consistently from one another in how they cope with their environment, a phenomenon known as animal personality, which may affect how individuals use coordination rules and requiring them to compromise. Here we tracked the movements of pairs of three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, separated by a transparent partition that allowed them to observe and interact with one another in a context containing cover. Individuals differed consistently in their tendency to approach their partner's compartment during collective movements. The strength of this social attraction was positively correlated with the behavioural coordination between members of a pair but was negatively correlated with an individual's tendency to lead. Social attraction may form part of a broader behavioural syndrome as it was predicted by the boldness of an individual, measured in isolation prior to the observation of pairs, and by the boldness of the partner. We found that bolder fish, and those paired with bolder partners, tended to approach their partner's compartment less closely. These findings provide important insights into the mechanisms that govern the dynamics and functioning of social groups and the emergence and maintenance of consistent behavioural differences. PMID:25598543

  19. Analysis of Neural-BOLD Coupling Through Four Models of the Neural Metabolic Demand

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Christopher W.; Likova, Lora T.; Nicholas, Spero C.

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of the neuronal energetics to the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response is still incompletely understood. To address this issue, we compared the fits of four plausible models of neurometabolic coupling dynamics to available data for simultaneous recordings of the local field potential and the local BOLD response recorded from monkey primary visual cortex over a wide range of stimulus durations. The four models of the metabolic demand driving the BOLD response were: direct coupling with the overall LFP; rectified coupling to the LFP; coupling with a slow adaptive component of the implied neural population response; and coupling with the non-adaptive intracellular input signal defined by the stimulus time course. Taking all stimulus durations into account, the results imply that the BOLD response is most closely coupled with metabolic demand derived from the intracellular input waveform, without significant influence from the adaptive transients and nonlinearities exhibited by the LFP waveform. PMID:26696806

  20. BOLD fractional contribution to resting-state functional connectivity above 0.1 Hz.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingyuan E; Glover, Gary H

    2015-02-15

    Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) spontaneous signals from resting-state (RS) brains have typically been characterized by low-pass filtered timeseries at frequencies ≤ 0.1 Hz, and studies of these low-frequency fluctuations have contributed exceptional understanding of the baseline functions of our brain. Very recently, emerging evidence has demonstrated that spontaneous activities may persist in higher frequency bands (even up to 0.8 Hz), while presenting less variable network patterns across the scan duration. However, as an indirect measure of neuronal activity, BOLD signal results from an inherently slow hemodynamic process, which in fact might be too slow to accommodate the observed high-frequency functional connectivity (FC). To examine whether the observed high-frequency spontaneous FC originates from BOLD contrast, we collected RS data as a function of echo time (TE). Here we focus on two specific resting state networks - the default-mode network (DMN) and executive control network (ECN), and the major findings are fourfold: (1) we observed BOLD-like linear TE-dependence in the spontaneous activity at frequency bands up to 0.5 Hz (the maximum frequency that can be resolved with TR=1s), supporting neural relevance of the RSFC at a higher frequency range; (2) conventional models of hemodynamic response functions must be modified to support resting state BOLD contrast, especially at higher frequencies; (3) there are increased fractions of non-BOLD-like contributions to the RSFC above the conventional 0.1 Hz (non-BOLD/BOLD contrast at 0.4-0.5 Hz is ~4 times that at <0.1 Hz); and (4) the spatial patterns of RSFC are frequency-dependent. Possible mechanisms underlying the present findings and technical concerns regarding RSFC above 0.1 Hz are discussed. PMID:25497686

  1. Functional connectivity in BOLD and CBF data: Similarity and reliability of resting brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Gee, Dylan G.; Kilroy, Emily; Schwab, Simon; Smith, Robert X.; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Wang, Danny J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (FC) fMRI (rs-fcMRI) offers an appealing approach to mapping the brain’s intrinsic functional organization. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) are the two main rs-fcMRI approaches to assess alterations in brain networks associated with individual differences, behavior and psychopathology. While the BOLD signal is stronger with a higher temporal resolution, ASL provides quantitative, direct measures of the physiology and metabolism of specific networks. This study systematically investigated the similarity and reliability of resting brain networks (RBNs) in BOLD and ASL. A 2 × 2 × 2 factorial design was employed where each subject underwent repeated BOLD and ASL rs-fcMRI scans on two occasions on two MRI scanners respectively. Both independent and joint FC analyses revealed common RBNs in ASL and BOLD rs-fcMRI with a moderate to high level of spatial overlap, verified by Dice Similarity Coefficients. Test–retest analyses indicated more reliable spatial network patterns in BOLD (average modal Intraclass Correlation Coefficients: 0.905 ± 0.033 between-sessions; 0.885 ± 0.052 between-scanners) than ASL (0.545 ± 0.048; 0.575 ± 0.059). Nevertheless, ASL provided highly reproducible (0.955 ± 0.021; 0.970 ± 0.011) network-specific CBF measurements. Moreover, we observed positive correlations between regional CBF and FC in core areas of all RBNs indicating a relationship between network connectivity and its baseline metabolism. Taken together, the combination of ASL and BOLD rs-fcMRI provides a powerful tool for characterizing the spatiotemporal and quantitative properties of RBNs. These findings pave the way for future BOLD and ASL rs-fcMRI studies in clinical populations that are carried out across time and scanners. PMID:25463468

  2. Test-Retest Stability of Calibrated BOLD-fMRI in HIV− and HIV+ Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ances, Beau; Vaida, Florin; Ellis, Ronald; Buxton, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Subject performance, scanner hardware, or biological factors can affect single session neuroimaging measures. Stability studies using calibrated blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) have been performed in health but not disease. We utilized calibrated BOLD-fMRI to determine the effects of HIV on neurovascular coupling. 6 clinically stable HIV-infected patients (HIV+) and 10 seronegative controls (HIV−) were scanned at two separate sessions approximately 3 months apart. Both mild hypercapnia (5% CO2) exposure and a visual functional activation task were performed. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and inter-subject variance were determined for calibrated BOLD-fMRI measures (baseline cerebral blood flow (CBF), functional CBF, BOLD, and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) changes) for HIV+ and HIV− subjects. The two groups did not differ in age, sex, or education. HIV+ subjects had lower mean baseline CBF (p <0.04, Cohen’s d=−1.07) and functional BOLD responses (p< 0.001, Cohen’s d=−2.47) and a trend towards a decrease in mean functional CBF responses (p= 0.07, Cohen’s d=−0.92) despite similar mean functional CMRO2 changes (p= 0.71, Cohen’s d=0.19). The stability of each calibrated BOLD-fMRI measure, as assessed by ICC, was significantly lower for HIV+ subjects. In addition, HIV+ participants had greater inter-subject variability for baseline CBF (p <0.02), functional BOLD (p< 0.001), CBF (p< 0.001), and CMRO2 (p< 0.002) responses. Our results demonstrate that calibrated BOLD-fMRI measures have excellent stability within healthy controls. In contrast, these values have greater variability in clinically stable HIV+ subjects and may reflect alterations in coupling between CBF and CMRO2 with disease. PMID:20932922

  3. Repetition suppression: a means to index neural representations using BOLD?

    PubMed

    Barron, Helen C; Garvert, Mona M; Behrens, Timothy E J

    2016-10-01

    Understanding how the human brain gives rise to complex cognitive processes remains one of the biggest challenges of contemporary neuroscience. While invasive recording in animal models can provide insight into neural processes that are conserved across species, our understanding of cognition more broadly relies upon investigation of the human brain itself. There is therefore an imperative to establish non-invasive tools that allow human brain activity to be measured at high spatial and temporal resolution. In recent years, various attempts have been made to refine the coarse signal available in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), providing a means to investigate neural activity at the meso-scale, i.e. at the level of neural populations. The most widely used techniques include repetition suppression and multivariate pattern analysis. Human neuroscience can now use these techniques to investigate how representations are encoded across neural populations and transformed by relevant computations. Here, we review the physiological basis, applications and limitations of fMRI repetition suppression with a brief comparison to multivariate techniques. By doing so, we show how fMRI repetition suppression holds promise as a tool to reveal complex neural mechanisms that underlie human cognitive function.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574308

  4. Development of BOLD signal hemodynamic responses in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Arichi, Tomoki; Fagiolo, Gianlorenzo; Varela, Marta; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Allievi, Alessandro; Merchant, Nazakat; Tusor, Nora; Counsell, Serena J.; Burdet, Etienne; Beckmann, Christian F.; Edwards, A. David

    2012-01-01

    In the rodent brain the hemodynamic response to a brief external stimulus changes significantly during development. Analogous changes in human infants would complicate the determination and use of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in developing populations. We aimed to characterize HRF in human infants before and after the normal time of birth using rapid sampling of the Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signal. A somatosensory stimulus and an event related experimental design were used to collect data from 10 healthy adults, 15 sedated infants at term corrected post menstrual age (PMA) (median 41 + 1 weeks), and 10 preterm infants (median PMA 34 + 4 weeks). A positive amplitude HRF waveform was identified across all subject groups, with a systematic maturational trend in terms of decreasing time-to-peak and increasing positive peak amplitude associated with increasing age. Application of the age-appropriate HRF models to fMRI data significantly improved the precision of the fMRI analysis. These findings support the notion of a structured development in the brain's response to stimuli across the last trimester of gestation and beyond. PMID:22776460

  5. To Boldly Go: Practical Career Advice for Young Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiske, P.

    1998-05-01

    Young scientists in nearly every field are finding the job market of the 1990's a confusing and frustrating place. Ph.D. supply is far larger than that needed to fill entry-level positions in "traditional" research careers. More new Ph.D. and Master's degree holders are considering a wider range of careers in and out of science, but feel ill-prepared and uninformed about their options. Some feel their Ph.D. training has led them to a dead-end. I present a thorough and practical overview to the process of career planning and job hunting in the 1990's, from the perspective of a young scientist. I cover specific steps that young scientists can take to broaden their horizons, strengthen their skills, and present their best face to potential employers. An important part of this is the realization that most young scientists possess a range of valuable "transferable skills" that are highly sought after by employers in and out of science. I will summarize the specifics of job hunting in the 90's, including informational interviewing, building your network, developing a compelling CV and resume, cover letters, interviewing, based on my book "To Boldly Go: A Practical Career Guide for Scientists". I will also identify other resources available for young scientists. Finally, I will highlight individual stories of Ph.D.-trained scientists who have found exciting and fulfilling careers outside the "traditional" world of academia.

  6. Effects of anesthesia on BOLD signal and neuronal activity in the somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Aksenov, Daniil P; Li, Limin; Miller, Michael J; Iordanescu, Gheorghe; Wyrwicz, Alice M

    2015-11-01

    Most functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) animal studies rely on anesthesia, which can induce a variety of drug-dependent physiological changes, including depression of neuronal activity and cerebral metabolism as well as direct effects on the vasculature. The goal of this study was to characterize the effects of anesthesia on the BOLD signal and neuronal activity. Simultaneous fMRI and electrophysiology were used to measure changes in single units (SU), multi-unit activity (MUA), local field potentials (LFP), and the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response in the somatosensory cortex during whisker stimulation of rabbits before, during and after anesthesia with fentanyl or isoflurane. Our results indicate that anesthesia modulates the BOLD signal as well as both baseline and stimulus-evoked neuronal activity, and, most significantly, that the relationship between the BOLD and electrophysiological signals depends on the type of anesthetic. Specifically, the behavior of LFP observed under isoflurane did not parallel the behavior of BOLD, SU, or MUA. These findings suggest that the relationship between these signals may not be straightforward. BOLD may scale more closely with the best measure of the excitatory subcomponents of the underlying neuronal activity, which may vary according to experimental conditions that alter the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the cortex. PMID:26104288

  7. Functional MRI during sleep: BOLD signal decreases and their electrophysiological correlates.

    PubMed

    Czisch, Michael; Wehrle, Renate; Kaufmann, Christian; Wetter, Thomas C; Holsboer, Florian; Pollmächer, Thomas; Auer, Dorothee P

    2004-07-01

    Prominent local decreases in blood oxygenation level (BOLD) can be observed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) upon acoustic stimulation during sleep. The goal of this study was to further characterize this BOLD signal decrease with respect to corresponding neurophysiological phenomena using a simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG)/fMRI approach in sleeping human subjects. Healthy volunteers were subjected to acoustic stimulation during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. On the basis of statistical parametric maps, the correlations between the fMRI response (both amplitude and extent of the BOLD response) and the concomittant changes in the EEG (delta power and K-complexes) were calculated. Amplitude and extent of the stimulus-induced negative BOLD effect correlated positively with measures of EEG synchronization, namely an increase in the number of K-complexes and EEG delta power. Stimulus-induced BOLD decreases were most prominent during light (stage 2) NREM sleep and disappeared during slow wave sleep, indicating an influence of the baseline degree of hyperpolarization. Our observations provide first evidence that 'negative' BOLD signal changes during human sleep are associated with electrophysiological indicators of altered neuronal activity. Increased number of K-complexes and delta power reflecting hyperpolarization suggests true cortical deactivation upon stimulus presentation. This sleep stage-dependent deactivation might serve to protect the brain from arousing stimuli, particularly during the light phases of sleep shortly after sleep onset. PMID:15233766

  8. Quantitative BOLD: Mapping of Human Cerebral Deoxygenated Blood Volume and Oxygen Extraction Fraction: Default State

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.

    2014-01-01

    Since Ogawa et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1990;87:9868–9872) made the fundamental discovery of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast in MRI, most efforts have been directed toward the study of dynamic BOLD (i.e., temporal changes in the MRI signal during changes in brain activity). However, very little progress has been made in elucidating the nature of BOLD contrast during the resting or baseline state of the brain, which is important for understanding normal human performance because it accounts for most of the enormous energy budget of the brain. It is also crucial for deciphering the consequences of baseline-state impairment by cerebral vascular diseases. The objective of this study was to develop a BOLD MR-based method that allows quantitative evaluation of tissue hemodynamic parameters, such as the blood volume, deoxyhemoglobin concentration, and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The proposed method, which we have termed quantitative BOLD (qBOLD), is based on an MR signal model that incorporates prior knowledge about brain tissue composition and considers signals from gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and blood. A 2D gradient-echo sampling of spin-echo (GESSE) pulse sequence is used for the acquisition of the MRI signal. The method is applied to estimate the hemodynamic parameters of the normal human brain in the baseline state. PMID:17191227

  9. Individual boldness is linked to protective shell shape in aquatic snails

    PubMed Central

    Ahlgren, Johan; Chapman, Ben B.; Nilsson, P. Anders; Brönmark, Christer

    2015-01-01

    The existence of consistent individual differences in behaviour (‘animal personality’) has been well documented in recent years. However, how such individual variation in behaviour is maintained over evolutionary time is an ongoing conundrum. A well-studied axis of animal personality is individual variation along a bold–shy continuum, where individuals differ consistently in their propensity to take risks. A predation-risk cost to boldness is often assumed, but also that the reproductive benefits associated with boldness lead to equivalent fitness outcomes between bold and shy individuals over a lifetime. However, an alternative or complementary explanation may be that bold individuals phenotypically compensate for their risky lifestyle to reduce predation costs, for instance by investing in more pronounced morphological defences. Here, we investigate the ‘phenotypic compensation’ hypothesis, i.e. that bold individuals exhibit more pronounced anti-predator defences than shy individuals, by relating shell shape in the aquatic snail Radix balthica to an index of individual boldness. Our analyses find a strong relationship between risk-taking propensity and shell shape in this species, with bolder individuals exhibiting a more defended shell shape than shy individuals. We suggest that this supports the ‘phenotypic compensation’ hypothesis and sheds light on a previously poorly studied mechanism to promote the maintenance of personality variation among animals. PMID:25904320

  10. Complex relationship between BOLD signal and synchronization/desynchronization of human brain MEG oscillations.

    PubMed

    Winterer, Georg; Carver, Frederick W; Musso, Francesco; Mattay, Venkata; Weinberger, Daniel R; Coppola, Richard

    2007-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) depends on the coupling of cerebral blood flow, energy demand, and neural activity. The precise nature of this interaction, however, is poorly understood. A positive correlation between BOLD-response and cortically generated local field potentials, which reflect the weighted average of synchronized dentrosomatic components of pyramidal synaptic signals, has been demonstrated. Likewise, positive BOLD-responses have been reported in conjunction with scalp-recorded synchronized electromagnetic activity by a number of groups. However, it is not yet clear how the opposite electromagnetic pattern, i.e. cortical desynchronization, is related to the BOLD signal. To address this question, we conducted a combined event-related fMRI and 275 sensor whole-head MEG study during identical visual two-choice reaction time task conditions in 10 human subjects. We found complex sequences of MEG-synchronization and desynchronization across a wide frequency range in the visual and motor area in close correspondence with "locales" of positive BOLD-responses. These results indicate that a correspondence of positive BOLD-responses is not exclusively found for cortical synchronization but also for desynchronization, suggesting that the relationship between BOLD signals and electromagnetic activity might be more complex than previously thought. PMID:17133396

  11. Steady-state BOLD Response to Higher-order Cognition Modulates Low-Frequency Neural Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Dai, Gang-Shu; Liu, Feng; Long, Zhi-Liang; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2015-12-01

    Steady-state responses (SSRs) reflect the synchronous neural oscillations evoked by noninvasive and consistently repeated stimuli at the fundamental or harmonic frequencies. The steady-state evoked potentials (SSEPs; the representative form of the SSRs) have been widely used in the cognitive and clinical neurosciences and brain-computer interface research. However, the steady-state evoked potentials have limitations in examining high-frequency neural oscillations and basic cognition. In addition, synchronous neural oscillations in the low frequency range (<1 Hz) and in higher-order cognition have received a little attention. Therefore, we examined the SSRs in the low frequency range using a new index, the steady-state BOLD responses (SSBRs) evoked by semantic stimuli. Our results revealed that the significant SSBRs were induced at the fundamental frequency of stimuli and the first harmonic in task-related regions, suggesting the enhanced variability of neural oscillations entrained by exogenous stimuli. The SSBRs were independent of neurovascular coupling and characterized by sensorimotor bias, an indication of regional-dependent neuroplasticity. Furthermore, the amplitude of SSBRs may predict behavioral performance and show the psychophysiological relevance. Our findings provide valuable insights into the understanding of the SSRs evoked by higher-order cognition and how the SSRs modulate low-frequency neural oscillations. PMID:26284992

  12. Bold, smart, dangerous and evil: perceived correlates of core psychopathic traits among jury panel members.

    PubMed

    Edens, John F; Clark, John; Smith, Shannon Toney; Cox, Jennifer; Kelley, Shannon E

    2013-05-01

    Relatively few studies have investigated how laypersons perceive psychopathy, what factors they believe to be commonly associated with this disorder, or what rater personality characteristics might predict perceived psychopathic traits of the target person. An ethnically diverse sample of 285 US community members attending jury duty reviewed a case vignette regarding a capital murder trial and then rated (1) their perceptions of the defendant's psychopathic characteristics loosely based on trait indicators from the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised; (2) other characteristics of the defendant that might be associated with psychopathy (e.g. intelligence, violence potential); and (3) their own personality, using a very brief measure of Five Factor traits. Multivariate regression analyses indicated that participant ratings of psychopathy pertaining to the defendant were strongly associated with ratings on measures of his perceived boldness (i.e. social dominance and fearlessness), intelligence, violence potential, and perceptions that he was 'evil'. Big Five personality characteristics of the layperson raters, however, were only modestly associated with their ratings of psychopathy for the defendant. We review these results in terms of the potential stigmatization of individuals labelled as 'psychopaths' in forensic settings. PMID:24343940

  13. Increased BOLD signal in the fusiform gyrus during implicit emotion processing in anorexia nervosa☆

    PubMed Central

    Fonville, Leon; Giampietro, Vincent; Surguladze, Simon; Williams, Steven; Tchanturia, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Background The behavioural literature in anorexia nervosa (AN) has suggested impairments in psychosocial functioning and studies using facial expression processing tasks (FEPT) have reported poorer recognition and slower identification of emotions. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used alongside a FEPT, depicting neutral, mildly happy and happy faces, to examine the neural correlates of implicit emotion processing in AN. Participants were instructed to specify the gender of the faces. Levels of depression, anxiety, obsessive–compulsive symptoms and eating disorder behaviour were obtained and principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to acquire uncorrelated variables. Results fMRI analysis revealed a greater blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response in AN in the right fusiform gyrus to all facial expressions. This response showed a linear increase with the happiness of the facial expression and was found to be stronger in those not taking medication. PCA analysis revealed a single component indicating a greater level of general clinical symptoms. Conclusion Neuroimaging findings would suggest that alterations in implicit emotion processing in AN occur during early perceptual processing of social signals and illustrate greater engagement on the FEPT. The lack of separate components using PCA suggests that the questionnaires used might not be suited as predictive measures. PMID:24501698

  14. Influence of BOLD Contributions to Diffusion fMRI Activation of the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Rebecca J.; Reutens, David C.; Hocking, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Reliance on the hemodynamic response as a surrogate marker of neural activity imposes an intrinsic limit on the spatial specificity of functional MRI. An alternative approach based on diffusion-weighted functional MRI (DfMRI) has been reported as a contrast less reliant on hemodynamic effects, however current evidence suggests that both hemodynamic and unique neural sources contribute to the diffusion signal. Here we compare activation patterns obtained with the standard blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast to DfMRI in order to gain a deeper understanding of how the BOLD proportion contributes to the observable diffusion signal. Both individual and group-level activation patterns obtained with DfMRI and BOLD to a visual field stimulation paradigm were analyzed. At the individual level, the DfMRI contrast showed a strong, positive relationship between the volumes of cortex activated in response to quadrant- and hemi-field visual stimulation. This was not observed in the corresponding BOLD experiment. Overall, the DfMRI response indicated less between-subject variability, with random effects analyses demonstrating higher statistical values at the peak voxel for DfMRI. Furthermore, the spatial extent of the activation was more restricted to the primary visual region for DfMRI than BOLD. However, the diffusion signal was sensitive to the hemodynamic response in a manner dependent on experimental manipulation. It was also limited by its low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), demonstrating lower sensitivity than BOLD. Together these findings both support DfMRI as a contrast that bears a closer spatial relationship to the underlying neural activity than BOLD, and raise important caveats regarding its utilization. Models explaining the DfMRI signal change need to consider the dynamic vascular contributions that may vary with neural activity. PMID:27445654

  15. White matter microstructure contributes to age-related declines in task-induced deactivation of the default mode network.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher A; Hakun, Jonathan G; Zhu, Zude; Johnson, Nathan F; Gold, Brian T

    2015-01-01

    Task-induced deactivations within the brain's default mode network (DMN) are thought to reflect suppression of endogenous thought processes to support exogenous goal-directed task processes. Older adults are known to show reductions in deactivation of the DMN compared to younger adults. However, little is understood about the mechanisms contributing to functional dysregulation of the DMN in aging. Here, we explored the relationships between functional modulation of the DMN and age, task performance and white matter (WM) microstructure. Participants were 117 adults ranging from 25 to 83 years old who completed an fMRI task switching paradigm, including easy (single) and difficult (mixed) conditions, and underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The fMRI results revealed an age by condition interaction (β = -0.13, t = -3.16, p = 0.002) such that increasing age affected deactivation magnitude during the mixed condition (β = -0.29, t = -3.24 p = 0.002) but not the single condition (p = 0.58). Additionally, there was a WM by condition interaction (β = 0.10, t = 2.33, p = 0.02) such that decreasing WM microstructure affected deactivation magnitude during the mixed condition (β = 0.30, t = 3.42 p = 0.001) but not the single condition (p = 0.17). Critically, mediation analyses indicated that age-related reductions in WM microstructure accounted for the relationship between age and DMN deactivation in the more difficult mixed condition. These findings suggest that age-related declines in anatomical connectivity between DMN regions contribute to functional dysregulation within the DMN in older adults. PMID:26500549

  16. White matter microstructure contributes to age-related declines in task-induced deactivation of the default mode network

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher A.; Hakun, Jonathan G.; Zhu, Zude; Johnson, Nathan F.; Gold, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Task-induced deactivations within the brain’s default mode network (DMN) are thought to reflect suppression of endogenous thought processes to support exogenous goal-directed task processes. Older adults are known to show reductions in deactivation of the DMN compared to younger adults. However, little is understood about the mechanisms contributing to functional dysregulation of the DMN in aging. Here, we explored the relationships between functional modulation of the DMN and age, task performance and white matter (WM) microstructure. Participants were 117 adults ranging from 25 to 83 years old who completed an fMRI task switching paradigm, including easy (single) and difficult (mixed) conditions, and underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The fMRI results revealed an age by condition interaction (β = −0.13, t = −3.16, p = 0.002) such that increasing age affected deactivation magnitude during the mixed condition (β = −0.29, t = −3.24 p = 0.002) but not the single condition (p = 0.58). Additionally, there was a WM by condition interaction (β = 0.10, t = 2.33, p = 0.02) such that decreasing WM microstructure affected deactivation magnitude during the mixed condition (β = 0.30, t = 3.42 p = 0.001) but not the single condition (p = 0.17). Critically, mediation analyses indicated that age-related reductions in WM microstructure accounted for the relationship between age and DMN deactivation in the more difficult mixed condition. These findings suggest that age-related declines in anatomical connectivity between DMN regions contribute to functional dysregulation within the DMN in older adults. PMID:26500549

  17. Linear and Nonlinear Relationships between Visual Stimuli, EEG and BOLD fMRI Signals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongming; Rios, Cristina; Zhang, Nanyin; Yang, Lin; Chen, Wei; He, Bin

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the cascaded interactions between stimuli and neural and hemodynamic responses were modeled using linear systems. These models provided the theoretical hypotheses that were tested against the electroencephalography (EEG) and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data recorded from human subjects during prolonged periods of repeated visual stimuli with a variable setting of the inter-stimulus-interval (ISI) and visual contrast. Our results suggest that 1) neural response is nonlinear only when ISI<0.2 s, 2) BOLD response is nonlinear with an exclusively vascular origin when 0.25BOLD effect size and the integrated power of event-related synaptic current activity, after modeling and taking into account the vascular refractory effect. These conclusions offer important insights into the origins of BOLD nonlinearity and the nature of neurovascular coupling, and suggest an effective means to quantitatively interpret the BOLD signal in terms of neural activity. The validated cross-modal relationship between fMRI and EEG may provide a theoretical basis for the integration of these two modalities. PMID:20079854

  18. Dopamine-induced dissociation of BOLD and neural activity in macaque visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Zaldivar, Daniel; Rauch, Alexander; Whittingstall, Kevin; Logothetis, Nikos K; Goense, Jozien

    2014-12-01

    Neuromodulators determine how neural circuits process information during cognitive states such as wakefulness, attention, learning, and memory. fMRI can provide insight into their function and dynamics, but their exact effect on BOLD responses remains unclear, limiting our ability to interpret the effects of changes in behavioral state using fMRI. Here, we investigated the effects of dopamine (DA) injections on neural responses and haemodynamic signals in macaque primary visual cortex (V1) using fMRI (7T) and intracortical electrophysiology. Aside from DA's involvement in diseases such as Parkinson's and schizophrenia, it also plays a role in visual perception. We mimicked DAergic neuromodulation by systemic injection of L-DOPA and Carbidopa (LDC) or by local application of DA in V1 and found that systemic application of LDC increased the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and amplitude of the visually evoked neural responses in V1. However, visually induced BOLD responses decreased, whereas cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses increased. This dissociation of BOLD and CBF suggests that dopamine increases energy metabolism by a disproportionate amount relative to the CBF response, causing the reduced BOLD response. Local application of DA in V1 had no effect on neural activity, suggesting that the dopaminergic effects are mediated by long-range interactions. The combination of BOLD-based and CBF-based fMRI can provide a signature of dopaminergic neuromodulation, indicating that the application of multimodal methods can improve our ability to distinguish sensory processing from neuromodulatory effects. PMID:25456449

  19. Systemic Low-Frequency Oscillations in BOLD Signal Vary with Tissue Type

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yunjie; Hocke, Lia M.; Lindsey, Kimberly P.; Erdoğan, Sinem B.; Vitaliano, Gordana; Caine, Carolyn E.; Frederick, Blaise deB.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signals are widely used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as a proxy measure of brain activation. However, because these signals are blood-related, they are also influenced by other physiological processes. This is especially true in resting state fMRI, during which no experimental stimulation occurs. Previous studies have found that the amplitude of resting state BOLD is closely related to regional vascular density. In this study, we investigated how some of the temporal fluctuations of the BOLD signal also possibly relate to regional vascular density. We began by identifying the blood-bound systemic low-frequency oscillation (sLFO). We then assessed the distribution of all voxels based on their correlations with this sLFO. We found that sLFO signals are widely present in resting state BOLD signals and that the proportion of these sLFOs in each voxel correlates with different tissue types, which vary significantly in underlying vascular density. These results deepen our understanding of the BOLD signal and suggest new imaging biomarkers based on fMRI data, such as amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and sLFO, a combination of both, for assessing vascular density. PMID:27445680

  20. Improving the precision of fMRI BOLD signal deconvolution with implications for connectivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Bush, Keith; Cisler, Josh; Bian, Jiang; Hazaroglu, Gokce; Hazaroglu, Onder; Kilts, Clint

    2015-12-01

    An important, open problem in neuroimaging analyses is developing analytical methods that ensure precise inferences about neural activity underlying fMRI BOLD signal despite the known presence of confounds. Here, we develop and test a new meta-algorithm for conducting semi-blind (i.e., no knowledge of stimulus timings) deconvolution of the BOLD signal that estimates, via bootstrapping, both the underlying neural events driving BOLD as well as the confidence of these estimates. Our approach includes two improvements over the current best performing deconvolution approach; 1) we optimize the parametric form of the deconvolution feature space; and, 2) we pre-classify neural event estimates into two subgroups, either known or unknown, based on the confidence of the estimates prior to conducting neural event classification. This knows-what-it-knows approach significantly improves neural event classification over the current best performing algorithm, as tested in a detailed computer simulation of highly-confounded fMRI BOLD signal. We then implemented a massively parallelized version of the bootstrapping-based deconvolution algorithm and executed it on a high-performance computer to conduct large scale (i.e., voxelwise) estimation of the neural events for a group of 17 human subjects. We show that by restricting the computation of inter-regional correlation to include only those neural events estimated with high-confidence the method appeared to have higher sensitivity for identifying the default mode network compared to a standard BOLD signal correlation analysis when compared across subjects. PMID:26226647

  1. Deficient aversive-potentiated startle and the triarchic model of psychopathy: The role of boldness.

    PubMed

    Esteller, Àngels; Poy, Rosario; Moltó, Javier

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the contribution of the phenotypic domains of boldness, meanness, and disinhibition of the triarchic conceptualization of psychopathy (Patrick, Fowles, & Krueger, 2009) to deficient aversive-potentiated startle in a mixed-gender sample of 180 undergraduates. Eyeblink responses to noise probes were recorded during a passive picture-viewing task (erotica, neutral, threat, and mutilation). Deficient threat vs. neutral potentiation was uniquely related to increased boldness scores, thus suggesting that the diminished defensive reaction to aversive stimulation is specifically linked to the charm, social potency and venturesomeness features of psychopathy (boldness), but not to features such as callousness, coldheartedness and cruelty traits (meanness), even though both phenotypes theoretically share the same underlying low-fear disposition. Our findings provide further evidence of the differential association between distinct psychopathy components and deficits in defensive reactivity and strongly support the validity of the triarchic model of psychopathy in disentangling the etiology of this personality disorder. PMID:27033014

  2. Developmental changes of BOLD signal correlations with global human EEG power and synchronization during working memory.

