Science.gov

Sample records for predicting ovarian cancer

  1. Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing ovarian cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  2. Predictive and therapeutic markers in ovarian cancer

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Guan, Yinghui; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Fridlyand, Jane; Mills, Gordon B.

    2013-03-26

    Cancer markers may be developed to detect diseases characterized by increased expression of apoptosis-suppressing genes, such as aggressive cancers. Genes in the human chromosomal regions, 8q24, 11q13, 20q11-q13, were found to be amplified indicating in vivo drug resistance in diseases such as ovarian cancer. Diagnosis and assessment of amplification levels certain genes shown to be amplified, including PVT1, can be useful in prediction of poor outcome of patient's response and drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates. Certain genes were found to be high priority therapeutic targets by the identification of recurrent aberrations involving genome sequence, copy number and/or gene expression are associated with reduced survival duration in certain diseases and cancers, specifically ovarian cancer. Therapeutics to inhibit amplification and inhibitors of one of these genes, PVT1, target drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates is described.

  3. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Ovarian Cancer There are five main types of cancer that affect a woman’s reproductive organs: cervical, ovarian, uterine, ... rare fallopian tube cancer.) This fact sheet about ovarian cancer is part of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  4. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian ...

  5. Ovarian cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - ovaries ... Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer among women. It causes more deaths than any other type of female reproductive organ cancer. The cause of ovarian cancer is unknown. Risk ...

  6. Ovarian cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of ovarian cancer Already been diagnosed with ovarian cancer to determine how well treatment is working Other tests that may be done include: Complete blood count and blood chemistry Pregnancy test (serum HCG) CT or MRI of ...

  7. Optimized Prediction of Extreme Treatment Outcomes in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Misganaw, Burook; Ahsen, Eren; Singh, Nitin; Baggerly, Keith A.; Unruh, Anna; White, Michael A.; Vidyasagar, M.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of death among female cancers. Front-line therapy for ovarian cancer is platinum-based chemotherapy. However, the response of patients is highly nonuniform. The TCGA database of serous ovarian carcinomas shows that ~10% of patients respond poorly to platinum-based chemotherapy, with tumors relapsing in seven months or less. Another 10% or so enjoy disease-free survival of three years or more. The objective of the present research is to identify a small number of highly predictive biomarkers that can distinguish between the two extreme responders and then extrapolate to all patients. This is achieved using the lone star algorithm that is specifically developed for biological applications. Using this algorithm, we are able to identify biomarker panels of 25 genes (of 12,000 genes) that can be used to classify patients into one of the three groups: super responders, medium responders, and nonresponders. We are also able to determine a discriminant function that can divide the entire patient population into two classes, such that one group has a clear survival advantage over the other. These biomarkers are developed using the TCGA Agilent platform data and cross-validated on the TCGA Affymetrix platform data, as well as entirely independent data from Tothill et al. The P-values on the training data are extremely small, sometimes below machine zero, while the P-values on cross-validation are well below the widely accepted threshold of 0.05. PMID:27034613

  8. Sprouty 1 predicts prognosis in human epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi-Moghaddam, Samar; Amini, Afshin; Wei, Ai-Qun; Robertson, Gregory; Morris, David L

    2015-01-01

    Sprouty proteins are evolutionary-conserved modulators of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. We have previously reported inverse correlation of the Sprouty 1 (Spry1) protein expression with ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion and survival. In the present study, the expression status of Spry1 protein and its clinical relevance in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer were explored. Matched tumor and normal tissue samples from 100 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer were immunohistochemically stained for Spry1. Expression of ERK, p-ERK, Ki67, FGF-2, VEGF and IL-6 and their correlation with Spry1 were also evaluated. In addition, correlation between Spry1 and clinicopathological characteristics and predictive significance of Spry1 for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were analysed. Our data indicated that Spry1 was significantly downregulated in tumor tissues (p=0.004). Spry1 showed significant inverse correlation with p-ERK/ERK (p=0.045), Ki67 (p=0.010), disease stage (p=0.029), tumor grade (p=0.037), recurrence (p=0.001) and lymphovascular invasion (p=0.042). It was revealed that Spry1 low-expressing patients had significantly poorer OS (p=0.010) and DFS (p=0.012) than those with high expression of Spry1. Multivariate analysis showed that high Spry1 (p=0.030), low stage (p=0.048) and no residual tumor (p=0.007) were independent prognostic factors for a better OS, among which high Spry1 (p=0.035) and low stage (p=0.035) remained as independent predictors of DFS, too. We also found that the expression of Spry1 significantly correlates with the expression of Spry2 (p<0.001), but not that of Spry4. In conclusion, we report for the first time to our knowledge that Spry1 protein is downregulated in human epithelial ovarian cancer. Spry1 expression significantly impacts tumor behavior and shows predictive value as an independent prognostic factor for survival and recurrence. PMID:26101716

  9. KRAS Genomic Status Predicts the Sensitivity of Ovarian Cancer Cells to Decitabine | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Decitabine, a cancer therapeutic that inhibits DNA methylation, produces variable antitumor response rates in patients with solid tumors that might be leveraged clinically with identification of a predictive biomarker. In this study, we profiled the response of human ovarian, melanoma, and breast cancer cells treated with decitabine, finding that RAS/MEK/ERK pathway activation and DNMT1 expression correlated with cytotoxic activity. Further, we showed that KRAS genomic status predicted decitabine sensitivity in low-grade and high-grade serous ovarian cancer cells.

  10. OVARIAN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kathleen R.; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian carcinomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms traditionally sub-classified based on type and degree of differentiation. Although current clinical management of ovarian carcinoma largely fails to take this heterogeneity into account, it is becoming evident that each major histological type has characteristic genetic defects that deregulate specific signaling pathways in the tumor cells. Moreover, within the most common histological types, the molecular pathogenesis of low-grade versus high-grade tumors appears to be largely distinct. Mouse models of ovarian carcinoma have been developed that recapitulate many of the morphological features, biological behavior, and gene expression patterns of selected subtypes of ovarian cancer. Such models will likely prove useful for studying ovarian cancer biology and for pre-clinical testing of molecularly targeted therapeutics, which may ultimately lead to better clinical outcomes for women with ovarian cancer. PMID:18842102

  11. [Prognostic and predictive factors in epithelial ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Boudou-Rouquette, P; Pautier, P; Morice, P; Lhommé, C

    2009-04-01

    Even if prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer remains very bad, survival and response to treatment are variable according to the patients. Determination of new prognostic markers helps us to adapt therapeutics for each patient and is necessary for the elaboration and the interpretation of clinical research studies. Many prognostic factors related to the tumor, the patient or the treatment, have been evaluated. The goal of this work is to review these parameters. So far, the most powerful variables are volume of residual disease after cytoreductive surgery, FIGO tumor stage, histologic type and grade of differentiation. The progress and accessibility to novel technologies applied to biology will make possible in the future the assessment of new prognostic profiles-based on genetic and/or proteomic tumor characteristics. The future also relies on the identification of predictive factors of response to treatment, but force is to note that on the last hundred publications testing predictive factors (p53, HER2, Topo-2-alpha, BRCA...), none have modified today our clinical practices. PMID:19357017

  12. Ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Matulonis, Ursula A; Sood, Anil K; Fallowfield, Lesley; Howitt, Brooke E; Sehouli, Jalid; Karlan, Beth Y

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is not a single disease and can be subdivided into at least five different histological subtypes that have different identifiable risk factors, cells of origin, molecular compositions, clinical features and treatments. Ovarian cancer is a global problem, is typically diagnosed at a late stage and has no effective screening strategy. Standard treatments for newly diagnosed cancer consist of cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. In recurrent cancer, chemotherapy, anti-angiogenic agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors are used, and immunological therapies are currently being tested. High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most commonly diagnosed form of ovarian cancer and at diagnosis is typically very responsive to platinum-based chemotherapy. However, in addition to the other histologies, HGSCs frequently relapse and become increasingly resistant to chemotherapy. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms underlying platinum resistance and finding ways to overcome them are active areas of study in ovarian cancer. Substantial progress has been made in identifying genes that are associated with a high risk of ovarian cancer (such as BRCA1 and BRCA2), as well as a precursor lesion of HGSC called serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, which holds promise for identifying individuals at high risk of developing the disease and for developing prevention strategies. PMID:27558151

  13. Ovarian Cancer FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ovarian Cancer Patient Education FAQs Ovarian Cancer Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Ovarian Cancer FAQ096, April 2015 PDF Format Ovarian ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  14. What Is Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about ovarian cancer? What is ovarian cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... section . Other cancers that are similar to epithelial ovarian cancer Primary peritoneal carcinoma Primary peritoneal carcinoma (PPC) is ...

  15. An epidemiologic risk prediction model for ovarian cancer in Europe: the EPIC study

    PubMed Central

    Li, K; Hüsing, A; Fortner, R T; Tjønneland, A; Hansen, L; Dossus, L; Chang-Claude, J; Bergmann, M; Steffen, A; Bamia, C; Trichopoulos, D; Trichopoulou, A; Palli, D; Mattiello, A; Agnoli, C; Tumino, R; Onland-Moret, N C; Peeters, P H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B(as); Gram, I T; Weiderpass, E; Sánchez-Cantalejo, E; Chirlaque, M-D; Duell, E J; Ardanaz, E; Idahl, A; Lundin, E; Khaw, K-T; Travis, R C; Merritt, M A; Gunter, M J; Riboli, E; Ferrari, P; Terry, K; Cramer, D; Kaaks, R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer has a high case-fatality ratio, largely due to late diagnosis. Epidemiologic risk prediction models could help identify women at increased risk who may benefit from targeted prevention measures, such as screening or chemopreventive agents. Methods: We built an ovarian cancer risk prediction model with epidemiologic risk factors from 202 206 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Results: Older age at menopause, longer duration of hormone replacement therapy, and higher body mass index were included as increasing ovarian cancer risk, whereas unilateral ovariectomy, longer duration of oral contraceptive use, and higher number of full-term pregnancies were decreasing risk. The discriminatory power (overall concordance index) of this model, as examined with five-fold cross-validation, was 0.64 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57, 0.70). The ratio of the expected to observed number of ovarian cancer cases occurring in the first 5 years of follow-up was 0.90 (293 out of 324, 95% CI: 0.81–1.01), in general there was no evidence for miscalibration. Conclusion: Our ovarian cancer risk model containing only epidemiological data showed modest discriminatory power for a Western European population. Future studies should consider adding informative biomarkers to possibly improve the predictive ability of the model. PMID:25742479

  16. KRAS genomic status predicts the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to decitabine

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, ML; Tamayo, P; Wilson, AJ; Wang, S; Chang, YM; Kim, JW; Khabele, D; Shamji, AF; Schreiber, SL

    2015-01-01

    Decitabine, a cancer therapeutic that inhibits DNA methylation, produces variable antitumor response rates in patients with solid tumors that might be leveraged clinically with identification of a predictive biomarker. In this study, we profiled the response of human ovarian, melanoma and breast cancer cells treated with decitabine, finding that RAS/MEK/ERK pathway activation and DNMT1 expression correlated with cytotoxic activity. Further, we showed that KRAS genomic status predicted decitabine sensitivity in low and high-grade serous ovarian cancer cells. Pre-treatment with decitabine decreased the cytotoxic activity of MEK inhibitors in KRAS-mutant ovarian cancer cells, with reciprocal downregulation of DNMT1 and MEK/ERK phosphorylation. In parallel with these responses, decitabine also upregulated the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member BNIP3, which is known to be regulated by MEK and ERK, and heightened the activity of pro-apoptotic small molecule navitoclax, a BCL-2 family inhibitor. In a xenograft model of KRAS-mutant ovarian cancer, combining decitabine and navitoclax heighted antitumor activity beyond administration of either compound alone. Our results define the RAS/MEK/DNMT1 pathway as a determinant of sensitivity to DNA methyltransferase inhibition, specifically implicating KRAS status as a biomarker of drug response in ovarian cancer. PMID:25968887

  17. BRCA1 epigenetic inactivation predicts sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy in breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stefansson, Olafur A.; Villanueva, Alberto; Vidal, August; Martí, Lola; Esteller, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are associated with an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer development. Both genes are involved in DNA repair, and tumors harboring genetic defects in them are thought to be more sensitive to DNA-damaging agents used in chemotherapy. However, as only a minority of breast and ovarian cancer patients carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, few patients are likely to benefit from these pharmacogenetic biomarkers. Herein, we show that, in cancer cell lines and xenografted tumors, BRCA1 CpG island promoter hypermethylation-associated silencing also predicts enhanced sensitivity to platinum-derived drugs to the same extent as BRCA1 mutations. Most importantly, BRCA1 hypermethylation proves to be a predictor of longer time to relapse and improved overall survival in ovarian cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy with cisplatin. PMID:23069641

  18. Predicting Ovarian Cancer Patients' Clinical Response to Platinum-Based Chemotherapy by Their Tumor Proteomic Signatures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kun-Hsing; Levine, Douglas A; Zhang, Hui; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Zhen; Snyder, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy in the United States with most patients diagnosed in the advanced stage of the disease. Platinum-based antineoplastic therapeutics is indispensable to treating advanced ovarian serous carcinoma. However, patients have heterogeneous responses to platinum drugs, and it is difficult to predict these interindividual differences before administering medication. In this study, we investigated the tumor proteomic profiles and clinical characteristics of 130 ovarian serous carcinoma patients analyzed by the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), predicted the platinum drug response using supervised machine learning methods, and evaluated our prediction models through leave-one-out cross-validation. Our data-driven feature selection approach indicated that tumor proteomics profiles contain information for predicting binarized platinum response (P < 0.0001). We further built a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO)-Cox proportional hazards model that stratified patients into early relapse and late relapse groups (P = 0.00013). The top proteomic features indicative of platinum response were involved in ATP synthesis pathways and Ran GTPase binding. Overall, we demonstrated that proteomic profiles of ovarian serous carcinoma patients predicted platinum drug responses as well as provided insights into the biological processes influencing the efficacy of platinum-based therapeutics. Our analytical approach is also extensible to predicting response to other antineoplastic agents or treatment modalities for both ovarian and other cancers. PMID:27312948

  19. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause one or more of these signs ...

  20. Irregular menses predicts ovarian cancer: Prospective evidence from the Child Health and Development Studies.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Piera M; Wang, Erica T; Cedars, Marcelle I; Chen, Lee-May; Cohn, Barbara A

    2016-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that irregular menstruation predicts lower risk for ovarian cancer, possibly due to less frequent ovulation. We conducted a 50-year prospective study of 15,528 mothers in the Child Health and Development Studies cohort recruited from the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan from 1959 to 1966. Irregular menstruation was classified via medical record and self-report at age 26. We identified 116 cases and 84 deaths due to ovarian cancer through 2011 via linkage to the California Cancer Registry and Vital Statistics. Contrary to expectation, women with irregular menstrual cycles had a higher risk of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality over the 50-year follow-up. Associations increased with age (p <0.05). We observed a 2-fold increased incidence and mortality by age 70 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1, 3.4) rising to a 3-fold increase by age 77 (95% CI = 1.5, 6.7 for incidence; 95% CI = 1.4, 5.9 for mortality). We also found a 3-fold higher risk of mortality for high-grade serous tumors (95% CI = 1.3, 7.6) that did not vary by age. This is the first prospective study to show an association between irregular menstruation and ovarian cancer-we unexpectedly found higher risk for women with irregular cycles. These women are easy to identify and many may have polycystic ovarian syndrome. Classifying high-risk phenotypes such as irregular menstruation creates opportunities to find novel early biomarkers, refine clinical screening protocols and potentially develop new risk reduction strategies. These efforts can lead to earlier detection and better survival for ovarian cancer. PMID:27082375

  1. Ovarian Cancer Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... States, ovarian cancer is the eighth most common cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer death. Around one in every 60 ... States, ovarian cancer is the eighth most common cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer death. Are some women more at ...

  2. A VEGF-dependent gene signature enriched in mesenchymal ovarian cancer predicts patient prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xia; Wang, Xiaojie; Shen, Boqiang; Jing, Ying; Li, Qing; Cai, Mei-Chun; Gu, Zhuowei; Yang, Qi; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Liu, Jin; Li, Hongxia; Di, Wen; Zhuang, Guanglei

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported surrogate biomarkers of VEGF pathway activities with the potential to provide predictive information for anti-VEGF therapies. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate a new VEGF-dependent gene signature (VDGs) in relation to molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer and patient prognosis. Using microarray profiling and cross-species analysis, we identified 140-gene mouse VDGs and corresponding 139-gene human VDGs, which displayed enrichment of vasculature and basement membrane genes. In patients who received bevacizumab therapy and showed partial response, the expressions of VDGs (summarized to yield VDGs scores) were markedly decreased in post-treatment biopsies compared with pre-treatment baselines. In contrast, VDGs scores were not significantly altered following bevacizumab treatment in patients with stable or progressive disease. Analysis of VDGs in ovarian cancer showed that VDGs as a prognostic signature was able to predict patient outcome. Correlation estimation of VDGs scores and molecular features revealed that VDGs was overrepresented in mesenchymal subtype and BRCA mutation carriers. These findings highlighted the prognostic role of VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in ovarian cancer, and proposed a VEGF-dependent gene signature as a molecular basis for developing novel diagnostic strategies to aid patient selection for VEGF-targeted agents. PMID:27498762

  3. A VEGF-dependent gene signature enriched in mesenchymal ovarian cancer predicts patient prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xia; Wang, Xiaojie; Shen, Boqiang; Jing, Ying; Li, Qing; Cai, Mei-Chun; Gu, Zhuowei; Yang, Qi; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Liu, Jin; Li, Hongxia; Di, Wen; Zhuang, Guanglei

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported surrogate biomarkers of VEGF pathway activities with the potential to provide predictive information for anti-VEGF therapies. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate a new VEGF-dependent gene signature (VDGs) in relation to molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer and patient prognosis. Using microarray profiling and cross-species analysis, we identified 140-gene mouse VDGs and corresponding 139-gene human VDGs, which displayed enrichment of vasculature and basement membrane genes. In patients who received bevacizumab therapy and showed partial response, the expressions of VDGs (summarized to yield VDGs scores) were markedly decreased in post-treatment biopsies compared with pre-treatment baselines. In contrast, VDGs scores were not significantly altered following bevacizumab treatment in patients with stable or progressive disease. Analysis of VDGs in ovarian cancer showed that VDGs as a prognostic signature was able to predict patient outcome. Correlation estimation of VDGs scores and molecular features revealed that VDGs was overrepresented in mesenchymal subtype and BRCA mutation carriers. These findings highlighted the prognostic role of VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in ovarian cancer, and proposed a VEGF-dependent gene signature as a molecular basis for developing novel diagnostic strategies to aid patient selection for VEGF-targeted agents. PMID:27498762

  4. Overexpression of centromere protein K (CENPK) in ovarian cancer is correlated with poor patient survival and associated with predictive and prognostic relevance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Chao; Huang, Chi-Chen; Lin, Ding-Yen; Chang, Wen-Chang; Lee, Kuen-Haur

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis. Most patients are diagnosed with ovarian cancer when the disease has reached an advanced stage and cure rates are generally under 30%. Hence, early diagnosis of ovarian cancer is the best means to control the disease in the long term and abate mortality. So far, cancer antigen 125 (CA125) and human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) are the gold-standard tumor markers for ovarian cancer; however, these two markers can be elevated in a number of conditions unrelated to ovarian cancer, resulting in decreased specifically and positive predictive value. Therefore, it is urgent to identify novel biomarkers with high reliability and sensitivity for ovarian cancer. In this study for the first time, we identified a member of the centromere protein (CENP) family, CENPK, which was specifically upregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines and the overexpression of which was associated with poor prognoses in patients with ovarian cancer. In addition, the presence of CENPK significantly improved the sensitivity of CA125 or HE4 for predicting clinical outcomes of ovarian cancer patients. In conclusion, we identified that CENPK was specifically upregulated in ovarian cancer cells and can be used as a novel tumor marker of ovarian cancer. PMID:26587348

  5. To predict or not to predict? The dilemma of predicting the risk of suboptimal cytoreduction in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, S; Park, S-Y

    2011-12-01

    Although maximal cytoreduction is the cornerstone of current treatment for patients with advanced ovarian cancer, optimal cytoreduction is not always achievable in the clinic. Therefore, using clinical characteristics, diagnostic imaging, serum biomarkers or laparoscopic findings, many studies have attempted to find models for predicting surgical resectability. However, most of these prediction models showed limited effectiveness and have not been properly validated. To establish a reliable prediction model, several requirements should be met. First, the goal of surgical cytoreduction should be adequately defined. Second, the desired accuracy for making the model clinically useful should be defined. Third, the model should test all relevant predictors, including clinical, radiological and biochemical predictors, and be developed using a large dataset that provides a sufficient number of events. Fourth, any prediction model should be validated with a relevant external dataset. Lastly, the prediction model should be able to aid decision making and, thereby, improve the outcome of patients. Therefore, randomized clinical trials with decision making based on prediction models are urgently required. PMID:22180395

  6. Claudin and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Chinmoy K.; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2010-01-01

    Claudins are a family of proteins and the most important component of the tight junction. They constitute a paracellular barrier that controls the flow of molecules in the intercellular space of an epithelium. Although it seems that claudin should be down regulated in cancer cell, some claudins are, in fact highly elevated in various human cancers, including ovarian cancer. Whereas the functional significance of claudin overexpression in ovarian carcinoma is unclear, these proteins are important for migration, invasion, and survival of ovarian cancer cells. They clearly represent a general pathway in tumorigenesis, are a novel marker for ovarian cancer and may become a target for therapy or diagnosis of this disease. PMID:24591894

  7. Claudin and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bose, Chinmoy K; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2010-01-01

    Claudins are a family of proteins and the most important component of the tight junction. They constitute a paracellular barrier that controls the flow of molecules in the intercellular space of an epithelium. Although it seems that claudin should be down regulated in cancer cell, some claudins are, in fact highly elevated in various human cancers, including ovarian cancer. Whereas the functional significance of claudin overexpression in ovarian carcinoma is unclear, these proteins are important for migration, invasion, and survival of ovarian cancer cells. They clearly represent a general pathway in tumorigenesis, are a novel marker for ovarian cancer and may become a target for therapy or diagnosis of this disease. PMID:24591894

  8. Evidence of Differential Effects of Vitamin D Receptor Variants on Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk by Predicted Vitamin D Status

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Jennifer; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Reid, Brett M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; De Vivo, Immaculata; Cramer, Daniel W.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Experimental studies suggest vitamin D inhibits ovarian carcinogenesis. Yet, epidemiologic studies of ovarian cancer risk and lifestyle correlates of vitamin D status, plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], or vitamin D receptor (VDR) variants have been inconsistent. Objective: To evaluate VDR genetic associations by high vs. low predicted 25(OH)D, scores derived from known determinants of plasma 25(OH)D. To assess ovarian cancer associations with variants identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of plasma 25(OH)D. Methods: We genotyped up to seven VDR and eight 25(OH)D GWAS variants in the Nurses’ Health Studies (562 cases, 1,553 controls) and New England Case–Control study (1,821 cases, 1,870 controls). We estimated haplotype scores using expectation-maximization-based algorithms. We used unconditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We combined study results using DerSimonian and Laird meta-analysis. Results: Ovarian cancer risk increased per A allele of rs7975232 (VDR; OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.01–1.25) among all women. When stratified by predicted 25(OH)D, ovarian cancer was associated with rs731236 (VDR; per C allele OR = 1.31) and rs7975232 (OR = 1.38) among women with high predicted 25(OH)D, but not among women with low levels (P ≤ 0.009). We also observed heterogeneity by predicted 25(OH)D for the ovarian cancer association with VDR 3′ end haplotypes (P = 0.009). Of 25(OH)D-associated GWAS loci, rs7041 was associated with reduced ovarian cancer risk (per T allele OR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.85-0.99), which did not differ by predicted 25(OH)D status. Conclusion: Our study suggests an influence of VDR 3′ end variants on ovarian cancer risk may be observed in women with high predicted 25(OH)D, which remained even after taking multiple comparisons into consideration. Future studies are needed to confirm our results and explore further the relation

  9. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  10. Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1530x1350 View Download Large: 3060x2700 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Description: Drawing of stage IIIC shows ...

  11. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage II Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  12. Ovarian Cancer Stage I

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage I Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage I Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  13. IL17a and IL21 combined with surgical status predict the outcome of ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Li; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Lin, Han-Wei; Huang, Ching-Ting; Hsieh, Shu-Feng; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2015-10-01

    Aside from tumor cells, ovarian cancer-related ascites contains the immune components. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a combination of clinical and immunological parameters can predict survival in patients with ovarian cancer. Ascites specimens and medical records from 144 ovarian cancer patients at our hospital were used as the derivation group to select target clinical and immunological factors to generate a risk-scoring system to predict patient survival. Eighty-two cases from another hospital were used as the validation group to evaluate this system. The surgical status and expression levels of interleukin 17a (IL17a) and IL21 in ascites were selected for the risk-scoring system in the derivation group. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves of the overall score for disease-free survival (DFS) of the ovarian cancer patients were 0.84 in the derivation group, 0.85 in the validation group, and 0.84 for all the patients. The AUROC curves of the overall score for overall survival (OS) of cases were 0.78 in the derivation group, 0.76 in the validation group, and 0.76 for all the studied patients. Good correlations between overall risk score and survival of the ovarian cancer patients were demonstrated by sub-grouping all participants into four groups (P for trend <0.001 for DFS and OS). Therefore, acombination of clinical and immunological parameters can provide a practical scoring system to predict the survival of patients with ovarian carcinoma. IL17a and IL21 can potentially be used as prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers. PMID:26150382

  14. Can Ovarian Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer Can ovarian cancer be found early? About 20% of ovarian cancers ... cancer in its earliest stage. Ways to find ovarian cancer early Regular women's health exams During a pelvic ...

  15. Epithelial ovarian cancer: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Arpita; Xu, Jingyao; Aysola, Kartik; Qin, Yunlong; Okoli, Chika; Hariprasad, Ravipati; Chinemerem, Ugorji; Gates, Candace; Reddy, Avinash; Danner, Omar; Franklin, Geary; Ngozi, Anachebe; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Singh, Karan; Grizzle, William; Landen, Charles; Partridge, Edward E; Rice, Valerie Montgomery; Reddy, E Shyam P; Rao, Veena N

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the second most common gynecological cancer and the leading cause of death in the United States. In this article we review the diagnosis and current management of epithelial ovarian cancer which accounts for over 95 percent of the ovarian malignancies. We will present various theories about the potential origin of ovarian malignancies. We will discuss the genetic anomalies and syndromes that may cause ovarian cancers with emphasis on Breast cancer type 1/2 mutations. The pathology and pathogenesis of ovarian carcinoma will also be presented. Lastly, we provide a comprehensive overview of treatment strategies and staging of ovarian cancer, conclusions and future directions. PMID:25525571

  16. Ovarian Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 22,280 % of All New Cancer Cases 1.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 14,240 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 195,767 women living with ovarian cancer in ...

  17. National Ovarian Cancer Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... ovarian cancer Read More View More News Upcoming Events Fabric Extravaganza! September 09, 2016 @ 12:00PM Hosted ... Roxy and Dukes Roadhouse View All Our Upcoming Events Latest from the Blog: Hailey's Story How her ...

