Science.gov

Sample records for predicting internal exposure

  1. Predicting the radiation exposure of terrestrial wildlife in the Chernobyl exclusion zone : an international comparison of approaches.

    SciTech Connect

    Beresford, N. A.; Barnett, C. L.; Brown, J. E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Copplestone, D.; Gaschak, S.; Hosseini, A.; Howard, B. J.; Kamboj, S.; Nedveckaite, T.; Olyslaegers, G.; Smith, J. T.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Vives-Lynch, S.; Yu, C.; Environmental Science Division; Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority; England and Wales Environment Agency; International Radioecology Lab.; Inst. of Physics, Radiation Protection,; Belgian Nuclear Research Centre; Univ. of Portsmouth; Westlakes Research Inst.

    2010-06-09

    There is now general acknowledgement that there is a requirement to demonstrate that species other than humans are protected from anthropogenic releases of radioactivity. A number of approaches have been developed for estimating the exposure of wildlife and some of these are being used to conduct regulatory assessments. There is a requirement to compare the outputs of such approaches against available data sets to ensure that they are robust and fit for purpose. In this paper we describe the application of seven approaches for predicting the whole-body ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am and Pu isotope) activity concentrations and absorbed dose rates for a range of terrestrial species within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Predictions are compared against available measurement data, including estimates of external dose rate recorded by thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to rodent species. Potential reasons for differences between predictions between the various approaches and the available data are explored.

  2. Predicting positive mental health in internally displaced persons in Indonesia: the roles of economic improvement and exposure to violent conflict.

    PubMed

    Saragih Turnip, Sherly; Sörbom, Dag; Hauff, Edvard

    2016-01-01

    Positive mental health, rather than just the absence of mental illness, is rarely investigated among the internally displaced persons (IDPs) affected by violent conflict in low-income countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate a model that could explain the interrelationship between factors contributing to positive mental health in displaced populations. In a longitudinal study we examine poverty, exposure to traumatic events and the change of material well-being after one year. We collected data in two consecutive years (2005 and 2006) from a community-based sample of IDPs in Ambon, Indonesia, through face-to-face structured interviews with consenting adults. Participants of this study were IDPs lived in Ambon during the violent conflict period. We interviewed 471 IDPs in the first year and reinterviewed 399 (85%) of the same subjects in the second year. The IDPs possessed good sense of coherence and subjective well-being. Our final model, which was generated by the use of structural equation modeling, fits the data well (χ(2) = 52.51, df = 45, p = .21, CFI = .99, RMSEA = .019). Exposure to violent conflict had a negative impact on IDPs' mental health initially and better economic conditions improved it (r = -.30 and .29 respectively). Mental health status one year previously was a strong predictor of future mental health, followed by individual economic growth in the past year (r = .43 and .29 respectively). On a group level the IDPs were resilient and adaptive to survive in adverse living conditions after devastating violent conflict, and the economic improvement contributed to it. PMID:26059612

  3. Nevirapine exposure with WHO pediatric weight band dosing: enhanced therapeutic concentrations predicted based on extensive international pharmacokinetic experience.

    PubMed

    Nikanjam, Mina; Kabamba, Desiré; Cressey, Tim R; Burger, David; Aweeka, Francesca T; Acosta, Edward P; Spector, Stephen A; Capparelli, Edmund V

    2012-10-01

    Nevirapine (NVP) is a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) used worldwide as part of combination antiretroviral therapy in infants and children to treat HIV infection. Dosing based on either weight or body surface area has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) but can be difficult to implement in resource-limited settings. The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed simplified weight band dosing for NVP, but it has not been critically evaluated. NVP pharmacokinetic data were combined from eight pediatric clinical trials (Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group [PACTG] studies 245, 356, 366, 377, 403, 1056, and 1069 and Children with HIV in Africa Pharmacokinetics and Adherence of Simple Antiretroviral Regimens [CHAPAS]) representing subjects from multiple continents and across the pediatric age continuum. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed to characterize developmental changes in NVP disposition, identify potential sources of NVP pharmacokinetic variability, and assess various pediatric dosing strategies and their impact on NVP exposure. Age, CYP2B6 genotype, and ritonavir were independent predictors of oral NVP clearance. The Triomune fixed-dose tablet was an independent predictor of bioavailability compared to the liquid and other tablet formulations. Monte Carlo simulations of the final model were used to assess WHO weight band dosing recommendations. The final pharmacokinetic model indicated that WHO weight band dosing is likely to result in a percentage of children with NVP exposure within the target range similar to that obtained with FDA dosing. Weight band dosing of NVP proposed by the WHO has the potential to provide a simple and effective dosing strategy for resource limited settings. PMID:22869579

  4. [Management of accidental internal exposure].

    PubMed

    Fatome, M

    1994-11-01

    Radionucleides can penetrate into the body via the lung, the digestive tract, wounds and sometimes through healthy skin. Once they have penetrated the body, they can either remain localized at the site of entry or be rapidly metabolized. The risk is late effects. Radioelements must be eliminated as rapidly as possible decreasing the exposure proportionally. The effectiveness of the treatment depends on early institution. Nevertheless, emergency intensive care or surgery may be required. As soon as possible, explorations must be carried out to evaluate the level of contamination (human spectrometry, radiotoxicological examinations) and to start treatment. Modalities include non-specific techniques (lavage, insolubilization, laxatives) and specific techniques such as complexation or isotopic dilution (iodine for iodine, Prussian blue for cesium, DTPA for plutonium, Diamox or sodium bicarbonate for uranium). Surgical cleaning of wounds and burns is an excellent means of decontamination. External contamination is often associated. Further contamination must be prevented immediately. PMID:7844774

  5. Does exposure prediction bias health effect estimation? The relationship between confounding adjustment and exposure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Dominici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    In environmental epidemiology, we are often faced with two challenges. First, an exposure prediction model is needed to estimate the exposure to an agent of interest, ideally at the individual level. Second, when estimating the health-effect associated with the exposure, confounding adjustment is needed in the health-effects regression model. The current literature addresses these two challenges separately. That is, methods that account for measurement error in the predicted exposure often fail to acknowledge the possibility of confounding, while methods designed to control confounding often fail to acknowledge that the exposure has been predicted. In this paper, we consider exposure prediction and confounding adjustment in a health-effects regression model simultaneously. By using theoretical arguments and simulation studies, we show that the bias of a health-effect estimate is influenced by the exposure prediction model, the type of confounding adjustment used in the health-effects regression model, and the relationship between these two. Moreover, we argue that even with a health-effects regression model that properly adjusts for confounding, the use of a predicted exposure can bias the health-effect estimate unless all confounders included in the health-effects regression model are also included in the exposure prediction model. While these results of this paper were motivated by studies of environmental contaminants, they apply more broadly to any context where an exposure needs to be predicted. PMID:24815302

  6. Comparing prediction models for radiographic exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, W.; Robinson, J.; McEntee, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    During radiographic exposures the milliampere-seconds (mAs), kilovoltage peak (kVp) and source-to-image distance can be adjusted for variations in patient thicknesses. Several exposure adjustment systems have been developed to assist with this selection. This study compares the accuracy of four systems to predict the required mAs for pelvic radiographs taken on a direct digital radiography system (DDR). Sixty radiographs were obtained by adjusting mAs to compensate for varying combinations of source-to-image distance (SID), kVp and patient thicknesses. The 25% rule, the DuPont Bit System and the DigiBit system were compared to determine which of these three most accurately predicted the mAs required for an increase in patient thickness. Similarly, the 15% rule, the DuPont Bit System and the DigiBit system were compared for an increase in kVp. The exposure index (EI) was used as an indication of exposure to the DDR. For each exposure combination the mAs was adjusted until an EI of 1500+/-2% was achieved. The 25% rule was the most accurate at predicting the mAs required for an increase in patient thickness, with 53% of the mAs predictions correct. The DigiBit system was the most accurate at predicting mAs needed for changes in kVp, with 33% of predictions correct. This study demonstrated that the 25% rule and DigiBit system were the most accurate predictors of mAs required for an increase in patient thickness and kVp respectively. The DigiBit system worked well in both scenarios as it is a single exposure adjustment system that considers a variety of exposure factors.

  7. LINKING EXPOSURES TO INTERNAL DOSES USING BIOMARKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomonitoring is a useful tool to help assess human exposures/internal doses to chemicals in the environment. This research contributes to EPA's mission to protect human health by understanding what chemicals people are exposed to in their daily environments. In this task, we wil...

  8. Predicting survival time for cold exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    1995-06-01

    The prediction of survival time (ST) for cold exposure is speculative as reliable controlled data of deep hypothermia are unavailable. At best, guidance can be obtained from case histories of accidental exposure. This study describes the development of a mathematical model for the prediction of ST under sedentary conditions in the cold. The model is based on steady-state heat conduction in a single cylinder comprised of a core and two concentric annular shells representing the fat plus skin and the clothing plus still boundary layer, respectively. The ambient condition can be either air or water; the distinction is made by assigning different values of insulation to the still boundary layer. Metabolic heat production ( M) is comprised of resting and shivering components with the latter predicted by temperature signals from the core and skin. Where the cold exposure is too severe for M to balance heat loss, ST is largely determined by the rate of heat loss from the body. Where a balance occurs, ST is governed by the endurance time for shivering. End of survival is marked by the deep core temperature reaching a value of 30° C. The model was calibrated against survival data of cold water (0 to 20° C) immersion and then applied to cold air exposure. A sampling of ST predictions for the nude exposure of an average healthy male in relatively calm air (1 km/h wind speed) are the following: 1.8, 2.5, 4.1, 9.0, and >24 h for -30, -20, -10, 0, and 10° C, respectively. With two layers of loose clothing (average thickness of 1 mm each) in a 5 km/h wind, STs are 4.0, 5.6, 8.6, 15.4, and >24 h for -50, -40, -30, -20, and -10° C. The predicted STs must be weighted against the extrapolative nature of the model. At present, it would be prudent to use the predictions in a relative sense, that is, to compare or rank-order predicted STs for various combinations of ambient conditions and clothing protection.

  9. Status: Crewmember Noise Exposures on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limardo-Rodriguez, Jose G.; Allen, Christopher S.; Danielson, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a unique environment where crewmembers from the US and our international partners work and live for as long as 6 to 12 consecutive months. During these long-durations ISS missions, noise exposures from onboard equipment are posing concerns for human factors and crewmember health risks, such as possible reductions in hearing sensitivity, disruptions of crew sleep, interference with speech intelligibility and voice communications, interference with crew task performance, and reduced alarm audibility. It is crucial to control acoustical noise aboard ISS to acceptable noise exposure levels during the work-time period, and to also provide a restful sleep environment during the sleep-time period. Acoustic dosimeter measurements, obtained when the crewmember wears the dosimeter for 24-hour periods, are conducted onboard ISS every 60 days and compared to ISS flight rules. NASA personnel then assess the acoustic environment to which the crewmembers are exposed, and provide recommendations for hearing protection device usage. The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on the status of ISS noise exposure monitoring and hearing conservation strategies, as well as to summarize assessments of acoustic dosimeter data collected since the Increment 36 mission (April 2013). A description of the updated noise level constraints flight rule, as well as the Noise Exposure Estimation Tool and the Noise Hazard Inventory implementation for predicting crew noise exposures and recommending to ISS crewmembers when hearing protection devices are required, will be described.

  10. Critical Dose of Internal Organs Internal Exposure - 13471

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, G.; Amirjanyan, A.; Grigoryan, N.

    2013-07-01

    The health threat posed by radionuclides has stimulated increased efforts to developed characterization on the biological behavior of radionuclides in humans in all ages. In an effort motivated largely by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is assembling a set of age specific biokinetic models for environmentally important radioelements. Radioactive substances in the air, mainly through the respiratory system and digestive tract, is inside the body. Radioactive substances are unevenly distributed in various organs and tissues. Therefore, the degree of damage will depend not only on the dose of radiation have but also on the critical organ, which is the most accumulation of radioactive substances, which leads to the defeat of the entire human body. The main objective of radiation protection, to avoid exceeding the maximum permissible doses of external and internal exposure of a person to prevent the physical and genetic damage people. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of radiation is called a dose of radiation a person in uniform getting her for 50 years does not cause changes in the health of the exposed individual and his progeny. The following classification of critical organs, depending on the category of exposure on their degree of sensitivity to radiation: First group: the whole body, gonads and red bone marrow; Second group: muscle, fat, liver, kidney, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, lungs and lens of the eye; The third group: bone, thyroid and skin; Fourth group: the hands, forearms, feet. MTD exposure whole body, gonads and bone marrow represent the maximum exposures (5 rem per year) experienced by people in their normal activities. The purpose of this article is intended dose received from various internal organs of the radionuclides that may enter the body by inhalation, and gastrointestinal tract. The biokinetic model describes the time dependent distribution and excretion of different

  11. Predicting Language Outcomes for Internationally Adopted Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennen, Sharon L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Language and speech are difficult to assess in newly arrived internationally adopted children. The purpose of this study was to determine if assessments completed when toddlers were first adopted could predict language outcomes at age 2. Local norms were used to develop early intervention guidelines that were evaluated against age 2…

  12. Identification of Gene Expression Biomarkers for Predicting Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tzu-Pin; Hsu, Yi-Yao; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Chuang, Eric Y.

    2014-01-01

    A need for more accurate and reliable radiation dosimetry has become increasingly important due to the possibility of a large-scale radiation emergency resulting from terrorism or nuclear accidents. Although traditional approaches provide accurate measurements, such methods usually require tedious effort and at least two days to complete. Therefore, we provide a new method for rapid prediction of radiation exposure. Eleven microarray datasets were classified into two groups based on their radiation doses and utilized as the training samples. For the two groups, Student's t-tests and resampling tests were used to identify biomarkers, and their gene expression ratios were used to develop a prediction model. The performance of the model was evaluated in four independent datasets, and Ingenuity pathway analysis was performed to characterize the associated biological functions. Our meta-analysis identified 29 biomarkers, showing approximately 90% and 80% accuracy in the training and validation samples. Furthermore, the 29 genes significantly participated in the regulation of cell cycle, and 19 of them are regulated by three well-known radiation-modulated transcription factors: TP53, FOXM1 and ERBB2. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a reliable method for identifying biomarkers across independent studies and high and reproducible prediction accuracy was demonstrated in both internal and external datasets. PMID:25189756

  13. A nozzle internal performance prediction method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A prediction method was written and incorporated into a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code (PAB3D) for the calculation of nozzle internal performance. The following quantities are calculated: (1) discharge coefficient; (2) normal, side, and axial thrust ratios; (3) rolling, pitching, and yawing moments; and (4) effective pitch and yaw vector angles. Four different case studies are presented to confirm the applicability of the methodology. Internal and, in most situations, external flow-field regions are required to be modeled. The computed nozzle discharge coefficient matches both the level and the trend of the experimental data within quoted experimental data accuracy (0.5 percent). Moment and force ratios are generally within 1 to 2 percent of the absolute level of experimental data, with the trends of data matched accurately.

  14. POPULATION EXPOSURES TO PARTICULATE MATTER: A COMPARISON OF EXPOSURE MODEL PREDICTIONS AND MEASUREMENT DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is currently developing an integrated human exposure source-to-dose modeling system (HES2D). This modeling system will incorporate models that use a probabilistic approach to predict population exposures to environmental ...

  15. Improving Undergraduate Learning for Employability through International Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Tim V.; Kleshinski, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify how undergraduate business programs can incorporate international exposure to increase employability among its graduates. We first examine how international opportunities in corporations have impacted the skills needed by employees to excel in a globalized work environment. From this, we identify desirable…

  16. Air pollution exposure prediction approaches used in air pollution epidemiology studies.

    PubMed

    Özkaynak, Halûk; Baxter, Lisa K; Dionisio, Kathie L; Burke, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of the health effects of outdoor air pollution have traditionally relied upon surrogates of personal exposures, most commonly ambient concentration measurements from central-site monitors. However, this approach may introduce exposure prediction errors and misclassification of exposures for pollutants that are spatially heterogeneous, such as those associated with traffic emissions (e.g., carbon monoxide, elemental carbon, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter). We review alternative air quality and human exposure metrics applied in recent air pollution health effect studies discussed during the International Society of Exposure Science 2011 conference in Baltimore, MD. Symposium presenters considered various alternative exposure metrics, including: central site or interpolated monitoring data, regional pollution levels predicted using the national scale Community Multiscale Air Quality model or from measurements combined with local-scale (AERMOD) air quality models, hybrid models that include satellite data, statistically blended modeling and measurement data, concentrations adjusted by home infiltration rates, and population-based human exposure model (Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation, and Air Pollutants Exposure models) predictions. These alternative exposure metrics were applied in epidemiological applications to health outcomes, including daily mortality and respiratory hospital admissions, daily hospital emergency department visits, daily myocardial infarctions, and daily adverse birth outcomes. This paper summarizes the research projects presented during the symposium, with full details of the work presented in individual papers in this journal issue. PMID:23632992

  17. Does Fear Reactivity during Exposure Predict Panic Symptom Reduction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuret, Alicia E.; Seidel, Anke; Rosenfield, Benjamin; Hofmann, Stefan G.; Rosenfield, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Fear reactivity during exposure is a commonly used indicator of learning and overall therapy outcome. The objective of this study was to assess the predictive value of fear reactivity during exposure using multimodal indicators and an advanced analytical design. We also investigated the degree to which treatment condition (cognitive…

  18. EPA perspective - exposure and effects prediction and monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk-based decisions for environmental chemicals often rely on estimates of human exposure and biological response. Biomarkers have proven a useful empirical tool for evaluating exposure and hazard predictions. In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Preventio...

  19. Validation of Aircraft Noise Prediction Models at Low Levels of Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Juliet A.; Hobbs, Christopher M.; Plotkin, Kenneth J.; Stusnick, Eric; Shepherd, Kevin P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aircraft noise measurements were made at Denver International Airport for a period of four weeks. Detailed operational information was provided by airline operators which enabled noise levels to be predicted using the FAA's Integrated Noise Model. Several thrust prediction techniques were evaluated. Measured sound exposure levels for departure operations were found to be 4 to 10 dB higher than predicted, depending on the thrust prediction technique employed. Differences between measured and predicted levels are shown to be related to atmospheric conditions present at the aircraft altitude.

  20. Uranium internal exposure evaluation based on urine assay data

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.N.P.

    1984-09-01

    The difficulties in assessing internal exposures to uranium from urine assay data are described. A simplified application of the ICRP-30 and ICRP Lung Model concepts to the estimation of uranium intake is presented. A discussion follows on the development of a computer code utilizing the ICRP-30-based uranium elimination model with the existing urine assay information. The calculated uranium exposures from 1949 through 1983 are discussed. 13 references, 1 table.

  1. Low Vagal Tone Magnifies the Association Between Psychosocial Stress Exposure and Internalizing Psychopathology in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Rith-Najarian, Leslie; Dirks, Melanie A.; Sheridan, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Vagal tone is a measure of cardiovascular function that facilitates adaptive responses to environmental challenge. Low vagal tone is associated with poor emotional and attentional regulation in children and has been conceptualized as a marker of sensitivity to stress. We investigated whether the associations of a wide range of psychosocial stressors with internalizing and externalizing psychopathology were magnified in adolescents with low vagal tone. Resting heart period data were collected from a diverse community sample of adolescents (ages 13–17; N =168). Adolescents completed measures assessing internalizing and externalizing psychopathology and exposure to stressors occurring in family, peer, and community contexts. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was calculated from the interbeat interval time series. We estimated interactions between RSA and stress exposure in predicting internalizing and externalizing symptoms and evaluated whether interactions differed by gender. Exposure to psychosocial stressors was associated strongly with psychopathology. RSA was unrelated to internalizing or externalizing problems. Significant interactions were observed between RSA and child abuse, community violence, peer victimization, and traumatic events in predicting internalizing but not externalizing symptoms. Stressors were positively associated with internalizing symptoms in adolescents with low RSA but not in those with high RSA. Similar patterns were observed for anxiety and depression. These interactions were more consistently observed for male than female individuals. Low vagal tone is associated with internalizing psychopathology in adolescents exposed to high levels of stressors. Measurement of vagal tone in clinical settings might provide useful information about sensitivity to stress in child and adolescent clients. PMID:24156380

  2. The Role of Stress Exposure and Family Functioning in Internalizing Outcomes of Urban Families

    PubMed Central

    Henry, David B.; Tolan, Patrick H.; Strachan, Martha K.

    2013-01-01

    Although research suggests that stress exposure and family functioning are associated with internalizing problems in adolescents and caregivers, surprisingly few studies have investigated the mechanisms that underlie this association. To determine whether family functioning buffers the development of internalizing problems in stress-exposed families, we assessed the relation between stress exposure, family functioning, and internalizing symptoms among a large sample of inner-city male youth and their caregivers living in poverty across five waves of data collection. We hypothesized that stress exposure and family functioning would predict development of subsequent youth and caregiver internalizing problems and that family functioning would moderate this relation, with higher functioning families demonstrating greater resiliency to stress exposure. We used a longitudinal, prospective design to evaluate whether family functioning (assessed at waves one through four) activated or buffered the effects of stress exposure (assessed at wave one) on subsequent internalizing symptoms (assessed at waves four and five). Stress from Developmental Transitions and family functioning were significant predictors of depressive symptoms and anxiety in youth; however, family functioning did not moderate the relation. Family functioning mediated the relation between stress from Daily Hassles and internalizing outcomes suggesting that poor parenting practices, low structure, and low emotional cohesion activate depression and anxiety in youth exposed to chronic and frequent everyday stressors. Surprisingly, only family functioning predicted depressive symptoms in caregivers. Results validate the use of a comprehensive, multi-informant assessment of stress when investigating internalizing outcomes in youth and support using family-based interventions in the treatment and prevention of internalizing. PMID:25601821

  3. 10 CFR 20.1204 - Determination of internal exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Determination of internal exposure. 20.1204 Section 20.1204 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Occupational Dose... Commission, adjust the DAC or ALI values to reflect the actual physical and chemical characteristics...

  4. 10 CFR 20.1204 - Determination of internal exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of internal exposure. 20.1204 Section 20.1204 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Occupational Dose... Commission, adjust the DAC or ALI values to reflect the actual physical and chemical characteristics...

  5. Prenatal substance exposure: What predicts behavioral resilience by early adolescence?

    PubMed

    Liebschutz, Jane M; Crooks, Denise; Rose-Jacobs, Ruth; Cabral, Howard J; Heeren, Timothy C; Gerteis, Jessie; Appugliese, Danielle P; Heymann, Orlaith D; Lange, Allison V; Frank, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Understanding behavioral resilience among at-risk adolescents may guide public policy decisions and future programs. We examined factors predicting behavioral resilience following intrauterine substance exposure in a prospective longitudinal birth-cohort study of 136 early adolescents (ages 12.4-15.9 years) at risk for poor behavioral outcomes. We defined behavioral resilience as a composite measure of lack of early substance use initiation (before age 14), lack of risky sexual behavior, or lack of delinquency. Intrauterine substance exposures included in this analysis were cocaine, tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana. We recruited participants from Boston Medical Center as mother-infant dyads between 1990 and 1993. The majority of the sample was African American/Caribbean (88%) and 49% female. In bivariate analyses, none and lower intrauterine cocaine exposure level predicted resilience compared with higher cocaine exposure, but this effect was not found in an adjusted model. Instead, strict caregiver supervision (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 6.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.90, 19.00], p = .002), lower violence exposure (AOR = 4.07, 95% CI [1.77, 9.38], p < .001), and absence of intrauterine tobacco exposure (AOR = 3.71, 95% CI [1.28, 10.74], p = .02) predicted behavioral resilience. In conclusion, caregiver supervision in early adolescence, lower violence exposure in childhood, and lack of intrauterine tobacco exposure predicted behavioral resilience among a cohort of early adolescents with significant social and environmental risk. Future interventions should work to enhance parental supervision as a way to mitigate the effects of adversity on high-risk groups of adolescents. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26076097

  6. Exposure factors resources: contrasting EPA's Exposure Factors Handbook with international sources.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Linda J; Moya, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to compile and standardize human exposure factors have resulted in the development of a variety of resources available to the scientific community. For example, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the Exposure Factors Handbook and Child-specific Exposure Factors Handbook to promote consistency among its various exposure-assessment activities. The US EPA handbooks are compilations of human exposure factors data, including anthropometric and sociocultural data (e.g., body weights, skin-surface areas, and life expectancy), behavioral data (e.g., non-dietary ingestion rates, activity/time use patterns, and consumer product use), factors that may be influenced by the physiological needs of the body, metabolic activity, and health and weight status (e.g., water and food intake, and inhalation rates), and other factors (e.g., building characteristics). Other countries have engaged in similar efforts to compile and standardize exposure factors for use in exposure and risk assessments. For example, the ExpoFacts database contains data for 30 European Union countries. Australia, Canada, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan have developed, or are developing, documents that provide exposure factors data relevant to their populations. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of some of the available exposure factors resources; to explore some of the similarities and differences between the US EPA Exposure Factors Handbook and selected other international resources, and to highlight data gaps and present some considerations for promoting consistency among these resources. PMID:23611905

  7. Prenatal and postnatal cocaine exposure predict teen cocaine use

    PubMed Central

    Delaney-Black, Virginia; Chiodo, Lisa M.; Hannigan, John H.; Greenwald, Mark K.; Janisse, James; Patterson, Grace; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Partridge, Robert T.; Ager, Joel; Sokol, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies have identified alterations in cocaine and alcohol self-administration and behavioral responses to pharmacological challenges in adolescent offspring following prenatal exposure. To date, no published human studies have evaluated the relation between prenatal cocaine exposure and postnatal adolescent cocaine use. Human studies of prenatal cocaine-exposed children have also noted an increase in behaviors previously associated with substance use/abuse in teens and young adults, specifically childhood and teen externalizing behaviors, impulsivity, and attention problems. Despite these findings, human research has not addressed prior prenatal exposure as a potential predictor of teen drug use behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between prenatal cocaine exposure and teen cocaine use in a prospective longitudinal cohort (n = 316) that permitted extensive control for child, parent and community risk factors. Logistic regression analyses and Structural Equation Modeling revealed that both prenatal exposure and postnatal parent/caregiver cocaine use were uniquely related to teen use of cocaine at age 14 years. Teen cocaine use was also directly predicted by teen community violence exposure and caregiver negativity, and was indirectly related to teen community drug exposure. These data provide further evidence of the importance of prenatal exposure, family and community factors in the intergenerational transmission of teen/young adult substance abuse/use. PMID:20609384

  8. Adaptive plasticity in speech perception: Effects of external information and internal predictions.

    PubMed

    Guediche, Sara; Fiez, Julie A; Holt, Lori L

    2016-07-01

    When listeners encounter speech under adverse listening conditions, adaptive adjustments in perception can improve comprehension over time. In some cases, these adaptive changes require the presence of external information that disambiguates the distorted speech signals, whereas in other cases mere exposure is sufficient. Both external (e.g., written feedback) and internal (e.g., prior word knowledge) sources of information can be used to generate predictions about the correct mapping of a distorted speech signal. We hypothesize that these predictions provide a basis for determining the discrepancy between the expected and actual speech signal that can be used to guide adaptive changes in perception. This study provides the first empirical investigation that manipulates external and internal factors through (a) the availability of explicit external disambiguating information via the presence or absence of postresponse orthographic information paired with a repetition of the degraded stimulus, and (b) the accuracy of internally generated predictions; an acoustic distortion is introduced either abruptly or incrementally. The results demonstrate that the impact of external information on adaptive plasticity is contingent upon whether the intelligibility of the stimuli permits accurate internally generated predictions during exposure. External information sources enhance adaptive plasticity only when input signals are severely degraded and cannot reliably access internal predictions. This is consistent with a computational framework for adaptive plasticity in which error-driven supervised learning relies on the ability to compute sensory prediction error signals from both internal and external sources of information. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26854531

  9. Skin burns after laser exposure: histological analysis and predictive simulation.

    PubMed

    Museux, Nathanaëlle; Perez, Laetitia; Autrique, Laurent; Agay, Diane

    2012-08-01

    Thermal effects of laser irradiation on skin are investigated in this paper. The main purpose is to determine the damage level induced by a laser exposure. Potential burns induced by two lasers (wavelength 808nm and 1940nm) are studied and animal experimentations are performed. Several exposure durations and laser powers are tested. Based on previous works, a mathematical model dedicated to temperature prediction is proposed and finite-element method is implemented. This numerical predictive tool based on the bioheat equation takes into account heat losses due to the convection on skin surface, blood circulatory and also evaporation. Thermal behavior of each skin layer is also described considering distinct thermal and optical properties. Since the mathematical model is able to estimate damage levels, histological analyses were also carried through. It is confirmed that the mathematical model is an efficient predictive tool for estimation of damage caused by lasers and that thermal effects sharply depend on laser wavelength. PMID:22237052

  10. Prospective Effects of Violence Exposure across Multiple Contexts on Early Adolescents’ Internalizing and Externalizing Problems

    PubMed Central

    Mrug, Sylvie; Windle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Violence exposure within each setting of community, school, or home has been linked with internalizing and externalizing problems. Although many children experience violence in multiple contexts, the effects of such cross-contextual exposure have not been studied. This study addresses this gap by examining independent and interactive effects of witnessing violence and victimization in the community, home, and school on subsequent internalizing and externalizing problems in early adolescence. Methods A community sample of 603 boys and girls (78% African American, 20% Caucasian) participated in a longitudinal study of youth violence. During two assessments 16 months apart, adolescents reported on witnessing violence and victimization in the community, school, and home, and their internalizing and externalizing problems. Results Multiple regressions tested the independent and interactive effects of witnessing violence or victimization across contexts on subsequent adjustment, after controlling for initial levels of internalizing and externalizing problems and demographic covariates. Witnessing violence at school predicted anxiety and depression; witnessing at home was related to anxiety and aggression; and witnessing community violence predicted delinquency. Victimization at home was related to subsequent anxiety, depression, and aggression; victimization at school predicted anxiety; and victimization in the community was not independently related to any outcomes. Finally, witnessing violence at home was associated with more anxiety, delinquency, and aggression only if adolescents reported no exposure to community violence. Conclusions Violence exposure at home and school had the strongest independent effects on internalizing and externalizing outcomes. Witnessing community violence attenuated the effects of witnessing home violence on anxiety and externalizing problems, perhaps due to desensitization or different norms or expectations regarding violence

  11. Perinatal Immunotoxicity: Why Adult Exposure Assessment Fails to Predict Risk

    PubMed Central

    Dietert, Rodney R.; Piepenbrink, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    Recent research has pointed to the developing immune system as a remarkably sensitive toxicologic target for environmental chemicals and drugs. In fact, the perinatal period before and just after birth is replete with dynamic immune changes, many of which do not occur in adults. These include not only the basic maturation and distribution of immune cell types and selection against autoreactive lymphocytes but also changes designed specifically to protect the pregnancy against immune-mediated miscarriage. The newborn is then faced with critical immune maturational adjustments to achieve an immune balance necessary to combat myriad childhood and later-life diseases. All these processes set the fetus and neonate completely apart from the adult regarding immunotoxicologic risk. Yet for decades, safety evaluation has relied almost exclusively upon exposure of the adult immune system to predict perinatal immune risk. Recent workshops and forums have suggested a benefit in employing alternative exposures that include exposure throughout early life stages. However, issues remain concerning when and where such applications might be required. In this review we discuss the reasons why immunotoxic assessment is important for current childhood diseases and why adult exposure assessment cannot predict the effect of xenobiotics on the developing immune system. It also provides examples of developmental immunotoxicants where age-based risk appears to differ. Finally, it stresses the need to replace adult exposure assessment for immune evaluation with protocols that can protect the developing immune system. PMID:16581533

  12. Prenatal Substance Exposure: What Predicts Behavioral Resilience by Early Adolescence?

    PubMed Central

    Liebschutz, Jane; Crooks, Denise; Rose-Jacobs, Ruth; Cabral, Howard J; Heeren, Timothy C; Gerteis, Jessie; Appugliese, Danielle P.; Heymann, Orlaith D.; Lange, Allison V.; Frank, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding behavioral resilience among at-risk adolescents may guide public policy decisions and future programs. We examined factors predicting behavioral resilience following intrauterine substance exposure (IUSE) in a prospective longitudinal birth-cohort study of 136 early adolescents (age 12.4–15.9) at-risk for poor behavioral outcomes. We defined behavioral resilience as a composite measure of lack of early substance use initiation (before age 14), lack of risky sexual behavior, or lack of delinquency. IUSEs included in this analysis were cocaine (IUCE), tobacco (IUTE), alcohol (IUAE), and marijuana (IUME). We recruited participants from Boston Medical Center as mother-infant dyads between 1990 and 1993. The majority of the sample was African-American/Caribbean (88%) and 49% female. In bivariate analyses, none and lower IUCE level predicted resilience compared to higher IUCE, but this effect was not found in an adjusted model. Instead, strict caregiver supervision (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=6.02, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.90–19.00, p=0.002), lower violence exposure (AOR=4.07, 95% CI=1.77–9.38, p<0.001), and absence of intrauterine tobacco exposure (AOR=3.71, 95% CI= 1.28–10.74, p=0.02) predicted behavioral resilience. In conclusion, caregiver supervision in early adolescence, lower violence exposure in childhood, and lack of intrauterine tobacco exposure predict behavioral resilience among a cohort of early adolescents with significant social and environmental risk. Future interventions should work to enhance parental supervision as a way to mitigate the effects of adversity on high-risk groups of adolescents. PMID:26076097

  13. Underwater Sound Propagation Modeling Methods for Predicting Marine Animal Exposure.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Craig A; McCammon, Diana F; Taillefer, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    The offshore exploration and production (E&P) industry requires comprehensive and accurate ocean acoustic models for determining the exposure of marine life to the high levels of sound used in seismic surveys and other E&P activities. This paper reviews the types of acoustic models most useful for predicting the propagation of undersea noise sources and describes current exposure models. The severe problems caused by model sensitivity to the uncertainty in the environment are highlighted to support the conclusion that it is vital that risk assessments include transmission loss estimates with statistical measures of confidence. PMID:26610982

  14. 78 FR 68447 - Exposure Draft-Standards for Internal Control in the Federal Government

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... OFFICE Exposure Draft--Standards for Internal Control in the Federal Government AGENCY: U.S. Government... 2013 Exposure Draft update to the Standards for Internal Control in the Federal Government reflect... Internal Control in the Federal Government, 2013 Exposure Draft, is available and can be downloaded...

  15. Predictive modeling of terrestrial radiation exposure from geologic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Daniel A.