    PubMed

    Michels, Lars; Lüchinger, Rafael; Koenig, Thomas; Martin, Ernst; Brandeis, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In humans, theta band (5-7 Hz) power typically increases when performing cognitively demanding working memory (WM) tasks, and simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings have revealed an inverse relationship between theta power and the BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) signal in the default mode network during WM. However, synchronization also plays a fundamental role in cognitive processing, and the level of theta and higher frequency band synchronization is modulated during WM. Yet, little is known about the link between BOLD, EEG power, and EEG synchronization during WM, and how these measures develop with human brain maturation or relate to behavioral changes. We examined EEG-BOLD signal correlations from 18 young adults and 15 school-aged children for age-dependent effects during a load-modulated Sternberg WM task. Frontal load (in-)dependent EEG theta power was significantly enhanced in children compared to adults, while adults showed stronger fMRI load effects. Children demonstrated a stronger negative correlation between global theta power and the BOLD signal in the default mode network relative to adults. Therefore, we conclude that theta power mediates the suppression of a task-irrelevant network. We further conclude that children suppress this network even more than adults, probably from an increased level of task-preparedness to compensate for not fully mature cognitive functions, reflected in lower response accuracy and increased reaction time. In contrast to power, correlations between instantaneous theta global field synchronization and the BOLD signal were exclusively positive in both age groups but only significant in adults in the frontal-parietal and posterior cingulate cortices. Furthermore, theta synchronization was weaker in children and was--in contrast to EEG power--positively correlated with response accuracy in both age groups. In summary we conclude that theta EEG-BOLD signal correlations differ between spectral power and synchronization and that

  3. Bold Dreams and Big Questions: The Future of Astronomy in the 21st and NSF's Role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    This is a special time in astronomy: Astronomers know much about the Universe, but understand much less. Profound questions can be formulated and the tools are at hand to answer them. I will discuss my vision of this future as well as NSF's role in realizing the bold dreams and answering the big questions.

  4. Female mating preference for bold males in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata.

    PubMed

    Godin, J G; Dugatkin, L A

    1996-09-17

    Although females prefer to mate with brightly colored males in numerous species, the benefits accruing to such females are virtually unknown. According to one hypothesis of sexual selection theory, if the expression of costly preferred traits in males (such as conspicuous colors) is proportional to the male's overall quality or reveals his quality, a well-developed trait should indicate good condition and/or viability for example. A female choosing such a male would therefore stand to gain direct or indirect fitness benefits, or both. Among potential phenotypic indicators of an individual's quality are the amount and brightness of its carotenoid-based colors and its boldness, as measured by its willingness to risk approaching predators without being killed. Here, we show experimentally that in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata) the visual conspicuousness of the color pattern of males correlates positively with boldness toward, and with escape distance from, a cichlid fish predator. Bold individuals are thus more informed about nearby predators and more likely to survive encounters with them. Mate-choice experiments showed that females prefer colorful males as mates, but prefer bolder males irrespective of their coloration when given the opportunity to observe their behavior toward a potential fish predator. By preferentially mating with colorful males, female guppies are thus choosing on average, relatively bold, and perhaps more viable, individuals. In doing so, and to the extent that viability is heritable, they potentially gain indirect fitness benefits by producing more viable offspring than otherwise. PMID:11607706

  5. Discerning Professional Identity and Becoming Bold, Socially Responsible Teacher-Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collay, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    This essay reviews the powerful influence of professional identity in shaping how school leaders perceive their work. I review factors that mold teacher professional identity, implications for educational leadership pedagogy, and supports and barriers for teacher leaders to consider in their quest to more fully enact bold, socially responsible…

  6. BOLD Response to Semantic and Syntactic Processing during Hypoglycemia Is Load-Dependent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Robin J.; Page, Kathleen A.; Arora, Jagriti; Sherwin, Robert; Constable, R. Todd

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how syntactic and semantic load factors impact sentence comprehension and BOLD signal under moderate hypoglycemia. A dual session, whole brain fMRI study was conducted on 16 healthy participants using the glucose clamp technique. In one session, they experienced insulin-induced hypoglycemia (plasma glucose at [image…

  7. The relationship between oscillatory EEG activity and the laminar-specific BOLD signal.

    PubMed

    Scheeringa, René; Koopmans, Peter J; van Mourik, Tim; Jensen, Ole; Norris, David G

    2016-06-14

    Electrophysiological recordings in animals have indicated that visual cortex γ-band oscillatory activity is predominantly observed in superficial cortical layers, whereas α- and β-band activity is stronger in deep layers. These rhythms, as well as the different cortical layers, have also been closely related to feedforward and feedback streams of information. Recently, it has become possible to measure laminar activity in humans with high-resolution functional MRI (fMRI). In this study, we investigated whether these different frequency bands show a differential relation with the laminar-resolved blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal by combining data from simultaneously recorded EEG and fMRI from the early visual cortex. Our visual attention paradigm allowed us to investigate how variations in strength over trials and variations in the attention effect over subjects relate to each other in both modalities. We demonstrate that γ-band EEG power correlates positively with the superficial layers' BOLD signal and that β-power is negatively correlated to deep layer BOLD and α-power to both deep and superficial layer BOLD. These results provide a neurophysiological basis for human laminar fMRI and link human EEG and high-resolution fMRI to systems-level neuroscience in animals. PMID:27247416

  8. Arterial spin tagging fMRI in continuous overt speech production compared to BOLD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemeny, Stefan; Ye, Frank; Braun, Allen

    2003-05-01

    Conventional BOLD fMRI has limited use in overt speech paradigms, due to movement and susceptibility artifacts. Our study used an arterial spin-tagging (AST) sequence to quantify focal brain activation in a continuous speech task. Furthermore, we compared the results to conventional BOLD fMRI. The ASSIST sequence was used to obtain transverse perfusion images of the brain, acquired on a 1.5T GE-Signa scanner. Three conditions were alternated in a block design: generation of complete sentences, nonsense syllables and rest with continuous and overt speech production. For 4 normal volunteers, task-related perfusion maps with quantified rCBF and rCBV values were calculated and activations were mapped to the MNI brain. The same paradigm was scanned with BOLD contrast fMRI in separate, independent scans and data from 6 subjects were analyzed using SPM99. Using the AST sequence, we could reliably identify focal brain activation in an overt continuous speech paradigm, and the activations observed were consistent with previous PET studies. We found differential activation at increasing levels of speech production with a focus in the left insula and opercular IFG related to the production of sentences at a syntactic level as opposed to nonsense syllable production. The BOLD technique failed to identify some of these activation foci, possibly due to decreased SNR and artifacts.

  9. A cortical vascular model for examining the specificity of the laminar BOLD signal.

    PubMed

    Markuerkiaga, Irati; Barth, Markus; Norris, David G

    2016-05-15

    Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI has been used for inferring layer specific activation in humans. However, intracortical veins perpendicular to the cortical surface are suspected to degrade the laminar specificity as they drain blood from the microvasculature and BOLD signal is carried over from lower to upper cortical layers on its way to the pial surface. In this work, a vascular model of the cortex is developed to investigate the laminar specificity of the BOLD signal for Spin Echo (SE) and Gradient Echo (GE) following the integrative model presented by Uludağ et al. (2009). The results of the simulation show that the laminar point spread function (PSF) of the BOLD signal presents similar features across all layers. The PSF for SE is highly localised whereas for GE there is a flat tail running to the pial surface, with amplitude less than a quarter of the response from the layer itself. Consequently the GE response at any layer will also contain a contribution accumulated from all lower layers. PMID:26952195

  10. Spatio-Temporal Information Analysis of Event-Related BOLD Responses

    PubMed Central

    Alpert, Galit Fuhrmann; Handwerker, Dan; Sun, Felice T.; D’Esposito, Mark; Knight, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    A new approach for analysis of event related fMRI (BOLD) signals is proposed. The technique is based on measures from information theory and is used both for spatial localization of task related activity, as well as for extracting temporal information regarding the task dependent propagation of activation across different brain regions. This approach enables whole brain visualization of voxels (areas) most involved in coding of a specific task condition, the time at which they are most informative about the condition, as well as their average amplitude at that preferred time. The approach does not require prior assumptions about the shape of the hemodynamic response function (HRF), nor about linear relations between BOLD response and presented stimuli (or task conditions). We show that relative delays between different brain regions can also be computed without prior knowledge of the experimental design, suggesting a general method that could be applied for analysis of differential time delays that occur during natural, uncontrolled conditions. Here we analyze BOLD signals recorded during performance of a motor learning task. We show that during motor learning, the BOLD response of unimodal motor cortical areas precedes the response in higher-order multimodal association areas, including posterior parietal cortex. Brain areas found to be associated with reduced activity during motor learning, predominantly in prefrontal brain regions, are informative about the task typically at significantly later times. PMID:17188515

  11. Using High Spatial Resolution to Improve BOLD fMRI Detection at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Claise, Béatrice; Jean, Betty

    2015-01-01

    For different functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, the acquisition of T2*-weighted scans at a high spatial resolution may be advantageous in terms of time-course signal-to-noise ratio and of BOLD sensitivity when the regions are prone to susceptibility artifacts. In this study, we explore this solution by examining how spatial resolution influences activations elicited when appetizing food pictures are viewed. Twenty subjects were imaged at 3 T with two different voxel volumes, 3.4 μl and 27 μl. Despite the diminution of brain coverage, we found that high-resolution acquisition led to a better detection of activations. Though known to suffer to different degrees from susceptibility artifacts, the activations detected by high spatial resolution were notably consistent with those reported in published activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses, corresponding to taste-responsive regions. Furthermore, these regions were found activated bilaterally, in contrast with previous findings. Both the reduction of partial volume effect, which improves BOLD contrast, and the mitigation of susceptibility artifact, which boosts the signal to noise ratio in certain regions, explained the better detection noted with high resolution. The present study provides further evidences that high spatial resolution is a valuable solution for human BOLD fMRI, especially for studying food-related stimuli. PMID:26550990

  12. Vascular Origins of BOLD and CBV fMRI Signals: Statistical Mapping and Histological Sections Compared.

    PubMed

    Kennerley, Aneurin J; Mayhew, John E; Redgrave, Peter; Berwick, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of 3T blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) activation maps to histological sections enables the spatial discrimination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal changes into different vascular compartments. We use a standard gradient echo-echo planar imaging technique to measure BOLD signal changes in the somatosensory cortex in response to whisker stimulation. Corresponding changes in CBV were estimated following the infusion of a super-paramagnetic contrast agent. We imaged in a tangential imaging plane that covered the cortical surface. Images were associated with post mortem histological sections showing both the surface vasculature and cytochrome oxidase stained whisker barrel cortex. We found a significant BOLD signal change in the large draining veins which occurred in the absence of a corresponding CBV change. Results suggest that in the venous drainage system, ~3mm distant from the area of activity, there is a robust change in blood oxygen saturation with little or no volume change. CBV changes are localised over the somatosensory barrel cortex and overlying arterial supply, supporting the theory that CBV changes are greater in the arterial than in the venous vasculature. This work investigating BOLD signal and underlying hemodynamics provides more information on the vascular origins of these important neuroimaging signals. PMID:20563253

  13. Female mating preference for bold males in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata.

    PubMed Central

    Godin, J G; Dugatkin, L A

    1996-01-01

    Although females prefer to mate with brightly colored males in numerous species, the benefits accruing to such females are virtually unknown. According to one hypothesis of sexual selection theory, if the expression of costly preferred traits in males (such as conspicuous colors) is proportional to the male's overall quality or reveals his quality, a well-developed trait should indicate good condition and/or viability for example. A female choosing such a male would therefore stand to gain direct or indirect fitness benefits, or both. Among potential phenotypic indicators of an individual's quality are the amount and brightness of its carotenoid-based colors and its boldness, as measured by its willingness to risk approaching predators without being killed. Here, we show experimentally that in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata) the visual conspicuousness of the color pattern of males correlates positively with boldness toward, and with escape distance from, a cichlid fish predator. Bold individuals are thus more informed about nearby predators and more likely to survive encounters with them. Mate-choice experiments showed that females prefer colorful males as mates, but prefer bolder males irrespective of their coloration when given the opportunity to observe their behavior toward a potential fish predator. By preferentially mating with colorful males, female guppies are thus choosing on average, relatively bold, and perhaps more viable, individuals. In doing so, and to the extent that viability is heritable, they potentially gain indirect fitness benefits by producing more viable offspring than otherwise. PMID:11607706

  14. Neurochemical and BOLD responses during neuronal activation measured in the human visual cortex at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Bednařík, Petr; Tkáč, Ivan; Giove, Federico; DiNuzzo, Mauro; Deelchand, Dinesh K; Emir, Uzay E; Eberly, Lynn E; Mangia, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Several laboratories have consistently reported small concentration changes in lactate, glutamate, aspartate, and glucose in the human cortex during prolonged stimuli. However, whether such changes correlate with blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) signals have not been determined. The present study aimed at characterizing the relationship between metabolite concentrations and BOLD-fMRI signals during a block-designed paradigm of visual stimulation. Functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (fMRS) and fMRI data were acquired from 12 volunteers. A short echo-time semi-LASER localization sequence optimized for 7 Tesla was used to achieve full signal-intensity MRS data. The group analysis confirmed that during stimulation lactate and glutamate increased by 0.26 ± 0.06 μmol/g (~30%) and 0.28 ± 0.03 μmol/g (~3%), respectively, while aspartate and glucose decreased by 0.20 ± 0.04 μmol/g (~5%) and 0.19 ± 0.03 μmol/g (~16%), respectively. The single-subject analysis revealed that BOLD-fMRI signals were positively correlated with glutamate and lactate concentration changes. The results show a linear relationship between metabolic and BOLD responses in the presence of strong excitatory sensory inputs, and support the notion that increased functional energy demands are sustained by oxidative metabolism. In addition, BOLD signals were inversely correlated with baseline γ-aminobutyric acid concentration. Finally, we discussed the critical importance of taking into account linewidth effects on metabolite quantification in fMRS paradigms. PMID:25564236

  15. Whole brain 3D T2-weighted BOLD fMRI at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jun; Qin, Qin; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Pekar, James J.; Jones, Craig K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A new acquisition scheme for T2-weighted spin-echo BOLD fMRI is introduced. Methods It employs a T2-preparation module to induce BOLD contrast, followed by a single-shot 3D fast gradient-echo readout with short TE. It differs from most spin-echo BOLD sequences in that BOLD contrast is generated before the readout, which eliminates the “dead time” due to long TE required for T2 contrast, and substantially improves acquisition efficiency. This approach, termed “3D T2prep-GRE”, was implemented at 7T with a typical spatial (2.5×2.5×2.5mm3) and temporal (TR=2.3s) resolution for fMRI and whole-brain coverage (55 slices), and compared with the widely used 2D spin-echo EPI sequence. Results In fMRI experiments of simultaneous visual/motor activities, 3D T2prep-GRE showed minimal distortion and little signal dropout across the whole brain. Its lower power deposition allowed greater spatial coverage (55 versus 17 slices with identical TR, resolution and power level), temporal SNR (60% higher) and CNR (35% higher) efficiency than 2D spin-echo EPI. It also showed smaller T2* contamination. Conclusion This approach is expected to be useful for ultra-high field fMRI, especially for regions near air cavities. The concept of using T2-preparation to generate BOLD contrast can be combined with many other sequences at any field strength. PMID:24338901

  16. Variability of the Relationship between Electrophysiology and BOLD-fMRI across Cortical Regions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Christopher R.; Ellmore, Timothy M.; Pieters, Thomas A.; DiSano, Michael A.; Tandon, Nitin

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) signal and the underlying neural electrical activity in humans is a topic of intense interest to systems neuroscience. This relationship has generally been assumed to be invariant regardless of the brain region and the cognitive task being studied. We critically evaluated these assumptions by comparing the BOLD-fMRI response with local field potential (LFP) measurements during visually cued common noun and verb generation in 11 humans in whom 1210 subdural electrodes were implanted. As expected, power in the mid-gamma band (60 –120 Hz) correlated positively (r2 = 0.16, p < 10−16) and power in the beta band (13–30 Hz) correlated negatively (r2 = 0.09, p < 10−16) with the BOLD signal change. Beta and mid-gamma band activity independently explain different components of the observed BOLD signal. Importantly, we found that the location (i.e., lobe) of the recording site modulates the relationship between the electrocorticographic (ECoG) signal and the observed fMRI response (p < 10−16, F21,1830 = 52.7), while the type of language task does not. Across all brain regions, ECoG activity in the gamma and beta bands explains 22% of the fMRI response, but if the lobar location is considered, 28% of the variance can be explained. Further evaluation of this relationship at the level of individual gyri provides additional evidence of differences in the BOLD-LFP relationship by cortical locus. This spatial variability in the relationship between the fMRI signal and neural activity carries implications for modeling of the hemodynamic response function, an essential step for interregional fMRI comparisons. PMID:21900564

  17. Mapping Transient Hyperventilation Induced Alterations with Estimates of the Multi-Scale Dynamics of BOLD Signal

    PubMed Central

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Remes, Jukka; Starck, Tuomo; Nikkinen, Juha; Haapea, Marianne; Silven, Olli; Tervonen, Osmo

    2009-01-01

    Temporal blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast signals in functional MRI during rest may be characterized by power spectral distribution (PSD) trends of the form 1/fα. Trends with 1/f characteristics comprise fractal properties with repeating oscillation patterns in multiple time scales. Estimates of the fractal properties enable the quantification of phenomena that may otherwise be difficult to measure, such as transient, non-linear changes. In this study it was hypothesized that the fractal metrics of 1/f BOLD signal trends can map changes related to dynamic, multi-scale alterations in cerebral blood flow (CBF) after a transient hyperventilation challenge. Twenty-three normal adults were imaged in a resting-state before and after hyperventilation. Different variables (1/f trend constant α, fractal dimension Df, and, Hurst exponent H) characterizing the trends were measured from BOLD signals. The results show that fractal metrics of the BOLD signal follow the fractional Gaussian noise model, even during the dynamic CBF change that follows hyperventilation. The most dominant effect on the fractal metrics was detected in grey matter, in line with previous hyperventilation vaso-reactivity studies. The α was able to differentiate also blood vessels from grey matter changes. Df was most sensitive to grey matter. H correlated with default mode network areas before hyperventilation but this pattern vanished after hyperventilation due to a global increase in H. In the future, resting-state fMRI combined with fractal metrics of the BOLD signal may be used for analyzing multi-scale alterations of cerebral blood flow. PMID:19636388

  18. A quantitative comparison of simultaneous BOLD fMRI and NIRS recordings during functional brain activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, Gary; Culver, Joseph P.; Thompson, John H.; Boas, David A.; Sutton, J. P. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to noninvasively monitor adult human brain function in a wide variety of tasks. While rough spatial correspondences with maps generated from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been found in such experiments, the amplitude correspondences between the two recording modalities have not been fully characterized. To do so, we simultaneously acquired NIRS and blood-oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI data and compared Delta(1/BOLD) (approximately R(2)(*)) to changes in oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentrations derived from the NIRS data from subjects performing a simple motor task. We expected the correlation with deoxyhemoglobin to be strongest, due to the causal relation between changes in deoxyhemoglobin concentrations and BOLD signal. Instead we found highly variable correlations, suggesting the need to account for individual subject differences in our NIRS calculations. We argue that the variability resulted from systematic errors associated with each of the signals, including: (1) partial volume errors due to focal concentration changes, (2) wavelength dependence of this partial volume effect, (3) tissue model errors, and (4) possible spatial incongruence between oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentration changes. After such effects were accounted for, strong correlations were found between fMRI changes and all optical measures, with oxyhemoglobin providing the strongest correlation. Importantly, this finding held even when including scalp, skull, and inactive brain tissue in the average BOLD signal. This may reflect, at least in part, the superior contrast-to-noise ratio for oxyhemoglobin relative to deoxyhemoglobin (from optical measurements), rather than physiology related to BOLD signal interpretation.

  19. BOLD Responses in Human Primary Visual Cortex are Insensitive to Substantial Changes in Neural Activity.

    PubMed

    Swettenham, J B; Muthukumaraswamy, S D; Singh, K D

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between blood oxygenation level dependent-functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) metrics were explored using low-level visual stimuli known to elicit a rich variety of neural responses. Stimuli were either perceptually isoluminant red/green or luminance-modulated black/yellow square-wave gratings with spatial frequencies of 0.5, 3, and 6 cycles per degree. Neural responses were measured with BOLD-fMRI (3-tesla) and whole head MEG. For all stimuli, the BOLD response showed bilateral activation of early visual cortex that was greater in the contralateral hemisphere. There was variation between individuals but weak, or no evidence, of amplitude dependence on either spatial frequency or the presence of luminance contrast. In contrast, beamformer analysis of MEG data showed activation in contralateral early visual cortex and revealed: (i) evoked responses with stimulus-dependent amplitude and latency; (ii) gamma and high-beta oscillations, with spatial frequency dependent peaks at approximately 30 and 50 Hz, but only for luminance-modulated gratings; (iii) The gamma and beta oscillations appeared to show different spatial frequency tuning profiles; (iv) much weaker gamma and beta responses, and at higher oscillation frequencies, for isoluminant compared to luminance-modulated gratings. The results provide further evidence that the relationship between the fMRI-BOLD response and cortical neural activity is complex, with BOLD-fMRI being insensitive to substantial changes in neural activity. All stimuli were clearly visible to participants and so the paucity of gamma oscillations to isoluminant stimuli is inconsistent with theories of their role in conscious visual perception. PMID:23482840

  20. Is behavioral variation along the bold-shy continuum associated with variation in the stress axis in zebrafish?

    PubMed

    Oswald, Mary E; Drew, Robert E; Racine, Matt; Murdoch, Gordon K; Robison, Barrie D

    2012-01-01

    We tested whether boldness is associated with attenuation of the physiological stress response in behaviorally selected lines of zebrafish Danio rerio. We measured three component behaviors of boldness: cortisol levels under control and stressed conditions, growth rate, and expression of key genes linked to the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal axis in the brain. Surprisingly, bold animals did not differ from shy animals with respect to cortisol levels. However, significant differences between these animals in the expression of glucocorticoid receptors and genes that regulate production of stress hormones indicate that there may still be a relationship between bold behavior and the stress axis. Perhaps the most surprising result of this study was the degree of sexual dimorphism: female zebrafish were bolder than male zebrafish, had significantly lower levels of cortisol, and differed significantly in the expression of several genes in the brain. Our data indicate that a bold behavioral type is associated with transcriptional attenuation of stress axis genes, but we do not yet know whether evolution along the bold-shy continuum is attributable to genetic changes in the stress axis. The bold and shy zebrafish lines will be valuable tools for additional research into the relationship between stress and behavior and the mechanisms regulating sexual dimorphism in these traits. PMID:23099468

  1. Inefficient Preparatory fMRI-BOLD Network Activations Predict Working Memory Dysfunctions in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Baenninger, Anja; Diaz Hernandez, Laura; Rieger, Kathryn; Ford, Judith M; Kottlow, Mara; Koenig, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia show abnormal dynamics and structure of temporally -coherent networks (TCNs) assessed using fMRI, which undergo adaptive shifts in preparation for a cognitively demanding task. During working memory (WM) tasks, patients with schizophrenia show persistent deficits in TCNs as well as EEG indices of WM. Studying their temporal relationship during WM tasks might provide novel insights into WM performance deficits seen in schizophrenia. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI data were acquired during the performance of a verbal Sternberg WM task with two load levels (load 2 and load 5) in 17 patients with schizophrenia and 17 matched healthy controls. Using covariance mapping, we investigated the relationship of the activity in the TCNs before the memoranda were encoded and EEG spectral power during the retention interval. We assessed four TCNs - default mode network (DMN), dorsal attention network (dAN), left and right working memory networks (WMNs) - and three EEG bands - theta, alpha, and beta. In healthy controls, there was a load-dependent inverse relation between DMN and frontal midline theta power and an anti-correlation between DMN and dAN. Both effects were not significantly detectable in patients. In addition, healthy controls showed a left-lateralized load-dependent recruitment of the WMNs. Activation of the WMNs was bilateral in patients, suggesting more resources were recruited for successful performance on the WM task. Our findings support the notion of schizophrenia patients showing deviations in their neurophysiological responses before the retention of relevant information in a verbal WM task. Thus, treatment strategies as neurofeedback -targeting prestates could be beneficial as task performance relies on the preparatory state of the brain. PMID:27047395

  2. Inefficient Preparatory fMRI-BOLD Network Activations Predict Working Memory Dysfunctions in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Baenninger, Anja; Diaz Hernandez, Laura; Rieger, Kathryn; Ford, Judith M.; Kottlow, Mara; Koenig, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia show abnormal dynamics and structure of temporally ­coherent networks (TCNs) assessed using fMRI, which undergo adaptive shifts in preparation for a cognitively demanding task. During working memory (WM) tasks, patients with schizophrenia show persistent deficits in TCNs as well as EEG indices of WM. Studying their temporal relationship during WM tasks might provide novel insights into WM performance deficits seen in schizophrenia. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI data were acquired during the performance of a verbal Sternberg WM task with two load levels (load 2 and load 5) in 17 patients with schizophrenia and 17 matched healthy controls. Using covariance mapping, we investigated the relationship of the activity in the TCNs before the memoranda were encoded and EEG spectral power during the retention interval. We assessed four TCNs – default mode network (DMN), dorsal attention network (dAN), left and right working memory networks (WMNs) – and three EEG bands – theta, alpha, and beta. In healthy controls, there was a load-dependent inverse relation between DMN and frontal midline theta power and an anti-correlation between DMN and dAN. Both effects were not significantly detectable in patients. In addition, healthy controls showed a left-lateralized load-dependent recruitment of the WMNs. Activation of the WMNs was bilateral in patients, suggesting more resources were recruited for successful performance on the WM task. Our findings support the notion of schizophrenia patients showing deviations in their neurophysiological responses before the retention of relevant information in a verbal WM task. Thus, treatment strategies as neurofeedback ­targeting prestates could be beneficial as task performance relies on the preparatory state of the brain. PMID:27047395

  3. Load Modulation of BOLD Response and Connectivity Predicts Working Memory Performance in Younger and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Irene E.; Preuschhof, Claudia; Li, Shu-Chen; Nyberg, Lars; Backman, Lars; Lindenberger, Ulman; Heekeren, Hauke R.