  18. Gene Expression Profile for Predicting Survival in Advanced-Stage Serous Ovarian Cancer Across Two Independent Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Kosuke; Tajima, Atsushi; Yahata, Tetsuro; Kodama, Shoji; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Mitsuaki; Onishi, Yoshitaka; Hatae, Masayuki; Sueyoshi, Kazunobu; Fujiwara, Hisaya; Kudo, Yoshiki; Kotera, Kohei; Masuzaki, Hideaki; Tashiro, Hironori; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Inoue, Ituro; Tanaka, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients are generally treated with platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy after primary debulking surgery. However, there is a wide range of outcomes for individual patients. Therefore, the clinicopathological factors alone are insufficient for predicting prognosis. Our aim is to identify a progression-free survival (PFS)-related molecular profile for predicting survival of patients with advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer tissues from 110 Japanese patients who underwent primary surgery and platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy were profiled using oligonucleotide microarrays. We selected 88 PFS-related genes by a univariate Cox model (p<0.01) and generated the prognostic index based on 88 PFS-related genes after adjustment of regression coefficients of the respective genes by ridge regression Cox model using 10-fold cross-validation. The prognostic index was independently associated with PFS time compared to other clinical factors in multivariate analysis [hazard ratio (HR), 3.72; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.66–5.43; p<0.0001]. In an external dataset, multivariate analysis revealed that this prognostic index was significantly correlated with PFS time (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.20–1.98; p = 0.0008). Furthermore, the correlation between the prognostic index and overall survival time was confirmed in the two independent external datasets (log rank test, p = 0.0010 and 0.0008). Conclusions/Significance The prognostic ability of our index based on the 88-gene expression profile in ridge regression Cox hazard model was shown to be independent of other clinical factors in predicting cancer prognosis across two distinct datasets. Further study will be necessary to improve predictive accuracy of the prognostic index toward clinical application for evaluation of the risk of recurrence in patients with advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer. PMID:20300634

  19. The NER-related gene GTF2H5 predicts survival in high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kamieniak, Marta M.; Muñoz-Repeto, Ivan; Borrego, Salud; Hernando, Susana; Hernández-Agudo, Elena; Heredia Soto, Victoria; Márquez-Rodas, Ivan; Echarri, María José; Lacambra-Calvet, Carmen; Sáez, Raquel; Redondo, Andrés; Benítez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the prognostic and predictive value of the nucleotide excision repair-related gene GTF2H5, which is localized at the 6q24.2-26 deletion previously reported by our group to predict longer survival of high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients. Methods In order to test if protein levels of GTF2H5 are associated with patients' outcome, we performed GTF2H5 immunohistochemical staining in 139 high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas included in tissue microarrays. Upon stratification of cases into high- and low-GTF2H5 staining categories (> and ≤ median staining, respectively) Kaplan-Meier and log-rank test were used to estimate patients’ survival and assess statistical differences. We also evaluated the association of GTF2H5 with survival at the transcriptional level by using the on-line Kaplan-Meier plotter tool, which includes gene expression and survival data of 855 high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients from 13 different datasets. Finally, we determined whether stable short hairpin RNA-mediated GTF2H5 downregulation modulates cisplatin sensitivity in the SKOV3 and COV504 cell lines by using cytotoxicity assays. Results Low expression of GTF2H5 was associated with longer 5-year survival of patients at the protein (hazard ratio [HR], 0.52; 95% CI, 0.29 to 0.93; p=0.024) and transcriptional level (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.97; p=0.023) in high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients. We confirmed the association with 5-year overall survival (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.78; p=0.0007) and also found an association with progression-free survival (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.96; p=0.026) in a homogenous group of 388 high-stage (stages III-IV using the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging system), optimally debulked high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients. GTF2H5-silencing induced a decrease of the half maximal inhibitory concentration upon cisplatin treatment in GTF2H5-silenced ovarian cancer cells. Conclusion Low

  20. Expression and Immune Responses to MAGE Antigens Predict Survival in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daudi, Sayeema; Eng, Kevin H.; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Morrison, Carl; Miliotto, Anthony; Beck, Amy; Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Groman, Adrienne; Gnjatic, Sacha; Spagnoli, Guillo; Lele, Shashikant; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-01-01

    The MAGE cancer-testis antigens (CTA) are attractive candidates for immunotherapy. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of expression, humoral immunity and prognostic significance of MAGE CTA in human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). mRNA or protein expression frequencies were determined for MAGE-A1, -A3, -A4, -A10 and -C1 (CT7) in tissue samples obtained from 400 patients with EOC. The presence of autologous antibodies against the MAGE antigens was determined from 285 serum samples. The relationships between MAGE expression, humoral immunity to MAGE antigens, and clinico-pathologic characteristics were studied. The individual frequencies of expression were as follows: A1: 15% (42/281), A3: 36% (131/390), A4: 47% (186/399), A10: 52% (204/395), C1: 16% (42/267). Strong concordant expression was noted with MAGE-A1:–A4, MAGE-A1:–C1 and MAGE-A4:–A10 (p<0.0005). Expression of MAGE-A1 or -A10 antigens resulted in poor progression free survival (PFS) (OR 1.44, CI 1.01–2.04, p = 0.044 and OR 1.3, CI 1.03–1.64, p = 0.03, respectively); whereas, MAGE-C1 expression was associated with improved PFS (OR 0.62, CI 0.42–0.92, p = 0.016). The improved PFS observed for MAGE-C1 expression, was diminished by co-expression of MAGE-A1 or -A10. Spontaneous humoral immunity to the MAGE antigens was present in 9% (27/285) of patients, and this predicted poor overall survival (log-rank test p = 0.0137). These findings indicate that MAGE-A1, MAGE-A4, MAGE-A3, and MAGE-A10 are priority attractive targets for polyvalent immunotherapy in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:25101620

  1. Sprouty2 protein in prediction of post-treatment ascites in epithelial ovarian cancer treated with adjuvant carbotaxol chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi-Moghaddam, Samar; Amini, Afshin; Wei, Ai-Qun; Robertson, Gregory; Morris, David L

    2015-01-01

    Ascites development and resistance to chemotherapy with carbotaxol are common clinical problems in epithelial ovarian cancer, partly due to the activation of MAPK/ERK signaling. Sprouty proteins are negative modulators of MAPK/ERK pathway, but their role in predicting resistance to carbotaxol chemotherapy and ascites development is unknown. In this study, we evaluated the expression of Sprouty protein isoforms by immunohistochemistry. The associations between the Sprouty expression and the clinicopathological features, including chemoresistance and the presence of ascites, were then explored. We found that the decreased expression of Spry2 was correlated with the post-treatment development of ascites and represented an independent predictor of this condition in carbotaxol-treated patients. However, no association was observed between the Sprouty expression and chemoresistance. In conclusion, our results suggest that Spry2 may be useful for patient follow-up and monitoring as it predicts the development of ascites in epithelial ovarian cancer cases treated with carbotaxol. PMID:26396926

  2. Prediction of Postchemotherapy Ovarian Function Using Markers of Ovarian Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Rong; Schott, Anne F.; McConnell, Daniel; Banerjee, Mousumi; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Reproductive-aged women frequently receive both chemotherapy and endocrine therapy as part of their treatment regimen for early stage hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Chemotherapy results in transient or permanent ovarian failure in the majority of women. The difficulty in determining which patients will recover ovarian function has implications for adjuvant endocrine therapy decision making. We hypothesized that pretreatment serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and inhibin B concentrations would predict for ovarian function following chemotherapy. Methods. Pre- and perimenopausal women aged 25–50 years with newly diagnosed breast cancer were enrolled. Subjects underwent phlebotomy for assessment of serum AMH, inhibin B, follicle-stimulating hormone, and estradiol prior to chemotherapy and 1 month and 1 year following completion of treatment. Associations among hormone concentrations, clinical factors, and biochemically assessed ovarian function were assessed. Results. Twenty-seven subjects were evaluable for the primary endpoint. Median age was 41. Twenty subjects (74.1%) experienced recovery of ovarian function within 18 months. Of the 26 evaluable subjects assessed prior to chemotherapy, 19 (73.1%) had detectable serum concentrations of AMH. The positive predictive value of a detectable baseline serum AMH concentration for recovery of ovarian function was 94.7%, and the negative predictive value was 85.7%. On univariate analysis, younger age and detectable serum AMH concentration at chemotherapy initiation were predictive of increased likelihood of recovery of ovarian function. Conclusion. Prechemotherapy assessment of serum AMH may be useful for predicting postchemotherapy ovarian function. This finding has implications for decision making about adjuvant endocrine therapy in premenopausal women treated with chemotherapy. PMID:24319018

  3. Ixabepilone and Liposomal Doxorubicin in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  4. Molecular imaging in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Reyners, A K L; Broekman, K E; Glaudemans, A W J M; Brouwers, A H; Arts, H J G; van der Zee, A G J; de Vries, E G E; Jalving, M

    2016-04-01

    Ovarian cancer has a high mortality and novel-targeted treatment strategies have not resulted in breakthroughs for this disease. Insight into the molecular characteristics of ovarian tumors may improve diagnosis and selection of patients for treatment with targeted therapies. A potential way to achieve this is by means of molecular imaging. Generic tumor processes, such as glucose metabolism ((18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose) and DNA synthesis ((18)F-fluorodeoxythymidine), can be visualized non-invasively. More specific targets, such as hormone receptors, growth factor receptors, growth factors and targets of immunotherapy, can also be visualized. Molecular imaging can capture data on intra-patient tumor heterogeneity and is of potential value for individualized, target-guided treatment selection. Early changes in molecular characteristics during therapy may serve as early predictors of response. In this review, we describe the current knowledge on molecular imaging in the diagnosis and as an upfront or early predictive biomarker in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:27141066

  5. Targeted Therapies in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Emma; El-Helw, Loaie; Hasan, Jurjees

    2010-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapy is relatively new to ovarian cancer despite the unquestionable success with these agents in other solid tumours such as breast and colorectal cancer. Advanced ovarian cancer is chemosensitive and patients can survive several years on treatment. However chemotherapy diminishes in efficacy over time whilst toxicities persist. Newer biological agents that target explicit molecular pathways and lack specific chemotherapy toxicities such as myelosuppression offer the advantage of long-term therapy with a manageable toxicity profile enabling patients to enjoy a good quality of life. In this review we appraise the emerging data on novel targeted therapies in ovarian cancer. We discuss the role of these compounds in the front-line treatment of ovarian cancer and in relapsed disease; and describe how the development of predictive clinical, molecular and imaging biomarkers will define the role of biological agents in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:24281034

  6. Immunotherapy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mantia-Smaldone, Gina M.; Corr, Bradley; Chu, Christina S.

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecologic malignancy, with more than 15,000 deaths anticipated in 2012.1 While approximately 80% of patients will respond to frontline chemotherapy, more than 60% of patients will experience disease recurrence and only 44% will be alive at 5 years.1,2 Host anti-tumor immune responses are associated with a significant improvement in overall survival for women with ovarian cancer.3,4 By bolstering these responses, it may therefore be possible to significantly influence the prognosis of women with this lethal disease. In this review, we will focus on innovative immune-based strategies which are currently being investigated in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:22906947

  7. The Lymphocyte-Monocyte Ratio Predicts Patient Survival and Aggressiveness of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Wan Kyu; Chang, Hye Jung; Kwon, Sang Hoon; Koh, Suk Bong; Kim, Young Ok; Ji, Yong Il; Kim, Hong-Bae; Lee, Ji Young; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hyung; Chang, Ik Jin; Kim, Heung Yeol; Chang, Suk Choo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To measure the prognostic value of the lymphocyte-monocyte ratio (LMR) in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods: We retrospectively examined the LMR as a prognosticator in a cohort of 234 patients with EOC who underwent surgical resection. Patients were categorized into two different groups based on the LMR (LMR-low and LMR-high) using cut-off values determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The objective of the study was to assess the effect of the LMR on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), and to validate the LMR as an independent predictor of survival. Results: Using the data collected from the whole cohort, the optimized LMR cut-off value selected on the ROC curve was 2.07 for both PFS and OS. The LMR-low and LMR-high groups included 48 (20.5%) and 186 patients (79.5%), respectively. The 5-year PFS rates in the LMR-low and LMR-high groups were 40.0 and 62.5% (P < 0.0001), respectively, and the 5-year OS rates in these two groups were 42.2 and 67.2% (P < 0.0001), respectively. On multivariate analysis, we identified age, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, and cancer antigen 125 levels to be the strongest valuable prognostic factors affecting PFS (P = 0.0421, P = 0.0012, and P = 0.0313, respectively) and age, FIGO stage, and the LMR as the most valuable prognostic factors predicting OS (P = 0.0064, P = 0.0029, and P = 0.0293, respectively). Conclusion: The LMR is an independent prognostic factor affecting the survival of patients with EOC. PMID:26918042

  8. Ovarian Function, Not Age, Predicts the Benefit from Ovarian Suppression or Ablation for Premenopausal Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ye; Wang, Shusen; Shi, Yanxia; An, Xin; Xu, Fei; Yuan, Zhongyu

    2016-01-01

    The role of adjuvant ovarian suppression or ablation (OS/OA) in premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer remains controversial. The purpose of our study was to examine which patients might benefit from the addition of OS/OA to tamoxifen. We analyzed the data of 2065 premenopausal patients with hormone receptor-positive invasive ductal carcinomas who were treated at Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center from 2000 to 2008. The five-year disease-free survival rate (DFSR) and overall survival rate (OSR) were compared by menstrual status and treatment. Compared with patients older than forty years of age, patients younger than forty years old had significant lower DFSRs and OSRs. The addition of OS/OA to tamoxifen increased the DFSR and OSR of patients with normal menstrual cycles after chemotherapy, regardless of their age at diagnosis. Patients with normal menstrual cycles after chemotherapy are the main beneficiaries of an adjuvant OS/OA. PMID:26866810

  9. Risk Prediction for Breast, Endometrial, and Ovarian Cancer in White Women Aged 50 y or Older: Derivation and Validation from Population-Based Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Park, Yikyung; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Lacey, James V.; Pee, David; Greenlee, Robert T.; Buys, Saundra S.; Hollenbeck, Albert; Rosner, Bernard; Gail, Mitchell H.; Hartge, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers share some hormonal and epidemiologic risk factors. While several models predict absolute risk of breast cancer, there are few models for ovarian cancer in the general population, and none for endometrial cancer. Methods and Findings Using data on white, non-Hispanic women aged 50+ y from two large population-based cohorts (the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial [PLCO] and the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study [NIH-AARP]), we estimated relative and attributable risks and combined them with age-specific US-population incidence and competing mortality rates. All models included parity. The breast cancer model additionally included estrogen and progestin menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) use, other MHT use, age at first live birth, menopausal status, age at menopause, family history of breast or ovarian cancer, benign breast disease/biopsies, alcohol consumption, and body mass index (BMI); the endometrial model included menopausal status, age at menopause, BMI, smoking, oral contraceptive use, MHT use, and an interaction term between BMI and MHT use; the ovarian model included oral contraceptive use, MHT use, and family history or breast or ovarian cancer. In independent validation data (Nurses' Health Study cohort) the breast and ovarian cancer models were well calibrated; expected to observed cancer ratios were 1.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.96–1.04) for breast cancer and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.97–1.19) for ovarian cancer. The number of endometrial cancers was significantly overestimated, expected/observed = 1.20 (95% CI: 1.11–1.29). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs; discriminatory power) were 0.58 (95% CI: 0.57–0.59), 0.59 (95% CI: 0.56–0.63), and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.66–0.70) for the breast, ovarian, and endometrial models, respectively. Conclusions These models predict absolute risks for breast, endometrial, and

  10. Denileukin Diftitox Used in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma, or Epithelial Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  11. ERCC1 and RRM1 as a predictive parameter for non-small cell lung, ovarian or pancreas cancer treated with cisplatin and/or gemcitabine

    PubMed Central

    Ulker, Mehmet; Sahin, Berksoy; Gumurdulu, Derya

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the impact of RRM1 and ERCC1 expression on response to cisplatin and/or gemcitabine chemotherapy in patients with lung, ovarian or pancreatic cancer. Material and methods Patients with lung, ovarian or pancreatic cancer, who used cisplatin and/or gemcitabine therapy were included; hospital files were examined and RRM1 and ERCC1 expression were evaluated with an immunohistochemical method on tissue cross sections from paraffin blocks of the tumour. Results Out of 89 patients, 51%, 30% and 19% had lung, ovarian and pancreatic cancer, respectively. The response rates to the therapy in patients with lung and ovarian cancer having low ERCC1 expression were 62% and 90%, respectively (p = 0.028 and p = 0.044, respectively). No significant association was found between ERCC1 expression and response to therapy in patients with pancreatic cancer (p = 0.354). Therapeutic response rates in patients with lung and pancreatic cancer with low RRM1 expression were 60% and 82%, respectively. Survival rates were higher in patients with lung cancer in which ERCC1 and RRM1 expressions were low. Median survival duration in patients with ovarian cancer showing low ERCC1 and RRM1 expressions was longer than that seen in patients with high expressions. Although no significant correlation was found between ERCC1 and the survival in ovarian cancer (p = 0.183), there was a significant correlation between RRM1 expression and survival in patients with pancreatic cancer (p = 0.005). Conclusions Our results suggest a predictive value of ERCC1 in lung and ovarian cancers, and also RRM1 in lung and pancreatic cancers. PMID:26557761

  12. Do We Know What Causes Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... ovarian cancer be prevented? Do we know what causes ovarian cancer? We don’t yet know exactly what causes ... Another theory is that male hormones (androgens) can cause ovarian cancer. Researchers have made great progress in understanding how ...

  13. Prognostic nomogram to predict progression-free survival in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C K; Simes, R J; Brown, C; Lord, S; Wagner, U; Plante, M; Vergote, I; Pisano, C; Parma, G; Burges, A; Bourgeois, H; Högberg, T; Bentley, J; Angleitner-Boubenizek, L; Ferrero, A; Richter, B; Hirte, H; Gebski, V; Pfisterer, J; Pujade-Lauraine, E; Friedlander, M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer are a heterogeneous group, and it is not possible to accurately predict the progression-free survival (PFS) in these patients. We developed and validated a nomogram to help improve prediction of PFS in patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Methods: The nomogram was developed in a training cohort (n=955) from the CALYPSO trial and validated in the AGO-OVAR 2.5 Study (n=340). The proportional-hazards model (nomogram) was based on pre-treatment characteristics. Results: The nomogram had a concordance index (C-index) of 0.645. Significant predictors were tumour size platinum-chemotherapy-free interval, CA-125, number of organ metastatic sites and white blood count. When the nomogram was applied without CA-125 (CA-125 was not available in validation cohort), the C-indices were 0.624 (training) and 0.594 (validation). When classification was based only on the platinum-chemotherapy-free interval, the indices were 0.571 (training) and 0.560 (validation). The calibration plot in the validation cohort based on four predictors (without CA-125) suggested good agreement between actual and nomogram-predicted 12-month PFS probabilities. Conclusion: This nomogram, using five pre-treatment characteristics, improves prediction of PFS in patients with platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer having platinum-based chemotherapy. It will be useful for the design and stratification of patients in clinical trials and also for counselling patients. PMID:21915127

  14. High preoperative blood levels of HE4 predicts poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of preoperative blood levels of HE4 as a predictor of overall survival in patients with ovarian cancer and to validate previous data of HE4 and the ROMA algorithm including HE4 and CA125 in discriminating benign and malignant ovarian tumors. Experimental design The preoperative plasma levels of HE4 and CA125 were analyzed with ELISA in 312 patients with adnexal lesions. Tumors were classified as benign (n= 206), borderline (i.e. low malignant potential tumors) (n= 25), and well (n= 14), moderately (n= 15), and poorly (n= 51) differentiated malignant. Results In univariate Cox regression analyses high levels (dichotomized at the median) of HE4, CA125, increased age (continuous variable), advanced-stage of disease 2–4, histological grade 3 and non-optimal tumor debulking at primary surgery were all significantly associated with shorter overall survival. A multivariate Cox regression model including pre-operative available covariates HE4 and CA125 both dichotomized at median in addition to age as continuous variable showed that high levels of HE4 was an independent prognostic marker for worse prognosis HR 2.02 (95% CI 1.1-3.8). In postmenopausal women the ROMA algorithm gave the highest AUC of 0.94 (95% CI, 0.90-0.97) which was higher than the separate markers HE4 AUC 0.91 (95% CI 0.86-0.95) and CA125 AUC 0.91(95% CI 0.87-0.96). Conclusions High concentration of plasma HE4 is an independent preoperative marker of poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer. The algorithm ROMA discriminates in postmenopausal women between malignant and benign tumors with an AUC of 0.94. PMID:22909379

  15. The Cancer Genome Atlas ovarian cancer analysis

    Cancer.gov

    An analysis of genomic changes in ovarian cancer has provided the most comprehensive and integrated view of cancer genes for any cancer type to date. Ovarian serous adenocarcinoma tumors from 500 patients were examined by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Re

  16. Can Ovarian Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... ovaries removed with your doctor. Prevention strategies for women with a family history of ovarian cancer or BRCA mutation If your ... what the results mean to you. For some women with a strong family history of ovarian cancer, knowing they do not have ...

  17. Oncolytic virotherapy for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shoudong; Tong, Jessica; Rahman, Masmudur M; Shepherd, Trevor G; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    In the past two decades, more than 20 viruses with selective tropism for tumor cells have been developed as oncolytic viruses (OVs) for treatments of a variety of malignancies. Of these viruses, eleven have been tested in human ovarian cancer models in preclinical studies. So far, nine phase I or II clinical trials have been conducted or initiated using four different types of OVs in patients with recurrent ovarian cancers. In this article, we summarize the different OVs that are being assessed as therapeutics for ovarian cancer. We also present an overview of recent advances in identification of key genetic or immune-response pathways involved in tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer, which provides a better understanding of the tumor specificities and oncolytic properties of OVs. In addition, we discuss how next-generation OVs could be genetically modified or integrated into multimodality regimens to improve clinical outcomes based on recent advances in ovarian cancer biology. PMID:25977900

  18. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Stage III Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  19. Homologous recombination deficiency and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Jonathan A; Drew, Yvette; Kristeleit, Rebecca S

    2016-06-01

    The discovery that PARP inhibitors block an essential pathway of DNA repair in cells harbouring a BRCA mutation has opened up a new therapeutic avenue for high-grade ovarian cancers. BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are essential for high-fidelity repair of double-strand breaks of DNA through the homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway. Deficiency in HRR (HRD) is a target for PARP inhibitors. The first PARP inhibitor, olaparib, has now been licensed for BRCA-mutated ovarian cancers. While mutated BRCA genes are individually most commonly associated with HRD other essential HRR proteins may be mutated or functionally deficient potentially widening the therapeutic opportunities for PARP inhibitors. HRD is the first phenotypically defined predictive marker for therapy with PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancer. Several different PARP inhibitors are being trialled in ovarian cancer and this class of drugs has been shown to be a new selective therapy for high-grade ovarian cancer. Around 20% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers harbour germline or somatic BRCA mutations and testing for BRCA mutations should be incorporated into routine clinical practice. The expanded use of PARP inhibitors in HRD deficient (non-BRCA mutant) tumours using a signature of HRD in clinical practice requires validation. PMID:27065456

  20. [The molecular biology of epithelial ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Leary, Alexandra; Pautier, Patricia; Tazi, Youssef; Morice, Philippe; Duvillard, Pierre; Gouy, Sébastien; Uzan, Catherine; Gauthier, Hélène; Balleyguier, Corinne; Lhommé, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer frequently presents at an advanced stage where the cornerstone of management remains surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Unfortunately, despite sometimes dramatic initial responses, advanced ovarian cancer almost invariably relapses. Little progress has been made in the identification of effective targeted-therapies for ovarian cancer. The majority of clinical trials investigating novel agents have been negative and the only approved targeted-therapy is bevacizumab, for which reliable predictive biomarkers still elude us. Ovarian cancer is treated as a uniform disease. Yet, biological studies have highlighted the heterogeneity of this malignancy with marked differences in histology, oncogenesis, prognosis, chemo-responsiveness, and molecular profile. Recent high throughput molecular analyses have identified a huge number of genomic/phenotypic alterations. Broadly speaking, high grade serous carcinomas (type II) display significant genomic instability and numerous amplifications and losses; low grade (type I) tumors are genomically stable but display frequent mutations. Importantly, many of these genomic alterations relate to known oncogenes for which targeted-therapies are available or in development. There is today a real potential for personalized medicine in ovarian cancer. We will review the current literature regarding the molecular characterization of epithelial ovarian cancer and discuss the biological rationale for a number of targeted strategies. In order to translate these biological advances into meaningful clinical improvements for our patients, it is imperative to incorporate translational research in ovarian cancer trials, a number of strategies will be proposed such as the acquisition of quality tumor samples, including sequential pre- and post-treatment biopsies, the potential of liquid biopsies, and novel trial designs more adapted to the molecular era of ovarian cancer research. PMID:23238064

  1. Serum folate receptor alpha as a biomarker for ovarian cancer: Implications for diagnosis, prognosis and predicting its local tumor expression.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Akira; Hasegawa, Kosei; Kato, Tomomi; Abe, Kenji; Hanaoka, Tatsuya; Miyara, Akiko; O'Shannessy, Daniel J; Somers, Elizabeth B; Yasuda, Masanori; Sekino, Tetsuo; Fujiwara, Keiichi

    2016-04-15

    Folate receptor alpha (FRA) is a GPI-anchored glycoprotein and encoded by the FOLR1 gene. High expression of FRA is observed in specific malignant tumors of epithelial origin, including ovarian cancer, but exhibits very limited normal tissue expression, making it as an attractive target for the ovarian cancer therapy. FRA is known to shed from the cell surface into the circulation which allows for its measurement in the serum of patients. Recently, methods to detect the soluble form of FRA have been developed and serum FRA (sFRA) is considered a highly promising biomarker for ovarian cancer. We prospectively investigated the levels of sFRA in patients clinically suspected of having malignant ovarian tumors. A total of 231 patients were enrolled in this study and analyzed for sFRA as well as tumor expression of FRA by immunohistochemistry. High sFRA was predominantly observed in epithelial ovarian cancer patients, but not in patients with benign or borderline gynecological disease or metastatic ovarian tumors from advanced colorectal cancers. Levels of sFRA were highly correlated to clinical stage, tumor grade and histological type and demonstrated superior accuracy for the detection of ovarian cancer than did serum CA125. High sFRA was significantly associated with shorter progression-free survival in both early and advanced ovarian cancer patients. Finally, tumor FRA expression status was strongly correlated with sFRA levels. Taken together, these data suggest that sFRA might be a useful noninvasive serum biomarkers for future clinical trials assessing FRA-targeted therapy. PMID:26595060

  2. "Incessant ovulation" and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Casagrande, J T; Louie, E W; Pike, M C; Roy, S; Ross, R K; Henderson, B E

    1979-07-28

    A case-control study of 150 ovarian cancer patients under the age of 50 and individually matched controls was done to study the influence of fertility and oral contraceptive use on the risk of ovarian cancer. The risk decreased with increasing numbers of live births, with increasing numbers of incomplete pregnancies, and with the use of oral contraceptives. These three factors can be amalgamated into a single index of protection--"protected time"--by considering them all as periods of anovulation. The complement of protected time--viz., "ovulatory age", the period between menarche and diagnosis of ovarian cancer (or cessation of menses) minus "protected time"--was strongly related to risk of ovarian cancer. Other factors found to be associated with increased ovarian cancer risk were obesity, cervical polyps, and gallbladder disease. Women who had an "immediate" intolerance to oral contraceptive use had a fourfold increased risk of ovarian cancer. 7 patients, but no controls, could recall a family history of ovarian cancer. PMID:89281

  3. Polyglutamate Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-07

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  4. Expression Proteomics Predicts Loss of RXR-γ during Progression of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Rajkumar S.; Bapat, Sharmila A.

    2013-01-01

    The process of cellular transformation involves cascades of molecular changes that are modulated through altered epigenetic, transcription, post-translational and protein regulatory networks. Thus, identification of transformation-associated protein alterations can provide an insight into major regulatory pathways activated during disease progression. In the present protein expression profiling approach, we identified differential sets of proteins in a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis screen of a serous ovarian adenocarcinoma progression model. Function-based categorization of the proteins exclusively associated with pre-transformed cells identified four cellular processes of which RXR-γ is known to modulate cellular differentiation and apoptosis. We thus probed the functional relevance of RXR-γ expression and signaling in these two pathways during tumor progression. RXR-γ expression was observed to modulate cellular differentiation and apoptosis in steady-state pre-transformed cells. Interestingly, retinoid treatment was found to enhance RXR-γ expression in transformed cells and sensitize them towards apoptosis in vitro, and also reduce growth of xenografts derived from transformed cells. Our findings emphasize that loss of RXR-γ levels appears to provide mechanistic benefits to transformed cells towards the acquisition of resistance to apoptosis hallmark of cancer, while effective retinoid treatment may present a viable approach towards sensitization of tumor cells to apoptosis through induction of RXR-γ expression. PMID:23936423

  5. Prediction of tumour response induced by chemotherapy using modelling of CA-125 kinetics in recurrent ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wilbaux, M; Hénin, E; Oza, A; Colomban, O; Pujade-Lauraine, E; Freyer, G; Tod, M; You, B

    2014-01-01

    Background: The main objective of the present study was to establish the relationships between CA-125 kinetics and tumour size changes during treatment. Methods: The data from the CALYPSO-randomised phase III trial, comparing two platinum-based regimens in recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC) patients, was randomly split into a ‘learning data set' to estimate model parameters and a ‘validation data set' to validate model performances. A kinetic–pharmacodynamic semi-mechanistic model was built to describe tumour size and CA-125 kinetics during chemotherapy. The ability of the model to predict tumour response induced by chemotherapy, based on CA-125 values, was assessed. Results: Data from 535 ROC patients were used to model CA-125 kinetics and tumour size changes during the first 513 days after treatment initiation. Using the validated model, we could predict with accuracy the tumour size changes induced by chemotherapy based on the baseline imaging assessment and longitudinal CA-125 values (mean prediction error: 0.3%, mean absolute prediction error: 10.6%). Conclusions: Using a semi-mechanistic model, the dynamic relationships between tumour size changes and CA-125 kinetics induced by chemotherapy were established in ROC patients. A modelling approach allowed CA-125 to be assessed as a biomarker for tumour size dynamics, to predict treatment efficacy for research and clinical purposes. PMID:24556626

  6. What Are the Key Statistics about Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors for ovarian cancer? What are the key statistics about ovarian cancer? The American Cancer Society estimates ... ovarian cancer is about 1 in 100. (These statistics don’t count low malignant potential ovarian tumors.) ...