    Aerial gamma ray surveys are an important tool for national security, scientific, and industrial interests in determining locations of both anthropogenic and natural sources of radioactivity. There is a relationship between radioactivity and geology and in the past this relationship has been used to predict geology from an aerial survey. The purpose of this project is to develop a method to predict the radiologic exposure rate of the geologic materials in an area by creating a model using geologic data, images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), geochemical data, and pre-existing low spatial resolution aerial surveys from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Survey. Using these data, geospatial areas, referred to as background radiation units, homogenous in terms of K, U, and Th are defined and the gamma ray exposure rate is predicted. The prediction is compared to data collected via detailed aerial survey by our partner National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), allowing for the refinement of the technique. High resolution radiation exposure rate models have been developed for two study areas in Southern Nevada that include the alluvium on the western shore of Lake Mohave, and Government Wash north of Lake Mead; both of these areas are arid with little soil moisture and vegetation. We determined that by using geologic units to define radiation background units of exposed bedrock and ASTER visualizations to subdivide radiation background units of alluvium, regions of homogeneous geochemistry can be defined allowing for the exposure rate to be predicted. Soil and rock samples have been collected at Government Wash and Lake Mohave as well as a third site near Cameron, Arizona. K, U, and Th concentrations of these samples have been determined using inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laboratory counting using radiation detection equipment. In addition, many sample locations also have

  16. Air pollution dispersion models for human exposure predictions in London.

    PubMed

    Beevers, Sean D; Kitwiroon, Nutthida; Williams, Martin L; Kelly, Frank J; Ross Anderson, H; Carslaw, David C

    2013-01-01

    The London household survey has shown that people travel and are exposed to air pollutants differently. This argues for human exposure to be based upon space-time-activity data and spatio-temporal air quality predictions. For the latter, we have demonstrated the role that dispersion models can play by using two complimentary models, KCLurban, which gives source apportionment information, and Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ)-urban, which predicts hourly air quality. The KCLurban model is in close agreement with observations of NO(X), NO(2) and particulate matter (PM)(10/2.5), having a small normalised mean bias (-6% to 4%) and a large Index of Agreement (0.71-0.88). The temporal trends of NO(X) from the CMAQ-urban model are also in reasonable agreement with observations. Spatially, NO(2) predictions show that within 10's of metres of major roads, concentrations can range from approximately 10-20 p.p.b. up to 70 p.p.b. and that for PM(10/2.5) central London roadside concentrations are approximately double the suburban background concentrations. Exposure to different PM sources is important and we predict that brake wear-related PM(10) concentrations are approximately eight times greater near major roads than at suburban background locations. Temporally, we have shown that average NO(X) concentrations close to roads can range by a factor of approximately six between the early morning minimum and morning rush hour maximum periods. These results present strong arguments for the hybrid exposure model under development at King's and, in future, for in-building models and a model for the London Underground. PMID:23443237

  17. Internal exposure dynamics drive the Adverse Outcome Pathways of synthetic glucocorticoids in fish

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Owen, Stewart F.; Huerta, Belinda; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Kugathas, Subramanian; Barceló, Damià; Rand-Weaver, Mariann; Sumpter, John P.

    2016-01-01

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework represents a valuable conceptual tool to systematically integrate existing toxicological knowledge from a mechanistic perspective to facilitate predictions of chemical-induced effects across species. However, its application for decision-making requires the transition from qualitative to quantitative AOP (qAOP). Here we used a fish model and the synthetic glucocorticoid beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) to investigate the role of chemical-specific properties, pharmacokinetics, and internal exposure dynamics in the development of qAOPs. We generated a qAOP network based on drug plasma concentrations and focused on immunodepression, skin androgenisation, disruption of gluconeogenesis and reproductive performance. We showed that internal exposure dynamics and chemical-specific properties influence the development of qAOPs and their predictive power. Comparing the effects of two different glucocorticoids, we highlight how relatively similar in vitro hazard-based indicators can lead to different in vivo risk. This discrepancy can be predicted by their different uptake potential, pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles. We recommend that the development phase of qAOPs should include the application of species-species uptake and physiologically-based PK/PD models. This integration will significantly enhance the predictive power, enabling a more accurate assessment of the risk and the reliable transferability of qAOPs across chemicals. PMID:26917256

  18. Internal exposure dynamics drive the Adverse Outcome Pathways of synthetic glucocorticoids in fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Owen, Stewart F.; Huerta, Belinda; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Kugathas, Subramanian; Barceló, Damià; Rand-Weaver, Mariann; Sumpter, John P.

    2016-02-01

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework represents a valuable conceptual tool to systematically integrate existing toxicological knowledge from a mechanistic perspective to facilitate predictions of chemical-induced effects across species. However, its application for decision-making requires the transition from qualitative to quantitative AOP (qAOP). Here we used a fish model and the synthetic glucocorticoid beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) to investigate the role of chemical-specific properties, pharmacokinetics, and internal exposure dynamics in the development of qAOPs. We generated a qAOP network based on drug plasma concentrations and focused on immunodepression, skin androgenisation, disruption of gluconeogenesis and reproductive performance. We showed that internal exposure dynamics and chemical-specific properties influence the development of qAOPs and their predictive power. Comparing the effects of two different glucocorticoids, we highlight how relatively similar in vitro hazard-based indicators can lead to different in vivo risk. This discrepancy can be predicted by their different uptake potential, pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles. We recommend that the development phase of qAOPs should include the application of species-species uptake and physiologically-based PK/PD models. This integration will significantly enhance the predictive power, enabling a more accurate assessment of the risk and the reliable transferability of qAOPs across chemicals.

  19. Internal exposure dynamics drive the Adverse Outcome Pathways of synthetic glucocorticoids in fish.

    PubMed

    Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Owen, Stewart F; Huerta, Belinda; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Kugathas, Subramanian; Barceló, Damià; Rand-Weaver, Mariann; Sumpter, John P

    2016-01-01

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework represents a valuable conceptual tool to systematically integrate existing toxicological knowledge from a mechanistic perspective to facilitate predictions of chemical-induced effects across species. However, its application for decision-making requires the transition from qualitative to quantitative AOP (qAOP). Here we used a fish model and the synthetic glucocorticoid beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) to investigate the role of chemical-specific properties, pharmacokinetics, and internal exposure dynamics in the development of qAOPs. We generated a qAOP network based on drug plasma concentrations and focused on immunodepression, skin androgenisation, disruption of gluconeogenesis and reproductive performance. We showed that internal exposure dynamics and chemical-specific properties influence the development of qAOPs and their predictive power. Comparing the effects of two different glucocorticoids, we highlight how relatively similar in vitro hazard-based indicators can lead to different in vivo risk. This discrepancy can be predicted by their different uptake potential, pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles. We recommend that the development phase of qAOPs should include the application of species-species uptake and physiologically-based PK/PD models. This integration will significantly enhance the predictive power, enabling a more accurate assessment of the risk and the reliable transferability of qAOPs across chemicals. PMID:26917256

  20. Predictive modeling of nanomaterial exposure effects in biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiong; Tang, Kaizhi; Harper, Stacey; Harper, Bryan; Steevens, Jeffery A; Xu, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Background Predictive modeling of the biological effects of nanomaterials is critical for industry and policymakers to assess the potential hazards resulting from the application of engineered nanomaterials. Methods We generated an experimental dataset on the toxic effects experienced by embryonic zebrafish due to exposure to nanomaterials. Several nanomaterials were studied, such as metal nanoparticles, dendrimer, metal oxide, and polymeric materials. The embryonic zebrafish metric (EZ Metric) was used as a screening-level measurement representative of adverse effects. Using the dataset, we developed a data mining approach to model the toxic endpoints and the overall biological impact of nanomaterials. Data mining techniques, such as numerical prediction, can assist analysts in developing risk assessment models for nanomaterials. Results We found several important attributes that contribute to the 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf) mortality, such as dosage concentration, shell composition, and surface charge. These findings concur with previous studies on nanomaterial toxicity using embryonic zebrafish. We conducted case studies on modeling the overall effect/impact of nanomaterials and the specific toxic endpoints such as mortality, delayed development, and morphological malformations. The results show that we can achieve high prediction accuracy for certain biological effects, such as 24 hpf mortality, 120 hpf mortality, and 120 hpf heart malformation. The results also show that the weighting scheme for individual biological effects has a significant influence on modeling the overall impact of nanomaterials. Sample prediction models can be found at http://neiminer.i-a-i.com/nei_models. Conclusion The EZ Metric-based data mining approach has been shown to have predictive power. The results provide valuable insights into the modeling and understanding of nanomaterial exposure effects. PMID:24098077

  1. International Symposia on Integrated Exposure Assessment for Hazardous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ho-Jang; Ha, Mina

    2012-01-01

    Objectives On September 2, 2010 and November 25, 2011, the Korean Research Project on Integrated Exposure Assessment to Hazardous Materials for Food Safety (KRIEFS) organized two international symposia in Seoul, Korea. KRIEFS, established by the Korean Food and Drug Administration in March 2010, envisioned these international symposia as means to obtain advanced experiences from other countries and to reflect on and refine the KRIEFS's survey design and methods. Methods For the first symposium KRIEFS invited human biomonitoring (HBM) experts from Germany, the US, and Canada. The visiting HBM experts shared the details of their national studies while the KRIEFS discussed study design, as well as the methods, results and policymaking processes of the KRIEFS project. The second symposium was organized to share the survey design and results on endocrine disruptors from Taiwan. Results The Speaker from Germany introduced the German Environmental Survey and shared their experiences in HBM design, such as the process of developing reference values, and discussed the new HBM plan in Germany and the European Union. The Representative from Canada shared insights from national HBM approach. In the case of the US, the speaker focused on risk communication with subjects in epidemiological studies. In the second international symposium, the speaker shared the experience of endocrine disruptors'studies from Taiwan. Conclusions KRIEFS was able to better understand previous nationwide HBM research designs, policy making process, and risk communication with research subjects.

  2. Learning to predict: Exposure to temporal sequences facilitates prediction of future events

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Rosalind; Dexter, Matthew; Hardwicke, Tom E.; Goldstone, Aimee; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    Previous experience is thought to facilitate our ability to extract spatial and temporal regularities from cluttered scenes. However, little is known about how we may use this knowledge to predict future events. Here we test whether exposure to temporal sequences facilitates the visual recognition of upcoming stimuli. We presented observers with a sequence of leftwards and rightwards oriented gratings that was interrupted by a test stimulus. Observers were asked to indicate whether the orientation of the test stimulus matched their expectation based on the preceding sequence. Our results demonstrate that exposure to temporal sequences without feedback facilitates our ability to predict an upcoming stimulus. In particular, observers’ performance improved following exposure to structured but not random sequences. Improved performance lasted for a prolonged period and generalized to untrained stimulus orientations rather than sequences of different global structure, suggesting that observers acquire knowledge of the sequence structure rather than its items. Further, this learning was compromised when observers performed a dual task resulting in increased attentional load. These findings suggest that exposure to temporal regularities in a scene allows us to accumulate knowledge about its global structure and predict future events. PMID:24231115

  3. 75 FR 44304 - Noise Exposure Map Notice, Portland International Airport, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... Noise Exposure Map Notice, Portland International Airport, Portland, OR AGENCY: Federal Aviation... determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by Port of Portland for Portland International Airport... the FAA's determination on the noise exposure maps is July 21, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  4. 78 FR 25523 - Acceptance of Noise Exposure Map Notice for Oakland County International Airport, Pontiac, Michigan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Acceptance of Noise Exposure Map Notice for Oakland County International...: The FAA announces its determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by Oakland County, for the... exposure maps submitted for Oakland County International Airport are in compliance with...

  5. 78 FR 41184 - Noise Exposure Map Notice for Hilo International Airport, Hilo, Hawaii

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice for Hilo International Airport, Hilo, Hawaii... determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by Hawaii State Department of Transportation, Airports... announces that the FAA finds that the noise exposure maps submitted for Hilo International Airport are...

  6. 77 FR 36331 - Noise Exposure Maps; Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, Cleveland, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... Noise Exposure Maps; Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, Cleveland, OH AGENCY: Federal Aviation... determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by the City of Cleveland for Cleveland Hopkins... International Airport under Part 150 in conjunction with the noise exposure map, and that this program will...

  7. Internal performance predictions for Langley scramjet engine module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.

    1978-01-01

    A one dimensional theoretical method for the prediction of the internal performance of a scramjet engine is presented. The effects of changes in vehicle forebody flow parameters and characteristics on predicted thrust for the scramjet engine were evaluated using this method, and results are presented. A theoretical evaluation of the effects of changes in the scramjet engine's internal parameters is also presented. Theoretical internal performance predictions, in terms thrust coefficient and specific impulse, are provided for the scramjet engine for free stream Mach numbers of 5, 6, and 7 free stream dynamic pressure of 23,940 N/sq m forebody surface angles of 4.6 deg to 14.6 deg, and fuel equivalence ratio of 1.0.

  8. Kantian fractionalization predicts the conflict propensity of the international system

    PubMed Central

    Cranmer, Skyler J.; Menninga, Elizabeth J.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Network science has spurred a reexamination of relational phenomena in political science, including the study of international conflict. We introduce a new direction to the study of conflict by showing that the multiplex fractionalization of the international system along three key dimensions is a powerful predictor of the propensity for violent interstate conflict. Even after controlling for well-established conflict indicators, our new measure contributes more to model fit for interstate conflict than all of the previously established measures combined. Moreover, joint democracy plays little, if any, role in predicting system stability, thus challenging perhaps the major empirical finding of the international relations literature. Lastly, the temporal variability of our measure with conflict is consistent with a causal relationship. Our results have real-world policy implications as changes in our fractionalization measure substantially aid the prediction of conflict up to 10 years into the future, allowing it to serve as an early warning sign of international instability. PMID:26338977

  9. Kantian fractionalization predicts the conflict propensity of the international system.

    PubMed

    Cranmer, Skyler J; Menninga, Elizabeth J; Mucha, Peter J

    2015-09-22

    Network science has spurred a reexamination of relational phenomena in political science, including the study of international conflict. We introduce a new direction to the study of conflict by showing that the multiplex fractionalization of the international system along three key dimensions is a powerful predictor of the propensity for violent interstate conflict. Even after controlling for well-established conflict indicators, our new measure contributes more to model fit for interstate conflict than all of the previously established measures combined. Moreover, joint democracy plays little, if any, role in predicting system stability, thus challenging perhaps the major empirical finding of the international relations literature. Lastly, the temporal variability of our measure with conflict is consistent with a causal relationship. Our results have real-world policy implications as changes in our fractionalization measure substantially aid the prediction of conflict up to 10 years into the future, allowing it to serve as an early warning sign of international instability. PMID:26338977

  10. A Comparison of Two Strategies for Building an Exposure Prediction Model.

    PubMed

    Heiden, Marina; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Garza, Jennifer; Liv, Per; Wahlström, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Cost-efficient assessments of job exposures in large populations may be obtained from models in which 'true' exposures assessed by expensive measurement methods are estimated from easily accessible and cheap predictors. Typically, the models are built on the basis of a validation study comprising 'true' exposure data as well as an extensive collection of candidate predictors from questionnaires or company data, which cannot all be included in the models due to restrictions in the degrees of freedom available for modeling. In these situations, predictors need to be selected using procedures that can identify the best possible subset of predictors among the candidates. The present study compares two strategies for selecting a set of predictor variables. One strategy relies on stepwise hypothesis testing of associations between predictors and exposure, while the other uses cluster analysis to reduce the number of predictors without relying on empirical information about the measured exposure. Both strategies were applied to the same dataset on biomechanical exposure and candidate predictors among computer users, and they were compared in terms of identified predictors of exposure as well as the resulting model fit using bootstrapped resamples of the original data. The identified predictors were, to a large part, different between the two strategies, and the initial model fit was better for the stepwise testing strategy than for the clustering approach. Internal validation of the models using bootstrap resampling with fixed predictors revealed an equally reduced model fit in resampled datasets for both strategies. However, when predictor selection was incorporated in the validation procedure for the stepwise testing strategy, the model fit was reduced to the extent that both strategies showed similar model fit. Thus, the two strategies would both be expected to perform poorly with respect to predicting biomechanical exposure in other samples of computer users. PMID

  11. TIME-INTEGRATED EXPOSURE MEASURES TO IMPROVE THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF EXPOSURE CLASSIFICATION FOR EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate exposure classification tools are required to link exposure with health effects in epidemiological studies. Although long-term integrated exposure measurements are a critical component of exposure assessment, the ability to include these measurements into epidemiologic...

  12. ASSESSING A COMPUTER MODEL FOR PREDICTING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper compares outputs of a model for predicting PM2.5 exposure with experimental data obtained from exposure studies of selected subpopulations. The exposure model is built on a WWW platform called pCNEM, "A PC Version of pNEM." Exposure models created by pCNEM are sim...

  13. Air pollution exposure prediction approaches used in air pollution epidemiology studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies of the health effects of air pollution have traditionally relied upon surrogates of personal exposures, most commonly ambient concentration measurements from central-site monitors. However, this approach may introduce exposure prediction errors and miscla...

  14. Change in BMI Accurately Predicted by Social Exposure to Acquaintances

    PubMed Central

    Oloritun, Rahman O.; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.; Moturu, Sai; Madan, Anmol; Pentland, Alex (Sandy); Khayal, Inas

    2013-01-01

    Research has mostly focused on obesity and not on processes of BMI change more generally, although these may be key factors that lead to obesity. Studies have suggested that obesity is affected by social ties. However these studies used survey based data collection techniques that may be biased toward select only close friends and relatives. In this study, mobile phone sensing techniques were used to routinely capture social interaction data in an undergraduate dorm. By automating the capture of social interaction data, the limitations of self-reported social exposure data are avoided. This study attempts to understand and develop a model that best describes the change in BMI using social interaction data. We evaluated a cohort of 42 college students in a co-located university dorm, automatically captured via mobile phones and survey based health-related information. We determined the most predictive variables for change in BMI using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) method. The selected variables, with gender, healthy diet category, and ability to manage stress, were used to build multiple linear regression models that estimate the effect of exposure and individual factors on change in BMI. We identified the best model using Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and R2. This study found a model that explains 68% (p<0.0001) of the variation in change in BMI. The model combined social interaction data, especially from acquaintances, and personal health-related information to explain change in BMI. This is the first study taking into account both interactions with different levels of social interaction and personal health-related information. Social interactions with acquaintances accounted for more than half the variation in change in BMI. This suggests the importance of not only individual health information but also the significance of social interactions with people we are exposed to, even people we may not consider as close friends. PMID

  15. A practical approach to helicopter internal noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, L. S.; Defelice, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    A practical and well correlated procedure for predicting helicopter internal noise is presented. It accounts for the propagation of noise along multiple paths on an octave by octave basis. The method is sufficiently general to be applicable to conventional helicopters as well as other aircraft types, when the appropriate structural geometry, noise source strengths, and material acoustic properties are defined. A guide is provided for the prediction of various helicopter noise sources over a wide range of horsepower for use when measured data are not available. The method is applied to the prediction of the interior levels of the Civil Helicopter Research Aircraft (CHRA), both with and without soundproofing installed. Results include good correlation with measured levels and prediction of the speech interference level within 1.5 db at all conditions. A sample problem is also shown illustrating the use of the procedure. This example calculates the engine casing noise observed in the passenger cabin of the CHRA.

  16. A PROBABILISTIC MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR PREDICTING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is modifying their probabilistic Stochastic Human Exposure Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model to assess aggregate exposures to air toxics. Air toxics include urban Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPS) such as benzene from mobile sources, part...

  17. Predicting Maternal Rat and Pup Exposures: How Different Are They?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk and safety assessments for early life exposures to environmental chemicals or pharmaceuticals based on cross-species extrapolation would greatly benefit from information on chemical dosimetry in the young. Although relevant toxicity studies involve exposures during multiple ...

  18. 78 FR 71706 - Noise Exposure Map Notice for Laughlin/Bullhead International Airport, Bullhead City, Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice for Laughlin/Bullhead International Airport... Aviation Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by Mohave... INFORMATION: This notice announces that the FAA finds that the noise exposure maps submitted for...

  19. 77 FR 834 - Noise Exposure Map Update for Albany International Airport, Albany, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Update for Albany International Airport, Albany, NY... Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the updated noise exposure maps submitted by the Albany... exposure maps is December 19, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Suki Gill,...

  20. 76 FR 12404 - Noise Exposure Map Notice; Jackson-Evers International Airport, Jackson, MS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice; Jackson-Evers International Airport, Jackson... Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by the Jackson Municipal.... DATES: Effective Date: The effective date of the FAA's determination on the noise exposure maps...

  1. 75 FR 54695 - Noise Exposure Map Notice; Brownsville South Padre Island International Airport, Brownsville, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice; Brownsville South Padre Island International... Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the noise exposure maps submitted... on the noise exposure maps is August 30, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lance E. Key,...

  2. 3D protein structure prediction using Imperialist Competitive algorithm and half sphere exposure prediction.

    PubMed

    Khaji, Erfan; Karami, Masoumeh; Garkani-Nejad, Zahra

    2016-02-21

    Predicting the native structure of proteins based on half-sphere exposure and contact numbers has been studied deeply within recent years. Online predictors of these vectors and secondary structures of amino acids sequences have made it possible to design a function for the folding process. By choosing variant structures and directs for each secondary structure, a random conformation can be generated, and a potential function can then be assigned. Minimizing the potential function utilizing meta-heuristic algorithms is the final step of finding the native structure of a given amino acid sequence. In this work, Imperialist Competitive algorithm was used in order to accelerate the process of minimization. Moreover, we applied an adaptive procedure to apply revolutionary changes. Finally, we considered a more accurate tool for prediction of secondary structure. The results of the computational experiments on standard benchmark show the superiority of the new algorithm over the previous methods with similar potential function. PMID:26718864

  3. In-depth methods for systemic exposure predictions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to a wide range of chemicals is ubiquitous and largely unavoidable within modern society. The potential for human exposure, however, has not been quantified for the vast majority of chemicals with wide commercial use. Creative advances in exposure science are needed to s...

  4. Identity Distress among Youth Exposed to Natural Disasters: Associations with Level of Exposure, Posttraumatic Stress, and Internalizing Problems

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Brandon G.; Sanders, Ashley F. P.; Graham, Rebecca A.; Banks, Donice M.; Russell, Justin D.; Berman, Steven L.; Weems, Carl F.

    2014-01-01

    Identity distress involves intense or prolonged upset or worry about personal identity issues including long-term goals, career choice, friendships, sexual orientation and behavior, religion, values and beliefs, and group loyalties. Research suggests that trauma exposure and subsequent PTSD symptoms may negatively impact identity development and psychological adjustment. However, little is known about their specific associations with identity distress and internalizing problems among disaster-exposed adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine these relationships in a sample of 325 adolescents (60% female; 89% African American) who experienced a major natural disaster and its aftermath. The results indicated that identity distress was positively associated with age, hurricane exposure, PTSD symptoms, and internalizing problems. Linear regression analyses also showed that identity distress was uniquely associated with internalizing symptoms and that there was an indirect effect of hurricane exposure on identity distress via PTSD symptoms. Finally, PTSD symptoms moderated the link between identity distress and internalizing symptoms, with a significant positive slope found for youth with more PTSD symptoms. Findings were generally consistent with previous work and predictions, and add to the extant knowledge about identity distress by providing data on the linkages between disaster exposure, posttraumatic stress and internalizing problems in adolescents. PMID:25505851

  5. Minimal Internal Radiation Exposure in Residents Living South of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Disaster.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Junichi; Kato, Shigeaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji; Hayano, Ryugo; Tokiwa, Michio; Shimmura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Following the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, assessment of internal radiation exposure was indispensable to predict radiation-related health threats to residents of neighboring areas. Although many evaluations of internal radiation in residents living north and west of the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant are available, there is little information on residents living in areas south of the plant, which were similarly affected by radio-contamination from the disaster. To assess the internal radio-contamination in residents living in affected areas to the south of the plant or who were evacuated into Iwaki city, a whole body counter (WBC) screening program of internal radio-contamination was performed on visitors to the Jyoban hospital in Iwaki city, which experienced less contamination than southern areas adjacent to the nuclear plant. The study included 9,206 volunteer subjects, of whom 6,446 were schoolchildren aged 4-15 years. Measurements began one year after the incident and were carried out over the course of two years. Early in the screening period only two schoolchildren showed Cs-137 levels that were over the detection limit (250 Bq/body), although their Cs-134 levels were below the detection limit (220 Bq/body). Among the 2,760 adults tested, 35 (1.3%) had detectable internal radio-contamination, but only for Cs-137 (range: 250 Bq/body to 859 Bq/body), and not Cs-134. Of these 35 subjects, nearly all (34/35) showed elevated Cs-137 levels only during the first year of the screening. With the exception of potassium 40, no other radionuclides were detected during the screening period. The maximum annual effective dose calculated from the detected Cs-137 levels was 0.029 and 0.028 mSv/year for the schoolchildren and adults, respectively, which is far below the 1 mSv/year limit set by the government of Japan. Although the data for radiation exposure during the most critical first year after the incident are unavailable due to a lack of systemic

  6. Minimal Internal Radiation Exposure in Residents Living South of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Junichi; Kato, Shigeaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji; Hayano, Ryugo; Tokiwa, Michio; Shimmura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Following the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, assessment of internal radiation exposure was indispensable to predict radiation-related health threats to residents of neighboring areas. Although many evaluations of internal radiation in residents living north and west of the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant are available, there is little information on residents living in areas south of the plant, which were similarly affected by radio-contamination from the disaster. To assess the internal radio-contamination in residents living in affected areas to the south of the plant or who were evacuated into Iwaki city, a whole body counter (WBC) screening program of internal radio-contamination was performed on visitors to the Jyoban hospital in Iwaki city, which experienced less contamination than southern areas adjacent to the nuclear plant. The study included 9,206 volunteer subjects, of whom 6,446 were schoolchildren aged 4–15 years. Measurements began one year after the incident and were carried out over the course of two years. Early in the screening period only two schoolchildren showed Cs-137 levels that were over the detection limit (250 Bq/body), although their Cs-134 levels were below the detection limit (220 Bq/body). Among the 2,760 adults tested, 35 (1.3%) had detectable internal radio-contamination, but only for Cs-137 (range: 250 Bq/body to 859 Bq/body), and not Cs-134. Of these 35 subjects, nearly all (34/35) showed elevated Cs-137 levels only during the first year of the screening. With the exception of potassium 40, no other radionuclides were detected during the screening period. The maximum annual effective dose calculated from the detected Cs-137 levels was 0.029 and 0.028 mSv/year for the schoolchildren and adults, respectively, which is far below the 1 mSv/year limit set by the government of Japan. Although the data for radiation exposure during the most critical first year after the incident are unavailable due to a lack of systemic

  7. ERPs recorded during early second language exposure predict syntactic learning.

    PubMed

    Batterink, Laura; Neville, Helen J

    2014-09-01

    Millions of adults worldwide are faced with the task of learning a second language (L2). Understanding the neural mechanisms that support this learning process is an important area of scientific inquiry. However, most previous studies on the neural mechanisms underlying L2 acquisition have focused on characterizing the results of learning, relying upon end-state outcome measures in which learning is assessed after it has occurred, rather than on the learning process itself. In this study, we adopted a novel and more direct approach to investigate neural mechanisms engaged during L2 learning, in which we recorded ERPs from beginning adult learners as they were exposed to an unfamiliar L2 for the first time. Learners' proficiency in the L2 was then assessed behaviorally using a grammaticality judgment task, and ERP data acquired during initial L2 exposure were sorted as a function of performance on this task. High-proficiency learners showed a larger N100 effect to open-class content words compared with closed-class function words, whereas low-proficiency learners did not show a significant N100 difference between open- and closed-class words. In contrast, amplitude of the N400 word category effect correlated with learners' L2 comprehension, rather than predicting syntactic learning. Taken together, these results indicate that learners who spontaneously direct greater attention to open- rather than closed-class words when processing L2 input show better syntactic learning, suggesting a link between selective attention to open-class content words and acquisition of basic morphosyntactic rules. These findings highlight the importance of selective attention mechanisms for L2 acquisition. PMID:24666165

  8. ERPs Recorded During Early Second Language Exposure Predict Syntactic Learning

    PubMed Central

    Batterink, Laura; Neville, Helen J.

    2015-01-01

    Millions of adults worldwide are faced with the task of learning a second language (L2). Understanding the neural mechanisms that support this learning process is an important area of scientific inquiry. However, most previous studies on the neural mechanisms underlying L2 acquisition have focused on characterizing the results of learning, relying upon end-state outcome measures in which learning is assessed after it has occurred, rather than on the learning process itself. In the present study, we adopted a novel and more direct approach to investigate neural mechanisms engaged during L2 learning, in which we recorded ERPs from beginning adult learners as they were exposed to an unfamiliar L2 for the first time. Learners’ proficiency in the L2 was then assessed behaviorally using a grammaticality judgment task, and ERP data acquired during initial L2 exposure were sorted as a function of performance on this task. High proficiency learners showed a larger N100 effect to open-class content words compared to closed-class function words, while low proficiency learners did not show a significant N100 difference between open- and closed-class words. In contrast, amplitude of the N400 word category effect correlated with learners’ L2 comprehension, rather than predicting syntactic learning. Taken together, these results indicate that learners who spontaneously direct greater attention to open- rather than closed-class words when processing L2 input show better syntactic learning, suggesting a link between selective attention to open-class content words and acquisition of basic morphosyntactic rules. These findings highlight the importance of selective attention mechanisms for L2 acquisition. PMID:24666165

  9. Developmental Trajectories of Internally and Externally Driven Temporal Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Mento, Giovanni; Tarantino, Vincenza

    2015-01-01

    The ability to generate temporal prediction (TP) is fundamental to our survival since it allows us to selectively orient our attention in time in order to prioritize relevant environmental information. Studies on adult participants showed that externally and internally driven mechanisms can be engaged to establish TP, both resulting in better behavioural performance. However, few studies on children have investigated the ability to engage internally and externally driven TP, especially in relation to how these mechanisms change across development. In this study, 111 participants (88 children between six and eleven years of age, and 23 adults) were tested by means of a simple reaction time paradigm, in which temporal cueing and neutral conditions were orthogonally manipulated to induce externally and internally driven TP mechanisms, as well as an interaction between the two. Sequential effects (SEs) relative to both tasks were also investigated. Results showed that all children participating in the study were able to implement both external and internal TP in an independent fashion. However, children younger than eight years were not able to combine both strategies. Furthermore, in the temporal cueing blocks they did not show the typically-observed asymmetric SE pattern. These results suggest that children can flexibly use both external and internal TP mechanisms to optimise their behaviour, although their successful combined use develops only after eight years of age. PMID:26262878

  10. Exposure factors resources: contrasting EPA’s Exposure Factors Handbook with international sources(journal article)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts to compile and standardize exposure human factors have resulted in the development of a variety of resources available to the scientific community. For example, the U.S. EPA developed the Exposure Factors Handbook and Child-specific Exposure Factors Handbook to promote c...

  11. Incorporating High-Throughput Exposure Predictions With Dosimetry-Adjusted In Vitro Bioactivity to Inform Chemical Toxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, Barbara A.; Wambaugh, John F.; Allen, Brittany; Ferguson, Stephen S.; Sochaski, Mark A.; Setzer, R. Woodrow; Houck, Keith A.; Strope, Cory L.; Cantwell, Katherine; Judson, Richard S.; LeCluyse, Edward; Clewell, Harvey J.; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2015-01-01

    We previously integrated dosimetry and exposure with high-throughput screening (HTS) to enhance the utility of ToxCast HTS data by translating in vitro bioactivity concentrations to oral equivalent doses (OEDs) required to achieve these levels internally. These OEDs were compared against regulatory exposure estimates, providing an activity-to-exposure ratio (AER) useful for a risk-based ranking strategy. As ToxCast efforts expand (ie, Phase II) beyond food-use pesticides toward a wider chemical domain that lacks exposure and toxicity information, prediction tools become increasingly important. In this study, in vitro hepatic clearance and plasma protein binding were measured to estimate OEDs for a subset of Phase II chemicals. OEDs were compared against high-throughput (HT) exposure predictions generated using probabilistic modeling and Bayesian approaches generated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ExpoCast program. This approach incorporated chemical-specific use and national production volume data with biomonitoring data to inform the exposure predictions. This HT exposure modeling approach provided predictions for all Phase II chemicals assessed in this study whereas estimates from regulatory sources were available for only 7% of chemicals. Of the 163 chemicals assessed in this study, 3 or 13 chemicals possessed AERs < 1 or < 100, respectively. Diverse bioactivities across a range of assays and concentrations were also noted across the wider chemical space surveyed. The availability of HT exposure estimation and bioactivity screening tools provides an opportunity to incorporate a risk-based strategy for use in testing prioritization. PMID:26251325

  12. Incorporating High-Throughput Exposure Predictions With Dosimetry-Adjusted In Vitro Bioactivity to Inform Chemical Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, Barbara A; Wambaugh, John F; Allen, Brittany; Ferguson, Stephen S; Sochaski, Mark A; Setzer, R Woodrow; Houck, Keith A; Strope, Cory L; Cantwell, Katherine; Judson, Richard S; LeCluyse, Edward; Clewell, Harvey J; Thomas, Russell S; Andersen, Melvin E

    2015-11-01

    We previously integrated dosimetry and exposure with high-throughput screening (HTS) to enhance the utility of ToxCast HTS data by translating in vitro bioactivity concentrations to oral equivalent doses (OEDs) required to achieve these levels internally. These OEDs were compared against regulatory exposure estimates, providing an activity-to-exposure ratio (AER) useful for a risk-based ranking strategy. As ToxCast efforts expand (ie, Phase II) beyond food-use pesticides toward a wider chemical domain that lacks exposure and toxicity information, prediction tools become increasingly important. In this study, in vitro hepatic clearance and plasma protein binding were measured to estimate OEDs for a subset of Phase II chemicals. OEDs were compared against high-throughput (HT) exposure predictions generated using probabilistic modeling and Bayesian approaches generated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ExpoCast program. This approach incorporated chemical-specific use and national production volume data with biomonitoring data to inform the exposure predictions. This HT exposure modeling approach provided predictions for all Phase II chemicals assessed in this study whereas estimates from regulatory sources were available for only 7% of chemicals. Of the 163 chemicals assessed in this study, 3 or 13 chemicals possessed AERs < 1 or < 100, respectively. Diverse bioactivities across a range of assays and concentrations were also noted across the wider chemical space surveyed. The availability of HT exposure estimation and bioactivity screening tools provides an opportunity to incorporate a risk-based strategy for use in testing prioritization. PMID:26251325

  13. 78 FR 52532 - Exposure Draft-Standards for Internal Control in the Federal Government

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... OFFICE Exposure Draft--Standards for Internal Control in the Federal Government AGENCY: U.S. Government... Office (GAO) is seeking public comments on the proposed revisions to the Standards for Internal Control... Internal Control in the Federal Government reflect major developments in the accountability and...

  14. PREDICTING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO PM: THE IMPORTANCE OF MICROENVIRONMENTAL CONCENTRATIONS AND HUMAN ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) models being developed by the US EPA/NERL use a probabilistic approach to predict population exposures to pollutants. The SHEDS model for particulate matter (SHEDS-PM) estimates the population distribution of PM exposure...