    2011-01-01

    Individual differences in working memory (WM) performance have rarely been related to individual differences in the functional responsivity of the WM brain network. By neglecting person-to-person variation, comparisons of network activity between younger and older adults using functional imaging techniques often confound differences in activity…

  4. Increased BOLD Activation to Predator Stressor in Subiculum and Midbrain of Amphetamine-Sensitized Maternal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Febo, Marcelo; Pira, Ashley S.

    2011-01-01

    Amphetamine, which is known to cause sensitization, potentiates the hormonal and neurobiological signatures of stress and may also increase sensitivity to stress-inducing stimuli in limbic areas. Trimethylthiazoline (5 μL TMT) is a chemical constituent of fox feces that evokes innate fear and activates the neuronal and hormonal signatures of stress in rats. We used blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) MRI to test whether amphetamine sensitization (1 mg/kg, i.p. X 3 days) in female rats has a lasting effect on the neural response to a stress-evoking stimulus, the scent of a predator, during the postpartum period. The subiculum and dopamine-enriched midbrain VTA/SN of amphetamine-sensitized, but not control mothers showed a greater BOLD signal response to predator odor than a control putrid scent. The greater responsiveness of these two brain regions following stimulant sensitization might impact neural processing in response to stressors in the maternal brain. PMID:21134359

  5. Increased BOLD activation to predator stressor in subiculum and midbrain of amphetamine-sensitized maternal rats.

    PubMed

    Febo, Marcelo; Pira, Ashley S

    2011-03-25

    Amphetamine, which is known to cause sensitization, potentiates the hormonal and neurobiological signatures of stress and may also increase sensitivity to stress-inducing stimuli in limbic areas. Trimethylthiazoline (5μL TMT) is a chemical constituent of fox feces that evokes innate fear and activates the neuronal and hormonal signatures of stress in rats. We used blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) MRI to test whether amphetamine sensitization (1mg/kg, i.p. ×3days) in female rats has a lasting effect on the neural response to a stress-evoking stimulus, the scent of a predator, during the postpartum period. The subiculum and dopamine-enriched midbrain VTA/SN of amphetamine-sensitized but not control mothers showed a greater BOLD signal response to predator odor than a control putrid scent. The greater responsiveness of these two brain regions following stimulant sensitization might impact neural processing in response to stressors in the maternal brain. PMID:21134359

  6. Bold-line Monte Carlo and the nonequilibrium physics of strongly correlated many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Guy

    2015-03-01

    This talk summarizes real time bold-line diagrammatic Monte-Carlo approaches to quantum impurity models, which make significant headway against the sign problem by summing over corrections to self-consistent diagrammatic expansions rather than a bare diagrammatic series. When the bold-line method is combined with reduced dynamics techniques both local single-time properties and two time correlators such as Green functions can be computed at very long timescales, enabling studies of nonequilibrium steady state behavior of quantum impurity models and creating new solvers for nonequilibrium dynamical mean field theory. This work is supported by NSF DMR 1006282, NSF CHE-1213247, DOE ER 46932, TG-DMR120085 and TG-DMR130036, and the Yad Hanadiv-Rothschild Foundation.

  7. Spiral-in/out BOLD fMRI for increased SNR and reduced susceptibility artifacts.

    PubMed

    Glover, G H; Law, C S

    2001-09-01

    BOLD fMRI is hampered by dropout of signal in the orbitofrontal and parietal brain regions due to magnetic field gradients near air-tissue interfaces. This work reports the use of spiral-in trajectories that begin at the edge of k-space and end at the origin, and spiral in/out trajectories in which a spiral-in readout is followed by a conventional spiral-out trajectory. The spiral-in trajectory reduces the dropout and increases the BOLD contrast. The spiral-in and spiral-out images can be combined in several ways to simultaneously achieve increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and reduced dropout artifacts. Activation experiments employing an olfaction task demonstrate significantly increased activation volumes due to reduced dropout, and overall increased SNR in all regions. PMID:11550244

  8. Fourier power, subjective distance, and object categories all provide plausible models of BOLD responses in scene-selective visual areas

    PubMed Central

    Lescroart, Mark D.; Stansbury, Dustin E.; Gallant, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    Perception of natural visual scenes activates several functional areas in the human brain, including the Parahippocampal Place Area (PPA), Retrosplenial Complex (RSC), and the Occipital Place Area (OPA). It is currently unclear what specific scene-related features are represented in these areas. Previous studies have suggested that PPA, RSC, and/or OPA might represent at least three qualitatively different classes of features: (1) 2D features related to Fourier power; (2) 3D spatial features such as the distance to objects in a scene; or (3) abstract features such as the categories of objects in a scene. To determine which of these hypotheses best describes the visual representation in scene-selective areas, we applied voxel-wise modeling (VM) to BOLD fMRI responses elicited by a set of 1386 images of natural scenes. VM provides an efficient method for testing competing hypotheses by comparing predictions of brain activity based on encoding models that instantiate each hypothesis. Here we evaluated three different encoding models that instantiate each of the three hypotheses listed above. We used linear regression to fit each encoding model to the fMRI data recorded from each voxel, and we evaluated each fit model by estimating the amount of variance it predicted in a withheld portion of the data set. We found that voxel-wise models based on Fourier power or the subjective distance to objects in each scene predicted much of the variance predicted by a model based on object categories. Furthermore, the response variance explained by these three models is largely shared, and the individual models explain little unique variance in responses. Based on an evaluation of previous studies and the data we present here, we conclude that there is currently no good basis to favor any one of the three alternative hypotheses about visual representation in scene-selective areas. We offer suggestions for further studies that may help resolve this issue. PMID:26594164

  9. Repeated BOLD-fMRI imaging of deep brain stimulation responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Chao, Tzu-Hao Harry; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a picture of the global spatial activation pattern of the brain. Interest is growing regarding the application of fMRI to rodent models to investigate adult brain plasticity. To date, most rodent studies used an electrical forepaw stimulation model to acquire fMRI data, with α-chloralose as the anesthetic. However, α-chloralose is harmful to animals, and not suitable for longitudinal studies. Moreover, peripheral stimulation models enable only a limited number of brain regions to be studied. Processing between peripheral regions and the brain is multisynaptic, and renders interpretation difficult and uncertain. In the present study, we combined the medetomidine-based fMRI protocol (a noninvasive rodent fMRI protocol) with chronic implantation of an MRI-compatible stimulation electrode in the ventroposterior (VP) thalamus to repetitively sample thalamocortical responses in the rat brain. Using this model, we scanned the forebrain responses evoked by the VP stimulation repeatedly of individual rats over 1 week. Cortical BOLD responses were compared between the 2 profiles obtained at day1 and day8. We discovered reproducible frequency- and amplitude-dependent BOLD responses in the ipsilateral somatosensory cortex (S1). The S1 BOLD responses during the 2 sessions were conserved in maximal response amplitude, area size (size ratio from 0.88 to 0.91), and location (overlap ratio from 0.61 to 0.67). The present study provides a long-term chronic brain stimulation protocol for studying the plasticity of specific neural circuits in the rodent brain by BOLD-fMRI. PMID:24825464

  10. Electrophysiological correlates of the BOLD signal for EEG-informed fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Murta, Teresa; Leite, Marco; Carmichael, David W; Figueiredo, Patrícia; Lemieux, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are important tools in cognitive and clinical neuroscience. Combined EEG–fMRI has been shown to help to characterise brain networks involved in epileptic activity, as well as in different sensory, motor and cognitive functions. A good understanding of the electrophysiological correlates of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal is necessary to interpret fMRI maps, particularly when obtained in combination with EEG. We review the current understanding of electrophysiological–haemodynamic correlates, during different types of brain activity. We start by describing the basic mechanisms underlying EEG and BOLD signals and proceed by reviewing EEG-informed fMRI studies using fMRI to map specific EEG phenomena over the entire brain (EEG–fMRI mapping), or exploring a range of EEG-derived quantities to determine which best explain colocalised BOLD fluctuations (local EEG–fMRI coupling). While reviewing studies of different forms of brain activity (epileptic and nonepileptic spontaneous activity; cognitive, sensory and motor functions), a significant attention is given to epilepsy because the investigation of its haemodynamic correlates is the most common application of EEG-informed fMRI. Our review is focused on EEG-informed fMRI, an asymmetric approach of data integration. We give special attention to the invasiveness of electrophysiological measurements and the simultaneity of multimodal acquisitions because these methodological aspects determine the nature of the conclusions that can be drawn from EEG-informed fMRI studies. We emphasise the advantages of, and need for, simultaneous intracranial EEG–fMRI studies in humans, which recently became available and hold great potential to improve our understanding of the electrophysiological correlates of BOLD fluctuations. PMID:25277370

  11. Laminar analysis of 7 T BOLD using an imposed spatial activation pattern in human V1

    PubMed Central

    Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Fischl, Bruce; Greve, Douglas N.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2010-01-01

    With sufficient image encoding, high-resolution fMRI studies are limited by the biological point-spread of the hemodynamic signal. The extent of this spread is determined by the local vascular distribution and by the spatial specificity of blood flow regulation, as well as by measurement parameters that (i) alter the relative sensitivity of the acquisition to activation-induced hemodynamic changes and (ii) determine the image contrast as a function of vessel size. In particular, large draining vessels on the cortical surface are a major contributor to both the BOLD signal change and to the spatial bias of the BOLD activation away from the site of neuronal activity. In this work, we introduce a laminar surface-based analysis method and study the relationship between spatial localization and activation strength as a function of laminar depth by acquiring 1 mm isotropic, single-shot EPI at 7 T and sampling the BOLD signal exclusively from the superficial, middle, or deep cortical laminae. We show that highly-accelerated EPI can limit image distortions to the point where a boundary-based registration algorithm accurately aligns the EPI data to the surface reconstruction. The spatial spread of the BOLD response tangential to the cortical surface was analyzed as a function of cortical depth using our surface-based analysis. Although sampling near the pial surface provided the highest signal strength, it also introduced the most spatial error. Thus, avoiding surface laminae improved spatial localization by about 40% at a cost of 36% in z-statistic, implying that optimal spatial resolution in functional imaging of the cortex can be achieved using anatomically-informed spatial sampling to avoid large pial vessels. PMID:20460157

  12. Pitfalls in Fractal Time Series Analysis: fMRI BOLD as an Exemplary Case

    PubMed Central

    Eke, Andras; Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Mukli, Peter; Nagy, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    This article will be positioned on our previous work demonstrating the importance of adhering to a carefully selected set of criteria when choosing the suitable method from those available ensuring its adequate performance when applied to real temporal signals, such as fMRI BOLD, to evaluate one important facet of their behavior, fractality. Earlier, we have reviewed on a range of monofractal tools and evaluated their performance. Given the advance in the fractal field, in this article we will discuss the most widely used implementations of multifractal analyses, too. Our recommended flowchart for the fractal characterization of spontaneous, low frequency fluctuations in fMRI BOLD will be used as the framework for this article to make certain that it will provide a hands-on experience for the reader in handling the perplexed issues of fractal analysis. The reason why this particular signal modality and its fractal analysis has been chosen was due to its high impact on today’s neuroscience given it had powerfully emerged as a new way of interpreting the complex functioning of the brain (see “intrinsic activity”). The reader will first be presented with the basic concepts of mono and multifractal time series analyses, followed by some of the most relevant implementations, characterization by numerical approaches. The notion of the dichotomy of fractional Gaussian noise and fractional Brownian motion signal classes and their impact on fractal time series analyses will be thoroughly discussed as the central theme of our application strategy. Sources of pitfalls and way how to avoid them will be identified followed by a demonstration on fractal studies of fMRI BOLD taken from the literature and that of our own in an attempt to consolidate the best practice in fractal analysis of empirical fMRI BOLD signals mapped throughout the brain as an exemplary case of potentially wide interest. PMID:23227008

  13. Early suppressive mechanisms and the negative BOLD response in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Alex R.; Rowland, Jess

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of early sensory cortex often measure stimulus-driven increases in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal. However, these positive responses are frequently accompanied by reductions in the BOLD signal in adjacent regions of cortex. Although this negative BOLD response (NBR) is thought to result from neuronal suppression, the precise relationship between local activity, suppression and perception remains unknown. By measuring BOLD signals in human primary visual cortex while varying the baseline contrast levels in the region affected by the NBR, we tested three physiologically-plausible computational models of neuronal modulation which could explain this phenomenon: a subtractive model, a response gain model and a contrast gain model. We also measured the ability of isoluminant contrast to generate an NBR. We show that the NBR can be modeled as a pathway-specific contrast gain modulation that is strongest outside the fovea. We found a similar spatial bias in a psychophysical study using identical stimuli, although these data indicated a response- rather than a contrast-gain mechanism. We reconcile these findings by proposing 1) that the NBR is associated with a long-range suppressive mechanism that hyperpolarizes a subset of magnocellularly-driven neurons at the input to V1; 2) that this suppression is broadly-tuned to match the spatial features of the mask region; 3) that increasing the baseline contrast in the suppressed region drives all neurons in the input layer, reducing the relative contribution of the suppressing subpopulation in the fMRI signal. PMID:20371821

  14. A NO way to BOLD? Dietary nitrate alters the hemodynamic response to visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Ho, Yi-Ching Lynn; Møller, Arne; Roepstorff, Andreas; Lund, Torben E

    2013-12-01

    Neurovascular coupling links neuronal activity to vasodilation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent vasodilator, and in neurovascular coupling NO production from NO synthases plays an important role. However, another pathway for NO production also exists, namely the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. On this basis, we hypothesized that dietary nitrate (NO3-) could influence the brain's hemodynamic response to neuronal stimulation. In the present study, 20 healthy male participants were given either sodium nitrate (NaNO3) or sodium chloride (NaCl) (saline placebo) in a crossover study and were shown visual stimuli based on the retinotopic characteristics of the visual cortex. Our primary measure of the hemodynamic response was the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (0.64×0.64×1.8 mm) in the visual cortex. From this response, we made a direct estimate of key parameters characterizing the shape of the BOLD response (i.e. lag and amplitude). During elevated nitrate intake, corresponding to the nitrate content of a large plate of salad, both the hemodynamic lag and the BOLD amplitude decreased significantly (7.0±2% and 7.9±4%, respectively), and the variation across activated voxels of both measures decreased (12.3±4% and 15.3±7%, respectively). The baseline cerebral blood flow was not affected by nitrate. Our experiments demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary nitrate may modulate the local cerebral hemodynamic response to stimuli. A faster and smaller BOLD response, with less variation across local cortex, is consistent with an enhanced hemodynamic coupling during elevated nitrate intake. These findings suggest that dietary patterns, via the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, may be a potential way to affect key properties of neurovascular coupling. This could have major clinical implications, which remain to be explored. PMID:23827330

  15. Teacherpreneurs: a bold brand of teacher leadership for 21st-century teaching and learning.

    PubMed

    Berry, Barnett

    2013-04-19

    Challenges facing our public schools demand a bold brand of teacher leadership. Teacherpreneurs, effective teachers who teach students regularly but also incubate and execute the kinds of policies and pedagogies students deserve, represent a new culture of training and ingenuity. Teachers who lead outside the classroom but do not lose their connection to students are best positioned to develop and disseminate best policies and practices for 21st-century teaching and learning. PMID:23599480

  16. Repeated BOLD-fMRI Imaging of Deep Brain Stimulation Responses in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Tzu-Hao Harry; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a picture of the global spatial activation pattern of the brain. Interest is growing regarding the application of fMRI to rodent models to investigate adult brain plasticity. To date, most rodent studies used an electrical forepaw stimulation model to acquire fMRI data, with α-chloralose as the anesthetic. However, α-chloralose is harmful to animals, and not suitable for longitudinal studies. Moreover, peripheral stimulation models enable only a limited number of brain regions to be studied. Processing between peripheral regions and the brain is multisynaptic, and renders interpretation difficult and uncertain. In the present study, we combined the medetomidine-based fMRI protocol (a noninvasive rodent fMRI protocol) with chronic implantation of an MRI-compatible stimulation electrode in the ventroposterior (VP) thalamus to repetitively sample thalamocortical responses in the rat brain. Using this model, we scanned the forebrain responses evoked by the VP stimulation repeatedly of individual rats over 1 week. Cortical BOLD responses were compared between the 2 profiles obtained at day1 and day8. We discovered reproducible frequency- and amplitude-dependent BOLD responses in the ipsilateral somatosensory cortex (S1). The S1 BOLD responses during the 2 sessions were conserved in maximal response amplitude, area size (size ratio from 0.88 to 0.91), and location (overlap ratio from 0.61 to 0.67). The present study provides a long-term chronic brain stimulation protocol for studying the plasticity of specific neural circuits in the rodent brain by BOLD-fMRI. PMID:24825464

  17. Functional MRI during hyperbaric oxygen: Effects of oxygen on neurovascular coupling and BOLD fMRI signals.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Damon P; Muir, Eric R; Huang, Shiliang; Boley, Angela; Lodge, Daniel; Duong, Timothy Q

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy is used to treat a number of ailments. Improved understanding of how HBO affects neuronal activity, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) changes could shed light on the role of oxygen in neurovascular coupling and help guide HBO treatments. The goal of this study was to test two hypotheses: i) activation-induced CBF fMRI response is not dependent on hemoglobin deoxygenation, and ii) activation-induced BOLD fMRI is markedly attenuated under HBO. CBF and BOLD fMRI of forepaw stimulation in anesthetized rats under HBO at 3 atmospheres absolute (ATA) were compared with normobaric air. Robust BOLD and CBF fMRI were detected under HBO. Inflow effects and spin-density changes did not contribute significantly to the BOLD fMRI signal under HBO. Analysis of the T2(⁎)-weighted signal at normobaric air and 1, 2 and 3ATA oxygen in the tissue and the superior sagittal sinus showed a strong dependence on increasing inhaled [O2]. Spontaneous electrophysiological activity and evoked local-field potentials were reduced under HBO. The differences between normobaric air and HBO in basal and evoked electrical activity could not fully account for the strong BOLD responses under HBO. We concluded that activation-induced CBF regulation in the brain does not operate through an oxygen-sensing mechanism and that stimulus-evoked BOLD responses and the venous T2(⁎)-weighted signals still have room to increase under 3ATA HBO. To our knowledge, this is the first fMRI study under HBO, providing insights into the effects of HBO on neural activity, neurovascular coupling, tissue oxygenation, and the BOLD signal. PMID:26143203

  18. Fluoxetine exposure impacts boldness in female Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Dzieweczynski, Teresa L; Kane, Jessica L; Campbell, Brennah A; Lavin, Lindsey E

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, on the behavior of female Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens, in three different boldness assays (Empty Tank, Novel Environment, Social Tendency). When females were unexposed to fluoxetine, boldness was consistent within a context and correlated across assays. Fluoxetine exposure affected behavior within and among individuals on multiple levels. Exposure reduced overall boldness levels, made females behave in a less consistent manner, and significantly reduced correlations over time and across contexts. Fluoxetine exerted its effects on female Betta splendens behavior in a dose-dependent fashion and these effects persisted even after females were housed in clean water. If fluoxetine exposure impacts behaviors such as exploration that are necessary to an individual’s success, this may yield evolutionary consequences. In conclusion, the results show that fluoxetine exposure alters behavior beyond the level of overall response and highlights the importance of studying the behavioral effects of inadvertent pharmaceutical exposure in multiple contexts and with different dosing regimes. PMID:26462842

  19. Dose-dependent fluoxetine effects on boldness in male Siamese fighting fish.

    PubMed

    Dzieweczynski, Teresa L; Campbell, Brennah A; Kane, Jessica L

    2016-03-01

    As the use of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) continues to rise, these compounds enter the environment in increasing frequency. One such PPCP, fluoxetine, has been found in detectable amounts in aquatic ecosystems worldwide, where it may interfere with the behavior of exposed organisms. Fluoxetine exposure has been found to influence boldness and exploration in a range of fish species; however, how it might alter behavior in multiple contexts or over time is rarely examined. To this end, the effects of fluoxetine on boldness over time were studied in male Siamese fighting fish. Three different groups of males (0, 0.5 and 5 µg l(-1) fluoxetine) were tested in multiple boldness assays (empty tank, novel environment and shoal) once a week for 3 weeks to collect baseline measures and then at three different time points post-exposure. The effects of these varying exposure amounts on behavior were then examined for overall response, consistency and across-context correlations. Unexposed males were bolder in all contexts, were more consistent within a context, and had stronger between-context correlations than exposed males. Fluoxetine had dose-dependent effects on behavior, as males that received the higher dose exhibited greater behavioral effects. This study stresses the potential fitness consequences of fluoxetine exposure and suggests that examining behavioral effects of PPCPs under different dosing regimens and in multiple contexts is important to gain an increased understanding of how exposure affects behavior. PMID:26985051

  20. fMRI at High Spatial Resolution: Implications for BOLD-Models

    PubMed Central

    Goense, Jozien; Bohraus, Yvette; Logothetis, Nikos K.

    2016-01-01

    As high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and fMRI of cortical layers become more widely used, the question how well high-resolution fMRI signals reflect the underlying neural processing, and how to interpret laminar fMRI data becomes more and more relevant. High-resolution fMRI has shown laminar differences in cerebral blood flow (CBF), volume (CBV), and neurovascular coupling. Features and processes that were previously lumped into a single voxel become spatially distinct at high resolution. These features can be vascular compartments such as veins, arteries, and capillaries, or cortical layers and columns, which can have differences in metabolism. Mesoscopic models of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response therefore need to be expanded, for instance, to incorporate laminar differences in the coupling between neural activity, metabolism and the hemodynamic response. Here we discuss biological and methodological factors that affect the modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI data. We also illustrate with examples from neuropharmacology and the negative BOLD response how combining BOLD with CBF- and CBV-based fMRI methods can provide additional information about neurovascular coupling, and can aid modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI. PMID:27445782

  1. fMRI at High Spatial Resolution: Implications for BOLD-Models.

    PubMed

    Goense, Jozien; Bohraus, Yvette; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2016-01-01

    As high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and fMRI of cortical layers become more widely used, the question how well high-resolution fMRI signals reflect the underlying neural processing, and how to interpret laminar fMRI data becomes more and more relevant. High-resolution fMRI has shown laminar differences in cerebral blood flow (CBF), volume (CBV), and neurovascular coupling. Features and processes that were previously lumped into a single voxel become spatially distinct at high resolution. These features can be vascular compartments such as veins, arteries, and capillaries, or cortical layers and columns, which can have differences in metabolism. Mesoscopic models of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response therefore need to be expanded, for instance, to incorporate laminar differences in the coupling between neural activity, metabolism and the hemodynamic response. Here we discuss biological and methodological factors that affect the modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI data. We also illustrate with examples from neuropharmacology and the negative BOLD response how combining BOLD with CBF- and CBV-based fMRI methods can provide additional information about neurovascular coupling, and can aid modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI. PMID:27445782

  2. Prospective active marker motion correction improves statistical power in BOLD fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Melvyn B.; Goldman, Robin I.; Krueger, Sascha; Thomas, William J.; Sajda, Paul; Brown, Truman R.

