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Sample records for pregabalin reduces neuropathic

  1. Pregabalin in Chemotherapy Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Atreya, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents belonging to vinca alkaloids, taxanes, and antitubulins produce peripheral neuropathy for which there is no validated treatment. Pregabalin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid analog, is known to inhibit theα2δ subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel. Earlier studies and case reports have shown pregabalin to be effective in treating neuropathic pain. We present a case series of patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy who were successfully treated with pregabalin with reduction in the hyperalgesia, allodynia, and improvement in the quality of life. PMID:26962289

  2. Pregabalin in Chemotherapy Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents belonging to vinca alkaloids, taxanes, and antitubulins produce peripheral neuropathy for which there is no validated treatment. Pregabalin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid analog, is known to inhibit theα2δ subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel. Earlier studies and case reports have shown pregabalin to be effective in treating neuropathic pain. We present a case series of patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy who were successfully treated with pregabalin with reduction in the hyperalgesia, allodynia, and improvement in the quality of life. PMID:26962289

  3. Neuropathic Pain in Elderly Patients with Chronic Low Back Painand Effects of Pregabalin: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kenyu; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Sadayuki; Harada, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Preliminary study. Purpose To assess the association of neuropathic pain with chronic low back pain (LBP) and the effect of pregabalin on neuropathic pain in the elderly. Overview of Literature Of those with chronic LBP, 37% were predominantly presenting with neuropathic pain in young adults. Pregabalin is effective for pain in patients with diabetic neuropathy and peripheral neuralgia. No study has reported on the effects of pregabalin for chronic LBP in elderly patients yet. Methods Pregabalin was administered to 32 patients (age, ≥65 years) with chronic LBP for 4 weeks. Pain and activities of daily living were assessed using the Neuropathic Pain Screening Questionnaire (NePSQ), the pain DETECT questionnaire, visual analog scale, the Japanese Orthopedic Association score, the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Modic change and spinal canal stenosis were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging. Results Altogether, 43.3% of patients had neuropathic pain according to the NePSQ and 15.6% patients had pain according to the pain DETECT. The efficacy rate of pregabalin was 73.3%. A significant effect was observed in patients with neuropathic pain after 4 weeks of administration. Conclusions Neuropathic pain was slightly less frequently associated with chronic LBP in the elderly. Pregabalin was effective in reducing pain in patients with chronic LBP accompanied with neuropathic pain. Lumbar spinal stenosis and lower limb symptoms were observed in patients with neuropathic pain. We recommend the use of pregabalin for patients after evaluating a screening score, clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:25901238

  4. Pregabalin in post traumatic neuropathic pain: Case studies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Sinha, Vijay Prakash; Pal, U. S.; Yadav, Sharad C.; Singh, Maneesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Pregabalin is effective in the treatment of peripheral and central neuropathic pain. This study evaluated the effectiveness of pregablin in management of post traumatic peripheral nerve injury facial pain not responding to other medication like analgesics. Pregabalin was well tolerated. The most common adverse effects were dizziness and tiredness. PMID:23251069

  5. Pregabalin in Neuropathic Pain: Evidences and Possible Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Singh, Nirmal; Singh Jaggi, Amteshwar

    2014-01-01

    Pregabalin is an antagonist of voltage gated Ca2+ channels and specifically binds to alpha-2-delta subunit to produce antiepileptic and analgesic actions. It successfully alleviates the symptoms of various types of neuropathic pain and presents itself as a first line therapeutic agent with remarkable safety and efficacy. Preclinical studies in various animal models of neuropathic pain have shown its effectiveness in treating the symptoms like allodynia and hyperalgesia. Clinical studies in different age groups and in different types of neuropathic pain (peripheral diabetic neuropathy, fibromyalgia, post-herpetic neuralgia, cancer chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain) have projected it as the most effective agent either as monotherapy or in combined regimens in terms of cost effectiveness, tolerability and overall improvement in neuropathic pain states. Preclinical studies employing pregabalin in different neuropathic pain models have explored various molecular targets and the signaling systems including Ca2+ channel-mediated neurotransmitter release, activation of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), potassium channels and inhibition of pathways involving inflammatory mediators. The present review summarizes the important aspects of pregabalin as analgesic in preclinical and clinical studies as well as focuses on the possible mechanisms. PMID:24533015

  6. Comparison of central versus peripheral delivery of pregabalin in neuropathic pain states

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although pregabalin therapy is beneficial for neuropathic pain (NeP) by targeting the CaVα2δ-1 subunit, its site of action is uncertain. Direct targeting of the central nervous system may be beneficial for the avoidance of systemic side effects. Results We used intranasal, intrathecal, and near-nerve chamber forms of delivery of varying concentrations of pregabalin or saline delivered over 14 days in rat models of experimental diabetic peripheral neuropathy and spinal nerve ligation. As well, radiolabelled pregabalin was administered to determine localization with different deliveries. We evaluated tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at multiple time points, and then analyzed harvested nervous system tissues for molecular and immunohistochemical changes in CaVα2δ-1 protein expression. Both intrathecal and intranasal pregabalin administration at high concentrations relieved NeP behaviors, while near-nerve pregabalin delivery had no effect. NeP was associated with upregulation of CACNA2D1 mRNA and CaVα2δ-1 protein within peripheral nerve, dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and dorsal spinal cord, but not brain. Pregabalin's effect was limited to suppression of CaVα2δ-1 protein (but not CACNA2D1 mRNA) expression at the spinal dorsal horn in neuropathic pain states. Dorsal root ligation prevented CaVα2δ-1 protein trafficking anterograde from the dorsal root ganglia to the dorsal horn after neuropathic pain initiation. Conclusions Either intranasal or intrathecal pregabalin relieves neuropathic pain behaviours, perhaps due to pregabalin's effect upon anterograde CaVα2δ-1 protein trafficking from the DRG to the dorsal horn. Intranasal delivery of agents such as pregabalin may be an attractive alternative to systemic therapy for management of neuropathic pain states. PMID:22236461

  7. The antiallodynic action of pregabalin in neuropathic pain is independent from the opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Ipek; Nexon, Laurent; Wurtz, Xavier; Ceredig, Rhian Alice; Daniel, Dorothée; Hawkes, Rachael Aredhel; Salvat, Eric; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical management of neuropathic pain, which is pain arising as a consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system, partly relies on the use of anticonvulsant drugs such as gabapentinoids. Therapeutic action of gabapentinoids such as gabapentin and pregabalin, which act by the inhibition of calcium currents through interaction with the α2δ-1 subunit of voltage-dependent calcium channels, is well documented. However, some aspects of the downstream mechanisms are still to be uncovered. Using behavioral, genetic, and pharmacological approaches, we tested whether opioid receptors are necessary for the antiallodynic action of acute and/or long-term pregabalin treatment in the specific context of neuropathic pain. Results Using the cuff model of neuropathic pain in mice, we show that acute pregabalin administration at high dose has a transitory antiallodynic action, while prolonged oral pregabalin treatment leads to sustained antiallodynic action, consistent with clinical observations. We show that pregabalin remains fully effective in μ-opioid receptor, in δ-opioid receptor and in κ-opioid receptor deficient mice, either female or male, and its antiallodynic action is not affected by acute naloxone. Our work also shows that long-term pregabalin treatment suppresses tumor necrosis factor-α overproduction induced by sciatic nerve constriction in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Conclusions We demonstrate that neither acute nor long-term antiallodynic effect of pregabalin in a context of neuropathic pain is mediated by the endogenous opioid system, which differs from opioid treatment of pain and antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain. Our data are also supportive of an impact of gabapentinoid treatment on the neuroimmune aspect of neuropathic pain. PMID:27030724

  8. Pregabalin

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain types of seizures in people with epilepsy. Pregabalin is in a class of medications called ... you are taking pregabalin for the treatment of epilepsy, mental illness, or other conditions. A small number ...

  9. Effect of Gabapentin and Pregabalin in Rat Model of Taxol Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Rameshkannan, S.; Ali, R. Meher

    2015-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy induced neuropathy pain remains as a major dose limiting side effect of many commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs. Presently newer antiepileptic agents have been developed with improved safety and tolerability profiles in alleviating neuropathic pain. Objectives To evaluate the effect of Gabapentin and Pregabalin in Paclitaxel (Taxol) induced neuropathic pain and to compare the effect of these drugs in animal models. Materials and Methods Rats were randomly divided into four groups of six animals each. Group 1- vehicle, Group 2 – Paclitaxel (2mg/kg), Group 3 - Gabapentin (60mg/kg) with Paclitaxel, Group 4 - Pregabalin (30mg/kg) with Paclitaxel. Pain was induced by intraperitoneal injection of Paclitaxel on four alternate days. After taking the baseline values, the drugs treated groups (group 3 and 4) were administered with respective drugs once a day orally for eight consecutive days along with paclitaxel. All the animals were tested for thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia on day 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 with Radiant heat method and Tail immersion test, Acetone drop method respectively. Results In Radiant heat method, gabapentin and pregabalin treated animals found to have significant increase in the tail latency period compared to control and paclitaxel treated groups in all periods of observation. Acetone drop test and tail immersion test also showed significant response similar to Radiant heat method. Pregabalin showed highly significant effect when compared to gabapentin group. Conclusion Both gabapentin and pregabalin produced significant anti-hyperalgesic and anti-allodynic effects in experimental animal models. Pregabalin treated group showed highly significant effect compared to gabapentin treated animals. PMID:26155495

  10. Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of pregabalin in older patients with neuropathic pain: results from a pooled analysis of 11 clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Older patients are typically underrepresented in clinical trials of medications for chronic pain. A post hoc analysis of multiple clinical studies of pregabalin in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) or postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin in older patients. Methods Data from 11 double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical studies of pregabalin in patients with DPN or PHN were pooled. Efficacy outcomes included change in Daily Pain Rating Scale score, ≥30% and ≥50% responders, and endpoint pain score ≤3. Safety was based on adverse events (AEs). Primary efficacy was analyzed by analysis of covariance with terms for treatment, age category, protocol, baseline pain, and treatment-by-age category interaction. Results 2516 patients (white, n = 2344 [93.2%]; men, n = 1347 [53.5%]; PHN, n = 1003 [39.9%]; pregabalin, n = 1595) were included in the analysis. Patients were grouped by age: 18 to 64 years (n = 1236), 65 to 74 years (n = 766), and ≥75 years (n = 514). Baseline mean pain and sleep interference scores were comparable across treatment and age groups. Significant improvements in endpoint mean pain were observed for all pregabalin dosages versus placebo in all age groups (p ≤ 0.0009), except for the lowest dosage (150 mg/day) in the youngest age group. Clinically meaningful pain relief, defined as ≥30% and ≥50% pain response, was observed in all age groups. The most common AEs were dizziness, somnolence, peripheral edema, asthenia, dry mouth, weight gain, and infections. The relative risks for these AEs increased with pregabalin dose, but did not appear related to older age or type of neuropathic pain. Conclusions Pregabalin (150-600 mg/day) significantly reduced pain in older patients (age ≥65 years) with neuropathic pain and improvements in pain were comparable to those observed in younger patients. Titration of pregabalin to the lowest effective

  11. Pregabalin, the lidocaine plaster and duloxetine in patients with refractory neuropathic pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients frequently fail to receive adequate pain relief from, or are intolerant of, first-line therapies prescribed for neuropathic pain (NeP). This refractory chronic pain causes psychological distress and impacts patient quality of life. Published literature for treatment in refractory patients is sparse and often published as conference abstracts only. The aim of this study was to identify published data for three pharmacological treatments: pregabalin, lidocaine plaster, and duloxetine, which are typically used at 2nd line or later in UK patients with neuropathic pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and CCTR was carried out and supplemented with extensive conference and grey literature searching. Studies of any design (except single patient case studies) that enrolled adult patients with refractory NeP were included in the review and qualitatively assessed. Results Seventeen studies were included in the review: nine of pregabalin, seven of the lidocaine plaster, and one of duloxetine. No head-to-head studies of these treatments were identified. Only six studies included treatments within UK licensed indications and dose ranges. Reported efficacy outcomes were not consistent between studies. Pain scores were most commonly assessed in studies including pregabalin; trials of pregabalin and the lidocaine plaster reported the proportion of responders. Significant improvements in the total, sensory and affective scores of the Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and in function interference, sleep interference and pain associated distress, were associated with pregabalin treatment; limited or no quality of life data were available for the other two interventions. Limitations to the review are the small number of included studies, which are generally small, of poor quality and heterogeneous in patient population and study design. Conclusions Little evidence is available relevant to the treatment of refractory

  12. Successful use of pregabalin by the rectal route to treat chronic neuropathic pain in a patient with complete intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Doddrell, Charlotte; Tripathi, Shiva Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin is widely used for treatment of neuropathic pain and is only approved for oral use. This is the first reported case of using pregabalin by the rectal route for treatment in a 70-year-old patient with chronic neuropathic pain and complete intestinal failure. Therapies used in an attempt to manage his chronic pain have included a variety of doses and strengths of opioid preparations and cannabinoids, plus topical and alternative therapies. These were not effective, so it was decided to start a trial of pregabalin administered by the rectal route. Serum levels were measured to assess absorption. Within a few weeks of starting the treatment, the patient had improved pain control and appeared more comfortable and calm. PMID:26516246

  13. Neuronal hyperexcitability in the ventral posterior thalamus of neuropathic rats: modality selective effects of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Dickenson, Anthony H.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain represents a substantial clinical challenge; understanding the underlying neural mechanisms and back-translation of therapeutics could aid targeting of treatments more effectively. The ventral posterior thalamus (VP) is the major termination site for the spinothalamic tract and relays nociceptive activity to the somatosensory cortex; however, under neuropathic conditions, it is unclear how hyperexcitability of spinal neurons converges onto thalamic relays. This study aimed to identify neural substrates of hypersensitivity and the influence of pregabalin on central processing. In vivo electrophysiology was performed to record from VP wide dynamic range (WDR) and nociceptive-specific (NS) neurons in anesthetized spinal nerve-ligated (SNL), sham-operated, and naive rats. In neuropathic rats, WDR neurons had elevated evoked responses to low- and high-intensity punctate mechanical stimuli, dynamic brushing, and innocuous and noxious cooling, but less so to heat stimulation, of the receptive field. NS neurons in SNL rats also displayed increased responses to noxious punctate mechanical stimulation, dynamic brushing, noxious cooling, and noxious heat. Additionally, WDR, but not NS, neurons in SNL rats exhibited substantially higher rates of spontaneous firing, which may correlate with ongoing pain. The ratio of WDR-to-NS neurons was comparable between SNL and naive/sham groups, suggesting relatively few NS neurons gain sensitivity to low-intensity stimuli leading to a “WDR phenotype.” After neuropathy was induced, the proportion of cold-sensitive WDR and NS neurons increased, supporting the suggestion that changes in frequency-dependent firing and population coding underlie cold hypersensitivity. In SNL rats, pregabalin inhibited mechanical and heat responses but not cold-evoked or elevated spontaneous activity. PMID:27098028

  14. Pregabalin (Pfizer).

    PubMed

    Huckle, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Pregabalin is a gamma-aminobutyric acid analog that is under development by Pfizer for the potential treatment of central nervous system disorders, including epilepsy, neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia and generalized anxiety disorder. By April 2003, Pfizer had filed for approval of pregabalin in Europe for neuropathic pain and as an adjunctive therapy for epilepsy, and in October 2003 an NDA was filed for these indications and generalized anxiety disorder. At this time, phase III trials in fibromyalgia were ongoing. PMID:14983979

  15. Real-life efficacy of pregabalin for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain in daily clinical practice in Denmark: the NEP-TUNE study

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Michael E; Poulsen, Peter Bo; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Habicht, Andreas; Strand, Mette; Bach, Flemming W

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to provide evidence regarding the real-life efficacy of pregabalin in the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain (NeP) in Denmark. Methods In this prospective, observational, noninterventional study, pregabalin (Lyrica®) was prescribed following usual clinical practice. Compared with baseline, the primary study end points after 3 months of observation were changes in 1) the average level of pain during the past week, 2) the worst level of pain during the past week, and 3) the least level of pain during the past week. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to perform paired analyses, and a multivariate regression analysis investigated factors driving change in pain. Results A total of 86 of the 128 patients included were regarded as efficacy evaluable (those completing 3 months of pregabalin treatment). Patients (59 years) were long-time sufferers of peripheral NeP, and 38% of them had comorbidities. The majority had previously been treated with tricyclic antidepressants or gabapentin. The average dose of pregabalin was 81.5 mg/d at baseline and 240 mg/d after 3 months. A clinically and statistically significant improvement of 2.2 points in the average level of pain intensity was found after 3 months. The higher the pain intensity at baseline, the higher was the reduction of the pain score. Positive results were also found for pain-related sleep interference, patients’ global impression of change, quality of life, and work and productivity impairment. Twenty-one patients reported 28 adverse events. Conclusion This real-life study indicates that for some patients (two-thirds), addition of pregabalin for peripheral NeP helps to reduce their pain intensity significantly. PMID:27284265

  16. Systemic pregabalin attenuates facial hypersensitivity and noxious stimulus-evoked release of glutamate in medullary dorsal horn in a rodent model of trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naresh; Cherkas, Pavel S; Varathan, Vidya; Miyamoto, Makiko; Chiang, Chen Yu; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O; Sessle, Barry J; Coderre, Terence J

    2013-05-01

    Pregabalin is effective in treating many neuropathic pain conditions. However, the mechanisms of its analgesic effects remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to determine whether pregabalin suppresses facial mechanical hypersensitivity and evoked glutamate release in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH) in a rodent model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Nociceptive mechanical sensitivity was assessed pre-operatively, and then post-operatively 1h following pregabalin or vehicle (saline) treatment on post-operative days 2 and 5 following infraorbital nerve transection (IONX). In addition, an in vivo microdialysis probe was inserted into the exposed medulla post-operatively and dialysate samples were collected. Glutamate release was then evoked by mustard oil (MO) application to the tooth pulp, and the effects of pregabalin or vehicle were examined on the MDH glutamate release. Glutamate concentrations in the dialysated samples were determined by HPLC, and data analyzed by ANOVA. IONX animals (but not control animals) showed facial mechanical hypersensitivity for several days post-operatively. In addition, tooth pulp stimulation with MO evoked a transient release of glutamate in the MDH of IONX animals. Compared to vehicle, administration of pregabalin significantly attenuated the facial mechanical hypersensitivity as well as the MO-evoked glutamate release in MDH. This study provides evidence in support of recent findings pointing to the usefulness of pregabalin in the treatment of orofacial neuropathic pain. PMID:23454190

  17. Effectiveness of pregabalin for the treatment of chronic low back pain with accompanying lower limb pain (neuropathic component): a non-interventional study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Toshihiko; Igarashi, Ataru; Watt, Stephen; Parsons, Bruce; Sadosky, Alesia; Nozawa, Kazutaka; Hayakawa, Kazuhiro; Yoshiyama, Tamotsu; Ebata, Nozomi; Fujii, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of pregabalin on sleep, pain, function, and health status in patients with chronic low back pain with accompanying neuropathic pain (CLBP-NeP) under routine clinical practice. Methods This prospective, non-interventional, observational study enrolled Japanese adults (≥18 years) with CLBP-NeP of duration ≥3 months and severity ≥5 on a numerical rating scale (0= no pain, 10= worst possible pain). Treatment was 8 weeks with pregabalin (n=157) or usual care alone (n=174); choice of treatment was determined by the physician. The primary efficacy outcome was change from baseline to 8 weeks in pain-related interference with sleep, assessed using the Pain-Related Sleep Interference Scale (PRSIS; 0= did not interfere with sleep, 10= completely interferes with sleep). Secondary endpoints were changes in PRSIS at week 4, and changes at weeks 4 and 8 in pain (numerical rating scale), function (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire), and quality of life (EuroQol 5D-5L); global assessments of change were evaluated from the clinician and patient perspectives at the final visit. Results Demographic characteristics were similar between cohorts, but clinical characteristics suggested greater disease severity in the pregabalin group including a higher mean (standard deviation) pain score, 6.3 (1.2) versus 5.8 (1.1) (P<0.001). For the primary endpoint, pregabalin resulted in significantly greater improvements in PRSIS at week 8, least-squares mean changes of −1.3 versus −0.4 for usual care (P<0.001); pregabalin also resulted in greater PRSIS improvement at week 4 (P=0.012). Relative to usual care at week 8, pregabalin improved pain and function (both P<0.001), and showed global improvements since beginning study medication (P<0.001). Pregabalin was well tolerated. Conclusion In clinical practice in patients with CLBP-NeP, pregabalin showed significantly greater improvements in pain-related interference with sleep relative to usual care. In

  18. Pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury: an exploratory analysis of pregabalin clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Sadosky, Alesia; Parsons, Bruce; Emir, Birol; Nieshoff, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterizing relationships between pain relief and function can inform patient management decisions. This analysis explored graphically the relationship between pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury in two clinical trials of pregabalin. Methods This was a post hoc analysis of two randomized, double-blind, clinical trials in patients who were treated with pregabalin (n=181) or placebo (n=172) for neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury. The bivariate relationship between percent pain relief and absolute change in the functional outcomes with placebo and pregabalin was evaluated graphically using scatter plots, and loess curves illustrated the extent of the relationship between pain and function. Linear trend analysis evaluated the statistical significance of these relationships using Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT)-based thresholds of pain reduction (<15%, 15% <30%, 30% to <50%, and ≥50%). Outcome measures included modified Brief Pain Inventory pain interference with function in one of the studies and the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (an 11-point Numeric Rating Scale) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for the pooled studies. Results Data ellipses showed a shift with pregabalin relative to placebo toward greater improvement with increasing pain relief for all outcome measures except HADS. Loess curves suggested a relationship between increased pain relief and improved function except for HADS, with the clearest relationship observed for sleep. Linear trend analysis showed significant relationships between pain and Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (P<0.0001) and between pain and function on the modified Brief Pain Inventory Interference Index and most individual items (P<0.05). Conclusion Greater functional improvements were generally achieved at higher levels of clinically significant pain

  19. Analgesic effectiveness and tolerability of oral oxycodone/naloxone and pregabalin in patients with lung cancer and neuropathic pain: an observational analysis

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Stefano; Borghesi, Cristina; Ricciardi, Serena; Giovannoni, Daniele; Fulvi, Alberto; Migliorino, Maria Rita; Marcassa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer-related pain has a severe negative impact on quality of life. Combination analgesic therapy with oxycodone and pregabalin is effective for treating neuropathic cancer pain. We investigated the efficacy and tolerability of a dose-escalation combination therapy with prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone (OXN-PR) and pregabalin in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and severe neuropathic pain. Methods This was a 4-week, open-label, observational study. Patients were treated with OXN-PR and pregabalin. Average pain intensity ([API] measured on a 0–10 numerical rating scale) and neuropathic pain (Douleur Neuropathique 4) were assessed at study entry and at follow-up visits. The primary endpoint was response to treatment, defined as a reduction of API at T28 ≥30% from baseline. Secondary endpoints included other efficacy measures, as well as patient satisfaction and quality of life (Brief Pain Inventory Short Form), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Symptom Distress Scale; bowel function was also assessed. Results A total of 56 patients were enrolled. API at baseline was 8.0±0.9, and decreased after 4 weeks by 48% (4.2±1.9; P<0.0001 vs baseline); 46 (82.1%) patients responded to treatment. Significant improvements were also reported in number/severity of breakthrough cancer pain episodes (P=0.001), Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (P=0.0002), Symptom Distress Scale (P<0.0001), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression (P=0.0006) and anxiety (P<0.0001) subscales, and bowel function (P=0.0003). At study end, 37 (66.0%) patients were satisfied/very satisfied with the new analgesic treatment. Combination therapy had a good safety profile. Conclusion OXN-PR and pregabalin were safe and highly effective in a real-world setting of severe neuropathic cancer pain, with a high rate of satisfaction, without interference on bowel function. PMID:27445495

  20. Cost-Effectiveness of Capsaicin 8% Patch Compared with Pregabalin for the Treatment of Patients with Peripheral Neuropathic Pain in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Mankowski, Colette; Patel, Sachin; Trueman, David; Bentley, Anthony; Poole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of capsaicin 8% patch (QUTENZA™) versus pregabalin in patients with PNP from the perspective of the National Health Service (NHS) and Personal and Social Services in Scotland, UK. A decision-tree cost-effectiveness model was developed for non-diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP) who were pregabalin-naïve and had not achieved adequate pain relief or tolerated conventional first- or second-line treatments. Patients entering the model received either a single application of capsaicin 8% patch or titrated daily dosing with pregabalin; after 8 weeks patients were classified as responders, non-responders, or were assumed to discontinue treatment due to intolerable adverse events. Responders continued to receive baseline treatment at intervals observed in clinical practice. Non-responders and those who discontinued treatment were assumed to receive last-line therapy (duloxetine). The base-case time horizon was 2 years. Model inputs for effectiveness, discontinuations and health-state utilities were taken from a head-to-head non-inferiority study (ELEVATE, NCT01713426). Other inputs were obtained from published sources or clinical expert opinion. Costs were expressed in GBP 2013/14. Results were presented as incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER), i.e. cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Model assumptions were tested with scenario analyses. Parameter uncertainty was tested using one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Compared with dose-optimized pregabalin, capsaicin 8% patch was the dominant treatment strategy (total cost difference, -£11; total QALY gain, 0.049). Capsaicin 8% patch was also the dominant treatment strategy versus pregabalin in 6 out of 7 scenario analyses. The model was most sensitive to variation in time to capsaicin 8% patch retreatment (maximum ICER, £7,951/QALY at lower-bound 95% confidence interval). At a willingness-to-pay threshold of £20,000/QALY, the

  1. Cost-Effectiveness of Capsaicin 8% Patch Compared with Pregabalin for the Treatment of Patients with Peripheral Neuropathic Pain in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Mankowski, Colette; Patel, Sachin; Trueman, David; Bentley, Anthony; Poole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of capsaicin 8% patch (QUTENZA™) versus pregabalin in patients with PNP from the perspective of the National Health Service (NHS) and Personal and Social Services in Scotland, UK. A decision-tree cost-effectiveness model was developed for non-diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP) who were pregabalin-naïve and had not achieved adequate pain relief or tolerated conventional first- or second-line treatments. Patients entering the model received either a single application of capsaicin 8% patch or titrated daily dosing with pregabalin; after 8 weeks patients were classified as responders, non-responders, or were assumed to discontinue treatment due to intolerable adverse events. Responders continued to receive baseline treatment at intervals observed in clinical practice. Non-responders and those who discontinued treatment were assumed to receive last-line therapy (duloxetine). The base-case time horizon was 2 years. Model inputs for effectiveness, discontinuations and health-state utilities were taken from a head-to-head non-inferiority study (ELEVATE, NCT01713426). Other inputs were obtained from published sources or clinical expert opinion. Costs were expressed in GBP 2013/14. Results were presented as incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER), i.e. cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Model assumptions were tested with scenario analyses. Parameter uncertainty was tested using one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Compared with dose-optimized pregabalin, capsaicin 8% patch was the dominant treatment strategy (total cost difference, –£11; total QALY gain, 0.049). Capsaicin 8% patch was also the dominant treatment strategy versus pregabalin in 6 out of 7 scenario analyses. The model was most sensitive to variation in time to capsaicin 8% patch retreatment (maximum ICER, £7,951/QALY at lower-bound 95% confidence interval). At a willingness-to-pay threshold of £20,000/QALY, the

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis of pregabalin for treatment of chronic low back pain in patients with accompanying lower limb pain (neuropathic component) in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Ataru; Akazawa, Manabu; Murata, Tatsunori; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Sadosky, Alesia; Ebata, Nozomi; Willke, Richard; Fujii, Koichi; Doherty, Jim; Kobayashi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of pregabalin for the treatment of chronic low back pain with accompanying neuropathic pain (CLBP-NeP) from the health care payer and societal perspectives. Methods The cost-effectiveness of pregabalin versus usual care for treatment of CLBP-NeP was evaluated over a 12-month time horizon using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), derived from the five-dimension, five-level EuroQol (EQ-5D-5L) questionnaire, was the measure of effectiveness. Medical costs and productivity losses were both calculated. Expected costs and outcomes were estimated via cohort simulation using a state-transition model, which mimics pain state transitions among mild, moderate, and severe pain. Distributions of pain severity were obtained from an 8-week noninterventional study. Health care resource consumption for estimation of direct medical costs for pain severity levels was derived from a physician survey. The ICER per additional QALY gained was calculated and sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate the robustness of the assumptions across a range of values. Results Direct medical costs and hospitalization costs were both lower in the pregabalin arm compared with usual care. The estimated ICERs in the base case scenarios were approximately ¥2,025,000 and ¥1,435,000 per QALY gained with pregabalin from the payer and societal perspectives, respectively; the latter included indirect costs related to lost productivity. Sensitivity analyses using alternate values for postsurgical pain scores (0 and 5), initial pain severity levels (either all moderate or all severe), and the actual EQ-5D-5L scores from the noninterventional study showed robustness of results, with ICERs that were similar to the base case. Development of a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve showed high probability (≥75%) of pregabalin being cost-effective. Conclusion Using data and assumptions from routine clinical

  3. Clinically relevant concentration of pregabalin has no acute inhibitory effect on excitation of dorsal horn neurons under normal or neuropathic pain conditions: An intracellular calcium-imaging study in spinal cord slices from adult rats.

    PubMed

    Baba, Hiroshi; Petrenko, Andrey B; Fujiwara, Naoshi

    2016-10-01

    Pregabalin is thought to exert its therapeutic effect in neuropathic pain via binding to α2δ-1 subunits of voltage-gated calcium (Ca(2+)) channels. However, the exact analgesic mechanism after its binding to α2δ-1 subunits remains largely unknown. Whether a clinical concentration of pregabalin (≈10μM) can cause acute inhibition of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is controversial. To address this issue, we undertook intracellular Ca(2+)-imaging studies using spinal cord slices with an intact attached L5 dorsal root, and examined if pregabalin acutely inhibits the primary afferent stimulation-evoked excitation of dorsal horn neurons in normal rats and in rats with streptozotocin-induced painful diabetic neuropathy. Under normal conditions, stimulation of a dorsal root evoked Ca(2+) signals predominantly in the superficial dorsal horn. Clinically relevant (10μM) and a very high concentration of pregabalin (100μM) did not affect the intensity or spread of dorsal root stimulation-evoked Ca(2+) signals, whereas an extremely high dose of pregabalin (300μM) slightly but significantly attenuated Ca(2+) signals in normal rats and in diabetic neuropathic (DN) rats. There was no difference between normal rats and DN rats with regard to the extent of signal attenuation at all concentrations tested. These results suggest that the activity of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is not inhibited acutely by clinical doses of pregabalin under normal or DN conditions. It is very unlikely that an acute inhibitory action in the dorsal horn is the main analgesic mechanism of pregabalin in neuropathic pain states. PMID:27543338

  4. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial and open-label extension study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin in the treatment of neuropathic pain associated with human immunodeficiency virus neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Simpson, David M; Rice, Andrew S C; Emir, Birol; Landen, Jaren; Semel, David; Chew, Marci L; Sporn, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    The objective of these studies was to assess the efficacy and safety of pregabalin in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neuropathic pain. Patients with HIV-associated distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP) were randomized to treatment with flexible-dose pregabalin (150-600 mg/day) or placebo for 17 weeks in a single-blind, placebo lead-in, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled multinational trial. The primary efficacy outcome was the change in mean pain score on an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS) from baseline to study endpoint. Participants who completed this trial were invited to participate in a 6-month open-label extension study with pregabalin. Of the 377 patients enrolled in the randomized controlled trial (pregabalin, n=183; placebo, n=194), 68.4% completed treatment. In the open-label extension, 217 patients were treated and 59.4% completed treatment. Both studies were terminated by the sponsor after a preplanned interim analysis indicated trial futility. At endpoint, the change from baseline in least-squares mean NRS pain scores in the intent-to-treat population was -2.04 for pregabalin versus -2.11 for placebo (P=.709). There were no significant differences between the pregabalin and placebo groups in the secondary efficacy measures. Incidence of adverse events was lower than seen in previous pregabalin studies. Overall, this trial did not show pregabalin to be more efficacious than placebo in treating HIV-associated DSP. Studies such as these, which fail to support their primary hypotheses, may be important in informing the methodology of future trials, especially when novel approaches to limit variability in the control group are included. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT01049217 and NCT01145417. PMID:24907403

  5. Managing Neuropathic Pain in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of the somatosensory system such as neuropathic pain are common in people with chronic neurologic and musculoskeletal diseases, yet these conditions remain an underappreciated morbidity in veterinary patients. This is likely because assessment of neuropathic pain in people relies heavily on self-reporting, something our veterinary patients are not able to do. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex phenomenon, and concepts related to it are frequently not addressed in the standard veterinary medical curriculum such that veterinarians may not recognize this as a potential problem in patients. The goals of this review are to discuss basic concepts in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, provide definitions for common clinical terms used in association with the condition, and discuss pharmacological treatment options for dogs with neuropathic pain. The development of neuropathic pain involves key mechanisms such as ectopic afferent nerve activity, peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, impaired inhibitory modulation, and pathologic activation of microglia. Treatments aimed at reducing neuropathic pain are targeted at one or more of these mechanisms. Several drugs are commonly used in the veterinary clinical setting to treat neuropathic pain. These include gabapentin, pregabalin, amantadine, and amitriptyline. Proposed mechanisms of action for each drug, and known pharmacokinetic profiles in dogs are discussed. Strong evidence exists in the human literature for the utility of most of these treatments, but clinical veterinary-specific literature is currently limited. Future studies should focus on objective methods to document neuropathic pain and monitor response to therapy in veterinary patients. PMID:26942185

  6. Pregabalin for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boomershine, Chad S

    2010-01-01

    This last article in a three-part series on approved medications for managing fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) reviews pregabalin (Lyrica®). Pregabalin was the first drug approved for FMS management and, as an anticonvulsant, differs from the other approved agents that are antidepressants. Pregabalin inhibits presynaptic excitatory neurotransmitter release by blocking α2δ calcium channels. Five randomized, placebo-controlled trials have demonstrated pregabalin reduces pain and improves sleep and health-related quality of life in FMS patients. While indicated dosing is 300–450 mg divided twice daily, initial dosing of 25–50 mg at night is recommended owing to side effects including somnolence, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction. Since side effects such as weight gain and peripheral edema are dose-related, uptitration in weekly increments based on tolerability and therapeutic response is recommended. Due to its lack of protein binding and negligible hepatic metabolism, pregabalin can be safely combined with other medications and used in patients with renal failure when the dose is appropriate. Pregabalin may worsen sedation when combined with central nervous system depressants. Pregabalin should be discontinued gradually. Pregabalin-treated patients should be monitored for the emergence or worsening of depression, suicidal thoughts or behavior. Pregabalin in combination with the other approved medications may be synergistic in treating FMS. PMID:21197312

  7. Pregabalin for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boomershine, Chad S

    2010-01-01

    This last article in a three-part series on approved medications for managing fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) reviews pregabalin (Lyrica(®)). Pregabalin was the first drug approved for FMS management and, as an anticonvulsant, differs from the other approved agents that are antidepressants. Pregabalin inhibits presynaptic excitatory neurotransmitter release by blocking α(2)δ calcium channels. Five randomized, placebo-controlled trials have demonstrated pregabalin reduces pain and improves sleep and health-related quality of life in FMS patients. While indicated dosing is 300-450 mg divided twice daily, initial dosing of 25-50 mg at night is recommended owing to side effects including somnolence, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction. Since side effects such as weight gain and peripheral edema are dose-related, uptitration in weekly increments based on tolerability and therapeutic response is recommended. Due to its lack of protein binding and negligible hepatic metabolism, pregabalin can be safely combined with other medications and used in patients with renal failure when the dose is appropriate. Pregabalin may worsen sedation when combined with central nervous system depressants. Pregabalin should be discontinued gradually. Pregabalin-treated patients should be monitored for the emergence or worsening of depression, suicidal thoughts or behavior. Pregabalin in combination with the other approved medications may be synergistic in treating FMS. PMID:21197312

  8. Pregabalin for acute and chronic pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Straube, Sebastian; Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiepileptic drugs have been used in pain management since the 1960s. Pregabalin is a recently developed antiepileptic drug also used in management of chronic neuropathic pain conditions. Objectives To assess analgesic efficacy and associated adverse events of pregabalin in acute and chronic pain. Search methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL to May 2009 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Additional studies were identified from the reference lists of retrieved papers and on-line clinical trial databases. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind trials reporting on the analgesic effect of pregabalin, with subjective pain assessment by the patient as either the primary or a secondary outcome. Data collection and analysis Two independent review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality. Numbers-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNTs) were calculated, where possible, from dichotomous data for effectiveness, adverse events and study withdrawals. Main results There was no clear evidence of beneficial effects of pregabalin in established acute postoperative pain. No studies evaluated pregabalin in chronic nociceptive pain, like arthritis. Pregabalin at doses of 300 mg, 450 mg, and 600 mg daily was effective in patients with postherpetic neuralgia, painful diabetic neuropathy, central neuropathic pain, and fibromyalgia (19 studies, 7003 participants). Pregabalin at 150 mg daily was generally ineffective. Efficacy was demonstrated for dichotomous outcomes equating to moderate or substantial pain relief, alongside lower rates for lack of efficacy discontinuations with increasing dose. The best (lowest) NNT for each condition for at least 50% pain relief over baseline (substantial benefit) for 600 mg pregabalin daily compared with placebo were 3.9 (95% confidence interval 3.1 to 5.1) for postherpetic neuralgia, 5.0 (4.0 to 6.6) for painful diabetic neuropathy, 5.6 (3.5 to 14) for central neuropathic pain, and 11 (7.1 to 21) for fibromyalgia

  9. Five Patients With Burning Mouth Syndrome in Whom an Antidepressant (Serotonin-Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitor) Was Not Effective, but Pregabalin Markedly Relieved Pain.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mikiko; Tokura, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Keizo; Nagashima, Wataru; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Umemura, Eri; Tachibana, Masako; Miyauchi, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Yuka; Arao, Munetaka; Ozaki, Norio; Kurita, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) causes idiopathic pain or a burning sensation in clinically normal oral mucosa. Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic disease with an unknown etiology. Burning mouth syndrome is also idiopathic, and a consensus regarding diagnosis/treatment has not been reached yet. Recent studies have supported the suggestion that BMS is a neuropathic pain disorder in which both the peripheral and central nervous systems are involved. Tricyclic antidepressants (nortriptyline and amitriptyline), serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (duloxetine and milnacipran), and antiepileptic drugs, potential-dependent calcium channel α2δ subunit ligands (gabapentine and pregabalin), are currently recommended as the first-choice drugs for neuropathic pain. In this study, we report 5 patients with BMS in whom there was no response to SNRI (milnacipran or duloxetine), or administration was discontinued because of adverse reactions, but in whom pregabalin therapy markedly reduced or led to the disappearance of pain in a short period. Pregabalin, whose mechanism of action differs from that of SNRIs, may become a treatment option for BMS patients who are not responsive to or are resistant to SNRIs. PMID:26166242

  10. Gabapentin and pregabalin for the treatment of chronic pruritus.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazuki M; Sharma, Divya; Schonfeld, Ariel R; Kwatra, Shawn G

    2016-09-01

    Chronic pruritus is a distressing symptom that is often refractory to treatment. Patients frequently fail topical therapies and oral over-the-counter antihistamines, prompting the clinician to consider alternative therapies such as neuroactive agents. Herein, the use of gabapentin and pregabalin, 2 medications well known for treating neuropathic pain and epilepsy that are occasionally used for relieving chronic pruritus is explored. The findings from original sources published to date to evaluate the use of gabapentin and pregabalin as antipruritic agents are explored. They are found to be promising alternative treatments for the relief of several forms of chronic pruritus, particularly uremic pruritus and neuropathic or neurogenic itch, in patients who fail conservative therapies. PMID:27206757

  11. Advances in the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Zhang, Yuguan; Huang, Yuguang

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is pain that arises as a direct consequence of a lesion or diseases affecting the somatosensory system. Treatments for neuropathic pain include pharmacological, nonpharmacological, and interventional therapies. Currently recommended first-line pharmacological treatments include antidepressants and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and pregabalin). However, in some cases, pharmacological therapy alone fails to give adequate control of the chronic pain. New techniques have been invented and have been proved effective on neuropathic pain, such as behavioral, cognitive, integrative, and physical therapies. In this review, we focused on the advances in the treatment of central neuropathic pain, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, and cancer pain. PMID:26900067

  12. Pharmacological kynurenine 3-monooxygenase enzyme inhibition significantly reduces neuropathic pain in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Piotrowska, Anna; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the involvement of the kynurenine pathway in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases, but the role of this system in neuropathic pain requires further extensive research. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the role of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (Kmo), an enzyme that is important in this pathway, in a rat model of neuropathy after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. For the first time, we demonstrated that the injury-induced increase in the Kmo mRNA levels in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was reduced by chronic administration of the microglial inhibitor minocycline and that this effect paralleled a decrease in the intensity of neuropathy. Further, minocycline administration alleviated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of Kmo mRNA expression in microglial cell cultures. Moreover, we demonstrated that not only indirect inhibition of Kmo using minocycline but also direct inhibition using Kmo inhibitors (Ro61-6048 and JM6) decreased neuropathic pain intensity on the third and the seventh days after CCI. Chronic Ro61-6048 administration diminished the protein levels of IBA-1, IL-6, IL-1beta and NOS2 in the spinal cord and/or the DRG. Both Kmo inhibitors potentiated the analgesic properties of morphine. In summary, our data suggest that in neuropathic pain model, inhibiting Kmo function significantly reduces pain symptoms and enhances the effectiveness of morphine. The results of our studies show that the kynurenine pathway is an important mediator of neuropathic pain pathology and indicate that Kmo represents a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of neuropathy. PMID:26524415

