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Sample records for predisposed subjects effects

  1. Prevalence of Radiographic Parameters Predisposing to Femoroacetabular Impingement in Young Asymptomatic Chinese and White Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Van Houcke, Jan; Yau, Wan Pan; Yan, Chun Hoi; Huysse, Wouter; Dechamps, Hannes; Lau, Wing Hang; Wong, Chun Sing; Pattyn, Christophe; Audenaert, Emmanuel Albert

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis of the hip is five to ten times more common in white people than in Chinese people. Little is known about the true prevalence of femoroacetabular impingement or its role in the development of osteoarthritis in the Chinese population. A cross-sectional study of both white and Chinese asymptomatic individuals was conducted to compare the prevalences of radiographic features posing a risk for femoroacetabular impingement in the two groups. It was hypothesized that that there would be proportional differences in hip anatomy between the white and Asian populations. Methods: Pelvic computed tomography scans of 201 subjects (ninety-nine white Belgians and 102 Chinese; 105 men and ninety-six women) without hip pain who were eighteen to forty years of age were assessed. The original axial images were reformatted to three-dimensional pelvic models simulating standardized radiographic views. Ten radiographic parameters predisposing to femoroacetabular impingement were measured: alpha angle, anterior offset ratio, and caput-collum-diaphyseal angle on the femoral side and crossover sign, ischial spine projection, acetabular anteversion angle, center-edge angle, acetabular angle of Sharp, Tönnis angle, and anterior acetabular head index on the acetabular side. Results: The white subjects had a less spherical femoral head than the Chinese subjects (average alpha angle, 56° compared with 50°; p < 0.001). The Chinese subjects had less lateral acetabular coverage than the white subjects, with average center-edge angles of 35° and 39° (p < 0.001) and acetabular angles of Sharp of 38° and 36° (p < 0.001), respectively. A shallower acetabular configuration was predominantly present in Chinese women. Conclusions: Significant differences in hip anatomy were demonstrated between young asymptomatic Chinese and white subjects. However, the absolute size of the observed differences appears to contrast with the reported low prevalence of femoroacetabular

  2. Cigarette Smoke-Induced Lung Disease Predisposes to More Severe Infection with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: Protective Effects of Andrographolide.

    PubMed

    Tan, W S Daniel; Peh, Hong Yong; Liao, Wupeng; Pang, Chu Hui; Chan, Tze Khee; Lau, Suk Hiang; Chow, Vincent T; Wong, W S Fred

    2016-05-27

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is associated with many maladies, one of which is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). As the disease progresses, patients are more prone to develop COPD exacerbation episodes by bacterial infection, particularly to nontypeable Haemophilus influenza (NTHi) infection. The present study aimed to develop a CS-exposed mouse model that increases inflammation induced by NTHi challenge and investigate the protective effects of andrographolide, a bioactive molecule with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties isolated from the plant Andrographis paniculata. Female BALB/c mice exposed to 2 weeks of CS followed by a single intratracheal instillation of NTHi developed increased macrophage and neutrophil pulmonary infiltration, augmented cytokine levels, and heightened oxidative damage. Andrographolide effectively reduced lung cellular infiltrates and decreased lung levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, CXCL1/KC, 8-OHdG, matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8), and MMP-9. The protective actions of andrographolide on CS-predisposed NTHi inflammation might be attributable to increased nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation and decreased Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) repressor function, resulting in enhanced gene expression of antioxidant enzymes including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPx-2), glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM), and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Taken together, these findings strongly support a therapeutic potential for andrographolide in preventing lung inflammation caused by NTHi in cigarette smokers. PMID:27104764

  3. Why to Treat Subjects as Fixed Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, James S.; Estes, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Adelman, Marquis, Sabatos-DeVito, and Estes (2013) collected word naming latencies from 4 participants who read 2,820 words 50 times each. Their recommendation and practice was that R2 targets set for models should take into account subject idiosyncrasies as replicable patterns, equivalent to a subjects-as-fixed-effects assumption. In light of an…

  4. 32 CFR 644.391 - Predisposal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Predisposal conference. 644.391 Section 644.391... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.391 Predisposal conference. (a) Where a substantial Army installation, or portion thereof, is involved, the DE will convene a predisposal conference...

  5. Recruiting phobic research subjects: effectiveness and cost.

    PubMed Central

    Kaakko, T.; Murtomaa, H.; Milgrom, P.; Getz, T.; Ramsay, D. S.; Coldwell, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    Efficiently enrolling subjects is one of the most important and difficult aspects of a clinical trial. This prospective study evaluated strategies used in the recruitment of 144 dental injection phobics for a clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of combining alprazolam with exposure therapy. Three types of recruitment strategies were evaluated: paid advertising, free publicity, and professional referral. Sixty-three percent of subjects were enrolled using paid advertising (the majority of them from bus advertisements [27.0%], posters on the University of Washington campus [20.1%], and newspaper advertisements [13.2%]). Free publicity (eg, television coverage, word of mouth) yielded 18.8% of enrolled subjects and professionaL referrals 14.6% of subjects. The average cost (1996 dollars) of enrolling 1 subject was $79. Bus and poster advertising attracted more initial contacts and yielded the greatest enrollment. PMID:11495403

  6. Effect of GDNF on depressive-like behavior, spatial learning and key genes of the brain dopamine system in genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Kondaurova, Elena M; Bazovkina, Daria V; Tsybko, Anton S; Ilchibaeva, Tatyana V; Khotskin, Nikita V; Semenova, Alina A; Popova, Nina K

    2014-11-01

    The effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on behavior and brain dopamine system in predisposed to depressive-like behavior ASC (Antidepressant Sensitive Cataleptics) mice in comparison with the parental "nondepressive" CBA mice was studied. In 7days after administration (800ng, i.c.v.) GDNF decreased escape latency time and the path traveled to reach hidden platform in Morris water maze in ASC mice. GDNF enhanced depressive-like behavioral traits in both "nondepressive" CBA and "depressive" ASC mice. In CBA mice, GDNF decreased functional response to agonists of D1 (chloro-APB hydrobromide) and D2 (sumanirole maleate) receptors in tail suspension test, reduced D2 receptor gene expression in the substantia nigra and increased monoamine oxydase A (MAO A) gene expression in the striatum. GDNF increased D1 and D2 receptor genes expression in the nucleus accumbens of ASC mice but failed to alter expression of catechol-O-methyltransferase, dopamine transporter, MAO B and tyrosine hydroxylase genes in both investigated mouse strains. Thus, GDNF produced long-term genotype-dependent effect on behavior and the brain dopamine system. GDNF pretreatment (1) reduced D1 and D2 receptors functional responses and D2 receptor gene expression in s. nigra of CBA mice; (2) increased D1 and D2 receptor genes expression in n. accumbens of ASC mice and (3) improved spatial learning in ASC mice. GDNF enhanced depressive-like behavior both in CBA and ASC mice. The data suggest that genetically defined variance in the cross-talk between GDNF and brain dopamine system contributes to the variability of GDNF-induced responses and might be responsible for controversial GDNF effects. PMID:25101543

  7. Mediating effect of Facebook addiction on the relationship between subjective vitality and subjective happiness.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Recep; Satici, Seydi Ahmet; Akin, Ahmet

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the mediating effects of Facebook addiction on the relationship between subjective vitality and subjective happiness. 297 university students (157 women, 140 men; M age = 20.1 yr., SD = 1.3) were administered the Facebook Addiction Scale, the Subjective Vitality Scale, and the Subjective Happiness Scale. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that Facebook addiction partially mediated the relationship between subjective vitality and subjective happiness. PMID:24693824

  8. Thermogenic Effect of Glucose in Hypothyroid Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kozacz, Agnieszka; Grunt, Paulina; Steczkowska, Marta; Mikulski, Tomasz; Dąbrowski, Jan; Górecka, Monika; Sanocka, Urszula; Ziemba, Andrzej Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    The importance of thyroid hormone, catecholamines, and insulin in modification of the thermogenic effect of glucose (TEG) was examined in 34 healthy and 32 hypothyroid subjects. We calculated the energy expenditure at rest and during oral glucose tolerance test. Blood samples for determinations of glucose, plasma insulin, adrenaline (A), and noradrenaline (NA) were collected. It was found that TEG was lower in hypothyroid than in control group (19.68 ± 3.90 versus 55.40 ± 7.32 kJ, resp., P < 0.0004). Mean values of glucose and insulin areas under the curve were higher in women with hypothyroidism than in control group (286.79 ± 23.65 versus 188.41 ± 15.84 mmol/L·min, P < 0.003 and 7563.27 ± 863.65 versus 4987.72 ± 583.88 mU/L·min, P < 0.03 resp.). Maximal levels of catecholamines after glucose ingestion were higher in hypothyroid patients than in control subjects (Amax—0.69 ± 0.08 versus 0.30 ± 0.07 nmol/L, P < 0.0001, and NAmax—6.42 ± 0.86 versus 2.54 ± 0.30 nmol/L, P < 0.0002). It can be concluded that in hypothyroidism TEG and glucose tolerance are decreased while the adrenergic response to glucose administration is enhanced. Presumably, these changes are related to decreased insulin sensitivity and responsiveness to catecholamine action. PMID:24711817

  9. Necrotic enteritis predisposing factors in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Necrotic enteritis in chickens develops as a result of infection with pathogenic strains of Clostridium perfringens and the presence of predisposing factors. Predisposing factors include elements that directly change the physical properties of the gut, either damaging the epithelial surface, inducing mucus production, or changing gut transit times; factors that disrupt the gut microbiota; and factors that alter the immune status of birds. In the past research into necrotic enteritis predisposing factors was directed by the simple hypothesis that low-level colonization of C. perfringens commonly occurred within the gut of healthy chickens and the predisposing factors lead to a proliferation of those bacteria to produce disease. More recently, with an increasing understanding of the major virulence factors of C. perfringens and the application of molecular techniques to define different clades of C. perfringens strains, it has become clear that the C. perfringens isolates commonly found in healthy chickens are generally not strains that have the potential to cause disease. Therefore, we need to re-evaluate hypotheses regarding the development of disease, the origin of disease causing isolates of C. perfringens, and the importance of interactions with other C. perfringens strains and with predisposing factors. Many predisposing factors that affect the physical and immunological characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract may also change the resident microbiota. Research directed towards defining the relative importance of each of these different actions of predisposing factors will improve the understanding of disease pathogenesis and may allow refinement of experiment disease models. PMID:26926926

  10. [Predisposing factors and prevention of emergence agitation].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ju; Nakata, Yoshinori; Morita, Shigeho; Arita, Hideko; Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2011-04-01

    Agitation during the emergence from general anesthesia is a great post-operative problem that often injures the patients themselves and requires the medical staff to restrain and calm the patients. The predisposing factors for emergence agitation include anesthesia, operation, and patient. Sevoflurane anesthesia results in higher incidence of emergence agitation than halothane, because of the rapid emergence, and its effects on central nervous system inducing convulsion and post-operative behavioral changes. The otorhinolaryngologic and ophthalmologic surgeries, post-operative pain, young age, pre-operative anxiety, no past surgical history, and adjustment disorder of patients are risk factors for emergence agitation. The change from sevoflurane to propofol during anesthesia maintenance is a contributing factor to reduce incidence of emergence agitation. The medications including opioids, midazolam, alpha-2 agonists, ketamine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, nitrous oxide, and propofol, and aggressive nerve block such as caudal epidural block for post-operative sedation and analgesia are effective to avoid incidence of emergence agitation. The calm emergence following general anesthesia would decrease the self-injuring behavior, and enhance the parent and caregiver satisfaction in general anesthesia and surgery. PMID:21520589

  11. Learning Styles, Subject Matter, and Effectiveness in Undergraduate Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Darren C.

    2014-01-01

    Are potential relationships among students' learning styles and effectiveness in online education moderated by subject matter for undergraduate students at a private higher education institution? This causal relationship correlational study evaluated the effects of subject matter as a moderating variable between students learning styles and…

  12. The Effectiveness of Subject Matter Experts as Technical Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Saundra Wall

    2001-01-01

    Subject matter experts have knowledge and experience to be technical trainers, but they may require training in adult learning theory and teaching methods. Research on trainer effectiveness is needed to identify ways to improve the use of subject matter experts as trainers. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  13. Effect of yogic practices on subjective well being.

    PubMed

    Malathi, A; Damodaran, A; Shah, N; Patil, N; Maratha, S

    2000-04-01

    Forty eight healthy volunteers who participated in the practice of yoga over a period of 4 months were assessed on Subjective Well Being Inventory (SUBI) before and after the course in order to evaluate the effect of practice of yoga on subjective feelings of well-being and quality of life. A significant improvement in 9 of the 11 factors of SUBI was observed at the end of 4 months, in these participants. The paper thus, reiterates the beneficial effects of regular practice of yoga on subjective well being. PMID:10846636

  14. Effect of Daytime Exercise on Sleep Eeg and Subjective Sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Y.; Kawada, T.; Kiryu, Y.

    1997-08-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of daytime physical exercise on the quality of objective and subjective sleep by examining all-night sleep EEGs. The subjects were five male students, aged 19 to 20 years, who were in the habit of performing regular daytime exercise. The sleep polygraphic parameters in this study were sleep stage time as a percentage of total sleep time (%S1, %S2, %S(3+4), %SREM, %MT), time in bed (TIB), sleep time (ST), total sleep time (TST), sleep onset latency (SOL), waking from sleep, sleep efficiency, number of awakenings, number of stage shifts, number of spindles, and percentages of α and δ waves, all of which were determined by an automatic computer analysis system. The OSA questionnaire was used to investigate subjective sleep. The five scales of the OSA used were sleepiness, sleep maintenance, worry, integrated sleep feeling, and sleep initiation. Each sleep parameter was compared in the exercise and the non-exercise groups. Two-way analysis of variance was applied using subject factor and exercise factor. The main effect of the subject was significant in all parameters and the main effect of exercise in %S(3+4), SOL and sleep efficiency, among the objective sleep parameters. The main effects of the subject, except sleepiness, were significant, as was the main effect of exercise on sleep initiation, among the subjective sleep parameters. These findings suggest that daytime exercise shortened sleep latency and prolonged slow-wave sleep, and that the subjects fell asleep more easily on exercise days. There were also significant individual differences in both the objective and subjective sleep parameters.

  15. Male and female rats differ in brain cannabinoid CB1 receptor density and function and in behavioural traits predisposing to drug addiction: effect of ovarian hormones.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Maria Paola; Fadda, Paola; Casu, Angelo; Spano, Maria Sabrina; Casti, Alberto; Fratta, Walter; Fattore, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Sex-dependent differences are frequently observed in the biological and behavioural effects of substances of abuse, including cannabis. We recently demonstrated a modulating effect of sex and oestrous cycle on cannabinoid-taking and seeking behaviours. Here, we investigated the influence of sex and oestrogen in the regulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptor density and function, measured by [(3)H]CP55940 and CP55940-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding autoradiography, respectively, in the prefrontal cortex (Cg1 and Cg3), caudate- putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus of male and cycling female rats, as well as ovariectomised (OVX) rats and OVX rats primed with oestradiol (10 µg/rat) (OVX+E). CB1 receptor density was significantly lower in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala of cycling females than in males and in OVX females, a difference that appeared to be oestradiol-dependent, because it was no more evident in the OVX+E group. CP55940-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding was significantly higher in the Cg3 of OVX rats relative to cycling and OVX+E rats. No difference was observed in CB1 receptor density or function in any of the other brain areas analysed. Finally, sex and oestradiol were also found to affect motor activity, social behaviour and sensorimotor gating in rats tested in locomotor activity boxes, social interaction and prepulse inhibition tasks, respectively. Our findings provide biochemical evidence for sex- and hormone- dependent differences in the density and function of CB1 receptors in selected brain regions, and in behaviours associated with greater vulnerability to drug addiction, revealing a more vulnerable behavioural phenotype in female than in male rats. PMID:23829370

  16. Predisposing factors and prevention of frostbite.

    PubMed

    Rintamäki, H

    2000-04-01

    This review focuses on the physiological, behavioural and environmental factors which predispose to frostbite. Also prevention of frostbite is summarised. Predisposing factors may increase heat loss, decrease heat production, decrease the insulation of the clothing, make people especially susceptible to cold or make them to behave inadequately. Marked increase in convective or conductive heat loss is often the immediate reason for frostbite. Wind (as described by wind chill index) increases convective heat loss and touching of metal objects increases conductive cooling. Poor insulation of the clothing is also a common reason of frostbite. The insulation can be insufficient when clothing is wet, tight, permeable to wind or does not cover the cold sensitive body parts. Individual factors predisposing to frostbite are inadequate behaviour, low physical fitness, fatigue, dehydration, earlier cold injuries, sickness or poor circulation in peripheral parts of the body. Frostbite is often associated with the use of alcohol. To prevent frostbite, it is necessary to recognise cold risks, practise tasks in the cold, eat and drink well, have physical exercise, have sufficient clothing (also spare clothing), change into dry clothing if necessary and take care of companions. In the cold it is not advisable to get fatigued until exhaustion, sweat excessively, use tight and/or wet clothing, drink alcohol, smoke and expose oneself unnecessarily to wind, metals or fluids. PMID:10998828

  17. Effect of hydration on nitrogen washout in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.; Conkin, J.

    1983-01-01

    Five subjects were tested to assess the influence of drinking hypotonic water (distilled water) on whole body tissue nitrogen washout. During the test, the subjects breathed aviators' oxygen for three hours. Each subject performed two baseline nitrogen washouts in a two-week period. The third washout, in the third week, was done under a transient hydrated condition. This was accomplished by having the subjects drink 1.5 liters of hypotonic water 30 minutes before the washout. Five-minute plots of tissue nitrogen removal from the three separate washouts were analyzed to ascertain if the hydration technique had any effect. Our results clearly indicate that the hydration technique did not alter the tissue nitrogen washout characteristics to any degree over three hours. An increase in tissue nitrogen washout under a transient hydrated condition using hypotonic fluid was not demonstrated to be the mechanism responsible for the reported benefit of this technique in preventing Type I altitude decompression pain in man.

  18. Effects of Prism Eyeglasses on Objective and Subjective Fixation Disparity

    PubMed Central

    Schroth, Volkhard; Joos, Roland; Jaschinski, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In optometry of binocular vision, the question may arise whether prisms should be included in eyeglasses to compensate an oculomotor and/or sensory imbalance between the two eyes. The corresponding measures of objective and subjective fixation disparity may be reduced by the prisms, or the adaptability of the binocular vergence system may diminish effects of the prisms over time. This study investigates effects of wearing prisms constantly for about 5 weeks in daily life. Two groups of 12 participants received eyeglasses with prisms having either a base-in direction or a base-out direction with an amount up to 8 prism diopters. Prisms were prescribed based on clinical fixation disparity test plates at 6 m. Two dependent variables were used: (1) subjective fixation disparity was indicated by a perceived offset of dichoptic nonius lines that were superimposed on the fusion stimuli and (2) objective fixation disparity was measured with a video based eye tracker relative to monocular calibration. Stimuli were presented at 6 m and included either central or more peripheral fusion stimuli. Repeated measurements were made without the prisms and with the prisms after about 5 weeks of wearing these prisms. Objective and subjective fixation disparity were correlated, but the type of fusion stimulus and the direction of the required prism may play a role. The prisms did not reduce the fixation disparity to zero, but induced significant changes in fixation disparity with large effect sizes. Participants receiving base-out prisms showed hypothesized effects, which were concurrent in both types of fixation disparity. In participants receiving base-in prisms, the individual effects of subjective and objective effects were negatively correlated: the larger the subjective (sensory) effect, the smaller the objective (motor) effect. This response pattern was related to the vergence adaptability, i.e. the individual fusional vergence reserves. PMID:26431525

  19. Effects of Prism Eyeglasses on Objective and Subjective Fixation Disparity.

    PubMed

    Schroth, Volkhard; Joos, Roland; Jaschinski, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In optometry of binocular vision, the question may arise whether prisms should be included in eyeglasses to compensate an oculomotor and/or sensory imbalance between the two eyes. The corresponding measures of objective and subjective fixation disparity may be reduced by the prisms, or the adaptability of the binocular vergence system may diminish effects of the prisms over time. This study investigates effects of wearing prisms constantly for about 5 weeks in daily life. Two groups of 12 participants received eyeglasses with prisms having either a base-in direction or a base-out direction with an amount up to 8 prism diopters. Prisms were prescribed based on clinical fixation disparity test plates at 6 m. Two dependent variables were used: (1) subjective fixation disparity was indicated by a perceived offset of dichoptic nonius lines that were superimposed on the fusion stimuli and (2) objective fixation disparity was measured with a video based eye tracker relative to monocular calibration. Stimuli were presented at 6 m and included either central or more peripheral fusion stimuli. Repeated measurements were made without the prisms and with the prisms after about 5 weeks of wearing these prisms. Objective and subjective fixation disparity were correlated, but the type of fusion stimulus and the direction of the required prism may play a role. The prisms did not reduce the fixation disparity to zero, but induced significant changes in fixation disparity with large effect sizes. Participants receiving base-out prisms showed hypothesized effects, which were concurrent in both types of fixation disparity. In participants receiving base-in prisms, the individual effects of subjective and objective effects were negatively correlated: the larger the subjective (sensory) effect, the smaller the objective (motor) effect. This response pattern was related to the vergence adaptability, i.e. the individual fusional vergence reserves. PMID:26431525

  20. Levels-of-processing effects in subject-performed tasks.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, H D; Engelkamp, J

    1999-09-01

    In memory for subject-performed tasks (SPTs), subjects encode a list of simple action phrases (e.g., thumb through a book, knock at the door) by performing these actions during learning. In three experiments, we investigated the size of the levels-of-processing effects in SPTs as compared with those in standard verbal learning tasks (VTs). Subjects under SPT and VT conditions learned lists of action phrases in a surface or a conceptual orienting task. Under both encoding conditions, the subjects recalled fewer items with surface orienting tasks than with conceptual orienting tasks, but the levels-of-processing effects were strongly reduced in the SPT condition. In the SPT condition, items that were encoded in a surface orienting task were still substantially recalled. The items were recalled almost as well as the conceptually encoded items in the VT condition. The distinct reduction of the levels-of-processing effect is caused by the fact that, in SPT encoding even with a verbal surface orienting task, subjects process conceptual information in order to perform the denoted action. We attribute the small conceptual advantage, which remains with SPT despite the conceptual processing for performing, to the fact that items are not as well integrated into memory as they are when conceptual processing is focused on the action component, rather than on the semantic contexts. This lower integration reduces the accessibility of items in the verbal surface task, even with SPT encoding. PMID:10540819

  1. Confidentiality and Professional Affiliation Effects on Subject Ratings of Interviewers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, David W.; And Others

    The purpose of this research was to study the effects of different statements regarding confidentiality (absolute; limited; nondirective) on subject impressions of interviewers. In addition, the professional affiliation of the interviewer was manipulated (psychologist, minister/pastoral counselor, social worker) to assess potential influence of…

  2. Effect Size Measure and Analysis of Single Subject Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaminathan, Hariharan; Horner, Robert H.; Rogers, H. Jane; Sugai, George

    2012-01-01

    This study is aimed at addressing the criticisms that have been leveled at the currently available statistical procedures for analyzing single subject designs (SSD). One of the vexing problems in the analysis of SSD is in the assessment of the effect of intervention. Serial dependence notwithstanding, the linear model approach that has been…

  3. Effect Size for Single-Subject Design in Phonological Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.; Dickinson, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document, validate, and corroborate effect size (ES) for single­-subject design in treatment of children with functional phonological disorders; to evaluate potential child-­specific contributing variables relative to ES; and to establish benchmarks for interpretation of ES for the population. Method: Data…

  4. Influence of "Halo" and "Demon" Effects in Subjective Grading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Gerald D.

    1983-01-01

    The phenomenon of "halo" effects in subjective grading was investigated. Two groups of three raters evaluated 20 term papers in introductory psychology. Term paper grades correlated significantly with course grades when information about previous academic performance was made available. When this information was not available, the correlation was…

  5. Effect of sildenafil on renin secretion in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yeong Jen; Reid, Ian A

    2002-09-01

    Sildenafil is a potent and selective inhibitor of the cyclic GMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE5) that is very effective in the treatment of male impotence. It inhibits breakdown of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) formed in penile smooth muscle cells in response to stimulation by nitric oxide resulting in muscle relaxation. PDE5 is widely distributed in the body, being present in the vasculature, platelets, and kidneys. In the kidney, PDE5 is involved in the regulation of sodium excretion and renin secretion. The aim of the present investigation was to investigate the effect of sildenafil, in doses used clinically, on renin secretion in human subjects. The studies were performed in two groups of healthy normotensive subjects: one in which sodium intake was unrestricted, and one in which sodium intake was restricted to 600 mg/day. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored throughout the study, and blood samples for the measurement of plasma cGMP and cAMP concentrations and plasma renin activity (PRA) were collected. After control measurements, the subjects ingested a capsule containing sildenafil or placebo. Cardiovascular measurements and blood sampling continued for the next 120 min. Sildenafil had only minor cardiovascular effects. Diastolic pressure tended to be lower and heart rate was generally higher after sildenafil than after placebo, but the differences were small. Sildenafil caused a prompt and sustained increase in plasma cGMP concentration and a more gradual increase in plasma cAMP concentration. After the subjects received placebo, there was a progressive decrease in PRA during the 2-hr observation period, presumably reflecting the circadian rhythm in renin secretion. In contrast, PRA failed to decrease after the subjects received sildenafil, thus indicating that sildenafil exerts a stimulatory action on renin secretion. This action on renin secretion may help explain why sildenafil only has minor effect on blood pressure despite the

  6. What aspects of autism predispose to talent?

    PubMed Central

    Happé, Francesca; Vital, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the question, why are striking special skills so much more common in autism spectrum conditions (ASC) than in other groups? Current cognitive accounts of ASC are briefly reviewed in relation to special skills. Difficulties in ‘theory of mind’ may contribute to originality in ASC, since individuals who do not automatically ‘read other minds’ may be better able to think outside prevailing fashions and popular theories. However, originality alone does not confer talent. Executive dysfunction has been suggested as the ‘releasing’ mechanism for special skills in ASC, but other groups with executive difficulties do not show raised incidence of talents. Detail-focused processing bias (‘weak coherence’, ‘enhanced perceptual functioning’) appears to be the most promising predisposing characteristic, or ‘starting engine’, for talent development. In support of this notion, we summarize data from a population-based twin study in which parents reported on their 8-year-olds' talents and their ASC-like traits. Across the whole sample, ASC-like traits, and specifically ‘restricted and repetitive behaviours and interests’ related to detail focus, were more pronounced in children reported to have talents outstripping older children. We suggest that detail-focused cognitive style predisposes to talent in savant domains in, and beyond, autism spectrum disorders. PMID:19528019

  7. Electronic cigarettes: abuse liability, topography and subjective effects

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Sarah E; Hoffman, Allison C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available evidence evaluating the abuse liability, topography, subjective effects, craving and withdrawal suppression associated with e-cigarette use in order to identify information gaps and provide recommendations for future research. Methods Literature searches were conducted between October 2012 and January 2014 using five electronic databases. Studies were included in this review if they were peer-reviewed scientific journal articles evaluating clinical laboratory studies, national surveys or content analyses. Results A total of 15 peer-reviewed articles regarding behavioural use and effects of e-cigarettes published between 2010 and 2014 were included in this review. Abuse liability studies are limited in their generalisability. Topography (consumption behaviour) studies found that, compared with traditional cigarettes, e-cigarette average puff duration was significantly longer, and e-cigarette use required stronger suction. Data on e-cigarette subjective effects (such as anxiety, restlessness, concentration, alertness and satisfaction) and withdrawal suppression are limited and inconsistent. In general, study data should be interpreted with caution, given limitations associated with comparisons of novel and usual products, as well as the possible effects associated with subjects’ previous experience/inexperience with e-cigarettes. Conclusions Currently, very limited information is available on abuse liability, topography and subjective effects of e-cigarettes. Opportunities to examine extended e-cigarette use in a variety of settings with experienced e-cigarette users would help to more fully assess topography as well as behavioural and subjective outcomes. In addition, assessment of ‘real-world’ use, including amount and timing of use and responses to use, would clarify behavioural profiles and potential adverse health effects. PMID:24732159

  8. Effect Size for Single-Subject Design in Phonological Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Morrisette, Michele L.; Dickinson, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to document, validate, and corroborate effect size (ES) for single-subject design in treatment of children with functional phonological disorders; to evaluate potential child-specific contributing variables relative to ES; and to establish benchmarks for interpretation of ES for the population. Method Data were extracted from the Developmental Phonologies Archive for 135 preschool children with phonological disorders who previously participated in single-subject experimental treatment studies. Standard mean differenceall with correction for continuity was computed to gauge the magnitude of generalization gain that accrued longitudinally from treatment for each child with the data aggregated for purposes of statistical analyses. Results ES ranged from 0.09 to 27.83 for the study population. ES was positively correlated with conventional measures of phonological learning and visual inspection of learning data on the basis of procedures standard to single-subject design. ES was linked to children's performance on diagnostic assessments of phonology but not other demographic characteristics or related linguistic skills and nonlinguistic skills. Benchmarks for interpretation of ES were estimated as 1.4, 3.6, and 10.1 for small, medium, and large learning effects, respectively. Conclusion Findings have utility for single-subject research and translation of research to evidence-based practice for children with phonological disorders. PMID:26184118

  9. Blood rheology effect of submaximal exercise on young subjects.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Marco; Alis, Rafael; Martinez-Bello, Vladimir; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Aranda, Rafael; Gómez-Cabrera, Mari-Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays cardiac and metabolic diseases are a matter of concern. Exercise is a valid treatment and method of prevention for not only adults, but also young subjects. Physical activity causes transient blood rheology impairment in adults. However little is known about the effects of exercise on blood flow characteristics in young subjects. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of a light aerobic exercise session on blood rheology in young subjects. Ten young subjects (aged 12-16 years) performed 1 hour of submaximal aerobic exercise (70% HRmax). Blood samples were drawn just before and after exercise. We determined blood and plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, erythrocyte deformability and aggregability. No changes in blood viscosity (p > 0.05), erythrocyte aggregation (p > 0.05) and fibrinogen (p > 0.05) were observed. Hematocrit (p = 0.025) and plasma viscosity (p = 0.018) rose with exercise, while erythrocyte elongation index lowered (p < 0.001). Plasma volume slightly reduced which may explain the lack of changes in blood viscosity. The results of the present study indicate a similar hemorheological response to submaximal exercise in both young people and adults. PMID:23302596

  10. Subclinical Mastitis in Dairy Animals: Incidence, Economics, and Predisposing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mukesh Kr.; Thombare, N. N.; Mondal, Biswajit

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the incidence and economics of subclinical form of bovine mastitis in Central Region of India. Daily milk records of 187 animals during three seasons were collected and subjected to analysis. The economic loss due to reduction in yield, clinical expenses, and additional resources used were quantified and aggregated. The losses due to mastitis in monetary terms were estimated to be INR1390 per lactation, among which around 49% was owing to loss of value from milk and 37% on account of veterinary expenses. Higher losses were observed in crossbred cows due to their high production potential that was affected during mastitis period. The cost of treating an animal was estimated to be INR509 which includes cost of medicine (31.10%) and services (5.47%). Inadequate sanitation, hygiene, and veterinary services were the main predisposing factors for incidence and spread of mastitis as perceived by the respondents. PMID:25093203

  11. Effect of cigarettes on memory search and subjective ratings.

    PubMed

    West, R; Hack, S

    1991-02-01

    The effects of smoking a nicotine versus a nonnicotine cigarette on performance on Sternberg's memory search task and subjective ratings were examined. Testing sessions were undertaken both before and after a period of 24 hours' abstinence in occasional and regular smokers. Memory search rate was significantly faster after the nicotine cigarette than the nonnicotine cigarette. No significant difference in search rate was found between the results from occasional and regular smokers, and between the effect of a cigarette before and after the period of abstinence. The regular smokers inhaled more smoke from the nicotine and nonnicotine cigarettes than did the occasional smokers, but the amount of smoke inhaled from the test cigarettes did not change significantly from pre- to postabstinence. The nicotine cigarette produced stronger dizziness, tremor and palpitations than the nonnicotine cigarette, the more so after abstinence than before in the regular smokers. The results indicate that smoking a cigarette can produce subjective effects and performance improvements in regular and occasional smokers during the course of normal smoking, and that some subjective effects can be greater after abstinence. PMID:2057498

  12. Effect of ozone on respiratory responses in subjects with asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.Q.

    1995-03-01

    In the process of understanding the respiratory effects of individual air pollutants, it is useful to consider which populations seem to be most susceptible to the exposures. Ozone is the most ubiquitous air pollutant in the United States, and there is great interest in the extent of susceptibility to this air pollutant. This review presents evidence that individuals with asthma are more susceptible to adverse respiratory effects from ozone exposure than are nonasthmatic individuals under similar circumstances. In studies comparing patients with asthma to nonasthmatic subjects, research has shown increased pulmonary-function decrements, an increased frequency of bronchial hyperresponsiveness in ozone responders, increased signs of upper airway inflammation after ozone exposure, and an increased response to inhaled sulfur dioxide or allergen in the subjects with asthma. Subjects with asthma are indeed a population susceptible to the inhaled effects of ozone. These data need to be considered by regulators who are charged with setting air quality standards to protect even the most susceptible members of the population. They also underline the importance of strategies to reduce human exposure to ambient ozone. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Effect of sonic boom asymmetry on subjective loudness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's sonic boom apparatus was used in an experimental study to quantify subjective loudness response to a wide range of asymmetrical N-wave sonic boom signatures. Results were used to assess the relative performance of several metrics as loudness estimators for asymmetrical signatures and to quantify in detail the effects on subjective loudness of varying both the degree and direction of signature loudness asymmetry. Findings of the study indicated that Perceived Level (Steven's Mark 7) and A-weighted sound exposure level were the best metrics for quantifying asymmetrical boom loudness. Asymmetrical signatures were generally rated as being less loud than symmetrical signatures of equivalent Perceived Level. The magnitude of the loudness reductions increased as the degree of boom asymmetry increased, and depended upon the direction of asymmetry. These loudness reductions were not accounted for by any of the metrics. Corrections were determined for use in adjusting calculated Perceived Level values to account for these reductions. It was also demonstrated that the subjects generally incorporated the loudness components of the complete signatures when making their subjective judgments.

  14. Recent developments in brain tumor predisposing syndromes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Gunnar; Andersson, Ulrika; Melin, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    The etiologies of brain tumors are in the most cases unknown, but improvements in genetics and DNA screening have helped to identify a wide range of brain tumor predisposition disorders. In this review we are discussing some of the most common predisposition disorders, namely: neurofibromatosis type 1 and 2, schwannomatosis, rhabdoid tumor predisposition disorder, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin), tuberous sclerosis complex, von Hippel-Lindau, Li-Fraumeni and Turcot syndromes. Recent findings from the GLIOGENE collaboration and the newly identified glioma causing gene POT1, will also be discussed. Genetics. We will describe these disorders from a genetic and clinical standpoint, focusing on the difference in clinical symptoms depending on the underlying gene or germline mutation. Central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Most of these disorders predispose the carriers to a wide range of symptoms. Herein, we will focus particularly on tumors affecting the CNS and discuss improvements of targeted therapy for the particular disorders. PMID:26634384

  15. Genomic scan for genes predisposing to schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Jensen. S.; Holik, J.

    1994-03-15

    We initiated a genome-wide search for genes predisposing to schizophrenia by ascertaining 9 families, each containing three to five cases of schizophrenia. The 9 pedigrees were initially genotyped with 329 polymorphic DNA loci distributed throughout the genome. Assuming either autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance, 254 DNA loci yielded lod scores less than -2.0 at {theta} = 0.0, 101 DNA markers gave lod scores less than -2.0 at {theta} = 0.05, while 5 DNA loci produced maximum lod scores greater than 1: D4S35, D14S17, D15S1, D22S84, and D22S55. Of the DNA markers yielding lod scores greater than 1, D4S35 and D22S55 also were suggestive of linkage when the Affected-Pedigree-Member method was used. The families were then genotyped with four highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat markers; possible linkage diminished with DNA markers mapping nearby D4S35, while suggestive evidence of linkage remained with loci in the region of D22S55. Although follow-up investigation of these chromosomal regions may be warranted, our linkage results should be viewed as preliminary observations, as 35 unaffected persons are not past the age of risk. 90 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Effect of microneedle design on pain in human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harvinder S.; Denson, Donald D.; Burris, Brett A.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To design microneedles that minimize pain, this study tested the hypothesis that microneedles cause significantly less pain than a 26-gage hypodermic needle, and that decreasing microneedle length and the number of microneedles reduces pain in normal human subjects. Methods Single microneedles with lengths ranging from 480 to 1450 μm, widths from 160 to 465 μm, thicknesses from 30 to 100 μm and tip angles from 20° to 90°; and arrays containing 5 or 50 microneedles were inserted into the volar forearms of ten healthy, human subjects in a double-blinded, randomized study. Visual analog scale pain scores were recorded and compared to each other and to the pain from a 26-gage hypodermic needle. Results All microneedles investigated were significantly less painful than the hypodermic needle with microneedle pain scores varying from 5 to 40% of the hypodermic needle. Microneedle length had the strongest effect on pain, where a three-fold increase in length increased the pain score by seven fold. The number of microneedles also affected the pain score, where a 10-fold increase in the number of microneedles increased pain just over two-fold. Microneedle tip angle, thickness and width did not significantly influence pain. Discussion Microneedles are significantly less painful than a 26-gage hypodermic needle over the range of dimensions investigated. Decreasing microneedle length and number of microneedles reduces pain. PMID:18716497

  17. Effect of Subject Control and Graduated Exposure on Snake Phobias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepner, Alain; Cauthen, Nelson R.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of two of the variables in Leitenberg's graduated exposure technique for treating phobias, graduated exposure and subject control of the exposure time, was investigated using 15 snake-phobic subjects. Subjective fear significantly decreased from pretesting to posttesting. (Author)

  18. Predisposing factors and surgical outcome of complicated liver hydatid cysts

    PubMed Central

    Akcan, Alper; Sozuer, Erdogan; Akyildiz, Hizir; Ozturk, Ahmet; Atalay, Altay; Yilmaz, Zeki

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the predisposing factors for peritoneal perforation and intrabiliary rupture and the effects of these complications on surgical outcome in liver hydatid disease. METHODS: A total of 372 patients with liver hydatid cysts who had undergone surgical treatment were evaluated retrospectively. Twenty eight patients with peritoneal perforation, 93 patients with spontaneous intrabiliary perforation, and 251 patients with noncomplicated hydatid cysts were treated in our clinics. RESULTS: When the predisposing factors for complications were evaluated, younger age, superficial position, and larger cyst dimensions (P < 0.05; range, 0.001-0.017) increased peritoneal perforation rates. It was shown that older age increased cyst dimensions, and presence of multiple and bilobar cysts increased intrabiliary rupture rates (P < 0.05; range, 0.001-0.028). Partial pericystectomy and drainage was the most frequent surgical procedure in all groups (71.6%). The incidence of post-operative complications in the peritoneal perforated group, in the intrabiliary ruptured group, and in the noncomplicated group was 25%, 16.1% and 5.5%, respectively. When compared, complication rates were significantly different (P = 0.002). When length of hospital stay was compared, there was no significant difference between the groups (P > 0.05). The overall recurrence rate was 3.8% (14 patients), but there was not any statistical difference among the patient groups (P = 0.13). The early postoperative mortality rate was 1.1%. CONCLUSION: In peritoneally perforated and intrabiliary ruptured cases, the most important steps are irrigation of the peritoneal cavity and clearance of the cystic material from the biliary tree. PMID:20572308

  19. The Influence of Predisposing, Enabling and Need Factors on Condom Use in Ivory Coast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngamini Ngui, Andre

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to identify key determinants of condom use in Ivory Coast. Data stem from Ivory Coast Demographic Health Survey (DHS) conducted by ORC Macro in 2005 among a representative sample of 9,686 persons aged 15 - 49. Following the behavioral model, we use logistic regression to assess the effect of predisposing,…

  20. Subject Expression in Brazilian Portuguese: Construction and Frequency Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silveira Neto, Agripino De Souza

    2012-01-01

    Brazilian Portuguese (henceforth BP) has for long been considered as a Null-subject language due to its variability in regards to subject expression (e.g. "Era bom porque eu diminuia de peso...era muito gordinha" "That was good because then I could lose some weight...(I) was a bit chubby." C33:179). Such variability has been…

  1. Effects of Inspiratory and Expiratory Muscle Training in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Hajime; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    The present study aimed to clarify the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) and expiratory muscle training (EMT) on ventilatory muscle strength, pulmonary function and responses during exercise testing. Young healthy women were randomly assigned to 3 groups: IMT (n=16); EMT (n=16); or untrained normal controls (NC, n=8). Subjects in the IMT and EMT groups trained for 15 minutes twice daily over 2 weeks at loads of 30% maximal inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength, respectively. Ventilatory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength; PImax and PEmax, respectively), pulmonary function and progressive exercise testing was performed. Both PImax and PEmax increased in the IMT group, and PEmax increased in the EMT group. Neither trained group demonstrated any change in pulmonary function or peak values during exercise testing. In the IMT group, exercise-induced increases in heart rate, oxygen uptake (VO2/kg) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) decreased with training, as did increases in VO2/kg and RPE in the EMT group. The increased ventilatory muscle strength in both IMT and EMT groups might improve ventilatory efficacy during exercise, and increased inspiratory muscle strength might facilitate oxygen delivery through improved circulatory responses. PMID:25792941

  2. Mixed-Effects Modeling with Crossed Random Effects for Subjects and Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baayen, R. H.; Davidson, D. J.; Bates, D. M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to mixed-effects models for the analysis of repeated measurement data with subjects and items as crossed random effects. A worked-out example of how to use recent software for mixed-effects modeling is provided. Simulation studies illustrate the advantages offered by mixed-effects analyses compared to…

  3. The effects of practice on tracking and subjective workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, P. A.; Robinson, M. A.; Chu, A. L.; Hansen, D. R.; Vercruyssen, M.

    1989-01-01

    Six college-age male subjects performed one hundred, two-minute trials on a second-order tracking task. After each trial, subjects estimated perceived workload using both the NASA TLX and SWAT workload assessment procedures. Results confirmed an expected performance improvement on the tracking task which followed traditional learning curves within the performance of each individual. Perceived workload also decreased for both scales across trials. While performance variability significantly decreased across trials, workload variability remained constant. One month later, the same subjects returned to complete the second experiment in the sequence which was a retention replication of the first experiment. Results replicated those for the first experiment except that both performance error and workload were at reduced overall levels. Results in general affirm a parallel workload reduction with performance improvement, an observation consistent with a resource-based view of automaticity.

  4. EFFECTS OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE ON PULMONARY FUNCTION IN HUMAN SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twenty human subjects with asthma and chronic bronchitis and ten normal, healthy adults were exposed to 0.5 ppm of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) for two hours in an environmental chamber. They engaged in one 15-minute, light to medium-exercise stint on a bicycle ergometer during this pe...

  5. Effectiveness of Professional Development Policies Based on Teachers' Subjective Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Donghai

    2010-01-01

    The results of a questionnaire-based investigation carried out across China regarding teachers' professional development were used to create an extensive database. Chinese teachers' subjective evaluation of a number of professional development policies was statistically analyzed. From their ratings, it is shown that in schools across China,…

  6. 47 CFR 76.905 - Standards for identification of cable systems subject to effective competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... subject to effective competition. 76.905 Section 76.905 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... Regulation § 76.905 Standards for identification of cable systems subject to effective competition. (a) Only the rates of cable systems that are not subject to effective competition may be regulated. (b) A...

  7. 47 CFR 76.905 - Standards for identification of cable systems subject to effective competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... subject to effective competition. 76.905 Section 76.905 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... Regulation § 76.905 Standards for identification of cable systems subject to effective competition. (a) Only the rates of cable systems that are not subject to effective competition may be regulated. (b) A...

  8. 47 CFR 76.905 - Standards for identification of cable systems subject to effective competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... subject to effective competition. 76.905 Section 76.905 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... Regulation § 76.905 Standards for identification of cable systems subject to effective competition. (a) Only the rates of cable systems that are not subject to effective competition may be regulated. (b) A...

  9. 47 CFR 76.905 - Standards for identification of cable systems subject to effective competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... subject to effective competition. 76.905 Section 76.905 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... Regulation § 76.905 Standards for identification of cable systems subject to effective competition. (a) Only the rates of cable systems that are not subject to effective competition may be regulated. (b) A...

  10. Effects of pyrethroid insecticides on subjects engaged in packaging pyrethroids.

    PubMed Central

    He, F; Sun, J; Han, K; Wu, Y; Yao, P; Wang, S; Liu, L

    1988-01-01

    A health survey was conducted on 199 workers engaged in dividing and packaging pyrethroids. The subjects were exposed to fenvalerate at 0.012-0.055 mg/m3 and deltamethrin at 0.005-0.012 mg/m3 in the air with simultaneous skin contact for 0.5-4.5 months. Burning sensations and tightness or numbness on the face appeared in two thirds of the subjects and one third had sniffs and sneezes. Abnormal facial sensations, dizziness, fatigue, and miliary red papules on the skin were more evident in summer than in winter. Neither abnormalities in other organs or systems nor symptoms or signs of acute pyrethroid poisoning were found by interviews, examinations, and laboratory tests. There was no significant difference in plasma levels of NA, cAMP, and cGMP between the examined subjects and the control group. The urine concentration of fenvalerate in the study group ranged from 1.02 to 18.6 micrograms/l; deltamethrin in the urine was present in trace amounts. PMID:3415921

  11. Nontuberculous mycobacteria: opportunistic environmental pathogens for predisposed hosts.

    PubMed

    Cook, James L

    2010-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections are caused by environmental mycobacteria. Patients with pulmonary NTM disease usually have predisposing lung abnormalities. Diagnostic methods are evolving. Treatment is largely empiric. Data were extracted from peer reviewed publications, guidelines, and case series. Progressive NTM lung disease should be treated. Multidrug regimens are mostly macrolide based and are occasionally complemented by lung resection. Disease persistence and relapse are not uncommon and are a greater problem with so-called rapid-grower NTM infections. Some of the issues considered in this review are: the role of antibiotic susceptibility testing in predicting treatment effectiveness, optimal drug combinations, daily vs. intermittent dosing intervals for different NTM infections and disease severity, when the goal of cure should be replaced with observation or palliation, and patient selection for surgery. Future needs for development and research include improved epidemiology, definition of genetic and other risk factors, definition of predictors of treatment outcome, multicenter treatment studies, new drug discovery and animal models of disease and treatment. PMID:20977990

  12. Ankle sprain: pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Wikstrom, Erik A

    2010-01-01

    With the high percentage (up to 75%) of initial lateral ankle sprains (LAS) leading to repetitive sprains and chronic symptoms, it is imperative to better understand how best to treat and rehabilitate LAS events. The purpose of this paper is to review LAS pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and the current evidence regarding therapeutic modalities and exercises used in the treatment of LAS. Functional rehabilitation, early mobilization with support, is the current standard of care for LAS. However, the high percentage of reinjury occurrence and development of chronic symptoms (up to 75%) after a LAS, suggests the current standard of care may not be effective. Recent evidence has shown the need for more stringent immobilization to facilitate ligament healing and restoration of joint stability and function after a LAS. Additionally, the importance of adding adjunctive therapies, specifically joint mobilizations and balance training have been shown to improve function and decrease the incidence of reinjury after a LAS. Modifying current rehabilitation protocols to include protecting the ankle joint with stringent immobilization, and including joint mobilizations and balance training may be the first step to decreasing the incidence of short and long term ankle joint dysfunction. PMID:24198549

  13. Ankle sprain: pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Wikstrom, Erik A

    2010-01-01

    With the high percentage (up to 75%) of initial lateral ankle sprains (LAS) leading to repetitive sprains and chronic symptoms, it is imperative to better understand how best to treat and rehabilitate LAS events. The purpose of this paper is to review LAS pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and the current evidence regarding therapeutic modalities and exercises used in the treatment of LAS. Functional rehabilitation, early mobilization with support, is the current standard of care for LAS. However, the high percentage of reinjury occurrence and development of chronic symptoms (up to 75%) after a LAS, suggests the current standard of care may not be effective. Recent evidence has shown the need for more stringent immobilization to facilitate ligament healing and restoration of joint stability and function after a LAS. Additionally, the importance of adding adjunctive therapies, specifically joint mobilizations and balance training have been shown to improve function and decrease the incidence of reinjury after a LAS. Modifying current rehabilitation protocols to include protecting the ankle joint with stringent immobilization, and including joint mobilizations and balance training may be the first step to decreasing the incidence of short and long term ankle joint dysfunction. PMID:24198549

  14. Predisposing factors in delayed sleep phase syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Hohjoh, H; Matsuura, K

    2000-06-01

    We classified 64 patients with chronic delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) into the primary (n = 53) and secondary (n = 11) group according to presence or absence of such signs as difficulty in waking up which appeared much earlier than the onset of DSPS. The age at the onset of the early signs concentrated in adolescence. The familial occurrence of DSPS was noted in 11 patients of the primary group. In human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing, the incidence of DR1 positivity alone was significantly higher in DSPS patients than in healthy subjects. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory revealed high scores on depression, psychoasthenia and hypochondriasis. We suggest that a predisposition to DSPS includes biological, genetic, social and psychological factors, various combinations of which may lead to DSPS. PMID:11186112

  15. A New Simulator for Assessing Subjective Effects of Sonic Booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1991-01-01

    A man rated and computer driven sonic boom simulator which has been constructed and placed in operational use at NASA-Langley is described. The simulator is used to study human subjective reactions to sonic booms and has the capability of producing a wide range of signatures under controlled conditions. Results are presented to illustrate the capability of the simulator to generate user specified N-wave and shaped booms having rise times as low as 0.5 milliseconds and peak overpressures up to 191 Pa (4 psf). The validity of the simulator as a lab research tool for studying human subjective response to sonic booms was demonstrated by successful completion of a preliminary test designed to compare loudness of N-wave sonic booms with results obtained by other investigators. Excellent agreement of the preliminary test data with existing data was observed. This provided confidence in the experimental methodology and established the simulator as a viable tool for performing detailed evaluations of sonic boom loudness and acceptability within the lab. environment.

  16. Detecting disease-predisposing variants: The haplotype method

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, A.M.; Thomson, G.

    1997-03-01

    For many HLA-associated diseases, multiple alleles - and, in some cases, multiple loci - have been suggested as the causative agents. The haplotype method for identifying disease-predisposing amino acids in a genetic region is a stratification analysis. We show that, for each haplotype combination containing all the amino acid sites involved in the disease process, the relative frequencies of amino acid variants at sites not involved in disease but in linkage disequilibrium with the disease-predisposing sites are expected to be the same in patients and controls. The haplotype method is robust to mode of inheritance and penetrance of the disease and can be used to determine unequivocally whether all amino acid sites involved in the disease have not been identified. Using a resampling technique, we developed a statistical test that takes account of the nonindependence of the sites sampled. Further, when multiple sites in the genetic region are involved in disease, the test statistic gives a closer fit to the null expectation when some - compared with none - of the true predisposing factors are included in the haplotype analysis. Although the haplotype method cannot distinguish between very highly correlated sites in one population, ethnic comparisons may help identify the true predisposing factors. The haplotype method was applied to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) HLA class II DQA1-DQB1 data from Caucasian, African, and Japanese populations. Our results indicate that the combination DQA1 No. 52 (Arg predisposing) DQB1 No. 57 (Asp protective), which has been proposed as an important IDDM agent, does not include all the predisposing elements. With rheumatoid arthritis HLA class H DRB1 data, the results were consistent with the shared-epitope hypothesis. 35 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. The Effects of Sex of Subject, Sex and Attractiveness of Photo on Facial Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroo, Agatha W.; Mozingo, R.

    1989-01-01

    Assessed effect of sex of subject, and sex and attractiveness of photo on facial recognition with 25 male and 25 female college students. Found male subjects performed better with male faces with d' prime scores. (Author/ABL)

  18. Psychosocial predisposing factors for infantile colic.

    PubMed Central

    Rautava, P; Helenius, H; Lehtonen, L

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study associations between characteristics of families during the first pregnancy and after childbirth and the development of infantile colic. DESIGN--Randomised, stratified cluster sampling. Follow up from the first visit to a maternity health care clinic during pregnancy to three months after birth with confidential semistructured questionnaires. SETTING--Maternity health care clinics in primary health care centres in Finland. SUBJECTS--1443 nulliparous women and 1407 partners. Altogether 1333 women and 1279 men returned the questionnaires. When the infants were 3 months old 1208 women and 1115 men returned questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Marital relationship; personal and social behaviour of parents during the pregnancy and their coping with the pregnancy; mothers' physical health and events, symptoms, and experiences in relation to pregnancy; self confidence and experiences of mothers and fathers in relation to childbirth; and parents' sociodemographic and educational variables. Measure of colic when the infant was 3 months old. RESULTS--Experience of stress and physical symptoms during the pregnancy, dissatisfaction with the sexual relationship, and negative experiences during childbirth were associated with the development of colic in the baby. None of the sociodemographic factors was associated with colic. CONCLUSIONS--Early preventive health work during pregnancy should attempt to improve parents' tolerance of symptoms of stress and ability to cope and increase their confidence in parenting abilities. PMID:8401016

  19. Association of the C2-CFB locus with non-infectious uveitis, specifically predisposed to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingming; Fan, Jiao-jie; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Yan; Teng, Yan; Liu, Ping

    2016-04-01

    Complement component 2 (C2) and factor B (CFB) are regulators of complement system and involved in the alternative pathway, which have been identified to be associated with multiple immune-related diseases. This study aimed to investigate the association of these genes with non-infectious intermediate and posterior uveitis. A total of 260 Chinese non-infectious uveitis patients were recruited, including 97 patients with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH), 70 patients with intermediate uveitis (IU) and 93 patients with Behçet's disease (BD). Two hundred and ninety-three normal control subjects were also recruited. Five SNPs across the C2/CFB region were selected and genotyped using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. Association analysis was adjusted for gender and stratified by different subtypes. The CFB SNP rs1048709 was significantly associated with non-infectious uveitis [P corr = 0.01, OR 1.49 (allele model) and P corr = 0.04, OR 1.58 (dominant model), respectively], and similar association was also detected between rs1048709 and female uveitis patients (P corr = 0.01, OR 1.70 and P corr = 0.049, OR 184, respectively). Moreover, subgroup analyses showed that CFB-rs1048709 was specifically associated with VKH, where significantly higher frequencies of A allele and AA homozygosity were observed in VKH patients compared with controls (P corr = 0.025 and P corr = 0.035, respectively), whereas none of these five SNPs was associated with IU or BD. In addition, a haplotype block across CFB (GTG) was significantly predisposed to uveitis with protective effect (OR 0.66, P corr = 0.048). Our results revealed a significant association of CFB with non-infectious uveitis, particularly predisposed to VKH disease. Genetic differences for uveitis could be gender-specific. PMID:26671509

  20. Reduced life expectancy seen in hereditary diseases which predispose to early-onset tumors

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D Gareth R; Ingham, Sarah Louise

    2013-01-01

    There are several hereditary diseases that are a predisposition to early-onset tumors. These include syndromic conditions like neurofibromatosis 1 and 2, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia, and familial adenomatous polyposis; and conditions which are usually not possible to diagnose clinically in a single individual, such as Lynch syndrome and BRCA1/2. Understanding of the mortality in hereditary cancer predisposing diseases is important for developing effective disease treatment programs. A number of studies have been undertaken to investigate the genetic predictors, prevalence and incidence, and treatment outcomes of these diseases; however, the majority examine only the most common of these diseases (eg, neurofibromatosis or BRCA), or look into postoperative survival. The mortality of individuals who are diagnosed with one of these hereditary diseases remains an area for investigation. This review is the first to attempt identification of studies investigating life expectancy in hereditary diseases which predispose to early-onset tumors. PMID:23935382

  1. Are Course Evaluations Subject to a Halo Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Jenny A.

    2007-01-01

    Many course evaluations, including those used in schools by OfStEd, colleges and universities, employ a number of scales as a means of evaluating various aspects of the educational experience of the student. It tends to be assumed that students consider the scales independently. This article argues that students are influenced by a "halo effect"…

  2. Effect Size Measure and Analysis of Single Subject Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness, 2013

    2013-01-01

    One of the vexing problems in the analysis of SSD is in the assessment of the effect of intervention. Serial dependence notwithstanding, the linear model approach that has been advanced involves, in general, the fitting of regression lines (or curves) to the set of observations within each phase of the design and comparing the parameters of these…

  3. The Role of the Effective Subject Leader: Perspectives from Practitioners in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poultney, Val

    2007-01-01

    In a report by Bennett et al. for the National College for School Leadership on the role and purpose of middle leaders (Subject Leaders) in secondary schools, two areas were identified for further research. First was the nature of effective subject leadership and second, the Subject Leader's "pivotal role in leading and managing cultural change…

  4. Antioxidant effects of a cinnamon extract on overweight subjects with impaired fasting glucose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the effects of an aqueous extract of cinnamon on antioxidant status of obese subjects. Methods: Twenty-two obese subjects with elevated blood glucose were enrolled in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Subjects were given either a placebo or 250 mg of an aqueous extract...

  5. Inhalation of diethylamine--acute nasal effects and subjective response

    SciTech Connect

    Lundqvist, G.R.; Yamagiwa, M.; Pedersen, O.F.; Nielsen, G.D. )

    1992-03-01

    Adult volunteers were exposed to 25 ppm (75 mg/m3) diethylamine in a climate chamber for 15 min in order to study the acute nasal reactions to an exposure equivalent to the present threshold limit value-short-term exposure limit. Changes in nasal volume and nasal resistance were measured by acoustic rhinometry and by rhinomanometry. Acute change in nasal volume, usually seen as acute nasal mucosa response to thermal stimuli, was not observed, nor was an acute change in nasal airway resistance. In a subsequent experiment, the aim was to measure acute sensory effects. Exposure to a concentration increasing from 0 to 12 ppm took place for 60 min, equal to an average concentration of 10 ppm (30 mg/m3). A moderate to strong olfactory response and distinct nasal and eye irritation were observed. In spite of considerable individual variation, the results were in agreement with sensory effect estimates obtained from animal studies.

  6. Subjective visual vertical in erect/supine subjects and under microgravity: effects of lower body negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Lucertini, Marco; De Angelis, Claudio; Martelli, Marialuisa; Zolesi, Valfredo; Tomao, Enrico

    2011-07-01

    Perception of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) is mainly based on the contributions from the visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive systems, and participates to the process of spatial orientation in relation to the surrounding environment and to the gravito-inertial force. The SVV can be significantly influenced by the presence of a displaced visual field, as in the case of the rod and frame test (RFT). A series of studies showed the effects of haematic mass shifts to and from the lower limbs on SVV, due to visceral mechanoreceptors (VM) located at the level of the kidneys and of the thorax. These sensors may be artificially activated with a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) device. In this study, the role of visual and VM cues to orientation perception have been evaluated using the RFT and the LBNP devices under a microgravity environment. A preliminary investigation was conducted in a sample of military pilots to develop a RFT protocol to be used in microgravity environments. This protocol was adopted to evaluate the contribution of VM to the SVV in a cosmonaut before, during and after a 10 day space flight, with and without concurrent activation of LBNP. The same test sequence, including LBNP exposure, was repeated a few months later on Earth on the same subject. As expected, the influence of the frame on rod positioning was statistically significant in all test conditions. During the in-flight experimental step, a substantial lack of significant changes compared to the pre-flight condition was observed. Moreover, substantially no effects due to LBNP were observed. A mild rod displacement from the body axis was detected under microgravity compared to the pre-flight recording. Such a finding was in part reduced during LBNP. The same findings were observed during the post-flight repetition of the experiment. Our results showed an absence in this subject of significant effects on the RFT due to microgravity. In conclusion, no effects from his VM on the RFT

  7. [Effects of nifuroxazide on fecal flora in healthy subjects].

    PubMed

    Buisson, Y; Larribaud, J

    1989-01-01

    Effect of nifuroxazide on fecal flora was studied in 12 healthy volunteers receiving, in hazardous order and double-blind procedure, three six-days courses of treatment separated by eight-days spaces of time: the conventional dosage of 400 mg twice a day, a dosage of 1200 mg once a day, and placebo. Among six settled bacteriological index (wealth of the fecal flora, percentage of gram-negative bacteria, numbers of E. coli, Enterococcus, Clostridium and Bacteroides), no significant variation was found by means of statistical study between D0, D2 and D7, nor between the three courses of treatment. Therefore nifuroxazide, even in high dosage, does not injure integrity of microbial intestinal ecosystem under so defined experimental conditions, similar with clinical conditions. PMID:2756516

  8. End effects on elbows subjected to moment loadings. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Rodabaugh, E.C.; Moore, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    So-called end effects for moment loadings on short-radius and long-radius butt welding elbows of various arc lengths are investigated with a view toward providing more accurate design formulas for critical piping systems. Data developed in this study, along with published information, were used to develop relatively simple design equations for elbows attached at both ends to long sections of straight pipe. These formulas are the basis for an alternate ASME Code procedure for evaluating the bending moment stresses in Class 1 nuclear piping (ASME Code Case N-319). The more complicated problems of elbows with other end conditions, e.g., flanges at one or both ends, are also considered. Comparisons of recently published experimental and theoretical studies with current industrial code design rules for these situations indicate that these rules also need to be improved.

  9. Nonlocal Intuition: Replication and Paired-subjects Enhancement Effects.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Saeed; Mirzaei, Maryam; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2014-03-01

    This article reports the results of a study of repeat entrepreneurs in Tehran, Iran, in which nonlocal intuition was investigated in a replication and extension of experiment using measures of heart rate variability (HRV). Nonlocal intuition is the perception of information about a distant or future event by the body's psychophysiological systems, which is not based on reason or memories of prior experience. This study follows up on the McCraty, Radin, and Bradley studies, which found evidence of nonlocal intuition. We used Radin's experimental protocol, with the addition of HRV measures as in the McCraty studies involving computer administration of a random sequence of calm and emotional pictures as the stimulus, and conducted two experiments on mutually exclusive samples-the first on a group of single participants (N=15) and the second on a group of co-participant pairs (N=30)-to investigate the question of the "amplification" of intuition effects by social connection. Each experiment was conducted over 45 trials while heart rate rhythm activity was recorded continuously. Results, using random permutation analysis, a statistically conservative procedure, show significant pre-stimulus results-that is, for the period before the computer had randomly selected the picture stimulus-for both experiments. Moreover, while significant separation between the emotional and calm HRV curves was observed in the single-participant experiment, an even larger separation was apparent for the experiment on co-participant pairs; the difference between the two groups was also significant. Overall, the results of the single-participant experiment confirm previous finding: that electrophysiological measures, especially changes in the heart rhythm, can detect intuitive foreknowledge. This result is notable because it constitutes cross-cultural corroboration in a non-Western context-namely, Iran. In addition, the results for co-participant pairs offer new evidence on the amplification of

  10. Nonlocal Intuition: Replication and Paired-subjects Enhancement Effects

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Maryam; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study of repeat entrepreneurs in Tehran, Iran, in which nonlocal intuition was investigated in a replication and extension of experiment using measures of heart rate variability (HRV). Nonlocal intuition is the perception of information about a distant or future event by the body's psychophysiological systems, which is not based on reason or memories of prior experience. This study follows up on the McCraty, Radin, and Bradley studies, which found evidence of nonlocal intuition. We used Radin's experimental protocol, with the addition of HRV measures as in the McCraty studies involving computer administration of a random sequence of calm and emotional pictures as the stimulus, and conducted two experiments on mutually exclusive samples—the first on a group of single participants (N=15) and the second on a group of co-participant pairs (N=30)—to investigate the question of the “amplification” of intuition effects by social connection. Each experiment was conducted over 45 trials while heart rate rhythm activity was recorded continuously. Results, using random permutation analysis, a statistically conservative procedure, show significant pre-stimulus results—that is, for the period before the computer had randomly selected the picture stimulus—for both experiments. Moreover, while significant separation between the emotional and calm HRV curves was observed in the single-participant experiment, an even larger separation was apparent for the experiment on co-participant pairs; the difference between the two groups was also significant. Overall, the results of the single-participant experiment confirm previous finding: that electrophysiological measures, especially changes in the heart rhythm, can detect intuitive foreknowledge. This result is notable because it constitutes cross-cultural corroboration in a non-Western context—namely, Iran. In addition, the results for co-participant pairs offer new evidence on the

  11. Effects of noise-disturbed sleep—A laboratory study on habituation and subjective noise sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhström, E.; Björkman, M.

    1988-04-01

    The effect of road traffic noise from heavy vehicles during the night was investigated in a two week laboratory experiment. Body movements, heart rate, subjective sleep quality, mood and performance was evaluated among two different groups of subjects, non-sensitive and sensitive to noise. Acute physiological effects, increased heart rate and an increased number of body movements, in connection with noise events were found and neither of these reactions decreased towards the end of the noise period. A significant effect on subjective sleep quality was found only among the sensitive subjects. No habititation was seen for the negative influence of noise on sleep quality, mood and performance.

  12. Subjective qualities of memories associated with the picture superiority effect in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Huron, Caroline; Danion, Jean-Marie; Rizzo, Lydia; Killofer, Valérie; Damiens, Annabelle

    2003-02-01

    Patients with schizophrenia (n = 24) matched with 24 normal subjects were presented with both words and pictures. On a recognition memory task, they were asked to give remember, know, or guess responses to items that were recognized on the basis of conscious recollection, familiarity, or guessing, respectively. Compared with normal subjects, patients exhibited a lower picture superiority effect selectively related to remember responses. Unlike normal subjects, they did not exhibit any word superiority effect in relation to guess responses; this explains why the overall picture superiority effect appeared to be intact. These results emphasize the need to take into account the subjective states of awareness when analyzing memory impairments in schizophrenia. PMID:12653423

  13. Factors predisposing to a complicated initial febrile convulsion.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, S J

    1975-01-01

    131 consecutive admissions to hospital for a first febrile convulsion were studied to find which factors predisposed to a complicated fit--defined as one lasting more than 30 minutes, unilateral, or repeated within the same illness. A significant excess of complicated attacks occurred where the age of onset was less than 16 months, where both family history of convulsive disorder and perinatal abnormality were present, and, in females only, where it was suspected that neurological disorder preceded the first fit. PMID:1220608

  14. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter; Gartside, Michael; Wadt, Karin; Pritchard, Antonia L; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Tomlinson, Ian; Kearsey, Stephen; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-12-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family. Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare variants in the exonuclease domain of POLE. Although this frequency is not significantly higher than that in unselected Caucasian controls, we observed multiple cancer types in the melanoma families, suggesting that some germline POLE mutations may predispose to a broad spectrum of cancers, including melanoma. In addition, we found the first mutation outside the exonuclease domain, p.(Gln520Arg), in a family with an extensive history of colorectal cancer. PMID:26251183

  15. Controlled vaporized cannabis, with and without alcohol: subjective effects and oral fluid-blood cannabinoid relationships.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Rebecca L; Brown, Timothy L; Milavetz, Gary; Spurgin, Andrew; Gorelick, David A; Gaffney, Gary; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-07-01

    Vaporized cannabis and concurrent cannabis and alcohol intake are commonplace. We evaluated the subjective effects of cannabis, with and without alcohol, relative to blood and oral fluid (OF, advantageous for cannabis exposure screening) cannabinoid concentrations and OF/blood and OF/plasma vaporized-cannabinoid relationships. Healthy adult occasional-to-moderate cannabis smokers received a vaporized placebo or active cannabis (2.9% and 6.7% Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol, THC) with or without oral low-dose alcohol (~0.065g/210L peak breath alcohol concentration [BrAC]) in a within-subjects design. Blood and OF were collected up to 8.3 h post-dose and subjective effects measured at matched time points with visual-analogue scales and 5-point Likert scales. Linear mixed models evaluated subjective effects by THC concentration, BrAC, and interactions. Effects by time point were evaluated by dose-wise analysis of variance (ANOVA). OF versus blood or plasma cannabinoid ratios and correlations were evaluated in paired-positive specimens. Nineteen participants (13 men) completed the study. Blood THC concentration or BrAC significantly associated with subjective effects including 'high', while OF contamination prevented significant OF concentration associations <1.4 h post-dose. Subjective effects persisted through 3.3-4.3 h, with alcohol potentiating the duration of the cannabis effects. Effect-versus-THC concentration and effect-versus-alcohol concentration hystereses were counterclockwise and clockwise, respectively. OF/blood and OF/plasma THC significantly correlated (all Spearman r≥0.71), but variability was high. Vaporized cannabis subjective effects were similar to those previously reported after smoking, with duration extended by concurrent alcohol. Cannabis intake was identified by OF testing, but OF concentration variability limited interpretation. Blood THC concentrations were more consistent across subjects and more accurate at predicting cannabis' subjective

  16. Strength and duration of priming effects in normal subjects and amnesic patients.

    PubMed

    Squire, L R; Shimamura, A P; Graf, P

    1987-01-01

    In three separate experiments, we assessed the strength and duration of word completion effects in amnesic patients and two control groups. In Experiment 1 subjects studied words under a semantic orienting condition and were given tests of word completion and recognition memory after an immediate, 2-hr or 4-day delay. In the word completion test for Experiment 1, we presented three-letter word stems that could be completed to form several common words, one of which had been presented previously (e.g. MOT for MOTEL), and subjects completed each stem with the first word that came to mind. Priming effects were equivalent in amnesic patients and control subjects and they reached baseline levels within 2 hr. In Experiments 2 and 3, subjects studied words under either a semantic or a nonsemantic orienting condition, and word completion was tested at the same three delays using cues that uniquely specified the study words (e.g. JUI for JUICE; or A--A--In for ASSASSIN). In these experiments, amnesic patients exhibited both smaller and shorter lasting word completion effects than control subjects. Specifically, amnesic patients exhibited word completion effects that seldom lasted as long as 2 hr, whereas control subjects usually exhibited completion effects lasting 4 days. An important additional finding was that control subjects exhibited larger and longer-lasting word completion effects when tested under the semantic orienting condition than when tested under the nonsemantic orienting condition. Amnesic patients were not affected by this manipulation. Moreover, under the nonsemantic orienting condition, control subjects and amnesic patients performed similarly. The results show that word completion performance is not always fully intact in amnesic patients. Long-lasting word completion effects found in normal subjects may be mediated by declarative or elaborative retrieval processes, which are impaired in amnesic patients. If so, priming as measured by word completion

  17. Native language influence on the distributive effect in producing second language subject-verb agreement.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoyan; Chen, Baoguo; Liang, Lijuan; Dunlap, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to investigate the distributive effect when producing subject-verb agreement in English as a second language (L2) when the participant's first language either does or does not require subject-verb agreement. Both Chinese-English and Uygur-English bilinguals were included in Experiment 1. Chinese has no required subject-verb agreement, whereas Uygur does. Results showed that the distributive effect was observed in Uygur-English bilinguals but not in Chinese-English bilinguals, indicating that this particular first language (L1) syntactic feature is one significant factor affecting the distributive effect in the production of subject-verb agreement in L2. Experiment 2 further investigated the matter by choosing Chinese-English participants with higher L2 proficiency. Still, no distributive effect was observed, suggesting that the absence of distributive effect in Chinese-English bilinguals in Experiment 1 was not due to low proficiency in the target language. Experiment 3 changed the way the stimuli were presented, highlighting the singular or distributive nature of the subject noun phrases, and the distributive effect was observed in Chinese-English bilinguals. Altogether, the results show that the L1 syntactic feature of subject-verb agreement is one significant factor affecting the distributive effect in the production of subject-verb agreement in L2. More specifically, distributive effects rarely occur in L2 when L1 has no requirement on subject-verb agreement, whereas distributive effects are more likely to occur in L2 when the L1 also has required subject-verb agreement. PMID:25671326

  18. Familiarity, but not Recollection, Supports the Between-Subject Production Effect in Recognition Memory

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Five experiments explored the basis of the between-subjects production effect in recognition memory as represented by differences in the recollection and familiarity of produced (read aloud) and nonproduced (read silently) words. Using remember-know judgments (Experiment 1b) and a dual-process signal-detection approach applied to confidence ratings (Experiments 2b and 3), we observed that production influences familiarity but not recollection when manipulated between-subjects. This is in contrast to within-subject designs, which reveal a clear effect of production on both recollection and familiarity (Experiments 1a and 2a). Our findings resolve contention concerning apparent design effects: Whereas the within-subject production effect is subserved by separable recollective- and familiarity-based components, the between-subjects production effect is subserved by the familiarity-based component alone. Our findings support a role for the relative distinctiveness of production as a means of guiding recognition judgments (at least when manipulated within-subjects), but we also propose that production influences the strength of produced items, explaining the persistence of the effect in between-subjects designs. PMID:27244352

  19. Familiarity, but not recollection, supports the between-subject production effect in recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Jonathan M; Ozubko, Jason D

    2016-06-01

    Five experiments explored the basis of the between-subjects production effect in recognition memory as represented by differences in the recollection and familiarity of produced (read aloud) and nonproduced (read silently) words. Using remember-know judgments (Experiment 1b) and a dual-process signal-detection approach applied to confidence ratings (Experiments 2b and 3), we observed that production influences familiarity but not recollection when manipulated between-subjects. This is in contrast to within-subject designs, which reveal a clear effect of production on both recollection and familiarity (Experiments 1a and 2a). Our findings resolve contention concerning apparent design effects: Whereas the within-subject production effect is subserved by separable recollective- and familiarity-based components, the between-subjects production effect is subserved by the familiarity-based component alone. Our findings support a role for the relative distinctiveness of production as a means of guiding recognition judgments (at least when manipulated within-subjects), but we also propose that production influences the strength of produced items, explaining the persistence of the effect in between-subjects designs. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27244352

  20. A Value-Added Study of Teacher Spillover Effects across Four Core Subjects in Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Kun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the existence, magnitude, and impact of teacher spillover effects (TSEs) across teachers of four subject areas (i.e., mathematics, English language arts [ELA], science, and social studies) on student achievement in each of the four subjects at the middle school level. The author conducted a series of value-added (VA) analyses,…

  1. The Effectiveness of Oral Presentation Assessment in a Finance Subject: An Empirical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhati, Shyam S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the effectiveness of oral presentation as an assessment tool in a Finance subject. Assessment data collected from a postgraduate Finance subject in an Australian university over a period of five years from 2005 to 2009 was analysed statistically to determine the relation between students' performance in oral…

  2. Effects of Local and Global Context on Processing Sentences with Subject and Object Relative Clauses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Fang; Mo, Lun; Louwerse, Max M.