    2013-01-01

    Group level statistical maps of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals acquired using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have become a basic measurement for much of systems, cognitive and social neuroscience. A challenge in making inferences from these statistical maps is the noise and potential confounds that arise from the head motion that occurs within and between acquisition volumes. This motion results in the scan plane being misaligned during acquisition, ultimately leading to reduced statistical power when maps are constructed at the group level. In most cases, an attempt is made to correct for this motion through the use of retrospective analysis methods. In this paper, we use a prospective active marker motion correction (PRAMMO) system that uses radio frequency markers for real-time tracking of motion, enabling on-line slice plane correction. We show that the statistical power of the activation maps is substantially increased using PRAMMO compared to conventional retrospective correction. Analysis of our results indicates that the PRAMMO acquisition reduces the variance without decreasing the signal component of the BOLD (beta). Using PRAMMO could thus improve the overall statistical power of fMRI based BOLD measurements, leading to stronger inferences of the nature of processing in the human brain. PMID:23220430

  3. Clinical utility of BOLD fMRI in preoperative work-up of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Karthik; Ursekar, Meher

    2014-01-01

    Surgical techniques have emerged as a viable therapeutic option in patients with drug refractory epilepsy. Pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy requires a comprehensive, multiparametric, and multimodal approach for precise localization of the epileptogenic focus. Various non-invasive techniques are available at the disposal of the treating physician to detect the epileptogenic focus, which include electroencephalography (EEG), video-EEG, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional MRI including blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) techniques, single photon emission tomography (SPECT), and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Currently, non-invasive high-resolution MR imaging techniques play pivotal roles in the preoperative detection of the seizure focus, and represent the foundation for successful epilepsy surgery. BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps allow for precise localization of the eloquent cortex in relation to the seizure focus. This review article focuses on the clinical utility of BOLD (fMRI) in the pre-surgical work-up of epilepsy patients. PMID:24851002

  4. Fourier modeling of the BOLD response to a breath-hold task: Optimization and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Joana; Jorge, João; Sousa, Inês; Vilela, Pedro; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2016-07-15

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) reflects the capacity of blood vessels to adjust their caliber in order to maintain a steady supply of brain perfusion, and it may provide a sensitive disease biomarker. Measurement of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response to a hypercapnia-inducing breath-hold (BH) task has been frequently used to map CVR noninvasively using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, the best modeling approach for the accurate quantification of CVR maps remains an open issue. Here, we compare and optimize Fourier models of the BOLD response to a BH task with a preparatory inspiration, and assess the test-retest reproducibility of the associated CVR measurements, in a group of 10 healthy volunteers studied over two fMRI sessions. Linear combinations of sine-cosine pairs at the BH task frequency and its successive harmonics were added sequentially in a nested models approach, and were compared in terms of the adjusted coefficient of determination and corresponding variance explained (VE) of the BOLD signal, as well as the number of voxels exhibiting significant BOLD responses, the estimated CVR values, and their test-retest reproducibility. The brain average VE increased significantly with the Fourier model order, up to the 3rd order. However, the number of responsive voxels increased significantly only up to the 2nd order, and started to decrease from the 3rd order onwards. Moreover, no significant relative underestimation of CVR values was observed beyond the 2nd order. Hence, the 2nd order model was concluded to be the optimal choice for the studied paradigm. This model also yielded the best test-retest reproducibility results, with intra-subject coefficients of variation of 12 and 16% and an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.74. In conclusion, our results indicate that a Fourier series set consisting of a sine-cosine pair at the BH task frequency and its two harmonics is a suitable model for BOLD-fMRI CVR measurements

  5. Removing motion and physiological artifacts from intrinsic BOLD fluctuations using short echo data.

    PubMed

    Bright, Molly G; Murphy, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Differing noise variance across study populations has been shown to cause artifactual group differences in functional connectivity measures. In this study, we investigate the use of short echo time functional MRI data to correct for these noise sources in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD)-weighted time series. A dual-echo sequence was used to simultaneously acquire data at both a short (TE=3.3 ms) and a BOLD-weighted (TE=35 ms) echo time. This approach is effectively "free," using dead-time in the pulse sequence to collect an additional echo without affecting overall scan time or temporal resolution. The proposed correction method uses voxelwise regression of the short TE data from the BOLD-weighted data to remove noise variance. In addition to a typical resting state scan, non-compliant behavior associated with patient groups was simulated via increased head motion or physiological fluctuations in 10 subjects. Short TE data showed significant correlations with the traditional motion-related and physiological noise regressors used in current connectivity analyses. Following traditional preprocessing, the extent of significant additional variance explained by the short TE data regressors was significantly correlated with the average head motion across the scan in the resting data (r(2)=0.93, p<0.0001). The reduction in data variance following the inclusion of short TE regressors was also correlated with scan head motion (r(2)=0.48, p=0.027). Task-related data were used to demonstrate the effects of the short TE correction on BOLD activation time series with known temporal structure; the size and strength of the activation were significantly decreased, but it is not clear whether this reflects BOLD contamination in the short TE data or correlated changes in blood volume. Finally, functional connectivity maps of the default mode network were constructed using a seed correlation approach. The effects of short TE correction and low-pass filtering on the resulting

  6. Sex-Differences and Temporal Consistency in Stickleback Fish Boldness

    PubMed Central

    King, Andrew J.; Fürtbauer, Ines; Mamuneas, Diamanto; James, Charlotte; Manica, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural traits that co-vary across contexts or situations often reflect fundamental trade-offs which individuals experience in different contexts (e.g. fitness trade-offs between exploration and predation risk). Since males tend to experience greater variance in reproductive success than females, there may be considerable fitness benefits associated with “bolder” behavioural types, but only recently have researchers begun to consider sex-specific and life-history strategies associated with these. Here we test the hypothesis that male three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) show high risk but potentially high return behaviours compared to females. According to this hypothesis we predicted that male fish would show greater exploration of their environment in a foraging context, and be caught sooner by an experimenter than females. We found that the time fish spent out of cover exploring their environment was correlated over two days, and males spent significantly more time out of cover than females. Also, the order in which fish were net-caught from their holding aquarium by an experimenter prior to experiments was negatively correlated with the time spent out of cover during tests, and males tended to be caught sooner than females. Moreover, we found a positive correlation between the catch number prior to our experiments and nine months after, pointing towards consistent, long-term individual differences in behaviour. PMID:24324664

  7. A BOLD Perspective on Age-Related Neurometabolic-Flow Coupling and Neural Efficiency Changes in Human Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Joanna Lynn; Shokri-Kojori, Ehsan; Lu, Hanzhang; Rypma, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Age-related performance declines in visual tasks have been attributed to reductions in processing efficiency. The neural basis of these declines has been explored by comparing the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) index of neural activity in older and younger adults during visual task performance. However, neural activity is one of many factors that change with age and lead to BOLD signal differences. We investigated the origin of age-related BOLD changes by comparing blood flow and oxygen metabolic constituents of BOLD signal. Subjects periodically viewed flickering annuli and pressed a button when detecting luminance changes in a central fixation cross. Using magnetic resonance dual-echo arterial spin labeling and CO2 ingestion, we observed age-equivalent (i.e., similar in older and younger groups) fractional cerebral blood flow (ΔCBF) in the presence of age-related increases in fractional cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (ΔCMRO2). Reductions in ΔCBF responsiveness to increased ΔCMRO2 in elderly led to paradoxical age-related BOLD decreases. Age-related ΔCBF/ΔCMRO2 ratio decreases were associated with reaction times, suggesting that age-related slowing resulted from less efficient neural activity. We hypothesized that reduced vascular responsiveness to neural metabolic demand would lead to a reduction in ΔCBF/ΔCMRO2. A simulation of BOLD relative to ΔCMRO2 for lower and higher neurometabolic-flow coupling ratios (approximating those for old and young, respectively) indicated less BOLD signal change in old than young in relatively lower CMRO2 ranges, as well as greater BOLD signal change in young compared to old in relatively higher CMRO2 ranges. These results suggest that age-comparative studies relying on BOLD signal might be misinterpreted, as age-related BOLD changes do not merely reflect neural activity changes. Age-related declines in neurometabolic-flow coupling might lead to neural efficiency reductions that can adversely affect visual task

  8. Decoding neural events from fMRI BOLD signal: A comparison of existing approaches and development of a new algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Keith; Cisler, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging methodology predominantly relies on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal. While the BOLD signal is a valid measure of neuronal activity, variance in fluctuations of the BOLD signal are not only due to fluctuations in neural activity. Thus, a remaining problem in neuroimaging analyses is developing methods that ensure specific inferences about neural activity that are not confounded by unrelated sources of noise in the BOLD signal. Here, we develop and test a new algorithm for performing semi-blind (i.e., no knowledge of stimulus timings) deconvolution of the BOLD signal that treats the neural event as an observable, but intermediate, probabilistic representation of the system’s state. We test and compare this new algorithm against three other recent deconvolution algorithms under varied levels of autocorrelated and Gaussian noise, hemodynamic response function (HRF) misspecification, and observation sampling rate (i.e., TR). Further, we compare the algorithms’ performance using two models to simulate BOLD data: a convolution of neural events with a known (or misspecified) HRF versus a biophysically accurate balloon model of hemodynamics. We also examine the algorithms’ performance on real task data. The results demonstrated good performance of all algorithms, though the new algorithm generally outperformed the others (3.0% improvement) under simulated resting state experimental conditions exhibiting multiple, realistic confounding factors (as well as 10.3% improvement on a real Stroop task). The simulations also demonstrate that the greatest negative influence on deconvolution accuracy is observation sampling rate. Practical and theoretical implications of these results for improving inferences about neural activity from fMRI BOLD signal are discussed. PMID:23602664

  9. Bold ideas shortlisted for future ESA science projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    nature of empty space. Quantum theory implies that even a perfect vacuum is not really empty but seethes with short-lived particles and forces. Half a century ago, the Dutch physicist Hendrik Casimir predicted that this hidden nature of the vacuum should reveal itself by a novel force between two metal plates. The proposal is to measure the Casimir force between superconducting surfaces a hundredth of a millimetre apart, a million times more accurately than has been done on the ground. Finally, one of the proposed projects is astronomical. EDDINGTON would take up a station far from the Earth and use a 1-metre telescope with a wide field of view to examine stars for oscillations and passing planets. Oscillations due to sound waves have already revealed many features of the Sun's interior, allowing astrophysicists to check their theories about how stars work, in the nearest case. Now astronomers are beginning to use the same method in other stars, and EDDINGTON would apply it to 50,000 stars of many different kinds. It would also check 700,000 stars for the presence of planets, revealed by a dip in the brightness of a star when a planet passes in front of it. In addition to the above mentioned proposals, SSAC recommended to study three proposals for accommodation on the International Space Station (ISS): * EUSO, study of the cosmic neutrinos and extremely high energy cosmic rays, * LOBSTER, an imaging all-sky X-Ray monitor; MOSS, studying the physics of superconducting ultra-stable microwave oscillators. "As is always the case, these exciting proposals give us an embarrassment of riches," comments Roger Bonnet, ESA's director of science. "That's thanks to the vigour and imagination of Europe's space science community".

  10. Role of 3T multiparametric-MRI with BOLD hypoxia imaging for diagnosis and post therapy response evaluation of postoperative recurrent cervical cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Abhishek; Engineer, Reena; Chopra, Supriya; Mahanshetty, Umesh; Juvekar, S.L.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Desekar, Naresh; Thakur, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the diagnostic value of multiparametric-MRI (MPMRI) with hypoxia imaging as a functional marker for characterizing and detecting vaginal vault/local recurrence following primary surgery for cervical cancer. Methods With institutional review board approval and written informed consent 30 women (median age: 45 years) from October 2009 to March 2010 with previous operated carcinoma cervix and suspected clinical vaginal vault/local recurrence were examined with 3.0T-MRI. MRI imaging included conventional and MPMRI sequences [dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE), diffusion weighted (DW), 1H-MR spectroscopy (1HMRS), blood oxygen level dependent hypoxia imaging (BOLD)]. Two radiologists, blinded to pathologic findings, independently assessed the pretherapy MRI findings and then correlated it with histopathology findings. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and their confidence intervals were calculated. The pre and post therapy conventional and MPMRI parameters were analyzed and correlated with response to therapy. Results Of the 30 patients, there were 24 recurrent tumors and 6 benign lesions. The accuracy of diagnosing recurrent vault lesions was highest at combined MPMRI and conventional MRI (100%) than at conventional-MRI (70%) or MPMRI (96.7%) alone. Significant correlation was seen between percentage tumor regression and pre-treatment parameters such as negative enhancement integral (NEI) (p = 0.02), the maximum slope (p = 0.04), mADC value (p = 0.001) and amount of hypoxic fraction on the pretherapy MRI (p = 0.01). Conclusion Conventional-MR with MPMRI significantly increases the diagnostic accuracy for suspected vaginal vault/local recurrence. Post therapy serial MPMRI with hypoxia imaging follow-up objectively documents the response. MPMRI and BOLD hypoxia imaging provide information regarding tumor biology at the molecular, subcellular, cellular and tissue levels and this information may be used

  11. Dictionary-Driven Ischemia Detection From Cardiac Phase-Resolved Myocardial BOLD MRI at Rest.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Marco; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Phase-resolved Blood-Oxygen-Level Dependent (CP-BOLD) MRI provides a unique opportunity to image an ongoing ischemia at rest. However, it requires post-processing to evaluate the extent of ischemia. To address this, here we propose an unsupervised ischemia detection (UID) method which relies on the inherent spatio-temporal correlation between oxygenation and wall motion to formalize a joint learning and detection problem based on dictionary decomposition. Considering input data of a single subject, it treats ischemia as an anomaly and iteratively learns dictionaries to represent only normal observations (corresponding to myocardial territories remote to ischemia). Anomaly detection is based on a modified version of One-class Support Vector Machines (OCSVM) to regulate directly the margins by incorporating the dictionary-based representation errors. A measure of ischemic extent (IE) is estimated, reflecting the relative portion of the myocardium affected by ischemia. For visualization purposes an ischemia likelihood map is created by estimating posterior probabilities from the OCSVM outputs, thus obtaining how likely the classification is correct. UID is evaluated on synthetic data and in a 2D CP-BOLD data set from a canine experimental model emulating acute coronary syndromes. Comparing early ischemic territories identified with UID against infarct territories (after several hours of ischemia), we find that IE, as measured by UID, is highly correlated (Pearson's r=0.84) with respect to infarct size. When advances in automated registration and segmentation of CP-BOLD images and full coverage 3D acquisitions become available, we hope that this method can enable pixel-level assessment of ischemia with this truly non-invasive imaging technique. PMID:26292338

  12. The Relevance of Interictal Bold Changes to Lateralize Seizure Focus Using Simultaneous EEG-fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Mangalore, Sandhya; Bharath, Rose Dawn; Upadhyay, Neeraj; Chaitanya, Ganne; Panda, Rajanikanth; Gupta, AK; Chandra, P Satish; Rao, Malla Bhaskar; Mahadevan, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The main challenge in assessing patients with epilepsy is the localization of neuronal networks involved in seizure generation and the lateralization of seizure onset. Electro encephalogram-functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) is a noninvasive multimodal imaging technique for epilepsies where the data is acquired based on the interictal epileptiform discharges (IED). Since this is a new technique, the specificity for lateralizing epileptic focus is yet to be established. The peak blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in an interictal recording is known to correlate with seizure onset focus. In this study we are proposing a simple and practical method without the need for high end post processing techniques of fmri data. The peak BOLD signal derived from EEG-fMRI aids to lateralise seizure focus in a given cerebral lobe (region of interest, ROI). This is a very useful tool in a clinical setting on a given individual clinical case, when other modalities may be conflicting or inconclusive. Methods: We analyzed simultaneous EEG-fMRI of 10 different types of refractory epilepsy. The lateralization index was calculated from the statistical significant clusters obtained between the different ROI and results were validated with other modalities. Results: Lateralization of seizure focus corroborated well in temporal and extratemporal lobe epilepsy, reflex epilepsy and lesional epilepsy. The only drawback of EEG-fMRI in our study was if insignificant BOLD changes were associated with the given IED. Conclusions: EEG-fMRI can be helpful additional tool in the pre-surgical work-up of refractory epilepsy particularly when lateralization with other modalities is conflicting or inconclusive. PMID:26819937

  13. Test-retest reliability of evoked heat stimulation BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Lemme, Jordan; Anderson, Julie; Bleakman, David; Large, Thomas; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L; Hargreaves, Richard; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2015-09-30

    To date, the blood oxygenated-level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique has enabled an objective and deeper understanding of pain processing mechanisms embedded within the human central nervous system (CNS). In order to further comprehend the benefits and limitations of BOLD fMRI in the context of pain as well as the corresponding subjective pain ratings, we evaluated the univariate response, test-retest reliability and confidence intervals (CIs) at the 95% level of both data types collected during evoked stimulation of 40°C (non-noxious), 44°C (mildly noxious) and a subject-specific temperature eliciting a 7/10 pain rating. The test-retest reliability between two scanning sessions was determined by calculating group-level interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and at the single-subject level. Across the three stimuli, we initially observed a graded response of increasing magnitude for both VAS (visual analog score) pain ratings and fMRI data. Test-retest reliability was observed to be highest for VAS pain ratings obtained during the 7/10 pain stimulation (ICC=0.938), while ICC values of pain fMRI data for a distribution of CNS structures ranged from 0.5 to 0.859 (p<0.05). Importantly, the upper and lower confidence interval CI bounds reported herein could be utilized in subsequent trials involving healthy volunteers to hypothesize the magnitude of effect required to overcome inherent variability of either VAS pain ratings or BOLD responses evoked during innocuous or noxious thermal stimulation. PMID:26072245

  14. BOLD VENTURE COMPUTATION SYSTEM for nuclear reactor core analysis, Version III

    SciTech Connect

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.; Cunningham, G.W. III.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a condensed documentation for VERSION III of the BOLD VENTURE COMPUTATION SYSTEM for nuclear reactor core analysis. An experienced analyst should be able to use this system routinely for solving problems by referring to this document. Individual reports must be referenced for details. This report covers basic input instructions and describes recent extensions to the modules as well as to the interface data file specifications. Some application considerations are discussed and an elaborate sample problem is used as an instruction aid. Instructions for creating the system on IBM computers are also given.

  15. Distinct BOLD Activation Profiles Following Central and Peripheral Oxytocin Administration in Awake Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Craig F.; Yee, Jason R.; Kenkel, William M.; Dumais, Kelly Marie; Moore, Kelsey; Veenema, Alexa H.; Kulkarni, Praveen; Perkybile, Allison M.; Carter, C. Sue

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature has suggested that intranasal oxytocin (OT) or other systemic routes of administration can alter prosocial behavior, presumably by directly activating OT sensitive neural circuits in the brain. Yet there is no clear evidence that OT given peripherally can cross the blood–brain barrier at levels sufficient to engage the OT receptor. To address this issue we examined changes in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity in response to peripheral OT injections (0.1, 0.5, or 2.5 mg/kg) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in awake rats imaged at 7.0 T. These data were compared to OT (1 μg/5 μl) given directly to the brain via the lateral cerebroventricle. Using a 3D annotated MRI atlas of the rat brain segmented into 171 brain areas and computational analysis, we reconstructed the distributed integrated neural circuits identified with BOLD fMRI following central and peripheral OT. Both routes of administration caused significant changes in BOLD signal within the first 10 min of administration. As expected, central OT activated a majority of brain areas known to express a high density of OT receptors, e.g., lateral septum, subiculum, shell of the accumbens, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. This profile of activation was not matched by peripheral OT. The change in BOLD signal to peripheral OT did not show any discernible dose–response. Interestingly, peripheral OT affected all subdivisions of the olfactory bulb, in addition to the cerebellum and several brainstem areas relevant to the autonomic nervous system, including the solitary tract nucleus. The results from this imaging study do not support a direct central action of peripheral OT on the brain. Instead, the patterns of brain activity suggest that peripheral OT may interact at the level of the olfactory bulb and through sensory afferents from the autonomic nervous system to influence brain activity. PMID:26441574

  16. Study protocol: The back pain outcomes using longitudinal data (BOLD) registry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Back pain is one of the most important causes of functional limitation, disability, and utilization of health care resources for adults of all ages, but especially among older adults. Despite the high prevalence of back pain in this population, important questions remain unanswered regarding the comparative effectiveness of commonly used diagnostic tests and treatments in the elderly. The overall goal of the Back pain Outcomes using Longitudinal Data (BOLD) project is to establish a rich, sustainable registry to describe the natural history and evaluate prospectively the effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness of interventions for patients 65 and older with back pain. Methods/design BOLD is enrolling 5,000 patients ≥ 65 years old who present to a primary care physician with a new episode of back pain. We are recruiting study participants from three integrated health systems (Kaiser-Permanente Northern California, Henry Ford Health System in Detroit and Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates/ Harvard Pilgrim Health Care in Boston). Registry patients complete validated, standardized measures of pain, back pain-related disability, and health-related quality of life at enrollment and 3, 6 and 12 months later. We also have available for analysis the clinical and administrative data in the participating health systems’ electronic medical records. Using registry data, we will conduct an observational cohort study of early imaging compared to no early imaging among patients with new episodes of back pain. The aims are to: 1) identify predictors of early imaging and; 2) compare pain, functional outcomes, diagnostic testing and treatment utilization of patients who receive early imaging versus patients who do not receive early imaging. In terms of predictors, we will examine patient factors as well as physician factors. Discussion By establishing the BOLD registry, we are creating a resource that contains patient-reported outcome measures as well as

  17. BOLD fMRI study of ultrahigh frequency encoding in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Patrick P; Zhang, Jevin W; Chan, Russell W; Leong, Alex T L; Wu, Ed X

    2015-07-01

    Many vertebrates communicate with ultrahigh frequency (UHF) vocalizations to limit auditory detection by predators. The mechanisms underlying the neural encoding of such UHF sounds may provide important insights for understanding neural processing of other complex sounds (e.g. human speeches). In the auditory system, sound frequency is normally encoded topographically as tonotopy, which, however, contains very limited representation of UHFs in many species. Instead, electrophysiological studies suggested that two neural mechanisms, both exploiting the interactions between frequencies, may contribute to UHF processing. Neurons can exhibit excitatory or inhibitory responses to a tone when another UHF tone is presented simultaneously (combination sensitivity). They can also respond to such stimulation if they are tuned to the frequency of the cochlear-generated distortion products of the two tones, e.g. their difference frequency (cochlear distortion). Both mechanisms are present in an early station of the auditory pathway, the midbrain inferior colliculus (IC). Currently, it is unclear how prevalent the two mechanisms are and how they are functionally integrated in encoding UHFs. This study investigated these issues with large-view BOLD fMRI in rat auditory system, particularly the IC. UHF vocalizations (above 40kHz), but not pure tones at similar frequencies (45, 55, 65, 75kHz), evoked robust BOLD responses in multiple auditory nuclei, including the IC, reinforcing the sensitivity of the auditory system to UHFs despite limited representation in tonotopy. Furthermore, BOLD responses were detected in the IC when a pair of UHF pure tones was presented simultaneously (45 & 55kHz, 55 & 65kHz, 45 & 65kHz, 45 & 75kHz). For all four pairs, a cluster of voxels in the ventromedial side always showed the strongest responses, displaying combination sensitivity. Meanwhile, voxels in the dorsolateral side that showed strongest secondary responses to each pair of UHF pure tones

  18. Resting state BOLD fMRI for pre-surgical planning

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Mudassar; Hacker, Carl D; Allen, Monica G; Mitchell, Timothy J; Leuthardt, Eric C; Snyder, Abraham Z; Shimony, Joshua S

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) measures spontaneous fluctuations in the BOLD signal and can be used to elucidate the brain’s functional organization. It can be used to simultaneously assess multiple distributed resting state networks. Unlike task fMRI, rsfMRI does not require task performance and thus can be performed in any subject that can obtain an MRI scan. In this article we present a brief introduction of rsfMRI processing methods followed by a detailed discussion on the use of rsfMRI in pre-surgical planning. Example cases are provided to highlight the strengths and limitations of the technique. PMID:25441506

  19. Sustained Negative BOLD Response in Human fMRI Finger Tapping Task

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yadong; Shen, Hui; Zhou, Zongtan; Hu, Dewen

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the sustained negative blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response (sNBR) using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a finger tapping task. We observed that the sNBR for this task was more extensive than has previously been reported. The cortical regions involved in sNBR are divided into the following three groups: frontal, somatosensory and occipital. By investigating the spatial structure, area, amplitude, and dynamics of the sNBR in comparison with those of its positive BOLD response (PBR) counterpart, we made the following observations. First, among the three groups, the somatosensory group contained the greatest number of activated voxels and the fewest deactivated voxels. In addition, the amplitude of the sNBR in this group was the smallest among the three groups. Second, the onset and peak time of the sNBR are both larger than those of the PBR, whereas the falling edge time of the sNBR is less than that of the PBR. Third, the long distance between most sNBR foci and their corresponding PBR foci makes it unlikely that they share the same blood supply artery. Fourth, the couplings between the sNBR and its PBR counterpart are distinct among different regions and thus should be investigated separately. These findings imply that the origin of most sNBR foci in the finger-tapping task is much more likely to be neuronal activity suppression rather than “blood steal.” PMID:21887329

  20. Sustained negative BOLD response in human fMRI finger tapping task.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yadong; Shen, Hui; Zhou, Zongtan; Hu, Dewen

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the sustained negative blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response (sNBR) using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a finger tapping task. We observed that the sNBR for this task was more extensive than has previously been reported. The cortical regions involved in sNBR are divided into the following three groups: frontal, somatosensory and occipital. By investigating the spatial structure, area, amplitude, and dynamics of the sNBR in comparison with those of its positive BOLD response (PBR) counterpart, we made the following observations. First, among the three groups, the somatosensory group contained the greatest number of activated voxels and the fewest deactivated voxels. In addition, the amplitude of the sNBR in this group was the smallest among the three groups. Second, the onset and peak time of the sNBR are both larger than those of the PBR, whereas the falling edge time of the sNBR is less than that of the PBR. Third, the long distance between most sNBR foci and their corresponding PBR foci makes it unlikely that they share the same blood supply artery. Fourth, the couplings between the sNBR and its PBR counterpart are distinct among different regions and thus should be investigated separately. These findings imply that the origin of most sNBR foci in the finger-tapping task is much more likely to be neuronal activity suppression rather than "blood steal." PMID:21887329

  1. BOLD fMRI and DTI in strabismic amblyopes following occlusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shikha; Kumaran, Senthil S; Saxena, Rohit; Gudwani, Sunita; Menon, Vimala; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-08-01

    Evaluation of brain cluster activation using the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was sought in strabismic amblyopes. In this hospital-based case-control cross-sectional study, fMRI and DTI were conducted in strabismic amblyopes before initiation of any therapy and after visual recovery following the administration of occlusion therapy. FMRI was performed in 10 strabismic amblyopic subjects (baseline group) and in 5 left strabismic amblyopic children post-occlusion therapy after two-line visual improvement. Ten age-matched healthy children with right ocular dominance formed control group. Structural and functional MRI was carried out on 1.5T MR scanner. The visual task consisted of 8 Hz flickering checkerboard with red dot and occasional green dot. Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI was analyzed using statistical parametric mapping and DTI on NordicIce (NordicNeuroLab) softwares. Reduced occipital activation was elicited when viewing with the amblyopic eye in amblyopes. An 'ipsilateral to viewing eye' pattern of calcarine BOLD activation was observed in controls and left amblyopes. Activation of cortical areas associated with visual processing differed in relation to the viewing eye. Following visual recovery on occlusion therapy, enhanced activity in bilateral hemispheres in striate as well as extrastriate regions when viewing with either eye was seen. Improvement in visual acuity following occlusion therapy correlates with hemodynamic activity in amblyopes. PMID:26659010

  2. Coupling Mechanism and Significance of the BOLD Signal: A Status Report

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Elizabeth M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a unique view of the working human mind. The blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, detected in fMRI, reflects changes in deoxyhemoglobin driven by localized changes in brain blood flow and blood oxygenation, which are coupled to underlying neuronal activity by a process termed neurovascular coupling. Over the past 10 years, a range of cellular mechanisms, including astrocytes, pericytes, and interneurons, have been proposed to play a role in functional neurovascular coupling. However, the field remains conflicted over the relative importance of each process, while key spatiotemporal features of BOLD response remain unexplained. Here, we review current candidate neurovascular coupling mechanisms and propose that previously overlooked involvement of the vascular endothelium may provide a more complete picture of how blood flow is controlled in the brain. We also explore the possibility and consequences of conditions in which neurovascular coupling may be altered, including during postnatal development, pathological states, and aging, noting relevance to both stimulus-evoked and resting-state fMRI studies. PMID:25032494

  3. Rapid three-dimensional functional magnetic resonance imaging of the initial negative BOLD response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, Martin A.; Zhang, Cun-Hui; Glover, Gary; Shepp, Lawrence

    2008-03-01

    Functional MRI is most commonly used to study the local changes in blood flow that accompanies neuronal activity. In this work we introduce a new approach towards acquiring and analyzing fMRI data that instead provides the potential to study the initial oxygen consumption in the brain that accompanies activation. As the oxygen consumption is closer in timing to the underlying neuronal activity than the subsequent blood flow, this approach promises to provide more precise information about the location and timing of activity. Our approach is based on using a new single shot 3D echo-volumar imaging sequence which samples a small central region of 3D k-space every 100 ms, thereby giving a low spatial resolution snapshot of the brain with extremely high temporal resolution. Explicit and simple rules for implementing the trajectory are provided, together with a straightforward reconstruction algorithm. Using our approach allows us to effectively study the behavior of the brain in the time immediately following activation through the initial negative BOLD response, and we discuss new techniques for detecting the presence of the negative response across the brain. The feasibility and efficiency of the approach is confirmed using data from a visual-motor task and an auditory-motor-visual task. The results of these experiments provide a proof of concept of our methodology, and indicate that rapid imaging of the initial negative BOLD response can serve an important role in studying cognition tasks involving rapid mental processing in more than one region.