  15. Positive interpretation bias predicts well-being in medical interns

    PubMed Central

    Kleim, Birgit; Thörn, Hanna A.; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive theories of emotion posit that affective responses may be shaped by how individuals interpret emotion-eliciting situations. This study tested whether individual differences in interpretation bias (i.e., interpreting ambiguous scenarios in a more negative or positive manner) independently predict trait resilience and depression in medical interns. Interpretation bias and trait resilience scores were assessed in 47 interns prior to their first internship. Depressive symptoms were assessed twice during internship. Nearly half of the sample (42%) scored above the cut-off for mild depressive symptoms during internship, a significant rise compared to the initial assessment. Those with a more positive interpretation bias had higher trait resilience (β = 0.44, p = 0.004) and a 6-fold decreased depressive symptom risk during internship (OR = 6.41, p = 0.027). The predictive power of a positive interpretation bias for decreased depression symptoms held over and above initial depressive symptoms, demographics and trait reappraisal. Assessing positive interpretation bias may have practical utility for predicting future well-being in at risk-populations. PMID:25009521

  16. Prediction of strongly-heated internal gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M. ||; Shehata, A.M.; Kunugi, Tomoaki |

    1997-12-31

    The purposes of the present article are to remind practitioners why the usual textbook approaches may not be appropriate for treating gas flows heated from the surface with large heat fluxes and to review the successes of some recent applications of turbulence models to this case. Simulations from various turbulence models have been assessed by comparison to the measurements of internal mean velocity and temperature distributions by Shehata for turbulent, laminarizing and intermediate flows with significant gas property variation. Of about fifteen models considered, five were judged to provide adequate predictions.

  17. Noise prediction and control of Pudong International Airport expansion project.

    PubMed

    Lei, Bin; Yang, Xin; Yang, Jianguo

    2009-04-01

    The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process of the third runway building project of Pudong International Airport is briefly introduced in the paper. The basic principle, the features, and the operation steps of newly imported FAA's Integrated Noise Model (INM) are discussed for evaluating the aircraft noise impacts. The prediction of the aircraft noise and the countermeasures for the noise mitigation are developed, which includes the reasonable runway location, the optimized land use, the selection of low noise aircrafts, the Fly Quit Program, the relocation of sensitive receptors and the noise insulation of sensitive buildings. Finally, the expansion project is justified and its feasibility is confirmed. PMID:18373206

  18. International perspectives of lead exposure and lead toxicity.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, P

    1993-01-01

    Three approaches have been used to examine how human body burdens of lead depend on different environments: (1) In paleopathologic studies, lead concentrations have been determined in well-preserved human bones or teeth, and pre-pollution samples generally show lead concentrations of about 1% of current levels in industrialized countries. (2) Geographic comparisons of blood-lead concentrations show low levels in, Nepal, Faroe Islands, and Sweden, while high levels occur in Mexico and Malta; average blood-lead levels may vary by a factor of 10 or more. (3) In analytical epidemiology, major exposure sources have been related to lead levels in blood, by either prospective or cross-sectional design. Increased blood-lead concentrations are related to smoking, drinking alcoholic beverages, eating vegetables for dinner, urban residence, and exposure from lead-using industries; average blood-lead values of subgroups within well-defined populations may vary by a factor of 3 or more. The dose-relationships for lead-induced neurotoxicity will depend on the sensitivity of the parameters chosen as indicators of lead exposure and of neurotoxicity. The temporal relationship between lead exposures and the development of deficits must be ascertained. Individual susceptibility and interacting factors must also be taken into account. Differences in addressing these issues impede the comparison between studies. Recently neonatal jaundice has been found to be a risk factor for subsequent neurobehavioral dysfunction in children with a birth weight above 2500 g, but only in children with increased lead exposure. Lead exposure may act in combination with several other factors and result in additive, or synergistic effects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8247415

  19. EXPOSURES AND INTERNAL DOSES OF TRIHALOMETHANES IN HUMANS: MULTI-ROUTE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM DRINKING WATER (FINAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) has released a final report that presents and applies a method to estimate distributions of internal concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) in humans resulting from a residential drinking water exposure. The report presen...

  20. Prospective Effects of Violence Exposure across Multiple Contexts on Early Adolescents' Internalizing and Externalizing Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mrug, Sylvie; Windle, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background: Violence exposure within each setting of community, school, or home has been linked with internalizing and externalizing problems. Although many children experience violence in multiple contexts, the effects of such cross-contextual exposure have not been studied. This study addresses this gap by examining independent and interactive…

  1. Harmonization of exposure assessment for food chemicals: the international perspective.

    PubMed

    Luetzow, Manfred

    2003-04-11

    The assessment of human exposure to chemicals present in the diet is a rapidly developing discipline. The formulation of the "risk analysis paradigm" by the Codex Alimentarius Commission in 1994 defined the exposure assessment as an essential step of the risk assessment process. This has re-enforced demands to those joint FAO/WHO scientific bodies who evaluate the safety of chemicals in foods to estimate routinely intakes for food additives, flavors, contaminants, and residues of pesticides and veterinary drugs as part of their safety assessments. The approaches chosen by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee for Food Additives (JECFA) and the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Meeting on Pesticide Residues (JMPR) for these compounds are considerably different. These differences can only be understood when considering the different risk policies of the Codex Alimentarius Committees involved. Specific problems emerge if global intake assessments are requested; lack of representative regional data for consumption patterns and insufficient knowledge about levels of chemicals occurring in foods in many countries bear the risk that exposure assessments do not provide risk managers with a true global picture. There is a need to improve the collection and dissemination of such data. PMID:12676490

  2. Assessing Occupational Exposure to Chemicals in an International Epidemiological Study of Brain Tumours

    PubMed Central

    van Tongeren, Martie

    2013-01-01

    The INTEROCC project is a multi-centre case–control study investigating the risk of developing brain cancer due to occupational chemical and electromagnetic field exposures. To estimate chemical exposures, the Finnish Job Exposure Matrix (FINJEM) was modified to improve its performance in the INTEROCC study and to address some of its limitations, resulting in the development of the INTEROCC JEM. An international team of occupational hygienists developed a crosswalk between the Finnish occupational codes used in FINJEM and the International Standard Classification of Occupations 1968 (ISCO68). For ISCO68 codes linked to multiple Finnish codes, weighted means of the exposure estimates were calculated. Similarly, multiple ISCO68 codes linked to a single Finnish code with evidence of heterogeneous exposure were refined. One of the key time periods in FINJEM (1960–1984) was split into two periods (1960–1974 and 1975–1984). Benzene exposure estimates in early periods were modified upwards. The internal consistency of hydrocarbon exposures and exposures to engine exhaust fumes was improved. Finally, exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and benzo(a)pyrene was modified to include the contribution from second-hand smoke. The crosswalk ensured that the FINJEM exposure estimates could be applied to the INTEROCC study subjects. The modifications generally resulted in an increased prevalence of exposure to chemical agents. This increased prevalence of exposure was not restricted to the lowest categories of cumulative exposure, but was seen across all levels for some agents. Although this work has produced a JEM with important improvements compared to FINJEM, further improvements are possible with the expansion of agents and additional external data. PMID:23467593

  3. Shadow prediction model for the International Space Station Alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, D.K.

    1995-12-31

    A Fortran computer model, SHADOW5, was developed to predict shadows on the solar arrays of the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) for general flight modes. This shadow model was incorporated into the EPSOP-F (Electrical Power System On-Orbit Performance) program to conduct ISSA power analyses for various operating conditions. This paper describes the mathematical methods of the model and shows the typical results predicted with the model. Vector analyses with coordinate transformations were used to trace the shadows between the potential shadowing and shadowed components of the station during the sun portion of the orbit. Including the space shuttle orbiter, 40 components were modeled. The basic shapes of the components were assumed to be either planar or cylindrical. The elemental areas obtained from the Cartesian grid lines allocated on the component surfaces were projected in the sun vector direction to reconstruct shadows on the shadowed planar surface. Comparison of predicted results with other models showed good agreement. Ease of preparing input data and relatively short CPU time make this model suitable for shadow analyses required for the many design and flight configurations of the space station.

  4. Prediction of thermal strains in fibre reinforced plastic matrix by discretisation of the temperature exposure history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngoy, E. K.

    2016-07-01

    Prediction of environmental effects on fibre reinforced plastics habitually is made difficult due to the complex variability of the natural service environment. This paper suggests a method to predict thermal strain distribution over the material lifetime by discretisation of the exposure history. Laboratory results show a high correlation between predicted and experimentally measured strain distribution

  5. Predicting Later-Life Outcomes of Early-Life Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: In utero exposure of the fetus to a stressor can lead to disease in later life. Epigenetic mechanisms are likely mediators of later-life expression of early-life events.Objectives: We examined the current state of understanding of later-life diseases resulting from ea...

  6. Documentation of quality improvement exposure by internal medicine residency applicants

    PubMed Central

    Kolade, Victor O.; Sethi, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality improvement (QI) has become an essential component of medical care in the United States. In residency programs, QI is a focus area of the Clinical Learning Environment Review visits conducted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The readiness of applicants to internal medicine residency to engage in QI on day one is unknown. Purpose To document the reporting of QI training or experience in residency applications. Methods Electronic Residency Application Service applications to a single internal medicine program were reviewed individually looking for reported QI involvement or actual projects in the curriculum vitae (CVs), personal statements (PSs), and letters of recommendation (LORs). CVs were also reviewed for evidence of education in QI such as completion of Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) modules. Results Of 204 candidates shortlisted for interview, seven had QI items on their CVs, including one basic IHI certificate. Three discussed their QI work in their PSs, and four had recommendation letters describing their involvement in QI. One applicant had both CV and LOR evidence, so that 13 (6%) documented QI engagement. Conclusion Practice of or instruction in QI is rarely mentioned in application documents of prospective internal medicine interns. PMID:26908376

  7. International Test Program for Synergistic Atomic Oxygen and Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure of Spacecraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K.

    2001-01-01

    The components and materials of spacecraft in low Earth orbit can degrade in thermal and optical performance through interaction with atomic oxygen and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, which are predominant in low Earth orbit. Because of the importance of low Earth orbit durability and performance to manufacturers and users, an international test program for assessing the durability of spacecraft materials and components was initiated. Initial tests at the NASA Glenn Research Center consisted of exposure of samples representing a variety of thermal control paints, multilayer insulation materials, and Sun sensors that have been used in space. Materials donated from various international sources were tested alongside materials whose performance is well known, such as Teflon FEP, Kapton H, or Z-93-P white paint. The optical, thermal, or mass loss data generated during the tests were then provided to the participating material suppliers. Data were not published unless the participant donating the material consented to publication. The test program is intended to give spacecraft builders and users a better understanding of degradation processes and effects so that they can improve their predictions of spacecraft performance.

  8. International Test Program for Synergistic Atomic Oxygen and VUV Exposure of Spacecraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon; Banks, Bruce; Dever, Joyce; Savage, William

    2000-01-01

    Spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) are subject to degradation in thermal and optical performance of components and materials through interaction with atomic oxygen and vacuum ultraviolet radiation which are predominant in LEO. Due to the importance of LEO durability and performance to manufacturers and users, an international test program for assessing the durability of spacecraft materials and components was initiated. Initial tests consisted of exposure of samples representing a variety of thermal control paints and multilayer insulation materials that have been used in space. Materials donated from various international sources were tested alongside a material whose performance is well known such as Teflon FEP or Kapton H for multilayer insulation, or Z-93-P for white thermal control paints. The optical, thermal or mass loss data generated during the test was then provided to the participating material supplier. Data was not published unless the participant donating the material consented to publication. This paper presents a description of the types of tests and facilities that have been used for the test program as well as some examples of data that have been generated. The test program is intended to give spacecraft builders and users a better understanding of degradation processes and effects to enable improved prediction of spacecraft performance.

  9. Brief Report: Do Delinquency and Community Violence Exposure Explain Internalizing Problems in Early Adolescent Gang Members?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madan, Anjana; Mrug, Sylvie; Windle, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Adolescent gang members are at higher risk for internalizing problems as well as exposure to community violence and delinquency. This study examined whether gang membership in early adolescence is associated with internalizing problems (depression, anxiety, and suicidal behavior) and whether these associations are mediated by delinquency and…

  10. 77 FR 50759 - Noise Exposure Map Notice, Orlando Sanford International Airport, Sanford, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice, Orlando Sanford International Airport, Sanford... Authority for Orlando Sanford International Airport under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47501 et seq... August 16, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Allan Nagy, Federal Aviation Administration,...

  11. Microcomputer programs for the evaluation of predictable long-term exposure.

    PubMed

    Re, M

    1985-07-01

    Some methods proposed for evaluation of predictable long-term exposure by statistical treatment of workshift exposure values are considered. Predictable long-term exposure is a useful parameter for risk assessment procedures, as it allows the evaluation of workplace hazards by taking into account interday variability of exposure to air contaminants. Statistical calculations required for evaluating predictable long-term exposure may be performed easily by hand-held programmable calculators. The programs reported here are for use with a Texas Instruments TI-59 hand-held programmable calculator equipped with a PC-100 C thermal printer. They are designed for users inexperienced in programming, since an interactive approach has been adopted that helps communication between user and computer. PMID:3880190

  12. Medial prefrontal cortex predicts internally driven strategy shifts

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Nicolas W.; Gaschler, Robert; Wenke, Dorit; Heinzle, Jakob; Frensch, Peter A.; Haynes, John-Dylan; Reverberi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many daily behaviors require us to actively focus on the current task and ignore all other distractions. Yet, ignoring everything else might hinder the ability to discover new ways to achieve the same goal. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms that support the spontaneous change to better strategies while an established strategy is executed. Multivariate neuroimaging analysis showed that before the spontaneous change to an alternative strategy, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) encoded information that was irrelevant for the current strategy but necessary for the later strategy. Importantly, this neural effect was related to future behavioral changes: information encoding in MPFC was changed only in participants who eventually switched their strategy and started before the actual strategy change. This allowed us to predict spontaneous strategy shifts ahead of time. These findings suggest that MPFC might internally simulate alternative strategies and sheds new light on the organization of PFC. PMID:25819613

  13. The effects of internal radiation exposure on cancer mortality in nuclear workers at Rocketdyne/Atomics International.

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, B; Morgenstern, H; Crawford-Brown, D; Young, B

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effects of chronic exposure to radionuclides, primarily uranium and mixed-fission products, on cancer mortality in a retrospective cohort study of workers enrolled in the radiation-monitoring program of a nuclear research and development facility. Between 1950 and 1994, 2,297 workers were monitored for internal radiation exposures, and 441 workers died, 134 (30.4%) of them from cancer as the underlying cause. We calculated internal lung-dose estimates based on urinalysis and whole-body and lung counts reported for individual workers. We examined cancer mortality of workers exposed at different cumulative lung-dose levels using complete risk-set analysis for cohort data, adjusting for age, pay type, time since first radiation monitored, and external radiation. In addition, we examined the potential for confounding due to chemical exposures and smoking, explored whether external radiation exposure modifies the effects of internal exposure, and estimated effects after excluding exposures likely to have been unrelated to disease onset. Dose-response relations were observed for death from hemato- and lymphopoietic cancers and from upper aerodigestive tract cancers, adjusting for age, time since first monitored, pay type, and external (gamma) radiation dose. No association was found for other cancers, including cancers of the lung. Despite the small number of exposed deaths from specific cancer types and possible bias due to measurement error and confounding, the positive findings and strong dose-response gradients observed suggest carcinogenic effects of internal radiation to the upper aerodigestive tract and the blood and lymph system in this occupational cohort. However, causal inferences require replication of our results in other populations or confirmation with an extended follow-up of this cohort. PMID:10964795

  14. Invited Commentary: Use of Arsenical Skin Lesions to Predict Risk of Internal Cancer—Implications for Prevention and Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Habibul; Steinmaus, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic exposure affects millions of people worldwide, causing substantial mortality and morbidity from cancers and cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. An article in the current issue (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;177(3):202–212) reports that classic dermatological manifestations, typically associated with chronic arsenic exposure, are predictive of internal cancers among Taiwanese decades after the cessation of exposure. Specifically, the risk of lung and urothelial cancers was elevated, which was evident regardless of arsenic dose, smoking, and age. There was also an unexpected elevated risk of prostate cancer. Despite some methodological limitations, these findings underscore the need for assessing whether dermatological manifestations are also predictive of cardiovascular, respiratory, and other arsenic-related, long-term health consequences. Given the emerging evidence of arsenic exposure from dietary sources beyond contaminated drinking water and occupational and environmental settings, and also because the vast majority of diseases and deaths among exposed populations do not show classic dermatological manifestations, larger and more comprehensive investigations of the health effects of arsenic exposure, especially at lower doses, are needed. In parallel, because the risk of known arsenic-related health outcomes remains elevated decades after exposure cessation, research toward identification of early clinical and biological markers of long-term risk as well as avenues for prevention, in addition to policy actions for exposure reductions, is warranted. PMID:23299696

  15. MEDIA EXPOSURE AND SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM REACTIVITY PREDICT PTSD SYMPTOMS AFTER THE BOSTON MARATHON BOMBINGS

    PubMed Central

    Busso, Daniel S.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Sheridan, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Terrorist attacks have been shown to precipitate posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology in children and adolescents, particularly among youths with high exposure to media coverage surrounding such events. Media exposure may be particularly likely to trigger PTSD symptoms in youths with high physiological reactivity to stress or with prior psychopathology or exposure to violence. We examined the interplay between media exposure, preattack psychopathology, autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity, and prior violence exposure in predicting PTSD symptom onset following the terrorist attack at the 2013 Boston Marathon. Methods A community sample of 78 adolescents (mean age = 16.7 years, 65% female) completed a survey about the bombings, including media exposure to the event and PTSD symptoms. All respondents participated in a study assessing psychopathology prior to the attack, and sympathetic and parasympathetic reactivity to a laboratory-based stressor was assessed in a subset (N = 44) of this sample. We examined the associations of media exposure, ANS reactivity, preattack psychopathology, and prior violence exposure with onset of PTSD symptoms related to the bombings. Results Media exposure, preattack psychopathology, and prior violence exposure were associated with PTSD symptoms. Moreover, media exposure interacted with sympathetic reactivity to predict PTSD symptom onset, such that adolescents with lower levels of sympathetic reactivity developed PTSD symptoms only following high exposure to media coverage of the attack. Conclusions We provide novel evidence that physiological reactivity prior to exposure to an unpredictable traumatic stressor predicts PTSD symptom onset. These findings have implications for identifying youths most vulnerable to PTSD following wide-scale trauma. PMID:24995832

  16. Monitoring methylmercury during pregnancy: maternal hair predicts fetal brain exposure.

    PubMed

    Cernichiari, E; Brewer, R; Myers, G J; Marsh, D O; Lapham, L W; Cox, C; Shamlaye, C F; Berlin, M; Davidson, P W; Clarkson, T W

    1995-01-01

    Autopsy brains were obtained from infants dying from a variety of causes within a few days of birth in a population exposed to methylmercury in fish. Infant and maternal blood and hair samples were also obtained. The concentration of total mercury in 6 major brain regions were highly correlated with maternal hair levels. This correlation was confirmed by a sequence of comparisons of maternal hair to maternal blood to infant blood and finally to infant brain. The results lend support to the use of maternal hair in assessing fetal exposure to methylmercury in fish-eating populations. PMID:8714874

  17. Late biological effects from internal and external exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Information on late biological effects of radiation was obtained from the long-term medical followup of a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout from a thermonuclear test in 1954. Endocrine data are compatible with a sequence of nonstochastic radiation effects. The ingestion of radioisotopes of iodine produced clinical thyroid hypofunction in children, biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction in some adults, thyroid adenomatous module formation, and, as a possible indirect effect of thyroid damage, at least two cases of pituitary adenoma. In contrast, the only evidence of a stochastic effect has been a real increase in thyroid cancers among the more highly exposed people of Rongelap, none of whom have evidence of residual disease. While three nonthyroidal cancers which are known to be inducible in humans by external irradiation have been documented in the exposed population, three similar cancers have occurred in an unexposed comparison population of Marshallese. Nonstochastic effects of radiation exposure may be common but subtle. In the Marshallese experience the morbidity of delayed nonstochastic effects far exceeds that of the stochastic. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Radiation exposure predictions for short-duration stay Mars missions.

    PubMed

    Striepe, S A; Nealy, J E; Simonsen, L C

    1992-01-01

    The human radiation environment for several short-duration stay manned Mars missions is predicted using the Mission Radiation Calculation (MIRACAL) program, which was developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This program provides dose estimates for galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and large and ordinary solar proton flare events for various amounts of effective spacecraft shielding (both operational and storm shelter thicknesses) and a given time history of the spacecraft's heliocentric position. The results of this study show that most of the missions can survive the most recent large flares (if they were to occur at the missions' perihelion) if a 25 g/cm2 storm shelter is assumed. The dose predictions show that missions during solar minima (when solar flare activity is the lowest) are not necessarily the minimum dose cases, due to increased GCR contribution during this time period. The direct transfer mission studied has slightly lower doses than the outbound Venus swingby mission [on the order of 10-20 centi-Sieverts (cSv) lower], with the greatest dose differences for the assumed worst case scenario (when the large flares occur at perihelion). The GCR dose for a mission can be reduced by having the crew spend some fraction of its day nominally in the storm shelter (other than during flare events). PMID:11538210

  19. Impact of subspecialty elective exposures on outcomes on the American board of internal medicine certification examination

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The American Board of Internal Medicine Certification Examination (ABIM-CE) is one of several methods used to assess medical knowledge, an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competency for graduating internal medicine residents. With recent changes in graduate medical education program directors and internal medicine residents are seeking evidence to guide decisions regarding residency elective choices. Prior studies have shown that formalized elective curricula improve subspecialty ABIM-CE scores. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate whether the number of subspecialty elective exposures or the specific subspecialties which residents complete electives in impact ABIM-CE scores. Methods ABIM-CE scores, elective exposures and demographic characteristics were collected for MedStar Georgetown University Hospital internal medicine residents who were first-time takers of the ABIM-CE in 2006–2010 (n=152). Elective exposures were defined as a two-week period assigned to the respective subspecialty. ABIM-CE score was analyzed using the difference between the ABIM-CE score and the standardized passing score (delta-SPS). Subspecialty scores were analyzed using percentage of correct responses. Data was analyzed using GraphPad Prism version 5.00 for Windows. Results Paired elective exposure and ABIM-CE scores were available in 131 residents. There was no linear correlation between ABIM-CE mean delta-SPS and the total number of electives or the number of unique elective exposures. Residents with ≤14 elective exposures had higher ABIM-CE mean delta-SPS than those with ≥15 elective exposures (143.4 compared to 129.7, p=0.051). Repeated electives in individual subspecialties were not associated with significant difference in mean ABIM-CE delta-SPS. Conclusions This study did not demonstrate significant positive associations between individual subspecialty elective exposures and ABIM-CE mean delta-SPS score. Residents with

  20. Exposure prediction approaches used in air pollution epidemiology studies: Key findings and future recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Lisa K.; Dionisio, Kathie L.; Burke, Janet; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Sarnat, Jeremy A.; Hodas, Natasha; Rich, David Q.; Turpin, Barbara J.; Jones, Rena R.; Mannshardt, Elizabeth; Kumar, Naresh; Beevers, Sean D.; Özkaynak, Halûk

    2014-01-01

    Many epidemiologic studies of the health effects of exposure to ambient air pollution use measurements from central-site monitors as their exposure estimate. However, measurements from central-site monitors may lack the spatial and temporal resolution required to capture exposure variability in a study population, thus resulting in exposure error and biased estimates. Articles in this dedicated issue examine various approaches to predict or assign exposures to ambient pollutants. These methods include: combining existing central-site pollution measurements with local- and/or regional-scale air quality models to create new or “hybrid” models for pollutant exposure estimates, and using exposure models to account for factors such as infiltration of pollutants indoors and human activity patterns. Key findings from these articles are summarized to provide lessons learned and recommendations for additional research on improving exposure estimation approaches for future epidemiological studies. In summary, when compared to use of central-site monitoring data, the enhanced spatial resolution of air quality or exposure models can have an impact on resultant health effect estimates, especially for pollutants derived from local sources such as traffic (e.g. EC, CO, and NOx). In addition, the optimal exposure estimation approach also depends upon the epidemiological study design. We recommend that future research develop pollutant-specific infiltration data (including for PM species), and improve existing data on human time-activity patterns, and exposure to local source (e.g. traffic), in order to enhance human exposure modeling estimates. We also recommend comparing how various approaches to exposure estimation characterize relationships between multiple pollutants in time and space, and investigating the impact of improved exposure estimates in chronic health studies. PMID:24084756

  1. Prediction of frequency and exposure level of solar particle events.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Hayat, Matthew J; Feiveson, Alan H; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2009-07-01

    For future space missions outside of the Earth's magnetic field, the risk of radiation exposure from solar particle events (SPEs) during extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) or in lightly shielded vehicles is a major concern when designing radiation protection including determining sufficient shielding requirements for astronauts and hardware. While the expected frequency of SPEs is strongly influenced by solar modulation, SPE occurrences themselves are chaotic in nature. We report on a probabilistic modeling approach, where a cumulative expected occurrence curve of SPEs for a typical solar cycle was formed from a non-homogeneous Poisson process model fitted to a database of proton fluence measurements of SPEs that occurred during the past 5 solar cycles (19-23) and those of large SPEs identified from impulsive nitrate enhancements in polar ice. From the fitted model, we then estimated the expected frequency of SPEs at any given proton fluence threshold with energy >30 MeV (Phi(30)) during a defined space mission period. Analytic energy spectra of 34 large SPEs observed in the space era were fitted over broad energy ranges extending to GeV, and subsequently used to calculate the distribution of mGy equivalent (mGy-Eq) dose for a typical blood-forming organ (BFO) inside a spacecraft as a function of total Phi(30) fluence. This distribution was combined with a simulation of SPE events using the Poisson model to estimate the probability of the BFO dose exceeding the NASA 30-d limit of 250 mGy-Eq per 30 d. These results will be useful in implementing probabilistic risk assessment approaches at NASA and guidelines for protection systems for astronauts on future space exploration missions. PMID:19509510

  2. Using Poison Center Exposure Calls to Predict Methadone Poisoning Deaths

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Nabarun; Davis, Jonathan; Jonsson Funk, Michele; Dart, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose There are more drug overdose deaths in the Untied States than motor vehicle fatalities. Yet the US vital statistics reporting system is of limited value because the data are delayed by four years. Poison centers report data within an hour of the event, but previous studies suggested a small proportion of poisoning deaths are reported to poison centers (PC). In an era of improved electronic surveillance capabilities, exposure calls to PCs may be an alternate indicator of trends in overdose mortality. Methods We used PC call counts for methadone that were reported to the Researched Abuse, Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS®) System in 2006 and 2007. US death certificate data were used to identify deaths due to methadone. Linear regression was used to quantify the relationship of deaths and poison center calls. Results Compared to decedents, poison center callers tended to be younger, more often female, at home and less likely to require medical attention. A strong association was found with PC calls and methadone mortality (b = 0.88, se = 0.42, t = 9.5, df = 1, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.77). These findings were robust to large changes in a sensitivity analysis assessing the impact of underreporting of methadone overdose deaths. Conclusions Our results suggest that calls to poison centers for methadone are correlated with poisoning mortality as identified on death certificates. Calls received by poison centers may be used for timely surveillance of mortality due to methadone. In the midst of the prescription opioid overdose epidemic, electronic surveillance tools that report in real-time are powerful public health tools. PMID:22829925

  3. Predictive Modeling of Terrestrial Radiation Exposure from Geologic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Malchow, Russell L.; Haber, Daniel University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Burnley, Pamela; Marsac, Kara; Hausrath, Elisabeth; Adcock, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Aerial gamma ray surveys are important for those working in nuclear security and industry for determining locations of both anthropogenic radiological sources and natural occurrences of radionuclides. During an aerial gamma ray survey, a low flying aircraft, such as a helicopter, flies in a linear pattern across the survey area while measuring the gamma emissions with a sodium iodide (NaI) detector. Currently, if a gamma ray survey is being flown in an area, the only way to correct for geologic sources of gamma rays is to have flown the area previously. This is prohibitively expensive and would require complete national coverage. This project’s goal is to model the geologic contribution to radiological backgrounds using published geochemical data, GIS software, remote sensing, calculations, and modeling software. K, U and Th are the three major gamma emitters in geologic material. U and Th are assumed to be in secular equilibrium with their daughter isotopes. If K, U, and Th abundance values are known for a given geologic unit the expected gamma ray exposure rate can be calculated using the Grasty equation or by modeling software. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport software (MCNP), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, is modeling software designed to simulate particles and their interactions with matter. Using this software, models have been created that represent various lithologies. These simulations randomly generate gamma ray photons at energy levels expected from natural radiologic sources. The photons take a random path through the simulated geologic media and deposit their energy at the end of their track. A series of nested spheres have been created and filled with simulated atmosphere to record energy deposition. Energies deposited are binned in the same manner as the NaI detectors used during an aerial survey. These models are used in place of the simplistic Grasty equation as they take into account absorption properties of the lithology which the

  4. Predicting adult pulmonary ventilation volume and wearing complianceby on-board accelerometry during personal level exposure assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodes, C. E.; Chillrud, S. N.; Haskell, W. L.; Intille, S. S.; Albinali, F.; Rosenberger, M. E.

    2012-09-01

    BackgroundMetabolic functions typically increase with human activity, but optimal methods to characterize activity levels for real-time predictions of ventilation volume (l min-1) during exposure assessments have not been available. Could tiny, triaxial accelerometers be incorporated into personal level monitors to define periods of acceptable wearing compliance, and allow the exposures (μg m-3) to be extended to potential doses in μg min-1 kg-1 of body weight? ObjectivesIn a pilot effort, we tested: 1) whether appropriately-processed accelerometer data could be utilized to predict compliance and in linear regressions to predict ventilation volumes in real-time as an on-board component of personal level exposure sensor systems, and 2) whether locating the exposure monitors on the chest in the breathing zone, provided comparable accelerometric data to other locations more typically utilized (waist, thigh, wrist, etc.). MethodsPrototype exposure monitors from RTI International and Columbia University were worn on the chest by a pilot cohort of adults while conducting an array of scripted activities (all <10 METS), spanning common recumbent, sedentary, and ambulatory activity categories. Referee Wocket accelerometers that were placed at various body locations allowed comparison with the chest-located exposure sensor accelerometers. An Oxycon Mobile mask was used to measure oral-nasal ventilation volumes in-situ. For the subset of participants with complete data (n = 22), linear regressions were constructed (processed accelerometric variable versus ventilation rate) for each participant and exposure monitor type, and Pearson correlations computed to compare across scenarios. ResultsTriaxial accelerometer data were demonstrated to be adequately sensitive indicators for predicting exposure monitor wearing compliance. Strong linear correlations (R values from 0.77 to 0.99) were observed for all participants for both exposure sensor accelerometer variables against

  5. [Predictive models for the assessment of occupational exposure to chemicals: a new challenge for employers].

    PubMed

    Gromiec, Jan Piotr; Kupczewska-Dobecka, Małgorzata; Jankowska, Agnieszka; Czerczak, Sławomir

    2013-01-01

    Employers are obliged to carry out and document the risk associated with the use of chemical substances. The best but the most expensive method is to measure workplace concentrations of chemicals. At present no "measureless" method for risk assessment is available in Poland, but predictive models for such assessments have been developed in some countries. The purpose of this work is to review and evaluate the applicability of selected predictive methods for assessing occupational inhalation exposure and related risk to check the compliance with Occupational Exposure Limits (OELs), as well as the compliance with REACH obligations. Based on the literature data HSE COSHH Essentials, EASE, ECETOC TRA, Stoffenmanager, and EMKG-Expo-Tool were evaluated. The data on validation of predictive models were also examined. It seems that predictive models may be used as a useful method for Tier 1 assessment of occupational exposure by inhalation. Since the levels of exposure are frequently overestimated, they should be considered as "rational worst cases" for selection of proper control measures. Bearing in mind that the number of available exposure scenarios and PROC categories is limited, further validation by field surveys is highly recommended. Predictive models may serve as a good tool for preliminary risk assessment and selection of the most appropriate risk control measures in Polish small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) providing that they are available in the Polish language. This also requires an extensive training of their future users. PMID:24502133

  6. Predicting Supervisor, Peer, and Self Ratings of Intern Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegel-Flom, Penelope

    1975-01-01

    Relationships between the ratings of interns by their supervisors, their peers, and the interns themselves on four dimensions are compared and analyzed in relationship to earlier measures of aptitude, achievement, and personality. Findings reported show supervisor ratings to be highest and admission variables to be unrelated to intern performance.…

  7. Beyond Host Language Proficiency: Coping Resources Predicting International Students' Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Anita S.; Bodycott, Peter; Ramburuth, Prem

    2015-01-01

    As international students navigate in a foreign educational environment, having higher levels of coping or stress-resistance resources--both internal and external--could be related to increased satisfaction with personal and university life. The internal coping resources examined in this study were host language proficiency, self-esteem,…

  8. Prenatal cocaine exposure: The role of cumulative environmental risk and maternal harshness in the development of child internalizing behavior problems in Kindergarten

    PubMed Central

    Eiden, Rina D.; Godleski, Stephanie; Colder, Craig R.; Schuetze, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the associations between prenatal exposure to cocaine and other substances and child internalizing behavior problems at Kindergarten. We investigated whether maternal harshness or cumulative environmental risk mediated or moderated this association. Participants consisted of 216 (116 cocaine exposed, 100 non-cocaine exposed) mother-infant dyads participating in an ongoing longitudinal study of prenatal cocaine exposure. Results indicated that, as hypothesized, maternal harshness moderated the association between prenatal cocaine exposure to child internalizing in Kindergarten such that prenatal cocaine exposure increased risk for internalizing problems at high levels of maternal harshness from 7 to 36 months and decreased risk at low levels of harshness. Contrary to hypothesis, the association between prenatal cocaine exposure and child internalizing in Kindergarten was not mediated by maternal harshness or cumulative environmental risk. However, cumulative environmental risk (from 1 month of child age to Kindergarten) was predictive of child internalizing behavior problems at Kindergarten. Results have implications for parenting interventions that may be targeted toward reducing maternal harshness in high risk samples characterized by maternal substance use in pregnancy. PMID:24803425

  9. 76 FR 39150 - Updated Noise Exposure Map Notice for Indianapolis International Airport; Indianapolis, Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ...The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the updated noise exposure maps submitted by the Indianapolis Airport Authority for the Indianapolis International Airport under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47501 et seq. (Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act) and 14 CFR part 150 are in compliance with applicable...