  13. Process and formulation variables of pregabalin microspheres prepared by w/o/o double emulsion solvent diffusion method and their clinical application by animal modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Ebru; Comoglu, Tansel; Pehlivanoglu, Bilge; Dogan, Murat; Comoglu, Selcuk; Dogan, Aysegul; Basci, Nursabah

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant drug used for neuropathic pain and as an adjunct therapy for partial seizures with or without secondary generalization in adults. In conventional therapy recommended dose for pregabalin is 75 mg twice daily or 50 mg three times a day, with maximum dosage of 600 mg/d. To achieve maximum therapeutic effect with a low risk of adverse effects and to reduce often drug dosing, modified release preparations; such as microspheres might be helpful. However, most of the microencapsulation techniques have been used for lipophilic drugs, since hydrophilic drugs like pregabalin, showed low-loading efficiency and rapid dissolution of compounds into the aqueous continous phase. The purpose of this study was to improve loading efficiency of a water-soluble drug and modulate release profiles, and to test the efficiency of the prepared microspheres with the help of animal modeling studies. Pregabalin is a water soluble drug, and it was encapsulated within anionic acrylic resin (Eudragit S 100) microspheres by water in oil in oil (w/o/o) double emulsion solvent diffusion method. Dichloromethane and corn oil were chosen primary and secondary oil phases, respectively. The presence of internal water phase was necessary to form stable emulsion droplets and it accelerated the hardening of microspheres. Tween 80 and Span 80 were used as surfactants to stabilize the water and corn oil phases, respectively. The optimum concentration of Tween 80 was 0.25% (v/v) and Span 80 was 0.02% (v/v). The volume of the continous phase was affected the size of the microspheres. As the volume of the continous phase increased, the size of microspheres decreased. All microsphere formulations were evaluated with the help of in vitro characterization parameters. Microsphere formulations (P1-P5) exhibited entrapment efficiency ranged between 57.00 ± 0.72 and 69.70 ± 0.49%; yield ranged between 80.95 ± 1.21 and 93.05 ± 1.42%; and mean particle size were

  14. Pioglitazone rapidly reduces neuropathic pain through astrocyte and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Ryan B.; Donahue, Renee R.; Morgenweck, Jenny; Grace, Peter M.; Sutton, Amanda; Watkins, Linda R.; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated administration of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists reduces neuropathic pain-like behavior and associated changes in glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. As PPARγ is a nuclear receptor, sustained changes in gene expression are widely believed to be the mechanism of pain reduction. However, we recently reported that a single intrathecal injection of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, reduced hyperalgesia within 30 minutes, a time frame that is typically less than that required for genomic mechanisms. To determine the very rapid anti-hyperalgesic actions of PPARγ activation we administered pioglitazone to rats with spared nerve injury (SNI) and evaluated hyperalgesia. Pioglitazone inhibited hyperalgesia within 5 min of injection, consistent with a non-genomic mechanism. Systemic or intrathecal administration of GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist, inhibited the anti-hyperalgesic actions of intraperitoneal or intrathecal pioglitazone, suggesting a spinal PPARγ-dependent mechanism. To further address the contribution of non-genomic mechanisms, we blocked new protein synthesis in the spinal cord with anisomycin. When co-administered intrathecally, anisomycin did not change pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia at an early 7.5 min timepoint, further supporting a rapid non-genomic mechanism. At later timepoints anisomycin reduced pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia, suggesting a delayed recruitment of genomic mechanisms. Pioglitazone reduction of SNI-induced increases in GFAP expression occurred more rapidly than expected, within 60 min. We are the first to show that activation of spinal PPARγ rapidly reduces neuropathic pain independent from canonical genomic activity. We conclude that acute pioglitazone inhibits neuropathic pain in part by reducing astrocyte activation, and via both genomic and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms. PMID:25599238

  15. Postoperative respiratory depression associated with pregabalin: A case series and a preoperative decision algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Eipe, Naveen; Penning, John

    2011-01-01

    Pregabalin is gaining popularity in the perioperative period for its usefulness in treating neuropathic pain and its apparent opioid-sparing effect. The present report describes the perioperative course of three patients who received pregabalin and experienced significant respiratory depression in the postoperative period. All three patients consented to the report and publication of the present case series. The first patient was elderly with borderline renal dysfunction. She experienced respiratory arrest in the immediate postoperative period following a craniotomy for tumour excision. The second patient presented with severe respiratory depression 12 h after receiving a spinal anesthetic for joint replacement, and was later found to have clinically significant obstructive sleep apnea. The third patient, who was an otherwise healthy elderly individual on benzodiazepines for anxiety, experienced respiratory arrest in the postanesthesia care unit after an uneventful anesthesia for lumbar spine decompression. All of these patients were treated successfully with standard resuscitation measures. Although other causes of respiratory depression in these patients were considered, there appears to be an association between pregabalin and this complication. The present article briefly reviews the evidence regarding the perioperative use of pregabalin. Based on the authors’ experience and the available evidence, they believe that pregabalin may be useful in the management of acute pain in carefully selected patients undergoing certain surgeries. A clinical algorithm has been developed to guide the perioperative use of pregabalin. This algorithm may be helpful in increasing the safety of perioperative pregabalin use. PMID:22059207

  16. Frutalin reduces acute and neuropathic nociceptive behaviours in rodent models of orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Marina B M V; de Melo Júnior, José de Maria A; Santos, Sacha Aubrey A R; Melo, Luana T M; Leite, Laura Hévila I; Vieira-Neto, Antonio E; Moreira, Renato de A; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina de O; Campos, Adriana R

    2016-08-25

    Orofacial pain is a highly prevalent clinical condition, yet difficult to control effectively with available drugs. Much attention is currently focused on the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties of lectins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of frutalin (FTL) using rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic orofacial pain. Acute pain was induced by formalin, glutamate or capsaicin (orofacial model) and hypertonic saline (corneal model). In one experiment, animals were pretreated with l-NAME and naloxone to investigate the mechanism of antinociception. The involvement of the lectin domain in the antinociceptive effect of FTL was verified by allowing the lectin to bind to its specific ligand. In another experiment, animals pretreated with FTL or saline were submitted to the temporomandibular joint formalin test. In yet another, animals were submitted to infraorbital nerve transection to induce chronic pain, followed by induction of thermal hypersensitivity using acetone. Motor activity was evaluated with the rotarod test. A molecular docking was performed using the TRPV1 channel. Pretreatment with FTL significantly reduced nociceptive behaviour associated with acute and neuropathic pain, especially at 0.5 mg/kg. Antinociception was effectively inhibited by l-NAME and d-galactose. In line with in vivo experiments, docking studies indicated that FTL may interact with TRPV1. Our results confirm the potential pharmacological relevance of FTL as an inhibitor of orofacial nociception in acute and chronic pain mediated by TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPM8 receptor. PMID:27302204

  17. The nitroxyl donor, Angeli's salt, reduces chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Longhi-Balbinot, Daniela T; Rossaneis, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Bertozzi, Mariana M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Alves-Filho, José C; Cunha, Thiago M; Peron, Jean P S; Miranda, Katrina M; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2016-08-25

    Chronic pain is a major health problem worldwide. We have recently demonstrated the analgesic effect of the nitroxyl donor, Angeli's salt (AS) in models of inflammatory pain. In the present study, the acute and chronic analgesic effects of AS was investigated in chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain in mice. Acute (7th day after CCI) AS treatment (1 and 3 mg/kg; s.c.) reduced CCI-induced mechanical, but not thermal hyperalgesia. The acute analgesic effect of AS was prevented by treatment with 1H-[1,2, 4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor), KT5823 (an inhibitor of protein kinase G [PKG]) or glibenclamide (GLB, an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker). Chronic (7-14 days after CCI) treatment with AS (3 mg/kg, s.c.) promoted a sustained reduction of CCI-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Acute AS treatment reduced CCI-induced spinal cord allograft inflammatory factor 1 (known as Iba-1), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and ST2 receptor mRNA expression. Chronic AS treatment reduced CCI-induced spinal cord glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Iba-1, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-33 (IL-33) and ST2 mRNA expression. Chronic treatment with AS (3 mg/kg, s.c.) did not alter aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, urea or creatinine plasma levels. Together, these results suggest that the acute analgesic effect of AS depends on activating the cGMP/PKG/ATP-sensitive potassium channel signaling pathway. Moreover, chronic AS diminishes CCI-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia by reducing the activation of spinal cord microglia and astrocytes, decreasing TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-33 cytokines expression. This spinal cord immune modulation was more prominent in the chronic treatment with AS. Thus, nitroxyl limits CCI-induced neuropathic pain by reducing spinal cord glial cells activation. PMID:27287419

  18. Neuropathic itch.

    PubMed

    Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2011-06-01

    Chronic itch can be caused by dysfunctions of itch-sensing neurons that produce sensory hallucinations of pruritogenic stimuli. The cellular and molecular mechanisms are still unknown. All neurological disease categories have been implicated, and neurological causes should be considered for patients with otherwise-unexplained itch. The same neurological illnesses that cause neuropathic pain can also or instead cause itch. These include shingles (particularly of the head or neck), small-fiber polyneuropathies, radiculopathies (eg, notalgia paresthetica and brachioradial pruritis), and diverse lesions of the trigeminal nerve, root, and central tracts. Central nervous system lesions affecting sensory pathways, including strokes, multiple sclerosis, and cavernous hemangiomas, can cause central itch. Neuropathic itch is a potent trigger of reflex and volitional scratching although this provides only fleeting relief. Rare patients whose lesion causes sensory loss as well as neuropathic itch can scratch deeply enough to cause painless self-injury. The most common location is on the face (trigeminal trophic syndrome). Treating neuropathic itch is difficult; antihistamines, corticosteroids, and most pain medications are largely ineffective. Current treatment recommendations include local or systemic administration of inhibitors of neuronal excitability (especially local anesthetics) and barriers to reduce scratching. PMID:21767768

  19. Neuropathic Itch

    PubMed Central

    Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2011-01-01

    Chronic itch can be caused by dysfunctions of itch-sensing neurons that produce sensory hallucinations of pruritogenic stimuli. The cellular and molecular mechanisms are still unknown. All neurological disease categories have been implicated and neurological causes should be considered for patients with otherwise-unexplained itch. The same neurological illnesses that cause neuropathic pain can also or instead cause itch. These include shingles (particularly of the head or neck), small-fiber polyneuropathies, radiculopathies (e.g., notalgia paresthetica and brachioradial pruritis) and diverse lesions of the trigeminal nerve, root, and central tracts. Central nervous system lesions affecting sensory pathways, including strokes, multiple sclerosis, and cavernous hemangiomas can cause central itch. Neuropathic itch is a potent trigger of reflex and volitional scratching although this provides only fleeting relief. Rare patients whose lesion causes sensory loss as well as neuropathic itch can scratch deeply enough to cause painless self-injury. The most common location is on the face (trigeminal trophic syndrome). Treating neuropathic itch is difficult; antihistamines, corticosteroids, and most pain medications are largely ineffective. Current treatment recommendations include local or systemic administration of inhibitors of neuronal excitability (especially local anesthetics) and barriers to reduce scratching. PMID:21767768

  20. The selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist E-52862 attenuates neuropathic pain of different aetiology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gris, Georgia; Portillo-Salido, Enrique; Aubel, Bertrand; Darbaky, Yassine; Deseure, Kristof; Vela, José Miguel; Merlos, Manuel; Zamanillo, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    E-52862 is a selective σ1R antagonist currently undergoing phase II clinical trials for neuropathic pain and represents a potential first-in-class analgesic. Here, we investigated the effect of single and repeated administration of E-52862 on different pain-related behaviours in several neuropathic pain models in rats: mechanical allodynia in cephalic (trigeminal) neuropathic pain following chronic constriction injury of the infraorbital nerve (IoN), mechanical hyperalgesia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic polyneuropathy, and cold allodynia in oxaliplatin (OX)-induced polyneuropathy. Mechanical hypersensitivity induced after IoN surgery or STZ administration was reduced by acute treatment with E-52862 and morphine, but not by pregabalin. In the OX model, single administration of E-52862 reversed the hypersensitivity to cold stimuli similarly to 100 mg/kg of gabapentin. Interestingly, repeated E-52862 administration twice daily over 7 days did not induce pharmacodynamic tolerance but an increased antinociceptive effect in all three models. Additionally, as shown in the STZ and OX models, repeated daily treatment with E-52862 attenuated baseline pain behaviours, which supports a sustained modifying effect on underlying pain-generating mechanisms. These preclinical findings support a role for σ1R in neuropathic pain and extend the potential for the use of selective σ1R antagonists (e.g., E-52862) to the chronic treatment of cephalic and extra-cephalic neuropathic pain. PMID:27087602

  1. Reduced basal ganglia μ-opioid receptor availability in trigeminal neuropathic pain: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although neuroimaging techniques have provided insights into the function of brain regions involved in Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain (TNP) in humans, there is little understanding of the molecular mechanisms affected during the course of this disorder. Understanding these processes is crucial to determine the systems involved in the development and persistence of TNP. Findings In this study, we examined the regional μ-opioid receptor (μOR) availability in vivo (non-displaceable binding potential BPND) of TNP patients with positron emission tomography (PET) using the μOR selective radioligand [11C]carfentanil. Four TNP patients and eight gender and age-matched healthy controls were examined with PET. Patients with TNP showed reduced μOR BPND in the left nucleus accumbens (NAc), an area known to be involved in pain modulation and reward/aversive behaviors. In addition, the μOR BPND in the NAc was negatively correlated with the McGill sensory and total pain ratings in the TNP patients. Conclusions Our findings give preliminary evidence that the clinical pain in TNP patients can be related to alterations in the endogenous μ-opioid system, rather than only to the peripheral pathology. The decreased availability of μORs found in TNP patients, and its inverse relationship to clinical pain levels, provide insights into the central mechanisms related to this condition. The results also expand our understanding about the impact of chronic pain on the limbic system. PMID:23006894

  2. The edible brown seaweed Ecklonia cava reduces hypersensitivity in postoperative and neuropathic pain models in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Goo; Lim, Dong Wook; Cho, Suengmok; Han, Daeseok; Kim, Yun Tai

    2014-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate whether edible brown seaweed Ecklonia cava extracts exhibits analgesic effects in plantar incision and spared nerve injury (SNI) rats. To evaluate pain-related behavior, we performed the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal hypersensitivity tests measured by von Frey filaments and a hot/cold plate analgesia meter. Pain-related behavior was also determined through analysis of ultrasonic vocalization. The results of experiments showed MWT values of the group that was treated with E. cava extracts by 300 mg/kg significantly increased; on the contrary, number of ultrasonic distress vocalization of the treated group was reduced at 6 h and 24 h after plantar incision operation (62.8%, p < 0.05). Moreover, E. cava 300 mg/kg treated group increased the paw withdrawal latency in hot-and cold-plate tests in the plantar incision rats. After 15 days of continuous treatment with E. cava extracts at 300 mg/kg, the treated group showed significantly alleviated SNI-induced hypersensitivity response by MWT compared with the control group. In conclusion, these results suggest that E. cava extracts have potential analgesic effects in the case of postoperative pain and neuropathic pain in rats. PMID:24918539

  3. Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Costigan, Michael; Scholz, Joachim; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is triggered by lesions to the somatosensory nervous system that alter its structure and function so that pain occurs spontaneously and responses to noxious and innocuous stimuli are pathologically amplified. The pain is an expression of maladaptive plasticity within the nociceptive system, a series of changes that constitute a neural disease state. Multiple alterations distributed widely across the nervous system contribute to complex pain phenotypes. These alterations include ectopic generation of action potentials, facilitation and disinhibition of synaptic transmission, loss of synaptic connectivity and formation of new synaptic circuits, and neuroimmune interactions. Although neural lesions are necessary, they are not sufficient to generate neuropathic pain; genetic polymorphisms, gender, and age all influence the risk of developing persistent pain. Treatment needs to move from merely suppressing symptoms to a disease-modifying strategy aimed at both preventing maladaptive plasticity and reducing intrinsic risk. PMID:19400724

  4. Forebrain GABAergic neuron precursors integrate into adult spinal cord and reduce injury-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, JM; Sharif-Naeini, R; Vogt, D; Kriegstein, A; Alvarez-Buylla, A; Rubenstein, JL; Basbaum, AI

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by mechanical allodynia and spontaneous pain. Because symptoms are often unresponsive to conventional methods of pain treatment, new therapeutic approaches are essential. Here, we describe a strategy that not only ameliorates symptoms of neuropathic pain, but is also potentially disease modifying. We show that transplantation of immature telencephalic GABAergic interneurons from the mouse medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) into the adult mouse spinal cord completely reverses the mechanical hypersensitivity produced by peripheral nerve injury. Underlying this improvement is a remarkable integration of the MGE transplants into the host spinal cord circuitry, in which the transplanted cells make functional connections with both primary afferent and spinal cord neurons. By contrast, MGE transplants were not effective against inflammatory pain. Our findings suggest that MGE-derived GABAergic interneurons overcome the spinal cord hyperexcitability that is a hallmark of nerve-injury induced neuropathic pain. PMID:22632725

  5. Spinal cord stimulation reduces mechanical hyperalgesia and glial cell activation in animals with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Karina L.; Johanek, Lisa M.; Sanada, Luciana S.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is used to manage chronic intractable neuropathic pain. We examined parameters of SCS in rats with spared nerve injury by modulating frequency (4Hz vs. 60Hz), duration (30m vs. 6h), or intensity (50%, 75%, or 90% MT). To elucidate potential mechanisms modulated by SCS, we examined immunoreactivity glial markers in the spinal cord after SCS). An epidural SCS lead was implanted in the upper lumbar spinal cord. Animals were tested for mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) of the paw before and 2 weeks after SNI, before and after SCS daily for 4 days, and for 9 days after SCS. Seperate groups of animals were tested for glial immunoreactivity after 4 days of 6h SCS. All rats showed a decrease in MWT 2 weeks after nerve injury and an increase in glial activation. For frequency, 4Hz or 60Hz SCS reversed the MWT when compared to sham SCS. For duration, 6h of SCS showed a greater reduction in MWT when compared to 30 min. For intensity, 90% MT was greater than 75% MT and both were greater than 50% MT or sham SCS. SCS decreased glial activation (GFAP, MCP-1 and OX-42) in the spinal cord dorsal horn when compared to sham. In conclusion, 4Hz and 60Hz SCS for a 6h at 90% MT were the most effective parameters for reducing hyperalgesia, suggesting parameters of stimulation are important for effectiveness of SCS. SCS reduced glial activation at the level of the spinal cord suggesting reduction in central excitability. PMID:24361846

  6. Efficacy of Pregabalin in the Treatment of Radicular Pain: Results of a Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Khalid M.; M. Nelson, Ariana; J. Avram, Michael; Lee Robak, Sabrina; T. Benzon, Honorio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregabalin is commonly used to treat patients with various neuropathic pain syndromes. Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of pregabalin in patients with lumbar or cervical radicular pain. Patients and Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind trial was conducted in 39 patients with lumbar and cervical radicular pain, who received 3 weeks of either pregabalin (n = 10) or placebo (n = 9) treatment. Baseline pain and disability were evaluated before the treatment and were re-evaluated, along with overall patient satisfaction, after the 3 weeks of treatment. Results: Data on 19 of the 39 patients recruited were available for analysis. No statistically significant differences in the pain, disability, and patient satisfaction scores were found between the groups. When the individual patient scores were assessed, the placebo treatment was found to be efficacious in 4 of the 9 patients and pregabalin was effective in 2 of the 10 patients, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.350). Conclusions: The present data do not suggest that pregabalin is more efficacious than placebo in the treatment of lumbar and cervical radicular pain. However, the small sample size of this study may have affected the ability to detect such a difference. PMID:26478867

  7. Effect of pregabalin on contextual memory deficits and inflammatory state-related protein expression in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Sałat, Kinga; Gdula-Argasińska, Joanna; Malikowska, Natalia; Podkowa, Adrian; Lipkowska, Anna; Librowski, Tadeusz

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia due to defects in insulin secretion or its action. Complications from long-term diabetes consist of numerous biochemical, molecular, and functional tissue alterations, including inflammation, oxidative stress, and neuropathic pain. There is also a link between diabetes mellitus and vascular dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Hence, it is important to treat diabetic complications using drugs which do not aggravate symptoms induced by the disease itself. Pregabalin is widely used for the treatment of diabetic neuropathic pain, but little is known about its impact on cognition or inflammation-related proteins in diabetic patients. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of intraperitoneal (ip) pregabalin on contextual memory and the expression of inflammatory state-related proteins in the brains of diabetic, streptozotocin (STZ)-treated mice. STZ (200 mg/kg, ip) was used to induce diabetes mellitus. To assess the impact of pregabalin (10 mg/kg) on contextual memory, a passive avoidance task was applied. Locomotor and exploratory activities in pregabalin-treated diabetic mice were assessed by using activity cages. Using Western blot analysis, the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cytosolic prostaglandin E synthase (cPGES), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-ĸB (NF-ĸB) p50 and p65, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), as well as glucose transporter type-4 (GLUT4) was assessed in mouse brains after pregabalin treatment. Pregabalin did not aggravate STZ-induced learning deficits in vivo or influence animals' locomotor activity. We observed significantly lower expression of COX-2, cPGES, and NF-κB p50 subunit, and higher expression of AhR and Nrf2 in the brains of pregabalin-treated mice in comparison to STZ-treated controls, which suggested immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of pregabalin. Antioxidant properties of pregabalin in the brains of

  8. The antiallodynic action of pregabalin may depend on the suppression of spinal neuronal hyperexcitability in rats with spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lei; Cai, Jie; Guo, Xiang-Yang; Meng, Xiu-Li; Xing, Guo-Gang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregabalin (PGB) is a novel antiepileptic drug and is also used as a first-line medication for the treatment of neuropathic pain. However, the mechanisms of its analgesic effects remain largely unknown. OBJECTIVES: To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the antiallodynic action of PGB in rats with neuropathic pain. METHODS: In a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by spared nerve injury, mechanical allodynia, as a behavioural sign of neuropathic pain, was assessed by measuring 50% paw withdrawal threshold with von Frey filaments. Activities of dorsal horn wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons were examined by extracellular electrophysiological recording in vivo. RESULTS: Spinal administration of PGB exerted a significant antiallodynic effect and a prominent inhibitory effect on the hypersensitivity of dorsal horn WDR neurons in rats with spared nerve injury. CONCLUSION: The antiallodynic action of PGB is likely dependent on the suppression of WDR neuron hyperexcitability in rats with neuropathic pain. PMID:24851240

  9. Low-dose methotrexate reduces peripheral nerve injury-evoked spinal microglial activation and neuropathic pain behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Joachim; Abele, Andrea; Marian, Claudiu; Häussler, Annett; Herbert, Teri A.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries that provoke neuropathic pain are associated with microglial activation in the spinal cord. We have investigated the characteristics of spinal microglial activation in three distinct models of peripheral neuropathic pain: spared nerve injury (SNI), chronic constriction injury, and spinal nerve ligation. In all models, dense clusters of cells immunoreactive for the microglial marker CD11b formed in the ipsilateral dorsal horn 7 days after injury. Microglial expression of ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) increased by up to 40% and phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, a marker of microglial activity, by 45%. Expression of the lysosomal ED1-antigen indicated phagocytic activity of the cells. Unlike the peripheral nerve lesions, rhizotomy produced only a weak microglial reaction within the spinal gray matter but a strong activation of microglia and phagocytes in the dorsal funiculus at lumbar and thoracic spinal cord levels. This suggests that although degeneration of central terminals is sufficient to elicit microglial activation, it does not account for the inflammatory response in the dorsal horn after peripheral nerve injury. Early intrathecal treatment with low-dose methotrexate, beginning at the time of injury, decreased microglial activation, reduced p38 phosphorylation, and attenuated pain-like behavior after SNI. In contrast, systemic or intrathecal delivery of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone did not inhibit the activation of microglia or reduce pain-like behavior. We confirm that microglial activation is crucial for the development of pain after nerve injury, and demonstrate that suppression of this cellular immune response is a promising approach for preventing neuropathic pain. PMID:18215468

  10. Effects of 2 Different Doses of Pregabalin on Morphine Consumption and Pain After Abdominal Hysterectomy: A Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Aytaç; Özturk, Erdoğan; Aydoğan, M. Said; Durmuş, Mahmut; Çolak, Cemil; Ersoy, M. Özcan

    2011-01-01

    Background Pregabalin has a similar pharmacologic profile to that of its developmental predecessor gabapentin but has shown greater analgesic activity in rodent models of neuropathic pain. Objective The objective of the study was to compare the effects of 2 different doses of pregabalin and placebo on postoperative pain and morphine consumption. Methods Ninety patients who underwent abdominal hysterectomy were included in the study and randomly divided into 3 groups in a doubled-blinded manner. They were given 150 mg of pregabalin (group P300, n = 30), 300 mg of pregabalin (group P600, n = 30), or placebo capsules (group C, n = 30) 4 hours before the induction of anesthesia; they received a second dose of the drug 12 hours postoperatively. Morphine consumption, nausea, and vomiting, visual analogue scale-pain intensity (VAS-PI), sedation scores, and dissatisfaction scores were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 2, 4, 6, and 24 hours after operation. Results Morphine consumption at 24 hours was 40.80 (3.42) mg, 33.79 (5.77) mg, and 46.97 (6.67) mg in groups P300, P600, and C, respectively (P < 0.001). VAS-PI scores at movement and at rest in the PACU and at 2, 4, and 6 hours decreased in group P600 (P < 0.01). In the PACU and at 2, 4, and 6 hours, the sedation scores were increased in group P600 compared with the scores in group C (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.01, P = 0.006, respectively). Patient satisfaction was higher in group P600 than in group C for all time points (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups for side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and dizziness (P = 0.58). Conclusions Pregabalin at a total dose of 600 mg, administered before operation and at 12 hours postoperatively after abdominal hysterectomy, reduced morphine consumption and pain intensity and increased patient satisfaction. No significant differences in side effects were

  11. Pregabalin for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: an update

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, David S; Ajel, Khalil; Masdrakis, Vasilios G; Nowak, Magda; Rafiq, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    A previous review summarized what was then known about the potential role of pregabalin in the treatment of patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD): this review provides an update on its pharmacological properties and presumed mechanism of action, the liability for abuse, and efficacy and tolerability in patients with GAD. Pregabalin has a similar molecular structure to the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) but its mechanism of action does not appear to be mediated through effects on GABA. Instead, its anxiolytic effects may arise through high-affinity binding to the alpha-2-delta sub-unit of the P/Q type voltage-gated calcium channel in “over-excited” presynaptic neurons, thereby reducing the release of excitatory neurotransmitters such as glutamate. The findings of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses together indicate that pregabalin is efficacious in both acute treatment and relapse prevention in GAD, with some evidence of an early onset of effect, and broad efficacy in reducing the severity of psychological and physical symptoms of anxiety. It also has efficacy as an augmenting agent after non-response to antidepressant treatment in GAD. Continuing vigilance is needed in assessing its potential abuse liability but the tolerability profile of pregabalin may confer some advantages over other pharmacological treatments in the short term for treatment in patients with GAD. PMID:23836974

  12. A randomized double-blind, placebo-, and active-controlled study of T-type calcium channel blocker ABT-639 in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Dan; Duan, W. Rachel; An, Guohua; Thomas, James W.; Nothaft, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Abstract T-type Cav3.2 calcium channels represent a novel target for neuropathic pain modulation. Preclinical studies with ABT-639, a peripherally acting highly selective T-type Cav3.2 calcium channel blocker, showed dose-dependent reduction of pain in multiple pain models. ABT-639 also demonstrated an acceptable safety profile at single- and multiple-dose levels evaluated in a clinical phase 1 study in healthy volunteers. The primary objective of this phase 2, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and active-controlled study was to compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of ABT-639 with placebo in the treatment of diabetic neuropathic pain. Pregabalin, an approved treatment for painful diabetic neuropathy, was included as a positive control. A total of 194 patients were randomized and treated for 6 weeks; 62 patients received ABT-639 (100 mg twice daily), 70 patients received pregabalin (150 mg twice daily), and 62 patients received placebo. When assessing the mean changes from baseline in patient-recorded pain scores at the end of week 6, there was no significant difference observed for ABT-639 compared with placebo (−2.28 vs −2.36; P = 0.582). Pregabalin treatment resulted in a transient improvement in pain compared with placebo, which did not persist throughout the study. There were no significant safety issues identified with ABT-639. A majority of adverse events were considered mild to moderate in intensity. In conclusion, treatment with the highly selective T-type Cav3.2 calcium channel blocker ABT-639 100 mg twice daily for 6 weeks showed no safety signals that would preclude further investigation but did not reduce neuropathic pain in patients with diabetes (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01345045). PMID:26067585

  13. PC1, a non-peptide PKR1-preferring antagonist, reduces pain behavior and spinal neuronal sensitization in neuropathic mice.

    PubMed

    Guida, F; Lattanzi, R; Boccella, S; Maftei, D; Romano, R; Marconi, V; Balboni, G; Salvadori, S; Scafuro, M A; de Novellis, V; Negri, L; Maione, S; Luongo, L

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is characterized by abnormal pain responses triggered by the release of several mediators and neuronal hyperexcitability at the spinal cord level. Emerging evidence indicates that the enhanced activity of dorsal horn neurons requires communication with glia and microglia, cells that are physiologically involved in neuronal wellbeing. Prokineticins (PKs), which include PK1 and PK2, represent a novel family of chemokines characterized by a unique structural motif comprising five disulfide bonds. They are expressed in the peripheral and central nervous system. PKs bind two G protein coupled receptors, PKR1 and PKR2, and participate in the regulation of several biological processes, including pain sensation. This study aimed to investigate the anti-nociceptive effect of PC1, a non-peptide PKR1-preferring antagonist, in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. To do this, we assessed the activity of spinal cord nociceptive neurons as well as astrocyte and microglia phenotypes after repeated administration of PC1 in vivo. PC1 treatment strongly delayed the development of thermal hyperalgesia and tactile and mechanical allodynia. It also reduced spinal microglial and glial activation 8 days post injury in spared nerve injury (SNI) mice. Neuropathic mice showed an increased level of PK2 protein in the spinal cord, mostly in astrocytes. PC1 treatment completely reversed the increased responsiveness to mechanical stimuli, the decreased threshold of neuronal activation, and the increased spontaneous activity that were observed in nociceptive specific (NS) neurons of SNI mice. PMID:25434589

  14. New treatment options in the management of fibromyalgia: role of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Zareba, Grazyna

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common, chronic pain disorder with unknown etiology, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and tenderness, and accompanied by several other symptoms such as sleep disturbance, fatigue, and mood disorders. Pregabalin is the first drug approved for the treatment of FM. Pregabalin has analgesic, anticonvulsant, and anxiolytic activity and has earlier demonstrated efficacy in the management of neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, and as adjuvant therapy for adult patients with partial onset seizures. Pregabalin, a lipophilic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analog, is α2δ-1 ligand that binds to, and modulates, voltage-gated calcium channels. This modulation is characterized by a reduction of the excessive neurotransmitter release that is observed in certain neurological and psychotic disorders. Several randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that pregabalin has been effective in pain management, improving sleep quality and fatigue, as well as in several domains of health related quality of life. Because of mild to moderate adverse effects it can be considered a well-tolerated therapy for FM. PMID:19337459

  15. Pregabalin in the treatment of inferior alveolar nerve paraesthesia following overfilling of endodontic sealer

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Ezpeleta, Oscar; Martín, Pablo J.; López-López, José; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Segura-Egea, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    A case of orofacial pain and inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) paraesthesia after extrusion of endodontic sealer within the mandibular canal treated with prednisone and pregabalin is described. A 36-year-old woman underwent root canal treatment of the mandibular second right premolar tooth. Post-operative panoramic radiograph revealed the presence of radiopaque canal sealer in the mandibular canal. Damage to IAN consecutive to extrusion of endodontic sealer was diagnosed. Non-surgical management was decided, including: 1 mg/kg/day prednisone 2 times/day, once-daily regimen, and 150 mg/day pregabalin, two doses per day, monitoring the progress with periodic follow-up visits. Six weeks after the incident the signs and symptoms were gone. The complete resolution of paraesthesia and the control of pain achieved suggest that a non-surgical approach, combining prednisone and the GABA analogue pregabalin, is a good option in the management of the IAN damage subsequent to endodontic sealer extrusion. Key words:Endodontics, inferior alveolar nerve, neuropathic pain, orofacial pain, paraesthesia, pregabalin. PMID:24790724

  16. Pregabalin Abuse amongst Opioid Substitution Treatment Patients.

    PubMed

    McNamara, S; Stokes, S; Kilduff, R; Shine, A

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin (Lyrica®) is used in treating epilepsy, nerve pain and anxiety. Pregabalin was initially thought to have a low misuse potential however there are emerging reports of Pregabalin being abused. A study was commenced at the National Drug Treatment Centre's (NDTC) Drug Analysis Laboratory to determine the level of usage of Pregabalin within the addiction services population in Ireland. A total of 498 urine samples representing samples from 440 individual opioid substitution patients, initially screened by immunoassay for drugs of abuse, were subjected to further analysis for Pregabalin by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS). Of 440 patients tested, 39 tested positive for Pregabalin (9.2%). Only 10 patients from this group were prescribed this drug to our knowledge thus giving an estimated rate of misuse of 7.0%. Other drugs detected in the Pregabalin positive patients were Opiates (31.8%), Cocaine (11.4%), Benzodiazepines (79.5%) and Cannabis (77.8%). Our study confirms that Pregabalin abuse is taking place amongst the addiction services population. We believe that misuse of this prescription drug is a serious emerging issue which should be monitored carefully. PMID:26817289

  17. The potential of pregabalin in neurology, psychiatry and addiction: a qualitative overview.

    PubMed

    Martinotti, Giovanni; Lupi, Matteo; Sarchione, Fabiola; Santacroce, Rita; Salone, Anatolia; De Berardis, Domenico; Serroni, Nicola; Cavuto, Marilde; Signorelli, Maria; Aguglia, Eugenio; Valchera, Alessandro; Iasevoli, Felice; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant drug that binds to the α₂δ (alpha2delta) subunit of the voltage-dependent calcium channel in central nervous system (CNS). Pregabalin decreases the release of neurotransmitters, including glutamate, norepinephrine, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Purpose of this paper is to offer a qualitative overview of the studies currently available in literature about this drug, examining the effectiveness of pregabalin in its various fields of application. Our analysis, conducted on a final selection of 349 scientific papers, shows that pregabalin may help to reduce pain in diabetic neuropathy, in post-herpetic neuralgia and in some patients affected by fibromyalgia. It is also effective for the treatment of diverse types of seizures and has similar efficacy to benzodiazepines and venlafaxine in anxiety disorder. Moreover, pregabalin may be a therapeutic agent for the treatment of alcohol abuse, in both withdrawal phase and relapse prevention. Possible implications in the treatment of benzodiazepines dependence are emerging, but a potential abuse or misuse of the drug has also been reported. Range of dosage may fluctuate considerably, from 75 mg to 600 mg per day. Further studies are needed to completely understand pregabalin mechanism of action in the different diseases. PMID:23782139

  18. Pregabalin and gabapentin for the treatment of sciatica.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kelvin; Marshman, Laurence A G; Plummer, David

    2016-04-01

    Whilst pregabalin (PGB) and gabapentin (GBP) are both used to treat neuropathic pain, their relative role in sciatica is unclear. Our aim was to extensively review the roles of PGB and GBP in treating sciatica. The efficacy, side effects (SE) profile and cost of PGB and GBP in neuropathic pain states were reviewed with special reference to sciatica. Eleven articles matched the criteria: seven systematic reviews, one retrospective cross-sectional study, one placebo-controlled-crossover study, one randomized placebo-controlled double-blind study and one case report. GBP and PGB appeared to demonstrate comparable efficacy and SE. However, the amount and quality of evidence was low, and only indirect comparisons were available. Importantly, no direct "head-to-head" study existed. Globally, costs varied widely (by up to 31 times) and unpredictably (PGB cheaper than GBP, or vice versa). Formulary regulator rulings were globally disparate; however, many exclusively favoured the more expensive drug (whether GBP or PGB). No studies assessed PGB-GBP interchange. Weak evidence suggests that efficacy and SE with GBP and PGB are probably similar; however, firm conclusions are precluded. Despite weak data, and having cited minor titration, but definite cost, advantages, UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence favoured PGB over GBP. Given that no evidence supports unhindered PGB-GBP interchange, neither drug should probably be favoured. Prospective "head-to-head" studies are urgently required to provide robust evidence-based knowledge for choice of GBP or PGB in sciatica. PMID:26633090

  19. Spinal inhibition of p38 MAP kinase reduces inflammatory and neuropathic pain in male but not female mice: Sex-dependent microglial signaling in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Taves, Sarah; Berta, Temugin; Liu, Da-Lu; Gan, Sophie; Chen, Gang; Kim, Yong Ho; Van de Ven, Thomas; Laufer, Stefan; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that activation of p38 mitogen-activating kinase (MAPK) in spinal microglia participates in the generation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain in various rodent models. However, these studies focused on male mice to avoid confounding effects of the estrous cycle of females. Recent studies have shown that some spinal pro-inflammatory signaling such as Toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling contributes to pain hypersensitivity only in male mice. In this study we investigated the distinct role of spinal p38 in inflammatory and neuropathic pain using a highly selective p38 inhibitor skepinone. Intrathecal injection of skepinone prevented formalin induced inflammatory pain in male but not female mice. Furthermore, intrathecal skepinone reduced chronic constriction injury (CCI) induced neuropathic pain (mechanical allodynia) in male mice on CCI-day 7 but not CCI-day 21. This male-dependent inhibition of neuropathic pain also occurred in rats following intrathecal skepinone. Nerve injury induced spinal p38 activation (phosphorylation) in CX3CR1-GFP(+) microglia on CCI-day 7, and this activation was more prominent in male mice. In contrast, CCI induced comparable microgliosis and expression of the microglial markers CX3CR1 and IBA-1 in both sexes. Notably, intraperitoneal or local perineural administration of skepinone inhibited CCI-induced mechanical allodynia in both sexes of mice. Finally, skepinone only reduced the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in lamina IIo neurons of spinal cord slices of males 7days post CCI. Therefore, the sex-specific p38 activation and signaling is confined to the spinal cord in inflammatory and neuropathic pain conditions. PMID:26472019

  20. Double-blind, randomized, controlled, crossover trial of pregabalin for neurogenic claudication

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Maria E.; Rast, Shirley A.; McDermott, Michael P.; Gewandter, Jennifer S.; Chowdhry, Amit K.; Czerniecka, Kate; Pilcher, Webster H.; Simon, Lee S.; Dworkin, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To test the effects of pregabalin on the induction of neurogenic claudication. Methods: This study was a randomized, double-blind, active placebo-controlled, 2-period, crossover trial. Twenty-nine subjects were randomized to receive pregabalin followed by active placebo (i.e., diphenhydramine) or active placebo followed by pregabalin. Each treatment period lasted 10 days, including a 2-step titration. Periods were separated by a 10-day washout period, including a 3-day taper phase after the first period. The primary outcome variable was the time to first moderate pain symptom (Numeric Rating Scale score ≥4) during a 15-minute treadmill test (Tfirst). Secondary outcome measures included pain intensity at rest, pain intensity at the end of the treadmill test, distance walked, and validated self-report measures of pain and functional limitation including the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, modified Brief Pain Inventory–Short Form, Oswestry Disability Index, and Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire. Results: No significant difference was found between pregabalin and active placebo for the time to first moderate pain symptom (difference in median Tfirst = −1.08 [95% confidence interval −2.25 to 0.08], p = 0.61). In addition, none of the secondary outcome measures of pain or functional limitation were significantly improved by pregabalin compared with active placebo. Conclusions: Pregabalin was not more effective than active placebo in reducing painful symptoms or functional limitations in patients with neurogenic claudication associated with lumbar spinal stenosis. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with neurogenic claudication, compared with diphenhydramine, pregabalin does not increase the time to moderate pain during a treadmill test. PMID:25503625

  1. Aloperine attenuated neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury via anti-oxidation activity and suppression of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ya-Qiong; Jin, Shao-Ju; Liu, Ning; Li, Yu-Xiang; Zheng, Jie; Ma, Lin; Du, Juan; Zhou, Ru; Zhao, Cheng-Jun; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Aloperine has anti-nociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced CCI. • Aloperine reduces ROS in neuropathic pain mice. • Aloperine down-regulates the expression of NF-κB and its downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines in neuropathic pain mice. - Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether aloperine (ALO) has antinociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury, whether ALO reduces ROS against neuropathic pain, and what are the mechanisms involved in ALO attenuated neuropathic pain. Methods: Mechanical and cold allodynia, thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia and spinal thermal hyperalgesia were estimated by behavior methods such as Von Frey filaments, cold-plate, radiant heat, paw pressure and tail immersion on one day before surgery and days 7, 8, 10, 12 and 14 after surgery, respectively. In addition, T-AOC, GSH-PX, T-AOC and MDA in the spinal cord (L4/5) were measured to evaluate anti-oxidation activity of ALO on neuropathic pain. Expressions of NF-κB and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β) in the spinal cord (L4/5) were analyzed by using Western blot. Results: Administration of ALO (80 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased paw withdrawal threshold, paw pressure, paw withdrawal latencies, tail-curling latencies, T-AOC, GSH-PX and T-SOD concentration, reduced the numbers of paw lifts and MDA concentration compared to CCI group. ALO attenuated CCI induced up-regulation of expressions of NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β at the dose of 80 mg/kg (i.p.). Pregabalin produced similar effects serving as positive control at the dose of 10 mg/kg (i.p.). Conclusion: ALO has antinociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced by CCI. The antinociceptive effects of ALO against neuropathic pain is related to reduction of ROS, via suppression of NF-κB pathway.