  4. Phase based venous suppression in resting-state BOLD GE-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Andrew T; Hutchison, R Matthew; Menon, Ravi S

    2014-10-15

    Resting-state functional MRI (RS-fMRI) is a widely used method for inferring connectivity between brain regions or nodes. As with task-based fMRI, the spatial specificity of the connectivity maps can be distorted by the strong biasing effect of the BOLD signal in macroscopic veins. In RS-fMRI this effect is exacerbated by the temporal coherences of physiological origin between large veins that are widely distributed in the brain. In gradient echo based EPI, used for the vast majority of RS-fMRI, macroscopic veins that carry BOLD-related changes exhibit a strong phase response. This allows for post-processing identification and removal of venous signals using a phase regressor technique. Here, we employ this approach to suppress macrovascular venous contributions in high-field whole-brain RS-fMRI data sets, resulting in significant changes to both the spatial localization of the networks and the correlations between the network nodes. These effects were observed at both the individual and group analysis level, suggesting that venous contamination is a confounding factor for RS-fMRI studies even at relatively low image resolutions. Suppression of the macrovascular signal using the phase regression approach may therefore help to better identify, delineate, and interpret the true structure of large-scale brain networks. PMID:24907484

  5. Resting state BOLD functional connectivity at 3T: spin echo versus gradient echo EPI.

    PubMed

    Chiacchiaretta, Piero; Ferretti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Previous evidence showed that, due to refocusing of static dephasing effects around large vessels, spin-echo (SE) BOLD signals offer an increased linearity and promptness with respect to gradient-echo (GE) acquisition, even at low field. These characteristics suggest that, despite the reduced sensitivity, SE fMRI might also provide a potential benefit when investigating spontaneous fluctuations of brain activity. However, there are no reports on the application of spin-echo fMRI for connectivity studies at low field. In this study we compared resting state functional connectivity as measured with GE and SE EPI sequences at 3T. Main results showed that, within subject, the GE sensitivity is overall larger with respect to that of SE, but to a less extent than previously reported for activation studies. Noteworthy, the reduced sensitivity of SE was counterbalanced by a reduced inter-subject variability, resulting in comparable group statistical connectivity maps for the two sequences. Furthermore, the SE method performed better in the ventral portion of the default mode network, a region affected by signal dropout in standard GE acquisition. Future studies should clarify if these features of the SE BOLD signal can be beneficial to distinguish subtle variations of functional connectivity across different populations and/or treatments when vascular confounds or regions affected by signal dropout can be a critical issue. PMID:25749359

  6. Influence of EEG electrodes on the BOLD fMRI signal.

    PubMed

    Bonmassar, G; Hadjikhani, N; Ives, J R; Hinton, D; Belliveau, J W

    2001-10-01

    Measurement of the EEG during fMRI scanning can give rise to image distortions due to magnetic susceptibility, eddy currents or chemical shift artifacts caused by certain types of EEG electrodes, cream, leads, or amplifiers. Two different creams were tested using MRS and T2* measurements, and we found that the one with higher water content was superior. This study introduces an index that quantifies the influence of EEG equipment on the BOLD fMRI signal. This index can also be used more generally to measure the changes in the fMRI signal due to the presence of any type of device inside (or outside) of the field of view (e.g., with fMRI and diffuse optical tomography, infrared imaging, transcranial magnetic stimulation, ultrasound imaging, etc.). Quantitative noise measurements are hampered by the normal variability of functional activation within the same subject and by the different slice profiles obtained when inserting a subject multiple times inside a MR imaging system. Our measurements account for these problems by using a matched filtering of cortical surface maps of functional activations. The results demonstrate that the BOLD signal is not influenced by the presence of EEG electrodes when using a properly constructed MRI compatible recording cap. PMID:11500994

  7. Nonlinear Bayesian estimation of BOLD signal under non-Gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ali Fahim; Younis, Muhammad Shahzad; Bajwa, Khalid Bashir

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal has been a subject of study for over a decade in the neuroimaging community. Inspired from fluid dynamics, the hemodynamic model provides a plausible yet convincing interpretation of the BOLD signal by amalgamating effects of dynamic physiological changes in blood oxygenation, cerebral blood flow and volume. The nonautonomous, nonlinear set of differential equations of the hemodynamic model constitutes the process model while the weighted nonlinear sum of the physiological variables forms the measurement model. Plagued by various noise sources, the time series fMRI measurement data is mostly assumed to be affected by additive Gaussian noise. Though more feasible, the assumption may cause the designed filter to perform poorly if made to work under non-Gaussian environment. In this paper, we present a data assimilation scheme that assumes additive non-Gaussian noise, namely, the e-mixture noise, affecting the measurements. The proposed filter MAGSF and the celebrated EKF are put to test by performing joint optimal Bayesian filtering to estimate both the states and parameters governing the hemodynamic model under non-Gaussian environment. Analyses using both the synthetic and real data reveal superior performance of the MAGSF as compared to EKF. PMID:25691911

  8. Functional and developmental significance of amplitude variance asymmetry in the BOLD resting-state signal.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ben; Jovicich, Jorge; Iacovella, Vittorio; Hasson, Uri

    2014-05-01

    It is known that the brain's resting-state activity (RSA) is organized in low frequency oscillations that drive network connectivity. Recent research has also shown that elements of RSA described by high-frequency and nonoscillatory properties are non-random and functionally relevant. Motivated by this research, we investigated nonoscillatory aspects of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) RSA using a novel method for characterizing subtle fluctuation dynamics. The metric that we develop quantifies the relative variance of the amplitude of local-maxima and local-minima in a BOLD time course (amplitude variance asymmetry; AVA). This metric reveals new properties of RSA activity, without relying on connectivity as a descriptive tool. We applied the AVA analysis to data from 3 different participant groups (2 adults, 1 child) collected from 3 different centers. The analyses show that AVA patterns a) identify 3 types of RSA profiles in adults' sensory systems b) differ in topology and pattern of dynamics in adults and children, and c) are stable across magnetic resonance scanners. Furthermore, children with higher IQ demonstrated more adult-like AVA patterns. These findings indicate that AVA reflects important and novel dimensions of brain development and RSA. PMID:23329729

  9. Spikes, BOLD, Attention and Awareness: A comparison of electrophysiology and fMRI signals in V1

    PubMed Central

    Boynton, Geoffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Early fMRI studies comparing results from fMRI and electrophysiology experiments supports the notion that the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal reliably follows the spiking activity of an underlying neuronal population averaged across a small region in space and a brief period in time. However, more recent studies focusing on higher-level cognitive factors such as attention and visual awareness report striking discrepancies between the fMRI response in humans and electrophysiological signals in macaque early visual areas. Four hypotheses are discussed that can explain the discrepancies between the two methods: (1) the BOLD signal follows local field potential (LFP) signals closer than spikes, and the only the LFP is modulated by top-down factors, (2) the BOLD signal is reflecting electrophysiological signals that are occurring later in time due to feedback delay, (3) the BOLD signal is more sensitive than traditional electrophysiological methods due to massive pooling by the hemodynamic coupling process, and finally (4) there is no real discrepancy, and instead weak but reliable effects on firing rates may be obscured by to differences in experimental design and interpretation of results across methods. PMID:22199162

  10. Comparison between end-tidal CO2 and respiration volume per time for detecting BOLD signal fluctuations during paced hyperventilation

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Keith M.; Ibinson, James W.; Schmalbrock, Petra; Small, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory motion and capnometry monitoring were performed during blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) of the brain while a series of paced hyperventilation tasks were performed that caused significant hypocapnia. Respiration volume per time (RVT) and end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) were determined and compared for their ability to explain BOLD contrast changes in the data. A 35% decrease in ETCO2 was observed along with corresponding changes in RVT. A best-fit ETCO2 response function, with an average initial peak delay time of 12 s, was empirically determined. ETCO2 data convolved with this response function was more strongly and prevalently correlated to BOLD signal changes than RVT data convolved with the corresponding respiration response function. The results suggest that ETCO2 better models BOLD signal fluctuations in FMRI experiments with significant transient hypocapnia. This is due to hysteresis in the ETCO2 response when moving from hypocapnia to normocapnia, compared to moving from normocapnia to hypocapnia. PMID:21908130

  11. Comparison between subjects with long- and short-allele carriers in the BOLD signal within amygdala during emotional tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Shamil; Siadat, Mohamad R.; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas

    2012-03-01

    Emotional tasks may result in a strong blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the amygdala in 5- HTTLRP short-allele. Reduced anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)-amygdala connectivity in short-allele provides a potential mechanistic account for the observed increase in amygdala activity. In our study, fearful and threatening facial expressions were presented to two groups of 12 subjects with long- and short-allele carriers. The BOLD signals of the left amygdala of each group were averaged to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. A Bayesian approach was used to estimate the model parameters to elucidate the underlying hemodynamic mechanism. Our results showed a positive BOLD signal in the left amygdala for short-allele individuals, and a negative BOLD signal in the same region for long-allele individuals. This is due to the fact that short-allele is associated with lower availability of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) and this leads to an increase of serotonin (5-HT) concentration in the cACC-amygdala synapse.

  12. Investigation of the electrophysiological correlates of negative BOLD response during intermittent photic stimulation: An EEG-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Maggioni, Eleonora; Zucca, Claudio; Reni, Gianluigi; Cerutti, Sergio; Triulzi, Fabio M; Bianchi, Anna M; Arrigoni, Filippo

    2016-06-01

    Although the occurrence of concomitant positive BOLD responses (PBRs) and negative BOLD responses (NBRs) to visual stimuli is increasingly investigated in neuroscience, it still lacks a definite explanation. Multimodal imaging represents a powerful tool to study the determinants of negative BOLD responses: the integration of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings is especially useful, since it can give information on the neurovascular coupling underlying this complex phenomenon. In the present study, the brain response to intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) was investigated in a group of healthy subjects using simultaneous EEG-fMRI, with the main objective to study the electrophysiological mechanisms associated with the intense NBRs elicited by IPS in extra-striate visual cortex. The EEG analysis showed that IPS induced a desynchronization of the basal rhythm, followed by the instauration of a novel rhythm driven by the visual stimulation. The most interesting results emerged from the EEG-informed fMRI analysis, which suggested a relationship between the neuronal rhythms at 10 and 12 Hz and the BOLD dynamics in extra-striate visual cortex. These findings support the hypothesis that NBRs to visual stimuli may be neuronal in origin rather than reflecting pure vascular phenomena. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2247-2262, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26987932

  13. Negligible fronto-parietal BOLD activity accompanying unreportable switches in bistable perception

    PubMed Central

    Brascamp, Jan; Blake, Randolph; Knapen, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The human brain's executive systems play a vital role in deciding and selecting among actions. Selection among alternatives also occurs in the perceptual domain, for instance when perception switches between interpretations during perceptual bistability. Whether executive systems also underlie this functionality remains debated, with known fronto-parietal concomitants of perceptual switches being variously interpreted as reflecting the switches' cause, or as reflecting their consequences. We developed a paradigm where the two eyes receive different inputs and perception demonstrably switches between these inputs, yet where switches themselves are so inconspicuous as to become unreportable, minimizing their executive consequences. Fronto-parietal fMRI BOLD responses that accompany perceptual switches were similarly minimized in this paradigm, indicating that these reflect the switches' consequences rather than their cause. We conclude that perceptual switches do not always rely on executive brain areas, and that processes responsible for selection among alternatives may operate outside of the brain's executive systems. PMID:26436901

  14. Pathfinder technologies for bold new missions. [U.S. research and development program for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadin, Stanley R.; Rosen, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Project Pathfinder is a proposed U.S. Space Research and Technology program intended to enable bold new missions of space exploration. Pathfinder continues the advancement of technological capabilities and extends the foundation established under the Civil Space Technology Initiative, CSTI. By filling critical technological gaps, CSTI enhances access to Earth orbit and supports effective operations and science missions therein. Pathfinder, with a longer-term horizon, looks to a future that builds on Shuttle and Space Station and addresses technologies that support a range of exploration missions including: a return to the Moon to build an outpost; piloted missions to Mars; and continued scientific exploration of Earth and the other planets. The program's objective is to develop, within reasonable time frames, those emerging and innovative technologies that will make possible both new and enhanced missions and system concepts.

  15. Consistency in boldness, activity and exploration at different stages of life

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Animals show consistent individual behavioural patterns over time and over situations. This phenomenon has been referred to as animal personality or behavioural syndromes. Little is known about consistency of animal personalities over entire life times. We investigated the repeatability of behaviour in common voles (Microtus arvalis) at different life stages, with different time intervals, and in different situations. Animals were tested using four behavioural tests in three experimental groups: 1. before and after maturation over three months, 2. twice as adults during one week, and 3. twice as adult animals over three months, which resembles a substantial part of their entire adult life span of several months. Results Different behaviours were correlated within and between tests and a cluster analysis showed three possible behavioural syndrome-axes, which we name boldness, exploration and activity. Activity and exploration behaviour in all tests was highly repeatable in adult animals tested over one week. In animals tested over maturation, exploration behaviour was consistent whereas activity was not. Voles that were tested as adults with a three-month interval showed the opposite pattern with stable activity but unstable exploration behaviour. Conclusions The consistency in behaviour over time suggests that common voles do express stable personality over short time. Over longer periods however, behaviour is more flexible and depending on life stage (i.e. tested before/after maturation or as adults) of the tested individual. Level of boldness or activity does not differ between tested groups and maintenance of variation in behavioural traits can therefore not be explained by expected future assets as reported in other studies. PMID:24314274

  16. A statistical approach for segregating cognitive task stages from multivariate fMRI BOLD time series.

    PubMed

    Demanuele, Charmaine; Bähner, Florian; Plichta, Michael M; Kirsch, Peter; Tost, Heike; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Multivariate pattern analysis can reveal new information from neuroimaging data to illuminate human cognition and its disturbances. Here, we develop a methodological approach, based on multivariate statistical/machine learning and time series analysis, to discern cognitive processing stages from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) time series. We apply this method to data recorded from a group of healthy adults whilst performing a virtual reality version of the delayed win-shift radial arm maze (RAM) task. This task has been frequently used to study working memory and decision making in rodents. Using linear classifiers and multivariate test statistics in conjunction with time series bootstraps, we show that different cognitive stages of the task, as defined by the experimenter, namely, the encoding/retrieval, choice, reward and delay stages, can be statistically discriminated from the BOLD time series in brain areas relevant for decision making and working memory. Discrimination of these task stages was significantly reduced during poor behavioral performance in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), but not in the primary visual cortex (V1). Experimenter-defined dissection of time series into class labels based on task structure was confirmed by an unsupervised, bottom-up approach based on Hidden Markov Models. Furthermore, we show that different groupings of recorded time points into cognitive event classes can be used to test hypotheses about the specific cognitive role of a given brain region during task execution. We found that whilst the DLPFC strongly differentiated between task stages associated with different memory loads, but not between different visual-spatial aspects, the reverse was true for V1. Our methodology illustrates how different aspects of cognitive information processing during one and the same task can be separated and attributed to specific brain regions based on information contained in

  17. Boldness towards novelty and translocation success in captive-raised, orphaned Tasmanian devils.

    PubMed

    Sinn, David L; Cawthen, Lisa; Jones, Susan M; Pukk, Chrissy; Jones, Menna E

    2014-01-01

    Translocation of endangered animals is common, but success is often variable and/or poor. Despite its intuitive appeal, little is known with regards to how individual differences amongst translocated animals influence their post-release survival, growth, and reproduction. We measured consistent pre-release responses to novelty in a familiar environment (boldness; repeatability=0.55) and cortisol response in a group of captive-reared Tasmanian devils, currently listed as "Endangered" by the IUCN. The devils were then released at either a hard- or soft-release site within their mothers' population of origin, and individual growth, movement, reproduction (females only), and survival across 2-8 months post-release was measured. Sex, release method, cohort, behavior, and cortisol response did not affect post-release growth, nor did these factors influence the home range size of orphan devils. Final linear distances moved from the release site were impacted heavily by the release cohort, but translocated devils' movement overall was not different from that in the same-age wild devils. All orphan females of reproductive age were subsequently captured with offspring. Overall survival rates in translocated devils were moderate (∼42%), and were not affected by devil sex, release method, cohort, release weight, or pre-release cortisol response. Devils that survived during the study period were, however, 3.5 times more bold than those that did not (effect size r=0.76). Our results suggest that conservation managers may need to provide developmental conditions in captivity that promote a wide range of behaviors across individuals slated for wild release. PMID:24375492

  18. A statistical approach for segregating cognitive task stages from multivariate fMRI BOLD time series

    PubMed Central

    Demanuele, Charmaine; Bähner, Florian; Plichta, Michael M.; Kirsch, Peter; Tost, Heike; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Multivariate pattern analysis can reveal new information from neuroimaging data to illuminate human cognition and its disturbances. Here, we develop a methodological approach, based on multivariate statistical/machine learning and time series analysis, to discern cognitive processing stages from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) time series. We apply this method to data recorded from a group of healthy adults whilst performing a virtual reality version of the delayed win-shift radial arm maze (RAM) task. This task has been frequently used to study working memory and decision making in rodents. Using linear classifiers and multivariate test statistics in conjunction with time series bootstraps, we show that different cognitive stages of the task, as defined by the experimenter, namely, the encoding/retrieval, choice, reward and delay stages, can be statistically discriminated from the BOLD time series in brain areas relevant for decision making and working memory. Discrimination of these task stages was significantly reduced during poor behavioral performance in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), but not in the primary visual cortex (V1). Experimenter-defined dissection of time series into class labels based on task structure was confirmed by an unsupervised, bottom-up approach based on Hidden Markov Models. Furthermore, we show that different groupings of recorded time points into cognitive event classes can be used to test hypotheses about the specific cognitive role of a given brain region during task execution. We found that whilst the DLPFC strongly differentiated between task stages associated with different memory loads, but not between different visual-spatial aspects, the reverse was true for V1. Our methodology illustrates how different aspects of cognitive information processing during one and the same task can be separated and attributed to specific brain regions based on information contained in

  19. Pre-stimulus BOLD-network activation modulates EEG spectral activity during working memory retention

    PubMed Central

    Kottlow, Mara; Schlaepfer, Anthony; Baenninger, Anja; Michels, Lars; Brandeis, Daniel; Koenig, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Working memory (WM) processes depend on our momentary mental state and therefore exhibit considerable fluctuations. Here, we investigate the interplay of task-preparatory and task-related brain activity as represented by pre-stimulus BOLD-fluctuations and spectral EEG from the retention periods of a visual WM task. Visual WM is used to maintain sensory information in the brain enabling the performance of cognitive operations and is associated with mental health. We tested 22 subjects simultaneously with EEG and fMRI while performing a visuo-verbal Sternberg task with two different loads, allowing for the temporal separation of preparation, encoding, retention and retrieval periods. Four temporally coherent networks (TCNs)—the default mode network (DMN), the dorsal attention, the right and the left WM network—were extracted from the continuous BOLD data by means of a group ICA. Subsequently, the modulatory effect of these networks' pre-stimulus activation upon retention-related EEG activity in the theta, alpha, and beta frequencies was analyzed. The obtained results are informative in the context of state-dependent information processing. We were able to replicate two well-known load-dependent effects: the frontal-midline theta increase during the task and the decrease of pre-stimulus DMN activity. As our main finding, these two measures seem to depend on each other as the significant negative correlations at frontal-midline channels suggested. Thus, suppressed pre-stimulus DMN levels facilitated later task related frontal midline theta increases. In general, based on previous findings that neuronal coupling in different frequency bands may underlie distinct functions in WM retention, our results suggest that processes reflected by spectral oscillations during retention seem not only to be “online” synchronized with activity in different attention-related networks but are also modulated by activity in these networks during preparation intervals. PMID

  20. MDMA (Ecstasy) association with impaired fMRI BOLD thalamic coherence and functional connectivity*

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Ronald M.; Karageorgiou, John; Dietrich, Mary S.; McLellan, Jessica Y.; Charboneau, Evonne J.; Blackford, Jennifer U.; Cowan, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    Background MDMA exposure is associated with chronic serotonergic dysfunction in preclinical and clinical studies. A recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) comparison of past MDMA users to non-MDMA-using controls revealed increased spatial extent and amplitude of activation in the supplementary motor area during motor tasks (Karageorgiou et al., 2009). Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) data from that study were reanalyzed for intraregional coherence and for inter-regional temporal correlations between time series, as functional connectivity. Methods Fourteen MDMA users and ten controls reporting similar non-MDMA abuse performed finger taps during fMRI. Fourteen motor pathway regions plus a pontine raphé region were examined. Coherence was expressed as percent of voxels positively correlated with an intraregional index voxel. Functional connectivity was determined using wavelet correlations. Results Intraregional thalamic coherence was significantly diminished at low frequencies in MDMA users compared to controls (p=0.009). Inter-regional functional connectivity was significantly weaker for right thalamo - left caudate (p=0.002), right thalamo - left thalamus (p=0.007), right caudate - right postcentral (p=0.007) and right supplementary motor area - right precentral gyrus (p=0.011) region pairs compared to controls. When stratified by lifetime exposure, significant negative associations were observed between cumulative MDMA use and functional connectivity in seven other region-pairs, while only one region-pair showed a positive association. Conclusions Reported prior MDMA use was associated with deficits in BOLD intraregional coherence and inter-regional functional connectivity, even among functionally robust pathways involving motor regions. This suggests that MDMA use is associated with long-lasting effects on brain neurophysiology beyond the cognitive domain. PMID:21807471

  1. Test-retest Stability Analysis of Resting Brain Activity Revealed by BOLD fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengjun; Kadivar, Aniseh; Pluta, John; Dunlop, John; Wang, Ze

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess test-retest stability of four fMRI-derived resting brain activity metrics: the seed-region-based functional connectivity (SRFC), independent component analysis (ICA)-derived network-based FC (NTFC), regional homogeneity (ReHo), and the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF). Methods Simulations were used to assess the sensitivity of SRFC, ReHo, and ALFF to noise interference. Repeat resting blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI were acquired from 32 healthy subjects. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the stability of the 4 metrics. Results Random noise yielded small random SRFC, small but consistent ReHo and ALFF. A neighborhood size greater than 20 voxels should be used for calculating ReHo in order to reduce the noise interference. Both the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC)-based SRFC were reproducible in more spatially extended regions than ICA NTFC. The two regional spontaneous brain activity (SBA) measures, ReHo and ALFF, showed test-retest reproducibility in almost the whole grey matter. Conclusion SRFC, ReHo, and ALFF are robust to random noise interference. The neighborhood size for calculating ReHo should be larger than 20 voxels. ICC>0.5 and cluster size>11 should be used to assess the ICC maps for ACC/PCC SRFC, ReHo and ALFF. BOLD fMRI-based SBA can be reliably measured using ACC/PCC SRFC, ReHo and ALFF after two months. PMID:22535702

  2. Pre-stimulus BOLD-network activation modulates EEG spectral activity during working memory retention.

    PubMed

    Kottlow, Mara; Schlaepfer, Anthony; Baenninger, Anja; Michels, Lars; Brandeis, Daniel; Koenig, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Working memory (WM) processes depend on our momentary mental state and therefore exhibit considerable fluctuations. Here, we investigate the interplay of task-preparatory and task-related brain activity as represented by pre-stimulus BOLD-fluctuations and spectral EEG from the retention periods of a visual WM task. Visual WM is used to maintain sensory information in the brain enabling the performance of cognitive operations and is associated with mental health. We tested 22 subjects simultaneously with EEG and fMRI while performing a visuo-verbal Sternberg task with two different loads, allowing for the temporal separation of preparation, encoding, retention and retrieval periods. Four temporally coherent networks (TCNs)-the default mode network (DMN), the dorsal attention, the right and the left WM network-were extracted from the continuous BOLD data by means of a group ICA. Subsequently, the modulatory effect of these networks' pre-stimulus activation upon retention-related EEG activity in the theta, alpha, and beta frequencies was analyzed. The obtained results are informative in the context of state-dependent information processing. We were able to replicate two well-known load-dependent effects: the frontal-midline theta increase during the task and the decrease of pre-stimulus DMN activity. As our main finding, these two measures seem to depend on each other as the significant negative correlations at frontal-midline channels suggested. Thus, suppressed pre-stimulus DMN levels facilitated later task related frontal midline theta increases. In general, based on previous findings that neuronal coupling in different frequency bands may underlie distinct functions in WM retention, our results suggest that processes reflected by spectral oscillations during retention seem not only to be "online" synchronized with activity in different attention-related networks but are also modulated by activity in these networks during preparation intervals. PMID:25999828

  3. Hemodynamic scaling of fMRI-BOLD signal: validation of low-frequency spectral amplitude as a scalability factor.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Bharat B; Kannurpatti, Sridhar S; Rypma, Bart

    2007-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (fMRI-BOLD) signal representing neural activity may be optimized by discriminating MR signal components related to neural activity and those related to intrinsic properties of the cortical vasculature. The objective of this study was to reduce the hemodynamic change independent of neural activity to obtain a scaled fMRI-BOLD response using two factors, namely, low-frequency spectral amplitude (LFSA) and breath-hold amplitude (BHA). Ten subjects (age range, 22-38 years) were scanned during four task conditions: (a) rest while breathing room air, (b) bilateral finger tapping while breathing room air, (c) rest during a partial inspirational breath-hold, and (d) rest during moderate hypercapnia (breathing 5% CO2, 20% O2 and 75% N2). In all subjects who breathed 5% CO2, regions with significant BOLD response during breath-hold correlated significantly with the percent signal increase during 5% CO2 inhalation. Finger-tapping-induced responses in the motor cortex were diminished to a similar extent after scaling using either LFSA or BHA. Inter- and intrasubject variation in the amplitude of the BOLD signal response reduced after hemodynamic scaling using LFSA or BHA. The results validated the hemodynamic amplitude scaling using LFSA with the earlier established BHA. LFSA free from motor-task contamination can be used to calibrate the fMRI-BOLD response in lieu of BHA or hypercapnia to minimize intra- and intersubject variation arising from vascular anatomy and vasodilative capacity. PMID:17482411

  4. Global signal modulation of single-trial fMRI response variability: Effect on positive vs negative BOLD response relationship.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, S D; Mullinger, K J; Ostwald, D; Porcaro, C; Bowtell, R; Bagshaw, A P; Francis, S T

    2016-06-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the relationship between positive BOLD responses (PBRs) and negative BOLD responses (NBRs) to stimulation is potentially informative about the balance of excitatory and inhibitory brain responses in sensory cortex. In this study, we performed three separate experiments delivering visual, motor or somatosensory stimulation unilaterally, to one side of the sensory field, to induce PBR and NBR in opposite brain hemispheres. We then assessed the relationship between the evoked amplitudes of contralateral PBR and ipsilateral NBR at the level of both single-trial and average responses. We measure single-trial PBR and NBR peak amplitudes from individual time-courses, and show that they were positively correlated in all experiments. In contrast, in the average response across trials the absolute magnitudes of both PBR and NBR increased with increasing stimulus intensity, resulting in a negative correlation between mean response amplitudes. Subsequent analysis showed that the amplitude of single-trial PBR was positively correlated with the BOLD response across all grey-matter voxels and was not specifically related to the ipsilateral sensory cortical response. We demonstrate that the global component of this single-trial response modulation could be fully explained by voxel-wise vascular reactivity, the BOLD signal standard deviation measured in a separate resting-state scan (resting state fluctuation amplitude, RSFA). However, bilateral positive correlation between PBR and NBR regions remained. We further report that modulations in the global brain fMRI signal cannot fully account for this positive PBR-NBR coupling and conclude that the local sensory network response reflects a combination of superimposed vascular and neuronal signals. More detailed quantification of physiological and noise contributions to the BOLD signal is required to fully understand the trial-by-trial PBR and NBR relationship compared with that of

  5. Blood pressure changes induced by arterial blood withdrawal influence bold signal in anesthesized rats at 7 Tesla: implications for pharmacologic mri.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, R; Elbel, G K; Gössl, C; Czisch, M; Auer, D P

    2001-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast is now increasingly applied for measuring drug effects on brain activity. A possible confound in pharmacologic fMRI (phMRI) is that the BOLD signal may be sensitive to systemic cardiovascular or respiratory parameters, which can themselves be modulated by a drug. To assess whether abrupt changes in arterial blood pressure (BP) as may be observed in phMRI experiments influence the BOLD signal, a hemorrhage model was studied in anesthesized rats at 7 T using spin-echo EPI. BP and BOLD signal time courses were found to be significantly correlated (P < 0.01). This effect was detected under the three different anesthetic regimens employed (isoflurane, halothane, and propofol). The regional pattern of BP-BOLD correlations was heterogeneous and may reflect vascular density. In physiological terms, a BOLD decrease during a decrease in BP may result from an increase in mostly venous cerebral blood volume (CBV) as an autoregulatory response to maintain cerebral blood flow (CBF) during decreased perfusion pressure. The observed influence of BP on BOLD may complicate qualitative and quantitative description of drug effects. PMID:11554808

  6. Comparison of regional skeletal muscle tissue oxygenation in college athletes and sedentary control subjects using quantitative BOLD MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Mitchel R; Caracciolo, Christopher M; Qiu, Maolin; Pal, Prasanta; Varga, Tyler; Constable, Robert Todd; Sinusas, Albert J

    2016-08-01

    Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging permits noninvasive assessment of tissue oxygenation. We hypothesized that BOLD imaging would allow for regional evaluation of differences in skeletal muscle oxygenation between athletes and sedentary control subjects, and dynamic BOLD responses to ischemia (i.e., proximal cuff occlusion) and reactive hyperemia (i.e., rapid cuff deflation) would relate to lower extremity function, as assessed by jumping ability. College football athletes (linemen, defensive backs/wide receivers) were compared to sedentary healthy controls. BOLD signal of the gastrocnemius, soleus, anterior tibialis, and peroneus longus was assessed for peak hyperemic value (PHV), time to peak (TTP), minimum ischemic value (MIV), and time to recovery (TTR). Significantly higher PHVs were identified in athletes versus controls for the gastrocnemius (linemen, 15.8 ± 9.1%; defensive backs/wide receivers, 17.9 ± 5.1%; controls, 7.4 ± 3.5%), soleus (linemen, 25.9 ± 11.5%; backs/receivers, 22.0 ± 9.4%; controls, 12.9 ± 5.8%), and anterior tibialis (linemen, 12.8 ± 5.3%; backs/receivers, 12.6 ± 3.9%; controls, 7.7 ± 4.0%), whereas no differences in PHV were found for the peroneus longus (linemen, 14.1 ± 6.9%; backs/receivers, 11.7 ± 4.6%; controls, 9.0 ± 4.9%). In all subject groups, the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles exhibited the lowest MIVs during cuff occlusion. No differences in TTR were found between muscles for any subject group. PHV of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly and positively related to maximal vertical (r = 0.56, P = 0.002) and broad jump (r = 0.47, P = 0.01). These results suggest that BOLD MR imaging is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating differences in tissue oxygenation of specific muscles between active and sedentary individuals, and peak BOLD responses may relate to functional capacity. PMID:27535483

  7. Back pain in seniors: the Back pain Outcomes using Longitudinal Data (BOLD) cohort baseline data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Back pain represents a substantial burden globally, ranking first in a recent assessment among causes of years lived with disability. Though back pain is widely studied among working age adults, there are gaps with respect to basic descriptive epidemiology among seniors, especially in the United States. Our goal was to describe how pain, function and health-related quality of life vary by demographic and geographic factors among seniors presenting to primary care providers with new episodes of care for back pain. Methods We examined baseline data from the Back pain Outcomes using Longitudinal Data (BOLD) registry, the largest inception cohort to date of seniors presenting to a primary care provider for back pain. The sample included 5,239 patients ≥ 65 years old with a new primary care visit for back pain at three integrated health systems (Northern California Kaiser-Permanente, Henry Ford Health System [Detroit], and Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates [Boston]). We examined differences in patient characteristics across healthcare sites and associations of patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics with baseline patient-reported measures of pain, function, and health-related quality of life. Results Patients differed across sites in demographic and other characteristics. The Detroit site had more African-American patients (50%) compared with the other sites (7-8%). The Boston site had more college graduates (68%) compared with Detroit (20%). Female sex, lower educational status, African-American race, and older age were associated with worse functional disability as measured by the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Except for age, these factors were also associated with worse pain. Conclusions Baseline pain and functional impairment varied substantially with a number of factors in the BOLD cohort. Healthcare site was an important factor. After controlling for healthcare site, lower education, female sex, African-American race

  8. Negative BOLD response and serotonin concentration within rostral subgenual portion of the anterior cingulate cortex for long-allele carriers during perceptual processing of emotional tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Shamil M.; Siadat, Mohamad R.; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the effect of synaptic serotonin concentration on hemodynamic responses. The stimuli paradigm involved the presentation of fearful and threatening facial expressions to a set of 24 subjects who were either5HTTLPR long- or short-allele carriers (12 of each type in each group). The BOLD signals of the rACC from subjects of each group were averaged to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. We used a Bayesian approach to estimate the parameters of the underlying hemodynamic model. Our results, during this perceptual processing of emotional task, showed a negative BOLD signal in the rACC in the subjects with long-alleles. In contrast, the subjects with short-alleles showed positive BOLD signals in the rACC. These results suggest that high synaptic serotonin concentration in the rACC inhibits neuronal activity in a fashion similar to GABA, and a consequent negative BOLD signal ensues.