    2013-01-01

    An eye tracking study investigated the effects of local and global discourse context on the processing of subject and object relative clauses, whereby the contexts favored either a subject relative clause interpretation or an object relative clause interpretation. The fixation data replicated previous studies showing that object relative clause…

  3. Effect of inhaled H1 and H2 receptor antagonist in normal and asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, N C; Kerr, J W

    1980-01-01

    The effects on airflow resistance of an inhaled H1 receptor antagonist, clemastine, and an H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine, have been investigated in normal and asthmatic subjects. No significant changes in specific conductance (sGaw) were seen in six normal subjects. In eight asthmatic subjects a significant increase in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) occurred at 60 min (< 0.02), and 120 (< 0.05) after the inhalation of clemastine, whereas inhaled cimetidine had no effect on airflow resistance. Clemastine and cimetidine were tested on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in eight normal and eight asthmatic subjects. Clemastine significantly reduced the fall in sGaw in normal subjects and the fall in FEV1 in asthmatic subjects, whereas cimetidine had no protective effect. Clemastine and ipratropium bromide were tested on methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction in eight normal subjects. Ipratropium bromide, but not clemastine, significantly reduced the fall in sGaw after methacholine. These results suggest that in normal and asthmatic subjects histamine-induced bronchoconstriction is mediated predominantly via H1 rather than H2 receptors in the airways. PMID:6449094

  4. Generalized Beddington model with the host subject to the Allee Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ufuktepe, U.; Kapcak, S.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the stability and invariant manifolds of generalized Beddington model with the host population subject to the Allee effect.We obtain the condition for the existence of the fixed points and investigate the stability of the system.

  5. The Role of Negative Statements on the Subjective Effects of Traffic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves Vera, M.; Vila, J.; Godoy, J. F.

    1995-12-01

    This study assesses subjective effects of traffic noise and the mediator role that negative statements about the noise and about oneself play. Eighty-four students underwent two 15-minute presentations of high intensity traffic noise, with and without negative statements. The potential effect of the negative statements was enhanced by the use of instructions concerning the expectation of negative noise effects and the credibility of the statements in half the subjects. Level of anxiety, subjective noise aversion and time estimation of the noise were taken. The State Anxiety Inventory and the Profile of Mood States Questionnaire were used as pre- and post-tests. Noise increased anxiety levels, these levels being higher during the Statements condition than during the Noise alone condition. Instructions further increased the effects of these negative statements. Subjects did not adapt to noise. Scores in the questionnaires were significantly higher in the post-test than in the pre-test. Implications of these results are discussed.

  6. Effects of Manual Lymph Drainage of the Neck on EEG in Subjects with Psychological Stress

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jung-Myo; Kim, Sung-Joong

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated the effect of manual lymph drainage (MLD) of the neck on electroencephalography (EEG) in subjects with psychological stress. [Methods] Twenty-six subjects were randomly allocated to receive one 15-min session of either MLD or resting on a bed (control). [Results] Analysis of EEG in the MLD group showed a significant increase in relaxation, manifested as an increase in average absolute and relative delta and alpha activity. [Conclusion] It is suggested that MLD provides acute neural effects that increase relaxation in subjects with psychological stress. PMID:24567691

  7. Effect of visual input on normalized standing stability in subjects with recurrent low back pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongchul C; Ham, Yong Woon; Sung, Paul S

    2012-07-01

    Although a number of studies have evaluated kinematic stability changes in subjects with low back pain (LBP), the combined sensitivity of normalized standing stability from the ground force and kinematic rotational angle of the body segment were not carefully examined for postural responses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate normalized standing stability in subjects with and without recurrent LBP while they stood quietly with the tested foot parallel to the other lower extremity at hip width. The subjects were then instructed to stand freely on one leg for 25 s with the contra lateral hip flexed 90° based on dominance side (dominant leg vs. non-dominant lower extremity) and visual condition (eyes open vs. eyes closed). A total of 42 subjects (27 subjects without LBP and 15 subjects with LBP) participated in the study. The dominant leg standing stability was significantly different during the eyes closed condition (0.68±0.30 for control vs. 0.37±0.32 for LBP, T=-3.23, p=0.002) compared to the eyes open condition. The standing kinematic stability, especially of the dominant thigh, was greater in the control subjects than in the subjects with LBP (T=-2.43, p=0.02). This sensitive detection of kinematic imbalance with postural stability is important for effective rehabilitation strategies and to understanding compensatory mechanisms in subjects with recurrent LBP. PMID:22717729

  8. Cox4i2, Ifit2, and Prdm11 Mutant Mice: Effective Selection of Genes Predisposing to an Altered Airway Inflammatory Response from a Large Compendium of Mutant Mouse Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bönisch, Clemens; Côme, Christophe; Kolster-Fog, Cathrine; Jensen, Klaus T.; Lund, Anders H.; Lee, Icksoo; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Sinkler, Christopher; Hüttemann, Maik; Bohn, Erwin; Fuchs, Helmut; Ollert, Markus; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabĕ de Angelis, Martin; Beckers, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We established a selection strategy to identify new models for an altered airway inflammatory response from a large compendium of mutant mouse lines that were systemically phenotyped in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). As selection criteria we included published gene functional data, as well as immunological and transcriptome data from GMC phenotyping screens under standard conditions. Applying these criteria we identified a few from several hundred mutant mouse lines and further characterized the Cox4i2tm1Hutt, Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb, and Prdm11tm1.1ahl lines following ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and repeated OVA airway challenge. Challenged Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice exhibited changes in B cell counts, CD4+ T cell counts, and in the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavages, whereas challenged Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb mice displayed alterations in plasma IgE, IgG1, IgG3, and IgM levels compared to the challenged wild type littermates. In contrast, challenged Cox4i2tm1Hutt mutant mice did not show alterations in the humoral or cellular immune response compared to challenged wild type mice. Transcriptome analyses from lungs of the challenged mutant mouse lines showed extensive changes in gene expression in Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice. Functional annotations of regulated genes of all three mutant mouse lines were primarily related to inflammation and airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling. We were thus able to define an effective selection strategy to identify new candidate genes for the predisposition to an altered airway inflammatory response under OVA challenge conditions. Similar selection strategies may be used for the analysis of additional genotype – envirotype interactions for other diseases. PMID:26263558

  9. Acetaminophen fails to inhibit ethanol-induced subjective effects in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pickworth, W B; Klein, S A; George, F R; Henningfield, J E

    1992-01-01

    In animals, ethanol causes some of its CNS effects by releasing prostaglandins (PG); this is demonstrated by reports that prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors (PGSIs) diminish ethanol-induced effects. However, use of animals in these studies has precluded testing for subjective effects. We studied the interaction of ethanol and acetaminophen, a PGSI, in a double-blind crossover experiment. Six adult males were given no drug or acetaminophen (0, 325, 650, 1300 or 1950 mg) 75 min before ethanol (total dose = 0.625 g/kg; five divided doses). Physiologic, subjective and performance measures were collected. Compared to the no drug condition, ethanol significantly increased ratings of drug "liking," "drunk," "sluggish" and "drug strength" and decreased ratings of "sober." Ethanol increased heart rate and acetaminophen did not diminish or enhance this effect. The failure to antagonize ethanol-induced subjective and physiologic effects by acetaminophen in humans may be due to species differences or inadequate dosage of the PGSI. It is also possible that subjective and certain physiologic effects of ethanol in humans are not mediated by prostaglandin-dependent neural processes. Nevertheless, the finding that at greater than typical analgesic doses, acetaminophen failed to prevent subjective effects of ethanol is of clinical significance. PMID:1539069

  10. On the Effects of Intra- and Inter-Subject Variabilities on Human Inspiratory Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiwoong; Lin, Ching-Long; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2007-11-01

    The effects of intra- and inter-subject variabilities on airflow patterns in the human central airways are investigated using large-eddy simulation (LES). The anatomical airway models are reconstructed from multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) image data. The intra-subject study considers four models of the same human subject, including complete, partial, and no upper respiratory tract. Either pressure or velocity boundary conditions are specified at the mouth, mid pharynx, supraglottis, and tracheal entrance, respectively, with two different flow rates. The inter-subject study considers upper and intra-thoracic airways (up to 6 generations) of two human subjects. LES captures the turbulent laryngeal jet formed at the vocal cords. It is found that the use of a complete upper respiratory tract as well as the anatomically realistic airway geometry is essential to correctly reproduce the laryngeal jet behavior and turbulent coherent structures in particular.

  11. Effect of acute exercise on some haematological parameters and neutrophil functions in active and inactive subjects.

    PubMed

    Benoni, G; Bellavite, P; Adami, A; Chirumbolo, S; Lippi, G; Brocco, G; Cuzzolin, L

    1995-01-01

    In this work we studied the possible effects of acute exercise on some haematological parameters and on some functions of neutrophils in seven active and six inactive subjects. Physical exercise (10 min on a cycle ergometer at a heart rate of 150 beats.min-1) induced a significant increase in total leucocyte, lymphocyte and neutrophil concentrations in active subjects; serum iron and ferritin concentrations were lower in active compared to inactive subjects. Cellular adhesion, bactericidal activity and superoxide anion production did not change after exercise, while we also observed some differences between active and inactive subjects before exercise. In particular, the neutrophils from active subjects showed a significantly higher percentage of adhesion, higher bactericidal activity and lower superoxide anion production. In conclusion, the training induced changes in some neutrophil functions, while acute exercise influenced, overall, leucocyte concentrations. PMID:7768243

  12. Effects of cerebral hemispheric laterality on the span of apprehension of schizophrenic and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Mass, R; Schoemig, T; Novikov, J; Wagner, M

    2001-01-01

    The effects of hemispheric laterality on a forced-choice Span of Apprehension (SoA) task were investigated. Forty-eight adult schizophrenic inpatients were recruited. A control group of healthy subjects was put together using the matched-pairs method with age, gender, and education as control variables. SoA performance was determined separately for the left and right visual field (VF), respectively. No SoA group differences were found; in both groups, the hit percentage was higher in the right VF. However, in the schizophrenic group, the left VF performance showed significant negative correlations with psychopathologic symptoms (especially auditory verbal hallucinations). In a subsample of patients receiving atypical neuroleptic drugs, the daily dosage correlated negatively with left VF performance. In general, young subjects performed better than old subjects (both VFs), males performed better than females, and subjects with high education performed better than subjects with low education (right VF). PMID:11315513

  13. How Pre-Service Teachers Observe Teaching on Video: Effects of Viewers' Teaching Subjects and the Subject of the Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomberg, Geraldine; Sturmer, Kathleen; Seidel, Tina

    2011-01-01

    As critical component of teachers' expertise, professional vision should be developed during teacher education. Professional vision draws on subject specific and generic knowledge, however, little is known about the knowledge interplay. This study systematically investigated pre-service teachers' (n = 32 majoring in mathematics/science; n = 56 in…

  14. Timing of predisposing factors is important in necrotic enteritis models.

    PubMed

    Van Waeyenberghe, Lieven; De Gussem, Maarten; Verbeke, Joren; Dewaele, Isabelle; De Gussem, Jeroen

    2016-06-01

    Since the ban of antimicrobial growth promotors, the importance of necrotic enteritis in broilers increases. Reliable and reproducible infection models are required for pathogenesis studies and product screening. Two major predisposing factors in necrotic enteritis models are fishmeal supplementation to feed and Eimeria infection. However, many unsolved issues regarding these predisposing factors still exist. Therefore, the influence of timepoint of fishmeal administration (onset on day 8 or day 18), timing of coccidiosis challenge (day 15 or day 19) and strain of coccidiosis challenge (field strain vs. commercial vaccine) on the induction of necrotic enteritis lesions was investigated. The birds were inoculated with Clostridium perfringens three times per day for four consecutive days (day 17 until day 20) and were scored for the presence of necrotic enteritis on days 22, 23, 24, 25 and 26. Supplementation of the diet with fishmeal from day 8 onwards increased the likelihood of necrotic enteritis compared to supplementation from day 18 onwards. Birds challenged on day 19 with coccidiosis were more likely to have necrotic enteritis on scoring days 23 and 24 compared to birds challenged on day 15. Differences on other scoring days were less pronounced. Finally, the strain of coccidiosis challenge had little influence on the induction of necrotic enteritis. Findings of this study can help researchers to set up successful necrotic enteritis infection models. PMID:26927291

  15. The distinctiveness effect in forenames: the role of subjective experiences and recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Karen R; Gardiner, John M; Macrae, C Neil

    2006-05-01

    We describe two experiments that tested the prediction that distinctive forenames would be better recognized than typical forenames and which investigated whether this distinctiveness effect, if obtained, occurred in subjective experiences of the recollective or familiarity components of recognition memory. To that end, the remember-know paradigm was used to measure people's experiences of recollection or familiarity. The results revealed that distinctive forenames were more memorable than typical forenames and that that this distinctiveness effect was present only in the subjective experience of remembering. Additionally, the present research showed that these distinctiveness effects were present after retention intervals of both 1 and 7 days. These results replicate and extend past research on distinctiveness effects and also provide support for Rajaram's (1996) distinctiveness-fluency account of the 2 states of subjective awareness. PMID:16613653

  16. Bias Corrections for Standardized Effect Size Estimates Used with Single-Subject Experimental Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugille, Maaike; Moeyaert, Mariola; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Ferron, John M.; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2014-01-01

    A multilevel meta-analysis can combine the results of several single-subject experimental design studies. However, the estimated effects are biased if the effect sizes are standardized and the number of measurement occasions is small. In this study, the authors investigated 4 approaches to correct for this bias. First, the standardized effect…

  17. Mu Opioid Mediated Discriminative-Stimulus Effects of Tramadol: An Individual Subjects Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Justin C.; Rush, Craig R.; Stoops, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Drug discrimination procedures use dose-dependent generalization, substitution, and pretreatment with selective agonists and antagonists to evaluate receptor systems mediating interoceptive effects of drugs. Despite the extensive use of these techniques in the nonhuman animal literature, few studies have used human subjects. Specifically, human studies have not routinely used antagonist administration as a pharmacological tool to elucidate the mechanisms mediating the discriminative stimulus effects of drugs. This study evaluated the discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol, an atypical analgesic with monoamine and mu opioid activity. Three human subjects first learned to discriminate 100 mg tramadol from placebo. A range of tramadol doses (25 to 150 mg) and hydromorphone (4 mg) with and without naltrexone pretreatment (50 mg) were then administered to subjects after acquiring the discrimination. Tramadol produced dose-dependent increases in drug-appropriate responding and hydromorphone partially or fully substituted for tramadol in all subjects. These effects were attenuated by naltrexone. Individual subject records indicated a relationship between mu opioid activity (i.e., miosis) and drug discrimination performance. Our findings indicate that mu opioid activity may mediate the discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol in humans. The correspondence of generalization, substitution, and pretreatment findings with the animal literature supports the neuropharmacological specificity of the drug discrimination procedure. PMID:25664525

  18. Revisiting multi-subject random effects in fMRI: advocating prevalence estimation.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J D; Vink, M; Benjamini, Y

    2014-01-01

    Random effect analysis has been introduced into fMRI research in order to generalize findings from the study group to the whole population. Generalizing findings is obviously harder than detecting activation within the study group since in order to be significant, an activation has to be larger than the inter-subject variability. Indeed, detected regions are smaller when using random effect analysis versus fixed effects. The statistical assumptions behind the classic random effect model are that the effect in each location is normally distributed over subjects, and "activation" refers to a non-null mean effect. We argue that this model is unrealistic compared to the true population variability, where due to function-anatomy inconsistencies and registration anomalies, some of the subjects are active and some are not at each brain location. We propose a Gaussian-mixture-random-effect that amortizes between-subject spatial disagreement and quantifies it using the prevalence of activation at each location. We present a formal definition and an estimation procedure of this prevalence. The end result of the proposed analysis is a map of the prevalence at locations with significant activation, highlighting activation regions that are common over many brains. Prevalence estimation has several desirable properties: (a) It is more informative than the typical active/inactive paradigm. (b) In contrast to the usual display of p-values in activated regions - which trivially converge to 0 for large sample sizes - prevalence estimates converge to the true prevalence. PMID:23988271

  19. Effects of cutouts on the behavior of symmetric composite laminates subjected to bending and twisting loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. B.; Shuart, M. J.; Bains, N. J.; Rouse, M.

    1993-01-01

    Composite structures are used for a wide variety of aerospace applications. Practical structures contain cutouts and these structures are subjected to in-plane and out-of-plane loading conditions. Structurally efficient designs for composite structures require a thorough understanding of the effects of cutouts on the response of composite plates subjected to inplane or out-of-plane loadings. Most investigations of the behavior of composite plates with cutouts have considered in-plane loadings only. Out-of-plane loadings suchas bending or twisting have received very limited attention. The response of homogeneous plates (e.g., isotropic or orthotropic plates) subjected to bending or twisting moments has been studied analytically. These analyses are for infinite plates and neglect finite-plate effects. Recently, analytical and experimental studies were conducted to determine the effects of cutouts on the response of laminated composite plates subjected to bending moments. No analytical or experimental results are currently available for the effects of cutouts on the response of composite laminates subjected to twisting moments.

  20. Implicit Theories of Change and Stability Moderate Effects of Subjective Distance on the Remembered Self.

    PubMed

    Ward, Cindy L P; Wilson, Anne E

    2015-09-01

    Temporal self-appraisal theory suggests that people can regulate current self-view by recalling former selves in ways that flatter present identity. People critique their subjectively distant (but not recent) former selves, creating the illusion of improvement over time. However, this revisionist strategy might not apply to everyone: People with fixed (entity) beliefs may not benefit from critiquing even distant selves. In three studies, we found that implicit theories of change and stability moderate the effects of subjective distance on the remembered self. In all studies, participants rated past selves portrayed as subjectively close or distant (controlling calendar time). Incremental theorists (but not entity theorists) were more critical of their subjectively distant (but not recent) past attributes. We found the same pattern when measuring existing implicit theories (Studies 1, 2) or manipulating them (Study 3). The present research is the first to integrate temporal self-appraisal theory and the implicit theories literature. PMID:26089348

  1. Deficient DNA repair capacity, a predisposing factor in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Parshad, R.; Price, F. M.; Bohr, V. A.; Cowans, K. H.; Zujewski, J. A.; Sanford, K. K.

    1996-01-01

    Women with breast cancer and a family history of breast cancer and some with sporadic breast cancer are deficient in the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage compared with normal donors with no family history of breast cancer. DNA repair was measured indirectly by quantifying chromatid breaks in phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated blood lymphocytes after either X-irradiation or UV-C exposure, with or without post treatment with the DNA repair inhibitor, 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C). We have correlated chromatid breaks with unrepaired DNA strand breaks using responses to X-irradiation of cells from xeroderma pigmentosum patients with well-characterised DNA repair defects or responses of repair-deficient mutant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with or without transfected human DNA repair genes. Deficient DNA repair appears to be a predisposing factor in familial breast cancer and in some sporadic breast cancers. PMID:8679441

  2. Rumen conditions that predispose cattle to pasture bloat.

    PubMed

    Majak, W; Howarth, R E; Cheng, K J; Hall, J W

    1983-08-01

    Rumen contents from the dorsal sac were examined before alfalfa ingestion to determine factors that predispose cattle to pasture bloat. Chlorophyll concentration, buoyancy of particulate matter, and rates of gas production were significantly higher in cattle that subsequently bloated than in those that did not. Higher chlorophyll in bloat cases indicated accumulation of suspended chloroplast particles in the dorsal sac, perhaps due to increased buoyancy of the particulate matter. The higher fermentation rates (in the presence of glucose) suggested that the latent capacity for gas production was due to microbial colonization of suspended feed particles. Chlorophyll 4 h after feeding was also higher in bloated as compared to unbloated animals. In short, the microbial colonization and retention of particulate matter provided active inocula for promoting rapid legume digestion. Consequently, gas production was enhanced when feeding commenced, but the fermentation gases were trapped by the buoyant, frothy ingesta, resulting in the condition of pasture bloat. PMID:6619348

  3. Capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension and the effect of antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Fegan, P Gerard; Tooke, John E; Gooding, Kim M; Tullett, Jayne M; MacLeod, Kenneth M; Shore, Angela C

    2003-05-01

    Raised capillary pressure has been implicated in the formation of diabetic microangiopathy in type I diabetes, in which it is elevated in those with the earliest signs of diabetic kidney disease but remains normal in those without complications. In subjects with type 2 diabetes without complications, capillary pressure is normal, although alterations in the pressure waveforms suggested enhanced wave reflections. The nature of skin capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension remains to be elucidated, as does the effect of blood pressure-lowering therapy on capillary pressure in these subjects. Three studies were performed in well-matched groups. First, capillary pressure was elevated in hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with normotensive subjects with type 2 diabetes (20.2 [17.4 to 22.7] mm Hg versus 17.7 [16.1 to 18.9] mm Hg, respectively, P<0.03, Mann-Whitney U test). Second, no significant difference was detected between hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertensive subjects without type 2 diabetes (19.4 [15.8 to 21.3] mm Hg versus 17.2 [15.1 to 19.8] mm Hg, respectively, P=0.5, Mann-Whitney U test). Finally, patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited to a case-control study. Seven subjects received blood pressure-lowering therapy and 8 did not. Therapy reduced capillary pressure from 18.2 [15.8 to 20.1] mm Hg to 15.9 [15.4 to 17.0] mm Hg (P=0.024 ANOVA), in contrast to the lack of effect of time alone. Mean arterial pressure was reduced from 110 [102 to 115] mm Hg to 105 [101 to 111] mm Hg (P=0.006, ANOVA). These findings provide a plausible mechanism by which reducing arterial hypertension may reduce the risk of microangiopathy in type 2 diabetes. PMID:12695416

  4. Effect of hyperhydration on bone mineralization in physically healthy subjects after prolonged restriction of motor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Federenko, Youri F.; Naexu, Konstantin A.

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of a daily intake of fluid and salt supplementation (FSS) on bone mineralization in physically healthy male volunteers after exposure to hypokinesia (decreased number of steps taken/day) over a period of 364 days. The studies were performed after exposure to 364 days of hypokinesia (HK) on 18 physically healthy male volunteers who had an average VO2max of 65 ml/kg/min and were aged between 19 and 24 years. For the simulation of the hypokinetic effect the volunteers were kept under an average of 1000 steps/day. The subjects were divided into three equal groups of 6: 6 underwent a normal ambulatory life (control group), 6 were placed under HK (hypokinetic group) and the remaining 6 were subjected to HK and consumed a daily FSS (water 26 ml/kg body wt and NaCl 0.10 mg/kg body wt) (hyperhydrated group). The density of the ulnar, radius, tibia, fibular, lumbar vertebrae and calcenous was measured. Calcium and phosphorus changes, plasma volume, blood pressure and body weight were determined. Calcium content in the examined skeletal bones decreased more in the hypokinetic subjects than in the hyperhydrated subjects. Urinary calcium and phosphorus losses were more pronounced in hypokinetic than hyperhydrated subjects. Plasma volume and body weight increased in hyperhydrated subjects, while it decreased in hypokinetic subjects. It was concluded that a daily intake of FSS may be used to neutralize bone demineralization in physically healthy subjects during prolonged restriction of motor activity.

  5. Varus gonarthrosis predisposes to varus malalignment in TKA.

    PubMed

    Heyse, Thomas J; Decking, Ralf; Davis, Jack; Boettner, Friedrich; Laskin, Richard S

    2009-09-01

    Postoperative alignment is a predictor for long-term survival of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether or not preoperative deformities predispose to intraoperative malposition of TKA components. A retrospective radiographic analysis of 53 primary TKA cases was performed. Preoperative AP hip to ankle and lateral knee radiographs were compared with postoperative views to evaluate component positioning. The following angles were measured: the hip-knee-ankle (HKA) angle expressing the mechanical axis of the leg, the mechanical lateral distal femur angle (mLDFA), the medial proximal tibia angle (MPTA), the posterior distal femur angle (PDFA), and the posterior proximal tibia angle (PPTA). Postoperative measurement of the HKA revealed 34.0% of the cases had a deviation of >+/-3 degrees from neutral alignment. Sixteen knees (30.2%) were in varus and, with one exception, all presented with severe varus gonarthrosis prior to surgery with a mean tibiofemoral angle of 12.4 degrees compared with 1.0 degrees of valgus in the optimally aligned group. Patients (93.3%) with preoperative valgus malalignment showed optimal postoperative HKA. Odds ratios for malalignment of TKA for varus knees in comparison with valgus knees were 7.1 for HKA, 2.4 for MPTA, 4.9 for PDFA, and 1.7 for PPTA. The overall number of outliers in the presented data corresponds well with reports from other authors using different implants and guide systems. The presented data indicate that patients with preoperative varus alignment have a higher risk of postoperative implant malposition than patients with valgus alignment. The data supports that preoperative varus deformity predisposes to varus malposition of TKA. The risk for intraoperative malposition is significantly lower in valgus knees. PMID:19455367

  6. Estimating intervention effects across different types of single-subject experimental designs: empirical illustration.

    PubMed

    Moeyaert, Mariola; Ugille, Maaike; Ferron, John M; Onghena, Patrick; Heyvaert, Mieke; Beretvas, S Natasha; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to illustrate the multilevel meta-analysis of results from single-subject experimental designs of different types, including AB phase designs, multiple-baseline designs, ABAB reversal designs, and alternating treatment designs. Current methodological work on the meta-analysis of single-subject experimental designs often focuses on combining simple AB phase designs or multiple-baseline designs. We discuss the estimation of the average intervention effect estimate across different types of single-subject experimental designs using several multilevel meta-analytic models. We illustrate the different models using a reanalysis of a meta-analysis of single-subject experimental designs (Heyvaert, Saenen, Maes, & Onghena, in press). The intervention effect estimates using univariate 3-level models differ from those obtained using a multivariate 3-level model that takes the dependence between effect sizes into account. Because different results are obtained and the multivariate model has multiple advantages, including more information and smaller standard errors, we recommend researchers to use the multivariate multilevel model to meta-analyze studies that utilize different single-subject designs. PMID:24884449

  7. Epigenetic suppression of Fli1, a potential predisposing factor in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Asano, Yoshihide

    2015-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem connective tissue disease featured by immune abnormalities, vasculopathy and tissue fibrosis with unknown etiology. A series of studies on disease-susceptibility genes and twins have demonstrated the association of genetic factors with autoimmunity and disease severity and the contribution of environmental factors to the induction of clinical features in this disease. Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (Fli1), a member of Ets transcription factor family, is epigenetically suppressed in the lesional skin of SSc patients, suggesting that Fli1 is a potential predisposing factor of SSc reflecting the influence of environmental factors. Consistent with this idea, Fli1 deficiency induces SSc-like phenotypes in dermal fibroblasts and dermal microvascular endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro at molecular levels. Furthermore, Fli1 haploinsufficiency recapitulates tissue fibrosis, vascular activation and inflammation characteristic of SSc to a greater extent in bleomycin-treated mice. Importantly, bosentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist with a potential disease-modifying effect on SSc vasculopathy, reverses the expression of Fli1 protein by increasing its protein stability. Therefore, Fli1 may serve as a predisposing factor of SSc and can be a promising therapeutic target of this incurable and devastating disease. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Epigenetics dynamics in development and disease. PMID:26055516

  8. Bayesian analysis of uncertainty in predisposing and triggering factors for landslides hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandric, I.; Petropoulos, Y.; Chitu, Z.; Mihai, B.

    2012-04-01

    The landslide hazard analysis models takes into consideration both predisposing and triggering factors combined into a Bayesian temporal network with uncertainty propagation. The model uses as predisposing factors the first and second derivatives from DEM, the effective precipitations, runoff, lithology and land use. The latter is expressed not as land use classes, as for example CORINE, but as leaf area index. The LAI offers the advantage of modelling not just the changes from different time periods expressed in years, but also the seasonal changes in land use throughout a year. The LAI index was derived from Landsat time series images, starting from 1984 and up to 2011. All the images available for the Panatau administrative unit in Buzau County, Romania, have been downloaded from http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov, including the images with cloud cover. The model is run in a monthly time step and for each time step all the parameters values, a-priory, conditional and posterior probability are obtained and stored in a log file. The validation process uses landslides that have occurred during the period up to the active time step and checks the records of the probabilities and parameters values for those times steps with the values of the active time step. Each time a landslide has been positive identified new a-priory probabilities are recorded for each parameter. A complete log for the entire model is saved and used for statistical analysis and a NETCDF file is created

  9. Dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonist enhances the subjective effects of cocaine in humans.

    PubMed

    Newton, Thomas F; Haile, Colin N; Mahoney, James J; Shah, Ravi; Verrico, Christopher D; De La Garza, Richard; Kosten, Thomas R

    2015-11-30

    Pramipexole is a D3 dopamine receptor-preferring agonist indicated for the treatment of Parkinson disease. Studies associate pramipexole with pathological gambling and impulse control disorders suggesting a role for D3 receptors in reinforcement processes. Clinical studies showed pramipexole decreased cocaine craving and reversed central deficits in individuals with cocaine use disorder. Preclinical studies have shown acute administration of pramipexole increases cocaine's reinforcing effects whereas other reports suggest chronic pramipexole produces tolerance to cocaine. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we examined the impact of pramipexole treatment on the subjective effects produced by cocaine in volunteers with cocaine use disorder. Volunteers received pramipexole titrated up to 3.0mg/d or placebo over 15 days. Participants then received intravenous cocaine (0, 20 and 40mg) on day 15. Cardiovascular and subjective effects were obtained with visual analog scales at time points across the session. Pramipexole alone increased peak heart rate following saline and diastolic blood pressure following cocaine. Pramipexole produced upwards of two-fold increases in positive subjective effects ratings following cocaine. These results indicate that chronic D3 receptor activation increases the subjective effects of cocaine in humans. Caution should be used when prescribing pramipexole to patients that may also use cocaine. PMID:26239766

  10. Absorption and subjective effects of caffeine from coffee, cola and capsules.

    PubMed

    Liguori, A; Hughes, J R; Grass, J A

    1997-11-01

    Coffee is often perceived as producing greater pharmacological effects than cola. The present study compared the magnitude and rapidity of peak caffeine levels and subjective effects between coffee and cola. Thirteen users of both coffee and cola (mean daily caffeine consumption = 456 mg) ingested 400 mg caffeine via 12 oz unsweetened coffee, 24 oz sugar-free cola or 2 capsules in a random, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects design. Subjects provided a saliva sample and completed subjective effect scales 15 min before and 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 min after ingestion. Mean peak saliva caffeine levels did not differ between coffee (9.7 +/- 1.2 micrograms/ml) and cola (9.8 +/- 0.9 micrograms/ml) and appeared to be greater with these beverages than with the capsule (7.8 +/- 0.6 micrograms/ml; p = NS). Saliva caffeine levels peaked at similar times for coffee (42 +/- 5 min) and cola (39 +/- 5 min) but later for capsule (67 +/- 7 min; p = 0.004). There was no main effect of vehicle or interaction of vehicle and drug on magnitude of peak effect or time to peak increase on self-report scales. In summary, peak caffeine absorption, time to peak absorption, and subjective effects do not appear to be influenced by cola vs. coffee vehicle. Perceived differences in the effects of coffee vs. cola may be due to differences in dose, time of day, added sweetener, environmental setting or contingencies. PMID:9329065

  11. [EFFECTS OF MUSIC-ACOUSTIC SIGNALS, ONLINE CONTROLLED BY EEG OSCILLATORS OF THE SUBJECT].

    PubMed

    Fedotchev, A I; Bondar, A T; Bakhchina, A V; Parin, S B; Polevaya, S A; Radchenko, G S

    2015-08-01

    The effects of 2 variants of the method of musical EEG neurofeedback, in which the dominant spectral components of subject's EEG (EEG oscillators) are online converted to music-like signals similar by timbre to flute sounds, have been studied. In the first case, these music-like signals were smoothly varying by the pitch and intensity in accordance with the current amplitude of the EEG oscillator. In the second case, the same variations of flute-like sound were accompanied by such musical element as rhythm. After the single exposure, the modifications of subject's brain activity and positive changes in psycho-physiological state of the subject have been found. Particularly pronounced effects were observed under rhythmically organized music-like stimuli. PMID:26591592

  12. Effect of visual stimulus using central and peripheral visual field on postural control of normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Park, Du-Jin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of visual stimulus using central and peripheral vision fields on postural control. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects consisted of 40 young adult volunteers (15 males, 25 females) who had been informed of the study purpose and procedure. The subjects were randomly divided into four groups of differing visual stimulus. Each group was given visual intervention in a standing position for 3 minutes. Postural control was evaluated before and after visual intervention. [Results] The results of the functional reach test and body sway test showed significant differences among the four groups. [Conclusion] The two-way peripheral vision-field group showed significantly more body sway after visual intervention than the other three groups. This finding may suggest two-way peripheral vision field is a more effective visual stimulus for training postural control and balance. PMID:27390412

  13. Beginning Teachers' Conceptual Understandings of Effective History Teaching: Examining the Change from "Subject Knowers" to "Subject Teachers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitano, Paul; Green, Nicole C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the investigation of change in preservice teachers' conceptions of effective history teaching across a secondary history methods course in a postgraduate diploma of education program. Using concept mapping to plot shifts in their expressed reflections, data were obtained that indicate personal constructs of effective history…

  14. A variant in ANKK1 modulates acute subjective effects of cocaine: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Spellicy, Catherine J.; Harding, Mark J.; Hamon, Sara C.; Mahoney, James J.; Reyes, Jennifer A.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Newton, Thomas F.; De La Garza, Richard; Nielsen, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether functional variants in the ankyrin repeat and kinase domain-containing 1 gene (ANKK1) and/or the dopamine receptor D2 gene (DRD2) modulate the subjective effects (reward or non-reward response to a stimulus) produced by cocaine administration. Cocaine-dependent participants (N = 47) were administered 40 mg of cocaine or placebo at time 0, and a subjective effects questionnaire (visual analog scale) was administered 15 minutes prior to cocaine administration, and at 5, 10,15, and 20 minutes following administration. The influence of polymorphisms in the ANKK1 and DRD2 genes on subjective experience of cocaine in the laboratory was tested. Participants with a T allele of ANKK1 rs1800497 experienced greater subjective ‘high’ (p = 0.00006), ‘any drug effect’ (p = 0.0003), and ‘like’ (p = 0.0004) relative to the CC genotype group. Although the variant in the DRD2 gene was shown to be associated with subjective effects, LD analysis revealed this association was driven by the ANKK1 rs1800497 variant. A participant’s ANKK1 genotype may identify individuals who are likely to experience greater positive subjective effects following cocaine exposure, including greater ‘high’ and ‘like’, and these individuals may have increased vulnerability to continue using cocaine or they may be at greater risk to relapse during periods of abstinence. However, these results are preliminary and replication is necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:24528631

  15. BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF SULFURIC ACID MIST INHALATION BY HUMAN SUBJECTS WHILE AT REST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study evaluated the effect of sulfuric acid aerosol exposure for 2 consecutive days on seven human biochemical blood parameters. A total of 20 human subjects were exposed to 100 micrograms per cu. m. sulfuric acid aerosol for 4 hr/day for 2 consecutive days. A total of 17 hum...

  16. EFFECTS OF 0.1 PPM NITROGEN DIOXIDE ON AIRWAYS OF NORMAL AND ASTHMATIC SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been reported that inhalation of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) will enhance the bronchial reactivity of asthmatics. This study was designed to evaluate the respiratory effect of a 1-h exposure of normal subjects and of atopic asthmatics to 0.1 parts per million (ppm) NO2. Fifteen...

  17. Effect of Subject Types on the Production of Auxiliary "Is" in Young English-Speaking Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Ling-Yu; Owen, Amanda J.; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors tested the unique checking constraint (UCC) hypothesis and the usage-based approach concerning why young children variably use tense and agreement morphemes in obligatory contexts by examining the effect of subject types on the production of auxiliary "is". Method: Twenty typically developing 3-year-olds were…

  18. Date Rape: Effects of Race of Assailant and Victim and Gender of Subjects on Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Linda S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines the effects of race (black or white) of assailant and victim of subjects on perceptions of date rape. Results indicated that date rape encounters were perceived as less serious if the victim was black, and that females were more likely to define the forced sexual encounter as a crime and to be in favor of prosecuting the perpetrator. (JPS)

  19. Habit Strength Differences in Motor Behavior: The Effects of Social Facilitation Paradigms and Subject Sex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landers, Daniel M.; And Others

    This document reports on research on the effects which the presence of other individuals have on another individual's performance. The experiment was conducted as follows: Selected male and female subjects were given the task of following a blind maze with a stylus. They were tested in performance under three different circumstances, alone, with a…

  20. Comparison of Nonoverlap Methods for Identifying Treatment Effect in Single-Subject Experimental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakap, Salih; Snyder, Patricia; Pasia, Cathleen

    2014-01-01

    Debate is occurring about which result interpretation aides focused on examining the experimental effect should be used in single-subject experimental research. In this study, we examined seven nonoverlap methods and compared results using each method to judgments of two visual analysts. The data sources for the present study were 36 studies…

  1. The Effect of Graphic Organizers on Subjective and Objective Comprehension of a Health Education Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kools, Marieke; van de Wiel, Margaretha W. J.; Ruiter, Robert A. C.; Cruts, Anica; Kok, Gerjo

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effect of graphic organizers on the comprehension of a health education brochure text and compared subjective with objective comprehension measures. Graphic organizers are graphical depictions of relations among concepts in a text. Participants read a brochure text about asthma with and without these organizers, and…

  2. Effects of the Sex of Both Interviewer and Subject on Reported Manifest Dream Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremsdorf, Ross B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Examined the effects of the sex of both interviewer and subject on the reported content of dreams. No sex differences in sexual content of dreams were found, although dreams of males were more vivid, active, and aggressive. Opposite-sex pairing mobilized reports of conflict within dreams. Same-sex pairing increased sexual content. (Author/BEF)

  3. The Effects of Objective Career Success on Subsequent Subjective Career Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stumpf, Stephen A.; Tymon, Walter G., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We use a sample of working adults (N = 638) to explore the effects of past objective career success (mobility, promotions, and salary change) on current subjective success (human capital assessments by one's managers, core self evaluations, satisfaction with one's career) by gender, across an economic cycle (2004-2011), controlling for career…

  4. Effects of stereoscopic filming parameters and display duration on the subjective assessment of eye strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    IJsselsteijn, Wijnand A.; de Ridder, Huib; Vliegen, Joyce

    2000-05-01

    Despite many benefits that stereoscopic displays are known to have, there is evidence that stereoscopic displays can potentially cause discomfort to the viewer. The experiment reported in this paper was motivated by the need to quantify the potential subjective discomfort of viewing stereoscopic TV images. Observers provided direct subjective ratings of eye strain and quality in response to stereoscopic still images that varied in camera separation, convergence distance and focal length. Display duration of the images was varied between 1 an d15 seconds. Before and after the experiment, observers filled out a symptom checklist to assess any subjective discomfort resulting from the total experiment. Reported eye strain was on average around 'perceptible, but not annoying' for natural disparities. As disparity values increased reported eye strain increased to 'very annoying' and quality rating solved off and eventually dropped. This effect was most pronounced for the stereoscopic images that were produce using a short convergence distance. This effect may be attributed to an increase in keystone distortion in this condition. No significant effect of display duration was found. The results of the symptom checklist showed a slight increase in reported negative side-effects, with most observers reporting only mild symptoms of discomfort. Finally, our results showed that subjective stereoscopic image quality can be described as a function of reported eye strain and perceived depth.

  5. Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 as a predisposing risk factor for the development of angina pectoris

    PubMed Central

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Morissette, Guillaume; Sedlak, Ruth H.; Jerome, Keith R.; Flamand, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 (iciHHV-6) results in the germ-line transmission of the HHV-6 genome. Every somatic cell of iciHHV-6+ individuals contains the HHV-6 genome integrated in the telomere of chromosomes. Whether having iciHHV-6 predisposes humans to diseases remains undefined. DNA from 19,597 participants between 40 and 69 years of age were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the presence of iciHHV-6. Telomere lengths were determined by qPCR. Medical records, hematological, biochemical, and anthropometric measurements and telomere lengths were compared between iciHHV-6+ and iciHHV-6− subjects. The prevalence of iciHHV-6 was 0.58%. Two-way ANOVA with a Holm–Bonferroni correction was used to determine the effects of iciHHV6, sex, and their interaction on continuous outcomes. Two-way logistic regression with a Holm–Bonferroni correction was used to determine the effects of iciHHV6, sex, and their interaction on disease prevalence. Of 50 diseases monitored, a single one, angina pectoris, is significantly elevated (3.3×) in iciHHV-6+ individuals relative to iciHHV-6− subjects (P = 0.017; 95% CI, 1.73–6.35). When adjusted for potential confounding factors (age, body mass index, percent body fat, and systolic blood pressure), the prevalence of angina remained three times greater in iciHHV-6+ subjects (P = 0.015; 95%CI, 1.23–7.15). Analyses of telomere lengths between iciHHV-6− without angina, iciHHV-6− with angina, and iciHHV-6+ with angina indicate that iciHHV-6+ with angina have shorter telomeres than age-matched iciHHV-6− subjects (P = 0.006). Our study represents, to our knowledge, the first large-scale analysis of disease association with iciHHV-6. Our results are consistent with iciHHV-6 representing a risk factor for the development of angina. PMID:26080419

  6. Cognition and the Placebo Effect – Dissociating Subjective Perception and Actual Performance

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Katharina A.; Büchel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The influence of positive or negative expectations on clinical outcomes such as pain relief or motor performance in patients and healthy participants has been extensively investigated for years. Such research promises potential benefit for patient treatment by deliberately using expectations as means to stimulate endogenous regulation processes. Especially regarding recent interest and controversies revolving around cognitive enhancement, the question remains whether mere expectancies might also yield enhancing or impairing effects in the cognitive domain, i.e., can we improve or impair cognitive performance simply by creating a strong expectancy in participants about their performance? Moreover, previous literature suggests that especially subjective perception is highly susceptible to expectancy effects, whereas objective measures can be affected in certain domains, but not in others. Does such a dissociation of objective measures and subjective perception also apply to cognitive placebo and nocebo effects? In this study, we sought to investigate whether placebo and nocebo effects can be evoked in cognitive tasks, and whether these effects influence objective and subjective measures alike. To this end, we instructed participants about alleged effects of different tone frequencies (high, intermediate, low) on brain activity and cognitive functions. We paired each tone with specific success rates in a Flanker task paradigm as a preliminary conditioning procedure, adapted from research on placebo hypoalgesia. In a subsequent test phase, we measured reaction times and success rates in different expectancy conditions (placebo, nocebo, and control) and then asked participants how the different tone frequencies affected their performance. Interestingly, we found no effects of expectation on objective measures, but a strong effect on subjective perception, i.e., although actual performance was not affected by expectancy, participants strongly believed that the placebo

  7. Oral Cannabidiol does not Alter the Subjective, Reinforcing or Cardiovascular Effects of Smoked Cannabis.

    PubMed

    Haney, Margaret; Malcolm, Robert J; Babalonis, Shanna; Nuzzo, Paul A; Cooper, Ziva D; Bedi, Gillinder; Gray, Kevin M; McRae-Clark, Aimee; Lofwall, Michelle R; Sparenborg, Steven; Walsh, Sharon L

    2016-07-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), a constituent of cannabis with few psychoactive effects, has been reported in some studies to attenuate certain aspects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) intoxication. However, most studies have tested only one dose of CBD in combination with one dose of oral THC, making it difficult to assess the nature of this interaction. Further, the effect of oral CBD on smoked cannabis administration is unknown. The objective of this multi-site, randomized, double-blind, within-subject laboratory study was to assess the influence of CBD (0, 200, 400, 800 mg, p.o.) pretreatment on the reinforcing, subjective, cognitive, and physiological effects of smoked cannabis (0.01 (inactive), 5.30-5.80% THC). Non-treatment-seeking, healthy cannabis smokers (n=31; 17M, 14 F) completed eight outpatient sessions. CBD was administered 90 min prior to cannabis administration. The behavioral and cardiovascular effects of cannabis were measured at baseline and repeatedly throughout the session. A subset of participants (n=8) completed an additional session to measure plasma CBD concentrations after administration of the highest CBD dose (800 mg). Under placebo CBD conditions, active cannabis (1) was self-administered by significantly more participants than placebo cannabis and (2) produced significant, time-dependent increases in ratings of 'High', 'Good Effect', ratings of the cannabis cigarette (eg, strength, liking), and heart rate relative to inactive cannabis. CBD, which alone produced no significant psychoactive or cardiovascular effects, did not significantly alter any of these outcomes. Cannabis self-administration, subjective effects, and cannabis ratings did not vary as a function of CBD dose relative to placebo capsules. These findings suggest that oral CBD does not reduce the reinforcing, physiological, or positive subjective effects of smoked cannabis. PMID:26708108

  8. Bio-economics of a renewable resource subjected to strong Allee effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasu, P. D. N.; Kiran Kumar, G.

    2014-06-01

    In this article bio-economics of a renewable resource that is subjected to strong Allee effect (multiplicative Allee effect) is investigated from sole owner perspective. The considered optimal harvesting problem has been solved using Pontryagin maximum principle. The control problem admits multiple singular equilibrium solutions in contrast to the case where the growth of the resource is of compensatory nature. Thus the choice of optimal singular solution and the nature of associated approach paths make the problem pertinent and interesting.

  9. The metabolic and hemodynamic effects of prolonged bed rest in normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chobanian, A. V.; Lille, R. D.; Tercyak, A.; Blevins, P.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation in six normal subjects of the effects of chronic bed rest on the interrelationships between cardiovascular hemodynamics, catecholamine metabolism, vascular reactivity, renin and aldosterone activity, and electrolyte and fluid balance. Negative sodium and potassium balances and reductions in plasma volume were observed in all subjects, but plasma renin activity and aldosterone secretory rate showed no significant change. Other findings included the observation that major decreases in sodium balance and plasma volume occurred in the early bed rest period and did not correlate closely with the degree of orthostatic intolerance.

  10. Subjectively Evaluated Effects of Domestic Violence on Well-Being in Clinical Populations

    PubMed Central

    Poutiainen, Marika; Holma, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Effects of domestic violence are reflected in victims' physical, psychological, and sexual health as well as in victims' subjective evaluations of health or subjective well-being. The principal aim of this study was to study the extent to which the consequences of domestic violence are reflected in patients' subjectively evaluated well-being, life management, and sense of security in an emergency department, a maternity department, and a reception unit of a psychiatric hospital. A questionnaire on the effects of domestic violence was administered to 530 patients. 61 patients reported either current or previous domestic violence that affected their current well-being and life management. Domestic violence was reported to have an effect on subjective well-being and sense of security: the more recent or frequent the experience of violence was, the greater was considered its impact on well-being and sense of security. Routine inquiry can uncover hidden cases of abuse and hence would be of great benefit in the healthcare context. Early identification of abuse victims can prevent further harm caused by violence. PMID:23476806

  11. Effects of moclobemide and mianserin on highway driving, psychometric performance and subjective parameters, relative to placebo.

    PubMed

    Ramaekers, J G; Swijgman, H F; O'Hanlon, J F

    1992-01-01

    The acute and sub-chronic effects of moclobemide and mianserin on driving and psychometric performance were compared to those of placebo in a double-blind, cross-over study involving 17 healthy volunteers. Mianserin, moclobemide and placebo were administered for 8 days. Subjects' performance was measured on days 1 and 8 of each treatment series; subjective sleep parameters, mood, and possible side-effects were recorded each treatment day on questionnaires or visual analog scales. Mianserin affected most of the performance measures, while moclobemide affected none; mianserin also impaired driving and tracking performance and decreased CFF. Whilst receiving mianserin, subjects reported depressed levels of alertness, calmness, and contentment; the quality of their sleep was unaffected, but its duration increased, together with feelings of drowsiness and fatigue during the day. No statistical interactions between the factors Drugs and (Treatment) Days were found, indicating that little pharmacological tolerance developed over time during mianserin treatment. Mianserin's sedative properties are held responsible for all performance and subjective effects of the drug. It is concluded that moclobemide 200 mg b.i.d. has no important sedative properties. PMID:1546144

  12. Effects of passive pedaling exercise on the intracortical inhibition in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Langthaler, Patrick B; Bathke, Arne C; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Christova, Monica; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-06-01

    Cortical reorganization can be induced by exercise below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of passive and active pedaling exercise on leg motor cortical area excitability of subjects with traumatic SCI. Ten subjects with chronic cervical or thoracic SCI were enrolled in the study. We found a significant effect of pedaling on short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), which did not interact with the experimental condition (active vs. passive). This corresponded to a significant reduction of SICI in the subjects with SCI, together with no evidence that this pattern differed for passive vs. active pedaling. We found no significant effect of pedaling on intracortical facilitation. Our results showed that also passive cycling may be beneficial in activating motor cortical regions and possibly also facilitating motor recovery after SCI. The present study confirms and extends the findings of previous studies that have observed task-specific cortical activation during passive pedaling. Therefore passive exercise therapies when applied below the level of the lesion in subjects with SCI could promote cortical neuroplastic reorganization. PMID:27108543

  13. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on mood in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Moulier, Virginie; Gaudeau-Bosma, Christian; Isaac, Clémence; Allard, Anne-Camille; Bouaziz, Noomane; Sidhoumi, Djedia; Braha-Zeitoun, Sonia; Benadhira, René; Thomas, Fanny; Januel, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background High frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has shown significant efficiency in the treatment of resistant depression. However in healthy subjects, the effects of rTMS remain unclear. Objective Our aim was to determine the impact of 10 sessions of rTMS applied to the DLPFC on mood and emotion recognition in healthy subjects. Design In a randomised double-blind study, 20 subjects received 10 daily sessions of active (10 Hz frequency) or sham rTMS. The TMS coil was positioned on the left DLPFC through neuronavigation. Several dimensions of mood and emotion processing were assessed at baseline and after rTMS with clinical scales, visual analogue scales (VASs), and the Ekman 60 faces test. Results The 10 rTMS sessions targeting the DLPFC were well tolerated. No significant difference was found between the active group and the control group for clinical scales and the Ekman 60 faces test. Compared to the control group, the active rTMS group presented a significant improvement in their adaptation to daily life, which was assessed through VAS. Conclusion This study did not show any deleterious effect on mood and emotion recognition of 10 sessions of rTMS applied on the DLPFC in healthy subjects. This study also suggested a positive effect of rTMS on quality of life. PMID:26993786

  14. Discriminative-Stimulus, Subject-rated and Physiological Effects of Methamphetamine in Humans Pretreated with Aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    Sevak, Rajkumar J.; Vansickel, Andrea R.; Stoops, William W.; Glaser, Paul E. A.; Hays, Lon R.; Rush, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine is thought to produce its behavioral effects by releasing dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine. Results from animal studies support this notion, while results from human laboratory studies have not consistently demonstrated the importance of monoamine systems in the behavioral effects of methamphetamine. Human laboratory procedures of drug-discrimination are well suited to assess neuropharmacological mechanisms of the training drug by studying pharmacological manipulation. In this human laboratory study, six participants with a history of recreational stimulant use learned to discriminate 10 mg oral methamphetamine. After acquiring the discrimination (i.e., ≥80% correct responding on 4 consecutive sessions), the effects of a range of doses of methamphetamine (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 15 mg), alone and in combination with 0 and 20 mg aripiprazole (a partial agonist at D2 and 5-HT1A receptors), were assessed. Methamphetamine alone functioned as a discriminative stimulus, produced prototypical stimulant-like subject-rated drug effects (e.g., increased ratings of Good Effects, Talkative-Friendly, and Willing to Pay For) and elevated cardiovascular indices. These effects were generally a function of dose. Aripiprazole alone did not occasion methamphetamine-appropriate responding or produce subject-rated effects, but modestly impaired performance. Administration of aripiprazole significantly attenuated the discriminative-stimulus and cardiovascular effects of methamphetamine, as well as some of the subject-rated drug effects. These results indicate that monoamine systems likely play a role in the behavioral effects of methamphetamine in humans. Moreover, given the concordance between past results with d-amphetamine and the present findings, d-amphetamine can likely serve as a model for the pharmacological effects of methamphetamine. PMID:21694622

  15. Differential effects of naltrexone on cardiac, subjective and behavioural reactions to acute ethanol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jordan B.; Conrod, Patricia; Vassileva, Jasmin; Gianoulakis, Christina; Pihl, Robert O.

    2006-01-01

    Objective Alcohol may have psychomotor stimulant properties during the rising limb of the blood alcohol curve at commonly self-administered doses. Increased heart rate (HR) immediately after alcohol consumption may serve as an indicator or marker of such properties, which appear to be potentially opiate-mediated and dopamine-dependent. Naltrexone, an opiate antagonist, has been used successfully in the treatment of alcoholism and may produce its therapeutic effects through its effects on alcohol metabolism or by blocking alcohol's rewarding effects. We hypothesized that, if naltrexone blocks the psychomotor stimulant properties of ethanol, then it would decrease or eliminate the HR increase associated with acute alcohol intoxication and that this would be independent of any effect on alcohol metabolism. Methods Twenty male subjects were administered placebo and alcohol (1.0 mL 95% USP ethanol/kg body weight) in a laboratory setting on one day and naltrexone (50 mg) and alcohol on another (counterbalanced). We assessed all subjects for a change in HR and for a subjective and behavioural response from 35 to 170 minutes after drug or alcohol administration. Results The placebo and alcohol mix produced a significant mean HR increase from baseline (F1,95 = 46.01, p < 0.0001, Cohen's d = 0.62), while naltrexone and alcohol did not (nonsignificant). The significant effects of naltrexone on blood alcohol level did not account for the effect of naltrexone on alcohol-induced HR change but did account for alterations in subjective and behavioural response to alcohol. Conclusions Naltrexone appears to substantially reduce the HR increase that is characteristic of alcohol intoxication. This finding appears to lend moderate support to the notions that, first, naltrexone has differential effects on alcohol reactions and, second, that it specifically blocks the acute psychomotor stimulant properties of alcohol. PMID:17136216

  16. Inhaled vs. oral alprazolam: subjective, behavioral and cognitive effects, and modestly increased abuse potential

    PubMed Central

    Reissig, Chad J.; Harrison, Joseph A.; Carter, Lawrence P.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Infrahuman and human studies suggest that a determinant of the abuse potential of a drug is rate of onset of subjective effects. Objectives This study sought to determine if the rate of onset of subjective effects and abuse potential of alprazolam would be increased when administered via inhalation vs. the oral route. Methods Placebo, inhaled alprazolam (0.5, 1, 2 mg), and oral alprazolam (1, 2, 4 mg) were administered under double-blind, double-dummy conditions using a cross-over design in 14 healthy participants with histories of drug abuse. Participant and observer ratings, and behavioral and cognitive performance measures were assessed repeatedly during 9 hour sessions. Results Both routes of administration produced orderly dose and time-related effects, with higher doses producing greater and longer lasting effects. Onset of subjective effects following inhaled alprazolam was very rapid (e.g., 2 vs. 49 minutes after 2 mg inhaled vs. oral). On measures of abuse potential (e.g., liking and good effects), inhaled alprazolam was more potent, as evidenced by a leftward shift in the dose response curve. Despite the potency difference, at the highest doses, peak ratings of subjective effects related to abuse potential (e.g., “drug liking”) were similar across the two routes. On other measures (e.g., sedation and performance) the routes were equipotent. Conclusions The inhaled route of administration modestly increased the abuse potential of alprazolam despite significantly increasing its rate of onset. If marketed, the reduced availability and increased cost of inhaled alprazolam may render the societal risk of increased abuse to be low. PMID:25199955

  17. Anticipating risk for human subjects participating in clinical research: application of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cody, Robert J

    2006-03-01

    Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a method applied in various industries to anticipate and mitigate risk. This methodology can be more systematically applied to the protection of human subjects in research. The purpose of FMEA is simple: prevent problems before they occur. By applying FMEA process analysis to the elements of a specific research protocol, the failure severity, occurrence, and detection rates can be estimated for calculation of a "risk priority number" (RPN). Methods can then be identified to reduce the RPN to levels where the risk/benefit ratio favors human subject benefit, to a greater magnitude than existed in the pre-analysis risk profile. At the very least, the approach provides a checklist of issues that can be individualized for specific research protocols or human subject populations. PMID:16537191

  18. Decreased Effective Connectivity from Cortices to the Right Parahippocampal Gyrus in Alzheimer's Disease Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangyu; Ward, B. Douglas; Chen, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to detect effective connectivity (EC) changes in the default mode network and hippocampus network in 20 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 20 cognitively normal (CN) subjects, using multivariate Granger causality. The authors used the maximum coefficients in the multivariate autoregression model to quantitatively measure the different EC strength levels between the CN and AD groups. It was demonstrated that the EC strength difference can classify AD from CN subjects. Further, the right parahippocampal gyrus (PHP_R) showed imbalanced bidirectional EC connections. The PHP_R received weaker input connections from the neocortices, but its output connections were significantly increased in AD. These findings may provide neural physiological mechanisms for interpreting AD subjects' memory deficits during the encoding processes. PMID:25132215

  19. A Common Variant in the FTO Gene Is Associated with Body Mass Index and Predisposes to Childhood and Adult Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frayling, Timothy M.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Weedon, Michael N.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Freathy, Rachel M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Perry, John R. B.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Lango, Hana; Rayner, Nigel W.; Shields, Beverley; Harries, Lorna W.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Ellard, Sian; Groves, Christopher J.; Knight, Bridget; Patch, Ann-Marie; Ness, Andrew R.; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Ring, Susan M.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Sovio, Ulla; Bennett, Amanda J.; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Barroso, Inês; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Karpe, Fredrik; Owen, Katharine R.; Cardon, Lon R.; Walker, Mark; Hitman, Graham A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Morris, Andrew D.; Smith, George Davey; Hattersley, Andrew T.; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is a serious international health problem that increases the risk of several common diseases. The genetic factors predisposing to obesity are poorly understood. A genome-wide search for type 2 diabetes–susceptibility genes identified a common variant in the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated) gene that predisposes to diabetes through an effect on body mass index (BMI). An additive association of the variant with BMI was replicated in 13 cohorts with 38,759 participants. The 16% of adults who are homozygous for the risk allele weighed about 3 kilograms more and had 1.67-fold increased odds of obesity when compared with those not inheriting a risk allele. This association was observed from age 7 years upward and reflects a specific increase in fat mass. PMID:17434869

  20. Effects of acceptance-based coping on task performance and subjective stress.

    PubMed

    Kishita, Naoko; Shimada, Hironori

    2011-03-01

    This paper examines the interactive effects of acceptance-based coping and job control on task performance, subjective stress, and perceived control. Forty-eight undergraduate and graduate students first participated in brief educational programs based on either acceptance or control coping strategies. They then participated in a 30-min high workload task under either high or low job control conditions. The results demonstrated a significant interactive effect of acceptance-based coping and job control on perceived control and task performance. No such effect was found for subjective stress. We conclude that to improve employees' perceived control and job performance, there should be an increase not only in job control through work redesign, but also in psychological acceptance. PMID:21074000

  1. The heart field effect: Synchronization of healer-subject heart rates in energy therapy.

    PubMed

    Bair, Christine Caldwell

    2008-01-01

    Recent health research has focused on subtle energy and vibrational frequency as key components of health and healing. In particular, intentional direction of bioenergy is receiving increasing scientific attention. This study investigates the effect of the healer's electromagnetic (EM) heart field upon subjects during energy healing as measured by synchronization of heart rates and scores on a Subjective Units of Distress (SUD) scale and a Profile of Mood States (POMS) inventory. A nonequivalent pretest-posttest design was used based on heart rate comparisons between healer and subject and correlated with pre-and posttest SUD and POMS scores. Subjects included those who sat within the 3- to 4-foot "strong" range of the independent variable, the healer's heart field, while performing self-application of WHEE (the wholistic hybrid derived from EMDR [eye movement desensitization and reprocessing], and EFT [emotional freedom technique]), a meridian-based tapping technique (n=50); and those who performed the same process beyond the 15- to 18-foot range of the healer's EM heart field (n=41). The dependent variables were heart rate, SUD, and POMS inventory. All subjects completed these measures within 1 hour. Study results showed statistically significant heart-rate synchronization with the intervention population. In addition, SUD and POMS scores demonstrated considerably more improvement than in the control population, indicating additional benefit beyond the meridian-based therapies, such as WHEE, alone. Additional findings and future research recommendations are presented in this article. PMID:20664147

  2. Effect of Laser Acupuncture on Anthropometric Measurements and Appetite Sensations in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Alan; Tseng, Jason; Chang, Chia-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. A patient-assessor-blinded, randomized, sham-controlled crossover trial was performed to investigate the effectiveness of laser acupuncture on anthropometric measurements and appetite sensation in obese subjects. Methods. Fifty-two obese subjects were randomly assigned to either the laser acupuncture group or the sham laser acupuncture group. Subjects within each group received the relevant treatment three times a week for 8 weeks. After a two-week washout period, the subjects then received the treatment of the opposite group for another 8 weeks. BMI, body fat percentage, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), waist circumference, hip circumference, and appetite sensations were measured before and after 8 weeks of treatment. Results. BMI, body fat percentage, WHR, waist circumference, and hip circumference decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in the laser acupuncture group compared to baseline but there was no decrease in those variables in the sham laser acupuncture group. Laser acupuncture significantly improved scores on the fullness, hunger, satiety, desire to eat, and overall well-being relative to the baseline (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Laser acupuncture is well tolerated and improves anthropometric measurements and appetite sensations in obese subjects. PMID:27051454

  3. [Effects of long term mental arithmetic on physiological parameters, subjective indices and task performances].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shimpei; Miyake, Shinji

    2007-03-01

    This study examined the effects of long term mental arithmetic on physiological parameters, subjective indices and task performances to investigate the psychophysiological changes induced by mental tasks. Fifteen male university students performed six successive trials of a ten-minute mental arithmetic task. They took a five-minute resting period before and after the tasks. CFF (Critical Flicker Fusion frequency) and subjective fatigue scores using a visual analog scale, POMS (Profiles of Mood States) and SFF (Subjective Feelings of Fatigue) were obtained after each task and resting period. The voices of participants who were instructed to speak five Japanese vowels ('a', 'i', 'u', 'e', 'o') were recorded after each block to investigate a chaotic property of vocal signals that is reported to be changed by fatigue. Subjective workload ratings were also obtained by the NASA-TLX (National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index) after the task. Physiological signals of ECG (Electrocardiogram), PTG (Photoelectric Plethysmogram), SCL (Skin Conductance Level), TBV (Tissue Blood Volume) and Respiration were recorded for all experimental blocks. The number of answers, correct rates and average levels of task difficulty for each ten-minute task were used as task performance indices. In this experiment, the task performance did not decrease, whereas subjective fatigue increased. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system was suggested by physiological parameters. PMID:17380727

  4. The reinforcing and subjective effects of intravenous and intranasal buprenorphine in heroin users.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Madera, Gabriela; Comer, Sandra D

    2014-07-01

    Abuse of buprenorphine (BUP) by the intravenous (IV) route has been documented in several studies, and reports of intranasal (IN) abuse are increasing. However, no studies have directly compared the effects of BUP when it is administered intranasally and intravenously. The present secondary analysis used data from two separate studies to compare the reinforcing and subjective effects of IV and IN buprenorphine. One study evaluated IV buprenorphine (N=13) and the other evaluated IN buprenorphine (N=12). Participants were maintained on 2 mg sublingual (SL) BUP and tested with each intranasal or intravenous buprenorphine test dose (0 mg, 2 mg, 4 mg, 8 mg, and 16 mg). During morning laboratory sessions, participants received money (US $20) and sample doses of IN or IV BUP, and then completed subjective effects questionnaires. Later that day, they completed a self-administration task to receive 10% portions of the drug and/or money they previously sampled. In general, positive subjective ratings for both IV and IN BUP were significantly greater than placebo, with IV BUP having a greater effect than IN BUP. All active BUP doses (IV and IN) maintained significantly higher progressive ratio breakpoint values than placebo, but breakpoint values for IV BUP were greater than for IN BUP. Buprenorphine is an effective maintenance treatment for opioid dependence, valued for its ability to reduce the positive subjective effects of other opioids. Nevertheless, the present data demonstrate that in participants maintained on a low dose of SL BUP, the medication itself has abuse liability when used intravenously or intranasally. PMID:24793093

  5. Naltrexone Maintenance Decreases Cannabis Self-Administration and Subjective Effects in Daily Cannabis Smokers.

    PubMed

    Haney, Margaret; Ramesh, Divya; Glass, Andrew; Pavlicova, Martina; Bedi, Gillinder; Cooper, Ziva D

    2015-10-01

    Given that cannabis use is increasing in the United States, pharmacological treatment options to treat cannabis use disorder are needed. Opioid antagonists modulate cannabinoid effects and may offer a potential approach to reducing cannabis use. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled human laboratory study, we assessed the effects of naltrexone maintenance on the reinforcing, subjective, psychomotor, and cardiovascular effects of active and inactive cannabis. Nontreatment-seeking, daily cannabis smokers were randomized to receive naltrexone (50 mg: n=18 M and 5 F) or placebo (0 mg; n=26 M and 2 F) capsules for 16 days. Before, during, and after medication maintenance, participants completed 10 laboratory sessions over 4-6 weeks, assessing cannabis' behavioral and cardiovascular effects. Medication compliance was verified by observed capsule administration, plasma naltrexone, and urinary riboflavin. Relative to placebo, maintenance on naltrexone significantly reduced both active cannabis self-administration and its positive subjective effects ('good effect'). Participants in the placebo group had 7.6 times (95% CI: 1.1-51.8) the odds of self-administering active cannabis compared with the naltrexone group. This attenuation of reinforcing and positive subjective effects also influenced cannabis use in the natural ecology. Naltrexone had intrinsic effects: decreasing ratings of friendliness, food intake, and systolic blood pressure, and increasing spontaneous reports of stomach upset and headache, yet dropout rates were comparable between groups. In summary, we show for the first time that maintenance on naltrexone decreased cannabis self-administration and ratings of 'good effect' in nontreatment-seeking daily cannabis smokers. Clinical studies in patients motivated to reduce their cannabis use are warranted to evaluate naltrexone's efficacy as a treatment for cannabis use disorder. PMID:25881117

  6. Pharmacokinetics and electrocardiographic effect of ebastine in young versus elderly healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Huang, M Y; Argenti, D; Wilson, J; Garcia, J; Heald, D

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and electrocardiographic effect of a 10-mg oral dose of ebastine in elderly (ages, 65-85 years) and young (ages, 18-35 years) healthy volunteers. Thirty-seven subjects completed this randomized, double-blind, multiple-dose, placebo-controlled, parallel group study. The elderly group consisted of 18 subjects, with 13 subjects receiving 10 mg ebastine and 5 receiving matching placebo. The young group consisted of 19 subjects, with 13 subjects receiving 10 mg ebastine and 6 receiving matching placebo. On study days 1 and 3 through 10, each subject received a single 10-mg dose of ebastine or matching placebo in the morning with a standard breakfast. No drug was administered on study day 2 because of pharmacokinetic sampling. Blood samples were collected at selected times postdose on study days 1, 2, and 10. Plasma samples were analyzed for ebastine and its active metabolite, carebastine, using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method. No plasma ebastine concentrations were detected, suggesting essentially complete metabolic conversion of ebastine to its metabolites. Analysis of variance showed no statistically significant differences between young and elderly single- and multiple-dose carebastine pharmacokinetics with respect to area under the plasma concentration-time curve, maximum concentration (Cmax ), terminal elimination rate constant, apparent oral clearance, or apparent volume of distribution. The mean time of maximum concentration value for young subjects was 1 hour longer than that for elderly subjects after single-dose administration but was comparable after multiple-dose administration. Within-group comparisons of both the young and elderly showed that pharmacokinetics between single dose and steady state were not statistically different. However, the mean steady-state carebastine Cmax values were approximately twofold greater than the mean Cmax values

  7. Effects of alcohol mixed with energy drink and alcohol alone on subjective intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Andrea; Hemberger, Sophie Helene; Loidl, Alexandra; Dufek, Stephanie; Pablik, Eleonore; Fodor, Sugarka; Herle, Marion; Aufricht, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that the combination of caffeine-containing drinks together with alcohol might reduce the subjective feelings of alcohol intoxication-the so-called "masking effect". In this study, we aimed to review the effects of alcohol in combination with caffeine or energy drink with special focus on the "masking effect". Fifty-two healthy male volunteers were analysed concerning breath alcohol concentration and subjective sensations of intoxication using a 18 item Visual Analogue Scale in a randomised, double-blinded, controlled, four treatments cross-over trial after consumption of (A) placebo, (B) alcohol (vodka 37.5% at a dose of 46.5 g ethanol), (C) alcohol in combination with caffeine at a dose of 80 mg (equivalent to one 250 ml can of energy drink) and (D) alcohol in combination with energy drink at a dose of 250 ml (one can). Primary variables were headache, weakness, salivation and motor coordination. Out of four primary variables, weakness and motor coordination showed a statistically significant difference between alcohol and non-alcohol group, out of 14 secondary variables, five more variables (dizziness, alterations in sight, alterations in walking, agitation and alterations in speech) also showed significant differences due mainly to contrasts with the non-alcohol group. In none of these end points, could a statistically significant effect be found for the additional ingestion of energy drink or caffeine on the subjective feelings of alcohol intoxication. This within-subjects study does not confirm the presence of a "masking effect" when combining caffeine or energy drink with alcohol. PMID:24178765

  8. Therapeutic satisfaction and subjective effects of different strains of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Tibor M; van Genugten, Marianne; Höner-Snoeken, Kathrin; van de Velde, Marco J; Niesink, Raymond J M

    2014-06-01

    In The Netherlands, pharmaceutical-grade cultivated cannabis is distributed for medicinal purposes as commissioned by the Ministry of Health. Few studies have thus far described its therapeutic efficacy or subjective (adverse) effects in patients. The aims of this study are to assess the therapeutic satisfaction within a group of patients using prescribed pharmaceutical-grade cannabis and to compare the subjective effects among the available strains with special focus on their delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol content. In a cross-sectional and natural design, users of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis were investigated with questionnaires. Medical background of the patients was asked as well as experienced therapeutic effects and characteristics of cannabis use. Subjective effects were measured with psychometric scales and used to compare among the strains of cannabis used across this group of patients. One hundred two patients were included; their average age was 53 years and 76% used it for more than a year preceding this study. Chronic pain (53%; n = 54) was the most common medical indication for using cannabis followed by multiple sclerosis (23%; n = 23), and 86% (n = 88) of patients (almost) always experienced therapeutic satisfaction when using pharmaceutical cannabis. Dejection, anxiety, and appetite stimulation were found to differ among the 3 strains of cannabis. These results show that patients report therapeutic satisfaction with pharmaceutical cannabis, mainly pain alleviation. Some subjective effects were found to differ among the available strains of cannabis, which is discussed in relation to their different tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol content. These results may aid in further research and critical appraisal for medicinally prescribed cannabis products. PMID:24747979

  9. Systemic and renal effects of an ETA receptor subtype-specific antagonist in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Schmetterer, Leopold; Dallinger, Susanne; Bobr, Barbara; Selenko, Nicole; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Wolzt, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Endothelins (ETs) might play a pathophysiological role in a variety of vascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of BQ-123, a specific ETA receptor antagonist on systemic and renal haemodynamics in healthy subjects. This was done at baseline and during infusion of exogenous ET-1.The study was performed in a balanced, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind 4 way cross-over design in 10 healthy male subjects. Subjects received co-infusions of ET-1 (2.5 ng kg−1 min−1 for 120 min) or placebo and BQ-123 (15 μg min−1 for 60 min and subsequently 60 μg min−1 for 60 min) or placebo. Renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed by the para-aminohippurate (PAH) and the inulin plasma clearance method, respectively.BQ-123 alone had no renal or systemic haemodynamic effect. ET-1 significantly reduced RPF (−24%, P<0.001) and GFR (−12%, P=0.034). These effects were abolished by co-infusion of either dose of BQ-123 (RPF: P=0.0012; GFR: P=0.020).BQ-123 reversed the renal haemodynamic effects induced by exogenous ET-1 in vivo. This indicates that vasoconstriction in the kidney provoked by ET-1 is predominantly mediated by the ETA receptor subtype. PMID:9692778

  10. Subjective, Physiological, and Cognitive Responses to Intravenous Nicotine: Effects of Sex and Menstrual Cycle Phase

    PubMed Central

    DeVito, Elise E; Herman, Aryeh I; Waters, Andrew J; Valentine, Gerald W; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine dependence is a serious public health concern. Optimal treatment of nicotine dependence will require greater understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to the maintenance of smoking behaviors. A growing literature indicates sex and menstrual phase differences in responses to nicotine. The aim of this study was to assess sex and menstrual phase influences on a broad range of measures of nicotine response including subjective drug effects, cognition, physiological responses, and symptoms of withdrawal, craving, and affect. Using a well-established intravenous nicotine paradigm and biochemical confirmation of overnight abstinence and menstrual cycle phase, analyses were performed to compare sex (age 18–50 years; 115 male and 45 female) and menstrual cycle phase (29 follicular and 16 luteal) effects. Females had diminished subjective drug effects of, but greater physiological responses to, nicotine administration. Luteal-phase females showed diminished subjective drug effects and better cognition relative to follicular-phase women. These findings offer candidate mechanisms through which the luteal phase, wherein progesterone is dominant relative to estradiol, may be protective against vulnerability to smoking. PMID:24345818

  11. Predisposing factors of restless legs syndrome in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tunç, Tuğba; Karadağ, Yeşim Sücüllü; Doğulu, Funda; Inan, Levent E

    2007-04-15

    The occurrence of restless legs syndrome in pregnancy is well known. However, the mechanism of this association is unclear. In this study, we aimed to identify the factors that predispose women to have restless legs syndrome during pregnancy. A total of 146 pregnant women were included in the study. Patients were asked questions regarding demographic characteristics, complications of pregnancy, medical therapy (vitamin and iron intake), sleep disorders, muscle cramps, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Electroneurography, routine blood biochemistry tests, complete blood count, and thyroid function tests were performed and vitamin B12, folic acid, serum iron, iron-binding capacity, ferritin, iron saturation, prolactin, estradiol, and progesterone were measured. Of the participants, 38 were diagnosed as having restless legs syndrome. In women with restless legs syndrome, additional medical problems, night cramps, and excessive daytime sleepiness were more frequent. In women without restless legs syndrome, serum hemoglobin levels were significantly higher and the use of supplemental iron or vitamins was greater. Among the women with restless legs syndrome, progesterone levels were slightly higher but this difference was not statistically significant. In summary, in this study, lower hemoglobin levels and supplementation deficits of iron and vitamins were found be the risk factors for restless legs syndrome in pregnancy. PMID:17285614

  12. Mutations in the transcriptional repressor REST predispose to Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Mahamdallie, Shazia S; Hanks, Sandra; Karlin, Kristen L; Zachariou, Anna; Perdeaux, Elizabeth R; Ruark, Elise; Shaw, Chad A; Renwick, Alexander; Ramsay, Emma; Yost, Shawn; Elliott, Anna; Birch, Jillian; Capra, Michael; Gray, Juliet; Hale, Juliet; Kingston, Judith; Levitt, Gill; McLean, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Stiller, Charles; Sebire, Neil; Westbrook, Thomas F; Rahman, Nazneen

    2015-12-01

    Wilms tumor is the most common childhood renal cancer. To identify mutations that predispose to Wilms tumor, we are conducting exome sequencing studies. Here we describe 11 different inactivating mutations in the REST gene (encoding RE1-silencing transcription factor) in four familial Wilms tumor pedigrees and nine non-familial cases. Notably, no similar mutations were identified in the ICR1000 control series (13/558 versus 0/993; P < 0.0001) or in the ExAC series (13/558 versus 0/61,312; P < 0.0001). We identified a second mutational event in two tumors, suggesting that REST may act as a tumor-suppressor gene in Wilms tumor pathogenesis. REST is a zinc-finger transcription factor that functions in cellular differentiation and embryonic development. Notably, ten of 11 mutations clustered within the portion of REST encoding the DNA-binding domain, and functional analyses showed that these mutations compromise REST transcriptional repression. These data establish REST as a Wilms tumor predisposition gene accounting for ∼2% of Wilms tumor. PMID:26551668

  13. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Reynolds, Corey L.; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Kwartler, Callie S.; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M.; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M.; Majesky, Mark W.; Swindell, Eric C.; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3–/– mice with p53–/– mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease. PMID:26854927

  14. The effects of sleep on circulating catecholamines and aqueous flow in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Maus, T L; McLaren, J W; Shepard, J W; Brubaker, R F

    1996-04-01

    We measured the rate of aqueous flow and analysed its relation to the time of day, the state of wakefulness and the urinary excretion of catecholamines. Two groups of subjects were studied. One group comprised 20 normal subjects who were studied over two 22-hr periods. During one period, the subjects were permitted to sleep during their customary hours of sleep; during the other, they were not permitted to sleep, but remained active for all 22 hr. The other group comprised ten subjects with obstructive sleep apnea who were studied over a 22-hr period and slept during their customary hours of sleep but without the aid of any respiratory device. Aqueous flow was measured with fluorophotometry. Motion of the wrist was monitored by a seismograph (wrist Actigraph) and served as a surrogate of activity and wakefulness. Urinary catecholamine excretion was measured during different periods of the wake/sleep cycle. Both groups exhibited the normal nocturnal suppression of flow (59% lower compared to morning in the normal group; 56% lower compared to morning in the apneic group). During sleep deprivation, the rate of flow at night in normal subjects was 30% lower than during the morning (P < 0.001) and 60% higher than during sleep (P < 0.001). Lid closure during sleep deprivation had no effect on the results. Aqueous flow correlated with a 'catecholamine index', derived from the combined excretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine. Flow also correlated with an 'activity index', and 'sleep efficiency', indices derived from motion of the wrist. We conclude that the day-night difference of aqueous humor flow as measured by clearance of fluorescein from the human eye is driven partly by a factor that has a circadian rhythm and partly by a factor that depends on the activity of the subject. We hypothesize that these factors are the catecholamines, epinephrine and norepinephrine. PMID:8795453

  15. Comparison of Caffeine and d-amphetamine in Cocaine-Dependent Subjects: Differential Outcomes on Subjective and Cardiovascular Effects, Reward Learning, and Salivary Paraxanthine.