  10. A Model of International Communication Media Appraisal and Exposure: A Comprehensive Test in Belize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. David; Oliveira, Omar Souki

    A study constituted the fifth phase of a programmatic research effort designed to develop and test a model of international communications media exposure and appraisal. The model posits that three variables--editorial tone, communication potential, and utility--have positive determinant effects on these dependent variables. Research was carried…

  11. Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence, Peer Relations, and Risk for Internalizing Behaviors: A Prospective Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camacho, Kathleen; Ehrensaft, Miriam K.; Cohen, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines the quality of peer relations as a mediator between exposure to IPV (intimate partner violence) and internalizing behaviors in a sample of 129 preadolescents and adolescents (ages 10-18), who were interviewed via telephone as part of a multigenerational, prospective, longitudinal study. Relational victimization is also…

  12. The contribution of different forms of violence exposure to internalizing and externalizing symptoms among young South African adolescents.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Bernice; Kaminer, Debra; Hardy, Anneli; Benjamin, Arlene

    2015-07-01

    While many youth are exposed to multiple forms of co-occurring violence, the comparative impact of different forms of violence on the mental health of children and adolescents has not been clearly established. Studies from low and middle income countries in particular are lacking. The present study examined the contribution of different forms of violence to internalizing and externalizing symptoms among young adolescents in South Africa. A community-based sample of 616 high school learners completed self-report scales assessing exposure to six different forms of violence and the severity of depression, aggression and conduct disorder symptoms. In bivariate analyses, all six forms of violence were significantly associated with internalizing and externalizing difficulties. When the contribution of all forms of violence to mental health outcomes was examined simultaneously, domestic victimization emerged as the strongest predictor of both internalizing and externalizing difficulties. Cumulative exposure to other forms of violence contributed further to the prediction of aggression and conduct disorder, but not depression. Recommendations for future research, and the implications of the findings for prioritizing the development of violence prevention and intervention initiatives in the South African context, are considered. PMID:25804436

  13. Predicting Return of Fear Following Exposure Therapy With an Implicit Measure of Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Vasey, Michael W.; Harbaugh, Casaundra N.; Buffington, Adam G.; Jones, Christopher R.; Fazio, Russell H.

    2012-01-01

    We sought to advance understanding of the processes underlying the efficacy of exposure therapy and particularly the phenomenon of return of fear (ROF) following treatment by drawing on a social psychological view of phobias as attitudes. Specifically, a dual process theory of attitude-related behavior predicts that a positive response to exposure therapy may reflect change in either the automatic (the attitude representation itself) or controlled (skills and confidence at coping with the fear) responses to the phobic stimulus, or both. However, if the attitude representation remains negative following treatment, ROF should be more likely. We tested this hypothesis in a clinical sample of individuals with public speaking phobia using a single-session exposure therapy protocol previously shown to be efficacious but also associated with some ROF. Consistent with predictions, a post-treatment implicit measure of attitudes toward public speaking (the Personalized Implicit Association Test [PIAT]) predicted ROF at 1-month follow-up. These results suggest that change in the automatically activated attitude toward the phobic stimulus is an important goal of exposure therapy and that an implicit measure like the PIAT can provide a useful measure of such change by which to gauge the adequacy of exposure treatment and predict its long-term efficacy. PMID:23085186

  14. Predicting return of fear following exposure therapy with an implicit measure of attitudes.

    PubMed

    Vasey, Michael W; Harbaugh, Casaundra N; Buffington, Adam G; Jones, Christopher R; Fazio, Russell H

    2012-12-01

    We sought to advance understanding of the processes underlying the efficacy of exposure therapy and particularly the phenomenon of return of fear (ROF) following treatment by drawing on a social psychological view of phobias as attitudes. Specifically, a dual process theory of attitude-related behavior predicts that a positive response to exposure therapy may reflect change in either the automatic (the attitude representation itself) or controlled (skills and confidence at coping with the fear) responses to the phobic stimulus, or both. However, if the attitude representation remains negative following treatment, ROF should be more likely. We tested this hypothesis in a clinical sample of individuals with public speaking phobia using a single-session exposure therapy protocol previously shown to be efficacious but also associated with some ROF. Consistent with predictions, a post-treatment implicit measure of attitudes toward public speaking (the Personalized Implicit Association Test [PIAT]) predicted ROF at 1-month follow-up. These results suggest that change in the automatically activated attitude toward the phobic stimulus is an important goal of exposure therapy and that an implicit measure like the PIAT can provide a useful measure of such change by which to gauge the adequacy of exposure treatment and predict its long-term efficacy. PMID:23085186

  15. Variation in predicted internal concentrations in relation to PBPK model complexity for rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Salmina, E S; Wondrousch, D; Kühne, R; Potemkin, V A; Schüürmann, G

    2016-04-15

    The present study is motivated by the increasing demand to consider internal partitioning into tissues instead of exposure concentrations for the environmental toxicity assessment. To this end, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can be applied. We evaluated the variation in accuracy of PBPK model outcomes depending on tissue constituents modeled as sorptive phases and chemical distribution tendencies addressed by molecular descriptors. The model performance was examined using data from 150 experiments for 28 chemicals collected from US EPA databases. The simplest PBPK model is based on the "Kow-lipid content" approach as being traditional for environmental toxicology. The most elaborated one considers five biological sorptive phases (polar and non-polar lipids, water, albumin and the remaining proteins) and makes use of LSER (linear solvation energy relationship) parameters to describe the compound partitioning behavior. The "Kow-lipid content"-based PBPK model shows more than one order of magnitude difference in predicted and measured values for 37% of the studied exposure experiments while for the most elaborated model this happens only for 7%. It is shown that further improvements could be achieved by introducing corrections for metabolic biotransformation and compound transmission hindrance through a cellular membrane. The analysis of the interface distribution tendencies shows that polar tissue constituents, namely water, polar lipids and proteins, play an important role in the accumulation behavior of polar compounds with H-bond donating functional groups. For compounds without H-bond donating fragments preferable accumulation phases are storage lipids and water depending on compound polarity. PMID:26849323

  16. Pituitary Volume Prospectively Predicts Internalizing Symptoms in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zipursky, Amy R.; Whittle, Sarah; Yucel, Murat; Lorenzetti, Valentina; Wood, Stephen J.; Lubman, Dan I.; Simmons, Julian G.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Early adolescence is a critical time for the development of both internalizing and externalizing disorders. We aimed to investigate whether pituitary volume, an index of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, represents a vulnerability factor for the emergence of internalizing and externalizing symptoms during adolescence…

  17. Biomarker-Based Calibration of Retrospective Exposure Predictions of Perfluorooctanoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Estimated historical exposures and serum concentrations of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) have been extensively used in epidemiologic studies that examined associations between PFOA exposures and adverse health outcomes among residents in highly exposed areas in the Mid-Ohio Valley. Using measured serum PFOA levels in 2005–2006, we applied two calibration methods to these retrospective exposure predictions: (1) multiplicative calibration and (2) Bayesian pharmacokinetic calibration with larger adjustments to more recent exposure estimates and smaller adjustments to exposure estimates for years farther in the past. We conducted simulation studies of various hypothetical exposure scenarios and compared hypothetical true historical intake rates with estimates based on mis-specified baseline exposure and pharmacokinetic models to find the method with the least bias. The Bayesian method outperformed the multiplicative method if a change to bottled water consumption was not reported or if the half-life of PFOA was mis-specified. On the other hand, the multiplicative method outperformed the Bayesian method if actual tap water consumption rates were systematically overestimated. If tap water consumption rates gradually decreased over time because of substitution with bottled water or other liquids, neither method clearly outperformed another. Calibration of retrospective exposure estimates using recently collected biomarkers may help reduce uncertainties in environmental epidemiologic studies. PMID:24730513

  18. Gene expression patterns predict exposure to PCBs in developing Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Jelaso, Anna M; Lehigh-Shirey, Elisabeth; Means, Jay; Ide, Charles F

    2003-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants that pose global ecological and human health problems. Although it is well established that PCBs are associated with a variety of adverse health effects in wildlife and in humans, it is often difficult to determine direct cause-and-effect relationships between exposure and specific health outcomes. In this study, gene expression signatures were used to relate exposure to PCBs with altered physiological responses and/or specific health effects. Real-time PCR was used to measure gene expression levels for 10 genes in Xenopus laevis tadpoles (18 days postfertilization, PF) after acute exposure (2 days) to the PCB mixture Aroclor 1254. Specific gene expression signatures correlated with exposure and were predictive of adverse health effects. Exposure to low levels of Aroclor 1254 (5-50 ppb) significantly increased expression of six genes, independent of any health effects; exposure to midlevel concentrations (300-400 ppb) significantly decreased expression levels of two genes, NGF and beta-actin, prior to the onset of observable health effects; exposure to higher doses (500-700 ppb) significantly decreased NGF and beta-actin expression concomitant with the appearance of gross morphological abnormalities, behavioral deficits, and a statistically significant decrease in survival. This study expands upon our previous work that demonstrated an age-dependent susceptibility to Aroclor 1254 in Xenopus laevis tadpoles and that defined specific gene expression signatures as useful bioindicators of exposure and as predictors of overt or impending health effects. PMID:12874807

  19. Mechanistic Modeling to Predict Midazolam Metabolite Exposure from In Vitro Data.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoa Q; Kimoto, Emi; Callegari, Ernesto; Obach, R Scott

    2016-05-01

    Methods to predict the pharmacokinetics of drugs in humans from in vitro data have been established, but corresponding methods to predict exposure to circulating metabolites are unproven. The objective of this study was to use in vitro methods combined with static and dynamic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to predict metabolite exposures, using midazolam and its major metabolites as a test system. Intrinsic clearances (CLint) of formation of individual metabolites were determined using human liver microsomes. Metabolic CLintof hydroxymidazolam metabolites via oxidation and glucuronidation were also determined. Passive diffusion intrinsic clearances of hydroxymidazolam metabolites were determined using sandwich cultured human hepatocytes and the combination of this term along with the metabolic CLint, and liver blood flow was used to estimate the fraction of the metabolite that can enter the systemic circulation after formation in the liver. The metabolite/parent drug area under the plasma concentration-time curve ratio (AUCm/AUCp) was predicted using a static model relating the fraction of midazolam clearance to each metabolite, the clearance rates of midazolam and hydroxymidazolam metabolites, and the availability of the metabolites. Additionally, the human disposition of midazolam metabolites was simulated using a SimCYP PBPK model. Both approaches yielded AUCm/AUCpratios that were in agreement with the in vivo ratios. This study shows that in vivo midazolam metabolite exposure can be predicted from in vitro data and PBPK modeling. This study emphasized the importance of metabolite systemic availability from its tissue of formation, which remains a challenge to quantitative prediction. PMID:26956641

  20. Do questions reflecting indoor air pollutant exposure from a questionnaire predict direct measure of exposure in owner-occupied houses?

    PubMed

    Loo, C K Jennifer; Foty, Richard G; Wheeler, Amanda J; Miller, J David; Evans, Greg; Stieb, David M; Dell, Sharon D

    2010-08-01

    Home characteristic questions are used in epidemiological studies and clinical settings to assess potentially harmful exposures in the home. The objective of this study was to determine whether questionnaire-reported home characteristics can predict directly measured pollutants. Sixty home inspections were conducted on a subsample of the 2006 population-based Toronto Child Health Evaluation Questionnaire. Indoor/outdoor air and settled dust samples were analyzed. Mean Fel d 1 was higher (p < 0.0001) in homes with a cat (450.58 μg/g) versus without (22.28 μg/g). Mean indoor NO(2) was higher (p = 0.003) in homes with gas stoves (14.98 ppb) versus without (8.31 ppb). Self-reported musty odours predicted higher glucan levels (10554.37 μg/g versus 6308.58 μg/g, p = 0.0077). Der f 1 was predicted by the home's age, but not by reports of carpets, and was higher in homes with mean relative humidity > 50% (61.30 μg/g, versus 6.24 μg/g, p = 0.002). Self-reported presence of a cat, a gas stove, musty odours, mice, and the home's age and indoor relative humidity over 50% predicted measured indoor levels of cat allergens, NO(2), fungal glucan, mouse allergens and dust mite allergens, respectively. These results are helpful for understanding the significance of indoor exposures ascertained by self-reporting in large epidemiological studies and also in the clinical setting. PMID:20948960

  1. Predicting violent behavior: The role of violence exposure and future educational aspirations during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Sarah A; Heinze, Justin E; Choe, Daniel Ewon; Zimmerman, Marc A

    2015-10-01

    Few researchers have explored future educational aspirations as a promotive factor against exposure to community violence in relation to adolescents' violent behavior over time. The present study examined the direct and indirect effect of exposure to community violence prior to 9th grade on attitudes about violence and violent behavior in 12th grade, and violent behavior at age 22 via 9th grade future educational aspirations in a sample of urban African American youth (n = 681; 49% male). Multi-group SEM was used to test the moderating effect of gender. Exposure to violence was associated with lower future educational aspirations. For boys, attitudes about violence directly predicted violent behavior at age 22. For boys, future educational aspirations indirectly predicted less violent behavior at age 22. Implications of the findings and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:26282242

  2. Predictive sufficiency and the use of stored internal state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musliner, David J.; Durfee, Edmund H.; Shin, Kang G.

    1994-01-01

    In all embedded computing systems, some delay exists between sensing and acting. By choosing an action based on sensed data, a system is essentially predicting that there will be no significant changes in the world during this delay. However, the dynamic and uncertain nature of the real world can make these predictions incorrect, and thus, a system may execute inappropriate actions. Making systems more reactive by decreasing the gap between sensing and action leaves less time for predictions to err, but still provides no principled assurance that they will be correct. Using the concept of predictive sufficiency described in this paper, a system can prove that its predictions are valid, and that it will never execute inappropriate actions. In the context of our CIRCA system, we also show how predictive sufficiency allows a system to guarantee worst-case response times to changes in its environment. Using predictive sufficiency, CIRCA is able to build real-time reactive control plans which provide a sound basis for performance guarantees that are unavailable with other reactive systems.

  3. Predicting Residential Exposure to Phthalate Plasticizer Emitted from Vinyl Flooring: Sensitivity, Uncertainty, and Implications for Biomonitoring

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Cohen Hubal, Elaine A.; Little, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Because of the ubiquitous nature of phthalates in the environment and the potential for adverse human health effects, an urgent need exists to identify the most important sources and pathways of exposure. Objectives Using emissions of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) from vinyl flooring (VF) as an illustrative example, we describe a fundamental approach that can be used to identify the important sources and pathways of exposure associated with phthalates in indoor material. Methods We used a three-compartment model to estimate the emission rate of DEHP from VF and the evolving exposures via inhalation, dermal absorption, and oral ingestion of dust in a realistic indoor setting. Results A sensitivity analysis indicates that the VF source characteristics (surface area and material-phase concentration of DEHP), as well as the external mass-transfer coefficient and ventilation rate, are important variables that influence the steady-state DEHP concentration and the resulting exposure. In addition, DEHP is sorbed by interior surfaces, and the associated surface area and surface/air partition coefficients strongly influence the time to steady state. The roughly 40-fold range in predicted exposure reveals the inherent difficulty in using biomonitoring to identify specific sources of exposure to phthalates in the general population. Conclusions The relatively simple dependence on source and chemical-specific transport parameters suggests that the mechanistic modeling approach could be extended to predict exposures arising from other sources of phthalates as well as additional sources of other semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) such as biocides and flame retardants. This modeling approach could also provide a relatively inexpensive way to quantify exposure to many of the SVOCs used in indoor materials and consumer products. PMID:20123613

  4. Predicting particulate (PM10) personal exposure distributions using a random component superposition statistical model.

    PubMed

    Ott, W; Wallace, L; Mage, D

    2000-08-01

    nonambient concentrations are similar across different cities and populations. These results indicate that, if the ambient concentrations were completely controlled and set to zero in all three cities, the median of the remaining personal exposures to PM10 would range from 32.0 micrograms/m3 (Toronto) to 34.4 micrograms/m3 (Phillipsburg) to 48.8 micrograms/m3 (Riverside). The highest-exposed 30% of the population in the three cities would still be exposed to 24-hr average PM10 concentrations of 47-74 micrograms/m3; the highest 20% would be exposed to concentrations of 56-92 micrograms/m3; the highest 10% to concentrations of 88-131 micrograms/m3; and the highest 5% to 133-175 micrograms/m3, due only to indoor sources and activities. The distribution for the difference between personal exposures and indoor concentrations, or the "personal cloud," also was similar in the three cities, with a mean of 30-35 micrograms/m3, suggesting that the personal cloud accounts for more than half of the nonambient component of PM10 personal exposure in the three cities. Using only the ambient measurements in Toronto, the nonambient data from THEES in Phillipsburg was used to predict the entire personal exposure distribution in Toronto. The PM10 exposure distribution predicted by the model showed reasonable agreement with the PM10 personal exposure distribution measured in Toronto. These initial results suggest that the RCS model may be a powerful tool for predicting personal exposure distributions and statistics in other cities where only ambient particle data are available. PMID:11002601

  5. Overall internal exposure to mycotoxins and their occurrence in occupational and residential settings--An overview.

    PubMed

    Fromme, H; Gareis, M; Völkel, W; Gottschalk, C

    2016-03-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of various fungal species that can contaminate food and feed, as well as indoor environments. Numerous studies have summarized the adverse health effects of mycotoxins and described severe intoxications of humans and animals. The major health concerns are caused via the alimentary route which unambiguously is the main source for human internal exposure; however, the relevance of other pathways under environmental and occupational conditions should also be considered. Thus firstly, this review aims in summarizing literature data on potentially inhalable mycotoxins occurring in dusts or air in residences and in working environments. Secondly, it gives an overview of the overall internal body burden of mycotoxins in humans in an attempt to characterize total human exposure. These data are also discussed in relation to the current toxicologically based values used for risk assessment. PMID:26725999

  6. International project on individual monitoring and radiation exposure levels in interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Padovani, R; Le Heron, J; Cruz-Suarez, R; Duran, A; Lefaure, C; Miller, D L; Sim, H K; Vano, E; Rehani, M; Czarwinski, R

    2011-03-01

    Within the Information System on Occupational Exposure in Medicine, Industry and Research (ISEMIR), a new International Atomic Energy Agency initiative, a Working Group on interventional cardiology, aims to assess staff radiation protection (RP) levels and to propose an international database of occupational exposures. A survey of regulatory bodies (RBs) has provided information at the country level on RP practice in interventional cardiology (IC). Concerning requirements for wearing personal dosemeters, only 57 % of the RB specifies the number and position of dosemeters for staff monitoring. Less than 40 % of the RBs could provide occupational doses. Reported annual median effective dose values (often <0.5 mSv) were lower than expected considering validated data from facility-specific studies, indicating that compliance with continuous individual monitoring is often not achieved in IC. A true assessment of annual personnel doses in IC will never be realised unless a knowledge of monitoring compliance is incorporated into the analysis. PMID:21051431

  7. Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Progress report, August 1993--January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, S.M.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1994-03-01

    This project, ``Use of International Data Sets to Evaluate and Validate Pathway Assessment Models Applicable to Exposure and Dose Reconstruction at DOE Facilities,`` grew out of several activities being conducted by the Principal Investigator Dr. F Owen Hoffman. One activity was originally part of the Chernobyl Studies Project and began as Task 7.1D, ``Internal Dose From Direct Contamination of Terrestrial Food Sources.`` The objective of Task 7.1D was to (1) establish a collaborative US USSR effort to improve and validate our methods of forecasting doses and dose commitments from the direct contamination of food sources, and (2) perform experiments and validation studies to improve our ability to predict rapidly and accurately the long-term internal dose from the contamination of agricultural soil. The latter was to include the consideration of remedial measures to block contamination of food grown on contaminated soil. The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates the activity of Task 7.1D into a multinational effort to evaluate data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two multinational studies, BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (VAlidation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains.

  8. A toxicokinetic study of specifically acting and reactive organic chemicals for the prediction of internal effect concentrations in Scenedesmus vacuolatus.

    PubMed

    Vogs, Carolina; Kühnert, Agnes; Hug, Christine; Küster, Eberhard; Altenburger, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The toxic potency of chemicals is determined by using the internal effect concentration by accounting for differences in toxicokinetic processes and mechanisms of toxic action. The present study examines toxicokinetics of specifically acting and reactive chemicals in the green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus by using an indirect method. Concentration depletion in the exposure medium was measured for chemicals of lower (log KOW  < 3: isoproturon, metazachlor, paraquat) and moderate (log KOW 4-5: irgarol, triclosan, N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine) hydrophobicity at 7 to 8 time points over 240 min or 360 min. Uptake and overall elimination rates were estimated by fitting a toxicokinetic model to the observed concentration depletions. The equilibrium of exposure concentrations was reached within minutes to hours or was even not observed within the exposure time. The kinetics of bioconcentration cannot be explained by the chemical's hydrophobicity only, but influential factors such as ionization of chemicals, the ion trapping mechanism, or the potential susceptibility for biotransformation are discussed. Internal effect concentrations associated with 50% inhibition of S. vacuolatus reproduction were predicted by linking the bioconcentration kinetics to the effect concentrations and ranged from 0.0480 mmol/kg wet weight to 7.61 mmol/kg wet weight for specifically acting and reactive chemicals. Knowing the time-course of the internal effect concentration may promote an understanding of toxicity processes such as delayed toxicity, carry-over toxicity, or mixture toxicity in future studies. PMID:25263251

  9. Microdosimetric analysis confirms similar biological effectiveness of external exposure to gamma-rays and internal exposure to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Manabe, Kentaro; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The risk of internal exposure to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I is of great public concern after the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE, defined herein as effectiveness of internal exposure relative to the external exposure to γ-rays) is occasionally believed to be much greater than unity due to insufficient discussions on the difference of their microdosimetric profiles. We therefore performed a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation in ideally aligned cell systems to calculate the probability densities of absorbed doses in subcellular and intranuclear scales for internal exposures to electrons emitted from 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I, as well as the external exposure to 662 keV photons. The RBE due to the inhomogeneous radioactive isotope (RI) distribution in subcellular structures and the high ionization density around the particle trajectories was then derived from the calculated microdosimetric probability density. The RBE for the bystander effect was also estimated from the probability density, considering its non-linear dose response. The RBE due to the high ionization density and that for the bystander effect were very close to 1, because the microdosimetric probability densities were nearly identical between the internal exposures and the external exposure from the 662 keV photons. On the other hand, the RBE due to the RI inhomogeneity largely depended on the intranuclear RI concentration and cell size, but their maximum possible RBE was only 1.04 even under conservative assumptions. Thus, it can be concluded from the microdosimetric viewpoint that the risk from internal exposures to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I should be nearly equivalent to that of external exposure to γ-rays at the same absorbed dose level, as suggested in the current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. PMID:24919099

  10. Effect of exposure to chlorpyrifos on the cuticular and internal lipid composition of Blattella germanica males.

    PubMed

    Paszkiewicz, Monika; Sikora, Agata; Boguś, Mieczysława I; Włóka, Emilia; Stepnowski, Piotr; Gołębiowski, Marek

    2016-02-01

    The results of our research on the cuticular and internal lipids of Blattella germanica males provide new information on variation in the composition of the cuticular and internal lipids of B. germanica males after exposure to the presence of the insecticide. gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses were used to identify and quantify the cuticular and internal lipid composition in males and males exposed to insecticide. There were significantly more acids having an even number of carbon atoms in the molecule, and these were also generally in higher concentrations. The following acids were in a higher concentration: C16:0 and C18:1, C18:2, C18:0. In both males and males exposed to insecticide, 24 fatty acids ranging from C6 to C22 were determined. However, there was a significantly higher content of fatty acids in the surface lipids of B. germanica males after exposure to insecticide. Our results indicate a higher content of n-alkanes, sterols, particularly cholesterol, fatty acids, and fatty acid methyl esters in the B. germanica surface after exposure to chlorpyrifos than in males that were not exposed. PMID:25641824

  11. Exposure to Movie Reckless Driving in Early Adolescence Predicts Reckless, but Not Inattentive Driving

    PubMed Central

    Kostermans, Evelien; Stoolmiller, Mike; de Leeuw, Rebecca N. H.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Sargent, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examine the association between exposure to depictions of reckless driving in movies and unsafe driving, modeling inattentive and reckless driving as separate outcomes. Methods Data were obtained by telephone from 1,630 US adolescents aged 10 to 14 years at baseline who were drivers at a survey 6 years later. Exposure to movie reckless driving was measured based on movies seen from a randomly selected list of 50 movie titles that had been content coded for reckless driving among characters. Associations were tested with inattentive and reckless driving behaviors in the subsequent survey–controlling for baseline age, sex, socioeconomic status, parental education, school performance, extracurricular activities, daily television and video/computer game exposure, number of movies watched per week, self-regulation and sensation seeking. Results Exposure to movie reckless driving was common, with approximately 10% of movie characters having driven recklessly. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a significant distinction between items tapping reckless and inattentive driving at the 6th wave. Age and exposure to movie reckless driving at baseline were directly associated with wave-6 reckless (but not inattentive) driving. Additionally, growth in sensation seeking mediated a prospective relation between the total number of movies watched per week at baseline and reckless driving, independent of exposure to movie reckless driving. Males and high sensation seekers reported lower seatbelt usage and more reckless driving, whereas lower self-regulation predicted inattentive driving. Discussion In this study, exposure to movie reckless driving during early adolescence predicted adolescents’ reckless driving, suggesting a direct modeling effect. Other aspects of movies were also associated with reckless driving, with that association mediated through growth in sensation seeking. Predictors of reckless driving were different from predictors of inattentive driving

  12. ANALYSIS OF CONCORDANCE OF PROBABILISTIC AGGREGATE EXPOSURE PREDICTIONS WITH OBSERVED BIOMONITORING RESULTS: AN EXAMPLE USING CTEPP DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three key areas of scientific inquiry in the study of human exposure to environmental contaminants are 1) assessment of aggregate (i.e., multi-pathway, multi-route) exposures, 2) application of probabilistic methods to exposure prediction, and 3) the interpretation of biomarker m...

  13. Exposure to Violence Predicting Cortisol Response During Adolescence and Early Adulthood: Understanding Moderating Factors

    PubMed Central

    Heinze, Justin E.; Miller, Alison L.; Stoddard, Sarah A.; Zimmerman, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research on the association between violence and biological stress regulation has been largely cross-sectional, and has also focused on childhood. Using longitudinal data from a low-income, high-risk, predominantly African-American sample (n = 266; 57 % female), we tested hypotheses about the influence of cumulative exposure to violence during adolescence and early adulthood on cortisol responses in early adulthood. We found that cumulative exposure to violence predicted an attenuated cortisol response. Further, we tested whether sex, mothers’ support, or fathers’ support moderated the effect of exposure to violence on cortisol responses. We found that the effect of cumulative exposure to violence on cortisol was modified by sex; specifically, males exposed to violence exhibited a more attenuated response pattern. In addition, the effect of cumulative exposure to violence on cortisol was moderated by the presence of fathers’ support during adolescence. The findings contribute to a better understanding of how cumulative exposure to violence influences biological outcomes, emphasizing the need to understand sex and parental support as moderators of risk. PMID:24458765

  14. [Prediction of short loops in the proteins with internal disorder].

    PubMed

    Deriusheva, E I; Galzitskaia, O V; Serdiuk, I N

    2008-01-01

    New possibility of the FoldUnfold program for prediction of short disordered regions (loops), which appears by using the short window width (3 amino acid residues), was described. For three representatives of the proteins G family the FoldUnfold program predicted almost all short loops and yield results are well compatible with the X-ray structure data. We have classified the loops predicted in the protein Ras-p21 structure in two types. In the first type, loops have high values of the Debye-Waller factor typical of the so-called functional loops (flexible loops). In the other type, loops have lower values of the Debye-Waller factor and can be considered as loops connecting secondary structure elements (rigid loops). When the results of prediction with the use of our program are compared with the results of other programs (PONDR, RONN, DisEMBL, PreLINK, IUPred, GlobPlot 2, FoldIndex), it is seen that the first enables far better prediction of short loop positions. Use of FoldUnfold for ubiquitin-like domain h-PLIC-2 allows to resolve such task as definition of boundary between the structured and unstructured regions in proteins with a big portion of disordered regions. The FoldUnfold program defines a clear boundary between the structured and unstructured regions at amino acid residues 30-31,whereas each of the other programs outlines the boundary from the 28-th amino acid residues through the 70th. PMID:19140328

  15. Internal exposure of waste incineration workers to organic and inorganic substances.

    PubMed

    Wrbitzky, R; Göen, T; Letzel, S; Frank, F; Angerer, J

    1995-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-two persons employed in an industrial waste incineration plant were examined with respect to organic and inorganic substances which may be produced during the combustion of different waste. The employees were divided into three groups: persons with contact with the incinerator (WI workers, n = 45), periphery workers (n = 54) and management (n = 23). For the evaluation of internal exposure, the levels of lead, cadmium, mercury, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene in blood, chromium in the erythrocytes, polychlorinated biphenyls, hexachlorobenzene and pentachlorophenol in plasma, and arsenic, chromium, nickel, vanadium, chlorophenols and hydroxypyrene in urine were determined. The internal exposures of the three groups were tested against each other and were compared with the reference values of the general population. Differences between the groups investigated were tested using the U test according to Wilcoxon, Mann and Whitney (P < 0.05). The biological exposure limits valid in Germany (BAT values) were not exceeded in any cases. Compared with the background levels of the German population, certain parameters were exceeded in several employees. Significantly higher levels of the WI workers in comparison to both periphery workers and management were found for toluene in blood (median: 1.1 vs 0.9 vs 0.6 microgram/l). For the lead and cadmium levels in blood and for the urinary excretion of arsenic, 2,4-dichlorophenol and tetrachlorophenols, statistical differences were found only between WI workers and one of the other groups. However, in all cases the elevations were very small and of interest more from the environmental than from the occupational point of view. It must be stressed that this waste incineration plant is very modern in terms of worker health and safety. At older plants without corresponding health and safety measures, higher internal exposure of the employees to hazardous substances may exist. PMID:8847108

  16. Impact of nano titanium dioxide exposure on cellular structure of Anabaena variabilis and evidence of internalization.

    PubMed

    Cherchi, Carla; Chernenko, Tatyana; Diem, Max; Gu, April Z

    2011-04-01

    The present study investigated the impact of nano titanium dioxide (nTiO(2) ) exposure on the cellular structures of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis. Results of the present study showed that nTiO(2) exposure led to observable alteration in various intracellular structures and induced a series of recognized stress responses, including production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), appearance and increase in the abundance of membrane crystalline inclusions, membrane mucilage layer formation, opening of intrathylakoidal spaces, and internal plasma membrane disruption. The production of total ROS in A. variabilis cells increased with increasing nTiO(2) doses and exposure time, and the intracellular ROS contributed to only a small fraction (<10%) of the total ROS measured. The percentage of cells with loss of thylakoids and growth of membrane crystalline inclusions increased as the nTiO(2) dose and exposure time increased compared with controls, suggesting their possible roles in stress response to nTiO(2) , as previously shown for metals. Algal cell surface morphology and mechanical properties were modified by nTiO(2) exposure, as indicated by the increase in cell surface roughness and shifts in cell spring constant determined by atomic force microscopy analysis. The change in cell surface structure and increase in the cellular turgor pressure likely resulted from the structural membrane damage mediated by the ROS production. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of nTiO(2) aggregates size distribution seems to suggest possible disaggregation of nTiO(2) aggregates when in close contact with microbial cells, potentially as a result of biomolecules such as DNA excreted by organisms that may serve as a biodispersant. The present study also showed, for the first time, with both TEM and Raman imaging that internalization of nTiO(2) particles through multilayered membranes in algal cells is possible. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2011; 30:861-869.

  17. Cigarette smoke exposure induces CFTR internalization and insolubility, leading to airway surface liquid dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Clunes, Lucy A.; Davies, Catrin M.; Coakley, Raymond D.; Aleksandrov, Andrei A.; Henderson, Ashley G.; Zeman, Kirby L.; Worthington, Erin N.; Gentzsch, Martina; Kreda, Silvia M.; Cholon, Deborah; Bennett, William D.; Riordan, John R.; Boucher, Richard C.; Tarran, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure induces mucus obstruction and the development of chronic bronchitis (CB). While many of these responses are determined genetically, little is known about the effects CS can exert on pulmonary epithelia at the protein level. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that CS exerts direct effects on the CFTR protein, which could impair airway hydration, leading to the mucus stasis characteristic of both cystic fibrosis and CB. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that CS rapidly decreased CFTR activity, leading to airway surface liquid (ASL) volume depletion (i.e., dehydration). Further studies revealed that CS induced internalization of CFTR. Surprisingly, CS-internalized CFTR did not colocalize with lysosomal proteins. Instead, the bulk of CFTR shifted to a detergent-resistant fraction within the cell and colocalized with the intermediate filament vimentin, suggesting that CS induced CFTR movement into an aggresome-like, perinuclear compartment. To test whether airway dehydration could be reversed, we used hypertonic saline (HS) as an osmolyte to rehydrate ASL. HS restored ASL height in CS-exposed, dehydrated airway cultures. Similarly, inhaled HS restored mucus transport and increased clearance in patients with CB. Thus, we propose that CS exposure rapidly impairs CFTR function by internalizing CFTR, leading to ASL dehydration, which promotes mucus stasis and a failure of mucus clearance, leaving smokers at risk for developing CB. Furthermore, our data suggest that strategies to rehydrate airway surfaces may provide a novel form of therapy for patients with CB.—Clunes, L. A., Davies, C. M., Coakley, R. D., Aleksandrov, A. A., Henderson, A. G., Zeman, K. L., Worthington, E. N., Gentzsch, M., Kreda, S. M., Cholon, D., Bennett, W. D., Riordan, J. R., Boucher, R. C., Tarran, R. Cigarette smoke exposure induces CFTR internalization and insolubility, leading to airway surface liquid dehydration. PMID:21990373

  18. DNA damage in internal organs after cutaneous exposure to sulphur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Batal, Mohamed; Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Wartelle, Julien; Bérard, Izabel

    2014-07-01

    Sulphur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that attacks mainly skin, eye and lungs. Due to its lipophilic properties, SM is also able to diffuse through the skin and reach internal organs. DNA represents one of the most critical molecular targets of this powerful alkylating agent which modifies DNA structure by forming monoadducts and biadducts. These DNA lesions are involved in the acute toxicity of SM as well as its long-term carcinogenicity. In the present work we studied the formation and persistence of guanine and adenine monoadducts and guanine biadducts in the DNA of brain, lungs, kidneys, spleen, and liver of SKH-1 mice cutaneously exposed to 2, 6 and 60 mg/kg of SM. SM-DNA adducts were detected in all studied organs, except in liver at the two lowest doses. Brain and lungs were the organs with the highest level of SM-DNA adducts, followed by kidney, spleen and liver. Monitoring the level of adducts for three weeks after cutaneous exposure showed that the lifetime of adducts were not the same in all organs, lungs being the organ with the longest persistence. Diffusion from skin to internal organs was much more efficient at the highest compared to the lowest dose investigated as the result of the loss of the skin barrier function. These data provide novel information on the distribution of SM in tissues following cutaneous exposures and indicate that brain is an important target. - Highlights: • Sulphur mustard reaches internal organs after skin exposure • Adducts are detected in the DNA of internal organs • Brain is the organ with the highest level of DNA damage • The barrier function of skin is lost at high dose of sulphur mustard • DNA adducts persist in organs for 2 or 3 weeks.