  9. Co-localization between the BOLD response and epileptiform discharges recorded by simultaneous intracranial EEG-fMRI at 3 T

    PubMed Central

    Aghakhani, Yahya; Beers, Craig A.; Pittman, Daniel J.; Gaxiola-Valdez, Ismael; Goodyear, Bradley G.; Federico, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Simultaneous scalp EEG-fMRI can identify hemodynamic changes associated with the generation of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs), and it has the potential of becoming a standard, non-invasive technique for pre-surgical assessment of patients with medically intractable epilepsy. This study was designed to assess the BOLD response to focal IEDs recorded via simultaneous intracranial EEG-functional MRI (iEEG-fMRI). Methods Twelve consecutive patients undergoing intracranial video EEG monitoring were recruited for iEEG-fMRI studies at 3 T. Depth, subdural strip, or grid electrodes were implanted according to our standard clinical protocol. Subjects underwent 10–60 min of continuous iEEG-fMRI scanning. IEDs were marked, and the most statistically significant clusters of BOLD signal were identified (Z-score 2.3, p value < 0.05). We assessed the concordance between the locations of the BOLD response and the IED. Concordance was defined as a distance <1.0 cm between the IED and BOLD response location. Negative BOLD responses were not studied in this project. Results Nine patients (7 females) with a mean age of 31 years (range 22–56) had 11 different types of IEDs during fMR scanning. The IEDs were divided based on the location of the active electrode contact into mesial temporal, lateral temporal, and extra-temporal. Seven (5 left) mesial temporal IED types were recorded in 5 patients (110–2092 IEDs per spike location). Six of these IEDs had concordant BOLD response in the ipsilateral mesial temporal structures, <1 cm from the most active contact. One of the two subjects with left lateral temporal IEDs had BOLD responses concordant with the location of the most active contact, as well other ipsilateral and contralateral sites. Notably, the remaining two subjects with extratemporal discharges showed no BOLD signal near the active electrode contact. Conclusions iEEG-fMRI is a feasible and low-risk method for assessment of hemodynamic changes

  10. Pattern changes of EEG oscillations and BOLD signals associated with temporal lobe epilepsy as revealed by a working memory task

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is known that the abnormal neural activity in epilepsy may be associated to the reorganization of neural circuits and brain plasticity in various ways. On that basis, we hypothesized that changes in neuronal circuitry due to epilepsy could lead to measurable variations in patterns of both EEG and BOLD signals in patients performing some cognitive task as compared to what would be obtained in normal condition. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the cerebral areas involved in EEG oscillations versus fMRI signal patterns during a working memory (WM) task in normal controls and patients with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS). The study included six patients with left MTLE-HS (left-HS group) and seven normal controls (control group) matched to the patients by age and educational level, both groups undergoing a blocked design paradigm based on Sternberg test during separated EEG and fMRI sessions. This test consisted of encoding and maintenance of a variable number of consonant letters on WM. Results EEG analysis for the encoding period revealed the presence of theta and alpha oscillations in the frontal and parietal areas, respectively. Likewise, fMRI showed the co-occurrence of positive and negative BOLD signals in both brain regions. As for the maintenance period, whereas EEG analysis revealed disappearance of theta oscillation, fMRI showed decrease of positive BOLD in frontal area and increase of negative BOLD in the posterior part of the brain. Conclusions Generally speaking, these patterns of electrophysiological and hemodynamic signals were observed for both control and left-HS groups. However, the data also revealed remarkable differences between these groups that are consistent with the hypothesis of reorganization of brain circuitry associated with epilepsy. PMID:24766708

  11. Quantitative mapping of cerebrovascular reactivity using resting-state BOLD fMRI: Validation in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Golestani, Ali M; Wei, Luxi L; Chen, J Jean

    2016-09-01

    In conventional neuroimaging, cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) is quantified primarily using the blood-oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) signal, specifically, as the BOLD response to intravascular carbon dioxide (CO2) modulations, in units of [%ΔBOLD/mmHg]. While this method has achieved wide appeal and clinical translation, the tolerability of CO2-related tasks amongst patients and the elderly remains a challenge in more routine and large-scale applications. In this work, we propose an improved method to quantify CVR by exploiting intrinsic fluctuations in CO2 and corresponding changes in the resting-state BOLD signal (rs-qCVR). Our rs-qCVR approach requires simultaneous monitoring of PETCO2, cardiac pulsation and respiratory volume. In 16 healthy adults, we compare our quantitative CVR estimation technique to the prospective CO2-targeting based CVR quantification approach (qCVR, the "standard"). We also compare our rs-CVR to non-quantitative alternatives including the resting-state fluctuation amplitude (RSFA), amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and global-signal regression. When all subjects were pooled, only RSFA and ALFF were significantly associated with qCVR. However, for characterizing regional CVR variations within each subject, only the PETCO2-based rs-qCVR measure is strongly associated with standard qCVR in 100% of the subjects (p≤0.1). In contrast, for the more qualitative CVR measures, significant within-subject association with qCVR was only achieved in 50-70% of the subjects. Our work establishes the feasibility of extracting quantitative CVR maps using rs-fMRI, opening the possibility of mapping functional connectivity and qCVR simultaneously. PMID:27177763

  12. Measurement of oxygen extraction fraction (OEF): An optimized BOLD signal model for use with hypercapnic and hyperoxic calibration.

    PubMed

    Merola, Alberto; Murphy, Kevin; Stone, Alan J; Germuska, Michael A; Griffeth, Valerie E M; Blockley, Nicholas P; Buxton, Richard B; Wise, Richard G

    2016-04-01

    Several techniques have been proposed to estimate relative changes in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) by exploiting combined BOLD fMRI and cerebral blood flow data in conjunction with hypercapnic or hyperoxic respiratory challenges. More recently, methods based on respiratory challenges that include both hypercapnia and hyperoxia have been developed to assess absolute CMRO2, an important parameter for understanding brain energetics. In this paper, we empirically optimize a previously presented "original calibration model" relating BOLD and blood flow signals specifically for the estimation of oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and absolute CMRO2. To do so, we have created a set of synthetic BOLD signals using a detailed BOLD signal model to reproduce experiments incorporating hypercapnic and hyperoxic respiratory challenges at 3T. A wide range of physiological conditions was simulated by varying input parameter values (baseline cerebral blood volume (CBV0), baseline cerebral blood flow (CBF0), baseline oxygen extraction fraction (OEF0) and hematocrit (Hct)). From the optimization of the calibration model for estimation of OEF and practical considerations of hypercapnic and hyperoxic respiratory challenges, a new "simplified calibration model" is established which reduces the complexity of the original calibration model by substituting the standard parameters α and β with a single parameter θ. The optimal value of θ is determined (θ=0.06) across a range of experimental respiratory challenges. The simplified calibration model gives estimates of OEF0 and absolute CMRO2 closer to the true values used to simulate the experimental data compared to those estimated using the original model incorporating literature values of α and β. Finally, an error propagation analysis demonstrates the susceptibility of the original and simplified calibration models to measurement errors and potential violations in the underlying assumptions of isometabolism

  13. Acute Nicotine Administration Increases BOLD fMRI Signal in Brain Regions Involved in Reward Signaling and Compulsive Drug Intake in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jon C.; Perez, Pablo D.; Bauzo-Rodriguez, Rayna; Hall, Gabrielle; Klausner, Rachel; Guerra, Valerie; Zeng, Huadong; Igari, Moe; Febo, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute nicotine administration potentiates brain reward function and enhances motor and cognitive function. These studies investigated which brain areas are being activated by a wide range of doses of nicotine, and if this is diminished by pretreatment with the nonselective nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine. Methods: Drug-induced changes in brain activity were assessed by measuring changes in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal using an 11.1-Tesla magnetic resonance scanner. In the first experiment, nicotine naïve rats were mildly anesthetized and the effect of nicotine (0.03–0.6mg/kg) on the BOLD signal was investigated for 10min. In the second experiment, the effect of mecamylamine on nicotine-induced brain activity was investigated. Results: A high dose of nicotine increased the BOLD signal in brain areas implicated in reward signaling, such as the nucleus accumbens shell and the prelimbic area. Nicotine also induced a dose-dependent increase in the BOLD signal in the striato-thalamo-orbitofrontal circuit, which plays a role in compulsive drug intake, and in the insular cortex, which contributes to nicotine craving and relapse. In addition, nicotine induced a large increase in the BOLD signal in motor and somatosensory cortices. Mecamylamine alone did not affect the BOLD signal in most brain areas, but induced a negative BOLD response in cortical areas, including insular, motor, and somatosensory cortices. Pretreatment with mecamylamine completely blocked the nicotine-induced increase in the BOLD signal. Conclusions: These studies demonstrate that acute nicotine administration activates brain areas that play a role in reward signaling, compulsive behavior, and motor and cognitive function. PMID:25552431

  14. Complexity of spontaneous BOLD activity in default mode network is correlated with cognitive function in normal male elderly: a multiscale entropy analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Albert C; Huang, Chu-Chung; Yeh, Heng-Liang; Liu, Mu-En; Hong, Chen-Jee; Tu, Pei-Chi; Chen, Jin-Fan; Huang, Norden E; Peng, Chung-Kang; Lin, Ching-Po; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2013-02-01

    The nonlinear properties of spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals remain unexplored. We test the hypothesis that complexity of BOLD activity is reduced with aging and is correlated with cognitive performance in the elderly. A total of 99 normal older and 56 younger male subjects were included. Cognitive function was assessed using Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument and Wechsler Digit Span Task. We employed a complexity measure, multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis, and investigated appropriate parameters for MSE calculation from relatively short BOLD signals. We then compared the complexity of BOLD signals between the younger and older groups, and examined the correlation between cognitive test scores and complexity of BOLD signals in various brain regions. Compared with the younger group, older subjects had the most significant reductions in MSE of BOLD signals in posterior cingulate gyrus and hippocampal cortex. For older subjects, MSE of BOLD signals from default mode network areas, including hippocampal cortex, cingulate cortex, superior and middle frontal gyrus, and middle temporal gyrus, were found to be positively correlated with major cognitive functions, such as attention, orientation, short-term memory, mental manipulation, and language. MSE from subcortical regions, such as amygdala and putamen, were found to be positively correlated with abstract thinking and list-generating fluency, respectively. Our findings confirmed the hypothesis that complexity of BOLD activity was correlated with aging and cognitive performance based on MSE analysis, and may provide insights on how dynamics of spontaneous brain activity relates to aging and cognitive function in specific brain regions. PMID:22683008

  15. Ketamine and fMRI BOLD signal: distinguishing between effects mediated by change in blood flow versus change in cognitive state.

    PubMed

    Abel, Kathryn M; Allin, Matthew P G; Kucharska-Pietura, Katarzyna; Andrew, Chris; Williams, Steve; David, Anthony S; Phillips, Mary L

    2003-02-01

    No human fMRI studies have examined ketamine effects on the BOLD signal change associated with cognitive task performance. We wished to distinguish between effects on 1) cerebral blood flow, with resultant change in BOLD signal; and 2) cognition and neural mechanisms underlying BOLD signal change associated with task performance. Eight right-handed men (mean age 28.75 years) received ketamine or saline i.v. in a randomized, double-blind manner (bolus 0.23 mg/kg; 0.5 mg/kg over 45 min to a maximum 1 hr). Subjects viewed 10 alternating 30-sec blocks of faces with neutral expressions and a fixation cross and discriminated gender of faces. Gradient echo echoplanar images were acquired on a GE Signa 1.5 T Neurovascular system. One hundred T2-weighted images depicting BOLD contrast were acquired over 5 min (for each task) at each of 14 near-axial noncontiguous 7-mm thick planes. Ketamine significantly increased dissociative phenomena and negative symptoms, but did not affect performance of the gender discrimination task. Significant BOLD signal change was demonstrated predominantly in occipitotemporal cortex with both ketamine and placebo. Only two clusters in middle occipital gyrus (BA 18) and precentral gyrus (BA 4) showed significantly decreased BOLD signal change during ketamine compared to placebo. BOLD signal change was not significantly greater in any region during ketamine. Our findings demonstrate subtle rather than major differences between the effects of ketamine and placebo upon the BOLD signal change during perception of face-non face contrast. We suggest that they represent task-dependent effects of the drug/placebo, rather than task-independent effects of the drug per se, and indicate that the effects of ketamine on cerebral blood flow are predominantly focal and task-dependent, rather than global and task-independent. PMID:12518293

  16. Amplitude of Sensorimotor Mu Rhythm Is Correlated with BOLD from Multiple Brain Regions: A Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Siyang; Liu, Yuelu; Ding, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    The mu rhythm is a field oscillation in the ∼10Hz range over the sensorimotor cortex. For decades, the suppression of mu (event-related desynchronization) has been used to index movement planning, execution, and imagery. Recent work reports that non-motor processes, such as spatial attention and movement observation, also desynchronize mu, raising the possibility that the mu rhythm is associated with the activity of multiple brain regions and systems. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by recording simultaneous resting-state EEG-fMRI from healthy subjects. Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the mu components. The amplitude (power) fluctuations of mu were estimated as a time series using a moving-window approach, which, after convolving with a canonical hemodynamic response function (HRF), was correlated with blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals from the entire brain. Two main results were found. First, mu power was negatively correlated with BOLD from areas of the sensorimotor network, the attention control network, the putative mirror neuron system, and the network thought to support theory of mind. Second, mu power was positively correlated with BOLD from areas of the salience network, including anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that sensorimotor mu rhythm is associated with multiple brain regions and systems. They also suggest that caution should be exercised when attempting to interpret mu modulation in terms of a single brain network. PMID:27499736

  17. High estrogen and chronic haloperidol lead to greater amphetamine-induced BOLD activation in awake, amphetamine-sensitized female rats.

    PubMed

    Madularu, Dan; Kulkarni, Praveen; Yee, Jason R; Kenkel, William M; Shams, Waqqas M; Ferris, Craig F; Brake, Wayne G

    2016-06-01

    The ovarian hormone estrogen has been implicated in schizophrenia symptomatology. Low levels of estrogen are associated with an increase in symptom severity, while exogenous estrogen increases the efficacy of antipsychotic medication, pointing at a possible interaction between estrogen and the dopaminergic system. The aim of this study is to further investigate this interaction in an animal model of some aspects of schizophrenia using awake functional magnetic resonance imaging. Animals receiving 17β-estradiol and haloperidol were scanned and BOLD activity was assessed in response to amphetamine. High 17β-estradiol replacement and chronic haloperidol treatment showed increased BOLD activity in regions of interest and neural networks associated with schizophrenia (hippocampal formations, habenula, amygdala, hypothalamus etc.), compared with low, or no 17β-estradiol. These data show that chronic haloperidol treatment has a sensitizing effect, possibly on the dopaminergic system, and this effect is dependent on hormonal status, with high 17β-estradiol showing the greatest BOLD increase. Furthermore, these experiments further support the use of imaging techniques in studying schizophrenia, as modeled in the rat, but can be extended to addiction and other disorders. PMID:27154458

  18. Amplitude of Sensorimotor Mu Rhythm Is Correlated with BOLD from Multiple Brain Regions: A Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Siyang; Liu, Yuelu; Ding, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    The mu rhythm is a field oscillation in the ∼10Hz range over the sensorimotor cortex. For decades, the suppression of mu (event-related desynchronization) has been used to index movement planning, execution, and imagery. Recent work reports that non-motor processes, such as spatial attention and movement observation, also desynchronize mu, raising the possibility that the mu rhythm is associated with the activity of multiple brain regions and systems. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by recording simultaneous resting-state EEG-fMRI from healthy subjects. Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the mu components. The amplitude (power) fluctuations of mu were estimated as a time series using a moving-window approach, which, after convolving with a canonical hemodynamic response function (HRF), was correlated with blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals from the entire brain. Two main results were found. First, mu power was negatively correlated with BOLD from areas of the sensorimotor network, the attention control network, the putative mirror neuron system, and the network thought to support theory of mind. Second, mu power was positively correlated with BOLD from areas of the salience network, including anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that sensorimotor mu rhythm is associated with multiple brain regions and systems. They also suggest that caution should be exercised when attempting to interpret mu modulation in terms of a single brain network. PMID:27499736

  19. Visual, Auditory, and Cross Modal Sensory Processing in Adults with Autism: An EEG Power and BOLD fMRI Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Hames, Elizabeth’ C.; Murphy, Brandi; Rajmohan, Ravi; Anderson, Ronald C.; Baker, Mary; Zupancic, Stephen; O’Boyle, Michael; Richman, David

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imagining (BOLD fMRI) assessed the neurocorrelates of sensory processing of visual and auditory stimuli in 11 adults with autism (ASD) and 10 neurotypical (NT) controls between the ages of 20–28. We hypothesized that ASD performance on combined audiovisual trials would be less accurate with observable decreased EEG power across frontal, temporal, and occipital channels and decreased BOLD fMRI activity in these same regions; reflecting deficits in key sensory processing areas. Analysis focused on EEG power, BOLD fMRI, and accuracy. Lower EEG beta power and lower left auditory cortex fMRI activity were seen in ASD compared to NT when they were presented with auditory stimuli as demonstrated by contrasting the activity from the second presentation of an auditory stimulus in an all auditory block vs. the second presentation of a visual stimulus in an all visual block (AA2-VV2).We conclude that in ASD, combined audiovisual processing is more similar than unimodal processing to NTs. PMID:27148020

  20. Visual, Auditory, and Cross Modal Sensory Processing in Adults with Autism: An EEG Power and BOLD fMRI Investigation.

    PubMed

    Hames, Elizabeth' C; Murphy, Brandi; Rajmohan, Ravi; Anderson, Ronald C; Baker, Mary; Zupancic, Stephen; O'Boyle, Michael; Richman, David

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imagining (BOLD fMRI) assessed the neurocorrelates of sensory processing of visual and auditory stimuli in 11 adults with autism (ASD) and 10 neurotypical (NT) controls between the ages of 20-28. We hypothesized that ASD performance on combined audiovisual trials would be less accurate with observable decreased EEG power across frontal, temporal, and occipital channels and decreased BOLD fMRI activity in these same regions; reflecting deficits in key sensory processing areas. Analysis focused on EEG power, BOLD fMRI, and accuracy. Lower EEG beta power and lower left auditory cortex fMRI activity were seen in ASD compared to NT when they were presented with auditory stimuli as demonstrated by contrasting the activity from the second presentation of an auditory stimulus in an all auditory block vs. the second presentation of a visual stimulus in an all visual block (AA2-VV2).We conclude that in ASD, combined audiovisual processing is more similar than unimodal processing to NTs. PMID:27148020

  1. Internal representations for face detection: an application of noise-based image classification to BOLD responses.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Adrian; Vettel, Jean M; Tarr, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    What basic visual structures underlie human face detection and how can we extract such structures directly from the amplitude of neural responses elicited by face processing? Here, we address these issues by investigating an extension of noise-based image classification to BOLD responses recorded in high-level visual areas. First, we assess the applicability of this classification method to such data and, second, we explore its results in connection with the neural processing of faces. To this end, we construct luminance templates from white noise fields based on the response of face-selective areas in the human ventral cortex. Using behaviorally and neurally-derived classification images, our results reveal a family of simple but robust image structures subserving face representation and detection. Thus, we confirm the role played by classical face selective regions in face detection and we help clarify the representational basis of this perceptual function. From a theory standpoint, our findings support the idea of simple but highly diagnostic neurally-coded features for face detection. At the same time, from a methodological perspective, our work demonstrates the ability of noise-based image classification in conjunction with fMRI to help uncover the structure of high-level perceptual representations. PMID:22711230

  2. Progression to deep sleep is characterized by changes to BOLD dynamics in sensory cortices.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ben; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Jovicich, Jorge; Laufs, Helmut; Hasson, Uri

    2016-04-15

    Sleep has been shown to subtly disrupt the spatial organization of functional connectivity networks in the brain, but in a way that largely preserves the connectivity within sensory cortices. Here we evaluated the hypothesis that sleep does impact sensory cortices, but through alteration of activity dynamics. We therefore examined the impact of sleep on hemodynamics using a method for quantifying non-random, high frequency signatures of the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal (amplitude variance asymmetry; AVA). We found that sleep was associated with the elimination of these dynamics in a manner that is restricted to auditory, motor and visual cortices. This elimination was concurrent with increased variance of activity in these regions. Functional connectivity between regions showing AVA during wakefulness maintained a relatively consistent hierarchical structure during wakefulness and N1 and N2 sleep, despite a gradual reduction of connectivity strength as sleep progressed. Thus, sleep is related to elimination of high frequency non-random activity signatures in sensory cortices that are robust during wakefulness. The elimination of these AVA signatures conjointly with preservation of the structure of functional connectivity patterns may be linked to the need to suppress sensory inputs during sleep while still maintaining the capacity to react quickly to complex multimodal inputs. PMID:26724779

  3. BOLD data representing activation and connectivity for rare no-go versus frequent go cues.

    PubMed

    Meffert, Harma; Hwang, Soonjo; Nolan, Zachary T; Chen, Gang; Blair, James R

    2016-06-01

    The neural circuitry underlying response control is often studied using go/no-go tasks, in which participants are required to respond as fast as possible to go cues and withhold from responding to no-go stimuli. In the current task, response control was studied using a fully counterbalanced design in which blocks with a low frequency of no-go cues (75% go, 25% no-go) were alternated with blocks with a low frequency of go cues (25% go, 75% no-go); see also "Segregating attention from response control when performing a motor inhibition task: Segregating attention from response control" [1]. We applied a whole brain corrected, paired t-test to the data assessing for regions differentially activated by low frequency no-go cues relative to high frequency go cues. In addition, we conducted a generalized psychophysiological interaction analysis on the data using a right inferior frontal gyrus seed region. This region was identified through the BOLD response t-test and was chosen because right inferior gyrus is highly implicated in response inhibition. PMID:26955650

  4. Oxygen spectral line synthesis: 3D non-LTE with CO5BOLD hydrodynamical model atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakapavičius, D.; Steffen, M.; Kučinskas, A.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Freytag, B.; Caffau, E.; Cayrel, R.

    In this work we present first results of our current project aimed at combining the 3D hydrodynamical stellar atmosphere approach with non-LTE (NLTE) spectral line synthesis for a number of key chemical species. We carried out a full 3D-NLTE spectrum synthesis of the oxygen IR 777 nm triplet, using a modified and improved version of our NLTE3D package to calculate departure coefficients for the atomic levels of oxygen in a CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamical solar model atmosphere. Spectral line synthesis was subsequently performed with the Linfor3D code. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the lines of the oxygen triplet produce deeper cores under NLTE conditions, due to the diminished line source function in the line forming region. This means that the solar oxygen IR 777 nm lines should be stronger in NLTE, leading to negative 3D NLTE-LTE abundance corrections. Qualitatively this result would support previous claims for a relatively low solar oxygen abundance. Finally, we outline several further steps that need to be taken in order to improve the physical realism and numerical accuracy of our current 3D-NLTE calculations.

  5. Solar Chemical Abundances Determined with a CO5BOLD 3D Model Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Steffen, M.; Freytag, B.; Bonifacio, P.

    2011-02-01

    In the last decade, the photospheric solar metallicity as determined from spectroscopy experienced a remarkable downward revision. Part of this effect can be attributed to an improvement of atomic data and the inclusion of NLTE computations, but also the use of hydrodynamical model atmospheres seemed to play a role. This "decrease" with time of the metallicity of the solar photosphere increased the disagreement with the results from helioseismology. With a CO 5 BOLD 3D model of the solar atmosphere, the CIFIST team at the Paris Observatory re-determined the photospheric solar abundances of several elements, among them C, N, and O. The spectroscopic abundances are obtained by fitting the equivalent width and/or the profile of observed spectral lines with synthetic spectra computed from the 3D model atmosphere. We conclude that the effects of granular fluctuations depend on the characteristics of the individual lines, but are found to be relevant only in a few particular cases. 3D effects are not responsible for the systematic lowering of the solar abundances in recent years. The solar metallicity resulting from this analysis is Z=0.0153, Z/ X=0.0209.