    PubMed

    Lane, Scott D; Green, Charles E; Schmitz, Joy M; Rathnayaka, Nuvan; Fang, Wendy B; Ferré, Sergi; Moeller, F Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Due to indirect modulation of dopamine transmission, adenosine receptor antagonists may be useful in either treating cocaine use or improving disrupted cognitive-behavioral functions associated with chronic cocaine use. To compare and contrast the stimulant effects of adenosine antagonism to direct dopamine stimulation, we administered 150 mg and 300 mg caffeine, 20 mg amphetamine, and placebo to cocaine-dependent vs. healthy control subjects, matched on moderate caffeine use. Data were obtained on measures of cardiovascular effects, subjective drug effects (ARCI, VAS, DEQ), and a probabilistic reward-learning task sensitive to dopamine modulation. Levels of salivary caffeine and the primary caffeine metabolite paraxanthine were obtained on placebo and caffeine dosing days. Cardiovascular results revealed main effects of dose for diastolic blood pressure and heart rate; follow up tests showed that controls were most sensitive to 300 mg caffeine and 20 mg amphetamine; cocaine-dependent subjects were sensitive only to 300 mg caffeine. Subjective effects results revealed dose × time and dose × group interactions on the ARCI A, ARCI LSD, and VAS 'elated' scales; follow up tests did not show systematic differences between groups with regard to caffeine or d-amphetamine. Large between-group differences in salivary paraxanthine (but not salivary caffeine) levels were obtained under both caffeine doses. The cocaine-dependent group expressed significantly higher paraxanthine levels than controls under 150 mg and 3-4 fold greater levels under 300 mg at 90 min and 150 min post caffeine dose. However, these differences also covaried with cigarette smoking status (not balanced between groups), and nicotine smoking is known to alter caffeine/paraxanthine metabolism via cytochrome P450 enzymes. These preliminary data raise the possibility that adenosine antagonists may affect cocaine-dependent and non-dependent subjects differently. In conjunction with previous preclinical and

  16. Comparison of Caffeine and d-amphetamine in Cocaine-Dependent Subjects: Differential Outcomes on Subjective and Cardiovascular Effects, Reward Learning, and Salivary Paraxanthine

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Scott D; Green, Charles E; Schmitz, Joy M; Rathnayaka, Nuvan; Fang, Wendy B; Ferré, Sergi; Moeller, F Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Due to indirect modulation of dopamine transmission, adenosine receptor antagonists may be useful in either treating cocaine use or improving disrupted cognitive-behavioral functions associated with chronic cocaine use. To compare and contrast the stimulant effects of adenosine antagonism to direct dopamine stimulation, we administered 150 mg and 300 mg caffeine, 20 mg amphetamine, and placebo to cocaine-dependent vs. healthy control subjects, matched on moderate caffeine use. Data were obtained on measures of cardiovascular effects, subjective drug effects (ARCI, VAS, DEQ), and a probabilistic reward-learning task sensitive to dopamine modulation. Levels of salivary caffeine and the primary caffeine metabolite paraxanthine were obtained on placebo and caffeine dosing days. Cardiovascular results revealed main effects of dose for diastolic blood pressure and heart rate; follow up tests showed that controls were most sensitive to 300 mg caffeine and 20 mg amphetamine; cocaine-dependent subjects were sensitive only to 300 mg caffeine. Subjective effects results revealed dose × time and dose × group interactions on the ARCI A, ARCI LSD, and VAS ‘elated’ scales; follow up tests did not show systematic differences between groups with regard to caffeine or d-amphetamine. Large between-group differences in salivary paraxanthine (but not salivary caffeine) levels were obtained under both caffeine doses. The cocaine-dependent group expressed significantly higher paraxanthine levels than controls under 150 mg and 3–4 fold greater levels under 300 mg at 90 min and 150 min post caffeine dose. However, these differences also covaried with cigarette smoking status (not balanced between groups), and nicotine smoking is known to alter caffeine/paraxanthine metabolism via cytochrome P450 enzymes. These preliminary data raise the possibility that adenosine antagonists may affect cocaine-dependent and non-dependent subjects differently. In conjunction with previous

  17. Effects of naloxone on upper airway collapsibility in normal sleeping subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Meurice, J. C.; Marc, I.; Sériès, F.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the possible influence of endorphin release on upper airway collapsibility the effects of naloxone, an opiate receptor antagonist, were measured. METHODS: The effects of naloxone on upper airway collapsibility were studied in five normal sleeping men in a pilot study. During a sleep fragmentation night the subjects received either naloxone or a volume matched saline placebo in a double blind crossover design. Critical pressure (Pcrit) was measured during a morning nap following sleep fragmentation. RESULTS: The plasma levels of endorphins increased during sleep fragmentation nights. Pcrit was significantly greater after placebo than after naloxone infusion. CONCLUSIONS: Naloxone may reduce upper airway collapsibility in normal sleeping subjects following sleep fragmentation. PMID:8795677

  18. Gender Differences in the Effect of Tobacco Use on Brain Phosphocreatine Levels in Methamphetamine Dependent Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Young-Hoon; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A.; Kondo, Douglas G.; Shi, Xian-Feng; Lundberg, Kelly J.; Hellem, Tracy L.; Huber, Rebekah S.; McGlade, Erin C.; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2015-01-01

    Background A high prevalence of tobacco smoking has been observed in methamphetamine users, but there have been no in vivo brain neurochemistry studies addressing gender effects of tobacco smoking in methamphetamine users. Methamphetamine addiction is associated with increased risk of depression and anxiety in females. There is increasing evidence that selective analogues of nicotine, a principal active component of tobacco smoking, may improve depression and cognitive performance in animals and humans. Objectives To investigate the effects of tobacco smoking and gender on brain phosphocreatine (PCr) levels, a marker of brain energy metabolism reported to be reduced in methamphetamine-dependent subjects. Methods Thirty female and twenty-seven male methamphetamine-dependent subjects were evaluated with phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) to measure PCr levels within the pregenual anterior cingulate, which has been implicated in methamphetamine neurotoxicity. Results Analysis of covariance revealed that there were statistically significant slope (PCr versus lifetime amount of tobacco smoking) differences between female and male methamphetamine-dependent subjects (p=0.03). In females, there was also a statistically significant interaction between lifetime amounts of tobacco smoking and methamphetamine in regard to PCr levels (p=0.01), which suggests that tobacco smoking may have a more significant positive impact on brain PCr levels in heavy, as opposed to light to moderate, methamphetamine-dependent females. Conclusion These results indicate that tobacco smoking has gender-specific effects in terms of increased anterior cingulate high energy PCr levels in methamphetamine-dependent subjects. Cigarette smoking in methamphetamine-dependent women, particularly those with heavy methamphetamine use, may have a potentially protective effect upon neuronal metabolism. PMID:25871447

  19. Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking and Cigarette Smoking: A Direct Comparison of Toxicant Exposure and Subjective Effects

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Caroline O.; Shihadeh, Alan; Weaver, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Waterpipe tobacco smoking is increasing worldwide and is believed by many users to be less harmful and addictive than cigarette smoking. In fact, waterpipe tobacco and cigarette smoke contain many of the same chemicals, and users are exposed to the dependence-producing drug nicotine as well as other smoke toxicants. The subjective effect profile of these 2 tobacco use methods has not been compared directly, though this information is relevant to understanding the risk of dependence development. Methods: Fifty-four participants who reported waterpipe and cigarette smoking completed 2, 45-min, counter-balanced sessions in which they completed a waterpipe use episode (mean smoking time = 43.3 min) or a cigarette (mean = 6.1 min). Outcome measures included plasma nicotine, carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), and subjective effects, including those relevant to predicting dependence potential. Results: Mean (±SEM) peak plasma nicotine concentration did not differ by session (waterpipe = 9.8 ± 1.0 ng/ml; cigarette = 9.4 ± 1.0 ng/ml). Mean peak COHb concentration differed significantly (waterpipe = 4.5% ± 0.3%; cigarette = 1.2% ± 0.1%). Subjective effect changes for waterpipe and cigarette were comparable in magnitude but often longer lived for waterpipe. Conclusions: Relative to a cigarette, waterpipe tobacco smoking was associated with similar peak nicotine exposure, 3.75-fold greater COHb, and 56-fold greater inhaled smoke volume. Waterpipe and cigarette influenced many of the same subjective effect measures. These findings are consistent with the conclusion that waterpipe tobacco smoking presents substantial risk of dependence, disease, and death, and they can be incorporated into prevention interventions that might help deter more adolescents and young adults from experimenting with an almost certainly lethal method of tobacco use. PMID:21127030

  20. Effects of practicing tandem gait with and without vibrotactile biofeedback in subjects with unilateral vestibular loss

    PubMed Central

    Dozza, Marco; Wall, Conrad; Peterka, Robert J.; Chiari, Lorenzo; Horak, Fay B.

    2008-01-01

    Subjects with unilateral vestibular loss exhibit motor control impairments as shown by body and limb deviation during gait. Biofeedback devices have been shown to improve stance postural control, especially when sensory information is limited by environmental conditions or pathologies such as unilateral vestibular loss. However, the extent to which biofeedback could improve motor performance or learning while practicing a dynamic task such as narrow gait is still unknown. In this cross-over design study, 9 unilateral vestibular loss subjects practiced narrow gait with and without wearing a trunk-tilt, biofeedback device in 2 practice sessions. The biofeedback device informed the subjects of their medial-lateral angular tilt and tilt velocity during gait via vibration of the trunk. From motion analysis and tilt data, the performance of the subjects practicing tandem gait were compared over time with and without biofeedback. By practicing tandem gait, subjects reduced their trunk-tilt, center of mass displacement, medial-lateral feet distance, and frequency of stepping error. In both groups, use of tactile biofeedback consistently increased postural stability during tandem gait, beyond the effects of practice alone. However, one single session of practice with biofeedback did not result in conclusive short-term after-effects consistent with short-term retention of motor performance without this additional biofeedback. Results from this study support the hypothesis that tactile biofeedback acts similar to natural sensory feedback to improve dynamic motor performance but does not facilitate a recalibration of motor performance to improve function after short-term use. PMID:18525145

  1. Effect of RAAS blockers on adverse clinical outcomes in high CVD risk subjects with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chaugai, Sandip; Sherpa, Lhamo Yanchang; Sepehry, Amir A.; Arima, Hisatomi; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have demonstrated that atrial fibrillation significantly increases the risk of adverse clinical outcomes in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects. Application of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers for prevention of recurrence of atrial fibrillation and adverse clinical outcomes in subjects with atrial fibrillation is a theoretically appealing concept. However, results of clinical trials evaluating the effect of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone blockers on adverse clinical outcomes in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects with atrial fibrillation remain inconclusive. A pooled study of 6 randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone blockers on subjects with atrial fibrillation was performed. A total of 6 randomized controlled trials enrolled a total of 53,510 patients followed for 1 to 5 years. RAAS blockade therapy was associated with 14% reduction in the incidence of heart failure (OR: 0.86, [95%CI: 0.76– 0.97], P=0.018) and 17% reduction in the incidence of CVE (OR: 0.83, [95%CI: 0.70–0.99], P = 0.038). The corresponding decline in absolute risk against heart failure (ARR: 1.4%, [95%CI: 0.2–2.6%], P = 0.018) and CVE (ARR: 3.5%, [95%CI: 0.0–6.9%], P = 0.045) in the AF group was much higher than the non-AF group for heart failure (ARR: 0.4%, [95%CI: 0.0–0.7%], P = 0.057) and CVE (ARR: 1.6%, [95%CI: –0.1% to 3.3%], P = 0.071). No significant effect was noted on all-cause or cardiovascular mortality, stroke, or myocardial infarction. This study suggests that RAAS blockade offers protection against heart failure and cardiovascular events in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects with atrial fibrillation. PMID:27368043

  2. Subjective and physiological effects of oromucosal sprays containing cannabinoids (nabiximols): potentials and limitations for psychosis research.

    PubMed

    Schoedel, Kerri A; Harrison, Sarah Jane

    2012-01-01

    Cannabis use is associated with a spectrum of effects including euphoria, relaxation, anxiety, perceptual alterations, paranoia, and impairments in attention and memory. Cannabis is made up of approximately 80 different cannabinoid compounds, which have synergistic or antagonistic effects on the principle active ingredient in cannabis, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The net overall effect of cannabis is thought to be related to the ratio of its composite constituents; in particular, the ratio of THC to cannabidiol (CBD). Since cannabinoids induce subjective and cognitive changes that share qualitative similarities with schizophrenia, cannabinoids have been used to model psychosis. Some limitations of cannabinoid models of psychosis include the relatively high variability in experiences between different individuals, the potential for inducing unwanted effects, such as toxic psychosis in study subjects, and the lack of data showing that effective anti-psychotic treatments can reverse the behavioural and cognitive/motor effects of cannabinoids. Nabiximols (Sativex®) is an oromucosal spray containing THC and CBD in an approximate 1:1 ratio. While not extensively studied, most studies confirm that nabiximols, despite the different route of administration and presence of CBD, have similar or slightly reduced subjective/cognitive effects compared to similar doses of oral THC. While the presence of CBD may have utility in some models, it is likely that the concentrations are not high enough to meaningfully affect those aspects important for psychosis research. This review suggests that while it may present an alternative to the use of oral THC, oromucosal nabiximols may not present substantial advantages for use in psychosis research. PMID:22716155

  3. The epidemiology of bovine respiratory disease: What is the evidence for predisposing factors?

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jared D.; Fulton, Robert W.; Lehenbauer, Terry W.; Step, Douglas L.; Confer, Anthony W.

    2010-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most costly disease of beef cattle in North America. It is multi-factorial, with a variety of physical and physiological stressors combining to predispose cattle to pneumonia. However, efforts to discern which factors are most important have frequently failed to establish definitive answers. Calves are at highest risk shortly after transport. Risk factors include purchasing from sale barns and commingling. It is unclear whether or not these practices increase susceptibility, increase exposure, or are proxies for poor management. Lighter-weight calves appear to be at greater risk, although this has not been consistent. Persistent infection (PI) with bovine virus diarrhea virus increases BRD occurrence, but it is unclear if PI calves affect other cattle in the feedlot. The complexity of BRD has made it difficult to define involvement of individual factors. Stressors may play a role as “necessary but not sufficient” components, requiring additive effects to cause disease. PMID:21197200

  4. Prestimulus oscillatory alpha power and connectivity patterns predispose perceptual integration of an audio and a tactile stimulus.

    PubMed

    Leonardelli, Elisa; Braun, Christoph; Weisz, Nathan; Lithari, Chrysa; Occelli, Valeria; Zampini, Massimiliano

    2015-09-01

    To efficiently perceive and respond to the external environment, our brain has to perceptually integrate or segregate stimuli of different modalities. The temporal relationship between the different sensory modalities is therefore essential for the formation of different multisensory percepts. In this magnetoencephalography study, we created a paradigm where an audio and a tactile stimulus were presented by an ambiguous temporal relationship so that perception of physically identical audiotactile stimuli could vary between integrated (emanating from the same source) and segregated. This bistable paradigm allowed us to compare identical bimodal stimuli that elicited different percepts, providing a possibility to directly infer multisensory interaction effects. Local differences in alpha power over bilateral inferior parietal lobules (IPLs) and superior parietal lobules (SPLs) preceded integrated versus segregated percepts of the two stimuli (audio and tactile). Furthermore, differences in long-range cortical functional connectivity seeded in rIPL (region of maximum difference) revealed differential patterns that predisposed integrated or segregated percepts encompassing secondary areas of all different modalities and prefrontal cortex. We showed that the prestimulus brain states predispose the perception of the audiotactile stimulus both in a global and a local manner. Our findings are in line with a recent consistent body of findings on the importance of prestimulus brain states for perception of an upcoming stimulus. This new perspective on how stimuli originating from different modalities are integrated suggests a non-modality specific network predisposing multisensory perception. PMID:26109518

  5. Effects of Daily Centrifugation on Segmental Fluid Distribution in Bed-rested Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diedrich, Andre; Moore, S. T.; Stenger, M.; Arya, T. M.; Newby, N.; Tucker, J. M.; Milstead, L.; Acock, K.; Knapp, C.; Jevans, J.; Paloski, W.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of daily centrifugation on segmental fluid distribution have been studied during 21 days of 6 degree head down bedrest. One group (N=7) underwent no countermeasure while the other (N=8) received a daily, one hour, dose (2.5 gz at the foot, decreasing to 1.0 gz at the heart) of artificial gravity (AG) training on the Johnson Space Center short radius centrifuge. Fluid shifts of thoracic(VTO), abdominal (VAB), thigh (VTH), and calf (VCA) regions were measured by the tetrapolar segmental body impedance technique. Untrained subjects reduced their total volume from 18.9 plus or minus 0.5L to 17.9 plus or minus 0.9L (MN plus or minus SE, P less than 0.05) while trained subjects maintained their total volume. In untrained, control, subjects after bed rest, there was a trend toward reduced volume in all segments, with significant reductions in thigh and calf (fig, P less than 0.05). Trained subjects maintained volume in all segments. Our data indicate that artificial gravity treatment counteracts bed rest-induced hypovolemia.

  6. Effect of adrenergic stimulation on clearance from small ciliated airways in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Svartengren, K; Philipson, K; Svartengren, M; Camner, P

    1998-01-01

    Mucociliary transport is an important clearance mechanism of larger airways, but in the smallest ciliated airways (bronchioles) it may be less effective. The present study aimed at investigating whether clearance from the bronchioles in subjects with healthy airways was stimulated by an adrenergic agonist (terbutaline sulphate). Tracheobronchial clearance was studied twice in 10 healthy subjects after inhalation of 6-micron (aerodynamic diameter) monodisperse Teflon particles labeled with 111In. At one exposure, oral treatment with terbutaline sulphate, known to stimulate clearance in large airways, began immediately after inhalation of the particles. The other exposure was a control measurement. The particles were inhaled at an extremely slow flow, 0.05 L/s, which gave deposition mainly in the small ciliated airways (bronchioles). Lung retention was measured at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h. Clearance was significant every 24 h for both exposures (p < .05, two-tailed paired t-test), with similar fractions of retained particles at all time points. During treatment with terbutaline sulphate, the subjects' pulse rates tended to be higher, but clearance rates did not increase. We found, as expected, no significant correlation between lung retention and lung function in either exposure. This study shows that an adrenergic agonist does not significantly influence overall clearance from the bronchiolar region in healthy subjects. This suggests that mucociliary transport does not significantly contribute to clearance from the smallest ciliated airways. Other mechanisms may be more important for the transportation of mucus from these airways. PMID:9555573

  7. Subjective Significance Shapes Arousal Effects on Modified Stroop Task Performance: A Duality of Activation Mechanisms Account.

    PubMed

    Imbir, Kamil K

    2016-01-01

    Activation mechanisms such as arousal are known to be responsible for slowdown observed in the Emotional Stroop and modified Stroop tasks. Using the duality of mind perspective, we may conclude that both ways of processing information (automatic or controlled) should have their own mechanisms of activation, namely, arousal for an experiential mind, and subjective significance for a rational mind. To investigate the consequences of both, factorial manipulation was prepared. Other factors that influence Stroop task processing such as valence, concreteness, frequency, and word length were controlled. Subjective significance was expected to influence arousal effects. In the first study, the task was to name the color of font for activation charged words. In the second study, activation charged words were, at the same time, combined with an incongruent condition of the classical Stroop task around a fixation point. The task was to indicate the font color for color-meaning words. In both studies, subjective significance was found to shape the arousal impact on performance in terms of the slowdown reduction for words charged with subjective significance. PMID:26869974

  8. Subjective Significance Shapes Arousal Effects on Modified Stroop Task Performance: A Duality of Activation Mechanisms Account

    PubMed Central

    Imbir, Kamil K.

    2016-01-01

    Activation mechanisms such as arousal are known to be responsible for slowdown observed in the Emotional Stroop and modified Stroop tasks. Using the duality of mind perspective, we may conclude that both ways of processing information (automatic or controlled) should have their own mechanisms of activation, namely, arousal for an experiential mind, and subjective significance for a rational mind. To investigate the consequences of both, factorial manipulation was prepared. Other factors that influence Stroop task processing such as valence, concreteness, frequency, and word length were controlled. Subjective significance was expected to influence arousal effects. In the first study, the task was to name the color of font for activation charged words. In the second study, activation charged words were, at the same time, combined with an incongruent condition of the classical Stroop task around a fixation point. The task was to indicate the font color for color-meaning words. In both studies, subjective significance was found to shape the arousal impact on performance in terms of the slowdown reduction for words charged with subjective significance. PMID:26869974

  9. Effective Inclusion of e-Learning in a Subject of Physics Experiments: Introductory Electronics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, T.; Abe, K.; Yamazaki, N.; Ooe, A.; Igarashi, K.; Hayashi, S.; Suzuki, M.

    2010-07-01

    A Web-based e-Learning homework system was introduced in the undergraduate subject of the introductory electronics experiment; "Introductory Electronics Laboratory". This homework is appended to practical trainings and face-to-face guidance in the laboratory (blended-type e-Learning). The e-Learning is mainly prepared to teach basic electronics and to guide necessary apparatus before the practical training. The overall impression about this subject in students' questionnaires has improved from 3.5 for 2005/2006 (e-Learning not introduced) to 3.9 2007/2008 (e-Learning introduced) (5 for good, 3 for average, and 1 for bad). Students understanding of the experiments has also improved from 3.43 for 2005/2006 to 3.45 for 2007/2008 (5, 4, 3, 2 for S, A, B, C grade). This subject is compulsory for all second-year students in our department (˜120 students). The e-Learning system in our case is considered to be effective especially for required subjects of experiments and large classes.

  10. Effects of hypercapnia and hypocapnia on respiratory resistance in normal and asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    van den Elshout, F J; van Herwaarden, C L; Folgering, H T

    1991-01-01

    The effects of hypercapnia and hypocapnia on respiratory resistance were studied in 15 healthy subjects and 30 asthmatic subjects. Respiratory resistance (impedance) was measured with the pseudo-random noise forced oscillation technique while the subjects rebreathed from a wet spirometer in a closed respiratory circuit in which end tidal carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) could be controlled. Hypercapnia was induced by partially short circuiting the carbon dioxide absorber, and hypocapnia by voluntary hyperventilation. The circulating air was saturated with water vapour and kept at body temperature and ambient pressure. A rise of end tidal PCO2 of 1 kPa caused a significant fall in respiratory resistance in both normal and asthmatic subjects (15% and 9% respectively). A fall of PCO2 of 1 kPa did not cause any significant change in impedance in the control group. In the asthmatic patients resistance increased by 13%, reactance fell by 45%, and the frequency dependence of resistance rose 240%. These findings confirm that hypocapnia may contribute to airway obstruction in asthmatic patients, even when water and heat loss are prevented. PMID:1908137

  11. Effects of external feedback about body tilt: Influence on the Subjective Proprioceptive Horizon.

    PubMed

    Bringoux, L; Bourdin, C; Nougier, V; Raphel, C

    2006-11-01

    The present study investigated a cognitive aspect upon spatial perception, namely the impact of a true or false verbal feedback (FB) about the magnitude of body tilt on Subjective Proprioceptive Horizon (SPH) estimates. Subjects were asked to set their extended arm normal to gravity for different pitch body tilts up to 9 degrees . True FB were provided at all body tilt angles, whereas false FB were provided only at 6 degrees backward and 6 degrees forward body tilts for half of the trials. Our data confirmed previous results about the egocentric influence of body tilt itself upon SPH: estimates were linearly lowered with forward tilts and elevated with backward tilts. In addition, results showed a significant effect of the nature of the external FB provided to the subjects. When subjects received a false FB inducing a 3 degrees forward bias relative to physical body tilt, they set their SPH consequently higher than when they received a false FB inducing a 3 degrees backward bias. These findings clearly indicated that false cognitive information about body tilt might significantly modify the judgement of a geocentric direction of space, such as the SPH. This may have deleterious repercussions in aeronautics when pilots have to localize external objects relative to earth-based directions in darkened environments. PMID:16982145

  12. Variation in Telangiectasia Predisposing Genes Is Associated With Overall Radiation Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Tanteles, George A.; Murray, Robert J.S.; Mills, Jamie; Barwell, Julian; Chakraborti, Prabir; Chan, Steve; Cheung, Kwok-Leung; Ennis, Dawn; Khurshid, Nazish; Lambert, Kelly; Machhar, Rohan; Meisuria, Mitul; Osman, Ahmed; Peat, Irene; Sahota, Harjinder; Woodings, Pamela; Talbot, Christopher J.; and others

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In patients receiving radiotherapy for breast cancer where the heart is within the radiation field, cutaneous telangiectasiae could be a marker of potential radiation-induced heart disease. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes known to cause heritable telangiectasia-associated disorders could predispose to such late, normal tissue vascular damage. Methods and Materials: The relationship between cutaneous telangiectasia as a late normal tissue radiation injury phenotype in 633 breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy was examined. Patients were clinically assessed for the presence of cutaneous telangiectasia and genotyped at nine SNPs in three candidate genes. Candidate SNPs were within the endoglin (ENG) and activin A receptor, type II-like 1 (ACVRL1) genes, mutations in which cause hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene associated with ataxia-telangiectasia. Results: A total of 121 (19.1%) patients exhibited a degree of cutaneous telangiectasiae on clinical examination. Regression was used to examine the associations between the presence of telangiectasiae in patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery, controlling for the effects of boost and known brassiere size (n=388), and individual geno- or haplotypes. Inheritance of ACVRL1 SNPs marginally contributed to the risk of cutaneous telangiectasiae. Haplotypic analysis revealed a stronger association between inheritance of a ATM haplotype and the presence of cutaneous telangiectasiae, fibrosis and overall toxicity. No significant association was observed between telangiectasiae and the coinheritance of the candidate ENG SNPs. Conclusions: Genetic variation in the ATM gene influences reaction to radiotherapy through both vascular damage and increased fibrosis. The predisposing variation in the ATM gene will need to be better defined to optimize it as a predictive marker for assessing radiotherapy late effects.

  13. The effectiveness and practicality of occupational stress management interventions: a survey of subject matter expert opinions.

    PubMed

    Bellarosa, C; Chen, P Y

    1997-07-01

    Stress management (SM) subject matter experts (SMEs) evaluated 6 widely used occupational SM interventions (relaxation, physical fitness, cognitive restructuring, meditation, assertiveness training, and stress inoculation) on the basis of 10 practicality criteria and 7 effectiveness objectives. Relaxation was evaluated overall as the most practical intervention, while meditation and stress inoculation were judged as the least practical. Physical fitness was chosen to be the most effective intervention, while both meditation and assertiveness training were rated overall as the least effective. The findings also revealed that the SMEs considered history of success and duration of effect, rather than "relevance to program objectives," as the most important factors when selecting SM interventions. Incongruence between effectiveness ratings and actual choices of interventions are discussed. PMID:9552295

  14. The Alu-Rich Genomic Architecture of SPAST Predisposes to Diverse and Functionally Distinct Disease-Associated CNV Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Yuan, Bo; Campbell, Ian M.; Scull, Jennifer C.; Withers, Marjorie A.; Baggett, Brett C.; Beck, Christine R.; Shaw, Christine J.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Moretti, Paolo; Goodwin, Wendy E.; Hein, Nichole; Fink, John K.; Seong, Moon-Woo; Seo, Soo Hyun; Park, Sung Sup; Karbassi, Izabela D.; Batish, Sat Dev; Ordóñez-Ugalde, Andrés; Quintáns, Beatriz; Sobrido, María-Jesús; Stemmler, Susanne; Lupski, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Intragenic copy-number variants (CNVs) contribute to the allelic spectrum of both Mendelian and complex disorders. Although pathogenic deletions and duplications in SPAST (mutations in which cause autosomal-dominant spastic paraplegia 4 [SPG4]) have been described, their origins and molecular consequences remain obscure. We mapped breakpoint junctions of 54 SPAST CNVs at nucleotide resolution. Diverse combinations of exons are deleted or duplicated, highlighting the importance of particular exons for spastin function. Of the 54 CNVs, 38 (70%) appear to be mediated by an Alu-based mechanism, suggesting that the Alu-rich genomic architecture of SPAST renders this locus susceptible to various genome rearrangements. Analysis of breakpoint Alus further informs a model of Alu-mediated CNV formation characterized by small CNV size and potential involvement of mechanisms other than homologous recombination. Twelve deletions (22%) overlap part of SPAST and a portion of a nearby, directly oriented gene, predicting novel chimeric genes in these subjects’ genomes. cDNA from a subject with a SPAST final exon deletion contained multiple SPAST:SLC30A6 fusion transcripts, indicating that SPAST CNVs can have transcriptional effects beyond the gene itself. SLC30A6 has been implicated in Alzheimer disease, so these fusion gene data could explain a report of spastic paraplegia and dementia cosegregating in a family with deletion of the final exon of SPAST. Our findings provide evidence that the Alu genomic architecture of SPAST predisposes to diverse CNV alleles with distinct transcriptional—and possibly phenotypic—consequences. Moreover, we provide further mechanistic insights into Alu-mediated copy-number change that are extendable to other loci. PMID:25065914

  15. Effect of cisapride on the gastrointestinal transit of a solid meal in normal human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, C A; Holden, S; Brown, C; Read, N W

    1987-01-01

    The effect of cisapride, a new gastrointestinal prokinetic agent, on the transit of a standard meal through the stomach, small intestine and colon was studied in 10 normal subjects. Cisapride had no significant effect on gastric emptying but decreased mouth to caecum transit time (p less than 0.01). Stool weight and frequency were not significantly increased but the time for the first appearance of stool markers and the arrival of 20% and 50% of stool markers was decreased after cisapride (p less than 0.05). PMID:3817579

  16. Cognitive, psychomotor, and subjective effects of sodium oxybate and triazolam in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Griffiths, Roland R.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Illicit gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has received attention as a “date rape drug” that produces robust amnesia; however, there is little experimental evidence in support of GHB’s amnestic effects. Objectives This study compared the cognitive effects of GHB (sodium oxybate) with those of triazolam in healthy volunteers. Materials and methods Doses of sodium oxybate (1.125, 2.25, and 4.5 g/70 kg), triazolam (0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 mg/70 kg), and placebo were administered to 15 volunteers under repeated measures, counterbalanced, double-blind, double-dummy conditions. The time course and peak physiological, psychomotor, subjective, and cognitive effects were examined. Results Sodium oxybate and triazolam produced similar increases in participant ratings of drug effects. Performance on psychomotor, working memory, and episodic memory tasks was impaired to a greater extent after triazolam than sodium oxybate. Conclusions Together, these data suggest that sodium oxybate produces less psychomotor and cognitive impairment than triazolam at doses that produce equivalent participant-rated subjective effects in healthy volunteers. PMID:19543883

  17. TNXB locus may be a candidate gene predisposing to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wei, J; Hemmings, G P

    2004-02-15

    We report here on the detection of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near to the NOTCH4 locus in the search for schizophrenia susceptibility genes in the class III region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We totally analyzed 122 family trios recruited in the UK. The TDT analysis demonstrated that of the nine SNPs, three were associated with schizophrenia, including rs1009382 (P = 0.00047), rs204887 (P = 0.007), and rs8283 (P = 0.015). Both rs1009382 and rs204887 are present in the TNXB locus. The rs1009382 is a non-synonymous SNP located in exon 23 of the gene and its A to G base change causes a Glu2578Gly substitution. The goodness-of-fit test showed that genotypic distribution of rs1009382 was deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium due to homozygote excess in the patient group (P = 0.01), suggesting that a double dose of a genetic risk may be involved. Possibly, rs1009382 is a candidate SNP predisposing to a schizophrenic illness. Moreover, the test for linkage disequilibrium (LD) between paired SNPs showed that the nine SNPs studied may be in the same LD block with an unexpected pattern as the strength of LD was not correlated with the distance between paired SNPs. The haplotype analysis suggested that there might be more than one disease-related allele located in the class III region of the MHC, and that these alleles possibly confer either susceptibility or resistance to schizophrenia. PMID:14755442

  18. Somatic Overgrowth Predisposes to Seizures in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brachini, Francesca; Apicella, Fabio; Cosenza, Angela; Ferrari, Anna Rita; Guerrini, Renzo; Muratori, Filippo; Romano, Maria Francesca; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Tancredi, Raffaella; Sicca, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Background Comorbidity of Autism Spectrum Disorders with seizures or abnormal EEG (Autism-Epilepsy Phenotype) suggests shared pathomechanisms, and might be a starting point to identify distinct populations within the clinical complexity of the autistic spectrum. In this study, we tried to assess whether distinct subgroups, having distinctive clinical hallmarks, emerge from this comorbid condition. Methods Two-hundred and six individuals with idiopathic Autism Spectrum Disorders were subgrouped into three experimental classes depending on the presence of seizures and EEG abnormalities. Neurobehavioral, electroclinical and auxological parameters were investigated to identify differences among groups and features which increase the risk of seizures. Our statistical analyses used ANOVA, post-hoc multiple comparisons, and the Chi-squared test to analyze continuous and categorical variables. A correspondence analysis was also used to decompose significant Chi-squared and reduce variables dimensions. Results The high percentage of children with seizures (28.2% of our whole cohort) and EEG abnormalities (64.1%) confirmed that the prevalence of epilepsy in Autism Spectrum Disorders exceeds that of the general population. Seizures were associated with severe intellectual disability, and not with autism severity. Interestingly, tall stature (without macrocephaly) was significantly associated with EEG abnormalities or later onset seizures. However, isolated macrocephaly was equally distributed among groups or associated with early onset seizures when accompanied by tall stature. Conclusions Tall stature seems to be a phenotypic “biomarker” of susceptibility to EEG abnormalities or late epilepsy in Autism Spectrum Disorders and, when concurring with macrocephaly, predisposes to early onset seizures. Growth pattern might act as an endophenotypic marker in Autism-Epilepsy comorbidity, delineating distinct pathophysiological subtypes and addressing personalized diagnostic work

  19. Effect of Painful and Non-Painful Sensorimotor Manipulations on Subjective Body Midline

    PubMed Central

    Bouffard, Jason; Gagné, Martin; Mercier, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic pain often show disturbances in their body perception. Understanding the exact role played by pain is however complex, as confounding factors can contribute to the observed deficits in these clinical populations. To address this question, acute experimental pain was used to test the effect of lateralized pain on body perception in healthy subjects. Subjects were asked to indicate the position of their body midline (subjective body midline, SBM) by stopping a moving luminescent dot projected on a screen placed in front of them, in a completely dark environment. The effect of other non-painful sensorimotor manipulations was also tested to assess the potential unspecific attentional effects of stimulating one side of the body. SBM judgment was made in 17 volunteers under control and three experimental conditions: (1) painful (heat) stimulation; (2) non-painful vibrotactile stimulation; and (3) muscle contraction. The effects of the stimulated side and the type of trial (control vs. experimental condition), were tested separately for each condition with a 2 × 2 repeated measures ANOVA. The analyses revealed a significant interaction in both pain (p = 0.05) and vibration conditions (p = 0.04). Post hoc tests showed opposite effects of pain and vibration. Pain applied on the right arm deviated the SBM toward the right (stimulated) side (p = 0.03) while vibration applied on the left arm deviated the SBM toward the right (not stimulated) side (p = 0.01). These opposite patterns suggest that the shift in SBM is likely to be specifically linked to the stimulation modality. It is concluded that acute experimental pain can induce an SBM shift toward the stimulated side, which might be functionally beneficial to protect the painful area of the body. Interestingly, it appears to be easier to bias SBM toward the right side, regardless of the modality and of the stimulated side. PMID:23504448

  20. Effect of ozone inhalation on the response to nasal challenge with antigen of allergic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Bascom, R.; Naclerio, R.M.; Fitzgerald, T.K.; Kagey-Sobotka, A.; Proud, D. )

    1990-09-01

    The effect of oxidant inhalation on allergic illness is of interest because allergic patients often report increased respiratory symptoms during episodes of poor air quality, and epidemiologic studies demonstrate an association between increased levels of the air pollutant ozone and exacerbations of asthma. The purpose of this study was to characterize the upper respiratory response to ozone inhalation in asymptomatic, allergic subjects and to determine whether ozone pre-exposure increased the acute response to nasal challenge with antigen in these subjects. A group of 12 asymptomatic subjects with a history of allergic rhinitis were exposed in a randomized, cross-over design, at rest, on each of 2 days, separated by 2 wk, to 4 h of clean air or 0.5 ppm ozone in an environmental chamber. Following the exposure period, subjects underwent nasal challenge with four doses of antigen (1 to 1,000 PNU ragweed or grass). Symptoms were rated and nasal lavage performed after each dose. Measurement of histamine and albumin concentration and TAME-esterase activity and determination of cell counts and differentials were performed. Exposure to ozone caused significant increases in upper and lower respiratory symptoms, a mixed inflammatory cell influx with a sevenfold increase in naval lavage neutrophils, a 20-fold increase in eosinophils, and a tenfold increase in mononuclear cells, as well as an apparent sloughing of epithelial cells. There was a significant increase in nasal lavage albumin concentration on the ozone exposure day and a small increase in nasal lavage histamine concentration on both the ozone and clean air exposure days. TAME-esterase activity showed no significant increase overall, but increased at least twofold in 5 of 12 subjects.

  1. Effect of antiorthostatic BedRest (BR) on GastroIntestinal Motility (GIM) of normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Hunter, R. P.; Tietze, K. J.; Cintron, N. M.

    1992-01-01

    The combined effects of postural changes, fluid shifts and diuresis associated with the absence of the gravity vector may decrease gastrointestinal motility (GIM) during space flight. GIM can be estimated from the mouth to cecum transit time (MCTT) of orally administered lactulose (LAC); this test is used to assess changes in GIM in normal subjects and in patients with GI pathology and related disease conditions. Since bedrest (BR) mimics some of the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the effect of ten days of BR on GIM was evaluated from the MCTT of LAC. Methods: Subjects were 12 nonsmoking males between the ages of 35 and 50. After an 8-10 hour fast, subjects ingested Cephulac (registered) (20 g solution) with a low-fiber breakfast on four different days (45, 30, 25, and 20) before BR and on three separate days (4, 7, and 10) during BR. Breath-H2 concentrations were measured before and at 10 minute intervals for 4 hours after breakfast using a Quintron breathalyzer and MCTT was determined from these data. Results: MCTT ranged between 10 and 122 minutes during ambulation and 80 to 120 minutes during BR with means of 79 minutes and 122 minutes respectively. Conclusion: Mean MCTT during BR was 54 percent longer than during ambulation, suggesting that absorption and availability of orally administered medications and nutrients may be delayed or impaired as a result of decreased GIM during bedrest.

  2. Ingroup favoritism or the black sheep effect: Perceived intentions modulate subjective responses to aggressive interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zheng, Jiehui; Meng, Liang; Lu, Qiang; Ma, Qingguo

    2016-07-01

    Social categorization plays an important role in provoking the victim's responses to aggressive interactions. Pioneering studies suggested that uncertainty in the perpetrator's hostile intention influences whether ingroup favoritism or the black sheep effect (ingroup strictness) will be manifested to a greater extent. However, when the hostile intention is ambiguous, subjective perception of the perpetrator's intention may still be quite different due to the inherent information gap between participants, and this discrepancy in perceived intentions may further modulate subjective responses to social aggression. In the present study, subjects played as responders of the Ultimatum Game, and received varied offers proposed by either ingroup or outgroup members. Electrophysiological results showed that, when proposers were perceived to be intentional, unfair offers from ingroups elicited significantly larger Feedback-related Negativity (FRN) than those from outgroups, potentially providing neural evidence for the black sheep effect. The opposite FRN pattern was observed when proposers were perceived to be unintentional, which might suggest ingroup favoritism. Interestingly, despite contrary neural patterns, perceived intentions did not modulate behavioral response to aggressive interactions. Thus, converging results suggested that, when the perpetrator's hostile intention remained ambiguous, perceived intentions modulated the victim's electrophysiological response while not the rational behavioral response to aggressive interactions. PMID:26851770

  3. Effects of Incentive Spirometry on Respiratory Motion in Healthy Subjects Using Cine Breathing Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Tsutomu; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Nagaya, Shigeyuki; Sonoda, Masaru; Tanaka, Yuji; Katogi, Takehide; Nemoto, Tetsuharu; Minami, Shohei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of incentive spirometry on respiratory motion in healthy subjects using cine breathing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Ten non-smoking healthy subjects without any history of respiratory disease were studied. Subjects were asked to perform pulmonary training using incentive spirometry every day for two weeks. To assess the effectiveness of this training, pulmonary function tests and cine breathing MRI were performed before starting pulmonary training and two weeks after its completion. Results After training, there were significant improvements in vital capacity (VC) from 3.58±0.8 L to 3.74±0.8 L and in %VC from 107.4±10.8 to 112.1±8.2. Significant changes were observed in the right diaphragm motion, right chest wall motion, and left chest wall motion, which were increased from 55.7±9.6 mm to 63.4±10.2 mm, from 15.6±6.1 mm to 23.4±10.4 mm, and from 16.3±7.6 mm to 22.0±9.8 mm, respectively. Conclusion Two weeks of training using incentive spirometry provided improvements in pulmonary function and respiratory motion, which suggested that incentive spirometry may be a useful preoperative modality for improving pulmonary function during the perioperative period. PMID:26161341

  4. Improved clinical tolerance to chronic lactose ingestion in subjects with lactose intolerance: a placebo effect?

    PubMed Central

    Briet, F; Pochart, P; Marteau, P; Flourie, B; Arrigoni, E; Rambaud, J

    1997-01-01

    Background—Uncontrolled studies of lactose intolerant subjects have shown that symptom severity decreases after chronic lactose consumption. Adaptation of the colonic flora might explain this improvement. 
Aims—To compare the effects of regular administration of either lactose or sucrose on clinical tolerance and bacterial adaptation to lactose. 
Methods—Forty six lactose intolerant subjects underwent two 50 g lactose challenges on days 1 and 15. Between these days they were given 34 g of lactose or sucrose per day, in a double blind protocol. Stool samples were obtained on days 0 and 14, to measure faecal β-galactosidase and pH. Symptoms, breath H2 excretion, faecal weight and electrolytes, and orofaecal transit time were assessed. 
Results—Except for faecal weight, symptoms were significantly milder during the second challenge in both groups, and covariance analysis showed no statistical difference between them. In the lactose group, but not in the sucrose group, faecal β-galactosidase activity increased, pH dropped, and breath H2 excretion decreased. 
Conclusion—Bacterial adaptation occurred when lactose intolerant subjects ingested lactose for 13 days, and all symptoms except diarrhoea regressed. Clinical improvement was also observed in the control group which displayed no signs of metabolic adaptation. This suggests that improved clinical tolerance may be just a placebo effect. 

 Keywords: lactose; lactose intolerance; colonic adaptation; lactase deficiency PMID:9414969

  5. Absence of respiratory effects in subjects exposed to low concentrations of TDI and MDI

    SciTech Connect

    Musk, A.W.; Peters, J.M.; DiBerardinis, L.; Murphy, R.L.

    1982-10-01

    One hundred seven subjects from a polyurethane plastic manufacturing plant have been followed over a five-year period with measurements of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), and questionnaires on respiratory symptoms and smoking habits. Environmental concentrations of toluene diisocyanate and diphenyl methyl diisocyanate were extensively monitored to provide accurate estimates of the upper-limits of exposure of the subjects. Current mean levels of FEV1 in this population were higher than those predicted for healthy subjects. The five-year change in FEV1 did not exceed that expected from aging. No acute change in FEV1 could be demonstrated over the course of a Monday either before or after a two-week vacation. No improvement in ventilatory function was observed over the vacation period. The presence of cough or sputum was related to smoking but was not related to isocyanate exposure. The results indicate that exposure of workers to extremely low levels of isocyanates (time-weighted average concentrations of the order of 0.001 parts per million (ppm)) is not associated with chronic respiratory symptoms or effects on ventilatory capacity. The results suggest that isocyanates can be controlled to the point of eliminating effects as measured by these techniques.

  6. Potential Subjective Effectiveness of Active Interior Noise Control in Propeller Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2000-01-01

    Active noise control technology offers the potential for weight-efficient aircraft interior noise reduction, particularly for propeller aircraft. However, there is little information on how passengers respond to this type of interior noise control. This paper presents results of two experiments that use sound quality engineering practices to determine the subjective effectiveness of hypothetical active noise control (ANC) systems in a range of propeller aircraft. The two experiments differed by the type of judgments made by the subjects: pair comparisons based on preference in the first and numerical category scaling of noisiness in the second. Although the results of the two experiments were in general agreement that the hypothetical active control measures improved the interior noise environments, the pair comparison method appears to be more sensitive to subtle changes in the characteristics of the sounds which are related to passenger preference. The reductions in subjective response due to the ANC conditions were predicted with reasonable accuracy by reductions in measured loudness level. Inclusion of corrections for the sound quality characteristics of tonality and fluctuation strength in multiple regression models improved the prediction of the ANC effects.

  7. Effect of weightlessness and centrifugation on red cell survival in rats subjected to space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. A.; Serova, L. V.; Landaw, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    Rats were flown aboard the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos 936 for 18.5 d during August, 1977. Five rats were subjected to near-weightless space flight, as with Cosmos 782, and five rats were subjected to a 1-G force via an on-board centrifuge. These rats and three control groups were injected with 2-(C-14) glycine 19 d preflight. The flight rats were recovered from orbit after 18.5 d of space flight. Erythrocyte hemolysis and lifespan were evaluated in the five groups of rats by quantitation of radioactive carbon monoxide exhaled in the breath which arises from the breakdown of the previously labeled hemoglobin. The results support the previous findings wherein hemolysis was found to increase as a result of weightless space flight. A comparison to the centrifuged animals indicates that artificial gravity attenuates the effect of weightlessness on hemolysis and appears to normalize the hemolytic rate in the early postflight period.

  8. Effects of piretanide, bumetanide and frusemide on electrolyte and urate excretion in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C J; Homeida, M; Roberts, F; Bogie, W

    1978-08-01

    1. The pharmacological actions of a new short acting loop diuretic were investigated in nine healthy male subjects and compared with those of frusemide and bumetanide. Subjects received 6 mg piretanide/day, 40 mg frusemide/day or 1 mg bumetanide/day for a period of 1 week. 2. Comparison of effects following the first dose administered showed that 6 mg piretanide is of similar potency to 40 mg frusemide in terms of diuresis, natriuresis and kaliuresis but is less potent than 1 mg bumetanide. 3. All three diuretics caused a decrease in urate excretion and a rise in serum uric acid. 4. Piretanide was well tolerated. Further investigation is required to ascertain what clinical advantage it offers over frusemide and bumetanide. PMID:678389

  9. Effects of blocked versus random practice by mentally retarded subjects on learning a novel skill.

    PubMed

    Heitman, R J; Gilley, W F

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of different practice conditions on mentally retarded subjects learning a novel task. 20 subjects with a mean IQ of 51.82 were randomly assigned to one of two practice conditions. The first group practiced at three different speeds (60, 30, and 15 rpm) on the pursuit rotor using a block arrangement in which each speed was practiced for five consecutive trials of 20 sec. duration before practicing at the next speed. The second group used random practice performing 15 trials of the pursuit rotor so three speeds were randomly distributed over the 15 trials. Both groups on the next day performed 15 trials of 20 sec. duration on the pursuit rotor at the transfer speed of 45 rpm. Analysis showed no significant differences among practice conditions which provided 10 min. of experience prior to test. PMID:2812988

  10. Effect of repeated US stimulation on adiponectin secretion by adipocytes of obese human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasutomo; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Satoh, Masaaki; Irie, Takasuke; Itoh, Kouichi

    2006-05-01

    To clarify the effect of the repeated sonication on the adiponectin secretion by adipocytes obtained from obese subjects. Using 1-MHz continuous-wave ultrasound at an intensity of 0.50 or 2.1 W/cm2, we sonicated culture flasks of subcutaneous adipocytes obtained from obese human subjects, in a series of 3 sessions of US stimulation applied for a daily total of 15 min. For the measurement of adiponectin secretion, 50 μl of the culture medium was collected from each flask every 24 h after the 1st stimulation. Quantification of adiponectin protein levels in cell culture supernatants was performed with a commercially available ELISA kit recommended by the manufacturer. The adiponectin concentrations in the culture medium of the US stimulation groups rose significantly (p<0.05). Repeated US stimulation may accelerate adiponectin secretion in obese human adipocytes.

  11. The Estimation of Branching Curves in the Presence of Subject-Specific Random Effects

    PubMed Central

    Elmi, Angelo; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Guo, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    Branching curves are a technique for modeling curves that change trajectory at a change (branching) point. Currently, the estimation framework is limited to independent data, and smoothing splines are used for estimation. This article aims to extend the branching curve framework to the longitudinal data setting where the branching point varies by subject. If the branching point is modeled as a random effect, then the longitudinal branching curve framework is a Semiparametric Nonlinear Mixed Effects Model. Given existing issues with using random effects within a smoothing spline, we express the model as a B-spline Based Semiparametric Nonlinear Mixed Effects Model. Simple, clever smoothness constraints are enforced on the B-splines at the change point. The method is applied to Women’s Health data where we model the shape of the labor curve (cervical dilation measured longitudinally) before and after treatment with oxytocin (a labor stimulant). PMID:25196299

  12. The effect of subject characteristics and respirator features on respirator fit.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ziqing; Coffey, Christopher C; Ann, Roland Berry

    2005-12-01

    A recent study was conducted to compare five fit test methods for screening out poor-fitting N95 filtering-facepiece respirators. Eighteen models of NIOSH-certified, N95 filtering-facepiece respirators were used to assess the fit test methods by using a simulated workplace protection factor (SWPF) test. The purpose of this companion study was to investigate the effect of subject characteristics (gender and face dimensions) and respirator features on respirator fit. The respirator features studied were design style (folding and cup style) and number of sizes available (one size fits all, two sizes, and three sizes). Thirty-three subjects participated in this study. Each was measured for 12 face dimensions using traditional calipers and tape. From this group, 25 subjects with face size categories 1 to 10 tested each respirator. The SWPF test protocol entailed using the PortaCount Plus to determine a SWPF based on total penetration (face-seal leakage plus filter penetration) while the subject performed six simulated workplace movements. Six tests were conducted for each subject/respirator model combination with redonning between tests. The respirator design style (folding style and cup style) did not have a significant effect on respirator fit in this study. The number of respirator sizes available for a model had significant impact on respirator fit on the panel for cup-style respirators with one and two sizes available. There was no significant difference in the geometric mean fit factor between male and female subjects for 16 of the 18 respirator models. Subsets of one to six face dimensions were found to be significantly correlated with SWPFs (p < 0.05) in 16 of the 33 respirator model/respirator size combinations. Bigonial breadth, face width, face length, and nose protrusion appeared the most in subsets (five or six) of face dimensions and their multiple linear regression coefficients were significantly different from zero (p < 0.05). Lip length was found in

  13. Black/white differences in prenatal care utilization: an assessment of predisposing and enabling factors.

    PubMed Central

    LaVeist, T A; Keith, V M; Gutierrez, M L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This article reports on analysis of the predisposing and enabling factors that affect black/white differences in utilization of prenatal care services. DATA SOURCES. We use a secondary data source from a survey conducted by the Michigan Department of Public Health. STUDY DESIGN. The study uses multivariate analysis methods to examine black/white differences in (1) total number of prenatal care visits, (2) timing of start of prenatal care, and (3) adequacy of care received. We use the model advanced by Aday, Andersen, and Fleming (1980) to examine the effect of enabling and predisposing factors on black/white differences in prenatal care utilization. DATA COLLECTION. A questionnaire was administered to all women who delivered in Michigan hospitals with an obstetrical unit. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Enabling factors fully accounted for black/white differences in timing of start of prenatal care; however, the model could not fully account for black/white differences in the total number or the adequacy of prenatal care received. CONCLUSION. Although there are no black/white differences in the initiation of prenatal care, black women are still less likely to receive adequate care as measured by the Kessner index, or to have as many total prenatal care contacts as white women. It is possible that barriers within the health care system that could not be assessed in this study may account for the differences we observed. Future research should consider the characteristics of the health care system that may account for the unwillingness or inability of black women to continue to receive care once they initiate prenatal care. PMID:7721584

  14. Effects of subjective preference of colors on attention-related occipital theta oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    Human daily behaviors are often affected by subjective preferences. Studies have shown that physical responses are affected by unconscious preferences before conscious decision making. Accordingly, attention-related neural activities could be influenced by unconscious preferences. However, few neurological data exist on the relationship between visual attention and subjective preference. To address this issue, we focused on lateralization during visual attention and investigated the effects of subjective color preferences on visual attention-related brain activities. We recorded electroencephalograph (EEG) data during a preference judgment task that required 19 participants to choose their preferred color from 2 colors simultaneously presented to the right and left hemifields. In addition, to identify oscillatory activity during visual attention, we conducted a control experiment in which the participants focused on either the right or the left color without stating their preference. The EEG results showed enhanced theta (4-6 Hz) and decreased alpha (10-12 Hz) activities in the right and left occipital electrodes when the participants focused on the color in the opposite hemifield. Occipital theta synchronizations also increased contralaterally to the hemifield to which the preferred color was presented, whereas the alpha desynchronizations showed no lateralization. The contralateral occipital theta activity lasted longer than the ipsilateral occipital theta activity. Interestingly, theta lateralization was observed even when the preferred color was presented to the unattended side in the control experiment, revealing the strength of the preference-related theta-modulation effect irrespective of visual attention. These results indicate that subjective preferences modulate visual attention-related brain activities. PMID:21820064

  15. Effects of covert subject actions on percent body fat by air-displacement plethsymography.

    PubMed

    Tegenkamp, Michelle H; Clark, R Randall; Schoeller, Dale A; Landry, Greg L

    2011-07-01

    Air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) is used for estimation of body composition, however, some individuals, such as athletes in weight classification sports, may use covert methods during ADP testing to alter their apparent percent body fat. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of covert subject actions on percent body fat measured by ADP. Subjects underwent body composition analysis in the Bod Pod following the standard procedure using the manufacturer's guidelines. The subjects then underwent 8 more measurements while performing the following intentional manipulations: 4 breathing patterns altering lung volume, foot movement to disrupt air, hand cupping to trap air, and heat and cold exposure before entering the chamber. Increasing and decreasing lung volume during thoracic volume measurement and during body density measurement altered the percent body fat assessment (p < 0.001). High lung volume during thoracic gas measures overestimated fat by 3.7 ± 2.1 percentage points. Lowered lung volume during body volume measures overestimated body fat by an additional 2.2 ± 2.1 percentage points. The heat and cold exposure, tapping, and cupping treatments provided similar estimates of percent body fat when compared with the standard condition. These results demonstrate the subjects were able to covertly change their estimated ADP body composition value by altering breathing when compared with the standard condition. We recommend that sports conditioning coaches, athletic trainers, and technicians administering ADP should be aware of the potential effects of these covert actions. The individual responsible for administering ADP should remain vigilant during testing to detect deliberate altered breathing patterns by athletes in an effort to gain a competitive advantage by manipulating their body composition assessment. PMID:21499137

  16. The Subjective Effects of Alcohol Scale: Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Novel Assessment Tool for Measuring Subjective Response to Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Morean, Meghan E.; Corbin, William R.; Treat, Teresa A.

    2013-01-01

    Three decades of research demonstrate that individual differences in subjective response (SR) to acute alcohol effects predict heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems. However, the SR patterns conferring the greatest risk remain under debate. Morean and Corbin (2010) highlighted that extant SR measures commonly have limitations within the following areas: assessment of a comprehensive range of effects, assessment of effects over the complete course of a drinking episode, and/or psychometric validation. Furthermore, the consistent pairing of certain SR measures and theoretical models has made integration of findings difficult. To address these issues, we developed the Subjective Effects of Alcohol Scale (SEAS), a novel, psychometrically sound SR measure for use in alcohol administration studies. Pilot data ensured that the SEAS comprised a comprehensive range of effects that varied in terms of valence and arousal and were perceived as plausible effects of drinking. For validation purposes, the SEAS was included in a two-site placebo-controlled alcohol administration study (N=215). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified a 14-item, 4-factor model categorizing effects into affective quadrants (high/low arousal positive; high/low arousal negative). SEAS scores evidenced the following: (1) scalar measurement invariance by limb of the blood alcohol curve (BAC) and beverage condition (2) good internal consistency, (3) convergence/divergence with extant SR measures, alcohol expectancies, and alcohol use, and (4) concurrent/incremental utility in accounting for alcohol-related outcomes, highlighting the novel high arousal negative and low arousal positive subscales. PMID:23647036

  17. Effects of Inhaled Rosemary Oil on Subjective Feelings and Activities of the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Sayorwan, Winai; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri; Piriyapunyporn, Teerut; Hongratanaworakit, Tapanee; Kotchabhakdi, Naiphinich; Siripornpanich, Vorasith

    2013-01-01

    Rosemary oil is one of the more famous essential oils widely used in aroma-therapy. However, the effects of rosemary oil on the human body, in particular the nervous system, have not been sufficiently studied. This study investigates the effects of the inhalation of rosemary oil on test subjects’ feelings, as well as its effects on various physiological parameters of the nervous system. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in the experiment. All subjects underwent autonomic nervous system (ANS) recording. This consisted of measurements of skin temperature; heart rate; respiratory rate; blood pressure; evaluations of the subjects’ mood states; and electroencephalography (EEG) recordings in the pre-, during treatment, and post-rosemary inhalation periods as compared with control conditions. Our results showed significant increases in blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate after rosemary oil inhalation. After the inhalation treatments, subjects were found to have become more active and stated that they felt “fresher”. The analysis of EEGs showed a reduction in the power of alpha1 (8–10.99 Hz) and alpha2 (11–12.99 Hz) waves. Moreover, an increment in the beta wave (13–30 Hz) power was observed in the anterior region of the brain. These results confirm the stimulatory effects of rosemary oil and provide supporting evidence that brain wave activity, autonomic nervous system activity, as well as mood states are all affected by the inhalation of the rosemary oil. PMID:23833718

  18. Effect of Frustration on Brain Activation Pattern in Subjects with Different Temperament

    PubMed Central

    Bierzynska, Maria; Bielecki, Maksymilian; Marchewka, Artur; Debowska, Weronika; Duszyk, Anna; Zajkowski, Wojciech; Falkiewicz, Marcel; Nowicka, Anna; Strelau, Jan; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the prevalence of frustration in everyday life, very few neuroimaging studies were focused on this emotional state. In the current study we aimed to examine effects of frustration on brain activity while performing a well-learned task in participants with low and high tolerance for arousal. Prior to the functional magnetic resonance imaging session, the subjects underwent 2 weeks of Braille reading training. Frustration induction was obtained by using a novel highly difficult tactile task based on discrimination of Braille-like raised dots patterns and negative feedback. Effectiveness of this procedure has been confirmed in a pilot study using galvanic skin response and questionnaires. Brain activation pattern during tactile discrimination task before and after frustration were compared directly. Results revealed changes in brain activity in structures mostly reported in acute stress studies: striatum, cingulate cortex, insula, middle frontal gyrus and precuneus and in structures engaged in tactile Braille discrimination: SI and SII. Temperament type affected activation pattern. Subjects with low tolerance for arousal showed higher activation in the posterior cingulate gyrus, precuneus, and inferior parietal lobule than high reactivity group. Even though performance in the discrimination trials following frustration was unaltered, we observed increased activity of primary and secondary somatosensory cortex processing the tactile information. We interpret this effect as an indicator of additional involvement required to counteract the effects of frustration. PMID:26793136

  19. Relationship between cocaine-induced subjective effects and dopamine transporter occupancy

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fischman, M.; Wang, G.J.

    1997-05-01

    The ability of cocaine to occupy the dopamine transporter has been linked to its reinforcing properties. However, such a relationship has not been demonstrated in humans. Methods: Positron Emission Tomography and [C-11]cocaine were used to estimate dopamine transporter occupancies after different doses of cocaine in 18 active cocaine abusers. The ratio of the distribution volume of [C-11]cocaine in striatum to that in cerebellum, which corresponds to Bmax/Kd +1 and is insensitive to changes in cerebral blood flow, was our measure of dopamine transporter availability. In parallel subjective effects were measured to assess the relationship between dopamine transporter occupancy and cocaines behavioral effects. Intravenous cocaine produced a significant dose,-dependent blockade of dopamine transporters: 73 % for 0.6 mg/kg; 601/6 for 0.3 mg/kg; 48 % for 0.1 mg/kg iv and 40 % for 0.05 mg/kg. In addition, dopamine transporter occupancies were significantly correlated with cocaine plasma concentration (r = 0.55 p < 0.001). Cocaine also produced dose-dependent increases in self-reported ratings of {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} which were significantly correlated with the levels of dopamine transporter blockade. Discussion: These results provide the first documentation in humans that dopamine transporter occupancy is associated with cocaine induced subjective effects. They also suggest that dopamine transporter occupancies equal to or greater than 60% are required to produce significant effects on ratings of {open_quotes}high{close_quotes}.

  20. The effect of local cryotherapy on subjective and objective recovery characteristics following an exhaustive jump protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hohenauer, Erich; Clarys, Peter; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Clijsen, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this controlled trial was to investigate the effects of a single local cryotherapy session on the recovery characteristics over a period of 72 hours. Twenty-two young and healthy female (n=17; mean age: 21.9±1.1 years) and male (n=5;mean age: 25.4±2.8 years) adults participated in this study. Following an exhaustive jump protocol (3×30 countermovement jumps), half of the participants received either a single local cryotherapy application (+8°C) or a single local thermoneutral application (+32°C) of 20-minute duration using two thigh cuffs. Subjective measures of recovery (delayed-onset muscle soreness and ratings of perceived exertion) and objective measures of recovery (vertical jump performance and peak power output) were assessed immediately following the postexercise applications (0 hours) and at 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after the jump protocol. Local cryotherapy failed to significantly affect any subjective recovery variable during the 72-hour recovery period (P>0.05). After 72 hours, the ratings of perceived exertion were significantly lower in the thermoneutral group compared to that in the cryotherapy group (P=0.002). No significant differences were observed between the cryotherapy and the thermoneutral groups with respect to any of the objective recovery variables. In this experimental study, a 20-minute cryotherapy cuff application failed to demonstrate a positive effect on any objective measures of recovery. The effects of local thermoneutral application on subjective recovery characteristics were superior when compared to the effects of local cryotherapy application at 72 hours postapplication. PMID:27579000

  1. The effect of local cryotherapy on subjective and objective recovery characteristics following an exhaustive jump protocol.