  19. Determination of oxidant exposure during ozonation of secondary effluent to predict contaminant removal.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Ines; Avisar, Dror; Mamane, Hadas; Jekel, Martin; Hübner, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    The use of kinetic models to predict oxidation performance in wastewater is limited due to fast ozone depletion during the first milliseconds of the reaction. This paper introduces the Quench Flow Module (QFM), a bench-scale experimental technique developed to measure the first 5-500 milliseconds of ozone depletion for accurate determination of ozone exposure in wastewater-ozonation processes. Calculated ozone exposure in QFM experiments was up to 24% lower than in standard batch experiments, strongly depending on the initial sampling point for measurement in batch experiments. However, oxidation rates of slowly- and moderately-reacting trace organic compounds (TrOCs) were accurately predicted from batch experiments based on integration of ozone depletion and removal of an ozone-resistant probe compound to calculate oxidant exposures. An alternative concept, where ozone and hydroxyl radical exposures are back-calculated from the removal of two probe compounds, was tested as well. Although the QFM was suggested to be an efficient mixing reactor, ozone exposure ranged over three orders of magnitude when different probe compounds reacting moderately with ozone were used for the calculation. These effects were beyond uncertainty ranges for apparent second order rate constants and consistently observed with different ozone-injection techniques, i.e. QFM, batch experiments, bubble columns and venturi injection. This indicates that previously suggested mixing effects are not responsible for the difference and other still unknown factors might be relevant. Results furthermore suggest that ozone exposure calculations from the relative residual concentration of a probe compound are not a promising option for evaluation of ozonation of secondary effluents. PMID:27232995

  20. Environmental Factors Affecting Asthma and Allergies: Predicting and Simulating Downwind Exposure to Airborne Pollen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, Jeffrey; Estes, Sue; Sprigg, William A.; Nickovic, Slobodan; Huete, Alfredo; Solano, Ramon; Ratana, Piyachat; Jiang, Zhangyan; Flowers, Len; Zelicoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the environmental factors that affect asthma and allergies and work to predict and simulate the downwind exposure to airborne pollen. Using a modification of Dust REgional Atmosphere Model (DREAM) that incorporates phenology (i.e. PREAM) the aim was to predict concentrations of pollen in time and space. The strategy for using the model to simulate downwind pollen dispersal, and evaluate the results. Using MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), to get seasonal sampling of Juniper, the pollen chosen for the study, land cover on a near daily basis. The results of the model are reviewed.

  1. Dynamic interactions between hydrogeological and exposure parameters in daily dose prediction under uncertainty and temporal variability.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; de Barros, Felipe P J; Schuhmacher, Marta; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2013-12-15

    We study the time dependent interaction between hydrogeological and exposure parameters in daily dose predictions due to exposure of humans to groundwater contamination. Dose predictions are treated stochastically to account for an incomplete hydrogeological and geochemical field characterization, and an incomplete knowledge of the physiological response. We used a nested Monte Carlo framework to account for uncertainty and variability arising from both hydrogeological and exposure variables. Our interest is in the temporal dynamics of the total dose and their effects on parametric uncertainty reduction. We illustrate the approach to a HCH (lindane) pollution problem at the Ebro River, Spain. The temporal distribution of lindane in the river water can have a strong impact in the evaluation of risk. The total dose displays a non-linear effect on different population cohorts, indicating the need to account for population variability. We then expand the concept of Comparative Information Yield Curves developed earlier (see de Barros et al. [29]) to evaluate parametric uncertainty reduction under temporally variable exposure dose. Results show that the importance of parametric uncertainty reduction varies according to the temporal dynamics of the lindane plume. The approach could be used for any chemical to aid decision makers to better allocate resources towards reducing uncertainty. PMID:24011618

  2. Exposure of Polymer Film Thermal Control Materials on the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce; Miller, Sharon; Messer, Russell; Sechkar, Edward; Tollis, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Seventy-nine samples of polymer film thermal control (PFTC) materials have been provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) for exposure to the low Earth orbit environment on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). MISSE is a materials flight experiment sponsored by the Air Force Research Lab/Materials Lab and NASA. This paper will describe background, objectives, and configurations for the GRC PFTC samples for MISSE. These samples include polyimides, fluorinated polyimides, and Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) with and without second-surface metallizing layers and/or surface coatings. Also included are polyphenylene benzobisoxazole (PBO) and a polyarylene ether benzimidazole (TOR-LM). On August 16, 2001, astronauts installed passive experiment carriers (PECs) on the exterior of the ISS in which were located twenty-eight of the GRC PFTC samples for 1-year space exposure. MISSE PECs for 3-year exposure, which will contain fifty-one GRC PFTC samples, will be installed on the ISS at a later date. Once returned from the ISS, MISSE GRC PFTC samples will be examined for changes in optical and mechanical properties and atomic oxygen (AO) erosion. Additional sapphire witness samples located on the AO exposed trays will be examined for deposition of contaminants.

  3. Exposure limits for nanoparticles: report of an international workshop on nano reference values.

    PubMed

    van Broekhuizen, Pieter; van Veelen, Wim; Streekstra, Willem-Henk; Schulte, Paul; Reijnders, Lucas

    2012-07-01

    This article summarizes the outcome of the discussions at the international workshop on nano reference values (NRVs), which was organized by the Dutch trade unions and employers' organizations and hosted by the Social Economic Council in The Hague in September 2011. It reflects the discussions of 80 international participants representing small- and medium-size enterprises (SMEs), large companies, trade unions, governmental authorities, research institutions, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) from many European countries, USA, India, and Brazil. Issues that were discussed concerned the usefulness and acceptability of precaution-based NRVs as a substitute for health-based occupational exposure limits (OELs) and derived no-effect levels (DNELs) for manufactured nanoparticles (NPs). Topics concerned the metrics for measuring NPs, the combined exposure to manufactured nanomaterials (MNMs) and process-generated NPs, the use of the precautionary principle, the lack of information about the presence of nanomaterials, and the appropriateness of soft regulation for exposure control. The workshop concluded that the NRV, as an 8-h time-weighted average, is a comprehensible and useful instrument for risk management of professional use of MNMs with a dispersible character. The question remains whether NRVs, as advised for risk management by the Dutch employers' organization and trade unions, should be under soft regulation or that a more binding regulation is preferable. PMID:22752096

  4. Modeling the imprecision in prospective dosimetry of internal exposure to uranium.

    PubMed

    Davesne, E; Chojnacki, E; Paquet, F; Blanchardon, E

    2009-02-01

    The dosimetry of internal exposure to radionuclides is performed on the basis of biokinetic and dosimetric models. For prospective purpose, the organ or effective dose resulting from potential conditions of exposure can be calculated by applying these models with dedicated software. However, it is acknowledged that a significant uncertainty is associated with such calculation due to the variability of individual cases and to the possible lack of knowledge about some factors influencing the dosimetry. This uncertainty has been studied in a range of situations by modeling the uncertainty on the model parameters by probability distributions and propagating this uncertainty onto the dose result by Monte Carlo calculation. However, while probability distributions are well adapted to model the known variability of a parameter, they may lead to an unrealistically low estimate of the uncertainty due to a lack of knowledge about some input parameters. Here we present a mathematical method, based on the Dempster-Shafer theory, to deal with such imprecise knowledge. We apply this method to the prospective dosimetry of inhaled uranium dust in the nuclear fuel cycle when its physico-chemical properties are not precisely known. The results show an increased estimation of the range of uncertainty as compared to the application of a probabilistic method. This Dempster-Shafer method may valuably be applied in future prospective dosimetry of internal exposure in order to more realistically estimate the uncertainty resulting from an imprecise knowledge of the parameters of the dose calculation. PMID:19131736

  5. Review of OPFRs in animals and humans: Absorption, bioaccumulation, metabolism, and internal exposure research.

    PubMed

    Hou, Rui; Xu, Yiping; Wang, Zijian

    2016-06-01

    Due to their widespread use, organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) are commonly detected in various environmental matrices and have been identified as emerging contaminants. Considering the adverse effects of OPFRs, many researchers have paid their attention on the absorption, bioaccumulation, metabolism and internal exposure processes of OPFRs in animals and humans. In this article, we first review the diverse absorption routes of OPFRs by animals and humans (e.g., inhalation, ingestion, dermal absorption and gill absorption). Bioaccumulation and biomagnification potentials of OPFRs in different types of organisms and food webs are also summarized, based on quite limited available data and results. For metabolism, we review the Phase-I and Phase-II metabolic processes for each type of OPFRs (chlorinated OPFRs, alkyl-OPFRs and aryl-OPFRs) in the animals and humans, as well as toxicokinetic information and putative exposure biomarkers on OPFRs. Finally, we highlight gaps in our knowledge and critical directions for future internal exposure studies of OPFRs in animals and humans. PMID:27010170

  6. International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Workshop on Aerosol Forecast Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to reinforce the working partnership between centers who are actively involved in global aerosol forecasting, and to discuss issues related to forecast verification. Participants included representatives from operational centers with global aerosol forecasting requirements, a panel of experts on Numerical Weather Prediction and Air Quality forecast verification, data providers, and several observers from the research community. The presentations centered on a review of current NWP and AQ practices with subsequent discussion focused on the challenges in defining appropriate verification measures for the next generation of aerosol forecast systems.

  7. Internal exposure to organochlorine pollutants and cadmium and self-reported health status: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Van Larebeke, Nik; Sioen, Isabelle; Hond, Elly Den; Nelen, Vera; Van de Mieroop, Els; Nawrot, Tim; Bruckers, Liesbeth; Schoeters, Greet; Baeyens, Willy

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, based on the Flemish biomonitoring programs, we describe the associations between internal exposure to organochlorine pollutants and to cadmium (measured in 2004-2005 for adults aged 50-65 years) and self-reported health status obtained through a questionnaire in November 2011. Dioxin-like activity in serum showed a significant positive association with risk of cancer for women. After adjustment for confounders and covariates, the odds ratio for an exposure equal to the 90th percentile was 2.4 times higher than for an exposure equal to the 10th percentile. For both men and women dioxin-like activity and serum hexachlorobenzene (HCB) showed a significant positive association with risk of diabetes and of hypertension. Detailed analysis suggested that an increase in BMI might be part of the mechanism through which HCB contributes to diabetes and hypertension. Serum dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) concentration showed a significant positive association with diabetes and hypertension in men, but not in women. Serum polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 118 showed a significant positive association with diabetes in both men and women, and after adjustment for correlated exposures, also with hypertension in men. Urinary cadmium concentrations showed a significant positive association with hypertension. Urinary cadmium concentrations were (in 2004-2005) significantly higher in persons who felt in less than good health (in 2011) than in persons who felt in very good health. After adjustment for correlated exposures (to HCB, p,p'-DDE and PCB118) marker PCBs showed a significant negative association with diabetes and hypertension. Serum p,p'-DDE showed in men a significant negative association with risk of diseases based on atheromata. Our findings suggest that exposure to pollutants can lead to an important increase in the risk of diseases such as cancer, diabetes and hypertension. Some pollutants may possibly also decrease the risk of some health

  8. Analysis of Noise Exposure Measurements Made Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limardo, Jose G.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique workplace environment for U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts to conduct research and live for a period of six months or more. Noise has been an enduring environmental physical hazard that has been a challenge for the U.S. space program since before the Apollo era. Noise exposure in ISS poses significant risks to the crewmembers, such as; hearing loss (temporary or permanent), possible disruptions of crew sleep, interference with speech intelligibility and communication, possible interference with crew task performance, and possible reduction in alarm audibility. Acoustic measurements are made aboard ISS and compared to requirements in order to assess the acoustic environment to which the crewmembers are exposed. The purpose of this paper is to describe in detail the noise exposure monitoring program as well as an assessment of the acoustic dosimeter data collected to date. The hardware currently being used for monitoring the noise exposure onboard ISS will be discussed. Acoustic data onboard ISS has been collected since the beginning of ISS (Increment 1, November 2000). Noise exposure data analysis will include acoustic dosimetry logged data from crew-worn during work and sleep periods and also fixed-location measurements from Increment 1 to present day. Noise exposure levels (8-, 16- and 24-hr), LEQ, will also be provided and discussed in this paper. Discussions related to hearing protection will also be included. Future directions and recommendations for the noise exposure monitoring program will be highlighted. This acoustic data is used to ensure a safe and healthy working and living environment for the crewmembers aboard the ISS.

  9. Analysis of Noise Exposure Measurements Acquired Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limardo, Jose G.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique workplace environment for U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts to conduct research and live for a period of six months or more. Noise has been an enduring environmental physical hazard that has been a challenge for the U.S. space program since before the Apollo era. Noise exposure in ISS poses significant risks to the crewmembers, such as; hearing loss (temporary or permanent), possible disruptions of crew sleep, interference with speech intelligibility and communication, possible interference with crew task performance, and possible reduction in alarm audibility. Acoustic measurements were made onboard ISS and compared to requirements in order to assess the acoustic environment to which the crewmembers are exposed. The purpose of this paper is to describe in detail the noise exposure monitoring program as well as an assessment of the acoustic dosimeter data collected to date. The hardware currently being used for monitoring the noise exposure onboard ISS will be discussed. Acoustic data onboard ISS has been collected since the beginning of ISS (Increment 1, November 2001). Noise exposure data analysis will include acoustic dosimetry logged data from crew-worn dosimeters during work and sleep periods and also fixed-location measurements from Increment 1 to present day. Noise exposure levels (8-, 16- and 24-hr), LEQ, will also be provided and discussed in this paper. Future directions and recommendations for the noise exposure monitoring program will be highlighted. This acoustic data is used to ensure a safe and healthy working and living environment for the crewmembers onboard the ISS.

  10. Comparison of three models for predicting blood lead levels in children: episodic exposures to lead.

    PubMed

    Lakind, J S

    1998-01-01

    A threshold blood lead level in children below which no adverse effects occur has not been identified (CDC, 1991), Therefore, the traditional risk assessment method of relating dose to a reference dose (RfD) for noncancer effects is not applicable to lead. To assess whether environmental lead concentrations may result in adverse health effects, predicted blood lead levels are compared to a blood lead level of 10 micrograms/dL, the current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention level of concern. Children's blood lead levels may be predicted with one of at least three models: USEPA'S Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic Model (IEUBK), and models by O'Flaherty (1993) and Carlisle and Wade (1992). This paper explores the utility of these models for predicting blood lead levels in children, and discusses areas of uncertainty associated with the use of these models in evaluating episodic exposures. It is hoped that this discussion will stimulate interest further researching exposure and health effects from episodic contact with lead contaminated media. PMID:9679219

  11. Atomic Oxygen Exposure of Polyimide Foam for International Space Station Solar Array Wing Blanket Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Albyn, K. C.; Watts, E. W.

    2006-01-01

    Onorbit photos of the International Space Station (ISS) solar array blanket box foam pad assembly indicate degradation of the Kapton film covering the foam, leading to atomic oxygen (AO) exposure of the foam. The purpose of this test was to determine the magnitude of particulate generation caused by low-Earth orbital environment exposure of the foam and also by compression of the foam during solar array wing retraction. The polyimide foam used in the ISS solar array wing blanket box assembly is susceptible to significant AO erosion. The foam sample in this test lost one-third of its mass after exposure to the equivalent of 22 mo onorbit. Some particulate was generated by exposure to simulated orbital conditions and the simulated solar array retraction (compression test). However, onorbit, these particles would also be eroded by AO. The captured particles were generally <1 mm, and the particles shaken free of the sample had a maximum size of 4 mm. The foam sample maintained integrity after a compression load of 2.5 psi.

  12. Cigarette smoke exposure induces CFTR internalization and insolubility, leading to airway surface liquid dehydration.

    PubMed

    Clunes, Lucy A; Davies, Catrin M; Coakley, Raymond D; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Henderson, Ashley G; Zeman, Kirby L; Worthington, Erin N; Gentzsch, Martina; Kreda, Silvia M; Cholon, Deborah; Bennett, William D; Riordan, John R; Boucher, Richard C; Tarran, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure induces mucus obstruction and the development of chronic bronchitis (CB). While many of these responses are determined genetically, little is known about the effects CS can exert on pulmonary epithelia at the protein level. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that CS exerts direct effects on the CFTR protein, which could impair airway hydration, leading to the mucus stasis characteristic of both cystic fibrosis and CB. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that CS rapidly decreased CFTR activity, leading to airway surface liquid (ASL) volume depletion (i.e., dehydration). Further studies revealed that CS induced internalization of CFTR. Surprisingly, CS-internalized CFTR did not colocalize with lysosomal proteins. Instead, the bulk of CFTR shifted to a detergent-resistant fraction within the cell and colocalized with the intermediate filament vimentin, suggesting that CS induced CFTR movement into an aggresome-like, perinuclear compartment. To test whether airway dehydration could be reversed, we used hypertonic saline (HS) as an osmolyte to rehydrate ASL. HS restored ASL height in CS-exposed, dehydrated airway cultures. Similarly, inhaled HS restored mucus transport and increased clearance in patients with CB. Thus, we propose that CS exposure rapidly impairs CFTR function by internalizing CFTR, leading to ASL dehydration, which promotes mucus stasis and a failure of mucus clearance, leaving smokers at risk for developing CB. Furthermore, our data suggest that strategies to rehydrate airway surfaces may provide a novel form of therapy for patients with CB. PMID:21990373

  13. Contribution of internal exposures to the radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Balonov, M I; Anspaugh, L R; Bouville, A; Likhtarev, I A

    2007-01-01

    The main pathways leading to exposure of members of the general public due to the Chernobyl accident were external exposure from radionuclides deposited on the ground and ingestion of contaminated terrestrial food products. The collective dose to the thyroid was nearly 1.5 million man Gy in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine with nearly half received by children and adolescents. The collective effective dose received in 1986-2005 by approximately five million residents living in the affected areas of the three countries was approximately 50,000 man Sv with approximately 40% from ingestion. That contribution might have been larger if countermeasures had not been applied. The main radionuclide contributing to both external and internal effective dose is 137Cs with smaller contributions of 134Cs and 90Sr and negligible contribution of transuranic elements. The major demonstrated radiation-caused health effect of the Chernobyl accident has been an elevated incidence of thyroid cancer in children. PMID:17977893

  14. Bacterial meningitis exposure during an international flight: lessons for communicable pathogens.

    PubMed

    Riley, Lyrad K

    2006-07-01

    Air transport of infectious patients presents challenges for screening, post-exposure follow-up of fellow passengers, and international coordination issues. This report illustrates how an index case may not receive a clear diagnosis until days after the flight of interest, complicating treatment and fellow passenger tracking. This patient was diagnosed with meningococcal meningitis after a transatlantic flight with over 200 other passengers. In such cases, prompt initiation of public health measures and rapid coordination between various agencies may be required to limit outbreaks. Similar concerns will likely complicate intentional pathogen exposures; however, there may also be additional challenges related to unfamiliar pathogens and legal or political limitations to information sharing. For meningococcal disease, published guidelines exist to assist in determining which passengers and health-care workers meet criteria for antimicrobial chemoprophylaxis. PMID:16856365

  15. Exposure versus internal dose: Respiratory tract deposition modeling of inhaled asbestos fibers in rats and humans (Presentation Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to asbestos is associated with respiratory diseases, including asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma. Internal fiber dose depends on fiber inhalability and orientation, fiber density, length and width, and various deposition mechanisms (DM). Species-specific param...

  16. 75 FR 3959 - Noise Exposure Map Notice for Kona International Airport at Keahole, Keahole, North Kona, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice for Kona International Airport at Keahole, Keahole, North Kona, HI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...

  17. The Role of Multicultural Personality in Predicting University Adjustment of International Students in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagnici, Dilek Yelda

    2012-01-01

    The study examined how particular demographic and multicultural personality variables might predict university adjustment of international students in Turkey. One hundred and twenty-one international students from five geographical regions, including Middle Central Asia, the Balkans, the Middle East, the Kafkasia Region, and the Russian…

  18. Emotional attentional control predicts changes in diurnal cortisol secretion following exposure to a prolonged psychosocial stressor.

    PubMed

    Lenaert, Bert; Barry, Tom J; Schruers, Koen; Vervliet, Bram; Hermans, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis irregularities have been associated with several psychological disorders. Hence, the identification of individual difference variables that predict variations in HPA-axis activity represents an important challenge for psychiatric research. We investigated whether self-reported attentional control in emotionally demanding situations prospectively predicted changes in diurnal salivary cortisol secretion following exposure to a prolonged psychosocial stressor. Low ability to voluntarily control attention has previously been associated with anxiety and depressive symptomatology. Attentional control was assessed using the Emotional Attentional Control Scale. In students who were preparing for academic examination, salivary cortisol was assessed before (time 1) and after (time 2) examination. Results showed that lower levels of self-reported emotional attentional control at time 1 (N=90) predicted higher absolute diurnal cortisol secretion and a slower decline in cortisol throughout the day at time 2 (N=71). Difficulty controlling attention during emotional experiences may lead to chronic HPA-axis hyperactivity after prolonged exposure to stress. These results indicate that screening for individual differences may foster prediction of HPA-axis disturbances, paving the way for targeted disorder prevention. PMID:26539967

  19. Aquatic Exposure Predictions of Insecticide Field Concentrations Using a Multimedia Mass-Balance Model.

    PubMed

    Knäbel, Anja; Scheringer, Martin; Stehle, Sebastian; Schulz, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Highly complex process-driven mechanistic fate and transport models and multimedia mass balance models can be used for the exposure prediction of pesticides in different environmental compartments. Generally, both types of models differ in spatial and temporal resolution. Process-driven mechanistic fate models are very complex, and calculations are time-intensive. This type of model is currently used within the European regulatory pesticide registration (FOCUS). Multimedia mass-balance models require fewer input parameters to calculate concentration ranges and the partitioning between different environmental media. In this study, we used the fugacity-based small-region model (SRM) to calculate predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) for 466 cases of insecticide field concentrations measured in European surface waters. We were able to show that the PECs of the multimedia model are more protective in comparison to FOCUS. In addition, our results show that the multimedia model results have a higher predictive power to simulate varying field concentrations at a higher level of field relevance. The adaptation of the model scenario to actual field conditions suggests that the performance of the SRM increases when worst-case conditions are replaced by real field data. Therefore, this study shows that a less complex modeling approach than that used in the regulatory risk assessment exhibits a higher level of protectiveness and predictiveness and that there is a need to develop and evaluate new ecologically relevant scenarios in the context of pesticide exposure modeling. PMID:26889709

  20. Predicting international medical graduate success on college certification examinations

    PubMed Central

    Schabort, Inge; Mercuri, Mathew; Grierson, Lawrence E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine predictors of international medical graduate (IMG) success in accordance with the priorities highlighted by the Thomson and Cohl judicial report on IMG selection. Design Retrospective assessment using regression analyses to compare the information available at the time of resident selection with those trainees’ national certification examination outcomes. Setting McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. Participants McMaster University IMG residents who completed the program between 2005 and 2011. Main outcome measures Associations between IMG professional experience or demographic characteristics and examination outcomes. Results The analyses revealed that country of study and performance on the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination are among the predictors of performance on the College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada certification examinations. Of interest, the analyses also suggest discipline-specific relationships between previous professional experience and examination success. Conclusion This work presents a useful technique for further improving our understanding of the performance of IMGs on certification examinations in North America, encourages similar interinstitutional analyses, and provides a foundation for the development of tools to assist with IMG education. PMID:25316762

  1. Effects of Exposure to Community Violence on Internalizing Symptoms: Does Desensitization to Violence Occur in African American Youth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaylord-Harden, Noni K.; Cunningham, Jamila A.; Zelencik, Brett

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the linear and curvilinear associations of exposure to community violence to internalizing symptoms in 251 African American adolescents (mean age = 12.86, SD = 1.28). Participants reported on exposure to community violence, anxiety symptoms, and depressive symptoms. Regression analyses were used to…

  2. [New horizons in medicine. Complexity and predictability in internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Guarini, G; Onofri, E

    1993-10-01

    Being a highly sophisticated structure, the human body should be considered on a physical level as a whole of inter-correlated non-linear dynamic systems, which are by definition, complex systems because they are always conditioned in their operativity by numerous variables. We must draw attention to the opportunity that within the field of medical science the concept of complexity referring to diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostical problems, is distinct between structural and functional. The functional complexity of a system, a phenomena, an event, MY be recognized in its dynamics, only if analysed using modern methods recently brought to light, on the relationship which exist between classic determinism and deterministic chaos. Furthermore, also on practical level, the recent discoveries on the general principles, which are at the base of the functional complexity of non-linear dynamic systems, demonstrate exactly how fragile is the probabilistic predictability which guides a doctor in clinical reasoning in all its various stages; in the gathering of anamnestic and objective data; in the programming the researches aimed at confirming the validness of the diagnosis; in the therapy aimed at reaching the best possible results; in the prognosis which summarize the destiny of the binomial patient illness. The scientific enunciate of universal nature, which demonstrate how, from a tiny uncertainty in the initial functional data of a system, of a phenomena, of an event can unleash a condition of absolute unpredictability, find daily confirmation in both clinical and experimental medicine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8235036

  3. Adiposity and pathogen exposure predict C-reactive protein in Filipino women.

    PubMed

    McDade, Thomas W; Rutherford, Julienne N; Adair, Linda; Kuzawa, Christopher

    2008-12-01

    Obesity and infectious agents are both sources of inflammatory stimuli that result in increased production of C-reactive protein (CRP). Rates of overweight and obesity are increasing globally, but for many populations, gains in body fat are set against a backdrop of high levels of pathogen exposure. Our primary objective was to evaluate the extent to which adiposity and pathogenicity contribute to a double burden of inflammation in a population currently undergoing the nutrition transition. Measures of adiposity, pathogen exposure, and infectious disease symptoms were evaluated as predictors of high-sensitivity CRP concentration in plasma samples from 1875 women participating in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey in the Philippines. Proxy measures of pathogen exposure included household crowding and cleanliness, quality of water source, mode of waste disposal, and fecal exposure. A series of maximum likelihood logistic regression models were used to predict a plasma CRP concentration > 3 mg/L. Waist circumference was the strongest anthropometric predictor of elevated CRP [odds ratio (OR) = 2.29; 95% CI = 2.00, 2.62; P < 0.001]. Presence of infectious disease symptoms (OR = 2.51; 95% CI = 1.84, 3.44; P < 0.001) and level of pathogen exposure (OR = 1.56; 95% CI = 1.15, 2.12; P < 0.01) were also associated with elevated CRP. These associations were independent of socioeconomic status and other health behaviors. Overweight/obesity and infectious exposures are associated with elevated CRP in the Philippines; it is likely that other populations undergoing the nutrition transition are experiencing comparable double burdens of inflammatory stimuli. These results underscore the need for additional research on the contributions of pathogenicity, adiposity, and inflammation to global epidemics of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. PMID:19022970

  4. Method for the prediction of the effective dose equivalent to the crew of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Tomi, Leena; Sihver, Lembit; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Richardson, Richard B.; Lewis, Brent J.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a methodology for assessing the pre-mission exposure of space crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in terms of an effective dose equivalent. In this approach, the PHITS Monte Carlo code was used to assess the particle transport of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and trapped radiation for solar maximum and minimum conditions through an aluminum shield thickness. From these predicted spectra, and using fluence-to-dose conversion factors, a scaling ratio of the effective dose equivalent rate to the ICRU ambient dose equivalent rate at a 10 mm depth was determined. Only contributions from secondary neutrons, protons, and alpha particles were considered in this analysis. Measurements made with a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) located at Service Module panel 327, as captured through a semi-empirical correlation in the ISSCREM code, where then scaled using this conversion factor for prediction of the effective dose equivalent. This analysis shows that at this location within the service module, the total effective dose equivalent is 10-30% less than the total TEPC dose equivalent. Approximately 75-85% of the effective dose equivalent is derived from the GCR. This methodology provides an opportunity for pre-flight predictions of the effective dose equivalent and therefore offers a means to assess the health risks of radiation exposure on ISS flight crew.

  5. ORERP (Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project) internal dose estimates for individuals.

    PubMed

    Ng, Y C; Anspaugh, L R; Cederwall, R T

    1990-11-01

    A method was developed to reconstruct the internal radiation dose to off-site individuals who were exposed to fallout from nuclear weapons tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). By this method, committed absorbed doses can be estimated for 22 target organs of persons in four age groups and for selected organs of the fetus. Ingestion doses are calculated by combining age-group dose factors and intakes specific for age group, test event, and location as calculated by the PATHWAY food-chain model. Inhalation doses are calculated by combining age-group dose factors and breathing rates, and time-integrated air concentrations that are derived from the ORERP Air-Quality Data Base. Dose estimates are calculated for the radionuclides that contribute significantly to the total dose; these number 20 via the ingestion pathway and 46 via the inhalation pathway. Internal doses to nonspecified individuals and nonspecified fetuses are being reconstructed for each location in the ORERP Town Data Base for which exposure rates and cloud-arrival times are listed. Examples of reconstructing internal dose are presented. This method will also be adapted to reconstruct internal doses from NTS fallout to specific individuals in accordance with the person's age, past residence, life-style, and living pattern. PMID:2211124

  6. ORERP (Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project) internal dose estimates for individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Y.C.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Cederwall, R.T. )

    1990-11-01

    A method was developed to reconstruct the internal radiation dose to off-site individuals who were exposed to fallout from nuclear weapons tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). By this method, committed absorbed doses can be estimated for 22 target organs of persons in four age groups and for selected organs of the fetus. Ingestion doses are calculated by combining age-group dose factors and intakes specific for age group, test event, and location as calculated by the PATHWAY food-chain model. Inhalation doses are calculated by combining age-group dose factors and breathing rates, and time-integrated air concentrations that are derived from the ORERP Air-Quality Data Base. Dose estimates are calculated for the radionuclides that contribute significantly to the total dose; these number 20 via the ingestion pathway and 46 via the inhalation pathway. Internal doses to nonspecified individuals and nonspecified fetuses are being reconstructed for each location in the ORERP Town Data Base for which exposure rates and cloud-arrival times are listed. Examples of reconstructing internal dose are presented. This method will also be adapted to reconstruct internal doses from NTS fallout to specific individuals in accordance with the person's age, past residence, life-style, and living pattern.