  7. The role of HE4 for prediction of recurrence in epithelial ovarian cancer patients-results from the OVCAD study.

    PubMed

    Nassir, Mani; Guan, Jun; Luketina, Hrvoje; Siepmann, Timo; Rohr, Irena; Richter, Rolf; Castillo-Tong, Dan Cacsire; Zeillinger, Robert; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Concin, Nicole; Marth, Christian; Hall, Christina; Mahner, Sven; Woelber, Linn; Sehouli, Jalid; Braicu, Elena Ioana

    2016-03-01

    Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) are at high risk of tumor recurrence. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) has been shown to be overexpressed in EOC. The primary aim of our study was to evaluate the role of HE4 in predicting recurrence in EOC patients. Furthermore, we assessed the role of HE4 in predicting recurrence after second-line chemotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed data of 92 out of 275 primary EOC patients of the multicenter project "Ovarian Cancer: Diagnosis of a silent killer" (OVCAD). The concentrations of HE4 and CA125 were determined preoperatively and 6 months after the end of platinum-based first-line chemotherapy (FU) using ELISA and Luminex technique, respectively. The role of HE4 and CA125 for prediction of recurrence was determined using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves. Out of 92 patients included, 70 (76 %) were responders and 22 (23 %) non-responders in terms of response to platinum-based first-line chemotherapy. Median HE4 concentrations at follow-up (FU) differed between responders and non-responders (60.5 vs. 237.25 pM, p = 0.0001), respectively. The combined use of HE4 and CA125 at FU with cut-off values of 49.5 pM and 25 U/ml for HE4 and CA125, respectively, for predicting recurrence within 12 months after first-line chemotherapy performed better than HE4 or CA125 alone (area under the curve (AUC) 0.928, 95 % confidence intervals (CI) 0.838-1, p < 0.001). HE4 at FU could predict recurrence within 6 months after second-line chemotherapy (AUC 0.719, 95 % CI 0.553-0.885, p = 0.024). The combination of both elevated biomarkers revealed significantly worse estimated median progression-free survival (PFS; hazard ratio (HR) 8.14, 95 % CI 3.75-17.68, p < 0.001) and slightly worse PFS in those in whom only one biomarker was elevated (HR 1.46, 95 % CI 0.72-2.96, p = 0.292) compared to those patients in whom no biomarker was elevated. For the estimated median overall survival (OS), our

  8. Comparison of Expression Profiles in Ovarian Epithelium In Vivo and Ovarian Cancer Identifies Novel Candidate Genes Involved in Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Catherine; Gava, Natalie; Kennedy, Catherine; Balleine, Rosemary L.; Sharma, Raghwa; Wain, Gerard; Brand, Alison; Hogg, Russell; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; George, Joshy; Birrer, Michael J.; Clarke, Christine L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bowtell, David D. L.; Harnett, Paul R.; deFazio, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Molecular events leading to epithelial ovarian cancer are poorly understood but ovulatory hormones and a high number of life-time ovulations with concomitant proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation, increases risk. We identified genes that are regulated during the estrous cycle in murine ovarian surface epithelium and analysed these profiles to identify genes dysregulated in human ovarian cancer, using publically available datasets. We identified 338 genes that are regulated in murine ovarian surface epithelium during the estrous cycle and dysregulated in ovarian cancer. Six of seven candidates selected for immunohistochemical validation were expressed in serous ovarian cancer, inclusion cysts, ovarian surface epithelium and in fallopian tube epithelium. Most were overexpressed in ovarian cancer compared with ovarian surface epithelium and/or inclusion cysts (EpCAM, EZH2, BIRC5) although BIRC5 and EZH2 were expressed as highly in fallopian tube epithelium as in ovarian cancer. We prioritised the 338 genes for those likely to be important for ovarian cancer development by in silico analyses of copy number aberration and mutation using publically available datasets and identified genes with established roles in ovarian cancer as well as novel genes for which we have evidence for involvement in ovarian cancer. Chromosome segregation emerged as an important process in which genes from our list of 338 were over-represented including two (BUB1, NCAPD2) for which there is evidence of amplification and mutation. NUAK2, upregulated in ovarian surface epithelium in proestrus and predicted to have a driver mutation in ovarian cancer, was examined in a larger cohort of serous ovarian cancer where patients with lower NUAK2 expression had shorter overall survival. In conclusion, defining genes that are activated in normal epithelium in the course of ovulation that are also dysregulated in cancer has identified a number of pathways and novel candidate genes that may contribute

  9. Survivorship Care Planning in Improving Quality of Life in Survivors of Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  10. Loss of Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 4 Correlates with an Aggressive Phenotype and Predicts Poor Outcome in Ovarian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nixdorf, Sheri; Ford, Caroline E.; Olivier, Jake; Caduff, Rosmarie; Scurry, James P.; Guertler, Rea; Hornung, Daniela; Mueller, Renato; Fink, Daniel A.; Hacker, Neville F.; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of the Wnt signaling pathway is implicated in aberrant cellular proliferation in various cancers. In 40% of endometrioid ovarian cancers, constitutive activation of the pathway is due to oncogenic mutations in β-catenin or other inactivating mutations in key negative regulators. Secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4) has been proposed to have inhibitory activity through binding and sequestering Wnt ligands. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed RT-qPCR and Western-blotting in primary cultures and ovarian cell lines for SFRP4 and its key downstream regulators activated β-catenin, β-catenin and GSK3β. SFRP4 was then examined by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 721 patients and due to its proposed secretory function, in plasma, presenting the first ELISA for SFRP4. SFRP4 was most highly expressed in tubal epithelium and decreased with malignant transformation, both on RNA and on protein level, where it was even more profound in the membrane fraction (p<0.0001). SFRP4 was expressed on the protein level in all histotypes of ovarian cancer but was decreased from borderline tumors to cancers and with loss of cellular differentiation. Loss of membrane expression was an independent predictor of poor survival in ovarian cancer patients (p = 0.02 unadjusted; p = 0.089 adjusted), which increased the risk of a patient to die from this disease by the factor 1.8. Conclusions/Significance Our results support a role for SFRP4 as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancers via inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway. This has not only predictive implications but could also facilitate a therapeutic role using epigenetic targets. PMID:22363760

  11. Hypodontia and ovarian cancer: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Iavazzo, Christos; Papakiritsis, Matthaios; Gkegkes, Ioannis D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypodontia can be defined as the non-formation of one or more teeth during the developmental period. Mutation in several genes related to tooth formation has previously been correlated with cancer. Regarding the ovarian cancer, there are few studies that associate the presence of hypodontia with ovarian cancer. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed and Scopus. In total, 385 patients were included in this study. Control group was present in 3 out of 4 studies (340 patients). Hypodontia was present in 56 out of 290 patients (incidence of 19.3%). Only in 2 out of 4 studies, the number of missing teeth was mentioned (47 teeth), while the majority of them were either maxillary second premolars or maxillary lateral incisors. Unilateral distribution of the missing teeth was present in 28 out of 46 patients, while bilateral distribution of the missing teeth was present in 18 out of 46 patients. The presence of ovarian cancer in the family medical history occurred in 12 out of 33 patients. Only 1 out of 4 studies examined the presence of genes with mutations in the included patients. Based on our findings, the lack of clinical studies was the principal obstacle to clarify the possible predictive value of hypodontia in the early prediction of patients with higher risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:27026778

  12. Use of CA125 and HE4 serum markers to predict ovarian cancer in elevated-risk women

    PubMed Central

    Karlan, Beth Y.; Thorpe, Jason; Watabayashi, Kate; Drescher, Charles W.; Palomares, Melanie; Daly, Mary B.; Paley, Pam; Hillard, Paula; Andersen, M Robyn; Anderson, Garnet; Drapkin, Ronny; Urban, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Background Serum markers are used prior to pelvic imaging to improve specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of ovarian cancer multimodal screening strategies. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled pilot trial to estimate surgical PPV of a “2 of 3 tests positive” screening rule, and to compare use of HE4 as a 1st-line (Arm 1) vs. a 2nd-line (Arm 2) screen, in women at high and elevated risk for EOC at five study sites. Semi-annual screening was offered to 208 women aged 25-80 with deleterious BRCA germ-line mutations, and to 834 women aged 35-80 with pedigrees suggesting inherited susceptibility. Annual screening was offered to 130 women aged 45-80 (Risk Group 3) with epidemiologic and serum marker risk factors. Rising marker levels were identified using the parametric empirical Bayes algorithm. Results Both strategies yielded surgical PPV above 25%. Protocol-indicated surgery was performed in six women, identifying two ovarian malignancies and yielding a surgical PPV in both arms combined of 33% (95% CI: 4%-78%), 25% in Arm 1 and 50% in Arm 2. Surgical consultation was recommended for 37 women (26 in Arm 1, 11 in Arm 2). Based on 12 women with at least 2 of 3 tests positive (CA125, HE4 or imaging), an intent-to-treat analysis yielded PPV of 14% in Arm 1 and 20% in Arm 2. Conclusions Positive screens were more frequent when HE4 was included in the primary screen. Impact. HE4 may be useful as a confirmatory screen when rising CA125 is used alone as a primary screen. PMID:24789859

  13. Association analysis of a chemo-response signature identified within The Cancer Genome Atlas aimed at predicting genetic risk for chemo-response in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Erin A; Newtson, Andreea M; Leslie, Kimberly K; Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Background: A gene signature associated with chemo-response in ovarian cancer was created through integration of biological data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and validated in five independent microarray experiments. Our study aimed to determine if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the 422-gene signature were associated with a genetic predisposition to platinum-based chemotherapy response in serous ovarian cancer. Methods: An association analysis between SNPs within the 422-gene signature and chemo-response in serous ovarian cancer was performed under the log-additive genetic model using the ‘SNPassoc’ package within the R environment (p<0.0001). Subsequent validation of statistically significant SNPs was done in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) database. Results: 19 SNPs were found to be associated with chemo-response with statistical significance. None of the SNPs found significant in TCGA were validated within OCAC for the outcome of interest, chemo-response. Conclusions: SNPs associated with chemo-response in ovarian cancer within TGCA database were not validated in a larger database of patients and controls from OCAC. New strategies integrating somatic and germline information may help to characterize genetic predictors for treatment response in ovarian cancer. PMID:27186327

  14. Ovarian Cancer in Hereditary Cancer Susceptibility Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nakonechny, Quentin B; Gilks, C Blake

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome and Lynch syndrome (LS) are associated with increased risk of developing ovarian carcinoma. Patients with HBOC have a lifetime risk of up to 50% of developing high-grade serous carcinoma of tube or ovary; patients with LS have a 10% lifetime risk of developing endometrioid or clear cell carcinoma of the ovary. Testing all patients with tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma for mutations associated with HBOC syndrome, and all patients presenting with endometrioid or clear cell carcinoma of the ovary for mutations associated with LS can identify patients with undiagnosed underlying hereditary cancer susceptibility syndromes. PMID:27241103

  15. An integrated model of clinical information and gene expression for prediction of survival in ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rendong; Xiong, Jie; Deng, Defeng; Wang, Yiren; Liu, Hequn; Jiang, Guli; Peng, Yangqin; Peng, Xiaoning; Zeng, Xiaomin

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that clinical factors alone are not adequate for predicting the survival of patients with ovarian cancer (OvCa), and many genes have been found to be associated with OvCa prognosis. The objective of this study was to develop a model that integrates clinical information and a gene signature to predict the survival durations of patients diagnosed with OvCa. We constructed mRNA and microRNA expression profiles and gathered the corresponding clinical data of 552 OvCa patients and 8 normal controls from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Using univariate Cox regression followed by a permutation test, elastic net-regulated Cox regression, and ridge regression, we generated a prognosis index consisting of 2 clinical variables, 7 protective mRNAs, 12 risky mRNAs, and 1 protective microRNA. The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic of the integrated clinical-and-gene model was 0.756, larger than that of the clinical-alone model (0.686) or the gene-alone model (0.703). OvCa patients in the high-risk group had a significantly shorter overall survival time compared with patients in the low-risk group (hazard ratio = 8.374, 95% confidence interval = 4.444-15.780, P = 4.90 × 10(-11), by the Wald test). The reliability of the gene signature was confirmed by a public external data set from the Gene Expression Omnibus. Our conclusions that we have identified an integrated clinical-and-gene model superior to the traditional clinical-alone model in ascertaining the survival prognosis of patients with OvCa. Our findings may prove valuable for improving the clinical management of OvCa. PMID:27059002

  16. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  17. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian Past Issues / Spring 2007 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian NCI estimates that endometrial, ...

  18. Exercise May Help Thwart Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159486.html Exercise May Help Thwart Ovarian Cancer Chronic inactivity linked ... TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Lack of exercise is associated with an increased risk of ovarian ...

  19. Exercise May Help Thwart Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159486.html Exercise May Help Thwart Ovarian Cancer Chronic inactivity linked ... TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Lack of exercise is associated with an increased risk of ovarian ...

  20. Aberrant DNA Damage Response Pathways May Predict the Outcome of Platinum Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stefanou, Dimitra T.; Bamias, Aristotelis; Episkopou, Hara; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Likka, Maria; Kalampokas, Theodore; Photiou, Stylianos; Gavalas, Nikos; Sfikakis, Petros P.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Souliotis, Vassilis L.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Despite the advances in the treatment of OC with combinatorial regimens, including surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy, patients generally exhibit poor prognosis due to high chemotherapy resistance. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are involved in resistance of OC patients to platinum chemotherapy. Selected DDR signals were evaluated in two human ovarian carcinoma cell lines, one sensitive (A2780) and one resistant (A2780/C30) to platinum treatment as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from OC patients, sensitive (n = 7) or resistant (n = 4) to subsequent chemotherapy. PBMCs from healthy volunteers (n = 9) were studied in parallel. DNA damage was evaluated by immunofluorescence γH2AX staining and comet assay. Higher levels of intrinsic DNA damage were found in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. Moreover, the intrinsic DNA damage levels were significantly higher in OC patients relative to healthy volunteers, as well as in platinum-sensitive patients relative to platinum-resistant ones (all P<0.05). Following carboplatin treatment, A2780 cells showed lower DNA repair efficiency than A2780/C30 cells. Also, following carboplatin treatment of PBMCs ex vivo, the DNA repair efficiency was significantly higher in healthy volunteers than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in platinum-sensitive ones (t1/2 for loss of γH2AX foci: 2.7±0.5h, 8.8±1.9h and 15.4±3.2h, respectively; using comet assay, t1/2 of platinum-induced damage repair: 4.8±1.4h, 12.9±1.9h and 21.4±2.6h, respectively; all P<0.03). Additionally, the carboplatin-induced apoptosis rate was higher in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. In PBMCs, apoptosis rates were inversely correlated with DNA repair efficiencies of these cells, being significantly higher in platinum-sensitive than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in healthy volunteers (all P<0.05). We conclude that

  1. Genital Cancers in Women: Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuznia, Angela L; Roett, Michelle A

    2015-11-01

    More than 20,000 US women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year. The average lifetime risk is 1.3%, but risk increases with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations (40% and 18% risk, respectively, by age 70 years) or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (12% lifetime risk). Other risk factors include smoking, possibly past clomiphene use, and more years of ovulation. Symptoms are nonspecific. Abdominal pain is most common; others include pelvic pain, bloating, and early satiety. When ovarian cancer is suspected, evaluation should begin with transvaginal ultrasonography with Doppler studies. Cancer antigen 125 testing can be obtained, but levels are not elevated in all patients. Other biomarkers (eg, OVA1) and scoring systems can be used to help determine if cancer is present. When diagnosed early (stage I), the 5-year survival rate is 90% for epithelial ovarian cancer. However, most patients with epithelial ovarian cancer are diagnosed in stage III or later, with a 5-year survival rate of 17% to 39%. Treatment involves total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, with or without chemotherapy. Fertility-preserving options can be considered in some early-stage cancers, followed by more definitive surgical procedures. There is no evidence that routine screening is beneficial and it is associated with significant harms from unnecessary procedures. Women with genetic syndromes that increase risk should be considered for prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. PMID:26569048

  2. Ovarian stimulation in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Hakan; Rosen, Mitchell P

    2013-05-01

    The patients referred for fertility preservation owing to a malignant disease do not represent the typical population of subfertile patients treated in IVF units. Cancer may affect multiple tissues throughout the body and can result in a variety of complications during controlled ovarian stimulation. Determination of the controlled ovarian stimulation protocol and gonadotropin dose for oocyte/embryo cryopreservation requires an individualized assessment. This review highlights the new protocols that are emerging to reduce time constraints and emphasizes management considerations to decrease complications. PMID:23635348

  3. Drug discovery in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Chase, Dana M; Mathur, Nidhee; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2010-11-01

    Drug discovery in the ovarian cancer arena has led to the activation of several important clinical trials. Many biologic agents have come down the pipeline and are being studied in phase II trials for recurrent disease. These agents include antivascular compounds that disrupt angiogenesis through a variety of mechanisms (e.g., prevention of ligand-binding to the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGF-R2), high-affinity VEGF blockade, oral inhibitors of tyrosine kinases stimulated by VEGF, inhibition of alpha5beta1 integrin, neutralization of angioproteins, etc.). Other novel drugs include oral platinum compounds as well as those that antagonize the tumor proliferation genes in the Hedgehog pathway, and that target folic acid receptors which are expressed by ovarian cancer cells. In addition, studies are underway with oral agents that inhibit the tyrosine kinase activity associated with two oncogenes (epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER-2/neu). Finally, emerging technologies in clinical trials include nanotechnology to enhance delivery of chemotherapy to ovarian tumors, drug resistance/sensitivity assays to guide therapy, and agents that mobilize and induce proliferation of hematopoetic progenitor cells to aid in red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet recovery following chemotherapy. The relevant patents in drug discovery of ovarian cancer are discussed. PMID:20524931

  4. Preoperative Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio as a Predictive and Prognostic Factor for High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Rui; Ju, Xingzhu; Chen, Xiaojun; Yang, Wentao; Wu, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to demonstrate the clinical and prognostic significance of the preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC). Methods We retrospectively investigated 875 patients who underwent primary staging or debulking surgery for HGSC between April 2005 and June 2013 at our institution. None of these patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. NLR was defined as the absolute neutrophil count divided by the absolute lymphocyte count. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank tests for univariate analyses. For multivariate analyses, Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the effects of the prognostic factors, which were expressed as hazard ratios (HRs). Results The NLRs ranged from 0.30 to 24.0. The median value was 3.24 and used as the cutoff value to discriminate between the high-NLR (≥3.24) and low-NLR (<3.24) groups. A high preoperative NLR level was associated with an advanced FIGO stage, increased CA125 level, more extensive ascites, worse cytoreduction outcome and chemoresistance. For univariate analyses, a high NLR was associated with reduced PFS (p<0.001) and OS (p<0.001). In multivariate analyses, a high NLR was still an independent predictor of PFS (p = 0.011), but not OS (p = 0.148). Conclusion Our study demonstrated that NLR could reflect tumor burden and clinical outcomes to a certain extent and should be regarded as a predictive and prognostic parameter for HGSC. PMID:27203425

  5. [Epidemiologic factors in ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Curie, P; Sussmann, M; Treisser, A; Renaud, R

    1985-05-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the most severe gynecological cancer with an overall incidence of 12 per 1000 Americans or Europeans developing it over 40 years of age. Only 3 of the 12 cases will receive efficient care because the diagnosis will be made too late. This study reveals the principal risk factors i.e. upper socioeconomic echelon, ovarian function uninterrupted by a pregnancy or usage of oral contraceptives, anamnestic evidence of ovarian carcinoma in the family, some hereditary disorders, external insults (talcum powder). The synthesis of these various risk factors permits a comprehensive review of the hypotheses of pathogenesis concerning recurrence of tumors. But corollary epidemiologic studies are still needed to try to define better the high risk groups whose follow-up systematic detection and testing is a priority. PMID:4023542

  6. Ovarian metastasis from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Birnkrant, A; Sampson, J; Sugarbaker, P H

    1986-11-01

    Controversies exist regarding the surgical treatment of the ovaries in women with primary colorectal cancer. A review of the authors' experience and the surgical literature reveals an incidence of ovarian metastases from colorectal cancer of approximately 6 percent. This problem may occur somewhat more frequently in premenopausal women. Resection of the ovaries at the time of colectomy is unlikely to affect survival. Removal of the ovaries at the time of bowel resection will prevent repeat laparotomy to resect an ovarian mass in approximately 2 percent of women with large bowel cancer. Oophorectomy should be performed in all postmenopausal females at the time of primary resection. Oophorectomy should be performed in premenopausal women if any gross abnormality of the ovary is detected or if peritoneal implants are seen at the time of primary resection. PMID:3533472

  7. Why have ovarian cancer mortality rates declined? Part I. Incidence.

    PubMed

    Sopik, Victoria; Iqbal, Javaid; Rosen, Barry; Narod, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    The age-adjusted mortality rate from ovarian cancer in the United States has declined over the past several decades. The decline in mortality might be the consequence of a reduced number of cases (incidence) or a reduction in the proportion of patients who die from their cancer (case-fatality). In part I of this three-part series, we examine rates of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry database and we explore to what extent the observed decline in mortality can be explained by a downward shift in the stage distribution of ovarian cancer (i.e. due to early detection) or by fewer cases of ovarian cancer (i.e. due to a change in risk factors). The proportion of localized ovarian cancers did not increase, suggesting that a stage-shift did not contribute to the decline in mortality. The observed decline in mortality paralleled a decline in incidence. The trends in ovarian cancer incidence coincided with temporal changes in the exposure of women from different birth cohorts to various reproductive risk factors, in particular, to changes in the use of the oral contraceptive pill and to declining parity. Based on recent changes in risk factor propensity, we predict that the trend of the declining age-adjusted incidence rate of ovarian cancer in the United States will reverse and rates will increase in coming years. PMID:26080287

  8. Antivascular Therapy for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duhoux, Francois P.; Machiels, Jean-Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth largest cancer killer in women. Improved understanding of the molecular pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer has led to the investigation of novel targeted therapies. Ovarian cancer is characterized by an imbalance between pro- and antiangiogenic factors in favor of angiogenesis activation. Various antivascular strategies are currently under investigation in ovarian cancer. They can schematically be divided into antiangiogenic and vascular-disrupting therapies. This paper provides a comprehensive review of these new treatments targeting the tumor vasculature in this disease. Promising activities have been detected in phase II trials, and results of phase III clinical trials are awaited eagerly. PMID:20072701

  9. Migration-inducing gene 7 promotes tumorigenesis and angiogenesis and independently predicts poor prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bihui; Yin, Mingzhu; Li, Xia; Cao, Guosheng; Qi, Jin; Lou, Ge; Sheng, Shijie; Kou, Junping; Chen, Kang; Yu, Boyang

    2016-05-10

    Epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOC) cause more mortality than any other cancer of the female reproductive system. New therapeutic approaches to reduce EOC mortality have been largely unsuccessful due to the poor understanding of the mechanisms underlying EOC proliferation and metastasis. Progress in EOC treatment is further hampered by a lack of reliable prognostic biomarkers for early risk assessment. In this study, we identify that Migration-Inducting Gene 7 (MIG-7) is specifically induced in human EOC tissues but not normal ovaries or ovarian cyst. Ovarian MIG-7 expression strongly correlated with EOC progression. Elevated MIG-7 level at the time of primary cytoreductive surgery was a strong and independent predictor of poor survival of EOC patients. Cell and murine xenograft models showed that MIG-7 was required for EOC proliferation and invasion, and MIG-7 enhanced EOC-associated angiogenesis by promoting the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Inhibiting MIG-7 by RNA interference in grafted EOC cells retarded tumor growth, angiogenesis and improved host survival, and suppressing MIG-7 expression with a small molecule inhibitor D-39 identified from the medicinal plant Liriope muscari mitigated EOC growth and invasion and specifically abrogated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Our data not only reveal a critical function of MIG-7 in EOC growth and metastasis and support MIG-7 as an independent prognostic biomarker for EOC, but also demonstrate that therapeutic targeting of MIG-7 is likely beneficial in the treatment of EOC. PMID:27050277

  10. Accumulation of ALDH1-positive cells after neoadjuvant chemotherapy predicts treatment resistance and prognosticates poor outcome in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Debald, Manuel; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Thiesler, Thore; Schröder, Lars; Barchet, Winfried; Abramian, Alina; Kaiser, Christina; Kristiansen, Glen; Kuhn, Walther; Kübler, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Although ovarian cancer is a highly chemosensitive disease, it is only infrequently cured. One of the major reasons lies in the presence of drug-resistant cancer stem-like cells, sufficient to fuel recurrence. We phenotyped cancer stem-like cells by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in 55 matched samples before and after taxane/platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All used markers of stemness (ALDH1, CD24, CD117, CD133) isolated low frequencies of malignant cells. ALDH1 was the most valuable marker for tracking stemness in vivo. The enrichment of ALDH1 expression after treatment was associated with a poor response to chemotherapy, with platinum resistance and independently prognosticated unfavorable outcome. Our results suggest that increased ALDH1 expression after treatment identifies patients with aggressive tumor phenotypes. PMID:25999351

  11. Accumulation of ALDH1-positive cells after neoadjuvant chemotherapy predicts treatment resistance and prognosticates poor outcome in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Tiyasha H; Keyver-Paik, Mignon-Denise; Debald, Manuel; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Thiesler, Thore; Schröder, Lars; Barchet, Winfried; Abramian, Alina; Kaiser, Christina; Kristiansen, Glen; Kuhn, Walther; Kübler, Kirsten

    2015-06-30

    Although ovarian cancer is a highly chemosensitive disease, it is only infrequently cured. One of the major reasons lies in the presence of drug-resistant cancer stem-like cells, sufficient to fuel recurrence. We phenotyped cancer stem-like cells by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in 55 matched samples before and after taxane/platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All used markers of stemness (ALDH1, CD24, CD117, CD133) isolated low frequencies of malignant cells. ALDH1 was the most valuable marker for tracking stemness in vivo. The enrichment of ALDH1 expression after treatment was associated with a poor response to chemotherapy, with platinum resistance and independently prognosticated unfavorable outcome. Our results suggest that increased ALDH1 expression after treatment identifies patients with aggressive tumor phenotypes. PMID:25999351

  12. Belinostat and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Carboplatin or Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  13. MicroRNAs in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Katz, Betina; Tropé, Claes G; Reich, Reuven; Davidson, Ben

    2015-09-01

    Ovarian cancer, consisting predominantly of ovarian carcinoma, is the eighth most common cancer in women and the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Efforts focus on identifying biomarkers which may aid in early diagnosis and reduce mortality, as well as on characterizing therapeutic targets with the aim of circumventing chemoresistance and prolonging survival at advanced-stage disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression, and have been found to play an important role in ovarian carcinoma. Recent research has identified multiple miRNAs involved in the biology and progression of the disease, and supports a role for miRNAs as potential biomarkers, predictive markers and prognostic factors. Many of the studies published to date nevertheless suffer from critical weaknesses which affect data quality and reproducibility, including the comparison of normal ovaries to tumor tissue without compensation for the highly discrepant target cell fraction in these two specimen types and the inclusion of carcinomas of different histotypes, non-epithelial tumors or tumors of non-specified histology. These shortcomings highlight the critical role of pathologists as part of the team in the setting of such research. This review summarizes current knowledge in this area and discusses the potential clinical relevance of miRNAs in ovarian carcinoma, with focus on studies of clinical specimens in which tissue selection has been deemed adequate. PMID:26216350

  14. CA125 in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Summary Twenty five years after its discovery, circulating CA125 antigen is recommended for clinical use in the US for ovarian cancer (OC) screening of high risk women with ovaries despite its limited sensitivity and specificity. Recent findings suggest that CA125 might also serve as a predictive marker for pre-invasive OC. Methods to quantify circulating CA125 evolved towards sensitive and reliable double determinant ELISA assays. The CA125 gene, MUC16, was cloned 20 years after the protein discovery and revealed a very complex and unusual glycoprotein structure suggesting an immunological role. Recent evidence points toward CA125 function in the induction of materno-fetal tolerance through the alteration of NK phenotype. Two receptors for CA125 have been described: mesothelin and galectin-1. The specific location and functional proprieties of CA125 make it a therapeutic target of choice; clinical trials have demonstrated that anti-CA125 injections are well tolerated and suggest a potential survival benefit. PMID:20477371

  15. Ovulation and extra-ovarian origin of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang-Hartwich, Yang; Gurrea-Soteras, Marta; Sumi, Natalia; Joo, Won Duk; Holmberg, Jennie C; Craveiro, Vinicius; Alvero, Ayesha B; Mor, Gil

    2014-01-01

    The mortality rate of ovarian cancer remains high due to late diagnosis and recurrence. A fundamental step toward improving detection and treatment of this lethal disease is to understand its origin. A growing number of studies have revealed that ovarian cancer can develop from multiple extra-ovarian origins, including fallopian tube, gastrointestinal tract, cervix and endometriosis. However, the mechanism leading to their ovarian localization is not understood. We utilized in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models to recapitulate the process of extra-ovarian malignant cells migrating to the ovaries and forming tumors. We provided experimental evidence to support that ovulation, by disrupting the ovarian surface epithelium and releasing chemokines/cytokines, promotes the migration and adhesion of malignant cells to the ovary. We identified the granulosa cell-secreted SDF-1 as a main chemoattractant that recruits malignant cells towards the ovary. Our findings revealed a potential molecular mechanism of how the extra-ovarian cells can be attracted by the ovary, migrate to and form tumors in the ovary. Our data also supports the association between increased ovulation and the risk of ovarian cancer. Understanding this association will lead us to the development of more specific markers for early detection and better prevention strategies. PMID:25135607