    PubMed

    Hohenauer, Erich; Clarys, Peter; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Clijsen, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this controlled trial was to investigate the effects of a single local cryotherapy session on the recovery characteristics over a period of 72 hours. Twenty-two young and healthy female (n=17; mean age: 21.9±1.1 years) and male (n=5;mean age: 25.4±2.8 years) adults participated in this study. Following an exhaustive jump protocol (3×30 countermovement jumps), half of the participants received either a single local cryotherapy application (+8°C) or a single local thermoneutral application (+32°C) of 20-minute duration using two thigh cuffs. Subjective measures of recovery (delayed-onset muscle soreness and ratings of perceived exertion) and objective measures of recovery (vertical jump performance and peak power output) were assessed immediately following the postexercise applications (0 hours) and at 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after the jump protocol. Local cryotherapy failed to significantly affect any subjective recovery variable during the 72-hour recovery period (P>0.05). After 72 hours, the ratings of perceived exertion were significantly lower in the thermoneutral group compared to that in the cryotherapy group (P=0.002). No significant differences were observed between the cryotherapy and the thermoneutral groups with respect to any of the objective recovery variables. In this experimental study, a 20-minute cryotherapy cuff application failed to demonstrate a positive effect on any objective measures of recovery. The effects of local thermoneutral application on subjective recovery characteristics were superior when compared to the effects of local cryotherapy application at 72 hours postapplication. PMID:27579000

  2. Human pharmacology of ayahuasca: subjective and cardiovascular effects, monoamine metabolite excretion, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Riba, Jordi; Valle, Marta; Urbano, Gloria; Yritia, Mercedes; Morte, Adelaida; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the South American psychotropic beverage ayahuasca on subjective and cardiovascular variables and urine monoamine metabolite excretion were evaluated, together with the drug's pharmacokinetic profile, in a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. This pharmacologically complex tea, commonly obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an orally labile psychedelic agent showing 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist activity, with monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids (harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine). Eighteen volunteers with prior experience in the use of psychedelics received single oral doses of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (0.6 and 0.85 mg of DMT/kg of body weight) and placebo. Ayahuasca produced significant subjective effects, peaking between 1.5 and 2 h, involving perceptual modifications and increases in ratings of positive mood and activation. Diastolic blood pressure showed a significant increase at the high dose (9 mm Hg at 75 min), whereas systolic blood pressure and heart rate were moderately and nonsignificantly increased. Cmax values for DMT after the low and high ayahuasca doses were 12.14 ng/ml and 17.44 ng/ml, respectively. Tmax (median) was observed at 1.5 h after both doses. The Tmax for DMT coincided with the peak of subjective effects. Drug administration increased urinary normetanephrine excretion, but, contrary to the typical MAO-inhibitor effect profile, deaminated monoamine metabolite levels were not decreased. This and the negligible harmine plasma levels found suggest a predominantly peripheral (gastrointestinal and liver) site of action for harmine. MAO inhibition at this level would suffice to prevent first-pass metabolism of DMT and allow its access to systemic circulation and the central nervous system. PMID:12660312

  3. The effect of method and format on the responses of subjects to a Piagetian reasoning problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staver, John R.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    Researchers interested in studying the effects of subjects' reasoning levels, as defined by Piaget (Inhelder & Piaget, 1958), on science achievement or other dependent variables face two measurement problems. First, the traditional clinical method is time-consuming and impractical for large numbers of subjects. Second, alternative methods of assessment, although reliable and valid, may over- or underestimate subjects' reasoning levels. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effects of various methods and formats of administering a Piagetian task on subjects' performance. The task chosen for this investigation was the Mr. Short-Mr. Tall problem (Karplus & Lavatelli, 1969; Karplus et al., 1977). The task was presented using four methods: (1) individual clinical interview, (2) group presentation of task followed by paper-and-pencil problem with illustration, (3) group administration of paper-and-pencil instrument with illustration, and (4) group administration of paper-and-pencil instrument without illustration. Each method included four formats: (1) completion answer with essay justification, (2) completion answer with multiple-choice justification, (3) multiple-choice answer with essay justification, and (4) multiple-choice answer with multiple-choice justification. Three hundred seventy-six students who were enrolled in a freshman level biological science class participated in the study. The research design was a 4 × 4 factorial design with method and format of assessment as the main effects. The participants were in 16 distinct laboratory or discussion sections, and each section was randomly assigned to a cell in the research design. Regression analysis with the individual as the unit of analysis showed that neither method nor format of assessment accounted for a significant amount of variance in student performance. The overall interaction remained nonsignificant. Regression analysis with sections as the unit of analysis revealed similar

  4. Biomarkers for the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, G J H; de Visser, S J; Cohen, A F; van Gerven, J M A

    2005-01-01

    Aims Studies of novel centrally acting drugs in healthy volunteers are traditionally concerned with kinetics and tolerability, but useful information may also be obtained from biomarkers of clinical endpoints. This paper provides a systematic overview of CNS-tests used with SSRIs in healthy subjects. A useful biomarker should meet the following requirements: a consistent response across studies and drugs; a clear response of the biomarker to a therapeutic dose; a dose–response relationship; a plausible relationship between biomarker, pharmacology and pathogenesis. Methods These criteria were applied to all individual tests found in studies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), performed in healthy subjects since 1966, identified with a systematic MedLine search. Separate databases were created to evaluate the effects of single or multiple dose SSRI-studies, and for amitriptyline whenever the original report included this antidepressant as a positive control. Doses of the antidepressant were divided into high- and low-dose ranges, relative to a medium range of therapeutic doses. For each test, the drug effects were scored as statistically significant impairment/decrease (−), improvement/increase (+) or no change (=) relative to placebo. Results 56 single dose studies and 22 multiple dose studies were identified, investigating the effects of 13 different SSRIs on 171 variants of neuropsychological tests, which could be clustered into seven neuropsychological domains. Low single doses of SSRIs generally stimulated tests of attention and memory. High doses tended to impair visual/auditory and visuomotor systems and subjective performance, while showing an acceleration in motor function. The most pronounced effects were observed using tests that measure flicker discrimination (improvement at low doses: 75%, medium doses: 40%, high doses: 43% of studies); REM sleep (inconsistent decrease after medium doses, decrease in 83% of studies after high doses

  5. Effects of haloperidol on the behavioral, subjective, cognitive, motor, and neuroendocrine effects of Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in humans

    PubMed Central

    Braley, Gabriel; Blaise, Rebecca; Vendetti, Michael; Oliver, Stephen; Pittman, Brian; Ranganathan, Mohini; Bhakta, Savita; Zimolo, Zoran; Cooper, Thomas; Perry, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Cannabinoids produce a spectrum of effects in humans including euphoria, cognitive impairments, psychotomimetic effects, and perceptual alterations. The extent to which dopaminergic systems contribute to the effects of Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-9-THC) remains unclear. This study evaluated whether pretreatment with a dopamine receptor antagonist altered the effects of Δ-9-THC in humans. Materials and methods In a 2-test-day double-blind study, 28 subjects including healthy subjects (n=17) and frequent users of cannabis (n=11) were administered active (0.057 mg/kg) or placebo oral haloperidol in random order followed 90 and 215 min later by fixed order intravenous administration of placebo (vehicle) and active (0.0286 mg/kg) Δ-9-THC, respectively. Results Consistent with previous reports, intravenous Δ-9-THC produced psychotomimetic effects, perceptual alterations, and subjective effects including “high.” Δ-9-THC also impaired verbal recall and attention. Haloperidol pretreatment did not reduce any of the behavioral effects of Δ-9-THC. Haloperidol worsened the immediate free and delayed free and cued recall deficits produced by Δ-9-THC. Haloperidol and Δ-9-THC worsened distractibility and vigilance. Neither drug impaired performance on a motor screening task, the Stockings of Cambridge task, or the delayed match to sample task. Frequent users had lower baseline plasma prolactin levels and blunted Δ-9-THC induced memory impairments. Conclusions The deleterious effects of haloperidol pretreatment on the cognitive effects of Δ-9-THC are consistent with the preclinical literature in suggesting crosstalk between DAergic and CBergic systems. However, it is unlikely that DA D2 receptor mechanisms play a major role in mediating the psychotomimetic and perceptual altering effects of Δ-9-THC. Further investigation is warranted to understand the basis of the psychotomimetic effects of Δ-9-THC and to better understand the crosstalk between DAergic

  6. Spectral evaluation of aging effects on blood pressure and heart rate variations in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Singh, D; Vinod, K; Saxena, S C; Deepak, K K

    2006-01-01

    The background to heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), and their determinants and physiological correlates, remain obscure. The impact of age must be taken into account if HRV and BPV are used for predictive purposes in clinical settings. Healthy subjects show wide inter-individual variation in their heart rate behaviour and the factors affecting heart rate dynamics are not well known. This paper has undertaken to evaluate heart rate variability (HRV) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in a random sample of subjects without evidence of heart disease, and to estimate the relation of HRV and BPV behaviour to age. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of ageing on HRV and BPV for simultaneous recordings of electrocardiograph (ECG) and blood pressure (BP) signals at rest in healthy subjects. We studied eight young (21-34 years old) and eight elderly (68-85 years old) rigorously screened subjects from the Fantasia Database to make the reproducibility and comparability of the results more extensive. Time- and frequency-domain analysis of HRV and BPV was performed on 5-minute ectopic-free recordings. BRS on the heart was estimated by frequency-domain analysis of spontaneous variability of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and RR interval. It has been observed that compared to young the elderly subjects have (i) diminished HRV; (ii) a shift in the power spectral density and median frequency to low frequency side for HRV and to higher frequency side for BPV; and (iii) increased low-frequency alpha index and decreased high-frequency alpha index of BRS with overall alpha index augmented. The results convey that normal ageing in the absence of disease is associated with lesser parasympathetic regulation of heart rate. Thus it is concluded that the age is an important factor to be considered for prognosis and diagnosis by HRV and BPV. For reliable clinical applications, more research needs to be done on a broad spectrum of subjects. In

  7. Sulfur dioxide and ammonium sulfate effects on pulmonary function and bronchial reactivity in human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Kulle, T.J.; Sauder, L.R.; Shanty, F.; Kerr, H.D.; Farrell, B.P.; Miller, W.R.; Milman, J.H.

    1984-03-01

    The effect of exposures to 1 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and 500 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ respirable ammonium sulfate ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) was studied in 20 nonsmoking subjects to determine if a response can be measured at these atmospheric levels and if the response is additive or synergistic. Four-hour separate and combined exposures were employed. Each subject acted as his or her own control and performed two light-to-moderate exercise stints (612 kg-m/min) for 15 minutes on each day's confinement in the environmental chamber. Pulmonary function tests (body plethysmography and spirometry) and bronchial reactivity to methacholine were performed to assess the response of these exposures. No significant changes in pulmonary function or bronchial reactivity were observed in the individual exposures ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or SO/sub 2/), the combined exposure ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and SO/sub 2/), or 24 hours post-exposure. This study design and the observed results did not demonstrate any readily apparent risk to healthy subjects with these exposures. Since no significant changes were measured, it was not possible to conclude if these two pollutants in combination produce an additive or synergistic response.

  8. The effect of facial hair and sex on the dispersal of bacteria below a masked subject.

    PubMed

    McLure, H A; Mannam, M; Talboys, C A; Azadian, B S; Yentis, S M

    2000-02-01

    Surgical face masks prevent the dispersal of bacteria from the upper airway to surfaces immediately in front of and below the face during talking. However, mask wiggling has been reported to increase dermabrasion and bacterial contamination of surfaces immediately below the face. Facial hair and recent shaving may alter the quantity of particles shed by dermabrasion when the mask is wiggled. We investigated the effect of mask wiggling in 10 bearded and 10 clean-shaven male subjects, and 10 female subjects. Wiggling the mask significantly increased the degree of bacterial shedding onto agar plates 15 cm below the lips in bearded males (p = 0.03) and females (p = 0.03), but not in clean-shaven males. At rest without mask wiggling the bearded subjects shed significantly more bacteria than clean-shaven males (p = 0.01) or females (p = 0.001). To reduce the risks of contamination of the sterile field when face masks are worn females and bearded males should avoid wiggling the face mask. Bearded males may also consider removing their beards. PMID:10651682

  9. Metabolic effects of dietary fructose and surcose in types I and II diabetic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Bantle, J.P.; Laine, D.C.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-12-19

    To learn more about the metabolic effects of dietary fructose and sucrose, 12 type 1 and 12 type II diabetic subjects were fed three isocaloric (or isoenergic) diets for eight days each according to a randomized, crossover design. The three diets provided, respectively, 21% of the energy as fructose, 23% of the energy as sucrose, and almost all carbohydrate energy as starch. The fructose diet resulted in significantly lower one- and two-hour postprandial plasma glucose levels, overall mean plasma glucose levels, and urinary glucose excretion in both type I and type II subjects than did the starch diet. There were no significant differences between the sucrose and starch diets in any of the measures of glycemic control in either subject group. The fructose and sucrose diets did not significantly increase serum triglyceride values when compared with the starch diet, but both increased postprandial serum lactate levels. The authors conclude that short-term replacement of other carbohydrate sources in the diabetic diet with fructose will improve glycemic control, whereas replacement with sucrose will not aggravate glycemic control.

  10. Sex differences in the subjective and reinforcing effects of visual and olfactory cigarette smoke stimuli.

    PubMed

    Perkins, K A; Gerlach, D; Vender, J; Grobe, J; Meeker, J; Hutchison, S

    2001-05-01

    Although nicotine intake clearly reinforces cigarette smoking behavior, non-nicotine smoke stimuli may become conditioned reinforcers of smoking. In Study 1, we compared the acute subjective and reinforcing effects of cigarette smoking in men and women under two conditions: blockade of visual and olfactory/taste smoke stimuli vs. no blockade. Subjective hedonic ratings of 'like puffs' and 'satisfying', but not 'strength', 'high in nicotine', or CO boost, were significantly reduced under the blockade vs. no blockade conditions. During subsequent ad lib puffing, significantly fewer puffs were self-administered under the blockade condition, particularly among women. In Study 2, we examined the influences of these stimuli separately and found that olfactory/taste stimuli, but not visual stimuli, reduced hedonic ratings and puff self-administration in women but not in men. In Study 3, procedures similar to those in Study 1 were used to examine whether this sex difference in responses to conditioned stimuli generalizes to a non-drug consummatory behavior, eating (pizza). However, hedonic ratings and ad lib consumption of pizza were substantially reduced in both men and women following blockade of visual and olfactory/taste food stimuli. These results indicate that the presumably conditioned stimuli of olfactory/taste from cigarette smoke may influence subjective hedonic ratings and reinforcement from smoking more in women than in men. However, this sex difference may not generalize beyond smoking or other drug reinforcement. PMID:11403728

  11. Laboratory study of effects of sonic boom shaping on subjective loudness and acceptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine the effects of sonic boom signature shaping on subjective loudness and acceptability. The study utilized the sonic boom simulator at the Langley Research Center. A wide range of symmetrical, front-shock-minimized signature shapes were investigated together with a limited number of asymmetrical signatures. Subjective loudness judgments were obtained from 60 test subjects by using an 11-point numerical category scale. Acceptability judgments were obtained using the method of constant stimuli. Results were used to assess the relative predictive ability of several noise metrics, determine the loudness benefits of detailed boom shaping, and derive laboratory sonic boom acceptability criteria. These results indicated that the A-weighted sound exposure level, the Stevens Mark 7 Perceived Level, and the Zwicker Loudness Level metrics all performed well. Significant reductions in loudness were obtained by increasing front-shock rise time and/or decreasing front-shock overpressure of the front-shock minimized signatures. In addition, the asymmetrical signatures were rated to be slightly quieter than the symmetrical front-shock-minimized signatures of equal A-weighted sound exposure level. However, this result was based on a limited number of asymmetric signatures. The comparison of laboratory acceptability results with acceptability data obtained in more realistic situations also indicated good agreement.

  12. The effects of UCP-1 polymorphisms on obesity phenotypes among Korean female subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Hyoung Doo; Kim, Kil Soo; Cha, Min Ho; Yoon, Yoosik . E-mail: ysyoon66@naver.com

    2005-09-23

    Three SNPs of UCP-1 including A-3826G, A-1766G, and Ala64Thr (G+1068A) were genotyped among 453 overweight Korean female subjects recruited from an obesity clinic. Four common haplotypes with frequency greater than 0.04 were constructed with three SNPs. For an accurate evaluation of the effects of UCP-1 polymorphism on body fat accumulation, all subjects were tested using computerized tomography to measure the cross-sectional fat tissue areas at abdominal and distal part of the body. By statistical analyses, ht4[GAA] showed a significant association with decreased abdominal fat tissue area (P = 0.02, dominant model), fat tissue area at thigh (P = 0.008, dominant model), body fat mass (P = 0.002, dominant model), and waist-to-hip ratio (P = 0.01, dominant model). In addition, ht3[GAG] was associated with the accelerated reduction of waist-to-hip ratio and body fat mass by very low calorie diet among subjects who finished one-month-weight control program (P = 0.05-0.006)

  13. The subjective effect of low frequency content in road traffic noise.

    PubMed

    Torija, Antonio J; Flindell, Ian H

    2015-01-01

    Based on subjective listening trials, Torija and Flindell [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135, 1-4 (2014)] observed that low frequency content in typical urban main road traffic noise appeared to make a smaller contribution to reported annoyance than might be inferred from its objective or physical dominance. This paper reports a more detailed study which was aimed at (i) identifying the difference in sound levels at which low frequency content becomes subjectively dominant over mid and high frequency content and (ii) investigating the relationship between loudness and annoyance under conditions where low frequency content is relatively more dominant, such as indoors where mid and high frequency content is reduced. The results suggested that differences of at least +30 dB between the low frequency and the mid/high frequency content are needed for changes in low frequency content to have as much subjective effect as equivalent changes in mid and high frequency content. This suggests that common criticisms of the A-frequency weighting based on a hypothesized excessive downweighting of the low frequency content may be relatively unfounded in this application area. PMID:25618050

  14. Beneficial Effects of an 8-Week, Very Low Carbohydrate Diet Intervention on Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yunjuan; Yu, Haoyong; Li, Yuehua; Ma, Xiaojing; Lu, Junxi; Yu, Weihui; Xiao, Yunfeng; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effects of weight loss during an 8-week very low carbohydrate diet (VLCD) on improvement of metabolic parameters, adipose distribution and body composition, and insulin resistance and sensitivity in Chinese obese subjects. Methods. Fifty-three healthy obese volunteers were given an 8-week VLCD. The outcomes were changes in anthropometry, body composition, metabolic profile, abdominal fat distribution, liver fat percent (LFP), and insulin resistance and sensitivity. Results. A total of 46 (86.8%) obese subjects completed the study. The VLCD caused a weight loss of −8.7 ± 0.6 kg (mean ± standard error (SE), P < 0.0001) combined with a significant improvement of metabolic profile. In both male and female, nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) significantly decreased (−166.2 ± 47.6 μmol/L, P = 0.001) and β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHA) increased (0.15 ± 0.06 mmol/L, P = 0.004) after eight weeks of VLCD intervention. The significant reductions in subcutaneous fat area (SFA), visceral fat area (VFA), and LFP were −66.5 ± 7.9 cm2, −35.3 ± 3.9 cm2, and −16.4 ± 2.4%, respectively (all P values P < 0.0001). HOMA IR and HOMA β significantly decreased while whole body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI) increased (all P values P < 0.001). Conclusion. Eight weeks of VLCD was an effective intervention in obese subjects. These beneficial effects may be associated with enhanced hepatic and whole-body lipolysis and oxidation. PMID:23573151

  15. Effects of age of serotonin 5-HT2 receptors in cocaine abusers and normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Logan, J.

    1995-05-01

    We measured the effect of age on serotonin 5-HT2 receptor availability and compared it with the effects on dopamine D2 receptors on 19 chronic cocaine abusers (35.2{plus_minus}9.8 years, range 18-54 years old) and 19 age matched normal controls using positron emission tomography (PET) and F-18 N-methylspiperone (NMS). 5-HT2 Receptor availability was measure din frontal (FR), occipital (OC), cingulate (CI) and orbitofrontal (OF) cortices using the ratio of the distribution volume in the region of interest to that in the cerebelium (CB) which is a function of Bmax/Kd. D2 receptor availability in the basal ganglia was measured using the {open_quotes}ratio index{close_quotes} (slope of striatum/CB versus time over 180 min of the scan) which is a function of Bmax. 5-HT2 Receptor availability differed among regions and were as follows: CI>OF>OC>FC.5-HT2 Receptor availability decreased significantly with age. This effect was more accentuated for 5-HT2 receptor availability in FR than in OC(df=1, p<0.025). Striatal dopamine D2 receptors were also found to decrease significantly with age (r=0.63, p<0.007). In a given subject, D2 receptor availability was significantly correlated with 5-HT2 receptor availability in FR (r=0.51, p<0.035) but not in OC. The values for 5-HT2 receptor availability were not different in normal subjects and cocaine abusers. These results document a decline in 5-HT2 and D2 receptors with age and document an association between frontal 5-HT2 and striatal D2 receptor availability. These results did not show any changes in 5-HT2 receptor availability in cocaine abusers as compared to control subjects.

  16. We know very little about the subjective effects of drugs in females.

    PubMed

    Bevins, Rick A; Charntikov, Sergios

    2015-03-18

    Pharmaceutical companies assessing the nervous system effects of candidate therapeutics often use a behavioral assay in rodents that assesses the drug's subjective (internal stimulus) effects. Variants of this so-called "drug discrimination task" have also been widely used by basic scientist for more than 50 years to study the receptor actions of a host of ligands related to disease states and neuropathologies. Notably, most published research with this task has used male rats or mice. This situation is unfortunate and severely limits the utility of the research, given the well-documented differences between women and men on drug efficacy and safety, as well as known sex differences in the neural and behavioral effects of drugs. In this Viewpoint, we highlight the need for basic researchers, as well as pharmaceutical scientists, to include females in drug discrimination studies in a manner that allows detection and interpretation of potential sex differences. PMID:25627010

  17. Effect of acetaldehyde on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis subjected to environmental shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, G.A.; Hobley, T.J.; Pamment, N.B.

    1997-01-05

    The lag phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to a step increase in temperature or ethanol concentration was reduced by as much as 60% when acetaldehyde was added to the medium at concentrations less than 0.1 g/L. Maximum specific growth rates were also substantially increased. Even greater proportional reductions in lag time due to acetaldehyde addition were observed for ethanol-shocked cultures of Zymomonas mobilis. Acetaldehyde had no effect on S. cerevisiae cultures started from stationary phase inocula in the absence of environmental shock and its lag-reducing effects were greater in complex medium than in a defined synthetic medium. Acetaldehyde reacted strongly with the ingredients of complex culture media. It is proposed that the effect of added acetaldehyde may be to compensate for the inability of cells to maintain transmembrane acetaldehyde gradients following an environmental shock.

  18. Absence of the predisposing factors and signs and symptoms usually associated with overreaching and overtraining in physical fitness centers

    PubMed Central

    Ackel‐D'Elia, Carolina; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Castelo, Adauto; Nouailhetas, Viviane Louise Andrée; da Silva, Antonio Carlos

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of the well‐known predisposing factors and signs and symptoms usually associated with either overreaching or overtraining syndrome in physical fitness centers in São Paulo City, Brazil. METHOD: A questionnaire consisting of 13 question groups pertaining to either predisposing factors (1‐7) or signs and symptoms (8‐13) was given to 413 subjects. The general training schedule of the volunteers was characterized by workout sessions of 2.18 ± 0.04 h for a total of 11.0 ± 0.3 h/week for 33 ± 2 months independent of the type of exercise performed (walking, running, spinning, bodybuilding and stretching). A mean score was calculated ranging from 1 (completely absent) to 5 (severe) for each question group. A low occurrence was considered to be a question group score lower than 4, which was observed in all 13 question groups. RESULTS: The psychological evaluation by POMS Mood State Questionnaire indicated a normal non‐inverted iceberg. The hematological parameters, creatine kinase activity, cortisol, total testosterone and free testosterone concentrations were within the normal ranges for the majority of the volunteers selected for this analysis (n  =  60). CONCLUSION: According to the questionnaire score analysis, no predisposing factors or signs and symptoms usually associated with either overreaching or overtraining were detected among the members of physical fitness centers in São Paulo City, Brazil. This observation was corroborated by the absence of any significant hematological or stress hormone level alterations in blood analyses of the majority of the selected volunteers (n  =  60). PMID:21243291

  19. Similar and Different? Subjective Effects of Methylphenidate and Cocaine in Opioid-Maintained Patients.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Marc; Bucher, Patricia; Strasser, Johannes; Liechti, Matthias E; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Dürsteler, Kenneth M

    2016-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is commonly prescribed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recreational nonmedical use has been described and also occurs in patients on opioid maintenance treatment (OMT). MPH has been proposed for use as replacement therapy in cocaine dependence, although evidence for efficacy is inconclusive. We conducted a cross-sectional interview study on patterns of MPH use in a sample of 20 MPH-using patients on OMT with a history of cocaine use. We assessed symptoms of depression, ADHD during childhood, and retrospective subjective-effects profiles of MPH and cocaine. Risky patterns of MPH use were common, in particular illicit acquisition, use of high doses, and parenteral administration. Sixty percent of patients reported having used MPH as a substitute for cocaine. Correspondingly, the subjective-effect profiles of MPH and cocaine showed striking parallels, with overall effects of MPH being rated more positively than those of cocaine. Proportions of patients with elevated scores for depression or childhood ADHD were large, highlighting the importance of treating dual disorders in this population. Clinical studies on MPH substitution in cocaine-dependent patients on opioid maintenance treatment could benefit from consideration of the patterns of application of MPH in this population. Results are preliminary due to small sample size. PMID:26940988

  20. Cerebral oxygenation and haemodynamic effects induced by nimodipine in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Canova, Daniela; Roatta, Silvestro; Micieli, Giuseppe; Bosone, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Summary The cerebrovascular effects of nimodipine are still poorly understood even in the healthy condition; in particular, its effects on tissue oxygenation have never been investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in cerebral oxygenation and blood volume upon oral administration of nimodipine (90 mg) in the healthy condition. In eight subjects, changes in cerebral tissue oxygenation and blood volume were determined simultaneously with changes in blood velocity of the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) by using, respectively, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD). The subjects also underwent non-invasive assessment of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and end-tidal CO2. TCD and NIRS CO2 reactivity indices were also extracted. Nimodipine significantly reduced ABP (11±13%) and increased heart rate, as well as NIRS oxygenation (6.0±4.8%) and blood volume indices (9.4±10.1%), while VMCA was not significantly decreased (2.0±3.5%). Nimodipine slightly but significantly reduced the VMCA response to changes in pCO2 whereas the CO2 reactivity of NIRS parameters was improved. The observed changes in cerebral tissue oxygenation and blood volume indicate nimodipine-induced cerebrovascular dilation and increased perfusion, while the effect on VMCA possibly results from dilation of the insonated artery. The present results cast doubt on the putative nimodipine-induced impairment of CO2 reactivity. PMID:23402678

  1. Relationship of the FKBP5 C/T polymorphism with dysfunctional attitudes predisposing to depression.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akihito; Matsumoto, Yoshihiko; Sadahiro, Ryoichi; Enokido, Masanori; Goto, Kaoru; Otani, Koichi

    2014-08-01

    FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP5) is a co-chaperone of the glucocorticoid receptor, and plays an important role in the negative feedback regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The C/T single nucleotide polymorphism in the intron 2 of the FKBP5 gene affects cortisol secretion, and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. In this study, the relationship of the FKBP5 C/T polymorphism with dysfunctional attitudes predisposing to depression was examined. The subjects were 300 healthy Japanese. The FKBP5 genotypes were determined by a real-time PCR and cycling probe technology for SNP typing. Dysfunctional attitudes were assessed by the 24-item version of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS-24), which has the Achievement, Self-control, and Dependency subscales. DAS-24 total scores were significantly higher in the group with the T allele than in that without this allele (p=0.001). Regarding the subscales, scores of the Achievement (p=0.003) and Self-control (p=0.009) subscales, but not those of the Dependency subscale, were significantly higher in the former group than in the latter group. The present study suggests that the FKBP5 C/T polymorphism is implicated in formation of dysfunctional attitudes, especially those about achievement and self-control. PMID:24889341

  2. The effect of a week's beta-adrenoceptor antagonism on daytime heart-rates, subjective responses to exercise, and physical activity in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, J M; Wharrad, H J; Wilson, C G; Birmingham, A T

    1985-01-01

    The effects on heart rate (HR) and physical activity of 1 week's treatment with three different beta-adrenoceptor antagonists (20 mg betaxolol (Lorex); 160 mg propranolol LA; or 100 mg atenolol daily) have been compared with placebo in a double-blind study of 12 normal men. On the fifth day of each treatment a body-borne tape-recorder was worn during waking hours for recording of ECG and footfall signals. Each record was calibrated in terms of the subject's response to laboratory ergometer exercise, and a computer analysis provided objective indices of physical activity. While on beta-adrenoceptor antagonists the subjects perceived standard exercise as significantly harder than on placebo and reported more side-effects (albeit mild and transient). Ambulatory monitoring of HR showed that subjects spent 13% of their waking day at heart rates below 50 beats min-1 while on propranolol, compared with 1% on placebo and 20% on atenolol and betaxolol. On these latter drugs, the group spent as much as 10% of their waking time with HR below 45 beats min-1. The lowest individual heart-rates recorded were below 35 beats min-1. Objective indices of physical activity, such as the duration of periods spent with heart rates above the HR found at 100 W in the ergometer test, showed no differences between the treatments. This negative finding was confirmed by pedometer step counts over the whole week. PMID:2859043

  3. Physiological and subjective effects of acute intranasal methamphetamine during extended-release alprazolam maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Lile, Joshua A.; Stoops, William W.; Glaser, Paul E.A.; Hays, Lon R.; Rush, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Medications development for methamphetamine dependence is ongoing, but no widely accepted, effective pharmacotherapy has been identified. Previous studies have demonstrated neurobiological perturbations to central GABAA activity following chronic stimulant use, and that positive modulation of GABAA receptors attenuates the neurochemical and behavioral response to stimulant drugs such as methamphetamine. Therefore, GABAA modulators could be useful as pharmacotherapies for stimulant-use disorders. Methods This study tested the hypothesis that intranasal methamphetamine would be safe and well tolerated during maintenance on extended-release alprazolam (XR), and that the effects of methamphetamine would be attenuated. Eight non-treatment-seeking, stimulant-dependent individuals completed an inpatient experiment in which ascending doses of intranasal methamphetamine (0, 5, 10, 20 and 30 mg) were administered after four days of alprazolam XR maintenance (0 and 1 mg/day). Results Intranasal methamphetamine produced prototypical effects (e.g., increased positive subjective ratings and elevated cardiovascular signs). The combination of intranasal methamphetamine and alprazolam XR was safe and well tolerated. Alprazolam XR produced small, but orderly, reductions in some of the subjective effects of methamphetamine, and performance impairment. Conclusions The present results demonstrate that methamphetamine use during alprazolam XR treatment would not pose a significant safety risk. Given the potential of GABAA positive modulators to manage certain aspects of stimulant abuse and dependence (i.e., drug-induced seizures, anxiety and stress), but the relatively small impact on the acute abuse-related effects of methamphetamine observed here, additional research with GABAA positive modulators is warranted, but should consider their use as an adjunct component of combination behavioral and/or drug treatment. PMID:21737214

  4. The effect of patellar taping on some landing characteristics during counter movement jumps in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Jesús; Díaz, Francisco; Anza, María Soledad; Mejuto, Gaizka; Puente, Asier; Iturriaga, Gorka; Fernández, Juan-Ramón

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of patellar taping (PT) on landing characteristics of the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) and on flight time during a counter movement jump (CMJ). Eleven healthy male subjects (age: 31.1 ± 4.2 years) volunteered for the study. Each subject performed six CMJs under two different jumping conditions: with PT and without PT (WPT). The order of the two conditions was randomized. All of the measured variables had fair-to-good reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient > 0.75). When we compared the PT and WPT groups, we did not find a significant difference in the magnitude of the first (F1) and second (F2) peaks of the VGRF. We also did not find a significant difference in the time to production of these peaks (T1 and T2), and the time to stabilization (TTS) (p < 0. 05). Furthermore, the flight time was similar in the two groups (0.475 ± 0.046 and 0.474 ± 0.056 s, respectively, for PT and WPT). These results suggest that PT does not jeopardize performance during CMJ. Furthermore, it also does not soften the VGRF generated during the landing, indicating that PT may be of limited utility in preventing injuries associated with this type of movement. Key pointsWe investigated whether patellar taping interferes with athletic performance, as has been suggested by previous studies.We also explored the effect of patellar taping on the forces generated during the landing phase of counter movement jumps.Patellar taping had no effect on the flight time during counter movement jumps.Patellar taping also had no effect on the vertical ground reaction force variables measured during the landing phase of counter movement jumps.This information may be relevant to athletes and trainers who are concerned about the effects of patellar taping on performance. PMID:24149562

  5. The Effect of Patellar Taping on Some Landing Characteristics During Counter Movement Jumps in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, Jesús; Díaz, Francisco; Anza, María Soledad; Mejuto, Gaizka; Puente, Asier; Iturriaga, Gorka; Fernández, Juan-Ramón

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of patellar taping (PT) on landing characteristics of the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) and on flight time during a counter movement jump (CMJ). Eleven healthy male subjects (age: 31.1 ± 4.2 years) volunteered for the study. Each subject performed six CMJs under two different jumping conditions: with PT and without PT (WPT). The order of the two conditions was randomized. All of the measured variables had fair-to-good reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient > 0.75). When we compared the PT and WPT groups, we did not find a significant difference in the magnitude of the first (F1) and second (F2) peaks of the VGRF. We also did not find a significant difference in the time to production of these peaks (T1 and T2), and the time to stabilization (TTS) (p < 0. 05). Furthermore, the flight time was similar in the two groups (0.475 ± 0.046 and 0.474 ± 0.056 s, respectively, for PT and WPT). These results suggest that PT does not jeopardize performance during CMJ. Furthermore, it also does not soften the VGRF generated during the landing, indicating that PT may be of limited utility in preventing injuries associated with this type of movement. Key points We investigated whether patellar taping interferes with athletic performance, as has been suggested by previous studies. We also explored the effect of patellar taping on the forces generated during the landing phase of counter movement jumps. Patellar taping had no effect on the flight time during counter movement jumps. Patellar taping also had no effect on the vertical ground reaction force variables measured during the landing phase of counter movement jumps. This information may be relevant to athletes and trainers who are concerned about the effects of patellar taping on performance. PMID:24149562

  6. The effect of vagal nerve blockade using electrical impulses on glucose metabolism in nondiabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sathananthan, Matheni; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Swain, James M; Shah, Meera; Piccinini, Francesca; Dalla Man, Chiara; Cobelli, Claudio; Rizza, Robert A; Camilleri, Michael; Vella, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Vagal interruption causes weight loss in humans and decreases endogenous glucose production in animals. However, it is unknown if this is due to a direct effect on glucose metabolism. We sought to determine if vagal blockade using electrical impulses alters glucose metabolism in humans. Patients and methods We utilized a randomized, cross-over study design where participants were studied after 2 weeks of activation or inactivation of vagal nerve blockade (VNB). Seven obese subjects with impaired fasting glucose previously enrolled in a long-term study to examine the effect of VNB on weight took part. We used a standardized triple-tracer mixed meal to enable measurement of the rate of meal appearance, endogenous glucose production, and glucose disappearance. The 550 kcal meal was also labeled with 111In-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) to measure gastrointestinal transit. Insulin action and β-cell responsivity indices were estimated using the minimal model. Results Integrated glucose, insulin, and glucagon concentrations did not differ between study days. This was also reflected in a lack of effect on β-cell responsivity and insulin action. Furthermore, fasting and postprandial endogenous glucose production, integrated meal appearance, and glucose disposal did not differ in the presence or absence of VNB. Similarly, gastric emptying and colonic transit were unchanged by VNB. Conclusion In this pilot study in nondiabetic humans, electrical vagal blockade had no acute effects on glucose metabolism, insulin secretion and action, or gastric emptying. It remains to be determined if more pronounced effects would be observed in diabetic subjects. PMID:25050073

  7. The Effect of Dolutegravir on the Pharmacokinetics of Metformin in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ivy H.; Zong, Jian; Borland, Julie; Jerva, Fred; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J.; Humphreys, Joan E.; Bowers, Gary D.; Choukour, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dolutegravir is an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) licensed for use in HIV-1 infection and is an inhibitor of organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2). This study assessed the effect of dolutegravir on the pharmacokinetics of metformin, an OCT2 substrate. Design: This was an open-label, parallel-group, 3-period crossover study in healthy adult subjects. Subjects were enrolled into 1 of 2 treatment cohorts (15 subjects/cohort) receiving metformin 500 mg q12h for 5 days in period 1; metformin 500 mg q12h plus dolutegravir 50 mg q24h (cohort 1) or 50 mg q12h (cohort 2) for 7 days in period 2; and metformin 500 mg q12h for 10 days in period 3. There were no washout periods between treatments. Effects of dolutegravir on metformin transport and paracellular permeability were evaluated in vitro. Results: Co-administration of dolutegravir 50 mg q24h increased metformin area under the curve(0–τ) by 79% and Cmax by 66%, whereas dolutegravir 50 mg q12h increased metformin area under the curve(0–τ) and Cmax by 145% and 111%, respectively. Metformin t(1/2) remained unchanged. Increased metformin exposure during dolutegravir co-administration returned to period 1 levels after dolutegravir discontinuation in period 3. Co-administration of dolutegravir and metformin was well tolerated. In vitro, dolutegravir was not a clinically relevant inhibitor of OCT1, OCT3, multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1, multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 2-K, or plasma membrane monoamine transporter, and it did not affect metformin paracellular permeability or uptake into an intestinal cell line. Conclusions: Dolutegravir significantly increased metformin plasma exposure, which can be partially explained by OCT2 inhibition. It is recommended that dose adjustments of metformin be considered to maintain optimal glycemic control when patients are starting/stopping dolutegravir while taking metformin. PMID:26974526

  8. Effect of fosamprenavir-ritonavir on the pharmacokinetics of dolutegravir in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Song, Ivy; Borland, Julie; Chen, Shuguang; Peppercorn, Amanda; Wajima, Toshihiro; Piscitelli, Stephen C

    2014-11-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) is an HIV integrase inhibitor (INI) with demonstrated activity in INI-naive and INI-resistant patients. The objective of this open-label, 2-period, single-sequence study was to evaluate the effect of fosamprenavir-ritonavir (FPV-RTV) on the steady-state plasma pharmacokinetics of DTG. Twelve healthy subjects received 50 mg DTG once daily for 5 days (period 1), followed by 10 days of 50 mg DTG once daily in combination with 700/100 mg FPV-RTV every 12 h (period 2). All doses were administered in the fasting state. Serial pharmacokinetic samples for DTG and amprenavir and safety assessments were obtained throughout the study. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed, and geometric least-squares mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals were generated for within-subject treatment comparison. Fosamprenavir-ritonavir decreased the DTG area under the concentration-time curve, maximum concentration in plasma, and concentration in plasma at the end of the dosing interval by 35%, 24%, and 49%, respectively. Both DTG and DTG with FPV-RTV were well tolerated; no subject withdrew because of adverse events. The most frequently reported drug-related adverse events were rash, abnormal dreams, and nasopharyngitis. The modest decrease in DTG exposure when it was coadministered with FPV-RTV is not considered clinically significant, and DTG dose adjustment is not required with coadministration of FPV-RTV in INI-naive patient populations on the basis of established "no-effect" boundaries of DTG. In the INI-resistant population, as a cautionary measure, alternative combinations that do not include FPV-RTV should be considered. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01209065.). PMID:25155604

  9. Early effects of modern electroconvulsive therapy on subjective memory in patients with mania or depression

    PubMed Central

    Bag, Sevda; Canbek, Ozge; Atagun, Ilhan Murat; Kutlar, Tarik Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Context: Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered a very effective tool for the treatment of psychiatric diseases, memory disturbances are among the most important adverse effects. Aims: This study aimed to assess prospectively early subjective memory complaints in depressive and manic patients due to bilateral, brief-pulse ECT, at different stages of the treatment, compare the associations between psychiatric diagnosis, sociodemographic characteristics, and ECT characteristics. Settings and Design: This prospective study was done with patients undergoing ECT between November 2008 and April 2009 at a tertiary care psychiatry hospital of 2000 beds. Materials and Methods: A total of 140 patients, scheduled for ECT with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder (depressive or manic episode) or unipolar depression according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV diagnostic criteria, were included in the study and invited to complete the Squire Subjective Memory Questionnaire (SSMQ) before ECT, after the first and third sessions and end of ECT treatment. Statistical Analysis: Mean values were compared with the Kruskal–Wallis test and comparison of the longitudinal data was performed with a nonparametric longitudinal data analysis method, F1_LD_F1 design. Results: SSMQ scores of the patients before ECT were zero. SSMQ scores showed a decrease after the first and third ECT sessions and before discharge, showing a memory disturbance after ECT and were significantly less severe in patients with mania in comparison to those with depression. Conclusions: These findings suggest an increasing degree of subjective memory complaints with bilateral brief-pulse ECT parallel to the increasing number of ECT sessions. PMID:27385854

  10. Aging 5 Years in 5 Minutes: The Effect of Taking a Memory Test on Older Adults’ Subjective Age

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Matthew L.; Geraci, Lisa; De Forrest, Ross L.

    2015-01-01

    How old one feels—one’s subjective age—has been shown to predict important psychological and health outcomes. The current studies examined the effect of taking a standard memory test on older adults’ subjective age. Study 1 showed that older adults felt older after taking a standard neuropsychological screening test and participating in a free-recall experiment than they felt at baseline. Study 2 showed that the effect was selective to older adults: Younger adults’ subjective age was not affected by participating in the memory experiment. Study 3 showed that the subjective-aging effect was specific to memory, as taking a vocabulary test for a similar amount of time did not affect older adults’ subjective age. Finally, Study 4 showed that simply expecting to take a memory test subjectively aged older adults. The results indicate that being in a memory-testing context affects older adults’ self-perception by making them feel older. PMID:24100121

  11. Investigation of Control Inceptor Dynamics and Effect on Human Subject Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanco, Anthony A.; Cardullo, Frank M.; Houck, Jacob A.; Grube, Richard C.; Kelly, Lon C.

    2013-01-01

    The control inceptor used in a vehicle simulation is an important part of adequately representing the dynamics of the vehicle. The inceptor characteristics are typically based on a second order spring mass damper system with damping, force gradient, breakout force, and natural frequency parameters. Changing these parameters can have a great effect on pilot control of the vehicle. A quasi transfer of training experiment was performed employing a high fidelity and a low fidelity control inceptor. A disturbance compensatory task was employed which involved a simple horizon line disturbed in roll by a sum of sinusoids presented in an out-the-window display. Vehicle dynamics were modeled as 1/s and 1/s2. The task was to maintain level flight. Twenty subjects were divided between the high and the low fidelity training groups. Each group was trained to a performance asymptote, and then transferred to the high fidelity simulation. RMS tracking error, a PSD analysis, and a workload analysis were performed to quantify the transfer of training effect. Quantitative results of the experiments show that there is no significant difference between the high and low fidelity training groups for 1/s plant dynamics. For 1/s2 plant dynamics there is a greater difference in tracking performance and PSD; and the subjects are less correlated with the input disturbance function

  12. A PC-based software test for measuring alcohol and drug effects in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Mills, K C; Parkman, K M; Spruill, S E

    1996-12-01

    A new software-based visual search and divided-attention test of cognitive performance was developed and evaluated in an alcohol dose-response study with 24 human subjects aged 21-62 years. The test used language-free, color, graphic displays to represent the visuospatial demands of driving. Cognitive demands were increased over previous hardware-based tests, and the motor skills required for the test involved minimal eye movements and eye-hand coordination. Repeated performance on the test was evaluated with a latin-square design by using a placebo and two alcohol doses, low (0.48 g/kg/LBM) and moderate (0.72 g/kg/LBM). The data on 7 females and 17 males yielded significant falling and rising impairment effects coincident with moderate rising and falling breath alcohol levels (mean peak BrALs = 0.045 g/dl and 0.079 g/dl). None of the subjects reported eye-strain or psychomotor fatigue as compared with previous tests. The high sensitivity/variance relative to use in basic and applied research, and worksite fitness-for-duty testing, was discussed. The most distinct advantage of a software-based test that operates on readily available PCs is that it can be widely distributed to researchers with a common reference to compare a variety of alcohol and drug effects. PMID:8986207

  13. Effects of elastic band exercise on subjects with rounded shoulder posture and forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woon; An, Da-In; Lee, Hye-Yun; Jeong, Ho-Young; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study performed to investigate the effect of elastic band exercise program on the posture of subjects with rounded shoulder and forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] The body length, forward shoulder angle, craniovertebral angle, and cranial rotation angle of participants (n=12) were measured before and after the exercise program. Furthermore, the thicknesses of the pectoralis major, rhomboid major, and upper trapezius were measured using an ultrasonographic imaging device. The exercises program was conducted with elastic bands, with 15 repetitions per set and 3 sets in total. [Results] The length of the pectoralis major, forward shoulder angle, and craniovertebral angle showed significant changes between before and after the exercise program, whereas the changes in the other measurements were not significant. The thickness of the upper trapezius showed a significant increase between before and after the elastic band exercise. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that the elastic band exercise program used in the study is effective for lengthening the pectoralis major and correcting rounded shoulder and forward head posture. PMID:27390405

  14. Effects of the "affectionless control" parenting style on personality traits in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Otani, Koichi; Suzuki, Akihito; Oshino, Shingo; Ishii, Genki; Matsumoto, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-30

    The effects of the affectionless control (AC) parenting style on personality traits were studied in 414 Japanese healthy subjects. Perceived parental rearing was assessed by the Parental Bonding Instrument, which comprises care and protection factors, and personality traits were assessed by the Temperament and Character Inventory, which has seven dimensions. Parental rearing was classified into four types, i.e., optimal parenting (high care/low protection), affectionate constraint (high care/high protection), neglectful parenting (low care/low protection), and AC (low care/high protection). Males with maternal AC showed significantly higher harm avoidance (HA) scores and lower scores of persistence and cooperativeness than those with maternal optimal parenting. Females with maternal AC showed significantly higher HA scores and lower self-directedness scores than those with maternal optimal parenting. Paternal AC was not significantly related to any personality score. In females, the interaction between paternal rearing and maternal rearing was significant; the effect of maternal AC on HA scores was strongest when combined with paternal neglectful parenting. The present study suggests that the AC type parenting by mothers is associated with specific personality traits, especially high HA, in healthy subjects. PMID:19081641

  15. Effects of thermal underwear on thermal and subjective responses in winter.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Wha; Lee, Joo-Young; Kim, So-Young

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain basic data in improving the health of Koreans, saving energy and protecting environments. This study investigated the effects of wearing thermal underwear for keeping warm in the office in winter where temperature is not as low as affecting work efficiency, on thermoregulatory responses and subjective sensations. In order to create an environment where every subject feels the same thermal sensation, two experimental conditions were selected through preliminary experiments: wearing thermal underwear in 18 degrees C air (18-condition) and not wearing thermal underwear in 23 degrees C air (23-condition). Six healthy male students participated in this study as experiment subjects. Measurement items included rectal temperature (T(re)), skin temperature (T(sk)), clothing microclimate temperature (T(cm)), thermal sensation and thermal comfort. The results are as follows: (1) T(re) of all subjects was maintained constant at 37.1 degrees C under both conditions, indicating no significant differences. (2) (T)(sk) under the 18-condition and the 23-condition were 32.9 degrees C and 33.7 degrees C, respectively, indicating a significant level of difference (p<0.05). (3) Among local skin temperature, trunk part (forehead and abdomen) did not show significant differences. After 90-min exposure, the skin temperature of hands and feet under the 18-condition was significantly lower than that under the 23-condition (p<0.001). (4) More than 80% of all the respondents felt comfortable under both conditions. It was found (T)(sk) decreased due to a drop in the skin temperature of hands and feet, and the subjects felt cooler wearing only one layer of normal thermal underwear at 18 degrees C. Yet, the thermal comfort level, T(re) and T(cm) of chest part under the 18-condition were the same as those under the 23-condition. These results show that the same level of comfort, T(re) and T(cm) can be maintained as that of an environment about 5 degrees C higher

  16. Subjective evaluation of experimental dyspnoea – Effects of isocapnia and repeated exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hayen, Anja; Herigstad, Mari; Wiech, Katja; Pattinson, Kyle T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Resistive respiratory loading is an established stimulus for the induction of experimental dyspnoea. In comparison to unloaded breathing, resistive loaded breathing alters end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2), which has independent physiological effects (e.g. upon cerebral blood flow). We investigated the subjective effects of resistive loaded breathing with stabilized PETCO2 (isocapnia) during manual control of inspired gases on varying baseline levels of mild hypercapnia (increased PETCO2). Furthermore, to investigate whether perceptual habituation to dyspnoea stimuli occurs, the study was repeated over four experimental sessions. Isocapnic hypercapnia did not affect dyspnoea unpleasantness during resistive loading. A post hoc analysis revealed a small increase of respiratory unpleasantness during unloaded breathing at +0.6 kPa, the level that reliably induced isocapnia. We did not observe perceptual habituation over the four sessions. We conclude that isocapnic respiratory loading allows stable induction of respiratory unpleasantness, making it a good stimulus for multi-session studies of dyspnoea. PMID:25578628

  17. On the effect of subliminal priming on subjective perception of images: a machine learning approach.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Parmod; Mahmood, Faisal; Mohan, Dhanya Menoth; Wong, Ken; Agrawal, Abhishek; Elgendi, Mohamed; Shukla, Rohit; Dauwels, Justin; Chan, Alice H D

    2014-01-01

    The research presented in this article investigates the influence of subliminal prime words on peoples' judgment about images, through electroencephalograms (EEGs). In this cross domain priming paradigm, the participants are asked to rate how much they like the stimulus images, on a 7-point Likert scale, after being subliminally exposed to masked lexical prime words, with EEG recorded simultaneously. Statistical analysis tools are used to analyze the effect of priming on behavior, and machine learning techniques to infer the primes from EEGs. The experiment reveals strong effects of subliminal priming on the participants' explicit rating of images. The subjective judgment affected by the priming makes visible change in event-related potentials (ERPs); results show larger ERP amplitude for the negative primes compared with positive and neutral primes. In addition, Support Vector Machine (SVM) based classifiers are proposed to infer the prime types from the average ERPs, which yields a classification rate of 70%. PMID:25571224

  18. Calculation of Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields and Their Effects in MRI of Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Christopher M.; Wang, Zhangwei

    2011-01-01

    Radiofrequency magnetic fields are critical to nuclear excitation and signal reception in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The interactions between these fields and human tissues in anatomical geometries results in a variety of effects regarding image integrity and safety of the human subject. In recent decades numerical methods of calculation have been used increasingly to understand the effects of these interactions and aid in engineering better, faster, and safer equipment and methods. As MRI techniques and technology have evolved through the years, so too have the requirements for meaningful interpretation of calculation results. Here we review the basic physics of RF electromagnetics in MRI and discuss a variety of ways RF field calculations are used in MRI in engineering and safety assurance from simple systems and sequences through advanced methods of development for the future. PMID:21381106

  19. The "subjective" pupil old/new effect: is the truth plain to see?

    PubMed

    Montefinese, Maria; Ambrosini, Ettore; Fairfield, Beth; Mammarella, Nicola

    2013-07-01

    Human memory is an imperfect process, prone to distortion and errors that range from minor disturbances to major errors that can have serious consequences on everyday life. In this study, we investigated false remembering of manipulatory verbs using an explicit recognition task and pupillometry. Our results replicated the "classical" pupil old/new effect as well as data in false remembering literature that show how items must be recognize as old in order for the pupil size to increase (e.g., "subjective" pupil old/new effect), even though these items do not necessarily have to be truly old. These findings support the strength-of-memory trace account that affirms that pupil dilation is related to experience rather than to the accuracy of recognition. Moreover, behavioral results showed higher rates of true and false recognitions for manipulatory verbs and a consequent larger pupil diameter, supporting the embodied view of language. PMID:23665094

  20. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD) IN GENETICALLY PREDISPOSED RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent CVD models are increasingly used for understanding individual differences in susceptibility to environmental stressors such as air pollution. We characterized pathologies and a number of known human risk factors of CVD in genetically predisposed, male young adult Spontaneo...

  1. Direct measurement of the effective pressure law: Deformation of joints subject to pore and confining pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Boitnott, G.N.; Scholz, C.H. )

    1990-11-10

    When describing the deformation of poro-elastic materials subject to pore pressure (P{sub p}) and confining pressure (P{sub c}), the concept of effective pressure is commonly used. In such a description the deformation is described in terms of a single stress parameter, the effective stress (P{sub e}). Experimental studies which attempt to describe the effective pressure law are troubled by the fact that deformation of geologic materials invariably exhibits loading path dependence (hysteresis). Here the authors develop an experimental technique for measuring the effective pressure law which is useful for many properties of interest, including those that are highly nonlinear and exhibit common types of hysteresis. They experimentally derive an effective pressure law which describes the values of pore and confining pressure consistent with a given joint closure for a law which describes the values of pore and confining pressure consistent with a given joint closure for a loading path of constant closure. The study can be viewed as an attempt to include both pore and confining pressure in a single constitutive law for joint closure. The constant closure loading path is such that the measurement is not affected by hysteresis caused by joint closure. The results provide insight into the microgeometrical and micromechanical properties of joints. The data are not consistent with a simple extension of commonly used linear elastic constitutive models for joint deformation which have compared favorably with experiments in the absence of pore pressure. For smooth lapped glass joints, the effective pressure relation is found to be dependent on the local joint stiffness, with the relationship between the effective pressure law and the local joint stiffness being insensitive to the measured surface topography. Similar measurements on lapped and fractured rock provide some constraints on the effective pressure behavior of jointed rock.

  2. Aging Effects on Cardiac and Respiratory Dynamics in Healthy Subjects across Sleep Stages

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Aicko Y.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Penzel, Thomas; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Kantelhardt, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Respiratory and heart rate variability exhibit fractal scaling behavior on certain time scales. We studied the short-term and long-term correlation properties of heartbeat and breathing-interval data from disease-free subjects focusing on the age-dependent fractal organization. We also studied differences across sleep stages and night-time wake and investigated quasi-periodic variations associated with cardiac risk. Design: Full-night polysomnograms were recorded during 2 nights, including electrocardiogram and oronasal airflow. Setting: Data were collected in 7 laboratories in 5 European countries. Participants: 180 subjects without health complaints (85 males, 95 females) aged from 20 to 89 years. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Short-term correlations in heartbeat intervals measured by the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) exponent α1 show characteristic age dependence with a maximum around 50–60 years disregarding the dependence on sleep and wake states. Long-term correlations measured by α2 differ in NREM sleep when compared with REM sleep and wake, besides weak age dependence. Results for respiratory intervals are similar to those for α2 of heartbeat intervals. Deceleration capacity (DC) decreases with age; it is lower during REM and deep sleep (compared with light sleep and wake). Conclusion: The age dependence of α1 should be considered when using this value for diagnostic purposes in post-infarction patients. Pronounced long-term correlations (larger α2) for heartbeat and respiration during REM sleep and wake indicate an enhanced control of higher brain regions, which is absent during NREM sleep. Reduced DC possibly indicates an increased cardiovascular risk with aging and during REM and deep sleep. Citation: Schumann AY; Bartsch RP; Penzel T; Ivanov PC; Kantelhardt JW. Aging effects on cardiac and respiratory dynamics in healthy subjects across sleep stages. SLEEP 2010;33(7):943-955. PMID:20614854

  3. Effect of Fosamprenavir-Ritonavir on the Pharmacokinetics of Dolutegravir in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Borland, Julie; Chen, Shuguang; Peppercorn, Amanda; Wajima, Toshihiro; Piscitelli, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) is an HIV integrase inhibitor (INI) with demonstrated activity in INI-naive and INI-resistant patients. The objective of this open-label, 2-period, single-sequence study was to evaluate the effect of fosamprenavir-ritonavir (FPV-RTV) on the steady-state plasma pharmacokinetics of DTG. Twelve healthy subjects received 50 mg DTG once daily for 5 days (period 1), followed by 10 days of 50 mg DTG once daily in combination with 700/100 mg FPV-RTV every 12 h (period 2). All doses were administered in the fasting state. Serial pharmacokinetic samples for DTG and amprenavir and safety assessments were obtained throughout the study. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed, and geometric least-squares mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals were generated for within-subject treatment comparison. Fosamprenavir-ritonavir decreased the DTG area under the concentration-time curve, maximum concentration in plasma, and concentration in plasma at the end of the dosing interval by 35%, 24%, and 49%, respectively. Both DTG and DTG with FPV-RTV were well tolerated; no subject withdrew because of adverse events. The most frequently reported drug-related adverse events were rash, abnormal dreams, and nasopharyngitis. The modest decrease in DTG exposure when it was coadministered with FPV-RTV is not considered clinically significant, and DTG dose adjustment is not required with coadministration of FPV-RTV in INI-naive patient populations on the basis of established “no-effect” boundaries of DTG. In the INI-resistant population, as a cautionary measure, alternative combinations that do not include FPV-RTV should be considered. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01209065.) PMID:25155604

  4. Effects of cholinergic and beta-adrenergic blockade on orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Convertino, V A; Sather, T M

    2000-12-01

    Cardiovascular responses during a graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) protocol were compared before and after atropine and propranolol administration to test the hypothesis that both sympathetic and parasympathetic control of cardio-acceleration are associated with syncopal predisposition to orthostatic stress in healthy subjects. Eleven men were categorized into two groups having high (HT, N = 6) or low (LT, N = 5) tolerance based on their total time before the onset of presyncopal symptoms. HT and LT groups were similar in physical characteristics, fitness, and baseline cardiovascular measurements. Atropine treatment had no effect on LBNP tolerance or mean arterial pressure at presyncope, despite an atropine-induced increase in heart rate. Propranolol treatment reduced (p<0.05) LBNP tolerance in both groups. Diminished LBNP tolerance after propranolol administration was associated with reductions in cardiac output, whereas increase in systemic peripheral resistance from baseline to presyncope was unaffected by propranolol. Reduction in cardiac output and LBNP tolerance after beta blockade reflected a chronotropic effect because lower LBNP tolerance for the HT (-50%) and LT (-39%) groups was associated with dramatic reductions (p <0.05) in the magnitude of LBNP-induced tachycardia without significant effects on stroke volume at presyncope. Absence of an atropine-induced difference in cardiac output and systemic peripheral resistance between HT and LT groups failed to support the notion that cardiac vagal withdrawal represents a predominant mechanism that could account for differences in orthostatic tolerance. Because a reduction in LBNP tolerance in both HT and LT groups after propranolol treatment was most closely associated with reduced tachycardia, the data suggest that a primary autonomically mediated mechanism for maintenance of mean arterial pressure and orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects is beta adrenergic-induced tachycardia. PMID:11324988

  5. Effects of cholinergic and beta-adrenergic blockade on orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Sather, T. M.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses during a graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) protocol were compared before and after atropine and propranolol administration to test the hypothesis that both sympathetic and parasympathetic control of cardio-acceleration are associated with syncopal predisposition to orthostatic stress in healthy subjects. Eleven men were categorized into two groups having high (HT, N = 6) or low (LT, N = 5) tolerance based on their total time before the onset of presyncopal symptoms. HT and LT groups were similar in physical characteristics, fitness, and baseline cardiovascular measurements. Atropine treatment had no effect on LBNP tolerance or mean arterial pressure at presyncope, despite an atropine-induced increase in heart rate. Propranolol treatment reduced (p<0.05) LBNP tolerance in both groups. Diminished LBNP tolerance after propranolol administration was associated with reductions in cardiac output, whereas increase in systemic peripheral resistance from baseline to presyncope was unaffected by propranolol. Reduction in cardiac output and LBNP tolerance after beta blockade reflected a chronotropic effect because lower LBNP tolerance for the HT (-50%) and LT (-39%) groups was associated with dramatic reductions (p <0.05) in the magnitude of LBNP-induced tachycardia without significant effects on stroke volume at presyncope. Absence of an atropine-induced difference in cardiac output and systemic peripheral resistance between HT and LT groups failed to support the notion that cardiac vagal withdrawal represents a predominant mechanism that could account for differences in orthostatic tolerance. Because a reduction in LBNP tolerance in both HT and LT groups after propranolol treatment was most closely associated with reduced tachycardia, the data suggest that a primary autonomically mediated mechanism for maintenance of mean arterial pressure and orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects is beta adrenergic-induced tachycardia.

  6. Effects of structural characterizations on fragility functions of bridges subject to seismic shaking and lateral spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Huo, Yili; Brandenberg, Scott J.; Kashighandi, Pirooz

    2008-12-01

    This paper evaluates the seismic vulnerability of different classes of typical bridges in California when subjected to seismic shaking or liquefaction-induced lateral spreading. The detailed structural configurations in terms of superstructure type, connection, continuity at support and foundation type, etc. render different damage resistant capability. Six classes of bridges are established based on their anticipated failure mechanisms under earthquake shaking. The numerical models that are capable of simulating the complex soil-structure interaction effects, nonlinear behavior of columns and connections are developed for each bridge class. The dynamic responses are obtained using nonlinear time history analyses for a suite of 250 earthquake motions with increasing intensity. An equivalent static analysis procedure is also implemented to evaluate the vulnerability of the bridges when subjected to liquefaction-induced lateral spreading. Fragility functions for each bridge class are derived and compared for both seismic shaking (based on nonlinear dynamic analyses) and lateral spreading (based on equivalent static analyses) for different performance states. The study finds that the fragility functions due to either ground shaking or lateral spreading show significant correlation with the structural characterizations, but differences emerge for ground shaking and lateral spreading conditions. Structural properties that will mostly affect the bridges’ damage resistant capacity are also identified.

  7. Effect of ozone exposure on the dispersion of inhaled aerosol boluses in healthy human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, M.J.; Bennett, W.D.; Dewitt, P.; Seal, E.; Strong, A.A.

    1990-12-06

    Acute exposure of humans to low levels of ozone are known to cause decreases FVC and increases sRaw. These alterations in lung function do not, however, elucidate the potential for acute small airways responses. In the study the authors employed a test of aerosol dispersion to examine the potential effects of ozone on small airways in humans. Twenty-two healthy non-smoking male volunteers were exposed to 0.4 ppm ozone for one hour while exercising at 20 l/min/m{sup 2} (BSA). Prior to and immediately following exposure, tests of spirometry (FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75) and plethysmography (Raw and sRaw) were performed. Subjects also performed an aerosol dispersion test before and after exposure. Each test involved a subject inhaling five to seven breaths of a 300 ml bolus of a 0.5 micrometers triphenyl phosphate (TPP) aerosol injected into a 2 liters tidal volume. The bolus was injected into the tidal breath at three different depths: at depth A the bolus was injected after 1.6 liters of clean air was inhaled from FRC; at depth B after 1.2 liters; and at depth C after 1.2 liters but with inhalation beginning from RV. The primary measure of bolus dispersion was the expired half-width (HW).

  8. Laterality effects in normal subjects' recognition of familiar faces, voices and names. Perceptual and representational components.

    PubMed

    Gainotti, Guido

    2013-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that a different hemispheric specialization may exist for different modalities of person identification, with a prevalent right lateralization of the sensory-motor systems allowing face and voice recognition and a prevalent left lateralization of the name recognition system. Data supporting this claim concern, however, much more disorders of familiar people recognition observed in patients with focal brain lesions than results of experimental studies conducted in normal subjects. These last data are sparse and in part controversial, but are important from the theoretical point of view, because it is not clear if hemispheric asymmetries in the recognition of faces, voices and names are limited to their perceptual processing, or also extend to the domain of their cortical representations. The present review has tried to clarify this issues, taking into account investigations that have evaluated in normal subjects laterality effects in recognition of familiar names, faces and voices, by means of behavioural, neurophysiological and neuroimaging techniques. Results of this survey indicate that: (a) recognition of familiar faces and voices show a prevalent right lateralization, whereas recognition of familiar names is lateralized to the left hemisphere; (b) the right hemisphere prevalence is greater in tasks involving familiar than unfamiliar faces and voices, and the left hemisphere superiority is greater in the recognition of familiar than unfamiliar names. Taken together, these data suggest that hemispheric asymmetries in the recognition of faces, voices and names are not limited to their perceptual processing, but also extend to the domain of their cortical representations. PMID:23542500

  9. Effect of Ondansetron on Metformin Pharmacokinetics and Response in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Yang, Hong; Guo, Dong; Zhang, Taolan; Polli, James E; Zhou, Honghao; Shu, Yan

    2016-04-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists such as ondansetron have been used to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting for over 2 decades. This study was to determine whether ondansetron could serve as a perpetrator drug causing transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions in humans. Twelve unrelated male healthy Chinese volunteers were enrolled into a prospective, randomized, double-blind, crossover study to investigate the effects of ondansetron or placebo on the pharmacokinetics of and the response to metformin, a well-characterized substrate of organic cation transporters and multidrug and toxin extrusions (MATEs). Ondansetron treatment caused a statistically significantly higher Cmax of metformin compared with placebo (18.3 ± 5.05 versus 15.2 ± 3.23; P = 0.006) and apparently decreased the renal clearance of metformin by 37% as compared with placebo (P = 0.001). Interestingly, ondansetron treatment also statistically significantly improved glucose tolerance in subjects, as indicated by the smaller glucose area under the curve in the oral glucose tolerance test (10.4 ± 1.43) as compared with placebo (11.5 ± 2.29 mmol∙mg/l) (P = 0.020). It remains possible that ondansetron itself may affect glucose homeostasis in human subjects, but our clinical study, coupled with our previous findings in cells and in animal models, indicates that ondansetron can cause a drug-drug interaction via its potent inhibition of MATE transporters in humans. PMID:26825640

  10. The Effects of Scraping Therapy on Local Temperature and Blood Perfusion Volume in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qin-Yan; Yang, Jin-Sheng; Zhu, Bing; Yang, Li; Wang, Ying-Ying; Gao, Xin-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Objective. We aim to study the therapeutic effects of scraping by investigating the changes of temperature and local blood perfusion volume in healthy subjects after scraping stimulation, and to explore the mechanism of scraping stimulation from the points of microcirculation and energy metabolism. Methods. Twenty-three health subjects were included in this study. Local blood perfusion volume and body surface temperature was detected at 5 min before scraping stimulation, 0, 15, 30, 60 and 90 min after scraping using Laser Doppler imager and infrared thermograph. Results. Significant increase was noted in the blood perfusion volume in the scraping area within 90 minutes compared to the baseline level and non-scraping area (P < 0.001). Compared with non-scraping area, an increase of body temperature with an average of 1°C was observed after scraping stimulation (P < 0.01). Conclusion. Scraping can significantly improve the blood perfusion volume and increase the temperature in the scraping area, promoting the local blood circulation and energy metabolism. PMID:22666292

  11. Effects of visual cortex activation on the nociceptive blink reflex in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sava, Simona L; de Pasqua, Victor; Magis, Delphine; Magis, Delphine; Schoenen, Jean; Schoenen, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR). Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia. PMID:24936654

  12. Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on insulin sensitivity and the systemic inflammatory response in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Anne Sofie; Larsen, Nadja; Pedersen-Skovsgaard, Theis; Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Svendsen, Kira Dynnes; Jakobsen, Mogens; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2010-12-01

    According to animal studies, intake of probiotic bacteria may improve glucose homeostasis. We hypothesised that probiotic bacteria improve insulin sensitivity by attenuating systemic inflammation. Therefore, the effects of oral supplementation with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on insulin sensitivity and the inflammatory response were investigated in subjects with normal or impaired insulin sensitivity. In a double-blinded, randomised fashion, forty-five males with type 2 diabetes, impaired or normal glucose tolerance were enrolled and allocated to a 4-week treatment course with either L. acidophilus NCFM or placebo. L. acidophilus was detected in stool samples by denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR. Separated by the 4-week intervention period, two hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps were performed to estimate insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the systemic inflammatory response was evaluated by subjecting the participants to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide injection (0·3 ng/kg) before and after the treatment course. L. acidophilus NCFM was detected in 75 % of the faecal samples after treatment with the probiotic bacterium. Insulin sensitivity was preserved among volunteers in the L. acidophilus NCFM group, whereas it decreased in the placebo group. Both baseline inflammatory markers and the systemic inflammatory response were, however, unaffected by the intervention. In conclusion, intake of L. acidophilus NCFM for 4 weeks preserved insulin sensitivity compared with placebo, but did not affect the systemic inflammatory response. PMID:20815975

  13. Acute effects of inspiratory muscle warm-up on pulmonary function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Özdal, Mustafa

    2016-06-15

    The acute effects of inspiratory muscle warm-up on pulmonary functions were examined in 26 healthy male subjects using the pulmonary function test (PFT) in three different trials. The control trial (CON) did not involve inspiratory muscle warm-up, while the placebo (IMWp) and experimental (IMW) trials involved inspiratory muscle warm-up. There were no significant changes between the IMWp and CON trials (p>0.05). All the PFT measurements, including slow vital capacity, inspiratory vital capacity, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and maximal inspiratory pressure were significantly increased by 3.55%, 12.52%, 5.00%, 2.75%, 2.66%, and 7.03% respectively, in the subjects in the IMW trial than those in the CON trial (p<0.05). These results show that inspiratory muscle warm-up improved the pulmonary functions. The mechanisms responsible for these improvements are probably associated with the concomitant increase in the inspiratory muscle strength, and the cooperation of the upper thorax, neck, and respiratory muscles, and increased level of reactive O2 species in muscle tissue, and potentially improvement of muscle O2 delivery-to-utilization. However, further investigation is required to determine the precise mechanisms responsible from among these candidates. PMID:26903486

  14. Effect of worry on regional cerebral blood flow in nonanxious subjects.

    PubMed

    Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf; Lee, Jae Sung; McLeod, Daniel R; Wong, Dean F

    2005-12-30

    Several studies suggest that cognitive tasks attenuate activation of the limbic system by emotional stimuli. We investigated the possibility that worry would similarly inhibit the limbic system by examining its effects on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Ten nonanxious volunteers underwent four scans within one session, using positron emission tomography (PET) with H(2)(15)O as tracer. The first two scans recorded emotionally neutral thinking induced after listening to tapes describing neutral statements. Preceding the third and fourth scans, subjects listened to the self-recorded tape describing their individual worries, were instructed to continue to worry, and were scanned 5 min later. Subjects rated themselves as more anxious during the worry scans but showed no significant heart interbeat or skin conductance changes. During worry, rCBF increases were found bilaterally in the medial fronto-orbital gyri and the right thalamus; rCBF decreases were found bilaterally in the hippocampi and amygdalae, in the right insula, the left and right inferior, middle and superior temporal gyri and the occipito-temporal gyri, the right inferior occipital gyrus and the left supramarginal gyrus. Activity of the left orbito-frontal gyrus was negatively correlated with activity of the amygdalae. The results support the hypothesis that worry-induced prefrontal activity suppresses affect-related subcortical regions. PMID:16297605

  15. Effectiveness of a heat and moisture exchanger in preventing hyperpnoea induced bronchoconstriction in subjects with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Gravelyn, T R; Capper, M; Eschenbacher, W L

    1987-01-01

    The effect of a heat and moisture exchanger, a device with hygroscopic material for conditioning inspired air, on hyperpnoea induced bronchoconstriction was studied in nine non-smoking volunteers with asthma, aged 19-32 years. Each had previously shown an increase of at least 100% in specific airways resistance (sRaw) to isocapnic hyperpnoea with dry air. On two separate days the subject performed isocapnic hyperpnoea with dry air at 60-70 l min-1 for five minutes. Before, immediately after, and five minutes after completion of a test sRaw measurements were made. Heat and moisture exchangers were placed in the breathing circuit on one of the two days. All subjects had an increase in sRaw of 100% or more without the heat and moisture exchangers (average increase 300%) but were protected from bronchoconstriction with the devices in place (average increase 7%) (p less than 0.005). The exchanger's resistance to airflow was less than 1 cm H2O for flow rates of 100 l min-1. A heat and moisture exchanger designed as a facemask or mouthpiece may allow a person with asthma to exercise without the need for prophylactic drugs. PMID:3424269

  16. Training and transfer effects of N-back training for brain-injured and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lindeløv, Jonas Kristoffer; Dall, Jonas Olsen; Kristensen, Casper Daniel; Aagesen, Marie Holt; Olsen, Stine Almgren; Snuggerud, Therese Ruud; Sikorska, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Working memory impairments are prevalent among patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). Computerised training targeting working memory has been researched extensively using samples from healthy populations but this field remains isolated from similar research in ABI patients. We report the results of an actively controlled randomised controlled trial in which 17 patients and 18 healthy subjects completed training on an N-back task. The healthy group had superior improvements on both training tasks (SMD = 6.1 and 3.3) whereas the ABI group improved much less (SMD = 0.5 and 1.1). Neither group demonstrated transfer to untrained tasks. We conclude that computerised training facilitates improvement of specific skills rather than high-level cognition in healthy and ABI subjects alike. The acquisition of these specific skills seems to be impaired by brain injury. The most effective use of computer-based cognitive training may be to make the task resemble the targeted behaviour(s) closely in order to exploit the stimulus-specificity of learning. PMID:26879183

  17. Effects of excitative and sedative music on subjective and physiological relaxation.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, M; Tsukamoto, M

    1997-08-01

    Previous investigations using heart rate as a measure have not clarified the excitative-sedative effects of music. One of the sources of this failure was considered to be use of the index of heart rate. The present purpose was to examine the excitative-sedative effect of music on indices of the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous activities through spectral analysis of heart rate. The presented stimuli were three excitative musical pieces and three sedative ones. Subjective feelings about music were measured by an adjective checklist concerning musical activity. Heart-rate variabilities divided into two components of Low Frequency, mainly affected by the sympathetic nervous system and of High Frequency, mainly affected by the parasympathetic nervous system. Six types of heart-rate indices were employed: (1) mean increments from posttrial base, (2) coefficient of variances of heart rate, (3) mean powers of Low Frequency, (4) coefficient of component variances of Low Frequency, (5) mean powers of High Frequency, and (6) coefficient of component variances of High Frequency. From the factor analysis based on responses to an adjective checklist, there was a single major activity factor. Activity scores showed some were high during excitative pieces and others low during sedative ones. For heart rate, excitative-sedative effects of music were observed only in indices related to High Frequency. This result suggests that musical effect was observed in measures of the parasympathetic nervous system but not in the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:9293589

  18. Effect of repeated gaboxadol administration on night sleep and next-day performance in healthy elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Stefan; Zihl, Josef; Steiger, Axel; Lancel, Marike

    2005-04-01

    Aging is associated with dramatic reductions in sleep continuity and sleep intensity. Since gaboxadol, a selective GABA(A) receptor agonist, has been demonstrated to improve sleep consolidation and promote deep sleep, it may be an effective hypnotic, particularly for elderly patients with insomnia. In the present study, we investigated the effects of subchronic gaboxadol administration on nocturnal sleep and its residual effects during the next days in elderly subjects. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced crossover study in 10 healthy elderly subjects without sleep complaints. The subjects were administered either placebo or 15 mg gaboxadol hydrochloride at bedtime on three consecutive nights. Sleep was recorded during each night from 2300 to 0700 h and tests assessing attention (target detection, stroop test) and memory function (visual form recognition, immediate word recall, digit span) were applied at 0900, 1400, and 1700 h during the following days. Compared with placebo, gaboxadol significantly shortened subjective sleep onset latency and increased self-rated sleep intensity and quality. Polysomnographic recordings showed that it significantly decreased the number of awakenings, the amount of intermittent wakefulness, and stage 1, and increased slow wave sleep and stage 2. These effects were stable over the three nights. None of the subjects reported side effects. Next-day cognitive performance was not affected by gaboxadol. Gaboxadol persistently improved subjective and objective sleep quality and was devoid of residual effects. Thus, at the employed dose, it seems an effective hypnotic in elderly subjects. PMID:15602499

  19. Effect of Piezoelectric Implant on the Structural Integrity of Composite Laminates Subjected to Tensile Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masmoudi, Sahir; El Mahi, Abderrahim; Turki, Saïd

    2016-07-01

    The embedment of sensors within composite structures gives the opportunity to develop smart materials for health and usage monitoring systems. This study investigates the use of acoustic emission monitoring with embedded piezoelectric sensor during mechanical tests in order to identify the effects of introducing the sensor into the composite materials. The composite specimen with and without embedded sensor were subject to tensile static and fatigue loading. The analysis and observation of AE signals show that the integration of a sensor presents advantage of the detection of the acoustic events and also show the presence of three or four types of damage during tests. The incorporation of piezoelectric sensor has a negligible influence on the mechanical properties of materials.