  2. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ormseth, Michelle J; Scholz, Beth A; Boomershine, Chad S

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no treatment and many treated with medications having little or no efficacy in managing DPNP. Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for DPNP management. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) proven safe, effective, and cost-saving in reducing DPNP symptoms at a dose of 60 mg/day. Duloxetine doses greater than 60 mg/day for DPNP management are not recommended since they are no more efficacious and associated with more side effects; addition of pregabalin or gabapentin for these patients may be beneficial. Side effects of duloxetine are generally mild and typical for the SNRI class including nausea, dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea. Given its other indications, duloxetine is a particularly good choice for DPNP treatment in patients with coexisting depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain. Duloxetine treatment had no clinically significant effect on glycemic control and did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes patients. However, duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with hepatic disease or severe renal impairment. Given its safety, efficacy, and tolerability, duloxetine is an excellent choice for DPNP treatment in many patients. PMID:21845034

  3. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Ormseth, Michelle J; Scholz, Beth A; Boomershine, Chad S

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no treatment and many treated with medications having little or no efficacy in managing DPNP. Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for DPNP management. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) proven safe, effective, and cost-saving in reducing DPNP symptoms at a dose of 60 mg/day. Duloxetine doses greater than 60 mg/day for DPNP management are not recommended since they are no more efficacious and associated with more side effects; addition of pregabalin or gabapentin for these patients may be beneficial. Side effects of duloxetine are generally mild and typical for the SNRI class including nausea, dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea. Given its other indications, duloxetine is a particularly good choice for DPNP treatment in patients with coexisting depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain. Duloxetine treatment had no clinically significant effect on glycemic control and did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes patients. However, duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with hepatic disease or severe renal impairment. Given its safety, efficacy, and tolerability, duloxetine is an excellent choice for DPNP treatment in many patients. PMID:21845034

  4. Pregabalin Versus Pramipexole: Effects on Sleep Disturbance in Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Patrick, Jeffrey; DuBrava, Sarah; Becker, Philip M.; Lankford, Alan; Chen, Crystal; Miceli, Jeffrey; Knapp, Lloyd; Allen, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare pregabalin versus placebo and pramipexole for reducing restless legs syndrome (RLS)-related sleep disturbance. Design: Randomized, double-blinded, crossover trial. Setting: Twenty-three US sleep centers. Participants: Eighty-five individuals with moderate to severe idiopathic RLS and associated sleep disturbance. Interventions: Participants were randomized across 6 treatment sequences comprising three 4-week periods on pregabalin 300 mg/day (n = 75), pramipexole 0.5 mg/day (n = 76), or placebo (n = 73). Measurements and Results: Polysomnography was conducted over 2 nights at the end of each period. Primary (wake after sleep onset [WASO], pregabalin vs placebo) and key secondary endpoints were analyzed for statistical significance, with descriptive statistics for other endpoints. Pregabalin improved sleep maintenance, demonstrated by reductions in WASO (-27.1 min vs placebo [P < 0.0001]; -26.9 vs pramipexole) and number of awakenings after sleep onset (-2.7 vs placebo; -7.9 vs pramipexole [P < 0.0001]) by polysomnography, and an increase in subjective total sleep time (30.8 min vs placebo [P < 0.0001]; 26.8 vs pramipexole). Pregabalin also increased slow wave sleep duration (20.9 min vs placebo; 32.1 vs pramipexole [P < 0.0001]). Reduction in periodic limb movement arousal index (PLMAI) with pregabalin was similar to pramipexole and greater than placebo (-3.7 PLMA/h [P < 0.0001]), although reduction in total PLM in sleep was less than for pramipexole. Conclusions: This study demonstrated improvements in objective and subjective measures of sleep maintenance and sleep architecture with pregabalin compared with placebo and pramipexole. Effects of pregabalin on periodic limb movement arousal index were comparable to pramipexole. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT00991276; http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00991276 Citation: Garcia-Borreguero D; Patrick J; DuBrava S; Becker PM; Lankford A; Chen C; Miceli J; Knapp L; Allen

  5. Inhibition of microglial activity alters spinal wide dynamic range neuron discharge and reduces microglial Toll-like receptor 4 expression in neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Nazemi, Samad; Manaheji, Homa; Noorbakhsh, Syyed Mohammad; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Mohammad-Zadeh, Mohammad; Haghparast, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    It is believed that neuropathic pain results from aberrant neuronal discharges although some evidence suggests that the activation of glia cells contributes to pain after an injury to the nervous system. This study aimed to evaluate the role of microglial activation on the hyper-responsiveness of wide dynamic range neurons (WDR) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expressions in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (230 ± 30 g) underwent surgery for induction of CCI neuropathy. Six days after surgery, administration of minocycline (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) was initiated and continued until day 14. After administration of the last dose of minocycline or saline, a behavioral test was conducted, then animals were sacrificed and lumbar segments of the spinal cord were collected for Western blot analysis of TLR4 expression. The electrophysiological properties of WDR neurons were investigated by single unit recordings in separate groups. The findings showed that after CCI, in parallel with thermal hyperalgesia, the expression of TLR4 in the spinal cord and the evoked response of the WDR neurons to electrical, mechanical, and thermal stimulation significantly increased. Post-injury administration of minocycline effectively decreased thermal hyperalgesia, TLR4 expression, and hyper-responsiveness of WDR neurons in CCI rats. The results of this study indicate that post-injury, repeated administration of minocycline attenuated neuropathic pain by suppressing microglia activation and reducing WDR neuron hyper-responsiveness. This study confirms that post-injury modulation of microglial activity is a new strategy for treating neuropathic pain. PMID:25933029

  6. Pharmacological management of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Baastrup, Cathrine; Finnerup, Nanna B

    2008-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has a number of severe and disabling consequences, including chronic pain, and around 40% of patients develop persistent neuropathic pain. Pain following SCI has a detrimental impact on the patient's quality of life and is a major specific healthcare problem in its own right. Thus far, there is no cure for the pain and oral pharmaceutical intervention is often inadequate, commonly resulting in a reduction of only 20-30% in pain intensity. Neuropathic pain sensations are characterized by spontaneous persistent pain and a range of abnormally evoked responses, e.g. allodynia (pain evoked by normally non-noxious stimuli) and hyperalgesia (an increased response to noxious stimuli). Neuropathic pain following SCI may be present at or below the level of injury. Oral pharmacological agents used in the treatment of neuropathic pain act either by depressing neuronal activity, by blocking sodium channels or inhibiting calcium channels, by increasing inhibition via GABA agonists, by serotonergic and noradrenergic reuptake inhibition, or by decreasing activation via glutamate receptor inhibition, especially by blocking the NMDA receptor. At present, only ten randomized, double-blind, controlled trials have been performed on oral drug treatment of pain after SCI, the results of most of which were negative. The studies included antidepressants (amitriptyline and trazodone), antiepileptics (gabapentin, pregabalin, lamotrigine and valproate) and mexiletine. Gabapentin, pregabalin and amitriptyline showed a significant reduction in neuropathic pain following SCI. Cannabinoids have been found to relieve other types of central pain, and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors as well as opioids relieve peripheral neuropathic pain and may be used to treat patients with SCI pain. PMID:18484790

  7. Reduced Glutamatergic Currents and Dendritic Branching of Layer 5 Pyramidal Cells Contribute to Medial Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Crystle J.; Huang, Mei; Meltzer, Herbert; Martina, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated that neuropathic pain is associated with major reorganization in multiple brain areas. In line with the strong emotional salience of chronic pain, involvement of the limbic system appears particularly important. Within the past few years, it has become clear that the functional deactivation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critical for both the cognitive/emotional and the sensory components of pain. However, at the cellular level, details of this deactivation remain in large part unclear. Here we show that 1 week after a peripheral neuropathic injury (Spared Nerve Injury model) pyramidal cells in layer 5 (L5) of the rat medial PFC show responses to excitatory glutamatergic inputs that are reduced by about 50%, as well as reduced frequency of spontaneous excitatory synaptic currents. Additionally, these cells have reduced membrane capacitance and increased input resistance. All these findings are consistent with decreased dendritic length, thus we performed a detailed morphological analysis on a subset of the recorded neurons. We found that the apical dendrites proximal to the soma (excluding the tuft) are shorter and less complex in SNI animals, in agreement with the reduced capacitance and glutamatergic input. Finally, we used in vivo microdialysis to compare the basal concentrations of glutamate and GABA in the PFC of sham and SNI rats and found that ambient glutamate is decreased in SNI rats. Taken together, these data show that impaired glutamatergic transmission contributes to the functional deactivation of the mPFC in neuropathic pain. Additionally, the reduced branching of apical dendrites of L5 pyramidal neurons may underlay the gray matter reduction in chronic pain. PMID:27252623

  8. A tarantula spider toxin, GsMTx4, reduces mechanical and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Pyo; Kim, Byung Moon; Koo, Jae Yeon; Cho, Hawon; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Misook; Na, Heung Sik; Oh, Uhtaek

    2008-07-01

    Mechanosensitive channels mediate various physiological functions including somatic sensation or pain. One of the peptide toxins isolated from the venom of the Chilean rose tarantula spider (Grammostola spatulata), mechanotoxin 4 (GsMTx4) is known to block stretch-activated cation channels. Since mechanosensitive channels in sensory neurons are thought to be molecular sensors for mechanotransduction, i.e., for touch, pressure, proprioception, and pain, we considered that the venom might block some types of mechanical pain. In order to prepare sufficiently large amounts of GsMTx4 for in vivo nociceptive behavioral tests, we constructed recombinant peptide of GsMTx4. Because the amino-acid sequence of the toxin, but not the nucleotide sequence, is known, we back-translated its amino-acid sequence to nucleotide sequence of yeast codons, constructed a template DNA, subcloned this into a Pichia pastoris expression vector, and purified the recombinant peptide. Intraperitoneal injection of the recombinant GsMTx4 to rats significantly increased the mechanical threshold for paw withdrawal in Randall Sellito test, eliciting significant analgesic responses to inflammation-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. GsMTx4 also reduced mechanical allodynia induced by inflammation and by sciatic nerve injury in Von Frey test. However, the venom was ineffective at changing withdrawal latency in hot plate and tail-flick tests. These results suggest that GsMTx4 selectively alleviates mechanical hyperalgesia, which it presumably achieves by blocking mechanosensitive channels. Because the peptide venom induces analgesia for some forms of mechanical pain, GsMTx4 appears to have potential clinical use as a pain treatment. PMID:18359568

  9. Pregabalin for the treatment of patients with generalized anxiety disorder with inadequate treatment response to antidepressants and severe depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Olivares, José M; Álvarez, Enrique; Carrasco, José L; Pérez Páramo, María; López-Gómez, Vanessa

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of pregabalin in patients with resistant generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and severe depressive symptoms, we carried out a post-hoc analysis of a multicenter, prospective, and observational 6-month study. We included patients who were at least 18 years old, fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) criteria for GAD, showed inadequate responses to previous courses of antidepressant treatment, had Montgomery-Asberg Rating Scale scores of at least 35, had not received pregabalin previously, and were prescribed pregabalin upon entry into this study. We included 1815 patients fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria for GAD, and 133 (7.3%) fulfilled the selection criteria for these analyses. Ninety-seven percent of the patients received pregabalin (mean dose: 222 mg/day) in combination with other psychotropics. The Hamilton Anxiety Scale total score was reduced by a mean of 20.3 points (95% confidence interval, 22.1-18.4) (57.2% reduction) at month 6. Pregabalin also ameliorated comorbid depressive symptoms, with a reduction in the mean score of the Montgomery-Asberg Rating Scale of 22.3 points (95% confidence interval, 24.2-20.4) (56.6% reduction). Our results suggest that pregabalin, as part of a combination regimen with antidepressants and/or benzodiazepines, might be effective for the treatment of patients with GAD who have shown inadequate response to previous antidepressants and have severe depressive symptoms. PMID:26111356

  10. Comparative clinical study of gabapentin and pregabalin for postoperative analgesia in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rajshree; Tripathi, Manoj; Chandola, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduction in central sensitization by gabapentinoids that include gabapentin and pregabalin may reduce acute postoperative pain. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate postoperative analgesic benefit and efficacy in patients administered with oral gabapentin or pregabalin as premedication for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. Settings and Design: Randomized, prospective, and comparative study. Materials and Methods: In this study, recruited patients were randomly allocated in three groups. Groups A, B, and C received 2 capsules of B complex, 3 capsules of 300 mg gabapentin each, and 2 capsules of 75 mg pregabalin, respectively, each in 30 patients of each group, 1 h before induction of anesthesia. Postoperative efficacy among these three groups was compared with respect to increase in duration of analgesia, reduction in postoperative pain scores, total postoperative requirements of analgesics and side effects. Statistical Analysis: Mean and standard deviation were calculated. Test of analysis between two groups was done by t-test and among three groups by analysis of variance, and then P value was calculated. Results: Pregabalin and gabapentin group had lower visual analog scale (VAS) score (P < 0.05), prolonged timing of first rescue analgesic (4.67 ± 14.79 vs. 158 ± 13.10 vs. 343.16 ± 9.69) min, and less opioid consumption (169.87 ± 20.32 vs. 116.13 ± 14.08 vs. 64.67 ± 16.69) mg compared to placebo group. Between the gabapentinoids, pregabalin group had lower VAS score, prolonged timing of first rescue analgesic, and less opioids consumption than the gabapentin group. Conclusion: It is concluded in this study that pregabalin group had lower VAS score, prolonged timing of first rescue analgesic, and less opioids consumption than the gabapentin group. Both gabapentinoids had better postoperative analgesic profile than placebo. PMID:27212747

  11. Effect of Oral Pregabalin as Preemptive Analgesic in Patients Undergoing Lower Limb Orthopedic Surgeries under Spinal Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Bon; Nelamangala, Kiran; Krishnamurthy, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Conquering postoperative pain which has significant impact on the surgery outcome can be challenging for the clinicians. Pregabalin is a GABA analogue used for various neuropathic pain syndromes. Very few studies are there with the use of pregabalin as a preemptive analgesic for orthopedic surgeries. Aim To compare pregabalin 150 mg with placebo for postoperative pain control in patients undergoing elective lower limb orthopedic surgeries under spinal anaesthesia and to assess any side effects. Materials and Methods A randomized double blinded prospective study was undertaken. Ninety patients with ASA physical status I, II, aged between 18–50 years were enrolled in the study. One hour prior to spinal anaesthesia Group C - received colour matched empty capsules, Group P – received 150mg of oral pregabalin. Spinal anaesthesia was administered in sitting position in L3-L4 space with Inj. Bupivacaine heavy (0.5%) at a dose of 0.3mg/kg body weight with 20 mg being the maximum dose using 25 gauge spinal needle. Rescue analgesia was provided with using Inj. Diclofenac 1.5 mg/kg intramuscular. Results Time for rescue analgesia (VAS score >3) was significantly increased in Group P than in Group C. The total dose of diclofenac required in the 24 hour postoperative period was significantly lower in Group P than in Group C. The sedation scores and patient satisfaction scores were also more in Group P than in Group C. Conclusion Preemptive pregabalin in an oral dose of 150 mg offers good postoperative analgesia in lower limb orthopedic surgeries under spinal anaesthesia.

  12. Antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of mianserin on diabetic neuropathic pain: a study on mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Üçel, Umut İrfan; Can, Özgür Devrim; Demir Özkay, Ümide; Öztürk, Yusuf

    2015-06-01

    This study used various experimental pain methods to investigate the effects of subacute mianserin administration on diabetes-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The effect of mianserin on hyperalgesia occurring in connection with peripheral diabetic neuropathy was examined using the Randall-Selitto (mechanical nociceptive stimulus), Hargreaves (thermal nociceptive stimulus), and cold-plate (4°C, thermal nociceptive stimulus) tests. The dynamic plantar aesthesiometer, which measures the threshold values for mechanical stimuli, was used for allodynia studies. Thermal allodynia was evaluated with the warm-plate (38°C) test. At 30 and 45 mg/kg, mianserin effectively improved mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia occurring in connection with diabetic neuropathy. Subacute administration of mianserin also reduced diabetes-associated mechanical and thermal allodynia. The ability of mianserin to reduce diabetic neuropathic pain was comparable to that of pregabalin (10mg/kg). The antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of mianserin were reversed with α-methyl-para-tyrosine methyl ester (AMPT, an inhibitor of catecholamine synthesis), phentolamine (a non-selective α-adrenoceptor antagonist), propranolol (a non-selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist), and naloxone (a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist) administrations. The same effects were not reversed, however, by para-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester (PCPA; an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis). These results suggest that the beneficial effect of mianserin on diabetic neuropathic pain is mediated through an increase in catecholamine levels in the synaptic cleft as well as through interactions with both subtypes of adrenoceptors and opioid receptors. Considering that mianserin exhibits simultaneous antidepressant and antinociceptive effects, this drug could provide a good alternative for treating the pain associated with diabetic neuropathy and the mood disorders caused directly by diabetes. PMID:25771454

  13. Novel Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) Derivative as a New Therapeutic Strategy for Reducing Neuropathic Pain after Chronic Constriction Nerve Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xifró, Xavier; Vidal-Sancho, Laura; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Turrado, Carlos; Alberch, Jordi; Puig, Teresa; Verdú, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in peripheral nerve injury and often fails to respond to ordinary medication. Here, we investigated whether the two novel epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) polyphenolic derivatives, compound 23 and 30, reduce the neuropathic pain in mice chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI). First, we performed a dose-response study to evaluate nociceptive sensation after administration of EGCG and its derivatives 23 and 30, using the Hargreaves test at 7 and 21 days after injury (dpi). We daily administered EGCG, 23 and 30 (10 to 100 mg/Kg; i.p.) during the first week post-CCI. None of the doses of compound 23 caused significant pain diminution, whereas 50mg/kg was optimal for both EGCG and 30 to delay the latency of paw withdrawal. With 50 mg/Kg, we showed that EGCC prevented the thermal hyperalgesia from 7 to 21 dpi and compound 30 from 14 to 56 dpi. To evaluate the molecular mechanisms underpinning why EGCG and compound 30 differentially prevented the thermal hyperalgesia, we studied several biochemical parameters in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord at 14 and 56 dpi. We showed that the effect observed with EGCG and compound 30 was related to the inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN), a known target of these polyphenolic compounds. Additionally, we observed that EGCG and compound 30 reduced the expression of CCI-mediated inflammatory proteins and the nuclear localization of nuclear factor-kappa B at 14 dpi, but not at 56 dpi. We also strongly detected a decrease of synaptic plasma membrane levels of N-methyl-D-asparte receptor 2B in CCI-mice treated with compound 30 at 56 dpi. Altogether, compound 30 reduced the chronic thermal hyperalgesia induced by CCI better than the natural compound EGCG. Thus, our findings provide a rationale for the preclinical development of compound 30 as an agent to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:25855977

  14. Diabetic neuropathic pain: Physiopathology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Anne K; Nones, Carina FM; Reis, Renata C; Chichorro, Juliana G; Cunha, Joice M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which affects over 90% of the diabetic patients. Although pain is one of the main symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, its pathophysiological mechanisms are not yet fully known. It is widely accepted that the toxic effects of hyperglycemia play an important role in the development of this complication, but several other hypotheses have been postulated. The management of diabetic neuropathic pain consists basically in excluding other causes of painful peripheral neuropathy, improving glycemic control as a prophylactic therapy and using medications to alleviate pain. First line drugs for pain relief include anticonvulsants, such as pregabalin and gabapentin and antidepressants, especially those that act to inhibit the reuptake of serotonin and noradrenaline. In addition, there is experimental and clinical evidence that opioids can be helpful in pain control, mainly if associated with first line drugs. Other agents, including for topical application, such as capsaicin cream and lidocaine patches, have also been proposed to be useful as adjuvants in the control of diabetic neuropathic pain, but the clinical evidence is insufficient to support their use. In conclusion, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying diabetic neuropathic pain will contribute to the search of new therapies, but also to the improvement of the guidelines to optimize pain control with the drugs currently available. PMID:25897354

  15. Effectiveness of posthemodialysis administration of pregabalin (75 mg) in treatment resistance uremia pruritus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Aziz, Abdul; Suleiman, Amal K

    2016-01-01

    Uremic pruritus (UP) is one of the complications faced by majority of the patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to complex pathophysiology of UP, most of the anti-inflammatory and tropical lubricants often not provide a long lasting control over pruritus. Recently the uses of certain anti-epileptics are found to demonstrate promising relief to UP. To test the effect of 75 mg pregabalin in patients with treatment resistance pruritus. Data was prospectively collected from a patient with ESRD and suffering from treatment resistance pruritus. Intensity of pruritus was recorded using 5D-itching scale (5D-IS) and visual analogue scale (VAS). Pre and post assessment was done for this patient, on initial assess the parathyroid hormone level of the patient was 70.5 pg/ml with a serum phosphate level of 2.61 mmol/L. Upon initial assess the VAS score was 8 and 5D-IS score was twenty. After the duration of four weeks of pregabalin 75 mg post hemodialysis, 5D-IS score reduced to 8 and VAS score move down to 3. Pregabalin 75 mg post hemodialysis was found to reduce the intensity of UP. Pregabalin 75 mg post hemodialysis can be another option to treat UP. PMID:26957874

  16. Pregabalin for Refractory Radicular Leg Pain due to Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Preliminary Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamashita, Masaomi; Eguchi, Yawara; Suzuki, Miyako; Inoue, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Tomoko; Ozawa, Tomoyuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ito, Toshinori; Kubota, Go; Suzuki, Munetaka; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Hanaoka, Eiji; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Shimbo, Jun; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takane; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of pregabalin (PGB) for neuropathic leg pain in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) patients with disturbed activities of daily living (ADL)/quality of life (QOL) in a prospective observational study. Subjects were a total of 104 LSS patients with neuropathic pain (NeP) in leg and neurological intermittent claudication (IMC) refractory to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for at least a month. NeP was identified using screening tool, Pain DETECT questionnaire. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores and responses to the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ) were assessed before and 6 weeks after PGB treatment initiation. Changes in IMC distance and adverse events were also recorded. PGB significantly improved their VAS scores for pain and sleep quality (P < 0.001). With respect to JOABPEQ, significant improvements were observed with regard to the following dimensions: pain-related disorders (P < 0.01), lumbar spine dysfunction (P = 0.031), gait disturbance (P = 0.028), and psychological disorders (P = 0.014). The IMC distance showed an improvement tendency after PGB treatment, albeit with no significance (P = 0.063). Minor adverse events such as dizziness were observed. PGB can be effective for neuropathic leg pain refractory to NSAIDs in LSS patients, resulting in not only pain control but also improving lower back pain-related ADL/QOL scores. PMID:27445615

  17. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome responsive to pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, FH; Liu, W; Geigel, E; Castaneda, S; Rossi, EM; Schnacky, K

    2015-01-01

    Report three cases of painful legs and moving toes (PLMT) syndrome responsive to pregabalin along with a review of its literature. Three patients with PLMT syndrome improved with pregabalin. The first and third patient reported improvement in pain scores, quality of life, and quality of sleep sustained over time. The second and third patient had near complete remission of toe movements, but pregabalin was discontinued in the second patient due to aggravation of leg edema. PLMT is a rare and debilitating disorder characterized by lower limb pain and involuntary toes or feet movements. Its pathophysiology remains unknown and its therapy refractory to most drugs, except for pregabalin, as shown in this case series. PLMT is a rare and incapacitating syndrome due to the lack of an effective pain therapy. We report three patients with PLMT who favorable responded to pregabalin. We propose pregabalin be considered in the management of PLMT. PMID:25766346

  18. The endocannabinoid system and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Rafael; Baños, Josep Eladi; Cabañero, David

    2016-02-01

    The research of new therapeutic strategies for neuropathic pain represents a major current priority. Important drawbacks to advance in the development of these therapies are the limited translational value of the animal models now available and the elucidation of the complex neuronal and immune pathophysiological mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain. One of the neurotransmitter systems participating in neuropathic pain control that has recently raised a particular interest is the endocannabinoid system. This system is highly expressed in neurons and immune cells, and it plays a crucial role in the development of neuropathic pain. Preclinical studies have provided important findings, revealing the potential interest of the endocannabinoid system for the treatment of neuropathic pain. These studies have reported the analgesic effects of cannabinoid agonists in multiple neuropathic pain models, and they have identified specific targets within this system to develop more effective and safe analgesic compounds. However, further studies using more relevant neuropathic pain animal models are required to confirm these interesting results. Several clinical studies suggest that cannabinoids significantly reduced neuropathic pain, although most of these trials fail the required standards of quality. The different pain patient populations included in the systematic reviews also make it difficult to get adequate conclusions. Therefore, additional clinical trials that consider an adequate number of patients, the use active treatments as controls, and longer duration of administration are required to have an adequate profile of the effectiveness and safety of cannabinoids in neuropathic pain. PMID:26785153

  19. A comparison of customised and prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration: a participant-blinded randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration may be prevented if the mechanical stress transmitted to the plantar tissues is reduced. Insole therapy is one practical method commonly used to reduce plantar loads and ulceration risk. The type of insole best suited to achieve this is unknown. This trial compared custom-made functional insoles with prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for ulceration of neuropathic diabetic feet. Method A participant-blinded randomised controlled trial recruited 119 neuropathic participants with diabetes who were randomly allocated to custom-made functional or prefabricated insoles. Data were collected at issue and six month follow-up using the F-scan in-shoe pressure measurement system. Primary outcomes were: peak pressure, forefoot pressure time integral, total contact area, forefoot rate of load, duration of load as a percentage of stance. Secondary outcomes were patient perceived foot health (Bristol Foot Score), quality of life (Audit of Diabetes Dependent Quality of Life). We also assessed cost of supply and fitting. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Results There were no differences between insoles in peak pressure, or three of the other four kinetic measures. The custom-made functional insole was slightly more effective than the prefabricated insole in reducing forefoot pressure time integral at issue (27% vs. 22%), remained more effective at six month follow-up (30% vs. 24%, p=0.001), but was more expensive (UK £656 vs. £554, p<0.001). Full compliance (minimum wear 7 hours a day 7 days per week) was reported by 40% of participants and 76% of participants reported a minimum wear of 5 hours a day 5 days per week. There was no difference in patient perception between insoles. Conclusion The custom-made insoles are more expensive than prefabricated insoles evaluated in this trial and no better in reducing peak pressure. We recommend that where clinically appropriate, the more cost effective prefabricated insole

  20. Identification of the alpha2-delta-1 subunit of voltage-dependent calcium channels as a molecular target for pain mediating the analgesic actions of pregabalin.

    PubMed

    Field, Mark J; Cox, Peter J; Stott, Emma; Melrose, Heather; Offord, James; Su, Ti-Zhi; Bramwell, Steve; Corradini, Laura; England, Steven; Winks, Joanna; Kinloch, Ross A; Hendrich, Jan; Dolphin, Annette C; Webb, Tony; Williams, Dic

    2006-11-14

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition affecting millions of people around the world and is defined as pain that follows a lesion or dysfunction of the nervous system. This type of pain is difficult to treat, but the novel compounds pregabalin (Lyrica) and gabapentin (Neurontin) have proven clinical efficacy. Unlike traditional analgesics such as nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs or narcotics, these agents have no frank antiinflammatory actions and no effect on physiological pain. Although extensive preclinical studies have led to a number of suggestions, until recently their mechanism of action has not been clearly defined. Here, we describe studies on the analgesic effects of pregabalin in a mutant mouse containing a single-point mutation within the gene encoding a specific auxiliary subunit protein (alpha2-delta-1) of voltage-dependent calcium channels. The mice demonstrate normal pain phenotypes and typical responses to other analgesic drugs. We show that the mutation leads to a significant reduction in the binding affinity of pregabalin in the brain and spinal cord and the loss of its analgesic efficacy. These studies show conclusively that the analgesic actions of pregabalin are mediated through the alpha2-delta-1 subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels and establish this subunit as a therapeutic target for pain control. PMID:17088553

  1. Early increasing-intensity treadmill exercise reduces neuropathic pain by preventing nociceptor collateral sprouting and disruption of chloride cotransporters homeostasis after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    López-Álvarez, Víctor M; Modol, Laura; Navarro, Xavier; Cobianchi, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Activity treatments, such as treadmill exercise, are used to improve functional recovery after nerve injury, parallel to an increase in neurotrophin levels. However, despite their role in neuronal survival and regeneration, neurotrophins may cause neuronal hyperexcitability that triggers neuropathic pain. In this work, we demonstrate that an early increasing-intensity treadmill exercise (iTR), performed during the first week (iTR1) or during the first 2 weeks (iTR2) after section and suture repair of the rat sciatic nerve, significantly reduced the hyperalgesia developing rapidly in the saphenous nerve territory and later in the sciatic nerve territory after regeneration. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in sensory neurons and spinal cord was reduced in parallel. iTR prevented the extension of collateral sprouts of saphenous nociceptive calcitonin gene-related peptide fibers within the adjacent denervated skin and reduced NGF expression in the same skin and in the L3 dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Injury also induced Na⁺-K⁺-2Cl⁻ cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) upregulation in DRG, and K⁺-Cl⁻ cotransporter 2 (KCC2) downregulation in lumbar spinal cord dorsal horn. iTR normalized NKCC1 and boosted KCC2 expression, together with a significant reduction of microgliosis in L3-L5 dorsal horn, and a reduction of BDNF expression in microglia at 1 to 2 weeks postinjury. These data demonstrate that specific activity protocols, such as iTR, can modulate neurotrophins expression after peripheral nerve injury and prevent neuropathic pain by blocking early mechanisms of sensitization such as collateral sprouting and NKCC1/KCC2 disregulation. PMID:26090759

  2. Intrathecal Administration of Tempol Reduces Chronic Constriction Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Rats by Increasing SOD Activity and Inhibiting NGF Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baisong; Pan, Yongying; Wang, Zixin; Tan, Yonghong; Song, Xingrong

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the antinociceptive effect of intrathecal and intraperitoneal tempol administration in a rat model of chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and explore the underlying antinociceptive mechanisms of tempol. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 8 per group): sham group, CCI group, Tem1 group (intrathecal injection of tempol), and Tem2 group (intraperitoneal injection of tempol). Neuropathic pain was induced by CCI of the sciatic nerve. Tempol was intrathecally or intraperitoneally administered daily for 7 days beginning on postoperative day one. The mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were tested on preoperative day 3 and postoperative days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, and 21. Structural changes were examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining, toluidine blue staining, and electron microscopy. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were determined using the thiobarbituric acid and nitroblue tetrazolium methods, respectively. Nerve growth factor (NGF) expression levels were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Intrathecal, but not intraperitoneal, injection of tempol produced a persistent antinociceptive effect. Intraperitoneal injection of tempol did not result in high enough concentration of tempol in the cerebrospinal fluid. Intrathecal, but not intraperitoneal, injection of tempol inhibited CCI-induced structural damage in the spinal cord reduced MDA levels, and increased SOD activities in the spinal cord. Furthermore, intrathecal, but not intraperitoneal, injection of tempol further downregulated the expression of NGF in the spinal cord following CCI, and this effect was blocked by p38MAPK inhibitor. Intrathecal injection of tempol produces antinociceptive effects and reduces CCI-induced structural damage in the spinal cord by increasing SOD activities and downregulating the expression of NGF via the p38MAPK pathway. Intraperitoneal administration of tempol does

  3. A peripherally acting, selective T-type calcium channel blocker, ABT-639, effectively reduces nociceptive and neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Michael F; Scott, Victoria E; McGaraughty, Steve; Chu, Katharine L; Xu, Jun; Niforatos, Wende; Milicic, Ivan; Joshi, Shailen; Zhang, Qingwei; Xia, Zhiren

    2014-06-15

    Activation of T-type Ca²⁺ channels contributes to nociceptive signaling by facilitating action potential bursting and modulation of membrane potentials during periods of neuronal hyperexcitability. The role of T-type Ca²⁺ channels in chronic pain is supported by gene knockdown studies showing that decreased Ca(v)3.2 channel expression results in the loss of low voltage-activated (LVA) currents in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and attenuation of neuropathic pain in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. ABT-639 is a novel, peripherally acting, selective T-type Ca²⁺ channel blocker. ABT-639 blocks recombinant human T-type (Ca(v)3.2) Ca²⁺ channels in a voltage-dependent fashion (IC₅₀ = 2 μM) and attenuates LVA currents in rat DRG neurons (IC₅₀ = 8 μM). ABT-639 was significantly less active at other Ca²⁺ channels (e.g. Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)2.2) (IC₅₀ > 30 μM). ABT-639 has high oral bioavailability (%F = 73), low protein binding (88.9%) and a low brain:plasma ratio (0.05:1) in rodents. Following oral administration ABT-639 produced dose-dependent antinociception in a rat model of knee joint pain (ED₅₀ = 2 mg/kg, p.o.). ABT-639 (10-100 mg/kg, p.o.) also increased tactile allodynia thresholds in multiple models of neuropathic pain (e.g. spinal nerve ligation, CCI, and vincristine-induced). [corrected]. ABT-639 did not attenuate hyperalgesia in inflammatory pain models induced by complete Freund's adjuvant or carrageenan. At higher doses (e.g. 100-300 mg/kg) ABT-639 did not significantly alter hemodynamic or psychomotor function. The antinociceptive profile of ABT-639 provides novel insights into the role of peripheral T-type (Ca(v)3.2) channels in chronic pain states. PMID:24726441

  4. Maraviroc reduces neuropathic pain through polarization of microglia and astroglia - Evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Klaudia; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Mika, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that CCR5 and its ligands are important regulators for the development of neuropathic pain and that their modulation can have some beneficial properties. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the influence of maraviroc (MVC, a CCR5 antagonist) on glial polarization markers and intracellular signaling pathways in the spinal cord 7 days after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve and in primary glial cultures after LPS stimulation. Our results demonstrated that chronic intrathecal administration of MVC diminished neuropathic pain symptoms and nociceptive threshold ∼60 min after drug administration on days 3 and 7 post-CCI. MVC downregulated the levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 and NF-κB proteins in the spinal cord and upregulated STAT3 in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Additionally, using Western blot analysis, we demonstrated that MVC effectively diminished "classical" activation markers: IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6 and NOS2 in the spinal cord. In contrast, MVC upregulated "alternative" antinociceptive activation markers: IL-1RA, IL-18BP and IL-10 in the spinal cord. In parallel, MVC downregulated the levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 and NF-κB proteins and upregulated STAT3 in microglial and astroglial cell cultures. Similarly, MVC reduced pronociceptive (IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6, NOS2) and enhanced the antinociceptive (IL-1RA, IL-18BP, IL-10) factors after LPS stimulation. Our studies provide new evidence that MVC attenuates neuropathy symptoms, promotes spinal glial "alternative" polarization and restores the balance between pro- and antinociceptive factors. Our results suggest the modulation of CCR5 by MVC as a novel therapeutic approach for neuropathy. PMID:27117708

  5. Efficacy of Pregabalin in Acute Postoperative Pain Under Different Surgical Categories

    PubMed Central

    Lam, David M.H.; Choi, Siu-Wai; Wong, Stanley S.C.; Irwin, Michael G.; Cheung, Chi-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The efficacy of pregabalin in acute postsurgical pain has been demonstrated in numerous studies; however, the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of using pregabalin in various surgical procedures remain uncertain. We aim to assess the postsurgical analgesic efficacy and adverse events after pregabalin administration under different surgical categories using a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. A search of the literature was performed between August 2014 to April 2015, using PubMed, Ovid via EMBASE, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov with no limitation on publication year or language. Studies considered for inclusion were randomized controlled trials, reporting on relevant outcomes (2-, 24-hour pain scores, or 24 hour morphine-equivalent consumption) with treatment with perioperative pregabalin. Seventy-four studies were included. Pregabalin reduced pain scores at 2 hours in all categories: cardiothoracic (Hedge's g and 95%CI, −0.442 [−0.752 to −0.132], P = 0.005), ENT (Hedge g and 95%CI, −0.684 [−1.051 to −0.316], P < 0.0001), gynecologic (Hedge g, 95%CI, −0.792 [−1.235 to −0.350], P < 0.0001), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (Hedge g, 95%CI, –0.600 [–0.989 to –0.210], P = 0.003), orthopedic (Hedge g, 95%CI, −0.507 [−0.812 to −0.202], P = 0.001), spine (Hedge g, 95%CI, −0.972 [−1.537 to −0.407], P = 0.001), and miscellaneous procedures (Hedge g, 95%CI, −1.976 [−2.654 to −1.297], P < 0.0001). Pregabalin reduced 24-hour morphine consumption in gynecologic (Hedge g, 95%CI, −1.085 [−1.582 to −0.441], P = 0.001), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (Hedge g, 95%CI, –0.886 [–1.652 to –0.120], P = 0.023), orthopedic (Hedge g, 95%CI, −0.720 [−1.118 to −0.323], P < 0.0001), spine (Hedge g, 95%CI, −1.016 [−1.732 to −0.300], P = 0.005), and miscellaneous procedures (Hedge g, 95%CI, −1.329 [−2.286 to −0.372], P = 0

  6. Teratogenic Effects of Pregabalin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Etemad, Leila; Mohammad, Afshar; Mohammadpour, Amir Hooshang; Vahdati Mashhadi, Nasser; Moallem, Seyed Adel

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) have the potential to affect fetal development throughout pregnancy. Considering the broad therapeutic indications of pregabalin (PGB), its potential teratogenic effects and the levels of homocysteine have been studied. Materials and Methods: Timed-pregnant mice received one of three doses of PGB (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/day) or the vehicle control during organogenesis, intraperitoneally. The litters were stained and examined for malformations. Total homocysteine (tHcy) was measured in serum from the pregnant mice on GD18. Results: The rate of fetus malformations increased significantly in all treated groups as compared to the control group. The abnormalities included limb, vertebral column and craniofacial abnormalities. The most common abnormality was limb deformity. The percentage of fetal resorption significantly increased at higher doses. There was no significant difference in tHcy concentrations between the treated and control groups. Conclusion: Pregabalin may have potential teratogenic effects even in lower doses, however with less intensity than other AEDs. Therefore, it is suggested that great caution should be taken when prescribing it in pregnancy and further investigation for possible mechaninsms. PMID:24379963

  7. Comparison of propranolol and pregabalin for prophylaxis of childhood migraine: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bakhshandeh Bali, MohammadKazem; Rahbarimanesh, Ali Akbar; Sadeghi, Manelie; Sedighi, Mostafa; Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Ghofrani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Migraine involves 5-10% of children and adolescents. Thirty percent of children with severe migraine attacks have school absence and reduced quality of life that need preventive therapy. The purpose of this randomised control trial study is to compare the effectiveness, safety and the tolerability of pregabalin toward Propranolol in migraine prophylaxis of children. From May 2011 to October 2012, 99 children 3-15 years referred to the neurology clinic of Mofid Children's Hospital with a diagnosis of migraine enrolled the study. Patients randomly divided into two groups (A&B). We treated children of group A with capsule of pregabalin as children of group B with tablet of propranolol for at least 8 weeks. In this study, 99 patients were examined that 91 children reached the last stage. The group A consistsed of 46 patients, 12(26.1%) girls, 34 (73.9%) boys and the group B consisted of 45 patients, 14(31.1%) girls, 31 (68.9%) boys. Basis of age, gender, headache onset, headache frequency, migraine type, triggering and relieving factors there was no significant difference among these groups (P>0.05). After 4 and 8 weeks of Pregabalin usage monthly headache frequency decreased to 2.2±4.5 and 1.76±6.2 respectively. Propranolol reduced monthly headache frequency up to 3.73±6.11 and 3.34±5.95 later 4 and 8 weeks respectively. There was a significant difference between these two groups according to headache frequency reduction (P=0.04). Pregabalin efficacy in reducing the frequency and duration of pediatric migraine headache is considerable in comparison with propranolol. PMID:26024701

  8. Local knockdown of the NaV1.6 sodium channel reduces pain behaviors, sensory neuron excitability, and sympathetic sprouting in rat models of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Xie, W; Strong, J A; Zhang, J-M

    2015-04-16

    In the spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model of neuropathic pain, as in other pain models, abnormal spontaneous activity of myelinated sensory neurons occurs early and is essential for establishing pain behaviors and other pathologies. Sympathetic sprouting into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is observed after SNL, and sympathectomy reduces pain behavior. Sprouting and spontaneous activity may be mutually reinforcing: blocking neuronal activity reduces sympathetic sprouting, and sympathetic spouts functionally increase spontaneous activity in vitro. However, most studies in this field have used nonspecific methods to block spontaneous activity, methods that also block evoked and normal activity. In this study, we injected small inhibitory (si) RNA directed against the NaV1.6 sodium channel isoform into the DRG before SNL. This isoform can mediate high-frequency repetitive firing, like that seen in spontaneously active neurons. Local knockdown of NaV1.6 markedly reduced mechanical pain behaviors induced by SNL, reduced sympathetic sprouting into the ligated sensory ganglion, and blocked abnormal spontaneous activity and other measures of hyperexcitability in myelinated neurons in the ligated sensory ganglion. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that sympathetic sprouting preferentially targeted NaV1.6-positive neurons. Under these experimental conditions, NaV1.6 knockdown did not prevent or strongly alter single evoked action potentials, unlike previous less specific methods used to block spontaneous activity. NaV1.6 knockdown also reduced pain behaviors in another pain model, chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve, provided the model was modified so that the lesion site was relatively close to the siRNA-injected lumbar DRGs. The results highlight the relative importance of abnormal spontaneous activity in establishing both pain behaviors and sympathetic sprouting, and suggest that the NaV1.6 isoform may have value as a therapeutic target. PMID:25686526

  9. Impact of pregabalin treatment on synaptic plasticity and glial reactivity during the course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gleidy A A; Pradella, Fernando; Moraes, Adriel; Farias, Alessandro; dos Santos, Leonilda M B; de Oliveira, Alexandre L R

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease that affects young adults. It is characterized by generating a chronic demyelinating autoimmune inflammation in the central nervous system. An experimental model for studying MS is the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), induced by immunization with antigenic proteins from myelin. Aims The present study investigated the evolution of EAE in pregabalin treated animals up to the remission phase. Methods and results The results demonstrated a delay in the onset of the disease with statistical differences at the 10th and the 16th day after immunization. Additionally, the walking track test (CatWalk) was used to evaluate different parameters related to motor function. Although no difference between groups was obtained for the foot print pressure, the regularity index was improved post treatment, indicating a better motor coordination. The immunohistochemical analysis of putative synapse preservation and glial reactivity revealed that pregabalin treatment improved the overall morphology of the spinal cord. A preservation of circuits was depicted and the glial reaction was downregulated during the course of the disease. qRT-PCR data did not show immunomodulatory effects of pregabalin, indicating that the positive effects were restricted to the CNS environment. Conclusions Overall, the present data indicate that pregabalin is efficient for reducing the seriousness of EAE, delaying its course as well as reducing synaptic loss and astroglial reaction. PMID:25365796

  10. Gabapentin vs pregabalin as a premedication in lower limb orthopaedics surgery under combined spinal epidural technique

    PubMed Central

    Khetarpal, Ranjana; Kataria, Amar Parakash; Bajaj, Samita; Kaur, Harjinder; Singh, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pregabalin and gabapentin are the gamma-aminobutyric acid analogs used as a part of multimodal analgesic regimen. Aim: To compare the postoperative analgesic benefits of gabapentin or pregabalin as a premedication for lower limb orthopedic surgery under combined spinal-epidural techniques. Settings and Design: Randomized double-blind study. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 patients were divided into three groups: G, P, C who received gabapentin 1200 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, and placebo, respectively 1.5 h before surgery. All patients received combined spinal-epidural block with 3 ml of 0.5% intrathecal bupivacaine. Assessment of pain was made with visual analog scale (VAS). Postoperative analgesia was provided with epidural top-ups with 2.5 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and fentanyl 25 μg when VAS >3. Rescue analgesia in the form of injection diclofenac (75 mg) intramuscularly was given if VAS >3 even after epidural top-up. A total number of epidural top-ups, rescue analgesia, pain-free interval postspinal anesthesia, and sedation score were noted. Statistical Analysis: This was done using SPSS version 17. Mean and standard deviation were calculated using Chi-square test and analysis of variance. Results: The total postoperative analgesic time was 7.23 h in Group G, 14.80 h in Group P, and 4.17 h in Group C. A total number of epidural top-ups were 2.43 in Group G, 0.77 in Group P, and 4.43 in Group C. Conclusion: Pregabalin 300 mg and gabapentin 1200 mg significantly reduce the need of postoperative rescue analgesia, epidural top-ups, and increase the duration of postspinal anesthesia without altering hemodynamics with sedation as a major side effect. PMID:27212758

  11. [Neurorehabilitation for Neuropathic Pain].