  16. Early Preinvasive Lesions in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chene, Gautier; Lamblin, Gery; Le Bail-Carval, Karine; Chabert, Philippe; Bakrin, Naoual; Mellier, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Faced with the catastrophic prognosis for ovarian cancer due to the fact that it is most often diagnosed late at the peritoneal carcinomatosis stage, screening and early detection could probably reduce the mortality rate. A better understanding of the molecular characteristics of the different ovarian cancer subtypes and their specific molecular signatures is indispensable prior to development of new screening strategies. We discuss here the early natural history of ovarian cancer and its origins. PMID:24804229

  17. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  18. Surgical management of recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Leitao, Mario M; Chi, Dennis S

    2009-04-01

    Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with advanced ovarian cancer. The majority of patients with advanced ovarian cancer who experience a clinical remission after initial surgery will develop a recurrence. The optimal management for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer remains to be defined. Chemotherapy is frequently used with varying response rates. Repeat surgical cytoreduction appears to offer a survival benefit for select patients with recurrent ovarian cancer and should be considered. Surgery also plays a role in the palliation of certain patients. Continued investigations, especially randomized trials, are needed to further define the optimal treatment modalities for these patients. PMID:19332245

  19. Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in the pre-treatment phase of final-line chemotherapy predicts the outcome of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, KEIICHIRO; NAGASAKA, TAKESHI; NISHIDA, TAKESHI; HARUMA, TOMOKO; OGAWA, CHIKAKO; KUSUMOTO, TOMOYUKI; SEKI, NORIKO; HIRAMATSU, YUJI

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and tumor immunology are associated with prognosis in a variety of cancers. The aim of the present retrospective study was to identify associations between the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR), cancer antigen 125 (CA125) concentrations, tumor response, performance status (PS) and survival of patients that developed recurrent ovarian cancer subsequent to receiving chemotherapy. The NLR and PLR measured prior to fourth-line chemotherapy were significantly increased compared with those measured prior to second-line chemotherapy (P=0.029 and 0.049, respectively). By using receiver operating characteristic curves, the cut-off values were determined for the NLR, PLR and CA125 levels that were measured during the pre-treatment phase, which predicted the outcomes. According to univariate analyses, pre-treatment NLR >3.91, PLR >299.0 and PS 2 were each significantly associated with poor outcomes (P=0.001, 0.005 and 0.021, respectively). According to multivariate analyses, only pre-treatment NLR was associated with poor outcome (P=0.035). The present findings indicate that pre-treatment NLR is an important predictor of prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer that experience recurrence following chemotherapy. PMID:27313726

  20. Belinostat in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer or Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  1. Deletion at 6q24.2-26 predicts longer survival of high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kamieniak, Marta M; Rico, Daniel; Milne, Roger L; Muñoz-Repeto, Ivan; Ibáñez, Kristina; Grillo, Miguel A; Domingo, Samuel; Borrego, Salud; Cazorla, Alicia; García-Bueno, José M; Hernando, Susana; García-Donas, Jesús; Hernández-Agudo, Elena; Y Cajal, Teresa Ramón; Robles-Díaz, Luis; Márquez-Rodas, Ivan; Cusidó, Maite; Sáez, Raquel; Lacambra-Calvet, Carmen; Osorio, Ana; Urioste, Miguel; Cigudosa, Juan C; Paz-Ares, Luis; Palacios, José; Benítez, Javier; García, María J

    2015-02-01

    Standard treatments for advanced high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs) show significant side-effects and provide only short-term survival benefits due to disease recurrence. Thus, identification of novel prognostic and predictive biomarkers is urgently needed. We have used 42 paraffin-embedded HGSOCs, to evaluate the utility of DNA copy number alterations, as potential predictors of clinical outcome. Copy number-based unsupervised clustering stratified HGSOCs into two clusters of different immunohistopathological features and survival outcome (HR = 0.15, 95%CI = 0.03-0.81; Padj = 0.03). We found that loss at 6q24.2-26 was significantly associated with the cluster of longer survival independently from other confounding factors (HR = 0.06, 95%CI = 0.01-0.43, Padj = 0.005). The prognostic value of this deletion was validated in two independent series, one consisting of 36 HGSOCs analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (P = 0.04) and another comprised of 411 HGSOCs from the Cancer Genome Atlas study (TCGA) (HR = 0.67, 95%CI = 0.48-0.93, Padj = 0.019). In addition, we confirmed the association of low expression of the genes from the region with longer survival in 799 HGSOCs (HR = 0.74, 95%CI = 0.61-0.90, log-rank P = 0.002) and 675 high-FIGO stage HGSOCs (HR = 0.76, 95%CI = 0.61-0.96, log-rank P = 0.02) available from the online tool KM-plotter. Finally, by integrating copy number, RNAseq and survival data of 296 HGSOCs from TCGA we propose a few candidate genes that can potentially explain the association. Altogether our findings indicate that the 6q24.2-26 deletion is an independent marker of favorable outcome in HGSOCs with potential clinical value as it can be analyzed by FISH on tumor sections and guide the selection of patients towards more conservative therapeutic strategies in order to reduce side-effects and improve quality of life. PMID:25454820

  2. OVARIAN CANCER: INVOLVEMENT OF THE MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alem, Linah; Curry, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies. Reasons for the high mortality rate associated with ovarian cancer include a late diagnosis at which time the cancer has metastasized throughout the peritoneal cavity. Cancer metastasis is facilitated by the remodeling of the extracellular tumor matrix by a family of proteolytic enzymes known as the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). There are 23 members in the MMP family, many of which have been reported to be associated with ovarian cancer. In the current paradigm, ovarian tumor cells and the surrounding stromal cells stimulate the synthesis and/or activation of various MMPs to aid in tumor growth, invasion, and eventual metastasis. This review sheds light on the different MMPs in the various types of ovarian cancer and their impact on the progression of this gynecologic malignancy. PMID:25918438

  3. Rethinking Ovarian Cancer: Recommendations for Improving Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Sebastian; Coward, Jermaine I.; Bast Jr., Robert C.; Berchuck, Andy; Berek, Jonathan S.; Brenton, James D.; Coukos, George; Crum, Christopher C.; Drapkin, Ronny; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Friedlander, Michael; Gabra, Hani; Kaye, Stan B.; Lord, Chris J.; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A.; McNeish, Iain A.; Menon, Usha; Mills, Gordon B.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Oza, Amit M.; Sood, Anil K.; Stronach, Euan A.; Walczak, Henning; Bowtell, David D.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2012-01-01

    There have been major advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of the human malignancies collectively referred to as ovarian cancer. At a recent Helene Harris Memorial Trust meeting, an international group of researchers considered actions that should be taken to improve the outcome for women with ovarian cancer. Nine major recommendations are outlined in this Perspective. PMID:21941283

  4. Ovarian cancer mortality and industrial pollution.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Javier; Lope, Virginia; López-Abente, Gonzalo; González-Sánchez, Mario; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo

    2015-10-01

    We investigated whether there might be excess ovarian cancer mortality among women residing near Spanish industries, according to different categories of industrial groups and toxic substances. An ecologic study was designed to examine ovarian cancer mortality at a municipal level (period 1997-2006). Population exposure to pollution was estimated by means of distance from town to facility. Using Poisson regression models, we assessed the relative risk of dying from ovarian cancer in zones around installations, and analyzed the effect of industrial groups and pollutant substances. Excess ovarian cancer mortality was detected in the vicinity of all sectors combined, and, principally, near refineries, fertilizers plants, glass production, paper production, food/beverage sector, waste treatment plants, pharmaceutical industry and ceramic. Insofar as substances were concerned, statistically significant associations were observed for installations releasing metals and polycyclic aromatic chemicals. These results support that residing near industries could be a risk factor for ovarian cancer mortality. PMID:26046426

  5. Role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Meynier, Sonia; Kramer, Marianne; Ribaux, Pascale; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Delie, Florence; Petignat, Patrick; Cohen, Marie

    2015-09-01

    Prostate apoptosis response-4 (PAR-4) is considered as a tumour suppressor due to its ability to selectively induce cell apoptosis in most cancer cells. However little is known about the role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer. In this study, we investigated for the first time the role of PAR-4 in ovarian carcinogenesis. We showed that PAR-4 mRNA level is not significantly different between healthy and cancer ovarian cells. Immunohistochemistry on ovarian tissue showed that ovarian cancer cells are positive for PAR-4 nuclear and cytoplasmic staining whereas ovarian healthy cells are negative for PAR-4 nuclear staining. We then studied the role of PAR-4 in cell apoptosis. We determined that PAR-4 induces cell apoptosis in response to stimuli, in vitro, but is also involved in the relocation of GRP78 from endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface of ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV-3 cells). In ovo, PAR-4 decreases ovarian tumour development and increases the response to taxol treatment. These observations suggest that PAR-4 is a very interesting therapeutic target against ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:26246468

  6. Role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meynier, Sonia; Kramer, Marianne; Ribaux, Pascale; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Delie, Florence; Petignat, Patrick; Cohen, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Prostate apoptosis response-4 (PAR-4) is considered as a tumour suppressor due to its ability to selectively induce cell apoptosis in most cancer cells. However little is known about the role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer. In this study, we investigated for the first time the role of PAR-4 in ovarian carcinogenesis. We showed that PAR-4 mRNA level is not significantly different between healthy and cancer ovarian cells. Immunohistochemistry on ovarian tissue showed that ovarian cancer cells are positive for PAR-4 nuclear and cytoplasmic staining whereas ovarian healthy cells are negative for PAR-4 nuclear staining. We then studied the role of PAR-4 in cell apoptosis. We determined that PAR-4 induces cell apoptosis in response to stimuli, in vitro, but is also involved in the relocation of GRP78 from endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface of ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV-3 cells). In ovo, PAR-4 decreases ovarian tumour development and increases the response to taxol treatment. These observations suggest that PAR-4 is a very interesting therapeutic target against ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:26246468

  7. EGEN-001 and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-11

    Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  8. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer? What should you ask your doctor about ovarian cancer? It is important for you to have honest, ... are some questions to consider: What type of ovarian cancer do I have? Has my cancer spread beyond ...

  9. Risk of Ovarian Cancer Relapse Score

    PubMed Central

    Rizzuto, Ivana; Stavraka, Chara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Borley, Jane; Hopkins, Thomas Glass; Gabra, Hani; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Huson, Les; Blagden, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to construct a prognostic index that predicts risk of relapse in women who have completed first-line treatment for ovarian cancer (OC). Methods A database of OC cases from 2000 to 2010 was interrogated for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, grade and histological subtype of cancer, preoperative and posttreatment CA-125 level, presence or absence of residual disease after cytoreductive surgery and on postchemotherapy computed tomography scan, and time to progression and death. The strongest predictors of relapse were included into an algorithm, the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Relapse (ROVAR) score. Results Three hundred fifty-four cases of OC were analyzed to generate the ROVAR score. Factors selected were preoperative serum CA-125, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade of cancer, and presence of residual disease at posttreatment computed tomography scan. In the validation data set, the ROVAR score had a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 61%, respectively. The concordance index for the validation data set was 0.91 (95% confidence interval, 0.85-0.96). The score allows patient stratification into low (<0.33), intermediate (0.34–0.67), and high (>0.67) probability of relapse. Conclusions The ROVAR score stratifies patients according to their risk of relapse following first-line treatment for OC. This can broadly facilitate the appropriate tailoring of posttreatment care and support. PMID:25647256

  10. Measurement of Phospholipids May Improve Diagnostic Accuracy in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lorelei; Han, Gang; Zhu, Weiwei; Molina, Ashley D.; Arango, Hector; LaPolla, James P.; Hoffman, Mitchell S.; Sellers, Thomas; Kirby, Tyler; Nicosia, Santo V.; Sutphen, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Background More than two-thirds of women who undergo surgery for suspected ovarian neoplasm do not have cancer. Our previous results suggest phospholipids as potential biomarkers of ovarian cancer. In this study, we measured the serum levels of multiple phospholipids among women undergoing surgery for suspected ovarian cancer to identify biomarkers that better predict whether an ovarian mass is malignant. Methodology/Principal Findings We obtained serum samples preoperatively from women with suspected ovarian cancer enrolled through a prospective, population-based rapid ascertainment system. Samples were analyzed from all women in whom a diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) was confirmed and from benign disease cases randomly selected from the remaining (non-EOC) samples. We measured biologically relevant phospholipids using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We applied a powerful statistical and machine learning approach, Hybrid huberized support vector machine (HH-SVM) to prioritize phospholipids to enter the biomarker models, and used cross-validation to obtain conservative estimates of classification error rates. Results The HH-SVM model using the measurements of specific combinations of phospholipids supplements clinical CA125 measurement and improves diagnostic accuracy. Specifically, the measurement of phospholipids improved sensitivity (identification of cases with preoperative CA125 levels below 35) among two types of cases in which CA125 performance is historically poor - early stage cases and those of mucinous histology. Measurement of phospholipids improved the identification of early stage cases from 65% (based on CA125) to 82%, and mucinous cases from 44% to 88%. Conclusions/Significance Levels of specific serum phospholipids differ between women with ovarian cancer and those with benign conditions. If validated by independent studies in the future, these biomarkers may serve as an adjunct at the time of clinical

  11. Therapeutic advances in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Rader, J S

    1992-02-01

    The propensity of ovarian cancer to recur--even after initial chemotherapeutic responses--is a problem that has been given a great deal of attention during the past year in the literature dealing with the treatment of ovarian cancer. Most of the articles address techniques to improve the percent of initial and secondary treatment responses. Several studies have described cytoreductive techniques to decrease the remaining tumor size for improved chemotherapeutic response. Cross-resistance between platinum analogues has been reconfirmed. However, improved secondary responses were seen when repeat treatment with platinum agents were preceded by a longer interval from initial platinum agent therapy. Radiation therapy has been shown to offer little solution to recurrent disease except possibly in a select group of patients with microscopic disease at second-look laparotomy. Reports on the use of carboplatin continue to demonstrate good initial responses, with decreased toxicity compared with cisplatin. Granisetron has been shown to significantly decrease the nausea and vomiting caused by emetogenic chemotherapy like cisplatin. PMID:1543823

  12. Metformin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Ovarian Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  13. Bevacizumab and Intravenous or Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  14. Oncolytic reovirus against ovarian and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Sandra G; Norman, Kara L; Alain, Tommy; Kossakowska, Anna; Lee, Patrick W K

    2002-03-15

    Reovirus selectively replicates in and destroys cancer cells with an activated Ras signaling pathway. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using reovirus (serotype 3, strain Dearing) as an antihuman colon and ovarian cancer agent. In in vitro studies, reovirus infection in human colon and ovarian cell lines was assessed by cytopathic effect as detected by light microscopy, [(35)S]Methionine labeling of infected cells for viral protein synthesis and progeny virus production by plaque assay. We observed that reovirus efficiently infected all five human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, DLD-1, HCT-116, HT-29, and SW48) and four human ovarian cancer cell lines (MDAH2774, PA-1, SKOV3, and SW626) which were tested, but not a normal colon cell line (CCD-18Co) or a normal ovarian cell line (NOV-31). We also observed that the Ras activity in the human colon and ovarian cancer cell lines was elevated compared with that in normal colon and ovarian cell lines. In animal models, intraneoplastic as well as i.v. inoculation of reovirus resulted in significant regression of established s.c. human colon and ovarian tumors implanted at the hind flank. Histological studies revealed that reovirus infection in vivo was restricted to tumor cells, whereas the surrounding normal tissue remained uninfected. Additionally, in an i.p. human ovarian cancer xenograft model, inhibition of ascites tumor formation and the survival of animals treated with live reovirus was significantly greater than of control mice treated with UV-inactivated reovirus. Reovirus infection in ex vivo primary human ovarian tumor surgical samples was also confirmed, further demonstrating the potential of reovirus therapy. These results suggest that reovirus holds promise as a novel agent for human colon and ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:11912142

  15. STAT3 polymorphisms may predict an unfavorable response to first-line platinum-based therapy for women with advanced serous epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Fulp, William J; Reid, Brett M; Chen, Zhihua; Georgeades, Christina; Cheng, Jin Q; Magliocco, Anthony; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Lancaster, Johnathan M

    2016-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) contribute to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) progression and therapeutic response. We hypothesized that germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CSC-related genes may predict an initial therapeutic response for women newly diagnosed with EOC. A nested case-control design was used to study 361 women with advanced-stage serous EOC treated with surgery followed by first-line platinum-based combination therapy at Moffitt Cancer Center or as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas Study. "Cases" included 102 incomplete responders (IRs) and "controls" included 259 complete clinical responders (CRs) to therapy. Using Illumina genotyping arrays and imputation, DNA samples were evaluated for 5,509 SNPs in 24 ovarian CSC-related genes. We also evaluated the overall significance of each CSC gene using the admixture maximum likelihood (AML) test, and correlated genotype with EOC tumor tissue expression. The strongest SNP-level associations with an IR to therapy were identified for correlated (r(2) > 0.80) SNPs within signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) [odds ratio (OR), 2.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.32-3.78; p = 0.0027], after adjustment for age, population stratification, grade and residual disease. At the gene level, STAT3 was significantly associated with an IR to therapy (pAML = 0.006). rs1053004, a STAT3 SNP in a putative miRNA-binding site, was associated with STAT3 expression (p = 0.057). This is the first study to identify germline STAT3 variants as independent predictors of an unfavorable therapeutic response for EOC patients. Findings suggest that STAT3 genotype may identify high-risk women likely to respond more favorably to novel therapeutic combinations that include STAT3 inhibitors. PMID:26264211

  16. STAT3 polymorphisms may predict an unfavorable response to first-line platinum-based therapy for women with advanced serous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Fulp, William J.; Reid, Brett M.; Chen, Zhihua; Georgeades, Christina; Cheng, Jin Q.; Magliocco, Anthony; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Lancaster, Johnathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) contribute to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) progression and therapeutic response. We hypothesized that germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CSC-related genes may predict an initial therapeutic response for women newly diagnosed with EOC. A nested case–control design was used to study 361 women with advanced-stage serous EOC treated with surgery followed by first-line platinum-based combination therapy at Moffitt Cancer Center or as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas Study. “Cases” included 102 incomplete responders (IRs) and “controls” included 259 complete clinical responders (CRs) to therapy. Using Illumina genotyping arrays and imputation, DNA samples were evaluated for 5,509 SNPs in 24 ovarian CSC-related genes. We also evaluated the overall significance of each CSC gene using the admixture maximum likelihood (AML) test, and correlated genotype with EOC tumor tissue expression. The strongest SNP-level associations with an IR to therapy were identified for correlated (r2 > 0.80) SNPs within signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) [odds ratio (OR), 2.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.32–3.78; p = 0.0027], after adjustment for age, population stratification, grade and residual disease. At the gene level, STAT3 was significantly associated with an IR to therapy (pAML 5 0.006). rs1053004, a STAT3 SNP in a putative miRNA-binding site, was associated with STAT3 expression (p = 0.057). This is the first study to identify germline STAT3 variants as independent predictors of an unfavorable therapeutic response for EOC patients. Findings suggest that STAT3 genotype may identify high-risk women likely to respond more favorably to novel therapeutic combinations that include STAT3 inhibitors. PMID:26264211

  17. OPT-821 With or Without Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer in Second or Third Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  18. Temsirolimus and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) combination therapy in breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer: phase Ib results and prediction of clinical outcome with FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Boers-Sonderen, Marye J; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Desar, Ingrid M E; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Oyen, Wim J G; Ottevanger, Petronella B; van Herpen, Carla M L

    2014-12-01

    Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) is active in breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer. Preclinical data suggest that the combination of PLD with a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor has an additive effect. The safety and recommended phase two dose (RPTD) of temsirolimus in combination with PLD were assessed. (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT was performed for early response monitoring. Nineteen patients with advanced breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer were treated with increasing doses of temsirolimus (10, 15, or 20 mg once weekly) and PLD (30 or 40 mg/m(2) once every 4 weeks). PLD was initiated 2 weeks after start of temsirolimus. FDG-PET/CT was performed at baseline, after 2 and 6 weeks. Standardized uptake values (SUV), metabolic volume, and total lesion glycolysis (TLG, SUV × metabolic volume) were calculated. The RPTD was 15 mg temsirolimus and 40 mg/m(2) PLD. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) were thrombocytopenia grade 3 with nose bleeding and skin toxicity grade 3. Most frequent treatment-related toxicities were nausea, fatigue, mucositis, and skin toxicity. Changes in TLG after 2 weeks predicted partial response (PR) after 10 weeks (p = 0.037). A rise in SUV between the second and sixth week predicted progression (PD) (p = 0.034) and was associated with worse progression free survival (PFS) (HR 1.068; p = 0.013). The RPTD was established at 15 mg temsirolimus weekly and PLD 40 mg/m(2) once every 4 weeks and the combination was safe. Early response evaluation with FDG-PET/CT may predict subsequent radiological PR and PD. This trial is registered under number NCT0098263. PMID:24577626

  19. Rethinking ovarian cancer II: reducing mortality from high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, David D; Böhm, Steffen; Ahmed, Ahmed A; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Bast, Robert C; Beral, Valerie; Berek, Jonathan S; Birrer, Michael J; Blagden, Sarah; Bookman, Michael A; Brenton, James D; Chiappinelli, Katherine B; Martins, Filipe Correia; Coukos, George; Drapkin, Ronny; Edmondson, Richard; Fotopoulou, Christina; Gabra, Hani; Galon, Jérôme; Gourley, Charlie; Heong, Valerie; Huntsman, David G; Iwanicki, Marcin; Karlan, Beth Y; Kaye, Allyson; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A; Lu, Karen H; McNeish, Iain A; Menon, Usha; Narod, Steven A; Nelson, Brad H; Nephew, Kenneth P; Pharoah, Paul; Powell, Daniel J; Ramos, Pilar; Romero, Iris L; Scott, Clare L; Sood, Anil K; Stronach, Euan A; Balkwill, Frances R

    2015-11-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) accounts for 70-80% of ovarian cancer deaths, and overall survival has not changed significantly for several decades. In this Opinion article, we outline a set of research priorities that we believe will reduce incidence and improve outcomes for women with this disease. This 'roadmap' for HGSOC was determined after extensive discussions at an Ovarian Cancer Action meeting in January 2015. PMID:26493647

  20. Rethinking ovarian cancer II: reducing mortality from high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bowtell, David D.; Böhm, Steffen; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Bast, Robert C.; Beral, Valerie; Berek, Jonathan S.; Birrer, Michael J.; Blagden, Sarah; Bookman, Michael A.; Brenton, James; Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Martins, Filipe Correia; Coukos, George; Drapkin, Ronny; Edmondson, Richard; Fotopoulou, Christina; Gabra, Hani; Galon, Jérôme; Gourley, Charlie; Heong, Valerie; Huntsman, David G.; Iwanicki, Marcin; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kaye, Allyson; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A.; Lu, Karen H.; McNeish, Iain A.; Menon, Usha; Narod, Steve A.; Nelson, Brad H.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Pharoah, Paul; Powell, Daniel J.; Ramos, Pilar; Romero, Iris L.; Scott, Clare L.; Sood, Anil K.; Stronach, Euan A.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) accounts for 70-80% of ovarian cancer deaths, and overall survival has not changed significantly for several decades. In this Opinion article, we outline a set of research priorities that we believe will reduce incidence and improve outcomes for women with this disease. This ‘roadmap’ for HGSOC was determined after extensive discussions at an Ovarian Cancer Action meeting in January 2015. PMID:26493647

  1. Epidemiological characteristics of ovarian cancer in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Boyoung; Park, Sohee; Kim, Tae-Joong; Ma, Seung Hyun; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Jae Weon; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Tae Jin; Yoo, Keun-Young

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to examine recent trends in ovarian cancer incidence and mortality and secular trends in demographic factors in Korea. Methods With the data from Korea Central Cancer Registry, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Korean Death Registry, and World Health Organization's Statistical Information System, we calculated age-standardized incidence and mortality rates for ovarian cancer. Also we estimated future incidence of ovarian and cervical cancer using linear regression model. To assess the demographic trend, data from national surveys in Korea or results from published papers were searched. Results Ovarian cancer incidence rate was similar to that in women worldwide but lower than those in Western countries, and the trend has been increased steadily. Ovarian cancer-related mortality rates have been increasing in Korea, even though those in western and some Asian countries, such as China, have been decreasing. Age-specific incidence rate and mortality rate showed steep increases with advancing age. The incidence rate of ovarian cancer was estimated to surpass that of uterine cervix cancer in 2015. Korea showed rapid changes in nutritional, reproductive, and anthropometric factors. Conclusion These recent trends in ovarian cancer incidence and mortality may be partly attributed to gradual westernizing of life styles and to changes in socio-demographic behavior factors. In particular, the increasing trend in ovarian cancer mortality in Korea may be attributed to a real rise in mortality as well as, in part, a decline in misclassification bias related to an increase in the proportion of deaths confirmed by physician diagnosis. PMID:21278886

  2. Ovarian cancer: emerging molecular-targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sourbier, Carole

    2012-01-01

    With about 22,000 new cases estimated in 2012 in the US and 15,500 related deaths, ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous and aggressive disease. Even though most of patients are sensitive to chemotherapy treatment following surgery, recurring disease is almost always lethal, and only about 30% of the women affected will be cured. Thanks to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer malignancy, new therapeutic options with molecular-targeted agents have become available. This review discusses the rationale behind molecular-targeted therapies and examines how newly identified molecular targets may enhance personalized therapies for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:22807625

  3. Olaparib for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, E; Jimeno, A

    2016-01-01

    Olaparib, an oral poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, is the first FDA-approved drug in its class for patients with ovarian cancer, specifically in a subset of patients with BRCA mutations and prior chemotherapy treatments. PARP inhibitors have had other implications in different solid tumor types including breast, gastric and pancreatic malignancies. In light of the recent FDA approval of olaparib for the treatment of ovarian cancer, this article aims to outline the mechanisms and implications of the drug. With a favorable adverse event profile and improved outcomes, including progression-free survival, olaparib has demonstrated augmentation to therapeutic options in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:26937492

  4. Genomic similarities between breast and ovarian cancers

    Cancer.gov

    One subtype of breast cancer shares many genetic features with high-grade serous ovarian cancer, a cancer that is very difficult to treat, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health. The findings suggest that the two cancers a

  5. Ormeloxifene efficiently inhibits ovarian cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Diane M.; Khan, Sheema; Nordquist, Jordan; Ebeling, Mara C.; Bauer, Nichole A.; Kopel, Lucas; Singh, Man Mohan; Halaweish, Fathi; Bell, Maria C.; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer related deaths for women. Anticancer agents effective against chemo-resistant cells are greatly needed for ovarian cancer treatment. Repurposing drugs currently in human use is an attractive strategy for developing novel cancer treatments with expedited translation into clinical trials. Therefore, we examined whether ormeloxifene (ORM), a non-steroidal Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) currently used for contraception, is therapeutically effective at inhibiting ovarian cancer growth. We report that ORM treatment inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cell lines, including cell lines resistant to cisplatin. Furthermore, ORM treatment decreases Akt phosphorylation, increases p53 phosphorylation, and modulates the expression and localization patterns of p27, cyclin E, cyclin D1, and CDK2. In a pre-clinical xenograft mouse ORM treatment significantly reduces tumorigenesis and metastasis. These results indicate that ORM effectively inhibits the growth of cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. ORM is currently in human use and has an established record of patient safety. Our encouraging in vitro and pre-clinical in vivo findings indicate that ORM is a promising candidate for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25306892

  6. LOH at 6q and 10q in fractionated circulating DNA of ovarian cancer patients is predictive for tumor cell spread and overall survival

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We recently showed that LOH proximal to M6P/IGF2R locus (D6S1581) in primary ovarian tumors is predictive for the presence of disseminated tumor cells (DTC) in the bone marrow (BM). For therapy-monitoring, it would be highly desirable to establish a blood-based biomarker. Therefore, we quantified circulating DNA (cirDNA) in sera of 63 ovarian cancer patients before surgery and after chemotherapy, measured incidence of LOH at four cancer-relevant chromosomal loci, correlated LOH with tumor cell spread to the BM and evaluated prognostic significance of LOH. Methods cirDNA was fractionated into high- and low molecular-weight fraction (HMWF, LMWF) for LOH-profiling, utilizing PCR-based fluorescence microsatellite analysis. BM aspirates were analyzed for DTC by immunocytochemistry using the pan-cytokeratin antibody A45-B/B3. Results cirDNA levels in the HMWF before surgery were predictive for residual tumor load (p = 0.017). After chemotherapy, we observed a significant decline of cirDNA in the LMWF (p = 0.0001) but not in the HMWF. LOH was prevalently detected in the LMWF with an overall frequency of 67%, only moderately ablating after chemotherapy (45%). Before surgery, LOH in the LMWF at marker D10S1765 and D13S218 significantly correlated with tumor grading and FIGO stage (p = 0.033, p = 0.004, respectively). In both combined fractions, LOH at D6S1581 additionally associated with overall survival (OS) (p = 0.030). Moreover, solely LOH at D10S1765 in LMWF after therapy correlated with DTC in BM after therapy (p = 0.017). Conclusion We demonstrate the applicability and necessity of DNA-fractionation prior to analyzing circulating LOH and identify LOH at D10S1765 and D6S1581 as novel blood-based biomarkers for ovarian cancer, being relevant for therapy-monitoring. PMID:22849543