  20. On the effect of bias on the behavior of MOS structures subjected to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, O. V.

    2015-06-15

    Using a quantitative model [6], the analysis of published data on the effect of the gate bias on the behavior of MOS structure subjected to ionizing radiation is performed. It is shown that, along with hydrogen-containing traps, there are hydrogen-free hole traps in samples with a low content of hydrogen; traps of both types are distributed inhomogeneously over the thickness of the gate insulator. In addition to ionized hydrogen, neutral hydrogen is involved in the formation of surface states and provides the main contribution to this process at negative gate bias. A decrease in the shift of the threshold voltage in the case of high fields is caused by an increase in the drift component of the hole drain to the electrodes.

  1. Subjective evaluation of the effect of noise and interference on frequency modulated NTSC television signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, M.; Chouinard, G.; Trenholm, R.

    1984-12-01

    The future environment of broadcasting satellites may well be governed by the limiting factor of interference between television signals from neighboring satellites. A program of tests was performed to evaluate subjectively the effect of aggregate interference and/or noise on the impairment of television pictures. Up to four interfering channels were added in an environment resembling that of future broadcasting satellite systems including up to two co-frequency channels and up to two adjacent channels. Also results of just-perceptible interference tests due to adjacent channel interferer at various intercarrier spacings and for different receive filter characteristics on the wanted signal path are presented. The results of these tests are considered valuable in the study of the quality standard for the RARC-83 for the planning of the broadcasting-satellite service.

  2. Shape Memory Effects in TiNi-based Alloys Subjected to Electroplastic Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapova, A. A.; Resnina, N. N.; Stolyarov, V. V.

    2014-07-01

    One of the prospective methods for structure refinement is electroplastic rolling (EPR). The use of an electric current pulse during cold rolling enhances deformability (1.5-3 times for TiNi-based alloys). It was shown that EPR ( e > 1) with post-deformation annealing at 450-500 °C leads to nanostructure formation with a grain size of 60-120 nm. Also, EPR leads to an increase in functional properties of TiNi-based alloys. So, the recovery coefficient was revealed as being better than the undeformed alloy (90-96% for Ti49,2Ni50,8 and 75-80% for Ti50,0Ni50,0). In the Ti50,0Ni50,0 subjected to EPR up to strain 3.6 and subsequent annealing at 450 °C for 1 h, the superelasticity effect is found.

  3. Effects of deindividuating situational cues and aggressive models on subjective deindividuation and aggression.

    PubMed

    Prentice-Dunn, S; Rogers, R W

    1980-07-01

    This experiment demonstrated that a subjective state of deindividuation mediates the effect of deindividuating situational cues on aggression displayed by small groups (n = 4) of coacting aggressors. The deindividuated state was composed of two factors, Self-Awareness and Altered Experiencing, both of which had a causal influence on aggressive behavior. These data are interpreted in terms of deindividuation theories which assume that certain input variables reduce self-awareness and concern about social evaluation and thereby weaken the restraints against expressing antisocial behavior. Also as predicted, compared with a no-model control condition, a high-aggressive model disinhibited overt displays of aggression, whereas a low-aggressive model inhibited aggression among both individuated and deindividuated group members. PMID:7411390

  4. Orientation effects in high-order harmonic generation of H2^+ subject to strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2008-05-01

    We present ab initio 3D calculations of the orientation-dependent high-order harmonic generation (HHG) of the hydrogen molecular ion H2^+ subject to intense linearly polarized laser pulses with the wavelength 800nm [1]. The nuclei are kept at the equilibrium separation of 2 a.u., and the initial electronic state can be either 1σg (ground) or 1σu (first excited) state. Split-operator technique in the energy represenation and generalized pseudospectral discretization in prolate spheroidal coordinates are used to solve the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation. HHG power spectra show strong dependence on the orientation angle between the molecular axis and the polarization direction of the laser field. Particularly, orientation-selected resonances with other electronic states are well pronounced. Two-center interference effects in the HHG spectra are also analyzed.1. D. A. Telnov and S. I. Chu, Phys. Rev. A 76, 043412 (2007).

  5. Immediate effects of acupuncture on biceps brachii muscle function in healthy and post-stroke subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effects of acupuncture on muscle function in healthy subjects are contradictory and cannot be extrapolated to post-stroke patients. This study evaluated the immediate effects of manual acupuncture on myoelectric activity and isometric force in healthy and post-stroke patients. Methods A randomized clinical trial, with parallel groups, single-blinded study design, was conducted with 32 healthy subjects and 15 post-stroke patients with chronic hemiparesis. Surface electromyography from biceps brachii during maximal isometric voluntary tests was performed before and after 20-min intermittent, and manual stimulation of acupoints Quchi (LI11) or Tianquan (PC2). Pattern differentiation was performed by an automated method based on logistic regression equations. Results Healthy subjects showed a decrease in the root mean-squared (RMS) values after the stimulation of LI11 (pre: 1.392 ± 0.826 V; post: 0.612 ± 0.0.320 V; P = 0.002) and PC2 (pre: 1.494 ± 0.826 V; post: 0.623 ± 0.320 V; P = 0.001). Elbow flexion maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC) was not significantly different after acupuncture stimulation of LI11 (pre: 22.2 ± 10.7 kg; post: 21.7 ± 9.5 kg; P = 0.288) or PC2 (pre: 18.8 ± 4.6 kg; post: 18.7 ± 6.0 kg; P = 0.468). Post-stroke patients did not exhibit any significant decrease in the RMS values after the stimulation of LI11 (pre: 0.627 ± 0.335 V; post: 0.530 ± 0.272 V; P = 0.187) and PC2 (pre: 0.601 ± 0.258 V; post: 0.591 ± 0.326 V; P = 0.398). Also, no significant decrease in the MIVC value was observed after the stimulation of LI11 (pre: 9.6 ± 3.9 kg; post: 9.6 ± 4.7 kg; P = 0.499) or PC2 (pre: 10.7 ± 5.6 kg; post: 10.2 ± 5.3 kg; P = 0.251). Different frequency of patterns was observed among healthy subjects and post-stroke patients groups (χ2 = 9.759; P = 0.021). Conclusion Manual acupuncture provides sufficient neuromuscular stimuli to promote immediate changes in motor unit gross recruitment without repercussion in

  6. Effects of recreational soccer on physical fitness and health indices in sedentary healthy and unhealthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Hammami, A; Chamari, K; Slimani, M; Shephard, R J; Yousfi, N; Tabka, Z; Bouhlel, E

    2016-06-01

    Recreational soccer (RS) is becoming a popular alternative to the classical continuous exercise mode used for the improvement of cardiovascular and metabolic fitness in untrained people. The objective of this paper was to conduct a detailed systematic review of the literature, identifying the physiological responses to RS and the training effects of RS on aerobic fitness and health in untrained healthy individuals and clinical patients. PubMed, Google Scholar and ScienceDirect databases were searched using terms related to recreational soccer. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCT) that assessed acute physiological responses to RS or the training effects of RS on physical fitness and health in sedentary, untrained subjects of any age or health status. All studies were assessed for methodological quality using the PEDro scale. Thirty-five articles met the inclusion criteria; seven examined the acute response to RS, and 28 assessed training effects. Clear evidence was found that RS had positive effects on many health-related indices and variables, including VO2max (gains of 7-16%), blood pressure (reductions of 6-13 mmHg), body composition (decreased fat mass and improved indices of bone health), and metabolic and cardiac function. These positive effects were observed in both healthy individuals and clinical patients, irrespective of age or sex. Although this review provides clear evidence of the positive effects of RS on health, most studies had limitations of methodology (an average PEDro score < 6). Furthermore, many of the training studies were from a small number of research groups. Future studies should be extended to other countries and institutions to ensure generality of the results. Regular RS training leads to significant cardiovascular and muscular adaptations and gains of health both in sedentary individuals and clinical patients at all ages, suggesting that RS is a potentially highly motivational method to enhance population health

  7. Effects of recreational soccer on physical fitness and health indices in sedentary healthy and unhealthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chamari, K; Slimani, M; Shephard, RJ; Yousfi, N; Tabka, Z; Bouhlel, E

    2016-01-01

    Recreational soccer (RS) is becoming a popular alternative to the classical continuous exercise mode used for the improvement of cardiovascular and metabolic fitness in untrained people. The objective of this paper was to conduct a detailed systematic review of the literature, identifying the physiological responses to RS and the training effects of RS on aerobic fitness and health in untrained healthy individuals and clinical patients. PubMed, Google Scholar and ScienceDirect databases were searched using terms related to recreational soccer. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCT) that assessed acute physiological responses to RS or the training effects of RS on physical fitness and health in sedentary, untrained subjects of any age or health status. All studies were assessed for methodological quality using the PEDro scale. Thirty-five articles met the inclusion criteria; seven examined the acute response to RS, and 28 assessed training effects. Clear evidence was found that RS had positive effects on many health-related indices and variables, including VO2max (gains of 7-16%), blood pressure (reductions of 6-13 mmHg), body composition (decreased fat mass and improved indices of bone health), and metabolic and cardiac function. These positive effects were observed in both healthy individuals and clinical patients, irrespective of age or sex. Although this review provides clear evidence of the positive effects of RS on health, most studies had limitations of methodology (an average PEDro score < 6). Furthermore, many of the training studies were from a small number of research groups. Future studies should be extended to other countries and institutions to ensure generality of the results. Regular RS training leads to significant cardiovascular and muscular adaptations and gains of health both in sedentary individuals and clinical patients at all ages, suggesting that RS is a potentially highly motivational method to enhance population health

  8. Effects of aerobic training on heart rate dynamics in sedentary subjects.

    PubMed

    Tulppo, Mikko P; Hautala, Arto J; Mäkikallio, Timo H; Laukkanen, Raija T; Nissilä, Seppo; Hughson, Richard L; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2003-07-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of moderate- and high-volume aerobic training on the time domain and on spectral and fractal heart rate (HR) variability indexes. Sedentary subjects were randomized into groups with moderate-volume training (n = 20), high-volume training (n = 20), and controls (n = 15). The training period was 8 wk, including 6 sessions/wk at an intensity of 70-80% of the maximum HR, lasting for 30 min/session in the moderate-volume group and 60 min/session in the high-volume group. Time domain, frequency domain, and short-term fractal scaling measures of HR variability were analyzed over a 24-h period. Mean HR decreased from 70 +/- 7 to 64 +/- 8 beats/min and from 67 +/- 5 to 60 +/- 6 beats/min (P < 0.001 for both) for the moderate- and high-volume training groups, respectively. The normalized high-frequency spectral component increased in both groups (P < 0.05). The normalized low-frequency component decreased significantly (P < 0.05), resulting in a marked decrease in low frequency-to-high frequency ratio in both groups. In addition, short-term scaling exponent decreased in both groups (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the changes of HR variability indexes between groups. Aerobic training in sedentary subjects results in altered autonomic regulation of HR toward vagal dominance. A moderate training volume is a sufficient intervention to induce these beneficial effects. PMID:12651862

  9. Effect of blood donation-mediated volume reduction on regional right ventricular deformation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Açar, Göksel; Alizade, Elnur; Avci, Anıl; Cakir, Hakan; Efe, Suleyman Cagan; Kalkan, Mehmet Emin; Tabakci, Mehmet Mustafa; Toprak, Cuneyt; Tanboğa, Ibrahim Halil; Esen, Ali Metin

    2014-03-01

    Strain (S) and strain rate (SR) are known to be altered in diseases associated with right ventricular (RV) pressure/volume overload and RV myocardial dysfunction; however determinants of S/SR are incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of blood donation-mediated volume reduction on regional RV deformation in healthy young adults. Study population was composed of 61 consecutive healthy subjects who were volunteers for blood donation. All underwent standard echocardiography and two-dimensional S and SR imaging by speckle tracking before and after 450 mL blood donation. We found no change in RV lateral wall SR in all three segments. However, the S in the apical and mid segments of the RV lateral wall immediately decreased after blood donation [-26.2 ± 3.3 vs. -23.2 ± 3.3 % (p < 0.0001) and -28.2 ± 3.4 vs. -27.1 ± 3.2 % (p = 0.009), respectively], whereas no change was observed in the basal segment. Moreover, changes in systolic S on the apical segment of the RV lateral wall before and after blood donation were significantly correlated with the changes in the RV size [end-diastolic area index, r = - 0.369 (p = 0.003) and end-systolic area index, r = - 0.319 (p = 0.012)] and changes in the stroke volume index [r = - 0.436 (p < 0.001)]. Blood donation-mediated volume reduction in healthy subjects caused a regional difference in RV longitudinal deformation with the lower mid and apical S that was related to parameters of volume load severity. However, RV systolic SR was found to be resistant to the effects of volume depletion. PMID:24442771

  10. Effect of licorice on the reduction of body fat mass in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Armanini, D; De Palo, C B; Mattarello, M J; Spinella, P; Zaccaria, M; Ermolao, A; Palermo, M; Fiore, C; Sartorato, P; Francini-Pesenti, F; Karbowiak, I

    2003-07-01

    The history of licorice, as a medicinal plant, is very old and has been used in many societies throughout the millennia. The active principle, glycyrrhetinic acid, is responsible for sodium retention and hypertension, which is the most common side-effect. We show an effect of licorice in reducing body fat mass. We studied 15 normal-weight subjects (7 males, age 22-26 yr, and 8 females, age 21-26 yr), who consumed for 2 months 3.5 g a day of a commercial preparation of licorice. Body fat mass (BFM, expressed as percentage of total body weight, by skinfold thickness and by bioelectrical impedance analysis, BIA) and extracellular water (ECW, percentage of total body water, by BIA) were measured. Body mass index (BMI) did not change. ECW increased (males: 41.8+/-2.0 before vs 47.0+/-2.3 after, p<0.001; females: 48.2+/-1.4 before vs 49.4+/-2.1 after, p<0.05). BFM was reduced by licorice: (male: before 12.0+/-2.1 vs after 10.8+/-2.9%, p<0.02; female: before 24.9+/-5.1 vs after 22.1+/-5.4, p<0.02); plasma renin activity (PRA) and aldosterone were suppressed. Licorice was able to reduce body fat mass and to suppress aldosterone, without any change in BMI. Since the subjects were consuming the same amount of calories during the study, we suggest that licorice can reduce fat by inhibiting 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Type 1 at the level of fat cells. PMID:14594116

  11. Skilled musicians are not subject to the McGurk effect.

    PubMed

    Proverbio, Alice M; Massetti, Gemma; Rizzi, Ezia; Zani, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The McGurk effect is a compelling illusion in which humans auditorily perceive mismatched audiovisual speech as a completely different syllable. In this study evidences are provided that professional musicians are not subject to this illusion, possibly because of their finer auditory or attentional abilities. 80 healthy age-matched graduate students volunteered to the study. 40 were musicians of Brescia Luca Marenzio Conservatory of Music with at least 8-13 years of musical academic studies. /la/, /da/, /ta/, /ga/, /ka/, /na/, /ba/, /pa/ phonemes were presented to participants in audiovisual congruent and incongruent conditions, or in unimodal (only visual or only auditory) conditions while engaged in syllable recognition tasks. Overall musicians showed no significant McGurk effect for any of the phonemes. Controls showed a marked McGurk effect for several phonemes (including alveolar-nasal, velar-occlusive and bilabial ones). The results indicate that the early and intensive musical training might affect the way the auditory cortex process phonetic information. PMID:27453363

  12. Dimethyltryptamine (DMT): subjective effects and patterns of use among Australian recreational users.

    PubMed

    Cakic, Vince; Potkonyak, Jacob; Marshall, Alex

    2010-09-01

    Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is an endogenous hallucinogen with traditional use as a sacrament in the orally active preparation of ayahuasca. Although the religious use of ayahuasca has been examined extensively, very little is known about the recreational use of DMT. In this study, Australian participants (n=121) reporting at least one lifetime use of DMT completed an online questionnaire recording patterns of use, subjective effects and attitudes towards their DMT use. Smoking DMT was by far the most common route of administration (98.3%) with a comparatively smaller proportion reporting use of ayahuasca (30.6%). The reasons for first trying DMT were out of a general interest in hallucinogenic drugs (46.6%) or curiosity about DMT's effects (41.7%), while almost one-third (31.1%) cited possible psychotherapeutic benefits of the drug. An increase in psychospiritual insight was the most commonly reported positive effect of both smoked DMT (75.5%) and ayahuasca (46.7%), a finding that is consistent with other studies examining the ritualised use of ayahuasca in a religious context. Although previous studies of DMT use have examined ayahuasca use exclusively, the present study demonstrates the ubiquity of smoking as the most prevalent route of administration among recreational DMT users. PMID:20570058

  13. Acute effects of ethanol and acetate on glucose kinetics in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Yki-Jaervinen, H.; Koivisto, V.A.; Ylikahri, R.; Taskinen, M.R. )

    1988-02-01

    The authors compared the effects of two ethanol doses on glucose kinetics and assessed the role of acetate as a mediator of ethanol-induced insulin resistance. Ten normal males were studied on four occasions, during which either a low or moderate ethanol, acetate, or saline dose was administered. Both ethanol doses similarly inhibited basal glucose production. The decrease in R{sub a} was matched by a comparable decrease in glucose utilization (R{sub d}), resulting in maintenance of normoglycemia. During hyperinsulinemia glucose disposal was lower in the moderate than the low-dose ethanol or saline studies. During acetate infusion, the blood acetate level was comparable with those in the ethanol studies. Acetate had no effect on glucose kinetics. In conclusion, (1) in overnight fasted subjects, ethanol does not cause hypoglycemia because its inhibitory effect on R{sub a} is counterbalanced by equal inhibition of R{sub d}; (2) basal R{sub a} and R{sub d} are maximally inhibited already by small ethanol doses, whereas inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal requires a moderate ethanol dose; and (3) acetate is not the mediator of ethanol-induced insulin resistance.

  14. Effect of ventilation inhomogeneity on "intrabreath" measurements of diffusing capacity in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Cotton, D J; Prabhu, M B; Mink, J T; Graham, B L

    1993-08-01

    In normal seated subjects we increased single-breath ventilation inhomogeneity by changing both the preinspiratory lung volume and breath-hold time and examined the ensuing effects on two different techniques of measuring the diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO). We measured the mean single-breath DLCO using the three-equation method (DLCOSB-3EQ) and also measured DLCO over discrete intervals during exhalation by the "intrabreath" method (DLCOexhaled). We assessed the distribution of ventilation using the normalized phase III slope for helium (SN). DLCOSB-3EQ was unaffected by preinspiratory lung volume and breath-hold time. DLCOexhaled increased with increasing preinspiratory lung volume and decreased with increasing breath-hold time. These changes correlated with the simultaneously observed changes in ventilation inhomogeneity as measured by SN (P < 0.01). We conclude that measurements of DLCOexhaled do not accurately reflect the mean DLCO. Intrabreath methods of measuring DLCO are based on the slope of the exhaled CO concentration curve, which is affected by both ventilation and diffusion inhomogeneities. Although DLCOexhaled may theoretically provide information about the distribution of CO uptake, the concomitant effects of ventilation nonuniformity on DLCOexhaled may mimic or mask the effects of diffusion nonuniformity. PMID:8226498

  15. Skilled musicians are not subject to the McGurk effect

    PubMed Central

    Proverbio, Alice M.; Massetti, Gemma; Rizzi, Ezia; Zani, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The McGurk effect is a compelling illusion in which humans auditorily perceive mismatched audiovisual speech as a completely different syllable. In this study evidences are provided that professional musicians are not subject to this illusion, possibly because of their finer auditory or attentional abilities. 80 healthy age-matched graduate students volunteered to the study. 40 were musicians of Brescia Luca Marenzio Conservatory of Music with at least 8–13 years of musical academic studies. /la/, /da/, /ta/, /ga/, /ka/, /na/, /ba/, /pa/ phonemes were presented to participants in audiovisual congruent and incongruent conditions, or in unimodal (only visual or only auditory) conditions while engaged in syllable recognition tasks. Overall musicians showed no significant McGurk effect for any of the phonemes. Controls showed a marked McGurk effect for several phonemes (including alveolar-nasal, velar-occlusive and bilabial ones). The results indicate that the early and intensive musical training might affect the way the auditory cortex process phonetic information. PMID:27453363

  16. Biomarkers of Dose and Effect of inhaled ozone in resting versus exercising human subjects: comparison with resting rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Human controlled exposure studies have generally focused on subjects exposed to ozone (O3) while exercising while exposures in rats have been done at rest. We exposed resting subjects to labeled O3 (18O3, 0.4 ppm, for 2 hr) and compared O3 dose and effects with our...

  17. Effects of consuming various foods and nutrients on objective and subjective aspects of human performance and behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.; Lieberman, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    A variety of behavioral tests were established and studies performed on young healthy subjects who received tryptophan, tyrosine or placeboes and on young and old subjects receiving protein and carbohydrate meals. The behavioral effect of the homone melatonin on human circadian rhythms was examined. The results are discussed.

  18. Effect Sizes as Result Interpretation Aids in Single-Subject Experimental Research: Description and Application of Four Nonoverlap Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakap, Salih

    2015-01-01

    Single-subject experimental research (SSER), one of the most commonly used research methods in special education and applied behaviour analysis, is a scientific, rigorous and valid method to evaluate the effectiveness of behavioural, educational and psychological treatments. However, studies using single-subject experimental research designs are…

  19. A Single-Subject Meta-Analysis of the Effectiveness of Time-Out in Reducing Disruptive Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vegas, Kristopher C.; Jenson, William R.; Kircher, John C.

    2007-01-01

    One current area of dispute in the psychological literature is the inclusion of and proper meta-analytic data analysis procedures for single-subject designs. The current single-subject meta-analysis (N = 25) investigated the effect of time-out for the reduction of disruptive classroom behaviors in nondevelopmentally delayed children. Two separate…

  20. Effects of growth hormone on glucose, lipid, and protein metabolism in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Møller, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde

    2009-04-01

    In evolutionary terms, GH and intracellular STAT 5 signaling is a very old regulatory system. Whereas insulin dominates periprandially, GH may be viewed as the primary anabolic hormone during stress and fasting. GH exerts anabolic effects directly and through stimulation of IGF-I, insulin, and free fatty acids (FFA). When subjects are well nourished, the GH-induced stimulation of IGF-I and insulin is important for anabolic storage and growth of lean body mass (LBM), adipose tissue, and glycogen reserves. During fasting and other catabolic states, GH predominantly stimulates the release and oxidation of FFA, which leads to decreased glucose and protein oxidation and preservation of LBM and glycogen stores. The most prominent metabolic effect of GH is a marked increase in lipolysis and FFA levels. In the basal state, the effects of GH on protein metabolism are modest and include increased protein synthesis and decreased breakdown at the whole body level and in muscle together with decreased amino acid degradation/oxidation and decreased hepatic urea formation. During fasting and stress, the effects of GH on protein metabolism become more pronounced; lack of GH during fasting increases protein loss and urea production rates by approximately 50%, with a similar increase in muscle protein breakdown. GH is a counterregulatory hormone that antagonizes the hepatic and peripheral effects of insulin on glucose metabolism via mechanisms involving the concomitant increase in FFA flux and uptake. This ability of GH to induce insulin resistance is significant for the defense against hypoglycemia, for the development of "stress" diabetes during fasting and inflammatory illness, and perhaps for the "Dawn" phenomenon (the increase in insulin requirements in the early morning hours). Adult patients with GH deficiency are insulin resistant-probably related to increased adiposity, reduced LBM, and impaired physical performance-which temporarily worsens when GH treatment is initiated

  1. Dietary zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the development of preneoplastic lesions in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romualdo, Guilherme Ribeiro; Goto, Renata Leme; Henrique Fernandes, Ana Angélica; Cogliati, Bruno; Barbisan, Luis Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Although there is a concomitance of zinc deficiency and high incidence/mortality for hepatocellular carcinoma in certain human populations, there are no experimental studies investigating the modifying effects of zinc on hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated whether dietary zinc deficiency or supplementation alter the development of hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions (PNL). Therefore, neonatal male Balb/C mice were submitted to a diethylnitrosamine/2-acetylaminefluorene-induced hepatocarcinogenesis model. Moreover, mice were fed adequate (35 mg/kg diet), deficient (3 mg/kg) or supplemented (180 mg/kg) zinc diets. Mice were euthanized at 12 (early time-point) or 24 weeks (late time-point) after introducing the diets. At the early time-point, zinc deficiency decreased Nrf2 protein expression and GSH levels while increased p65 and p53 protein expression and the number of PNL/area. At the late time-point, zinc deficiency also decreased GSH levels while increased liver genotoxicity, cell proliferation into PNL and PNL size. In contrast, zinc supplementation increased antioxidant defense at both time-points but not altered PNL development. Our findings are the first to suggest that zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the PNL development in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. The decrease of Nrf2/GSH pathway and increase of liver genotoxicity, as well as the increase of p65/cell proliferation, are potential mechanisms to this zinc deficiency-mediated effect. PMID:27544374

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies novel loci predisposing to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Amos, Christopher I; Wang, Li-E; Lee, Jeffrey E; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Chen, Wei V; Fang, Shenying; Kosoy, Roman; Zhang, Mingfeng; Qureshi, Abrar A; Vattathil, Selina; Schacherer, Christopher W; Gardner, Julie M; Wang, Yuling; Bishop, D Tim; Barrett, Jennifer H; MacGregor, Stuart; Hayward, Nicholas K; Martin, Nicholas G; Duffy, David L; Mann, Graham J; Cust, Anne; Hopper, John; Brown, Kevin M; Grimm, Elizabeth A; Xu, Yaji; Han, Younghun; Jing, Kaiyan; McHugh, Caitlin; Laurie, Cathy C; Doheny, Kim F; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Seldin, Michael F; Han, Jiali; Wei, Qingyi

    2011-12-15

    We performed a multistage genome-wide association study of melanoma. In a discovery cohort of 1804 melanoma cases and 1026 controls, we identified loci at chromosomes 15q13.1 (HERC2/OCA2 region) and 16q24.3 (MC1R) regions that reached genome-wide significance within this study and also found strong evidence for genetic effects on susceptibility to melanoma from markers on chromosome 9p21.3 in the p16/ARF region and on chromosome 1q21.3 (ARNT/LASS2/ANXA9 region). The most significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 15q13.1 locus (rs1129038 and rs12913832) lie within a genomic region that has profound effects on eye and skin color; notably, 50% of variability in eye color is associated with variation in the SNP rs12913832. Because eye and skin colors vary across European populations, we further evaluated the associations of the significant SNPs after carefully adjusting for European substructure. We also evaluated the top 10 most significant SNPs by using data from three other genome-wide scans. Additional in silico data provided replication of the findings from the most significant region on chromosome 1q21.3 rs7412746 (P = 6 × 10(-10)). Together, these data identified several candidate genes for additional studies to identify causal variants predisposing to increased risk for developing melanoma. PMID:21926416

  3. Preserving Subjective Wellbeing in the Face of Psychopathology: Buffering Effects of Personal Strengths and Resources

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Elisabeth H.; Snippe, Evelien; de Jonge, Peter; Jeronimus, Bertus F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many studies on resilience have shown that people can succeed in preserving mental health after a traumatic event. Less is known about whether and how people can preserve subjective wellbeing in the presence of psychopathology. We examined to what extent psychopathology can co-exist with acceptable levels of subjective wellbeing and which personal strengths and resources moderate the association between psychopathology and wellbeing. Methods Questionnaire data on wellbeing (Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life/Happiness Index), psychological symptoms (Depression Anxiety Stress Scales), and personal strengths and resources (humor, Humor Style questionnaire; empathy, Empathy Quotient questionnaire; social company; religion; daytime activities, Living situation questionnaire) were collected in a population-based internet study (HowNutsAreTheDutch; N = 12,503). Data of the subset of participants who completed the above questionnaires (n = 2411) were used for the present study. Regression analyses were performed to predict wellbeing from symptoms, resources, and their interactions. Results Satisfactory levels of wellbeing (happiness score 6 or higher) were found in a substantial proportion of the participants with psychological symptoms (58% and 30% of those with moderate and severe symptom levels, respectively). The association between symptoms and wellbeing was large and negative (-0.67, P < .001), but less so in persons with high levels of self-defeating humor and in those with a partner and/or pet. Several of the personal strengths and resources had a positive main effect on wellbeing, especially self-enhancing humor, having a partner, and daytime activities. Conclusions Cultivating personal strengths and resources, like humor, social/animal company, and daily occupations, may help people preserve acceptable levels of wellbeing despite the presence of symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. PMID:26963923

  4. The effect of ozone exposure on the dispersion of inhaled aerosol boluses in healthy human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, M.J.; Bennett, W.D.; DeWitt, P.; Seal, E.; Strong, A.A.; Gerrity, T.R. )

    1991-07-01

    Acute exposure of humans to low levels of ozone are known to cause decreases in FVC and increases in SRaw. These alterations in lung function do not, however, elucidate the potential for acute small airway responses. In this study we employed a test of aerosol dispersion to examine the potential effects of ozone on small airways in humans. Twenty-two healthy nonsmoking male volunteers were exposed to 0.4 ppm ozone for 1 h while exercising at 20 L/min/m2 body surface area. Before and immediately after exposure, tests of spirometry (FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75) and plethysmography (Raw and SRaw) were performed. Subjects also performed an aerosol dispersion test before and after exposure. Each test involved a subject inhaling five to seven breaths of a 300-ml bolus of a 0.5 micron triphenyl phosphate aerosol injected into a 2-L tidal volume. The bolus was injected into the tidal breath at three different depths: at Depth A the bolus was injected after 1.6 L of clean air were inhaled from FRC, at Depth B after 1.2 L, and at Depth C after 1.2 L but with inhalation beginning from RV. The primary measure of bolus dispersion was the expired half-width (HW). Secondary measures were the ratio (expressed as percent) of peak exhaled aerosol concentration to peak inhaled concentration (PR), shift in the median bolus volume between inspiration and expiration (VS), and percent of total aerosol recovered (RC). Changes in pulmonary function after ozone exposure were consistent with previous findings.

  5. The effect of low light intensity on the maintenance of circadian synchrony in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Lyman, J.; Beljan, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The light-intensity threshold for humans is not known. In past space flights owing to power restrictions, light intensities have been minimal and reported to be as low as 15 ft. c. This study was conducted to determine whether the light (L)/dark (D) environment of 16L : 8D at the relatively low light intensity of 15 ft. c. was adequate for the maintenance of circadian synchrony in human subjects. Six healthy male subjects aged 20-23 years were exposed for 21 days to a 16L : 8D photoperiod. During the first 7 days the light intensity was 100 ft. c.; it was reduced to 15 ft. c. during the next 7 days and increased again to 100 ft. c. during the last 7 days of the study. Rectal temperature (RT) and heart rate (HR) were recorded continuously throughout the 21 days of the study. In the 100 ft. c. 16L : 8D the RT and HR rhythms remained stable and circadian throughout. When the light intensity was decreased to 15 ft. c. the periodicity of the HR rhythm was significantly decreased and this rhythm showed marked instability. In contrast the period of the RT rhythm did not change but a consistent phase delay occurred due to a delay in the lights-on associated rise in RT. These divergent effects on these two rhythms in internal desynchronization and performance decrement during the 15 ft. c. exposure. The data emphasize the need for establishing accurately the minimal lighting requirements for the maintenance of circadian rhythms of humans in confined environments.

  6. Effects of walking speed and age on the muscle forces of unimpaired gait subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliger, Carlos G.; Crespo, Marcos J.; Braidot, Ariel A.; Ravera, Emiliano P.

    2016-04-01

    Clinical gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait disorders and also provides a mean for a more comprehensive treatment plan. However, direct measures of muscle forces are difficult to obtain in clinical settings because it generally requires invasive techniques. Techniques of musculoskeletal modeling have been used for several decades to improve the benefits of clinical gait analysis, but many of the previous studies were focused on analyzing separately the muscle forces distribution of children or adult subjects with only one condition of walking speed. For these reason, the present study aims to enhance the current literature by describing the age and speed gait effects on muscle forces during walking. We used a musculoskeletal model with 23 degrees of freedom and 92 musculotendon actuators to represent 76 muscles in the lower extremities and torso. The computed muscle control algorithm was used to estimate the muscle forces from the kinematics and to adjust the model obtained in the residual reduction algorithm. We find that hamstrings has an important peak in the mid-stance phase in the adult group but this peak disappears in the children group with the same walking speed condition. Furthermore, the rectus femoris presents an increase in the muscle force during the pre- and mid-swing in concordance with the increment in the walking speed of subjects. This behavior could be associated with the role that the rectus femoris has in the acceleration of the knee joint. Finally, we show that the soleus is the muscle that perform the major force throughout the gait cycle regardless of age and walking speed.

  7. Water- versus land-based exercise in elderly subjects: effects on physical performance and body composition

    PubMed Central

    Bergamin, Marco; Ermolao, Andrea; Tolomio, Silvia; Berton, Linda; Sergi, Giuseppe; Zaccaria, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a 24-week exercise protocol carried out in geothermal spring water to improve overall physical function and muscle mass in a group of healthy elderly subjects. A further aim was to compare this water-based protocol with a land-based protocol and a control group. For this purpose, 59 subjects were recruited and randomly allocated to three groups: aquatic group (AG), land group (LG), and control group (CG). AG and LG followed a 6-month, twice-weekly, multimodality exercise intervention. AG underwent the protocol in hot-spring water (36°C) while LG did it in a land-based environment. After the intervention, knee-extension strength was maintained in AG and LG. The 8-foot up-and-go test showed a reduction in both exercise groups (AG −19.3%, P < 0.05; LG −12.6%, P < 0.05), with a significantly greater decrease in AG. The back-scratch test revealed an improvement only in AG (25.8%; P < 0.05), while the sit-and-reach test improved in all groups. Finally, AG reduced fat mass by 4% (P < 0.05), and dominant forearm fat decreased by 9.2% (P < 0.05). In addition, calf muscle density increased by 1.8% (P < 0.05). In summary, both water- and land-based activities were beneficial in maintaining strength and in improving lower-body flexibility. Aquatic exercise appeared a better activity to improve dynamic balance. Thermal swimming pools and the use of rating of perceived exertion as a method of exercise monitoring should be considered potentially useful tools to enhance physical performance and body composition in healthy elderly. PMID:24009416

  8. The effect of tafamidis on the QTc interval in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Klamerus, Karen J; Watsky, Eric; Moller, Robert; Wang, Ronnie; Riley, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Aims The transthyretin (TTR) stabilizer, tafamidis, has demonstrated efficacy and safety in the treatment of TTR familial amyloid polyneuropathy (20 mg day−1). Tafamidis use in TTR cardiomyopathy led to the study of the potential effect of tafamidis on the QTc interval in healthy subjects. Methods This randomized, three treatment, three period, six sequence crossover study with placebo, a positive control (moxifloxacin 400 mg) and tafamidis (400 mg, to achieve a supra-therapeutic Cmax of ∽20 µg ml−1) was conducted in healthy volunteers at three clinical research units. Oral dosing in each of the three treatment periods was separated by a washout period of  ≥ 14 days. Serial triplicate 12-lead electrocardiograms were performed. QTc intervals were derived using the Fridericia correction method. Safety and tolerability were assessed by physical examination, vital signs measurement, laboratory analyses and monitoring of adverse events (AEs). Results A total of 42 subjects completed the study. The upper limit of the two-sided 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the difference in baseline-adjusted QTcF between tafamidis 400 mg and placebo was <10 ms (non-inferiority criterion) for all time points. The lower limit of the two-sided 90% CI between moxifloxacin 400 mg and placebo exceeded 5 ms at the pre-specified moxifloxacin tmax of 3 h post-dose, confirming assay sensitivity. Cmax and AUC(0,24 h) for tafamidis were 20.36 µg ml−1 and 305.4 µg ml−1 h, respectively. There were no serious/severe AEs or treatment discontinuations due to AEs. Conclusions This thorough QTc study suggests that a supra-therapeutic single 400 mg oral dose of tafamidis does not prolong the QTc interval and is well-tolerated in healthy volunteers. PMID:25546001

  9. Effect of "Touch Rugby" Training on the Cardiovascular Autonomic Control In Sedentary Subjects.

    PubMed

    Filliau, C; Younes, M; Blanchard, A-L; Piscione, J; Van de Louw, A; Seguret, C; Israel, J; Cottin, F

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of "touch-rugby" training on the cardiovascular autonomic control in sedentary subjects. 22 adults (30-64 years old) were included in this study. Before (pre-test) and after (post-test) the period of training, cardio-respiratory recordings were achieved at rest and during a graded maximal exercise on a treadmill. The Smoothed-Pseudo-Wigner-Ville Distribution provided instantaneous time frequency components of RR intervals and systolic blood pressure variability in low- and high-frequency bands. The baroreflex sensitivity was assessed in low-frequency and high-frequency bands. Between pre-test and post-test, resting heart rate (74±10 vs. 69±12 beats.min(-1), p<0.05) and systolic blood pressure (118±19 vs. 103±22 mm Hg, p<0.01) decreased. Root mean square of successive differences (34.6±30.1 vs. 47.6±34.8 ms, p<0.001), high-frequency RR variability (590±288 vs. 1262±767 ms², p<0.001) increased whereas low-frequency/high-frequency ratio decreased (3.5±3.4 vs. 1.5±0.9, p<0.05). The high-frequency baroreflex sensitivity increased (13.4±10.1 vs. 26.0±20.9 ms.mmHg(-1), p<0.05). Playing touch rugby with one session weekly over 3 months modified the cardiovascular autonomic control of sedentary subjects. A decrease in the sympathetic tone combined with both an increase in the vagal tone and a decrease in systolic blood pressure at rest were observed. Therefore, such training appears to be beneficial to cardiac health. PMID:25781871

  10. Effect of Daily Supine LBNP Exercise on Gastrointestinal Motility During Antiorthostatic Bedrest in Normal Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; DeKerlegand, D.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Space flight alters gastrointestinal (GI) function in general, and GI motility, in particular. This can decrease appetite, affect the body's ability to absorb nutrients, fluids and electrolytes, and contribute to a negative energy balance. Antiorthostatic bed rest (ABR) has been used to simulate microgravity-induced physiological changes in human subjects. The objective of this investigation is to determine if daily supine lower body negative pressure (LBNP) exercise will maintain GI motility at near normal levels during ABR. Eight subjects participated in the study protocol consisting of an ambulatory phase scheduled before bedrest periods and two 14 day bed rest (6 deg head-down tilt) periods, once with and another time without exercise. Supine treadmill running in an LBNP chamber was used for exercise. Mouth-to-cecum transit time (MCTT) of lactulose was measured indirectly using the rise in breath hydrogen level after oral administration of lactulose (20 g) following a standard low-fiber breakfast. GI motility during ambulatory and ABR periods was assessed using MCTT data. Results of this Study indicate that GI motility during ABR without exercise decreased by 45% [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 56.2 +/- 6.0 (Ambulatory); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (ABR)]. Supine LBNP exercise did not significantly alter this reduction in GI motility during ABR [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 81.3 +/- 4.2 (Exercise); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (No Exercise)]. These results suggest that supine LBNP exercise may not be an effective countermeasure for microgravity-induced decrements in GI motility and function.

  11. The subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with dermocosmetics use by patients with skin disturbances

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atopic dermatitis and different constellations and the severity of symptoms that not meet the criteria for this diagnosis are a common skin disturbances. An important component of the treatment of these diseases and the proper care of sensitive and dry skin is local dermocosmetics use. Aim To assess the frequency of skin disturbances and the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use as well as the source of information about these products. Material and methods A questionnaire survey about the type of skin disturbances, the subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use and source of information about these products was performed by 787 general practitioners, internists, pediatricians, dermatologists, allergists and pulmonologists and 252 pharmacists in a group of 51 085 subjects with skin disturbances. Results In the group interviewed by doctors, the most common skin problem was atopic dermatitis (52.5%) and in the group interviewed by pharmacists, pruritus (70.0%). In both groups, respondents after Atoperal products use most frequently reported improving of the skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In both groups, over 90.0% of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with Atoperal products use. In the group surveyed by doctors, 75.5% of respondents obtained information about these products from doctors and 17.4% from pharmacists, while in the group surveyed by pharmacists, 48.9% from pharmacists and 36.1% from doctors. Conclusions Atopic dermatitis was most frequently diagnosed in a group surveyed by doctors. The main skin disturbance that occurred in a group surveyed by pharmacists was skin pruritus. The main effect of Atoperal products use, independent of the place of the survey, included improving of skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In a study population, there was a high level of satisfaction from the use of Atoperal products. Doctors

  12. Antihypertensive effect of green coffee bean extract on mildly hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Kozuma, Kazuya; Tsuchiya, Shigemi; Kohori, Jun; Hase, Tadashi; Tokimitsu, Ichiro

    2005-09-01

    A water-soluble green coffee bean extract (GCE) has been shown to be effective against hypertension in both spontaneously hypertensive rats and humans. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study evaluated the dose-response relationship of GCE in 117 male volunteers with mild hypertension. Subjects were randomized into four groups: a placebo and three drug groups that received 46 mg, 93 mg, or 185 mg of GCE once a day. After 28 days, systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the placebo, 46 mg, 93 mg, and 185 mg groups was reduced by -1.3+/-3.0 mmHg, -3.2+/-4.6 mmHg, -4.7+/-4.5 mmHg, and -5.6+/-4.2 mmHg from the baseline, respectively. The decreases in SBP in the 93 mg group (p<0.05) and the 185 mg group (p<0.01) were statistically significant compared with the placebo group. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in the placebo, 46 mg, 93 mg, and 185 mg groups was reduced by -0.8+/-3.1 mmHg, -2.9+/-2.9 mmHg, -3.2+/-3.2 mmHg, and -3.9+/-2.8 mmHg from the baseline, respectively, and significant effects were observed in the 93 mg group (p<0.05) and the 185 mg group (p<0.01) compared with the placebo group. Both blood pressures were significantly reduced in a dose-related manner by GCE (p<0.001). Adverse effects caused by GCE were not observed. The results suggested that daily use of GCE has a blood pressure-lowering effect in patients with mild hypertension. PMID:16419643

  13. Acute Effects of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide on Circulating Steroid Levels in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Strajhar, P; Schmid, Y; Liakoni, E; Dolder, P C; Rentsch, K M; Kratschmar, D V; Odermatt, A; Liechti, M E

    2016-03-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT2A ) receptor agonist that is used recreationally worldwide. Interest in LSD research in humans waned after the 1970s, although the use of LSD in psychiatric research and practice has recently gained increasing attention. LSD produces pronounced acute psychedelic effects, although its influence on plasma steroid levels over time has not yet been characterised in humans. The effects of LSD (200 μg) or placebo on plasma steroid levels were investigated in 16 healthy subjects using a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study design. Plasma concentration-time profiles were determined for 15 steroids using liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. LSD increased plasma concentrations of the glucocorticoids cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone and 11-dehydrocorticosterone compared to placebo. The mean maximum concentration of LSD was reached at 1.7 h. Mean peak psychedelic effects were reached at 2.4 h, with significant alterations in mental state from 0.5 h to > 10 h. Mean maximal concentrations of cortisol and corticosterone were reached at 2.5 h and 1.9 h, and significant elevations were observed 1.5-6 h and 1-3 h after drug administration, respectively. LSD also significantly increased plasma concentrations of the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone but not other androgens, progestogens or mineralocorticoids compared to placebo. A close relationship was found between plasma LSD concentrations and changes in plasma cortisol and corticosterone and the psychotropic response to LSD, and no clockwise hysteresis was observed. In conclusion, LSD produces significant acute effects on circulating steroids, especially glucocorticoids. LSD-induced changes in circulating glucocorticoids were associated with plasma LSD concentrations over time and showed no acute pharmacological tolerance. PMID:26849997

  14. Acute Effects of Modafinil on Brain Resting State Networks in Young Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Pieramico, Valentina; Ferretti, Antonio; Macchia, Antonella; Tommasi, Marco; Saggino, Aristide; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Manna, Antonietta; Navarra, Riccardo; Cieri, Filippo; Stuppia, Liborio; Tartaro, Armando; Sensi, Stefano L.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is growing debate on the use of drugs that promote cognitive enhancement. Amphetamine-like drugs have been employed as cognitive enhancers, but they show important side effects and induce addiction. In this study, we investigated the use of modafinil which appears to have less side effects compared to other amphetamine-like drugs. We analyzed effects on cognitive performances and brain resting state network activity of 26 healthy young subjects. Methodology A single dose (100 mg) of modafinil was administered in a double-blind and placebo-controlled study. Both groups were tested for neuropsychological performances with the Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices II set (APM) before and three hours after administration of drug or placebo. Resting state functional magnetic resonance (rs-FMRI) was also used, before and after three hours, to investigate changes in the activity of resting state brain networks. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) was employed to evaluate differences in structural connectivity between the two groups. Protocol ID: Modrest_2011; NCT01684306; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01684306. Principal Findings Results indicate that a single dose of modafinil improves cognitive performance as assessed by APM. Rs-fMRI showed that the drug produces a statistically significant increased activation of Frontal Parietal Control (FPC; p<0.04) and Dorsal Attention (DAN; p<0.04) networks. No modifications in structural connectivity were observed. Conclusions and Significance Overall, our findings support the notion that modafinil has cognitive enhancing properties and provide functional connectivity data to support these effects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01684306 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01684306. PMID:23935959

  15. Beyond intensity: Spectral features effectively predict music-induced subjective arousal.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Bruno; Marin, Manuela M; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2014-01-01

    Emotions in music are conveyed by a variety of acoustic cues. Notably, the positive association between sound intensity and arousal has particular biological relevance. However, although amplitude normalization is a common procedure used to control for intensity in music psychology research, direct comparisons between emotional ratings of original and amplitude-normalized musical excerpts are lacking. In this study, 30 nonmusicians retrospectively rated the subjective arousal and pleasantness induced by 84 six-second classical music excerpts, and an additional 30 nonmusicians rated the same excerpts normalized for amplitude. Following the cue-redundancy and Brunswik lens models of acoustic communication, we hypothesized that arousal and pleasantness ratings would be similar for both versions of the excerpts, and that arousal could be predicted effectively by other acoustic cues besides intensity. Although the difference in mean arousal and pleasantness ratings between original and amplitude-normalized excerpts correlated significantly with the amplitude adjustment, ratings for both sets of excerpts were highly correlated and shared a similar range of values, thus validating the use of amplitude normalization in music emotion research. Two acoustic parameters, spectral flux and spectral entropy, accounted for 65% of the variance in arousal ratings for both sets, indicating that spectral features can effectively predict arousal. Additionally, we confirmed that amplitude-normalized excerpts were adequately matched for loudness. Overall, the results corroborate our hypotheses and support the cue-redundancy and Brunswik lens models. PMID:24215647

  16. The Subjective Effects of Alcohol-Tobacco Co-Use: An Ecological Momentary Assessment Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Piasecki, Thomas M.; Jahng, Seungmin; Wood, Phillip K.; Robertson, Brandon M.; Epler, Amee J.; Cronk, Nikole J.; Rohrbaugh, John W.; Heath, Andrew C.; Shiffman, Saul; Sher, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol and tobacco use covary at multiple levels of analysis, and co-use of the two substances may have profound health consequences. In order to characterize the motivationally relevant processes contributing to co-use, the current study used Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) to examine the subjective consequences of naturally occurring simultaneous use of alcohol and tobacco. Current smokers who reported frequently drinking alcohol (N = 259) monitored their daily experiences for 21 days using electronic diaries. Participants responded to prompted assessments and also initiated recordings when they smoked a cigarette or completed the first drink in a drinking episode. Momentary reports of smoking and alcohol consumption were associated with one another, and these effects remained after adjustment for occasion- and person-level covariates. When participants consumed alcohol, they reported increased pleasure and decreased punishment from the last cigarette. Smoking was associated with small increases in pleasure from the last drink. Ratings of “buzzed” and “dizzy” were synergistically affected by co-use of alcohol and tobacco. Co-use was also followed by higher levels of craving for both alcohol and tobacco. Results point to the importance of reward and incentive processes in ongoing drug use and suggest that alcohol intensifies real-time reports of the motivational consequences of smoking more strongly than smoking affects corresponding appraisals of alcohol effects. PMID:21443289

  17. Effects of unilateral robotic limb loading on gait characteristics in subjects with chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hemiparesis after stroke often leads to impaired ankle motor control that impacts gait function. In recent studies, robotic devices have been developed to address this impairment. While capable of imparting forces to assist during training and gait, these devices add mass to the paretic leg which might encumber patients' gait pattern. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of the added mass of one of these robots, the MIT's Anklebot, while unpowered, on gait of chronic stroke survivors during overground and treadmill walking. Methods Nine chronic stroke survivors walked overground and on a treadmill with and without the anklebot mounted on the paretic leg. Gait parameters, interlimb symmetry, and joint kinematics were collected for the four conditions. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were conducted to examine for possible differences across four conditions for the paretic and nonparetic leg. Results The added inertia and friction of the unpowered anklebot had no statistically significant effect on spatio-temporal parameters of gait, including paretic and nonparetic step time and stance percentage, in both overground and treadmill conditions. Noteworthy, interlimb symmetry as characterized by relative stance duration was greater on the treadmill than overground regardless of loading conditions. The presence of the unpowered robot loading reduced the nonparetic knee peak flexion on the treadmill and paretic peak dorsiflexion overground (p < 0.05). Conclusions Our results suggest that for these subjects the added inertia and friction of this backdriveable robot did not significantly alter their gait pattern. PMID:20492698

  18. Effect of Tongkat Ali on stress hormones and psychological mood state in moderately stressed subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Eurycoma longifolia is a medicinal plant commonly called tongkat ali (TA) and “Malaysian ginseng.” TA roots are a traditional “anti-aging” remedy and modern supplements are intended to improve libido, energy, sports performance and weight loss. Previous studies have shown properly-standardized TA to stimulate release of free testosterone, improve sex drive, reduce fatigue, and improve well-being. Methods We assessed stress hormones and mood state in 63 subjects (32 men and 31 women) screened for moderate stress and supplemented with a standardized hot-water extract of TA root (TA) or Placebo (PL) for 4 weeks. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) with significance set at p < 0.05 was used to determine differences between groups. Results Significant improvements were found in the TA group for Tension (−11%), Anger (−12%), and Confusion (−15%). Stress hormone profile (salivary cortisol and testosterone) was significantly improved by TA supplementation, with reduced cortisol exposure (−16%) and increased testosterone status (+37%). Conclusion These results indicate that daily supplementation with tongkat ali root extract improves stress hormone profile and certain mood state parameters, suggesting that this “ancient” remedy may be an effective approach to shielding the body from the detrimental effects of “modern” chronic stress, which may include general day-to-day stress, as well as the stress of dieting, sleep deprivation, and exercise training. PMID:23705671

  19. Effects of Nalbuphine on Anterior Pituitary and Adrenal Hormones and Subjective Responses in Male Cocaine Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Goletiani, Nathalie V.; Mendelson, Jack H.; Sholar, Michelle B.; Siegel, Arthur J.; Skupny, Alicja J.; Mello, Nancy K.

    2007-01-01

    Nalbuphine (Nubain®) is a mixed action mu-kappa agonist used clinically for the management of pain. Nalbuphine and other mu-kappa agonists decreased cocaine self-administration in preclinical models. Cocaine stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, but the effects of nalbuphine on the HPA axis are unknown. Analgesic doses (5 and 10 mg/70 kg) of IV nalbuphine were administered to healthy male cocaine abusers, and plasma levels of PRL, ACTH and cortisol were measured before and at 10, 17, 19, 23, 27, 31, 35, 40, 45, 60, 75, 105, 135 min after nalbuphine administration. Subjective effects were measured on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Prolactin (PRL) increased significantly within 17 min (P=.04) and reached peak levels of 22.1 ± 7.1 ng/ml and 54.1 ± 11.3 at 60 min after low and high dose nalbuphine administration, respectively. VAS reports of “Sick,” “Bad” and “Dizzy” were significantly higher after 10 mg/70 kg than after 5 mg/70 kg nalbuphine (P=.05−.0001), and were significantly correlated with increases in PRL (P=.05−.0003). However, sedation and emesis were observed only after a 10 mg/70 kg dose of nalbuphine. Interestingly, ACTH and cortisol levels did not change significantly after administration of either dose of nalbuphine. Taken together, these data suggest that nalbuphine had both mu- and kappa-like effects on PRL (PRL increase) but did not increase ACTH and cortisol. PMID:17391744

  20. Analysis of induced sputum to examine the effects of prednisone on airway inflammation in asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Claman, D M; Boushey, H A; Liu, J; Wong, H; Fahy, J V

    1994-11-01

    To determine whether induced sputum samples might provide a useful means for evaluating the effects of therapy on airway mucosal inflammation, we examined induced sputum samples obtained before and after 6 days of treatment with prednisone (0.5 mg/kg/day) or placebo in a randomized, double-blind study of 24 asthmatic subjects. Induced sputum was analyzed for total and differential cell counts and for concentrations of eosinophil cationic protein, albumin, and mucin-like glycoprotein. We found that the mean (+/- SEM) percentage of eosinophils in sputum samples from the prednisone-treated group fell from 14.1% +/- 5.0% at baseline to 1.8% +/- 0.8% after treatment, a decrease significantly greater than in the placebo-treated group (from 10.3% +/- 4.9% to 11.1% +/- 4.0%; p = 0.002). The absolute number of eosinophils also decreased significantly more in the prednisone-treated group than in the placebo-treated group (p = 0.04). In addition, eosinophil cationic protein levels in induced sputum fell more in the prednisone-treated group than in the placebo-treated group (from 324 +/- 131 ng/ml to 144 +/- 84 ng/ml vs 173 +/- 50 ng/ml to 188 +/- 47 ng/ml; p = 0.002). Furthermore, prednisone treatment was associated with a significant increase in peak expiratory flow, an effect that was significantly correlated with the decrease in eosinophil percentage in induced sputum (rs = 0.64, p = 0.04). Prednisone treatment was not associated with any significant change in the concentrations of albumin or mucin-like glycoprotein. We conclude that analysis of induced sputum is a useful noninvasive method for studying the effects of asthma therapy on airway eosinophilic inflammation. PMID:7963155

  1. CO exposure, puff topography, and subjective effects in waterpipe tobacco smokers

    PubMed Central

    Maziak, Wasim; Rastam, Samer; Ibrahim, Iman; Ward, Kenneth D.; Shihadeh, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Waterpipe tobacco smoking is increasing in popularity though the toxicant exposure and effects associated with this tobacco use method are not well understood. Methods: Sixty-one waterpipe tobacco smokers (56 males; mean age ± SD, 30.9 ± 9.5 years; mean number of weekly waterpipe smoking episodes, 7.8 ± 5.7; mean duration of waterpipe smoking 8.5 ± 6.1 years) abstained from smoking for at least 24 hr and then smoked tobacco from a waterpipe ad libitum in a laboratory. Before and after smoking, expired-air carbon monoxide (CO) and subjective effects were assessed; puff topography was measured during smoking. Results: The mean waterpipe use episode duration was 33.1 ± 13.1 min. Expired-air CO increased significantly from a mean of 4.0 ± 1.7 before to 35.5 ± 32.7 after smoking. On average, participants took 169 ± 100 puffs, with a mean puff volume of 511 ± 333 ml. Urge to smoke, restlessness, craving, and other tobacco abstinence symptoms were reduced significantly after smoking, while ratings of dizzy, lightheaded, and other direct effects of nicotine increased. Discussion: Expired-air CO and puff topography data indicate that, relative to a single cigarette, a single waterpipe tobacco smoking episode is associated with greater smoke exposure. Abstinent waterpipe tobacco smokers report symptoms similar to those reported by abstinent cigarette smokers, and these symptoms are reduced by subsequent waterpipe tobacco smoking. Taken together, these data are consistent with the notion that waterpipe tobacco smoking is likely associated with the risk of tobacco/nicotine dependence. PMID:19420278

  2. The Combined Effects of Alcohol, Caffeine and Expectancies on Subjective Experience, Impulsivity and Risk-Taking

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Adrienne J.; de Wit, Harriet; Lilje, Todd C.; Kassel, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeinated alcoholic beverage (CAB) consumption is a rapidly growing phenomenon among young adults and is associated with a variety of health-risk behaviors. The current study examined whether either caffeinated alcohol or the expectation of receiving caffeinated alcohol altered affective, cognitive and behavioral outcomes hypothesized to contribute to risk behavior. Young adult social drinkers (N=146) participated in a single session where they received alcohol (peak Breath Alcohol Content = .088 g/dL, SD = .019; equivalent to about 4 standard drinks) and were randomly assigned to one of four further conditions 1) no caffeine, no caffeine expectancy, 2) caffeine and caffeine expectancy, 3) no caffeine but caffeine expectancy, 4) caffeine but no caffeine expectancy. Participants’ habitual CAB consumption was positively correlated with measures of impulsivity and risky behavior, independently of study drugs. Administration of caffeine (mean dose = 220 mg, SD = 38; equivalent to about 2.75 Red Bulls) in the study reduced subjective ratings of intoxication and reversed the decrease in desire to continue drinking, regardless of expectancy. Caffeine also reduced the effect of alcohol on inhibitory reaction time (faster incorrect responses). Participants not expecting caffeine were less attentive after alcohol, whereas participants expecting caffeine were not, regardless of caffeine administration. Alcohol decreased response accuracy in all participants except those who both expected and received caffeine. Findings suggest that CABs may elevate risk for continued drinking by reducing perceived intoxication, and by maintaining the desire to continue drinking. Simply expecting to consume caffeine may reduce the effects of alcohol on inattention, and either expecting or consuming caffeine may protect against other alcohol-related performance decrements. Caffeine, when combined with alcohol, has both beneficial and detrimental effects on mechanisms known to contribute to

  3. Effect of Rifampin on the Disposition of Brivaracetam in Human Subjects: Further Insights into Brivaracetam Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Stockis, Armel; Watanabe, Shikiko; Scheen, André J; Tytgat, Dominique; Gerin, Brigitte; Rosa, Maria; Chanteux, Hugues; Nicolas, Jean-Marie

    2016-06-01

    Brivaracetam (BRV) is a high-affinity synaptic vesicle protein 2A ligand developed for the treatment of uncontrolled partial-onset seizures. The present phase I, open-label, two-way crossover study was designed to assess the effect of rifampin on the pharmacokinetics of BRV and its hydroxy (BRV-OH), acid (BRV-AC), and hydroxy acid (BRV-OHAC) metabolites. Twenty-six healthy subjects received BRV (150-mg single oral dose) either alone or following 5 days of rifampin 600 mg/day. BRV and its metabolites were examined for their plasma profiles and urinary excretion. Pharmacokinetic modeling was developed to estimate the rate constants of the various metabolic routes. Parallel in vitro assays were conducted to characterize the hydrolysis of BRV to BRV-AC as well as to identify any potential effect of rifampin on the hydrolysis reaction. Rifampin did not significantly affect the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of BRV, but decreased its area under the curve (AUC) by 45%. In addition, rifampin significantly increased the AUC of BRV-OH (+109%), decreased the AUC of BRV-AC (-53%), but had little effect on BRV-OHAC (-10%). In vitro assays showed that the major urinary metabolite BRV-AC (33% of the dose) was likely to be formed by amidase EC 3.5.1.4. In vitro data indicated that the enzyme was not significantly inhibited nor induced by rifampin. Modeling confirmed that all of the observed changes in vivo were secondary to the induction of the CYP2C19-mediated hydroxylation of BRV to BRV-OH (3.7-fold increase in the rate constant). PMID:27002062

  4. Genoprotective effects of green tea (Camellia sinensis) in human subjects: results of a controlled supplementation trial.

    PubMed

    Han, K C; Wong, W C; Benzie, Iris F F

    2011-01-01

    Green tea is rich in polyphenolic antioxidants and has widely reported but largely unsubstantiated health benefits. In the present study, genoprotective effects of two types of green tea were studied both in an in vitro and in a human supplementation trial. For the in vitro study, human lymphocytes were pre-incubated in tea (0·005-0·1 %, w/v), washed and subjected to oxidant challenge induced by H2O2. In a placebo-controlled, cross-over supplementation study, eighteen healthy volunteers took 2 x 150 ml/d of 1% (w/v) green tea ('Longjing' green tea or 'screw-shaped' green tea) or water (control) for 4 weeks (n 6). Subjects took all the three treatments in a random order, with 6 weeks' washout between each treatment. Fasting blood and urine were collected before and after each treatment. The comet assay was used to measure the resistance of lymphocytic DNA to H2O2-induced challenge. Basal oxidation-induced DNA damage was measured using the formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg) enzyme-assisted comet assay. Urine 7,8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG, mol/mmol creatinine), a biomarker of whole-body oxidative stress, was measured by liquid chromatography with tandem MS. In vitro testing results of tea-treated cells showed increased (P < 0·05) resistance of DNA to the challenge. In the supplementation trial, a significant (P < 0·05) increase in resistance was also observed. Furthermore, the FPg comet data showed .20% decrease in DNA damage with tea supplementation: mean and standard deviation changes in %DNA in comet tail in the Fpg-assisted comet assay were: -5·96 (SD 3·83) % after Longjing tea; -6·22 (SD 3·34) % after screw-shaped tea; +0·91 (SD 5·79) % after water (P < 0·05). No significant changes in urine 8-oxodG were seen. The results indicate that green tea has significant genoprotective effects and provide evidence for green tea as a 'functional food'. PMID:20807462

  5. Effects of pH and dose on nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S.; Sileno, A. P.; deMeireles, J. C.; Dua, R.; Pimplaskar, H. K.; Xia, W. J.; Marinaro, J.; Langenback, E.; Matos, F. J.; Putcha, L.; Romeo, V. D.; Behl, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of formulation pH and dose on nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide, the single most effective drug available for the prevention of nausea and vomiting induced by motion sickness. METHODS: Human subjects received scopolamine nasally at a dose of 0.2 mg/0.05 mL or 0.4 mg/0.10 mL, blood samples were collected at different time points, and plasma scopolamine concentrations were determined by LC-MS/MS. RESULTS: Following administration of a 0.2 mg dose, the average Cmax values were found to be 262+/-118, 419+/-161, and 488+/-331 pg/ mL for pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0 formulations, respectively. At the 0.4 mg dose the average Cmax values were found to be 503+/-199, 933+/-449, and 1,308+/-473 pg/mL for pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0 formulations, respectively. At a 0.2 mg dose, the AUC values were found to be 23,208+/-6,824, 29,145+/-9,225, and 25,721+/-5,294 pg x min/mL for formulation pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0, respectively. At a 0.4 mg dose, the average AUC value was found to be high for pH 9.0 formulation (70,740+/-29,381 pg x min/mL) as compared to those of pH 4.0 (59,573+/-13,700 pg x min/mL) and pH 7.0 (55,298+/-17,305 pg x min/mL) formulations. Both the Cmax and AUC values were almost doubled with doubling the dose. On the other hand, the average Tmax, values decreased linearly with a decrease in formulation pH at both doses. For example, at a 0.4 mg dose, the average Tmax values were 26.7+/-5.8, 15.0+/-10.0, and 8.8+/-2.5 minutes at formulation pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide in human subjects increased substantially with increases in formulation pH and dose.