  6. Acute Alcohol Effects on Contextual Memory BOLD Response: Differences Based on Fragmentary Blackout History

    PubMed Central

    Wetherill, Reagan R.; Schnyer, David M.; Fromme, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Background Contextual memory, or memory for source details, is an important aspect of episodic memory and has been implicated in alcohol-induced fragmentary blackouts (FB). Little is known, however, about how neural functioning during contextual memory processes may differ between individuals with and without a history of fragmentary blackouts. This study examined whether neural activation during a contextual memory task differed by history of fragmentary blackout and acute alcohol consumption. Methods Twenty-four matched individuals with (FB+; n = 12) and without (FB−; n = 12) a history of FBs were recruited from a longitudinal study of alcohol use and behavioral risks and completed a laboratory beverage challenge followed by two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions under no alcohol and alcohol [breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) = 0.08%] conditions. Task performance and brain hemodynamic activity during a block design contextual memory task were examined across 48 fMRI sessions. Results Groups demonstrated no differences in performance on the contextual memory task, yet exhibited different brain response patterns after alcohol intoxication. A significant FB group by beverage interaction emerged in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex with FB− individuals showing greater BOLD response after alcohol exposure (p < .05). Conclusions Alcohol had differential effects on neural activity for FB+ and FB− individuals during recollection of contextual information, perhaps suggesting a neurobiological mechanism associated with alcohol-induced fragmentary blackouts. PMID:22420742

  7. The impact of COPD on health status: findings from the BOLD study

    PubMed Central

    Janson, Christer; Marks, Guy; Buist, Sonia; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Gislason, Thorarinn; McBurnie, Mary Ann; Nielsen, Rune; Studnicka, Michael; Toelle, Brett; Benediktsdottir, Bryndis; Burney, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on health status in the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) populations. We conducted a cross-sectional, general population-based survey in 11 985 subjects from 17 countries. We measured spirometric lung function and assessed health status using the Short Form 12 questionnaire. The physical and mental health component scores were calculated. Subjects with COPD (post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity <0.70, n = 2269) had lower physical component scores (44±10 versus 48±10 units, p<0.0001) and mental health component scores (51±10 versus 52±10 units, p = 0.005) than subjects without COPD. The effect of reported heart disease, hypertension and diabetes on physical health component scores (-3 to -4 units) was considerably less than the effect of COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease grade 3 (-8 units) or 4 (-11 units). Dyspnoea was the most important determinant of a low physical and mental health component scores. In addition, lower forced expiratory volume in 1 s, chronic cough, chronic phlegm and the presence of comorbidities were all associated with a lower physical health component score. COPD is associated with poorer health status but the effect is stronger on the physical than the mental aspects of health status. Severe COPD has a greater negative impact on health status than self-reported cardiovascular disease and diabetes. PMID:23722617

  8. Case-finding options for COPD: Results from the BOLD Study

    PubMed Central

    Jithoo, Anamika; Enright, Paul; Burney, Peter; Buist, A Sonia; Bateman, Eric D; Tan, Wan C; Studnicka, Michael; Mejza, Filip; Gillespie, Suzanne; Vollmer, William M

    2012-01-01

    Aim To compare strategies for COPD case-finding using data from the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study. Methods Population-based samples of adults aged ≥40 years (n= 9390) from 14 countries completed a questionnaire and spirometry. We compared the screening efficiency of different staged algorithms that used questionnaire data and/or PEF to identify persons at risk for COPD and hence needing confirmatory spirometry. Separate algorithms were fitted for moderate/severe COPD and for severe COPD. We estimated the cost of each algorithm in 1000 people. Results For moderate/severe COPD, use of questionnaire data alone permitted high sensitivity (97%), but required confirmatory spirometry on 80% of participants. Use of PEF only required confirmatory spirometry in only 19-22% of subjects with 83-84% sensitivity. For severe COPD, use of PEF achieved 91-93% sensitivity, requiring confirmatory spirometry in <9% of participants. Cost analysis suggested that a staged screening algorithm using only PEF initially, followed by confirmatory spirometry as needed, was the most cost-effective case finding strategy. Conclusion Our results support the use of PEF as a simple, cost-effective initial screening tool for conducting COPD case-finding in adults ≥40 years. These findings should be validated in real-world settings such as the primary care environment. PMID:22743668

  9. Progression to deep sleep is characterized by changes to BOLD dynamics in sensory cortices

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ben; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Jovicich, Jorge; Laufs, Helmut; Hasson, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Sleep has been shown to subtly disrupt the spatial organization of functional connectivity networks in the brain, but in a way that largely preserves the connectivity within sensory cortices. Here we evaluated the hypothesis that sleep does impact sensory cortices, but through alteration of activity dynamics. We therefore examined the impact of sleep on hemodynamics using a method for quantifying non-random, high frequency signatures of the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal (amplitude variance asymmetry; AVA). We found that sleep was associated with the elimination of these dynamics in a manner that is restricted to auditory, motor and visual cortices. This elimination was concurrent with increased variance of activity in these regions. Functional connectivity between regions showing AVA during wakefulness maintained a relatively consistent hierarchical structure during wakefulness and N1 and N2 sleep, despite a gradual reduction of connectivity strength as sleep progressed. Thus, sleep is related to elimination of high frequency non-random activity signatures in sensory cortices that are robust during wakefulness. The elimination of these AVA signatures conjointly with preservation of the structure of functional connectivity patterns may be linked to the need to suppress sensory inputs during sleep while still maintaining the capacity to react quickly to complex multimodal inputs. PMID:26724779

  10. BOLD Response Selective to Flow-Motion in Very Young Infants

    PubMed Central

    Tosetti, Michela; Morrone, Maria Concetta

    2015-01-01

    In adults, motion perception is mediated by an extensive network of occipital, parietal, temporal, and insular cortical areas. Little is known about the neural substrate of visual motion in infants, although behavioural studies suggest that motion perception is rudimentary at birth and matures steadily over the first few years. Here, by measuring Blood Oxygenated Level Dependent (BOLD) responses to flow versus random-motion stimuli, we demonstrate that the major cortical areas serving motion processing in adults are operative by 7 wk of age. Resting-state correlations demonstrate adult-like functional connectivity between the motion-selective associative areas, but not between primary cortex and temporo-occipital and posterior-insular cortices. Taken together, the results suggest that the development of motion perception may be limited by slow maturation of the subcortical input and of the cortico-cortical connections. In addition they support the existence of independent input to primary (V1) and temporo-occipital (V5/MT+) cortices very early in life. PMID:26418729

  11. To boldly climb: behavioural and cognitive differences in migrating European glass eels

    PubMed Central

    Podgorniak, T.; Blanchet, S.; De Oliveira, E.; Daverat, F.; Pierron, F.

    2016-01-01

    European eel (Anguilla anguilla) is a catadromous fish species that received substantial attention as its population has markedly declined in the last three decades. The possible causes of this decline include habitat fragmentation factors such as dams and weirs. In some cases, these obstacles are equipped with fish friendly passage devices that may select young eels according to their climbing behaviour. We tested how individual climbing tendency was related to the event of fishway passage experienced in the field and classified fish climbing profiles as climbing ‘leaders’, ‘followers’, ‘finishers’ and ‘no climbers’. Moreover, we analysed the brain transcription level of genes related to neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity and compared it to climbing profiles. We found that fish from the upstream segments of an impounded river had a higher climbing propensity. Their behaviour was also more repeatable throughout the whole test than the obstacle-naive fish from the downstream segment. Moreover, we found that boldly climbing ‘leaders’ had lower levels of transcription of synapse-related genes than the climbing ‘followers’. These differences could be related to coping styles of fish, where proactive ‘leaders’ express a routine and risky behaviour, whereas reactive fish need an environmental assessment before exploratory behaviour. Our study showed that differences in climbing propensity exist in glass eels separated by water obstacles. Moreover, eels could adopt climbing different strategies according to the way they deal with environmental stress and to the cognitive abilities they possess. PMID:26909192

  12. To boldly climb: behavioural and cognitive differences in migrating European glass eels.

    PubMed

    Podgorniak, T; Blanchet, S; De Oliveira, E; Daverat, F; Pierron, F

    2016-01-01

    European eel (Anguilla anguilla) is a catadromous fish species that received substantial attention as its population has markedly declined in the last three decades. The possible causes of this decline include habitat fragmentation factors such as dams and weirs. In some cases, these obstacles are equipped with fish friendly passage devices that may select young eels according to their climbing behaviour. We tested how individual climbing tendency was related to the event of fishway passage experienced in the field and classified fish climbing profiles as climbing 'leaders', 'followers', 'finishers' and 'no climbers'. Moreover, we analysed the brain transcription level of genes related to neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity and compared it to climbing profiles. We found that fish from the upstream segments of an impounded river had a higher climbing propensity. Their behaviour was also more repeatable throughout the whole test than the obstacle-naive fish from the downstream segment. Moreover, we found that boldly climbing 'leaders' had lower levels of transcription of synapse-related genes than the climbing 'followers'. These differences could be related to coping styles of fish, where proactive 'leaders' express a routine and risky behaviour, whereas reactive fish need an environmental assessment before exploratory behaviour. Our study showed that differences in climbing propensity exist in glass eels separated by water obstacles. Moreover, eels could adopt climbing different strategies according to the way they deal with environmental stress and to the cognitive abilities they possess. PMID:26909192

  13. Barcroft's bold assertion: All dwellers at high altitudes are persons of impaired physical and mental powers.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2016-03-01

    Barcroft's bold assertion that everyone at high altitude has physical and mental impairment compared with sea level was very provocative. It was a result of the expedition that he led to Cerro de Pasco in Peru, altitude 4300 m. Although it is clear that newcomers to high altitude have reduced physical powers, some people believe that this does not apply to permanent residents who have been at high altitude for generations. The best evidence supports Barcroft's contention, although permanent residents often perform better than acclimatized lowlanders. Turning to neuropsychological function, newcomers to high altitude certainly have some impairment, and there is evidence that the same applies to highlanders. However the notion that permanent residents are impaired is anathema to many people. For example the eminent Peruvian physician Carlos Monge took great exception to Barcroft's remark and even attributed it to the fact that Barcroft was suffering from acute mountain sickness when he made it! Monge referred to 'climatic aggression', by which he meant the negative consequences of the inevitable hypoxia of high altitude. Recent technological advances such as oxygen enrichment of room air can overcome this 'aggression'. This might be useful in some settings at high altitude such as a nursery where newborn babies are cared for, and possibly operating rooms where the surgeon's dexterity may be enhanced. Other situations might be dormitories, conference rooms, and perhaps some school rooms. These constitute possible ways by which the effects of Barcroft's assertion might be countered. PMID:25962370

  14. Shy birds play it safe: personality in captivity predicts risk responsiveness during reproduction in the wild.

    PubMed

    Cole, Ella F; Quinn, John L

    2014-05-01

    Despite a growing body of evidence linking personality to life-history variation and fitness, the behavioural mechanisms underlying these relationships remain poorly understood. One mechanism thought to play a key role is how individuals respond to risk. Relatively reactive and proactive (or shy and bold) personality types are expected to differ in how they manage the inherent trade-off between productivity and survival, with bold individuals being more risk-prone with lower survival probability, and shy individuals adopting a more risk-averse strategy. In the great tit (Parus major), the shy-bold personality axis has been well characterized in captivity and linked to fitness. Here, we tested whether 'exploration behaviour', a captive assay of the shy-bold axis, can predict risk responsiveness during reproduction in wild great tits. Relatively slow-exploring (shy) females took longer than fast-exploring (bold) birds to resume incubation after a novel object, representing an unknown threat, was attached to their nest-box, with some shy individuals not returning within the 40 min trial period. Risk responsiveness was consistent within individuals over days. These findings provide rare, field-based experimental evidence that shy individuals prioritize survival over reproductive investment, supporting the hypothesis that personality reflects life-history variation through links with risk responsiveness. PMID:24829251

  15. Individual differences in nicotine dependence, withdrawal symptoms, and sex predict transient fMRI-BOLD responses to smoking cues.

    PubMed

    McClernon, Francis J; Kozink, Rachel V; Rose, Jed E

    2008-08-01

    Exposure to smoking cues increases craving for cigarettes and can precipitate relapse. Whereas brain imaging studies have identified a distinct network of brain regions subserving the processing of smoking cues, little is known about the influence of individual difference factors and withdrawal symptoms on brain cue reactivity. Multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate relations between individual difference factors and withdrawal symptoms and event-related blood oxygen level-dependent responses to visual smoking cues in a sample of 30 smokers. Predictors were self-report nicotine dependence (Fagerström test of nicotine dependence, FTND), prescan withdrawal symptoms (craving and negative affect), and sex. The unique variance of each predictor was examined after controlling for each of the others. Positive associations were observed between FTND and reactivity to cues in right anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) whereas negative associations were observed between prescan craving and reactivity in ventral striatum. Higher negative affect or being male was associated with greater reactivity in left hippocampus and left OFC. Women exhibited greater cue reactivity than men in regions including the cuneus and left superior temporal gyrus. Individual difference factors and withdrawal symptoms were uniquely associated with brain reactivity to smoking cues in regions subserving reward, affect, attention, motivation, and memory. These findings provide further evidence that reactivity to conditioned drug cues is multiply determined and suggest that smoking cessation treatments designed to reduce cue reactivity focus on each of these variables. PMID:17987060

  16. Graph network analysis of immediate motor-learning induced changes in resting state BOLD

    PubMed Central

    Sami, S.; Miall, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that following learning tasks, changes in the resting state activity of the brain shape regional connections in functionally specific circuits. Here we expand on these findings by comparing changes induced in the resting state immediately following four motor tasks. Two groups of participants performed a visuo-motor joystick task with one group adapting to a transformed relationship between joystick and cursor. Two other groups were trained in either explicit or implicit procedural sequence learning. Resting state BOLD data were collected immediately before and after the tasks. We then used graph theory-based approaches that include statistical measures of functional integration and segregation to characterize changes in biologically plausible brain connectivity networks within each group. Our results demonstrate that motor learning reorganizes resting brain networks with an increase in local information transfer, as indicated by local efficiency measures that affect the brain's small world network architecture. This was particularly apparent when comparing two distinct forms of explicit motor learning: procedural learning and the joystick learning task. Both groups showed notable increases in local efficiency. However, a change in local efficiency in the inferior frontal and cerebellar regions also distinguishes between the two learning tasks. Additional graph analytic measures on the “non-learning” visuo-motor performance task revealed reversed topological patterns in comparison with the three learning tasks. These findings underscore the utility of graph-based network analysis as a novel means to compare both regional and global changes in functional brain connectivity in the resting state following motor learning tasks. PMID:23720616

  17. Cerebral Asymmetry of fMRI-BOLD Responses to Visual Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hougaard, Anders; Jensen, Bettina Hagström; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Rostrup, Egill; Hoffmann, Michael B.; Ashina, Messoud

    2015-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetry of a wide range of functions is a hallmark of the human brain. The visual system has traditionally been thought of as symmetrically distributed in the brain, but a growing body of evidence has challenged this view. Some highly specific visual tasks have been shown to depend on hemispheric specialization. However, the possible lateralization of cerebral responses to a simple checkerboard visual stimulation has not been a focus of previous studies. To investigate this, we performed two sessions of blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 54 healthy subjects during stimulation with a black and white checkerboard visual stimulus. While carefully excluding possible non-physiological causes of left-to-right bias, we compared the activation of the left and the right cerebral hemispheres and related this to grey matter volume, handedness, age, gender, ocular dominance, interocular difference in visual acuity, as well as line-bisection performance. We found a general lateralization of cerebral activation towards the right hemisphere of early visual cortical areas and areas of higher-level visual processing, involved in visuospatial attention, especially in top-down (i.e., goal-oriented) attentional processing. This right hemisphere lateralization was partly, but not completely, explained by an increased grey matter volume in the right hemisphere of the early visual areas. Difference in activation of the superior parietal lobule was correlated with subject age, suggesting a shift towards the left hemisphere with increasing age. Our findings suggest a right-hemispheric dominance of these areas, which could lend support to the generally observed leftward visual attentional bias and to the left hemifield advantage for some visual perception tasks. PMID:25985078

  18. Chronic Airflow Obstruction in a Black African Population: Results of BOLD Study, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Obaseki, Daniel O; Erhabor, Gregory E; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Adewole, Olufemi O; Buist, Sonia A; Burney, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    Global estimates suggest that Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is emerging as a leading cause of death in developing countries but there are few spirometry-based general population data on its prevalence and risk factors in sub-Saharan Africa. We used the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) protocol to select a representative sample of adults aged 40 years and above in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. All the participants underwent spirometry and provided information on smoking history, biomass and occupational exposures as well as diagnosed respiratory diseases and symptoms. Chronic Airflow Obstruction (CAO) was defined as the ratio of post-bronchodilator (BD) one second Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1) to Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) below the lower limit of normal (LLN) of the population distribution for FEV1/FVC. The overall prevalence of obstruction (post-BD FEV1/FVC < LLN) was 7.7% (2.7% above LLN) using Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) equations. It was associated with few respiratory symptoms; 0.3% reported a previous doctor-diagnosed chronic bronchitis, emphysema or COPD. Independent predictors included a lack of education (OR 2.5, 95% CI: 1.0, 6.4) and a diagnosis of either TB (OR 23.4, 95% CI: 2.0, 278.6) or asthma (OR 35.4, 95%CI: 4.9, 255.8). There was no association with the use of firewood or coal for cooking or heating. The vast majority of this population (89%) are never smokers. We conclude that the prevalence of CAO is low in Ile-Ife, Nigeria and unrelated to biomass exposure. The key independent predictors are poor education, and previous diagnosis of tuberculosis or asthma. PMID:26451840

  19. To Boldly Go: America's Next Era in Space. The Universe Now and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. France Cordova, NASA's Chief Scientist opened this, the third session in the NASA Administrator's Seminar Series, by asking the following question: 'What would be a bold and aspiring agenda for America's next era in space?' It aimed at answering the following questions: What do we know about the universe? How do we know it? (Dr. Cordova also mentioned that the first seminar was about the definition of cellular life and how to recognize it, and featured as speakers, Dr. Lynn Margoles and Dr. Leslie Orgle.) Administrator Daniel S. Goldin was introduced; he welcomed the attendees, and remarked that NASA personnel have a critical need to explain to Congress and the public why a space program is important. Congress and the public pay for the space programs. Therefore the programs' importance cannot remain in the sole domain of scientists. The first speaker, Dr. Vera Ruben of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism at the Carnegie Institute of Washington, was introduced as an art historian expert in cosmology and an observational astronomer. Dr. Ruben brought up a number of questions regarding the substance, location, and origin of dark matter, radiation, galaxies, and the lumpy structure of galaxies in space, as well as the age and density of our universe. The next speaker was Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, a theoretical astrophysicist from Princeton University's Department of Astrophysical Sciences. The final speaker, Dr. Linda Schale is a cosmologist from the University of Texas at Austin. She was said to be a 'paleontologist of the human mind' who tries 'to understand mechanisms people use to understand the world'. The concluding discussion centered on why NASA scientists don t communicate better with people who are not highly educated. This is a big concern because to continue its work, NASA needs to communicate the importance of its goals to the average person. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  20. BOLD fMRI in awake prairie voles: A platform for translational social and affective neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Yee, J R; Kenkel, W M; Kulkarni, P; Moore, K; Perkeybile, A M; Toddes, S; Amacker, J A; Carter, C S; Ferris, C F

    2016-09-01

    The advancement of neuroscience depends on continued improvement in methods and models. Here, we present novel techniques for the use of awake functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) - an important step forward in minimally-invasive measurement of neural activity in a non-traditional animal model. Imaging neural responses in prairie voles, a species studied for its propensity to form strong and selective social bonds, is expected to greatly advance our mechanistic understanding of complex social and affective processes. The use of ultra-high-field fMRI allows for recording changes in region-specific activity throughout the entire brain simultaneously and with high temporal and spatial resolutions. By imaging neural responses in awake animals, with minimal invasiveness, we are able to avoid the confound of anesthesia, broaden the scope of possible stimuli, and potentially make use of repeated scans from the same animals. These methods are made possible by the development of an annotated and segmented 3D vole brain atlas and software for image analysis. The use of these methods in the prairie vole provides an opportunity to broaden neuroscientific investigation of behavior via a comparative approach, which highlights the ethological relevance of pro-social behaviors shared between voles and humans, such as communal breeding, selective social bonds, social buffering of stress, and caregiving behaviors. Results using these methods show that fMRI in the prairie vole is capable of yielding robust blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes in response to hypercapnic challenge (inhaled 5% CO2), region-specific physical challenge (unilateral whisker stimulation), and presentation of a set of novel odors. Complementary analyses of repeated restraint sessions in the imaging hardware suggest that voles do not require acclimation to this procedure. Taken together, awake vole fMRI represents a new arena of neurobiological

  1. BOLD signal in insula is differentially related to cardiac function during compassion meditation in experts vs. novices

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Antoine; Greischar, Lawrence L.; Perlman, David; Davidson, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    The brain and the cardiovascular system influence each other during the processing of emotion. The study of the interactions of these systems during emotion regulation has been limited in human functional neuroimaging, despite its potential importance for physical health. We have previously reported that mental expertise in cultivation of compassion alters the activation of circuits linked with empathy and theory of mind in response to emotional stimuli. Guided by the finding that heart rate increases more during blocks of compassion meditation than neutral states, especially for experts, we examined the interaction between State (compassion vs. neutral) and Group (novice, expert) on the relation between heart rate and BOLD signal during presentation of emotional sounds presented during each state. Our findings revealed that BOLD signal in the right middle insula showed a significantly stronger association with heart rate (HR) across state and group. This association was stronger in the left middle/ posterior insula when experts were compared to novices. The positive coupling of HR and BOLD was higher within the compassion state than within the neutral state in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex for both groups, underlining the role of this region in the modulation of bodily arousal states. This state effect was stronger for experts than novices in somato-sensory cortices and the right inferior parietal lobule (group by state interaction). These data confirm that compassion enhances the emotional and somatosensory brain representations of others' emotions, and that this effect is modulated by expertise. Future studies are needed to further investigate the impact of compassion training on these circuits. PMID:19426817

  2. Increased sensitivity of fast BOLD fMRI with a subject-specific hemodynamic response function and application to epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Sébastien; Safi-Harb, Mouna; Levan, Pierre; An, Dongmei; Watanabe, Satsuki; Gotman, Jean

    2014-06-01

    Activation detection in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) typically assumes the hemodynamic response to neuronal activity to be invariant across brain regions and subjects. Reports of substantial variability of the morphology of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) responses are accumulating, suggesting that the use of a single generic model of the expected response in general linear model (GLM) analyses does not provide optimal sensitivity due to model misspecification. Relaxing assumptions of the model can limit the impact of hemodynamic response function (HRF) variability, but at a cost on model parsimony. Alternatively, better specification of the model could be obtained from a priori knowledge of the HRF of a given subject, but the effectiveness of this approach has only been tested on simulation data. Using fast BOLD fMRI, we characterized the variability of hemodynamic responses to a simple event-related auditory-motor task, as well as its effect on activation detection with GLM analyses. We show the variability to be higher between subjects than between regions and variation in different regions to correlate from one subject to the other. Accounting for subject-related variability by deriving subject-specific models from responses to the task in some regions lead to more sensitive detection of responses in other regions. We applied the approach to epilepsy patients, where task-derived patient-specific models provided additional information compared to the use of a generic model for the detection of BOLD responses to epileptiform activity identified on scalp electro-encephalogram (EEG). This work highlights the importance of improving the accuracy of the model for detecting neuronal activation with fMRI, and the fact that it can be done at no cost to model parsimony through the acquisition of independent a priori information about the hemodynamic response. PMID:24582920

  3. The hypnotic zolpidem increases the synchrony of BOLD signal fluctuations in widespread brain networks during a resting paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Licata, Stephanie C.; Nickerson, Lisa D.; Lowen, Steven B.; Trksak, George H.; MacLean, Robert R.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Networks of brain regions having synchronized fluctuations of the blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) time-series at rest, or “resting state networks” (RSNs), are emerging as a basis for understanding intrinsic brain activity. RSNs are topographically consistent with activity-related networks subserving sensory, motor, and cognitive processes, and studying their spontaneous fluctuations following acute drug challenge may provide a way to understand better the neuroanatomical substrates of drug action. The present within-subject double-blind study used BOLD fMRI at 3T to investigate the functional networks influenced by the non-benzodiazepine hypnotic zolpidem (Ambien®). Zolpidem is a positive modulator of γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptors, and engenders sedative effects that may be explained in part by how it modulates intrinsic brain activity. Healthy participants (n= 12) underwent fMRI scanning 45 min after acute oral administration of zolpidem (0, 5, 10, or 20 mg), and changes in BOLD signal were measured while participants gazed at a static fixation point (i.e., at rest). Data were analyzed using group independent component analysis (ICA) with dual regression and results indicated that compared to placebo, the highest dose of zolpidem increased functional connectivity within a number of sensory, motor, and limbic networks. These results are consistent with previous studies showing an increase in functional connectivity at rest following administration of the positive GABAA receptor modulators midazolam and alcohol, and suggest that investigating how zolpidem modulates intrinsic brain activity may have implications for understanding the etiology of its powerful sedative effects. PMID:23296183

  4. Characterization of regional heterogeneity in cerebrovascular reactivity dynamics using novel hypocapnia task and BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Bright, Molly G; Bulte, Daniel P; Jezzard, Peter; Duyn, Jeff H

    2009-10-15

    We offer a new method for characterizing the magnitude and dynamics of the vascular response to changes in arterial gas tensions using non-invasive blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) and paradigms appropriate for clinical settings. A novel respiratory task, "Cued Deep Breathing" (CDB), consisting of two consecutive cycles of cued breaths, has been developed to cause transient hypocapnia, and consequently a strong, short-lived BOLD signal decrease. Data from CDB hypocapnia paradigms and traditional breath-holding hypercapnia paradigms were analyzed on a voxel-wise basis to map regional heterogeneity in magnitude and timing parameters. The tasks caused comparable absolute BOLD percent signal changes (approximately 0.5-3.0% in gray matter) and both datasets suggested consistent regional heterogeneity in the response timing: parts of the basal ganglia, particularly the putamen, and bilateral areas of medial cortex reached their maximum signal change several seconds earlier than remaining cortical gray matter voxels. This phenomenon and a slightly delayed response in posterior cortical regions were present in group-maps of ten healthy subjects. An auxiliary experiment in different subjects measured end-tidal CO2 changes associated with the new CDB task and quantitatively compared the resulting reactivity maps with those acquired using a traditional hypercapnia challenge of 4% CO2 gas inspiration. The CDB task caused average end-tidal CO2 decreases between 6.0+/-1.1 and 10.5+/-2.6 mm Hg, with levels returning to baseline after approximately three breaths, giving evidence that the task indeed causes transient mild hypocapnia. Similarity between resulting reactivity maps suggest CDB offers an alternative method for mapping cerebrovascular reactivity. PMID:19450694

  5. Relative changes of cerebral arterial and venous blood volumes during increased cerebral blood flow: implications for BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Lee, S P; Duong, T Q; Yang, G; Iadecola, C; Kim, S G

    2001-05-01

    Measurement of cerebral arterial and venous blood volumes during increased cerebral blood flow can provide important information regarding hemodynamic regulation under normal, pathological, and neuronally active conditions. In particular, the change in venous blood volume induced by neural activity is one critical component of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal because BOLD contrast is dependent only on venous blood, not arterial blood. Thus, relative venous and arterial blood volume (rCBV) and cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in alpha-chlorolase-anesthetized rats under hypercapnia were measured by novel diffusion-weighted (19)F NMR following an i.v. administration of intravascular tracer, perfluorocarbons, and continuous arterial spin labeling methods, respectively. The relationship between rCBF and total rCBV during hypercapnia was rCBV(total) = rCBF(0.40), which is consistent with previous PET measurement in monkeys. This relationship can be linearized in a CBF range of 50-130 ml/100 g/min as DeltarCBV(total)/ DeltarCBF = 0.31 where DeltarCBV and DeltarCBF represent rCBV and rCBF changes. The average arterial volume fraction was 0.25 at a basal condition with CBF of approximately 60 ml/100 g/min and increased up to 0.4 during hypercapnia. The change in venous rCBV was 2-fold smaller than that of total rCBV (DeltarCBV(vein)/DeltarCBF = 0.15), while the arterial rCBV change was 2.5 times larger than that of total rCBV (DeltarCBV(artery)/DeltarCBF = 0.79). These NMR results were confirmed by vessel diameter measurements with in vivo videomicroscopy. The absolute venous blood volume change contributes up to 36% of the total blood volume change during hypercapnia. Our findings provide a quantitative physiological model of BOLD contrast. PMID:11323805

  6. BOLD-based Techniques for Quantifying Brain Hemodynamic and Metabolic Properties – Theoretical Models and Experimental Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Sukstanskii, Alexander L.; He, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of brain hemodynamics and metabolism, particularly the relationship between brain function and oxygen utilization, is important for understanding normal human brain operation as well as pathophysiology of neurological disorders. It can also be of great importance for evaluation of hypoxia within tumors of the brain and other organs. A fundamental discovery by Ogawa and co-workers of the BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) contrast opened a possibility to use this effect to study brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties by means of MRI measurements. Such measurements require developing theoretical models connecting MRI signal to brain structure and functioning and designing experimental techniques allowing MR measurements of salient features of theoretical models. In our review we discuss several such theoretical models and experimental methods for quantification brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties. Our review aims mostly at methods for measuring oxygen extraction fraction, OEF, based on measuring blood oxygenation level. Combining measurement of OEF with measurement of CBF allows evaluation of oxygen consumption, CMRO2. We first consider in detail magnetic properties of blood – magnetic susceptibility, MR relaxation and theoretical models of intravascular contribution to MR signal under different experimental conditions. Then, we describe a “through-space” effect – the influence of inhomogeneous magnetic fields, created in the extravascular space by intravascular deoxygenated blood, on the MR signal formation. Further we describe several experimental techniques taking advantage of these theoretical models. Some of these techniques - MR susceptometry, and T2-based quantification of oxygen OEF – utilize intravascular MR signal. Another technique – qBOLD – evaluates OEF by making use of through-space effects. In this review we targeted both scientists just entering the MR field and more experienced MR researchers