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Jun; Osumi, Michihiro; Ogata, Toru; Sumitani, Masahiko

    2015-07-01

    Deafferentation, like as in limb amputation, brachial plexus avulsion injury and spinal cord injury, is usually followed by neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition and it impairs the quality of life profoundly. Based on recent advances in the cognitive neuroscience, we explain intimate relationships among neuropathic pain, reorganization of primary sensory and motor cortices and the sensorimotor integration of the deafferentated limb. From the standpoint of the sensorimotor integration theory for emerging phantom limb pain, we further discuss the analgesic mechanism of neurorehabilitation techniques such as mirror visual feedback treatment and its related neurorobotics advancement for neuropathic pain. PMID:26422941

  12. Pregabalin: a new approach to treatment of the dysautonomic crisis.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Berlin, Dena

    2009-08-01

    Nausea and dysautonomic crises severely limit function and quality of life for a large number of individuals with familial dysautonomia. We treated a small cohort of 15 patients with familial dysautonomia who suffered frequent dysautonomic crises with pregabalin. Nausea and overt crises markedly decreased in 13 (87%) of these patients and the overall assessments of benefit were extremely favorable, suggesting that pregabalin may be a potentially useful therapeutic agent for this disorder. PMID:19620195

  13. Pregabalin attenuates place escape/avoidance behavior in a rat model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Baastrup, Cathrine; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2011-01-25

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) pain in humans is difficult to treat, and the lack of valid methods to measure behavior comparable to the complex human pain experience preclinically represents an important obstacle to finding better treatments for this type of central pain. The place escape/avoidance paradigm (PEAP) relies on the active choice of an animal between its natural preference for a dark environment or pain relief, and it has been suggested to measure the affective-motivational component of pain. We have modified the method to a T10 spinal cord contusion model (SCC) of at-level central neuropathic pain in Sprague-Dawley rats. In order to demonstrate sensitivity to change in escape/avoidance behavior and thus the applicability of the PEAP method to predict drug efficacy, we investigated the effect of pregabalin (30 mg/kg) treatment in a randomized design. SCC animals displayed increased escape/avoidance behavior postinjury, indicating at-level mechanical hypersensitivity. Second, we found no correlation between state anxiety levels in SCC animals (elevated plus maze) and PEAP behavior, suggesting that the PEAP measurement is not biased by differences in anxiety levels. Third, we demonstrated a decrease in escape/avoidance behavior in response to treatment with the analgesic drug pregabalin. Thus, the PEAP may be applicable as a surrogate correlate of human pain. In conclusion, the primary finding in this study was a sensitivity to change in escape/avoidance behavior induced by pharmacological modulation with analgesics, supporting the use of the PEAP as a central outcome measure in preclinical SCI pain research. PMID:21070753

  14. Systemic Anti-inflammatory Corticosteroid Reduces Mechanical Pain Behavior, Sympathetic Sprouting, and Elevation of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiqing; Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Background: Chronic pain models are commonly defined as either nerve-injury or inflammation models, but recent work suggests inflammatory processes are important in nerve injury-induced pain. Methods: In the rat spinal nerve ligation model, the authors examined effects of systemic corticosteroid triamcinolone acetonide (TA) on the cytokine protein profile and sympathetic sprouting in the axotomized sensory ganglia, excitability of sensory neurons, and mechanical sensitivity. Results: By postoperative day 3, marked increases (5- to 16-fold) in monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, growth-related oncogene (GRO/KC or CXCL1), and interleukin (IL)-6 were observed, whereas IL-4 and IL-2 levels fell more than 4-fold. The increased cytokines and number of sympathetic basket formations in the sensory ganglia were reduced toward normal values by TA given starting at the time of injury. IL-4 and IL-2 levels were not restored by TA. Systemic TA also reduced the firing rate and incidence of bursting activity, but not the overall incidence of spontaneous activity, in large- and medium-sized neurons. Mechanical hypersensitivity on postoperative day 3 was reduced by TA, and some effect could still be observed 4 days after cessation of TA. However, starting TA at day 7 was ineffective. Conclusions: Several components of the spinal nerve injury model are responsive to corticosteroid, suggesting inflammatory processes are important in the development of neuropathic pain. The observation that TA was effective when given starting at the time of injury suggests that steroid treatment might alter the development of chronic pain after surgical procedures that involve nerve injury, such as amputation or hernia repair. PMID:17721250

  15. Neuropathic and psychogenic itch.

    PubMed

    Yosipovitch, Gil; Samuel, Lena S

    2008-01-01

    Neuropathic and psychogenic itch are two entities that have not been well studied. Neuropathic itch is related to pathology located at any point along the afferent pathway of the nervous system. It could be related to damage to the peripheral nervous system, such as in postherpetic neuropathy, brachioradial pruritus, notalgia paresthetica, and in central nervous system damage as a result of spinal cord tumors and demyelinization diseases such as multiple sclerosis. It has many clinical features similar to neuropathic pain. Patients complain of itch, which coincides with burning sensation, aching, and stinging. Psychogenic itch is related to psychologic abnormalities e.g., itch in obsessive compulsive disorders, depression, and delusions of parasitosis. Although no controlled studies have been conducted for treatment of neuropathic and psychogenic itch, medications that are part of the treatment armentarium for neuropathic pain, depression, and anxiety seem to be effective. PMID:18318883

  16. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  17. Neuropathic pain in cancer.

    PubMed

    Urch, C E; Dickenson, A H

    2008-05-01

    Neuropathic pain in cancer arises following injury to peripheral or central neurons, in a similar manner to such pain arising from a non-cancer injury. Much of our knowledge of neuropathic pain is based on peripheral originating events with little known about central neuropathic pain. This article explores some of the similarities and differences between cancer and non-cancer-related neuropathic pain. The neural pathways, ion channels, receptors and neurotransmitters that potentially can be altered in both neuropathies are the same; however the nature of the injury, the timing, repeated injuries and the co-existence of simultaneous non-neuropathic pain states lead to potential unique constellations of neuroreceptor and neurotransmitter expression in the context of cancer pain. This in turn may lead to different clinical presentation of pain sensations and potentially lead to specific treatment options. PMID:18492553

  18. Herpes simplex virus vector-mediated expression of interleukin-10 reduces below-level central neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Darryl; Harte, Steven E.; Morrow, Thomas J.; Wang, Shiyong; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuroimmune activation in the spinal dorsal horn plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic pain after peripheral nerve injury. Objective We wanted to examine the role of neuroimmune activation in below level neuropathic pain after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods Right hemilateral SCI was created in male Sprague Dawley rats by controlled blunt impact through a T12 laminectomy. Pain related behaviors were assessed using both evoked reflex responses and an operant conflict-avoidance test. Neuroimmune activation was blocked by the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) delivered by a non-replicating herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based gene transfer vector (vIL10). Markers of neuroimmune activation were assessed using immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results One week after SCI, injured animals demonstrated mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, and mechanical hyperalgesia in the hind limbs below the level of injury. Animals inoculated with vIL10 had a statistically significant reduction in all of these measures compared to injured rats or injured rats inoculated with control vector. Conflict-avoidance behavior of injured rats inoculated with vIL10 was consistent with significantly reduced pain compared to injured rats injected with control vector. These behavioral results correlated with a significant decrease in spinal tumor necrosis factor α (mTNFα) expression assessed by Western blot and astrocyte activation assessed by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunohistochemistry. Conclusion Below level pain after SCI is characterized by neuroimmune activation (increase mTNFα and astrocyte activation). Blunting of the neuroimmune response by HSV-mediated delivery of IL-10 reduced pain-related behaviors, and may represent a potential novel therapeutic agent. PMID:22593113

  19. Neuroprotective Effects of Pregabalin on Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Aşcı, Sanem; Demirci, Serpil; Aşcı, Halil; Doğuç, Duygu Kumbul; Onaran, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke is one of the most common causes of death and the leading cause of disability in adults. Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury causes cerebral edema, hemorrhage, and neuronal death. Aims: In post-ischemic reperfusion, free radical production causes brain tissue damage by oxidative stress. Pregabalin, an antiepileptic agent was shown to have antioxidant effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of pregabalin on ischemia and reperfusion in rat brain injury. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Male Wistar rats weighing (250–300 g) were randomly divided into six groups, each consisting of 6 rats: control (C), pregabalin (P), ischemia (I), pregabalin + ischemia (PI), ischemia + reperfusion (IR) and ischemia + reperfusion + pregabalin (PIR). Rats were initially pre-treated with 50 mg/kg/d pregabalin orally for two days. Then, animals that applied ischemia in I, PI, IR and PIR groups were exposed to carotid clamping for 30 minutes and 20 minutes reperfusion was performed in the relevant reperfusion groups. Results: NR2B receptor levels were significantly lower in the PIR group in comparison to the IR group. In the PIR group, Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) level had statistically significant decrease compared with IR group. Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) levels were also significantly increased in the PIR group compared with I, IR and control groups. In the PI and PIR groups, catalase (CAT) levels were also significantly increased compared with I and IR groups (p=0.03 and p=0.07, respectively). Conclusion: Pregabalin may protect the damage of oxidative stress after ischemia + reperfusion. This result would illuminate clinical studies in the future. PMID:27403394

  20. Development and evaluation of in situ gel of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Jyotsana R; Adokar, Bhushan R; Dua, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Background: Pregabalin (PRG), an analog of gamma-aminobutyric acid, reduces the release of many neurotransmitters, including glutamate, and noradrenaline. It is used for the treatment of epilepsy; simple and complex partial convulsion. The present research work aims to ensure a high drug absorption by retarding the advancement of PRG formulation through the gastrointestinal tract. The work aims to design a controlled release PRG formulation which is administered as liquid and further gels in the stomach and floats in gastric juice. Materials and Methods: In situ gelling formulations were prepared using sodium alginate, calcium chloride, sodium citrate, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) K100M, and sodium bicarbonate. The prepared formulations were evaluated for solution viscosity, drug content, in vitro gelling studies, gel strength, and in vitro drug release. The final formulation was optimized using a 32 full factorial design. Results: The formulation containing 2.5% w/v sodium alginate and 0.2% w/v calcium chloride were considered optimum since it showed minimum floating lag time (18 s), optimum viscosity (287.3 cps), and gel strength (4087.17 dyne/cm2). The optimized formulation follows Korsmeyer-Peppas kinetic model with n value 0.3767 representing Fickian diffusion mechanism of drug release. Conclusion: Floating in situ gelling system of PRG can be formulated using sodium alginate as a gelling polymer and calcium chloride as a complexing agent to control the drug release for about 12 h for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:26682193

  1. Transient Positive Horizontal Head Impulse Test in Pregabalin Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong-Hae; Kim, Yong Soo; Lee, Ju-Hoen; Jo, Hyunjin; Lee, Ae Young; Kim, Jae-Moon

    2015-12-01

    Head impulse test (HIT) is helpful to understanding high-frequency vestibulo-ocular reflex in patients with dizziness and imbalance. There are some reports on abnormal HITs in cerebellar disorder. To our knowledge, there was no report of transient bilateral positive head impulse related to antiepileptic drugs. A 65-year-old woman developed dizziness and imbalance after treatment with pregabalin for pain control of radiation cystitis. Neurological examination exhibited positive bilateral HIT results, in addition to ataxia and gaze-evoked rebound nystagmus. Pregabalin intoxication can evoke transient positive horizontal head impulse test as another indicator of cerebellar dysfunction. PMID:26819943

  2. Transient Positive Horizontal Head Impulse Test in Pregabalin Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seong-Hae; Kim, Yong Soo; Lee, Ju-Hoen; Jo, Hyunjin; Lee, Ae Young; Kim, Jae-Moon

    2015-01-01

    Head impulse test (HIT) is helpful to understanding high-frequency vestibulo-ocular reflex in patients with dizziness and imbalance. There are some reports on abnormal HITs in cerebellar disorder. To our knowledge, there was no report of transient bilateral positive head impulse related to antiepileptic drugs. A 65-year-old woman developed dizziness and imbalance after treatment with pregabalin for pain control of radiation cystitis. Neurological examination exhibited positive bilateral HIT results, in addition to ataxia and gaze-evoked rebound nystagmus. Pregabalin intoxication can evoke transient positive horizontal head impulse test as another indicator of cerebellar dysfunction. PMID:26819943

  3. Structural and Functional Small Fiber Abnormalities in the Neuropathic Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher H.; Bonyhay, Istvan; Benson, Adam; Wang, Ningshan; Freeman, Roy

    2013-01-01

    Objective To define the neuropathology, clinical phenotype, autonomic physiology and differentiating features in individuals with neuropathic and non-neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Methods Twenty-four subjects with POTS and 10 healthy control subjects had skin biopsy analysis of intra-epidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD), quantitative sensory testing (QST) and autonomic testing. Subjects completed quality of life, fatigue and disability questionnaires. Subjects were divided into neuropathic and non-neuropathic POTS, defined by abnormal IENFD and abnormal small fiber and sudomotor function. Results Nine of 24 subjects had neuropathic POTS and had significantly lower resting and tilted heart rates; reduced parasympathetic function; and lower phase 4 valsalva maneuver overshoot compared with those with non-neuropathic POTS (P<0.05). Neuropathic POTS subjects also had less anxiety and depression and greater overall self-perceived health-related quality of life scores than non-neuropathic POTS subjects. A sub-group of POTS patients (cholinergic POTS) had abnormal proximal sudomotor function and symptoms that suggest gastrointestinal and genitourinary parasympathetic nervous system dysfunction. Conclusions and Relevance POTS subtypes may be distinguished using small fiber and autonomic structural and functional criteria. Patients with non-neuropathic POTS have greater anxiety, greater depression and lower health-related quality of life scores compared to those with neuropathic POTS. These findings suggest different pathophysiological processes underlie the postural tachycardia in neuropathic and non-neuropathic POTS patients. The findings have implications for the therapeutic interventions to treat this disorder. PMID:24386408

  4. Quantitative Sensory Testing Predicts Pregabalin Efficacy in Painful Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Olesen, Søren S.; Graversen, Carina; Bouwense, Stefan A. W.; van Goor, Harry; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H. G.; Drewes, Asbjørn M.

    2013-01-01

    Background A major problem in pain medicine is the lack of knowledge about which treatment suits a specific patient. We tested the ability of quantitative sensory testing to predict the analgesic effect of pregabalin and placebo in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Methods Sixty-four patients with painful chronic pancreatitis received pregabalin (150–300 mg BID) or matching placebo for three consecutive weeks. Analgesic effect was documented in a pain diary based on a visual analogue scale. Responders were defined as patients with a reduction in clinical pain score of 30% or more after three weeks of study treatment compared to baseline recordings. Prior to study medication, pain thresholds to electric skin and pressure stimulation were measured in dermatomes T10 (pancreatic area) and C5 (control area). To eliminate inter-subject differences in absolute pain thresholds an index of sensitivity between stimulation areas was determined (ratio of pain detection thresholds in pancreatic versus control area, ePDT ratio). Pain modulation was recorded by a conditioned pain modulation paradigm. A support vector machine was used to screen sensory parameters for their predictive power of pregabalin efficacy. Results The pregabalin responders group was hypersensitive to electric tetanic stimulation of the pancreatic area (ePDT ratio 1.2 (0.9–1.3)) compared to non-responders group (ePDT ratio: 1.6 (1.5–2.0)) (P = 0.001). The electrical pain detection ratio was predictive for pregabalin effect with a classification accuracy of 83.9% (P = 0.007). The corresponding sensitivity was 87.5% and specificity was 80.0%. No other parameters were predictive of pregabalin or placebo efficacy. Conclusions The present study provides first evidence that quantitative sensory testing predicts the analgesic effect of pregabalin in patients with painful chronic pancreatitis. The method can be used to tailor pain medication based on patient’s individual sensory profile and thus

  5. [Toothache with a neuropathic background].

    PubMed

    Khatchaturian, V; de Wijer, A; Kalaykova, S I; Steenks, M H

    2015-03-01

    A 48-year old woman in good general health was referred to the orofacial pain clinic in a centre for special dentistry with a toothache in the premolar region of the left maxillary quadrant. The complaints had existed for 15 years and various dental treatments, including endodontic treatments, apical surgery, extraction and splint therapy, had not helped to alleviate the complaints. As a result of the fact that anti-epileptic drugs were able to reduce the pain it was concluded that this 'toothache' satisfied the criteria of an atypical odontalgia: 'toothache' with a neuropathic background. PMID:26181392

  6. Pregabalin in Childhood Epilepsy: A Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    MOLLAMOHAMMADI, Mohsen; TONKABONI, Seyed Hassan; PIRZADEH, Zahra; Vahedian, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of active epilepsy is about 0.5–1%, and approximately 70% of patients are cured with first anti-epileptic drugs and the remaining patients need multiple drugs. Pregabalin as an add-on therapy has a postive effect on refractory seizures in adults. To the best of our knowledge, there is no research with this drug in childhood epilepsy. We use pregabalin in children with refractory seizures as an add-on therapy. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of pregabalin in the reduction of seizures for refractory epilepsy. Material & Methods Forty patients with refractory seizures who were referred to Mofid Children’s Hospital and Hazrat Masoumeh Hospital were selected. A questionnaire based on patient record forms, demographic data (age, gender,…), type of seizure, clinical signs, EEG record, imaging report, drugs that had been used, drugs currently being used, and the number of seizures before and after Pregabalin treatment was completed. We checked the number of seizures after one and four months. Results After one month, 26.8% of patients had more than a 50% reduction in seizures and 14.6% of these patients were seizure-free; 12.2% had a 25–50% reduction; and approximately 61% had less than a 25% reduction or no change in seizures. After the fourth month, 34.1% of patients had more than a 50% reduction in seizures and 24.4% of these patients were seizure-free. Additionally, 65.9% of patients had less than 50% reduction in seizures (9.8% between 25–50% and 56.1% less than 25% or without improvement). Conclusion We recommend Pregabalin as an add-on therapy for refractory seizures (except for myoclonic seizures) for children. PMID:25657772

  7. Separation and characterization of modified pregabalins in terms of cyclodextrin complexation, using capillary electrophoresis and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Béni, Szabolcs; Sohajda, Tamás; Neumajer, Gábor; Iványi, Róbert; Szente, Lajos; Noszál, Béla

    2010-03-11

    The (S)-(+)-isomer of 3-isobutyl-GABA (pregabalin), the blockbuster drug in the treatment of neuropathic pain has been separated from its R isomer by cyclodextrin modified capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) using uncoated fused-silica capillary. Derivatization of the single isomer and the racemate with tosyl- and dansyl-chloride was carried out to introduce strong UV chromophores of different size. CE-pH titrations were performed to determine the dissociation constants for both derivatives. 30 cyclodextrin (CD) derivatives as chiral agents were used at four different pH values to study the enantioseparation of the differently protonated guest molecules. The separation was optimized as a function of CD concentration, buffer type and concentration, pH and applied voltage. For the tosylated derivate the best resolution (R(s)=2.76) was found with 6-monodeoxy-6-mono-(3-hydroxy)-propylamino-beta-cyclodextrin hydrochloride (PA-beta-CD) at pH 6.8, while with the same selector at pH 7.2 enantioseparation with an R(s) value of 4.32 could be achieved for the dansylated pregabalin. At pH 2.5 for the dansylated derivative trimethylated alpha- and beta-CD systems resulted the most significant separation (R(s)=7.38 and R(s)=7.74, respectively). Experiments with dual CD systems were carried out as well. The stoichiometry of the complexes was determined using the Job plot method and resulted in a 1:1 complex in both cases. The structures of the inclusion complexes were elucidated using 2D ROESY NMR experiments. PMID:19914021

  8. Favouring inhibitory synaptic drive mediated by GABAA receptors in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala efficiently reduces pain symptoms in neuropathic mice.

    PubMed

    Zeitler, Alexandre; Kamoun, Nisrine; Goyon, Stéphanie; Wahis, Jérôme; Charlet, Alexandre; Poisbeau, Pierrick; Darbon, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Pain is an emotion and neuropathic pain symptoms are modulated by supraspinal structures such as the amygdala. The central nucleus of the amygdala is often called the 'nociceptive amygdala', but little is known about the role of the basolateral amygdala. Here, we monitored the mechanical nociceptive thresholds in a mouse model of neuropathic pain and infused modulators of the glutamate/GABAergic transmission in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) via chronically-implanted cannulas. We found that an N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptor antagonist (MK-801) exerted a potent antiallodynic effect, whereas a transient allodynia was induced after perfusion of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist. Potentiating GABAA receptor function using diazepam or etifoxine (a non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic) fully but transiently alleviated mechanical allodynia. Interestingly, the antiallodynic effect of etifoxine disappeared in animals that were incapable of producing 3α-steroids. Diazepam had a similar effect but of shorter duration. As indicated by patch-clamp recordings of BLA neurons, these effects were mediated by a potentiation of GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. Together with a presynaptic elevation of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency, the duration and amplitude of GABAA miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents were also increased (postsynaptic effect). The analgesic contribution of endogenous neurosteroid seemed to be exclusively postsynaptic. This study highlights the importance of the BLA and the local inhibitory/excitatory neuronal network activity while setting the mechanical nociceptive threshold. Furthermore, it appears that promoting inhibition in this specific nucleus could fully alleviate pain symptoms. Therefore, the BLA could be a novel interesting target for the development of pharmacological or non-pharmacological therapies. PMID:26913957

  9. Early treatment with UR13870, a novel inhibitor of p38α mitogenous activated protein kinase, prevents hyperreflexia and anxiety behaviors, in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Galan-Arriero, Iriana; Avila-Martin, Gerardo; Ferrer-Donato, Agueda; Gomez-Soriano, Julio; Piazza, Stefano; Taylor, Julian

    2015-09-14

    Microglia cell activation plays a role in the development of neuropathic pain partly due to the activation of the p38α MAPK signaling pathway after nerve injury. In this study we assessed the effect of UR13870, a p38α MAPK inhibitor, in the "spared nerve injury" (SNI) model, to study its effects on modulation of spinal microglial activation and to test behavioral hyperreflexia responses and cerebral-mediated pain behavior. The effect of daily administration of UR13870 (10mg/kg p.o.) and Pregabalin (50mg/kg p.o.) on reflex hypersensitivity to mechanical and cold test stimuli and on affective related pain responses measured with the place escape avoidance paradigm and the open field-induced anxiety test, were evaluated after SNI in Sprague Dawley rats. Microglial reactivity in the ipsilateral lumbar laminae I/II dorsal horn was evaluated with OX-42 immunohistochemistry. UR13870 treatment significantly decreased hindlimb hyperreflexia to both mechanical and cold stimuli after SNI without loss of general motor function, in addition to a reduction in pain-related anxiety behavior at day 21 after SNI, accompanied by normalization of OX-42 immunoreactivity within the ipsilateral lumbar dorsal horn. Pregabalin treatment only reduced mechanical hyperreflexia and affected general motor function. Oral administration of the p38α MAPK inhibitor, UR13870, mediates antinociception to both mechanical and cold stimuli, and significantly restored inner-zone exploration in the open field test, accompanied by normalization in dorsal horn microglial activation in the SNI model. PMID:26240995

  10. [Non pharmacologic treatment of neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Guastella, Virginie; Mick, Gérard; Laurent, Bernard

    2008-02-01

    Nondrug treatments of neuropathic pain should always begin at the same time as pharmacologic treatment. There are three types of nondrug treatment for neuropathic pain: physical, surgical, and "psychocorporal" and psychotherapeutic treatment. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a simple physical treatment that strengthens local inhibitory controls and is indicated in focal neuropathic pain when upstream stimulation is possible for a superficial sensitive nerve trunk. Destructive surgery is represented today by "DREZotomy", destruction of nociceptive fibers and their dorsal root entry zones. It is indicated essentially in intractable pain due to plexus avulsion. Functional surgery is implanted electric stimulation--either spinal or central (encephalic)--of structures that exert inhibitory control on the pain pathways. Spinal stimulation is performed at the level of the posterior spinal cord and is indicated essentially in segmental mononeuropathies refractory to drug treatment. Central stimulation is performed at the motor cortex and is indicated for refractory central pain. "Psychocorporal" techniques (relaxation, sophrology, hypnosis) are useful to reduce anxiety and neurovegetative hypertonicity, both factors that aggravate neuropathic pain. PMID:18191370

  11. Guidelines in the management of diabetic nerve pain: clinical utility of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron I; Casellini, Carolina M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. It presents as a variety of syndromes for which there is no universally accepted unique classification. Sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common type, affecting about 30% of diabetic patients in hospital care and 25% of those in the community. Pain is the reason for 40% of patient visits in a primary care setting, and about 20% of these have had pain for greater than 6 months. Chronic pain may be nociceptive, which occurs as a result of disease or damage to tissue with no abnormality in the nervous system. In contrast, neuropathic pain is defined as “pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system.” Persistent neuropathic pain interferes significantly with quality of life, impairing sleep and recreation; it also significantly impacts emotional well-being, and is associated with depression, anxiety, and noncompliance with treatment. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a difficult-to-manage clinical problem, and patients with this condition are more apt to seek medical attention than those with other types of diabetic neuropathy. Early recognition of psychological problems is critical to the management of pain, and physicians need to go beyond the management of pain per se if they are to achieve success. This evidence-based review of the assessment of the patient with pain in diabetes addresses the state-of-the-art management of pain, recognizing all the conditions that produce pain in diabetes and the evidence in support of a variety of treatments currently available. A search of the full Medline database for the last 10 years was conducted in August 2012 using the terms painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, painful diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy, painful diabetic neuropathy and pain in diabetes. In addition, recent reviews addressing this issue were adopted as necessary. In particular, reports from the American Academy of

  12. Ocular neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Perry; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    As the biological alarm of impending or actual tissue damage, pain is essential for our survival. However, when it is initiated and/or sustained by dysfunctional elements in the nociceptive system, it is itself a disease known as neuropathic pain. While the critical nociceptive system provides a number of protective functions, it is unique in its central role of monitoring, preserving and restoring the optical tear film in the face of evaporative attrition without which our vision would be non-functional. Meeting this existential need resulted in the evolution of the highly complex, powerful and sensitive dry eye alarm system integrated in the peripheral and central trigeminal sensory network. The clinical consequences of corneal damage to these nociceptive pathways are determined by the type and location of its pathological elements and can range from the spectrum known as dry eye disease to the centalised oculofacial neuropathic pain syndrome characterised by a striking disparity between the high intensity of symptoms and paucity of external signs. These changes parallel those observed in somatic neuropathic pain. When seen through the neuroscience lens, diseases responsible for inadequately explained chronic eye pain (including those described as dry eye) can take on new meanings that may clarify long-standing enigmas and point to new approaches for developing preventive, symptomatic and disease-modifying interventions for these currently refractory disorders. PMID:25943558

  13. The Role of NMDARs Ligands on Antinociceptive Effects of Pregabalin in the Tail Flick Test

    PubMed Central

    Meymandi, Manzumeh-Shamsi; Keyhanfar, Fariborz; Yazdanpanah, Omid; Heravi, Gioia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregabalin as a new anticonvulsant has been used in different pain treatments. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) ligands in antinociceptive effect of pregabalin in mice using tail flick. Materials and Methods: NMDA (15 and 30 mg/kg) as an agonist or MK801 (0.02 and 0.05 mg/kg) as an antagonist were injected intraperitoneally either alone or 15 minutes before antinociceptive dose of pregabalin (100 mg/kg). Then the latency times and %MPE were measured in the tail flick assay during 75 minutes. Results: NMDA and MK801 had no effects alone. NMDA pretreatment significantly decreased the latency times of pregabalin till 75th minutes. In NMDA pretreated groups, %MPE30 unlike %MPE75 decreased significantly compared to those of pregabalin. MK801 delayed the latency times in pretreated groups, but %MPE30 and %MPE75 did not change significantly compared to pregabalin alone. Conclusions: Our findings support the role of NMDARs in pregabalin antinociception, because the NMDAR agonist, unlike the antagonist, decreased the antinociceptive effect of pregabalin, even if tail flick is not an adequate pain assessment method in this regard. PMID:26587404

  14. Topical capsaicin formulations in the management of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Mark; Pasvankas, George

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the scientific and clinical evidence supporting the use of topical formulations containing the pungent principle of chili peppers--capsaicin, for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain. Given the limitations of current oral and parenteral therapies for the management of pain arising from various forms of nerve injury, alternate therapeutic approaches that are not associated with systemic adverse events that limit quality of life, impair function, or threaten respiratory depression are critically needed. Moreover, neuropathic conditions can be complicated by progressive changes in the central and peripheral nervous system, leading to persistent reorganization of pain pathways and chronic neuropathic pain. Recent advances in the use of high-dose topical capsaicin preparations hold promise in managing a wide range of painful conditions associated with peripheral neuropathies and may in fact help reduce suffering by reversing progressive changes in the nervous system associated with chronic neuropathic pain conditions. PMID:24941666

  15. Neuropathic cancer pain: What we are dealing with? How to manage it?

    PubMed Central

    Esin, Ece; Yalcin, Suayib

    2014-01-01

    Cancer pain is a serious health problem, and imposes a great burden on the lives of patients and their families. Pain can be associated with delay in treatment, denial of treatment, or failure of treatment. If the pain is not treated properly it may impair the quality of life. Neuropathic cancer pain (NCP) is one of the most complex phenomena among cancer pain syndromes. NCP may result from direct damage to nerves due to acute diagnostic/therapeutic interventions. Chronic NCP is the result of treatment complications or malignancy itself. Although the reason for pain is different in NCP and noncancer neuropathic pain, the pathophysiologic mechanisms are similar. Data regarding neuropathic pain are primarily obtained from neuropathic pain studies. Evidence pertaining to NCP is limited. NCP due to chemotherapeutic toxicity is a major problem for physicians. In the past two decades, there have been efforts to standardize NCP treatment in order to provide better medical service. Opioids are the mainstay of cancer pain treatment; however, a new group of therapeutics called coanalgesic drugs has been introduced to pain treatment. These coanalgesics include gabapentinoids (gabapentin, pregabalin), antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants, duloxetine, and venlafaxine), corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists, and cannabinoids. Pain can be encountered throughout every step of cancer treatment, and thus all practicing oncologists must be capable of assessing pain, know the possible underlying pathophysiology, and manage it appropriately. The purpose of this review is to discuss neuropathic pain and NCP in detail, the relevance of this topic, clinical features, possible pathology, and treatments of NCP. PMID:24790459

  16. Targeting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors for treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Yi; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains a major clinical problem and a therapeutic challenge because existing analgesics are often ineffective and can cause serious side effects. Increased N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activity contributes to central sensitization in certain types of neuropathic pain. NMDAR antagonists can reduce hyperalgesia and allodynia in animal models of neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury and diabetic neuropathy. Clinically used NMDAR antagonists, such as ketamine and dextromethorphan, are generally effective in patients with neuropathic pain, such as complex regional pain syndrome and painful diabetic neuropathy. However, patients with postherpetic neuralgia respond poorly to NMDAR antagonists. Recent studies on identifying NMDAR-interacting proteins and molecular mechanisms of increased NMDAR activity in neuropathic pain could facilitate the development of new drugs to attenuate abnormal NMDAR activity with minimal impairment of the physiological function of NMDARs. Combining NMDAR antagonists with other analgesics could also lead to better management of neuropathic pain without causing serious side effects. PMID:21686074

  17. Neuropathic itch: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Astrid; Ständer, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pruritus (CP) is a frequent symptom in the general population; in 8% of all patients, it has a neuropathic origin. CP is of neuropathic origin when nerve fiber damage is responsible for the symptom. The damage can be caused by compression or degeneration of the nerve fibers in the skin or extracutaneous in peripheral nerves or the central nervous system. There are significant differences in the pathogenesis and in the clinical presentation of neuropathic CP. Localized neuropathic CP such as brachioradial pruritus or notalgia paresthetica are due to a circumscribed nerve compression and are often limited on the corresponding dermatome. In contrast, generalized neuropathic CP, as in small fiber neuropathies, may be associated with a systemic or metabolic underlying disease. It is not always easy to establish the diagnosis because a variety of diseases can be responsible for this type of CP. The present study shows an overview of possible diseases, diagnostic tools, and the relevant therapy strategies. PMID:23551367

  18. (S)-lacosamide inhibition of CRMP2 phosphorylation reduces postoperative and neuropathic pain behaviors through distinct classes of sensory neurons identified by constellation pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Moutal, Aubin; Chew, Lindsey A; Yang, Xiaofang; Wang, Yue; Yeon, Seul Ki; Telemi, Edwin; Meroueh, Seeneen; Park, Ki Duk; Shrinivasan, Raghuraman; Gilbraith, Kerry B; Qu, Chaoling; Xie, Jennifer Y; Patwardhan, Amol; Vanderah, Todd W; Khanna, May; Porreca, Frank; Khanna, Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    Chronic pain affects the life of millions of people. Current treatments have deleterious side effects. We have advanced a strategy for targeting protein interactions which regulate the N-type voltage-gated calcium (CaV2.2) channel as an alternative to direct channel block. Peptides uncoupling CaV2.2 interactions with the axonal collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) were antinociceptive without effects on memory, depression, and reward/addiction. A search for small molecules that could recapitulate uncoupling of the CaV2.2-CRMP2 interaction identified (S)-lacosamide [(S)-LCM], the inactive enantiomer of the Food and Drug Administration-approved antiepileptic drug (R)-lacosamide [(R)-LCM, Vimpat]. We show that (S)-LCM, but not (R)-LCM, inhibits CRMP2 phosphorylation by cyclin dependent kinase 5, a step necessary for driving CaV2.2 activity, in sensory neurons. (S)-lacosamide inhibited depolarization-induced Ca influx with a low micromolar IC50. Voltage-clamp electrophysiology experiments demonstrated a commensurate reduction in Ca currents in sensory neurons after an acute application of (S)-LCM. Using constellation pharmacology, a recently described high content phenotypic screening platform for functional fingerprinting of neurons that uses subtype-selective pharmacological agents to elucidate cell-specific combinations (constellations) of key signaling proteins that define specific cell types, we investigated if (S)-LCM preferentially acts on certain types of neurons. (S)-lacosamide decreased the dorsal root ganglion neurons responding to mustard oil, and increased the number of cells responding to menthol. Finally, (S)-LCM reversed thermal hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia in a model of postoperative pain, and 2 models of neuropathic pain. Thus, using (S)-LCM to inhibit CRMP2 phosphorylation is a novel and efficient strategy to treat pain, which works by targeting specific sensory neuron populations. PMID:26967696

  19. Neuropathic orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Benoliel, Rafael; Eliav, Eli

    2008-05-01

    Neuropathic orofacial pain is a general term employed to describe a number of clinical syndromes, which may be spontaneous or triggered by local trauma or systemic disorders. Symptomatically these painful syndromes may be episodic or continuous and are often difficult to distinguish from dental pathology. In the present article, we review the diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutic approaches to trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgias, orofacial pain associated with herpetic infection, persistent idiopathic facial pain (previously termed atypical facial pain), post-traumatic orofacial neuropathy and neuritis. PMID:18343328

  20. Managing Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, Robert Carter Wellford; Lawson, Erin; Backonja, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) arises from injuries or diseases affecting the somatosensory component of the nervous system at any level of the peripheral or central nervous system. NP is diagnosed based on common neurologic signs and symptoms. NP is best treated with a combination of multiple therapeutic approaches, and treatments include conservative, complementary, medical, interventional, and surgical treatment modalities. Goals of treatment are the same as in pain management and include improvement in pain control and in coping skills as well as restoration of functional status. Most patients with NP benefit most from an individualized, multimodal approach that emphasizes both pain and function. PMID:26614725

  1. Topical amitriptyline and ketamine for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    A neuropathy is a disturbance of function or pathological change in nerves. In some cases, peripheral neuropathic pain may occur due to a lesion or disease of the peripheral somatosensory nervous system. Efficacy of different agents for peripheral neuropathic pain conditions is less than optimal. The administration of topical analgesics might be an option, due to the potential of reduced adverse effects and increased patient compliance. There is major interest in compounding topical analgesics for peripheral neuropathic pain, but several challenges remain for this approach. Topical analgesics have the potential to be a valuable additional approach for the management of peripheral neuropathic pain. Topical amitriptyline-ketamine combination (AK) is a promising agent for peripheral neuropathic pain conditions. Some studies have shown its efficacy in neuropathic pain conditions. However, this data was not uniformely obtained and its role remains still controversial. Efficacy may depend on many factors, including the choice of the vehicle, the concentration, the pain site, and specific diseases. More studies are necessary to support the use of AK in clinical practice. PMID:26488799

  2. Early dexamethasone relieves trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Han, S R; Yeo, S P; Lee, M K; Bae, Y C; Ahn, D K

    2010-09-01

    The analgesic effects of dexamethasone on neuropathic pain have been controversial. The present study investigated the effects of dexamethasone on mechanical allodynia in rats with mal-positioned dental implants. Under anesthesia, the left mandibular second molar was extracted and replaced by a miniature dental implant to injure the inferior alveolar nerve. Nociceptive behavior was examined on each designated day after surgery. Mal-positioned dental implants significantly decreased air-puff thresholds both ipsilateral and contralateral to the injury site. Distinct mechanical hyperalgesia and cold and thermal hypersensitivity were also observed bilaterally. Daily administration of dexamethasone produced prolonged anti-allodynic effects (25 or 50 mg/kg, i.p.), but failed to reduce mechanical allodynia when it had already been established. Therefore, our findings provide that early treatment with dexamethasone is important in the treatment of nociceptive behavior suggestive of trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:20581355

  3. Clinical utility, safety, and efficacy of pregabalin in the treatment of fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Bhusal, Santosh; Diomampo, Sherilyn; Magrey, Marina N

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic debilitating medical syndrome with limited therapeutic options. Pregabalin, an anticonvulsant and α-2-Δ subunit receptor ligand, is one of the anchor drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia. The drug has shown clinically meaningful benefits across multiple symptom domains of fibromyalgia. Efficacy of pregabalin in fibromyalgia pain has been evaluated in at least five high-quality randomized trials, two long-term extension studies, a meta-analysis, a Cochrane database systematic review, and several post hoc analyses. These studies also hint towards a meaningful benefit on sleep, functioning, quality of life, and work productivity. Side effects of pregabalin, although common, are mild to moderate in intensity. They are noted early during therapy, improve or disappear with dose reduction, and are not usually life- or organ threatening. In most patients, tolerance develops to the most common side effects, dizziness, and somnolence, with time. With close clinical monitoring at initiation or dose titration, pregabalin can be effectively used in primary care setting. Pregabalin is cost saving with long-term use and its cost-effectiveness profile is comparable, if not better, to that of other drugs used in fibromyalgia. In the present era of limited therapeutic options, pregabalin undoubtedly retains its role as one of cardinal drugs used in the treatment of fibromyalgia. This review intends to discuss the clinical utility of pregabalin in the management of fibromyalgia with a focus on efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness. PMID:26937205

  4. The neuropathic diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Rathur, Haris M; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic foot problems are common throughout the world, and result in major medical, social and economic consequences for the patients, their families, and society. Foot ulcers are likely to be of neuropathic origin and, therefore, are eminently preventable. Individuals with the greatest risk of ulceration can easily be identified by careful clinical examination of their feet: education and frequent follow-up is indicated for these patients. When infection complicates a foot ulcer, the combination can be limb-threatening, or life-threatening. Infection is defined clinically, but wound cultures assist in identification of causative pathogens. Tissue specimens are strongly preferred to wound swabs for wound cultures. Antimicrobial therapy should be guided by culture results, and although such therapy may cure the infection, it does not heal the wound. Alleviation of the mechanical load on ulcers (offloading) should always be a part of treatment. Plantar neuropathic ulcers typically heal in 6 weeks with nonremovable casts, because pressure at the ulcer site is mitigated and compliance is enforced. The success of other approaches to offloading similarly depends on the patient's adherence to the strategy used for pressure relief. PMID:17179926

  5. Pregabalin: a review of its use in adults with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2014-09-01

    Pregabalin (Lyrica(®)), a well established anxiolytic agent, has been approved in the EU for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in adults. It has a distinct mechanism of action relative to other anti-anxiety agents (α2δ binding at presynaptic voltage dependent calcium channels leading to inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission), a rapid onset of effect (typically ≤1 week) and broad spectrum activity against both the psychic and somatic symptoms of GAD. In long-term studies, pregabalin maintained improvements in anxiety symptoms that occurred in response to short-term treatment and delayed the time to relapse of GAD compared with placebo. Common comorbidities of GAD, such as insomnia, gastrointestinal symptoms and subsyndromal depression, have no effect on the anxiolytic efficacy of, and moreover are specifically improved by, pregabalin. Treatment with pregabalin is generally well tolerated; the drug has an adverse event profile that includes dizziness, somnolence and weight gain. The potential for abuse of pregabalin is low; the risk of withdrawal symptoms is generally low when the drug is discontinued gradually (over 1 week). Alongside selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), pregabalin is considered a first-line agent for the long-term treatment of GAD by the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry. It should be stressed, however, that definitive head-to-head studies comparing pregabalin with SSRI/SNRIs, including in patients with GAD and co-morbid major depressive disorder, are currently lacking. Recently, a study of SSRI/SNRI augmentation with pregabalin yielded positive results, while another study of switching from long-term benzodiazepine therapy to pregabalin was inconclusive; further investigations on these topics are warranted. PMID:25149863

  6. In vitro study of the neuropathic potential of the organophosphorus compounds fenamiphos and profenofos: Comparison with mipafox and paraoxon.