  6. Urine Stasis Predisposes to Urinary Tract Infection by an Opportunistic Uropathogen in the Megabladder (Mgb) Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Becknell, Brian; Mohamed, Ahmad Z.; Li, Birong; Wilhide, Michael E.; Ingraham, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Urinary stasis is a risk factor for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Homozygous mutant Megabladder (Mgb-/-) mice exhibit incomplete bladder emptying as a consequence of congenital detrusor aplasia. We hypothesize that this predisposes Mgb-/- mice to spontaneous and experimental UTI. Methods Mgb-/-, Mgb+/-, and wild-type female mice underwent serial ultrasound and urine cultures at 4, 6, and 8 weeks to detect spontaneous UTI. Urine bacterial isolates were analyzed by Gram stain and speciated. Bladder stones were analyzed by x-ray diffractometry. Bladders and kidneys were subject to histologic analysis. The pathogenicity of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CONS) isolated from Mgb-/- urine was tested by transurethral administration to culture-negative Mgb-/- or wild-type animals. The contribution of urinary stasis to CONS susceptibility was evaluated by cutaneous vesicostomy in Mgb-/- mice. Results Mgb-/- mice develop spontaneous bacteriuria (42%) and struvite bladder stones (31%) by 8 weeks, findings absent in Mgb+/- and wild-type controls. CONS was cultured as a solitary isolate from Mgb-/- bladder stones. Bladders and kidneys from mice with struvite stones exhibit mucosal injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. These pathologic features of cystitis and pyelonephritis are replicated by transurethral inoculation of CONS in culture-negative Mgb-/- females, whereas wild-type animals are less susceptible to CONS colonization and organ injury. Cutaneous vesicostomy prior to CONS inoculation significantly reduces the quantity of CONS recovered from Mgb-/- urine, bladders, and kidneys. Conclusions CONS is an opportunistic uropathogen in the setting of urinary stasis, leading to enhanced UTI incidence and severity in Mgb-/- mice. PMID:26401845

  7. A cancer-predisposing "hot spot" mutation of the fumarase gene creates a dominant negative protein.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Perro, Mario; Brière, Jean Jacques; Rustin, Pierre; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2008-02-15

    The Fumarase (Fumarate Hydratase, FH) is a tumor suppressor gene whose germline heterozygous mutations predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). The FH gene encodes an enzyme of the Krebs cycle, functioning as a homotetramer and catalyzing the hydration of fumarate to malate. Among the numerous FH mutations reported so far, the R190H missense mutation is the most frequent in HLRCC patients. Here we show the functional analyses of the R190H, in comparison to the better characterized E319Q mutation. We first expressed wild-type and mutated proteins in FH deficient human skin fibroblasts, using lentiviral vectors. The wild-type transgene was able to restore the FH enzymatic activity in cells, while the R190H- and E319Q-FH were not. More interestingly, when the same transgenes were expressed in normal, FH-proficient cells, only the R190H-FH reduced the endogenous FH enzymatic activity. By enforcing the expression of equal amount of wild-type and R190H-FH in the same cell, we showed that the mutated FH protein directly inhibited enzymatic activity by nearly abrogating the FH homotetramer formation. These data demonstrate the dominant negative effect of the R190H missense mutation in the FH gene and suggest that the FH tumor-suppressing activity might be impaired in cells carrying a heterozygous mutation. PMID:17960613

  8. Childhood CT scans and cancer risk: impact of predisposing factors for cancer on the risk estimates.

    PubMed

    Journy, N; Roué, T; Cardis, E; Le Pointe, H Ducou; Brisse, H; Chateil, J-F; Laurier, D; Bernier, M-O

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the role of cancer predisposing factors (PFs) on the associations between paediatric computed tomography (CT) scan exposures and subsequent risk of central nervous system (CNS) tumours and leukaemia. A cohort of children who underwent a CT scan in 2000-2010 in 23 French radiology departments was linked with the national childhood cancers registry and national vital status registry; information on PFs was retrieved through hospital discharge databases. In children without PF, hazard ratios of 1.07 (95% CI 0.99-1.10) for CNS tumours (15 cases) and 1.16 (95% CI 0.77-1.27) for leukaemia (12 cases) were estimated for each 10 mGy increment in CT x-rays organ doses. These estimates were similar to those obtained in the whole cohort. In children with PFs, no positive dose-risk association was observed, possibly related to earlier non-cancer mortality in this group. Our results suggest a modifying effect of PFs on CT-related cancer risks, but need to be confirmed by longer follow-up and other studies. PMID:26878249

  9. Cancers predispose neutrophils to release extracellular DNA traps that contribute to cancer-associated thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Demers, Mélanie; Krause, Daniela S.; Schatzberg, Daphne; Martinod, Kimberly; Voorhees, Jaymie R.; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Scadden, David T.; Wagner, Denisa D.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer-associated thrombosis often lacks a clear etiology. However, it is linked to a poor prognosis and represents the second-leading cause of death in cancer patients. Recent studies have shown that chromatin released into blood, through the generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), is procoagulant and prothrombotic. Using a murine model of chronic myelogenous leukemia, we show that malignant and nonmalignant neutrophils are more prone to NET formation. This increased sensitivity toward NET generation is also observed in mammary and lung carcinoma models, suggesting that cancers, through a systemic effect on the host, can induce an increase in peripheral blood neutrophils, which are predisposed to NET formation. In addition, in the late stages of the breast carcinoma model, NETosis occurs concomitant with the appearance of venous thrombi in the lung. Moreover, simulation of a minor systemic infection in tumor-bearing, but not control, mice results in the release of large quantities of chromatin and a prothrombotic state. The increase in neutrophil count and their priming is mediated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), which accumulates in the blood of tumor-bearing mice. The prothrombotic state in cancer can be reproduced by treating mice with G-CSF combined with low-dose LPS and leads to thrombocytopenia and microthrombosis. Taken together, our results identify extracellular chromatin released through NET formation as a cause for cancer-associated thrombosis and unveil a target in the effort to decrease the incidence of thrombosis in cancer patients. PMID:22826226

  10. Discrete deposition of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on a titanium implant with predisposing substrate microtopography accelerated osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Ichiro; Huang, Yuhong; Butz, Frank; Ogawa, Takahiro; Lin, Audrey; Wang, Chiachien Jake

    2007-06-01

    We report here a new versatile method to deposit discrete hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles on a titanium (Ti) implant with predisposing substrate microtopography, which exhibited an unexpectedly robust biological effect. Commercially pure Ti substrates were treated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, on which HA nanoparticles (20 nm) were deposited and chemically bonded to TiO2. The HA deposition rate was linearly related to the treatment time and HA nanoparticles were deposited on up to 50% of the substrate surface. As a result, the discrete deposition of HA nanoparticles generated novel 20-40 nm nanotopography on the Ti substrate with microtopography that was smooth (turned) or roughened by double acid etching (DAE). The experimental implants with or without HA nanoparticles were surgically placed in rat femur and an implant push-in test was performed after two weeks of healing. The deposition of HA nanoparticles on the DAE surface increased the mechanical withstanding load by 129% and 782% as compared to the control DAE and turned implants, respectively. Micro-computed tomography-based 3D bone morphometry revealed equivalent bone volumes around the DAE implant with or without HA nanoparticles. These data suggest that the discrete deposition of HA nanoparticles accelerates the early osseointegration process, likely through increased shear bonding strengths.

  11. [Ketamine racemate or S-(+)-ketamine and midazolam. The effect on vigilance, efficacy and subjective findings].

    PubMed

    Doenicke, A; Kugler, J; Mayer, M; Angster, R; Hoffmann, P

    1992-10-01

    Ketamine is a racemic mixture containing equal amounts of optical isomers that have almost identical pharmacokinetic properties but different pharmacodynamic effects. The S-(+)-isomer of ketamine has about twice the anaesthetic and analgesic potency of the racemic ketamine preparation and is judged to induce less psychic emergence reactions and to be followed by a more rapid recovery of vigilance. The present study was designed to assess whether the S-(+)-isomer of ketamine is superior to the racemic mixture in cardiovascular characteristics, emergence reactions and cognitive functions, and whether side effects may be reduced or prevented by administration of midazolam prior to injection of S-(+)-ketamine. METHODS. Following ethics committee approval and informed consent, 30 volunteers were randomly allocated in this double-blind study to three groups of 10 each. Group 1 received 2 mg/kg bw racemic ketamine, group 2, 1 mg/kg bw S-(+)-ketamine and group 3, 1 mg/kg bw S-(+)-ketamine after premedication with 0.1 mg/kg midazolam i.v. Cardiovascular changes, state of vigilance, cognitive performance, subjective mood and acceptance of anaesthesia were assessed by means of haemodynamic routine monitoring, electroencephalography (EEG), psychometric tests and interview. RESULTS. The increases in mean arterial pressure and heart rate following the injection of racemic ketamine and S-(+)-ketamine were identical and the differences from baseline values significant after both. Premedication with midazolam ensured stable haemodynamics after injection of S-(+)-ketamine. EEG analysis displayed the characteristic changes well known from ketamine anaesthesia for both racemic and S-(+)-ketamine. The vigilosomnoscript showed an identical profile of vigilance up to 30 min after injection of both drugs. The vigilance status after 125 min was less impaired by S-(+)-ketamine than by racemic ketamine. Psychological assessment showed a prompter recovery of visual attentiveness and

  12. Evaluating the subject-performed task effect in healthy older adults: relationship with neuropsychological tests

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Rita; Pinho, Maria Salomé; Souchay, Céline; Moulin, Christopher J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background An enhancement in recall of simple instructions is found when actions are performed in comparison to when they are verbally presented – the subject-performed task (SPT) effect. This enhancement has also been found with older adults. However, the reason why older adults, known to present a deficit in episodic memory, have a better performance for this type of information remains unclear. In this article, we explored this effect by comparing the performance on the SPT task with the performance on other tasks, in order to understand the underlying mechanisms that may explain this effect. Objective We hypothesized that both young and older adult groups should show higher recall in SPT compared with the verbal learning condition, and that the differences between age groups should be lower in the SPT condition. We aimed to explore the correlations between these tasks and known neuropsychological tests, and we also measured source memory for the encoding condition. Design A mixed design was used with 30 healthy older adults, comparing their performance with 30 healthy younger adults. Each participant was asked to perform 16 simple instructions (SPT condition) and to only read the other 16 instructions (Verbal condition – VT). The test phase included a free recall task. Participants were also tested with a set of neuropsychological measures (speed of processing, working memory and verbal episodic memory). Results The SPT effect was found for both age groups; but even for SPT materials, group differences in recall persisted. Source memory was found to be preserved for the two groups. Simple correlations suggested differences in correlates of SPT performance between the two groups. However, when controlling for age, the SPT and VT tasks correlate with each other, and a measure of episodic memory correlated moderately with both SPT and VT performance. Conclusions A strong effect of SPT was observed for all but one, which still displayed the expected aging

  13. Estimating Intervention Effects across Different Types of Single-Subject Experimental Designs: Empirical Illustration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeyaert, Mariola; Ugille, Maaike; Ferron, John M.; Onghena, Patrick; Heyvaert, Mieke; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to illustrate the multilevel meta-analysis of results from single-subject experimental designs of different types, including AB phase designs, multiple-baseline designs, ABAB reversal designs, and alternating treatment designs. Current methodological work on the meta-analysis of single-subject experimental designs…

  14. Stress and Performance: Effects of Subjective Work Load and Time Urgency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friend, Kenneth E.

    1982-01-01

    Measured subjective work load, time urgency, and other stress/motivation variables for management personnel taking a demanding problem-solving exam. Data suggest increases in psychological stresses like subjectively high work load and time urgency uniformly impair performance across the whole range of these variables. (Author)

  15. Effects of bolus size and hardness on within-subject variability of chewing cycle kinematics.

    PubMed

    Wintergerst, Ana M; Throckmorton, Gaylord S; Buschang, Peter H

    2008-04-01

    This study analysed how bolus hardness and size affect within-subject variability of chewing cycle kinematics. Two independent prospective studies were performed; both tracked chin movements using an optoelectronic recording system. Computer programs identified each subject's ten most representative cycles, and multilevel modelling procedures were used to estimate variances. One study evaluated 38 subjects who chewed 1, 2, 4 or 8 g of gum presented in random order. The second study evaluated 26 subjects who chewed approximately 2.5 g of harder (670 g) or softer (440 g) gum, also presented in random order. In terms of bolus size, the 2g and 1g boluses produced the least and greatest relative within-subject variability, respectively; the largest differences were found for cycle duration and excursions. Within-subject variability when chewing the harder gum was consistently greater than when chewing the softer gum, except for lateral movement towards the balancing side. Because bolus hardness and bolus size influence within-subject variability differently, they must be taken into consideration when designing experiments to study masticatory kinematics. We conclude that a 2g bolus of soft gum should be used in studies of chewing cycle kinematics in order to reduce within-subject variability and increase statistical power. PMID:18093571

  16. Effect of yoga based lifestyle intervention on subjective well-being.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ratna; Gupta, Nidhi; Bijlani, R L

    2008-01-01

    Yoga is assuming importance in improving mental health and quality of life in the treatment of a number of psychiatric and psychosomatic disorders. The present study was a prospective controlled study to explore the short-term impact of a comprehensive but brief lifestyle intervention, based on yoga, on subjective well being levels in normal and diseased subjects. Normal healthy individuals and subjects having hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus or a variety of other illnesses were included in the study. The outcome measures were 'subjective well being inventory' (SUBI) scores, taken on the first and last day of the course. The inventory consists of questions related to one's feelings and attitude about various areas of life, such as happiness, achievement and interpersonal relationship. There was significant improvement in the subjective well being scores of the 77 subjects within a period of 10 days as compared to controls. These observations suggest that a short lifestyle modification and stress management educational program leads to remarkable improvement in the subjective well being scores of the subjects and can therefore make an appreciable contribution to primary prevention as well as management of lifestyle diseases. PMID:19130855

  17. Effects of Ketoconazole on the Pharmacokinetics of Ponatinib in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Narayana I; Dorer, David J; Niland, Katie; Haluska, Frank; Sonnichsen, Daryl

    2013-01-01

    Ponatinib is a BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) approved for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia and Philadelphia chromosome–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in patients resistant or intolerant to prior TKIs. In vitro studies suggested that metabolism of ponatinib is partially mediated by CYP3A4. The effects of CYP3A4 inhibition on the pharmacokinetics of ponatinib and its CYP3A4-mediated metabolite, AP24567, were evaluated in a single-center, randomized, two-period, two-sequence crossover study in healthy volunteers. Subjects (N = 22) received two single doses (orally) of ponatinib 15 mg, once given alone and once coadministered with daily (5 days) ketoconazole 400 mg, a CYP3A4 inhibitor. Ponatinib plus ketoconazole increased ponatinib maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration–time curve (AUC) compared with ponatinib alone. The estimated mean ratios for AUC0–∞, AUC0–t, and Cmax indicated increased exposures to ponatinib of 78%, 70%, and 47%, respectively; exposure to AP24567 decreased by 71%. Exposure to AP24567 was marginal after ponatinib alone (no more than 4% of the exposure to ponatinib). These results suggest that caution should be exercised with the concurrent use of ponatinib and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors and that a ponatinib dose decrease to 30 mg daily, from the 45 mg daily starting dose, could be considered. PMID:23801357

  18. [Comparative effects of couscous and pasta on glycemia in normal subjects and type I diabetics].

    PubMed

    Jamel, N; Hajri, S; Jenkins, D J; Bousnina, S; Naggati, K; Jedidi, H; Boukhris, R; Bennaceur, B

    1990-01-01

    8 healthy subjects have eaten in the morning, after an overnight fast, in two separated occasions and in a randomised order 50 gr of CHO as pasta or couscous. Blood glucose after pasta ingestion was lower at 30 mn (p less than 0.05) at 45 mn (p less than 0.01) and at 60 mn (p less than 0.05). Area under the curve after pasta was significantly reduced (p less than 0.01). In a second time 6 IDDM patients have eaten in a randomised order a meal made of pasta with tomato sauce (P = 11%, F = 30%, G = 59%) or couscous with vegetables and sauce (P = 10%, F = 37%, G = 53%). Blood glucose after the pasta was lower than couscous at 90 mn (p less than 0.05) the area under the curve after the pasta ingestion was reduced of 38% but did'nt reach significance. In conclusion couscous has a higher glycemic effect than pasta although it has a similar composition. This phenomenon is still observed when the cereal products are mixed with other foods and ingested by IDDM patients. PMID:2332095

  19. Cerebral organization for language in deaf and hearing subjects: Biological constraints and effects of experience

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Helen J.; Bavelier, Daphne; Corina, David; Rauschecker, Josef; Karni, Avi; Lalwani, Anil; Braun, Allen; Clark, Vince; Jezzard, Peter; Turner, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Cerebral organization during sentence processing in English and in American Sign Language (ASL) was characterized by employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 4 T. Effects of deafness, age of language acquisition, and bilingualism were assessed by comparing results from (i) normally hearing, monolingual, native speakers of English, (ii) congenitally, genetically deaf, native signers of ASL who learned English late and through the visual modality, and (iii) normally hearing bilinguals who were native signers of ASL and speakers of English. All groups, hearing and deaf, processing their native language, English or ASL, displayed strong and repeated activation within classical language areas of the left hemisphere. Deaf subjects reading English did not display activation in these regions. These results suggest that the early acquisition of a natural language is important in the expression of the strong bias for these areas to mediate language, independently of the form of the language. In addition, native signers, hearing and deaf, displayed extensive activation of homologous areas within the right hemisphere, indicating that the specific processing requirements of the language also in part determine the organization of the language systems of the brain. PMID:9448260

  20. Effect of ketoconazole on the pharmacokinetics of oral bosutinib in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Richat; Hug, Bruce A; Leister, Cathie; Burns, Jaime; Sonnichsen, Daryl

    2011-12-01

    Bosutinib (SKI-606), a dual inhibitor of Src and Abl tyrosine kinases, is being developed for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. The effect of coadministration of ketoconazole on the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of bosutinib was evaluated in an open-label, randomized, 2-period, crossover study. Healthy subjects (fasting) received a single dose of oral bosutinib 100 mg alone and with multiple once-daily doses of oral ketoconazole 400 mg. PK sampling occurred through 96 hours. The least square geometric mean treatment ratios (90% confidence interval [CI]) of C(max(bosutinib+ketoconazole))/C(max(bosutinib alone)), AUC(T(bosutinib+ketoconazole))/AUC(T(bosutinib alone)), and AUC((bosutinib+ketoconazole))/AUC((bosutinib alone)) were assessed. Compared with bosutinib administered alone, coadministration with ketoconazole increased bosutinib C(max) 5.2-fold, AUC(T) 7.6-fold, and AUC 8.6-fold. Ketoconazole coadministration decreased the mean apparent clearance of bosutinib approximately 9-fold and increased the mean (SD) terminal half-life from 46.2 (16.4) hours to 69.0 (29.1) hours. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was comparable between the 2 treatments. The most common AEs were headache, nausea, and increased blood creatinine. No safety-related discontinuations or serious AEs occurred. These PK results indicate that bosutinib is susceptible to interaction with potent CYP3A4 inhibitors. PMID:21148045

  1. Evolution of Vortex Pairs Subject to the Crow Instability in Wall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselin, Daniel; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2015-11-01

    In this research, we examine the effect of a solid boundary on the dynamics and instabilities of a pair of counter-rotating vortices. An isolated vortex pair is subject to both a short-wave elliptic instability and a long-wave Crow (1970) instability. Near a wall, the boundary layer that forms between the primary vortices and the wall can separate, leading to the generation of secondary vorticity. In the present study, we are examining the long-wave Crow instability as it is modified by interaction with a wall. The regions of the perturbed vortex pair which first interact with the wall experience accelerated circulation decay, which leads to the formation of an axial pressure gradient. This pressure difference produces strong axial flows, which ultimately give rise to interactions between the primary and secondary vortices and the generation of small-scale vortex rings. These rings vary in number and orientation depending on the extent to which the Crow instability has developed prior to interaction with the wall. In addition to the topological modifications, significant changes to the vortex dynamics, including circulation and core size, are also observed during and after interaction with the boundary. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research under ONR Award No. N00014-12-1-0712.

  2. Frataxin mRNA isoforms in FRDA patients and normal subjects: effect of tocotrienol supplementation.

    PubMed

    Abruzzo, Provvidenza Maria; Marini, Marina; Bolotta, Alessandra; Malisardi, Gemma; Manfredini, Stefano; Ghezzo, Alessandro; Pini, Antonella; Tasco, Gianluca; Casadio, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is caused by deficient expression of the mitochondrial protein frataxin involved in the formation of iron-sulphur complexes and by consequent oxidative stress. We analysed low-dose tocotrienol supplementation effects on the expression of the three splice variant isoforms (FXN-1, FXN-2, and FXN-3) in mononuclear blood cells of FRDA patients and healthy subjects. In FRDA patients, tocotrienol leads to a specific and significant increase of FXN-3 expression while not affecting FXN-1 and FXN-2 expression. Since no structural and functional details were available for FNX-2 and FXN-3, 3D models were built. FXN-1, the canonical isoform, was then docked on the human iron-sulphur complex, and functional interactions were computed; when FXN-1 was replaced by FXN-2 or FNX-3, we found that the interactions were maintained, thus suggesting a possible biological role for both isoforms in human cells. Finally, in order to evaluate whether tocotrienol enhancement of FXN-3 was mediated by an increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG), PPARG expression was evaluated. At a low dose of tocotrienol, the increase of FXN-3 expression appeared to be independent of PPARG expression. Our data show that it is possible to modulate the mRNA expression of the minor frataxin isoforms and that they may have a functional role. PMID:24175286

  3. Effect of phosphate binders on supplemental iron absorption in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Pruchnicki, Maria C; Coyle, James D; Hoshaw-Woodard, Stacy; Bay, William H

    2002-10-01

    A single-dose, prospective, randomized, four-treatment, four-period crossover study was conducted to determine the acute effect of therapeutically equivalent doses of three commonly used phosphate binders on oral iron absorption. Twenty-three healthy subjects received 65 mg of elemental iron alone and with each phosphate binder (calcium carbonate 3000 mg, calcium acetate 2668 mg, or sevelamer HCl 2821 mg). Area under the change in plasma iron concentration-time curve over 6 hours postdosing was measured. ANOVA was used to assess the statistical significance of differences in iron absorption among the treatments. The relative bioavailability of iron administered with each phosphate binder compared to iron administered alone was estimated. The relative iron bioavailabilities (95% confidence intervals) for the calcium carbonate, calcium acetate, and sevelamer HCI treatments were 0.81 (0.70, 0.94), 0.73 (0.63, 0.85), and 0.90 (0.78, 1.05), respectively. Thus, single doses of both calcium-based phosphate binders significantly reduced single-dose iron absorption, while sevelamer HCl did not. PMID:12362933

  4. Effect of Daylight on Melatonin and Subjective General Health Factors in Elderly People

    PubMed Central

    KARAMI, Zohre; GOLMOHAMMADI, Rostam; HEIDARIPAHLAVIAN, Ahmad; POOROLAJAL, Jalal; HEIDARIMOGHADAM, Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Background: This paper investigated the effect of daylight on morning and night melatonin, subjective general health using GHQ questionnaire, sleepiness and alertness on elderly who lived in nursing houses. Methods: Nineteen nursing home residents participated voluntarily. They exposed to daylight from 9 to 10 a.m. and from 4 to 5 p.m. for 6 wk. The level of melatonin in the morning and at night was measured. General health of all participants was evaluated using General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) as well. Results: Daylight exposure significantly affected morning melatonin from 25.39 pg/ml to 59.77 pg/ml (P=0.001) and night melatonin were changed from 40.30pg/ml to 34.41pg/ml (P=0.081). Mean score of general health changed 36.31 to 29.89 (P=0.003). Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) showed increase sleepiness and decrease alertness from 3:00 to 7:00 a.m. Sleepiness decreased and alertness increased during 1:00 p.m. and 20:00 p.m. Conclusions: Daylight exposure could delay sleep phase and correction of circadian rhythm in elderly. Anxiety and insomnia could be improved with daylight exposure. It suggests that elders should be exposed to scheduled daylight in morning and evening for prevention and improvement of mental disorders. Adequate light should be provided for elder’s homes and nursing house. PMID:27398336

  5. Gender effect on the scapular 3D posture and kinematic in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, C; Croisier, J L; Rigaux, E; Brüls, O; Denoël, V; Forthomme, B

    2016-05-01

    Populations considered for shoulder analysis are often composed of various ratios of men and women. It is consequently hypothesized that gender has no significant effect on the joint kinematic. However, the literature reports, for the shoulder, differences in the range of motion between genders. The specific influence of gender on the scapulo-thoracic kinematics has not been studied yet. The dominant shoulder of two populations of men and women composed of 11 subjects each were evaluated in three dimensions for three distinct motions: flexion in the sagittal plane, abduction in the frontal plane and gleno-humeral internal/external rotation with the arm abducted at 90°. Posture, kinematics and range of motion were studied separately. For flexion and abduction and with regard to the scapular kinematic, external rotation was significantly larger for women than men. The differences were of at least 5° at 120° of humeral elevation. Upward rotations were identical. Women also showed larger average active humero-thoracic range of motion. The mean differences were of 13°, 7°, 12° and 5° for abduction, flexion, internal rotation and external rotation, respectively. No difference was observed between the scapular resting positions of both populations. The observed differences concerning both the scapular and humeral patterns would indicate that the shoulder behaviour of men and women should not be expected to be similar. PMID:25382377

  6. Evolution of Vortex Pairs Subject to the Crow Instability in Wall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselin, Daniel; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2014-11-01

    In this research, we examine the effect of a solid boundary on the dynamics and instabilities of a pair of counter-rotating vortices. An isolated vortex pair is subject to both a short-wave elliptic instability and a long-wave Crow (1970) instability. Near a wall, the boundary layer that forms between the primary vortices and the wall can separate, leading to the generation of secondary vorticity. In the present study, we are examining the long-wave Crow instability as it is modified by interaction with a wall. Several key features of the flow are observed. Strong axial flows cause fluid containing vorticity to move from the ``troughs'' of the initially wavy vortex tube to the ``peaks.'' This process is associated with distinct differences in vortex concentration at the peak and the trough, which lead to the establishment of an axial pressure gradient. Furthermore, the primary and secondary vortices interact to form additional small-scale vortex rings. The exact number and orientation of these small-scale rings is highly dependent on the extent to which the Crow instability has developed prior to interaction with the ground. Finally, significant changes to the vortex dynamics, including circulation, core size, and topology, are also observed during and after interaction with the boundary. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research under ONR Award No. N00014-12-1-0712.

  7. Effect of 6-month caloric restriction on Cu bound to ceruloplasmin in adult overweight subjects.

    PubMed

    Piacenza, Francesco; Malavolta, Marco; Basso, Andrea; Costarelli, Laura; Giacconi, Robertina; Ravussin, Eric; Redman, Leanne M; Mocchegiani, Eugenio

    2015-08-01

    In a randomized clinical trial of calorie restriction (CR), we demonstrated that important cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers were favorably influenced by CR alone and in conjunction with physical exercise. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of CR with or without exercise on copper bound to ceruloplasmin (CuCp), a well-known biomarker for CVD, in overweight men and women enrolled in the CALERIE phase 1 study. Forty-six individuals were randomized to one of four groups for 6 months: control, healthy weight maintenance; CR, 25% CR from baseline energy requirements; CR+exercise, 12.5% CR and 12.5% through aerobic exercise; and low-calorie diet, low-calorie diet until 15% reduction in body weight followed by weight maintenance diet. CuCp was determined in fasting blood samples by a high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry methodology and compared with changes in body composition and markers of CVD. After 6 months, CR combined with exercise induced a decrease in plasma concentration of CuCp. CuCp was inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity at baseline and after 6 months of intervention. A cluster analysis showed that the percent change of weight after 6 months of intervention was the most important variable that could discriminate the intervention groups. The percent change of CuCp was the only other variable selected by the analysis. Decreased CuCp in overweight subjects by CR combined with exercise suggests a positive effect of this intervention on metabolic health. Further studies to explain the relationship between weight loss and CuCp and its relevance for cardiovascular health are needed. PMID:26001545

  8. Predisposing, Enabling and Need Correlates of Mental Health Treatment Utilization Among Homeless Men

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Golinelli, Daniela; Tucker, Joan S.; Kennedy, David P.; Ewing, Brett

    2016-01-01

    There is significant unmet need for mental health treatment among homeless men, but little is known about the correlates of treatment utilization in this population. Within the framework of the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, this study examines predisposing, enabling and need factors that may be associated with mental health care utilization. Participants were a representative sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men utilizing meal programs in the Skid Row region of LA. Logistic regression examined the association between predisposing, enabling and need factors and past 30 day mental health service utilization on Skid Row. Results indicated that while need, operationalized as positive screens for posttraumatic stress disorder or depression, was associated with recent mental health care utilization, predisposing and enabling factors were also related to utilization. African-American homeless men, and those men who also reported substance abuse treatment and drop-in center use, had increased odds of reporting mental health care utilization. PMID:24595594

  9. Predisposing, enabling and need correlates of mental health treatment utilization among homeless men.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Harmony; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Golinelli, Daniela; Tucker, Joan S; Kennedy, David P; Ewing, Brett

    2014-11-01

    There is significant unmet need for mental health treatment among homeless men, but little is known about the correlates of treatment utilization in this population. Within the framework of the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, this study examines predisposing, enabling and need factors that may be associated with mental health care utilization. Participants were a representative sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men utilizing meal programs in the Skid Row region of LA. Logistic regression examined the association between predisposing, enabling and need factors and past 30 day mental health service utilization on Skid Row. Results indicated that while need, operationalized as positive screens for posttraumatic stress disorder or depression, was associated with recent mental health care utilization, predisposing and enabling factors were also related to utilization. African-American homeless men, and those men who also reported substance abuse treatment and drop-in center use, had increased odds of reporting mental health care utilization. PMID:24595594

  10. The effects of goshajinkigan, a herbal medicine, on subjective symptoms and vibratory threshold in patients with diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tawata, M; Kurihara, A; Nitta, K; Iwase, E; Gan, N; Onaya, T

    1994-12-16

    Goshajinkigan, a herbal medicine, has long been used in Japan to alleviate the subjective symptoms of diabetic neuropathy; however, its effects have not been confirmed objectively. We evaluated its effects on subjective symptoms and on vibration sensation in patients with diabetic neuropathy. The oral administration of 7.5 g/day of Goshajinkigan for 3 months (treatment period) relieved subjective symptoms of numbness in 9 of 13 patients. When the drug was discontinued for 2 months as a washout period, the subjective symptom worsened in 7 of 13 patients. Chi-square analysis revealed significant effects of Goshajiniagan on subjective symptoms (P < 0.001 for numbness and P < 0.05 for cold sensation). Vibration sensation was evaluated by measuring vibratory threshold using an SMV-5 vibrometer. There were significant changes in vibratory thresholds by paired t-test (P < 0.05) both in the upper and the lower extremities during the treatment and washout periods. Chi-square analysis also revealed a significant effect of Goshajinkigan on vibratory threshold (P < 0.01). There was no significant change in glycosylated hemoglobin as a whole during the study. These observations confirm that Goshajinkigan relieves subjective symptoms and demonstrate that it improves vibration sensation in patients with diabetic neuropathy. PMID:7705193

  11. How Many Is Enough? Effect of Sample Size in Inter-Subject Correlation Analysis of fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Pajula, Juha; Tohka, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Inter-subject correlation (ISC) is a widely used method for analyzing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired during naturalistic stimuli. A challenge in ISC analysis is to define the required sample size in the way that the results are reliable. We studied the effect of the sample size on the reliability of ISC analysis and additionally addressed the following question: How many subjects are needed for the ISC statistics to converge to the ISC statistics obtained using a large sample? The study was realized using a large block design data set of 130 subjects. We performed a split-half resampling based analysis repeatedly sampling two nonoverlapping subsets of 10–65 subjects and comparing the ISC maps between the independent subject sets. Our findings suggested that with 20 subjects, on average, the ISC statistics had converged close to a large sample ISC statistic with 130 subjects. However, the split-half reliability of unthresholded and thresholded ISC maps improved notably when the number of subjects was increased from 20 to 30 or more. PMID:26884746

  12. Air toxics and epigenetic effects: ozone altered microRNAs in the sputum of human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Rebecca C.; Rager, Julia E.; Bauer, Rebecca; Sebastian, Elizabeth; Peden, David B.; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is a criteria air pollutant that is associated with numerous adverse health effects, including altered respiratory immune responses. Despite its deleterious health effects, possible epigenetic mechanisms underlying O3-induced health effects remain understudied. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are epigenetic regulators of genomic response to environmental insults and unstudied in relationship to O3 inhalation exposure. Our objective was to test whether O3 inhalation exposure significantly alters miRNA expression profiles within the human bronchial airways. Twenty healthy adult human volunteers were exposed to 0.4 ppm O3 for 2 h. Induced sputum samples were collected from each subject 48 h preexposure and 6 h postexposure for evaluation of miRNA expression and markers of inflammation in the airways. Genomewide miRNA expression profiles were evaluated by microarray analysis, and in silico predicted mRNA targets of the O3-responsive miRNAs were identified and validated against previously measured O3-induced changes in mRNA targets. Biological network analysis was performed on the O3-associated miRNAs and mRNA targets to reveal potential associated response signaling and functional enrichment. Expression analysis of the sputum samples revealed that O3 exposure significantly increased the expression levels of 10 miRNAs, namely miR-132, miR-143, miR-145, miR-199a*, miR-199b-5p, miR-222, miR-223, miR-25, miR-424, and miR-582-5p. The miRNAs and their predicted targets were associated with a diverse range of biological functions and disease signatures, noted among them inflammation and immune-related disease. The present study shows that O3 inhalation exposure disrupts select miRNA expression profiles that are associated with inflammatory and immune response signaling. These findings provide novel insight into epigenetic regulation of responses to O3 exposure. PMID:24771714

  13. Effects of prolonged fasting and sustained lipolysis on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Salgin, B; Marcovecchio, M L; Humphreys, S M; Hill, N; Chassin, L J; Lunn, D J; Hovorka, R; Dunger, D B

    2009-03-01

    Normal beta-cells adjust their function to compensate for any decrease in insulin sensitivity. Our aim was to explore whether a prolonged fast would allow a study of the effects of changes in circulating free fatty acid (FFA) levels on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity and whether any potential effects could be reversed by the antilipolytic agent acipimox. Fourteen (8 female, 6 male) healthy young adults (aged 22.8-26.9 yr) without a family history of diabetes and a body mass index of 22.6 +/- 3.2 kg/m(2) were studied on three occasions in random order. Growth hormone and FFA levels were regularly measured overnight (2200-0759), and subjects underwent an intravenous glucose tolerance test in the morning (0800-1100) on each visit. Treatment A was an overnight fast, treatment B was a 24-h fast with regular administrations of a placebo, and treatment C was a 24-h fast with regular ingestions of 250 mg of acipimox. The 24-h fast increased overnight FFA levels (as measured by the area under the curve) 2.8-fold [51.3 (45.6-56.9) vs. 18.4 (14.4-22.5) *10(4) micromol/l*min, P < 0.0001], and it led to decreases in insulin sensitivity [5.7 (3.6-8.9) vs. 2.6 (1.3-4.7) *10(-4) min(-1) per mU/l, P < 0.0001] and the acute insulin response [16.3 (10.9-21.6) vs. 12.7 (8.7-16.6) *10(2) pmol/l*min, P = 0.02], and therefore a reduction in the disposition index [93.1 (64.8-121.4) vs. 35.5 (21.6-49.4) *10(2) pmol/mU, P < 0.0001]. Administration of acipimox during the 24-h fast lowered FFA levels by an average of 20% (range: -62 to +49%; P = 0.03), resulting in a mean increase in the disposition index of 31% (P = 0.03). In conclusion, the 24-h fast was accompanied by substantial increases in fasting FFA levels and induced reductions in the acute glucose-simulated insulin response and insulin sensitivity. The use of acipimox during the prolonged fast increased the disposition index, suggesting a partial reversal of the effects of fasting on the acute insulin response and insulin

  14. Subject-Specific Effect of Metallic Body Accessories on Path Loss of Dynamic on-Body Propagation Channels.

    PubMed

    Rahim, H A; Abdulmalek, M; Soh, P J; Rani, K A; Hisham, N; Vandenbosch, G A E

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the investigation of path loss variation for subject-specific on-body radio propagation channels, considering the effect of metallic spectacles and loop like metallic accessories. Adding metallic items may affect the operability of Body Centric Wireless Communications (BCWC). Measurements were carried out in an RF-shielded room lined with microwave absorbing sheets for strategically placed bodyworn antennas covering the upper front torso and the lower limbs. The path loss of the on-body radio channel was characterized explicitly taking into account the body size of the subjects. For metallic loop-like accessories, the results indicate that for underweight subjects, there was a slightly higher influence, up to 2%, compared to normal and overweight subjects. Our findings indicate that a noticeable effect exists on on-body channels for dynamic movements where the metallic watch acts as a local scatterer that affects the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) signal path between transmitter and receiver for underweight subjects in comparison to normal and overweight subjects. The path loss decreases when the receiving terminal was positioned very close to the metallic item. If a loop-like metallic accessory is not appropriately considered when designing the radio channel on a subject, the reliability of the body-centric wireless system may degrade. PMID:27436496

  15. Subject-Specific Effect of Metallic Body Accessories on Path Loss of Dynamic on-Body Propagation Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim, H. A.; Abdulmalek, M.; Soh, P. J.; Rani, K. A.; Hisham, N.; Vandenbosch, G. A. E.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the investigation of path loss variation for subject-specific on-body radio propagation channels, considering the effect of metallic spectacles and loop like metallic accessories. Adding metallic items may affect the operability of Body Centric Wireless Communications (BCWC). Measurements were carried out in an RF-shielded room lined with microwave absorbing sheets for strategically placed bodyworn antennas covering the upper front torso and the lower limbs. The path loss of the on-body radio channel was characterized explicitly taking into account the body size of the subjects. For metallic loop-like accessories, the results indicate that for underweight subjects, there was a slightly higher influence, up to 2%, compared to normal and overweight subjects. Our findings indicate that a noticeable effect exists on on-body channels for dynamic movements where the metallic watch acts as a local scatterer that affects the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) signal path between transmitter and receiver for underweight subjects in comparison to normal and overweight subjects. The path loss decreases when the receiving terminal was positioned very close to the metallic item. If a loop-like metallic accessory is not appropriately considered when designing the radio channel on a subject, the reliability of the body-centric wireless system may degrade.

  16. Subject-Specific Effect of Metallic Body Accessories on Path Loss of Dynamic on-Body Propagation Channels

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, H. A.; Abdulmalek, M.; Soh, P. J.; Rani, K. A.; Hisham, N.; Vandenbosch, G. A. E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the investigation of path loss variation for subject-specific on-body radio propagation channels, considering the effect of metallic spectacles and loop like metallic accessories. Adding metallic items may affect the operability of Body Centric Wireless Communications (BCWC). Measurements were carried out in an RF-shielded room lined with microwave absorbing sheets for strategically placed bodyworn antennas covering the upper front torso and the lower limbs. The path loss of the on-body radio channel was characterized explicitly taking into account the body size of the subjects. For metallic loop-like accessories, the results indicate that for underweight subjects, there was a slightly higher influence, up to 2%, compared to normal and overweight subjects. Our findings indicate that a noticeable effect exists on on-body channels for dynamic movements where the metallic watch acts as a local scatterer that affects the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) signal path between transmitter and receiver for underweight subjects in comparison to normal and overweight subjects. The path loss decreases when the receiving terminal was positioned very close to the metallic item. If a loop-like metallic accessory is not appropriately considered when designing the radio channel on a subject, the reliability of the body-centric wireless system may degrade. PMID:27436496

  17. Predisposing factors for individuals' Lyme disease prevention practices: Connecticut, Maine, and Montana.

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, J E; Campbell, G L; Bailey, R E; Cartter, M L; Adams, M; Frazier, E L; Damrow, T A; Gensheimer, K F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined factors that predispose individuals to protect against Lyme disease. METHODS: Knowledge, attitude, and practice questions concerning Lyme disease prevention were included in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance surveys in Connecticut, Maine, and Montana. A total of 4246 persons were interviewed. RESULTS: Perceived risk of acquiring Lyme disease, knowing anyone with Lyme disease, knowledge about Lyme disease, and believing Lyme disease to be a common problem were significantly associated with prevention practices. CONCLUSIONS: Predisposing factors differ substantially between states and appear related to disease incidence. Personal risk, knowing someone with Lyme disease, and cognizance about Lyme disease and acting on this information are consistent with social learning theories. PMID:9431299

  18. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome predisposing to non-WNT, non-SHH, group 3 medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bourdeaut, Franck; Miquel, Catherine; Richer, Wilfrid; Grill, Jacques; Zerah, Michel; Grison, Camille; Pierron, Gaelle; Amiel, Jeanne; Krucker, Clementine; Radvanyi, Francois; Brugieres, Laurence; Delattre, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    Medulloblastomas (MB) are classified in four subgroups: the well defined WNT and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) subgroups, and the less defined groups 3 and 4. They occasionally occur in the context of a cancer predisposition syndrome. While germline APC mutations predispose to WNT MB, germline mutations in SUFU, PTCH1, and TP53 predispose to SHH tumors. We report on a child with a Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) due to a germline deletion in CREBBP, who developed a MB. Biological profilings demonstrate that this tumor belongs to the group 3. RTS may therefore be the first predisposition syndrome identified for non-WNT/non-SHH MB. PMID:24115570

  19. Effects of method and format on subjects' responses to a control of variables reasoning problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staver, John R.

    Excessive time and training demands have rendered Piaget's clinical method of reasoning assessment impractical for researchers and science teachers who work with large numbers of students. The published literature[Note ][See: Lawson, A. E. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 1978, 15(1), 11-24; Shayer, M., Adey, P., & Wylam, H. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 1981, 18(2), 157-168; Staver, J. R., & Gabel, D. L. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 1979, 16(6), 534-544; Tobin, K. G., & Capie, W. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 1981, 41(2), 413-424.] indicates that reliable, valid alternatives to clinical assessment are feasible. However, the overestimate/underestimate of reasoning for different methods and formats remains unresolved through research. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various methods and formats on subjects' responses to a Piagetian reasoning problem requiring control of variables. The task chosen for this investigation was the Mealworm problem.[Note ][See: Karplus, R., Lawson, A., Wollman, W., Appel, M., Bernoff, R., Howe, A., Rusch, J., & Sullivan, F. Science teaching and the development of reasoning. Berkeley, CA: University of California, 1977.] The task was presented by three methods: (1) individual clinical interview; (2) group presentation of task followed by paper-and-pencil problem with illustration; and (3) group administration of paper-and-pencil instrument with illustration. Each method included four formats: (1) completion answer with essay justification; (2) completion answer with multiplechoice justification; (3) multiple-choice answer with essay justification; and (4) multiple-choice answer with multiple-choice justification. Two hundred and fifty-three (253) students who were enrolled in a freshman level biological science class participated in the study. The research design was a 3 × 4 factorial design with method and format of assessment as the main effects

  20. Effect of ginkgo and ginger on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of warfarin in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuemin; Williams, Kenneth M; Liauw, Winston S; Ammit, Alaina J; Roufogalis, Basil D; Duke, Colin C; Day, Richard O; McLachlan, Andrew J

    2005-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of two common herbal medicines, ginkgo and ginger, on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of warfarin and the independent effect of these herbs on clotting status. Methods This was an open label, three-way crossover randomized study in 12 healthy male subjects, who received a single 25 mg dose of warfarin alone or after 7 days pretreatment with recommended doses of ginkgo or ginger from herbal medicine products of known quality. Dosing with ginkgo or ginger was continued for 7 days after administration of the warfarin dose. Platelet aggregation, international normalized ratio (INR) of prothrombin time, warfarin enantiomer protein binding, warfarin enantiomer concentrations in plasma and S-7-hydroxywarfarin concentration in urine were measured. Statistical comparisons were made using anova and the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the ratio of log transformed parameters are reported. Results INR and platelet aggregation were not affected by administration of ginkgo or ginger alone. The mean (95% CI) apparent clearances of S-warfarin after warfarin alone, with ginkgo or ginger were 189 (167–210) ml h−1, 200 (173–227) ml h−1 and 201 (171–231) ml h−1, respectively. The respective apparent clearances of R-warfarin were 127 (106–149) ml h−1, 126 (111–141) ml h−1 and 131 (106–156) ml h−1. The mean ratio (90% CI) of apparent clearance for S-warfarin was 1.05 (0.98–1.21) and for R-warfarin was 1.00 (0.93–1.08) when coadministered with ginkgo. The mean ratio (90% CI) of AUC0−168 of INR was 0.93 (0.81–1.05) when coadministered with ginkgo. The mean ratio (90% CI) of apparent clearance for S-warfarin was 1.05 (0.97–1.13) and for R-warfarin was 1.02 (0.95–1.10) when coadministered with ginger. The mean ratio (90% CI) of AUC0−168 of INR was 1.01 (0.93–1.15) when coadministered with ginger. The mean ratio (90% CI) for S-7-hydroxywarfarin urinary excretion rate was 1.07 (0.85–1

  1. Effect of aerosol particle size on bronchodilatation with nebulised terbutaline in asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Clay, M M; Pavia, D; Clarke, S W

    1986-05-01

    The bronchodilatation achieved by the beta 2 agonist terbutaline sulphate given as nebulised aerosol from different devices has been measured in seven patients with mild asthma (mean FEV1 76% predicted) over two hours after inhalation. The subjects were studied on four occasions. On three visits they received 2.5 mg terbutaline delivered from three different types of nebuliser, selected on the basis of the size distribution of the aerosols generated; and on a fourth (control) visit no aerosol was given. The size distributions of the aerosols expressed in terms of their mass median diameter (MMD) were: A: MMD 1.8 microns; B: 4.6 microns; C: 10.3 microns. The aerosols were given under controlled conditions of respiratory rate and tidal volume to minimise intertreatment variation. Bronchodilator response was assessed by changes in FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and maximal flow after expiration of 50% and 75% FVC (Vmax50, Vmax25) from baseline (before aerosol) and control run values. For each pulmonary function index all three aerosols gave significantly better improvement over baseline than was seen in the control (p less than 0.05) and had an equipotent effect on FEV1, FVC, and PEF. Aerosol A (MMD 1.8 microns) produced significantly greater improvements in Vmax50 and Vmax25 than did B or C (p less than 0.05). These results suggest that for beta 2 agonists small aerosols (MMD less than 2 microns) might be advantageous in the treatment of asthma. PMID:3750243

  2. Parental age effects on odor sensitivity in healthy subjects and schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Malaspina, Dolores; Walsh-Messinger, Julie; Antonius, Daniel; Dracxler, Roberta; Rothman, Karen; Puthota, Jennifer; Gilman, Caitlin; Feuerstein, Jessica L; Keefe, David; Goetz, Deborah; Goetz, Raymond R; Buckley, Peter; Lehrer, Douglas S; Pato, Michele; Pato, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    A schizophrenia phenotype for paternal and maternal age effects on illness risk could benefit etiological research. As odor sensitivity is associated with variability in symptoms and cognition in schizophrenia, we examined if it was related to parental ages in patients and healthy controls. We tested Leukocyte Telomere Length (LTL) as an explanatory factor, as LTL is associated with paternal age and schizophrenia risk. Seventy-five DSM-IV patients and 46 controls were assessed for detection of PEA, WAIS-III for cognition, and LTL, assessed by qPCR. In healthy controls, but not schizophrenia patients, decreasing sensitivity was monotonically related to advancing parental ages, particularly in sons. The relationships between parental aging and odor sensitivity differed significantly for patients and controls (Fisher's R to Z: χ(2)  = 6.95, P = 0.009). The groups also differed in the association of odor sensitivity with cognition; lesser sensitivity robustly predicted cognitive impairments in patients (<0.001), but these were unassociated in controls. LTL was unrelated to odor sensitivity and did not explain the association of lesser sensitivity with cognitive deficits.Parental aging predicted less sensitive detection in healthy subjects but not in schizophrenia patients. In patients, decreased odor sensitivity strongly predicted cognitive deficits, whereas more sensitive acuity was associated with older parents. These data support separate risk pathways for schizophrenia. A parental age-related pathway may produce psychosis without impairing cognition and odor sensitivity. Diminished odor sensitivity may furthermore be useful as a biomarker for research and treatment studies in schizophrenia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26224136

  3. Effectiveness of oral hygiene with and without root planing in treating subjects with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Y; Ashley, F P; Wilson, R F

    1994-11-19

    The extent to which patients with chronic periodontitis could improve their condition by oral hygiene without instrumentation was investigated. Ten subjects were assessed, instructed in a subgingivally-directed oral hygiene technique (OH) twice a week until plaque was present at less than 20% of sites on two occasions and reassessed after 6 weeks when half the mouth was root planed. A final assessment took place after a further 6 weeks. At six weeks the mean number of sites with bleeding on probing (BOP) was significantly reduced (P < 0.001), the percentage of sites with BOP falling from 59% to 34%. In addition, an increase in gingival recession (P < 0.001) was accompanied by a reduction in mean probing depths (PD) (P < 0.05). The mean percentage reduction in sites with BOP was greatest for sites with probing depths less than 4 mm at baseline but even at sites with PD of 6 mm or more the mean BOP reduced from 81% to 57% of sites. Root planing at 6 weeks resulted in further significant reductions at 12 weeks in both BOP (to 10% of all sites) and in PD (P < 0.001), but there was little further change for the sites receiving OH alone. There was some evidence that this adjunctive effect of root planing was also present at sites with a PD less than 4 mm at baseline and at sites without retention factors at or below the gingival margin. The results indicate that patients with chronic periodontitis can improve their periodontal condition by OH alone even in deep pockets.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7986629

  4. Metacognition of Working Memory Performance: Trial-by-Trial Subjective Effects from a New Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Andrew C.; Bhangal, Sabrina; Velasquez, Anthony G.; Geisler, Mark W.; Morsella, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    Investigators have begun to examine the fleeting urges and inclinations that subjects experience when performing tasks involving response interference and working memory. Building on this research, we developed a paradigm in which subjects, after learning to press certain buttons when presented with certain letters, are presented with two action-related letters (the memoranda) but must withhold responding (4 s) until cued to emit the response associated with only one of the two letters. In the Congruent condition, the action corresponds to the cue (e.g., memoranda = AB, cue = B, response = B); in the Incongruent condition, the action corresponds to the other item of the memoranda (e.g., memoranda = AB, cue = B, response = A). After each trial, subjects inputted a rating regarding their subjectively experienced “urge to err” on that trial. These introspection-based data revealed that, as found in previous research, urges to err were strongest for incongruent trials. Our findings reveal, first, that subjects can successfully perform this new task, even though it is more complex than that of previous studies, and second, that, in this new paradigm, reliable subjective, metacognitive data can be obtained on a trial-by-trial basis. We hope that our novel paradigm will serve as a foundation for future experimental projects on the relationship between working memory performance and consciousness—an under-explored nexus whose investigation is likely to reveal insights about working memory, cognitive control, and metacognition. PMID:27445897

  5. Metacognition of Working Memory Performance: Trial-by-Trial Subjective Effects from a New Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Andrew C; Bhangal, Sabrina; Velasquez, Anthony G; Geisler, Mark W; Morsella, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    Investigators have begun to examine the fleeting urges and inclinations that subjects experience when performing tasks involving response interference and working memory. Building on this research, we developed a paradigm in which subjects, after learning to press certain buttons when presented with certain letters, are presented with two action-related letters (the memoranda) but must withhold responding (4 s) until cued to emit the response associated with only one of the two letters. In the Congruent condition, the action corresponds to the cue (e.g., memoranda = AB, cue = B, response = B); in the Incongruent condition, the action corresponds to the other item of the memoranda (e.g., memoranda = AB, cue = B, response = A). After each trial, subjects inputted a rating regarding their subjectively experienced "urge to err" on that trial. These introspection-based data revealed that, as found in previous research, urges to err were strongest for incongruent trials. Our findings reveal, first, that subjects can successfully perform this new task, even though it is more complex than that of previous studies, and second, that, in this new paradigm, reliable subjective, metacognitive data can be obtained on a trial-by-trial basis. We hope that our novel paradigm will serve as a foundation for future experimental projects on the relationship between working memory performance and consciousness-an under-explored nexus whose investigation is likely to reveal insights about working memory, cognitive control, and metacognition. PMID:27445897

  6. Study of respiratory effects from exposure to 2 ppm formaldehyde in healthy subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Schachter, E.N.; Witek, T.J. Jr.; Tosun, T.; Leaderer, B.P.; Beck, G.J.

    1986-07-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a common indoor air pollutant with irritative properties. It has been suggested that FA may produce physiologic alterations of the respiratory system. To study such responses, 15 nonsmoking, healthy subjects were exposed in a double blind, random manner to 0 and 2 ppm FA for 40 min in an environmental chamber. In addition, the same exposures were repeated on a separate day with the subjects performing moderate exercise (450 kpm/min) for 10 min. Exposures were carried out under controlled environmental conditions (temperature = 23/sup 0/C, relative humidity = 50%). Pulmonary function was measured before, during, and after exposures using partial and maximal flow-volume curves and airway resistance. Symptom diaries were given to the subjects; upper and lower airway symptoms were recorded for up to 24 hr following exposures. No significant bronchoconstriction was noted in this group. In 3 subjects, sequential measurements of peak flow over a 24-hr period following FA exposure failed to reveal any delayed airway response. On a separate day, 6 healthy subjects failed to demonstrate changes from their baseline responsiveness to methacholine after exposure to 2 ppm FA. Respiratory symptoms were, in general, confined to the upper airways and were mild to moderate in severity. We conclude that short exposures to 2 ppm FA do not result in acute or subacute changes in lung function among healthy individuals either at rest or with exercise. Subjective complaints following such exposures are confined to irritative phenomena of the upper airways.

  7. Age Effects on Upper Limb Kinematics Assessed by the REAplan Robot in Healthy Subjects Aged 3 to 93 Years.

    PubMed

    Gilliaux, Maxime; Lejeune, Thierry M; Sapin, Julien; Dehez, Bruno; Stoquart, Gaëtan; Detrembleur, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Kinematics is recommended for the quantitative assessment of upper limb movements. The aims of this study were to determine the age effects on upper limb kinematics and establish normative values in healthy subjects. Three hundred and seventy healthy subjects, aged 3-93 years, participated in the study. They performed two unidirectional and two geometrical tasks ten consecutive times with the REAplan, a distal effector robotic device that allows upper limb displacements in the horizontal plane. Twenty-six kinematic indices were computed for the four tasks. For the four tasks, nineteen of the computed kinematic indices showed an age effect. Seventeen indices (the accuracy, speed and smoothness indices and the reproducibility of the accuracy, speed and smoothness) improved in young subjects aged 3-30 years, showed stabilization in adults aged 30-60 years and declined in elderly subjects aged 60-93 years. Additionally, for both geometrical tasks, the speed index exhibited a decrease throughout life. Finally, a principal component analysis provided the relations between the kinematic indices, tasks and subjects' age. This study is the first to assess age effects on upper limb kinematics and establish normative values in subjects aged 3-93 years. PMID:26208617

  8. Protective Effects of Quercetin on Selected Oxidative Biomarkers in Bovine Spermatozoa Subjected to Ferrous Ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Tvrdá, E; Tušimová, E; Kováčik, A; Paál, D; Libová, Ľ; Lukáč, N

    2016-08-01

    Quercetin (QUE) is a natural flavonol-type flavonoid with antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-aggregatory properties. It is also a powerful reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger and chelating agent. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of QUE to reverse ROS-mediated alterations to the motility, viability and intracellular antioxidant profile of bovine spermatozoa. Spermatozoa were washed out of fresh bovine semen, suspended in 2.9% sodium citrate and subjected to QUE treatment (7.5, 25, 50 and 100 μmol/l) in the presence or absence of a pro-oxidant, that is ferrous ascorbate (FeAA; 150 μmol/l FeSO4 and 750 μmol/l ascorbic acid) during a 6-h in vitro culture. Spermatozoa motion characteristics were assessed using the SpermVision computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) system. Cell viability was examined with the metabolic activity (MTT) assay, ROS generation was quantified via luminometry, and the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test was applied to quantify the intracellular superoxide formation. Cell lysates were prepared at the end of the in vitro culture to investigate the intracellular activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) as well as the concentrations of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA). FeAA treatment led to a reduced sperm motility (p < 0.001), viability (p < 0.001) and decreased the antioxidant parameters of the sperm samples (p < 0.001) but increased the ROS generation (p < 0.001), superoxide production (p < 0.001) and lipid peroxidation (p < 0.001). QUE administration resulted in a preservation of the spermatozoa vitality and antioxidant characteristics (p < 0.01 with respect to the enzymatic antioxidants, p < 0.001 in relation to GSH) with a concentration range of 50-100 μmol/l QUE revealing to be the most effective. Our results suggest that QUE exhibits significant ROS-scavenging and metal-chelating properties which may prevent spermatozoa alterations

  9. The effect of folate supplementation and genotype on cardiovascular and epigenetic measures in schizophrenia subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ellingrod, Vicki L; Grove, Tyler B; Burghardt, Kyle J; Taylor, Stephan F; Dalack, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome may be related to folate’s pharmacogenetically regulated metabolism and atypical antipsychotic (AAP) exposure. Aims: We examined folate supplementation on metabolic measures, endothelial functioning (Reactive Hyperemia Index (RHI)), and global methylation in AAP-treated schizophrenia subjects meeting NCEP-ATP-III-a metabolic syndrome criteria. Methods: Subjects were given 5 mg/day open label folate for 3 months. Baseline and end point measurements included RHI, body mass index, fasting metabolic laboratory measures, C-reactive protein, homocysteine, IL-6, and leptin. Subjects were genotyped for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C/T and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) 158 Val/Met, as well as global DNA methylation using the LUminometric Methylation Assay (LUMA). Results: Thirty-five subjects (mean age 50±9 years and 70% Caucasian) were included. At end point, RHI improved by 20% (P=0.02), homocysteine decreased 14% (P=0.006), and IL-6 decreased 13% (P=0.09). At baseline, 61% met endothelial dysfunction criteria (RHI<1.67), which decreased to 27% (P=0.0006) at end point. The MTHFR 677C/C+COMT 158Met/Met group also showed significant reduction in those meeting endothelial dysfunction (83% baseline and 16% end point (P=0.001)). Global methylation levels increased after supplementation (4.3%, P<0.0001), with subjects receiving olanzapine or clozapine experiencing greater methylation changes after folate supplementation. Folate may reduce AAP-associated metabolic risks. Conclusions: We report significant reductions in the number of subjects meeting endothelial dysfunction. Given that all subjects met metabolic syndrome criteria, this may prove as a useful avenue to reducing cardiovascular disease risk. MTHFR and COMT genotypes may affect response and underlying changes in DNA methylation may help to explain the mechanistic underpinnings of these findings. PMID:27336047

  10. Oxidant and acid aerosol exposure in healthy subjects and subjects with asthma. Part 1. Effects of oxidants, combined with sulfuric or nitric acid, on the pulmonary function of adolescents with asthma. Part 2. Effects of sequential sulfuric acid and ozone exposures on the pulmonary function of healthy subjects and subjects with asthma. Research report, February 1989-April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.Q.; Covert, D.S.; Pierson, W.E.; Hanley, Q.S.; Rebolledo, V.

    1994-11-01

    The study investigated the pulmonary effects of acid summer haze in a controlled laboratory setting. Of 28 adolescent subjects with allergic asthma, exercise-induced bronchospasm, and a positive response to a standardized methacholine challenge enrolled in the study, 22 completed the study. For two consecutive days each subject inhaled each of four test atmospheres by mouthpiece. The order of exposure to the four test atmospheres was assigned via a random protocol; air, oxidants (0.12 parts per million (ppm) ozone plus 0.30 ppm nitrogen dioxide), oxidants plus sulfuric acid at 70 micro/m3 of air, or oxidants plus 0.05 ppm nitric acid. Exposure to each of the different atmospheres was separated by at least one week. A postexposure methacholine challenge was performed on Day 3.

  11. alpha/beta-Arteether-induced mania in a predisposed adolescent.

    PubMed

    Haq, Mohammad Zia Ul; Mishra, Biswa Ranjan; Goyal, Nishant; Sinha, Vinod Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Artemisinin, by the name of Qinghaosu, has been used in China for the treatment of fever over the years. Recently, a number of artemisinin derivatives such as artesunate, artemether, dihydroartemisinin, and arteether have been developed and have found widespread clinical use because of their efficacy against resistant forms of all plasmodial species and a favorable side-effect profile. However, concerns have been expressed about the neurotoxic effects of artemisinin derivatives based on some animal and human studies. We present a case of alpha/beta-arteether-induced mania in an adolescent having a family history of chloroquine-induced psychosis to discuss the hereditary predispositions, possible mechanisms, management, and clinical implications of this rare adverse event. PMID:19555804

  12. Effect of positive acceleration (+gz) on electrocardiogram of subjects with vasoregulatory abnormality.

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, P K; Balasubramanian, K V; Dham, S K; Rai, K; Hoon, R S

    1977-01-01

    ST-T wave changes in the electrocardiogram detected during routine examination and aggravated by erect posture, hyperventilation, and exercise in apparently healthy young individuals have been termed vasoregulatory abnormalities. No evidence of ischaemic heart disease has been found in such subjects. Ten young healthy air crew with vasoregulatory abnormalities were subjected to maximal exercise on treadmill and procedure repeated after 120 mg propranolol daily for 3 days. After one week, they were subjected to a stress of positive acceleration (+gz) in a human centrifuge at 2-5 g and 3-5 g for 15 seconds each at a constant rate of rise of 0-1 g/s and the electrocardiogram was monitored during and in the post-acceleration phase. The procedure was repeated after propranolol 120 mg daily for 3 days. The stress of positive acceleration resulted in pronounced prominence of P waves and inversion of T waves (as has been reported in normal subjects) with minimal ST depression in the electrocardiogram. ST segment depression during exercise, at heart rates corresponding to those achieved during peak centrifuge runs, was significantly more pronounced. The ST, P, and T wave changes were returned to normal after propranolol. It is concluded that minimal ST segment depression after stress of positive acceleration as compared with conspicuous ST segment depression during exercise at corresponding heart rates, and their normalisation after propranolol, rules out ischaemia as an aetiological factor in subjects with vasoregulatory abnormalities. Images PMID:849393

  13. Effects of Low Volume Aerobic Training on Muscle Desaturation During Exercise in Elderly Subjects.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Murase, Norio; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Osada, Takuya; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Aging enhances muscle desaturation responses due to reduced O2 supply. Even though aerobic training enhances muscle desaturation responses in young subjects, it is unclear whether the same is true in elderly subjects. Ten elderly women (age: 62±4 years) participated in 12-weeks of cycling exercise training. Training consisted of 30 min cycling exercise at the lactate threshold. The subjects exercised 15±6 sessions during training. Before and after endurance training, the subjects performed ramp cycling exercise. Muscle O2 saturation (SmO2) was measured at the vastus lateralis by near infrared spectroscopy during the exercise. There were no significant differences in SmO2 between before and after training. Nevertheless, changes in peak pulmonary O2 uptake were significantly negatively related to changes in SmO2 (r=-0.67, p<0.05) after training. Muscle desaturation was not enhanced by low volume aerobic training in this study, possibly because the training volume was too low. However, our findings suggest that aerobic training may potentially enhance muscle desaturation at peak exercise in elderly subjects. PMID:26782196

  14. Mixed Effects Models for Resampled Network Statistics Improves Statistical Power to Find Differences in Multi-Subject Functional Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Manjari; Allen, Genevera I

    2016-01-01

    Many complex brain disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders, exhibit a wide range of symptoms and disability. To understand how brain communication is impaired in such conditions, functional connectivity studies seek to understand individual differences in brain network structure in terms of covariates that measure symptom severity. In practice, however, functional connectivity is not observed but estimated from complex and noisy neural activity measurements. Imperfect subject network estimates can compromise subsequent efforts to detect covariate effects on network structure. We address this problem in the case of Gaussian graphical models of functional connectivity, by proposing novel two-level models that treat both subject level networks and population level covariate effects as unknown parameters. To account for imperfectly estimated subject level networks when fitting these models, we propose two related approaches-R (2) based on resampling and random effects test statistics, and R (3) that additionally employs random adaptive penalization. Simulation studies using realistic graph structures reveal that R (2) and R (3) have superior statistical power to detect covariate effects compared to existing approaches, particularly when the number of within subject observations is comparable to the size of subject networks. Using our novel models and methods to study parts of the ABIDE dataset, we find evidence of hypoconnectivity associated with symptom severity in autism spectrum disorders, in frontoparietal and limbic systems as well as in anterior and posterior cingulate cortices. PMID:27147940

  15. Differences in understanding and subjective effects of home-visit rehabilitation between user families and rehabilitation providers

    PubMed Central

    Ohura, Tomoko; Tsuyama, Tsutomu; Nakayama, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify differences in understanding and subjective effects of home-visit rehabilitation between user families and rehabilitation providers. [Subjects] The subjects were home-visit rehabilitation providers and user families. [Methods] Home-visit rehabilitation providers and user families completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding the content and subjective effects of home-visit rehabilitation. For statistical analysis, the McNemar’s test was used. [Results] Fifty pairs of responses met the inclusion criteria. The mean age of user families was 65.0 ± 11.2 years, and 58.0% (29/50) were spouses of users (user mean age, 77.7 ± 10.2 years; 48.0% (24/50) female). With regard to home-visit rehabilitation content, user families thought that paralysis improvement exercise, massage, and self-care activities were implemented to a greater degree than did rehabilitation providers. With regard to the subjective effects of home-visit rehabilitation, a higher proportion of user families noticed “maintenance/improvement” effects on symptoms and sequelae, as well as pain and suffering, compared with providers. [Conclusion] User families believed that rehabilitation would also improve users’ symptoms and pain. Care providers should explain the aims of home-visit rehabilitation to users and their families, both of which require a strong understanding of home-visit rehabilitation in order to achieve rehabilitation goals. PMID:26834364

  16. Mixed Effects Models for Resampled Network Statistics Improves Statistical Power to Find Differences in Multi-Subject Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Manjari; Allen, Genevera I.

    2016-01-01

    Many complex brain disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders, exhibit a wide range of symptoms and disability. To understand how brain communication is impaired in such conditions, functional connectivity studies seek to understand individual differences in brain network structure in terms of covariates that measure symptom severity. In practice, however, functional connectivity is not observed but estimated from complex and noisy neural activity measurements. Imperfect subject network estimates can compromise subsequent efforts to detect covariate effects on network structure. We address this problem in the case of Gaussian graphical models of functional connectivity, by proposing novel two-level models that treat both subject level networks and population level covariate effects as unknown parameters. To account for imperfectly estimated subject level networks when fitting these models, we propose two related approaches—R2 based on resampling and random effects test statistics, and R3 that additionally employs random adaptive penalization. Simulation studies using realistic graph structures reveal that R2 and R3 have superior statistical power to detect covariate effects compared to existing approaches, particularly when the number of within subject observations is comparable to the size of subject networks. Using our novel models and methods to study parts of the ABIDE dataset, we find evidence of hypoconnectivity associated with symptom severity in autism spectrum disorders, in frontoparietal and limbic systems as well as in anterior and posterior cingulate cortices. PMID:27147940

  17. An evaluation of subjective experiences, effects and overall satisfaction with clozapine treatment in a UK forensic service

    PubMed Central

    Qurashi, Inti; Chu, Simon; Duffy, Chris; Husain, Nusrat; Chaudhry, Imran

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Patients prescribed clozapine were surveyed to assess (a) the effects, both positive and adverse, and overall satisfaction with clozapine in comparison to previously prescribed antipsychotics and (b) the relative significance of effects experienced, both positive and adverse, in terms of impact on subjective well-being. Methods: A total of 56 male patients prescribed clozapine at a forensic psychiatric hospital were surveyed using a 27-item questionnaire. All patients had been prescribed clozapine for a minimum of 3 months. Respondents were asked to rate effects and satisfaction with clozapine treatment in comparison with previously prescribed antipsychotic medication on a five-point scale. Respondents were also asked to rate effects experienced with clozapine treatment in terms of impact on subjective well-being on a five-point scale. Results: A total of 89% of respondents reported greater satisfaction with clozapine than with previously prescribed antipsychotic medication. A majority of patients reported positive effects in terms of an improvement in their quality of life (68%) and social abilities (52%) with clozapine in comparison with previously prescribed antipsychotics. Nocturnal hypersalivation (84%) and weight gain (57%) were the most common adverse effects. Hedonic responses were assessed for each effect in order to determine the associated subjective experiences. The most positive hedonic responses were for quality of life, mood and alertness. In terms of adverse impact on subjective well-being, nocturnal hypersalivation ranked highest. Conclusions: Patients in a UK forensic sample are largely satisfied with clozapine treatment. The subjective effects of clozapine treatment should be taken into account by clinicians when assessing response. This may provide an opportunity to highlight the positive changes and prioritize management of the most undesirable adverse effects, which is likely to promote compliance and improve longer term treatment

  18. Biomarkers of Dose and Effect of Inhaled Ozone in Resting versus Exercising Human Subjects: Comparison with Resting Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Gary E.; McKee, John; Brown, James; McDonnell, William; Seal, Elston; Soukup, Joleen; Slade, Ralph; Crissman, Kay; Devlin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    To determine the influence of exercise on pulmonary dose of inhaled pollutants, we compared biomarkers of inhaled ozone (O3) dose and toxic effect between exercise levels in humans, and between humans and rats. Resting human subjects were exposed to labeled O3 (18O3, 0.4 ppm, for 2 hours) and alveolar O3 dose measured as the concentration of excess 18O in cells and extracellular material of nasal, bronchial, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). We related O3 dose to effects (changes in BALF protein, LDH, IL-6, and antioxidant substances) measurable in the BALF. A parallel study of resting subjects examined lung function (FEV1) changes following O3. Subjects exposed while resting had 18O concentrations in BALF cells that were 1/5th of those of exercising subjects and directly proportional to the amount of O3 breathed during exposure. Quantitative measures of alveolar O3 dose and toxicity that were observed previously in exercising subjects were greatly reduced or non-observable in O3 exposed resting subjects. Resting rats and resting humans were found to have a similar alveolar O3 dose. PMID:23761957

  19. Effect of divided attention on gait in subjects with and without cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Anna F; Olsson, Elisabeth; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of cognition on motor function using 2 simple everyday tasks, talking and walking, in younger subjects with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment. A second aim was to evaluate reliability for the dual-task test Talking While Walking. Walking speed during single and dual task and time change between single and dual task were compared between groups. The test procedure was repeated after 1 week. Subjects with AD had lower walking speed and greater time change between single and dual task compared with healthy controls. Reliability for Talking While Walking was very good. The results show that motor function in combination with a cognitive task, as well as motor function alone, influences subjects with Alzheimer's disease in a negative way and that decreased walking speed during single- and dual-task performance may be an early symptom in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:17341772

  20. Effect of background motion on line bisection performance in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Na, Duk L; Son, Youngchul; Kim, Chi Hun; Lee, Byung Hwa; Shon, Young-Min; Lee, Kwang Joo; Lee, Kyung Min; Adair, John C; Watson, Robert T; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2002-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that optokinetic stimulation (OKS) influences line bisection (LB) performance in normal subjects and patients with hemispatial neglect. Since subjects were required to attend to stationary targets on a moving background, prior experimental designs might have induced an illusion of target motion or induced motion (IM) in a direction opposite the background. The current study tested whether the IM affects LB performance in normal subjects and how the speed of targets also influences LB. Thirty-two right-handed normal volunteers (aged 28.0 +/- 5.3 years) were asked to bisect stationary lines with a background of horizontal OKS. These stimuli were generated by computer displayed on a large screen via a beam projector. The OKS was varied according to direction (leftward or rightward) and speed (9.4 degrees/sec or 56.1 degrees/sec), producing 4 different experimental conditions. Mean bisection errors in all conditions were compared with a control condition with no background OKS. For each condition, subjects rated the degree of IM on a 5 point scale. With fast rate OKS, subjects reported minimal IM and LB errors were in the same direction as background motion, a finding that replicates previous studies. Conversely, the slow OKS rate caused subjects to report IM and resulted in deviation of the bisection mark in a direction opposite the background OKS. While this discrepancy between the slow and fast OKS conditions might be related to motion illusion, we did not find a direct correlation between the degree of IM and bisection errors and thus reasons for these results remain unexplained. PMID:12507047

  1. DIET- AND COLONIZATION-DEPENDENT INTESTINAL DYSFUNCTION PREDISPOSES TO NECROTIZING ENTEROCOLITIS IN PRETERM PIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Preterm birth and formula feeding are key risk factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in infants, but little is known about intestinal conditions that predispose to disease. Thus, structural, functional, and microbiologic indices were used to investigate the etiol...

  2. Predisposing, Precipitating, Perpetuating, Professional Help, and Prevention Factors of Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; Chanko, Cathy

    This report describes an eating disorder as a multi-dimensional physiological, psychological, social, and cultural illness. A chart describing the typical anorexic and bulimic is included which has on its horizontal axis the predisposing, precipitating, perpetuating, professional help, and prevention factors of anorexia nervosa and bulimia. On its…

  3. Identifying Some Factors That Might Predispose Drug Abuse among Learners in a South African Township School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobler, R.; Khatite, M.