  7. HOXB13 promotes ovarian cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jiangyong; Wang, Zuncai; Provencher, Heather; Muir, Beth; Dahiya, Sonika; Carney, Erin; Leong, Chee-Onn; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Orsulic, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Deregulated expression of HOXB13 in a subset of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen monotherapy is associated with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome. Because the ovary is another hormone-responsive organ, we investigated whether HOXB13 plays a role in ovarian cancer progression. We show that HOXB13 is expressed in multiple human ovarian cancer cell lines and tumors and that knockdown of endogenous HOXB13 by RNA interference in human ovarian cancer cell lines is associated with reduced cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of HOXB13 is capable of transforming p53−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts and promotes cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in mouse ovarian cancer cell lines that contain genetic alterations in p53, myc, and ras. In this genetically defined cell line model of ovarian cancer, we demonstrate that HOXB13 collaborates with activated ras to markedly promote tumor growth in vivo and that HOXB13 confers resistance to tamoxifen-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, our results support a pro-proliferative and pro-survival role for HOXB13 in ovarian cancer. PMID:17942676

  8. General Information about Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary Peritoneal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  9. Genetic and molecular changes in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Robert L; Gourley, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the developed world, and can be divided into five main histological subtypes: high grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous and low grade serous. These subtypes represent distinct disease entities, both clinically and at the molecular level. Molecular analysis has revealed significant genetic heterogeneity in ovarian cancer, particularly within the high grade serous subtype. As such, this subtype has been the focus of much research effort to date, revealing molecular subgroups at both the genomic and transcriptomic level that have clinical implications. However, stratification of ovarian cancer patients based on the underlying biology of their disease remains in its infancy. Here, we summarize the molecular changes that characterize the five main ovarian cancer subtypes, highlight potential opportunities for targeted therapeutic intervention and outline priorities for future research. PMID:27458531

  10. Cytogenetic studies in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Whang-Peng, J; Knutsen, T; Douglass, E C; Chu, E; Ozols, R F; Hogan, W M; Young, R C

    1984-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies of ovarian cancer have been conducted in the Medicine Branch, NCI, National Institutes of Health for 5 years. A total of 72 patients were studied by direct preparation and/or 1- to 3-day short-term culture of ascites (86 samples), pleural fluid (4 samples), and tumor (2 samples). Repeat examinations (1-24 months later) were performed in 7 of the 72 patients. Forty-four patients (62%) were successfully analyzed with banding techniques: 6 patients had adenocarcinoma, 7 had serous adenocarcinoma, 13 had serous papillary adenocarcinoma, 7 had serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, 2 had mucinous adenocarcinoma, 6 had undifferentiated or poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, 1 had clear cell adenocarcinoma, and 2 were not classified. Of these 44 patients, 29 had received prior chemotherapy, 14 were untreated, and in 1 patient the treatment status was unknown. Aneuploidy was observed in all patients and there was considerable variation in the chromosome numbers (even within single samples), often ranging from diploidy to triploidy to tetraploidy. All 44 patients had numerical abnormalities and 39 had structural abnormalities. The chromosomes most frequently involved in structural abnormalities (in decreasing order according to the number of patients involved) were #1, #3, #2, #4, #9, #10, #15, #19, #6, and #11; the least involved chromosomes were #21 and #5. Clone formation and the number of chromosomes involved in structural abnormalities increased with duration of disease and were more extensive in patients treated with chemotherapy than in patients treated with surgery alone. Our data did not show a deletion of chromosome #6 (6q-) to be specific for ovarian cancer. PMID:6690026

  11. Pharmacoprevention for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, Massimiliano; Bonanni, Bernardo

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome is an important women's health condition characterized by an increased susceptibility to the development of cancer, in particular breast and ovarian neoplasms, and is caused by an inherited germline genetic mutation in one or both tumor suppressor genes named BRCA1 and BRCA2. This monographic issue provides an update on our knowledge of this syndrome with particular emphasis on the risk reduction strategies through a pharmacopreventive approach. PMID:26928419

  12. Surgical management of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Salani, Ritu; Bristow, Robert E

    2012-03-01

    Ovarian cancer affects approximately 21,880 women and accounts for over 13,000 deaths annually in the United States. Although survival rates have improved over the past several decades, directly as a result of advances in chemotherapy and surgery, ovarian cancer continues to have high mortality rates. Understanding the multiple roles of surgery throughout the disease course is the focus of this review. PMID:22343231

  13. Rethinking ovarian cancer: recommendations for improving outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sebastian; Coward, Jermaine I; Bast, Robert C; Berchuck, Andy; Berek, Jonathan S; Brenton, James D; Coukos, George; Crum, Christopher C; Drapkin, Ronny; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Friedlander, Michael; Gabra, Hani; Kaye, Stan B; Lord, Chris J; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A; McNeish, Iain A; Menon, Usha; Mills, Gordon B; Nephew, Kenneth P; Oza, Amit M; Sood, Anil K; Stronach, Euan A; Walczak, Henning; Bowtell, David D; Balkwill, Frances R

    2011-10-01

    There have been major advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of the human malignancies that are collectively referred to as ovarian cancer. At a recent Helene Harris Memorial Trust meeting, an international group of researchers considered actions that should be taken to improve the outcome for women with ovarian cancer. Nine major recommendations are outlined in this Opinion article. PMID:21941283

  14. The treatment of early stage ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, R C

    1995-10-01

    Approximately one third of women with ovarian cancer present with localized disease. A series of recent studies have identified a population of patients who require only comprehensive surgical staging for optimal results and another group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy. A series of national and international studies are evaluating a variety of adjuvant treatments in prospective randomized trials that may enhance long-term survival in poor-prognosis early ovarian cancer. PMID:7481865

  15. Unbalanced estrogen metabolism in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Muhammad; Beseler, Cheryl L; Hall, James B; LeVan, Tricia; Cavalieri, Ercole L; Rogan, Eleanor G

    2014-05-15

    Greater exposure to estrogens is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in ovarian cancer, a spot urine sample and a saliva sample were obtained from 33 women with ovarian cancer and 34 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed in the urine samples using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates was significantly higher in cases compared to controls (p < 0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. DNA was purified from the saliva samples and analyzed for genetic polymorphisms in the genes for two estrogen-metabolizing enzymes. Women with two low-activity alleles of catechol-O-methyltransferase plus one or two high-activity alleles of cytochrome P450 1B1 had higher levels of estrogen-DNA adducts and were more likely to have ovarian cancer. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in ovarian cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts plays a critical role in the initiation of ovarian cancer. PMID:24170413

  16. Diagnosis and Management of Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Doubeni, Chyke A; Doubeni, Anna R; Myers, Allison E

    2016-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer. Less than one-half of patients survive for more than five years after diagnosis. Ovarian cancer affects women of all ages but is most commonly diagnosed after menopause. More than 75% of affected women are diagnosed at an advanced stage because early-stage disease is usually asymptomatic and symptoms of late-stage disease are nonspecific. The strongest risk factors are advancing age and family history of ovarian and breast cancer. Women who have symptoms concerning for ovarian cancer should undergo a physical examination, transvaginal ultrasonography, and measurement of biomarkers such as cancer antigen 125. If results are suspicious for ovarian cancer, the patient should be referred to a gynecologic oncologist. Despite the low rate of early diagnosis, guidelines recommend against routine screening for ovarian cancer in average-risk women because screening, including routine pelvic examinations, is ineffective and associated with harm. However, a recent trial found a potential benefit of annual screening using an algorithm based on serial cancer antigen 125 measurements followed by transvaginal ultrasonography for women at increased risk, as determined by the algorithm. Women with an increased-risk family history should be referred for genetic counseling and, if genetic mutations (e.g., BRCA mutations) are identified, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy can be considered for risk reduction. In both average- and high-risk women, long-term hormonal contraceptive use reduces risk by about 50%. The treatment of ovarian cancer usually involves surgery, with or without intraperitoneal and intravenous chemotherapy. Primary care physicians have important roles in posttreatment surveillance and end-of-life care. PMID:27281838

  17. Features of ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome (Review)

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, KANAKO; BANNO, KOUJI; YANOKURA, MEGUMI; IIDA, MIHO; ADACHI, MASATAKA; MASUDA, KENTA; UEKI, ARISA; KOBAYASHI, YUSUKE; NOMURA, HIROYUKI; HIRASAWA, AKIRA; TOMINAGA, EIICHIRO; AOKI, DAISUKE

    2014-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary ovarian cancer with a prevalence of 0.9–2.7%. Lynch syndrome accounts for 10–15% of hereditary ovarian cancers, while hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome accounts for 65–75% of these cancers. The lifetime risk for ovarian cancer in families with Lynch syndrome is ~8%, which is lower than colorectal and endometrial cancers, and ovarian cancer is not listed in the Amsterdam Criteria II. More than half of sporadic ovarian cancers are diagnosed in stage III or IV, but ≥80% of ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome are diagnosed in stage I or II. Ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome mostly have non-serous histology and different properties from those of sporadic ovarian cancers. A screening method for ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome has yet to be established and clinical studies of prophylactic administration of oral contraceptives are not available. However, molecular profiles at the genetic level indicate that ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome has a more favorable prognosis than sporadic ovarian cancer. Inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of the rapamycin pathway and anti-epidermal growth factor antibodies may have efficacy for the disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review focusing on ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome. PMID:25279173

  18. Predictive value of the age-adjusted charlson comorbidity index on perioperative complications and survival in patients undergoing primary debulking surgery for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suidan, Rudy S.; Leitao, Mario M.; Zivanovic, Oliver; Gardner, Ginger J.; Long Roche, Kara C.; Sonoda, Yukio; Levine, Douglas A.; Jewell, Elizabeth L.; Brown, Carol L.; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R.; Charlson, Mary E.; Chi, Dennis S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the ability of the Age-Adjusted Charlson Comorbidity index (ACCI) to predict perioperative complications and survival in patients undergoing primary debulking for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods Data were analyzed for all patients with stage IIIB-IV EOC who underwent primary cytoreduction from 1/2001–1/2010 at our institution. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on an ACCI of 0–1, 2–3, and ≥4. Clinical and survival outcomes were assessed and compared. Results We identified 567 patients; 199 (35%) had an ACCI of 0–1, 271 (48%) had an ACCI of 2–3, and 97 (17%) had an ACCI of ≥4. The ACCI was significantly associated with the rate of complete gross resection (0–1=44%, 2–3=32%, and ≥4=32%; p=0.02), but was not associated with the rate of minor (47% vs 47% vs 43%, p=0.84) or major (18% vs 19% vs 16%, p=0.8) complications. The ACCI was also significantly associated with progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Median PFS for patients with an ACCI of 0–1, 2–3, and ≥4 was 20.3, 16, and 15.4 months, respectively (p=0.02). Median OS for patients with an ACCI of 0–1, 2–3, and ≥4 was 65.3, 49.9, and 42.3 months, respectively (p<0.001). On multivariate analysis, the ACCI remained a significant prognostic factor for both PFS (p=0.02) and OS (p<0.001). Conclusions The ACCI was not associated with perioperative complications in patients undergoing primary cytoreduction for advanced EOC, but was a significant predictor of PFS and OS. Prospective clinical trials in ovarian cancer should consider stratifying for an age-comorbidity covariate. PMID:26037900

  19. Lost expression of DCC gene in ovarian cancer and its inhibition in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meimei, Liu; Peiling, Li; Baoxin, Li; Changmin, Li; Rujin, Zhuang; Chunjie, Hu

    2011-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related women mortality in China. In recent years, the molecular mechanisms involved in ovarian carcinoma development and/or progression have been intensely studied, and several genes have been identified. Deleted in Colorectal Carcinoma (DCC), is an important tumor suppressor gene, which is inactivated in many kinds of tumors, and its function(s) is not clarified. Even though the lost expression of DCC occurred in later stages of multistep colorectal carcinogenesis, its contribution to the onset or progression of ovarian cancer is not fully understood. To investigate DCC expression in ovarian cancer, we studied 254 clinical samples by RT-PCR. Our results revealed that 52% malignant ovarian cancer did not express DCC gene. By contrast, DCC expression was observed in all normal ovary tissues and 80% benign ovarian tumors. Obviously, there was a significant correlation between DCC expression and ovarian cancer, especially in the epithelial ovarian cancer. The present study also suggested that the loss expression of DCC occurred more frequently in the cases of later clinical stage, higher pathological grade, and poorer prognosis. In the other part of this study, we further explored DCC expression after transfection in two kinds of ovarian cancer cell lines, namely SKOV3 cell and HO-8910 cell, using RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. The results indicated that DCC expressed in SKOV3-DCC and HO-8910-DCC cells, and ultrastructural analysis showed the appearance of apoptotic features in them. Furthermore, cell growth was markedly down-regulated in above groups of cells, indicating that transfection with the DCC constructs can suppress the growth of tumor cells. In conclusion, our results suggest an association of lost expression of DCC with the ovarian cancer, and DCC gene may inhibit the growth of ovarian carcinoma cells. However, this result needs further trials with a larger sample. PMID:20054719

  20. Three-dimensional modeling of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erin, White; Hilary, Kenny; Ernst, Lengyel

    2015-01-01

    New models for epithelial ovarian cancer initiation and metastasis are required to obtain a mechanistic understanding of the disease and to develop new therapeutics. Modeling ovarian cancer however is challenging as a result of the genetic heterogeneity of the malignancy, the diverse pathology, the limited availability of human tissue for research, the atypical mechanisms of metastasis, and because the origin is unclear. Insights into the origin of high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas and mechanisms of metastasis have resulted in the generation of novel three-dimensional (3D) culture models that better approximate the behavior of the tumor cells in vivo than prior two-dimensional models. The 3D models aim to recapitulate the tumor microenvironment, which has a critical role in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. Ultimately, findings using models that accurately reflect human ovarian cancer biology are likely to translate into improved clinical outcomes. In this review we discuss the design of new 3D culture models of ovarian cancer primarily using human cells, key studies in which these models have been applied, current limitations, and future applications. PMID:25034878

  1. Cisplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage IIC, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Gastrointestinal Complication; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  2. Genetic heterogeneity of breast-ovarian cancer revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.; Ford, D.; Easton, D.

    1995-10-01

    We have recently reported the results of a linkage analysis of 145 breast-ovarian cancer families. Each family has three or more cases of early-onset breast cancer (age {le}60) or of ovarian cancer, and all families have at least one case of ovarian cancer (there were nine site-specific ovarian cancer families). Overall, we estimated that 76% of the families were linked to the BRCA1 locus. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Adoptive immunotherapy against ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mittica, Gloria; Capellero, Sonia; Genta, Sofia; Cagnazzo, Celeste; Aglietta, Massimo; Sangiolo, Dario; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The standard front-line therapy for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is combination of debulking surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Nevertheless, the majority of patients experience disease recurrence. Although extensive efforts to find new therapeutic options, cancer cells invariably develop drug resistance and disease progression. New therapeutic strategies are needed to improve prognosis of patients with advanced EOC.Recently, several preclinical and clinical studies investigated feasibility and activity of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC. Our aim is to highlight prospective of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC, focusing on HLA-restricted Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs), and MHC-independent immune effectors such as natural killer (NK), and cytokine-induced killer (CIK). Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has shown activity in several pre-clinical models. Available preclinical and clinical data suggest that adoptive cell therapy may provide the best benefit in settings of low tumor burden, minimal residual disease, or maintenance therapy. Further studies are needed to better define the optimal clinical setting. PMID:27188274

  4. Ovarian stimulation in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Elkin; González, Naira; Muñoz, Luis; Aguilar, Jesús; Velasco, Juan A García

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among women under 50. Improvements in diagnosis and treatment have yielded an important decrease in mortality in the last 20 years. In many cases, chemotherapy and radiotherapy develop side effects on the reproductive function. Therefore, before the anti-cancer treatment impairs fertility, clinicians should offer some techniques for fertility preservation for women planning motherhood in the future. In order to obtain more available oocytes for IVF, the ovary must be stimulated. New protocols which prevent exposure to increased estrogen during gonadotropin stimulation, measurements to avoid the delay in starting anti-cancer treatment or the outcome of ovarian stimulation have been addressed in this review. There is no evidence of association between ovarian stimulation and breast cancer. It seems that there are more relevant other confluent factors than ovarian stimulation. Factors that can modify the risk of breast cancer include: parity, age at full-term birth, age of menarche, and family history. There is an association between breast cancer and exogenous estrogen. Therefore, specific protocols to stimulate patients with breast cancer include anti-estrogen agents such as letrozole. By using letrozole plus recombinant follicular stimulating hormone, patients develop a multifollicular growth with only a mild increase in estradiol serum levels. Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) takes around 10 days, and we discuss new strategies to start COS as soon as possible. Protocols starting during the luteal phase or after inducing the menses currently prevent a delay in starting ovarian stimulation. Patients with breast cancer have a poorer response to COS compared with patients without cancer who are stimulated with conventional protocols of gonadotropins. Although many centres offer fertility preservation and many patients undergo ovarian stimulation, there are not enough studies to evaluate the recurrence, breast cancer

  5. Prophylactic Oophorectomy: Reducing the U.S. Death Rate from Epithelial Ovarian Cancer. A Continuing Debate.

    PubMed

    Piver

    1996-01-01

    ovarian cancer, Taxol® and cisplatin, researchers reported that this resulted in an increase in the median disease-free survival of only five months, as compared with those women allocated to receive cisplatin and cyclophosphamide (median disease-free survival of 18 and 12.9 months, respectively), felt then to be the standard therapy [3]. Patients treated with Taxol® and cisplatin survived a median of 14 months longer than those treated with cisplatin and cyclophosphamide. These results may improve in women whose cancers were optimally debulked to cancer greater than 1 cm. Given these sobering statistics, the public health issue is whether prophylactic oophorectomy for two select groups of women may be one measure in reducing the mortality from ovarian cancer in the United States. The two groups of women are: A) women age 40 or older who undergo hysterectomy for non-cancerous uterine conditions and B) those with a family history of ovarian cancer. PROPHYLACTIC OOPHORECTOMY AT THE TIME OF HYSTERECTOMY IN WOMEN AGE 40 OR OLDER: Concerning the first group of women, researchers from the University of Miami reported that 4.5%-14.1% of women develop ovarian cancer after prior hysterectomy for non-ovarian conditions (Table 2) [4-9]. Utilizing their University of Miami experience and the three other similar series in the literature, they were able to determine the number of ovarian cancer patients who had previously undergone hysterectomy at age 40 or older for non-cancerous uterine conditions. Of the 2,632 ovarian cancer cases, they predicted that 5.2% (138) of the ovarian cancers could have been prevented if prophylactic oophorectomy were performed in women 40 years or older at the time of hysterectomy for benign disease. Confirming these results is a recent survey of the American College of Surgeons which reported that of 12,316 cases of ovarian cancer studied, 18.2% of these women had had a

  6. A photobleaching-based PDT dose metric predicts PDT efficacy over certain BPD concentration ranges in a three-dimensional model of ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbil, S.; Rizvi, I.; Celli, J. P.; Alagic, N.; Hasan, T.

    2013-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) dosimetry is an active area of study that is motivated by the need to reliably predict treatment outcomes. Implicit dosimetric parameters, such as photosensitizer (PS) photobleaching, may indicate PDT efficacy and could establish a framework to provide patient-customized PDT. Here, tumor destruction and benzoporphryin-derivative (BPD) photobleaching are characterized by systematically varying BPD-light combinations to achieve fixed PDT doses (M * J * cm-2) in a three-dimensional (3D) model of micrometastatic ovarian cancer (OvCa). It is observed that the BPD-light parameters used to construct a given PDT dose significantly impact nodule viability and BPD photobleaching. As a result, PDT dose, when measured by the product of BPD concentration and fluence, does not reliably predict overall efficacy. A PDT dose metric that incorporates a term for BPD photobleaching more robustly predicts PDT efficacy at low concentrations of BPD. These results suggest that PDT dose metrics that are informed by implicit approaches to dosimetry could improve the reliability of PDT-based regimens and provide opportunities for patient-specific treatment planning.

  7. Quantitative measurement of adiposity using CT images to predict the benefit of bevacizumab-based chemotherapy in epithelial ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUNZHI; THAI, THERESA; MOORE, KATHLEEN; DING, KAI; MCMEEKIN, SCOTT; LIU, HONG; ZHENG, BIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to quantitatively measure adiposity-related image features and to test the feasibility of applying multivariate statistical data analysis-based prediction models to generate a novel clinical marker and predict the benefit of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients with and without maintenance bevacizumab-based chemotherapy. A dataset involving computed tomography (CT) images acquired from 59 patients diagnosed with advanced EOC was retrospectively collected. Among them, 32 patients received maintenance bevacizumab following primary chemotherapy, while 27 did not. A computer-aided detection scheme was developed to automatically segment visceral and subcutaneous fat areas depicted on CT images of abdominal sections, and 7 adiposity-related image features were computed. Upon combining these features with the measured body mass index, multivariate data analyses were performed using three statistical models (multiple linear, logistic and Cox proportional hazards regressions) to analyze the association between the model-generated prediction results and the treatment outcome, including progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of the patients. The results demonstrated that applying all three prediction models yielded a significant association between the adiposity-related image features and patients' PFS or OS in the group of the patients who received maintenance bevacizumab (P<0.010), while there was no significant difference when these prediction models were applied to predict both PFS and OS in the group of patients that did not receive maintenance bevacizumab. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that the use of a quantitative adiposity-related image feature-based statistical model may generate a novel clinical marker to predict who will benefit among EOC patients receiving maintenance bevacizumab-based chemotherapy. PMID:27347200

  8. Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Topotecan With or Without Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  9. Two-Pronged Chemo Helps Some with Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Two-Pronged Chemo Helps Some With Advanced Ovarian Cancer Study found using both abdomen drip and ... 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some women with advanced ovarian cancer may fare better if chemotherapy is dripped ...

  10. Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Genomic Resources Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Screening. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. February 2016. Family Health History, Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk, and ...

  11. Does Breast or Ovarian Cancer Run in Your Family?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Breast or Ovarian Cancer Run in Your Family? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... get ovarian cancer by age 70. Does Your Family Health History Put You At Risk? Tell your ...

  12. Epigenetic targeting of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P; Matei, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer. As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor-suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cells (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA-hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC toward a differentiated phenotype by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH(+) ovarian cancer cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low-dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH(+) cells, including their tumor-initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced reexpression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by reprogramming residual cancer stem-like cells. Furthermore, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25035395

  13. Distinct prognostic values of four-Notch-receptor mRNA expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinling; Teng, Lingling; Wang, Min

    2016-05-01

    Notch signaling pathway includes ligands and Notch receptors, which are frequently deregulated in several human malignancies including ovarian cancer. Aberrant activation of Notch signaling has been linked to ovarian carcinogenesis and progression. In the current study, we used the "Kaplan-Meier plotter" (KM plotter) database, in which updated gene expression data and survival information from a total of 1306 ovarian cancer patients were used to access the prognostic value of four Notch receptors in ovarian cancer patients. Hazard ratio (HR), 95 % confidence intervals, and log-rank P were calculated. Notch1 messenger RNA (mRNA) high expression was not found to be correlated to overall survival (OS) for all ovarian cancer, as well as in serous and endometrioid cancer patients followed for 20 years. However, Notch1 mRNA high expression is significantly associated with worsen OS in TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer patients, while it is significantly associated with better OS in TP53 mutation-type ovarian cancer patients. Notch2 mRNA high expression was found to be significantly correlated to worsen OS for all ovarian cancer patients, as well as in grade II ovarian cancer patients. Notch3 mRNA high expression was found to be significantly correlated to better OS for all ovarian cancer patients, but not in serous cancer patients and endometrioid cancer patients. Notch4 mRNA high expression was not found to be significantly correlated to OS for all ovarian cancer patients, serous cancer patients, and endometrioid cancer patients. These results indicate that there are distinct prognostic values of four Notch receptors in ovarian cancer. This information will be useful for better understanding of the heterogeneity and complexity in the molecular biology of ovarian cancer and for developing tools to more accurately predict their prognosis. Based on our results, Notch1 could be a potential drug target of TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer and Notch2 could be a potential drug

  14. Mucinous ovarian cancer: A therapeutic review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Rush, Jack; Rickett, Kirsty; Coward, Jermaine I G

    2016-06-01

    Mucinous ovarian cancer represents approximately 3% of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC). Despite this seemingly low prevalence, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic conundrum that has resulted in numerous attempts to adopt novel strategies in managing this disease. Anecdotally, there has been a prevailing notion that established gold standard systemic regimens should be substituted for those utilised in cancers such as gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies; tumours that share more biological similarities than other EOC subtypes. This review summarises the plethora of small studies which have adopted this philosophy and influenced the design of the multinational GOG142 study, which was ultimately terminated due to poor accrual. To date, there is a paucity of evidence to support delivering 'GI style' chemotherapy for mucinous ovarian cancer over and above carboplatin-paclitaxel doublet therapy. Hence there is an urge to develop studies focused on targeted therapeutic agents driven by refined mutational analysis and conducted within the context of harmonised international collaborations. PMID:27083591

  15. Olaparib in the management of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bixel, Kristin; Hays, John L

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the homologous repair pathway are thought to occur in 30%–50% of epithelial ovarian cancers. Cells deficient in homologous recombination rely on alternative pathways for DNA repair in order to survive, thereby providing a potential target for therapy. Olaparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, capitalizes on this concept and is the first drug in its class approved for patients with ovarian cancer. This review article will provide an overview of the BRCA genes and homologous recombination, the role of PARP in DNA repair and the biological rationale for the use of PARP inhibitors as cancer therapy, and ultimately will focus on the use of olaparib in the management of ovarian cancer. PMID:26309417

  16. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-15

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  17. Expression profile of COL2A1 and the pseudogene SLC6A10P predicts tumor recurrence in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ganapathi, Mahrukh K; Jones, Wendell D; Sehouli, Jalid; Michener, Chad M; Braicu, Ioana E; Norris, Eric J; Biscotti, Charles V; Vaziri, Susan A J; Ganapathi, Ram N

    2016-02-01

    Tumor recurrence, following initial response to adjuvant chemotherapy, is a major problem in women with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). Microarray analysis of primary tumors has identified genes that may be useful in risk stratification/overall survival, but are of limited value in predicting the >70% rate for tumor recurrence. In this study, we performed RNA-Seq analysis of primary and recurrent HGSOC to first identify unique differentially expressed genes. From this dataset, we selected 21 archetypical coding genes and one noncoding RNA, based on statistically significant differences in their expression profile between tumors, for validation by qPCR in a larger cohort of 110 ovarian tumors (71 primary and 39 recurrent) and for testing association of specific genes with time-to-recurrence (TTR). Kaplan-Meier tests revealed that high expression of collagen type II, alpha 1 (COL2A1) was associated with delayed TTR (HR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.27-0.82, p = 0.008), whereas low expression of the pseudogene, solute carrier family 6 member 10 (SLC6A10P), was associated with longer TTR (HR = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.30-0.93, p = 0.027). Notably, TTR was significantly delayed for tumors that simultaneously highly expressed COL2A1 and lowly expressed SLC6A10P (HR = 0.21, 95% CI: 0.082-0.54, p = 0.0011), an estimated median of 95 months as compared to an estimated median of 16 months for subjects expressing other levels of COL2A1 and SLC6A10P. Thus, evaluating expression levels of COL2A1 and SLC6A10P at primary surgery could be beneficial for clinically managing recurrence of HGSOC. PMID:26311224

  18. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoiemma, Phillip P; Powell, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in ovarian cancer is prognostic for increased survival while increases in immunosuppressive regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are associated with poor outcomes. Approaches that bolster tumor-reactive TILs may limit tumor progression. However, identifying tumor-reactive TILs in ovarian cancer has been challenging, though adoptive TIL therapy in patients has been encouraging. Other forms of TIL immunomodulation remain under investigation including Treg depletion, antibody-based checkpoint modification, activation and amplification using dendritic cells, antigen presenting cells or IL-2 cytokine culture, adjuvant cytokine injections, and gene-engineered T-cells. Many approaches to TIL manipulation inhibit ovarian cancer progression in preclinical or clinical studies as monotherapy. Here, we review the impact of TILs in ovarian cancer and attempts to mobilize TILs to halt tumor progression. We conclude that effective TIL therapy for ovarian cancer is at the brink of translation and optimal TIL activity may require combined methodologies to deliver clinically-relevant treatment. PMID:25894333

  19. Changes in Brain Function in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  20. Ovarian cancer treatment: The end of empiricism?