  7. Streamlining the use of BOLD specimen data to record species distributions: a case study with ten Nearctic species of Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    PubMed Central

    Penev, Lyubomir; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; Smith, M. Alex; Sones, Jayme; Telfer, Angela; deWaard, Jeremy R.; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) is designed to support the generation and application of DNA barcode data, but it also provides a unique source of data with potential for many research uses. This paper explores the streamlining of BOLD specimen data to record species distributions – and its fast publication using the Biodiversity Data Journal (BDJ), and its authoring platform, the Pensoft Writing Tool (PWT). We selected a sample of 630 specimens and 10 species of a highly diverse group of parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Microgastrinae) from the Nearctic region and used the information in BOLD to uncover a significant number of new records (of locality, provinces, territories and states). By converting specimen information (such as locality, collection date, collector, voucher depository) from the BOLD platform to the Excel template provided by the PWT, it is possible to quickly upload and generate long lists of "Material Examined" for papers discussing taxonomy, ecology and/or new distribution records of species. For the vast majority of publications including DNA barcodes, the generation and publication of ancillary data associated with the barcoded material is seldom highlighted and often disregarded, and the analysis of those data sets to uncover new distribution patterns of species has rarely been explored, even though many BOLD records represent new and/or significant discoveries. The introduction of journals specializing in – and streamlining – the release of these datasets, such as the BDJ, should facilitate thorough analysis of these records, as shown in this paper. PMID:25473326

  8. Study of the spatial correlation between neuronal activity and BOLD fMRI responses evoked by sensory and channelrhodopsin-2 stimulation in the rat somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; van Zijl, Peter; Thakor, Nitish; Pelled, Galit

    2014-01-01

    In this work we combined optogenetics tools with high-resolution blood oxygenation level dependent functional MRI (BOLD fMRI), electrophysiology, and optical imaging of cerebral blood flow (CBF), to study the spatial correlation between the hemodynamic responses and neuronal activity. We first investigated the spatial and temporal characteristics of BOLD fMRI and the underlying neuronal responses evoked by sensory stimulations at different frequencies. The results demonstrated that under dexmedetomidine anesthesia, BOLD fMRI and neuronal activity in the rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) have different frequency - dependency and distinct laminar activation profiles. We the found that localized activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expressed in neurons throughout the cortex induced neuronal responses that were confined to the light stimulation S1 region (<500 μm) with distinct laminar activation profile. However, the spatial extent of the hemodynamic responses measured by CBF and BOLD fMRI induced by both ChR2 and sensory stimulation were greater than 3 mm. These results suggest that due to the complex neurovascular coupling it is challenging to determine specific characteristics of the underlying neuronal activity exclusively from the BOLD fMRI signals. PMID:24443233

  9. Coupling of fMRI and NIRS measurements in the study of negative BOLD response to intermittent photic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Maggioni, E; Molteni, E; Arrigoni, F; Zucca, C; Reni, G; Triulzi, F M; Bianchi, A M

    2013-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) in combination with Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) is finding widespread use in the analysis of brain function. While most of the studies deal with the detection of positive responses, here we focus on negative responses to visual stimulation. In a group fMRI study on Intermittent Photic Stimulation (IPS) we detected a sustained Negative BOLD Response (NBR) in the extrastriate visual cortex. To confirm and better characterize NBR, we repeated the same protocol during NIRS recordings. In this paper we show fMRI results and demonstrate the NBR on the basis of NIRS findings. PMID:24109953

  10. Using an achiasmic human visual system to quantify the relationship between the fMRI BOLD signal and neural response

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Pinglei; Purington, Christopher J; Tjan, Bosco S

    2015-01-01

    Achiasma in humans causes gross mis-wiring of the retinal-fugal projection, resulting in overlapped cortical representations of left and right visual hemifields. We show that in areas V1-V3 this overlap is due to two co-located but non-interacting populations of neurons, each with a receptive field serving only one hemifield. Importantly, the two populations share the same local vascular control, resulting in a unique organization useful for quantifying the relationship between neural and fMRI BOLD responses without direct measurement of neural activity. Specifically, we can non-invasively double local neural responses by stimulating both neuronal populations with identical stimuli presented symmetrically across the vertical meridian to both visual hemifields, versus one population by stimulating in one hemifield. Measurements from a series of such doubling experiments show that the amplitude of BOLD response is proportional to approximately 0.5 power of the underlying neural response. Reanalyzing published data shows that this inferred relationship is general. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09600.001 PMID:26613411

  11. The fMRI BOLD response to unisensory and multisensory smoking cues in nicotine-dependent adults.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Bernadette M; Uhde, Thomas W; Brady, Kathleen T; McClernon, F Joseph; Yang, Qing X; Collins, Heather R; LeMatty, Todd; Hartwell, Karen J

    2015-12-30

    Given that the vast majority of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of drug cue reactivity use unisensory visual cues, but that multisensory cues may elicit greater craving-related brain responses, the current study sought to compare the fMRI BOLD response to unisensory visual and multisensory, visual plus odor, smoking cues in 17 nicotine-dependent adult cigarette smokers. Brain activation to smoking-related, compared to neutral, pictures was assessed under cigarette smoke and odorless odor conditions. While smoking pictures elicited a pattern of activation consistent with the addiction literature, the multisensory (odor+picture) smoking cues elicited significantly greater and more widespread activation in mainly frontal and temporal regions. BOLD signal elicited by the multisensory, but not unisensory cues, was significantly related to participants' level of control over craving as well. Results demonstrated that the co-presentation of cigarette smoke odor with smoking-related visual cues, compared to the visual cues alone, elicited greater levels of craving-related brain activation in key regions implicated in reward. These preliminary findings support future research aimed at a better understanding of multisensory integration of drug cues and craving. PMID:26475784

  12. MEG and fMRI Fusion for Non-Linear Estimation of Neural and BOLD Signal Changes.

    PubMed

    Plis, Sergey M; Calhoun, Vince D; Weisend, Michael P; Eichele, Tom; Lane, Terran

    2010-01-01

    The combined analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG)/electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements can lead to improvement in the description of the dynamical and spatial properties of brain activity. In this paper we empirically demonstrate this improvement using simulated and recorded task related MEG and fMRI activity. Neural activity estimates were derived using a dynamic Bayesian network with continuous real valued parameters by means of a sequential Monte Carlo technique. In synthetic data, we show that MEG and fMRI fusion improves estimation of the indirectly observed neural activity and smooths tracking of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response. In recordings of task related neural activity the combination of MEG and fMRI produces a result with greater signal-to-noise ratio, that confirms the expectation arising from the nature of the experiment. The highly non-linear model of the BOLD response poses a difficult inference problem for neural activity estimation; computational requirements are also high due to the time and space complexity. We show that joint analysis of the data improves the system's behavior by stabilizing the differential equations system and by requiring fewer computational resources. PMID:21120141

  13. MEG and fMRI Fusion for Non-Linear Estimation of Neural and BOLD Signal Changes

    PubMed Central

    Plis, Sergey M.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Weisend, Michael P.; Eichele, Tom; Lane, Terran

    2010-01-01

    The combined analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG)/electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements can lead to improvement in the description of the dynamical and spatial properties of brain activity. In this paper we empirically demonstrate this improvement using simulated and recorded task related MEG and fMRI activity. Neural activity estimates were derived using a dynamic Bayesian network with continuous real valued parameters by means of a sequential Monte Carlo technique. In synthetic data, we show that MEG and fMRI fusion improves estimation of the indirectly observed neural activity and smooths tracking of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response. In recordings of task related neural activity the combination of MEG and fMRI produces a result with greater signal-to-noise ratio, that confirms the expectation arising from the nature of the experiment. The highly non-linear model of the BOLD response poses a difficult inference problem for neural activity estimation; computational requirements are also high due to the time and space complexity. We show that joint analysis of the data improves the system's behavior by stabilizing the differential equations system and by requiring fewer computational resources. PMID:21120141

  14. A behavioral view on chimpanzee personality: exploration tendency, persistence, boldness, and tool-orientation measured with group experiments.

    PubMed

    Massen, Jorg J M; Antonides, Alexandra; Arnold, Anne-Marie K; Bionda, Thomas; Koski, Sonja E

    2013-09-01

    Human and nonhuman animals show personality: temporal and contextual consistency in behavior patterns that vary among individuals. In contrast to most other species, personality of chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, has mainly been studied with non-behavioral methods. We examined boldness, exploration tendency, persistence and tool-orientation in 29 captive chimpanzees using repeated experiments conducted in an ecologically valid social setting. High temporal repeatability and contextual consistency in all these traits indicated they reflected personality. In addition, Principal Component Analysis revealed two independent syndromes, labeled exploration-persistence and boldness. We found no sex or rank differences in the trait scores, but the scores declined with age. Nonetheless, there was considerable inter-individual variation within age-classes, suggesting that behavior was not merely determined by age but also by dispositional effects. In conclusion, our study complements earlier rating studies and adds new traits to the chimpanzee personality, thereby supporting the existence of multiple personality traits among chimpanzees. We stress the importance of ecologically valid behavioral research to assess multiple personality traits and their association, as it allows inclusion of ape studies in the comparison of personality structures across species studied behaviorally, and furthers our attempts to unravel the causes and consequences of animal personality. PMID:23649750

  15. Oxygenation in cervical cancer and normal uterine cervix assessed using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) MRI at 3T.

    PubMed

    Hallac, Rami R; Ding, Yao; Yuan, Qing; McColl, Roderick W; Lea, Jayanthi; Sims, Robert D; Weatherall, Paul T; Mason, Ralph P

    2012-12-01

    Hypoxia is reported to be a biomarker for poor prognosis in cervical cancer. However, a practical noninvasive method is needed for the routine clinical evaluation of tumor hypoxia. This study examined the potential use of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast MRI as a noninvasive technique to assess tumor vascular oxygenation at 3T. Following Institutional Review Board-approved informed consent and in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, successful results were achieved in nine patients with locally advanced cervical cancer [International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIA to IVA] and three normal volunteers. In the first four patients, dynamic T₂*-weighted MRI was performed in the transaxial plane using a multi-shot echo planar imaging sequence whilst patients breathed room air followed by oxygen (15 dm³/min). Later, a multi-echo gradient echo examination was added to provide quantitative R₂* measurements. The baseline T₂*-weighted signal intensity was quite stable, but increased to various extents in tumors on initiation of oxygen breathing. The signal in normal uterus increased significantly, whereas that in the iliacus muscle did not change. R₂* responded significantly in healthy uterus, cervix and eight cervical tumors. This preliminary study demonstrates that BOLD MRI of cervical cancer at 3T is feasible. However, more patients must be evaluated and followed clinically before any prognostic value can be determined. PMID:22619091

  16. The role of font size and font style in younger and older adults' predicted and actual recall performance.

    PubMed

    Price, Jodi; McElroy, Kelsey; Martin, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    We examined how font sizes (18pt., 48 pt.) and font styles (regular, italic, bold) influenced younger and older adults' judgments of learning (JOLs) and recall. In Experiment 1 younger adults gave higher JOLs and obtained higher recall than older adults. However, JOLs and recall varied for both age groups as a function of font size and font style manipulations despite a tendency for both groups to predict higher recall for items in large and in regular and italic styles than for small and bold fonts and achieve higher recall for regular than italic or bold items. No age differences were found in relative accuracy, with near-perfect calibration in absolute accuracy for younger and older adults. Experiment 2 presented a description of Experiment 1 and asked participants to predict recall for the various font size/style combinations. Younger and older adults predicted higher recall for large than small font items, regardless of font style, and higher recall for bold than regular or italic styles, regardless of font size. Memory predictions did not align across experiments, suggesting that memory beliefs combine with processing fluency to affect JOLs and recall. PMID:26513175

  17. Linear aspects of transformation from interictal epileptic discharges to BOLD fMRI signals in an animal model of occipital epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mirsattari, Seyed M; Wang, Zheng; Ives, John R; Bihari, Frank; Leung, L Stan; Bartha, Robert; Menon, Ravi S

    2006-05-01

    Epileptic disorders manifest with seizures and interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs). The hemodynamic changes that accompany IEDs are poorly understood and may be critical for understanding epileptogenesis. Despite a known linear coupling of the neurovascular elements in normal brain tissues, previous simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG)-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown variable correlations between epileptic discharges and blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response, partly because most previous studies assumed particular hemodynamic properties in normal brain tissue. The occurrence of IEDs in human subjects is unpredictable. Therefore, an animal model with reproducible stereotyped IEDs was developed by the focal injection of penicillin into the right occipital cortex of rats anesthetized with isoflurane. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI was used to study the hemodynamic changes during IEDs. A hybrid of temporal independent component analysis (ICA) of EEG and spatial ICA of fMRI data was used to correlate BOLD fMRI signals with IEDs. A linear autoregression with exogenous input (ARX) model was used to estimate the hemodynamic impulse response function (HIRF) based on the data from simultaneous EEG-fMRI measurement. Changes in the measured BOLD signal from the right primary visual cortex and bilateral visual association cortices were consistently coupled to IEDs. The linear ARX model was applied here to confirm that a linear transform can be used to study the correlation between BOLD signal and its corresponding neural activity in this animal model of occipital epilepsy. PMID:16414283

  18. Patterns of Cortical Oscillations Organize Neural Activity into Whole-Brain Functional Networks Evident in the fMRI BOLD Signal

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, Jennifer C.; Ward, Lawrence M.; Woodward, Todd S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings from electrophysiology and multimodal neuroimaging have elucidated the relationship between patterns of cortical oscillations evident in EEG/MEG and the functional brain networks evident in the BOLD signal. Much of the existing literature emphasized how high-frequency cortical oscillations are thought to coordinate neural activity locally, while low-frequency oscillations play a role in coordinating activity between more distant brain regions. However, the assignment of different frequencies to different spatial scales is an oversimplification. A more informative approach is to explore the arrangements by which these low- and high-frequency oscillations work in concert, coordinating neural activity into whole-brain functional networks. When relating such networks to the BOLD signal, we must consider how the patterns of cortical oscillations change at the same speed as cognitive states, which often last less than a second. Consequently, the slower BOLD signal may often reflect the summed neural activity of several transient network configurations. This temporal mismatch can be circumvented if we use spatial maps to assess correspondence between oscillatory networks and BOLD networks. PMID:23504590

  19. Patterns of Cortical Oscillations Organize Neural Activity into Whole-Brain Functional Networks Evident in the fMRI BOLD Signal.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Jennifer C; Ward, Lawrence M; Woodward, Todd S

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings from electrophysiology and multimodal neuroimaging have elucidated the relationship between patterns of cortical oscillations evident in EEG/MEG and the functional brain networks evident in the BOLD signal. Much of the existing literature emphasized how high-frequency cortical oscillations are thought to coordinate neural activity locally, while low-frequency oscillations play a role in coordinating activity between more distant brain regions. However, the assignment of different frequencies to different spatial scales is an oversimplification. A more informative approach is to explore the arrangements by which these low- and high-frequency oscillations work in concert, coordinating neural activity into whole-brain functional networks. When relating such networks to the BOLD signal, we must consider how the patterns of cortical oscillations change at the same speed as cognitive states, which often last less than a second. Consequently, the slower BOLD signal may often reflect the summed neural activity of several transient network configurations. This temporal mismatch can be circumvented if we use spatial maps to assess correspondence between oscillatory networks and BOLD networks. PMID:23504590

  20. BOLD fMRI of C-Fiber Mediated Nociceptive Processing in Mouse Brain in Response to Thermal Stimulation of the Forepaws

    PubMed Central

    Bosshard, Simone C.; Stuker, Florian; von Deuster, Constantin; Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in rodents enables non-invasive studies of brain function in response to peripheral input or at rest. In this study we describe a thermal stimulation paradigm using infrared laser diodes to apply noxious heat to the forepaw of mice in order to study nociceptive processing. Stimulation at 45 and 46°C led to robust BOLD signal changes in various brain structures including the somatosensory cortices and the thalamus. The BOLD signal amplitude scaled with the temperature applied but not with the area irradiated by the laser beam. To demonstrate the specificity of the paradigm for assessing nociceptive signaling we administered the quaternary lidocaine derivative QX-314 to the forepaws, which due to its positive charge cannot readily cross biological membranes. However, upon activation of TRPV1 channels following the administration of capsaicin the BOLD signal was largely abolished, indicative of a selective block of the C-fiber nociceptors due to QX-314 having entered the cells via the now open TRPV1 channels. This demonstrates that the cerebral BOLD response to thermal noxious paw stimulation is specifically mediated by C-fibers. PMID:25950440

  1. Using a novel source-localized phase regressor technique for evaluation of the vascular contribution to semantic category area localization in BOLD fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Vu, An T.; Gallant, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that gradient-echo blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI is biased toward large draining veins. However, the impact of this large vein bias on the localization and characterization of semantic category areas has not been examined. Here we address this issue by comparing standard magnitude measures of BOLD activity in the Fusiform Face Area (FFA) and Parahippocampal Place Area (PPA) to those obtained using a novel method that suppresses the contribution of large draining veins: source-localized phase regressor (sPR). Unlike previous suppression methods that utilize the phase component of the BOLD signal, sPR yields robust and unbiased suppression of large draining veins even in voxels with no task-related phase changes. This is confirmed in ideal simulated data as well as in FFA/PPA localization data from four subjects. It was found that approximately 38% of right PPA, 14% of left PPA, 16% of right FFA, and 6% of left FFA voxels predominantly reflect signal from large draining veins. Surprisingly, with the contributions from large veins suppressed, semantic category representation in PPA actually tends to be lateralized to the left rather than the right hemisphere. Furthermore, semantic category areas larger in volume and higher in fSNR were found to have more contributions from large veins. These results suggest that previous studies using gradient-echo BOLD fMRI were biased toward semantic category areas that receive relatively greater contributions from large veins. PMID:26578868

  2. Disruption of Performance in the 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task Induced by Administration of NMDA Receptor Antagonists: Relevance to Cognitive Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Amitai, Nurith; Markou, Athina

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients suffer from cognitive impairments that are not satisfactorily treated by currently available medications. Cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia encompasses deficits in several cognitive modalities that can be differentially responsive to different medications and are likely to be mediated by different neurobiological substrates. Translational animal models of cognitive deficits with relevance to schizophrenia are critical for gaining insights into the mechanisms underlying these impairments and developing more effective treatments. The 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) is a cognitive task used in rodents that allows simultaneous assessment of several cognitive modalities, including attention, response inhibition, cognitive flexibility, and processing speed. Administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonists disrupts multiple 5-CSRTT performance measures in a way that mirrors various cognitive deficits exhibited by schizophrenia patients. Some of these disruptions are partially attenuated by antipsychotic medications that exhibit partial effectiveness on cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia, suggesting that the model has predictive validity. Examination of the effects of pharmacological manipulations on 5-CSRTT performance disruptions induced by NMDA antagonists have implicated a range of brain regions, neurotransmitter systems, and specific receptor subtypes in schizophrenia-like impairment of different cognitive modalities. Thus, disruption of 5-CSRTT performance by NMDA antagonists represents a valuable tool for exploring the neurobiological bases of cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:20488434

  3. Alterations in task-induced activity and resting-state fluctuations in visual and DMN areas revealed in long-term meditators.

    PubMed

    Berkovich-Ohana, Aviva; Harel, Michal; Hahamy, Avital; Arieli, Amos; Malach, Rafael

    2016-07-15

    Recently we proposed that the information contained in spontaneously emerging (resting-state) fluctuations may reflect individually unique neuro-cognitive traits. One prediction of this conjecture, termed the "spontaneous trait reactivation" (STR) hypothesis, is that resting-state activity patterns could be diagnostic of unique personalities, talents and life-styles of individuals. Long-term meditators could provide a unique experimental group to test this hypothesis. Using fMRI we found that, during resting-state, the amplitude of spontaneous fluctuations in long-term mindfulness meditation (MM) practitioners was enhanced in the visual cortex and significantly reduced in the DMN compared to naïve controls. Importantly, during a visual recognition memory task, the MM group showed heightened visual cortex responsivity, concomitant with weaker negative responses in Default Mode Network (DMN) areas. This effect was also reflected in the behavioral performance, where MM practitioners performed significantly faster than the control group. Thus, our results uncover opposite changes in the visual and default mode systems in long-term meditators which are revealed during both rest and task. The results support the STR hypothesis and extend it to the domain of local changes in the magnitude of the spontaneous fluctuations. PMID:27109713

  4. Is domestication driven by reduced fear of humans? Boldness, metabolism and serotonin levels in divergently selected red junglefowl (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Agnvall, Beatrix; Katajamaa, Rebecca; Altimiras, Jordi; Jensen, Per

    2015-09-01

    Domesticated animals tend to develop a coherent set of phenotypic traits. Tameness could be a central underlying factor driving this, and we therefore selected red junglefowl, ancestors of all domestic chickens, for high or low fear of humans during six generations. We measured basal metabolic rate (BMR), feed efficiency, boldness in a novel object (NO) test, corticosterone reactivity and basal serotonin levels (related to fearfulness) in birds from the fifth and sixth generation of the high- and low-fear lines, respectively (44-48 individuals). Corticosterone response to physical restraint did not differ between selection lines. However, BMR was higher in low-fear birds, as was feed efficiency. Low-fear males had higher plasma levels of serotonin and both low-fear males and females were bolder in an NO test. The results show that many aspects of the domesticated phenotype may have developed as correlated responses to reduced fear of humans, an essential trait for successful domestication. PMID:26382075

  5. Is domestication driven by reduced fear of humans? Boldness, metabolism and serotonin levels in divergently selected red junglefowl (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Agnvall, Beatrix; Katajamaa, Rebecca; Altimiras, Jordi; Jensen, Per

    2015-01-01

    Domesticated animals tend to develop a coherent set of phenotypic traits. Tameness could be a central underlying factor driving this, and we therefore selected red junglefowl, ancestors of all domestic chickens, for high or low fear of humans during six generations. We measured basal metabolic rate (BMR), feed efficiency, boldness in a novel object (NO) test, corticosterone reactivity and basal serotonin levels (related to fearfulness) in birds from the fifth and sixth generation of the high- and low-fear lines, respectively (44–48 individuals). Corticosterone response to physical restraint did not differ between selection lines. However, BMR was higher in low-fear birds, as was feed efficiency. Low-fear males had higher plasma levels of serotonin and both low-fear males and females were bolder in an NO test. The results show that many aspects of the domesticated phenotype may have developed as correlated responses to reduced fear of humans, an essential trait for successful domestication. PMID:26382075

  6. Modeling of region-specific fMRI BOLD neurovascular response functions in rat brain reveals residual differences that correlate with the differences in regional evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Pawela, Christopher P; Hudetz, Anthony G; Ward, B Douglas; Schulte, Marie L; Li, Rupeng; Kao, Dennis S; Mauck, Matthew C; Cho, Younghoon R; Neitz, Jay; Hyde, James S

    2008-06-01

    The response of the rat visual system to flashes of blue light has been studied by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The BOLD temporal response is dependent on the number of flashes presented and demonstrates a refractory period that depends on flash frequency. Activated brain regions included the primary and secondary visual cortex, superior colliculus (SC), dorsal lateral geniculate (DLG), and lateral posterior nucleus (LP), which were found to exhibit differing temporal responses. To explain these differences, the BOLD neurovascular response function was modeled. A second-order differential equation was developed and solved numerically to arrive at region-specific response functions. Included in the model are the light input from the diode (duty cycle), a refractory period, a transient response following onset and cessation of stimulus, and a slow adjustment to changes in the average level of the signal. Constants in the differential equation were evaluated for each region by fitting the model to the experimental BOLD response from a single flash, and the equation was then solved for multiple flashes. The simulation mimics the major features of the data; however, remaining differences in the frequency dependence of the response between the cortical and subcortical regions were unexplained. We hypothesized that these discrepancies were due to regional-specific differences in neuronal response to flash frequency. To test this hypothesis, cortical visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded using the same stimulation protocol as the fMRI. Cortical VEPs were more suppressed than subcortical VEPs as flash frequency increased, supporting our hypothesis. This is the first report that regional differences in neuronal activation to the same stimulus lead to differential BOLD activation. PMID:18406628

  7. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, J; Chang, Z; Cai, J; Palta, M; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique.

  8. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. II. Spectral line formation in the atmosphere of a giant located near the RGB tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučinskas, A.; Steffen, M.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Dobrovolskas, V.; Ivanauskas, A.; Klevas, J.; Prakapavičius, D.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the role of convection in the formation of atomic and molecular lines in the atmosphere of a red giant star. For this purpose we study the formation properties of spectral lines that belong to a number of astrophysically important tracer elements, including neutral and singly ionized atoms (Li I, N I, O I, Na I, Mg I, Al I, Si I, Si II, S I, K I, Ca I, Ca II, Ti I, Ti II, Cr I, Cr II, Mn I, Fe I, Fe II, Co I, Ni I, Zn I, Sr II, Ba II, and Eu II), and molecules (CH, CO, C2, NH, CN, and OH). Methods: We focus our investigation on a prototypical red giant located close to the red giant branch (RGB) tip (Teff = 3660 K, log g = 1.0, [M/H] = 0.0). We used two types of model atmospheres, 3D hydrodynamical and classical 1D, calculated with the CO5BOLD and LHD stellar atmosphere codes, respectively. Both codes share the same atmospheric parameters, chemical composition, equation of state, and opacities, which allowed us to make a strictly differential comparison between the line formation properties predicted in 3D and 1D. The influence of convection on the spectral line formation was assessed with the aid of 3D-1D abundance corrections, which measure the difference between the abundances of chemical species derived with the 3D hydrodynamical and 1D classical model atmospheres. Results: We find that convection plays a significant role in the spectral line formation in this particular red giant. The derived 3D-1D abundance corrections rarely exceed ± 0.1 dex when lines of neutral atoms and molecules are considered, which is in line with the previous findings for solar-metallicity red giants located on the lower RGB. The situation is different with lines that belong to ionized atoms, or to neutral atoms with high ionization potential. In both cases, the corrections for high-excitation lines (χ > 8 eV) may amount to Δ3D-1D ~ -0.4 dex. The 3D-1D abundance corrections generally show a significant wavelength dependence; in most cases they are smaller in

  9. Feeding Behaviour, Swimming Activity and Boldness Explain Variation in Feed Intake and Growth of Sole (Solea solea) Reared in Captivity

    PubMed Central

    Mas-Muñoz, Julia; Komen, Hans; Schneider, Oliver; Visch, Sander W.; Schrama, Johan W.

    2011-01-01

    The major economic constraint for culturing sole (Solea solea) is its slow and variable growth. The objective was to study the relationship between feed intake/efficiency, growth, and (non-) feeding behaviour of sole. Sixteen juveniles with an average (SD) growth of 2.7 (1.9) g/kg0.8/d were selected on their growth during a 4-week period in which they were housed communally with 84 other fish. Selected fish were housed individually during a second 4-week period to measure individual feed intake, growth, and behaviour. Fish were hand-fed three times a day during the dark phase of the day until apparent satiation. During six different days, behaviour was recorded twice daily during 3 minutes by direct observations. Total swimming activity, frequency of burying and of escapes were recorded. At the beginning and end of the growth period, two sequential behavioural tests were performed: “Novel Environment” and “Light Avoidance”. Fish housed individually still exhibited pronounced variation in feed intake (CV = 23%), growth (CV = 25%) and behavior (CV = 100%). Differences in feed intake account for 79% of the observed individual differences in growth of sole. Fish with higher variation in feed intake between days and between meals within days had significantly a lower total feed intake (r = −0.65 and r = −0.77) and growth. Active fish showed significantly higher feed intake (r = 0.66) and growth (r = 0.58). Boldness during both challenge tests was related to fast growth: (1) fish which reacted with a lower latency time to swim in a novel environment had significantly higher feed intake (r = −0.55) and growth (r = −0.66); (2) fish escaping during the light avoidance test tended to show higher feed intake (P<0.1) and had higher growth (P<0.05). In conclusion, feeding consistency, swimming activity in the tank, and boldness during behavioral tests are related to feed intake and growth of sole in captivity. PMID:21738651

  10. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these