    2012-01-01

    This study inquires into some of the factors that might predispose the use and abuse of drugs among secondary school learners in a township school. The objective of this research is to identify these factors and to offer a few suggestions on how the abuse may be prevented. A quantitative research strategy is used and a document analysis technique…

  4. Acute effects of traditional Japanese alcohol beverages on blood glucose and polysomnography levels in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kido, Megumi; Asakawa, Akihiro; Koyama, Ken-Ichiro K; Takaoka, Toshio; Tajima, Aya; Takaoka, Shigeru; Yoshizaki, Yumiko; Okutsu, Kayu; Takamine, Kazunori T; Sameshima, Yoshihiro; Inui, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Background. Alcohol consumption is a lifestyle factor associated with type 2 diabetes. This relationship is reportedly different depending on the type of alcohol beverage. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of traditional Japanese alcohol beverages on biochemical parameters, physical and emotional state, and sleep patterns. Methods. Six healthy subjects (three men and three women; age, 28.8 ± 9.5 years; body mass index, 21.4 ± 1.6 kg/m(2)) consumed three different types of alcohol beverages (beer, shochu, and sake, each with 40 g ethanol) or mineral water with dinner on different days in the hospital. Blood samples were collected before and 1, 2, and 12 h after drinking each beverage, and assessments of physical and emotional state were administered at the same time. In addition, sleep patterns and brain waves were examined using polysomnography. Results. Blood glucose levels at 1 h and the 12-h area under the curve (AUC) value after drinking shochu were significantly lower than that with water and beer. The 12-h blood insulin AUC value after drinking shochu was significantly lower than that with beer. Blood glucose × insulin level at 1 h and the 2-h blood glucose × insulin AUC value with shochu were significantly lower than that with beer. The insulinogenic indexes at 2 h with beer and sake, but not shochu, were significantly higher than that with water. The visual analogue scale scores of physical and emotional state showed that the tipsiness levels with beer, shochu, and sake at 1 h were significantly higher than that with water. These tipsiness levels were maintained at 2 h. The polysomnography showed that the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep latency with shochu and sake were shorter than that with water and beer. Conclusions. Acute consumption of alcohol beverages with a meal resulted in different responses in postprandial glucose and insulin levels as well as REM sleep latency. Alcohol beverage type should be taken into consideration

  5. Acute effects of traditional Japanese alcohol beverages on blood glucose and polysomnography levels in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Megumi; Asakawa, Akihiro; Koyama, Ken-Ichiro K.; Takaoka, Toshio; Tajima, Aya; Takaoka, Shigeru; Yoshizaki, Yumiko; Okutsu, Kayu; Takamine, Kazunori T.; Sameshima, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background. Alcohol consumption is a lifestyle factor associated with type 2 diabetes. This relationship is reportedly different depending on the type of alcohol beverage. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of traditional Japanese alcohol beverages on biochemical parameters, physical and emotional state, and sleep patterns. Methods. Six healthy subjects (three men and three women; age, 28.8 ± 9.5 years; body mass index, 21.4 ± 1.6 kg/m2) consumed three different types of alcohol beverages (beer, shochu, and sake, each with 40 g ethanol) or mineral water with dinner on different days in the hospital. Blood samples were collected before and 1, 2, and 12 h after drinking each beverage, and assessments of physical and emotional state were administered at the same time. In addition, sleep patterns and brain waves were examined using polysomnography. Results. Blood glucose levels at 1 h and the 12-h area under the curve (AUC) value after drinking shochu were significantly lower than that with water and beer. The 12-h blood insulin AUC value after drinking shochu was significantly lower than that with beer. Blood glucose × insulin level at 1 h and the 2-h blood glucose × insulin AUC value with shochu were significantly lower than that with beer. The insulinogenic indexes at 2 h with beer and sake, but not shochu, were significantly higher than that with water. The visual analogue scale scores of physical and emotional state showed that the tipsiness levels with beer, shochu, and sake at 1 h were significantly higher than that with water. These tipsiness levels were maintained at 2 h. The polysomnography showed that the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep latency with shochu and sake were shorter than that with water and beer. Conclusions. Acute consumption of alcohol beverages with a meal resulted in different responses in postprandial glucose and insulin levels as well as REM sleep latency. Alcohol beverage type should be taken into consideration

  6. Ideograms Versus Alphabets: Effects of Script on Memory in "Biscriptual" Korean Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Soja; Arbuckle, Tannis Y.

    1977-01-01

    Four experiments examined the memory of Korean subjects for words written in the two writing systems used in Korea, one alphabetic, the other ideographic. The impetus for the investigation was the apparently different encoding properties of the two scripts, with alphabets seeming to encode sound and ideograms, meaning. (Editor)

  7. Effects of individual sound sources on the subjective loudness and acoustic comfort in underground shopping streets.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Meng, Qi; Jin, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that human evaluation of subjective loudness and acoustic comfort depends on a series of factors in a particular situation rather than only on sound pressure levels. In the present study, a large-scale subjective survey has been undertaken on underground shopping streets in Harbin, China, to determine how individual sound sources influence subjective loudness and acoustic comfort evaluation. Based on the analysis of case study results, it has been shown that all individual sound sources can increase subjective loudness to a certain degree. However, their levels of influence on acoustic comfort are different. Background music and the public address system can increase acoustic comfort, with a mean difference of 0.18 to 0.32 and 0.21 to 0.27, respectively, where a five-point bipolar category scale is used. Music from shops and vendor shouts can decrease acoustic comfort, with a mean difference of -0.11 to -0.38 and -0.39 to -0.62, respectively. The feasibility of improving acoustic comfort by changing certain sound sources is thus demonstrated. PMID:22846767

  8. The Effect of Scaffolded Vignette Instruction on Student Mastery of Subject Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffries, Carolyn; Maeder, Dale W.

    2009-01-01

    Vignettes have long been used as a tool to model, teach, and research behavior and understanding as well as to stimulate discussion and problem solving in learning situations. The growing body of research on vignettes as an instructional and assessment tool to enhance recognition, recall, and transfer of subject matter knowledge suggests that the…

  9. Effect of 6-day hypokinesia on oxygen metabolism indices in elderly and senile subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, L. A.; Orlov, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    After a strict 6 day confinement to bed of elderly and senile subjects the oxygen supply of the subcutaneous cellular tissue was impaired, and the intensity of its tissue respiration was somewhat reduced. The vacat-oxygen of the blood and urine, the coefficient of incomplete oxidation, and the oxygen deficiency in the organism were increased.

  10. Relative Effects of English Proficiency on General Admissions Tests versus Subject Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennock-Roman, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Examined the degree to which test scores reflect English proficiency using data on students whose native language was Spanish. They had taken the GRE, English proficiency tests, and the PAEG, a test in Spanish used for admission to graduate schools in Puerto Rico. Found that quantitative, analytical, and subject tests are more highly related to…

  11. Effects of industrial respirator wear during exercise in subjects with restrictive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hodous, T.K.; Boyles, C.; Hankinson, J.

    1986-03-01

    Few studies have examined the response of individuals with restrictive lung disease (RLD) to respirator wear. Such information should be of theoretical and practical interest when the need to determine fitness to wear respirators is considered. Seventeen females performed progressive submaximal treadmill exercise. Twelve control subjects with total lung capacity (TLC) = 5.71 +/- .19L (mean +/- SEM) and DLCO = 25.8 +/- 1.0 mL/min/mm Hg were compared to five RLD subjects with TLC + 3.70 +/- 0.22 and DLCO = 14.5 +/- 0.7. Mean age, height and weight were similar. Separate exercise trials were performed with no added resistance (NAR), and with 5 cm H/sub 2/O/L/sec inspiratory and 1.5 cm H/sub 2/O/L/sec expiratory resistance (R/sub 2/) to simulate widely used respiratory masks. Comparisons of exercise data were made at an oxygen consumption of 0.8 L/min. With NAR, RLD subjects had significantly higher minute ventilation (V/sub E/) (29.0 vs. 21.2 L/min for controls), higher respiratory rate (RR), and lower tidal volume (V/sub T/). Heart rate, end-tidal PCO/sub 2/ (P/sub ET/CO/sub 2/), and mouth pressure swing (Poral) were not different from control values. With R/sub 2/ compared to NAR, the controls had reduced RR and V/sub E/; and increased V/sub T/, P/sub ET/CO/sub 2/, and Poral. While changes with R/sub 2/ for the RLD subjects were in the same directions as controls, only the increase in Poral was statistically significant. Analysis of the differences showed that none of the changes with R/sub 2/ in RLD subjects was different from control changes except for the greater increase in Poral and the smaller increase in V/sub T/. The former was explained by the RLD subjects' higher V/sub E/ and flow rates, and the non-linear nature of R/sub 2/ at higher flow rates. Our data suggest that the stress to RLD subjects of the resistance used is minor compared to that of mild exercise.

  12. Intraduodenal Administration of Intact Pea Protein Effectively Reduces Food Intake in Both Lean and Obese Male Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Geraedts, Maartje C. P.; Troost, Freddy J.; Munsters, Marjet J. M.; Stegen, Jos H. C. H.; de Ridder, Rogier J.; Conchillo, Jose M.; Kruimel, Joanna W.; Masclee, Ad A. M.; Saris, Wim H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Human duodenal mucosa secretes increased levels of satiety signals upon exposure to intact protein. However, after oral protein ingestion, gastric digestion leaves little intact proteins to enter the duodenum. This study investigated whether bypassing the stomach, through intraduodenal administration, affects hormone release and food-intake to a larger extent than orally administered protein in both lean and obese subjects. Methods Ten lean (BMI:23.0±0.7 kg/m2) and ten obese (BMI:33.4±1.4 kg/m2) healthy male subjects were included. All subjects randomly received either pea protein solutions (250 mg/kg bodyweight in 0.4 ml/kg bodyweight of water) or placebo (0.4 ml/kg bodyweight of water), either orally or intraduodenally via a naso-duodenal tube. Appetite-profile, plasma GLP-1, CCK, and PYY concentrations were determined over a 2 h period. After 2 h, subjects received an ad-libitum meal and food-intake was recorded. Results CCK levels were increased at 10(p<0.02) and 20(p<0.01) minutes after intraduodenal protein administration (IPA), in obese subjects, compared to lean subjects, but also compared to oral protein administration (OPA)(p<0.04). GLP-1 levels increased after IPA in obese subjects after 90(p<0.02) to 120(p<0.01) minutes, compared to OPA. Food-intake was reduced after IPA both in lean and obese subjects (-168.9±40 kcal (p<0.01) and −298.2±44 kcal (p<0.01), respectively), compared to placebo. Also, in obese subjects, food-intake was decreased after IPA (−132.6±42 kcal; p<0.01), compared to OPA. Conclusions Prevention of gastric proteolysis through bypassing the stomach effectively reduces food intake, and seems to affect obese subjects to a greater extent than lean subjects. Enteric coating of intact protein supplements may provide an effective dietary strategy in the prevention/treatment of obesity. PMID:21931864

  13. Dasatinib induces lung vascular toxicity and predisposes to pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Guignabert, Christophe; Phan, Carole; Seferian, Andrei; Huertas, Alice; Tu, Ly; Thuillet, Raphaël; Sattler, Caroline; Le Hiress, Morane; Tamura, Yuichi; Jutant, Etienne-Marie; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Bouchet, Stéphane; Manéglier, Benjamin; Molimard, Mathieu; Rousselot, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease that can be induced by dasatinib, a dual Src and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Today, key questions remain regarding the mechanisms involved in the long-term development of dasatinib-induced PAH. Here, we demonstrated that chronic dasatinib therapy causes pulmonary endothelial damage in humans and rodents. We found that dasatinib treatment attenuated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction responses and increased susceptibility to experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) in rats, but these effects were absent in rats treated with imatinib, another BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment induced pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, while imatinib did not. Dasatinib treatment mediated endothelial cell dysfunction via increased production of ROS that was independent of Src family kinases. Consistent with these findings, we observed elevations in markers of endothelial dysfunction and vascular damage in the serum of CML patients who were treated with dasatinib, compared with CML patients treated with imatinib. Taken together, our findings indicate that dasatinib causes pulmonary vascular damage, induction of ER stress, and mitochondrial ROS production, which leads to increased susceptibility to PH development. PMID:27482885

  14. Fumonisins affect the intestinal microbial homeostasis in broiler chickens, predisposing to necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Antonissen, Gunther; Croubels, Siska; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Devreese, Mathias; Verlinden, Marc; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Antlinger, Birgit; Novak, Barbara; Martel, An; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Fumonisins (FBs) are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium fungi. This study aimed to investigate the effect of these feed contaminants on the intestinal morphology and microbiota composition, and to evaluate whether FBs predispose broilers to necrotic enteritis. One-day-old broiler chicks were divided into a group fed a control diet, and a group fed a FBs contaminated diet (18.6 mg FB1+FB2/kg feed). A significant increase in the plasma sphinganine/sphingosine ratio in the FBs-treated group (0.21 ± 0.016) compared to the control (0.14 ± 0.014) indicated disturbance of the sphingolipid biosynthesis. Furthermore, villus height and crypt depth of the ileum was significantly reduced by FBs. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis showed a shift in the microbiota composition in the ileum in the FBs group compared to the control. A reduced presence of low-GC containing operational taxonomic units in ileal digesta of birds exposed to FBs was demonstrated, and identified as a reduced abundance of Candidatus Savagella and Lactobaccilus spp. Quantification of total Clostridium perfringens in these ileal samples, previous to experimental infection, using cpa gene (alpha toxin) quantification by qPCR showed an increase in C. perfringens in chickens fed a FBs contaminated diet compared to control (7.5 ± 0.30 versus 6.3 ± 0.24 log10 copies/g intestinal content). After C. perfringens challenge, a higher percentage of birds developed subclinical necrotic enteritis in the group fed a FBs contaminated diet as compared to the control (44.9 ± 2.22% versus 29.8 ± 5.46%). PMID:26394675

  15. Disruption of Vitamin D and Calcium Signaling in Keratinocytes Predisposes to Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bikle, Daniel D.; Jiang, Yan; Nguyen, Thai; Oda, Yuko; Tu, Chia-ling

    2016-01-01

    1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), the active metabolite of vitamin D, and calcium regulate epidermal differentiation. 1,25(OH)2D exerts its effects through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a transcription factor in the nuclear hormone receptor family, whereas calcium acts through the calcium sensing receptor (Casr), a membrane bound member of the G protein coupled receptor family. We have developed mouse models in which the Vdr and Casr have been deleted in the epidermis (epidVdr−∕− and epidCasr−∕−). Both genotypes show abnormalities in calcium induced epidermal differentiation in vivo and in vitro, associated with altered hedgehog (HH) and β–catenin signaling that when abnormally expressed lead to basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and trichofolliculomas, respectively. The Vdr−∕− mice are susceptible to tumor formation following UVB or chemical carcinogen exposure. More recently we found that the keratinocytes from these mice over express long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) oncogenes such as H19 and under express lncRNA tumor suppressors such as lincRNA-21. Spontaneous tumors have not been observed in either the epidVdr−∕− or epidCasr−∕−. But in mice with epidermal specific deletion of both Vdr and Casr (epidVdr−∕−/epidCasr−∕− [DKO]) tumor formation occurs spontaneously when the DKO mice are placed on a low calcium diet. These results demonstrate important interactions between vitamin D and calcium signaling through their respective receptors that lead to cancer when these signals are disrupted. The roles of the β–catenin, hedgehog, and lncRNA pathways in predisposing the epidermis to tumor formation when vitamin D and calcium signaling are disrupted will be discussed. PMID:27462278

  16. Disruption of Vitamin D and Calcium Signaling in Keratinocytes Predisposes to Skin Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bikle, Daniel D; Jiang, Yan; Nguyen, Thai; Oda, Yuko; Tu, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), the active metabolite of vitamin D, and calcium regulate epidermal differentiation. 1,25(OH)2D exerts its effects through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a transcription factor in the nuclear hormone receptor family, whereas calcium acts through the calcium sensing receptor (Casr), a membrane bound member of the G protein coupled receptor family. We have developed mouse models in which the Vdr and Casr have been deleted in the epidermis ((epid) Vdr (-∕-) and (epid) Casr (-∕-)). Both genotypes show abnormalities in calcium induced epidermal differentiation in vivo and in vitro, associated with altered hedgehog (HH) and β-catenin signaling that when abnormally expressed lead to basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and trichofolliculomas, respectively. The Vdr (-∕-) mice are susceptible to tumor formation following UVB or chemical carcinogen exposure. More recently we found that the keratinocytes from these mice over express long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) oncogenes such as H19 and under express lncRNA tumor suppressors such as lincRNA-21. Spontaneous tumors have not been observed in either the (epid) Vdr (-∕-) or (epid) Casr (-∕-). But in mice with epidermal specific deletion of both Vdr and Casr ((epid) Vdr (-∕-)/(epid) Casr (-∕-) [DKO]) tumor formation occurs spontaneously when the DKO mice are placed on a low calcium diet. These results demonstrate important interactions between vitamin D and calcium signaling through their respective receptors that lead to cancer when these signals are disrupted. The roles of the β-catenin, hedgehog, and lncRNA pathways in predisposing the epidermis to tumor formation when vitamin D and calcium signaling are disrupted will be discussed. PMID:27462278

  17. Effects of meal composition on blood alcohol level, psychomotor performance and subjective state after ingestion of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Finnigan, F; Hammersley, R; Millar, K

    1998-12-01

    Moderating effects of meal composition on psychomotor performance impairment and feelings after alcohol were examined in a between-subjects design. Fifty-one male volunteers fasted or received either a high carbohydrate (85% energy) or a high protein (94% energy) meal. Alcohol was administered at a dose to achieve a blood alcohol level (BAL) of 60 mg/100 ml, as a placebo. Subjects performed a dual task of primary tracking and secondary reaction time and a five-choice reaction time task. Feelings were also assessed by rating. The high carbohydrate meal reduced BAL at peak and 2 h after drinking, but a high protein meal had no significant effect. Although performance was impaired by alcohol, neither meal significantly reduced impairment and there was no effect of meal type on performance in the placebo condition. However, alcohol increased rated intoxication and the high carbohydrate meal reduced this effect. Subjects who had consumed high protein meals had more negative affect 2 h after alcohol than did subjects who had consumed high carbohydrate meals or fasted. It is concluded that there is only a weak relationship between BAL and performance impairment and food has only limited effects on impairment, although it reduces BAL. PMID:9920688

  18. Effect of Plantago ovata (psyllium) husk and seeds on sterol metabolism: studies in normal and ileostomy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gelissen, I C; Brodie, B; Eastwood, M A

    1994-02-01

    The diet of six normal and five ileostomy subjects was supplemented with 10 g/d Plantago ovata psyllium husk for 3 wk while six normal and four ileostomy subjects received 10 g/d psyllium seed. Fecal and ileostomy output, sterol excretion, serum cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured before and after supplementation. The husk had no effect on cholesterol or triglyceride concentrations in either normal or ileostomy subjects. Total and high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were reduced on average by 6.4% and 9.3%, respectively, in the normal group after seed supplementation. No effect on fecal bile acid excretion in the normal subjects was found after both regimes. Ileostomy bile acids were increased (on average 25%) after seed supplementation, whereas no effect on cholesterol concentrations was found. These results suggest that psyllium seed might be more effective than the husk in reducing serum cholesterol, that this cholesterol-lowering effect is not mediated by increased fecal bile acid losses, and increased ileal losses of bile acids might be compensated for by enhanced reabsorption in the colon. PMID:8310991

  19. Haploinsufficiency of the Ammonia Transporter Rhcg Predisposes to Chronic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Soline; Bounoure, Lisa; Christensen, Erik I.; Ramakrishnan, Suresh K.; Houillier, Pascal; Devuyst, Olivier; Wagner, Carsten A.

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia secretion by the collecting duct (CD) is critical for acid-base homeostasis and, when defective, causes distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). The Rhesus protein RhCG mediates NH3 transport as evident from cell-free and cellular models as well as from Rhcg-null mice. Here, we investigated in a Rhcg mouse model the metabolic effects of Rhcg haploinsufficiency, the role of Rhcg in basolateral NH3 transport, and the mechanisms of adaptation to the lack of Rhcg. Both Rhcg+/+ and Rhcg+/− mice were able to handle an acute acid load, whereas Rhcg−/− mice developed severe metabolic acidosis with reduced ammonuria and high mortality. However, chronic acid loading revealed that Rhcg+/− mice did not fully recover, showing lower blood HCO3− concentration and more alkaline urine. Microperfusion studies demonstrated that transepithelial NH3 permeability was reduced by 80 and 40%, respectively, in CDs from Rhcg−/− and Rhcg+/− mice compared with controls. Basolateral membrane permeability to NH3 was reduced in CDs from Rhcg−/− mice consistent with basolateral Rhcg localization. Rhcg−/− responded to acid loading with normal expression of enzymes and transporters involved in proximal tubular ammoniagenesis but reduced abundance of the NKCC2 transporter responsible for medullary accumulation of ammonium. Consequently, tissue ammonium content was decreased. These data demonstrate a role for apical and basolateral Rhcg in transepithelial NH3 transport and uncover an incomplete dRTA phenotype in Rhcg+/− mice. Haploinsufficiency or reduced expression of RhCG may underlie human forms of (in)complete dRTA. PMID:23281477

  20. Do founder mutations characteristic of some cancer sites also predispose to pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed

    Lener, Marcin R; Scott, Rodney J; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Baszuk, Piotr; Cybulski, Cezary; Wiechowska-Kozłowska, Anna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Kładny, Józef; Pietrzak, Sandra; Soluch, Agnieszka; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the etiology and risk of pancreatic cancer (PaCa) is still poorly understood. This study evaluated the prevalence of 10 Polish founder mutations in four genes among PaCa patients and assessed their possible association with the risk of disease in Poland. In the study 383 PaCa patients and 4,000 control subjects were genotyped for founder mutations in: BRCA1 (5382insC, 4153delA, C61G), CHEK2 (1100delC, IVS2 + 1G > A, del5395, I157T), NBS1 (657del5) and PALB2 (509_510delGA, 172_175delTTGT). A statistically significant association between the 657del5 mutation and an increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed for NBS1 gene. The Slavic NBS1 gene mutation (657delACAAA) was detected in 8 of 383 (2.09%) unselected cases compared with 22 of 4,000 (0.55%) controls (OR: 3.80, p = 0.002). The PALB2 509_510delGA and 172_175delTTGT mutations combined were seen in 2 (0.52%) unselected cases of PaCa and in 8 (0.20%) of 4,000 controls (OR: 2.61, p = 0.49). For BRCA1, the three mutations combined were detected in 4 of 383 (1.04%) PaCa patients and in 17 of 4,000 (0.42%) controls (OR: 2.46, p = 0.20). CHEK2 mutations were not associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.11, p = 0.72). The founder mutation in NBS1 (657del5) was associated with an increased risk of PaCa in heterozygous carriers, indicating that this mutation appears to predispose to cancer of the pancreas. By identifying pancreatic cancer risk groups, founder mutation testing in Poland should be considered for people at risk for PaCa. PMID:27038244

  1. The Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Predisposes for the Development of Clostridium perfringens-Induced Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Antonissen, Gunther; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001). DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001) and decreased duodenal villus height (P = 0.014) indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P = 0.023). Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens. PMID:25268498

  2. Nicotine content and abstinence state have different effects on subjective ratings of positive versus negative reinforcement from smoking

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Kimberly P.; Bracken, Bethany K.; MacLean, Robert R.; Ryan, Elizabeth T.; Lukas, Scott E.; Frederick, Blaise deB.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the well-known adverse health consequences of smoking, approximately 20% of US adults smoke tobacco cigarettes. Much of the research on smoking reinforcement and the maintenance of tobacco smoking behavior has focused on nicotine; however, a number of other non-nicotine factors are likely to influence the reinforcing effects of smoked tobacco. A growing number of studies suggest that non-nicotine factors, through many pairings with nicotine, are partially responsible for the reinforcing effect of smoking. Additionally, both clinical studies and preclinical advances in our understanding of nicotinic receptor regulation suggest that abstinence from smoking may influence smoking reinforcement. These experiments were conducted for 2 reasons: to validate a MRI-compatible cigarette smoking device; and to simultaneously investigate the impact of nicotine, smoking-associated conditioned reinforcers, and smoking abstinence state on subjective ratings of smoking reinforcement. Participants smoked nicotine and placebo cigarettes through an fMRI compatible device in an overnight-abstinent state or in a nonabstinent state, after having smoked a cigarette 25 minutes prior. Outcome measures were within-subject changes in physiology and subjective ratings of craving and drug effect during the smoking of nicotine or placebo cigarettes on different days in both abstinence states. Cigarette type (nicotine vs. placebo) had a significant effect on positive subjective ratings of smoking reinforcement (“High”, “Like Drug”, “Feel Drug”; nicotine>placebo). In contrast, abstinence state was found to have significant effects on both positive and negative ratings of smoking reinforcement (“Crave”, “Anxiety”, “Irritability”; abstinence > nonabstinence). Interaction effects between abstinence and nicotine provide clues about the importance of neuroadaptive mechanisms operating in dependence, as well as the impact of conditioned reinforcement on subjective ratings

  3. Residual effects of zolpidem, triazolam, rilmazafone and placebo in healthy elderly subjects: a randomized double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Sachiko Ito; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Wakasa, Masahiko; Satake, Masahiro; Ito, Wakako; Shimizu, Kazumi; Shioya, Takanobu; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Nishino, Seiji

    2015-11-01

    With current hypnotic agents, next-day residual effects are a common problem. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the residual effects of the commercially available hypnotics - zolpidem, triazolam, and rilmazafone - on the physical and cognitive functions of healthy elderly people in the early morning and the day following drug administration. In this study, the next-day residual effects of zolpidem, triazolam, and rilmazafone, following bedtime dosing in elderly subjects, were evaluated. Women (n = 11) and men (n = 2) aged 60-70 years received a single dose (at 23:00) of one of these, zolpidem 5 mg, triazolam 0.125 mg, rilmazafone 1 mg and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, crossover design. Measures of objective parameters and psychomotor performances (Timed up and Go test, Functional Reach Test, body sway test, critical flicker fusion test, simple discrimination reaction test, short-term memory test) and subjective ratings were obtained at 04:00, 07:00, and the next time of the day. All hypnotics were generally well tolerated; there were no serious adverse side effects and no subjects discontinued the evaluations. Compared to placebo, zolpidem and rilmazafone had good results on the Functional Reach Test. Although subjective assessments tended to be poor in the early morning, rilmazafone significantly improved the body sway test in the other hypnotics. A single dose of zolpidem 5 mg and triazolam 0.125 mg did not have any next-day residual effects on healthy elderly subjects. Residual effects appeared to be related to the compound's half-life and the dose used. Rilmazafone 1 mg exhibited steadiness in static and dynamic balance and seemed to be more favorable for the elderly with early morning awakening. PMID:26498242

  4. The reinforcing, subject-rated, performance, and cardiovascular effects of d-amphetamine: Influence of sensation-seeking status

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Lile, Joshua A.; Robbins, C. Glenn; Martin, Catherine A.; Rush, Craig R.; Kelly, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    Individual differences that may contribute to vulnerability to abuse drugs have been identified. Sensation-seeking status has been shown to influence both vulnerability to drug use and response to acute drug administration. The purpose of the present experiment was to examine the reinforcing effects of d-amphetamine in high and low sensation-seeking subjects using a modified progressive-ratio procedure. A battery of subject-rated, performance, and cardiovascular measures was also included to better characterize the effects of d-amphetamine in these groups. Ten high sensation seekers and ten low sensation seekers that were matched for education, age, drug use, height, and weight, first sampled doses of d-amphetamine (0, 8, and 16 mg). In subsequent sessions, subjects were offered the opportunity to work for the sampled dose on a modified progressive-ratio procedure. d-Amphetamine functioned as a reinforcer and produced prototypical stimulant-like effects (e.g., increased subject-ratings of Like Drug, enhanced performance, and increased heart rate). High sensation seekers were more sensitive than low sensation seekers to the reinforcing and some of the subject-rated effects of d-amphetamine. The results of the present experiment extend those of previous findings by demonstrating that the reinforcing effects of d-amphetamine vary as a function of the biologically based sensation-seeking personality trait. These results suggest that increased stimulant drug use and abuse among high sensation seekers may be related, in part, to increased sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of stimulants among these individuals. PMID:17011712

  5. Air toxics and epigenetic effects: ozone altered microRNAs in the sputum of human subjects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone (03) is a criteria air pollutant that is associated with numerous adverse health effects, including altered respiratory immune responses. Despite its deleterious health effects, possible epigenetic mechanisms underlying 03-induced health effects remain understudied. MicroRN...

  6. The effect of inhaled bronchoconstrictors on transcutaneous gas tensions in normal adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Gray, B; Barnes, N

    1987-01-01

    The administration of histamine and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) by nebulised aerosol in logarithmically increasing doses to normal subjects resulted in significant bronchoconstriction. Transcutaneous oxygen tension (tcPO2) was monitored during and after the bronchial challenge tests. Following histamine challenge there was significant hypoxaemia in all subjects (mean fall in tcPO2, 20 mmHg). However, following LTD4 administration, there was a small and insignificant fall in tcPO2. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension (tcPCO2) was also monitored throughout bronchial challenge, but showed no significant change. We suggest that the hypoxaemia following histamine challenge was due to increased ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatching in the lung induced by histamine deposition. PMID:3673787

  7. Beneficial effect of proprioceptive physical activities on balance control in elderly human subjects.

    PubMed

    Gauchard, G C; Jeandel, C; Tessier, A; Perrin, P P

    1999-10-01

    Age and lack of physical activities may both be responsible for poor balance control. Conversely, physical activities may modulate postural control in elderly individuals. We examined which type of exercise might prove most beneficial to retain or regain proper balance. Nineteen healthy subjects, aged over 60, regularly practicing proprioceptive (group I) or bioenergetic (group II) physical activities and 21 controls only walking on a regular basis, were studied. All were submitted to a dynamic posturographic test and to a test evaluating lower limbs muscular strength. Control individuals displayed the poorest balance and muscular performance. Group I subjects had the best postural control with average muscular strength. In group II, muscular strength was significantly increased, but balance control was of poor quality. Proprioceptive exercise therefore appears to have the best impact on balance control. PMID:10505621

  8. The effect of subjective social status on depressive thinking: An experimental examination.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Torben; Süssenbach, Philipp; Schäfer, Sarina J; Euteneuer, Frank

    2016-07-30

    Subjective social status (SSS) predicts health outcomes above and beyond objective measures of social status. Both objective and subjective measures of social status are strongly related with depression. Cognitive mechanisms such as depressive cognitions, rumination, and a negative cognitive style are seen as both concomitant and antecedent to depression. This experiment examined the causal role of SSS in developing depressive thinking. Participants were randomly assigned to a low and a high status group and followed a manipulation procedure targeting their SSS. Depressive thinking was subsequently assessed by depressive cognitions, stress-reactive state rumination and negative cognitive style. Low status participants exhibited higher levels of depressive cognitions and rumination compared to their high status counterparts, but both groups did not differ regarding their cognitive style. Findings support the causal nature of the relationship between SSS and depressive thinking. Several mechanisms of how low SSS may lead to depression are discussed. PMID:27152906

  9. Backward disequilibrium in elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    Manckoundia, Patrick; Mourey, France; Pérennou, Dominic; Pfitzenmeyer, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Backward disequilibrium is observed frequently in daily clinical practice. However, there are no epidemiological data concerning this postural disorder. Defined by a posterior position of the centre of mass with respect to the base of support, backward disequilibrium is abnormal postural behavior, usually characterized by a posterior trunk tilt in standing and sitting positions, which predisposes subjects to backward falls. Many afflictions whether they are somatic (degenerative, ischemic and traumatic brain lesions), psychosomatic (psychomotor disadaptation syndrome, confinement to bed, nonuse situations) or psychological (depression) can cause backward disequilibrium. A vicious circle of falls, and loss of autonomy can arise and this is the main consequence of backward disequilibrium. Thus, in this paper, we review backward disequilibrium in elderly subjects with regard to the causes, consequences, assessment, and management. PMID:19281059

  10. Sustained-Release Buprenorphine (RBP-6000) Blocks the Effects of Opioid Challenge With Hydromorphone in Subjects With Opioid Use Disorder.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Azmi F; Greenwald, Mark K; Vince, Bradley; Fudala, Paul J; Twumasi-Ankrah, Philip; Liu, Yongzhen; Jones, J P; Heidbreder, Christian

    2016-02-01

    A major goal for the treatment of opioid use disorder is to reduce or eliminate the use of illicit opioids. Buprenorphine, a μ-opioid receptor partial agonist and kappa opioid receptor antagonist, is now being developed as a monthly, sustained-release formulation (RBP-6000). The objective of this study was to demonstrate that RBP-6000 blocks the subjective effects and reinforcing efficacy of the μ-opioid receptor agonist hydromorphone (intramuscularly administered) in subjects with moderate or severe opioid use disorder. Subjects were first inducted and dose stabilized on sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone (8-24 mg daily; dose expressed as the buprenorphine component), then received two subcutaneous injections of RBP-6000 (300 mg) on Day 1 and Day 29. Hydromorphone challenges (6 mg, 18 mg or placebo administered in randomized order) occurred on 3 consecutive days of each study week before and after receiving RBP-6000. Subjects reported their responses to each challenge on various 100-mm Visual Analogue Scales (VAS). Subjects also completed a choice task to assess the reinforcing efficacy of each hydromorphone dose relative to money. At baseline, mean "drug liking" VAS scores for hydromorphone 18 mg and 6 mg versus placebo were 61 mm (95% confidence interval, 52.3-68.9) and 45 mm (95% confidence interval, 37.2-53.6), respectively. After 300 mg RBP-6000 was administered, mean VAS score differences from placebo were less than 10 mm through week 12. The reinforcing efficacy of hydromorphone decreased in a parallel manner. This study demonstrated that RBP-6000 at a 300 mg dose provides durable and potent blockade of the subjective effects and reinforcing efficacy of hydromorphone in subjects with moderate or severe opioid use disorder. PMID:26650971

  11. Nonsmoker Exposure to Secondhand Cannabis Smoke. III. Oral Fluid and Blood Drug Concentrations and Corresponding Subjective Effects.

    PubMed

    Cone, Edward J; Bigelow, George E; Herrmann, Evan S; Mitchell, John M; LoDico, Charles; Flegel, Ronald; Vandrey, Ryan

    2015-09-01

    The increasing use of highly potent strains of cannabis prompted this new evaluation of human toxicology and subjective effects following passive exposure to cannabis smoke. The study was designed to produce extreme cannabis smoke exposure conditions tolerable to drug-free nonsmokers. Six experienced cannabis users smoked cannabis cigarettes [5.3% Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in Session 1 and 11.3% THC in Sessions 2 and 3] in a closed chamber. Six nonsmokers were seated alternately with smokers during exposure sessions of 1 h duration. Sessions 1 and 2 were conducted with no ventilation and ventilation was employed in Session 3. Oral fluid, whole blood and subjective effect measures were obtained before and at multiple time points after each session. Oral fluid was analyzed by ELISA (4 ng/mL cutoff concentration) and by LC-MS-MS (limit of quantitation) for THC (1 ng/mL) and total THCCOOH (0.02 ng/mL). Blood was analyzed by LC-MS-MS (0.5 ng/mL) for THC, 11-OH-THC and free THCCOOH. Positive tests for THC in oral fluid and blood were obtained for nonsmokers up to 3 h following exposure. Ratings of subjective effects correlated with the degree of exposure. Subjective effect measures and amounts of THC absorbed by nonsmokers (relative to smokers) indicated that extreme secondhand cannabis smoke exposure mimicked, though to a lesser extent, active cannabis smoking. PMID:26139312

  12. The Effect of Applying Elements of Instructional Design on Teaching Material for the Subject of Classification of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdilek, Zehra; Ozkan, Muhlis

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of instructional materials for the subject of classification of matter as solids, liquids and gases that were developed using a holistic instructional design model on student achievement. In the study a pre-test/post-test with control group experimental design was used. The study was conducted in the…

  13. The Effects of Form-Focused Instruction on the Acquisition of Subject-Verb Inversion in German

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindseth, Martina

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the effects of form-focused instruction (FFI) on the acquisition of subject-verb inversion word order in declarative sentences in German. A group of U.S. college students who participated in a semester-long study abroad program in Germany and were comparable in terms of preprogram oral proficiency levels and accuracy scores in…

  14. Teacher Credentials and Student Achievement in High School: A Cross-Subject Analysis with Student Fixed Effects. Working Paper 11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clotfelter, Charles T.; Ladd, Helen F.; Vigdor, Jacob L.

    2007-01-01

    We use data on statewide end-of-course tests in North Carolina to examine the relationship between teacher credentials and student achievement at the high school level. The availability of test scores in multiple subjects for each student permits us to estimate a model with student fixed effects, which helps minimize any bias associated with the…

  15. Stimulus-Dominance Effects and Lateral Asymmetries for Language in Normal Subjects and in Patients with a Single Functional Hemisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Stefano, Marirosa; Marano, Elena; Viti, Marzia

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of language laterality by the dichotic fused-words test may be impaired by interference effects revealed by the dominant report of one member of the stimuli-pair. Stimulus-dominance and ear asymmetry were evaluated in normal population (48 subjects of both sex and handedness) and in 2 patients with a single functional hemisphere.…

  16. The Effects of Professional Learning Communities and School Leaders on Veteran Teachers Assigned to New Grade Levels or Subject Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchens, Joy C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the effects of professional learning communities on veteran teachers with three or more years of experience assigned to new grade levels or subject areas and the implications for school leaders. The specific research questions that framed the study were: (1) What do veteran teachers assigned…

  17. Associations of endothelial dysfunction with exposure to ambient fine particles in diabetic subjects: are the effects modified by patient characteristics?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objective: Exposure to fme airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) has been shown to be responsible for cardiovascular and hematological effects, especially in older people with cardiovascular disease. Results of epidemiological studies suggest that subjects with diabetes may be a pa...

  18. The Effects of Classic and Web-Designed Conceptual Change Texts on the Subject of Water Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tas, Erol; Gülen, Salih; Öner, Zeynep; Özyürek, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to research the effects of traditional and web-assisted conceptual change texts for the subject of water chemistry on the success, conceptual errors and permanent learning of students. A total of 37 8th graders in a secondary school of Samsun participated in this study which had a random experimental design with…

  19. Do Functional Behavioral Assessments Improve Intervention Effectiveness for Students with ADHD? A Single-Subject Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Faith G.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this quantitative synthesis of single-subject research was to investigate the relative effectiveness of function-based and non-function-based behavioral interventions for students diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In addition, associations between various participant, assessment, and intervention…

  20. Do Functional Behavioral Assessments Improve Intervention Effectiveness for Students Diagnosed with ADHD? A Single-Subject Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Faith G.; Lee, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this quantitative synthesis of single-subject research was to investigate the relative effectiveness of function-based and non-function-based behavioral interventions for students diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In addition, associations between various participant, assessment, and intervention…

  1. Toward Independent L2 Readers: Effects of Text Adjuncts, Subject Knowledge, L1 Reading, and L2 Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantmeier, Cindy; Hammadou Sullivan, JoAnn; Strube, Michael

    2014-01-01

    With 97 learners in an advanced Spanish course, the study examines the effects of textual enhancement adjuncts, prior subject knowledge, first language (L1) reading ability, and second language (L2) Spanish proficiency on L2 comprehension of scientific passages. Readings included two texts with two types of embedded questions: a pause or written…

  2. The Effect of Internet-Based Education on Student Success in Teaching of 8th Grade Triangles Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Deniz; Kesan, Cenk; Izgiol, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    In the study, it was researched the effect of internet-based application on student success. Internet-based application was used at the teaching of triangles subject which is included in 8th grade units of triangles and algebra. The study was carried out over the internet with a computer software program: Vitamin Program. The study was carried out…

  3. Nonsmoker Exposure to Secondhand Cannabis Smoke. III. Oral Fluid and Blood Drug Concentrations and Corresponding Subjective Effects

    PubMed Central

    Cone, Edward J.; Bigelow, George E.; Herrmann, Evan S.; Mitchell, John M.; LoDico, Charles; Flegel, Ronald; Vandrey, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of highly potent strains of cannabis prompted this new evaluation of human toxicology and subjective effects following passive exposure to cannabis smoke. The study was designed to produce extreme cannabis smoke exposure conditions tolerable to drug-free nonsmokers. Six experienced cannabis users smoked cannabis cigarettes [5.3% Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in Session 1 and 11.3% THC in Sessions 2 and 3] in a closed chamber. Six nonsmokers were seated alternately with smokers during exposure sessions of 1 h duration. Sessions 1 and 2 were conducted with no ventilation and ventilation was employed in Session 3. Oral fluid, whole blood and subjective effect measures were obtained before and at multiple time points after each session. Oral fluid was analyzed by ELISA (4 ng/mL cutoff concentration) and by LC–MS-MS (limit of quantitation) for THC (1 ng/mL) and total THCCOOH (0.02 ng/mL). Blood was analyzed by LC–MS-MS (0.5 ng/mL) for THC, 11-OH-THC and free THCCOOH. Positive tests for THC in oral fluid and blood were obtained for nonsmokers up to 3 h following exposure. Ratings of subjective effects correlated with the degree of exposure. Subjective effect measures and amounts of THC absorbed by nonsmokers (relative to smokers) indicated that extreme secondhand cannabis smoke exposure mimicked, though to a lesser extent, active cannabis smoking. PMID:26139312

  4. EFFECT OF INHALED ENDOTOXIN ON AIRWAY AND CIRCULATING INFLAMMATORY CELL PHAGOCYTOSIS AND CD11B EXPRESSION IN ATOPIC ASTHMATIC SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effect of inhaled endotoxin on airway and circulating inflammatory cell phagocytosis and CD11b expression in atopic asthmatic subjects

    Neil E. Alexis, PhD, Marlowe W. Eldridge, MD, David B. Peden, MD, MS

    Chapel Hill and Research Triangle Park, NC

    Backgrou...

  5. Effect of co-trimoxazole and sulfamethoxazole on serum creatinine in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Roy, M T; First, M R; Myre, S A; Cacini, W

    1982-01-01

    Significant elevation of serum creatinine concentration and reduction in creatinine clearance have been reported following cotrimoxazole therapy in patients with normal and impaired renal function. Both components of co-trimoxazole, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, have been proposed as the causative agent. Ten healthy male volunteers were treated for seven days with either sulfamethoxazole (5 subjects) or co-trimoxazole (5 subjects) in the usual recommended doses. After a one-week recovery period, the subjects were allocated to the alternate treatment regimen for another seven days. Cotrimoxazole caused a mean elevation in the serum creatinine concentration of 0.12 mg/dl over the base-line value (p less than 0.05). Sulfamethoxazole produced an insignificant fall in the serum creatinine level. The increase in the serum creatinine concentration induced by co-trimoxazole was reversed seven days after discontinuation of the drug. From this study, it can be concluded that either trimethoprim alone or an interaction between trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole is responsible for the increase in serum creatinine observed following co-trimoxazole therapy and that sulfamethoxazole alone is not the causative agent. PMID:7071907

  6. Effect of short-term fasting on lipolytic responsiveness in normal and obese human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.R.; Peters, E.J.; Klein, S.; Holland, O.B.; Rosenblatt, J.; Gary, H. Jr.

    1987-02-01

    In this study the rate of lipolysis (fatty acid and glycerol release into blood) has been quantified in both normal weight and obese volunteers after both 15 and 87 h of fasting. In each study, the basal rate and subsequent response to epinephrine infusion were determined. The rate of appearance (R/sub a/) of free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol were quantified by infusion of (1- TC)palmitate and D-5-glycerol, respectively. Substrate flux rates per unit of body fat mass and lean body mass were calculated from total body water measurements using H2 YO dilution. In normal volunteers, the basal R/sub a/ FFA and R/sub a/ glycerol rose markedly with 87 h of fasting, whereas the increases were more modest in the obese subjects. However, the rate of mobilization of fat, in relation to the lean body mass, was higher in the obese subjects than in the normal subjects after 15 h of fasting, and the values were similar in both groups after 87 h of fasting. There was an increased lipolytic response to epinephrine after fasting in both groups. This increased sensitivity may have resulted from the enhancement of fatty acid-triglyceride substrate cycling that occurred after fasting.

  7. [Effects of companion animals on owner's subjective well-being and social networks in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Megumi

    2006-04-01

    A multi-method approach was used to examine whether and how companion animals (CA) affect subjective well-being and social networks of Japanese people. In Study 1, a mail survey with a probability sample of 1250 Japanese adults over 40 years old showed that (1) female owners' attachment to CA negatively correlated with subjective well-being, and (2) although younger (under 65) CA owners had more close friends than non-owners, this tendency was reversed for those over 65. In Study 2, in-depth interviews with 27 adults showed that (1) female CA owners reported lower subjective well-being than non-owners, (2) although CA owners were generally successful in interacting with strangers through CA-related behaviors such as dog-walking, those relationships were unlikely to become close, and (3) in contrast to the owners' tendency to portray themselves in positive ways, most non-owners described CA owners negatively, such as being lonely or bad-mannered. Based on the present findings, which sharply contradict those of previous studies in the western societies, future issues are discussed. PMID:16862960

  8. Dose-related Behavioral, Subjective, Endocrine and Psychophysiological Effects Of the Kappa Opioid Agonist Salvinorin A in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Schnakenberg, Ashley; Skosnik, Patrick D.; Cohen, Bruce; Pittman, Brian; Sewell, R. Andrew; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Background Salvia divinorum (Salvia) is an increasingly popular recreational drug amongst adolescents and young adults. Its primary active ingredient, Salvinorin A (SA), a highly selective agonist at the kappa opiate receptor (KOR), is believed to be one of the most potent naturally occurring hallucinogens. However, there is little experimental data on the effects of SA in humans. Methods In a 3-day, double-blind, randomized, crossover, counterbalanced study, the behavioral, subjective, cognitive, psychophysiological and endocrine effects of 0 mg, 8 mg and 12 mg of inhaled SA were characterized in 10 healthy individuals who had previously used Salvia. Results SA produced psychotomimetic effects and perceptual alterations including dissociative and somaesthetic effects, increased plasma cortisol and prolactin and reduced resting EEG spectral power. SA administration was associated with a rapid increase of its levels in the blood. SA did not produce euphoria, cognitive deficits or changes in vital signs. The effects were transient and not dose-related. SA administration was very well tolerated without acute or delayed adverse effects. Conclusions SA produced a wide range of transient effects in healthy subjects. The perceptual altering effects and lack of euphoric effects would explain its intermittent use pattern. Such a profile would also suggest a low addictive potential similar to other hallucinogens and consistent with KOR agonism. Further work is warranted to carefully characterize a full spectrum of its effects in humans, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms involved and to explore the basis for individual variability in its effects. PMID:22817868

  9. Effect of inhaled furosemide and torasemide on bronchial response to ultrasonically nebulized distilled water in asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Foresi, A; Pelucchi, A; Mastropasqua, B; Cavigioli, G; Carlesi, R M; Marazzini, L

    1992-08-01

    Inhaled furosemide has been shown to reduce the bronchoconstriction induced by several indirect stimuli, including ultrasonically nebulized distilled water (UNDW). Because the protective effect could be due to the inhibition of the Na(+)-2Cl(-)-K+ cotransport system of bronchial epithelium, we have compared the protective effect of inhaled furosemide with that of inhaled torasemide, a new and more potent loop diuretic, on UNDW-induced bronchoconstriction in a group of 12 asthmatic subjects. UNDW challenge was performed by constructing a stimulus-response curve with five increasing volume outputs of distilled water (from 0.5 to 5.2 ml/min) and the bronchial response expressed as the provocative output causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PO20UNDW). On different days, each subject inhaled an equal dose (28 mg) of furosemide and torasemide in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study 5 min prior to an UNDW challenge. Furosemide and torasemide had no significant effect on resting lung function. The geometric mean value of PO20UNDW measured after placebo was 1.73 ml/min. This was significantly lower than that recorded after furosemide (4.25 ml/min; p < 0.025), but not after torasemide (3.05 ml/min; p = 0.07). Inhaled furosemide totally blocked bronchial response to UNDW in five subjects. In two of five subjects the response was also blocked by inhaled torasemide. A remarkable increase in diuresis was noted only after torasemide in most subjects. We conclude that inhaled furosemide has a better protective effect than does inhaled torasemide against UNDW-induced bronchoconstriction. However, the protective effect of furosemide is variable, with some asthmatic patients showing no change in bronchial response to UNDW.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1489126

  10. Subjective Effects of Ethanol, Morphine, Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol, and Ketamine Following a Pharmacological Challenge Are Related to Functional Brain Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kleinloog, Daniël; Rombouts, Serge; Zoethout, Remco; Klumpers, Linda; Niesters, Marieke; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Dahan, Albert; van Gerven, Joop

    2015-12-01

    This analysis examines the neuronal foundation of drug-induced psychomimetic symptoms by relating the severity of these symptoms to changes in functional connectivity for a range of different psychoactive compounds with varying degrees of psychomimetic effects. The repeated measures design included 323 resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging time series and measures of subjective effects in 36 healthy male volunteers. Four different pharmacological challenges with ethanol, morphine, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and ketamine (12 subjects per drug) were applied. A set of 10 "template" resting-state networks was used to determine individual connectivity maps. Linear regression was used for each individual subject to relate these connectivity maps to three clusters of drug-induced subjective psychomimetic effects ("perception," "relaxation," and "dysphoria") as measured with visual analogue scales. Group analysis showed that the subjective effects of perception correlated significantly across drugs with the connectivity of the posterior cingulate cortex and precentral gyrus with the sensorimotor network (p < 0.005, corrected). No significant correlations were found for relaxation or dysphoria. The posterior cingulate cortex has a role in visuospatial evaluation and the precentral gyrus has been associated with auditory hallucinations. Both the posterior cingulate cortex and the precentral gyrus show changes in activation in patients with schizophrenia, which can be related to the severity of positive symptoms (i.e., hallucinations and delusions), and have previously been related to changes induced by psychoactive drugs. The similarity of functional connectivity changes for drug-induced psychomimetic effects and symptoms of psychosis provides further support for the use of pharmacological challenges with psychomimetic drugs as models for psychosis. PMID:26390148

  11. A comparison of the effects of fatigue on subjective and objective assessment of situation awareness in cycling.

    PubMed

    Knez, Wade L; Ham, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    Maximal effort on a 30 km Time Trial (TT30) was examined to assess whether it would elicit changes in objective and subjective tests of the participants' perception of the environment and their ability to anticipate future occurrences (situation awareness; SA) and to determine the effect of post-exercise recovery on SA. Nine experienced (5.22 ± 2.77 years) road cyclists had their objective and subjective levels of SA assessed prior to and at the completion of two TT30. The participants' results were compared to measurements of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), peak power output (PPO), age and years of competitive cycle racing experience. Fatigue resulting from maximal effort on a TT30 produced significant changes in both the objective and subjective test of SA. Effect sizes of 0.93 and 0.99 indicated that the first and second TT30 were likely or almost certain to have a beneficial effect on the objective assessment of SA. However, the effect sizes of 0.97 and 0.95 relating to the subjective assessment of cognitive performance on the first and second TT30 showed that it was very likely the participants' had an increased difficulty in maintaining SA. A recovery period of up to three minutes post TT30 had no effect on SA. Changes in SA had no relationship with measurements of VO2max, peak power output (PPO), age and years of competitive cycle racing experience. The findings suggest that within a laboratory environment, participants consistently underestimate their ability to make accurate assessments of their cycling environment compared to objective measures of their SA. Key PointsExhaustive exercise from a TT30 produces significant changes in both subjective and objective SA.This study indicates that fatigued participants underestimate their ability to maintain SA.A time period of three minutes is not enough to observe a recovery effect on subjective or objective SA.Both the objective and subjective tests proved to be reliable assessments of SA. PMID:24198685

  12. Effect of boundary conditions and panel geometry on the response of laminated panels subjected to transverse pressure loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of thin laminated flat and curved panels subjected to transverse pressure and inplane loads is considered. The effects of panel geometry, boundary conditions and laminate stacking sequence on the response of panels subjected to transverse pressure loads up to 12.4 N/sq cm is presented. The response of thin laminated panels is evaluated analytically and selected results are compared with test data. A parametric study of the deformation and strain responses of panels with radius of curvature ranging from 20 to 305 cm is presented. The combination of inplane tensile and pressure loads is also considered.

  13. Effect of standing on neurohumoral responses and plasma volume in healthy subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Ertl, A. C.; Shannon, J. R.; Furlan, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Upright posture leads to rapid pooling of blood in the lower extremities and shifts plasma fluid into surrounding tissues. This results in a decrease in plasma volume (PV) and in hemoconcentration. There has been no integrative evaluation of concomitant neurohumoral and PV shifts with upright posture in normal subjects. We studied 10 healthy subjects after 3 days of stable Na+ and K+ intake. PV was assessed by the Evans blue dye method and by changes in hematocrit. Norepinephrine (NE), NE spillover, epinephrine (Epi), vasopressin, plasma renin activity, aldosterone, osmolarity, and kidney response expressed by urine osmolality and by Na+ and K+ excretion of the subjects in the supine and standing postures were all measured. We found that PV fell by 13% (375 +/- 35 ml plasma) over approximately 14 min, after which time it remained relatively stable. There was a concomitant decrease in systolic blood pressure and an increase in heart rate that peaked at the time of maximal decrease in PV. Plasma Epi and NE increased rapidly to this point. Epi approached baseline by 20 min of standing. NE spillover increased 80% and clearance decreased 30% with 30 min of standing. The increase in plasma renin activity correlated with an increase in aldosterone. Vasopressin increased progressively, but there was no change in plasma osmolarity. The kidney response showed a significant decrease in Na+ and an increase in K+ excretion with upright posture. We conclude that a cascade of neurohumoral events occurs with upright posture, some of which particularly coincide with the decrease in PV. Plasma Epi levels may contribute to the increment in heart rate with maintained upright posture.

  14. The Effect of Sampling and Storage on the Fecal Microbiota Composition in Healthy and Diseased Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tedjo, Danyta I.; Jonkers, Daisy M. A. E.; Savelkoul, Paul H.; Masclee, Ad A.; van Best, Niels; Pierik, Marieke J.; Penders, John

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale cohort studies are currently being designed to investigate the human microbiome in health and disease. Adequate sampling strategies are required to limit bias due to shifts in microbial communities during sampling and storage. Therefore, we examined the impact of different sampling and storage conditions on the stability of fecal microbial communities in healthy and diseased subjects. Fecal samples from 10 healthy controls, 10 irritable bowel syndrome and 8 inflammatory bowel disease patients were collected on site, aliquoted immediately after defecation and stored at -80°C, -20°C for 1 week, at +4°C or room temperature for 24 hours. Fecal transport swabs (FecalSwab, Copan) were collected and stored for 48-72 hours at room temperature. We used pyrosequencing of the 16S gene to investigate the stability of microbial communities. Alpha diversity did not differ between all storage methods and -80°C, except for the fecal swabs. UPGMA clustering and principal coordinate analysis showed significant clustering by test subject (p<0.001) but not by storage method. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity and (un)weighted UniFrac showed a significant higher distance between fecal swabs and -80°C versus the other methods and -80°C samples (p<0.009). The relative abundance of Ruminococcus and Enterobacteriaceae did not differ between the storage methods versus -80°C, but was higher in fecal swabs (p<0.05). Storage up to 24 hours (at +4°C or room temperature) or freezing at -20°C did not significantly alter the fecal microbial community structure compared to direct freezing of samples from healthy subjects and patients with gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26024217

  15. The effect of sampling and storage on the fecal microbiota composition in healthy and diseased subjects.

    PubMed

    Tedjo, Danyta I; Jonkers, Daisy M A E; Savelkoul, Paul H; Masclee, Ad A; van Best, Niels; Pierik, Marieke J; Penders, John

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale cohort studies are currently being designed to investigate the human microbiome in health and disease. Adequate sampling strategies are required to limit bias due to shifts in microbial communities during sampling and storage. Therefore, we examined the impact of different sampling and storage conditions on the stability of fecal microbial communities in healthy and diseased subjects. Fecal samples from 10 healthy controls, 10 irritable bowel syndrome and 8 inflammatory bowel disease patients were collected on site, aliquoted immediately after defecation and stored at -80 °C, -20 °C for 1 week, at +4°C or room temperature for 24 hours. Fecal transport swabs (FecalSwab, Copan) were collected and stored for 48-72 hours at room temperature. We used pyrosequencing of the 16S gene to investigate the stability of microbial communities. Alpha diversity did not differ between all storage methods and -80 °C, except for the fecal swabs. UPGMA clustering and principal coordinate analysis showed significant clustering by test subject (p < 0.001) but not by storage method. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity and (un)weighted UniFrac showed a significant higher distance between fecal swabs and -80 °C versus the other methods and -80 °C samples (p < 0.009). The relative abundance of Ruminococcus and Enterobacteriaceae did not differ between the storage methods versus -80 °C, but was higher in fecal swabs (p < 0.05). Storage up to 24 hours (at +4 °C or room temperature) or freezing at -20 °C did not significantly alter the fecal microbial community structure compared to direct freezing of samples from healthy subjects and patients with gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26024217

  16. Effects of ventilation inhomogeneity on DLcoSB-3EQ in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Cotton, D J; Prabhu, M B; Mink, J T; Graham, B L

    1992-12-01

    In patients with airflow obstruction, we found that ventilation inhomogeneity during vital capacity single-breath maneuvers was associated with decreases in the three-equation single-breath CO diffusing capacity of the lung (DLcoSB-3EQ) when breath-hold time (tBH) decreased. We postulated that this was due to a significant resistance to diffusive gas mixing within the gas phase of the lung. In this study, we hypothesized that this phenomenon might also occur in normal subjects if the breathing cycle were altered from traditional vital capacity maneuvers to those that increase ventilation inhomogeneity. In 10 normal subjects, we examined the tBH dependence of both DLcoSB-3EQ and the distribution of ventilation, measured by the mixing efficiency and the normalized phase III slope for helium. Preinspiratory lung volume (V0) was increased by keeping the maximum end-inspiratory lung volume (Vmax) constant or by increasing V0 and Vmax. When V0 increased while Vmax was kept constant, we found that the tBH-independent and the tBH-dependent components of ventilation inhomogeneity increased, but DLcoSB-3EQ was independent of V0 and tBH. Increasing V0 and Vmax did not change ventilation inhomogeneity at a tBH of 0 s, but the tBH-dependent component decreased. DLcoSB-3EQ, although independent of tBH, increased slightly with increases in Vmax. We conclude that in normal subjects increases in ventilation inhomogeneity with increases in V0 do not result in DLcoSB-3EQ becoming tBH dependent. PMID:1490979

  17. Effect of Different Cooling Regimes on the Mechanical Properties of Cementitious Composites Subjected to High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiangtao; Weng, Wenfang; Yu, Kequan

    2014-01-01

    The influence of different cooling regimes (quenching in water and cooling in air) on the residual mechanical properties of engineered cementitious composite (ECC) subjected to high temperature up to 800°C was discussed in this paper. The ECC specimens are exposed to 100, 200, 400, 600, and 800°C with the unheated specimens for reference. Different cooling regimens had a significant influence on the mechanical properties of postfire ECC specimens. The microstructural characterization was examined before and after exposure to fire deterioration by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results from the microtest well explained the mechanical properties variation of postfire specimens. PMID:25161392

  18. The subjective effect of multiple co-channel frequency modulated television interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, W. A., Jr.; Cauley, M. A.; Groumpos, P. P.

    1983-01-01

    As the geostationary orbit/spectrum becomes saturated, there is a need for the ability to reuse frequency assignments. Protection ratios (the ratio of wanted signal power to interfering signal power at the receiver) play a key role in determining efficient frequency reuse plans. A knowledge of the manner in which multiple sources of co-channel interference combine is vital in determining protection ratio requirements such that suitable margin may be allocated for multiple interfering signals. Results of tests examining the subjective assessment of multiple co-channel frequency modulated television signals interfering with another frequency modulated TV system are presented.

  19. Measuring subjective response to aircraft noise: the effects of survey context.

    PubMed

    Kroesen, Maarten; Molin, Eric J E; van Wee, Bert

    2013-01-01

    In applied research, noise annoyance is often used as indicator of subjective reaction to aircraft noise in residential areas. The present study aims to show that the meaning which respondents attach to the concept of aircraft noise annoyance is partly a function of survey context. To this purpose a survey is conducted among residents living near Schiphol Airport, the largest airport in the Netherlands. In line with the formulated hypotheses it is shown that different sets of preceding questionnaire items influence the response distribution of aircraft noise annoyance as well as the correlational patterns between aircraft noise annoyance and other relevant scales. PMID:23297898

  20. Effect of potassium and calcium loading on healthy subjects under hypokinesia and physical exercise with fluid and salt supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Naexu, Konstantin A.; Federenko, Youri F.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the acute responses to the electrolyte challenges under hypokinesia and physical exercise (PE) of different intensities with fluid and salt supplementation (FSS). The studies were performed on 12 physically healthy male volunteers aged 19-24 years under 364 days of hypokinesia (decreased number of steps per day) with a set of PE with FSS. The volunteers were divided into two equal groups. The first group was subjected to a set of intensive PE and the second group was submitted to a set of moderate PE. Both groups of subjects consumed daily water and salt supplements that aimed to increase the body hydration level. For simulation of the hypokinetic effect all subjects were kept under an average of 3000 steps per day. Functional tests with a potassium chloride (KCl) and calcium lactate (Cal) load were performed during the hypokinetic period of 364 days and the 60-day prehypokinetic period that served as control, while both groups of subjects consumed daily calcium and potassium supplements. The concentration of electrolyte and hormone levels in the blood and their excretion rate in urine were determined. Renal excretion of calcium and potassium and the blood concentration thereof increased markedly in both groups of subjects. With the potassium chloride load tests the increased potassium excretion was accompanied by higher aldosterone and insulin blood levels, and with the calcium lactate load tests the increased calcium excretion was accompanied by a decreased parathyroid content in the blood. FSS and PE, regardless of intensity, failed to attenuate calcium and potassium losses. Additional intake of KCl and Cal also failed to normalize potassium and calcium abnormalities. It was concluded that during the KCl and Cal loading tests, the increased losses of potassium and calcium in the hypokinetic subjects were due to the inability of their bodies to retain these electrolytes, and that electrolyte abnormalities could

  1. Effects of alprazolam and clonidine on carbon dioxide-induced increases in anxiety rating in healthy human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, S.W.; Krystal, J.H.; Heninger, G.R.; Charney, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate possible neurobiologic mechanisms underlying carbon dioxide-induced anxiety, the effects of oral alprazolam 0.75 mg and intravenous clonidine 2 mcg/kg on CO/sub 2/-induced increases in ratings of subjective anxiety, pulse rate, and ventilation were measured in healthy human subjects. Pretreatment with alprazolam but not with clonidine significantly reduced the CO/sub 2/-induced increases in ratings of anxiety. Neither drug altered CO/sub 2/-induced increases in pulse rate or ventilatory responses. Clonidine did produce potent sedative and hypotensive effects. The behavioral data suggest that the mechanisms through which CO/sub 2/ induces anxiety-like effects involve neural systems regulated by benzodiazepine receptors and, secondly, that they appear not to require normal functioning of noradrenergic systems. Carbon dioxide may provide a useful model system for identification of new drugs with anxiolytic properties.

  2. Beyond Cohen's "d": Alternative Effect Size Measures for Between-Subject Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Chao-Ying Joanne; Chen, Li-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Given the long history of discussion of issues surrounding statistical testing and effect size indices and various attempts by the American Psychological Association and by the American Educational Research Association to encourage the reporting of effect size, most journals in education and psychology have witnessed an increase in effect size…

  3. The effects of sequential exposure to acidic fog and ozone on pulmonary function in exercising subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Aris, R.; Christian, D.; Sheppard, D.; Balmes, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    In Southern California coastal regions, morning fog is often acidified by the presence of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). Peak exposure to ozone (O{sub 3}) usually occurs in the afternoon and evening, after the fog has dissipated. To determine whether fog containing HNO{sub 3} might enhance pulmonary responses to O{sub 3}, we studied a group of healthy, athletic subjects selected for lung function sensitivity to O{sub 3}. On 3 separate days, the subjects exercised for 2 h in atmospheres containing HNO{sub 3} fog (0.5 mg/ml), H{sub 2}O fog, or clean, filtered air. After a 1-h break, they exercised for an additional 3 h in an atmosphere containing 0.20 ppm O{sub 3}. Surprisingly, the mean O{sub 3}-induced decrements in FEV1 and FVC were smaller after exercise in each fog-containing atmosphere than they were after exercise in clean, filtered air. The mean (+/- SEM) O{sub 3}-induced decrements in FEV1 were 26.4 +/- 5.3% after air, 17.1 +/- 3.7% after H{sub 2}O fog, and 18.0 +/- 4.3% after HNO{sub 3} fog, and in FVC they were 19.9 +/- 4.7% after air, 13.6 +/- 2.8% after H{sub 2}O fog, and 13.6 +/- 4.2% after HNO{sub 3} fog.

  4. Electromyographic Evaluation of the Effect of Lined Dentures on Masticatory Muscle Activity in Edentulous Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shitij; Gaur, Abhishek; Dupare, Arun; Rastogi, Shiksha; Kamatagi, Laxmikant

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to examine changes in relative electromyographic (EMG) activities of temporal and masseter muscles after relining the dentures with silicone and acrylic-resin based denture liners. Materials and Methods Conventional complete dentures were fabricated for 20 edentulous patients. One month after completing adjustments of the dentures, electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscle during maximum intercuspation was recorded. The dentures were then relined with a silicone denture liner and after an adaptation period of one month, were again subjected for electromyographic evaluation. Further, the dentures were relined with acrylic denture liner and subjected to electromyographic evaluation. Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0. Intergroup comparisons were done using ANOVA followed by post-hoc assessments using Tukey HSD test. Results Mean amplitude and duration with conventional dentures was found to be significantly lower as compared to silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures for all the comparisons. Statistically, no significant difference between silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures was observed for any of the comparisons. Conclusion Within the limitations of this experimental design, it was concluded that relining significantly increases electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Thus, resulting in an improved biting force, chewing efficiency and masticatory performance. There were no significant differences between silicone and acrylic based denture liners for both electromyographic variables. PMID:26436054

  5. The effect of Stokes shift in the discrimination of urine of cervical cancer from normal subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekaran, Ramu; Brindha, Elumalai; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Stokes shift spectroscopy has been considered as a potential tool in characterization of multiple components present in tissues and biofluids. Since, the intensity and resolution of the fluorophores depends on the Stokes shift, different opinion has been reflected by the researchers in fixing the Stokes shift. Also, not many studies have been reported on the characterization of biofluids and especially on the diagnosis of cancer. Urine is considered as an important diagnostic biofluid as it is rich in many metabolites where many of them are native fluorophores. In this study, we aimed at characterizing the urine of normal subjects and patients with cervical cancer as function of different Stokes shift. It is observed that Neopterin and Riboflavin are the main fluorophores contribute to the variation between normal and cervical cancer subjects. Ratio variables based linear discriminant analysis shows that the Stokes shift of 40 nm and 60 nm may be considered for better characterization with better signal to noise ratio when compared to others.

  6. Effect of caffeine contained in a cup of coffee on microvascular function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Katsuhiko; Matsuzaki, Toshihiro; Sakanashi, Mayuko; Hamadate, Naobumi; Uchida, Taro; Kina-Tanada, Mika; Kubota, Haruaki; Nakasone, Junko; Sakanashi, Matao; Ueda, Shinichiro; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Ishiuchi, Shogo; Ohya, Yusuke; Tsutsui, Masato

    2015-02-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that coffee drinking is associated with reduced mortality of cardiovascular disease. However, its precise mechanisms remain to be clarified. In this study, we examined whether single ingestion of caffeine contained in a cup of coffee improves microvascular function in healthy subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was performed in 27 healthy volunteers. A cup of either caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee was drunk by the subjects, and reactive hyperemia of finger blood flow was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry. In an interval of more than 2 days, the same experimental protocol was repeated with another coffee in a crossover manner. Caffeinated coffee intake slightly but significantly elevated blood pressure and decreased finger blood flow as compared with decaffeinated coffee intake. There was no significant difference in heart rate between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee intake. Importantly, caffeinated coffee intake significantly enhanced post-occlusive reactive hyperemia of finger blood flow, an index of microvascular endothelial function, compared with decaffeinated coffee intake. These results provide the first evidence that caffeine contained in a cup of coffee enhances microvascular function in healthy individuals. PMID:25727960

  7. The effect on skin blood flow of short-term venous hypertension in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Cheatle, T R; Chittenden, S J; Coleridge Smith, P D; Scurr, J H

    1991-02-01

    Plugging of skin capillaries by activated white blood cells is one of the proposed mechanisms by which skin damage may be initiated in chronic venous insufficiency. The aim of this study was to determine whether a microcirculatory deficit was induced in the skin by raising the venous pressure proximally for thirty minutes. Seventeen subjects with no evidence of venous or arterial disease had laser Doppler velocimetry performed in the goiter region of the leg; 8 different subjects had the measurement done on the dorsum of the hand. Peak hyperemic response following three minutes of ischemia was measured before and after a thirty-minute period of sustained venous hypertension applied by a proximal tourniquet inflated to 80 mm Hg. A decrease in the peak flow: baseline flow ratio (median ratio 2.25 before, 1.70 after, p less than 0.02) and an increase in the time taken to reach maximal hyperemia (median time ten seconds before, twenty seconds after, p less than 0.01) were observed after the period of venous hypertension in the lower limb. The second parameter, but not the first, was significantly affected in the upper limb. The authors conclude that a microvascular deficit in the skin is demonstrable after a short period of venous hypertension. This is consistent with the white-cell-trapping theory, but other possible explanations are discussed. PMID:1826074

  8. Effects of a new slow release formulation of caffeine on EEG, psychomotor and cognitive functions in sleep-deprived subjects.