    PubMed

    Lheureux, Stephanie; Karakasis, Katherine; Kohn, Elise C; Oza, Amit M

    2015-09-15

    The diagnosis, investigation, and management of ovarian cancer are in a state of flux-balancing ever rapid advances in our understanding of its biology with 3 decades of clinical trials. Clinical trials that started with empirically driven selections have evolved in an evidence-informed manner to gradually improve outcome. Has this improved understanding of the biology and associated calls to action led to appropriate changes in therapy? In this review, the authors discuss incorporating emerging data on biology, combinations, dose, and scheduling of new and existing agents with patient preferences in the management of women with ovarian cancer. PMID:26096019

  1. Cell stiffness is a biomarker of the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenwei; Mezencev, Roman; Kim, Byungkyu; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John; Sulchek, Todd; Sulchek Team; McDonald Team

    2013-03-01

    The metastatic potential of cells is an important parameter in the design of optimal strategies for the personalized treatment of cancer. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we show that ovarian cancer cells are generally softer and display lower intrinsic variability in cell stiffness than non-malignant ovarian epithelial cells. A detailed study of highly invasive ovarian cancer cells (HEY A8) and their less invasive parental cells (HEY), demonstrates that deformability can serve as an accurate biomarker of metastatic potential. Comparative gene expression profiling indicate that the reduced stiffness of highly metastatic HEY A8 cells is associated with actin cytoskeleton remodeling, microscopic examination of actin fiber structure in these cell lines is consistent with this prediction. Our results indicate that cell stiffness not only distinguishes ovarian cancer cells from non-malignant cells, but may also be a useful biomarker to evaluate the relative metastatic potential of ovarian and perhaps other types of cancer cells.

  2. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-21

    Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinofibroma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  3. Ovarian Cancer Biomarker Performance in Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Daniel W.; Bast, Robert C.; Berg, Christine D.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Hartge, Patricia; Lokshin, Anna E.; Lu, Karen H.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Mor, Gil; Patriotis, Christos; Pinsky, Paul F.; Thornquist, Mark D.; Scholler, Nathalie; Skates, Steven J.; Sluss, Patrick M.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Ward, David C.; Zhang, Zhen; Zhu, Claire S.; Urban, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Establishing a cancer screening biomarker’s intended performance requires “phase III” specimens obtained in asymptomatic individuals before clinical diagnosis rather than “phase II” specimens obtained from symptomatic individuals at diagnosis. We used specimens from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) cancer screening trial to evaluate ovarian cancer biomarkers previously assessed in phase II sets. Phase II specimens from 180 ovarian cancer cases and 660 benign disease or general population controls were assembled from four Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) or Ovarian Cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) sites and used to rank 49 biomarkers. Thirty-five markers, including 6 additional markers from a fifth site, were then evaluated in PLCO proximate specimens from 118 women with ovarian cancer and 474 matched controls. Top markers in phase II specimens included CA125, HE4, transthyretin, CA15.3, and CA72.4 with sensitivity at 95% specificity ranging from 0.73 to 0.40. Except for transthyretin, these markers had similar or better sensitivity when moving to phase III specimens that had been drawn within six months of the clinical diagnosis. Performance of all markers declined in phase III specimens more remote than 6 months from diagnosis. Despite many promising new markers for ovarian cancer, CA125 remains the single-best biomarker in the phase II and phase III specimens tested in this study. PMID:21372036

  4. [Immunological analogies between ovarian cancer and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Hanssen, S; Collinet, P; Leblanc, E; Salzet, M; Vinatier, D

    2013-05-01

    During pregnancy an environment allowing installation of tolerance toward the fetus is set up locally at the materno-fetal interface. Numerous effectors of immunity are involved in this tolerance (NK cell, T cell, Macrophages, dendritic cell). Specific mechanisms during pregnancy attract locally these immunological cells. In the decidua, they are educated toward tolerance. These mechanisms evolve during the pregnancy because at the end of the pregnancy, tolerance is broken to prepare and activate the labor. Ovarian tumors, after having surmounted the immunosurveillance, like trophoblast, chair the installation of a tolerance of their host facilitating the development of the disease. The blocking of these mechanisms of tolerance coupled with activation of mechanisms of defenses offer new perspectives in the treatment of the ovarian cancer. The authors suggest showing the analogies of the tolerance observed during ovarian cancer and pregnancy. The knowledge of the orchestration of the physiological mechanisms observed during pregnancy will offer new therapeutic targets. PMID:23182791

  5. The diagnostic value of serum HE4 and CA-125 and ROMA index in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    WEI, SU; LI, HUI; ZHANG, BEI

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a common malignancy of the female reproductive system. Tumor markers serve as tools in the diagnosis of the disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the diagnostic value of sera levels of carbohydrate antigen-125 (CA-125), human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) as well as the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and the risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm (ROMA) index in ovarian cancer. The sera were measured using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay on 158 individuals (64 patients with ovarian cancer, 64 with ovarian benign tumor and 30 healthy individuals) between September 2013 and May 2015. The results showed that levels of HE4 and CA-125 in the sera of the ovarian benign tumor group as well as their ROMA index were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of the ovarian benign tumor and control groups, regardless of pre- or postmenopausal status. However, the level of CA-125 was significantly higher (P<0.05) in the ovarian benign tumor group compared with the healthy group, while the level of HE4 was similar in the two groups. The sensitivity of the ROMA index was higher (P<0.01) with detection of HE4 and CA-125. In the ovarian cancer group, the areas under ROC curves of ROMA, HE4 and CA-125 were 0.994, 0.990 and 0.941, respectively. The specificity and positive predictive value of HE4 in the premenopausal ovarian cancer group reached 98.36 and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, the results showed that the serum level of HE4 and the ROMA index are important indicators in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. However, in addition to HE4 and CA-125 detection, the ROMA index is extremely valuable in improving the diagnostic efficiency of ovarian cancer. PMID:27347403

  6. Quality of Life and Care Needs of Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Anxiety; Fatigue; Nausea and Vomiting; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  7. Targeting the EGF Receptor for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zeineldin, Reema; Muller, Carolyn Y.; Stack, M. Sharon; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the US. Factors such as the molecular heterogeneity of ovarian tumors and frequent diagnosis at advanced stages hamper effective disease treatment. There is growing emphasis on the identification and development of targeted therapies to disrupt molecular pathways in cancer. The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is one such protein target with potential utility in the management of ovarian cancer. This paper will discuss contributions of EGF receptor activation to ovarian cancer pathogenesis and the status of EGF receptor inhibitors and EGF receptor targeted therapies in ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:20066160

  8. Targeted Immune Therapy of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Keith L.; Karyampudi, Lavakumar; Lamichhane, Purushottam; Preston, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Clinical outcomes, such as recurrence free survival and overall survival, in ovarian cancer are quite variable, independent of common characteristics such as stage, response to therapy and grade. This disparity in outcomes warrants further exploration and therapeutic targeting into the interaction between the tumor and host. One compelling host characteristic that contributes both to the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer is the immune system. Hundreds of studies have confirmed a prominent role for the immune system in modifying the clinical course of the disease. Recent studies also show that anti-tumor immunity is often negated by immune regulatory cells present in the tumor microenvironment. Regulatory immune cells also directly enhance the pathogenesis through the release of various cytokines and chemokines, which together form an integrated pathologic network. Thus, in the future, research into immunotherapy targeting ovarian cancer will probably become increasingly focused on combination approaches that simultaneously augment immunity while preventing local immune suppression. In this article, we summarize important immunological targets that influence ovarian cancer outcome as well as include an update on newer immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25544369

  9. Microvesicles as Potential Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Ilaria; D'Ascenzo, Sandra; Dolo, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    Although the incidence of ovarian cancer is low (i.e., less than 5% in European countries), it is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy and typically has a poor prognosis. To ensure optimal survival, it is important to diagnose this condition when the pathology is confined to the ovary. However, this is difficult to achieve because the first specific symptoms appear only during advanced disease stages. To date, the biomarker mainly used for the diagnosis and prognosis of ovarian cancer is CA125; however, this marker has a low sensitivity and specificity and is associated with several other physiological and pathological conditions. No other serum ovarian cancer markers appear to be able to replace or complement CA125, and the current challenge is therefore to identify novel markers for the early diagnosis of this disease. For this purpose, studies have focused on the microvesicles (MVs) released from tumor cells. MVs may represent an ideal biomarker because they can be easily isolated from blood, and they have particular features (mainly regarding microRNA profiles) that strongly correlate with ovarian cancer stage and may be effective for early diagnosis. PMID:23484144

  10. Surgical management of recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Hee Seung; Chang, Suk-Joon; Bristow, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    Most patients with advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer will experience a relapse of disease despite a complete response after surgical cytoreduction and platinum-based chemotherapy. Treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer mainly comprises various combinations of systemic chemotherapy with or without targeted agents. The role of cytoreductive surgery for recurrent ovarian cancer is not well established. Although the literature on survival benefit of cytoreductive surgery for recurrent disease has expanded steadily over the past decade, most studies were retrospective, single-institution series with small numbers of patients. Given the balance between survival benefit and surgery-related morbidity during maximum cytoreductive surgical effort, it is essential to establish the optimal selection criteria for identifying appropriate candidates who will benefit from surgery without worsening quality of life. Three phase III randomized trials for this issue are currently underway. Herein, we present contemporary evidence supporting the positive role of cytoreductive surgery and offer selection criteria for optimal candidates for surgery in the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer. PMID:27130407

  11. Ovarian Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... any other group, followed by black, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Asian/Pacific Islander women. Ovarian Cancer Death Rates* by Race and Ethnicity, U.S., 1999–2012 Mortality source: U.S. Mortality Files, National Center for Health ...

  12. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal ... primary peritoneal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal ...

  13. Ovarian cancer treatment: The end of empiricism?

    PubMed Central

    Lheureux, Stephanie; Karakasis, Katherine; Kohn, Elise C.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis, investigation, and management of ovarian cancer are in a state of flux—balancing ever rapid advances in our understanding of its biology with 3 decades of clinical trials. Clinical trials that started with empirically driven selections have evolved in an evidence‐informed manner to gradually improve outcome. Has this improved understanding of the biology and associated calls to action led to appropriate changes in therapy? In this review, the authors discuss incorporating emerging data on biology, combinations, dose, and scheduling of new and existing agents with patient preferences in the management of women with ovarian cancer. Cancer 2015;121:3203–3211. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:26096019

  14. Targeting CD133 in an in vivo ovarian cancer model reduces ovarian cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Skubitz, Amy P.N.; Taras, Elizabeth P.; Boylan, Kristin L.M.; Waldron, Nate N.; Oh, Seunguk; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Vallera, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives While most women with ovarian cancer will achieve complete remission after treatment, the majority will relapse within two years, highlighting the need for novel therapies. Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been identified in ovarian cancer and most other carcinomas as a small population of cells that can self-renew. CSC are more chemoresistant and radio-resistant than the bulk tumor cells; it is likely that CSC are responsible for relapse, the major problem in cancer treatment. CD133 has emerged as one of the most promising markers for CSC in ovarian cancer. The hypothesis driving this study is that despite their low numbers in ovarian cancer tumors, CSC can be eradicated using CD133 targeted therapy and tumor growth can be inhibited. Methods Ovarian cancer cell lines were evaluated using flow cytometry for expression of CD133. In vitro viability studies with an anti-CD133 targeted toxin were performed on one of the cell lines, NIH:OVCAR5. The drug was tested in vivo using a stably transfected luciferase-expressing NIH:OVCAR5 subline in nude mice, so that tumor growth could be monitored by digital imaging in real time. Results Ovarian cancer cell lines showed 5.6% to 16.0% CD133 expression. dCD133KDEL inhibited the in vitro growth of NIH:OVCAR5 cells. Despite low numbers of CD133-expressing cells in the tumor population, intraperitoneal drug therapy caused a selective decrease in tumor progression in intraperitoneal NIH: OVCAR5-luc tumors. Conclusions Directly targeting CSC that are a major cause of drug resistant tumor relapse with an anti-CD133 targeted toxin shows promise for ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:23721800

  15. Glutathione in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy Caused by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Patients With Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, and/or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-22

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  16. ARID3B Directly Regulates Ovarian Cancer Promoting Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bobbs, Alexander; Gellerman, Katrina; Hallas, William Morgan; Joseph, Stancy; Yang, Chao; Kurkewich, Jeffrey; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein AT-Rich Interactive Domain 3B (ARID3B) is elevated in ovarian cancer and increases tumor growth in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer. However, relatively little is known about ARID3B's function. In this study we perform the first genome wide screen for ARID3B direct target genes and ARID3B regulated pathways. We identified and confirmed numerous ARID3B target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. Using motif-finding algorithms, we characterized a binding site for ARID3B, which is similar to the previously known site for the ARID3B paralogue ARID3A. Functionality of this predicted site was demonstrated by ChIP analysis. We next demonstrated that ARID3B induces expression of its targets in ovarian cancer cell lines. We validated that ARID3B binds to an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) enhancer and increases mRNA expression. ARID3B also binds to the promoter of Wnt5A and its receptor FZD5. FZD5 is highly expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines, and is upregulated by exogenous ARID3B. Both ARID3B and FZD5 expression increase adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) components including collagen IV, fibronectin and vitronectin. ARID3B-increased adhesion to collagens II and IV require FZD5. This study directly demonstrates that ARID3B binds target genes in a sequence-specific manner, resulting in increased gene expression. Furthermore, our data indicate that ARID3B regulation of direct target genes in the Wnt pathway promotes adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26121572

  17. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3–17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer. PMID:27594911

  18. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3-17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer. PMID:27594911

  19. Cisplatin induces stemness in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, Andrew; Saygin, Caner; Thiagarajan, Praveena S; Rao, Vinay S; Hale, James S; Gupta, Nikhil; Hitomi, Masahiro; Nagaraj, Anil Belur; DiFeo, Analisa; Lathia, Justin D; Reizes, Ofer

    2016-05-24

    The mainstay of treatment for ovarian cancer is platinum-based cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, therapeutic resistance and recurrence is a common eventuality for nearly all ovarian cancer patients, resulting in poor median survival. Recurrence is postulated to be driven by a population of self-renewing, therapeutically resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). A current limitation in CSC studies is the inability to interrogate their dynamic changes in real time. Here we utilized a GFP reporter driven by the NANOG-promoter to enrich and track ovarian CSCs. Using this approach, we identified a population of cells with CSC properties including enhanced expression of stem cell transcription factors, self-renewal, and tumor initiation. We also observed elevations in CSC properties in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells as compared to cisplatin-naïve ovarian cancer cells. CD49f, a marker for CSCs in other solid tumors, enriched CSCs in cisplatin-resistant and -naïve cells. NANOG-GFP enriched CSCs (GFP+ cells) were more resistant to cisplatin as compared to GFP-negative cells. Moreover, upon cisplatin treatment, the GFP signal intensity and NANOG expression increased in GFP-negative cells, indicating that cisplatin was able to induce the CSC state. Taken together, we describe a reporter-based strategy that allows for determination of the CSC state in real time and can be used to detect the induction of the CSC state upon cisplatin treatment. As cisplatin may provide an inductive stress for the stem cell state, future efforts should focus on combining cytotoxic chemotherapy with a CSC targeted therapy for greater clinical utility. PMID:27105520

  20. Gene expression profiling analysis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    YIN, JI-GANG; LIU, XIAN-YING; WANG, BIN; WANG, DAN-YANG; WEI, MAN; FANG, HUA; XIANG, MEI

    2016-01-01

    As a gynecological oncology, ovarian cancer has high incidence and mortality. To study the mechanisms of ovarian cancer, the present study analyzed the GSE37582 microarray. GSE37582 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and included data from 74 ovarian cancer cases and 47 healthy controls. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were screened using linear models for microarray data package in R and were further screened for functional annotation. Next, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was conducted. The interaction associations of the proteins encoded by the DEGs were searched using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes, and the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized by Cytoscape. Moreover, module analysis of the PPI network was performed using the BioNet analysis tool in R. A total of 284 DEGs were screened, consisting of 145 upregulated genes and 139 downregulated genes. In particular, downregulated FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) was an oncogene, while downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) was a tumor suppressor gene and upregulated cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) was classed as an ‘other’ gene. The enriched functions included collagen catabolic process, stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases cascade and insulin receptor signaling pathway. Meanwhile, FOS (degree, 15), CD44 (degree, 9), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2; degree, 7), CDKN1A (degree, 7) and matrix metallopeptidase 3 (MMP3; degree, 6) had higher connectivity degrees in the PPI network for the DEGs. These genes may be involved in ovarian cancer by interacting with other genes in the module of the PPI network (e.g., BCL2-FOS, BCL2-CDKN1A, FOS-CDKN1A, FOS-CD44, MMP3-MMP7 and MMP7-CD44). Overall, BCL2, FOS, CDKN1A, CD44, MMP3 and MMP7 may be correlated with ovarian cancer. PMID:27347159

  1. Familial ovarian cancer: a study of 11 families.

    PubMed

    Villani, C; Ficorella, C; Tomao, S

    1989-01-01

    In a group of 152 ovarian cancer patients, 11 cases with familial recurrence were investigated (7.23%). Of the families evaluated we found 26 patients with ovarian cancer and twenty two with different cancers in other sites. In ovarian cancer the familial aspect, despite its relatively low frequency, is one of the few factors for identifying "high risk" patients, thus allowing effective secondary prevention. PMID:2776785

  2. [Treatment of brain metastasis from ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Bondiau, P-Y; Largillier, R; Foa, C; Rasendrarijao, D; Frenay, M; Gérard, J-P

    2003-06-01

    Systemic metastases from ovarian carcinoma are frequent, but they seldom affect the central nervous system. We present here the case of a patient treated for an ovarian cancer by surgery and chemotherapy. Three months after the end of chemotherapy, the patient developed cerebral metastases from ovarian carcinoma (CMOC) treated by iterative surgery and and whole brain irradiation. As the frequency of solitary cerebral metastasis of ovarian cancer is higher than with other cancers, it is likely that they behave slightly differently. Literature analysis reveals an increase in the incidence of CMOC since the middle of the nineties. CMOC can occur during or after adjuvant chemotherapy and the best management strategies to better define determinants of survival for patients are not well known. It appears that a better outcome of CMOC may be obtained by an aggressive treatment, if possible, including surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Taking into account the increase in the incidence of the CMOC and their early occurrence, some authors have proposed a prophylactic brain radiotherapy in patients who receive adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:12834774

  3. Sargramostim and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Previous Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-15

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  4. Rare ATAD5 missense variants in breast and ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Maleva Kostovska, Ivana; Wang, Jing; Bogdanova, Natalia; Schürmann, Peter; Bhuju, Sabin; Geffers, Robert; Dürst, Matthias; Liebrich, Clemens; Klapdor, Rüdiger; Christiansen, Hans; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Dörk, Thilo

    2016-06-28

    ATAD5/ELG1 is a protein crucially involved in replication and maintenance of genome stability. ATAD5 has recently been identified as a genomic risk locus for both breast and ovarian cancer through genome-wide association studies. We aimed to investigate the spectrum of coding ATAD5 germ-line mutations in hospital-based series of patients with triple-negative breast cancer or serous ovarian cancer compared with healthy controls. The ATAD5 coding and adjacent splice site regions were analyzed by targeted next-generation sequencing of DNA samples from 273 cancer patients, including 114 patients with triple-negative breast cancer and 159 patients with serous epithelial ovarian cancer, and from 276 healthy females. Among 42 different variants identified, twenty-two were rare missense substitutions, of which 14 were classified as pathogenic by at least one in silico prediction tool. Three of four novel missense substitutions (p.S354I, p.H974R and p.K1466N) were predicted to be pathogenic and were all identified in ovarian cancer patients. Overall, rare missense variants with predicted pathogenicity tended to be enriched in ovarian cancer patients (14/159) versus controls (11/276) (p = 0.05, 2df). While truncating germ-line variants in ATAD5 were not detected, it remains possible that several rare missense variants contribute to genetic susceptibility toward epithelial ovarian carcinomas. PMID:27045477

  5. Second-look laparoscopy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Xygakis, A M; Politis, G S; Michalas, S P; Kaskarelis, D B

    1984-08-01

    Forty-six patients with epithelial ovarian cancer previously treated with surgery, chemotherapy or external radiation underwent second-look laparoscopy to evaluate management. Twenty of the patients had positive laparoscopic findings and were not subjected to further laparotomy. The frequency of positive findings was related to the stage of the disease. Laparoscopic examination revealed no evidence of cancer in the remaining 26 patients. Three of the patients in this group were found to have additional disease at subsequent laparotomy. The laparoscopic procedures were not associated with major complications. Although second-look laparoscopy cannot replace repeat laparotomy, it does have a role in the follow-up of patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:6237197

  6. Clinical Efficacy of Ovarian Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Koshiyama, Masafumi; Matsumura, Noriomi; Konishi, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Various trials of ovarian cancer screening programs have been reported worldwide. In 2011, one of the most famous papers indicated that annual screening using CA125/transvaginal sonography (TVS) did not reduce ovarian cancer mortality in the United States of America (USA). To investigate the validity of ovarian cancer screening, we verified the analyses of previous reports. At first, we obtained the USA datasets that were used for the analyses and identified many patients in whom cancers were accidentally detected several years after the screening period. We thus performed a new prognostic comparison between the screening group (cancers that were detected through screening or within one year after screening) and the control group (cancers that were found more than one year after screening, without screening, or in the original control group). The results showed that the prognoses of the screening group were significantly better than those of the control group (p=0.0017). In addition, the screening group contained significantly fewer stage IV cases than the control group (p=0.005). In another screening in the United Kingdom, ovarian cancer was detected at a relatively earlier stage (stage I/II: 44%), while the rate of stage IV detection was low (4%). Very recently, this team showed significant difference in the rates with and without screening (p=0.021) when prevalent cases were excluded and indicated the delayed effect of screening. These results contrasted with the USA data. In other studies in the USA and Japan, annual screening was also associated with a decreased stage at detection. New histopathological, molecular and genetic studies have recently provided two categories of ovarian carcinogenesis. Type I carcinomas are slow-growing neoplasms that often develop from benign ovarian cysts. Type II carcinomas are high-grade clinically aggressive neoplasms. The rate of type II carcinomas is significantly higher in Europe and the USA than in Asia (p<0

  7. Ovarian cancer proteomics: Many technologies one goal.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Kothandaraman; Changqing, Zhao; Choolani, Mahesh

    2008-02-01

    The last decade has seen major changes in the technologies used to identify markers for diagnosing cancer. This review focuses on recent developments on the evolving field of biomarker discovery, and validation techniques using proteomics platforms for ovarian cancer. It is possible now to diagnose various disease conditions using microliter quantities of body fluids. Currently the major developments were made in three distinct areas: (i) protein profiling, (ii) high-throughput validation techniques, and (iii) solid and liquid phase protein microarray platforms for analyzing candidate markers across subclasses and stages of cancers. The recent addition to the long list of technologies is metabolomics using metabolite profiling and informatics-based filtering of information for biomarker discovery of ovarian cancer. Emerging technologies need to address ways to eliminate the limitations posed by the complex dynamic nature of body fluids as well as ways to enrich low-abundance tumor markers if they were to become a successful biomarker discovery tool. These new technologies hold significant promise in identifying more robust markers for ovarian cancer. Since the prevalence of this disease in the population is low, the test must have a high specificity. PMID:21136825

  8. Ovarian Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Gynecologic Cancers Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Gynecologic Cancers Basic Information What Is Gynecologic Cancer? What Are ...

  9. ARHGAP10, downregulated in ovarian cancer, suppresses tumorigenicity of ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, N; Guo, J; Chen, L; Yang, W; Qu, X; Cheng, Z

    2016-01-01

    Rho GTPase-activating proteins (RhoGAPs) are implicated in the development and progression of ovarian cancer. ARHGAP10 is a member of RhoGAP proteins and inactivates Cdc42 by converting GTP-bound form to GDP-bound form. Here, we aimed to evaluate ARHGAP10 expression profile and functions in ovarian cancer. The decreased expression of ARHGAP10 was found in 77.3% (58/75) of ovarian cancer tissues, compared with their non-tumorous counterparts. Furthermore, overall survival in ovarian cancer patients with higher expression of ARHGAP10 was longer than those with lower expression. Ectopic expression of ARHGAP10 in two ovarian cancer cell lines with lower expression of ARHGAP10 (A2780 and HO-8910) dramatically suppressed cell proliferation in vitro. In nude mice, its stable overexpression significantly inhibited the tumorigenicity of A2780 cells. We further demonstrated that overexpression of ARHGAP10 significantly inhibited cell adhesion, migration and invasion, resulted in cell arrest in G1 phase of cell cycle and a significant increase of apoptosis. Moreover, ARHGAP10 interacted with Cdc42 and overexpression of ARHGAP10 inhibited the activity of Cdc42 in A2780 cells. Gene set enrichment analysis on The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset showed that KEGG cell cycle, replication and base excision repair (BER) pathways were correlatively with the ARHGAP10 expression, which was further confirmed in ovarian cancer cells by western blotting. Hence, ARHGAP10 may serve as a tumor suppressor through inactivating Cdc42, as well as inhibiting cell cycle, replication and BER pathways. Our data suggest an important role of ARHGAP10 in the molecular etiology of cancer and implicate the potential application of ARHGAP10 in cancer therapy. PMID:27010858

  10. The Chicken Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hawkridge, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    The chicken is a unique experimental model for studying the spontaneous onset and progression of ovarian cancer (OVC). The prevalence of OVC in chickens can range from 10–35% depending on age, genetic strain, reproductive history, and diet. Furthermore, the chicken presents epidemiological, morphological, and molecular traits that are similar to human OVC making it a relevant experimental model for translation research. Similarities to humans include associated increased risk of OVC with the number of ovulations, common histopathological sub-types including high-grade serous, and molecular-level markers or pathways such as CA-125 expression and p53 mutation frequency. Collectively, the similarities between chicken and human OVC combined with a tightly controlled genetic background and predictable onset window provides an outstanding experimental model for studying the early events and progression of spontaneous OVC tumors under controlled environmental conditions. This review will cover the existing literature on OVC in the chicken and highlight potential opportunities for further exploitation (e.g, biomarkers, prevention, treatment, and genomics). PMID:25130871

  11. New ways to successfully target tumor vasculature in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyun; Shen, Fangrong; Hu, Wei; Coleman, Robert L.; Sood, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The aim of this paper was to review the recent literature on potential therapeutic strategies for overcoming resistance to anti-VEGF drugs in ovarian cancer. Recent findings Although clinical benefits of anti-VEGF therapy were observed in ovarian cancer treatment trials, this use yielded only modest improvement in progression-free survival, and with the exception of cediranib no effect on overall survival. Adaptive resistance and escape from anti-angiogenesis therapy is likely a multifactorial process, including induction of hypoxia, vascular modulators and the immune response. New drugs targeting the tumor vasculature or other components of the surrounding microenvironment have shown promising results. Summary When to start and end antiangiogenesis therapy and the choice of optimal treatment combinations remain controversial. Further evaluation of personalized novel angiogenesis-based therapy is warranted. Defining the critical interaction of these agents and pathways and the appropriate predictive markers will become an increasingly important objective for effective treatment. PMID:25502429

  12. Hormone Therapy and Ovarian Cancer: Incidence and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Wernli, Karen J.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hampton, John; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Egan, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We conducted a population-based case-control study to investigate the association between hormone therapy (HT) and ovarian cancer incidence, and followed all these cancer cases to determine the association of HT use with ovarian cancer mortality. Methods Seven hundred fifty-one incident cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer aged 40–79 years were diagnosed in Wisconsin and Massachusetts between 1993–1995 and 1998–2001 and matched to similarly-aged controls (n=5808). Study subjects were interviewed by telephone, which ascertained information on HT use and specific preparation, estrogen alone (E-alone) or estrogen plus progestin (EP). Ovarian cancer cases were followed-up for mortality through December 2005. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for ovarian cancer incidence, and Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to estimate hazard ratios and corresponding confidence intervals for ovarian cancer mortality. Results Ever use of HT was significantly associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer (odds ratio 1.57, 95% CI 1.31–1.87). The excess risk was confined to women who used E-alone preparations (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.85–2.95). No significant associations were detected between pre-diagnosis HT use and ovarian cancer survival. Conclusions Hormone therapy increases risk of ovarian cancer among E-alone users, but there is no substantial impact on survival after diagnosis. PMID:18264784

  13. Mathematical models of breast and ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Botesteanu, Dana-Adriana; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Lee, Jung-Min; Levy, Doron

    2016-07-01

    Women constitute the majority of the aging United States (US) population, and this has substantial implications on cancer population patterns and management practices. Breast cancer is the most common women's malignancy, while ovarian cancer is the most fatal gynecological malignancy in the US. In this review, we focus on these subsets of women's cancers, seen more commonly in postmenopausal and elderly women. In order to systematically investigate the complexity of cancer progression and response to treatment in breast and ovarian malignancies, we assert that integrated mathematical modeling frameworks viewed from a systems biology perspective are needed. Such integrated frameworks could offer innovative contributions to the clinical women's cancers community, as answers to clinical questions cannot always be reached with contemporary clinical and experimental tools. Here, we recapitulate clinically known data regarding the progression and treatment of the breast and ovarian cancers. We compare and contrast the two malignancies whenever possible in order to emphasize areas where substantial contributions could be made by clinically inspired and validated mathematical modeling. We show how current paradigms in the mathematical oncology community focusing on the two malignancies do not make comprehensive use of, nor substantially reflect existing clinical data, and we highlight the modeling areas in most critical need of clinical data integration. We emphasize that the primary goal of any mathematical study of women's cancers should be to address clinically relevant questions. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:337-362. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1343 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27259061

  14. Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... lifestyle or eating habits. Avoiding things known to cause cancer. Taking medicines to treat a precancerous condition or ... called the endometrium. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer of the female reproductive system. In recent years, ...