    PubMed

    Emerick, Guilherme L; Fernandes, Laís S; de Paula, Eloísa Silva; Barbosa, Fernando; dos Santos, Neife Aparecida Guinaim; dos Santos, Antonio Cardozo

    2015-08-01

    Organophosphorus-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) is a central-peripheral distal axonopathy that develops 8-14 days after poisoning by a neuropathic organophosphorus compound (OP). Several OPs that caused OPIDN were withdrawn from the agricultural market due to induction of serious delayed effects. Therefore, the development of in vitro screenings able to differentiate neuropathic from non-neuropathic OPs is of crucial importance. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in the neurotoxic effects of mipafox (neuropathic OP) and paraoxon (non-neuropathic OP) in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, using the inhibition and aging of neuropathy target esterase (NTE), inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), activation of calpain, neurite outgrowth, cytotoxicity and intracellular calcium as indicators. Additionally, the potential of fenamiphos and profenofos to cause acute and/or delayed effects was also evaluated. Mipafox had the lowest IC50 and induced the highest percentage of aging of NTE among the OPs evaluated. Only mipafox was able to cause calpain activation after 24 h of incubation. Concentrations of mipafox and fenamiphos which inhibited at least 70% of NTE were also able to reduce neurite outgrowth. Cytotoxicity was higher in non-neuropathic than in neuropathic OPs while the intracellular calcium levels were higher in neuropathic than in non-neuropathic OPs. In conclusion, the SH-SY5Y cellular model was selective to differentiate neuropathic from non-neuropathic OPs; fenamiphos, but not profenofos presented results compatible with the induction of OPIDN. PMID:25910916

  7. Gelsemine alleviates both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in partial sciatic nerve ligation mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-er; Li, Ya-dong; Luo, Yan-jia; Wang, Tian-xiao; Wang, Hui-jing; Chen, Shuo-nan; Qu, Wei-min; Huang, Zhi-li

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Gelsemine, an alkaloid from the Chinese herb Gelsemium elegans (Gardn & Champ) Benth., is effective in mitigating chronic pain in rats. In the present study we investigated whether the alkaloid improved sleep disturbance, the most common comorbid symptoms of chronic pain, in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. Methods: Mice were subjected to partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). After the mice were injected with gelsemine or pregabalin (the positive control) intraperitoneally, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed, and electroencephalogram (EEG)/electromyogram (EMG) recording was performed. Motor performance of the mice was assessed using rota-rod test. c-Fos expression in the brain was analyzed with immunohistochemical staining. Results: In PSNL mice, gelsemine (2 and 4 mg/kg) increased the mechanical threshold for 4 h and prolonged the thermal latencies for 3 h. Furthermore, gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at 6:30 AM) increased non-rapid eye movement (non-REM, NREM) sleep, decreased wakefulness, but did not affect REM sleep during the first 3 h in PSNL mice. Sleep architecture analysis showed that gelsemine decreased the mean duration of wakefulness and increased the total number of episodes of NREM sleep during the first 3 h after the dosing. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg) did not impair motor coordination in PSNL mice. Immunohistochemical study showed that PSNL increased c-Fos expression in the neurons of the anterior cingulate cortex, and gelsemine (4 mg/kg) decreased c-Fos expression by 58%. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at either 6:30 AM or 8:30 PM) did not produce hypnotic effect in normal mice. Pregabalin produced similar antinociceptive and hypnotic effects, but impaired motor coordination in PSNL mice. Conclusion: Gelsemine is an effective agent for treatment of both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in PSNL mice; anterior cingulate cortex might play a role in the hypnotic effects of gelsemine. PMID:26388157

  8. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to manage chronic intractable neuropathic pain and to evaluate the adverse events and Ontario-specific economic profile of this technology. Clinical Need SCS is a reversible pain therapy that uses low-voltage electrical pulses to manage chronic, intractable neuropathic pain of the trunk or limbs. Neuropathic pain begins or is caused by damage or dysfunction to the nervous system and can be difficult to manage. The prevalence of neuropathic pain has been estimated at about 1.5% of the population in the United States and 1% of the population in the United Kingdom. These prevalence rates are generalizable to Canada. Neuropathic pain is extremely difficult to manage. People with symptoms that persist for at least 6 months or who have symptoms that last longer than expected for tissue healing or resolution of an underlying disease are considered to have chronic pain. Chronic pain is an emotional, social, and economic burden for those living with it. Depression, reduced quality of life (QOL), absenteeism from work, and a lower household income are positively correlated with chronic pain. Although the actual number is unknown, a proportion of people with chronic neuropathic pain fail to obtain pain relief from pharmacological therapies despite adequate and reasonable efforts to use them. These people are said to have intractable neuropathic pain, and they are the target population for SCS. The most common indication for SCS in North America is chronic intractable neuropathic pain due to failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), a term that describes persistent leg or back and leg pain in patients who have had back or spine surgery. Neuropathic pain due to complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), which can develop in the distal aspect of a limb a minor injury, is another common indication. To a lesser extent, chronic intractable

  9. Preparation and evaluation of floating tablets of pregabalin.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Navjot; Kumar, Rakesh; Sarwal, Amita; Sinha, V R

    2016-01-01

    Floating tablets of pregabalin were prepared using different concentrations of the gums (xanthan gum and guar gum), Carbopol 974P NF and HPMC K100. Optimized formulations were studied for physical tests, floating time, swelling behavior, in vitro release studies and stability studies. In vitro drug release was higher for tablet batches containing guar and xanthan gum as compared to the batches containing Carbopol 974P NF. Tablet batches were subjected to stability studies and evaluated by different parameters (drug release, drug content, FTIR and DSC studies). The optimized tablet batch was selected for in vivo pharmacodynamic studies (PTZ induced seizures). The results obtained showed that the onset of jerks and clonus were delayed and extensor phase was abolished with time in treated groups. A significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed in control and treated group behavior indicating an excellent activity of the formulation for a longer period (>12 h). PMID:26146770

  10. The neuropathic joint.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, W

    1994-01-01

    Neuropathic arthritis is a destructive arthropathy frequently associated with loss of proprioception. A third of patients, however, may have no demonstrable neurological deficit. Patients with diabetes, syphilis, syringomyelia and other neuropathies are particularly prone to developing this joint disease. The diagnosis of Charcot's joints should be considered in anyone who develops what appears to be a severe osteoarthritis or a transverse fracture of the tibia or fibula after minor trauma. Scoliosis with particularly destructive changes on radiography should prompt a search for syringomyelia or syphilis. The most common radiographic abnormalities are those of distension in 3D (Dislocation, Destruction and Degeneration). An atrophic form with resorption of the proximal humerus, most frequently described in syringomyelia, has been observed in diabetes. Loss of the distal end of the clavicle has not been described before in the neuropathies. These changes coupled with speckled calcification or shards of bone in the periarticular soft tissue confirm the diagnosis. Infection and CPPD crystal disease can be difficult to exclude. The joint fluid may be inflammatory and infection may be a complication. Treatment includes anti-inflammatories and splinting. Indications for surgery are limited. PMID:8070170

  11. Pregabalin and placebo responders show different effects on central pain processing in chronic pancreatitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Bouwense, Stefan AW; Olesen, Søren S; Drewes, Asbjørn M; van Goor, Harry; Wilder-Smith, Oliver HG

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain control in chronic pancreatitis is a major challenge; the mechanisms behind analgesic treatment are poorly understood. This study aims to investigate the differences in pain sensitivity and modulation in chronic pancreatitis patients, based on their clinical response (responders vs nonresponders) to placebo or pregabalin treatment. Methods This study was part of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluating the analgesic effects of pregabalin and placebo in chronic pancreatitis. Post hoc, patients were assigned to one of four groups, ie, responders and nonresponders to pregabalin (n=16; n=15) or placebo (n=12; n=17) treatment. Responders were defined as patients with >30% pain reduction after 3 weeks of treatment. We measured change in pain sensitivity before and after the treatment using electric pain detection thresholds (ePDT) in dermatomes C5 (generalized effects) and Ventral T10 (segmental effects). Descending endogenous pain modulation was quantified via conditioned pain modulation (CPM) paradigm. Results Sixty patients were analyzed in a per-protocol analysis. ePDT change in C5 was significant vs baseline and greater in pregabalin (1.3 mA) vs placebo responders (−0.1 mA; P=0.015). This was not so for ePDT in Ventral T10. CPM increased more in pregabalin (9%) vs placebo responders (−17%; P<0.001). CPM changed significantly vs baseline only for pregabalin responders (P=0.006). Conclusion This hypothesis-generating study provides the first evidence that pain relief with pregabalin is associated with anti-hyperalgesic effects and increased endogenous inhibitory modulation. No such effects were observed in patients experiencing pain relief with the placebo treatment. The mechanisms underlying analgesic response to placebo vs drug treatments are different and, together with their interactions, deserve further study. PMID:26203273

  12. Hemangiosarcoma in mice administered pregabalin: analysis of genotoxicity, tumor incidence, and tumor genetics.

    PubMed

    Pegg, David; Bleavins, Michael; Herman, James; Wojcinski, Zbigniew; Graziano, Michael; Henck, Judith; Criswell, Kay A; Anderson, Timothy; Duddy, Steven

    2012-07-01

    Pregabalin, (S)-3-(aminomethyl)-5-methylhexanoic acid, binds with high affinity to the α(2)δ subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels and exerts analgesic, anxiolytic, and antiseizure activities. Two-year carcinogenicity studies were completed in B6C3F1 and CD-1 mice and two separate studies in Wistar rats. Doses in mice were 200, 1000, and 5000 mg/kg/day, with systemic exposures (AUC(0-24 h)) up to 31 times the mean exposure in humans, given the maximum recommended clinical dose. In rats, doses were 50, 150, and 450 mg/kg/day in males and 100, 300, and 900 mg/kg/day in females; systemic exposures up to 24 times were achieved in clinical trials. In both strains of mice, pregabalin treatment was associated with an increased incidence of hemangiosarcoma primarily in liver, spleen, and bone marrow. The incidence of hemangiosarcoma was higher in B6C3F1 mice than in CD-1 mice, consistent with its spontaneous incidence. Pregabalin did not increase the incidence of any other tumor type in rats and was not genotoxic, based on an extensive battery of in vivo and in vitro tests in bacterial and mammalian systems. Thus, pregabalin is a single-species, single tumor-type, nongenotoxic mouse carcinogen. Hemangiosarcomas occurring in mice treated with pregabalin were genotypically distinct from hemangiosarcomas induced by genotoxic carcinogens in humans with respect to ras and p53 mutation patterns and were similar to spontaneous tumors. Furthermore, there was a strong association between pregabalin treatment and bone marrow changes in these studies in mice, suggesting a possible link between the effects observed in bone marrow and the increase in tumor incidence in pregabalin-treated mice. PMID:22539615

  13. Exposure-response modeling of average daily pain score, and dizziness and somnolence, for mirogabalin (DS-5565) in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Hutmacher, Matthew M; Frame, Bill; Miller, Raymond; Truitt, Kenneth; Merante, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Mirogabalin (DS-5565) is an α2δ-1 ligand being developed for pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, fibromyalgia, and postherpetic neuralgia. Nonlinear mixed-effects analyses were performed on average daily pain and on the incidence of the adverse events dizziness and somnolence. These models were used to predict the dose of mirogabalin equivalent to pregabalin and the probability of meaningful reduction in pain compared with placebo and pregabalin. In addition, regimen effects were evaluated for reductions of adverse events. Mirogabalin was estimated to be 17-fold more potent than pregabalin. The effectiveness of 150 mg pregabalin, dosed twice daily, attenuated by week 5. Therefore, the estimated mechanism-based equivalent dose (ED) of 17.7 mg mirogabalin was higher than that predicted to achieve comparable pain reduction. If attenuation of the pregabalin effect is real, mirogabalin doses lower than the ED could yield comparable pain reduction, albeit with less differentiation in pain from placebo. The incidence rate of dizziness and somnolence decreased over time. Twice-daily dosing of mirogabalin was predicted to yield a lower incidence rate of dizziness than once-daily dosing; thus, titration of dosages should reduce adverse event rates. These model results were used to influence phase 3 dosing selection. PMID:26073181

  14. Combination of pregabalin with duloxetine for fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gilron, Ian; Chaparro, Luis E; Tu, Dongsheng; Holden, Ronald R; Milev, Roumen; Towheed, Tanveer; DuMerton-Shore, Deborah; Walker, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic widespread pain and associated with sleep disturbance, depression, fatigue, and cognitive dysfunction. Polypharmacy is commonly used, but supportive evidence is limited. Most fibromyalgia trials focus primarily on pain reduction with monotherapy. This trial compares a pregabalin-duloxetine combination to each monotherapy. Using a randomized, double-blind, 4-period crossover design, participants received maximally tolerated doses of placebo, pregabalin, duloxetine, and pregabalin-duloxetine combination-for 6 weeks. Primary outcome was daily pain (0-10); secondary outcomes included global pain relief, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, SF-36 survey, Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), adverse events, and other measures. Of 41 participants randomized, 39 completed ≥2 treatments. Daily pain during placebo, pregabalin, duloxetine, and combination was 5.1, 5.0, 4.1, and 3.7, respectively (P < 0.05 only for combination vs placebo, and pregabalin). Participants (%) reporting ≥moderate global pain relief were 18%, 39%, 42%, and 68%, respectively (P < 0.05 for combination vs placebo, pregabalin, and duloxetine). Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire scores were 42.9, 37.4, 36.0, and 29.8, respectively (P < 0.05 for combination vs placebo, pregabalin, and duloxetine). SF-36 scores were 50.2, 55.7, 56.0, and 61.2, respectively (P < 0.05 for combination vs placebo, pregabalin, and duloxetine). Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale scores were 48.9, 35.2, 46.1, and 32.1, respectively (P < 0.05 only for combination vs placebo, and duloxetine). BDI-II scores were 11.9, 9.9, 10.7, and 8.9, respectively (P < 0.05 only for combination vs placebo). Moderate-severe drowsiness was more frequent during combination vs placebo. Combining pregabalin and duloxetine for fibromyalgia improves multiple clinical outcomes vs monotherapy. Continued research should compare this and other combinations to monotherapy

  15. Pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain in adults: systematic review, meta-analysis and updated NeuPSIG recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Finnerup, Nanna B; Attal, Nadine; Haroutounian, Simon; McNicol, Ewan; Baron, Ralf; Dworkin, Robert H; Gilron, Ian; Haanpaa, Maija; Hansson, Per; Jensen, Troels S; Kamerman, Peter R; Lund, Karen; Moore, Andrew; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rice, Andrew SC; Rowbotham, Michael; Sena, Emily; Siddall, Philip; Smith, Blair H; Wallace, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat. New treatments, clinical trials and standards of quality for assessing evidence justify an update of evidence-based recommendations for its pharmacological treatment. Methods The Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group (NeuPSIG) of the International Association for the Study of Pain conducted a systematic review of randomised double-blind studies of oral and topical pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain, including unpublished trials (retrieved from clinicaltrials.gov and pharmaceutical websites). Meta-analysis used Numbers Needed to Treat (NNT) for 50 % pain relief as primary measure and assessed publication bias. Recommendations used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). Findings In total 229 studies were included. Analysis of publication bias suggested a 10% overstatement of treatment effects. Studies published in peer-review journals reported greater effects than online studies (R2=9·3%, p<0·01). Trial outcomes were generally modest even for effective drugs : in particular NNTs were 3·6 (95 % CI 3·0–4·4) for tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), 6·4 (95 % CI 5·2–8·4) for serotonin- noradrenaline reuptake inbibitor (SNRI) antidepressants duloxetine and venlafaxine, 7·7 (95 % CI 6·5–9·4) for pregabalin and 6·3 (95 % CI 5·0–8·3) for gabapentin. NNTs were higher for gabapentin ER/enacarbil and capsaicin high concentration patches, lower for opioids and botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) and undetermined for lidocaine patches. Final quality of evidence was lower for lidocaine patches and BTX-A. Tolerability/safety and values/preferences were high for lidocaine patches and lower for opioids and TCAs. This permitted a strong GRADE recommendation for use and proposal as first line for TCAs, SNRIs, pregabalin, gabapentin and gabapentin ER/enacarbil in neuropathic pain, a weak recommendation for use and proposal as second line for lidocaine patches, capsaicin

  16. Diagnostic challenges of neuropathic tooth pain.

    PubMed

    Matwychuk, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    This article presents the clinical characteristics, epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of 2 neuropathic conditions: trigeminal neuralgia and atypical odontalgia. A case report highlights the complexities involved in diagnosing neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is chronic, diverse in quality, difficult to localize and it occurs in the absence of obvious pathology. To avoid multiple, ineffective dental treatments, general practitioners must be familiar with the signs of nonodontogenic sources of tooth pain. PMID:15363215

  17. Emerging Treatments for Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Bruno L; Escudeiro, Gabriel; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is a series of well-known conditions caused by diseases or lesions to the somatosensory system. Due to the better understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, previously unexplored therapies have been used with encouraging results. As such, Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC), Alpha-lipoic-acid (ALA), cannabinoids, Clonidine, EMA401, Botulinum Toxin type A, and new voltage-gated sodium channel blockers, can be cited. Furthermore, new modalities in neuromodulation such as high-frequency spinal cord stimulation, burst stimulation, dorsal root ganglion stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and many others have been showing exciting results. Besides, changing paradigms may occur with the advent of optogenetics and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation. This article reviews the published literature on the treatment of NP. Despite the interesting results, randomized controlled trials are demanded for the majority of the therapies previously mentioned. PMID:26530058

  18. Neuropathic pain after dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Tınastepe, Neslihan; Oral, Koray

    2013-01-01

    The head and neck regions are the most common sites of the human body to be involved in chronic pain conditions. Neuropathic pain is a chronic pain condition, and refers to all pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction or transitory perturbation in the peripheral or central nervous system (CNS). Trigeminal neuralgia, atypical odontalgia (phantom tooth pain), burning mouth syndrome, traumatic neuropathies, postherpetic neuralgias and complex regional pain syndrome are neuropathic pain conditions in the orofacial region that can be encountered in pain and dental clinics. The majority of the time this problem is misdiagnosed by the dentist, which can lead to unnecessary treatments. These treatments may include endodontic treatment and extraction of the tooth or teeth in the region. In this review, only post-traumatic peripheral pain neuropathies seen after dental treatments will be discussed. PMID:23588863

  19. Comparative study between paracetamol and two different doses of pregabalin on postoperative pain in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Esmat, Ibrahim M.; Farag, Hanan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is the primary reason for prolonged hospital stay after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This study compared the effect of a single oral preoperative administration of paracetamol (1 g) with 2 different doses of pregabalin (150 or 300 mg) for attenuating postoperative pain and analgesic consumption. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients, aged 18-60 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists’ physical status I and II undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in this randomized controlled study. Patients were divided into three groups, 25 each to receive either oral paracetamol 1 g (group I, control group) or pregabalin 150 (group II) or 300 mg (group III), 2 h before surgery. Postoperative pain was evaluated based on visual analog scale over a period of 6 h and 1st time for rescue analgesia. Postoperative sedation, hemodynamic changes, serum cortisol level, and side effects were also evaluated. Results: There was a significant decrease in mean heart rate, mean systolic blood pressure, sedation score, pain score, and delayed the first request for analgesics postoperatively in group (II) and group (III) compared to group (I) 2 h postoperatively. There was no significant difference in group (III) compared to group (II) postoperatively. The incidence of postoperative side effects was more in group (III). Conclusion: The single oral preoperative dose administration of pregabalin had significant opioid-sparing effect in the first 6 h after surgery, whereas side effects were more common with administration of pregabalin 300 mg. PMID:26543452

  20. Premedication With Oral Pregabalin for the Prevention of Acute Postsurgical Pain in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Mehrabanian, Mohammad Javad; Faritus, Seyedeh Zahra; Khazaei Koohpar, Mehrdad; Ferasatkish, Rasool; Hosseinnejad, Heidar; Mehrabanian, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: For coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) sternotomy should be performed. The pain after surgery is severe and requires medical intervention. Use of the analgesics is limited by their side effects and studies suggest that prevention with some medications before surgery is effective in controlling the postoperative pain. Objectives: We investigated the efficacy of pregabalin administration before surgery in the treatment of acute postoperative pain after CABG surgery. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients indicated for elective CABG surgery were randomly allocated to two groups. One group received placebo and the other received 150 mg of oral pregabalin before surgery. Heart rates, blood pressure, respiratory rate, intensive care unit (ICU) stay duration, morphine consumption, and pain score according to the visual analog scale (VAS) were measured and recorded at 4, 12, and 24 hours of surgery. Results: Pregabalin consumption did not alter hemodynamic parameters and was safe in patients after CABG. Its consumption was associated with significant reduction in the pain score (P values were 0.035, 0.026, and 0.047 respectively at 4, 12, and 24 hours of surgery). Its use was not associated with changes in the morphine consumption at 4, 12, and 24 hours of surgery (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Premedication with studied dose of pregabalin is effective for the prevention of postoperative pain in patients after CABG and has no adverse effects. Trials with other treating schedule and doses of the drug should be performed to determine the best treatment plan. PMID:25830118

  1. Systemic Pregabalin Attenuates Sensorimotor Responses and Medullary Glutamate Release in Inflammatory Tooth Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Noriyuki; Kumar, Naresh; Cherkas, Pavel S.; Chiang, Chen Yu; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O.; Coderre, Terence J.; Sessle, Barry J.

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that application to the tooth pulp of the inflammatory irritant mustard oil (MO) induces medullary glutamate release and central sensitization in the rat medullary dorsal horn (MDH), as well as nociceptive sensorimotor responses in craniofacial muscles in rats. There is recent evidence that anticonvulsant drugs such as pregabalin that influence glutamatergic neurotransmission are effective in several pain states. The aim of this study was to examine whether systemic administration of pregabalin attenuated glutamate release in the medulla as well as these nociceptive effects reflected in increased electromyographic (EMG) activity induced by MO application to the tooth pulp. Male adult rats were anesthetized with isofluorane (1.0~1.2 %), and jaw and tongue muscle EMG activities were recorded by needle electrodes inserted bilaterally into masseter and anterior digastric muscles and into the genioglossus muscle, and also the medullary release of glutamate was assessed by in vivo microdialysis. Pregabalin or vehicle control (isotonic saline) was administered 30 min before the pulpal application of MO or vehicle control (mineral oil). Application of mineral oil to the maxillary first molar tooth pulp produced no change in baseline EMG activity and glutamate release. However, application of MO to the pulp significantly increased both the medullary release of glutamate and EMG activity in the jaw and tongue muscles for several minutes. In contrast, pre-medication with pregabalin, but not vehicle control, significantly and dose-dependently attenuated the medullary glutamate release and EMG activity in these muscles after MO application to the tooth pulp (ANOVA, p<0.05). These results suggest that pregabalin may attenuate the medullary release of glutamate and associated nociceptive sensorimotor responses in this acute inflammatory pulpal pain model, and that it may prove useful for the treatment of orofacial inflammatory pain states

  2. Systemic pregabalin attenuates sensorimotor responses and medullary glutamate release in inflammatory tooth pain model.

    PubMed

    Narita, N; Kumar, N; Cherkas, P S; Chiang, C Y; Dostrovsky, J O; Coderre, T J; Sessle, B J

    2012-08-30

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that application of inflammatory irritant mustard oil (MO) to the tooth pulp induces medullary glutamate release and central sensitization in the rat medullary dorsal horn (MDH), as well as nociceptive sensorimotor responses in craniofacial muscles in rats. There is recent evidence that anticonvulsant drugs such as pregabalin that influence glutamatergic neurotransmission are effective in several pain states. The aim of this study was to examine whether systemic administration of pregabalin attenuated glutamate release in the medulla as well as these nociceptive effects reflected in increased electromyographic (EMG) activity induced by MO application to the tooth pulp. Male adult rats were anesthetized with isofluorane (1.0-1.2%), and jaw and tongue muscle EMG activities were recorded by needle electrodes inserted bilaterally into masseter and anterior digastric muscles and into the genioglossus muscle, and also the medullary release of glutamate was assessed by in vivo microdialysis. Pregabalin or vehicle control (isotonic saline) was administered 30 min before the pulpal application of MO or vehicle control (mineral oil). Application of mineral oil to the maxillary first molar tooth pulp produced no change in baseline EMG activity and glutamate release. However, application of MO to the pulp significantly increased both the medullary release of glutamate and EMG activity in the jaw and tongue muscles for several minutes. In contrast, pre-medication with pregabalin, but not vehicle control, significantly and dose-dependently attenuated the medullary glutamate release and EMG activity in these muscles after MO application to the tooth pulp (analysis of variance (ANOVA), p<0.05). These results suggest that pregabalin may attenuate the medullary release of glutamate and associated nociceptive sensorimotor responses in this acute inflammatory pulpal pain model, and that it may prove useful for the treatment of orofacial

  3. Assessment and management of pain, with particular emphasis on central neuropathic pain, in moderate to severe dementia.

    PubMed

    Scherder, Erik J A; Plooij, Bart

    2012-09-01

    (acetaminophen), which, together with opioids, is the most frequently prescribed analgesic drug in dementia. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are hardly prescribed in a residential setting. Some authors advise starting treatment with a low dose of opioids. Antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs appear to have a positive effect on central neuropathic pain. In the review, advantages and disadvantages of amitriptyline, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin and pregabalin are discussed; a negative effect of these drugs on liver and kidney functions, as well as on cognitive functions in patients who already suffer from cognitive impairment is highlighted. Next to pharmacotherapy, non-pharmacological treatment strategies such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may be effective as long as afferent pathways transmitting the electrical stimulus are still intact. PMID:23018606

  4. Animal model of neuropathic tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, R. P.; Appalsamy, M.; Diedrich, A.; Davis, T. L.; Robertson, D.

    2001-01-01

    Clinically relevant autonomic dysfunction can result from either complete or partial loss of sympathetic outflow to effector organs. Reported animal models of autonomic neuropathy have aimed to achieve complete lesions of sympathetic nerves, but incomplete lesions might be more relevant to certain clinical entities. We hypothesized that loss of sympathetic innervation would result in a predicted decrease in arterial pressure and a compensatory increase in heart rate. Increased heart rate due to loss of sympathetic innervation is seemingly paradoxical, but it provides a mechanistic explanation for clinical autonomic syndromes such as neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome. Partially dysautonomic animals were generated by selectively lesioning postganglionic sympathetic neurons with 150 mg/kg 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored using radiotelemetry. Systolic blood pressure decreased within hours postlesion (Delta>20 mm Hg). Within 4 days postlesion, heart rate rose and remained elevated above control levels. The severity of the lesion was determined functionally and pharmacologically by spectral analysis and responsiveness to tyramine. Low-frequency spectral power of systolic blood pressure was reduced postlesion and correlated with the diminished tyramine responsiveness (r=0.9572, P=0.0053). The tachycardia was abolished by treatment with the beta-antagonist propranolol, demonstrating that it was mediated by catecholamines acting on cardiac beta-receptors. Partial lesions of the autonomic nervous system have been hypothesized to underlie many disorders, including neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome. This animal model may help us better understand the pathophysiology of autonomic dysfunction and lead to development of therapeutic interventions.

  5. Consistence and discrepancy of neuropathic pain screening tools DN4 and ID-Pain.

    PubMed

    Padua, L; Briani, C; Truini, A; Aprile, I; Bouhassirà, D; Cruccu, G; Jann, S; Nobile-Orazio, E; Pazzaglia, C; Morini, A; Mondelli, M; Ciaramitaro, P; Cavaletti, G; Cocito, D; Fazio, R; Santoro, L; Galeotti, F; Carpo, M; Plasmati, R; Benedetti, L; Schenone, A

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a subjective condition that cannot be objectively measured; for this reason, self patient-perspective is crucial. Recently, several screening tools to discriminate between nociceptive and neuropathic pain have been developed. We aimed at assessing the consistence and discrepancy of two widely used screening tools, The Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4) and the 6-item questionnaire (ID-Pain), by comparing their ability in discriminating neuropathic from nociceptive pain. DN4 and ID-Pain were administered to 392 Italian patients attending 16 outpatient services for peripheral nerve diseases. Based on medical history, clinical findings and diagnostic tools, patients were divided into two groups (neuropathic and nociceptive). Globally, ID-Pain identified neuropathic pain in 60 % of patients (38 % probable, 22 % likely). Interestingly also DN4 diagnosed neuropathic pain in 60 % of cases. A discrepancy was observed in 16 % of cases. DN4 and ID-Pain resulted to be highly interrelated in the identification of neuropathic pain. Sensitivity of DN4 was 82 % and specificity was 81 %, while ID-Pain (considering both probable and likely groups) showed sensitivity 78 % and specificity 74 %. Reliable screening tools for neuropathic pain are well related between them; hence, they are available for researchers and clinicians who may choose the most appropriate for their activity. Since the gold standard for the diagnosis and treatment of neuropathic pain cannot do without a neurological evaluation, perhaps DN4, that includes physician objective measures, may help reducing the percentage of dubious cases. Conversely, when needing a more agile tool (not needing a physician) ID-Pain may be adopted. PMID:22434411

  6. Difficult decisions: managing chronic neuropathic pain with opioids.

    PubMed

    England, John D; Franklin, Gary M

    2012-02-01

    The decision to use opioids to treat chronic neuropathic pain is complex and somewhat controversial. Although opioid therapy may be appropriate for some patients with chronic neuropathic pain, physicians must implement strategies to reduce opioid abuse, addiction, and diversion. The decision to use chronic opioids should be made proactively with institution of best practices to ensure safe and effective use. As with all aspects of chronic pain management, better education of both health care providers and patients is necessary. Fortunately, specific recommendations for the safe and effective use of opioids are now available in several recently published guidelines. The best practices embodied in these guidelines should be considered for widespread adoption by both individual providers and health care systems. PMID:22810077

  7. Harpagophytum procumbens extract potentiates morphine antinociception in neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Parenti, Carmela; Aricò, Giuseppina; Pennisi, Marzio; Venditti, Alessandro; Scoto, Giovanna M

    2016-06-01

    The association of opioids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, to enhance pain relief and reduce the development of side effects, has been demonstrated. Given many reports concerning the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Harpagophytum procumbens extracts, the aim of our study was to investigate the advantage of a co-administration of a subanalgesic dose of morphine preceded by a low dose of H. procumbens to verify this therapeutically useful association in a neuropathic pain model. Time course, registered with the association of the natural extract, at a dose that does not induce an antinociceptive effect, followed by a subanalgesic dose of morphine showed a well-defined antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effect, suggesting a synergism as a result of the two-drug association. H. procumbens cooperates synergistically with morphine in resolving hyperalgesia and allodynia, two typical symptoms of neuropathic pain. The results support the strategy of using an adjuvant drug to improve opioid analgesic efficacy. PMID:26189616

  8. Diagnosis and management of trigeminal neuropathic pains.

    PubMed

    Napeñas, Joel J; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2011-07-01

    SUMMARY Trigeminal neuropathic pains have presented diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to providers. In addition, knowledge of pathophysiology, current classification systems, taxonomy and phenotyping of these conditions are incomplete. While trigeminal neuralgia is the most identifiable and studied, other conditions are being recognized and require distinct management approaches. Furthermore, other facial pain conditions such as atypical odontalgia and burning mouth syndrome are now considered to have neuropathic elements in their etiology. This article reviews current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of neuropathic pain conditions involving the trigeminal nerve, to include: trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathic pain (with traumatically induced neuralgia and atypical odontalgia) and burning mouth syndrome. Treatment modalities are reviewed based on current and best available evidence. Trigeminal neuralgia is managed with anticonvulsant drugs as the first line, with surgical options providing variable results. Trigeminal neuropathic pain is managed medically based on the guidelines for other neuropathic pain conditions. Burning mouth syndrome is also treated with a number of neuropathic medications, both topical and systemic. In all these conditions, patients need to be thoroughly educated about their condition, involved in its management, and be provided with supportive and adjunctive treatment resources. PMID:24645661

  9. Chronic Neuropathic Pain: It's about the Rhythm.

    PubMed

    Alshelh, Zeynab; Di Pietro, Flavia; Youssef, Andrew M; Reeves, Jenna M; Macey, Paul M; Vickers, E Russell; Peck, Christopher C; Murray, Greg M; Henderson, Luke A

    2016-01-20

    The neural mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of chronic neuropathic pain remain unclear. Evidence from human investigations suggests that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic burst firing and thalamocortical dysrhythmia. Additionally, experimental animal investigations show that neuropathic pain is associated with altered infra-slow (<0.1 Hz) frequency oscillations within the dorsal horn and somatosensory thalamus. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether, in humans, neuropathic pain was also associated with altered infra-slow oscillations within the ascending "pain" pathway. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that individuals with orofacial neuropathic pain have increased infra-slow oscillatory activity throughout the ascending pain pathway, including within the spinal trigeminal nucleus, somatosensory thalamus, thalamic reticular nucleus, and primary somatosensory cortex. Furthermore, these infra-slow oscillations were temporally coupled across these multiple sites and occurred at frequencies similar to calcium waves in activated astrocytes. The region encompassing the spinal trigeminal nucleus also displayed increased regional homogeneity, consistent with a local spread of neural activity by astrocyte activation. In contrast, no increase in oscillatory behavior within the ascending pain pathway occurred during acute noxious stimuli in healthy individuals. These data reveal increased oscillatory activity within the ascending pain pathway that likely underpins increased thalamocortical oscillatory activity, a self-sustaining thalamocortical dysrhythmia, and the constant perception of pain. Significance statement: Chronic neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic firing and thalamocortical dysrhythmia. The mechanisms responsible for these changes remain unknown. In this study, we report in individuals with neuropathic pain increased oscillatory neural activity within the

  10. Neuropathic Pain in Children: Special Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Walco, Gary A.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Krane, Elliot J.; LeBel, Alyssa A.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is relatively uncommon in children. Although some syndromes closely resemble those found in adults, the incidence and course of the condition can vary substantially in children, depending on developmental status and contextual factors. There are some neuropathic pain syndromes that are rare and relatively unique to the pediatric population. This article discusses the array of neuropathic pain conditions in children and available treatment strategies. Data are limited by small numbers and few randomized controlled trials. Research and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:20194147

  11. The neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews the definition, etiology and evaluation, and medical and neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain. A neuropathic origin for facial pain should be considered when evaluating a patient for rhinologic surgery because of complaints of facial pain. Neuropathic facial pain is caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve in the prepontine cistern and is characterized by an intermittent prickling or stabbing component or a constant burning, searing pain. Medical treatment consists of anticonvulsant medication. Neurosurgical treatment may require microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve. PMID:24680498

  12. Pain relief induces dopamine release in the rat nucleus accumbens during the early but not late phase of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takahiro; Ide, Soichiro; Minami, Masabumi

    2016-08-26

    Comorbidity of chronic pain and depression has long been recognized in the clinic, and preclinical studies have reported depression-like behaviors in animal models of chronic pain. These findings suggest a common neuronal basis for chronic pain and depression. The neuronal pathway from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is critical in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) reward circuit, and dysfunction of this pathway has been implicated in depression. Although time-dependent development of depression-related behaviors has been reported in chronic pain animals, time-dependent functional changes in this pathway remain to be examined. To address this issue, we examined the effects of two types of rewards, pain relief by intrathecal injection of pregabalin (100μg in 10μL phosphate buffered saline) and 30% sucrose solution intake, on intra-NAc DA release in rats subjected to spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Specifically, the effects were investigated during the early (17-20days after ligation) and late (31-34days after ligation) phases of neuropathic pain. Pain relief increased the intra-NAc DA levels in the SNL rats during the early but not late phase of neuropathic pain. Intake of the sucrose solution increased the intra-NAc DA levels both in the SNL and sham animals during the early phase of neuropathic pain, while it induced DA release in the sham but not SNL animals during the late phase. These results suggest that dysfunction of the mesolimbic DA reward circuit develops in a time-dependent manner. Mesolimbic DA reward circuit dysfunction might be a common neuronal mechanism underlying chronic pain and depression, and a potential target for novel analgesic and antidepressant medications. PMID:27369326

  13. Respective pharmacological features of neuropathic-like pain evoked by intrathecal BDNF versus sciatic nerve ligation in rats.