    PubMed

    Patat, Alain; Rosenzweig, Pierre; Enslen, Marc; Trocherie, Suzanne; Miget, Nathalie; Bozon, Marie-Christine; Allain, Hervé; Gandon, Jean-Marc

    2000-04-01

    Caffeine is a widely-consumed psychoactive substance whose stimulant effects on mood, attention and performance are largely recognised. The central nervous system pharmacodynamic profile of a single oral dose of a new slow release (SR) caffeine formulation (600 mg) was assessed in a randomised, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled study. Twelve young, health, male, sleep-deprived (for 36 h) subjects were studied using EEG and various measures of psychomotor and cognitive functions, including critical flicker fusion (CFF), choice reaction task (CRT), tracking, continuous performance task (CPT), Stroop test, body sway and subjective evaluation (Stanford Sleepiness Scale). Caffeine significantly ( < 0/05) antagonised the detrimental effects of sleep-deprivation on EEG (i.e. produced a significant decrease in delta and theta relative power and a significant increase in alpha and beta (12-40 Hz) relative power) and psychomotor performance (significant increase in speed of reaction on the CRT and Stroop tests, significant decrease in body sway, significant increase in accuracy of the CPT and significant reduction in subjective sedation) compared to placebo. The effect peaked 4 h after dosing and was maintained until the end of sleep deprivation (i.e. 24 h after dosing). In conclusion, the present results demonstrate that a single dose of caffeine SR possesses alerting effects which are able to reverse the deleterious effect of 36 h sleep deprivation for at least 24 h. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:12404329

  9. A causal model of post-traumatic stress disorder: disentangling predisposed from acquired neural abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Admon, Roee; Milad, Mohammed R; Hendler, Talma

    2013-07-01

    Discriminating neural abnormalities into the causes versus consequences of psychopathology would enhance the translation of neuroimaging findings into clinical practice. By regarding the traumatic encounter as a reference point for disease onset, neuroimaging studies of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can potentially allocate PTSD neural abnormalities to either predisposing (pre-exposure) or acquired (post-exposure) factors. Based on novel research strategies in PTSD neuroimaging, including genetic, environmental, twin, and prospective studies, we provide a causal model that accounts for neural abnormalities in PTSD, and outline its clinical implications. Current data suggest that abnormalities within the amygdala and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex represent predisposing risk factors for developing PTSD, whereas dysfunctional hippocampal-ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) interactions may become evident only after having developed the disorder. PMID:23768722

  10. Effect of anorexic drugs on food intake and the micro-structure of eating in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P J; Blundell, J E

    1979-11-01

    Human volunteer subjects of normal weight received oral doses of (+)amphetamine (10 mg) or (+/-)fenfluramine (30 mg and 60 mg) together with a placebo control according to a within-subjects design. The effects of these treatments were monitored by measuring food intake in a test meal, subjective ratings of hunger motivation and the micro-structure of eating behaviour abstracted from videotaped recordings of the test meal. Various measures of the rate of feeding were computed from these recordings. Amphetamine and fenfluramine (60 mg) showed generally similar effects on food intake and on the subjective experience of hunger, but displayed differing actions on the fine structure of eating. Amphetamine increased latency to initiation of eating and increased the rate of food ingestion, whilst fenfluramine slowed the local rate of eating and eliminated the characteristic decline in the rate of feeding across the course of a meal. These findings display certain resemblance to the results of animal experiments involving similar pharmacological manipulations and emphasise the importance of measuring rate of feeding in animal and human studies. The results of this study suggest that the micro-analysis of feeding behaviour not only provides a tool for understanding systems involved in the modulation of food consumption but also reveals information which may be helpful for the use of drugs in the treatment of obesity. PMID:119258

  11. Immediate Effects of Neurodynamic Sliding versus Muscle Stretching on Hamstring Flexibility in Subjects with Short Hamstring Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Castellote-Caballero, Yolanda; Valenza, Maríe C; Puentedura, Emilio J; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hamstring injuries continue to affect active individuals and although inadequate muscle extensibility remains a commonly accepted factor, little is known about the most effective method to improve flexibility. Purpose. To determine if an isolated neurodynamic sciatic sliding technique would improve hamstring flexibility to a greater degree than stretching or a placebo intervention in asymptomatic subjects with short hamstring syndrome (SHS). Study Design. Randomized double-blinded controlled trial. Methods. One hundred and twenty subjects with SHS were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: neurodynamic sliding, hamstring stretching, and placebo control. Each subject's dominant leg was measured for straight leg raise (SLR) range of motion (ROM) before and after interventions. Data were analyzed with a 3 × 2 mixed model ANOVA followed by simple main effects analyses. Results. At the end of the study, more ROM was observed in the Neurodynamic and Stretching groups compared to the Control group and more ROM in the Neurodynamic group compared to Stretching group. Conclusion. Findings suggest that a neurodynamic sliding technique will increase hamstring flexibility to a greater degree than static hamstring stretching in healthy subjects with SHS. Clinical Relevance. The use of neurodynamic sliding techniques to improve hamstring flexibility in sports may lead to a decreased incidence in injuries; however, this needs to be formally tested. PMID:26464889

  12. Efficiency of automotive cabin air filters to reduce acute health effects of diesel exhaust in human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Rudell, B.; Wass, U.; Horstedt, P.; Levin, J. O.; Lindahl, R.; Rannug, U.; Sunesson, A. L.; Ostberg, Y.; Sandstrom, T.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficiency of different automotive cabin air filters to prevent penetration of components of diesel exhaust and thereby reduce biomedical effects in human subjects. Filtered air and unfiltered diluted diesel exhaust (DDE) were used as negative and positive controls, respectively, and were compared with exposure to DDE filtered with four different filter systems. METHODS: 32 Healthy non- smoking subjects (age 21-53) participated in the study. Each subject was exposed six times for 1 hour in a specially designed exposure chamber: once to air, once to unfiltered DDE, and once to DDE filtered with the four different cabin air filters. Particle concentrations during exposure to unfiltered DDE were kept at 300 micrograms/m3. Two of the filters were particle filters. The other two were particle filters combined with active charcoal filters that might reduce certain gaseous components. Subjective symptoms were recorded and nasal airway lavage (NAL), acoustic rhinometry, and lung function measurements were performed. RESULTS: The two particle filters decreased the concentrations of diesel exhaust particles by about half, but did not reduce the intensity of symptoms induced by exhaust. The combination of active charcoal filters and a particle filter significantly reduced the symptoms and discomfort caused by the diesel exhaust. The most noticable differences in efficacy between the filters were found in the reduction of detection of an unpleasant smell from the diesel exhaust. In this respect even the two charcoal filter combinations differed significantly. The efficacy to reduce symptoms may depend on the abilities of the filters investigated to reduce certain hydrocarbons. No acute effects on NAL, rhinometry, and lung function variables were found. CONCLUSIONS: This study has shown that the use of active charcoal filters, and a particle filter, clearly reduced the intensity of symptoms induced by diesel exhaust. Complementary studies on vehicle

  13. Caffeine administration at night during extended wakefulness effectively mitigates performance impairment but not subjective assessments of fatigue and sleepiness.

    PubMed

    Paech, Gemma M; Banks, Siobhan; Pajcin, Maja; Grant, Crystal; Johnson, Kayla; Kamimori, Gary H; Vedova, Chris B Della

    2016-06-01

    The current study investigated the effects of repeated caffeine administration on performance and subjective reports of sleepiness and fatigue during 50h extended wakefulness. Twenty-four, non-smokers aged 22.5±2.9y (mean±SD) remained awake for two nights (50h) in a controlled laboratory environment. During this period, 200mg of caffeine or placebo gum was administered at 01:00, 03:00, 05:00 and 07:00 on both nights (total of 800mg/night). Neurobehavioral performance and subjective reports were assessed throughout the wake period. Caffeine improved performance compared to placebo, but did not affect overall ratings of subjective sleepiness and fatigue. Performance and sleepiness worsened with increasing time awake for both conditions. However, caffeine slowed performance impairments such that after 50h of wakefulness performance was better following caffeine administration compared to placebo. Caffeine also slowed the increase in subjective sleepiness and performance ratings, but only during the first night of wakefulness. After two nights of sleep deprivation, there was no difference in sleepiness ratings between the two conditions. These results demonstrate that strategic administration of caffeine effectively mitigates performance impairments associated with 50h wakefulness but does not improve overall subjective assessments of sleepiness, fatigue and performance. Results indicate that while performance impairment is alleviated, individuals may continue to report feelings of sleepiness. Individuals who use caffeine as a countermeasure in sustained operations may feel as though caffeine is not effective despite impairments in objective performance being largely mitigated. PMID:27061779

  14. A Multifactorial Analysis of the Extent to Which Eimeria and Fishmeal Predispose Broiler Chickens to Necrotic Enteritis.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Nicholas J; Swick, Robert A; Geier, Mark S; Moore, Robert J; Choct, Mingan; Wu, Shu-Biao

    2015-03-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is an important infectious disease in chickens. Predisposing factors play critical roles both in disease outbreaks in the field and in models for experimental induction of disease. Systematic manipulation and study of predisposing factors help to optimize methods for the experimental reproduction of disease. The nature of such factors may play a confounding role in challenge models and, therefore, warrant investigation to determine their importance in industry-relevant NE reproduction models. In the present study, we examined the roles of dietary fishmeal inclusion, Eimeria inoculation (E), and Clostridium perfringens challenge (C) on broiler growth performance and induction of NE infection. The results showed that E, preceding C, greatly increased the severity of NE induced in broiler chickens, but fishmeal addition played only a marginal role in the challenge model. Bird performance was significantly affected by all three factors during the 35-day experimental period. Fishmeal increased body weight, but statistically significant effects of fishmeal were not observed on feed conversion ratio (FCR) and feed intake. Both Eimeria and C. perfringens significantly reduced body weight gain and feed intake. E but not C led to significantly poorer FCR. These findings indicate that dietary fishmeal may be removed from the model to allow the performance results of challenged chicks to be equivalent to the performance of chicks in the field. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that an NE challenge model without fishmeal is valid and removes bird performance bias in the model introduced by feeding high fishmeal diets, refining the model to facilitate the yield of more commercially relevant results. PMID:26292532

  15. Increased aldosterone-dependent Kv1.5 recycling predisposes to pacing-induced atrial fibrillation in Kcne3-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Lisewski, Ulrike; Koehncke, Clemens; Wilck, Nicola; Buschmeyer, Bastian; Pieske, Burkert; Roepke, Torsten K

    2016-07-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with an increased prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF). Mutations in KCNE3 have been associated with AF, and Kcne3(-/-) mice exhibit hyperaldosteronism. In this study, we used recently developed Kcne3(-/-) mice to study atrial electrophysiology with respect to development of aldosterone-dependent AF. In invasive electrophysiology studies, Kcne3(-/-) mice displayed a reduced atrial effective refractory period (AERP) and inducible episodes of paroxysmal AF. The cellular arrhythmogenic correlate for AF predisposition was a significant increase in atrial Kv currents generated by the micromolar 4-aminopyridine-sensitive Kv current encoded by Kv1.5. Electrophysiological alterations in Kcne3(-/-) mice were aldosterone dependent and were associated with increased Rab4, -5, and -9-dependent recycling of Kv1.5 channels to the Z-disc/T-tubulus region and lateral membrane via activation of the Akt/AS160 pathway. Treatment with spironolactone inhibited Akt/AS160 phosphorylation, reduced Rab-dependent Kv1.5 recycling, normalized AERP and atrial Kv currents to the wild-type level, and reduced arrhythmia induction in Kcne3(-/-) mice. Kcne3 deletion in mice predisposes to AF by a heretofore unrecognized mechanism-namely, increased aldosterone-dependent Kv1.5 recycling via Rab GTPases. The findings uncover detailed molecular mechanisms underpinning a channelopathy-linked form of AF and emphasize the inevitability of considering extracardiac mechanisms in genetic arrhythmia syndromes.-Lisewski, U., Koehncke, C., Wilck, N., Buschmeyer, B., Pieske, B., Roepke, T. K. Increased aldosterone-dependent Kv1.5 recycling predisposes to pacing-induced atrial fibrillation in Kcne3(-/-) mice. PMID:26985008

  16. Effect of selenium supplementation in hypothyroid subjects of an iodine and selenium deficient area: the possible danger of indiscriminate supplementation of iodine-deficient subjects with selenium.

    PubMed

    Contempre, B; Dumont, J E; Ngo, B; Thilly, C H; Diplock, A T; Vanderpas, J

    1991-07-01

    Selenium and seleno dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPX) deficiency has been described in endemias of myxedematous cretinism. In northern Zaire, a selenium supplementation trial has been conducted. Beside correcting the GPX activity, two months of selenium supplementation was shown to modify the serum thyroid hormones parameters in clinically euthyroid subjects and to induce a dramatic fall of the already impaired thyroid function in clinically hypothyroid subjects. These results further support a role of selenium in thyroid hormone metabolism. In an iodine deficient area, this selenium deficiency could lead to opposite clinical consequences: protect the general population and the fetus against iodine deficiency and brain damage; and in turn, favour the degenerative process of the thyroid gland leading to myxoedematous cretinism. PMID:2045471

  17. Dimensions of subjective well-being and effects of physical activity in Chinese older adults.

    PubMed

    Ku, Po-Wen; McKenna, Jim; Fox, Kenneth R

    2007-10-01

    Subjective well-being (SWB) and its relationship with physical activity have not been systematically investigated in older Chinese people. This study explored these issues using qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of 23 community-dwelling Chinese older adults (age 55-78 y, 12 women); 16 were physically active and 7 physically inactive. Using cross-case analyses, 7 dimensions of SWB emerged: physical, psychological, developmental, material, spiritual, sociopolitical, and social. Although elements of SWB may be shared across cultures, specific distinctions were identified. Active respondents reported the unique contributions of physical activity to the physical, psychological, developmental, and social elements of SWB. The findings suggest that physical activity could enhance the quality of life in Chinese older adults. PMID:18048943

  18. Cardioprotective effect of a biofermented nutraceutical on endothelial function in healthy middle-aged subjects.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Francesco; Yadav, Hariom; Kumari, Archana; Catanzaro, Roberto; Jain, Shalini; Polimeni, Ascanio; Lorenzetti, Aldo; Soresi, Vincenzo

    2012-04-01

    We tested a biofermented nutraceutical (FPP) that has been previously shown to positively modulate nitric oxide (NO). Forty-two healthy middle-aged subjects were given 3 grams of FPP three times a day for 6 weeks, and tests were repeated at 3 and 6 weeks; the control group was given a placebo. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured together with NO compounds (nitrogen oxides [NOx]: NO(2)(-)+NO(3)(-)) plasma levels and asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA). In the interventional group, overall FMD significantly increased from 4.2% to 7.3% (p<0.05 vs. placebo). A significant increase in plasma NO and a decrease in ADMA were detected after consumption of FPP (p<0.01). Although larger studies are awaited, it appears that, at least in healthy individuals, such nutraceutical intervention by positively acting on significant cardiovascular parameters can be considered in the armamentarium of a proactive age-management strategy. PMID:22533427

  19. The Acute Effect of Resistance Exercise with Blood Flow Restriction with Hemodynamic Variables on Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Joamira P.; Silva, Eliney D.; Silva, Julio C. G.; Souza, Thiago S. P.; Lima, Eloíse O.; Guerra, Ialuska; Sousa, Maria S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and the heart rate (HR) before, during and after training at moderate intensity (MI, 50%-1RM) and at low intensity with blood flow restriction (LIBFR). In a randomized controlled trial study, 14 subjects (average age 45±9,9 years) performed one of the exercise protocols during two separate visits to the laboratory. SBP, DBP and HR measurements were collected prior to the start of the set and 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after knee extension exercises. Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to identify significant variables (2 × 5; group × time). The results demonstrated a significant reduction in SBP in the LIBFR group. These results provide evidence that strength training performed acutely alters hemodynamic variables. However, training with blood flow restriction is more efficient in reducing blood pressure in hypertensive individuals than training with moderate intensity. PMID:25713647

  20. Cultural Specific Effects on the Recognition of Basic Emotions: A Study on Italian Subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Anna; Riviello, Maria Teresa; Bourbakis, Nikolaos

    The present work reports the results of perceptual experiments aimed to investigate if some of the basic emotions are perceptually privileged and if the cultural environment and the perceptual mode play a role in this preference. To this aim, Italian subjects were requested to assess emotional stimuli extracted from Italian and American English movies in the single (either video or audio alone) and the combined audio/video mode. Results showed that anger, fear, and sadness are better perceived than surprise, happiness in both the cultural environments (irony instead strongly depend on the language), that emotional information is affected by the communication mode and that language plays a role in assessing emotional information. Implications for the implementation of emotionally colored interactive systems are discussed.

  1. The effectiveness of phonological intervention in preschool children: a single-subject design study.

    PubMed

    Palle, Nanna; Berntsson, Agneta; Miniscalco, Carmela; Persson, Christina

    2014-04-01

    The purpose was to investigate an intervention model for treating preschool children with phonological processes. Six children, three girls and three boys, between 4y 1m and 5y 7m, with similar developmental phonological disorder (PD) received an individually adjusted intervention including articulatory, phonological, and meta-phonological approaches. A single-subject multiple-baseline design with /f/ and /s/ as target phonemes and velar plosives and /r/ as control phonemes was used. An improved production of the treated phonemes was found in five of the children, while one girl established /f/ but not /s/. The control phonemes remained unchanged for all children. Six to 18 therapy sessions were needed to reach the intervention goal. The study highlights the importance of considering heterogeneity in children with PD. PMID:23190080

  2. Effect of Atlas Vertebrae Realignment in Subjects with Migraine: An Observational Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Woodfield, H Charles; Hasick, D Gordon; Becker, Werner J; Rose, Marianne S; Scott, James N

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In a migraine case study, headache symptoms significantly decreased with an accompanying increase in intracranial compliance index following atlas vertebrae realignment. This observational pilot study followed eleven neurologist diagnosed migraine subjects to determine if the case findings were repeatable at baseline, week four, and week eight, following a National Upper Cervical Chiropractic Association intervention. Secondary outcomes consisted of migraine-specific quality of life measures. Methods. After examination by a neurologist, volunteers signed consent forms and completed baseline migraine-specific outcomes. Presence of atlas misalignment allowed study inclusion, permitting baseline MRI data collection. Chiropractic care continued for eight weeks. Postintervention reimaging occurred at week four and week eight concomitant with migraine-specific outcomes measurement. Results. Five of eleven subjects exhibited an increase in the primary outcome, intracranial compliance; however, mean overall change showed no statistical significance. End of study mean changes in migraine-specific outcome assessments, the secondary outcome, revealed clinically significant improvement in symptoms with a decrease in headache days. Discussion. The lack of robust increase in compliance may be understood by the logarithmic and dynamic nature of intracranial hemodynamic and hydrodynamic flow, allowing individual components comprising compliance to change while overall it did not. Study results suggest that the atlas realignment intervention may be associated with a reduction in migraine frequency and marked improvement in quality of life yielding significant reduction in headache-related disability as observed in this cohort. Future study with controls is necessary, however, to confirm these findings. Clinicaltrials.gov registration number is NCT01980927. PMID:26783523

  3. Distinct effects of contrast and color on subjective rating of fearfulness

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhengang; Guo, Bingbing; Boguslavsky, Anne; Cappiello, Marcus; Zhang, Weiwei; Meng, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Natural scenes provide important affective cues for observers to avoid danger. From an adaptationist perspective, such cues affect the behavior of the observer and shape the evolution of the observer’s response. It is evolutionarily significant for individuals to extract affective information from the environment as quickly and as efficiently as possible. However, the nearly endless variations in physical appearance of natural scenes present a fundamental challenge for perceiving significant visual information. How image-level properties, such as contrast and color, influence the extraction of affective information leading to subjective emotional perception is unclear. On the one hand, studies have shown that visual perception and emotional perception seem to interact with each other at the earliest stages in cortical processing. On the other hand, it is important for high-level subjective ratings to be invariant to low-level visual properties. Using a psychophysical approach and signal detection theory (SDT), we tested how contrast and color influenced fearfulness ratings of a set of natural scene pictures that varied in contents and in levels of fearfulness. Image contrast influenced perceptual sensitivity but not the decision criterion of fearfulness rating, whereas color affected the decision criterion but not perceptual sensitivity. These results show that different low-level visual features contribute independently to sensitivity or decision criterion in affective perception, suggesting distinct interactions between visual cognition and affective processing. Specifically, our naturalistic approach using a novel stimulus set, combined with SDT, has demonstrated two dissociable types of cognitive mechanisms underlying how image-level properties leverage the extraction of affective information in natural vision. PMID:26500585

  4. Effect of Atlas Vertebrae Realignment in Subjects with Migraine: An Observational Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Woodfield, H. Charles; Hasick, D. Gordon; Becker, Werner J.; Rose, Marianne S.; Scott, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In a migraine case study, headache symptoms significantly decreased with an accompanying increase in intracranial compliance index following atlas vertebrae realignment. This observational pilot study followed eleven neurologist diagnosed migraine subjects to determine if the case findings were repeatable at baseline, week four, and week eight, following a National Upper Cervical Chiropractic Association intervention. Secondary outcomes consisted of migraine-specific quality of life measures. Methods. After examination by a neurologist, volunteers signed consent forms and completed baseline migraine-specific outcomes. Presence of atlas misalignment allowed study inclusion, permitting baseline MRI data collection. Chiropractic care continued for eight weeks. Postintervention reimaging occurred at week four and week eight concomitant with migraine-specific outcomes measurement. Results. Five of eleven subjects exhibited an increase in the primary outcome, intracranial compliance; however, mean overall change showed no statistical significance. End of study mean changes in migraine-specific outcome assessments, the secondary outcome, revealed clinically significant improvement in symptoms with a decrease in headache days. Discussion. The lack of robust increase in compliance may be understood by the logarithmic and dynamic nature of intracranial hemodynamic and hydrodynamic flow, allowing individual components comprising compliance to change while overall it did not. Study results suggest that the atlas realignment intervention may be associated with a reduction in migraine frequency and marked improvement in quality of life yielding significant reduction in headache-related disability as observed in this cohort. Future study with controls is necessary, however, to confirm these findings. Clinicaltrials.gov registration number is NCT01980927. PMID:26783523

  5. Distinct effects of contrast and color on subjective rating of fearfulness.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhengang; Guo, Bingbing; Boguslavsky, Anne; Cappiello, Marcus; Zhang, Weiwei; Meng, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Natural scenes provide important affective cues for observers to avoid danger. From an adaptationist perspective, such cues affect the behavior of the observer and shape the evolution of the observer's response. It is evolutionarily significant for individuals to extract affective information from the environment as quickly and as efficiently as possible. However, the nearly endless variations in physical appearance of natural scenes present a fundamental challenge for perceiving significant visual information. How image-level properties, such as contrast and color, influence the extraction of affective information leading to subjective emotional perception is unclear. On the one hand, studies have shown that visual perception and emotional perception seem to interact with each other at the earliest stages in cortical processing. On the other hand, it is important for high-level subjective ratings to be invariant to low-level visual properties. Using a psychophysical approach and signal detection theory (SDT), we tested how contrast and color influenced fearfulness ratings of a set of natural scene pictures that varied in contents and in levels of fearfulness. Image contrast influenced perceptual sensitivity but not the decision criterion of fearfulness rating, whereas color affected the decision criterion but not perceptual sensitivity. These results show that different low-level visual features contribute independently to sensitivity or decision criterion in affective perception, suggesting distinct interactions between visual cognition and affective processing. Specifically, our naturalistic approach using a novel stimulus set, combined with SDT, has demonstrated two dissociable types of cognitive mechanisms underlying how image-level properties leverage the extraction of affective information in natural vision. PMID:26500585

  6. Effect of exercise on epinephrine turnover in trained and untrained male subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Kjaer, M.; Christensen, N.J.; Sonne, B.; Richter, E.A.; Galbo, H.

    1985-10-01

    The kinetics underlying plasma epinephrine concentrations were studied. Six athletes (T) and six sedentary males (C) were given intravenous infusions of TH-labeled epinephrine, after which arterial blood was drawn. They rested sitting and bicycled continuously to exhaustion (60 min at 125 W, 60 min at 160 W, 40 min at 200 W, and 240 W to the end). Work time was 154 +/- 13 (SE) (T) and 75 +/- 6 (C) min. At rest, epinephrine clearance was identical (28.4 +/- 1.3 (T) vs. 29.2 +/- 1.8 (C) ml . kg-1 . min-1), but plasma concentration (1.42 +/- 0.27 (T) vs. 0.71 +/- 0.16 (C) nmol . l-1) and, accordingly, secretion (2.9 +/- 0.7 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.4 nmol . min-1) were higher (P less than 0.05) in T than C subjects. Epinephrine clearance was closely related to relative work load, decreasing from 15% above the basal level at 30% of maximal O2 uptake (VO2 max) to 22% below at 76% of VO2 max. Epinephrine concentrations increased much more with work intensity than could be accounted for by changes in clearance and were, at exhaustion, higher (P less than 0.05) in T (7.2 +/- 1.6) than in C (2.5 +/- 0.7 nmol . l-1) subjects despite similar glucose, heart rate, and hematocrit values. At a given load, epinephrine clearance rapidly became constant, whereas concentration increased continuously. Forearm extraction of epinephrine invalidated use of blood from a cubital vein or a hand vein arterialized by hot water in turnover measurements. During exercise, changes in epinephrine concentrations reflect changes in secretion rather than in clearance. Training may increase adrenal medullary secretory capacity.

  7. Candidate colorectal cancer predisposing gene variants in Chinese early-onset and familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun-Xiao; Fu, Lei; de Voer, Richarda M; Hahn, Marc-Manuel; Jin, Peng; Lv, Chen-Xi; Verwiel, Eugène TP; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn JL; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Kuiper, Roland P; Sheng, Jian-Qiu; Geurts van Kessel, Ad

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether whole-exome sequencing may serve as an efficient method to identify known or novel colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposing genes in early-onset or familial CRC cases. METHODS: We performed whole-exome sequencing in 23 Chinese patients from 21 families with non-polyposis CRC diagnosed at ≤ 40 years of age, or from multiple affected CRC families with at least 1 first-degree relative diagnosed with CRC at ≤ 55 years of age. Genomic DNA from blood was enriched for exome sequences using the SureSelect Human All Exon Kit, version 2 (Agilent Technologies) and sequencing was performed on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Data were processed through an analytical pipeline to search for rare germline variants in known or novel CRC predisposing genes. RESULTS: In total, 32 germline variants in 23 genes were identified and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. In 6 of the 21 families (29%), we identified 7 mutations in 3 known CRC predisposing genes including MLH1 (5 patients), MSH2 (1 patient), and MUTYH (biallelic, 1 patient), five of which were reported as pathogenic. In the remaining 15 families, we identified 20 rare and novel potentially deleterious variants in 19 genes, six of which were truncating mutations. One previously unreported variant identified in a conserved region of EIF2AK4 (p.Glu738_Asp739insArgArg) was found to represent a local Chinese variant, which was significantly enriched in our early-onset CRC patient cohort compared to a control cohort of 100 healthy Chinese individuals scored negative by colonoscopy (33.3% vs 7%, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Whole-exome sequencing of early-onset or familial CRC cases serves as an efficient method to identify known and potential pathogenic variants in established and novel candidate CRC predisposing genes. PMID:25892863

  8. Modeling subject-specific phase-dependent effects and variations in longitudinal responses via a geometric Brownian motion process.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Hsieh, Fushing; Li, Juan; Chi, Eric

    2011-08-30

    We address statistical issues regarding modeling a collection of longitudinal response trajectories characterized by the presence of subject-specific phase-dependent effects and variation. To accommodate these two time-varying individual characteristics, we employ a geometric stochastic differential equation for modeling based on a Brownian motion process and develop a two-step paradigm for statistical analysis. This paradigm reverses the order of statistical inference in random effects model. We first extract individual information about phase-dependent treatment effects and volatility parameters for all subjects. Then, we derive the association relationship between the parameters characterizing the individual longitudinal trajectories and the corresponding covariates by means of multiple regression analysis. The stochastic differential equation model and the two-step paradigm together provide significant advantages both in modeling flexibility and in computational efficiency. The modeling flexibility is due to the easy adaptation of temporal change points for subject-specific phase transition in treatment effects, whereas the computational efficiency benefits in part from the independent increment property of Brownian motion that avoids high-dimensional integration. We demonstrate our modeling approach and statistical analysis on a real data set of longitudinal measurements of disease activity scores from a rheumatoid arthritis study. PMID:21751228

  9. It's all in the past: temporal-context effects modulate subjective evaluations of emotional visual stimuli, regardless of presentation sequence

    PubMed Central

    Czekóová, Kristína; Shaw, Daniel J.; Janoušová, Eva; Urbánek, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if and how temporal context influences subjective affective responses to emotional images. To do so, we examined whether the subjective evaluation of a target image is influenced by the valence of its preceding image, and/or its overall position in a sequence of images. Furthermore, we assessed if these potentially confounding contextual effects can be moderated by a common procedural control: randomized stimulus presentation. Four groups of participants evaluated the same set of 120 pictures from the International Affective System (IAPS) presented in four different sequences. Our data reveal strong effects of both aspects of temporal context in all presentation sequences, modified only slightly in their nature and magnitude. Furthermore, this was true for both valence and arousal ratings. Subjective ratings of negative target images were influenced by temporal context most strongly across all sequences. We also observed important gender differences: females expressed greater sensitivity to temporal-context effects and design manipulations relative to males, especially for negative images. Our results have important implications for future emotion research that employs normative picture stimuli, and contributes to our understanding of context effects in general. PMID:25904877

  10. Objective and subjective components of the first-night effect in young nightmare sufferers and healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Kis, Anna; Szakadát, Sára; Simor, Péter; Gombos, Ferenc; Horváth, Klára; Bódizs, Róbert

    2014-01-01

    The first-night effect--marked differences between the first- and the second-night sleep spent in a laboratory--is a widely known phenomenon that accounts for the common practice of excluding the first-night sleep from any polysomnographic analysis. The extent to which the first-night effect is present in a participant, as well as its duration (1 or more nights), might have diagnostic value and should account for different protocols used for distinct patient groups. This study investigated the first-night effect on nightmare sufferers (NM; N = 12) and healthy controls (N = 15) using both objective (2-night-long polysomnography) and subjective (Groningen Sleep Quality Scale for the 2 nights spent in the laboratory and 1 regular night spent at home) methods. Differences were found in both the objective (sleep efficiency, wakefulness after sleep onset, sleep latency, Stage-1 duration, Stage-2 duration, slow-wave sleep duration, and REM duration) and subjective (self-rating) variables between the 2 nights and the 2 groups, with a more pronounced first-night effect in the case of the NM group. Furthermore, subjective sleep quality was strongly related to polysomnographic variables and did not differ among 1 regular night spent at home and the second night spent in the laboratory. The importance of these results is discussed from a diagnostic point of view. PMID:24294972

  11. Physical Activity Benefits the Skeleton of Children Genetically Predisposed to Lower Bone Density in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan A; Chesi, Alessandra; Elci, Okan; McCormack, Shana E; Roy, Sani M; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Lappe, Joan M; Gilsanz, Vicente; Oberfield, Sharon E; Shepherd, John A; Kelly, Andrea; Grant, Struan Fa; Zemel, Babette S

    2016-08-01

    Both genetics and physical activity (PA) contribute to bone mineral density (BMD), but it is unknown if the benefits of physical activity on childhood bone accretion depend on genetic risk. We, therefore, aimed to determine if PA influenced the effect of bone fragility genetic variants on BMD in childhood. Our sample comprised US children of European ancestry enrolled in the Bone Mineral Density in Childhood Study (N = 918, aged 5 to 19 years, and 52.4% female). We used a questionnaire to estimate hours per day spent in total, high-, and low-impact PA. We calculated a BMD genetic score (% BMD lowering alleles) using adult genome-wide association study (GWAS)-implicated BMD variants. We used dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to estimate femoral neck, total hip, and spine areal-BMD and total body less head (TBLH) bone mineral content (BMC) Z-scores. The BMD genetic score was negatively associated with each bone Z-score (eg, TBLH-BMC: estimate = -0.03, p = 1.3 × 10(-6) ). Total PA was positively associated with bone Z-scores; these associations were driven by time spent in high-impact PA (eg, TBLH-BMC: estimate = 0.05, p = 4.0 × 10(-10) ) and were observed even for children with lower than average bone Z-scores. We found no evidence of PA-adult genetic score interactions (p interaction > 0.05) at any skeletal site, and there was no evidence of PA-genetic score-Tanner stage interactions at any skeletal site (p interaction > 0.05). However, exploratory analyses at the individual variant level revealed that PA statistically interacted with rs2887571 (ERC1/WNT5B) to influence TBLH-BMC in males (p interaction = 7.1 × 10(-5) ), where PA was associated with higher TBLH-BMC Z-score among the BMD-lowering allele carriers (rs2887571 AA homozygotes: estimate = 0.08 [95% CI 0.06, 0.11], p = 2.7 × 10(-9) ). In conclusion, the beneficial effect of PA on bone, especially high-impact PA, applies to the average child and those

  12. Trajectories of Organized Activity Participation Among Urban Adolescents: An Analysis of Predisposing Factors.

    PubMed

    Eisman, Andria B; Stoddard, Sarah A; Bauermeister, José A; Caldwell, Cleopatra H; Zimmerman, Marc A

    2016-01-01

    Organized activity participation provides important opportunities for adolescents to develop assets and resources related to positive youth development. Predisposing factors, in addition to sociodemographics and self-selection factors, may influence how youth participate over time. In this study, we used growth mixture modeling with longitudinal data from African American adolescents attending urban high schools in Flint, MI to identify subgroups of participation trajectories (Wave 1 N = 681, mean age at Wave 1 = 14.86 years, 51% female). We measured activity participation using psychological and behavioral engagement across multiple contexts over the 4 years of high school. We examined how predisposing risk and promotive factors were related to these trajectories, accounting for sociodemographic and self-selection factors. The results indicated three participation trajectories: a low group decreasing over time (74%), a moderate, consistent participation group (21%) and a moderate, increasing group (5%). More substance use was associated with lower odds of being in the moderate/consistent versus low/decreasing participation group. More parental support was associated with lower odds of being in the moderate/increasing versus the moderate/consistent group. Our results suggest that addressing predisposing factors such as substance use may help facilitate participation over time. PMID:25735866

  13. Retinal detachments after Boston Keratoprosthesis: incidence, predisposing factors, and visual outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jardeleza, Maria Stephanie R.; Rheaume, Marc-Andre; Chodosh, James; Lane, Anne Marie; Dohlman, Claes H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the rates, predisposing factors, and visual outcomes of retinal detachment (RD) after Boston Keratoprosthesis (KPro) implantation. Methods In this noncomparative, interventional case series, the medical records of 170 patients (205 eyes) who underwent Boston type 1 and type 2 KPro implantation at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary between April 1993 and June 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Incidence and annual rates of RD were calculated, and the roles of possible predictive factors for RD after KPro were investigated. Main outcome measures were rates of and risk factors for RD, visual acuity after RD, and surgical outcomes after repair. Results Sterile vitritis and autoimmune systemic disease significantly predisposed patients to RD after KPro placement. Of patients who developed RD after implantation, 50% progressed to visual acuity of no light perception despite surgical repair. Conclusions Inflammation plays a major role in RD development after KPro implantation. Patients with predisposing factors should be advised of the high rates of RD and comanaged with a vitreoretinal specialist.

  14. Acute Effect of Decaffeinated Coffee on Heart Rate, Blood Pressure, and Exercise Performance in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ravi; Kaushik, Vidya S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of decaffeinated coffee on the cardiovascular exercise performance in nine healthy volunteers was evaluated in a double-blind randomized fashion. The heart rate, blood pressure, and duration of exercise were unchanged, and no arrhythmias or ischemic changes were seen on the electrocardiogram after drinking decaffeinated coffee. It was concluded that decaffeinated coffee has no discernible, acute, adverse cardiovascular effects. PMID:3339645

  15. Vapor pressure deficit effects on leaf area expansion and transportation of soybean subjected to soil drying

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference (VPD) and soil water deficit on transpiration rate (TR) of plants are well understood but their effects on plant leaf area expansion (PLAE) are less defined. Both PLAE and TR are unaffected by soil drying until the fraction transpirable soil water (FT...

  16. The Combined Effects of Ethanol and Amphetamine Sulfate on Performance of Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Lolita; Taylor, Jack D.; Nash, Charles W.; Cameron, Donald F.

    1966-01-01

    The combined effects of ethanol and amphetamine on the performance of selected tests were evaluated. No differences were shown between the effects of ethanol-amphetamine and ethanol-lactose on the performance of balance, skipping, Minnesota manipulation, Purdue peg board, Maudsley Personality Inventory, pursuit rotor or digit span tests; but ethanol plus amphetamine produced less impairment of performance of coding, mental addition, and trail making tests than did ethanol plus a placebo. Ethanol increased the errors in performance of the Wonderlic Personnel Test, but the simultaneous administration of amphetamine did not reduce this effect. Conversely, amphetamine reduced the test-retest reliability of the Wonderlic Personnel Test, but alcohol appeared to counteract this effect of amphetamine. These experiments indicate that, when ethanol and amphetamine are used together, each drug modifies some of the effects produced by the other in a manner that cannot be predicted on the assumption that a depressant versus stimulant competition is operative. PMID:5324976

  17. Arousal from sleep: the physiological and subjective effects of a 15 dB(A) reduction in aircraft flyover noise.

    PubMed

    LeVere, T E; Davis, N

    1977-07-01

    The present research was concerned with whether or not a 15 dB(A) reduction in overall noise level would lessen the sleep disturbing properties of jet aircraft flyover noise and, if less disturbing, whether this would be subjectively appreciated by the sleeping individual. The results indicate that a reduction of 15 dB(A) does result in less sleep disruption but only during sleep characterized by fast-wave electroencephalographic activity. During sleep characterized by slow-wave electroencephalographic activity, such a reduction in the sleep-disturbing properties of jet aircraft noise has little effect. Moreover, even when effective during fast-wave sleep, the decreased arousal produced by the lower noise levels is not subjectively appreciated by the individual in terms of his estimate of the quality of his night's sleep. Thus, reducing the overall noise level of jet aircraft flyovers by some 15 dB(A), is, at best, minimally beneficial to sleep. PMID:196586

  18. Arousal from sleep - The physiological and subjective effects of a 15 dB/A/ reduction in aircraft flyover noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levere, T. E.; Davis, N.

    1977-01-01

    The present research was concerned with whether or not a 15 dB(A) reduction in overall noise level would lessen the sleep disturbing properties of jet aircraft flyover noise and, if less disturbing, whether this would be subjectively appreciated by the sleeping individual. The results indicate that a reduction of 15 dB (A) does result in less sleep disruption but only during sleep characterized by fast-wave electroencephalographic activity. During sleep characterized by slow-wave electroencephalographic activity, such a reduction in the sleep-disturbing properties of jet aircraft noise has little effect. Moreover, even when effective during fast-wave sleep, the decreased arousal produced by the lower noise levels is not subjectively appreciated by the individual in terms of his estimate of the quality of his night's sleep. Thus, reducing the overall noise level of jet aircraft flyovers by some 15 dB(A), is, at best, minimally beneficial to sleep.

  19. A pilot study on the effect of Lactobacillus casei Zhang on intestinal microbiota parameters in Chinese subjects of different age.

    PubMed

    Kwok, L Y; Wang, L; Zhang, J; Guo, Z; Zhang, H

    2014-09-01

    Ageing of the population is an imminent global problem. Lactobacillus casei Zhang (LcZ) was isolated from Inner Mongolian fermented milk, koumiss. LcZ possesses numerous probiotic properties in in vitro tests and in animal models. However, it has never been tested in any human trial. In the current study, the impact of oral consumption of LcZ on different age groups was tested. Chinese subjects, including 10 young, 7 middle-aged and 7 elderly volunteers (with mean age of 24.3, 47.6 and 64.7, respectively), were recruited. Each subject took 10.6 log10 cfu LcZ daily for a continuous period of 28 days. Several parameters, including the amounts of LcZ and four selected groups of bacteria, change of bacterial diversity, short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and total bile acids (TBA), were monitored in faecal samples collected from the subjects before starting, during and after stopping oral LcZ consumption. The consumption of LcZ exhibited beneficial effects to the subjects by modulating faecal microbiota in a temporal manner with a prolonged elevation of SCFA and reduction of TBA. The potentially harmful Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter genera were suppressed by the probiotic administration. Furthermore, a moderately divergent response was observed in the indigenous gut populations of Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides fragilis group in different age subjects. Taken together, the current study has provided proof on the positive effect of probiotic consumption and crucial insights into the design and application of probiotic-based products to users of different age segments. PMID:24854958

  20. Reappraisal and Mindfulness: A Comparison of Subjective Effects and Cognitive Costs

    PubMed Central

    Keng, Shian-Ling; Robins, Clive J.; Smoski, Moria J.; Dagenbach, Jana; Leary, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the relative effects of mindfulness and reappraisal in reducing sad mood and whether trait mindfulness and habitual reappraisal moderated the effects. The study also compared the extent to which implementation of these strategies incurred cognitive resources. A total of 129 participants were randomly assigned to receiving training in mindfulness, reappraisal, or no training prior to undergoing an autobiographical sad mood induction. Results showed that mindfulness and reappraisal were superior to no training, and equivalent in their effects in lowering sad mood. Compared to mindfulness, reappraisal resulted in significantly higher interference scores on a subsequent Stroop test, reflecting greater depletion of cognitive resources. Higher trait mindfulness, but not habitual reappraisal, predicted greater reductions in sadness across conditions. The study suggests that although mindfulness and reappraisal are equally effective in down-regulating sad mood, they incur different levels of cognitive costs. PMID:24225174

  1. The Effects of Rehearsal Instructions Upon the Paired-Associate Learning of Normal and Retarded Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Donald A.; Baumeister, Alfred A.

    1972-01-01

    Pattern of results suggests that retardates were relatively deficient in the spontaneous use of effective rehearsal mechanisms, but could perform as well as normals when instructed to use a specific rehearsal strategy. (Authors)

  2. A "Partial Reinforcement Extinction Effect" in Perceptual-Motor Performance: Coerced versus Volunteer Subject Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Roger W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    The present study was concerned with demonstrating that schedule of knowledge of results may enhance resistance to extinction" on the pursuit rotor in a manner analogous to the partial reinforcement effect in conditioning. (Author)

  3. Calcium absorption in corticoid treated subjects effects of a single oral dose of calcitriol.

    PubMed

    Colette, C; Monnier, L; Pares Herbute, N; Blotman, F; Mirouze, J

    1987-07-01

    We compared the fractional absorption of calcium (FACa, 6 h, % TD) and the radiocalcium transit (% TD per min) in seven glucocorticoid-treated patients (10-25 mg prednisolone per day) and in seven normal subjects, in the basal state and 12 h after an oral dose of synthetic 1,25-(OH)2D (3 micrograms). In the basal state, the radiocalcium transit was significantly decreased (P less than 0.02) at 15 min in patients treated with prednisolone, but FACa at 6 h was not significantly decreased (51 +/- 5 vs. 60 +/- 5% TD). 12 h after an oral dose of 1,25-(OH)2D which resulted in supraphysiologic plasma levels, FACa increased significantly (P less than 0.02) in both groups but the peak absorption rate of Ca remained lower in the corticoid-treated patients than in controls (P less than 0.02). The results suggest that glucocorticoids decrease the 1,25-(OH)2D-dependent transport of calcium across the proximal small intestine. PMID:3623424

  4. The effect of residual axial gravity on the stability of liquid columns subjected to electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Heliodoro; Castellanos, Antonio

    1993-04-01

    The stability criterion for almost cylindrical dielectric liquid bridges subjected to axial electric fields in the presence of residual axial gravity is obtained. In its absence, a perfectly cylindrical equilibrium solution is allowed for all values of the relevant parameters, which are the slenderness of the liquid bridge, the electrical Bond number and the relative permittivity between the outer and inner media. This basic solution is unstable beyond a critical slenderness which varies with the electrical parameters (Gonzalez et al. 1989). The destabilization takes place axisymmetrically. The inclusion of the gravitational Bond number as a new, small parameter may be treated by means of the Liapunov-Schmidt Method, a well-known projection technique that gives the local bifurcation diagram relating the admissible equilibrium amplitudes for the liquid bridge and the aforementioned parameters. As in the absence of applied electric field, the gravitational Bond number breaks the pitchfork diagram into two isolated branches of axisymmetric equilibrium solutions. The stable one has a turning point whose location determines the new stability criterion. Quantitative results are presented after solving the resulting set of linear recursive problems by means of the method of lines.

  5. Urinary excretion of endogenous digitalis-like natriuretic substances in healthy subjects. Effect of sodium load.

    PubMed

    Asbert, M; Jiménez, W; La Villa, G; Clària, J; López, C; Ginés, P; Gaya, J; Castro, A; Rivera, F; Arroyo, V

    1990-09-01

    In the current study digoxin-like immunoreactivity (DLIA), Na-K-ATPase inhibition and natriuretic activity of urinary extracts from 10 healthy volunteers following a low and a high-sodium intake, respectively, were measured. Detectable urinary DLIA (46.1 +/- 5.6 ng eq digoxin/day), Na-K-ATPase inhibition (182.9 +/- 22.7 nmol eq oub/day) and natriuretic activity (UNaV: 0.38 +/- 0.11 microEq/min) were observed during the low-sodium diet period in all subjects. High-sodium diet was associated with a significant increase in DLIA (87.9 +/- 9.2 ng eq digoxin/day, p less than 0.001) which parallelled changes in Na-K-ATPase inhibition (359.8 +/- 51.9 nmol eq oub/day, p less than 0.005) and natriuretic activity (UNaV: 1.33 +/- 0.3 microEq/min, p less than 0.025). These results support the contention that DLIA is related to NH. PMID:1965341

  6. Effect of food on acetaminophen absorption in young and elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Divoll, M; Greenblatt, D J; Ameer, B; Abernethy, D R

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-four healthy volunteers aged 22 to 78 years received 650-mg doses of acetaminophen (AAP) on five separate occasions. The modes of administration were: intravenous AAP by 5-minute infusion; oral AAP as two 325-mg tablets in the fasting state; oral AAP 650 mg as an elixir preparation in the fasting state; tablets with food; and elixir with food. Plasma concentrations of AAP were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography for up to 12 hours after the dose. In both the young and the elderly groups, the four oral modes of administration were significantly different with respect to peak plasma concentration (P less than 0.001), time to peak plasma concentration (P less than 0.001), and systemic availability (P less than 0.01). Although food slowed the rate of absorption of both oral preparations, no significant difference in peak acetaminophen plasma concentration or time of peak concentration was observed as a function of age. Absolute systemic availability of elixir and tablets in the fasting state tended to be lower in the elderly subjects (P less than 0.05). However, when either preparation was coadministered with food, there were no differences between the two age groups. Thus, age as such does not appear to be a critical determinant in the design of oral acetaminophen dosage schedules. PMID:7161411

  7. Assessment of lifestyle effects on the overall antioxidant capacity of healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Lesgards, Jean-François; Durand, Philippe; Lassarre, Magali; Stocker, Pierre; Lesgards, Guy; Lanteaume, André; Prost, Michel; Lehucher-Michel, Marie-Pascale

    2002-01-01

    Oxidative damage is increasingly recognized as playing an important role in the pathogenesis of several diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Using a biologic test based on whole blood resistance to free-radical aggression, we sought to evaluate lifestyle factors that may contribute to the normal variability of the overall antioxidant status. We assessed this global antiradical defense capacity in 88 men and 96 women in relation to information on lifestyle obtained by questionnaire. In our relatively young, healthy population, we found a weak negative relation between male sex or aging and the resistance to oxidant stress. Among the factors studied, nonsmoking, vitamin and/or mineral supplementation, and regular physical activity were closely associated with an increased overall antioxidant capacity. Conversely, the antioxidant potential was negatively related to tobacco smoking; psychologic stress; alcohol consumption; moderate vegetable, low fruit, and low fish consumption; and, to a lesser extent, high natural ultraviolet light exposure. Thus, we were able to determine "unhealthy" and "healthy" lifestyle patterns that truly contributed to the variation of individual antioxidant capacity. We conclude that lifestyle determinants of cancer and cardiovascular risks were associated with a decreased overall antioxidant status as dynamically measured by means of a biologic test. Thus, the evaluation of the total human resistance against free-radical aggression, taking into account nutritional habits, lifestyle, and environmental factors, may be useful in preventive medicine as a precocious diagnosis to identify healthy subjects who are at risk for free-radical-mediated diseases. PMID:12003751

  8. The effect of low light intensity on the maintenance of circadian synchrony in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Lyman, J.; Beljan, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on six healthy male subjects aged 20-23 yr and exposed for 21 days in a confined regulated environment to 16L:8D light:dark cycle with a view toward determining whether the light environment of 16L:8D at the relatively low light intensity of 15 ft.c. is adequate for the maintenance of circadian synchrony in man. The light intensity was 100 ft.c. during the first seven days, reduced to 15 ft.c. during the next seven days, and increased again to 100 ft.c. during the last seven days. Rectal temperature (RT) and heart rate (HR) were recorded throughout the three phases. In the 100 ft.c. regime, the RT and HR rhythms remained stable and circadian throughout. It is shown that 15 ft.c. light intensity is at or below threshold for maintaining circadian synchrony of human physiologic rhythms marked by instability and internal desynchronization with degradation of performance and well-being.

  9. Subjective Well-Being, Test Anxiety, Academic Achievement: Testing for Reciprocal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Steinmayr, Ricarda; Crede, Julia; McElvany, Nele; Wirthwein, Linda

    2016-01-01

    In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety is, however, still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57) completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of 1 year. Grade point average (GPA) indicated students’ academic achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction). Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students’ GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic achievement and test anxiety on adolescents’ SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes. PMID:26779096

  10. The Effect of Drinking on Plasma Vasopressin and Renin in Dehydrated Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geelen, G.; Keil, L. C.; Kravik, S. E.; Wade, C. E.; Thrasher, T. N.; Barnes, P. R.; Pyka, G.; Nesvig, C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Oropharyngeal mechanisms activated by drinking have been shown to induce a rapid decline in plasma vasopressin which preceeds postabsorptive changes in plasma composition in the dehydrated dog. The present study was undertaken to determine what factor(s) inhibit(s) vasopressin secretion after rehydration in water deprived human subjects. Hematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin (Hb) were determined on the day of the experiment, together with electrolytes and osmolalities which were measured on freshly separated serum. Plasma was immediately frozen and further analyzed by radioimmunoassay for renin activity (PRA), vasopressin (AVP), and aldosterone. The data were analyzed using an analysis of variance for repeated measurements and significant differences between the dehydrated control period and various time points after the start of rehydration were determined using a multiple-range test. began and reached water replete levels 15 minutes after drinking in the absence of any detectable decline in serum sodium or osmolality, we conclude that 427 oropharyngeal factors, alone or combined with gastric distension account for the extremely rapid inhibition of AVP secretion after drinking in the water-deprived human, as has been shown to be the case in dogs. Our findings are also in agreement wiht the recent demonstration that at the onset of drinking in the dehydrated monkey, there is an abrupt fall in plasma AVP concentration associated with a considerable decrease in the firing rate of the supraoptic neurosecretory neurons.

  11. Effects of counselor's profanity and subject's religiosity on content acquisition of a counseling lecture and behavioral compliance.

    PubMed

    Sazer, L; Kassinove, H

    1991-12-01

    Effects of counselor's profanity and subject's religiosity on acquisition of lecture content and behavioral compliance were investigated. 40 male and 80 female undergraduate students volunteered to attend a lecture about "coping with problems of daily living." They were divided into low, medium, or high religiosity groups based upon scores on Rohrbough and Jessor's Religiosity Scale. Each subject listened to a 15-min, videotaped rational-emotive mental health presentation which included a recommendation that they pick up a card (initial compliance) and send for a free book (delayed compliance) expanding upon the principles discussed in the tape. Half listened to a tape containing 16 profane words and half watched a nonprofane tape. At the end of the tape subjects were given a test on content. Analysis showed that profanity had a negative effect on acquisition of content and on initial compliance. Religiosity had no effect on any of the dependent variables. In contrast to the behavior modeled by some senior clinical practitioners, it was concluded that counselors be wary of using profanity in an initial session. Also, in keeping with the 1989 recommendations of Heppner and Claiborn, the importance of studying behavioral measures in influence studies was stressed. PMID:1792270

  12. Studies on air pollution: Effects of nitrogen dioxide on airway caliber and reactivity in asthmatic subjects; effects of nitrogen dioxide on lung lymphocytes and macrophage products in healthy subjects; nasal and bronchial effects of sulfur dioxide in asthmatic subjects. Final report, 26 June 1987-26 November 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Boushey, H.A.; Rubinstein, I.; Bigby, B.G.

    1988-12-13

    The investigators performed three studies of the effects of NO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/ on airway function in human subjects. In 9 exercising asthmatic subjects, a 30-min exposure to 0.3 ppm nitrogen dioxide did not alter specific airway resistance, maximal expiratory flow, or the slope of phase III on the single breath test of nitrogen distribution and had no effect on airway hyperresponsiveness to sulfur dioxide. In the second study, repeated exposure of 5 healthy subjects to nitrogen dioxide was associated neither with any significant change in pulmonary function nor in the levels of secretory product of lung macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Analysis of the numbers and types of lymphocytes in venous blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed no change apart from a small, possibly artifactual increase in natural killer cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after NO/sub 2/ exposure. The third study examined whether brief exposures to moderately high concentrations of SO/sub 2/ caused acute increases in nasal symptoms and nasal resistance in 8 subjects with a history of both asthma and allergic rhinitis and with demonstrable bronchial hyperreactivity to SO/sub 2/.

  13. THE SUBJECTIVE PSYCHOACTIVE EFFECTS OF ORAL DRONABINOL STUDIED IN A RANDOMIZED, CONTROLLED CROSSOVER CLINICAL TRIAL FOR PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Mohammed A.; Narang, Sanjeet; Jamison, Robert N.; Michna, Edward; Edwards, Robert R.; Penetar, David M.; Wasan, Ajay D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many cannabinoid medications are approved in North America or in Phase III trials, such as Dronabinol, Nabilone, or Nabiximols. Little is known about their subjective psychoactive effects when used for pain management. We hypothesized that when used for pain, dronabinol has psychoactive effects in a dose response relationship, whose peak effects are comparable to smoking marijuana. Methods With IRB approval and written consent, this was a randomized controlled trial of single dose placebo, 10 or 20 mg dronabinol in 30 chronic non-cancer pain patients taking opioids and not using marijuana. Hourly, for 8 hours during 3 monitored sessions, subjects completed the Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI). Comparison sample was the ARCI ratings in a study population with no pain (N=20), monitored every 30 minutes after smoking a 1.99% THC (low) and a 3.51% (high strength) marijuana cigarette. Results The 10 and 20 mg dronabinol doses had significantly elevated scores on 4/5 subscales vs. placebo over time (p<.05). Average daily morphine use, total pain relief (TOTPAR), age, gender, and baseline pain level were not significant covariates. ARCI peak effects at 2 hours were similar to peak effects of smoked marijuana at 30 minutes (p=.80, 10 mg=low, 20 mg=high strength). Conclusions In pain patients, oral dronabinol has similar psychoactive effects to smoking marijuana. This risk must be considered in any decision to prescribe cannabinoid medications for pain. PMID:24281276

  14. Isolated assessment of translation or rotation severely underestimates the effects of subject motion in fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Subject motion has long since been known to be a major confound in functional MRI studies of the human brain. For resting-state functional MRI in particular, data corruption due to motion artefacts has been shown to be most relevant. However, despite 6 parameters (3 for translations and 3 for rotations) being required to fully describe the head's motion trajectory between timepoints, not all are routinely used to assess subject motion. Using structural (n = 964) as well as functional MRI (n = 200) data from public repositories, a series of experiments was performed to assess the impact of using a reduced parameter set (translationonly and rotationonly) versus using the complete parameter set. It could be shown that the usage of 65 mm as an indicator of the average cortical distance is a valid approximation in adults, although care must be taken when comparing children and adults using the same measure. The effect of using slightly smaller or larger values is minimal. Further, both translationonly and rotationonly severely underestimate the full extent of subject motion; consequently, both translationonly and rotationonly discard substantially fewer datapoints when used for quality control purposes ("motion scrubbing"). Finally, both translationonly and rotationonly severely underperform in predicting the full extent of the signal changes and the overall variance explained by motion in functional MRI data. These results suggest that a comprehensive measure, taking into account all available parameters, should be used to characterize subject motion in fMRI. PMID:25333359

  15. The effect of histidine on mental fatigue and cognitive performance in subjects with high fatigue and sleep disruption scores.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Ikuko; Fujimura, Naoko; Nozawa, Yoshizu; Furuhata, Yasufumi; Sato, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    Our previous study reported that a dried bonito broth known in Japan as 'dashi' improved or ameliorated mood states, including fatigue, during the daily lives of human subjects. Histidine is an amino acid that is present in dried bonito broth, and we sought to evaluate whether histidine would affect feelings of fatigue in humans. We investigated the effects of histidine intake on the feeling of fatigue, mood states and mental task performance by performing a placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover trial. Twenty subjects with high fatigue and sleep disruption scores were asked to ingest histidine or a placebo every day for two weeks. The subjects' mood states were evaluated using the Profile of Mood States (POMS) scale and a visual analog scale (VAS) for eight feelings (fatigue, depression, carelessness, drowsiness, clear thinking, motivation, attentiveness and concentration). We also measured subjects' cognitive performance using the CogHealth test battery. The fatigue T-scores on the POMS test decreased significantly following histidine ingestion compared to placebo ingestion (p<0.05). After two weeks of histidine ingestion, the reaction time for the working memory task in the CogHealth test battery was significantly shorten compared to placebo ingestion. The VAS scores for clear thinking and for attentiveness were increased significantly following histidine ingestion compared to placebo ingestion (p<0.05). These results suggest that daily ingestion of histidine may ameliorate feelings of fatigue, increase performance during working memory tasks, and improve the clear thinking and attentiveness. PMID:25921948

  16. Effects of Orally Administered Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Disodium Salt on Dry Skin Conditions in Mice and Healthy Female Subjects.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahiko; Kamimura, Ayako; Watanabe, Fumiko; Kamiya, Toshikazu; Watanabe, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Etsushi; Fukagawa, Mitsuhiko; Hasumi, Keiji; Suzuki, Eriko

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a coenzyme involved in the redox-cycling system. The supplemental use of PQQ has been examined based on its properties as an antioxidant and redox modulator. Although an animal study on deficiency of PQQ suggested that PQQ contributes to skin conditions, its efficacy in humans has not been reported. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of orally administered PQQ on skin moisture, viscoelasticity, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) both in dry skin mouse models and in healthy female subjects with a subjective symptom of dry skin. In our dry skin mouse model study, oral intake of PQQ (0.0089%, w/w, in the diet for 6 wk) significantly decreased the number of mast cells in the dermis and the number of CD3⁺ T-cells in the epidermis. In our human study, oral intake of PQQ (20 mg/d for 8 wk) significantly inhibited the increase in TEWL on the forearm. Finally, subject questionnaires showed positive impressions for the improvement of skin conditions. These results suggest that oral intake of PQQ improves skin conditions both in female subjects with dry skin and in mice with a compromised skin barrier function. PMID:26226961

  17. Effects of Aerobic Exercise Based upon Heart Rate at Aerobic Threshold in Obese Elderly Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Donini, Lorenzo Maria

    2015-01-01

    In obese diabetic subjects, a correct life style, including diet and physical activity, is part of a correct intervention protocol. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic training intervention, based on heart rate at aerobic gas exchange threshold (AerTge), on clinical and physiological parameters in obese elderly subjects with type 2 diabetes (OT2DM). Thirty OT2DM subjects were randomly assigned to an intervention (IG) or control group (CG). The IG performed a supervised aerobic exercise training based on heart rate at AerTge whereas CG maintained their usual lifestyle. Anthropometric measures, blood analysis, peak oxygen consumption (V˙O2peak), metabolic equivalent (METpeak), work rate (WRpeak), and WRAerTge were assessed at baseline and after intervention. After training, patients enrolled in the IG had significantly higher (P < 0.001) V˙O2peak, METpeak, WRpeak, and WRAerTge and significantly lower (P < 0.005) weight, BMI, %FM, and waist circumference than before intervention. Both IG and CG subjects had lower glycated haemoglobin levels after intervention period. No significant differences were found for all the other parameters between pre- and posttraining and between groups. Aerobic exercise prescription based upon HR at AerTge could be a valuable physical intervention tool to improve the fitness level and metabolic equilibrium in OT2DM patients. PMID:26089890

  18. Pilates versus general exercise effectiveness on pain and functionality in non-specific chronic low back pain subjects.

    PubMed

    Mostagi, Fernanda Queiroz Ribeiro Cerci; Dias, Josilainne Marcelino; Pereira, Ligia Maxwell; Obara, Karen; Mazuquin, Bruno Fles; Silva, Mariana Felipe; Silva, Monica Angelica Cardoso; de Campos, Renata Rosa; Barreto, Maria Simone Tavares; Nogueira, Jéssyca Fernandes; Lima, Tarcísio Brandão; Carregaro, Rodrigo Luiz; Cardoso, Jefferson Rosa

    2015-10-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common causes of disability, and the Pilates method has been associated with improvements in symptoms. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the Pilates method, when compared to general exercises, on pain and functionality after eight weeks (16 sessions, 2×/week) and a follow-up of three months, in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). A randomised controlled trial composed of 22 subjects was proposed. Subjects were allocated into two groups: the Pilates group (PG) (n = 11) and the general exercise group (GEG) (n = 11). The PG protocol was based on the Pilates method and the GEG performed exercises to manage NSCLBP. There were no differences between the groups. When analysed over time, the GEG demonstrated improvements in functionality between baseline and the end of treatment (P = .02; Cohen'sd¯ = 0.34) and baseline and follow-up (P = .04; Cohen'sd¯ = 0.31). There were no differences between the Pilates and general exercises with regard to pain and functionality in NSCLBP subjects but general exercises were better than Pilates for increasing functionality and flexibility. PMID:26592221

  19. Effect of intraperitoneal selenium administration on liver glycogen levels in rats subjected to acute forced swimming.

    PubMed

    Akil, Mustafa; Bicer, Mursel; Kilic, Mehmet; Avunduk, Mustafa Cihat; Mogulkoc, Rasim; Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim

    2011-03-01

    There are a few of studies examining how selenium, which is known to reduce oxidative damage in exercise, influences glucose metabolism and exhaustion in physical activity. The present study aims to examine how selenium administration affects liver glycogen levels in rats subjected to acute swimming exercise. The study included 32 Sprague-Dawley type male rats, which were equally allocated to four groups: Group 1, general control; Group 2; selenium-supplemented control (6 mg/kg/day sodium selenite); Group 3, swimming control; Group 4, selenium-supplemented swimming (6 mg/kg/day sodium selenite). Liver tissue samples collected from the animals at the end of the study were fixed in 95% ethyl alcohol. From the tissue samples buried into paraffin, 5-µm cross-sections were obtained using a microtome, put on a microscope slide, and stained with PAS. Stained preparations were assessed using a Nikon Eclipse E400 light microscope. All images obtained with the light microscope were transferred to a PC and evaluated using Clemex PE 3.5 image analysis software. The highest liver glycogen levels were found in groups 1 and 2 (p < 0.05). The levels in group 4 were lower than those in groups 1 and 2 but higher than the levels in group 3 (p < 0.05). The lowest liver glycogen levels were obtained in group 3 (p < 0.05). Results of the study indicate that liver glycogen levels that decrease in acute swimming exercise can be restored by selenium administration. It can be argued that physiological doses of selenium administration can contribute to performance. PMID:20340052

  20. Inter-subject variability effects on the primary stability of a short cementless femoral stem.

    PubMed

    Bah, Mamadou T; Shi, Junfen; Heller, Markus O; Suchier, Yanneck; Lefebvre, Fabien; Young, Philippe; King, Leonard; Dunlop, Doug G; Boettcher, Mick; Draper, Edward; Browne, Martin

    2015-04-13

    This paper is concerned with the primary stability of the Furlong Evolution(®) cementless short stem across a spectrum of patient morphology. A computational tool is developed that automatically selects and positions the most suitable stem from an implant system made of a total of 48 collarless stems to best match a 3D model based on a library of CT femur scans (75 males and 34 females). Finite Element contact models of reconstructed hips, subjected to physiologically-based boundary constraints and peak loads of walking mode, were simulated using a coefficient of friction of 0.4 and an interference-fit of 50 μm. Maximum and average implant micromotions across the subpopulation were predicted to be 100±7 μm and 7±5 μm with ranges [15 μm, 350 μm] and [1 μm, 25 μm], respectively. The computed percentage of implant area with micromotions greater than reported critical values of 50 μm, 100 μm and 150 μm never exceeded 14%, 8% and 7%, respectively. To explore the possible correlations between anatomy and implant performance, response surface models for micromotion metrics were constructed. Detailed morphological analyses were conducted and a clear nonlinear decreasing trend was observed between implant average micromotion and both the metaphyseal canal flare indices and average densities in Gruen zones. The present study demonstrates that the primary stability and tolerance of the short stem to variability in patient anatomy were high, reducing the need for patient stratification. In addition, the developed tool could be utilised to support implant design and planning of femoral reconstructive surgery. PMID:25724937

  1. Dose-Related Hepatic Blood Flow Effects Differentiate Nicorandil, Hydralazine, and Isosorbide Dinitrate in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Daniel L.; Metzler, Carl M.; Froeschke, Monica O.; Luderer, John R.

    1994-08-01

    Dose response on hepatic blood flow of nicorandil (2.5, 5, and 10 mg), isosorbide dinitrate (5, 15, and 40 mg), and hydralazine (10, 25, and 50 mg) was assessed in 18 healthy subjects (6 per drug) using a three-period crossover design. Indocyanine green clearance was used to estimate hepatic blood flow before and at two timepoints after dosing. Greater hepatic blood flow changes occurred 90 (than 30) min after nicorandil and isosorbide dinitrate, and 60 (than 150) min after hydralazine. Nicorandil (mixed vasodilator) decreased hepatic blood flow by minus sign13 plus minus 4% (p < 0.05), minus sign15 plus minus 7%, and minus sign21 plus minus 6% (p < 0.05) (mean plus minus standard error of the mean) after 2.5, 5, and 10 mg, respectively; blood pressure was not reduced and heart rate was unchanged. Individual changes correlated poorly with plasma nicorandil concentrations. Isosorbide dinitrate (predominant venodilator) decreased hepatic blood flow by minus sign23 plus minus 9%, minus sign27 plus minus 5% (p < 0.05), and minus sign26 plus minus 7% (p < 0.05) after 5, 15, and 40 mg, respectively; blood pressure decreased (8--12 mm Hg) and heart rate increased (8 beats min(minus sign1)). Hydralazine (arterial dilator) increased hepatic blood flow by 29 plus minus 16%, 32 plus minus 11% (p < 0.05), and 33 plus minus 26% after 10, 25, and 50 mg, respectively; blood pressure was unchanged and heart rate increased (16 beats min(minus sign1)). Hepatic vascular resistance increased after nicorandil and isosorbide dinitrate but decreased after hydralazine. As assessed by hepatic blood flow response, nicorandil behaves more like a predominant venodilator than a direct arterial dilator. Dose and time variables were important to understanding the overall hemodynamic profile of each drug. PMID:11835080

  2. Effect of centerline-guided walking on gait characteristics in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Chow, John W; Hemleben, Mark E; Stokic, Dobrivoje S

    2009-05-29

    One of the challenges in collecting ground reaction force (GRF) and moment data for gait analysis is to obtain "good hits" when the subject walks past the forceplates. We examined whether centerline-guided walking would significantly increase the chance of good hits and alter gait characteristics. Thirty-five healthy individuals (age: 37+/-13yrs) walked on a walkway with five embedded forceplates at comfortable self-selected speeds under two conditions: (1) free walking and (2) walking along a centerline and avoiding stepping on it. Gait kinematics and GRF were collected using an 8-camera optoelectronic system and five forceplates, respectively. Surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the rectus femoris, hamstring, gastrocnemius (GAS), and tibialis anterior (TA) were monitored bilaterally. The probability of good hits significantly increased with the centerline-guided walking (p=0.008). Repeated measures MANOVA and follow-up univariate tests revealed no significant differences between the two conditions in any of the spatiotemporal parameters except for a significant increase in step width with centerline walking (p<0.001). Centerline guiding significantly increased peak mediolateral GRF (p<0.001) and hip adduction/abduction and ankle internal/external rotation ranges of motion (p<0.01). In addition, the average EMG activity in GAS and TA during the stance phase significantly increased with the centerline walking (p<0.001). In general, the centerline walking tended to impact women more than men. Centerline-guided walking increases the chance of good hits but biomechanical characteristics of gait in the frontal and transverse planes and EMG activity should be interpreted with caution, especially in women. PMID:19345362

  3. A vitamin, mineral, herb dietary supplement effect on blood glucose in uncontrolled type II diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    González, Michael J; Ricart, Carlos M; Miranda-Massari, Jorge

    2004-06-01

    We tested a dietary supplement formulated with a synergistic combination of vitamins, minerals, herbals in a group of 15 patients with uncontrolled diabetes type II. The supplement was given for 30 days. Fasting blood glucose was measured prior to the supplementation and at the end of the 30 days treatment period. Blood glucose was significantly reduced in all patients with no adverse effects. This orthomolecular correction of faulty glucose metabolism with a combination of nontoxic, safe and fairly inexpensive nutraceuticals needs to be further substantiated. Nervertheless the idea of correcting metabolism with micronutrients is a new concept of genetic nutritioneering that seems appealing and cost effective. PMID:15377060

  4. Effects of team-based learning on perceived teamwork and academic performance in a health assessment subject.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung-Ran; Kim, Chun-Ja; Park, Jee-Won; Park, Eunyoung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of team-based learning (a well-recognized learning and teaching strategy), applied in a health assessment subject, on nursing students' perceived teamwork (team-efficacy and team skills) and academic performance (individual and team readiness assurance tests, and examination scores). A prospective, one-group, pre- and post-test design enrolled a convenience sample of 74 second-year nursing students at a university in Suwon, Korea. Team-based learning was applied in a 2-credit health assessment subject over a 16-week semester. All students received written material one week before each class for readiness preparation. After administering individual- and team-readiness assurance tests consecutively, the subject instructor gave immediate feedback and delivered a mini-lecture to the students. Finally, students carried out skill based application exercises. The findings showed significant improvements in the mean scores of students' perceived teamwork after the introduction of team-based learning. In addition, team-efficacy was associated with team-adaptability skills and team-interpersonal skills. Regarding academic performance, team readiness assurance tests were significantly higher than individual readiness assurance tests over time. Individual readiness assurance tests were significantly related with examination scores, while team readiness assurance tests were correlated with team-efficacy and team-interpersonal skills. The application of team-based learning in a health assessment subject can enhance students' perceived teamwork and academic performance. This finding suggests that team-based learning may be an effective learning and teaching strategy for improving team-work of nursing students, who need to collaborate and effectively communicate with health care providers to improve patients' health. PMID:26552201

  5. Memory for Medication Side Effects in Younger and Older Adults: The Role of Subjective and Objective Importance

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Michael C.; McGillivray, Shannon; Murayama, Kou; Castel, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    Older adults often experience memory impairments, but can sometimes use selective processing and schematic support to remember important information. The current experiments investigate to what degree younger and healthy older adults remember medication side effects that were subjectively or objectively important to remember. Participants studied a list of common side effects, and rated how negative these effects were if they were to experience them, and were then given a free recall test. In Experiment 1, the severity of the side effects ranged from mild (e.g., itching) to severe (e.g., stroke), and in Experiment 2, certain side effects were indicated as critical to remember (i.e., “contact your doctor if you experience this”). There were no age differences in terms of free recall of the side effects, and older adults remembered more severe side effects relative to mild effects. However, older adults were less likely to recognize critical side effects on a later recognition test, relative to younger adults. The findings suggest that older adults can selectively remember medication side effects, but have difficulty identifying familiar but potentially critical side effects, and this has implications for monitoring medication use in older age. PMID:25331278

  6. Grapefruit juice markedly increases the plasma concentrations and antiplatelet effects of ticagrelor in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Mikko T; Tornio, Aleksi; Joutsi-Korhonen, Lotta; Neuvonen, Mikko; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Lassila, Riitta; Niemi, Mikko; Backman, Janne T

    2013-01-01

    Aim This study examined the effects of grapefruit juice on the new P2Y12 inhibitor ticagrelor, which is a substrate of CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein. Methods In a randomized crossover study, 10 healthy volunteers ingested 200 ml of grapefruit juice or water thrice daily for 4 days. On day 3, they ingested a single 90 mg dose of ticagrelor. Results Grapefruit juice increased ticagrelor geometric mean peak plasma concentration (Cmax) to 165% (95% confidence interval 147, 184%) and area under the concentration–time curve (AUC(0,∞)) to 221% of control (95% confidence interval 200, 245%). The Cmax and AUC(0,34 h) (P < 0.05) but not the AUC(0,∞) of the active metabolite C12490XX were decreased significantly. Grapefruit juice had a minor effect on ticagrelor elimination half-life prolonging it from 6.7 to 7.2 h (P = 0.036). In good correlation with the elevated plasma ticagrelor concentrations, grapefruit juice enhanced the antiplatelet effect of ticagrelor, assessed with VerifyNow® and Multiplate® methods, and postponed the recovery of platelet reactivity. Conclusions Grapefruit juice increased ticagrelor exposure by more than two-fold, leading to an enhanced and prolonged ticagrelor antiplatelet effect. The grapefruit juice–ticagrelor interaction seems clinically important and indicates the significance of intestinal metabolism to ticagrelor pharmacokinetics. PMID:23126367