  7. Exposure to international migration and its effect on childbearing in Turkey.

    PubMed

    White, Kari; Buckley, Cynthia J

    2011-01-01

    International migration alters social norms, family structures, and population development in sending regions. Each of these factors affects fertility, making the impact of international migration on childbearing an increasingly important area of study. In many sending regions, the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) provide a promising, but underutilized, source of data for understanding the relationship between international migration and childbearing. Using the household and individual questionnaires in the 2003 Turkish DHS, we develop a multi-layered approach for measuring international migration. We then use these measures to examine differences in childbearing among women in migrant and non-migrant households, assessing the effects of migrant selection and migration-related roles and attitudes on the number of children born. After adjusting for selection characteristics, we find return female migrants and migrant wives are not significantly different from women in non-migrant households; role and attitude differences have only modest impacts on the association between women’s exposure to migration and childbearing. PMID:21717598

  8. Comparison of NIRS approach for prediction of internal quality traits in three fruit species.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabrieli Alves; Bureau, Sylvie; Renard, Catherine Marie-Geneviève Claire; Pereira-Netto, Adaucto Bellarmino; de Castilhos, Fernanda

    2014-01-15

    NIR Spectroscopy ability was investigated to assess the fruit structure effect (passion fruit, tomato and apricot) on prediction performance of soluble solids content (SSC) and titratable acidity (TA). Relationships between spectral wavelengths and SSC and TA were evaluated through the application of chemometric techniques based on partial least squares (PLS). Good prediction performance was obtained for apricot with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.95 for SSC and TA and root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP%) of 3.3% and 14.2%, respectively. For the passion fruit and tomato, the prediction models were not satisfactorily accurate due to the high RMSEP. Results showed that NIR technology can be used to evaluate apricot internal quality, however, it was not appropriate to evaluate internal quality in fruits with thick skin, (passion fruit), and/or heterogeneous internal structure (tomato). PMID:24054234

  9. Engineered nanoparticle respiratory exposure and potential risks for cardiovascular toxicity: predictive tests and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Simeonova, Petia P; Erdely, Aaron

    2009-07-01

    The most attractive properties of engineered nanomaterials for technological applications, including their small size, large surface area, and high reactivity, are also the main factors for their potential toxicity. Based on ambient ultrafine particle research, it is predicted that nanosized particles may have deeper pulmonary deposition, higher biological activity, and a tendency for extrapulmonary translocation compared to larger particles. In this regard, nanoparticle exposure, by direct or indirect mechanisms, may lead to unexpected distant responses, involving the immune system, cardiovascular system, liver, kidney, and brain. The systemic effects may induce or modify the progression of existing diseases such as cardiovascular disease. Current experimental toxicity evaluation of engineered nanomaterials, specifically carbon nanotubes, demonstrated that deposition of these materials in the lung leads to inflammation and fibrosis. The local toxicity is associated with cardiovascular effects related to atherosclerosis. Although translocation of carbon nanotubes into the systemic circulation is hypothetically possible, there is no current evidence to support this hypothesis. However, studies pointed out that carbon nanotube-induced lung inflammation results in a release of inflammatory mediators and activation of blood cells which can contribute to cardiovascular adverse effects. Furthermore, complex protein and gene expression blood analysis can help in development of biomarkers for application in human screening of nanoparticle exposure. Future studies to evaluate the systemic effects of carbon nanotube exposure under workplace or environmental exposure paradigms should be conducted. PMID:19558236

  10. Trauma exposure interacts with impulsivity in predicting emotion regulation and depressive mood

    PubMed Central

    Ceschi, Grazia; Billieux, Joël; Hearn, Melissa; Fürst, Guillaume; Van der Linden, Martial

    2014-01-01

    Background Traumatic exposure may modulate the expression of impulsive behavioral dispositions and change the implementation of emotion regulation strategies associated with depressive mood. Past studies resulted in only limited comprehension of these relationships, especially because they failed to consider impulsivity as a multifactorial construct. Objective Based on Whiteside and Lynam's multidimensional model that identifies four distinct dispositional facets of impulsive-like behaviors, namely urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking (UPPS), the current study used a sample of community volunteers to investigate whether an interaction exists between impulsivity facets and lifetime trauma exposure in predicting cognitive emotion regulation and depressive mood. Methods Ninety-three adults completed questionnaires measuring lifetime trauma exposure, impulsivity, cognitive emotion regulation, and depressive mood. Results Results showed that trauma-exposed participants with a strong disposition toward urgency (predisposition to act rashly in intense emotional contexts) tended to use fewer appropriate cognitive emotion regulation strategies than other individuals. Unexpectedly, participants lacking in perseverance (predisposition to have difficulties concentrating on demanding tasks) used more appropriate emotion regulation strategies if they had experienced traumatic events during their life than if they had not. Emotion regulation mediated the path between these two impulsivity facets and depressive mood. Conclusions Together, these findings suggest that impulsivity has a differential impact on emotion regulation and depressive mood depending on lifetime exposure to environmental factors, especially traumatic events. PMID:25317255

  11. Exposure to Violence in the Community Predicts Friendships with Academically Disengaged Peers During Middle Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, David; Kelly, Brynn M; Mali, Luiza V; Duong, Mylien T

    2016-09-01

    Adolescents who have been exposed to violence in the community often experience subsequent difficulties with academic achievement. Because competence in the classroom is a salient developmental task during the adolescent years, outcomes in this critical context can then have broader implications for social and psychological functioning. In the current study, we tested a hypothesized progression in which the association between violence exposure and deficient achievement is presumed to potentiate friendships with academically disengaged peers. We followed 415 urban adolescents (53 % girls; average age of 14.6 years) for a one-year period, with two annual assessment of psychosocial functioning. Exposure to violence in the community and academic engagement were assessed with a self-report inventory; reciprocated friendships were assessed with a peer interview; and achievement was indexed based on a review of school records. Consistent with our hypotheses, neighborhood violence was associated with deficient classroom achievement. Poor achievement, in turn, mediated associations between community violence exposure and low academic engagement among friends. Our findings highlight pathways though which exposure to community violence potentially predicts later dysfunction. PMID:27138174

  12. Meeting report: international workshop on endocrine disruptors: exposure and potential impact on consumers health.

    PubMed

    Rousselle, C; Ormsby, J N; Schaefer, B; Lampen, A; Platzek, T; Hirsch-Ernst, K; Warholm, M; Oskarsson, A; Nielsen, P J; Holmer, M L; Emond, C

    2013-02-01

    The French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety (Anses) hosted a two-day workshop on Endocrine Disruptors: Exposure and Potential Impact on Consumers Health, bringing together participants from international organizations, academia, research institutes and from German, Swedish, Danish and French governmental agencies. The main objective of the workshop was to share knowledge and experiences on endocrine disruptors (ED) exposure and potential impact on consumers' health, to identify current risk assessment practices and knowledge gaps and issue recommendations on research needs and future collaboration. The following topics were reviewed: (1) Definition of ED, (2) endpoints to be considered for Risk assessment (RA) of ED, (3) non-monotonic dose response curves, (4) studies to be considered for RA (regulatory versus academic studies), (5) point of departure and uncertainty factors, (6) exposure assessment, (7) regulatory issues related to ED. The opinions expressed during this workshop reflect day-to-day experiences from scientists, regulators, researchers, and others from many different countries in the fields of risk assessment, and were regarded by the attendees as an important basis for further discussions. Accordingly, the participants underlined the need for more exchange in the future to share experiences and improve the methodology related to risk assessment for endocrine disrupters. PMID:23211416

  13. Predicting children's short-term exposure to pesticides: results of a questionnaire screening approach.

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Ken; Adgate, John L; Eberly, Lynn E; Clayton, C Andrew; Whitmore, Roy W; Pellizzari, Edo D; Lioy, Paul J; Quackenboss, James J

    2003-01-01

    The ability of questionnaires to predict children's exposure to pesticides was examined as part of the Minnesota Children's Pesticide Exposure Study (MNCPES). The MNCPES focused on a probability sample of 102 children between the ages of 3 and 13 years living in either urban (Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN) or nonurban (Rice and Goodhue Counties in Minnesota) households. Samples were collected in a variety of relevant media (air, food, beverages, tap water, house dust, soil, urine), and chemical analyses emphasized three organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, malathion) and a herbicide (atrazine). Results indicate that the residential pesticide-use questions and overall screening approach used in the MNCPES were ineffective for identifying and oversampling children/households with higher levels of individual target pesticides. PMID:12515690

  14. Predicting exposure-response associations of ambient particulate matter with mortality in 73 Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    Madaniyazi, Lina; Guo, Yuming; Chen, Renjie; Kan, Haidong; Tong, Shilu

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the burden of mortality associated with particulates requires knowledge of exposure-response associations. However, the evidence on exposure-response associations is limited in many cities, especially in developing countries. In this study, we predicted associations of particulates smaller than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) with mortality in 73 Chinese cities. The meta-regression model was used to test and quantify which city-specific characteristics contributed significantly to the heterogeneity of PM10-mortality associations for 16 Chinese cities. Then, those city-specific characteristics with statistically significant regression coefficients were treated as independent variables to build multivariate meta-regression models. The model with the best fitness was used to predict PM10-mortality associations in 73 Chinese cities in 2010. Mean temperature, PM10 concentration and green space per capita could best explain the heterogeneity in PM10-mortality associations. Based on city-specific characteristics, we were able to develop multivariate meta-regression models to predict associations between air pollutants and health outcomes reasonably well. PMID:26452312

  15. Real-Time Aircraft Cosmic Ray Radiation Exposure Predictions from the NAIRAS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, C. J.; Tobiska, W.; Kress, B. T.; Xu, X.

    2012-12-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a prototype operational model for predicting commercial aircraft radiation exposure from galactic and solar cosmic rays. NAIRAS predictions are currently streaming live from the project's public website, and the exposure rate nowcast is also available on the SpaceWx smartphone app for iPhone, IPad, and Android. Cosmic rays are the primary source of human exposure to high linear energy transfer radiation at aircraft altitudes, which increases the risk of cancer and other adverse health effects. Thus, the NAIRAS model addresses an important national need with broad societal, public health and economic benefits. There is also interest in extending NAIRAS to the LEO environment to address radiation hazard issues for the emerging commercial spaceflight industry. The processes responsible for the variability in the solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, solar energetic particle spectrum, and the dynamical response of the magnetosphere to these space environment inputs, strongly influence the composition and energy distribution of the atmospheric ionizing radiation field. Real-time observations are required at a variety of locations within the geospace environment. The NAIRAS model is driven by real-time input data from ground-, atmospheric-, and space-based platforms. During the development of the NAIRAS model, new science questions and observational data gaps were identified that must be addressed in order to obtain a more reliable and robust operational model of atmospheric radiation exposure. The focus of this talk is to present the current capabilities of the NAIRAS model, discuss future developments in aviation radiation modeling and instrumentation, and propose strategies and methodologies of bridging known gaps in current modeling and observational capabilities.

  16. [Development of Chemical Exposure Prediction Model for Aerobic Sewage Treatment Plant for Biochemical Wastewaters].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin-jun; Liu, Ji-ning; Shi, Li-li; Feng, Jie; Xu, Yan-hua

    2016-01-15

    Sewage treatment plant (STP) is a key transfer station for chemicals distributed into different environment compartment, and hence models of exposure prediction play a crucial role in the environmental risk assessment and pollution prevention of chemicals. A mass balance model namely Chinese Sewage treatment plant (C-STP(O)) was developed to predict the fate and exposure of chemicals in a conventional sewage treatment plant. The model was expressed as 9 mixed boxes by compartment of air, water, suspended solids, and settled solids. It was based on the minimum input data required on the notification in new chemicals, such as molecular weight, absorption coefficient, vapor pressure, water solubility, ready or inherent biodegradability. The environment conditions ( Temperature = 283 K, wind speed = 2 m x s(-1)) and the classic STP scenario parameters of China, especially the scenario parameters of water quality and sludge properties were adopted in C-STP( 0) model to reflect Chinese characteristics, these parameters were sewage flow of 35 000 m3 x d(-1), influent BOD5 of 0.15 g x L(-1), influent SS of 0.2 kg x m(-3), effluent SS of 0.02 kg x m(-3), BOD5 removal in aerator of 90% sludge density of 1.6 kg x L(3) and organic carbon content of 0.18-0.19. It adopted the fugacity express for mechanism of linear absorption, first-order degradation, Whitman two resistances. An overall interphase transfer constant which was the sum of surface volatilization and stripping was used to assess the volatilization in aerator. The most important and uncertain input value was the biodegradation rate constant, and determination of which required a tier test strategy from ready or inherent biodegradability data to simulate test in STP. An extrapolated criterion of US EPA to derive biodegradation rate constant using the results of ready and inherent biodegradability was compared with that of EU and was recommended. C-STP ( 0 ) was valid to predict the relative emission of volatilization

  17. Using ecological measures of smoking trigger exposure to predict smoking cessation milestones.

    PubMed

    Minami, Haruka; Tran, Lisa T; McCarthy, Danielle E

    2015-03-01

    This study used ecological momentary assessment data from adult daily smokers attempting to quit smoking to assess relations between exposure to contextual risk factors and cessation failure, latency to a first smoking lapse, or progression from lapse to relapse (smoking 7 days in a row). Participants were adult, daily smokers enrolled in a randomized controlled clinical trial of bupropion SR and individual counseling who were followed to 1 year postquit. Participants reported exposure to high-risk contexts and behaviors, including being where cigarettes were available or smoking was permitted, being around others smoking in prospective, real-time assessment for 2 weeks pre- and 4 weeks postquit. Results showed that greater exposure to contextual risk factors during the prequit did not predict cessation failure. However, Cox regression survival analyses revealed that spending a greater proportion of time where cigarettes were easily available following at least 1 day of abstinence predicted shorter latency to a first lapse, even after controlling for baseline risk factors such as gender, nicotine dependence, depressive symptoms, and living with a smoker. Greater cigarette availability following a lapse was not associated with progression from lapse to relapse with or without baseline risk factors in the model. This suggests that postquit environmental risk factors, such as cigarette availability, increase lapse risk, and stable risk factors, such as living with smokers and higher baseline carbon monoxide level or depressive symptoms, remain potent predictors of progression to relapse. Real-time contextual risk assessments postquit predict lapse above and beyond stable, baseline risk factors. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25134024

  18. Comparison of International Guidelines of Dermal Absorption Tests Used in Pesticides Exposure Assessment for Operators

    PubMed Central

    So, Jaehwan; Ahn, Junyoung; Lee, Tae-Hee; Park, Kyung-Hun; Paik, Min-Kyoung; Jeong, Mihye; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2014-01-01

    The number of farmers who have suffered from non-fatal acute pesticide poisoning has been reported to vary from 5.7% to 86.7% in South Korea since 1975. Absorption through the skin is the main route of exposure to pesticides for farmers who operate with them. Several in vitro tests using the skins of humans or animal and in vivo tests using laboratory animals are introduced for the assessment of human dermal absorption level of pesticides. The objective of this study is to evaluate and compare international guidelines and strategies of dermal absorption assessments and to propose unique approaches for applications into pesticide registration process in our situation. Until present in our situation, pesticide exposure level to operator is determined just using default value of 10 as for skin absorption ratio because of data shortage. Dermal absorption tests are requested to get exposure level of pesticides and to ultimately know the safety of pesticides for operators through the comparison with the value of AOEL. When the exposure level is higher than AOEL, the pesticide cannot be approved. We reviewed the skin absorption test guidelines recommended by OECD, EFSA and EPA. The EPA recommends assessment of skin absorption of pesticides for humans through the TPA which includes all the results of in vitro human and animal and animal in vivo skin absorption studies. OECD and EFSA, employ a tiered approach, which the requirement of further study depends on the results of the former stage study. OECD guidelines accept the analysis of pesticide level absorbed through skin without radioisotope when the recovery using the non-labeled method is within 80~120%. Various factors are reviewed in this study, including the origin of skin (gender, animal species and sites of skin), thickness, temperature and, etc., which can influence the integrity of results. PMID:25584144

  19. Levels and predictors of airborne and internal exposure to manganese and iron among welders.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Beate; Weiss, Tobias; Kendzia, Benjamin; Henry, Jana; Lehnert, Martin; Lotz, Anne; Heinze, Evelyn; Käfferlein, Heiko Udo; Van Gelder, Rainer; Berges, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Mattenklott, Markus; Punkenburg, Ewald; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We investigated airborne and internal exposure to manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) among welders. Personal sampling of welding fumes was carried out in 241 welders during a shift. Metals were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Mn in blood (MnB) was analyzed by graphite furnace atom absorption spectrometry. Determinants of exposure levels were estimated with multiple regression models. Respirable Mn was measured with a median of 62 (inter-quartile range (IQR) 8.4-320) μg/m(3) and correlated with Fe (r=0.92, 95% CI 0.90-0.94). Inhalable Mn was measured with similar concentrations (IQR 10-340 μg/m(3)). About 70% of the variance of Mn and Fe could be explained, mainly by the welding process. Ventilation decreased exposure to Fe and Mn significantly. Median concentrations of MnB and serum ferritin (SF) were 10.30 μg/l (IQR 8.33-13.15 μg/l) and 131 μg/l (IQR 76-240 μg/l), respectively. Few welders were presented with low iron stores, and MnB and SF were not correlated (r=0.07, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.20). Regression models revealed a significant association of the parent metal with MnB and SF, but a low fraction of variance was explained by exposure-related factors. Mn is mainly respirable in welding fumes. Airborne Mn and Fe influenced MnB and SF, respectively, in welders. This indicates an effect on the biological regulation of both metals. Mn and Fe were strongly correlated, whereas MnB and SF were not, likely due to higher iron stores among welders. PMID:22377681

  20. The impact of composite AUC estimates on the prediction of systemic exposure in toxicology experiments.

    PubMed

    Sahota, Tarjinder; Danhof, Meindert; Della Pasqua, Oscar

    2015-06-01

    Current toxicity protocols relate measures of systemic exposure (i.e. AUC, Cmax) as obtained by non-compartmental analysis to observed toxicity. A complicating factor in this practice is the potential bias in the estimates defining safe drug exposure. Moreover, it prevents the assessment of variability. The objective of the current investigation was therefore (a) to demonstrate the feasibility of applying nonlinear mixed effects modelling for the evaluation of toxicokinetics and (b) to assess the bias and accuracy in summary measures of systemic exposure for each method. Here, simulation scenarios were evaluated, which mimic toxicology protocols in rodents. To ensure differences in pharmacokinetic properties are accounted for, hypothetical drugs with varying disposition properties were considered. Data analysis was performed using non-compartmental methods and nonlinear mixed effects modelling. Exposure levels were expressed as area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC), peak concentrations (Cmax) and time above a predefined threshold (TAT). Results were then compared with the reference values to assess the bias and precision of parameter estimates. Higher accuracy and precision were observed for model-based estimates (i.e. AUC, Cmax and TAT), irrespective of group or treatment duration, as compared with non-compartmental analysis. Despite the focus of guidelines on establishing safety thresholds for the evaluation of new molecules in humans, current methods neglect uncertainty, lack of precision and bias in parameter estimates. The use of nonlinear mixed effects modelling for the analysis of toxicokinetics provides insight into variability and should be considered for predicting safe exposure in humans. PMID:25868863

  1. Stem cell responses after radiation exposure: A key to the evaluation and prediction of its effects

    SciTech Connect

    Fliedner, T.M.; Paul, W.; Tibken, B.; Hofer, E.P.

    1996-06-01

    A biomathematical model of granulocytopoiesis is described and used to analyze the blood granulocyte changes seen in the blood of dogs and humans after continuous and after acute external radiation exposure. This allows to relate the cell change pattern seen to the extent of stem cell damage in the hematopoietic bone marrow distributed as semiautonomous units throughout the skeletal bones. The model is described briefly and consists of 8 cellular and 2 regulatory compartments and is described by 37 differential equations. With the help of this model, it can be shown that the chronic radiation exposure of dogs at a rate of between 0.003 and 0.12 Gy per day results in a system failure with subsequent death of the animal, if the stem cell pool decreases below 2.5% of its normal content. In human beings exposed to a single radiation exposure (as seen in radiation accidents) the simulation of the granulocyte pattern results in the finding that a reduction of the stem pool to 5-10% of normal is compatible with the assumption of its {open_quotes}reversible{close_quotes} damage (to be treated by conventional replacement therapy including cytokines), whereas the reduction of blood granulocytes to levels of less than 200-300 per mm{sup 3} on day 5-6 after exposure indicates that no stem cells remain from which a spontaneous regeneration could occur and hence would require a substitution therapy by stem cell transplantation. The same model was used to correlate the changing granulocyte pattern seen after autologous blood stem cell transfusion in patients treated with supralethal radiochemo conditioning regimen. The results indicate a proportionality of progenitor cells in the transfusate with the calculated stem cell number of the modeling exercise. It is proposed to use the pattern of granulocyte changes in the blood as a principal indicator to predict the outcome of a radiation exposure and to select appropriate therapeutic strategies. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Prediction in complex systems: The case of the international trade network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmer, Alexandre; Zeng, An; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Predicting the future evolution of complex systems is one of the main challenges in complexity science. Based on a current snapshot of a network, link prediction algorithms aim to predict its future evolution. We apply here link prediction algorithms to data on the international trade between countries. This data can be represented as a complex network where links connect countries with the products that they export. Link prediction techniques based on heat and mass diffusion processes are employed to obtain predictions for products exported in the future. These baseline predictions are improved using a recent metric of country fitness and product similarity. The overall best results are achieved with a newly developed metric of product similarity which takes advantage of causality in the network evolution.

  3. Predicting Developmental Changes in Internalizing Symptoms: Examining the Interplay Between Parenting and Neuroendocrine Stress Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlman, Kate R.; Olson, Sheryl L.; Lopez-Duran, Nestor L.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether parenting and HPA-axis reactivity during middle childhood predicted increases in internalizing symptoms during the transition to adolescence, and whether HPA-axis reactivity mediated the impact of parenting on internalizing symptoms. The study included 65 children (35 boys) who were assessed at age 5, 7, and 11. Parenting behaviors were assessed via parent report at age 5 and 11. The child’s HPA-axis reactivity was measured at age 7 via a stress task. Internalizing symptoms were measured via teacher reports at age 5 and 11. High maternal warmth at age 5 predicted lower internalizing symptoms at age 11. Also, high reported maternal warmth and induction predicted lower HPA-axis reactivity. Additionally, greater HPA-axis reactivity at age 7 was associated with greater increases in internalizing symptoms from age 5 to 11. Finally, the association between age 5 maternal warmth and age 11 internalizing symptoms was partially mediated by lower cortisol in response to the stress task. Thus, parenting behaviors in early development may influence the physiological stress response system and therefore buffer the development of internalizing symptoms during preadolescence when risk for disorder onset is high. PMID:24009085

  4. International issues on human health effects of exposure to chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Feron, Victor J; Cassee, Flemming R; Groten, John P; van Vliet, Petronella W; van Zorge, Job A

    2002-12-01

    In this article, we highlight new developments and recent studies concerning adverse human health effects related to chemical mixtures. One group of activities comprises the development of a new computer program for analyzing mixture studies and a mathematical model as a basis for combination rules that predict the toxicity of mixtures. Other new activities in the area of experimental studies are the application of gene expression technologies in mixture research, and pattern recognition as a tool in safety evaluation of complex mixtures. A "bottom-up" approach for chemosensory detection of mixtures has recently been presented. Other topics include a method for the safety evaluation of natural flavoring complexes, and an evaluation of the possible health effects of the simultaneous intake of food additives. Examples of issues related to mixtures of airborne chemicals are potential interaction of fine particles and gaseous pollutants in ambient air, nasal cancer associated with inhaled chemical mixtures, and the recommendation of a limit value for volatile organic compounds. Topics of a more strategic nature include studies concerning the public health effects of large airports, and the development of criteria for a harmonized classification of chemical mixtures. This overview illustrates that strategies to tackle the safety evaluation of combined exposures and complex mixtures as well as models facilitating the interpretation of findings in the context of risk assessment of mixtures have become increasingly important. It is true that exposure of humans to chemical mixtures is the rule rather than the exception, and therefore health risk assessments should focus on mixtures and not on single chemicals. It is also true, however, that humans have learned to cope with exposure to huge numbers of chemicals simultaneously (food, water, air, soil, and consumer products). Therefore, in view of limited resources for toxicological research, the focus in toxicology should be

  5. International issues on human health effects of exposure to chemical mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Feron, Victor J; Cassee, Flemming R; Groten, John P; van Vliet, Petronella W; van Zorge, Job A

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we highlight new developments and recent studies concerning adverse human health effects related to chemical mixtures. One group of activities comprises the development of a new computer program for analyzing mixture studies and a mathematical model as a basis for combination rules that predict the toxicity of mixtures. Other new activities in the area of experimental studies are the application of gene expression technologies in mixture research, and pattern recognition as a tool in safety evaluation of complex mixtures. A "bottom-up" approach for chemosensory detection of mixtures has recently been presented. Other topics include a method for the safety evaluation of natural flavoring complexes, and an evaluation of the possible health effects of the simultaneous intake of food additives. Examples of issues related to mixtures of airborne chemicals are potential interaction of fine particles and gaseous pollutants in ambient air, nasal cancer associated with inhaled chemical mixtures, and the recommendation of a limit value for volatile organic compounds. Topics of a more strategic nature include studies concerning the public health effects of large airports, and the development of criteria for a harmonized classification of chemical mixtures. This overview illustrates that strategies to tackle the safety evaluation of combined exposures and complex mixtures as well as models facilitating the interpretation of findings in the context of risk assessment of mixtures have become increasingly important. It is true that exposure of humans to chemical mixtures is the rule rather than the exception, and therefore health risk assessments should focus on mixtures and not on single chemicals. It is also true, however, that humans have learned to cope with exposure to huge numbers of chemicals simultaneously (food, water, air, soil, and consumer products). Therefore, in view of limited resources for toxicological research, the focus in toxicology should be

  6. Adaptation of distortion product otoacoustic emissions predicts susceptibility to acoustic over-exposure in alert rabbits.

    PubMed

    Luebke, Anne E; Stagner, Barden B; Martin, Glen K; Lonsbury-Martin, Brenda L

    2014-04-01

    A noninvasive test was developed in rabbits based on fast adaptation measures for 2f1-f2 distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). The goal was to evaluate the effective reflex activation, i.e., "functional strength," of both the descending medial olivocochlear efferent reflex (MOC-R) and the middle-ear muscle reflex (MEM-R) through sound activation. Classically, it is assumed that both reflexes contribute toward protecting the inner ear from cochlear damage caused by noise exposure. The DP-gram method described here evaluated the MOC-R effect on DPOAE levels over a two-octave (oct) frequency range. To estimate the related activation of the middle-ear muscles (MEMs), the MEM-R was measured by monitoring the level of the f1-primary tone throughout its duration. Following baseline measures, rabbits were subjected to noise over-exposure. A main finding was that the measured adaptive activity was highly variable between rabbits but less so between the ears of the same animal. Also, together, the MOC-R and MEM-R tests showed that, on average, DPOAE adaptation consisted of a combined contribution from both systems. Despite this shared involvement, the amount of DPOAE adaptation measured for a particular animal's ear predicted that ear's subsequent susceptibility to the noise over-exposure for alert but not for deeply anesthetized rabbits. PMID:25234992

  7. How to quantify exposure to traumatic stress? Reliability and predictive validity of measures for cumulative trauma exposure in a post-conflict population

    PubMed Central

    Wilker, Sarah; Pfeiffer, Anett; Kolassa, Stephan; Koslowski, Daniela; Elbert, Thomas; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Background While studies with survivors of single traumatic experiences highlight individual response variation following trauma, research from conflict regions shows that almost everyone develops posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) if trauma exposure reaches extreme levels. Therefore, evaluating the effects of cumulative trauma exposure is of utmost importance in studies investigating risk factors for PTSD. Yet, little research has been devoted to evaluate how this important environmental risk factor can be best quantified. Methods We investigated the retest reliability and predictive validity of different trauma measures in a sample of 227 Ugandan rebel war survivors. Trauma exposure was modeled as the number of traumatic event types experienced or as a score considering traumatic event frequencies. In addition, we investigated whether age at trauma exposure can be reliably measured and improves PTSD risk prediction. Results All trauma measures showed good reliability. While prediction of lifetime PTSD was most accurate from the number of different traumatic event types experienced, inclusion of event frequencies slightly improved the prediction of current PTSD. Conclusions As assessing the number of traumatic events experienced is the least stressful and time-consuming assessment and leads to the best prediction of lifetime PTSD, we recommend this measure for research on PTSD etiology. PMID:26589255

  8. Explicit contextual information selectively contributes to predictive switching of internal models.

    PubMed

    Imamizu, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Norikazu; Osu, Rieko; Tsutsui, Kiyoka; Sugiyama, Kouichi; Wada, Yasuhiro; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2007-08-01

    Many evidences suggest that the central nervous system (CNS) acquires and switches internal models for adaptive control in various environments. However, little is known about the neural mechanisms responsible for the switching. A recent computational model for simultaneous learning and switching of internal models proposes two separate switching mechanisms: a predictive mechanism purely based on contextual information and a postdictive mechanism based on the difference between actual and predicted sensorimotor feedbacks. This model can switch internal models solely based on contextual information in a predictive fashion immediately after alteration of the environment. Here we show that when subjects simultaneously adapted to alternating blocks of opposing visuomotor rotations, explicit contextual information about the rotations improved the initial performance at block alternations and asymptotic levels of performance within each block but not readaptation speeds. Our simulations using separate switching mechanisms duplicated these effects of contextual information on subject performance and suggest that improvement of initial performance was caused by improved accuracy of the predictive switch while adaptation speed corresponds to a switch dependent on sensorimotor feedback. Simulations also suggested that a slow change in output signals from the switching mechanisms causes contamination of motor commands from an internal model used in the previous context (anterograde interference) and partial destruction of internal models (retrograde interference). Explicit contextual information prevents destruction and assists memory retention by improving the changes in output signals. Thus, the asymptotic levels of performance improved. PMID:17437093

  9. Predicting human exposure and risk from chlorinated indoor swimming pool: a case study.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2015-08-01

    This study predicted human exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in a chlorinated indoor swimming pool. Human exposure was predicted through ingestion, inhalation, and dermal routes while ingestion exposure was accidental with water intake of 18-34 mL/h. The number of pool attendants and duration and frequency of swimming were in the ranges of 14-62 persons/day, 40-85 min/event, and 26-48 times/year, respectively. Trihalomethanes (THMs) in pool water and air were 28.7-95.5 μg/L and 44.1-133.6 μg/m(3), respectively, while haloacetic acids (HAAs) in pool water were 68.9-158.9 μg/L. The brominated THMs in water and air were 95.4 and 94.3% of total THMs, respectively, while brominated HAAs were 94.4 % of total HAAs. Chronic daily intakes of THMs and HAAs were 2.16 × 10(-5)-3.14 × 10(-3) and 8.4 × 10(-8)-4.6 × 10(-6) mg/kg-day, respectively. The cancer risk from three THMs and two HAAs was 2.46 × 10(-5) with a range of 8.1 × 10(-6)-5.7 × 10(-5), in which THMs contributed 99.6% of total risks. Approximately 99.3% of risks were through inhalation and dermal routes, indicating that the ingestion route may be insignificant. The cancer risks from THMs in swimming pool were 4.06-6.64 times to the cancer risks from THMs in drinking water. PMID:26164734

  10. Characterization of silver nanoparticles in selected consumer products and its relevance for predicting children's potential exposures.

    PubMed

    Tulve, Nicolle S; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Vance, Marina E; Rogers, Kim; Mwilu, Samuel; LeBouf, Ryan F; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Willis, Robert; Thomas, Treye A; Marr, Linsey C

    2015-05-01

    Due to their antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral, and antimicrobial properties, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used in consumer products intended for use by children or in the home. Children may be especially affected by the normal use of consumer products because of their physiological functions, developmental stage, and activities and behaviors. Despite much research to date, children's potential exposures to AgNPs are not well characterized. Our objectives were to characterize selected consumer products containing AgNPs and to use the data to estimate a child's potential non-dietary ingestion exposure. We identified and cataloged 165 consumer products claiming to contain AgNPs that may be used by or near children or found in the home. Nineteen products (textile, liquid, plastic) were selected for further analysis. We developed a tiered analytical approach to determine silver content, form (particulate or ionic), size, morphology, agglomeration state, and composition. Silver was detected in all products except one sippy cup body. Among products in a given category, silver mass contributions were highly variable and not always uniformly distributed within products, highlighting the need to sample multiple areas of a product. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of AgNPs. Using this data, a child's potential non-dietary ingestion exposure to AgNPs when drinking milk formula from a sippy cup is 1.53 μg Ag/kg. Additional research is needed to understand the number and types of consumer products containing silver and the concentrations of silver in these products in order to more accurately predict children's potential aggregate and cumulative exposures to AgNPs. PMID:25747543

  11. Predicting pulmonary fibrosis in humans after exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monita; Nikota, Jake; Halappanavar, Sabina; Castranova, Vincent; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clippinger, Amy J

    2016-07-01

    The increased production and use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a diverse array of consumer, medical, and industrial applications have raised concerns about potential human exposure to these materials in the workplace and ambient environments. Inhalation is a primary route of exposure to MWCNTs, and the existing data indicate that they are potentially hazardous to human health. While a 90-day rodent inhalation test (e.g., OECD Test No. 413: subchronic inhalation toxicity: 90-day study or EPA Health Effects Test Guidelines OPPTS 870.3465 90-day inhalation toxicity) is recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics for MWCNTs (and other CNTs) if they are to be commercially produced (Godwin et al. in ACS Nano 9:3409-3417, 2015), this test is time and cost-intensive and subject to scientific and ethical concerns. As a result, there has been much interest in transitioning away from studies on animals and moving toward human-based in vitro and in silico models. However, given the multiple mechanisms of toxicity associated with subchronic exposure to inhaled MWCNTs, a battery of non-animal tests will likely be needed to evaluate the key endpoints assessed by the 90-day rodent study. Pulmonary fibrosis is an important adverse outcome related to inhalation exposure to MWCNTs and one that the non-animal approach should be able to assess. This review summarizes the state-of-the-science regarding in vivo and in vitro toxicological methods for predicting MWCNT-induced pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27215431

  12. External and internal radiation exposure of herbal plants used in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Fawzia; Daif, Manal M.; El-Masry, N. M.; Abo-Elmagd, M.

    2010-01-01

    Herbs in Egypt are imported from different countries and widely used in different forms. Owing to their different origins, the measured radioactivity levels show a broad range. For example, the radium concentrations in the studied herbs ranged from 7.71±0.25 Bq/kg in green tea to 115.08±0.49 Bq/kg in gawafa. 137Cs concentrations were found to be quite different from one herb to another, ranging from below the minimum detectable limit to 12.62±0.42 Bq/kg. Some values are much greater than the UNSCEAR reported values for grain products and vegetables. The external exposure and the uptake of naturally occurring radionuclides were studied in terms of the annual effective absorbed dose and the annual ingestion dose, respectively. The herb store workers are externally exposed due to natural radiation in the herbs. The annual effective absorbed dose was calculated as 282.8 μSv for tilia, a dose which is over half the total annual effective dose due to terrestrial radiation (which is 410 μSv). Thus, it is potentially possible to accumulate excess doses from all herbs in the store which constitute a health hazard to the workers. For internal exposure, assuming a 1 kg/year annual intake for each herb, the annual ingestion doses are lower than the global value and can be further diminished if herbs with lower concentrations of radionuclides are consumed.

  13. HYPOXIC EFFECT ON GROWTH OF PALEOMENETES VULGARIS LARVAE AND OTHER SPECIES: USING CONSTANT EXPOSURE DATA TO PREDICT CYCLIC EXPOSURE RESPONSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    First stage larval marsh grass shrimp, Palaemonetes vulgaris, were exposed to patterns of diurnal, semidiurnal, and constant hypoxia to evaluate effects on growth and to determine if there was a consistent relationship between exposures. A comparison of growth with cyclic exposur...

  14. Model for predicting the effects of laser exposures and eye protection on vision. Interim report, January 1989-January 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez, A.R.; Smith, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    Laser safety standards and eye protection (filters) are designed to limit ocular exposures to prevent retinal lesions, yet eyesafe laser exposures can disrupt vision by causing glare and flashblindness. Protective filters can have opposing effects on vision function. They reduce laser exposures but also reduce task luminance and contrast. Filters alone may interfere with vision and consequently reduce work safety and performance. It is therefore important to be able to predict the effects of both laser exposures and protective filters to assess trade-offs between protection and visual function. This paper briefly reviews the methods, concepts, and experimental database used in our laboratory to predict laser, filter, and laser-plus-filter effects on tasks involving visual detection. The modeling approach uses estimates of the spatial distribution of light in the retinal image of the laser source to predict glare, flashblindness, and retinal lesions. It also considers the non-uniformity of visual abilities across the retina in predicting the impact of a laser exposure of a given size and retinal location. The proposed modeling approach provides a general framework for the interpretation, integration, and application of data from various studies. It has the potential to assess the effects of lasers and eye-protection devices on vision, and to guide visual simulations of the appearance of displays and scenes after laser exposures. The model is far from complete and is complicated by the number of variables affecting laser exposures, vision, and the role of vision in occupational tasks.