    PubMed

    M'Dahoma, Saïd; Barthélemy, Sandrine; Tromilin, Claire; Jeanson, Tiffany; Viguier, Florent; Michot, Benoit; Pezet, Sophie; Hamon, Michel; Bourgoin, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    Numerous reported data support the idea that Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is critically involved in both depression and comorbid pain. The possible direct effect of BDNF on pain mechanisms was assessed here and compared with behavioral/neurobiological features of neuropathic pain caused by chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve (CCI-SN). Sprague-Dawley male rats were either injected intrathecally with BDNF (3.0 ng i.t.) or subjected to unilateral CCI-SN. Their respective responses to anti-hyperalgesic drugs were assessed using the Randall-Selitto test and both immunohistochemical and RT-qPCR approaches were used to investigate molecular/cellular mechanisms underlying hyperalgesia in both models. Long lasting hyperalgesia and allodynia were induced by i.t. BDNF in intact healthy rats like those found after CCI-SN. Acute treatment with the BDNF-TrkB receptor antagonist cyclotraxin B completely prevented i.t. BDNF-induced hyperalgesia and partially reversed this symptom in both BDNF-pretreated and CCI-SN lesioned rats. Acute administration of the anticonvulsant pregabalin, the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, the opioid analgesics morphine and tapentadol or the antidepressant agomelatine also transiently reversed hyperalgesia in both i.t. BDNF injected- and CCI-SN lesioned-rats. Marked induction of microglia activation markers (OX42, Iba1, P-p38), proinflammatory cytokine IL-6, NMDA receptor subunit NR2B and BDNF was found in spinal cord and/or dorsal root ganglia of CCI-SN rats. A long lasting spinal BDNF overexpression was also observed in BDNF i.t. rats, indicating an autocrine self-induction, with downstream long lasting TrkB-mediated neuropathic-like pain. Accordingly, TrkB blockade appeared as a relevant approach to alleviate not only i.t. BDNF- but also nerve lesion-evoked neuropathic pain. PMID:26343858

  14. Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandow, Amanda M.; Farley, Rebecca A.; Panepinto, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the suggestion of a neuropathic component to sickle cell disease (SCD) pain, there are minimal data on the systematic assessment of neuropathic pain in patients with SCD. Neuropathic pain is defined as pain primarily initiated by dysfunction of the peripheral or central nervous system. Procedure In a cross-sectional study, we used the painDETECT questionnaire, a one-page validated neuropathic pain screening tool, to determine the presence of neuropathic pain in patients with SCD and to evaluate the relationship between neuropathic pain, age, and gender. We hypothesized that 20% of patients with SCD will experience neuropathic pain and that neuropathic pain will be associated with older age and female gender. The completed painDETECT questionnaire yields a total score between 0–38 (≥19=definite neuropathic pain, 13–18=probable neuropathic pain, ≤12=no neuropathic pain). Scores ≥13 were designated as having evidence of neuropathic pain. Results A total of 56 patients participated. Median age was 20.3 years and 77% were female. We found 37% of patients had evidence of neuropathic pain. Age was positively correlated with total score [r=0.43; p=0.001] suggesting older patients experience more neuropathic pain. Females had higher mean total scores [13 vs 8.4; p=0.04]. Significantly more patients with neuropathic pain were taking hydroxyurea [90% vs 59%; p=0.015]. Despite 37% of patients experiencing neuropathic pain, only 5% were taking a neuropathic pain drug. Conclusions Neuropathic pain exists in SCD. Valid screening tools can identify patients that would benefit from existing and future neuropathic pain therapies and could determine the impact of these therapies. PMID:24167104

  15. The topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in localized neuropathic pain: a reappraisal of the clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    de León-Casasola, Oscar A; Mayoral, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Topical 5% lidocaine medicated plasters represent a well-established first-line option for the treatment of peripheral localized neuropathic pain (LNP). This review provides an updated overview of the clinical evidence (randomized, controlled, and open-label clinical studies, real-life daily clinical practice, and case series). The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster effectively provides pain relief in postherpetic neuralgia, and data from a large open-label controlled study indicate that the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is as effective as systemic pregabalin in postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic polyneuropathy but with an improved tolerability profile. Additionally, improved analgesia and fewer side effects were experienced by patients treated synchronously with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, further demonstrating the value of multimodal analgesia in LNP. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster provides continued benefit after long-term (≤7 years) use and is also effective in various other LNP conditions. Minor application-site reactions are the most common adverse events associated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster; there is minimal risk of systemic adverse events and drug–drug interactions. Although further well-controlled studies are warranted, the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is efficacious and safe in LNP and may have particular clinical benefit in elderly and/or medically compromised patients because of the low incidence of adverse events. PMID:26929664

  16. Minimally invasive procedures for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Sdrulla, Andrei; Chen, Grace

    2016-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is "pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system". The prevalence of neuropathic pain ranges from 7 to 11% of the population and minimally invasive procedures have been used to both diagnose and treat neuropathic pain. Diagnostic procedures consist of nerve blocks aimed to isolate the peripheral nerve implicated, whereas therapeutic interventions either modify or destroy nerve function. Procedures that modify how nerves function include epidural steroid injections, peripheral nerve blocks and sympathetic nerve blocks. Neuroablative procedures include radiofrequency ablation, cryoanalgesia and neurectomies. Currently, neuromodulation with peripheral nerve stimulators and spinal cord stimulators are the most evidence-based treatments of neuropathic pain. PMID:26988024

  17. Role of Nucleus Accumbens in Neuropathic Pain: Linked Multi-Scale Evidence in the Rat Transitioning to Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Pollema-Mays, Sarah Lynn; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Procissi, Daniel; Contini, Massimos; Baria, Alex Tomas; Martina, Macro; Apkarian, Apkar Vania

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent evidence implicating the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as causally involved in the transition to chronic pain in humans, underlying mechanisms of this involvement remain entirely unknown. Here we elucidate mechanisms of NAc reorganizational properties (longitudinally and cross-sectionally), in an animal model of neuropathic pain (spared nerve injury, SNI). We observed inter-related changes: 1) In resting-state fMRI, functional connectivity of the NAc to dorsal striatum and cortex was reduced 28 days (but not 5 days) after SNI; 2) contralateral to SNI injury, gene expression of NAc dopamine 1A, 2, and κ-opioid receptors decreased 28 days after SNI; 3) In SNI (but not sham) covariance of gene expression was upregulated at 5 days and settled to a new state at 28 days; and 4) NAc functional connectivity correlated with dopamine receptor gene expression and with tactile allodynia. Moreover, interruption of NAc activity (via lidocaine infusion) reversibly alleviated neuropathic pain in SNI animals. Together, these results demonstrate macroscopic (fMRI) and molecular reorganization of NAc and indicate that NAc neuronal activity is necessary for full expression of neuropathic pain-like behavior. PMID:24607959

  18. Molecular Hydrogen Attenuates Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Masanori; Satoh, Yasushi; Otsubo, Yukiko; Kazama, Tomiei

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains intractable and the development of new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Accumulating evidence indicates that overproduction of oxidative stress is a key event in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, repeated intra-peritoneal or intrathecal injections of antioxidants are unsuitable for continuous use in therapy. Here we show a novel therapeutic method against neuropathic pain: drinking water containing molecular hydrogen (H2) as antioxidant. The effect of hydrogen on neuropathic pain was investigated using a partial sciatic nerve ligation model in mice. As indicators of neuropathic pain, temporal aspects of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were analysed for 3 weeks after ligation. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured using the von Frey test and the plantar test, respectively. When mice were allowed to drink water containing hydrogen at a saturated level ad libitum after ligation, both allodynia and hyperalgesia were alleviated. These symptoms were also alleviated when hydrogen was administered only for the induction phase (from day 0 to 4 after ligation). When hydrogen was administered only for the maintenance phase (from day 4 to 21 after ligation), hyperalgesia but not allodynia was alleviated. Immunohistochemical staining for the oxidative stress marker, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, showed that hydrogen administration suppressed oxidative stress induced by ligation in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion. In conclusion, oral administration of hydrogen water may be useful for alleviating neuropathic pain in a clinical setting. PMID:24941001

  19. Strong Manual Acupuncture Stimulation of “Huantiao” (GB 30) Reduces Pain-Induced Anxiety and p-ERK in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiao-mei; Shen, Zui; Sun, Jing; Fang, Fang; Fang, Jun-fan; Wu, Yuan-yuan; Fang, Jian-qiao

    2015-01-01

    Persistent neuropathic pain is associated with anxiety. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays an important role in pain-induced anxiety. Acupuncture is widely used for pain and anxiety. However, little is known about which acupuncture technique is optimal on pain-induced anxiety and the relationship between acupuncture effect and p-ERK. The rat model was induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Male adult SD rats were randomly divided into control, SNL, strong manual acupuncture (sMA), mild manual acupuncture (mMA), and electroacupuncture (EA) group. Bilateral “Huantiao” (GB 30) were stimulated by sMA, mMA, and EA, respectively. The pain withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) and anxiety behavior were measured, and p-ERK protein expression and immunoreactivity cells in ACC were detected. PWTs increased significantly in both sMA and EA groups. Meanwhile, anxiety-like behavior was improved significantly in the sMA and mMA groups. Furthermore, the overexpression of p-ERK induced by SNL was downregulated by strong and mild manual acupuncture. Therefore, strong manual acupuncture on bilateral “Huantiao” (GB 30) could be a proper therapy relieving both pain and pain-induced anxiety. The effect of different acupuncture techniques on pain-induced anxiety may arise from the regulation of p-ERK in ACC. PMID:26770252

  20. Effect of Pregabalin on Cardiovascular Responses to Exercise and Postexercise Pain and Fatigue in Fibromyalgia: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Crossover Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrea T.; Light, Kathleen C.; Bateman, Lucinda; Hughen, Ronald W.; Vanhaitsma, Timothy A.; Light, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin, an approved treatment for fibromyalgia (FM), has been shown to decrease sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity and inhibit sympathetically maintained pain, but its effects on exercise responses have not been reported. Methods. Using a randomized double-blind crossover design, we assessed the effect of 5 weeks of pregabalin (versus placebo) on acute cardiovascular and subjective responses to moderate exercise in 19 FM patients. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) during exercise and ratings of pain, physical fatigue, and mental fatigue before, during, and for 48 hours after exercise were compared in patients on pregabalin versus placebo and also versus 18 healthy controls. Results. On placebo, exercise RPE and BP were significantly higher in FM patients than controls (p < 0.04). Pregabalin responders (n = 12, defined by patient satisfaction and symptom changes) had significantly lower exercise BP, HR, and RPE on pregabalin versus placebo (p < 0.03) and no longer differed from controls (p > 0.26). Cardiovascular responses of nonresponders (n = 7) were not altered by pregabalin. In responders, pregabalin improved ratings of fatigue and pain (p < 0.04), but negative effects on pain and fatigue were seen in nonresponders. Conclusions. These preliminary findings suggest that pregabalin may normalize cardiovascular and subjective responses to exercise in many FM patients. PMID:27026828

  1. Simvastatin Attenuates Neuropathic Pain by Inhibiting the RhoA/LIMK/Cofilin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Chen, W Y; Wang, Z Y; Liu, F; Wei, M; Ma, C; Huang, Y G

    2016-09-01

    Neuropathic pain occurs due to deleterious changes in the nervous system caused by a lesion or dysfunction. Currently, neuropathic pain management is unsatisfactory and remains a challenge in clinical practice. Studies have suggested that actin cytoskeleton remodeling may be associated with neural plasticity and may involve a nociceptive mechanism. Here, we found that the RhoA/LIM kinase (LIMK)/cofilin pathway, which regulates actin dynamics, was activated after chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Treatments that reduced RhoA/LIMK/cofilin pathway activity, including simvastatin, the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632, and the synthetic peptide Tat-S3, attenuated actin filament disruption in the dorsal root ganglion and CCI-induced neuropathic pain. Over-activation of the cytoskeleton caused by RhoA/LIMK/cofilin pathway activation may produce a scaffold for the trafficking of nociceptive signaling factors, leading to chronic neuropathic pain. Here, we found that simvastatin significantly decreased the ratio of membrane/cytosolic RhoA, which was significantly increased after CCI, by inhibiting the RhoA/LIMK/cofilin pathway. This effect was highly dependent on the function of the cytoskeleton as a scaffold for signal trafficking. We conclude that simvastatin attenuated neuropathic pain in rats subjected to CCI by inhibiting actin-mediated intracellular trafficking to suppress RhoA/LIMK/cofilin pathway activity. PMID:27216618

  2. Attenuation of neuropathic pain by saikosaponin a in a rat model of chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Cheng, Hong; Xu, Dedong; Yin, Qing; Cheng, Lei; Wang, Lei; Song, Shasha; Zhang, Mengyuan

    2014-11-01

    Despite immense advances in the treatment strategies, the effective treatment of patients suffering from neuropathic pain remains challenging. Saikosaponin a possesses anti-inflammatory activity. However, the role of saikosaponin a in neuropathic pain is still unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of saikosaponin a on neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After CCI, rats were administered saikosaponin a (6.25, 12.50 and 25.00 mg/kg intraperitoneal, once daily) for 14 days. Mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were assessed before surgery and on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after CCI. Our results showed that CCI significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency on days 1, 3, 7 and 14, as compared with sham groups, however, saikosaponin a reversed this effects. In addition, saikosaponin a inhibited CCI-induced the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2 in spinal cord. Western blot analysis demonstrated that saikosaponin a reduced the elevated expression of p-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB in the spinal cord induced by CCI. These results suggest that saikosaponin a could effectively attenuate neuropathic pain in CCI rats by inhibiting the activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways in spinal cord. PMID:25107300

  3. Attenuation of neuropathic pain and neuroinflammatory responses by a pyranocoumarin derivative, anomalin in animal and cellular models.

    PubMed

    Khan, Salman; Choi, Ran Joo; Lee, Joohee; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigated the neuropathic pain, anti-neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective properties of a pyranocoumarin derivative (anomalin) in in vivo and in vitro models. An in vivo streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic neuropathic pain model demonstrated that anomalin significantly suppressed neuropathic pain in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism of the anti-neuropathic pain activity of anomalin, sodium-nitroprusside (SNP)-induced neuroinflammation in neuro-2a (N2a) cells was further investigated in signaling pathways. The effects of anomalin against SNP-induced toxicity, nitrite production and related mRNA gene expression (iNOS and COX-2) were considerably reduced by anomalin in the SNP-induced N2a cells. In the molecular signaling pathway, anomalin effectively blocked the SNP-induced activation of the IKKα/β, IκBα, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways. Furthermore, anomalin remarkably reduced the increase in the SNP-induced nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) pathway. Additionally, the pro-inflammatory cytokines level was remarkably inhibited by anomalin in high glucose-induced DRG primary neurons and SNP-induced N2a cells. These findings indicate that anomalin has anti-neuropathic pain, anti-neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective effects against STZ-induced diabetic type I neuropathic pain and SNP-induced in neuronal cell models via the inactivation of the NF-κB, Nrf2 and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:26849943

  4. Central Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sujin; Zhao, Xing; Hatch, Maya; Chun, Sophia; Chang, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating medical condition affecting 1.2 million people in the United States. Central neuropathic pain is one of the most common medical complications of SCI. Current treatment options include opioids, antiepileptic agents such as gabapentin, antispastic agents such as baclofen or tizanidine, and tricyclic acid. Other options include complementary, nonpharmacological treatment such as exercise or acupuncture, interventional treatments, and psychological approaches. Although these treatment options exist, central neuropathic pain in patients with SCI is still extremely difficult to treat because of its complexity. To develop and provide more effective treatment options to these patients, proper assessment of and classification tools for central neuropathic pain, as well as a better understanding of the pathophysiology, are needed. A combination of approaches, from standard general pain assessments to medically specific questions unique to SCI pathophysiology, is essential for this population. A multidisciplinary approach to patient care, in addition with a better understanding of pathophysiology and diagnosis, will lead to improved management and treatment of patients with SCI displaying central neuropathic pain. Here we summarize the most recent classification tools, pathophysiology, and current treatment options for patients with SCI with central neuropathic pain. PMID:25750485

  5. Neuropathic pain therapy: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Backonja, Miroslav Misha

    2012-07-01

    Neuropathic pain is a result of complex interactions between peripheral and central mechanisms with multiple potential therapeutic targets. However, the complexity of these mechanisms and relative youth of translational pain research, which is in its infancy, have prevented translation of successful basic bench research to human therapy. Most of the clinically available neuropathic pain treatments are borrowed from other therapeutic areas, such as antidepressants and antiepileptics, or involve application of older therapy, such as opioids. Exceptions are ziconotide, tapentadol, and the high-concentration capsaicin patch. Similar to all other analgesic agents, these provide only partial pain relief in subsets of patients. The standard of care for patients with chronic neuropathic pain is multimodal and multidisciplinary. For most patients to achieve and maintain satisfactory pain relief a combination of therapeutic agents is necessary, providing the empiric basis for rational polypharmacy, which has become a standard approach as well. PMID:23117951

  6. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew M; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is a significant unmet medical need in patients with variety of injury or disease insults to the nervous system. Neuropathic pain often presents as a painful sensation described as electrical, burning, or tingling. Currently available treatments have limited effectiveness and narrow therapeutic windows for safety. More powerful analgesics, e.g., opioids, carry a high risk for chemical dependence. Thus, a major challenge for pain research is the elucidation of the mechanisms that underlie neuropathic pain and developing targeted strategies to alleviate pathological pain. The mechanistic link between dendritic spine structure and circuit function could explain why neuropathic pain is difficult to treat, since nociceptive processing pathways are adversely "hard-wired" through the reorganization of dendritic spines. Several studies in animal models of neuropathic pain have begun to reveal the functional contribution of dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain. Previous reports have demonstrated three primary changes in dendritic spine structure on nociceptive dorsal horn neurons following injury or disease, which accompany chronic intractable pain: (I) increased density of dendritic spines, particularly mature mushroom-spine spines, (II) redistribution of spines toward dendritic branch locations close to the cell body, and (III) enlargement of the spine head diameter, which generally presents as a mushroom-shaped spine. Given the important functional implications of spine distribution, density, and shape for synaptic and neuronal function, the study of dendritic spine abnormality may provide a new perspective for investigating pain, and the identification of specific molecular players that regulate spine morphology may guide the development of more effective and long-lasting therapies. PMID:25445354

  7. Treatment of neuropathic pain in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Lacoux, Phillipe; Ford, Nathan

    2002-07-01

    During Sierra Leone's violent decade-long war, the warring parties used amputation, especially of arms, as a means of terror. In a camp for amputees in the capital city Freetown, Médecins Sans Frontières established a clinic and a treatment programme for neuropathic pain. Insecurity and cultural and language barriers have complicated this work, but medical and humanitarian benefits have been demonstrated. Pain services are virtually non-existent in less-developed countries. There have recently been no major treatment advances for neuropathic or phantom pain; however, the general body of knowledge about amputation pain can be increased by observations from these difficult settings. PMID:12849488

  8. Spinal NTS2 receptor activation reverses signs of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tétreault, Pascal; Beaudet, Nicolas; Perron, Amélie; Belleville, Karine; René, Adeline; Cavelier, Florine; Martinez, Jean; Stroh, Thomas; Jacobi, Ashley M; Rose, Scott D; Behlke, Mark A; Sarret, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    Management of painful peripheral neuropathies remains challenging, since patients with chronic pain respond poorly to the available pharmacopeia. In recent years, the G-protein-coupled receptor neurotensin (NT) type 2 (NTS2) emerged as an attractive target for treating transitory pain states. To date, however, there is no evidence for its role in the regulation of chronic peripheral neuropathies. Here, we found that NTS2 receptors were largely localized to primary afferent fibers and superficial dorsal horns. Changes in the time course of the gene expression profile of NT, NTS1, and NTS2 were observed over a 28-d period following the sciatic nerve constriction [chronic constriction injury (CCI) model]. We next determined the effects of central delivery of selective-NTS2 agonists to CCI-treated rats on both mechanical allodynia (evoked withdrawal responses) and weight-bearing deficits (discomfort and quality-of-life proxies). The NTS2 analogs JMV431, levocabastine, and β-lactotensin were all effective in reducing ongoing tactile allodynia in CCI-treated rats. Likewise, amitriptyline, pregabalin, and morphine significantly attenuated CCI-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. NTS2 agonists were also efficient in reversing weight-bearing and postural deficits caused by nerve damage, unlike reference analgesics currently used in the clinic. Thus, NTS2 agonists may offer new treatment avenues for limiting pain associated with peripheral neuropathies and improve functional rehabilitation and well-being. PMID:23756650

  9. Imaging Biomarkers and the Role of Neuroinflammation in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Linda; Cooper, Mark S.; Clark, Vincent P.

    2013-01-01

    The papers from this thematic issue followed a translational research workshop, Imaging Neuroinflammation and Neuropathic Pain, that focused on the search for neuroimaging biomarkers to assess neuroinflammation associated with neuropathic pain. The topics covered in this issue include overviews of the historical and current knowledge regarding neuropathic pain, the potential mechanisms involved, the often under-recognized clinical presentations that can delay diagnosis, the various neuroimaging techniques that have been applied to evaluate neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation, to case series illustrating novel treatments of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, the use of telemedicine to disseminate knowledge and improve the diagnosis and treatment of pain syndromes is also discussed. PMID:23666404

  10. Pregabalin and Tranexamic Acid Evaluation by Two Simple and Sensitive Spectrophotometric Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sher, Nawab; Fatima, Nasreen; Perveen, Shahnaz; Siddiqui, Farhan Ahmed; Wafa Sial, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates colorimetric visible spectrophotometric quantification methods for amino acid, namely, tranexamic acid and pregabalin. Both drugs contain the amino group, and when they are reacted with 2,4-dinitrophenol and 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, they give rise to yellow colored complexes showing absorption maximum at 418 nm and 425 nm, respectively, based on the Lewis acid base reaction. Detailed optimization process and stoichiometric studies were conducted along with investigation of thermodynamic features, that is, association constant and standard free energy changes. The method was linear over the concentration range of 0.02–200 µgmL−1 with correlation coefficient of more than 0.9990 in all of the cases. Limit of detection was in range from 0.0041 to 0.0094 µgmL−1 and limit of quantification was in the range from 0.0137 to 0.0302 µgmL−1. Excellent recovery in Placebo spiked samples indicated that there is no interference from common excipients. The analytical methods under proposal were successfully applied to determine tranexamic acid and pregabalin in commercial products. t-test and F ratio were evaluated without noticeable difference between the proposed and reference methods. PMID:25873964

  11. A randomised controlled trial of peri-operative pregabalin vs. placebo for video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Konstantatos, A H; Howard, W; Story, D; Mok, L Y H; Boyd, D; Chan, M T V

    2016-02-01

    We allocated 52 participants to oral pregabalin 300 mg and 48 participants to placebo tablets before thoracoscopic surgery and for five postoperative days. The median (IQR [range]) cumulative pain scores at rest for nine postoperative months were 184 (94-274 [51-1454]) after pregabalin and 166 (66-266 [48-1628]) after placebo, p = 0.39. The corresponding scores on deep breathing were 468 (281-655 [87-2870]) and 347 (133-561 [52-3666]), respectively, p = 0.16. After three postoperative months, 29/100 participants had persistent surgical site pain, 19/52 after pregabalin and 10/48 after placebo, p = 0.12, of whom four and five, respectively, attended a pain management clinic, p = 0.24. The median (IQR [range]) morphine equivalent consumption six days after surgery was 273 (128-619 [39-2243]) mg after pregabalin and 319 (190-663 [47-2258]) mg after placebo, p = 0.35. PMID:26566754

  12. The neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Costa, F.; Shannon, J. R.; Robertson, R. M.; Wathen, M.; Stein, M.; Biaggioni, I.; Ertl, A.; Black, B.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The postural tachycardia syndrome is a common disorder that is characterized by chronic orthostatic symptoms and a dramatic increase in heart rate on standing, but that does not involve orthostatic hypotension. Several lines of evidence indicate that this disorder may result from sympathetic denervation of the legs. METHODS: We measured norepinephrine spillover (the rate of entry of norepinephrine into the venous circulation) in the arms and legs both before and in response to exposure to three stimuli (the cold pressor test, sodium nitroprusside infusion, and tyramine infusion) in 10 patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome and in 8 age- and sex-matched normal subjects. RESULTS: At base line, the mean (+/-SD) plasma norepinephrine concentration in the femoral vein was lower in the patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome than in the normal subjects (135+/-30 vs. 215+/-55 pg per milliliter [0.80+/-0.18 vs. 1.27+/-0.32 nmol per liter], P=0.001). Norepinephrine spillover in the arms increased to a similar extent in the two groups in response to each of the three stimuli, but the increases in the legs were smaller in the patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome than in the normal subjects (0.001+/-0.09 vs. 0.12+/-0.12 ng per minute per deciliter of tissue [0.006+/-0.53 vs. 0.71+/-0.71 nmol per minute per deciliter] with the cold pressor test, P=0.02; 0.02+/-0.07 vs. 0.23+/-0.17 ng per minute per deciliter [0.12+/-0.41 vs. 1.36+/-1.00 nmol per minute per deciliter] with nitroprusside infusion, P=0.01; and 0.008+/-0.09 vs. 0.19+/-0.25 ng per minute per deciliter [0.05+/-0.53 vs. 1.12+/-1.47 nmol per minute per deciliter] with tyramine infusion, P=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: The neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome results from partial sympathetic denervation, especially in the legs.

  13. Use of naturally occurring peptides for neuropathic spinal cord injury pain.

    PubMed

    Hama, Aldric; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2013-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is accompanied by intractable pain as well as loss of motor and visceral control. As part of an overall strategy in patient rehabilitation and improvement in quality of life, pain management is crucial. Interestingly, SCI patients report pain below the level of injury that has characteristics of neuropathic-type pain. Preclinical studies suggest that a key substrate that underlies the symptoms of neuropathic pain such as spontaneous pain and below-level cutaneous hypersensitivity is aberrant activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons. While pharmacotherapies for peripheral neuropathic pain exist, these treatments may lead to adverse side effects in SCI patients, such as muscle weakness and constipation, which may exacerbate existing dysfunctions. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies are needed. One way to limit the adverse effects associated with systemically administered drugs is intrathecal delivery. Intrathecal delivery also directs drug to dorsal horn neurons. Another way to reduce the severity of side effects and to potentially enhance drug efficacy is to utilize combination drug therapy. While the conopeptide ziconotide has demonstrated clinical efficacy for severe chronic pain, a limitation of this drug is its potential for significant side effects. Combinations of conopeptides with currently available drugs as well as with other conopeptides could be an effective means of reducing neuropathic SCI pain. PMID:23721309

  14. An Epidemiological Study of Neuropathic Pain Symptoms in Canadian Adults

    PubMed Central

    VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G.; Mann, Elizabeth G.; Torrance, Nicola; Smith, Blair H.; Johnson, Ana; Gilron, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The reported prevalence of neuropathic pain ranges from 6.9% to 10%; however the only Canadian study reported 17.9%. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of neuropathic pain in Canada. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a random sample of Canadian adults. The response rate was 21.1% (1504/7134). Likely or possible neuropathic pain was defined using a neuropathic pain-related diagnosis and a positive outcome on the Self-Report Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale (S-LANSS) or the Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4) Questions. The prevalence of likely neuropathic pain was 1.9% (S-LANSS) and 3.4% (DN4) and that of possible neuropathic pain was 5.8% (S-LANSS) and 8.1% (DN4). Neuropathic pain was highest in economically disadvantaged males. There is a significant burden of neuropathic pain in Canada. The low response rate and a slightly older and less educated sample than the Canadian population may have led to an overestimate of neuropathic pain. Population prevalence varies by screening tool used, indicating more work is needed to develop reliable measures. Population level screening targeted towards high risk groups should improve the sensitivity and specificity of screening, while clinical examination of those with positive screening results will further refine the estimate of prevalence. PMID:27445636

  15. Pharmacological management of chronic neuropathic pain – Consensus statement and guidelines from the Canadian Pain Society

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, DE; Clark, AJ; Gilron, I; Ware, MA; Watson, CPN; Sessle, BJ; Coderre, T; Morley-Forster, PK; Stinson, J; Boulanger, A; Peng, P; Finley, GA; Taenzer, P; Squire, P; Dion, D; Cholkan, A; Gilani, A; Gordon, A; Henry, J; Jovey, R; Lynch, M; Mailis-Gagnon, A; Panju, A; Rollman, GB; Velly, A

    2007-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NeP), generated by disorders of the peripheral and central nervous system, can be particularly severe and disabling. Prevalence estimates indicate that 2% to 3% of the population in the developed world suffer from NeP, which suggests that up to one million Canadians have this disabling condition. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of NeP are therefore urgently needed. Randomized, controlled trials, systematic reviews and existing guidelines focusing on the pharmacological management of NeP were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications are recommended in the guidelines if their analgesic efficacy was supported by at least one methodologically sound, randomized, controlled trial showing significant benefit relative to placebo or another relevant control group. Recommendations for treatment are based on degree of evidence of analgesic efficacy, safety, ease of use and cost-effectiveness. Analgesic agents recommended for first-line treatments are certain antidepressants (tricyclics) and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and pregabalin). Second-line treatments recommended are serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and topical lidocaine. Tramadol and controlled-release opioid analgesics are recommended as third-line treatments for moderate to severe pain. Recommended fourth-line treatments include cannabinoids, methadone and anticonvulsants with lesser evidence of efficacy, such as lamotrigine, topiramate and valproic acid. Treatment must be individualized for each patient based on efficacy, side-effect profile and drug accessibility, including cost. Further studies are required to examine head-to-head comparisons among analgesics, combinations of analgesics, long-term outcomes, and treatment of pediatric and central NeP. PMID:17372630

  16. Pharmacological management of chronic neuropathic pain: Revised consensus statement from the Canadian Pain Society

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, DE; Boulanger, A; Clark, AJ; Clarke, H; Dao, T; Finley, GA; Furlan, A; Gilron, I; Gordon, A; Morley-Forster, PK; Sessle, BJ; Squire, P; Stinson, J; Taenzer, P; Velly, A; Ware, MA; Weinberg, EL; Williamson, OD

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain (NeP), redefined as pain caused by a lesion or a disease of the somatosensory system, is a disabling condition that affects approximately two million Canadians. OBJECTIVE: To review the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews related to the pharmacological management of NeP to develop a revised evidence-based consensus statement on its management. METHODS: RCTs, systematic reviews and existing guidelines on the pharmacological management of NeP were evaluated at a consensus meeting in May 2012 and updated until September 2013. Medications were recommended in the consensus statement if their analgesic efficacy was supported by at least one methodologically sound RCT (class I or class II) showing significant benefit relative to placebo or another relevant control group. Recommendations for treatment were based on the degree of evidence of analgesic efficacy, safety and ease of use. RESULTS: Analgesic agents recommended for first-line treatments are gabapentinoids (gabapentin and pregabalin), tricyclic antidepressants and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors. Tramadol and controlled-release opioid analgesics are recommended as second-line treatments for moderate to severe pain. Cannabinoids are now recommended as third-line treatments. Recommended fourth-line treatments include methadone, anticonvulsants with lesser evidence of efficacy (eg, lamotrigine, lacos-amide), tapentadol and botulinum toxin. There is support for some analgesic combinations in selected NeP conditions. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines provide an updated, stepwise approach to the pharmacological management of NeP. Treatment should be individualized for each patient based on efficacy, side-effect profile and drug accessibility, including cost. Additional studies are required to examine head-to-head comparisons among analgesics, combinations of analgesics, long-term outcomes and treatment of pediatric, geriatric and central NeP. PMID:25479151

  17. Capsaicinoids in the treatment of neuropathic pain: a review

    PubMed Central

    Pappagallo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of neuropathic pain is difficult. Oral pharmaceuticals have significant side effects, and treatment efficacy tends to be modest. The use of topical analgesics reduces the potential for systemic side effects and allows direct application of medications to the area of pain. The natural spicy substance, capsaicin, has historically been known for its topical use. Capsaicin, once applied to the skin, causes a brief initial sensitization followed by a prolonged desensitization of the local pain nerves. This occurs through stimulation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) expressing pain nerve fibers. While low-dose capsaicin has not resulted in good efficacy, the larger dose 8% topical capsaicin has had some of the best data currently available in the treatment of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) and other neuropathic conditions. This paper discusses the data currently existing for capsaicin 8% in the treatment of PHN. It further reviews data for the low-dose capsaicin products and the current status in the development of other capsaicinoids, e.g. resiniferotoxin, and high-concentration liquid capsaicin. PMID:24409200

  18. Impact of Neuropathic Pain at the Population Level

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Ana Shirley Maranhao; Baptista, Abrahao Fontes; Mendes, Livia; Silva, Kamilla Soares; Gois, Sharize Cristine de Araujo; Lima, Flavia Manoela de Almeida; Souza, Israel; Sa, Katia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the chief complaints of individuals who frequent the Family Health Units is chronic pain which, in Salvador, affects over 40% of the population. However, little is known about the type of pain and its impact on quality of life (QoL) at population level. The aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of neuropathic pain on QoL in a community. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from March to October 2012, in a Family Health Unit, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The DN-4 (type of pain), body map (location), VAS (intensity) and SF-36 (QoL) instruments were applied. The Chi-square (univariate analysis) and logistic regression (multivariate) tests were used, with IC 95% and P < 0.05. Results In a sample of 191 individuals with chronic pain, predominantly women (86.4%), single (48.7%), nonwhite (93.2%), low educational (46.6%) and low economic (100%) level. The most affected locations of the body were knees, lumbar region and head. In 60.2% of interviewees, neuropathic pain, of high intensity (VAS = 7.09 ± 3.0) predominated, with duration of 8.53 ± 8.8 years and mean QoL was reduced in 47.13%. Conclusions Intense pain in the dorsal region and type of neuropathy are independent predictors for greater compromise of QoL. PMID:24578752

  19. Effects of silymarin on neuropathic pain and formalin-induced nociception in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Faezeh Vahdati; Rezaee, Ramin; Sazegara, Hasan; Hashemzaei, Mahmoud; Shirani, Kobra; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Based on the previous reports, silymarin can suppress nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotrienes, cytokines production, and neutrophils infiltration. Regarding the fact that inflammation plays an important role in neuropathic and formalin-induced pain, it was assumed that silymarin could reduce pain. The present study investigates the analgesic effects of silymarin in chemical nociception and a model of neuropathic pain. Materials and Methods: Chemical nociception was produced by injection of 20 µl of formalin (0.5% formaldehyde in saline) into the plantar region of the right hind paw. A sciatic-nerve ligated mouse was applied as the model of neuropathic pain and the antinociceptive response of silymarin was examined 14 days after unilateral nerve-ligation using the hot plate test. Results: The intraperitoneal administration of silymarin (25, 50, and, 100 mg/kg) 2 hr prior to the intraplantar formalin injection suppressed the nociceptive response during the late phase of the formalin test significantly, but it was not in a dose-dependent manner. Different doses of silymarin 14 days after unilateral sciatic nerve ligation in hot plate test did not induce obvious antinociception. Conclusion: Results of the present study indicated that repeated administration of silymarin prevents the formalin-induced nociceptive behavior. However, it is not effective in the treatment of sciatic neuropathic pain. PMID:26351564

  20. Silencing of Id2 Alleviates Chronic Neuropathic Pain Following Chronic Constriction Injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuming; Wu, Qun; Yang, Tao

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation 2 (Id2) belongs to a helix-loop-helix family of proteins. Recent studies have showed that Id2 plays a pivotal role in neuronal survival and neuroprotection. However, under neuropathic pain conditions, the role of Id2 is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of Id2 on neuropathic pain in a rat chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Our results demonstrated that Id2 was upregulated in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in a CCI rat in a time-dependent manner. Intrathecal short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-Id2 attenuates mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats, and inhibits the expression of TNF-α and IL-1β in the DRG in CCI rats. Furthermore, knockdown of Id2 reduces the expression of NF-κB p65 in the DRG of CCI rats. Taken together, our findings suggest that knockdown of Id2 may alleviate neuropathic pain by inhibiting the NF-κB activation to inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. Therefore, Id2 may provide an important target of neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:26768262

  1. Intrathecal bone marrow stromal cells inhibit neuropathic pain via TGF-β secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Park, Chul-Kyu; Xie, Rou-Gang; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains a pressing clinical problem. Here, we demonstrate that a local, intrathecal (i.t.) injection of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) following lumbar puncture alleviates early- and late-phase neuropathic pain symptoms, such as allodynia and hyperalgesia, for several weeks in murine chronic constriction injury (CCI) and spared nerve injury models. Moreover, i.t. BMSCs reduced CCI-induced spontaneous pain and axonal injury of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and inhibited CCI-evoked neuroinflammation in DRGs and spinal cord tissues. BMSCs secreted TGF-β1 into the cerebrospinal fluid, and neutralization of TGF-β1, but not IL-10, reversed the analgesic effect of BMSCs. Conversely, i.t. administration of TGF-β1 potently inhibited neuropathic pain. TGF-β1 acted as a powerful neuromodulator and rapidly (within minutes) suppressed CCI-evoked spinal synaptic plasticity and DRG neuronal hyperexcitability via TGF-β receptor 1–mediated noncanonical signaling. Finally, nerve injury upregulated CXCL12 in lumbar L4–L6 DRGs, and this upregulation caused migration of i.t.-injected BMSCs to DRGs through the CXCL12 receptor CXCR4, which was expressed on BMSCs. BMSCs that migrated from the injection site survived at the border of DRGs for more than 2 months. Our findings support a paracrine mechanism by which i.t. BMSCs target CXCL12-producing DRGs to elicit neuroprotection and sustained neuropathic pain relief via TGF-β1 secretion. PMID:26168219

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a fluorescent analog of phenytoin as a potential inhibitor of neuropathic pain and imaging agent

    PubMed Central

    Walls, Thomas H.; Grindrod, Scott C.; Beraud, Dawn; Zhang, Li; Baheti, Aparna R.; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Patel, Manoj K.; Brown, Milton L.; MacArthur, Linda H.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report on a novel fluorescent analog of phenytoin as a potential inhibitor of neuropathic pain with potential use as an imaging agent. Compound 2 incorporated a heptyl side chain and dansyl moiety onto the parent compound phenytoin and produced greater displacement of BTX from sodium channels and greater functional blockade with greatly reduced toxicity. Compound 2 reduced mechano-allodynia in a rat model of neuropathic pain and was visualized ex vivo in sensory neuron axons with two-photon microscopy. These results suggest a promising strategy for developing novel sodium channel inhibitors with imaging capabilities. PMID:22863530

  3. Fat Grafting in Burn Scar Alleviates Neuropathic Pain via Anti-Inflammation Effect in Scar and Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Lee, Su-Shin; Chang, Kao-Ping; Chai, Chee-Yin; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Lin, Sin-Daw; Kwan, Aij-Lie; David Wang, Hui-Min; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Burn-induced neuropathic pain is complex, and fat grafting has reportedly improved neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism of fat grafting in improving neuropathic pain is unclear. Previous investigations have found that neuroinflammation causes neuropathic pain, and anti-inflammatory targeting may provide potential therapeutic opportunities in neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that fat grafting in burn scars improves the neuropathic pain through anti-inflammation. Burn-induced scar pain was confirmed using a mechanical response test 4 weeks after burn injuries, and autologous fat grafting in the scar area was performed simultaneously. After 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and specimens were collected for the inflammation test, including COX-2, iNOS, and nNOS in the injured skin and spinal cord dorsal horns through immunohistochemistry and Western assays. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) in the spinal cord were collected. Double immunofluorescent staining images for measuring p-IκB, p-NFκB, p-JNK, and TUNEL as well as Western blots of AKT, Bax/Bcl-2 for the inflammatory process, and apoptosis were analyzed. Fat grafting significantly reduced COX2, nNOS, and iNOS in the skin and spinal cord dorsal horns, as well as IL-1β and TNF-α, compared with the burn group. Moreover, regarding the anti-inflammatory effect, the apoptosis cells in the spinal cord significantly decreased after the fat grafting in the burn injury group. Fat grafting was effective in treating burn-induced neuropathic pain through the alleviation of neuroinflammation and ameliorated spinal neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26368011

  4. Fat Grafting in Burn Scar Alleviates Neuropathic Pain via Anti-Inflammation Effect in Scar and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Lee, Su-Shin; Chang, Kao-Ping; Chai, Chee-Yin; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Lin, Sin-Daw; Kwan, Aij-Lie; David Wang, Hui-Min; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Burn-induced neuropathic pain is complex, and fat grafting has reportedly improved neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism of fat grafting in improving neuropathic pain is unclear. Previous investigations have found that neuroinflammation causes neuropathic pain, and anti-inflammatory targeting may provide potential therapeutic opportunities in neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that fat grafting in burn scars improves the neuropathic pain through anti-inflammation. Burn-induced scar pain was confirmed using a mechanical response test 4 weeks after burn injuries, and autologous fat grafting in the scar area was performed simultaneously. After 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and specimens were collected for the inflammation test, including COX-2, iNOS, and nNOS in the injured skin and spinal cord dorsal horns through immunohistochemistry and Western assays. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) in the spinal cord were collected. Double immunofluorescent staining images for measuring p-IκB, p-NFκB, p-JNK, and TUNEL as well as Western blots of AKT, Bax/Bcl-2 for the inflammatory process, and apoptosis were analyzed. Fat grafting significantly reduced COX2, nNOS, and iNOS in the skin and spinal cord dorsal horns, as well as IL-1β and TNF-α, compared with the burn group. Moreover, regarding the anti-inflammatory effect, the apoptosis cells in the spinal cord significantly decreased after the fat grafting in the burn injury group. Fat grafting was effective in treating burn-induced neuropathic pain through the alleviation of neuroinflammation and ameliorated spinal neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26368011

  5. Comparative efficacy and tolerability of duloxetine, pregabalin, and milnacipran for the treatment of fibromyalgia: a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ho; Song, Gwan Gyu

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relative efficacy and tolerability of duloxetine, pregabalin, and milnacipran at the recommended doses in patients with fibromyalgia. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the efficacy and safety of duloxetine 60 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, pregabalin 150 mg, milnacipran 200 mg, and milnacipran 100 mg compared to placebo in patients with fibromyalgia were included in this Bayesian network meta-analysis. Nine RCTs including 5140 patients met the inclusion criteria. The proportion of patients with >30 % improvement from baseline in pain was significantly higher in the duloxetine 60 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, milnacipran 100 mg, and milnacipran 200 mg groups than in the placebo group [pairwise odds ratio (OR) 2.33, 95 % credible interval (CrI) 1.50-3.67; OR 1.68, 95 % CrI 1.25-2.28; OR 1.62, 95 % CrI 1.16-2.25; and OR 1.61; 95 % CrI 1.15-2.24, respectively]. Ranking probability based on the surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) indicated that duloxetine 60 mg had the highest probability of being the best treatment for achieving the response level (SUCRA = 0.9431), followed by pregabalin 300 mg (SUCRA = 0.6300), milnacipran 100 mg (SUCRA = 0.5680), milnacipran 200 mg (SUCRA = 0.5617), pregabalin 150 mg (SUCRA = 0.2392), and placebo (SUCRA = 0.0580). The risk of withdrawal due to adverse events was lower in the placebo group than in the pregabalin 300 mg, duloxetine 60 mg, milnacipran 100 mg, and milnacipran 200 mg groups. However, there was no significant difference in the efficacy and tolerability between the medications at the recommended doses. Duloxetine 60 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, milnacipran 100 mg, and milnacipran 200 mg were more efficacious than placebo. However, there was no significant difference in the efficacy and tolerability between the medications at the recommended doses. PMID:27000046

  6. Impact of potential pregabalin or duloxetine drug–drug interactions on health care costs and utilization among Medicare members with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jeffrey J; Sadosky, Alesia B; Ten Eyck, Laura L; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Brown, Courtney R; Suehs, Brandon T; Parsons, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the impact of newly initiated pregabalin or duloxetine treatment on fibromyalgia (FM) patients’ encounters with potential drug–drug interactions (DDIs), the health care cost and utilization consequences of those interactions, and the impact of treatment on opioid utilization. Patients and methods Subjects included those with an FM diagnosis, a pregabalin or duloxetine prescription claim (index event), ≥1 inpatient or ≥2 outpatient medical claims, and ≥12 months preindex and ≥6 postindex enrollment. Propensity score matching was used to help balance the pregabalin and duloxetine cohorts on baseline demographics and comorbidities. Potential DDIs were defined based on Micromedex 2.0 software and were identified by prescription claims. Results No significant differences in baseline characteristics were found between matched pregabalin (n=794) and duloxetine cohorts (n=794). Potential DDI prevalence was significantly greater (P<0.0001) among duloxetine subjects (71.9%) than among pregabalin subjects (4.0%). There were no significant differences in all-cause health care utilization or costs between pregabalin subjects with and without a potential DDI. By contrast, duloxetine subjects with a potential DDI had higher mean all-cause costs ($9,373 versus $7,228; P<0.0001) and higher mean number of outpatient visits/member (16.0 versus 13.0; P=0.0009) in comparison to duloxetine subjects without a potential DDI. There was a trend toward a statistically significant difference between pregabalin and duloxetine subjects in their respective pre- versus post-differences in use of ≥1 long-acting opioids (1.6% and 3.4%, respectively; P=0.077). Conclusion The significantly higher prevalence of potential DDIs and potential cost impact found in FM duloxetine subjects, relative to pregabalin subjects, underscore the importance of considering DDIs when selecting a treatment. PMID:25339847

  7. [Gabapentin for therapy of neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Block, F

    2001-08-01

    Gabapentin, which has been approved for add-on therapy of focal seizures, is increasingly used for treatment of neuropathic pain. Its analgesic effect is supposed to be due to reduction of glutamatergic transmission, improvement of GABAergic transmission and to binding to voltage-dependent calcium channels. Experimental studies demonstrated an ameliorating effect of gabapentin on neuropathic pain. Placebo-controlled studies revealed an efficacy of gabapentin against pain in diabetic neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia and in prophylaxis of migraine. Case reports show an analgesic effect of gabapentin in trigeminus neuralgia and in reflex sympathetic dystrophy. The main adverse events are dizziness, ataxia and somnolence. Controlled studies, which compare the efficacy of gabapentin with that of the respective reference drug, are needed to evaluate its importance in treatment of pain. PMID:11810368

  8. Spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wolter, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain constitutes a significant portion of chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain are usually more heavily burdened than patients with nociceptive pain. They suffer more often from insomnia, anxiety, and depression. Moreover, analgesic medication often has an insufficient effect on neuropathic pain. Spinal cord stimulation constitutes a therapy alternative that, to date, remains underused. In the last 10 to 15 years, it has undergone constant technical advancement. This review gives an overview of the present practice of spinal cord stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain and current developments such as high-frequency stimulation and peripheral nerve field stimulation. PMID:25429237

  9. Relationship between Neuropathic Pain and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hozumi, Jun; Sumitani, Masahiko; Matsubayashi, Yoshitaka; Abe, Hiroaki; Oshima, Yasushi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Takeshita, Katsushi; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Overweight negatively affects musculoskeletal health; hence obesity is considered a risk factor for osteoarthritis and chronic low back pain. This was conducted to determine if obesity affects neuropathic pain, usually considered unrelated to the weight-load on the musculoskeletal system. Methods. Using a cut-off body mass index value of 25, 44 patients with neuropathic pain were grouped into a “high-BMI” group and a “normal-BMI” group. Results. The numeric rating scale of the high-BMI group was significantly higher than that of the normal-weight group (P < 0.05). The total NPSI scores were significantly higher (P < 0.01), and the paroxysmal pain and the negative symptoms were more serious in the high-BMI group than in the normal-BMI group. The high-BMI subjects also had significantly higher SF-MPQ scores (P < 0.05). However, both physical and mental health status on the SF-36 were comparable between the groups. Discussion. Neuropathic pain that did not arise from musculoskeletal damage was higher in the high-BMI patients. Paroxysmal pain was more severe, suggesting that neural damage might be aggravated by obesity-associated inflammation. These findings should have needed to be confirmed in future studies. PMID:27445603

  10. Botulinum Toxin Treatment of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Safarpour, Delaram; Jabbari, Bahman

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP), a common form of human pain, often poorly responds to analgesic medications. In this review the authors discuss the pathophysiology and conventional treatment of neuropathic pain and provide evidenced-based statements on the efficacy of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) in this form of pain. The level of efficacy for BoNT treatment in each category of NP is defined according to the published guidelines of the American Academy of Neurology. The data indicate that BoNT treatment (most of the literature is with onabotulinumtoxinA) is effective (level A evidence) in postherpetic neuralgia and trigeminal neuralgia. It is probably effective (level B) in posttraumatic neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy. The data on complex regional pain syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome, occipital neuralgia, and phantom limb pain are preliminary and await conduction of randomized, blinded clinical trials. Much remains to be learned about the most-effective dosage and technique of injection, optimum dilutions, and differences among BoNTs in the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:26866499

  11. Somatosensory Profiles but Not Numbers of Somatosensory Abnormalities of Neuropathic Pain Patients Correspond with Neuropathic Pain Grading

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; Houghton, Andrea; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Vliet, Andre; Timmerman, Wia; den Boer, Johan A.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; van Wijhe, Marten

    2012-01-01

    Due to the lack of a specific diagnostic tool for neuropathic pain, a grading system to categorize pain as ‘definite’, ‘probable’, ‘possible’ and ‘unlikely’ neuropathic was proposed. Somatosensory abnormalities are common in neuropathic pain and it has been suggested that a greater number of abnormalities would be present in patients with ‘probable’ and ‘definite’ grades. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the presence of somatosensory abnormalities by means of Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) in patients with a clinical diagnosis of neuropathic pain and correlated the number of sensory abnormalities and sensory profiles to the different grades. Of patients who were clinically diagnosed with neuropathic pain, only 60% were graded as ‘definite’ or ‘probable’, while 40% were graded as ‘possible’ or ‘unlikely’ neuropathic pain. Apparently, there is a mismatch between a clinical neuropathic pain diagnosis and neuropathic pain grading. Contrary to the expectation, patients with ‘probable’ and ‘definite’ grades did not have a greater number of abnormalities. Instead, similar numbers of somatosensory abnormalities were identified for each grade. The profiles of sensory signs in ‘definite’ and ‘probable’ neuropathic pain were not significantly different, but different from the ‘unlikely’ grade. This latter difference could be attributed to differences in the prevalence of patients with a mixture of sensory gain and loss and with sensory loss only. The grading system allows a separation of neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain based on profiles but not on the total number of sensory abnormalities. Our findings indicate that patient selection based on grading of neuropathic pain may provide advantages in selecting homogenous groups for clinical research. PMID:22927981

  12. Liquid chromatographic separation of pregabalin and its possible impurities with fluorescence detection after postcolumn derivatization with o-phtaldialdehyde.