  15. NMDA receptors are expressed in human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    North, William G; Liu, Fuli; Tian, Ruiyang; Abbasi, Hamza; Akerman, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    We have earlier demonstrated that breast cancer and small-cell lung cancer express functional NMDA receptors that can be targeted to promote cancer cell death. Human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3, A2008, and A2780) have now been shown to also express NMDA-receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) and subunit 2B (GluN2B). Seventeen ovarian cancers in two arrays were screened by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies that recognize an extracellular moiety on GluN1 and on GluN2B. These specimens comprised malignant tissue with pathology diagnoses of serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Additionally, archival tissues defined as ovarian adenocarcinoma from ten patients treated at this institute were also evaluated. All of the cancerous tissues demonstrated positive staining patterns with the NMDA-receptor antibodies, while no staining was found for tumor-adjacent normal tissues or sections of normal ovarian tissue. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines (A2008, A2780, SKOV3) were demonstrated to express GluN1 by Western blotting, but displayed different levels of expression. Through immunocytochemistry utilizing GluN1 antibodies and imaging using a confocal microscope, we were able to demonstrate that GluN1 protein is expressed on the surface of these cells. In addition to these findings, GluN2B protein was demonstrated to be expressed using polyclonal antibodies against this protein. Treatment of all ovarian cell lines with antibodies against GluN1 was found to result in decreased cell viability (P<0.001), with decreases to 10%-25% that of untreated cells. Treatment of control HEK293 cells with various dilutions of GluN1 antibodies had no effect on cell viability. The GluN1 antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and the GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil, like antibodies, dramatically decreased the viability of A2780 ovarian tumor cells (P<0.01). Treatment of A2780 tumor xenografts with

  16. NMDA receptors are expressed in human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    North, William G; Liu, Fuli; Tian, Ruiyang; Abbasi, Hamza; Akerman, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    We have earlier demonstrated that breast cancer and small-cell lung cancer express functional NMDA receptors that can be targeted to promote cancer cell death. Human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3, A2008, and A2780) have now been shown to also express NMDA-receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) and subunit 2B (GluN2B). Seventeen ovarian cancers in two arrays were screened by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies that recognize an extracellular moiety on GluN1 and on GluN2B. These specimens comprised malignant tissue with pathology diagnoses of serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Additionally, archival tissues defined as ovarian adenocarcinoma from ten patients treated at this institute were also evaluated. All of the cancerous tissues demonstrated positive staining patterns with the NMDA-receptor antibodies, while no staining was found for tumor-adjacent normal tissues or sections of normal ovarian tissue. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines (A2008, A2780, SKOV3) were demonstrated to express GluN1 by Western blotting, but displayed different levels of expression. Through immunocytochemistry utilizing GluN1 antibodies and imaging using a confocal microscope, we were able to demonstrate that GluN1 protein is expressed on the surface of these cells. In addition to these findings, GluN2B protein was demonstrated to be expressed using polyclonal antibodies against this protein. Treatment of all ovarian cell lines with antibodies against GluN1 was found to result in decreased cell viability (P<0.001), with decreases to 10%–25% that of untreated cells. Treatment of control HEK293 cells with various dilutions of GluN1 antibodies had no effect on cell viability. The GluN1 antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and the GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil, like antibodies, dramatically decreased the viability of A2780 ovarian tumor cells (P<0.01). Treatment of A2780 tumor xenografts with

  17. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy. PMID:26849037

  18. Ovarian cysts and cancer in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Asima; Shinde, Aditi; Naik, Raj

    2016-05-01

    Adnexal masses are diagnosed in 5% pregnancies and pose diagnostic and management challenges. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the mainstay as an evaluation procedure; surgery is warranted for persistent masses with a diameter of >5 cm and sonographic signs of possible malignancy. Optimal timing for a planned surgery is the second trimester and does not adversely affect neonatal outcome. Laparoscopy is safe in pregnancy. Management for ovarian cancer during pregnancy should be individualised and formulated by a multidisciplinary team in a specialised centre while also considering the patients' wishes to preserve pregnancy. The following options can be considered: (i) induced abortion followed by standard management of ovarian cancer, (ii) pregnancy-preserving surgery followed by chemotherapy, planned delivery and secondary surgical completion or (iii) neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery during the postpartum period. Standard chemotherapy administered in non-pregnant population can only be used during the first trimester of pregnancy. PMID:26707193

  19. Knockdown of cathepsin L sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HONGMEI; ZHANG, LUOSHENG; WEI, LIXIA; GAO, XINGWANG; TANG, LI; GONG, WEI; MIN, NA; ZHANG, LI; YUAN, YAWEI

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading gynecological malignancy associated with high mortality. The development of acquired drug resistance is the primary cause of chemotherapy failure in the treatment of ovarian cancer. To examine the mechanism underlying paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer and attempt to reverse it, the present study induced a TAX-resistant ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3/TAX. Cathepsin L (CTSL) has been found to be overexpressed in ovarian cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible involvement of CTSL in the development of TAX resistance in ovarian cancer. CTSL expression was knocked down in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells and their phenotypic changes were analyzed. The effects of silenced CTSL on the resistant cell line were investigated by proliferation and apoptosis analysis compared with control SKOV3 cells. CTSL was more highly expressed in SKOV3/TAX cells compared with SKOV3 cells. Paclitaxel treatment downregulated the expression of CTSL in SKOV-3 but not in the paclitaxel-resistant SKOV3/TAX cells. CTSL small hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown significantly potentiated apoptosis induced by paclitaxel compared with SKOV3/TAX cells transfected with control shRNA, suggesting that CTSL contributes to paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer cells and that CTSL silencing can enhance paclitaxel-mediated cell apoptosis. Thus, CTSL should be explored as a candidate of therapeutic target for modulating paclitaxel sensitivity in ovarian cancer. PMID:27313771

  20. Transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth R; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation. In this Review, we highlight the key mechanisms that regulate the transcription of pro-inflammatory chemokines in ovarian cancer cells, and that have important roles in controlling ovarian cancer progression. We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies. PMID:25790431

  1. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Cancer Stem Cells in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landen, Charles N.; Goodman, Blake; Katre, Ashwini A.; Steg, Adam D.; Nick, Alpa M.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Miller, Lance D.; Mejia, Pablo Vivas; Jennings, Nicolas B.; Gershenson, David M.; Bast, Robert C.; Coleman, Robert L.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) expression characterizes a subpopulation of cells with tumor initiating or cancer stem cell properties in several malignancies. Our goal was to characterize the phenotype of ALDH1A1-positive ovarian cancer cells and examine the biological effects of ALDH1A1 gene silencing. In our analysis of multiple ovarian cancer cell lines, we found that ALDH1A1 expression and activity was significantly higher in taxane and platinum-resistant cell lines. In patient samples, 72.9% of ovarian cancers had ALDH1A1 expression, in whom the percent of ALDH1A1-positive cells correlated negatively with progression-free survival (6.05 v 13.81 months, p<0.035). Subpopulations of A2780cp20 cells with ALDH1A1 activity were isolated for orthotopic tumor initiating studies, where tumorigenicity was approximately 50-fold higher with ALDH1A1-positive cells. Interestingly, tumors derived from ALDH1A1-positive cells gave rise to both ALDH1A1-positive and ALDH1A1-negative populations, but ALDH1A1-negative cells could not generate ALDH1A1-positive cells. In an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, ALDH1A1 silencing using nanoliposomal siRNA sensitized both taxane- and platinum-resistant cell lines to chemotherapy, significantly reducing tumor growth in mice compared to chemotherapy alone (a 74–90% reduction, p<0.015). These data demonstrate that the ALDH1A1 subpopulation is associated with chemoresistance and outcome in ovarian cancer patients, and targeting ALDH1A1 sensitizes resistant cells to chemotherapy. ALDH1A1-positive cells have enhanced, but not absolute, tumorigenicity, but do have differentiation capacity lacking in ALDH1A1-negative cells. This enzyme may be important for identification and targeting of chemoresistant cell populations in ovarian cancer. PMID:20889728

  2. Identification of candidate biomarkers with cancer-specific glycosylation in the tissue and serum of endometrioid ovarian cancer patients by glycoproteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Karen L.; Lim, Jae-Min; Wells, Lance; Benigno, Benedict B.; McDonald, John F.; Pierce, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is diagnosed less than 25% of the time when the cancer is confined to the ovary, leading to 5-year survival rates of less than 30%. Therefore, there is an urgent need for early diagnostics for ovarian cancer. Our study using glycotranscriptome comparative analysis of endometrioid ovarian cancer tissue and normal ovarian tissue led to the identification of distinct differences in the transcripts of a restricted set of glycosyltransferases involved in N-linked glycosylation. Utilizing lectins that bind to glycan structures predicted to show changes, we observed differences in lectin-bound glycoproteins consistent with some of the transcript differences. In this study, we have extended our observations by the use of selected lectins to perform a targeted glycoproteomic analysis of ovarian cancer and normal ovarian tissues. Our results have identified several glycoproteins that display tumor-specific glycosylation changes. We have verified these glycosylation changes on glycoproteins from tissue using immunoprecipitation followed by lectin blot detection. The glycoproteins that were verified were then analyzed further using existing microarray data obtained from benign ovarian adenomas, borderline ovarian adenocarcinomas, and malignant ovarian adenocarcinomas. The verified glycoproteins found to be expressed above control levels in the microarray data sets were then screened for tumor-specific glycan modifications in serum from ovarian cancer patients. Results obtained from two of these glycoprotein markers, periostin and thrombospondin, have confirmed that tumor-specific glycan changes can be used to distinguish ovarian cancer patient serum from normal serum. PMID:19953551

  3. Sirolimus and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  4. Three-photon imaging of ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Amirsolaimani, Babak; Rice, Photini; Hatch, Kenneth; Kieu, Khanh

    2016-02-01

    Optical imaging methods have the potential to detect ovarian cancer at an early, curable stage. Optical imaging has the disadvantage that high resolution techniques require access to the tissue of interest, but miniature endoscopes that traverse the natural orifice of the reproductive tract, or access the ovaries and fallopian tubes through a small incision in the vagina wall, can provide a minimally-invasive solution. We have imaged both rodent and human ovaries and fallopian tubes with a variety of endoscope-compatible modalities. The recent development of fiber-coupled femtosecond lasers will enable endoscopic multiphoton microscopy (MPM). We demonstrated two- and three-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF, 3PEF), and second- and third-harmonic generation microscopy (SHG, THG) in human ovarian and fallopian tube tissue. A study was undertaken to understand the mechanisms of contrast in these images. Six patients (normal, cystadenoma, and ovarian adenocarcinoma) provided ovarian and fallopian tube biopsies. The tissue was imaged with three-dimensional optical coherence tomography, multiphoton microscopy, and frozen for histological sectioning. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and Sudan black. Approximately 1 μm resolution images were obtained with an excitation source at 1550 nm. 2PEF signal was absent. SHG signal was mainly from collagen. 3PEF and THG signal came from a variety of sources, including a strong signal from fatty connective tissue and red blood cells. Adenocarcinoma was characterized by loss of SHG signal, whereas cystic abnormalities showed strong SHG. There was limited overlap of two- and three- photon signals, suggesting that three-photon imaging can provide additional information for early diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  5. Experiences of predictive testing in young people at risk of Huntington's disease, familial cardiomyopathy or hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Rhona; Beach, Anna; Henriques, Sasha; Knopp, Jasmin; Nelson, Katie; Kerzin-Storrar, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    While debate has focused on whether testing of minors for late onset genetic disorders should be carried out if there is no medical benefit, less is known about the impact on young people (<25 years) who have had predictive testing often many years before the likely onset of symptoms. We looked at the experiences of young people who had had predictive testing for a range of conditions with variable ages at onset and options for screening and treatment. A consecutive series of 61 young people who had a predictive test aged 15–25 years at the Clinical Genetic Service, Manchester, for HD, HBOC (BrCa 1 or 2) or FCM (Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy or Dilated Cardiomyopathy), were invited to participate. Thirty-six (36/61; 59%) agreed to participate (10 HD, 16 HBOC and 10 FCM) and telephone interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. None of the participants expressed regret at having the test at a young age. Participants saw the value of pretest counselling not in facilitating a decision, but rather as a source of information and support. Differences emerged among the three groups in parent/family involvement in the decision to be tested. Parents in FCM families were a strong influence in favour of testing, in HBOC the decision was autonomous but usually congruent with the views of parents, whereas in HD the decision was autonomous and sometimes went against the opinions of parents/grandparents. Participants from all three groups proposed more tailoring of predictive test counselling to the needs of young people. PMID:23860040

  6. Salpingectomy as a Means to Reduce Ovarian Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Mary B.; Dresher, Charles W.; Yates, Melinda S.; Jeter, Joanne M.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Alberts, David S.; Lu, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) has become the standard of care for risk reduction in women at hereditary risk of ovarian cancer. While this procedure significantly decreases both the incidence of and mortality from ovarian cancer, it impacts quality of life, and the premature cessation of ovarian function may have long term health hazards. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular pathways of ovarian cancer point to the fallopian tube epithelium as the origin of most high grade serous cancers (HGSC). This evolving appreciation of the role of the fallopian tube in HGSC has led to the consideration of salpingectomy alone as an option for risk management, especially in premenopausal women. In addition, it is postulated that bilateral salpingectomy with ovarian retention (BSOR), may have a public health benefit for women undergoing benign gynecologic surgery. In this review we provide the rationale for salpingectomy as an ovarian cancer risk reduction strategy. PMID:25586903

  7. Ovarian Cancer Biomarker Discovery Based on Genomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Hee Seung; Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Song, Yong-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer presents at an advanced stage in more than 75% of patients. Early detection has great promise to improve clinical outcomes. Although the advancing proteomic technologies led to the discovery of numerous ovarian cancer biomarkers, no screening method has been recommended for early detection of ovarian cancer. Complexity and heterogeneity of ovarian carcinogenesis is a major obstacle to discover biomarkers. As cancer arises due to accumulation of genetic change, understanding the close connection between genetic changes and ovarian carcinogenesis would provide the opportunity to find novel gene-level ovarian cancer biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the various gene-based biomarkers by genomic technologies, including inherited gene mutations, epigenetic changes, and differential gene expression. In addition, we suggest the strategy to discover novel gene-based biomarkers with recently introduced next generation sequencing. PMID:25337559

  8. MicroRNAs and Recent Insights into Pediatric Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Jessica C.; Kolomeyevskaya, Nonna; Mach, Claire M.; Dietrich, Jennifer E.; Anderson, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common pediatric gynecologic malignancy. When diagnosed in children, ovarian cancers present unique challenges that differ dramatically from those faced by adults. Here, we review the spectrum of ovarian cancers found in young women and girls and discuss the biology of these diseases. A number of advances have recently shed significant new understanding on the potential causes of ovarian cancer in this unique population. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding how altered expression of non-coding RNA transcripts known as microRNAs play a key role in the etiology of ovarian germ cell and sex cord-stromal tumors. Emerging transgenic models for these diseases are also reviewed. Lastly, future challenges and opportunities for understanding pediatric ovarian cancers, delineating clinically useful biomarkers, and developing targeted therapies are discussed. PMID:23641362

  9. Metformin Hydrochloride and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ascites; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  10. Clinical tumour markers in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, A; Nikliński, J; Laudański, T; Pluygers, E

    1998-02-01

    Within past few years, the measurement of serological, histochemical and molecular genetic markers has had an increasing influence on clinical decisions about initial treatment and follow-up. This review presents data concerning the most studied and interesting markers in ovarian cancer. CA 125, CA 19.9, TATI, CASA, CEA, TPA, TPS and CYFRA21-1 are now the most widely used serological tumour markers for management of ovarian cancer patients. Ras oncogenes, C-erb2 proto-oncogene, p53 suppressor gene and Bcl-2 oncogene are examples of currently used molecular genetic markers. As histochemical markers-proliferation markers, flow cytometric analysis, thymidine labelling index, Ki-67 nuclear antigen or differentiation markers are nowadays the ones most often determined. Some of these markers might be useful adjuncts for monitoring response to therapy, including early detection of tumour reactivation to allow curative therapy and rapid detection of treatment failure. The study of these markers may also lead to a better understanding of the biological characteristics of ovarian cancer. Numerous tumour markers characterized in this paper have been recognized as promising prognostic factors. The information derived from studies of these markers also represents the most promising avenue towards new treatment strategies; nevertheless to validate these factors, prospective studies of a large patient population are needed. PMID:9511849

  11. Familial site-specific Ovarian cancer is linked to BRCA1 on 17q12-21

    SciTech Connect

    Steichen-Gersdorf, E.; Gallion, H.H.; Ponder, M.A.; Pye, C.; Mazoyer, S.; Smith, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J.; Ford, D.; Easton, D.F.; Girodet, C.

    1994-11-01

    In a study of nine families with {open_quotes}site-specific{close_quotes} ovarian cancer (criterion: three or more cases of epithelial ovarian cancer and no cases of breast cancer diagnosed at age <50 years) we have obtained evidence of linkage to the breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1 on 17q12-21. If the risk of cancer in these families is assumed to be restricted to the ovary, the best estimate of the proportion of families linked to BRCA1 is .78 (95% confidence interval .32-1.0). If predisposition to both breast and ovarian cancer is assumed, the proportion linked is 1.0 (95% confidence interval .46-1.0). The linkage of familial site-specific ovarian cancer to BRCA1 indicates the possibility of predictive testing in such families; however, this is only appropriate in families where the evidence for linkage to BRCA1 is conclusive. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Translational Application of Epigenetic Alterations: Ovarian Cancer as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Maradeo, Marie E.; Cairns, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a disease initiated and driven by the accumulation and interplay of genetic and epigenetic mutations of genes involved in the regulation of cell growth and signaling. Dysregulation of these genes and pathways in a cell leads to a growth advantage and clonal expansion. The epigenetic alterations involved in the initiation and progression of cancer are DNA methylation and histone modifications which interact to remodel chromatin, as well as RNA interference. These alterations can be used as candidate targets in molecular tests for risk, early detection, prognosis, prediction of response to therapy, and monitoring, as well as new therapeutic targets in cancer. In this review, we discuss the rationale, studies to date, and issues in the translational application of epigenetics using epithelial ovarian cancer as a specific example of all types of cancer. PMID:21402071

  13. [Hope for improvement of survival in ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Högberg, Thomas; Bergfeldt, Kjell; Borgfeldt, Christer; Holmberg, Erik; Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death from a gynecologic cancer. Every year around 700 women contracts ovarian cancer in Sweden. The overall survival is among the highest in Europe, but still long term relative survival is only 46%. It is a long-held myth that ovarian cancer is a disease without symptoms. Almost 90% of women have symptoms, even in the early stages. Symptoms that should arise suspicion of ovarian cancer and initiate diagnostic work-up are continuous abdominal extension, early feeling of satiety, pelvic or abdominal pain, urinary urge and postmenopausal bleeding. Women's awareness of symptoms and willingness to seek medical advice and the organization of the health care system are important factors determining cancer survival. Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases with different tumor traits and prognosis. Personalized medicine and preventive measures recognizing recent knowledge about tumor biology will positively affect survival. PMID:26646961

  14. Management of relapsed ovarian cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Giornelli, Gonzalo H

    2016-01-01

    Around 70 % of ovarian cancer patients relapse after primary cytoreductive surgery and standard first-line chemotherapy. The biology of relapse remains unclear, but cancer stem cells seem to play an important role. There are still some areas of controversy on how to manage these relapses and or progressions that occur almost unavoidably in the course of this disease with shorter intervals between them as the natural history of this disease develops. The goal of treatments investigated in this neoplasm has shifted to maintenance therapy, trying to extend the progression free intervals in a disease that is becoming more and more protracted. PMID:27516935

  15. Noncontraceptive estrogen use and epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, D W; Kelly, J P; Welch, W R; Rosenberg, L; Stolley, P D; Warshauer, M E; Lewis, J; Woodruff, J; Shapiro, S

    1989-12-01

    The relation of noncontraceptive estrogen use to epithelial ovarian cancer was evaluated in a case-control study conducted in hospitals mainly in the northeastern United States. There were 377 cases diagnosed within the year before hospital admission and 2,030 hospital controls; data were collected by interview in the hospital. Compared with women who never took noncontraceptive estrogens, the overall relative risk estimate for women whose estrogen use lasted at least one year and was not combined with progestogens or testosterone was 1.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8-1.9), after taking into account risk factors for ovarian cancer. There were 55 cases of the endometrioid, clear cell, or malignant mixed mesodermal cell type; the corresponding relative risk estimate was 0.9 (95% CI 0.3-3.0). There were 26 cases of undifferentiated cell type, with a relative risk estimate of 3.6 (95% CI 1.2-11). Relative risk estimates were similar in a subset of the cases (57%) for which pathology slides were reviewed. For estrogen use of long duration, use of high-dose preparations, or use in the distant past, the relative risk estimates were not significantly different from 1.0. The estimates were elevated for some categories of use, but not consistently--for example, for an interval of 5-9 years since estrogen use began (relative risk (RR) = 2.7), but not after shorter or longer intervals, and for use of conjugated estrogens with a dose of 0.3 mg (RR = 3.2) or 1.25 mg (RR = 2.4), but not for doses of 0.625 mg or 2.5 mg. The relative risk estimate was also elevated for use by nulliparous women (RR = 2.4). The results suggest that, overall, noncontraceptive estrogen use is not associated with the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. Furthermore, our data do not support the hypothesis that estrogens increase the risk of endometrioid ovarian cancer. The elevated estimates could be due to multiple stratification of the data, but they should be explored in further studies, given the

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Temporally Stimulated Ovarian Cancer Cells for Biomarker Discovery*

    PubMed Central

    Marzinke, Mark A.; Choi, Caitlin H.; Chen, Li; Shih, Ie-Ming; Chan, Daniel W.; Zhang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    While ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the United States, there are no biomarkers available that are able to predict therapeutic responses to ovarian malignancies. One major hurdle in the identification of useful biomarkers has been the ability to obtain enough ovarian cancer cells from primary tissues diagnosed in the early stages of serous carcinomas, the most deadly subtype of ovarian tumor. In order to detect ovarian cancer in a state of hyperproliferation, we analyzed the implications of molecular signaling cascades in the ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR3 in a temporal manner, using a mass-spectrometry-based proteomics approach. OVCAR3 cells were treated with EGF1, and the time course of cell progression was monitored based on Akt phosphorylation and growth dynamics. EGF-stimulated Akt phosphorylation was detected at 12 h post-treatment, but an effect on proliferation was not observed until 48 h post-exposure. Growth-stimulated cellular lysates were analyzed for protein profiles between treatment groups and across time points using iTRAQ labeling and mass spectrometry. The protein response to EGF treatment was identified via iTRAQ analysis in EGF-stimulated lysates relative to vehicle-treated specimens across the treatment time course. Validation studies were performed on one of the differentially regulated proteins, lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1), in human tissue lysates and ovarian tumor tissue sections. Further, tissue microarray analysis was performed to demarcate LAMP-1 expression across different stages of epithelial ovarian cancers. These data support the use of this approach for the efficient identification of tissue-based markers in tumor development related to specific signaling pathways. LAMP-1 is a promising biomarker for studies of the progression of EGF-stimulated ovarian cancers and might be useful in predicting treatment responses involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors or EGF receptor monoclonal

  17. Tumor microenvironment: The culprit for ovarian cancer metastasis?

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhongyue; Wang, Qiu; Lau, Wayne Bond; Lau, Bonnie; Xu, Lian; Zhao, Linjie; Yang, Huiliang; Feng, Min; Xuan, Yu; Yang, Yanfei; Lei, Lingzi; Wang, Chenlu; Yi, Tao; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yuquan; Zhou, Shengtao

    2016-07-28

    Despite chemotherapy and surgical debulking options, ovarian cancer recurs and disseminates frequently, with poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer metastasis still remain unelucidated. The tumor microenvironment, consisting of stromal cells (including fibroblasts, macrophages, regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, endothelial cells, pericytes and platelets), the extracellular matrix component (EMC) (including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, matrix metalloproteinases, integrins, and other secreted molecules) and exosomes (small extracellular vesicles loaded with molecules), establishes an autocrine-paracrine communication circuit that reinforces invasion and cancer cell metastasis via reciprocal signaling. Recent evidences have unraveled the significant contribution of tumor microenvironment to ovarian cancer metastasis. In this review, we provide a comprehensive landscape of the reciprocity between tumor stroma and ovarian cancer cells upon metastasis, aiming to offer novel clues on the development of novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer in future clinical practice. PMID:27131957

  18. Development of a Mouse Model of Menopausal Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth R.; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xiang-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant understanding of the genetic mutations involved in ovarian epithelial cancer and advances in genomic approaches for expression and mutation profiling of tumor tissues, several key questions in ovarian cancer biology remain enigmatic: the mechanism for the well-established impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk remains obscure; cell of origin of ovarian cancer continue to be debated; and the precursor lesion, sequence, or events in progression remain to be defined. Suitable mouse models should complement the analysis of human tumor tissues and may provide clues to these questions currently perplexing ovarian cancer biology. A potentially useful model is the germ cell-deficient Wv (white spotting variant) mutant mouse line, which may be used to study the impact of menopausal physiology on the increased risk of ovarian cancer. The Wv mice harbor a point mutation in c-Kit that reduces the receptor tyrosine kinase activity to about 1–5% (it is not a null mutation). Homozygous Wv mutant females have a reduced ovarian germ cell reservoir at birth and the follicles are rapidly depleted upon reaching reproductive maturity, but other biological phenotypes are minimal and the mice have a normal life span. The loss of ovarian function precipitates changes in hormonal and metabolic activity that model features of menopause in humans. As a consequence of follicle depletion, the Wv ovaries develop ovarian tubular adenomas, a benign epithelial tumor corresponding to surface epithelial invaginations and papillomatosis that mark human ovarian aging. Ongoing work will test the possibility of converting the benign epithelial tubular adenomas into neoplastic tumors by addition of an oncogenic mutation, such as of Tp53, to model the genotype and biology of serous ovarian cancer. Model based on the Wv mice may have the potential to gain biological and etiological insights into ovarian cancer development and prevention. PMID:24616881

  19. 78 FR 54741 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... America the two hundred and thirty- eighth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-21821 Filed 9-5-13; 8:45 am... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9008 of August 30, 2013 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 By the... ovarian cancer, and more than half that number of women will die of this disease. During National...

  20. 77 FR 55095 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-22148 Filed 9-5-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8853 of August 31, 2012 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the... their lives to ovarian cancer. They are mothers and daughters, sisters and grandmothers,...

  1. [Tardive cecal metastasis from ovarian cancer: a case report].

    PubMed

    Talarico, C; Casella, C; Gambarotti, M

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal insolvement is a frequent sequela of metastatic ovarian cancer may be syncronous or following ovaric resection, after several years of disease free condition. The authors herein describe a clinical report of a case of cecal metastatic neoplasm due to ovarian cancer treated with surgical resection 24 years before. PMID:15960367

  2. Recreational Physical Activity and Ovarian Cancer Risk and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Moorman, Patricia G.; Jones, Lee W.; Akushevich, Lucy; Schildkraut, Joellen M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Physical activity may influence ovarian cancer risk and outcomes through effects on ovulation, inflammatory markers and other processes. We examined associations between self-reported physical activity and ovarian cancer risk and survival in a population-based, case-control study in North Carolina. Methods The analyses involved 638 epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 683 controls recruited between 1999-2008. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess ovarian cancer risk in relation to reported average physical activity at various time periods. Kaplan-Meier analyses and proportional hazards modeling were used to assess associations between physical activity and survival among ovarian cancer cases. Results Modestly reduced risks for ovarian cancer were observed in some categories of physical activity, but there were no consistent patterns of greater reductions in risk with higher activity levels. Physical activity prior to diagnosis was not significantly related to ovarian cancer survival overall, but survival was better for women who reported >2 hours of activity/week as compared to those reporting <1 hour/week among women who were non-obese (multivariable hazard ratio=0.69, 95% CI 0.47 – 1.00) Conclusions Our data provide weak evidence in support of beneficial effects of physical activity on ovarian cancer risk and survival, but results should be interpreted cautiously because of the lack of a clear dose response relation with higher levels of exercise and the likely misclassification of self-reported activity. PMID:21296269

  3. 75 FR 54451 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-22427 Filed 9-3-10; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8551 of August 31, 2010 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the... against ovarian cancer, this disease continues to claim more lives than any other gynecologic...

  4. A non-synonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Shimon–Paluch; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; García, Encarna B. Gómez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Maria, Muy-Kheng Tea; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. Results Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 [Hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06–1.92; p = 0.019] and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=2.21; 95% CI: 1.39–3.52, p=0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class 2 mutations than class 1 (mutations (class 2 HR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.28–2.70; class 1 HR=0.86, 95%CI:0.69–1.09; p-for difference=0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers (HR = 2.42; p = 0.03). Conclusion The IRS1 Gly972Arg SNP, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22729394

  5. General Information About Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition or to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer ... PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  6. Genetic Variation at 9p22.2 and Ovarian Cancer Risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Górski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A.; Asperen, Christi J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M.; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valérie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V. C.; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lázaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-wide association study recently identified an association between the rare allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3814113 (ie, the C allele) at 9p22.2 and decreased risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated the association of this SNP with ovarian cancer risk among BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers by use of data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. Methods We genotyped rs3814113 in 10 029 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 5837 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Associations with ovarian and breast cancer were assessed with a retrospective likelihood approach. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The minor allele of rs3814113 was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer among BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.72 to 0.85; P = 4.8 × 10-9) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 0.90; P = 5.5 × 10-4). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk among either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. BRCA1 mutation carriers with the TT genotype at SNP rs3814113 were predicted to have an ovarian cancer risk to age 80 years of 48%, and those with the CC genotype were predicted to have a risk of 33%. Conclusion Common genetic variation at the 9p22.2 locus was associated with decreased risk of ovarian cancer for carriers of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. PMID:21169536

  7. [Individualized therapy of synchronous ovarian and colon cancers with lymph].