  15. Food Emulsifier Glycerin Monostearate Increases Internal Exposure Levels of Six Priority Controlled Phthalate Esters and Exacerbates Their Male Reproductive Toxicities in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hai-Tao; Xu, Run; Cao, Wei-Xin; Zhou, Xu; Yan, Ye-Hui-Mei; Lu, Lingeng; Xu, Qian; Shen, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Human beings are inevitably exposed to ubiquitous phthalate esters (PAEs). Processed, packaged foods are popular nowadays, in which emulsifiers are frequently added as food additives. It is unclear how emulsifiers affect the bioavailability of ingested PAEs contaminants and their toxicities. The purposes of our study were to explore whether food emulsifier Glycerin Monostearate (GMS) could increase the internal exposure levels of six priority controlled PAEs and affect their reproductive toxicities when male rats are exposed to PAEs mixture (MIXPs). The male rats were exposed to MIXPs by gavage for thirty days in combination with or without given GMS. Phthalate monoesters (MPAEs), primary metabolites of PAEs, in rat urine were used as biomarkers to predict the internal exposure levels of the six PAEs, and their concentrations were determined using UPLC-MS. The reproductive toxicity was evaluated using serum testosterone levels test and histopathology of testes. Results showed that compared to PAEs exposure alone, the internal exposure levels of PAEs increased by 30%-49% in the presence of GMS. PAEs exposure led to the reduction of testosterone level by 23.4%-42.1% in the presence and absence of GMS, respectively, compared to the baseline. Testosterone levels in MIXPs+GMS and DEHP+GMS group were decreased by 9.1% and 13.6%, respectively, compared with MIXPs and DEHP group. Histopathology showed that injuries of testis (deciduous spermatids) were observed, and GMS exacerbated the injuries. The results indicated food emulsifiers chronically taken up might increase safety risks of food PAEs contaminants. PMID:27575856

  16. Food Emulsifier Glycerin Monostearate Increases Internal Exposure Levels of Six Priority Controlled Phthalate Esters and Exacerbates Their Male Reproductive Toxicities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hai-Tao; Xu, Run; Cao, Wei-Xin; Zhou, Xu; Yan, Ye-Hui-Mei; Lu, Lingeng; Xu, Qian; Shen, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Human beings are inevitably exposed to ubiquitous phthalate esters (PAEs). Processed, packaged foods are popular nowadays, in which emulsifiers are frequently added as food additives. It is unclear how emulsifiers affect the bioavailability of ingested PAEs contaminants and their toxicities. The purposes of our study were to explore whether food emulsifier Glycerin Monostearate (GMS) could increase the internal exposure levels of six priority controlled PAEs and affect their reproductive toxicities when male rats are exposed to PAEs mixture (MIXPs). The male rats were exposed to MIXPs by gavage for thirty days in combination with or without given GMS. Phthalate monoesters (MPAEs), primary metabolites of PAEs, in rat urine were used as biomarkers to predict the internal exposure levels of the six PAEs, and their concentrations were determined using UPLC-MS. The reproductive toxicity was evaluated using serum testosterone levels test and histopathology of testes. Results showed that compared to PAEs exposure alone, the internal exposure levels of PAEs increased by 30%-49% in the presence of GMS. PAEs exposure led to the reduction of testosterone level by 23.4%-42.1% in the presence and absence of GMS, respectively, compared to the baseline. Testosterone levels in MIXPs+GMS and DEHP+GMS group were decreased by 9.1% and 13.6%, respectively, compared with MIXPs and DEHP group. Histopathology showed that injuries of testis (deciduous spermatids) were observed, and GMS exacerbated the injuries. The results indicated food emulsifiers chronically taken up might increase safety risks of food PAEs contaminants. PMID:27575856

  17. Predicting residential exposure to phthalate plasticizer emitted from vinyl flooring: a mechanistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Hubal, Elaine A Cohen; Clausen, Per A; Little, John C

    2009-04-01

    A two-room model is developed to estimate the emission rate of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) from vinyl flooring and the evolving gas-phase and adsorbed surface concentrations in a realistic indoor environment. Because the DEHP emission rate measured in a test chamber may be quite different from the emission rate from the same material in the indoor environment the model provides a convenient means to predict emissions and transport in a more realistic setting. Adsorption isotherms for phthalates and plasticizers on interior surfaces, such as carpet, wood, dust, and human skin, are derived from previous field and laboratory studies. Log-linear relationships between equilibrium parameters and chemical vapor pressure are obtained. The predicted indoor air DEHP concentration at steady state is 0.15 microg/m3. Room 1 reaches steady state within about one year, while the adjacent room reaches steady state about three months later. Ventilation rate has a strong influence on DEHP emission rate while total suspended particle concentration has a substantial impact on gas-phase concentration. Exposure to DEHP via inhalation, dermal absorption, and oral ingestion of dust is evaluated. The model clarifies the mechanisms that govern the release of DEHP from vinyl flooring and the subsequent interactions with interior surfaces, airborne particles, dust, and human skin. Although further model development, parameter identification, and model validation are needed, our preliminary model provides a mechanistic framework that elucidates exposure pathways for phthalate plasticizers, and can most likely be adapted to predict emissions and transport of other semivolatile organic compounds, such as brominated flame retardants and biocides, in a residential environment. PMID:19452889

  18. Spatiotemporal neurodynamics underlying internally and externally driven temporal prediction: a high spatial resolution ERP study.

    PubMed

    Mento, Giovanni; Tarantino, Vincenza; Vallesi, Antonino; Bisiacchi, Patrizia Silvia

    2015-03-01

    Temporal prediction (TP) is a flexible and dynamic cognitive ability. Depending on the internal or external nature of information exploited to generate TP, distinct cognitive and brain mechanisms are engaged with the same final goal of reducing uncertainty about the future. In this study, we investigated the specific brain mechanisms involved in internally and externally driven TP. To this end, we employed an experimental paradigm purposely designed to elicit and compare externally and internally driven TP and a combined approach based on the application of a distributed source reconstruction modeling on a high spatial resolution electrophysiological data array. Specific spatiotemporal ERP signatures were identified, with significant modulation of contingent negative variation and frontal late sustained positivity in external and internal TP contexts, respectively. These different electrophysiological patterns were supported by the engagement of distinct neural networks, including a left sensorimotor and a prefrontal circuit for externally and internally driven TP, respectively. PMID:25203276

  19. Media exposure, internalization of the thin ideal, and body dissatisfaction: comparing Asian American and European American college females.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mahsa; Hill, Laura G; Orrell-Valente, Joan K

    2011-09-01

    Internalization of the thin ideal mediates the media exposure-body dissatisfaction relation in young adult European American females. There is little related research on Asian Americans. We used structural equations modeling to test: (1) whether media exposure was associated with body dissatisfaction in Asian American young adult females, (2) internalization of the thin ideal mediated any such association, and (3) whether the mediational model provided equivalent fit for European American and Asian American samples. Participants were 287 college females (154 Asian Americans, 133 European Americans). Internalization of the thin ideal explained the media exposure-body dissatisfaction association equally well for both groups. Results suggest that Asian Americans may be employing unhealthy weight control behaviors, and may be prone to developing eating disorders, at rates similar to European American young adult females. Clinicians need to screen carefully for body dissatisfaction, unhealthy weight control behaviors, and eating disorders in Asian American females. PMID:21775227

  20. Monte Carlo and analytical model predictions of leakage neutron exposures from passively scattered proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Zhang, Rui; Newhauser, Wayne

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Stray neutron radiation is of concern after radiation therapy, especially in children, because of the high risk it might carry for secondary cancers. Several previous studies predicted the stray neutron exposure from proton therapy, mostly using Monte Carlo simulations. Promising attempts to develop analytical models have also been reported, but these were limited to only a few proton beam energies. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical model to predict leakage neutron equivalent dose from passively scattered proton beams in the 100-250-MeV interval.Methods: To develop and validate the analytical model, the authors used values of equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) predicted with Monte Carlo simulations. The authors also characterized the behavior of the mean neutron radiation-weighting factor, w{sub R}, as a function of depth in a water phantom and distance from the beam central axis.Results: The simulated and analytical predictions agreed well. On average, the percentage difference between the analytical model and the Monte Carlo simulations was 10% for the energies and positions studied. The authors found that w{sub R} was highest at the shallowest depth and decreased with depth until around 10 cm, where it started to increase slowly with depth. This was consistent among all energies.Conclusion: Simple analytical methods are promising alternatives to complex and slow Monte Carlo simulations to predict H/D values. The authors' results also provide improved understanding of the behavior of w{sub R} which strongly depends on depth, but is nearly independent of lateral distance from the beam central axis.

  1. Preliminary studies for the ORganics Exposure in Orbit (OREOcube) Experiment on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo, Jason; Fresneau, A.; Elsaesser, A.; Chan, J.; Breitenbach, A.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Ricco, A.; Salama, F.; Mattioda, A.; Santos, O.; Cottin, H.; Dartois, E.; d'Hendecourt, L.; Demets, R.; Foing, B.; Martins, Z.; Sephton, M.; Spaans, M.; Quinn, R.

    2013-01-01

    Organic compounds that survive in uncommon space environments are an important astrobiology focus. The ORganics Exposure in Orbit (OREOcube) experiment will investigate, in real time, chemical changes in organic compounds exposed to low Earth orbit radiation conditions on an International Space Station (ISS) external platform. OREOcube is packaged as an identical pair of 10-cm cube instruments, each weighing < 2 kg and containing a highly capable UV-Visible-NIR spectrometer, a 24-sample carousel, and integral optics enabling use of the Sun as light source for spectroscopy, along with the electronics, microcontroller, and data storage to make each cube an autonomous stand-alone instrument package requiring only a standard power and data interface. We have characterized the influence of mineralogically relevant inorganic materials on the stability, modification, and degradation of the organic molecules under ground laboratory experimental conditions. The results of our laboratory experiments will be used as the basis for the selection of samples for further investigations on the OREOcube ISS experiment. OREOcube is an international collaboration between the European Space Agency, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and University partners.

  2. Internalization and re-expression of antigens of human melanoma cells following exposure to monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.S.; Lumanglas, A.L.; Silva, J.; Ruszala-Mallon, V.; Durr, F.E.

    1987-04-15

    Modulation of the surface membrane of human Sk-Mel-28 melanoma cells by monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 96.5 recognizing p97 determinants was examined using direct radioimmunoassay and indirect fluorescent antibody-staining techniques. It was determined that the majority of /sup 111/In-labeled antibody that remained associated with cells after a 24-hr incubation at 37 degrees C had been internalized because MoAb 96.5 was no longer visible on the cell surface. A second treatment of these cells with the same antibody 24 hr later not only increased the cell-associated radioactivity, reflecting an increase of total antibody bound, but also rendered these cells membrane immunofluorescent again, indicating the re-expression of surface antigens. Autoradiographs of the electrophoretically analyzed membrane components of Sk-Mel-28 cells further demonstrated the appearance of newly synthesized 97-kDa proteins that were immunoprecipitable with MoAb 96.5. Taken together, the present findings suggest that p97 antigens undergo endocytosis in Sk-Mel-28 cells following exposure to MoAb 96.5. However, the same antigens were regenerated and expressed on the cell surface within a period of 24 hr. The re-expression of tumor cell surface antigen following initial internalization of the MoAb-antigen complex may have implications for diagnosis and therapy.

  3. Predicting Individuals' Turnover and Internal Transfer Behavior. Wisconsin Working Paper 6-82-31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, M. Susan; Covaleski, Mark A.

    Researchers have spent considerable time and effort in the last 5 years developing process models to explain individuals' job turnover behavior. To examine the predictability of internal job transfers and turnover behavior from individuals' work values, career plans, and job satisfaction, nurses (N=160) completed questionnaires on demographic…

  4. Attempting to Predict Success in the Qualifying Round of the International Chemistry Olympiad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urhahne, Detlef; Ho, Lok Hang; Parchmann, Ilka; Nick, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was trying to predict success in the qualifying round for the International Chemistry Olympiad (IChO) on the basis of the expectancy-value model of achievement motivation by Eccles et al. The investigation with 52 participants, including 14 females, was conducted during the third of four qualifying rounds of the IChO in…

  5. Extreme Appraisals of Internal States and Bipolar Symptoms: The Hypomanic Attitudes and Positive Predictions Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Alyson L.; Mansell, Warren; Morrison, Anthony P.; Tai, Sara

    2011-01-01

    The Hypomanic Attitudes and Positive Predictions Inventory (HAPPI; W. Mansell, 2006) was developed to assess multiple, extreme, self-relevant appraisals of internal states. The present study aimed to validate the HAPPI in a clinical sample. Participants (N = 50) with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder (confirmed by a structured clinical interview)…

  6. Prediction of 3D internal organ position from skin surface motion: results from electromagnetic tracking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kenneth H.; Tang, Jonathan; Zhang, Hui J.; Varghese, Emmanuel; Cleary, Kevin R.

    2005-04-01

    An effective treatment method for organs that move with respiration (such as the lungs, pancreas, and liver) is a major goal of radiation medicine. In order to treat such tumors, we need (1) real-time knowledge of the current location of the tumor, and (2) the ability to adapt the radiation delivery system to follow this constantly changing location. In this study, we used electromagnetic tracking in a swine model to address the first challenge, and to determine if movement of a marker attached to the skin could accurately predict movement of an internal marker embedded in an organ. Under approved animal research protocols, an electromagnetically tracked needle was inserted into a swine liver and an electromagnetically tracked guidewire was taped to the abdominal skin of the animal. The Aurora (Northern Digital Inc., Waterloo, Canada) electromagnetic tracking system was then used to monitor the position of both of these sensors every 40 msec. Position readouts from the sensors were then tested to see if any of the movements showed correlation. The strongest correlations were observed between external anterior-posterior motion and internal inferior-superior motion, with many other axes exhibiting only weak correlation. We also used these data to build a predictive model of internal motion by taking segments from the data and using them to derive a general functional relationship between the internal needle and the external guidewire. For the axis with the strongest correlation, this model enabled us to predict internal organ motion to within 1 mm.

  7. Biomarkers of World Trade Center Particulate Matter Exposure: Physiology of distal airway and blood biomarkers that predict FEV1 decline

    PubMed Central

    Weiden, Michael D.; Kwon, Sophia; Caraher, Erin; Berger, Kenneth I.; Reibman, Joan; Rom, William N.; Prezant, David J.; Nolan, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers can be important predictors of disease severity and progression. The intense exposure to particulates and other toxins from the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) overwhelmed the lung’s normal protective barriers. The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) cohort not only had baseline pre-exposure lung function measures but also had serum samples banked soon after their WTC exposure. This well phenotyped group of highly exposed first responders is an ideal cohort for biomarker discovery and eventual validation. Disease progression was heterogeneous in this group in that some individuals subsequently developed abnormal lung function while others recovered. Airflow obstruction predominated in WTC exposed patients who were symptomatic. Multiple independent disease pathways may cause this abnormal FEV1 after irritant exposure. WTC exposure activates one or more of these pathways causing abnormal FEV1 in an individual. Our hypothesis was that serum biomarkers expressed within 6 months after World Trade Center (WTC) exposure reflect active disease pathways and predict subsequent development or protection from abnormal FEV1predictive biomarkers of WTC-LI. We have identified biomarkers of Inflammation, metabolic derangement, protease/antiprotease balance and vascular injury expressed in serum within 6 months of WTC exposure that were predictive of their FEV1 up to 7 years after their WTC exposure. Predicting future risk of airway injury after particulate exposures can focus monitoring and early treatment on a subset of patients in greatest need of these services. PMID:26024341

  8. Biomarkers of World Trade Center Particulate Matter Exposure: Physiology of Distal Airway and Blood Biomarkers that Predict FEV₁ Decline.

    PubMed

    Weiden, Michael D; Kwon, Sophia; Caraher, Erin; Berger, Kenneth I; Reibman, Joan; Rom, William N; Prezant, David J; Nolan, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Biomarkers can be important predictors of disease severity and progression. The intense exposure to particulates and other toxins from the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) overwhelmed the lung's normal protective barriers. The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) cohort not only had baseline pre-exposure lung function measures but also had serum samples banked soon after their WTC exposure. This well-phenotyped group of highly exposed first responders is an ideal cohort for biomarker discovery and eventual validation. Disease progression was heterogeneous in this group in that some individuals subsequently developed abnormal lung function while others recovered. Airflow obstruction predominated in WTC-exposed patients who were symptomatic. Multiple independent disease pathways may cause this abnormal FEV1 after irritant exposure. WTC exposure activates one or more of these pathways causing abnormal FEV1 in an individual. Our hypothesis was that serum biomarkers expressed within 6 months after WTC exposure reflect active disease pathways and predict subsequent development or protection from abnormal FEV1 below the lower limit of normal known as WTC-Lung Injury (WTC-LI). We utilized a nested case-cohort control design of previously healthy never smokers who sought subspecialty pulmonary evaluation to explore predictive biomarkers of WTC-LI. We have identified biomarkers of inflammation, metabolic derangement, protease/antiprotease balance, and vascular injury expressed in serum within 6 months of WTC exposure that were predictive of their FEV1 up to 7 years after their WTC exposure. Predicting future risk of airway injury after particulate exposures can focus monitoring and early treatment on a subset of patients in greatest need of these services. PMID:26024341

  9. Intimate Partner Violence Exposure Predicts PTSD Treatment Engagement and Outcome in Cognitive Processing Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Iverson, Katherine M.; Resick, Patricia A.; Suvak, Michael K.; Walling, Sherry; Taft, Casey T.

    2012-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) exposure was examined as a predictor of treatment engagement (i.e., starting and completing therapy) and treatment outcome in 150 women taking part in a dismantling study of cognitive processing therapy (CPT) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; Resick et al., 2008). Results indicate that women in a current intimate relationship with recent IPV (i.e., past year) were less likely to begin treatment relative to women who reported past IPV only or no history of IPV. For women who began treatment, IPV exposure was not predictive of whether or not they completed treatment. Among women who began treatment, the frequency of IPV was associated with treatment outcome such that women who experienced more frequent IPV exhibited larger reductions in PTSD and depression symptoms over the course of treatment, but experienced similar levels of PTSD and depression severity at the 6-month follow-up. Findings highlight the importance of targeting treatment engagement among women who report recent IPV and suggest that women who have experienced frequent IPV respond well to CPT treatment in spite of their IPV experiences. PMID:21496509

  10. Importance of environmental and biomass dynamics in predicting chemical exposure in ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Melissa; Semplice, Matteo; De Laender, Frederik; Van den Brink, Paul J; Di Guardo, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    In ecological risk assessment, exposure is generally modelled assuming static conditions, herewith neglecting the potential role of emission, environmental and biomass dynamics in affecting bioavailable concentrations. In order to investigate the influence of such dynamics on predicted bioavailable concentrations, the spatially-resolved dynamic model "ChimERA fate" was developed, incorporating macrophyte and particulate/dissolved organic carbon (POC/DOC) dynamics into a water-sediment system. An evaluation against three case studies revealed a satisfying model performance. Illustrative simulations then highlighted the potential spatio-temporal variability of bioavailable concentrations after a pulsed emission of four chemicals in a system composed of a pond connected to its inflow and outflow streams. Changes in macrophyte biomass and POC/DOC levels caused exposure variations which were up to a factor of 4.5 in time and even more significant (several orders of magnitude) in space, especially for highly hydrophobic chemicals. ChimERA fate thus revealed to be a useful tool to investigate such variations and to identify those environmental and ecological conditions in which risk is expected to be highest. PMID:25967479

  11. Estrogen Metabolism and Exposure in a Genotypic-Phenotypic Model for Breast Cancer Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Crooke, Philip S.; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Dawling, Sheila; Roodi, Nady; Higginbotham, Kathryn S. P.; Plummer, W. Dale; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Sanders, Melinda E; Page, David L.; Smith, Jeffrey R.; Dupont, William D.; Parl, Fritz F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Current models of breast cancer risk prediction do not directly reflect mammary estrogen metabolism or genetic variability in exposure to carcinogenic estrogen metabolites. Methods We developed a model that simulates the kinetic effect of genetic variants of the enzymes CYP1A1, CYP1B1, and COMT on the production of the main carcinogenic estrogen metabolite, 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), expressed as area under the curve metric (4-OHE2-AUC). The model also incorporates phenotypic factors (age, body mass index, hormone replacement therapy, oral contraceptives, family history), which plausibly influence estrogen metabolism and the production of 4-OHE2. We applied the model to two independent, population-based breast cancer case-control groups, the German GENICA study (967 cases, 971 controls) and the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 465 cases, 885 controls). Results In the GENICA study, premenopausal women at the 90th percentile of 4-OHE2-AUC among control subjects had a risk of breast cancer that was 2.30 times that of women at the 10th control 4-OHE2-AUC percentile (95% CI 1.7 – 3.2, P = 2.9 × 10−7). This relative risk was 1.89 (95% CI 1.5 – 2.4, P = 2.2 × 10−8) in postmenopausal women. In the NBC, this relative risk in postmenopausal women was 1.81 (95% CI 1.3 – 2.6, P = 7.6 × 10−4), which increased to 1.83 (95% CI 1.4 – 2.3, P = 9.5 × 10−7) when a history of proliferative breast disease was included in the model. Conclusions The model combines genotypic and phenotypic factors involved in carcinogenic estrogen metabolite production and cumulative estrogen exposure to predict breast cancer risk. Impact The estrogen carcinogenesis-based model has the potential to provide personalized risk estimates. PMID:21610218

  12. Post-Extinction Conditional Stimulus Valence Predicts Reinstatement Fear: Relevance for Long Term Outcomes of Exposure Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zbozinek, Tomislav D.; Hermans, Dirk; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Liao, Betty; Craske, Michelle G.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure therapy for anxiety disorders is translated from fear conditioning and extinction. While exposure therapy is effective in treating anxiety, fear sometimes returns after exposure. One pathway for return of fear is reinstatement: unsignaled unconditional stimuli following completion of extinction. The present study investigated the extent to which valence of the conditional stimulus (CS+) after extinction predicts return of CS+ fear after reinstatement. Participants (N = 84) engaged in a differential fear conditioning paradigm and were randomized to reinstatement or non-reinstatement. We hypothesized that more negative post-extinction CS+ valence would predict higher CS+ fear after reinstatement relative to non-reinstatement and relative to extinction retest. Results supported the hypotheses and suggest that strategies designed to decrease negative valence of the CS+ may reduce the return of fear via reinstatement following exposure therapy. PMID:24957680

  13. Exposure and food web transfer of pharmaceuticals in ospreys (Pandion haliaetus): Predictive model and empirical data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lazarus, Rebecca; Rattner, Barnett A.; Du, Bowen; McGowan, Peter C.; Blazer, Vicki; Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    The osprey (Pandion haliaetus) is a well-known sentinel of environmental contamination, yet no studies have traced pharmaceuticals through the water–fish–osprey food web. A screening-level exposure assessment was used to evaluate the bioaccumulation potential of 113 pharmaceuticals and metabolites, and an artificial sweetener in this food web. Hypothetical concentrations in water reflecting “wastewater effluent dominated” or “dilution dominated” scenarios were combined with pH-specific bioconcentration factors (BCFs) to predict uptake in fish. Residues in fish and osprey food intake rate were used to calculate the daily intake (DI) of compounds by an adult female osprey. Fourteen pharmaceuticals and a drug metabolite with a BCF greater than 100 and a DI greater than 20 µg/kg were identified as being most likely to exceed the adult human therapeutic dose (HTD). These 15 compounds were also evaluated in a 40 day cumulative dose exposure scenario using first-order kinetics to account for uptake and elimination. Assuming comparable absorption to humans, the half-lives (t1/2) for an adult osprey to reach the HTD within 40 days were calculated. For 3 of these pharmaceuticals, the estimated t1/2 in ospreys was less than that for humans, and thus an osprey might theoretically reach or exceed the HTD in 3 to 7 days. To complement the exposure model, 24 compounds were quantified in water, fish plasma, and osprey nestling plasma from 7 potentially impaired locations in Chesapeake Bay. Of the 18 analytes detected in water, 8 were found in fish plasma, but only 1 in osprey plasma (the antihypertensive diltiazem). Compared to diltiazem detection rate and concentrations in water (10/12 detects,

  14. International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics opinion on reproductive health impacts of exposure to toxic environmental chemicals.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Conry, Jeanne A; Blake, Jennifer; DeFrancesco, Mark S; DeNicola, Nathaniel; Martin, James N; McCue, Kelly A; Richmond, David; Shah, Abid; Sutton, Patrice; Woodruff, Tracey J; van der Poel, Sheryl Ziemin; Giudice, Linda C

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to toxic environmental chemicals during pregnancy and breastfeeding is ubiquitous and is a threat to healthy human reproduction. There are tens of thousands of chemicals in global commerce, and even small exposures to toxic chemicals during pregnancy can trigger adverse health consequences. Exposure to toxic environmental chemicals and related health outcomes are inequitably distributed within and between countries; universally, the consequences of exposure are disproportionately borne by people with low incomes. Discrimination, other social factors, economic factors, and occupation impact risk of exposure and harm. Documented links between prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals and adverse health outcomes span the life course and include impacts on fertility and pregnancy, neurodevelopment, and cancer. The global health and economic burden related to toxic environmental chemicals is in excess of millions of deaths and billions of dollars every year. On the basis of accumulating robust evidence of exposures and adverse health impacts related to toxic environmental chemicals, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) joins other leading reproductive health professional societies in calling for timely action to prevent harm. FIGO recommends that reproductive and other health professionals advocate for policies to prevent exposure to toxic environmental chemicals, work to ensure a healthy food system for all, make environmental health part of health care, and champion environmental justice. PMID:26433469

  15. Arsenic, internal cancers, and issues in inference from studies of low-level exposures in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, Kenneth P. Lubin, Jay H.

    2007-08-01

    Epidemiologic data from regions of the world with very high levels of arsenic in drinking water (> 150 {mu}g/L) show a strong association between arsenic exposure and risk of several internal cancers. A causal interpretation of the data is warranted based on the strength and consistency of study findings. At lower levels of exposure (< 100 {mu}g/L), in the absence of unambiguous human data, extrapolation from the high-exposure studies has been used to estimate risk. Misclassification of exposure usually results in depressing observed levels of risk, and studies conducted in populations with exposures below 100 {mu}g/L have been limited by the challenge of estimating past exposures, a critically important aspect of studying relative small increases in risk. Relatively small study size contributes to the variability of findings in most studies and makes interpretation of results all the more challenging. The effects on risk estimates of exposure misclassification and small study size under various scenarios are graphically illustrated. Efforts are underway to improve exposure assessment in a large case-control study of bladder cancer in a region of the United States with moderately elevated levels of arsenic in drinking water.

  16. Neonatal hair analysis contribution to establishing a gestational drug exposure profile and predicting a withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vinner, Elisabeth; Vignau, Jean; Thibault, Denise; Codaccioni, Xavier; Brassart, Claudie; Humbert, Luc; Lhermitte, Michel

    2003-08-01

    Recently, interest in hair analysis in such fields as drug abuse, driving, or for clinical purposes (determination of drug-exposed neonates especially) has grown because of the highly sensitive method of detection (GC-MS) that can now be applied. Neonates born to drug-addicted mothers can suffer from neonatal withdrawal syndrome (NWS), which requires morphine treatment in its severe forms. To assess and measure toxicologic factors predicting the appearance and the severity of this syndrome, matrices such as urine, meconium, and hair are necessary. Cannabinoids, opiates, cocaine (and its metabolites), and methadone in particular were determined in the various matrices collected in 17 mother/neonate pairs. An immunologic screening method was used, and quantification was achieved with GC-MS. In spite of some bias (color, length, race) that might hinder an accurate interpretation, the results of hair analysis makes it possible to confirm a fetal drug exposure and to reinforce the diagnosis of the NWS observed, particularly when results obtained in other matrices are negative. Hair analysis contributes to our ability to predict a NWS. PMID:12883224

  17. ESTIMATION OF INTERNAL EXPOSURE TO URANIUM WITH UNCERTAINTY FROM URINALYSIS DATA USING THE InDEP COMPUTER CODE

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jeri L.; Apostoaei, A. Iulian; Thomas, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is currently studying mortality in a cohort of 6409 workers at a former uranium processing facility. As part of this study, over 220 000 urine samples were used to reconstruct organ doses due to internal exposure to uranium. Most of the available computational programs designed for analysis of bioassay data handle a single case at a time, and thus require a significant outlay of time and resources for the exposure assessment of a large cohort. NIOSH is currently supporting the development of a computer program, InDEP (Internal Dose Evaluation Program), to facilitate internal radiation exposure assessment as part of epidemiological studies of both uranium- and plutonium-exposed cohorts. A novel feature of InDEP is its batch processing capability which allows for the evaluation of multiple study subjects simultaneously. InDEP analyses bioassay data and derives intakes and organ doses with uncertainty estimates using least-squares regression techniques or using the Bayes’ Theorem as applied to internal dosimetry (Bayesian method). This paper describes the application of the current version of InDEP to formulate assumptions about the characteristics of exposure at the study facility that were used in a detailed retrospective intake and organ dose assessment of the cohort. PMID:22683620

  18. Adolescent Anabolic/Androgenic Steroids: Aggression and Anxiety During Exposure Predict Behavioral Responding During Withdrawal in Syrian Hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Lesley A.; Morrison, Thomas R.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    In the U.S. and worldwide anabolic/androgenic steroid use remains high in the adolescent population. This is concerning given that anabolic/androgenic steroid use is associated with a higher incidence of aggressive behavior during exposure and anxiety during withdrawal. This study uses pubertal Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) to investigate the hypothesis that an inverse behavioral relationship exists between anabolic/androgenic steroid-induced aggression and anxiety across adolescent exposure and withdrawal. In the first experiment, we examined aggression and anxiety during adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroid exposure and withdrawal. Adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroid administration produced significant increases in aggression and decreases in anxiety during the exposure period followed by significant decreases in aggression and increases in anxiety during anabolic/androgenic steroid withdrawal. In a second experiment, anabolic/androgenic steroid exposed animals were separated into groups based on their aggressive response during the exposure period and then tested for anxiety during exposure and then for both aggression and anxiety during withdrawal. Data were analyzed using a within subjects repeated measures predictive analysis. Linear regression analysis revealed that the difference in aggressive responding between the anabolic/androgenic steroid exposure and withdrawal periods was a significant predictor of differences in anxiety for both days of testing. Moreover, the combined data suggest that the decrease in aggressive behavior from exposure to withdrawal predicts an increase in anxiety-like responding within these same animals during this time span. Together these findings indicate that early anabolic/androgenic steroid exposure has potent aggression- and anxiety- eliciting effects and that these behavioral changes occur alongside a predictive relationship that exists between these two behaviors over time. PMID:24126136

  19. Monte Carlo and analytical model predictions of leakage neutron exposures from passively scattered proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Zhang, Rui; Newhauser, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stray neutron radiation is of concern after radiation therapy, especially in children, because of the high risk it might carry for secondary cancers. Several previous studies predicted the stray neutron exposure from proton therapy, mostly using Monte Carlo simulations. Promising attempts to develop analytical models have also been reported, but these were limited to only a few proton beam energies. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical model to predict leakage neutron equivalent dose from passively scattered proton beams in the 100-250-MeV interval. Methods: To develop and validate the analytical model, the authors used values of equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) predicted with Monte Carlo simulations. The authors also characterized the behavior of the mean neutron radiation-weighting factor, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\overline {w_R }\\end{document}wR¯, as a function of depth in a water phantom and distance from the beam central axis. Results: The simulated and analytical predictions agreed well. On average, the percentage difference between the analytical model and the Monte Carlo simulations was 10% for the energies and positions studied. The authors found that \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\overline {w_R }\\end{document}wR¯ was highest at the shallowest depth and decreased with depth until around 10 cm, where it started to increase slowly with depth. This was consistent among all energies. Conclusion: Simple analytical methods are promising alternatives to complex and slow Monte Carlo simulations

  20. Justification of diagnostic medical exposures: some practical issues. Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency Consultation

    PubMed Central

    Malone, J; Guleria, R; Craven, C; Horton, P; Järvinen, H; Mayo, J; O’reilly, G; Picano, E; Remedios, D; Le Heron, J; Rehani, M; Holmberg, O; Czarwinski, R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The Radiation Protection of Patients Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is concerned about the effectiveness of justification of diagnostic medical exposures. Recent published work and the report of an initial IAEA consultation in the area gave grounds for such concerns. There is a significant level of inappropriate usage, and, in some cases, a poor level of awareness of dose and risk among some key groups involved. This article aims to address this. Methods The IAEA convened a second group of experts in November 2008 to review practical and achievable actions that might lead to more effective justification. Results This report summarises the matters that this group considered and the outcome of their deliberations. There is a need for improved communication, both within professions and between professionals on one hand, and between professionals and the patients/public on the other. Coupled with this, the issue of consent to imaging procedures was revisited. The need for good evidence-based referral guidelines or criteria of acceptability was emphasised, as was the need for their global adaptation and dissemination. Conclusion Clinical audit was regarded as a key tool in ensuring that justification becomes an effective, transparent and accountable part of normal radiological practice. In summary, justification would be facilitated by the “3 As”: awareness, appropriateness and audit. PMID:21343316

  1. Waste incineration: estimation of the workers' internal exposure to PCB, PAH chlorophenols and other relevant agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angerer, Juergen; Heinzow, B.; Reimann, D. O.; Knorz, W.; Lehnert, G.

    1993-03-01

    Fifty-four persons occupied in a municipal waste incinerator were examined with respect to their internal exposure to organic substances which are possibly produced during pyrolysis of organic matter. For this purpose the levels of benzene of blood, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in plasma as well as mono- (MCP), di- (DCP), tri- (TCP), tetra- (TECP) and pentachlorophenols (PCP) and hydroxypyrene in urine have been determined. Four hundred thirty-one men and women were examined for control purposes. Statistical significantly higher values for the workers were found for the excretion of hydroxypyrene 2,5/2,4-DCP, 2,4,5 TCP, and for the HCB level in plasma. For the concentrations of 4-MCP and 2,3,4,6-2,3,5,6-TECP the controls had significantly higher concentrations in urine than the workers in the incineration plant. No significant differences between workers and controls were detected with respect to benzene in blood, 2,4,6-TCP and PCP in urine, and to the levels of PCP congeners in plasma. The elevated levels of hydroxypyrene, 2,4-/2,5 DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, and HCB in biological material may be related to the incineration of the waste. These elevations, however, are very small and attract attention more from the environmental than from the occupational point of view.