    PubMed

    Dousa, Michal; Gibala, Petr; Lemr, K

    2010-11-01

    A rapid procedure based on direct extraction and RP-HPLC separation of pregabalin and its possible impurities with fluorescence detection has been developed. The separation conditions and parameters of derivatization reaction for postcolumn derivatization of pregabalin with o-phtaldialdehyde/2-mercaptoethanol were studied. Purospher STAR RP-8e column with isocratic elution was employed. Fluorescence detection was performed at excitation and emission wavelength of 345 nm and 450 nm, respectively. The proposed method has an advantage of a simple sample pre-treatment and a quick and very sensitive HPLC method. The applicability of developed method was successfully verified during analysis of commercial samples of tablets of Lyrica (Pfizer, USA). PMID:20435423

  13. Modeling the longitudinal latent effect of pregabalin on self-reported changes in sleep disturbances in outpatients with generalized anxiety disorder managed in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Miguel A; Álvarez, Enrique; Carrasco, Jose L; Olivares, José M; Pérez, María; Rejas, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric illnesses, with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) being one of the most common. Sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in GAD patients. While treatment with pregabalin has been found to be associated with significant improvement in GAD-related sleep disturbance across many controlled clinical trials, mediational analysis has suggested that a substantial portion of this effect could be the result of a direct effect of pregabalin. Thus, the objective of this study was to model the longitudinal latent effect of pregabalin or usual care (UC) therapies on changes in sleep in outpatients with GAD under routine clinical practice. Methods Male and female GAD outpatients, aged 18 years or above, from a 6-month prospective noninterventional trial were analyzed. Direct and indirect effects of either pregabalin or UC changes in anxiety symptoms (assessed with Hamilton Anxiety Scale) and sleep disturbances (assessed with Medical Outcomes Study-Sleep Scale [MOS-S]) were estimated by a conditional latent curve model applying structural equation modeling. Results A total of 1,546 pregabalin-naïve patients were analyzed, 984 receiving pregabalin and 562 UC. Both symptoms of anxiety and sleep disturbances were significantly improved in both groups, with higher mean (95% confidence interval) score reductions in subjects receiving pregabalin: −15.9 (−15.2; −16.6) vs −14.5 (−13.5; −15.5), P=0.027, in Hamilton Anxiety Scale; and −29.7 (−28.1; −31.3) vs −24.0 (−21.6; −26.4), P<0.001, in MOS-S. The conditional latent curve model showed that the pregabalin effect on sleep disturbances was significant (γ =−3.99, P<0.001), after discounting the effect on reduction in anxiety symptoms. A mediation model showed that 70% of the direct effect of pregabalin on sleep remained after discounting the mediated effect of anxiety improvement. Conclusion A substantial proportion of the incremental

  14. Impairment of adenylyl cyclase-mediated glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the periaqueductal grey in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Key points Long-lasting neuropathic pain has been attributed to elevated neuronal plasticity changes in spinal, peripheral and cortical levels. Here, we found that reduced neuronal plasticity in the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG), a midbrain region important for initiating descending pain inhibition, may also contribute to neuropathic pain. Forskolin- and isoproterenol (isoprenaline)-elicited EPSC potentiation was impaired in the vlPAG of a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve injury. Down-regulation of adenylyl cyclase–cAMP– PKA signalling, due to impaired adenylyl cyclase, but not phosphodiesterase, in glutamatergic terminals may contribute to the hypofunction of excitatory synaptic plasticity in the vlPAG of neuropathic rats and the subsequent descending pain inhibition, ultimately leading to long-lasting neuropathic pain. Our results suggest that drugs that activate adenylyl cyclase in the vlPAG have the potential for relieving neuropathic pain. Abstract Neuropathic pain has been attributed to nerve injury-induced elevation of peripheral neuronal discharges and spinal excitatory synaptic plasticity while little is known about the contribution of neuroplasticity changes in the brainstem. Here, we examined synaptic plasticity changes in the ventrolateral (vl) periaqueductal grey (PAG), a crucial midbrain region for initiating descending pain inhibition, in spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic rats. In vlPAG slices of sham-operated rats, forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase (AC) activator, produced long-lasting enhancement of EPSCs. This is a presynaptic effect since forskolin decreased the paired-pulse ratio and failure rate of EPSCs, and increased the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature EPSCs. Forskolin-induced EPSC potentiation was mimicked by a β-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol (isoprenaline)), and prevented by an AC inhibitor (SQ 22536) and a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor (H89), but not by a

  15. Neuropathic Pain Management: A Reference for the Clinical Nurse.

    PubMed

    Blumstein, Bree; Barkley, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain neuropathic pain guidelines are presented. Nursing considerations, including neuropathic pain assessment and medication efficacy, are reported to explain medications' primary mechanisms of action and provide a nursing reference for patient education. PMID:26863700

  16. A preliminary report on stem cell therapy for neuropathic pain in humans

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, E Russell; Karsten, Elisabeth; Flood, John; Lilischkis, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown in animal models to attenuate chronic neuropathic pain. This preliminary study investigated if: i) injections of autologous MSCs can reduce human neuropathic pain and ii) evaluate the safety of the procedure. Methods Ten subjects with symptoms of neuropathic trigeminal pain underwent liposuction. The lipoaspirate was digested with collagenase and washed with saline three times. Following centrifugation, the stromal vascular fraction was resuspended in saline, and then transferred to syringes for local injections into the pain fields. Outcome measures at 6 months assessed reduction in: i) pain intensity measured by standard numerical rating scale from 0–10 and ii) daily dosage requirements of antineuropathic pain medication. Results Subjects were all female (mean age 55.3 years ± standard deviation [SD] 14.67; range 27–80 years) with pain symptoms lasting from 4 months to 6 years and 5 months. Lipoaspirate collection ranged from 102–214 g with total cell numbers injected from 33 million to 162 million cells. Cell viability was 62%–91%. There were no systemic or local tissue side effects from the stem cell therapy (n=41 oral and facial injection sites). Clinical pain outcomes showed that at 6 months, 5/9 subjects had reduced both pain intensity scores and use of antineuropathic medication. The mean pain score pre-treatment was 7.5 (SD 1.58) and at 6 months had decreased to 4.3 (SD 3.28), P=0.018, Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Antineuropathic pain medication use showed 5/9 subjects reduced their need for medication (gabapentin, P=0.053, Student’s t-test). Conclusion This preliminary open-labeled study showed autologous administration of stem cells for neuropathic trigeminal pain significantly reduced pain intensity at 6 months and is a safe and well tolerated intervention. PMID:24855388

  17. Prior voluntary wheel running attenuates neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Grace, Peter M; Fabisiak, Timothy J; Green-Fulgham, Suzanne M; Anderson, Nathan D; Strand, Keith A; Kwilasz, Andrew J; Galer, Erika L; Walker, Frederick Rohan; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Maier, Steven F; Fleshner, Monika; Watkins, Linda R

    2016-09-01

    Exercise is known to exert a systemic anti-inflammatory influence, but whether its effects are sufficient to protect against subsequent neuropathic pain is underinvestigated. We report that 6 weeks of voluntary wheel running terminating before chronic constriction injury (CCI) prevented the full development of allodynia for the ∼3-month duration of the injury. Neuroimmune signaling was assessed at 3 and 14 days after CCI. Prior exercise normalized ipsilateral dorsal spinal cord expression of neuroexcitatory interleukin (IL)-1β production and the attendant glutamate transporter GLT-1 decrease, as well as expression of the disinhibitory P2X4R-BDNF axis. The expression of the macrophage marker Iba1 and the chemokine CCL2 (MCP-1), and a neuronal injury marker (activating transcription factor 3), was attenuated by prior running in the ipsilateral lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Prior exercise suppressed macrophage infiltration and/or injury site proliferation, given decreased presence of macrophage markers Iba1, iNOS (M1), and Arg-1 (M2; expression was time dependent). Chronic constriction injury-driven increases in serum proinflammatory chemokines were suppressed by prior running, whereas IL-10 was increased. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were also stimulated with lipopolysaccharide ex vivo, wherein CCI-induced increases in IL-1β, nitrite, and IL-10 were suppressed by prior exercise. Last, unrestricted voluntary wheel running, beginning either the day of, or 2 weeks after, CCI, progressively reversed neuropathic pain. This study is the first to investigate the behavioral and neuroimmune consequences of regular exercise terminating before nerve injury. This study suggests that chronic pain should be considered a component of "the diseasome of physical inactivity," and that an active lifestyle may prevent neuropathic pain. PMID:27355182

  18. HSV vector-mediated GAD67 suppresses neuropathic pain induced by perineural HIV gp120 in rats through inhibition of ROS and Wnt5a

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Hirotsugu; Kanao, Megumi; Liu, Shue; Yi, Hyun; Iida, Takafumi; Levitt, Roy C; Candiotti, Keith A; Lubarsky, David A; Hao, Shuanglin

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related neuropathic pain is a debilitating chronic condition that is severe and unrelenting. Despite the extensive research, the exact neuropathological mechanisms remain unknown, which hinders our ability to develop effective treatments. Loss of GABAergic tone may play an important role in the neuropathic pain state. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) is one of isoforms that catalyze GABA synthesis. Here, we used recombinant herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vectors that encode gad1 gene to evaluate the therapeutic potential of GAD67 in peripheral HIV gp120-induced neuropathic pain in rats. We found that 1) subcutaneous inoculation of the HSV vectors expressing GAD67 attenuated mechanical allodynia in the model of HIV gp120-induced neuropathic pain, 2) the anti-allodynic effect of GAD67 was reduced by GABA-A and-B receptors antagonists, 3) HSV vectors expressing GAD67 reversed the lowered GABA-IR expression, and 4) the HSV vectors expressing GAD67 suppressed the upregulated mitochondrial superoxide and Wnt5a in the spinal dorsal horn. Taken together, our studies support the concept that recovering GABAergic tone by the HSV vectors may reverse HIV-associated neuropathic pain through suppressing mitochondrial superoxide and Wnt5a. Our studies provide validation of HSV-mediated GAD67 gene therapy in the treatment of HIV-related neuropathic pain. PMID:26752351

  19. NEUROPATHIC PAIN-INDUCED DEPRESSIVE-LIKE BEHAVIOR AND HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS AND PLASTICITY ARE DEPENDENT ON TNFR1 SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Anna, Dellarole; Paul, Morton; Roberta, Brambilla; Winston, Walters; Spencer, Summer; Danielle, Bernardes; Mariagrazia, Grilli; R, Bethea John

    2014-01-01

    Patients suffering from neuropathic pain have a higher incidence of mood disorders such as depression. Increased expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been reported in neuropathic pain and depressive-like conditions and most of the pro-inflammatory effects of TNF are mediated by the TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1). Here we sought to investigate: 1) the occurrence of depressive-like behavior in chronic neuropathic pain and the associated forms of hippocampal plasticity, and 2) the involvement of TNFR1-mediated TNF signaling as a possible regulator of such events. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and TNFR1−/− mice. Anhedonia, weight loss and physical state were measured as symptoms of depression. Hippocampal neurogenesis, neuroplasticity, myelin remodeling and TNF/TNFRs expression were analyzed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot assay. We found that neuropathic pain resulted in the development of depressive symptoms in a time dependent manner and was associated with profound hippocampal alterations such as impaired neurogenesis, reduced expression of neuroplasticity markers and myelin proteins. The onset of depressive-like behavior also coincided with increased hippocampal levels of TNF, and decreased expression of TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2), which were all fully restored after mice spontaneously recovered from pain. Notably, TNFR1−/− mice did not develop depressive-like symptoms after injury, nor were there changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and plasticity. Our data show that neuropathic pain induces a cluster of depressive-like symptoms and profound hippocampal plasticity that are dependent on TNF signaling through TNFR1. PMID:24938671

  20. Interleukin-17A Acts to Maintain Neuropathic Pain Through Activation of CaMKII/CREB Signaling in Spinal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yao, Cheng-Ye; Weng, Ze-Lin; Zhang, Jian-Cheng; Feng, Tao; Lin, Yun; Yao, Shanglong

    2016-08-01

    Immunity and neuroinflammation play major roles in neuropathic pain. Spinal interleukin (IL)-17A, as a mediator connecting innate and adaptive immunity, has been shown to be an important cytokine in neuroinflammation and acute neuropathic pain. However, the effects and underlying mechanisms of spinal IL-17A in the maintenance of neuropathic pain remain unknown. This study was designed to investigate whether spinal IL-17A acted to maintain neuropathic pain and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms in IL-17A knockout or wild-type (WT) mice following L4 spinal nerve ligation (L4 SNL). WT mice were treated with anti-IL-17A neutralized monoclonal antibody (mAb) or recombinant IL-17A (rIL-17A). We showed that IL-17A levels were significantly increased 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after SNL in spinal cord. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that astrocytes were the major cellular source of spinal IL-17A. IL-17A knockout or anti-IL-17A mAb treatment significantly ameliorated hyperalgesia 7 days after SNL, which was associated with a significant reduction of p-CaMKII and p-CREB levels in spinal cord, whereas rIL-17A treatment conferred the opposite effects. Furthermore, we showed that blocking CaMKII with KN93 significantly reduced SNL- or rIL-17A-induced hyperalgesia and p-CREB expression. Our in vitro data showed that KN93 also significantly inhibited rIL-17A-induced CREB activation in primary cultured spinal neurons. Taken together, our study indicates that astrocytic IL-17A plays important roles in the maintenance of neuropathic pain through CaMKII/CREB signaling pathway in spinal cord, and thus targeting IL-17A may offer an attractive strategy for the treatment of chronic persistent neuropathic pain. PMID:26166359

  1. The Central Analgesic Mechanism of YM-58483 in Attenuating Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zeyou; Wang, Yaping; Zhou, Haocheng; Liang, Na; Yang, Lin; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Calcium channel antagonists are commonly used to treat neuropathic pain. Their analgesic effects rely on inhibiting long-term potentiation, and neurotransmitters release in the spinal cord. Store-operated Ca(2+)channels (SOCCs) are highly Ca(2+)-selective cation channels broadly expressed in non-excitable cells and some excitable cells. Recent studies have shown that the potent inhibitor of SOCCs, YM-58483, has analgesic effects on neuropathic pain, but its mechanism is unclear. This experiment performed on spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic pain model in rats tries to explore the mechanism, whereby YM-58483 attenuates neuropathic pain. The left L5 was ligated to produce the SNL neuropathic pain model in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The withdrawal threshold of rats was measured by the up-down method and Hargreaves' method before and after intrathecal administration of YM-58483 and vehicle. The SOCCs in the spinal dorsal horn were located by immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated ERK and phosphorylated CREB, CD11b, and GFAP proteins in spinal level was tested by Western blot, while the release of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, PGE2) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Intrathecal YM-58483 at the concentration of 300 μM (1.5 nmol) and 1000 μM (10 nmol) produced a significant central analgesic effect on the SNL rats, compared with control + vehicle (n = 7, P < 0.001). However, both could not prevent the development of neuropathic pain, compared with normal + saline (P < 0.001). Immunofluorescent staining revealed that Orai1 and STIM1 (the two key components of SOCCs) were located in the spinal dorsal horn neurons. Western blot showed that YM-58483 could decrease the levels of P-ERK and P-CREB (n = 10, #P < 0.05), without affecting the expression of CD11b and GFAP (n = 10, #P > 0.05). YM-58483 also inhibited the release of spinal cord IL-1β, TNF-α, and PGE2, compared with control

  2. Neuropathic Pain Post Spinal Cord Injury Part 1: Systematic Review of Physical and Behavioral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neuropathic pain has various physiologic and psychosocial aspects. Hence, there is a growing use of adjunct nonpharmacological therapy with traditional pharmacotherapy to reduce neuropathic pain post spinal cord injury (SCI). Objective: The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of published research on nonpharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain after SCI. Methods: MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles addressing nonpharmacological treatment of pain post SCI. Articles were restricted to the English language. Article selection was conducted by 2 independent reviewers with the following inclusion criteria: the subjects participated in a treatment or intervention for neuropathic pain; at least 50% of the subjects had an SCI; at least 3 subjects had an SCI; and a definable intervention was being studied. Data extracted included study design, study type, subject demographics, inclusion and exclusion criteria, sample size, outcome measures, and study results. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were assessed for quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) assessment scale. Levels of evidence were assigned to each intervention using a modified Sackett scale. Results: The 16 articles selected for this review fell into 1 of 2 categories of nonpharmacological management of pain after SCI: physical and behavioral treatments. The pooled sample size of all studies included 433 participants. Of the 16 studies included, 7 were level 1, 3 were level 2, and 6 were level 4 studies. Conclusions: Physical interventions demonstrated the strongest evidence based on quality of studies and numbers of RCTs in the nonpharmacological treatment of post-SCI pain. Of these interventions, transcranial electrical stimulation had the strongest evidence of reducing pain. Despite a growing body of literature, there is still a significant lack of research on the use of nonpharmacological therapies for SCI pain

  3. Formulation of a modified-release pregabalin tablet using hot-melt coating with glyceryl behenate.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyu Ho; Woo, Hye Seung; Kim, Chae Jin; Lee, Kyung Hwa; Jeon, Jun Young; Lee, Sang Young; Kang, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Sangkil; Choi, Young Wook

    2015-11-10

    A modified-release (MR) tablet of the anti-anxiety drug pregabalin (PRE) was prepared by hot-melt coating PRE with glyceryl behenate (GB) as a release retardant and compressing to form a matrix with microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) as a hydrophilic diluent. GB-coated PRE had a size in the range of 177-290 μm with good to acceptable flowability. Tablet hardness decreased slightly as GB content increased. PRE release from the tablet matrices was successfully modified by altering the ratio of MCC and GB, and it was found that dissolution- or diffusion-controlled release depended on the amount of GB used. Drug release was pH-independent. An accelerated stability test on the most promising MR tablet at 40°C and 75% relative humidity for 6 months showed no significant changes in PRE content, and the occurrence of total impurities--including PRE-lactam--was within acceptable limits. After oral administration of the selected MR tablet or a commercial IR capsule (Lyrica) to healthy human volunteers, pharmacokinetic parameters including Tmax, Cmax, AUC0-24, and T1/2 were compared. The confidence interval of AUC0-24 was within the adequate range, but that of Cmax was inadequate. This study demonstrated the potential use of GB for PRE-containing MR formulations. PMID:26315121

  4. Can treatment success with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster be predicted in cancer pain with neuropathic components or trigeminal neuropathic pain?

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Kai-Uwe; Nalamachu, Srinivas; Brasseur, Louis; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2013-01-01

    An expert group of 40 pain specialists from 16 countries performed a first assessment of the value of predictors for treatment success with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster in the management of cancer pain with neuropathic components and trigeminal neuropathic pain. Results were based on the retrospective analysis of 68 case reports (sent in by participants in the 4 weeks prior to the conference) and the practical experience of the experts. Lidocaine plaster treatment was mostly successful for surgery or chemotherapy-related cancer pain with neuropathic components. A dose reduction of systemic pain treatment was observed in at least 50% of all cancer pain patients using the plaster as adjunct treatment; the presence of allodynia, hyperalgesia or pain quality provided a potential but not definitively clear indication of treatment success. In trigeminal neuropathic pain, continuous pain, severe allodynia, hyperalgesia, or postherpetic neuralgia or trauma as the cause of orofacial neuropathic pain were perceived as potential predictors of treatment success with lidocaine plaster. In conclusion, these findings provide a first assessment of the likelihood of treatment benefits with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster in the management of cancer pain with neuropathic components and trigeminal neuropathic pain and support conducting large, well-designed multicenter studies. PMID:23630431

  5. Galectin-3 Inhibition Is Associated with Neuropathic Pain Attenuation after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhicong; Han, Qi; Wang, Xiaolei; Ai, Zisheng; Zheng, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains a prevalent and persistent clinical problem because it is often poorly responsive to the currently used analgesics. It is very urgent to develop novel drugs to alleviate neuropathic pain. Galectin-3 (gal3) is a multifunctional protein belonging to the carbohydrate-ligand lectin family, which is expressed by different cells. Emerging studies showed that gal3 elicits a pro-inflammatory response by recruiting and activating lymphocytes, macrophages and microglia. In the study we investigated whether gal3 inhibition could suppress neuroinflammation and alleviate neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury. We found that L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) increases the expression of gal3 in dorsal root ganglions at the mRNA and protein level. Intrathecal administration of modified citrus pectin (MCP), a gal3 inhibitor, reduces gal3 expression in dorsal root ganglions. MCP treatment also inhibits SNL-induced gal3 expression in primary rat microglia. SNL results in an increased activation of autophagy that contributes to microglial activation and subsequent inflammatory response. Intrathecal administration of MCP significantly suppresses SNL-induced autophagy activation. MCP also inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced autophagy in cultured microglia in vitro. MCP further decreases LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory mediators including IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 by regulating autophagy. Intrathecal administration of MCP results in adecreased mechanical and cold hypersensitivity following SNL. These results demonstrated that gal3 inhibition is associated with the suppression of SNL-induced inflammatory process andneurophathic pain attenuation. PMID:26872020

  6. Optogenetic Silencing of Nav1.8-Positive Afferents Alleviates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Daou, Ihab; Beaudry, Hélène; Ase, Ariel R; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Séguéla, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel transgenic mouse model in which the terminals of peripheral nociceptors can be silenced optogenetically with high spatiotemporal precision, leading to the alleviation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Inhibitory archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) proton pumps were delivered to Nav1.8(+) primary afferents using the Nav1.8-Cre driver line. Arch expression covered both peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptors and yellow light stimulation reliably blocked electrically induced action potentials in DRG neurons. Acute transdermal illumination of the hindpaws of Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice significantly reduced mechanical allodynia under inflammatory conditions, while basal mechanical sensitivity was not affected by the optical stimulation. Arch-driven hyperpolarization of nociceptive terminals was sufficient to prevent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-mediated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in double-transgenic Nav1.8-ChR2(+)-Arch(+) mice. Furthermore, prolonged optical silencing of peripheral afferents in anesthetized Nav1.8-Arch(+) mice led to poststimulation analgesia with a significant decrease in mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity under inflammatory and neuropathic conditions. These findings highlight the role of peripheral neuronal inputs in the onset and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, demonstrate the plasticity of pain pathways even after sensitization has occurred, and support the involvement of Nav1.8(+) afferents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Together, we present a selective analgesic approach in which genetically identified subsets of peripheral sensory fibers can be remotely and optically inhibited with high temporal resolution, overcoming the compensatory limitations of genetic ablations. PMID:27022626

  7. Orofacial Neuropathic Pain Leads to a Hyporesponsive Barrel Cortex with Enhanced Structural Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Karine; Rivière, Sébastien; Lenkei, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a long-lasting debilitating condition that is particularly difficult to treat due to the lack of identified underlying mechanisms. Although several key contributing processes have been described at the level of the spinal cord, very few studies have investigated the supraspinal mechanisms underlying chronic pain. Using a combination of approaches (cortical intrinsic imaging, immunohistochemical and behavioural analysis), our study aimed to decipher the nature of functional and structural changes in a mouse model of orofacial neuropathic pain, focusing on cortical areas involved in various pain components. Our results show that chronic neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with decreased haemodynamic responsiveness to whisker stimulation in the barrel field cortex. This reduced functional activation is likely due to the increased basal neuronal activity (measured indirectly using cFos and phospho-ERK immunoreactivity) observed in several cortical areas, including the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. In the same animals, immunohistochemical analysis of markers for active pre- or postsynaptic elements (Piccolo and phospho-Cofilin, respectively) revealed an increased immunofluorescence in deep cortical layers of the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. These results suggest that long-lasting orofacial neuropathic pain is associated with exacerbated neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity at the cortical level. PMID:27548330

  8. Orofacial Neuropathic Pain Leads to a Hyporesponsive Barrel Cortex with Enhanced Structural Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Karine; Rivière, Sébastien; Lenkei, Zsolt; Férézou, Isabelle; Pezet, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a long-lasting debilitating condition that is particularly difficult to treat due to the lack of identified underlying mechanisms. Although several key contributing processes have been described at the level of the spinal cord, very few studies have investigated the supraspinal mechanisms underlying chronic pain. Using a combination of approaches (cortical intrinsic imaging, immunohistochemical and behavioural analysis), our study aimed to decipher the nature of functional and structural changes in a mouse model of orofacial neuropathic pain, focusing on cortical areas involved in various pain components. Our results show that chronic neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with decreased haemodynamic responsiveness to whisker stimulation in the barrel field cortex. This reduced functional activation is likely due to the increased basal neuronal activity (measured indirectly using cFos and phospho-ERK immunoreactivity) observed in several cortical areas, including the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. In the same animals, immunohistochemical analysis of markers for active pre- or postsynaptic elements (Piccolo and phospho-Cofilin, respectively) revealed an increased immunofluorescence in deep cortical layers of the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. These results suggest that long-lasting orofacial neuropathic pain is associated with exacerbated neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity at the cortical level. PMID:27548330

  9. Galectin-3 Inhibition Is Associated with Neuropathic Pain Attenuation after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Zisheng; Zheng, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains a prevalent and persistent clinical problem because it is often poorly responsive to the currently used analgesics. It is very urgent to develop novel drugs to alleviate neuropathic pain. Galectin-3 (gal3) is a multifunctional protein belonging to the carbohydrate-ligand lectin family, which is expressed by different cells. Emerging studies showed that gal3 elicits a pro-inflammatory response by recruiting and activating lymphocytes, macrophages and microglia. In the study we investigated whether gal3 inhibition could suppress neuroinflammation and alleviate neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury. We found that L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) increases the expression of gal3 in dorsal root ganglions at the mRNA and protein level. Intrathecal administration of modified citrus pectin (MCP), a gal3 inhibitor, reduces gal3 expression in dorsal root ganglions. MCP treatment also inhibits SNL-induced gal3 expression in primary rat microglia. SNL results in an increased activation of autophagy that contributes to microglial activation and subsequent inflammatory response. Intrathecal administration of MCP significantly suppresses SNL-induced autophagy activation. MCP also inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced autophagy in cultured microglia in vitro. MCP further decreases LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory mediators including IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 by regulating autophagy. Intrathecal administration of MCP results in adecreased mechanical and cold hypersensitivity following SNL. These results demonstrated that gal3 inhibition is associated with the suppression of SNL-induced inflammatory process andneurophathic pain attenuation. PMID:26872020

  10. Exercise therapy normalizes BDNF upregulation and glial hyperactivity in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cayo; DeMaman, Aline; Kusuda, Ricardo; Cadetti, Flaviane; Ravanelli, Maria Ida; Queiroz, André L; Sousa, Thais A; Zanon, Sonia; Silveira, Leonardo R; Lucas, Guilherme

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of neuropathic pain is a clinical challenge likely because of the time-dependent changes in many neurotransmitter systems, growth factors, ionic channels, membrane receptors, transcription factors, and recruitment of different cell types. Conversely, an increasing number of reports have shown the ability of extended and regular physical exercise in alleviating neuropathic pain throughout a wide range of mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the effect of swim exercise on molecules associated with initiation and maintenance of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. BALB/c mice were submitted to partial ligation of the sciatic nerve followed by a 5-week aerobic exercise program. Physical training reversed mechanical hypersensitivity, which lasted for an additional 4 weeks after exercise interruption. Swim exercise normalized nerve injury-induced nerve growth factor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhanced expression in the dorsal root ganglion, but had no effect on the glial-derived neurotrophic factor. However, only BDNF remained at low levels after exercise interruption. In addition, exercise training significantly reduced the phosphorylation status of PLCγ-1, but not CREB, in the spinal cord dorsal horn in response to nerve injury. Finally, prolonged swim exercise reversed astrocyte and microglia hyperactivity in the dorsal horn after nerve lesion, which remained normalized after training cessation. Together, these results demonstrate that exercise therapy induces long-lasting analgesia through various mechanisms associated with the onset and advanced stages of neuropathy. Moreover, the data support further studies to clarify whether appropriate exercise intensity, volume, and duration can also cause long-lasting pain relief in patients with neuropathic pain. PMID:25687543

  11. Are the emergence of affective disturbances in neuropathic pain states contingent on supraspinal neuroinflammation?

    PubMed

    Fiore, Nathan T; Austin, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Neuro-immune interactions contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve injury. A large body of preclinical evidence supports the idea that the immune system acts to modulate the sensory symptoms of neuropathy at both peripheral and central nervous system sites. The potential involvement of neuro-immune interactions in the highly debilitating affective disturbances of neuropathic pain, such as depression, anhedonia, impaired cognition and reduced motivation has received little attention. This is surprising given the widely accepted view that sickness behaviour, depression, cognitive impairment and other neuropsychiatric conditions can arise from inflammatory mechanisms. Moreover, there is a set of well-described immune-to-brain transmission mechanisms that explain how peripheral inflammation can lead to supraspinal neuroinflammation. In the last 5years increasing evidence has emerged that peripheral nerve injury induces supraspinal changes in cytokine or chemokine expression and alters glial cell activity. In this systematic review, based on strong preclinical evidence, we advance the argument that the emergence of affective disturbances in neuropathic pain states are contingent on pro-inflammatory mediators in the interconnected hippocampal-medial prefrontal circuitry that subserve affective behaviours. We explore how dysregulation of inflammatory mediators in these networks may result in affective disturbances through a wide variety of neuromodulatory mechanisms. There are also promising results from clinical trials showing that anti-inflammatory agents have efficacy in the treatment of a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions including depression and appear suited to sub-groups of patients with elevated pro-inflammatory profiles. Thus, although further research is required, aggressively targeting supraspinal pro-inflammatory mediators at critical time-points in appropriate clinical populations is likely to be a novel avenue to treat

  12. Enhanced serotonin and mesolimbic dopamine transmissions in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Sagheddu, Claudia; Aroni, Sonia; De Felice, Marta; Lecca, Salvatore; Luchicchi, Antonio; Melis, Miriam; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Romano, Rosaria; Palazzo, Enza; Guida, Francesca; Maione, Sabatino; Pistis, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In humans, affective consequences of neuropathic pain, ranging from depression to anxiety and anhedonia, severely impair quality of life and are a major disease burden, often requiring specific medications. Depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors have also been observed in animal models of peripheral nerve injury. Dysfunctions in central nervous system monoamine transmission have been hypothesized to underlie depressive and anxiety disorders in neuropathic pain. To assess whether these neurons display early changes in their activity that in the long-term might lead to chronicization, maladaptive plasticity and affective consequences, we carried out in vivo extracellular single unit recordings from serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and from dopamine neurons in ventral tegmental area (VTA) in the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain in rats. Extracellular dopamine levels and the expression of dopamine D1, D2 receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were measured in the nucleus accumbens. We report that, two weeks following peripheral nerve injury, discharge rate of serotonin DRN neurons and burst firing of VTA dopamine cells are enhanced, when compared with sham-operated animals. We also observed higher extracellular dopamine levels and reduced expression of D2, but not D1, receptors and TH in the nucleus accumbens. Our study confirms that peripheral neuropathy induces changes in the serotonin and dopamine systems that might be the early result of chronic maladaptation to persistent pain. The allostatic activation of these neural systems, which mirrors that already described as a consequence of stress, might lead to depression and anxiety previously observed in neuropathic animals but also an attempt to cope positively with the negative experience. PMID:26113399

  13. Antidepressants Are Effective in Decreasing Neuropathic Pain After SCI: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Stacey; Lam, Tracey; Teasell, Robert; Loh, Eldon

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review and assess the effectiveness and safety of antidepressants for neuropathic pain among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: A systematic search was conducted using multiple databases for relevant articles published from 1980 to April 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain with ≥3 individuals and ≥50% of study population with SCI were included. Two independent reviewers selected studies based on inclusion criteria and then extracted data. Pooled analysis using Cohen’s d to calculate standardized mean difference, standard error, and 95% confidence interval for primary (pain) and other secondary outcomes was conducted. Results: Four RCTs met inclusion criteria. Of these, 2 studies assessed amitriptyline, 1 trazadone, and 1 duloxetine among individuals with neuropathic SCI pain. A small effect was seen in the effectiveness of antidepressants in decreasing pain among individuals with SCI (standardized mean difference = 0.34 ± 0.15; 95% CI, 0.05-0.62; P = .02). A number needed to treat of 3.4 for 30% or more pain relief was found by pooling 2 studies. Of these, significantly higher risk of experiencing constipation (risk ratio [RR] = 1.74; 95% CI, 1.09-2.78; P = .02) and dry mouth (RR = 1.39; 95% CI, 1.04-1.85; P = .02) was found amongst individuals receiving antidepressant treatment compared to those in the control group. Conclusion: The current meta-analysis demonstrates that antidepressants are effective in reducing neuropathic SCI pain. However, this should be interpreted with caution due to the limited number of studies. Further evaluation of long-term therapeutic options may be required. PMID:26364286

  14. Quantitation of pregabalin in dried blood spots and dried plasma spots by validated LC-MS/MS methods.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Nađa; Dotsikas, Yannis; Jović, Nebojša; Stevanović, Galina; Malenović, Anđelija; Medenica, Mirjana

    2015-05-10

    In this paper, novel LC-MS/MS methods for the determination of antiepileptic drug pregabalin in dried matrix spots (DMS) are presented. This attractive technique of sample collection in micro amount was utilized in the form of dried blood spots (DBS) and dried plasma spots (DPS). Following a pre-column derivatization procedure, using n-propyl chloroformate in the presence of n-propanol, and consecutive liquid-liquid extraction, derivatized pregabalin and its internal standard, 4-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid, were detected in positive ion mode by applying two SRM transitions per analyte. A YMC-Pack Octyl column (50mm×4.0mm, 3μm particle size) maintained at 30°C, was utilized with running mobile phase composed of acetonitrile: 0.15% formic acid (85:15, v/v). Flow rate was 550μL/min and total run time 2min. Established methods were fully validated over the concentration range of 0.200-20.0μg/mL for DBS and 0.400-40.0μg/mL for DPS, respectively, while specificity, accuracy, precision, recovery, matrix-effect, stability, dilution integrity and spot homogeneity were found within acceptance criteria. Validated methods were applied for the determination of pregabalin levels in dried blood and plasma samples obtained from patients with epilepsy, after per os administration of commercial capsules. Comparison of drug level in blood and plasma, as well as correction steps undertaken in order to overcome hematocrit issue, when analyzing DBS, are also given. PMID:25767905

  15. Efficacy and safety of premedication with single dose of oral pregabalin in children with dental anxiety: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Eskandarian, Tahereh; Eftekharian, Hamidreza; Soleymanzade, Rojin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental anxiety is a relatively frequent problem that can lead to more serious problems such as a child entering a vicious cycle as he/she becomes reluctant to accept the required dental treatments. The aim of this randomized double-blind clinical trial study was to evaluate the anxiolytic and sedative effect of pregabalin in children. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five children were randomized to a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial. Two visits were scheduled for each patient. At the first visit, 75 mg pregabalin or placebo was given randomly, and the alternative was administered at the next visit. Anxiolytic and sedative effects were measured using the visual analogue scale. The child's behavior was rated with the Frankl behavioral rating scale and the sedation level during the dental procedure was scored using the Ramsay sedation scale. The unpaired, two-tailed Student's t-test was used to compare the mean changes of visual analog scale (VAS) for anxiety in the pregabalin group with that of the placebo group. A repeated measures MANOVA model was used to detect differences in sedation level in the pregabalin and placebo groups regarding the interaction of 3-time measurements; sub-group analysis was performed using Student's t-test. The Mann–Whitney U-test was used to analyze the nonparametric data of the Frankl and Ramsay scales. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The reduction of the VAS-anxiety score from 2 h post-dose was statistically significant in the pregabalin group. From 2 h to 4 h post-dose, the VAS-sedation score increased significantly in the pregabalin group. The child's behavior rating was not significantly different between the groups. The number of “successful” treatment visits was higher in the pregabalin group compared to the placebo group. Conclusion: Significant anxiolytic and sedative effects can be anticipated 2 h after oral administration of pregabalin without serious side effects. PMID

  16. Intraoral administration of botulinum toxin for trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Herrero Babiloni, Alberto; Kapos, Flavia P; Nixdorf, Donald R

    2016-06-01

    This article presents 2 cases of different neuropathic trigeminal pain conditions treated with intraoral botulinum toxin injections. There is a growing body of evidence to support the use of this substance when administered subcutaneously in the treatment of neuropathic pain, such as in extraoral injections for trigeminal neuralgia. However, reports of intraoral submucosal administration are still lacking. In the 2 cases presented here, neuropathic pain was refractory to treatment with an important intraoral peripheral component, so onabotulinum toxin A was introduced as an adjuvant therapy. The technique, doses, and dilution are discussed. The patients reported significant reductions in pain frequency and intensity, with minimal side effects of temporary mucosal dryness and smile droopiness. The analgesic benefits of botulinum toxin may be utilized to address intraoral neuropathic pain. Further studies are needed to confirm safety and effectiveness in larger samples. PMID:27181448

  17. Understanding Neuropathic Corneal Pain-Gaps and Current Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sunali; Hamrah, Pedram

    2016-01-01

    The richly innervated corneal tissue is one of the most powerful pain generators in the body. Corneal neuropathic pain results from dysfunctional nerves causing perceptions such as burning, stinging, eye-ache, and pain. Various inflammatory diseases, neurological diseases, and surgical interventions can be the underlying cause of corneal neuropathic pain. Recent efforts have been made by the scientific community to elucidate the pathophysiology and neurobiology of pain resulting from initially protective physiological reflexes, to a more persistent chronic state. The goal of this clinical review is to briefly summarize the pathophysiology of neuropathic corneal pain, describe how to systematically approach the diagnosis of these patients, and finally summarizing our experience with current therapeutic approaches for the treatment of corneal neuropathic pain. PMID:26959131

  18. Neuropathic pain syndrome displayed by malingerers

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, José L.; Verdugo, Renato J.