    PubMed

    Deme, Dániel; Bishr, Abdulfatah M; Nizar, Jamool; Telekes, András

    2015-06-01

    A 71-year-old female patient underwent urgent laparotomy due to severe right lower quadrant abdominal pain and fever. Macroscopically duplex coecal and transverse colon cancer as well as a sigmoid or left ovarian cancer were suspected. Pathological findings revealed synchronous left ovarian and transverse colonic neoplasms. Both primaries metastatized to their regional lymph nodes. Furthermore, the ovarian cancer infiltrating the sigmoid colon gave distant metastasis in the coecum, too. Ovarian cancer histology showed papillary adenocarcinoma, and transverse colon cancer was a tubular adenocarcinoma. The affected lymph nodes were clearly distinguished by immunohistochemistry staining: ovarian metastases were CK7 positive, and colonic metastases were CK20 and CEA positive. The patient was treated with combinated chemotherapy: FOLFOX-4 two weekly and paclitaxel monotherapy every other week. The patient tolerated this combined treatment well. The authors conclude that multiple synchronous neoplasms can be treated with individualized chemotherapeutic protocol with good efficacy and few adverse reactions. PMID:26027602

  8. DNA methylation changes in epithelial ovarian cancer histotypes

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Madalene A.; Cunningham, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    Survival after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer has not improved, and despite histological differences, treatment is similar for all cases. Understanding the molecular basis for ovarian cancer risk and prognosis is fundamental, and to this end much has been gleaned about genetic changes contributing to risk, and to a lesser extent, survival. There’s considerable evidence for genetic differences between the four pathologically defined histological subtypes; however, the contribution of epigenetics is less well documented. In this report, we review alterations in DNA methylation in ovarian cancer, focusing on histological subtypes, and studies examining the roles of methylation in determining therapy response. As epigenetics is making its way into clinical care, we review the application of cell free DNA methylation to ovarian cancer diagnosis and care. Finally, we comment on recurrent limitations in the DNA methylation literature for ovarian cancer, which can and should be addressed to mature this field. PMID:26363302

  9. Integrated analysis of germline and somatic variants in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kanchi, Krishna L; Johnson, Kimberly J; Lu, Charles; McLellan, Michael D; Leiserson, Mark D M; Wendl, Michael C; Zhang, Qunyuan; Koboldt, Daniel C; Xie, Mingchao; Kandoth, Cyriac; McMichael, Joshua F; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Larson, David E; Schmidt, Heather K; Miller, Christopher A; Fulton, Robert S; Spellman, Paul T; Mardis, Elaine R; Druley, Todd E; Graubert, Timothy A; Goodfellow, Paul J; Raphael, Benjamin J; Wilson, Richard K; Ding, Li

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large-scale exome-wide analysis of the combined germline-somatic landscape in ovarian cancer. Here we analyse germline and somatic alterations in 429 ovarian carcinoma cases and 557 controls. We identify 3,635 high confidence, rare truncation and 22,953 missense variants with predicted functional impact. We find germline truncation variants and large deletions across Fanconi pathway genes in 20% of cases. Enrichment of rare truncations is shown in BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. In addition, we observe germline truncation variants in genes not previously associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility (NF1, MAP3K4, CDKN2B and MLL3). Evidence for loss of heterozygosity was found in 100 and 76% of cases with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 truncations, respectively. Germline-somatic interaction analysis combined with extensive bioinformatics annotation identifies 222 candidate functional germline truncation and missense variants, including two pathogenic BRCA1 and 1 TP53 deleterious variants. Finally, integrated analyses of germline and somatic variants identify significantly altered pathways, including the Fanconi, MAPK and MLL pathways. PMID:24448499

  10. Integrated Analysis of Germline and Somatic Variants in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanchi, Krishna L.; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Lu, Charles; McLellan, Michael D.; Leiserson, Mark D.M.; Wendl, Michael C.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Xie, Mingchao; Kandoth, Cyriac; McMichael, Joshua F.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Larson, David E.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Miller, Christopher A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Spellman, Paul T.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Druley, Todd E.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ding, Li

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large-scale exome-wide analysis of the combined germline-somatic landscape in ovarian cancer. Here we analyze germline and somatic alterations in 429 ovarian carcinoma cases and 557 controls. We identify 3,635 high confidence, rare truncation and 22,953 missense variants with predicted functional impact. We find germline truncation variants and large deletions across Fanconi pathway genes in 20% of cases. Enrichment of rare truncations is shown in BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2. Additionally, we observe germline truncation variants in genes not previously associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility (NF1, MAP3K4, CDKN2B, and MLL3). Evidence for loss of heterozygosity was found in 100% and 76% of cases with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 truncations respectively. Germline-somatic interaction analysis combined with extensive bioinformatics annotation identifies 237 candidate functional germline truncation and missense variants, including 2 pathogenic BRCA1 and 1 TP53 deleterious variants. Finally, integrated analyses of germline and somatic variants identify significantly altered pathways, including the Fanconi, MAPK, and MLL pathways. PMID:24448499

  11. Prevalence screening for ovarian cancer in postmenopausal women by CA 125 measurement and ultrasonography.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, I; Davies, A P; Bridges, J; Stabile, I; Fay, T; Lower, A; Grudzinskas, J G; Oram, D

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the performance of the sequential combination of serum CA 125 measurement and ultrasonography in screening for ovarian cancer. DESIGN--The serum CA 125 concentration of each subject was determined and those with a concentration > or = 30 U/ml were recalled for abdominal ultrasonography. If ultrasonography gave abnormal results surgical investigation was arranged. Volunteers were followed up by annual postal questionnaire. SETTING--General practice, occupational health departments, ovarian cancer screening clinic. SUBJECTS--22,000 women volunteers who were postmenopausal and aged over 45 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Apparent sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, years of cancer detected. RESULTS--41 women had a positive screening result and were investigated surgically. 11 had ovarian cancer (true positive result) and 30 had other disorders or no abnormality (false positive result). Of the 21,959 volunteers with a negative screening result, eight subsequently presented clinically with ovarian cancer (false negative result) and 21,951 had not developed ovarian cancer during follow up (apparent true negative result). The screening protocol achieved a specificity of 99.9%, a positive predictive value of 26.8%, and an apparent sensitivity of 78.6% and 57.9% at one year and two year follow up respectively. The estimated number of years of cancer detected by the prevalence screen was 1.4 years. CONCLUSIONS--This screening protocol is highly specific for ovarian cancer and can detect a substantial proportion of cases at a preclinical stage. Further investigation is required to determine the effect of the screening protocol on the ratio of early to late stage disease detected and on mortality from ovarian cancer. PMID:8490497

  12. Emerging and Evolving Ovarian Cancer Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Bobbs, Alexander S; Cole, Jennifer M; Cowden Dahl, Karen D

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the leading cause of death from a gynecological malignancy in the United States. By the time a woman is diagnosed with OC, the tumor has usually metastasized. Mouse models that are used to recapitulate different aspects of human OC have been evolving for nearly 40 years. Xenograft studies in immunocompromised and immunocompetent mice have enhanced our knowledge of metastasis and immune cell involvement in cancer. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) can accurately reflect metastasis, response to therapy, and diverse genetics found in patients. Additionally, multiple genetically engineered mouse models have increased our understanding of possible tissues of origin for OC and what role individual mutations play in establishing ovarian tumors. Many of these models are used to test novel therapeutics. As no single model perfectly copies the human disease, we can use a variety of OC animal models in hypothesis testing that will lead to novel treatment options. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the utility of different mouse models in the study of OC and their suitability for cancer research. PMID:26380555

  13. Safety of Ovarian Tissue Autotransplantation for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bockstaele, Laurence; Tsepelidis, Sophie; Dechene, Julie; Englert, Yvon; Demeestere, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Cancer treatments can induce premature ovarian failure in almost half of young women suffering from invasive neoplasia. Cryopreservation of ovarian cortex and subsequent autotransplantation of frozen-thawed tissue have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional fertility preservation technologies. However, human ovarian tissue is generally harvested before the administration of gonadotoxic treatment and could be contaminated with malignant cells. The safety of autotransplantation of ovarian cortex remains a major concern for fertility preservation units worldwide. This paper discusses the main tools for detecting disseminated cancer cells currently available, their limitations, and clinical relevance. PMID:22253631

  14. Inhibitory Effect of Baicalin and Baicalein on Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianchu; Li, Zhaoliang; Chen, Allen Y.; Ye, Xingqian; Luo, Haitao; Rankin, Gary O.; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the primary causes of death for women all through the Western world. Baicalin and baicalein are naturally occurring flavonoids that are found in the roots and leaves of some Chinese medicinal plants and are thought to have antioxidant activity and possible anti-angiogenic, anti-cancer, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. Two kinds of ovarian cancer (OVCAR-3 and CP-70) cell lines and a normal ovarian cell line (IOSE-364) were selected to be investigated in the inhibitory effect of baicalin and baicalein on cancer cells. Largely, baicalin and baicalein inhibited ovarian cancer cell viability in both ovarian cancer cell lines with LD50 values in the range of 45–55 μM for baicalin and 25–40 μM for baicalein. On the other hand, both compounds had fewer inhibitory effects on normal ovarian cells viability with LD50 values of 177 μM for baicalin and 68 μM for baicalein. Baicalin decreased expression of VEGF (20 μM), cMyc (80 μM), and NFkB (20 μM); baicalein decreased expression of VEGF (10 μM), HIF-1α (20 μM), cMyc (20 μM), and NFkB (40 μM). Therefore baicalein is more effective in inhibiting cancer cell viability and expression of VEGF, HIF-1α, cMyc, and NFκB in both ovarian cancer cell lines. It seems that baicalein inhibited cancer cell viability through the inhibition of cancer promoting genes expression including VEGF, HIF-1α, cMyc, and NFκB. Overall, this study showed that baicalein and baicalin significantly inhibited the viability of ovarian cancer cells, while generally exerting less of an effect on normal cells. They have potential for chemoprevention and treatment of ovarian cancers. PMID:23502466

  15. Chromosome abnormalities in primary ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yonescu, R.; Currie, J.; Griffin, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that are specific and recurrent may occur in regions of the genome that are involved in the conversion of normal cells to those with tumorigenic potential. Ovarian cancer is the primary cause of death among patients with gynecological malignancies. We have performed cytogenetic analysis of 16 ovarian tumors from women age 28-82. Three tumors of low malignant potential and three granulosa cell tumors had normal karyotypes. To look for the presence of trisomy 12, which has been suggested to be a common aberration in this group of tumors, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on direct preparations from three of these tumors using a probe for alpha satellite sequences of chromosome 12. In the 3 preparations, 92-98 percent of the cells contained two copies of chromosome 12, indicating that trisomy 12 is not a universal finding in low grade ovarian tumors. Endometrioid carcinoma of the ovary is histologically indistinguishable from endometial carcinoma of the uterus. We studied 10 endometrioid tumors to determine the degree of genetic similarity between these two carcinomas. Six out of ten endometrioid tumors showed a near-triploid modal number, and one presented with a tetraploid modal number. Eight of the ten contained structural chromosome abnormalities, of which the most frequent were 1p- (5 tumors), 19q+ (3 tumors), 6q- or ins(6) (4 tumors), 3q- or 3q+ (4 tumors). These cytogenetic results resemble those reported for papillary ovarian tumors and differ from those of endometrial carcinoma of the uterus. We conclude that despite the histologic similarities between the endometrioid and endometrial carcinomas, the genetic abnormalities in the genesis of these tumors differ significantly.

  16. Validating genetic risk associations for ovarian cancer through the international Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, C L; Near, A M; Van Den Berg, D J; Ramus, S J; Gentry-Maharaj, A; Menon, U; Gayther, S A; Anderson, A R; Edlund, C K; Wu, A H; Chen, X; Beesley, J; Webb, P M; Holt, S K; Chen, C; Doherty, J A; Rossing, M A; Whittemore, A S; McGuire, V; DiCioccio, R A; Goodman, M T; Lurie, G; Carney, M E; Wilkens, L R; Ness, R B; Moysich, K B; Edwards, R; Jennison, E; Kjaer, S K; Hogdall, E; Hogdall, C K; Goode, E L; Sellers, T A; Vierkant, R A; Cunningham, J C; Schildkraut, J M; Berchuck, A; Moorman, P G; Iversen, E S; Cramer, D W; Terry, K L; Vitonis, A F; Titus-Ernstoff, L; Song, H; Pharoah, P D P; Spurdle, A B; Anton-Culver, H; Ziogas, A; Brewster, W; Galitovskiy, V; Chenevix-Trench, G

    2009-01-01

    The search for genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer risk has focused on pathways including sex steroid hormones, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) identified 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes in these pathways, which had been genotyped by Consortium members and a pooled analysis of these data was conducted. Three of the 10 SNPs showed evidence of an association with ovarian cancer at P⩽0.10 in a log-additive model: rs2740574 in CYP3A4 (P=0.011), rs1805386 in LIG4 (P=0.007), and rs3218536 in XRCC2 (P=0.095). Additional genotyping in other OCAC studies was undertaken and only the variant in CYP3A4, rs2740574, continued to show an association in the replication data among homozygous carriers: ORhomozygous(hom)=2.50 (95% CI 0.54-11.57, P=0.24) with 1406 cases and 2827 controls. Overall, in the combined data the odds ratio was 2.81 among carriers of two copies of the minor allele (95% CI 1.20–6.56, P=0.017, phet across studies=0.42) with 1969 cases and 3491 controls. There was no association among heterozygous carriers. CYP3A4 encodes a key enzyme in oestrogen metabolism and our finding between rs2740574 and risk of ovarian cancer suggests that this pathway may be involved in ovarian carcinogenesis. Additional follow-up is warranted. PMID:19127255

  17. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel or Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine With or Without Bevacizumab as First-Line Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV or Recurrent Stage I Epithelial Ovarian or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-29

    Borderline Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer

  18. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  19. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab Compared to Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Carcinoma (Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  20. Value of Symptom-Triggered Diagnostic Evaluation for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, M. Robyn; Lowe, Kimberly A.; Goff, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential harms and ovarian cancer outcomes associated with symptom-triggered diagnostic evaluation of all women with symptoms of ovarian cancer. Methods Five thousand-twelve women over age 40 were prospectively enrolled in a cohort study of proactive symptom-triggered diagnostic evaluation. Women who tested positive on a Symptom Index were offered testing with CA125 and transvaginal ultrasound. Results of these tests and any subsequent procedures were recorded. Assessment of ovarian cancer outcomes for all participants through Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) was performed a year after enrollment was complete. Results A positive Symptom Index was found in 241 (4.8%) of participating patients and 211 (88%) participated in CA125, transvaginal ultrasound, or both CA125 and transvaginal ultrasound. Twenty surgical procedures (laparoscopy, laparotomy, vaginal) were performed in the study population (0.4% of participating women). However, only six (0.12%) were performed for a suspicious ovarian mass and only 4 (0.08%) were performed solely due to study participation. A total of eight ovarian cancers were diagnosed, 31–843days after symptom assessment (50% distant, 50% local or regional). Of the two cancers diagnosed within 6 months, one was Symptom Index-positive. Conclusions Proactive symptom-triggered diagnostic evaluation for ovarian cancer results in minimal unindicated surgery. A small number of ovarian cancers were identified solely on the basis of symptom-triggered diagnostic testing. PMID:24463666

  1. Other Gynecologic Cancers: endometrial, ovarian, vulvar and vaginal cancers.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Franco, Eliane; Franco, Eduardo L

    2004-08-25

    HEALTH ISSUE: In Canada, cancers of the endometrium, ovaries, vulva, vagina, placenta and adnexa account for 11% of all malignant neoplasms in women and 81% of all genital cancers. Although the incidence and mortality from vulvar and vaginal cancers are very low, endometrium and ovarian cancer are important public health problems. KEY FINDINGS: In Canada, there has been no appreciable improvement in survival for women with advanced endometrial (EC) or ovarian cancer (OC) over the past 30 years. The prognosis of EC is good for most patients because diagnosis is made at early stages. However, survival of OC is poor; more than 70% of cases are diagnosed at late stages. Up to 10% of OCs is linked to familial aggregation. Cancers of the vulva and of the vagina are very rare. The survival experience for women with the latter is worse than for those with the former. Both share many risk factors with cervical cancer and the recent developments in the study of HPV infection should be applicable to these diseases as well. Of particular interest will be the advent of vaccines for the primary prevention of HPV infection. DATA GAPS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: At present, the best available means to diagnose gynecologic malignancies is a detailed clinical examination, considering the totality of information on potential and proven risk factors, such as age, reproductive health, sexual practices, use unopposed estrogens or of oral contraceptives or tubal ligation, obesity, diet, smoking, and the familial clustering of some of these cancers. PMID:15345077

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression correlates with serum CA125 and represents a useful tool in prediction of refractoriness to platinum-based chemotherapy and ascites formation in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ai-Qun; Robertson, Gregory; Morris, David L.

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing need for the identification of novel biological markers and potential therapeutic targets in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Given the critical role of growth factors in the biology of EOC, we aimed in the present study to evaluate the intratumoral expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) proteins and their clinical relevance in a cohort of 100 patients with EOC. All patients received platinum-based chemotherapy after surgery. A comparative immunohistochemical study of normal ovarian and EOC tissues showed that both growth factors were expressed at higher levels in tumor samples. In our statistical analysis, while no association existed between the FGF expression status and the clinicopathological characteristics of patients, intratumoral VEGF was identified as a potential biomarker for the prediction of ascites formation. In addition, the expression status of VEGF appeared to independently predict overall survival and response to chemotherapy. Furthermore, a direct association was demonstrated between the pre-treatment VEGF expression and serum CA125 after three cycles of chemotherapy. In sum, we report for the first time to our knowledge the correlation between intratumoral VEGF and serum CA125 in EOC. Our data also shows the prognostic value of VEGF expression in EOC. These results suggest the potential value of intratumoral VEGF in patient stratification. Dual inhibition of VEGF and CA125 might bring about a better outcome for patients with EOC. PMID:26143638

  3. Clinical Use of Cancer Biomarkers in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sölétormos, György; Duffy, Michael J.; Othman Abu Hassan, Suher; Verheijen, René H.M.; Tholander, Bengt; Bast, Robert C.; Gaarenstroom, Katja N.; Sturgeon, Catharine M.; Bonfrer, Johannes M.; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Troonen, Hugo; CarloTorre, Gian; Kanty Kulpa, Jan; Tuxen, Malgorzata K.; Molina, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Objective To present an update of the European Group on Tumor Markers guidelines for serum markers in epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Systematic literature survey from 2008 to 2013. The articles were evaluated by level of evidence and strength of recommendation. Results Because of its low sensitivity (50–62% for early stage epithelial ovarian cancer) and limited specificity (94–98.5%), cancer antigen (CA) 125 (CA125) is not recommended as a screening test in asymptomatic women. The Risk of Malignancy Index, which includes CA125, transvaginal ultrasound, and menopausal status, is recommended for the differential diagnosis of a pelvic mass. Because human epididymis protein 4 has been reported to have superior specificity to CA125, especially in premenopausal women, it may be considered either alone or as part of the risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm, in the differential diagnosis of pelvic masses, especially in such women. CA125 should be used to monitor response to first-line chemotherapy using the previously published criteria of the Gynecological Cancer Intergroup, that is, at least a 50% reduction of a pretreatment sample of 70 kU/L or greater. The value of CA125 in posttherapy surveillance is less clear. Although a prospective randomized trial concluded that early administration of chemotherapy based on increasing CA125 levels had no effect on survival, European Group on Tumor Markers state that monitoring with CA125 in this situation should occur, especially if the patient is a candidate for secondary cytoreductive surgery. Conclusions At present, CA125 remains the most important biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer, excluding tumors of mucinous origin. PMID:26588231

  4. Data Mining for Identification of Molecular Targets in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Ruiz, Vanessa; Juarez-Mendez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is possibly the sixth most common malignancy worldwide, in Mexico representing the fourth leading cause of gynecological cancer death more than 70% being diagnosed at an advanced stage and the survival being very poor. Ovarian tumors are classified according to histological characteristics, epithelial ovarian cancer as the most common (~80%). We here used high-density microarrays and a systems biology approach to identify tissue-associated deregulated genes. Non-malignant ovarian tumors showed a gene expression profile associated with immune mediated inflammatory responses (28 genes), whereas malignant tumors had a gene expression profile related to cell cycle regulation (1,329 genes) and ovarian cell lines to cell cycling and metabolism (1,664 genes). PMID:27221839

  5. Prognostic values of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 isoenzymes in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yu-mei; Zhao, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity has been used as a functional stem cell marker to isolate cancer stem cells in different cancer types, including ovarian cancer. However, which ALDH1’s isoenzymes are contributing to ALDH1 activity in ovarian cancer remains elusive. In addition, the prognostic value of an individual ALDH1 isoenzyme in ovarian cancer is not clear. Thus, we accessed the prognostic value of ALDH1 isoenzymes in ovarian cancer patients through the “Kaplan–Meier plotter” online database, which can be used to determine the effect of the genes on ovarian cancer prognosis. We found that high mRNA expression of five ALDH1 isoenzymes, such as ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, ALDH1A3, ALDH1B1, and ALDH1L1, was not correlated with overall survival (OS) for all 1,306 ovarian cancer patients. In addition, all five of the ALDH1 isoenzymes’ high mRNA expression was found to be uncorrelated with OS in serous cancer or endometrioid cancer patients. However, ALDH1A3’s high mRNA expression is associated with worse OS in grade II ovarian cancer patients, hazard ratio (HR) 1.53 (1.14–2.07), P=0.005. ALDH1A2’s high mRNA expression is significantly associated with worse OS in TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer patients, HR 2.86 (1.56–5.08), P=0.00036. In addition, ALDH1A3’s high mRNA expression is significantly associated with better OS in TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer patients, HR 0.56 (0.32–1.00), P=0.04. Our results indicate that although ALDH1 isoenzyme mRNA might not be a prognostic marker for overall ovarian cancer patients, some isoenzymes, such as ALDH1A2 and ALDH1A3, might be a good prognostic marker for some types of ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27110126

  6. MiR181c inhibits ovarian cancer metastasis and progression by targeting PRKCD expression

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lijuan; Wang, Li; Li, Fengxia; Gao, Xihai; Wei, Xuegong; Liu, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate many important cancer related gene expression in the posttranscriptional process. Dysregulated expression of miRNAs has been observed in numerous human cancers including ovarian cancer. In this study, we found that the expression of the miR-181c was significantly decreased in ovarian cancer tissue and in tissues with lymph node metastasis when compared with their control samples, respectively. Moreover, among pathological stages, the expression of miR-181c was significantly decreased in the tissues with IV stage compared with other stages. In vitro, miR-181c significantly inhibited the proliferation, metastasis of A2780 cell line, and induced G1 phase arrest. Through bioinformatics prediction, protein kinase C delta (PRKCD) was identified as a target gene of miR-181c. Western blot results showed that PRKCD was increased in ovarian cancer tissue, in tissues with lymph node metastasis and IV stage of ovarian cancer pathological samples. After knocking down PRKCD, the cell cycle of A2780 cells was also arrested in G1 phase. The proliferation and the metastasis of A2780 cells were reduced. The dual luciferase reporter experiments showed that miR-181c regulated the expression of PRKCD by combining with its 3’UTR. These results indicate that miR-181c inhibits ovarian cancer metastasis and progression by targeting PRKCD expression. PMID:26629004

  7. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab, and Veliparib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Tumor; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  8. Role of minimally invasive surgery in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nezhat, Farr R; Pejovic, Tanja; Finger, Tamara N; Khalil, Susan S

    2013-01-01

    The standard treatment of ovarian cancer includes upfront surgery with intent to accurately diagnose and stage the disease and to perform maximal cytoreduction, followed by chemotherapy in most cases. Surgical staging of ovarian cancer traditionally has included exploratory laparotomy with peritoneal washings, hysterectomy, salpingo-oophorectomy, omentectomy, multiple peritoneal biopsies, and possible pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. In the early 1990s, pioneers in laparoscopic surgery used minimally invasive techniques to treat gynecologic cancers, including laparoscopic staging of early ovarian cancer and primary and secondary cytoreduction in advanced and recurrent disease in selected cases. Since then, the role of minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology has been continually expanding, and today advanced laparoscopic and robotic-assisted laparoscopic techniques are used to evaluate and treat cervical and endometrial cancer. However, the important question about the place of the minimally invasive approach in surgical treatment of ovarian cancer remains to be evaluated and answered. Overall, the potential role of minimally invasive surgery in treatment of ovarian cancer is as follows: i) laparoscopic evaluation, diagnosis, and staging of apparent early ovarian cancer; ii) laparoscopic assessment of feasibility of upfront surgical cytoreduction to no visible disease; iii) laparoscopic debulking of advanced ovarian cancer; iv) laparoscopic reassessment in patients with complete remission after primary treatment; and v) laparoscopic assessment and cytoreduction of recurrent disease. The accurate diagnosis of suspect adnexal masses, the safety and feasibility of this surgical approach in early ovarian cancer, the promise of laparoscopy as the most accurate tool for triaging patients with advanced disease for surgery vs upfront chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and its potential in treatment of advanced cancer have been documented and

  9. Pre-test prediction models of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation in breast/ovarian families attending familial cancer clinics

    PubMed Central

    de la Hoya, M; Diez, O; Perez-Segura, P; Godino, J; Fernandez, J; Sanz, J; Alonso, C; Baiget, M; Diaz-Rubio, E; Caldes, T

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To test whether statistical models developed to calculate pre-test probability of being a BRCA1/2 carrier can differentiate better between the breast/ovarian families to be referred to the DNA test laboratory. Study design: A retrospective analysis was performed in 109 Spanish breast/ovarian families previously screened for germline mutations in both the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Four easy to use logistic regression models originally developed in Spanish (HCSC model), Dutch (LUMC model), Finnish (HUCH model), and North American (U Penn model) families and one model based on empirical data of Frank 2002 were tested. A risk counsellor was asked to assign a subjective pre-test probability for each family. Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values, and areas under receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curves were calculated in each case. Correlation between predicted probability and mutation prevalence was tested. All statistical tests were two sided. Results: Overall, the models performed well, improving the performances of a genetic counsellor. The median ROC curve area was 0.80 (range 0.77-0.82). At 100% sensitivity, the median specificity was 30% (range 25-33%). At 92% sensitivity, the median specificity was 42% (range 33.3-54.2%) and the median negative predictive value was 93% (range 89.7-98%). BRCA1 families tended to score higher risk than BRCA2 families in all models tested. Conclusions: All models increased the discrimination power of an experienced risk counsellor, suggesting that their use is valuable in the context of clinical counselling and genetic testing to optimise selection of patients for screening and allowing for more focused management. Models developed in different ethnic populations performed similarly well in a Spanish series of families, suggesting that models targeted to specific populations may not be necessary in all cases. Carrier probability as predicted by the models is consistent with actual prevalence

  10. Quantitative analysis of cell-free DNA in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    SHAO, XUEFENG; He, YAN; JI, MIN; CHEN, XIAOFANG; QI, JING; SHI, WEI; HAO, TIANBO; JU, SHAOQING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) levels and clinicopathological characteristics of patients with ovarian cancer using a branched DNA (bDNA) technique, and to determine the value of quantitative cf-DNA detection in assisting with the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Serum specimens were collected from 36 patients with ovarian cancer on days 1, 3 and 7 following surgery, and additional serum samples were also collected from 22 benign ovarian tumor cases, and 19 healthy, non-cancerous ovaries. bDNA techniques were used to detect serum cf-DNA concentrations. All data were analyzed using SPSS version 18.0. The cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in the ovarian cancer group compared with those of the benign ovarian tumor group and healthy ovarian group (P<0.01). Furthermore, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in stage III and IV ovarian cancer compared with those of stages I and II (P<0.01). In addition, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased on the first day post-surgery (P<0.01), and subsequently demonstrated a gradual decrease. In the ovarian cancer group, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of cf-DNA and the sensitivity were 0.917 and 88.9%, respectively, which was higher than those of cancer antigen 125 (0.724, 75%) and human epididymis protein 4 (0.743, 80.6%). There was a correlation between the levels of serum cf-DNA and the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer in the patients evaluated. bDNA techniques possessed higher sensitivity and specificity than other methods for the detection of serum cf-DNA in patients exhibiting ovarian cancer, and bDNA techniques are more useful for detecting cf-DNA than other factors. Thus, the present study demonstrated the potential value for the use of bDNA as an adjuvant diagnostic method for ovarian cancer. PMID:26788153