  2. Impacts of stage-specific acute pesticide exposure on predicted population structure of the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, S; Chasse, J; Butler, R A; Morrill, W; Van Beneden, R J

    2010-07-01

    A combined laboratory and modeling approach was used to assess the impact of selected pesticides on early life stages of the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria. Clams were exposed for 24h as veligers or pediveligers to the broad-spectrum herbicide hexazinone [3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4(1h,3h)-dione; Velpar], the phenoxyacetic acid herbicide, 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid; Agway Super BK 32), or phosmet (Imidan). In addition, juvenile clams were exposed for 24h to 2,4-D and their growth monitored for 21 months. Laboratory experiments indicated veligers were more sensitive to acute pesticide exposure than pediveligers, with 2,4-D exposed veligers exhibiting the lowest survival among all treatments. Relative to controls, juvenile clams exposed to 0.5 ppm 2,4-D had enhanced survival following the initial 3 months of grow out. Juveniles exposed to 0.5, 5 and 10 ppm 2,4-D showed an initial growth delay relative to control clams, but at 21 months post-exposure these clams were significantly larger than control clams. Data from the larval and juvenile exposures were used to generate a stage-specific matrix model to predict the effect of pesticide exposure on clam populations. Impacts on simulated clam populations varied with the pesticide and stage exposed. For example, 2,4-D exposure of veligers and pediveligers significantly reduced predicted recruitment as well as population growth rate compared to controls, but juvenile exposure to 2,4-D did not significantly reduce population growth rate. With the exception of veligers exposed to 10 ppm, hexazinone exposure at the both veliger and pediveliger stages significantly reduced predicted recruitment success compared to 0 ppm controls. Hexazinone exposure also reduced modeled population growth rates, but these reductions were only slight in the pediveliger exposure simulations. Veliger and pediveliger exposure to phosmet reduced modeled population growth rate in a dose-dependent fashion

  3. Impacts of stage-specific acute pesticide exposure on predicted population structure of the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, S.; Chasse, J.; Butler, R.A.; Morrill, W.; Van Beneden, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    A combined laboratory and modeling approach was used to assess the impact of selected pesticides on early life stages of the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria. Clams were exposed for 24 h as veligers or pediveligers to the broad-spectrum herbicide hexazinone [3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4 (1h,3h)-dione; (Velpar®)], the phenoxyacetic acid herbicide, 2,4-D (2,4- dichlorophenoxyacetic acid; Agway® Super BK 32), or phosmet (Imidan®). In addition, juvenile clams were exposed for 24 h to 2,4-D and their growth monitored for 21 months. Laboratory experiments indicated veligers were more sensitive to acute pesticide exposure than pediveligers, with 2,4-D exposed veligers exhibiting the lowest survival among all treatments. Relative to controls, juvenile clams exposed to 0.5 ppm 2,4-D had enhanced survival following the initial 3 months of grow out. Juveniles exposed to 0.5 ppm, 5 ppm and 10 ppm 2,4-D showed an initial growth delay relative to control clams, but at 21 months post exposure these clams were significantly larger than control clams. Data from the larval and juvenile exposures were used to generate a stage-specific matrix model to predict the effect of pesticide exposure on clam populations. Impacts on simulated clam populations varied with the pesticide and stage exposed. For example, 2,4-D exposure of veligers and pediveligers significantly reduced predicted recruitment as well as population growth rate compared to controls, but juvenile exposure to 2,4-D did not significantly reduce population growth rate. With the exception of veligers exposed to 10 ppm, hexazinone exposure at the both veliger and pediveliger stages significantly reduced predicted recruitment success compared to 0 ppm controls. Hexazinone exposure also reduced modeled population growth rates, but these reductions were only slight in the pediveliger exposure simulations. Veliger and pediveliger exposure to phosmet reduced modeled population growth rate in a dose

  4. International scale implementation of the CNOSSOS-EU road traffic noise prediction model for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Morley, D W; de Hoogh, K; Fecht, D; Fabbri, F; Bell, M; Goodman, P S; Elliott, P; Hodgson, S; Hansell, A L; Gulliver, J

    2015-11-01

    The EU-FP7-funded BioSHaRE project is using individual-level data pooled from several national cohort studies in Europe to investigate the relationship of road traffic noise and health. The detailed input data (land cover and traffic characteristics) required for noise exposure modelling are not always available over whole countries while data that are comparable in spatial resolution between different countries is needed for harmonised exposure assessment. Here, we assess the feasibility using the CNOSSOS-EU road traffic noise prediction model with coarser input data in terms of model performance. Starting with a model using the highest resolution datasets, we progressively introduced lower resolution data over five further model runs and compared noise level estimates to measurements. We conclude that a low resolution noise model should provide adequate performance for exposure ranking (Spearman's rank = 0.75; p < 0.001), but with relatively large errors in predicted noise levels (RMSE = 4.46 dB(A)). PMID:26232738

  5. Interfacial shear modeling and flow predictions for internal film condesation flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narain, A.

    1992-01-01

    Internal flow of pure vapor experiencing film condesation on the walls of a straight duct is studied. The commonly occuring case of turbulent (or laminar) vapor flow in the core and laminar flow of the liquid condensate-with or without waves on the interface-is emphasized. We propose and implement a new first principle methodolgy which model interfacial shear with the help of reliable experimental data on heat transfer rates. Other details of the flow are predicted with the help of this model. These predictions are shown to be in agreement with relevant experimental data. Correlations for film thickness and heat transfer rates are also given.

  6. The Relative Contribution of Internal and Model Variabilities to the Uncertainty in Decadal Climate Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobach, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2016-04-01

    Decadal climate predictions, which are initialized with observed conditions, are characterized by two main sources of uncertainties--internal and model variabilities. The former is due to the sensitivity of the models to the initial conditions, and the latter is due to the different predictions of different models. There is not much that can be done to reduce the internal variability; however, there are several methods for reducing the model variability--for example, using an ensemble weighted according to the past performance of the models rather than an equally weighted ensemble. Quantifying the contribution of each of these sources can help in assessing the potential reduction of the total uncertainty of these climate predictions. We used an ensemble of climate model simulations, from the CMIP5 decadal experiments, that includes different climate models and several initializations for each of the models, to analyze the uncertainties on a decadal time scale. Time series of the monthly and annual means of the surface temperature and wind components were established for the variability analysis. The analysis focused on the contributions of the internal and model variabilities and the total uncertainty. We found that different definitions of the anomaly resulted in different conclusions regarding the variability of the ensemble. However, some features of the uncertainty were common to all the anomalies we considered. In particular, we found that (i) over decadal time scales, there is no considerable increase in the uncertainty with time; (ii) the model variability is more sensitive to the annual cycle than the internal variability (this, in turn, results in a maximal uncertainty during the winter in the northern hemisphere); (iii) the uncertainty of the surface temperature prediction is dominated by the model variability, whereas the uncertainty of the surface wind components is determined by both the model and the internal variabilities. Analysis of the spatial

  7. Incorporating High-Throughput Exposure Predictions with Dosimetry-Adjusted In Vitro Bioactivity to Inform Chemical Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    We previously integrated dosimetry and exposure with high-throughput screening (HTS) to enhance the utility of ToxCast™ HTS data by translating in vitro bioactivity concentrations to oral equivalent doses (OEDs) required to achieve these levels internally. These OEDs were compare...

  8. An internal model of head kinematics predicts the influence of head orientation on reflexive eye movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupan, L. H.; Merfeld, D. M.

    2005-09-01

    Our sense of self-motion and self-orientation results from combining information from different sources. We hypothesize that the central nervous system (CNS) uses internal models of the laws of physics to merge cues provided by different sensory systems. Different models that include internal models have been proposed; we focus herein on that referred to as the sensory weighting model (Zupan et al 2002 Biol. Cybern. 86 209-30). For simplicity, we isolate the portion of the sensory weighting model that estimates head angular velocity: it includes an inverse internal model of head kinematics and an 'idiotropic' vector aligned with the main body axis. Following a post-rotatory tilt in the dark, which is a rapid tilt following a constant-velocity rotation about an earth-vertical axis, the inverse internal model is applied to conflicting vestibular signals. Consequently, the CNS computes an inaccurate estimate of head angular velocity that shifts toward alignment with an estimate of gravity. Since reflexive eye movements known as vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) compensate for this estimate of head angular velocity, the model predicts that the VOR rotation axis shifts toward alignment with this estimate of gravity and that the VOR time constant depends on final head orientation. These predictions are consistent with experimental data.

  9. An internal model of head kinematics predicts the influence of head orientation on reflexive eye movements.

    PubMed

    Zupan, L H; Merfeld, D M

    2005-09-01

    Our sense of self-motion and self-orientation results from combining information from different sources. We hypothesize that the central nervous system (CNS) uses internal models of the laws of physics to merge cues provided by different sensory systems. Different models that include internal models have been proposed; we focus herein on that referred to as the sensory weighting model. For simplicity, we isolate the portion of the sensory weighting model that estimates head angular velocity: it includes an inverse internal model of head kinematics and an 'idiotropic' vector aligned with the main body axis. Following a post-rotatory tilt in the dark, which is a rapid tilt following a constant-velocity rotation about an earth-vertical axis, the inverse internal model is applied to conflicting vestibular signals. Consequently, the CNS computes an inaccurate estimate of head angular velocity that shifts toward alignment with an estimate of gravity. Since reflexive eye movements known as vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) compensate for this estimate of head angular velocity, the model predicts that the VOR rotation axis shifts toward alignment with this estimate of gravity and that the VOR time constant depends on final head orientation. These predictions are consistent with experimental data. PMID:16135883

  10. Predicting the Match Outcome in One Day International Cricket Matches, while the Game is in Progress

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Michael; Clarke, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Millions of dollars are wagered on the outcome of one day international (ODI) cricket matches, with a large percentage of bets occurring after the game has commenced. Using match information gathered from all 2200 ODI matches played prior to January 2005, a range of variables that could independently explain statistically significant proportions of variation associated with the predicted run totals and match outcomes were created. Such variables include home ground advantage, past performances, match experience, performance at the specific venue, performance against the specific opposition, experience at the specific venue and current form. Using a multiple linear regression model, prediction variables were numerically weighted according to statistical significance and used to predict the match outcome. With the use of the Duckworth-Lewis method to determine resources remaining, at the end of each completed over, the predicted run total of the batting team could be updated to provide a more accurate prediction of the match outcome. By applying this prediction approach to a holdout sample of matches, the efficiency of the “in the run ”wagering market could be assessed. Preliminary results suggest that the market is prone to overreact to events occurring throughout the course of the match, thus creating brief inefficiencies in the wagering market. Key Points In excess of 80% of monies wagered on the outcome of ODI matches are placed after the match has commenced. Using all past data from ODI matches, multiple linear regression models are constructed to predict team totals and margin of victory. By combining match information with prediction models, an ‘in the run’ prediction process is created for ODI matches. PMID:24357940

  11. International Low-Earth-Orbit Spacecraft Materials Test Program Initiated for Better Prediction of Durability and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1999-01-01

    Spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) are subjected to many components of the environment, which can cause them to degrade much more rapidly than intended and greatly shorten their functional life. The atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, and cross contamination present in LEO can affect sensitive surfaces such as thermal control paints, multilayer insulation, solar array surfaces, and optical surfaces. The LEO Spacecraft Materials Test (LEO-SMT) program is being conducted to assess the effects of simulated LEO exposure on current spacecraft materials to increase understanding of LEO degradation processes as well as to enable the prediction of in-space performance and durability. Using ground-based simulation facilities to test the durability of materials currently flying in LEO will allow researchers to compare the degradation evidenced in the ground-based facilities with that evidenced on orbit. This will allow refinement of ground laboratory test systems and the development of algorithms to predict the durability and performance of new materials in LEO from ground test results. Accurate predictions based on ground tests could reduce development costs and increase reliability. The wide variety of national and international materials being tested represent materials being functionally used on spacecraft in LEO. The more varied the types of materials tested, the greater the probability that researchers will develop and validate predictive models for spacecraft long-term performance and durability. Organizations that are currently participating in the program are ITT Research Institute (USA), Lockheed Martin (USA), MAP (France), SOREQ Nuclear Research Center (Israel), TNO Institute of Applied Physics (The Netherlands), and UBE Industries, Ltd. (Japan). These represent some of the major suppliers of thermal control and sensor materials currently flying in LEO. The participants provide materials that are exposed to selected levels of atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet

  12. Childhood trauma predicts antidepressant response in adults with major depression: data from the randomized international study to predict optimized treatment for depression.

    PubMed

    Williams, L M; Debattista, C; Duchemin, A-M; Schatzberg, A F; Nemeroff, C B

    2016-01-01

    Few reliable predictors indicate which depressed individuals respond to antidepressants. Several studies suggest that a history of early-life trauma predicts poorer response to antidepressant therapy but results are variable and limited in adults. The major goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of early-life trauma in predicting acute response outcomes to antidepressants in a large sample of well-characterized patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment for Depression (iSPOT-D) is a randomized clinical trial with enrollment from December 2008 to January 2012 at eight academic and nine private clinical settings in five countries. Patients (n=1008) meeting DSM-IV criteria for MDD and 336 matched healthy controls comprised the study sample. Six participants withdrew due to serious adverse events. Randomization was to 8 weeks of treatment with escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine with dosage adjusted by the participant's treating clinician per routine clinical practice. Exposure to 18 types of traumatic events before the age of 18 was assessed using the Early-Life Stress Questionnaire. Impact of early-life stressors-overall trauma 'load' and specific type of abuse-on treatment outcomes measures: response: (⩾50% improvement on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, HRSD17 or on the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Rated, QIDS_SR16) and remission (score ⩽7 on the HRSD17 and ⩽5 on the QIDS_SR16). Trauma prevalence in MDD was compared with controls. Depressed participants were significantly more likely to report early-life stress than controls; 62.5% of MDD participants reported more than two traumatic events compared with 28.4% of controls. The higher rate of early-life trauma was most apparent for experiences of interpersonal violation (emotional, sexual and physical abuses). Abuse and notably abuse occurring at ⩽7 years of age predicted poorer outcomes

  13. An index of prenatal steroid exposure predicts adult face perception skills.

    PubMed

    Leow, Mei Chern; Davis, Greg

    2012-12-01

    Face perception skills are fundamental to social cognition, yet they vary markedly across individuals. This diversity has stimulated controversy over the relative contributions of genetic factors, prenatal environment, and postnatal experience to face perception. Recent twin studies have found that face perception is heritable, highlighting the potential for substantial prenatal determination of these skills. In contrast, previous work on potential influences of the prenatal hormonal environment on social cognition have found no association between 2D:4D, a marker for prenatal androgen exposure, and processing of facial emotional expressions, apparently precluding a major role for prenatal hormones in governing face perception. We propose that substantial predictive relationships between 2D:4D and face perception may have been masked in previous work because the task employed required both face perception and processing of others' emotions, the latter component being greatly influenced by circulating hormones in adults. To assess prenatal hormone influences on face perception without requiring emotion processing, we related 2D:4D to the face inversion effect (FIE), a measure of the recruitment of specialist face processes to visual perception. The magnitude of the resulting predictive relationship (r = .52) compared surprisingly well with that found between identical twins' face perception (rs = .27-.61), suggesting that mechanisms of 2D:4D may account for a substantial proportion of perinatal influences on face processing. Furthermore, we employed 2D:4D as a common scale to map individual differences in the FIE onto prenatal testosterone:estrogen ratios, assayed by Lutchmaya, Baron-Cohen, Raggatt, Knickmeyer, and Manning (Early Human Development 77:23-28, 2004). The substantial overlap between the two data sets further implicates prenatal steroids in adult face perception skills. PMID:23011910

  14. Prediction of noise levels and annoyance from aircraft run-ups at Vancouver International Airport.

    PubMed

    Scherebnyj, Katrina; Hodgson, Murray

    2007-10-01

    Annoyance complaints resulting from engine run-ups have been increasing at Vancouver International Airport for several years. To assist the Airport in managing run-up noise levels, a prediction tool based on a Green's function parabolic equation (GFPE) model has been consolidated, evaluated, and applied. It was extended to include more realistic atmospheric and ground input parameters. Measurements were made of the noise-radiation characteristics of a CRJ200 jet aircraft. The GFPE model was validated by comparing predictions with results in the literature. A sensitivity analysis showed that predicted levels are relatively insensitive to small variations in geometry and ground impedance, but relatively sensitive to variations in wind speed, atmosphere type, and aircraft heading and power setting. Predicted noise levels were compared with levels measured at noise monitoring terminals. For the four cases for which all input information was available, agreement was within 10 dBA. For events for which some information had to be estimated, predictions were within 20 dBA. The predicted annoyance corresponding to the run-up events considered ranged from 1.8% to 9.5% of people awoken, suggesting that noise complaints can be expected. PMID:17902830

  15. Perception of affordances during long-term exposure to weightlessness in the International Space station.

    PubMed

    Bourrelly, Aurore; McIntyre, Joseph; Luyat, Marion

    2015-09-01

    On Earth, visual eye height (VEH)--the distance from the observer's line of gaze to the ground in the visual scene--constitutes an effective cue in perceiving affordance such as the passability through apertures, based on the assumption that one's feet are on the ground. In the present study, we questioned whether an observer continues to use VEH to estimate the width of apertures during long-term exposure to weightlessness, where contact with the floor is not required. Ten astronauts were tested in preflight, inflight in the International Space Station, and postflight sessions. They were asked to adjust the opening of a virtual doorway displayed on a laptop device until it was perceived to be just wide enough to pass through (i.e., the critical aperture). We manipulated VEH by raising and lowering the level of the floor in the visual scene. We observed an effect of VEH manipulation on the critical aperture. When VEH decreased, the critical aperture decreased too, suggesting that widths relative to the body were perceived to be larger when VEH was smaller. There was no overall significant session effect, but the analysis of between-subjects variability revealed two participant profile groups. The effect of weightlessness was different for these two groups even though the VEH strategy remained operational during spaceflight. This study shows that the VEH strategy appears to be very robust and can be used, if necessary, in inappropriate circumstances such as free-floating, perhaps promoted by the nature of the visual scene. PMID:26224263

  16. Exposure prediction approaches used in air pollution epidemiology studies: Keyfindings and future recommendations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many epidemiologic studies of the health effects of exposure to ambient air pollution use measurements from central-site monitors as their exposure estimate. However, measurements from central-site monitors may lack the spatial and temporal resolution required to capture exposure...

  17. Parental occupational pesticide exposure and the risk of childhood leukemia in the offspring: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Helen D; Fritschi, Lin; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Glass, Deborah C; Miligi, Lucia; Dockerty, John D; Lightfoot, Tracy; Clavel, Jacqueline; Roman, Eve; Spector, Logan G; Kaatsch, Peter; Metayer, Catherine; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Simpson, Jill; Rudant, Jérémie; Sidi, Vasiliki; Rondelli, Roberto; Orsi, Laurent; Kang, Alice; Petridou, Eleni; Schüz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Maternal occupational pesticide exposure during pregnancy and/or paternal occupational pesticide exposure around conception have been suggested to increase risk of leukemia in the offspring. With a view to providing insight in this area we pooled individual level data from 13 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC). Occupational data were harmonized to a compatible format. Pooled individual analyses were undertaken using unconditional logistic regression. Using exposure data from mothers of 8,236 cases, and 14,850 controls, and from fathers of 8,169 cases and 14,201 controls the odds ratio (OR) for maternal exposure during pregnancy and the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78, 1.30) and for paternal exposure around conception 1.20 (95% 1.06, 1.38). For acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the OR for maternal exposure during pregnancy was 1.94 (CI 1.19, 3.18) and for paternal exposure around conception 0.91 (CI 0.66, 1.24.) based on data from 1,329 case and 12,141 control mothers, and 1,231 case and 11,383 control fathers. Our finding of a significantly increased risk of AML in the offspring with maternal exposure to pesticides during pregnancy is consistent with previous reports. We also found a slight increase in risk of ALL with paternal exposure around conception which appeared to be more evident in children diagnosed at the age of five years or more and those with T cell ALL which raises interesting questions on possible mechanisms. PMID:24700406

  18. The influence of physicochemical properties on the internal dose of trihalomethanes in humans following a controlled showering exposure.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lalith K; Backer, Lorraine C; Ashley, David L; Gordon, Sydney M; Brinkman, Marielle C; Nuckols, John R; Wilkes, Charles R; Blount, Benjamin C

    2013-01-01

    Although disinfection of domestic water supply is crucial for protecting public health from waterborne diseases, this process forms potentially harmful by-products, such as trihalomethanes (THMs). We evaluated the influence of physicochemical properties of four THMs (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform) on the internal dose after showering. One hundred volunteers showered for 10 min in a controlled setting with fixed water flow, air flow, and temperature. We measured THMs in shower water, shower air, bathroom air, and blood samples collected at various time intervals. The geometric mean (GM) for total THM concentration in shower water was 96.2 μg/l. The GM of total THM in air increased from 5.8 μg/m(3) pre shower to 351 μg/m(3) during showering. Similarly, the GM of total-blood THM concentration increased from 16.5 ng/l pre shower to 299 ng/l at 10 min post shower. THM levels were significantly correlated between different matrices (e.g. dibromochloromethane levels) in water and air (r=0.941); blood and water (r=0.845); and blood and air (r=0.831). The slopes of best-fit lines for THM levels in water vs air and blood vs air increased with increasing partition coefficient of water/air and blood/air. The slope of the correlation plot of THM levels in water vs air decreased in a linear (r=0.995) fashion with increasing Henry's law constant. The physicochemical properties (volatility, partition coefficients, and Henry's law constant) are useful parameters for predicting THM movement between matrices and understanding THM exposure during showering. PMID:22829048

  19. State-of-the-Science Report on Predictive Models and Modeling Approaches for Characterizing and Evaluating Exposure to Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    This state-of-the-science review was undertaken to identify fate and transport models and alternative modeling approaches that could be used to predict exposure to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) released into the environment, specifically, for aquatic systems. The development of...

  20. Predicting Adaptive Response to Fadrozole Exposure: Computational Model of the Fathead Minnow Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We are developing a mechanistic mathematical model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predict dose-response and time-course (...

  1. Predicting Adaptive Response to Fadrozole Exposure:Computational Model of the Fathead MinnowsHypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We are developing a mechanistic mathematical model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predict doseresponse and time-course (...

  2. Internal migration and urbanization in China: impacts on population exposure to household air pollution (2000-2010).

    PubMed

    Aunan, Kristin; Wang, Shuxiao

    2014-05-15

    Exposure to fine particles ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) from incomplete combustion of solid fuels in household stoves, denoted household air pollution (HAP), is a major contributor to ill health in China and globally. Chinese households are, however, undergoing a massive transition to cleaner household fuels. The objective of the present study is to establish the importance of internal migration when it comes to the changing household fuel use pattern and the associated exposure to PM2.5 for the period 2000 to 2010. We also estimate health benefits of the fuel transition in terms of avoided premature deaths. Using China Census data on population, migration, and household fuel use for 2000 and 2010 we identify the size, place of residence, and main cooking fuel of sub-populations in 2000 and 2010, respectively. We combine these data with estimated exposure levels for the sub-populations and estimate changes in population exposure over the decade. We find that the population weighted exposure (PWE) for the Chinese population as a whole was reduced by 52 (36-70) μg/m(3) PM2.5 over the decade, and that about 60% of the reduction can be linked to internal migration. During the same period the migrant population, in total 261 million people, was subject to a reduced population weighted exposure (ΔPWE) of 123 (87-165) μg/m(3) PM2.5. The corresponding figure for non-migrants is 34 (23-47) μg/m(3). The largest ΔPWE was estimated for rural-to-urban migrants (138 million people), 214 (154-283) μg/m(3). The estimated annual health benefit associated with the reduced exposure in the total population is 31 (26-37) billion USD, corresponding to 0.4% of the Chinese GDP. PMID:24598149

  3. Retrospective Exposure Estimation and Predicted versus Observed Serum Perfluorooctanoic Acid Concentrations for Participants in the C8 Health Project

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Verónica M.; Ryan, P. Barry; Steenland, Kyle; Bartell, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: People living or working in eastern Ohio and western West Virginia have been exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) released by DuPont Washington Works facilities. Objectives: Our objective was to estimate historical PFOA exposures and serum concentrations experienced by 45,276 non-occupationally exposed participants in the C8 Health Project who consented to share their residential histories and a 2005–2006 serum PFOA measurement. Methods: We estimated annual PFOA exposure rates for each individual based on predicted calibrated water concentrations and predicted air concentrations using an environmental fate and transport model, individual residential histories, and maps of public water supply networks. We coupled individual exposure estimates with a one-compartment absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) model to estimate time-dependent serum concentrations. Results: For all participants (n = 45,276), predicted and observed median serum concentrations in 2005–2006 are 14.2 and 24.3 ppb, respectively [Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (rs) = 0.67]. For participants who provided daily public well water consumption rate and who had the same residence and workplace in one of six municipal water districts for 5 years before the serum sample (n = 1,074), predicted and observed median serum concentrations in 2005–2006 are 32.2 and 40.0 ppb, respectively (rs = 0.82). Conclusions: Serum PFOA concentrations predicted by linked exposure and ADME models correlated well with observed 2005–2006 human serum concentrations for C8 Health Project participants. These individualized retrospective exposure and serum estimates are being used in a variety of epidemiologic studies being conducted in this region. PMID:21813367

  4. Thyroid cancer in the Marshallese: relative risk of short-lived internal emitters and external radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, E.T.; Brill, A.B.; Adams, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    In a study of the comparative effects of internal versus external irradiation of the thyroid in young people, we determined that the dose from internal irradiation of the thyroid with short-lived internal emitters produced several times less thyroid cancer than did the same dose of radiation given externally. We determined this finding for a group of 85 Marshall Islands children, who were less than 10 years of age at the time of exposure and who were accidentially exposed to internal and external thyroid radiation at an average level of 1400 rad. The external risk coefficient ranged between 2.5 and 4.9 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk, and thus, from our computations, the internal risk coefficient for the Marshallese children was estimated to range between 1.0 and 1.4 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk. In contrast, for individual more than 10 years of age at the time of exposure, the dose from internal irradiation of the thyroid with short-lived internal emitters produced several times more thyroid cancer than did the same dose of radiation given externally. The external risk coefficients for the older age groups were reported in the literature to be in the range of 1.0 to 3.3 cancers per million person-rad-years-at risk. We computed internal risk coefficients of 3.3 to 8.1 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk for adolescent and adult groups. This higher sensitivity to cancer induction in the exposed adolescents and adults, is different from that seen in other exposed groups. 14 refs., 8 tabs.

  5. Limited internal radiation exposure associated with resettlements to a radiation-contaminated homeland after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

    PubMed

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nihei, Masahiko; Sakuma, Yu; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Uehara, Keisuke; Sugimoto, Amina; Nomura, Shuhei; Hayano, Ryugo; Kami, Masahiro; Watanobe, Hajime; Endo, Yukou

    2013-01-01

    Resettlement to their radiation-contaminated hometown could be an option for people displaced at the time of a nuclear disaster; however, little information is available on the safety implications of these resettlement programs. Kawauchi village, located 12-30 km southwest of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, was one of the 11 municipalities where mandatory evacuation was ordered by the central government. This village was also the first municipality to organize the return of the villagers. To assess the validity of the Kawauchi villagers' resettlement program, the levels of internal Cesium (Cs) exposures were comparatively measured in returnees, commuters, and non-returnees among the Kawauchi villagers using a whole body counter. Of 149 individuals, 5 villagers had traceable levels of Cs exposure; the median detected level was 333 Bq/body (range, 309-1050 Bq/kg), and 5.3 Bq/kg (range, 5.1-18.2 Bq/kg). Median annual effective doses of villagers with traceable Cs were 1.1 x 10(-2) mSv/y (range, 1.0 x 10(-2)-4.1 x 10(-2) mSv/y). Although returnees had higher chances of consuming locally produced vegetables, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test showed that their level of internal radiation exposure was not significantly higher than that in the other 2 groups (p=0.643). The present findings in Kawauchi village imply that it is possible to maintain internal radiation exposure at very low levels even in a highly radiation-contaminated region at the time of a nuclear disaster. Moreover, the risks for internal radiation exposure could be limited with a strict food control intervention after resettlement to the radiation-contaminated village. It is crucial to establish an adequate number of radio-contaminated testing sites within the village, to provide immediate test result feedback to the villagers, and to provide education regarding the importance of re-testing in reducing the risk of high internal radiation exposure. PMID:24312602

  6. Limited Internal Radiation Exposure Associated with Resettlements to a Radiation-Contaminated Homeland after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nihei, Masahiko; Sakuma, Yu; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Uehara, Keisuke; Sugimoto, Amina; Nomura, Shuhei; Hayano, Ryugo; Kami, Masahiro; Watanobe, Hajime; Endo, Yukou

    2013-01-01

    Resettlement to their radiation-contaminated hometown could be an option for people displaced at the time of a nuclear disaster; however, little information is available on the safety implications of these resettlement programs. Kawauchi village, located 12–30 km southwest of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, was one of the 11 municipalities where mandatory evacuation was ordered by the central government. This village was also the first municipality to organize the return of the villagers. To assess the validity of the Kawauchi villagers’ resettlement program, the levels of internal Cesium (Cs) exposures were comparatively measured in returnees, commuters, and non-returnees among the Kawauchi villagers using a whole body counter. Of 149 individuals, 5 villagers had traceable levels of Cs exposure; the median detected level was 333 Bq/body (range, 309–1050 Bq/kg), and 5.3 Bq/kg (range, 5.1–18.2 Bq/kg). Median annual effective doses of villagers with traceable Cs were 1.1 x 10-2 mSv/y (range, 1.0 x 10-2-4.1 x 10-2 mSv/y). Although returnees had higher chances of consuming locally produced vegetables, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test showed that their level of internal radiation exposure was not significantly higher than that in the other 2 groups (p=0.643). The present findings in Kawauchi village imply that it is possible to maintain internal radiation exposure at very low levels even in a highly radiation-contaminated region at the time of a nuclear disaster. Moreover, the risks for internal radiation exposure could be limited with a strict food control intervention after resettlement to the radiation-contaminated village. It is crucial to establish an adequate number of radio-contaminated testing sites within the village, to provide immediate test result feedback to the villagers, and to provide education regarding the importance of re-testing in reducing the risk of high internal radiation exposure. PMID:24312602

  7. Parental occupational paint exposure and risk of childhood leukemia in the offspring: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Helen D; Fritschi, Lin; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Magnani, Corrado; Petridou, Eleni; Roman, Eve; Spector, Logan G; Kaatsch, Peter; Clavel, Jacqueline; Milne, Elizabeth; Dockerty, John D; Glass, Deborah C; Lightfoot, Tracy; Miligi, Lucia; Rudant, Jérémie; Baka, Margarita; Rondelli, Roberto; Amigou, Alicia; Simpson, Jill; Kang, Alice; Moschovi, Maria; Schüz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been suggested that parental occupational paint exposure around the time of conception or pregnancy increases the risk of childhood leukemia in the offspring. Methods We obtained individual level data from 13 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC). Occupational data were harmonized to a compatible format. Meta-analyses of study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were undertaken, as well as pooled analyses of individual data using unconditional logistic regression. Results Using individual data from fathers of 8,185 cases and 14,210 controls, the pooled OR for paternal exposure around conception and risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was 0.93 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.76, 1.14). Analysis of data from 8,156 ALL case mothers and 14,568 control mothers produced a pooled OR of 0.81 (95% CI 0.39, 1.68) for exposure during pregnancy. For acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), the pooled ORs for paternal and maternal exposure were 0.96 (95% CI 0.65, 1.41) and 1.31 (95% CI 0.38, 4.47) respectively, based on data from 1,231 case and 11,392 control fathers and 1,329 case and 12,141 control mothers. Heterogeneity among the individual studies ranged from low to modest. Conclusions Null findings for paternal exposure for both ALL and AML are consistent with previous reports. Despite the large sample size, results for maternal exposure to paints in pregnancy were based on small numbers of exposed. Overall, we found no evidence that parental occupational exposure to paints increases the risk of leukemia in the offspring, but further data on home exposure are needed. PMID:25088805

  8. Lead risk assessment for children in Hungary by predicting their blood lead levels using US EPA integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Hassanien, M A; Horváth, A

    1999-08-01

    The US EPA integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK 0.99d) lead exposure for children was validated, updated, and applied to predict mean blood lead levels based on lead uptake from multiple sources and provide assessment of risk. Surveys were carried out around houses in a polluted area (Heves, Hungary) in 1995. The collected data from that area have shown very high levels of lead in soil. In some cases the level of lead in soil has reached more than 1000 times the allowable limit value used (100 mg/kg) in Hungary. Moreover, the concentration of lead in air was measured and the concentration of lead in air varied from 0.05-1.83 micrograms/m3. The environmental data within the community were used to predict the children blood lead levels and to compare the observed estimates with the other predicted ones. The age of the investigated group of children varied from 0-60 months. The estimated blood lead levels have illustrated variation according to age, sex, and the specific site. It can be concluded from this study that the model can be used on a wide range to give us an excellent picture for site cleanup, to decision makers, and finally to use the environmental data to predict blood lead level for the community or population. Results of several validation exercises utilizing the IEUBK model comparing predicted and measured blood lead levels with international guidelines and the percent of risk of exceeding a specific blood lead level (i.e., 10 micrograms/dl) are presented in this paper. PMID:10499150

  9. Examining the Effects of External or Internal Radiation Exposure of Juvenile Mice on Late Morbidity after Infection with Influenza A.

    PubMed

    Misra, Ravi S; Johnston, Carl J; Groves, Angela M; DeDiego, Marta L; St Martin, Joe; Reed, Christina; Hernady, Eric; Miller, Jen-Nie; Love, Tanzy; Finkelstein, Jacob N; Williams, Jacqueline P

    2015-07-01

    A number of investigators have suggested that exposure to low-dose radiation may pose a potentially serious health risk. However, the majority of these studies have focused on the short-term rather than long-term effects of exposure to fixed source radiation, and few have examined the effects of internal contamination. Additionally, very few studies have focused on exposure in juveniles, when organs are still developing and could be more sensitive to the toxic effects of radiation. To specifically address whether early-life radiation injury may affect long-term immune competence, we studied 14-day-old juvenile pups that were either 5 Gy total-body irradiated or injected internally with 50 μCi soluble (137)Cs, then infected with influenza A virus at 26 weeks after exposure. After influenza infection, all groups demonstrated immediate weight loss. We found that externally irradiated, infected animals failed to recover weight relative to age-matched infected controls, but internally (137)Cs contaminated and infected animals had a weight recovery with a similar rate and degree as controls. Externally and internally irradiated mice demonstrated reduced levels of club cell secretory protein (CCSP) message in their lungs after influenza infection. The externally irradiated group did not recover CCSP expression even at the two-week time point after infection. Although the antibody response and viral titers did not appear to be affected by either radiation modality, there was a slight increase in monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 expression in the lungs of externally irradiated animals 14 days after influenza infection, with increased cellular infiltration present. Notably, an increase in the number of regulatory T cells was seen in the mediastinal lymph nodes of irradiated mice relative to uninfected mice. These data confirm the hypothesis that early-life irradiation may have long-term consequences on the immune system, leading to an altered antiviral response

  10. Examining the Effects of External or Internal Radiation Exposure of Juvenile Mice on Late Morbidity after Infection with Influenza A

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ravi S.; Johnston, Carl J.; Groves, Angela M.; DeDiego, Marta L.; St Martin, Joe; Reed, Christina; Hernady, Eric; Miller, Jen-nie; Love, Tanzy; Finkelstein, Jacob N.; Williams, Jacqueline P.

    2015-01-01

    A number of investigators have suggested that exposure to low-dose radiation may pose a potentially serious health risk. However, the majority of these studies have focused on the short-term rather than long-term effects of exposure to fixed source radiation, and few have examined the effects of internal contamination. Additionally, very few studies have focused on exposure in juveniles, when organs are still developing and could be more sensitive to the toxic effects of radiation. To specifically address whether early-life radiation injury may affect long-term immune competence, we studied 14-day-old juvenile pups that were either 5 Gy total-body irradiated or injected internally with 50 μCi soluble 137Cs, then infected with influenza A virus at 26 weeks after exposure. After influenza infection, all groups demonstrated immediate weight loss. We found that externally irradiated, infected animals failed to recover weight relative to age-matched infected controls, but internally 137Cs contaminated and infected animals had a weight recovery with a similar rate and degree as controls. Externally and internally irradiated mice demonstrated reduced levels of club cell secretory protein (CCSP) message in their lungs after influenza infection. The externally irradiated group did not recover CCSP expression even at the two-week time point after infection. Although the antibody response and viral titers did not appear to be affected by either radiation modality, there was a slight increase in monocyte chemo-attractant protein (MCP)-1 expression in the lungs of externally irradiated animals 14 days after influenza infection, with increased cellular infiltration present. Notably, an increase in the number of regulatory T cells was seen in the mediastinal lymph nodes of irradiated mice relative to uninfected mice. These data confirm the hypothesis that early-life irradiation may have long-term consequences on the immune system, leading to an altered antiviral response. PMID