    2009-01-01

    Among 237 patients communicating chronic pain, associated with sensory-motor and “autonomic” displays, qualifying taxonomically for Neuropathic Pain, there were 16 shown through surveillance to be malingerers. When analyzed through neurological methods, their profile was characteristically atypical. There were no objective equivalents of peripheral or central processes impairing nerve impulse transmission. In absence of medical explanation all 16 had been adjudicated, by default, the label Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). We emphasize that CRPS patients may not only harbor unrecognized pathology (“lesion”) of the nervous system (CRPS II); or hypothetical central neuronal “dysfunction” (CRPS I); or conversion disorder; but may display a recognizable simulated illness without neuropsychiatric pathology. PMID:20686134

  19. Neuropathic Pain Treatment: Still a Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Pessoa, Bruno L.; Orsini, Marco; Ribeiro, Pedro; Davidovich, Eduardo; Pupe, Camila; Filho, Pedro Moreira; Dornas, Ricardo Menezes; Masiero, Lucas; Bittencourt, Juliana; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is the result of a series of conditions caused by diseases or lesions to the somatosensory system. Due to the better understanding of NP pathophysiology previously unexplored therapies have been used with encouraging results. In this group, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha-lipoic-acid, cannabinoids, clonidine, EMA401, botulinum toxin type A and new voltage-gated sodium channel blockers, can be included. Besides, changing paradigms may occur with the advent of optogenetics and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation. We reviewed the published literature on the pharmacological treatment of NP. Despite the interesting results, randomized controlled trials are demanded the majority of the therapies previously mentioned. In spite of several studies for the relief of NP, pain control continues being a challenge. PMID:27441065

  20. Neuropathic pain in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Allen, R R

    1998-11-01

    Cancer presents itself in numerous ways, adding to the complexity of any pain syndrome with which it is associated. Neuropathic pain, unlike many other pain syndromes, is difficult to treat even in the absence of cancer. The combination results in a heterogeneous group of patients with a complex set of symptoms. This makes the assessment of pain, classification of syndromes, and clinical study a challenge. If the disease is nonprogressive, general principles of care are essentially the same as in those without cancer. In patients with progressive disease and more refractory painful conditions, spinal anesthetic and neurosurgical therapies must often be considered. Under such circumstances, caregivers are forced to carefully balance uncertain benefits and risks, often without the luxury of time. More careful observation and controlled trials in these patients help facilitate this challenging process. PMID:9767067

  1. [Neuropathic pain. How to open the blackbox].

    PubMed

    Maier, C; Baron, R; Sommer, C

    2015-10-01

    This article, without presuming to be comprehensive, gives a brief outline of the development of research on neuropathic pain in Germany. Current clinical research on this subject focusses on the validation of human models, patient phenotyping, mechanism-based classification and treatment as well as on molecular pathomechanisms. This clinical research is based to a large extent on the work of several internationally recognized basic researchers in the 1990s. In particular, findings from system physiology led to the analysis of clinical phenotypes and the underlying pathophysiology. In parallel, basic research achieved international top levels through the development of innovative methods. Close cooperation, building of consortia and European networking made major contributions to the success of this research. PMID:26264897

  2. Motor cortex stimulation for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Lazorthes, Y; Sol, J C; Fowo, S; Roux, F E; Verdié, J C

    2007-01-01

    Since the initial publication of Tsubokawa in 1991, epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS) is increasingly reported as an effective surgical option for the treatment of refractory neuropathic pain although its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. The authors review the extensive literature published over the last 15 years on central and neuropathic pain. Optimal patient selection remains difficult and the value of pharmacological tests or transcranial magnetic stimulation in predicting the efficacy of MCS has not been established. Pre-operative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), 3-dimensional volume MRI, neuronavigation and intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring have contributed to improvements in the technique for identifying the precise location of the targeted motor cortical area and the correct placement of the electrode array. MCS should be considered as the treatment of choice in post-stroke pain, thalamic pain or facial anesthesia dolorosa. In brachial plexus avulsion pain, it is preferable to propose initially dorsal root entry zone (DREZ)-tomy; MCS may be offered after DREZotomy has failed to control the pain. In our experience, the results of MCS on phantom limb pain are promising. In general, the efficacy of MCS depends on: a) the accurate placement of the stimulation electrode over the appropriate area of the motor cortex, and b) on sophisticated programming of the stimulation parameters. A better understanding of the MCS mechanism of action will probably make it possible to adjust better the stimulation parameters. The conclusions of multicentered randomised studies, now in progress, will be very useful and are likely to promote further research and clinical applications in this field. PMID:17691287

  3. Pathophysiological implication of CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channels in trigeminal neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Hwang, Eunjin; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial pathophysiological issue concerning central neuropathic pain is the modification of sensory processing by abnormally increased low-frequency brain rhythms. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms responsible for such abnormal rhythmicity and its relation to neuropathic pain syndrome. Toward this aim, we investigated the behavioral and electrophysiological consequences of trigeminal neuropathic pain following infraorbital nerve ligations in CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channel knockout and wild-type mice. CaV3.1 knockout mice had decreased mechanical hypersensitivity and reduced low-frequency rhythms in the primary somatosensory cortex and related thalamic nuclei than wild-type mice. Lateral inhibition of gamma rhythm in primary somatosensory cortex layer 4, reflecting intact sensory contrast, was present in knockout mice but severely impaired in wild-type mice. Moreover, cross-frequency coupling between low-frequency and gamma rhythms, which may serve in sensory processing, was pronounced in wild-type mice but not in CaV3.1 knockout mice. Our results suggest that the presence of CaV3.1 channels is a key element in the pathophysiology of trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:26858455

  4. Antinociceptive effects of maprotiline in a rat model of peripheral neuropathic pain: possible involvement of opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Banafshe, Hamid Reza; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Mesdaghinia, Azam; Abed, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuropathic pain remains a clinical problem and is poorly relieved by conventional analgesics. This study was designed to determine whether maprotiline administration was effective in alleviating symptoms of neuropathic pain and whether the antinociceptive effect of maprotiline mediated through the opioid system. Materials and Methods: Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats, which resulted in thermal hyperalgesia, and mechanical and cold allodynia. Maprotiline (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, IP) was administered on the 7th and 14th days after surgery. To study the role of the opioid system in the antinociceptive effects of maprotiline, maprotiline (20 mg/kg, IP) was administered in combination with naloxone (1 mg/kg, SC) on the 7th post-surgery day. Behavioral tests were done at 45 min after drug injections on the 7th and 14th days after surgery. Results: Systemic administration of maprotiline blocked heat hyperalgesia, cold allodynia and reduced mechanical allodynia. Also antihyperalgesic effect of maprotiline was reversed by pretreatment with naloxone. Conclusion: Our results suggest that maprotiline can be considered a potential therapeutic for the treatment of neuropathic pain, and the opioid system may be involved in the antihyperalgesic effects of maprotiline. PMID:26557963

  5. Patterns of nerve injury and neuropathic pain in ischemic neuropathy after ligation-reperfusion of femoral artery in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jing-Er; Wang, Kuo-Chuan; Chiang, Hou-Yu; Hsieh, Jung-Hsien; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2012-09-01

    Ischemia is an important etiology of painful neuropathies. We generated a mouse system of ischemic neuropathy by ligation-reperfusion of the femoral artery to mimic neuropathic pain and nerve injury patterns observed clinically. Mice exhibited spontaneous neuropathic pain behaviors, which were most obvious after ischemia for 5 h. Mechanical and cold allodynia developed by post-operative day (POD) 7 and persisted through the experimental period up to POD 56. Neuropathic pain behaviors were alleviated with intraperitoneal gabapentin (50 and 100 mg/kg) in a dose-dependent manner. Large-fiber deficit assessed with nerve conduction studies was demonstrated by reduced amplitudes of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) on POD 7 (48.4% of the control side, p < 0.001). Small-fiber impairment was demonstrated by decreased epidermal nerve density (END) on POD 7 (29.1% of the control side, p < 0.001). Reductions in CMAP amplitudes and ENDs persisted through POD 56. Our system replicated the clinical manifestations of ischemic neuropathy: (1) neuropathic pain with cold and mechanical allodynia and (2) nerve injury to both large and small fibers with pathologic and physiologic evidence. This system produced by a simple procedure provides an opportunity to investigate mechanisms and further treatments of ischemic neuropathy on genetically engineered mice. PMID:22971092

  6. Nerve growth factor induces facial heat hyperalgesia and plays a role in trigeminal neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis, Renata C; Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Nones, Carina F M; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2016-09-01

    There is preclinical evidence that nerve growth factor (NGF) contributes toward inflammatory hyperalgesia in the orofacial region, but the mechanisms underlying its hyperalgesic effect as well as its role in trigeminal neuropathic pain require further investigation. This study investigated the ability of NGF to induce facial heat hyperalgesia and the involvement of tyrosine kinase receptor A, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, and mast cells in NGF pronociceptive effects. In addition, the role of NGF in heat hyperalgesia in a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain was evaluated. NGF injection into the upper lip of naive rats induced long-lasting heat hyperalgesia. Pretreatment with an antibody anti-NGF, antagonists of tyrosine kinase receptor A, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors or compound 48/80, to induce mast-cell degranulation, all attenuated NGF-induced hyperalgesia. In a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain, local treatment with anti-NGF significantly reduced heat hyperalgesia. In addition, increased NGF levels were detected in the ipsilateral infraorbital nerve branch at the time point that represents the peak of heat hyperalgesia. The results suggest that NGF is a prominent hyperalgesic mediator in the trigeminal system and it may represent a potential therapeutic target for the management of painful orofacial conditions, including trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:27392124

  7. The positive allosteric GABAB receptor modulator rac-BHFF enhances baclofen-mediated analgesia in neuropathic mice.

    PubMed

    Zemoura, Khaled; Ralvenius, William T; Malherbe, Pari; Benke, Dietmar

    2016-09-01

    Neuropathic pain is associated with impaired inhibitory control of spinal dorsal horn neurons, which are involved in processing pain signals. The metabotropic GABAB receptor is an important component of the inhibitory system and is highly expressed in primary nociceptors and intrinsic dorsal horn neurons to control their excitability. Activation of GABAB receptors with the orthosteric agonist baclofen effectively reliefs neuropathic pain but is associated with severe side effects that prevent its widespread application. The recently developed positive allosteric GABAB receptor modulators lack most of these side effects and are therefore promising drugs for the treatment of pain. Here we tested the high affinity positive allosteric modulator rac-BHFF for its ability to relief neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve in mice. rac-BHFF significantly increased the paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation in healthy mice, indicating an endogenous GABABergic tone regulating the sensitivity to mechanical stimuli. Surprisingly, rac-BHFF displayed no analgesic activity in neuropathic mice although GABAB receptor expression was not affected in the dorsal horn as shown by quantitative receptor autoradiography. However, activation of spinal GABAB receptors by intrathecal injection of baclofen reduced hyperalgesia and its analgesic effect was considerably potentiated by co-application of rac-BHFF. These results indicate that under conditions of neuropathic pain the GABAergic tone is too low to provide a basis for allosteric modulation of GABAB receptors. However, allosteric modulators would be well suited as an add-on to reduce the dose of baclofen required to achieve analgesia. PMID:27108932

  8. The Sciatic Nerve Cuffing Model of Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Ipek; Megat, Salim; Barthas, Florent; Waltisperger, Elisabeth; Kremer, Mélanie; Salvat, Eric; Barrot, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain arises as a consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system. This syndrome results from maladaptive changes in injured sensory neurons and along the entire nociceptive pathway within the central nervous system. It is usually chronic and challenging to treat. In order to study neuropathic pain and its treatments, different models have been developed in rodents. These models derive from known etiologies, thus reproducing peripheral nerve injuries, central injuries, and metabolic-, infectious- or chemotherapy-related neuropathies. Murine models of peripheral nerve injury often target the sciatic nerve which is easy to access and allows nociceptive tests on the hind paw. These models rely on a compression and/or a section. Here, the detailed surgery procedure for the "cuff model" of neuropathic pain in mice is described. In this model, a cuff of PE-20 polyethylene tubing of standardized length (2 mm) is unilaterally implanted around the main branch of the sciatic nerve. It induces a long-lasting mechanical allodynia, i.e., a nociceptive response to a normally non-nociceptive stimulus that can be evaluated by using von Frey filaments. Besides the detailed surgery and testing procedures, the interest of this model for the study of neuropathic pain mechanism, for the study of neuropathic pain sensory and anxiodepressive aspects, and for the study of neuropathic pain treatments are also discussed. PMID:25078668

  9. (+)-Borneol attenuates oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic hyperalgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Hui; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Qi-Gang; Fang, Yun; Ge, Wei-Hong

    2016-02-10

    Common chemotherapeutic agents such as oxaliplatin often cause neuropathic pain during cancer treatment in patients. Such neuropathic pain is difficult to treat and responds poorly to common analgesics, which represents a clinical challenge. (+)-Borneol, a bicyclic monoterpene present in the essential oil of plants, is used for analgesia and anesthesia in traditional Chinese medicine. Although borneol has an antinociceptive effect on acute pain models, little is known about its effect on chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain and its mechanism. We found that (+)-borneol exerted remarkable antihyperalgesic effects in a mouse model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. In addition, (+)-borneol blocked the action of the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 agonist in mechanical and cold stimulus tests. Repeated treatment with (+)-borneol did not lead to the development of antinociceptive tolerance and did not affect body weight and locomotor activity. (+)-Borneol showed robust analgesic efficacy in mice with neuropathic pain by blocking transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 in the spinal cord and may be a useful analgesic in the management of neuropathic pain. PMID:26730517

  10. TNF-α and neuropathic pain - a review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was discovered more than a century ago, and its known roles have extended from within the immune system to include a neuro-inflammatory domain in the nervous system. Neuropathic pain is a recognized type of pathological pain where nociceptive responses persist beyond the resolution of damage to the nerve or its surrounding tissue. Very often, neuropathic pain is disproportionately enhanced in intensity (hyperalgesia) or altered in modality (hyperpathia or allodynia) in relation to the stimuli. At time of this writing, there is as yet no common consensus about the etiology of neuropathic pain - possible mechanisms can be categorized into peripheral sensitization and central sensitization of the nervous system in response to the nociceptive stimuli. Animal models of neuropathic pain based on various types of nerve injuries (peripheral versus spinal nerve, ligation versus chronic constrictive injury) have persistently implicated a pivotal role for TNF-α at both peripheral and central levels of sensitization. Despite a lack of success in clinical trials of anti-TNF-α therapy in alleviating the sciatic type of neuropathic pain, the intricate link of TNF-α with other neuro-inflammatory signaling systems (e.g., chemokines and p38 MAPK) has indeed inspired a systems approach perspective for future drug development in treating neuropathic pain. PMID:20398373

  11. [Pharmacological treatment strategy and mirror visual feedback treatment for neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Sumitani, Masahiko; Miyauchi, Satoru; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2012-11-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition, and pharmacotherapy is the most established treatment strategy. A variety of pharmacotherapies is used for neuropathic pain management: however, pharmacotherapies with evidence for analgesic potency are less common. Several pharmacotherapeutic treatment guidelines for neuropathic pain treatment recommend the first- to third-line drugs on the basis of evidence-based medicine; however, neuropathic pain is often resistant to pharmacotherapies. We have treated pharmacotherapy-resistant neuropathic pain with neurorehabilitation techniques such as mirror visual feedback (MVF) treatment. Further to our clinical experience using MVF, we discuss the cerebral mechanism associated with neuropathic pain in this study. PMID:23131739

  12. Evidence for the participation of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CART) in the fluoxetine-induced anti-hyperalgesia in neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Upadhya, Manoj A; Dandekar, Manoj P; Kokare, Dadasaheb M; Singru, Praful S; Subhedar, Nishikant K

    2011-02-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CART) has a role in chronic pain, and also in the actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) employed in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Herein, we test the hypothesis that CART may mediate the anti-hyperalgesic effect of the SSRI, fluoxetine, in neuropathic rats. Sciatic nerve in the right hind paw of rat was ligated to induce neuropathic pain, and the paw withdrawal latency was evaluated using Hargreaves apparatus. Fluoxetine [5-25mg/kg, intraperitoneal (ip)] or CART (54-102) [0.1-1.5μg/rat, intracerebroventricular (icv)] dose-dependently attenuated the hyperalgesic response observed in neuropathic rats, indicating anti-nociceptive properties of each agent. The anti-hyperalgesic effect of fluoxetine was potentiated by the subeffective dose of CART, and attenuated by CART-antibody (1:500 dilution; 5μl/rat, icv); CART-antibody had no effect per se. Isobolographic analysis showed a significant synergism between fluoxetine and CART, and antagonism between fluoxetine and CART-antibody. Immunocytochemical labeling with monoclonal antibodies against CART showed drastic increase in CART-immunoreactive fibers in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VLPAG; 116%), dorsal subdivision of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRD; 176%), and locus coeruleus (LC; 733%) of neuropathic animals. Fluoxetine treatment significantly reduced the immunoreactivity in these areas. However, CART-immunoreactive cells and fibers in the arcuate nucleus did not respond to neuropathy or fluoxetine treatments. We suggest that the CART innervation of DRD, LC and VLPAG may be involved in the (i) central processing of neuropathic pain and (ii) fluoxetine-induced anti-hyperalgesic effect in neuropathic pain. PMID:21167239

  13. Joint modeling of dizziness, drowsiness, and dropout associated with pregabalin and placebo treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Frame, Bill; Miller, Raymond; Hutmacher, Matthew M

    2009-12-01

    Dizziness and drowsiness are cited as being predictors of dropout from clinical trials for the medicine pregabalin. These adverse events are typically recorded daily on a four point ordinal scale (0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, 3 = severe), with most subjects never reporting either adverse event. We modeled the dizziness, drowsiness, and dropout associated with pregabalin use in generalized anxiety disorder using piecewise Weibull distributions for the time to first non-zero dizziness or drowsiness score, after which the dizziness or drowsiness was modeled with ordinal regression with a Markovian element. Dropout was modeled with a Weibull distribution. Platykurtosis was encountered in the estimated random effects distributions for the ordinal regression models and was addressed with dynamic John-Draper transformations. The only identified predictor for the time to first non-zero dizziness or drowsiness score was daily titrated dose. Predictors for dropout included creatinine clearance and maximum daily adverse event score. Tolerance to adverse events over time was modeled by including a non-stationary component for the dizziness ordinal Markov regression while the piecewise Weibull distributions allowed a change point in the median time to first non-zero dizziness or drowsiness score. PMID:19904583

  14. Early Systemic Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment Attenuates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Lin; Chen, Jin-Chung; Wang, Hung-Li; Yang, Yi-Ling; Cheng, Mei-Yun; Liao, Ming-Feng; Ro, Long-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that opioid treatment can reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production and counteract various neuropathic pain syndromes. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can promote immune cell differentiation by increasing leukocytes (mainly opioid-containing polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells), suggesting a potential beneficial role in treating chronic pain. This study shows the effectiveness of exogenous G-CSF treatment (200 µg/kg) for alleviating thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI), during post-operative days 1–25, compared to that of vehicle treatment. G-CSF also increases the recruitment of opioid-containing PMN cells into the injured nerve. After CCI, single administration of G-CSF on days 0, 1, and 2, but not on day 3, relieved thermal hyperalgesia, which indicated that its effect on neuropathic pain had a therapeutic window of 0–48 h after nerve injury. CCI led to an increase in the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) protein in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). These high levels of IL-6 mRNA and TNF-α were suppressed by a single administration of G-CSF 48–144 h and 72–144 h after CCI, respectively. Furthermore, G-CSF administered 72–144 h after CCI suppressed the CCI-induced upregulation of microglial activation in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn, which is essential for sensing neuropathic pain. Moreover, the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone methiodide (NLXM) reversed G-CSF-induced antinociception 3 days after CCI, suggesting that G-CSF alleviates hyperalgesia via opioid/opioid receptor interactions. These results suggest that an early single systemic injection of G-CSF alleviates neuropathic pain via activation of PMN cell-derived endogenous opioid secretion to activate opioid receptors in the injured nerve, downregulate IL-6 and TNF-α inflammatory cytokines, and attenuate microglial activation in the spinal dorsal horn. This

  15. Management of chronic neuropathic pain: a protocol for a multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Mulla, Sohail M; Buckley, D Norman; Moulin, Dwight E; Couban, Rachel; Izhar, Zain; Agarwal, Arnav; Panju, Akbar; Wang, Li; Kallyth, Sun Makosso; Turan, Alparslan; Montori, Victor M; Sessler, Daniel I; Thabane, Lehana; Guyatt, Gordon H; Busse, Jason W

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic neuropathic pain is associated with reduced health-related quality of life and substantial socioeconomic costs. Current research addressing management of chronic neuropathic pain is limited. No review has evaluated all interventional studies for chronic neuropathic pain, which limits attempts to make inferences regarding the relative effectiveness of treatments. Methods and analysis We will conduct a systematic review of all randomised controlled trials evaluating therapies for chronic neuropathic pain. We will identify eligible trials, in any language, by a systematic search of CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, AMED, HealthSTAR, DARE, PsychINFO and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Eligible trials will be: (1) enrol patients presenting with chronic neuropathic pain, and (2) randomise patients to alternative interventions (pharmacological or non-pharmacological) or an intervention and a control arm. Pairs of reviewers will, independently and in duplicate, screen titles and abstracts of identified citations, review the full texts of potentially eligible trials and extract information from eligible trials. We will use a modified Cochrane instrument to evaluate risk of bias of eligible studies, recommendations from the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) to inform the outcomes we will collect, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system to evaluate our confidence in treatment effects. When possible, we will conduct: (1) in direct comparisons, a random-effects meta-analysis to establish the effect of reported therapies on patient-important outcomes; and (2) a multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis within a Bayesian framework to assess the relative effects of treatments. We will define a priori hypotheses to explain heterogeneity between studies, and conduct meta-regression and subgroup analyses consistent with the current best practices

  16. Activation of Corticostriatal Circuitry Relieves Chronic Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michelle; Manders, Toby R.; Eberle, Sarah E.; Su, Chen; D'amour, James; Yang, Runtao; Lin, Hau Yueh; Deisseroth, Karl; Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Neural circuits that determine the perception and modulation of pain remain poorly understood. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) provides top-down control of sensory and affective processes. While animal and human imaging studies have shown that the PFC is involved in pain regulation, its exact role in pain states remains incompletely understood. A key output target for the PFC is the nucleus accumbens (NAc), an important component of the reward circuitry. Interestingly, recent human imaging studies suggest that the projection from the PFC to the NAc is altered in chronic pain. The function of this corticostriatal projection in pain states, however, is not known. Here we show that optogenetic activation of the PFC produces strong antinociceptive effects in a rat model (spared nerve injury model) of persistent neuropathic pain. PFC activation also reduces the affective symptoms of pain. Furthermore, we show that this pain-relieving function of the PFC is likely mediated by projections to the NAc. Thus, our results support a novel role for corticostriatal circuitry in pain regulation. PMID:25834050

  17. Neuropathic orofacial pain part 1--prevalence and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Vickers, E R; Cousins, M J

    2000-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is defined as "pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system". Neuropathic orofacial pain has previously been known as "atypical odontalgia" (AO) and "phantom tooth pain". The patient afflicted with neuropathic oral/orofacial pain may present to the dentist with a persistent, severe pain, yet there are no clearly identifiable clinical or radiographic abnormalities. Accordingly, multiple endodontic procedures may be instigated to remove the likely anatomical source of the pain, yet the pain persists. There have been few studies and limited patient numbers investigating the condition. Two retrospective studies revealed the incidence of persistent pain following endodontic treatment to be 3-6% and 5% of patients; one author with wide experience in assessing the condition estimated its prevalence at 125,000 individuals in the USA alone. In one study, 50% of neuropathic orofacial pain patients reported persistent pain specifically following endodontic treatment. Patients predisposed to the condition may include those suffering from recurrent cluster or migraine headaches. Neuropathic pain states include postherpetic neuralgia (shingles) and phantom limb/stump pain. The aberrant developmental neurobiology leading to this pain state is complex. Neuropathic pain serves no protective function, in contrast to physiological pain that warns of noxious stimuli likely to result in tissue damage. The relevant clinical features of neuropathic pain include: (i) precipitating factors such as trauma or disease (infection), and often a delay in onset after initial injury (days-months), (ii) typical complaints such as dysaesthesias (abnormal unpleasant sensations), pain that may include burning, and paroxysmal, lancinating or sharp qualities, and pain in an area of sensory deficit, (iii) on physical examination there may be hyperalgesia, allodynia and sympathetic hyperfunction, and (iv) the pathophysiology includes deafferentation

  18. Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase Regulates Interleukin-1β Expression and Glial Glutamate Transporter Function in Rodents with Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Maixner, Dylan W.; Yan, Xisheng; Gao, Mei; Yadav, Ruchi; Weng, Han-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroinflammation and dysfunctional glial glutamate transporters (GTs) in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) are implicated in the genesis of neuropathic pain. We determined if adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the SDH regulates these processes in rodents with neuropathic pain. Methods Hind paw withdrawal responses to radiant heat and mechanical stimuli were used to assess nociceptive behaviors. Spinal markers related to neuroinflammation and glial GTs were determined by Western blotting. AMPK activities were manipulated pharmacologically and genetically. Regulation of glial GTs was determined by measuring protein expression and activities of glial GTs. Results AMPK activities were reduced in the SDH of rats (n = 5) with thermal hyperalgesia induced by nerve injury, which were accompanied with the activation of astrocytes, increased production of interleukin-1beta and activities of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, and suppressed protein expression of glial glutamate transporter-1. Thermal hyperalgesia was reversed by spinal activation of AMPK in neuropathic rats (n = 10), and induced by inhibiting spinal AMPK in naïve rats (n = 7 to 8). Spinal AMPKα knockdown (n = 6) and AMPKα1 conditional knockout (n = 6) induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. These genetic alterations mimicked the changes of molecular markers induced by nerve injury. Pharmacological activation of AMPK enhanced glial GT activity in mice with neuropathic pain (n = 8) and attenuated glial glutamate transporter-1 internalization induced by interleukin-1β (n = 4). Conclusion These findings suggest enhancing spinal AMPK activities could be an effective approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:25710409

  19. D-Aspartate drinking solution alleviates pain and cognitive impairment in neuropathic mice.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Enza; Luongo, Livio; Guida, Francesca; Marabese, Ida; Romano, Rosaria; Iannotta, Monica; Rossi, Francesca; D'Aniello, Antimo; Stella, Luigi; Marmo, Federica; Usiello, Alessandro; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Maione, Sabatino; de Novellis, Vito

    2016-07-01

    D-Aspartate (D-Asp) is a free D-amino acid detected in multiple brain regions and putative precursor of endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) acting as agonist at NMDA receptors. In this study, we investigated whether D-Asp (20 mM) in drinking solution for 1 month affects pain responses and pain-related emotional, and cognitive behaviour in a model of neuropathic pain induced by the spared nerve injury (SNI) of the sciatic nerve in mice. SNI mice developed mechanical allodynia and motor coordination impairment 30 days after SNI surgery. SNI mice showed cognitive impairment, anxiety and depression-like behaviour, reduced sociability in the three chamber sociability paradigm, increased expression of NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor and Homer 1a in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The expression of (post synaptic density) PSD-95 and Shank 1was instead unaffected in the mPFC of the SNI mice. Treatment with D-Asp drinking solution, started right after the SNI (day 0), alleviated mechanical allodynia, improved cognition and motor coordination and increased social interaction. D-Asp also restored the levels of extracellular D-Asp, Homer 1a and NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor to physiological levels and reduced Shank1 and PSD-95 protein levels in the mPFC. Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant used also to alleviate neuropathic pain in humans, reverted mechanical allodynia and cognitive impairment, and unlike D-Asp, was effective in reducing depression and anxiety-like behaviour in the SNI mice and increased PSD protein level. Altogether these findings demonstrate that D-Asp improves sensorial, motor and cognitive-like symptoms related to chronic pain possibly through glutamate neurotransmission normalization in neuropathic mice. PMID:27115160

  20. Botulinum toxin type A for neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zee‐A; Song, Dae Heon; Oh, Hyun‐Mi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin type A (BTX‐A) on patients with spinal cord injury‐associated neuropathic pain. Methods The effect of BTX‐A on 40 patients with spinal cord injury‐associated neuropathic pain was investigated using a randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled design. A 1‐time subcutaneous BTX‐A (200U) injection was administered to the painful area. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores (0–100mm), the Korean version of the short‐form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and the World Health Organization WHOQOL‐BREF quality of life assessment were evaluated prior to treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the injection. Results At 4 and 8 weeks after injection, the VAS score for pain was significantly reduced by 18.6 ± 16.8 and 21.3 ± 26.8, respectively, in the BTX‐A group, whereas it was reduced by 2.6 ± 14.6 and 0.3 ± 19.5, respectively, in the placebo group. The pain relief was associated with preservation of motor or sensory function below the neurological level of injury. Among the responders in the BTX‐A group, 55% and 45% reported pain relief of 20% or greater at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, after the injection, whereas only 15% and 10% of the responders in the placebo group reported a similar level of pain relief. Improvements in the score for the physical health domain of the WHOQOL‐BREF in the BTX‐A group showed a marginal trend toward significance (p = 0.0521) at 4 weeks after the injection. Interpretation These results indicate that BTX‐A may reduce intractable chronic neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury. Ann Neurol 2016;79:569–578 PMID:26814620

  1. Neuropathic Minimally Invasive Surgeries (NEMESIS):: Percutaneous Diabetic Foot Surgery and Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Miller, Roslyn J

    2016-09-01

    Patients with peripheral neuropathy associated with ulceration are the nemesis of the orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon. Diabetic foot syndrome is the leading cause of peripheral neuropathy, and its prevalence continues to increase at an alarming rate. Poor wound healing, nonunion, infection, and risk of amputation contribute to the understandable caution toward this patient group. Significant metalwork is required to hold these technically challenging deformities. Neuropathic Minimally Invasive Surgeries is an addition to the toolbox of management of the diabetic foot. It may potentially reduce the risk associated with large wounds and bony correction in this patient group. PMID:27524708

  2. Treatment of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome as a neuropathic pain condition

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Lakshmi; Pattanik, Manorama; Titarmore, Vaishali

    2014-01-01

    A lady of 52 years with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC) presented with chronic pelvic pain, irritative voiding with sphincter dominance on urodynamics. 3 yrs of oral analgesics, antispasmodics and intravesical therapy was ineffective. We surmised her pain, and irritative voiding to be secondary to constant straining against a dysfunctional pelvic floor. We treated PBS/IC as a neuropathic phenomenon with a combination of neuromodulator medications and continuous caudal epidural analgesia to reduce the pain induced peripheral and central sensitisation. Botulinum toxin type A injection into pelvic floor muscles appeared to address their dysfuction. Clinical and urodynamics response was encouraging. PMID:25097327

  3. [Capsaicin in treatment of neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Kamchatnov, P R; Evzelman, M A; Abusueva, B A; Volkov, A I

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of neuropathic pain (NP) is a serious medical problem. Antiepileptic drugs and antidepressants, used to relief pain, act on the central pain mechanisms and cause several side-effects, thus substantially restricting possibilities of their clinical application.At the same time, NP often has a peripheral component. Ligand-associated channels, including vanilloid receptors TRPV1, play a key role in the development of regional NP syndromes. Capsaicin, a component of chili pepper and several other plants, is a highly selective ligand of TRPV1 receptors and has long been used in treatment of pain syndromes. However, its using is limited by short-term action and relatively low efficacy. Recently it has been shown that the local use of single high doses of capsaicin during 30-60 min causes a marked stable(> 12 weeks) effect. The decrease in NP (>50%) is seen in about half of patients. Current studies will allow to single out groups of patients with the maximal treatment effect of capsaicin. PMID:25629137

  4. Neuropathic pain - the case for opioid therapy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Stephen C

    2008-01-01

    For many patients, neuropathic pain (NeP) is arguably more difficult to control than nociceptive or 'normal' pain. We also now recognise the great burden that NeP has on the lives of patients - it is not only a matter of treating pain in isolation, but managing all of the issues that affect the patient's quality of life. Until relatively recently we have had little understanding of the pathophysiology causing NeP and have relied on the secondary effects of non-analgesic drugs as the mainstays of treatment. Greater understanding of the pathophysiology of NeP has led to more appropriate therapy and an increased use of multiple drug therapy - 'rational polypharmacy'. Traditional opinions concerning the treatment of NeP have been challenged and it is because of this that the use of opioids in NeP has been re-evaluated. Opioids will never replace tricyclic antidepressants and anti-epileptic drugs as first-line therapy for NeP. However, they are now fully established as effective and useful second- or third-line drugs. Many patients in the past have been potentially undertreated as a result of our inertia to use opioids. The case for opioid therapy in NeP has been firmly established. PMID:18758203

  5. In vivo and in vitro protective effects of omeprazole against neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Chanchal, Sanjay K.; Mahajan, Umesh B.; Siddharth, Sumit; Reddy, Navyya; Goyal, Sameer N.; Patil, Prakash H.; Bommanahalli, Basavaraj P.; Kundu, Chanakya N.; Patil, Chandragouda R.; Ojha, Shreesh

    2016-01-01

    Apart from reducing the acid secretion, omeprazole inhibits activation of the nuclear factor-κB, release of inflammatory cytokines, and chemotaxis of neutrophils. These mechanisms prompted us to evaluate antineuropathic effect of omeprazole in the chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced rat model of neuropathic pain and LPS mediated ROS-induced U-87 cells. Omeprazole at 50 mg/kg/day/oral for 14 days significantly reduced the intensity of neuropathic pain estimated as paw withdrawal latency, withdrawal pressure threshold and restored the motor nerve conduction velocity in the constricted nerve, when compared with respective groups. The histological findings revealed the protective effect of omeprazole against the CCI-induced damage. Omeprazole significantly decreased the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as compared to their respective control groups. It also reduced the oxidative stress by up regulating the SOD, catalase activity and decreasing MDA content. Similarly, in-vitro study, LPS mediated ROS-induced U-87 cells, omeprazole reduced the oxidative stress as well as the release of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Altogether, these results suggest that, neuroprotective effect of omeprazole is mediated through preventing release of proinflammatory cytokines, augmenting endogenous anti-oxidant defense system, and maintain the structural integrity of sciatic nerve from the CCI-induced structural damage and inflammatory changes. PMID:27435304

  6. In vivo and in vitro protective effects of omeprazole against neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Chanchal, Sanjay K; Mahajan, Umesh B; Siddharth, Sumit; Reddy, Navyya; Goyal, Sameer N; Patil, Prakash H; Bommanahalli, Basavaraj P; Kundu, Chanakya N; Patil, Chandragouda R; Ojha, Shreesh

    2016-01-01

    Apart from reducing the acid secretion, omeprazole inhibits activation of the nuclear factor-κB, release of inflammatory cytokines, and chemotaxis of neutrophils. These mechanisms prompted us to evaluate antineuropathic effect of omeprazole in the chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced rat model of neuropathic pain and LPS mediated ROS-induced U-87 cells. Omeprazole at 50 mg/kg/day/oral for 14 days significantly reduced the intensity of neuropathic pain estimated as paw withdrawal latency, withdrawal pressure threshold and restored the motor nerve conduction velocity in the constricted nerve, when compared with respective groups. The histological findings revealed the protective effect of omeprazole against the CCI-induced damage. Omeprazole significantly decreased the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as compared to their respective control groups. It also reduced the oxidative stress by up regulating the SOD, catalase activity and decreasing MDA content. Similarly, in-vitro study, LPS mediated ROS-induced U-87 cells, omeprazole reduced the oxidative stress as well as the release of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Altogether, these results suggest that, neuroprotective effect of omeprazole is mediated through preventing release of proinflammatory cytokines, augmenting endogenous anti-oxidant defense system, and maintain the structural integrity of sciatic nerve from the CCI-induced structural damage and inflammatory changes. PMID:27435304

  7. Treatment Considerations for Elderly and Frail Patients With Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Schmader, Kenneth E.; Baron, Ralf; Haanpää, Maija L.; Mayer, John; O'Connor, Alec B.; Rice, Andrew S. C.; Stacey, Brett

    2010-01-01

    Currently, an estimated 38 million individuals 65 years or older live in the United States, and more than 11 million of these individuals are 80 years or older. Older people are at high risk of neuropathic pain because many diseases that cause neuropathic pain increase in incidence with age. Depending on their underlying health, older adults with neuropathic pain may have to cope with multiple coexisting diseases, polypharmacy, and impaired functional ability. The objective of this article is to review how aging and frailty affect the treatment of older adults with neuropathic pain. Specific topics reviewed include the complexity of treatment decisions in older patients due to aged heterogeneity, multimorbidity, and polypharmacy; selection of treatment in an effort to maximize patients' functional abilities in addition to relieving their pain; more careful dosing (usually lower) and monitoring of pharmacotherapy relative to younger patients due to age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics; and underrepresentation of older adults in clinical trials of neuropathic pain treatments, which further compromises physicians' ability to make informed treatment decisions. PMID:20194145

  8. Mechanical Antiallodynic Effect of Intrathecal Nefopam in a Rat Neuropathic Pain Model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Hoon; Byeon, Gyeong-Jo; Kim, Hee-Young; Baek, Seung-Hoon; Shin, Sang-Wook; Koo, Sung-Tae

    2015-08-01

    Nefopam has a pharmacologic profile distinct from that of opioids or other anti-inflammatory drugs. Several recent studies demonstrate that nefopam has a mechanism of action similar to those of anti-depressants and anticonvulsants for treating neuropathic pain. The present study investigates the mechanical antiallodynic effect of nefopam using immunohistochemical study and western blot analysis in a rat neuropathic pain model. Twenty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to left fifth lumbar (L5) spinal nerve ligation and intrathecal catheter implantation, procedures which were not performed on the 7 male Sprague-Dawley rats in the sham surgery group (group S). Nefopam, either 10 or 100 µg/kg (group N10 or N100, respectively), and normal saline (group C) were intrathecally administered into the catheter every day for 14 days. The mechanical allodynic threshold of intrathecal nefopam was measured using a dynamic plantar aesthesiometer. Immunohistochemistry targeting cluster of differentiation molecule 11b (CD11b) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was performed on the harvested spinal cord at the level of L5. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) were measured using western blot analysis. The N10 and N100 groups showed improved mechanical allodynic threshold, reduced CD11b and GFAP expression, and attenuated ERK 1/2 and CREB in the affected L5 spinal cord. In conclusion, intrathecal nefopam reduced mechanical allodynia in a rat neuropathic pain model. Its mechanical antiallodynic effect is associated with inhibition of glial activation and suppression of the transcription factors' mitogen-activated protein kinases in the spinal cord. PMID:26240499

  9. The Role of Regulatory Transporters in Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Muhammad Saad; Kerr, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain arises from an injury or disease of the somatosensory nervous system rather than stimulation of pain receptors. As a result, the fine balance between excitation and inhibition is perturbed leading to hyperalgesia and allodynia. Various neuropathic pain models provide considerable evidence that changes in the glutamatergic, GABAergic, and monoaminergic systems. Neurotransmitter reuptake transporter proteins have the potential to change the temporal and spatial profile of various neurotransmitters throughout the nervous system. This, in turn, can affect the downstream effects of these neurotransmitters and hence modulate pain. This chapter explores various reuptake transporter systems and implicates their role in pain processing. Understanding the transporter systems will enhance drug discovery targeting different facets of neuropathic pain. PMID:26920015

  10. Glia as a Link between Neuroinflammation and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Jeon, Sangmin

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary studies illustrate that peripheral injuries activate glial components of the peripheral and central cellular circuitry. The subsequent release of glial stressors or activating signals contributes to neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation. Recent studies document the importance of glia in the development and persistence of neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation as a connecting link, thereby focusing attention on the glial pathology as the general underlying factor in essentially all age-related neurodegenerative diseases. There is wide agreement that excessive glial activation is a key process in nervous system disorders involving the release of strong pro-inflammatory cytokines, which can trigger worsening of multiple disease states. This review will briefly discuss the recent findings that have shed light on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of glia as a connecting link between neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation. PMID:22740789